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Sample records for allele-specific pcr assay

  1. Allele-specific rpoB PCR assays for detection of rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum smears.

    PubMed

    Mokrousov, Igor; Otten, Tatiana; Vyshnevskiy, Boris; Narvskaya, Olga

    2003-07-01

    We describe an allele-specific PCR assay to detect mutations in three codons of the rpoB gene (516, 526, and 531) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains; mutations in these codons are reported to account for majority of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates resistant to rifampin (RIF), a marker of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Three different allele-specific PCRs are carried out either directly with purified DNA (single-step multiplex allele-specific PCR), or with preamplified rpoB fragment (nested allele-specific PCR [NAS-PCR]). The method was optimized and validated following analysis of 36 strains with known rpoB sequence. A retrospective analysis of the 287 DNA preparations from epidemiologically unlinked RIF-resistant clinical strains from Russia, collected from 1996 to 2002, revealed that 247 (86.1%) of them harbored a mutation in one of the targeted rpoB codons. A prospective study of microscopy-positive consecutive sputum samples from new and chronic TB patients validated the method for direct analysis of DNA extracted from sputum smears. The potential of the NAS-PCR to control for false-negative results due to lack of amplification was proven especially useful in the study of these samples. The developed rpoB-PCR assay can be used in clinical laboratories to detect RIF-resistant and hence MDR M. tuberculosis in the regions with high burdens of the MDR-TB. PMID:12821473

  2. Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid Quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR): An Accurate and Cost-Effective Assay to Diagnose and Quantify KRAS and BRAF Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Luca; de Biase, Dario; Visani, Michela; Cesari, Valentina; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Pession, Annalisa; Tallini, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) requires the testing for hot spot mutations of the molecular effectors downstream the membrane-bound tyrosine kinases since their wild type status is expected for response to TKI therapy. We report a novel assay that we have called Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR). The assay uses LNA-modified allele specific primers and LNA-modified beacon probes to increase sensitivity, specificity and to accurately quantify mutations. We designed primers specific for codon 12/13 KRAS mutations and BRAF V600E, and validated the assay with 300 routine samples from a variety of sources, including cytology specimens. All were analyzed by ASLNAqPCR and Sanger sequencing. Discordant cases were pyrosequenced. ASLNAqPCR correctly identified BRAF and KRAS mutations in all discordant cases and all had a mutated/wild type DNA ratio below the analytical sensitivity of the Sanger method. ASLNAqPCR was 100% specific with greater accuracy, positive and negative predictive values compared with Sanger sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of ASLNAqPCR is 0.1%, allowing quantification of mutated DNA in small neoplastic cell clones. ASLNAqPCR can be performed in any laboratory with real-time PCR equipment, is very cost-effective and can easily be adapted to detect hot spot mutations in other oncogenes. PMID:22558339

  3. Allele specific locked nucleic acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR): an accurate and cost-effective assay to diagnose and quantify KRAS and BRAF mutation.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Luca; de Biase, Dario; Visani, Michela; Cesari, Valentina; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Pession, Annalisa; Tallini, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) requires the testing for hot spot mutations of the molecular effectors downstream the membrane-bound tyrosine kinases since their wild type status is expected for response to TKI therapy. We report a novel assay that we have called Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR). The assay uses LNA-modified allele specific primers and LNA-modified beacon probes to increase sensitivity, specificity and to accurately quantify mutations. We designed primers specific for codon 12/13 KRAS mutations and BRAF V600E, and validated the assay with 300 routine samples from a variety of sources, including cytology specimens. All were analyzed by ASLNAqPCR and Sanger sequencing. Discordant cases were pyrosequenced. ASLNAqPCR correctly identified BRAF and KRAS mutations in all discordant cases and all had a mutated/wild type DNA ratio below the analytical sensitivity of the Sanger method. ASLNAqPCR was 100% specific with greater accuracy, positive and negative predictive values compared with Sanger sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of ASLNAqPCR is 0.1%, allowing quantification of mutated DNA in small neoplastic cell clones. ASLNAqPCR can be performed in any laboratory with real-time PCR equipment, is very cost-effective and can easily be adapted to detect hot spot mutations in other oncogenes.

  4. The allele-specific probe and primer amplification assay, a new real-time PCR method for fine quantification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pooled DNA.

    PubMed

    Billard, A; Laval, V; Fillinger, S; Leroux, P; Lachaise, H; Beffa, R; Debieu, D

    2012-02-01

    The evolution of fungicide resistance within populations of plant pathogens must be monitored to develop management strategies. Such monitoring often is based on microbiological tests, such as microtiter plate assays. Molecular monitoring methods can be considered if the mutations responsible for resistance have been identified. Allele-specific real-time PCR approaches, such as amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR and mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) PCR, are, despite their moderate efficacy, among the most precise methods for refining SNP quantification. We describe here a new real-time PCR method, the allele-specific probe and primer amplification assay (ASPPAA PCR). This method makes use of mixtures of allele-specific minor groove binder (MGB) TaqMan probes and allele-specific primers for the fine quantification of SNPs from a pool of DNA extracted from a mixture of conidia. It was developed for a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that is responsible for resistance to the sterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicide fenhexamid, resulting in the replacement of the phenylalanine residue (encoded by the TTC codon) in position 412 of the enzymatic target (3-ketoreductase) by a serine (TCC), valine (GTC), or isoleucine (ATC) residue. The levels of nonspecific amplification with the ASPPAA PCR were reduced at least four times below the level of currently available allele-specific real-time PCR approaches due to strong allele specificity in amplification cycles, including two allele selectors. This new method can be used to quantify a complex quadriallelic SNP in a DNA pool with a false discovery rate of less than 1%.

  5. Requisite analytic and diagnostic performance characteristics for the clinical detection of BRAF V600E in hairy cell leukemia: a comparison of 2 allele-specific PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Brown, Noah A; Weigelin, Helmut C; Bailey, Nathanael; Laliberte, Julie; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Lim, Megan S; Betz, Bryan L

    2015-09-01

    Detection of high-frequency BRAF V600E mutations in hairy cell leukemia (HCL) has important diagnostic utility. However, the requisite analytic performance for a clinical assay to routinely detect BRAF V600E mutations in HCL has not been clearly defined. In this study, we sought to determine the level of analytic sensitivity needed for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and frozen samples and to compare the performance of 2 allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Twenty-nine cases of classic HCL, including 22 FFPE bone marrow aspirates and 7 frozen specimens from blood or bone marrow were evaluated using a laboratory-developed allele-specific PCR assay and a commercially available allele-specific quantitative PCR assay-myT BRAF Ultra. Also included were 6 HCL variant and 40 non-HCL B-cell lymphomas. Two cases of classic HCL, 1 showing CD5 expression, were truly BRAF V600E-negative based on negative results by PCR and sequencing despite high-level leukemic involvement. Among the remaining 27 specimens, V600E mutations were detected in 88.9% (17/20 FFPE; 7/7 frozen) and 81.5% (15/20 FFPE; 7/7 frozen), for the laboratory-developed and commercial assays, respectively. No mutations were detected among the 46 non-HCL lymphomas. Both assays showed an analytic sensitivity of 0.3% involvement in frozen specimens and 5% in FFPE tissue. On the basis of these results, an assay with high analytic sensitivity is required for the clinical detection of V600E mutations in HCL specimens. Two allele-specific PCR assays performed well in both frozen and FFPE bone marrow aspirates, although detection in FFPE tissue required 5% or more involvement.

  6. Development of allele-specific PCR and RT-PCR assays for clustered resistance genes using a potato late blight resistance transgene as a model.

    PubMed

    Millett, B P; Bradeen, J M

    2007-02-01

    Members of the NBS-LRR gene family impart resistance to a wide variety of pathogens and are often found clustered within a plant genome. This clustering of homologous sequences can complicate PCR-based characterizations, especially the study of transgenes. We have developed allele-specific PCR and RT-PCR assays for the potato late blight resistance gene RB. Our assay utilizes two approaches toward primer design, allowing discrimination between the RB transgene and both the endogenous RB gene and numerous RB homeologs. First, a reverse primer was designed to take advantage of an indel present in the RB transgene but absent in rb susceptibility alleles, enhancing specificity for the transgene, though not fully discriminating against RB homeologs. Second, a forward primer was designed according to the principles of mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) PCR, targeting SNPs introduced during the cloning of RB. Together, the indel reverse primer and the MAMA forward primer provide an assay that is highly specific for the RB transgene, being capable of distinguishing the transgene from all RB endogenous gene copies and from all RB paralogs in a diverse collection of wild and cultivated potato genotypes. These primers have been successfully multiplexed with primers of an internal control. The multiplexed assay is useful for both PCR and RT-PCR applications. Double MAMA-PCR, in which both PCR primers target separate transgene-specific SNPs, was also tested and shown to be equally specific for the RB transgene. We propose extending the use of MAMA for the characterization of resistance transgenes. PMID:17177064

  7. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections.

  8. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections. PMID:26407876

  9. Allele-Specific Quantitative PCR for Accurate, Rapid, and Cost-Effective Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han B; Schwab, Tanya L; Koleilat, Alaa; Ata, Hirotaka; Daby, Camden L; Cervera, Roberto Lopez; McNulty, Melissa S; Bostwick, Hannah S; Clark, Karl J

    2016-06-01

    Customizable endonucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) enable rapid generation of mutant strains at genomic loci of interest in animal models and cell lines. With the accelerated pace of generating mutant alleles, genotyping has become a rate-limiting step to understanding the effects of genetic perturbation. Unless mutated alleles result in distinct morphological phenotypes, mutant strains need to be genotyped using standard methods in molecular biology. Classic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or sequencing is labor-intensive and expensive. Although simpler than RFLP, current versions of allele-specific PCR may still require post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) handling such as sequencing, or they are more expensive if allele-specific fluorescent probes are used. Commercial genotyping solutions can take weeks from assay design to result, and are often more expensive than assembling reactions in-house. Key components of commercial assay systems are often proprietary, which limits further customization. Therefore, we developed a one-step open-source genotyping method based on quantitative PCR. The allele-specific qPCR (ASQ) does not require post-PCR processing and can genotype germline mutants through either threshold cycle (Ct) or end-point fluorescence reading. ASQ utilizes allele-specific primers, a locus-specific reverse primer, universal fluorescent probes and quenchers, and hot start DNA polymerase. Individual laboratories can further optimize this open-source system as we completely disclose the sequences, reagents, and thermal cycling protocol. We have tested the ASQ protocol to genotype alleles in five different genes. ASQ showed a 98-100% concordance in genotype scoring with RFLP or Sanger sequencing outcomes. ASQ is time-saving because a single qPCR without post-PCR handling suffices to score

  10. Allele-Specific Quantitative PCR for Accurate, Rapid, and Cost-Effective Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han B; Schwab, Tanya L; Koleilat, Alaa; Ata, Hirotaka; Daby, Camden L; Cervera, Roberto Lopez; McNulty, Melissa S; Bostwick, Hannah S; Clark, Karl J

    2016-06-01

    Customizable endonucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) enable rapid generation of mutant strains at genomic loci of interest in animal models and cell lines. With the accelerated pace of generating mutant alleles, genotyping has become a rate-limiting step to understanding the effects of genetic perturbation. Unless mutated alleles result in distinct morphological phenotypes, mutant strains need to be genotyped using standard methods in molecular biology. Classic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or sequencing is labor-intensive and expensive. Although simpler than RFLP, current versions of allele-specific PCR may still require post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) handling such as sequencing, or they are more expensive if allele-specific fluorescent probes are used. Commercial genotyping solutions can take weeks from assay design to result, and are often more expensive than assembling reactions in-house. Key components of commercial assay systems are often proprietary, which limits further customization. Therefore, we developed a one-step open-source genotyping method based on quantitative PCR. The allele-specific qPCR (ASQ) does not require post-PCR processing and can genotype germline mutants through either threshold cycle (Ct) or end-point fluorescence reading. ASQ utilizes allele-specific primers, a locus-specific reverse primer, universal fluorescent probes and quenchers, and hot start DNA polymerase. Individual laboratories can further optimize this open-source system as we completely disclose the sequences, reagents, and thermal cycling protocol. We have tested the ASQ protocol to genotype alleles in five different genes. ASQ showed a 98-100% concordance in genotype scoring with RFLP or Sanger sequencing outcomes. ASQ is time-saving because a single qPCR without post-PCR handling suffices to score

  11. Allele-Specific Quantitative PCR for Accurate, Rapid, and Cost-Effective Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han B.; Schwab, Tanya L.; Koleilat, Alaa; Ata, Hirotaka; Daby, Camden L.; Cervera, Roberto Lopez; McNulty, Melissa S.; Bostwick, Hannah S.; Clark, Karl J.

    2016-01-01

    Customizable endonucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) enable rapid generation of mutant strains at genomic loci of interest in animal models and cell lines. With the accelerated pace of generating mutant alleles, genotyping has become a rate-limiting step to understanding the effects of genetic perturbation. Unless mutated alleles result in distinct morphological phenotypes, mutant strains need to be genotyped using standard methods in molecular biology. Classic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or sequencing is labor-intensive and expensive. Although simpler than RFLP, current versions of allele-specific PCR may still require post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) handling such as sequencing, or they are more expensive if allele-specific fluorescent probes are used. Commercial genotyping solutions can take weeks from assay design to result, and are often more expensive than assembling reactions in-house. Key components of commercial assay systems are often proprietary, which limits further customization. Therefore, we developed a one-step open-source genotyping method based on quantitative PCR. The allele-specific qPCR (ASQ) does not require post-PCR processing and can genotype germline mutants through either threshold cycle (Ct) or end-point fluorescence reading. ASQ utilizes allele-specific primers, a locus-specific reverse primer, universal fluorescent probes and quenchers, and hot start DNA polymerase. Individual laboratories can further optimize this open-source system as we completely disclose the sequences, reagents, and thermal cycling protocol. We have tested the ASQ protocol to genotype alleles in five different genes. ASQ showed a 98–100% concordance in genotype scoring with RFLP or Sanger sequencing outcomes. ASQ is time-saving because a single qPCR without post-PCR handling suffices to score

  12. Optimized Multiplex Detection of 7 KRAS Mutations by Taqman Allele-Specific qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Orue, Andrea; Rieber, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples is essential to manage patients with colorectal or lung cancer, since these mutations preclude treatment with monoclonal anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies. We report an inexpensive, rapid multiplex allele-specific qPCR method detecting the 7 most clinically relevant KRAS somatic mutations with concomitant amplification of non-mutated KRAS in tumor cells and tissues from CRC patients. Positive samples evidenced in the multiplex assay were further subjected to individual allele-specific analysis, to define the specific mutation. Reference human cancer DNA harbouring either G12A, G12C, G12D, G12R, G12S, G12V and G13D confirmed assay specificity with ≤1% sensitivity of mutant alleles. KRAS multiplex mutation analysis usefulness was also demonstrated with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) from CRC biopsies. Conclusion. Co-amplification of non-mutated DNA avoided false negatives from degraded samples. Moreover, this cost effective assay is compatible with mutation detection by DNA sequencing in FFPE tissues, but with a greater sensitivity when mutant DNA concentrations are limiting. PMID:27632281

  13. Determination of DQB1 alleles using PCR amplification and allele-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Lepage, V; Ivanova, R; Loste, M N; Mallet, C; Douay, C; Naoumova, E; Charron, D

    1995-10-01

    Molecular genotyping of HLA class II genes is commonly carried out using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in combination with sequence-specific oligotyping (PCR-SSO) or a combination of the PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods (PCR-RFLP). However, the identification of the DQB1 type by PCR-SSO and PCR-RFLP is very time-consuming which is disadvantageous for the typing of cadaveric organ donors. We have developed a DQB1 typing method using PCR in combination with allele-specific amplification (PCR-ASA), which allows the identification of the 17 most frequent alleles in one step using seven amplification mixtures. PCR allele-specific amplification HLA-DQB1 typing is easy to perform, and the results are easy to interpret in routine clinical practice. The PCR-ASA method is therefore better suited to DQB1 typing for organ transplantation than other methods.

  14. Epidemiological survey of Theileria parasite infection of cattle in Northeast China by allele-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Yu, Longzheng; Zhang, Shoufa; Liang, Wanfeng; Jin, Chunmei; Jia, Lijun; Luo, Yuzi; Li, Yan; Cao, Shinuo; Yamagishi, Junya; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Kawano, Suguru; Fujisaki, Kozo; Xuan, Xuenan

    2011-11-01

    An epidemiological survey on a Theileria parasite infection of cattle in Northeast China was carried out using allele-specific PCR and DNA sequence analysis of the major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) gene. The results showed that 14 of 104 blood samples were positive for Theileria by PCR. Among the positive cases, co-infection with various combinations of C- and I-type parasites was detected in 12 samples; no B- and Thai-type parasites were detected by allele-specific PCR. Phylogenetic analysis based on the MPSP gene sequences revealed that Theileria parasites with the MPSP types 1, 2, and 4 were distributed in Northeast China.

  15. Enhancing allele-specific PCR for specifically detecting short deletion and insertion DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiran; Rollin, Joseph A; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2010-02-01

    Allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) has been widely used for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism. But there are some challenges in using AS-PCR for specifically detecting DNA variations with short deletions or insertions. The challenges are associated with designing selective allele-specific primers as well as the specificity of AS-PCR in distinguishing some types of single base-pair mismatches. In order to address such problems and enhance the applicability of AS-PCR, a general primer design method was developed to create a multiple base-pair mismatch between the primer 3'-terminus and the template DNA. This approach can destabilize the primer-template complex more efficiently than does a single base-pair mismatch, and can dramatically increase the specificity of AS-PCR. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, the method of primer design was applied in colony PCR for identifying plasmid DNA deletion or insertion mutants after site-directed mutagenesis. As anticipated, multiple base-pair mismatches achieved much more specific PCR amplification than single base-pair mismatches. Therefore, with the proposed primer design method, the detection of short nucleotide deletion and insertion mutations becomes simple, accurate and more reliable.

  16. Kinetic characterisation of primer mismatches in allele-specific PCR: a quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Christy M; Eisenthal, Robert; Cobb, Benjamin D

    2002-12-20

    A novel method of estimating the kinetic parameters of Taq DNA polymerase during rapid cycle PCR is presented. A model was constructed using a simplified sigmoid function to represent substrate accumulation during PCR in combination with the general equation describing high substrate inhibition for Michaelis-Menten enzymes. The PCR progress curve was viewed as a series of independent reactions where initial rates were accurately measured for each cycle. Kinetic parameters were obtained for allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) amplification to examine the effect of mismatches on amplification. A high degree of correlation was obtained providing evidence of substrate inhibition as a major cause of the plateau phase that occurs in the later cycles of PCR. PMID:12470637

  17. Kinetic characterisation of primer mismatches in allele-specific PCR: a quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Christy M; Eisenthal, Robert; Cobb, Benjamin D

    2002-12-20

    A novel method of estimating the kinetic parameters of Taq DNA polymerase during rapid cycle PCR is presented. A model was constructed using a simplified sigmoid function to represent substrate accumulation during PCR in combination with the general equation describing high substrate inhibition for Michaelis-Menten enzymes. The PCR progress curve was viewed as a series of independent reactions where initial rates were accurately measured for each cycle. Kinetic parameters were obtained for allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) amplification to examine the effect of mismatches on amplification. A high degree of correlation was obtained providing evidence of substrate inhibition as a major cause of the plateau phase that occurs in the later cycles of PCR.

  18. S-genotype identification based on allele-specific PCR in Japanese pear

    PubMed Central

    Nashima, Kenji; Terakami, Shingo; Nishio, Sogo; Kunihisa, Miyuki; Nishitani, Chikako; Saito, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2015-01-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) is controlled by the single, multi-allelic S-locus. Information about the S-genotypes is important for breeding and the selection of pollen donors for fruit production. Rapid and reliable S-genotype identification system is necessary for efficient breeding of new cultivars in Japanese pear. We designed S allele-specific PCR primer pairs for ten previously reported S-RNase alleles (S1–S9 and Sk) as simple and reliable method. Specific nucleotide sequences were chosen to design the primers to amplify fragments of only the corresponding S alleles. The developed primer pairs were evaluated by using homozygous S-genotypes (S1/S1–S9/S9 and S4sm/S4sm) and 14 major Japanese pear cultivars, and found that S allele-specific primer pairs can identify S-genotypes effectively. The S allele-specific primer pairs developed in this study will be useful for efficient S-genotyping and for marker-assisted selection in Japanese pear breeding programs. PMID:26175617

  19. Competitive allele-specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) is a sensitive, specific and fast method for BRAF V600 mutation detection in Melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Barbano, Raffaela; Pasculli, Barbara; Coco, Michelina; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Rendina, Michelina; Valori, Vanna Maria; Graziano, Paolo; Maiello, Evaristo; Fazio, Vito Michele; Parrella, Paola

    2015-12-22

    BRAF codon 600 mutation testing of melanoma patients is mandatory for the choice of the most appropriate therapy in the clinical setting. Competitive allele specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) technology allows not only the selective amplification of minor alleles, but it also blocks the amplification of non-mutant allele. We genotyped codon 600 of the BRAF gene in 54 patients' samples by Cast-PCR and bidirectional direct sequence analysis. All the mutations detected by sequencing were also identified by Cast-PCR. In addition, Cast-PCR assay detected four samples carrying mutations and was able to clearly identify two mutations of uncertain interpretation by Sanger sequencing. The limit of detection of Cast-PCR was evaluated by constructing dilution curves of BRAF(V600E) and BRAF(V600K) mutated clinical samples mixed with a not-mutated specimens. Both mutations could be detected until a 1:100 mutated/not mutated ratio. Cloning and sequencing of the clones was used to confirm mutations on representative discrepant cases. Cast PCR performances were not affected by intratumour heterogeneity, and less affected by melanin content. Our results indicate that Cast-PCR is a reliable diagnostic tool for the identification of melanoma patients as eligible to be treated with TKIs and might be implemented in the clinical setting as elective screening method.

  20. Competitive allele-specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) is a sensitive, specific and fast method for BRAF V600 mutation detection in Melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Barbano, Raffaela; Pasculli, Barbara; Coco, Michelina; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Rendina, Michelina; Valori, Vanna Maria; Graziano, Paolo; Maiello, Evaristo; Fazio, Vito Michele; Parrella, Paola

    2015-01-01

    BRAF codon 600 mutation testing of melanoma patients is mandatory for the choice of the most appropriate therapy in the clinical setting. Competitive allele specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) technology allows not only the selective amplification of minor alleles, but it also blocks the amplification of non-mutant allele. We genotyped codon 600 of the BRAF gene in 54 patients’ samples by Cast-PCR and bidirectional direct sequence analysis. All the mutations detected by sequencing were also identified by Cast-PCR. In addition, Cast-PCR assay detected four samples carrying mutations and was able to clearly identify two mutations of uncertain interpretation by Sanger sequencing. The limit of detection of Cast-PCR was evaluated by constructing dilution curves of BRAFV600E and BRAFV600K mutated clinical samples mixed with a not-mutated specimens. Both mutations could be detected until a 1:100 mutated/not mutated ratio. Cloning and sequencing of the clones was used to confirm mutations on representative discrepant cases. Cast PCR performances were not affected by intratumour heterogeneity, and less affected by melanin content. Our results indicate that Cast-PCR is a reliable diagnostic tool for the identification of melanoma patients as eligible to be treated with TKIs and might be implemented in the clinical setting as elective screening method. PMID:26690267

  1. Identification of self-incompatibility genotypes of apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) by S-allele-specific PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Jie, Qi; Shupeng, Gai; Jixiang, Zhang; Manru, Gu; Huairui, Shu

    2005-08-01

    A cDNA of 417 bp encoding an S-RNase gene, named PA S3, was isolated from apricot, Prunus aremeniaca. Nine S-alleles, S1-S9, were recognized by S-allele-specific PCR and confirmed by Southern blot analysis using PA S3 as probe. The S-genotypes of the six cultivars were determined and the results of self- and cross-pollination tests among the six cultivars were consistent with the predicted S-haplotypes by PCR analysis.

  2. Electrochemical detection of point mutation based on surface hybridization assay conjugated allele-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Zhu, Jing; Li, Guiyin; Chen, Zhencheng; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2013-04-15

    In this work, we developed an electrochemical detection method based on allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) and surface hybridization assay technique for the point mutation detection. A high-fidelity Vent(R)™(exo⁻) DNA polymerase, which eliminated the 3'→5' proofreading exonuclease activity by genetical engineering, was used to discriminate and extend the detection probe that perfectly matched with mutant target DNA and generate a redox-active DNA replica which folded into a molecular beacon structure by intramolecular hybridization. After hybridized with capture probe modified on gold electrode by self-assembly reaction, the redox tags can be closed to electrode, resulting in a substantial current with the maximized sensitivity for point mutation analysis. However, when there is an allele mismatch in the wild target DNA, and so no the redox-active replica DNA can be obtained. In this case, no remarkable current signal can be trigged. The proposed approach has been successfully implemented for the identification of single base mutation at the -28 position in human β-globin gene with a detection limit of 0.5 fM, demonstrating that this method provides a highly specific, sensitive and cost-efficient approach for point mutation detection.

  3. Allele-specific PCR for detecting the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Liu, Qi; Li, Mei-Ya; Huang, Shui-Xian; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2016-10-10

    Mutations in mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1) are the important causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Of these mutations, the homoplasmic m.1555A>G or m.1494C>T mutation in the highly conserved A-site of MT-RNR1 gene has been found to be associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss in many families worldwide. Since the m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations are sensitive to ototoxic drugs, therefore, screening for the presence of these mutations is important for early diagnosis and prevention of deafness. For this purpose, we recently developed a novel allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) which is able to simultaneously detect these mutations. To assess its accuracy, in this study, we employed this method to screen the frequency of m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations in 200 deafness patients and 120 healthy subjects. Consequently, four m.1555A>G and four m.1494C>T mutations were identified; among these, only one patient with the m.1494C>T mutation had an obvious family history of hearing loss. Strikingly, clinical evaluation showed that this family exhibited a high penetrance of hearing loss. In particular, the penetrances of hearing loss were 80% with the aminoglycoside included and 20% when excluded. PCR-Sanger sequencing of the mitochondrial genomes confirmed the presence of the m.1494C>T mutation and identified a set of polymorphisms belonging to mitochondrial haplogroup A. However, the lack of functional variants in mitochondrial and nuclear modified genes (GJB2 and TRMU) in this family indicated that mitochondrial haplogroup and nuclear genes may not play important roles in the phenotypic expression of the m.1494C>T mutation. Thus, other modification factors, such as environmental factor, aminoglycosides or epigenetic modification may have contributed to the high penetrance of hearing loss in this family. Taken together, our data showed that this assay is an effective approach that could be used for detection the deafness-associated MT-RNR1

  4. Assignment of SNP allelic configuration in polyploids using competitive allele-specific PCR: application to citrus triploid progeny

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploidy is a major component of eukaryote evolution. Estimation of allele copy numbers for molecular markers has long been considered a challenge for polyploid species, while this process is essential for most genetic research. With the increasing availability and whole-genome coverage of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, it is essential to implement a versatile SNP genotyping method to assign allelic configuration efficiently in polyploids. Scope This work evaluates the usefulness of the KASPar method, based on competitive allele-specific PCR, for the assignment of SNP allelic configuration. Citrus was chosen as a model because of its economic importance, the ongoing worldwide polyploidy manipulation projects for cultivar and rootstock breeding, and the increasing availability of SNP markers. Conclusions Fifteen SNP markers were successfully designed that produced clear allele signals that were in agreement with previous genotyping results at the diploid level. The analysis of DNA mixes between two haploid lines (Clementine and pummelo) at 13 different ratios revealed a very high correlation (average = 0·9796; s.d. = 0·0094) between the allele ratio and two parameters [θ angle = tan−1 (y/x) and y′ = y/(x + y)] derived from the two normalized allele signals (x and y) provided by KASPar. Separated cluster analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) from mixed DNA simulating triploid and tetraploid hybrids provided 99·71 % correct allelic configuration. Moreover, triploid populations arising from 2n gametes and interploid crosses were easily genotyped and provided useful genetic information. This work demonstrates that the KASPar SNP genotyping technique is an efficient way to assign heterozygous allelic configurations within polyploid populations. This method is accurate, simple and cost-effective. Moreover, it may be useful for quantitative studies, such as relative allele-specific expression analysis and bulk segregant analysis

  5. A multiplex allele-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for HLA-B*13:01 genotyping in four Chinese populations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Chen, G; Kang, X; Han, M; Chen, R; Chen, C; Wang, H

    2016-10-01

    Human leukocyte antigen HLA-B*13:01 is identified currently as a marker of individual susceptibility to drug-induced hypersensitivity reaction, such as dapsone-induced hypersensitivity reactions (DIHRs) and trichloroethylene-induced dermatitis. Therefore, screening for the HLA-B*13:01 allele can assist clinics in identifying patients at risk of developing DIHRs. By combining the allele-specific primers with TaqMan probes, we established a single tube, triplex real-time PCR to detect HLA-B*13:01. The reliability of this assay was validated by the comparison of genotyping results with those by sequence-based typing (SBT). With this assay, the distribution of HLA-B*13:01 in a total of 350 blood samples from four ethnic groups: Han, Tibetan, Uighur, and Buyei were determined. A 100% concordance was observed between the results with the established real-time PCR and SBT in 100 samples. The detection limit of this assay was 0.016 ng genomic DNA. The prevalence of HLA-B*13:01 carriers were 11%, 8%, 1%, and 2% in the Buyei (n = 100), Northern Han (n = 100), Tibetan (n = 100), and Uighur (n = 50) populations, respectively. The multiplex real-time PCR assay provided a fast and reliable method for accurate detection of HLA-B*13:01 allele prior to dapsone administration in clinical practice and onset of the reaction after exposure to trichloroethylene.

  6. Authentication of official Da-huang by sequencing and multiplex allele-specific PCR of a short maturase K gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guojie; Wang, Xueyong; Liu, Chunsheng; Li, Weidong; Wei, Shengli; Liu, Ying; Cheng, Xiaoli; Liu, Juan

    2013-02-01

    Rhubarb (official Da-huang) is an important medicinal herb in Asia. Many adulterants of official Da-huang have been discovered in Chinese markets in recent years, which has resulted in adverse effects in medicinal treatment. Here, novel molecular markers based on a short maturase K (matK) gene were developed for authenticating official Da-huang. This study showed that all the species from official Da-huang were clustered together in one clade in the polygenetic trees based on short matK. Two highly conserved single nucleotide polymorphisms of short matK were mined in the species from official Da-huang. Based on these polymophisms, four improved specific primers of official Da-huang were successfully developed that generated reproducible specific bands. These results suggest that the short matK sequence can be considered as a favorable candidate for distinguishing official Da-huang from its adulterants. The established multiplex allele-specific PCR was determined to be simple and accurate and may serve as a preferable tool for authentication of official Da-huang. In addition, we suggest that short-sized specific bands be developed to authenticate materials used in traditional Chinese medicine.

  7. Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations of HIV-1 Subtype B Viruses from Dried Blood Spot Specimens by Multiplex Allele-Specific Assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqing; Cai, Fangping; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Zhou, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jing; Nkengasong, John; Gao, Feng; Yang, Chunfu

    2016-01-01

    A multiplex allele-specific (MAS) assay has been developed for the detection of HIV-1 subtype C drug resistance mutations (DRMs). We have optimized the MAS assay to determine subtype B DRMs in dried blood spots (DBS) collected from patients on antiretroviral therapy. The new assay accurately detected DRMs, including low-abundance mutations that were often missed by Sanger sequencing. PMID:26560533

  8. Concordance between allele-specific PCR and ultra-deep pyrosequencing for the detection of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Gillian M; Morris, Lynn; Moorthy, Anitha; Coovadia, Ashraf; Abrams, Elaine J; Strehlau, Renate; Kuhn, Louise; Persaud, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genotyping technologies have allowed for detection of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations present at low levels. The presence and percentage of Y181C and K103N drug-resistant variants in the blood of 105 subtype C HIV-infected infants who failed single-dose nevirapine prophylaxis for HIV transmission were compared using two highly sensitive genotyping methods, allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) and ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Significant correlations in detection between both methods were found for both Y181C (correlation coefficients of 0.94 [95% CI 0.91-0.96]) and K103N (0.89 [95% CI 0.84 – 0.92]) mutations. The majority of discordant specimens (3/5 Y181C and 8/11 K103N) had wild-type variants when population sequencing was used, but mutant variants were detectable at very low levels (≤5%) with either assay. This difference is most likely due to stochastic variations in the appearance of mutant variants. Overall, both AS-PCR and ultra-deep pyrosequencing methods have proven to be sensitive and accurate, and may confidently be used where feasible. PMID:25034127

  9. An allele-specific PCR system for rapid detection and discrimination of the CYP2C19∗4A, ∗4B, and ∗17 alleles: implications for clopidogrel response testing.

    PubMed

    Scott, Stuart A; Tan, Qian; Baber, Usman; Yang, Yao; Martis, Suparna; Bander, Jeffrey; Kornreich, Ruth; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Desnick, Robert J

    2013-11-01

    CYP2C19 is involved in the metabolism of clinically relevant drugs, including the antiplatelet prodrug clopidogrel, which has prompted interest in clinical CYP2C19 genotyping. The CYP2C19∗4B allele is defined by both gain-of-function [c.-806C>T (∗17)] and loss-of-function [c.1A>G (∗4)] variants on the same haplotype; however, current genotyping and sequencing assays are unable to determine the phase of these variants. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop an assay that could rapidly detect and discriminate the related ∗4A, ∗4B, and ∗17 alleles. An allele-specific PCR assay, composed of four unique primer mixes that specifically interrogate the defining ∗17 and ∗4 variants, was developed by using samples (n = 20) with known genotypes, including the ∗4A, ∗4B, and/or ∗17 alleles. The assay was validated by testing 135 blinded samples, and the results were correlated with CYP2C19 genotyping and allele-specific cloning/sequencing. Importantly, among the six ∗4 carriers in the validation cohort, after allele-specific PCR testing both samples with a ∗1/∗4 genotype were reclassified to ∗1/∗4A, all three samples with a ∗4/∗17 genotype were reclassified to ∗1/∗4B, and a sample with a ∗4/∗17/∗17 genotype was reclassified to ∗4B/∗17. In conclusion, this rapid and robust allele-specific PCR assay can refine CYP2C19 genotyping and metabolizer phenotype classification by determining the phase of the defining ∗17 and ∗4 variants, which may have utility when testing CYP2C19 for clopidogrel response.

  10. A Multiplex Allele Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (MAS-PCR) for the Detection of Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin G20210A

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Morteza; Rad, Isa Abdi

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: In order to determine the frequencies of factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A point mutations in the Iranian population with Azeri Turkish origin. Material and methods: 120 unrelated individuals from general population randomly selected and were examined for factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations using a multiplex allele specific polymerase chain reaction (MAS-PCR) assay Outcomes: The frequency of prothrombin G20210A mutation was 2.08%, which means 5 chromosomes out of 240 chromosomes had prothrombin G20210A mutation. The distribution of prothrombin 20210 GG, GA, AA genotypes and prothrombin 20210A allele were 37(92.5%), 3(7.5%), 0(0%) and 3(3.75%) in males and 78(97.5%), 2(2.5%), 0(0%) and 2(1.25%) in females, respectively. Factor V Leiden was not found in our tested group (zero chromosomes out of 240 chromosomes). Analysis of the observed frequencies in the studied groups indicates that there is no statistically significant difference between females and males, regarding prothrombin G20210A mutation (p value>0.05). Conclusions: This is the first study in its own kind in this population and implies that the frequency of Factor V Leiden G1691A (R506Q, FV-Leiden) allele is extremely low but the prothrombin G20210A mutation is more frequent in the tested group. PMID:21977183

  11. Development of a Melting Curve-Based Allele-Specific PCR of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) Genotyping Method for Genomic DNA, Guthrie Blood Spot, and Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E (APOE) are associated with various health conditions and diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, etc. Hence, genotyping of APOE has broad applications in biomedical research and clinical settings, particularly in the era of precision medicine. The study aimed to develop a convenient and accurate method with flexible throughput to genotype the APOE polymorphisms. A melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method was developed to genotype two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of APOE, i.e. rs429358 at codon 112 and rs7412 at codon 158. These two SNPs determine the genotype of APOE2, E3, and E4. PCR-based Sanger sequencing was used as the reference method for APOE genotyping. A 100% concordance rate was obtained in 300 subjects between the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method and the Sanger sequencing method. This method was applied to a genetic association analysis of APOE and schizophrenia consisting of 711 patients with schizophrenia and 665 control subjects from Taiwan. However, no significant differences in the allele and genotype frequencies were detected between these two groups. Further experiments showed that DNA dissolved from blood collected on Guthrie filter paper and total blood cell lysate without DNA extraction can be used in the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method. Thus, we suggest that this is a fast, accurate and robust APOE genotyping method with a flexible throughput and suitable for DNA template from different preparations. This convenient method shall meet the different needs of various research and clinical laboratories. PMID:27078154

  12. Allele-specific PCR for the beta-tubulin codon 200 TTC/TAC polymorphism using single adult and larval small strongyle (Cyathostominae) stages.

    PubMed

    von Samson-Himmelstjerna, G; Pape, M; von Witzendorff, C; Schnieder, T

    2002-04-01

    It has been shown that benzimidazole (BZ) resistance in sheep gastrointestinal nematodes is linked with an increase in beta-tubulin codon 200 tyrosine-expressing alleles in the resistant parasite populations. Here, an allele-specific PCR has been developed for the discrimination of the TAC/TTC polymorphism in the beta-tubulin 200 codon of small strongyles. One reverse primer was used in 2 separate amplifications with 1 of 2 forward primers that differed only in their final 3' nucleotide. The primers flank a facultative intron/exon. Therefore, the amplified fragments are either 251 or 308 bp in size, depending on the presence or absence of the intron in individual worms. Amplification of genomic DNA isolated from single adult small strongyles from a set of 7 species consistently generated allele-specific products. Three worms each of the following species were used: Cylicocyclus nassatus, Cylicocyclus insigne, Cylicocyclus elongatus, Cylicocyclus radiatus, Cyathostomum pateratum, Cyathostomum catinatum, and Cyathostomum coronatum. PCR with DNA isolated from single larvae also reproducibly generated specific fragments. This method might be applied for the future assessment of allele frequencies in susceptible and resistant populations to further investigate the mechanism of BZ-resistance in small strongyles. PMID:12053994

  13. Validation of a Multiplex Allele-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Detection of KRAS Gene Mutations in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues from Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Seekhuntod, Sirirat; Thavarungkul, Paninee; Chaichanawongsaroj, Nuntaree

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with KRAS mutations do not respond to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors and fail to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Mutation analysis of KRAS is needed before starting treatment with monoclonal anti-EGFR antibodies in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The objective of this study is to develop a multiplex allele-specific PCR (MAS-PCR) assay to detect KRAS mutations. Methods We developed a single-tube MAS-PCR assay for the detection of seven KRAS mutations (G12D, G12A, G12R, G12C, G12S, G12V, and G13D). We performed MAS-PCR assay analysis for KRAS on DNA isolated from 270 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) colorectal cancer tissues. Sequences of all 270 samples were determined by pyrosequencing. Seven known point-mutation DNA samples diluted with wild-type DNA were assayed to determine the limitation of detection and reproducibility of the MAS-PCR assay. Results Overall, the results of MAS-PCR assay were in good concordance with pyrosequencing, and only seven discordant samples were found. The MAS-PCR assay reproducibly detected 1 to 2% mutant alleles. The most common mutations were G13D in codon 13 (49.17%), G12D (25.83%) and G12V (12.50%) in codon 12. Conclusion The MAS-PCR assay provides a rapid, cost-effective, and reliable diagnostic tool for accurate detection of KRAS mutations in routine FFPE colorectal cancer tissues. PMID:26812617

  14. Development of a Novel Allele-Specific PCR Method for Rapid Assessment of Nervous Necrosis Virus Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Margaroni, Maritsa; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2015-11-01

    Viral nervous necrosis infections are causing severe problems on aquaculture industry due to ecological and economic impacts. Their causal agent is nervous necrosis virus or nodavirus, which has been classified into four genotypes. Different genotypes correlate with differences in viral pathogenicity. Therefore, rational development of effective vaccines and diagnostic reagents requires analysis of the genetic variation. The development and validation of a polymerase chain reaction amplification (PCR)-based methodology for nodavirus genotype assessment in a simple and robust format is described. Degenerate external primers and two genotype-specific internal primers were utilized for simultaneous amplification of nodavirus products in a single PCR. A first set of cycles produced a long PCR product, defined by the outer primers, and the internal primers amplified short DNA fragments specific for each genotype in lower annealing temperature. Detection was based on the size of the short products. Nodavirus infected and healthy samples were analyzed and none of the non-infected samples showed any bands, while all infected samples were positive. The proposed method can be performed within 4 h and consumes standard PCR and electrophoresis reagents, with costs lower than 2€ per sample. Tetra-primer PCR is a suitable alternative for virus sequencing in medium scale research laboratories and farming facilities. PMID:26210900

  15. Development of a Novel Allele-Specific PCR Method for Rapid Assessment of Nervous Necrosis Virus Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Margaroni, Maritsa; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2015-11-01

    Viral nervous necrosis infections are causing severe problems on aquaculture industry due to ecological and economic impacts. Their causal agent is nervous necrosis virus or nodavirus, which has been classified into four genotypes. Different genotypes correlate with differences in viral pathogenicity. Therefore, rational development of effective vaccines and diagnostic reagents requires analysis of the genetic variation. The development and validation of a polymerase chain reaction amplification (PCR)-based methodology for nodavirus genotype assessment in a simple and robust format is described. Degenerate external primers and two genotype-specific internal primers were utilized for simultaneous amplification of nodavirus products in a single PCR. A first set of cycles produced a long PCR product, defined by the outer primers, and the internal primers amplified short DNA fragments specific for each genotype in lower annealing temperature. Detection was based on the size of the short products. Nodavirus infected and healthy samples were analyzed and none of the non-infected samples showed any bands, while all infected samples were positive. The proposed method can be performed within 4 h and consumes standard PCR and electrophoresis reagents, with costs lower than 2€ per sample. Tetra-primer PCR is a suitable alternative for virus sequencing in medium scale research laboratories and farming facilities.

  16. From genes to phenotypes - evaluation of two methods for the SNP analysis in archaeological remains: pyrosequencing and competitive allele specific PCR (KASPar).

    PubMed

    Pruvost, Melanie; Reissmann, Monika; Benecke, Norbert; Ludwig, Arne

    2012-01-20

    The amplification length of the DNA fragments is one major limitation of most paleogenetic analyses. Routinely, only fragments below 200 bp can be amplified, significantly reducing the content of genetic information. Although overlapping PCR strategies and next generation sequencing techniques have strongly improved data mining recently, these methods are still expensive and time consuming. In contrast, SNP analyses are easy to handle, fast and cheap. In this study, we compare two methods of SNP detection as to efficiency, cost and reliability for their use in ancient DNA applications: pyrosequencing and competitive allele specific PCR (KASPar). Our sample set consisted of 16 horse bones from two Scythian graves (600-800 BC). In conclusion, both approaches produced reliable results for most allelic patterns. But an indel of 11 bp (ASIP) could not be detected in the KASPar approach and produced problems in the pyrosequencing method (70% success rate). In such cases, we recommend checking allelic distribution using a gel approach or capillary sequencing. Overall, in comparison with the traditional mode of ancient DNA investigations (PCR, cloning, capillary sequencing), both approaches are superior for SNP analyses especially of large sample sets.

  17. A simple and rapid method for HLA-DQA1 genotyping by digestion of PCR-amplified DNA with allele specific restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Murayama, N; Ishii, H; Uryu, N; Ota, M; Tsuji, K; Inoko, H

    1989-11-01

    The second exon of the HLA-DQA1 genes was selectively amplified from genomic DNAs of 72 HLA-homozygous B cell lines by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Amplified DNAs were digested with HaeIII, Ddel, ScrFI, FokI and RsaI, which recognize allelic sequence variations in the polymorphic segments of the DQA1 second exon, and then subjected to electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. Eight different polymorphic patterns of restriction fragments were obtained, and seven were identical to patterns predicted from the known DNA sequences, correlating with each HLA-DQw type defined by serological typing. The remaining one pattern cannot be explained from the sequence data, suggesting the presence of a novel DQA1 allele at the nucleotide level. This PCR-RFLP method provides a simple and rapid technique for accurate definition of the HLA-DQ types at the nucleotide level, eliminating the need for radioisotope as well as allele specific oligonucleotide probes and can be extended and applied to HLA-DR, -Dw DP typing. PMID:2576477

  18. Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations in the Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Genes for HIV-1 Subtype C by Use of a Multiplex Allele-Specific Assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guoqing; Cai, Fangping; Zhou, Zhiyong; DeVos, Joshua; Wagar, Nick; Diallo, Karidia; Zulu, Isaac; Wadonda-Kabondo, Nellie; Stringer, Jeffrey S. A.; Weidle, Paul J.; Ndongmo, Clement B.; Sikazwe, Izukanji; Sarr, Abdoulaye; Kagoli, Matthew; Nkengasong, John

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput, sensitive, and cost-effective HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) detection assays are needed for large-scale monitoring of the emergence and transmission of HIVDR in resource-limited settings. Using suspension array technology, we have developed a multiplex allele-specific (MAS) assay that can simultaneously detect major HIVDR mutations at 20 loci. Forty-five allele-specific primers tagged with unique 24-base oligonucleotides at the 5′ end were designed to detect wild-type and mutant alleles at the 20 loci of HIV-1 subtype C. The MAS assay was first established and optimized with three plasmid templates (C-wt, C-mut1, and C-mut2) and then evaluated using 148 plasma specimens from HIV-1 subtype C-infected individuals. All the wild-type and mutant alleles were unequivocally distinguished with plasmid templates, and the limits of detection were 1.56% for K219Q and K219E, 3.13% for L76V, 6.25% for K65R, K70R, L74V, L100I, K103N, K103R, Q151M, Y181C, and I47V, and 12.5% for M41L, K101P, K101E, V106A, V106M, Y115F, M184V, Y188L, G190A, V32I, I47A, I84V, and L90M. Analyses of 148 plasma specimens revealed that the MAS assay gave 100% concordance with conventional sequencing at eight loci and >95% (range, 95.21% to 99.32%) concordance at the remaining 12 loci. The differences observed were caused mainly by 24 additional low-abundance alleles detected by the MAS assay. Ultradeep sequencing analysis confirmed 15 of the 16 low-abundance alleles. This multiplex, sensitive, and straightforward result-reporting assay represents a new efficient genotyping tool for HIVDR surveillance and monitoring. PMID:23985909

  19. Rapid KRAS, EGFR, BRAF and PIK3CA Mutation Analysis of Fine Needle Aspirates from Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using Allele-Specific qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Schrumpf, Melanie; Talebian Yazdi, Mehrdad; Ruano, Dina; Forte, Giusi I.; Nederlof, Petra M.; Veselic, Maud; Rabe, Klaus F.; Annema, Jouke T.; Smit, Vincent; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Endobronchial Ultrasound Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and Trans-esophageal Ultrasound Scanning with Fine Needle Aspiration (EUS-FNA) are important, novel techniques for the diagnosis and staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that have been incorporated into lung cancer staging guidelines. To guide and optimize treatment decisions, especially for NSCLC patients in stage III and IV, EGFR and KRAS mutation status is often required. The concordance rate of the mutation analysis between these cytological aspirates and histological samples obtained by surgical staging is unknown. Therefore, we studied the extent to which allele-specific quantitative real-time PCR with hydrolysis probes could be reliably performed on EBUS and EUS fine needle aspirates by comparing the results with histological material from the same patient. We analyzed a series of 43 NSCLC patients for whom cytological and histological material was available. We demonstrated that these standard molecular techniques can be accurately applied on fine needle cytological aspirates from NSCLC patients. Importantly, we show that all mutations detected in the histological material of primary tumor were also identified in the cytological samples. We conclude that molecular profiling can be reliably performed on fine needle cytology aspirates from NSCLC patients. PMID:21408138

  20. [Detection of JAK2V617F mutation rate by real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR using allele specific primer and TaqMan-MGB probe for dual inhibiting amplification of wild type alleles].

    PubMed

    Liang, Guo-Wei; Shao, Dong-Hua; He, Mei-Ling; Cao, Qing-Yun

    2012-12-01

    This study was purposed to develop a real-time PCR assay for sensitive quantification of JAK2V617F allele burden in peripheral blood and to evaluate the clinical value of this method. Both allele-specific mutant reverse primer and wild-type TaqMan-MGB probe were used for dual-inhibiting amplification of wild-type alleles in a real-time PCR, and then the JAK2V617F mutant alleles were amplified specially. The standard curve for quantification of JAK2V617F was established by percentages of JAK2V617F alleles with threshold cycle (Ct) values in a real-time PCR. Furthermore, 89 apparent healthy donors were tested by this method. The results showed that the quantitative lower limit of this method for JAK2V617F was 0.1%, and the intra- and inter-assay average variability for quantifying percentage of JAK2V617F in total DNA was 4.1% and 6.1%, respectively. Two JAK2V617F-positive individuals were identified (the percentage of JAK2V617F alleles were 0.64% and 0.98%, respectively) using this method in blood from 89 apparently healthy donors. It is concluded that the developed method with highly sensitive and reproducible quantification of JAK2V617F mutant burden can be used clinically for diagnosis and evaluation of disease prognosis and efficacy of therapy in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. Moreover, this technique can be also used for quantitative detection of variety of single nucleotide mutation.

  1. Electromobility Shift Assay Reveals Evidence in Favor of Allele-Specific Binding of RUNX1 to the 5' Hypersensitive Site 4-Locus Control Region.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Hossein; Ghobakhloo, Sepideh; Neishabury, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    In our previous studies on the Iranian β-thalassemia (β-thal) patients, we identified an association between the severity of the β-thal phenotype and the polymorphic palindromic site at the 5' hypersensitive site 4-locus control region (5'HS4-LCR) of the β-globin gene cluster. Furthermore, a linkage disequilibrium was observed between this region and XmnI-HBG2 in the patient population. Based on this data, it was suggested that the well-recognized phenotype-ameliorating role assigned to positive XmnI could be associated with its linked elements in the LCR. To investigate the functional significance of polymorphisms at the 5'HS4-LCR, we studied its influence on binding of transcription factors. Web-based predictions of transcription factor binding revealed a binding site for runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1), when the allele at the center of the palindrome (TGGGG(A/G)CCCCA) was A but not when it was G. Furthermore, electromobility shift assay (EMSA) presented evidence in support of allele-specific binding of RUNX1 to 5'HS4. Considering that RUNX1 is a well-known regulator of hematopoiesis, these preliminary data suggest the importance of further studies to confirm this interaction and consequently investigate its functional and phenotypical relevance. These studies could help us to understand the molecular mechanism behind the phenotype modifying role of the 5'HS4-LCR polymorphic palindromic region (rs16912979), which has been observed in previous studies. PMID:27492765

  2. Comparison of a multiplexed MassARRAY system with real-time allele-specific PCR technology for genotyping of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Syrmis, M W; Moser, R J; Whiley, D M; Vaska, V; Coombs, G W; Nissen, M D; Sloots, T P; Nimmo, G R

    2011-12-01

    The Sequenom MassARRAY iPLEX single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing platform uses matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) coupled with single-base extension PCR for high-throughput multiplex SNP detection. In this study, we investigated the use of iPLEX MassARRAY technology for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) genotyping. A 16-plex MassARRAY iPLEX GOLD assay (MRSA-iPLEX) was developed that targets a set of informative SNPs and binary genes for MRSA characterization. The method was evaluated with 147 MRSA isolates, and the results were compared with those of an established SYBR Green-based real-time PCR system utilizing the same SNP-binary markers. A total of 2352 markers belonging to 44 SNP-binary profiles were analysed by both real-time PCR and MRSA-iPLEX. With real-time PCR as the reference standard, MRSA-iPLEX correctly assigned 2298 of the 2352 (97.7%) markers. Sequence variation in the MRSA-iPLEX primer targets accounted for the majority of MRSA-iPLEX erroneous results, highlighting the importance of primer target selection. MRSA-iPLEX provided optimal throughput for MRSA genotyping, and was, on a reagent basis, more cost-effective than the real-time PCR methods. The 16-plex MRSA-iPLEX is a suitable alternative to SYBR Green-based real-time PCR typing of major sequence types and clonal complexes of MRSA.

  3. 454 next generation-sequencing outperforms allele-specific PCR, Sanger sequencing, and pyrosequencing for routine KRAS mutation analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples.

    PubMed

    Altimari, Annalisa; de Biase, Dario; De Maglio, Giovanna; Gruppioni, Elisa; Capizzi, Elisa; Degiovanni, Alessio; D'Errico, Antonia; Pession, Annalisa; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Tallini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Detection of KRAS mutations in archival pathology samples is critical for therapeutic appropriateness of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer. We compared the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Sanger sequencing, ARMS-Scorpion (TheraScreen®) real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), pyrosequencing, chip array hybridization, and 454 next-generation sequencing to assess KRAS codon 12 and 13 mutations in 60 nonconsecutive selected cases of colorectal cancer. Twenty of the 60 cases were detected as wild-type KRAS by all methods with 100% specificity. Among the 40 mutated cases, 13 were discrepant with at least one method. The sensitivity was 85%, 90%, 93%, and 92%, and the accuracy was 90%, 93%, 95%, and 95% for Sanger sequencing, TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization, respectively. The main limitation of Sanger sequencing was its low analytical sensitivity, whereas TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization showed higher sensitivity but suffered from the limitations of predesigned assays. Concordance between the methods was k = 0.79 for Sanger sequencing and k > 0.85 for the other techniques. Tumor cell enrichment correlated significantly with the abundance of KRAS-mutated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), evaluated as ΔCt for TheraScreen real-time PCR (P = 0.03), percentage of mutation for pyrosequencing (P = 0.001), ratio for chip array hybridization (P = 0.003), and percentage of mutation for 454 next-generation sequencing (P = 0.004). Also, 454 next-generation sequencing showed the best cross correlation for quantification of mutation abundance compared with all the other methods (P < 0.001). Our comparison showed the superiority of next-generation sequencing over the other techniques in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Next-generation sequencing will replace Sanger sequencing as the reference technique for diagnostic detection of KRAS mutation in archival tumor tissues.

  4. 454 next generation-sequencing outperforms allele-specific PCR, Sanger sequencing, and pyrosequencing for routine KRAS mutation analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples

    PubMed Central

    Altimari, Annalisa; de Biase, Dario; De Maglio, Giovanna; Gruppioni, Elisa; Capizzi, Elisa; Degiovanni, Alessio; D’Errico, Antonia; Pession, Annalisa; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Tallini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Detection of KRAS mutations in archival pathology samples is critical for therapeutic appropriateness of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer. We compared the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Sanger sequencing, ARMS-Scorpion (TheraScreen®) real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), pyrosequencing, chip array hybridization, and 454 next-generation sequencing to assess KRAS codon 12 and 13 mutations in 60 nonconsecutive selected cases of colorectal cancer. Twenty of the 60 cases were detected as wild-type KRAS by all methods with 100% specificity. Among the 40 mutated cases, 13 were discrepant with at least one method. The sensitivity was 85%, 90%, 93%, and 92%, and the accuracy was 90%, 93%, 95%, and 95% for Sanger sequencing, TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization, respectively. The main limitation of Sanger sequencing was its low analytical sensitivity, whereas TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization showed higher sensitivity but suffered from the limitations of predesigned assays. Concordance between the methods was k = 0.79 for Sanger sequencing and k > 0.85 for the other techniques. Tumor cell enrichment correlated significantly with the abundance of KRAS-mutated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), evaluated as ΔCt for TheraScreen real-time PCR (P = 0.03), percentage of mutation for pyrosequencing (P = 0.001), ratio for chip array hybridization (P = 0.003), and percentage of mutation for 454 next-generation sequencing (P = 0.004). Also, 454 next-generation sequencing showed the best cross correlation for quantification of mutation abundance compared with all the other methods (P < 0.001). Our comparison showed the superiority of next-generation sequencing over the other techniques in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Next-generation sequencing will replace Sanger sequencing as the reference technique for diagnostic detection of KRAS mutation in archival tumor tissues. PMID

  5. High-speed droplet-allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Honda, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide alternations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or single nucleotide mutations are useful genetic markers for molecular diagnosis, prognosis, drug response, and predisposition to diseases. Rapid identification of SNPs or mutations is clinically important, especially for determining drug responses and selection of molecular-targeted therapy. Here, we describe a rapid genotyping assay based on the allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) by using our droplet-PCR machine (droplet-AS-PCR).

  6. SNP-Based Quantification of Allele-Specific DNA Methylation Patterns by Pyrosequencing®.

    PubMed

    Busato, Florence; Tost, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of allele-specific DNA methylation patterns has recently attracted much interest as loci of allele-specific DNA methylation overlap with known risk loci for complex diseases and the analysis might contribute to the fine-mapping and interpretation of non-coding genetic variants associated with complex diseases and improve the understanding between genotype and phenotype. In the presented protocol, we present a method for the analysis of DNA methylation patterns on both alleles separately using heterozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) as anchor for allele-specific PCR amplification followed by analysis of the allele-specific DNA methylation patterns by Pyrosequencing(®). Pyrosequencing is an easy-to-handle, quantitative real-time sequencing method that is frequently used for genotyping as well as for the analysis of DNA methylation patterns. The protocol consists of three major steps: (1) identification of individuals heterozygous for a SNP in a region of interest using Pyrosequencing; (2) analysis of the DNA methylation patterns surrounding the SNP on bisulfite-treated DNA to identify regions of potential allele-specific DNA methylation; and (3) the analysis of the DNA methylation patterns associated with each of the two alleles, which are individually amplified using allele-specific PCR. The enrichment of the targeted allele is re-enforced by modification of the allele-specific primers at the allele-discriminating base with Locked Nucleic Acids (LNA). For the proof-of-principle of the developed approach, we provide assay details for three imprinted genes (IGF2, IGF2R, and PEG3) within this chapter. The mean of the DNA methylation patterns derived from the individual alleles corresponds well to the overall DNA methylation patterns and the developed approach proved more reliable compared to other protocols for allele-specific DNA methylation analysis.

  7. Identification of new primer binding site mutations at TH01 and D13S317 loci and determination of their corresponding STR alleles by allele-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengrui; Xuan, Jinfeng; Xing, Jiaxin; Ding, Mei; Wang, Baojie; Pang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Several commercial multiplex PCR kits for the amplification of short tandem repeat (STR) loci have been extensively applied in forensic genetics. Consequently, large numbers of samples have been genotyped, and the number of discordant genotypes observed has also increased. We observed allele dropout with two novel alleles at the STR loci TH01 and D13S317 during paternity testing using the AmpFℓSTR Identifiler PCR Amplification Kit. The lost alleles reappeared when alternative PCR primer pairs were used. A sequence analysis revealed a G-to-A substitution 82 bases downstream of the last TCAT motif of the repeat region at the TH01 locus (GenBank accession: D00269) and a G-to-T substitution 90 bases upstream of the first TATC motif of the repeat region at the D13S317 locus (GenBank accession: G09017). The frequencies of these two point mutations were subsequently investigated in the Chinese population using sequence-specific primer PCR (SSP-PCR), but neither of these mutations was detected in any of the samples tested. In addition, the DNA samples in which the mutations were identified were amplified to type the point mutations by SSP-PCR to determine the corresponding STR alleles at the two loci. Subsequently, the amplified PCR products with different point mutations and STR repeat numbers were directly sequenced because this strategy overcomes the appearance overlapping peaks generated by different STR alleles and accurately characterizes genotypes. Thus, our findings not only provide useful information for DNA databases and forensic identification but also establish an effective strategy for typing STR alleles with primer binding site mutations.

  8. Allele-Specific PCR Method Based on pncA and oxyR Sequences for Distinguishing Mycobacterium bovis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Intraspecific M. bovis pncA Sequence Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    de los Monteros, Luz Elena Espinosa; Galán, Juan Carlos; Gutiérrez, Montserrat; Samper, Sofía; García Marín, Juan F.; Martín, Carlos; Domínguez, Lucas; de Rafael, Luis; Baquero, Fernando; Gómez-Mampaso, Enrique; Blázquez, Jesús

    1998-01-01

    An allele-specific amplification method based on two genetic polymorphisms to differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Mycobacterium bovis was tested. Based on the differences found at position 169 in the pncA genes from M. tuberculosis and M. bovis, a PCR system which was able to differentiate most of the 237 M. tuberculosis complex isolates tested in one of the two species was developed. All 121 M. tuberculosis strains showed the expected base (cytosine) at position 169. Most of the M. bovis isolates had a guanine at the cited position. Nevertheless, 18 of the 116 M. bovis isolates, all of them goat isolates, showed the pncA polymorphism specific to M. tuberculosis. These results suggest that goat M. bovis may be the nicotinamidase-missing link at the origin of the M. tuberculosis species. Based on the polymorphism found at position 285 in the oxyR gene, the same system was used to differentiate M. tuberculosis from M. bovis. In this case, DNAs from all 121 M. tuberculosis isolates had the expected base (guanine) at this position. In addition, all 116 M. bovis isolates, including those from goats, showed the identical polymorphism (adenine). The oxyR allele-specific amplification method can differentiate M. bovis from M. tuberculosis, is rapid (results can be obtained in less than 3 h), and is easy to perform. PMID:9431955

  9. Comparison of 454 Ultra-Deep Sequencing and Allele-Specific Real-Time PCR with Regard to the Detection of Emerging Drug-Resistant Minor HIV-1 Variants after Antiretroviral Prophylaxis for Vertical Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Andrea; Kuecherer, Claudia; Kunz, Andrea; Dabrowski, Piotr Wojtek; Radonić, Aleksandar; Nitsche, Andreas; Theuring, Stefanie; Bannert, Norbert; Sewangi, Julius; Mbezi, Paulina; Dugange, Festo; Harms, Gundel; Meixenberger, Karolin

    2015-01-01

    Background Pregnant HIV-infected women were screened for the development of HIV-1 drug resistance after implementation of a triple-antiretroviral transmission prophylaxis as recommended by the WHO in 2006. The study offered the opportunity to compare amplicon-based 454 ultra-deep sequencing (UDS) and allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR) for the detection of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Methods Plasma samples from 34 Tanzanian women were previously analysed by ASPCR for key resistance mutations in the viral RT selected by AZT, 3TC, and NVP (K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, T215Y/F). In this study, the RT region of the same samples was investigated by amplicon-based UDS for resistance mutations using the 454 GS FLX System. Results Drug-resistant HIV-variants were identified in 69% (20/29) of women by UDS and in 45% (13/29) by ASPCR. The absolute number of resistance mutations identified by UDS was twice that identified by ASPCR (45 vs 24). By UDS 14 of 24 ASPCR-detected resistance mutations were identified at the same position. The overall concordance between UDS and ASPCR was 61.0% (25/41). The proportions of variants quantified by UDS were approximately 2–3 times lower than by ASPCR. Amplicon generation from samples with viral loads below 20,000 copies/ml failed more frequently by UDS compared to ASPCR (limit of detection = 650 copies/ml), resulting in missing or insufficient sequence coverage. Conclusions Both methods can provide useful information about drug-resistant minor HIV-1 variants. ASPCR has a higher sensitivity than UDS, but is restricted to single resistance mutations. In contrast, UDS is limited by its requirement for high viral loads to achieve sufficient sequence coverage, but the sequence information reveals the complete resistance patterns within the genomic region analysed. Improvements to the UDS limit of detection are in progress, and UDS could then facilitate monitoring of drug-resistant minor variants in

  10. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients. Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3′-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5′-UTR polymorphisms). For neither the 3′- nor the 5′-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance. The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold

  11. Allele-specific qRT-PCR demonstrates superior detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms as genetic markers for West Nile virus compared to Luminex® and quantitative sequencing.

    PubMed

    Worwa, Gabriella; Andrade, Christy C; Thiemann, Tara C; Park, Bborie; Maharaj, Payal D; Anishchenko, Michael; Brault, Aaron C; Reisen, William K

    2014-01-01

    To enable in vivo and in vitro competitive fitness comparisons among West Nile viruses (WNV), three reference viruses were marked genetically by site-directed mutagenesis with five synonymous nucleotide substitutions in the envelope gene region of the genome. Phenotypic neutrality of the mutants was assessed experimentally by competitive replication in cell culture and genetic stability of the substituted nucleotides was confirmed by direct sequencing. Luminex(®) technology, quantitative sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) were compared in regard to specificity, sensitivity and accuracy for quantitation of wildtype and genetically marked viruses in mixed samples based on RNA obtained from samples of known viral titers. Although Luminex(®) technology and quantitative sequencing provided semi-quantitative or qualitative measurements, a sequence-specific primer extension approach using a specific reverse primer set in singleplex qRT-PCR demonstrated the best quantitation and specificity in the detection of RNA from wildtype and mutant viruses.

  12. Misuse of PCR assay for diagnosis of mollusc protistan infections.

    PubMed

    Burreson, Eugene M

    2008-06-19

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays are useful tools for pathogen surveillance, but they are only proxy indications of pathogen presence in that they detect a DNA sequence. To be useful for detection of actual infections, PCR assays must be thoroughly tested for sensitivity and specificity, and ultimately validated against a technique, typically histology, which allows visualization of the parasite in host tissues. There is growing use of PCR assays for pathogen surveillance, but too often the assumption is made that a positive PCR result verifies an infection in a tested host. This assumption is valid only if the assay has been properly validated for the geographic area and for the hosts examined. Researchers should interpret unvalidated PCR assay results with caution, and editors and reviewers should insist that robust validations support all assertions that PCR results confirm infections.

  13. [Microchip electrophoresis coupled with multiplex allele-specific am-plification for typing multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) simultaneously].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Peng; Zhou, Guo-Hua

    2009-02-01

    A new method of DNA adapter ligation-mediated allele-specific amplification (ALM-ASA) was developed for typing multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the platform of microchip electrophoresis. Using seven SNPs of 794C>T, 1274C>T, 2143T>C, 2766T>del, 3298G>A, 5200G>A, and 5277C>T in the interleukin 1B (IL1B) gene as a target object, a long DNA fragment containing the seven SNPs of interest was pre-amplified to enhance the specificity. The pre-amplified DNA fragment was digested by a restriction endonuclease to form sticky ends; and then the adapter was ligated to either end of the digested fragment. Using the adapter-ligated fragments as templates, a 7-plex allele-specific amplification was performed by 7 allele-specific primers and a universal primer in one tube. The allele-specific products amplified were separated by chip electrophoresis and the types of SNPs were easily discriminated by the product sizes. The seven SNPs in IL1B gene in 48 healthy Chinese were successfully typed by microchip electrophoresis and the results coincided with those by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing method. The method established was accurate and can be used to type multiple SNPs simultaneously. In combination with microchip electrophoresis for readout, ALM-ASA assay can be used for fast SNP detection with a small amount of sample. Using self-prepared gel matrix and reused chips for analysis, the SNP can be typed at an ultra low cost.

  14. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chaoyong; Odeberg, Jacob; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per . E-mail: Per.Eriksson@ki.se

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  15. Allele-Specific DNA Methylation Detection by Pyrosequencing®.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays important roles in healthy as well as diseased cells, by influencing the transcription of genes. In spite the fact that human somatic cells are diploid, most of the currently available methods for the study of DNA methylation do not provide information on the methylation status of individual alleles of genes. This information may be of importance in many situations. In particular, in cancer both alleles of tumour suppressor genes generally need to be inactivated for a phenotypic effect to be observed. Here, we present a simple and cost-effective protocol for allele-specific DNA methylation detection based on Pyrosequencing(®) of methylation-specific PCR (MSP) products including a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the amplicon. PMID:26103906

  16. Development and Validation of a HPV-32 Specific PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Herrel, Nicholas R; Johnson, Nadia L; Cameron, Jennifer E; Leigh, Janet; Hagensee, Michael E

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus-32 (HPV-32) has traditionally been associated with focal-epithelial-hyperplasia (FEH). It is also present in 58% of oral warts of HIV-positive individuals whose prevalence is increasing. Current methods for the detection of HPV-32 are labor-intensive and insensitive so the goal of this work was to develop a highly sensitive and easy to use specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Materials and methods An HPV-32 L1 specific PCR assay was developed and optimized. The sensitivity and specificity was compared to previous assays utilized for detection (PGMY and MY09/11 PCR with dot blot hybridization) using cloned HPV-32 L1, the closely related HPV-42 L1 as well as clinical samples (oral swabs and fluids from 89 HIV-positive subjects). Results The HPV-32 specific PCR assay showed improved sensitivity to 5 copies of HPV-32 as compared to the PGMY PCR, MY09/11 PCR and dot blot which had a limit of detection of approximately 3,000 copies. Using the HPV-32 dot blot hybridization assay as the gold standard, the HPV-32 specific PCR assay has a sensitivity of 95.8% and 88.9% by sample and subject, respectively, and specificity was 87.8% and 58.8% by sample and subject, respectively. The low sensitivity is due to the HPV-32 specific PCR assays ability to detect more HPV-32 positive samples and may be the new gold standard. Conclusion Due to the ease, sensitivity, and specificity the HPV-32 specific PCR assay is superior to previous assays and is ideal for detection of HPV-32 in large cohorts. This assay provides an excellent tool to study the natural history of HPV-32 infection and the development of oral warts. PMID:19558697

  17. Posttreatment Follow-Up of Brucellosis by PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Morata, Pilar; Queipo-Ortuño, María Isabel; Reguera, José María; García-Ordoñez, Miguel Angel; Pichardo, Cristina; Colmenero, Juan de Dios

    1999-01-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of a peripheral blood PCR assay in the posttreatment follow-up of brucellosis, a cohort of 30 patients was studied by means of blood cultures, rose Bengal, seroagglutination, Coombs' antibrucella tests, and PCR assay at the time of diagnosis, at the end of treatment, and 2, 4, and 6 months later. Of the 29 patients whose PCR assays were initially positive, 28 (96.5%) were negative at the conclusion of the treatment. PCR was positive for the two patients who had relapses and negative for another four who had suspected but unconfirmed relapses. PCR was negative for 98.3% of the follow-up samples from those patients who had a favorable evolution. In conclusion, PCR appears to be a very useful technique, not only for the initial diagnosis of the disease, but also for posttreatment follow-up and the early detection of relapses. PMID:10565954

  18. Protocol: a simple gel-free method for SNP genotyping using allele-specific primers in rice and other plant species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genotype analysis using multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a useful but labor-intensive or high-cost procedure in plant research. Here we describe an alternative genotyping method that is suited to multi-sample or multi-locus SNP genotyping and does not require electrophoresis or specialized equipment. Results We have developed a simple method for multi-sample or multi-locus SNP genotyping using allele-specific primers (ASP). More specifically, we (1) improved the design of allele-specific primers, (2) established a method to detect PCR products optically without electrophoresis, and (3) standardized PCR conditions for parallel genomic assay using various allele-specific primers. As an illustration of multi-sample SNP genotyping using ASP, we mapped the locus for lodging resistance in a typhoon (lrt5). Additionally, we successfully tested multi-locus ASP-PCR analysis using 96 SNPs located throughout the genomes of rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars 'Koshihikari' and 'Kasalath', and demonstrated its applicability to other diverse cultivars/subspecies, including wild rice (O. rufipogon). Conclusion Our ASP methodology allows characterization of SNPs genotypes without electrophoresis, expensive probes or specialized equipment, and is highly versatile due to the flexibility in the design of primers. The method could be established easily in any molecular biology laboratory, and is applicable to diverse organisms. PMID:20409329

  19. Nested PCR Assay for Detection of Granulocytic Ehrlichiae

    PubMed Central

    Massung, Robert F.; Slater, Kim; Owens, Jessica H.; Nicholson, William L.; Mather, Thomas N.; Solberg, Victoria B.; Olson, James G.

    1998-01-01

    A sensitive and specific nested PCR assay was developed for the detection of granulocytic ehrlichiae. The assay amplifies the 16S rRNA gene and was used to examine acute-phase EDTA-blood and serum samples obtained from seven humans with clinical presentations compatible with human granulocytic ehrlichiosis. Five of the seven suspected cases were positive by the PCR assay using DNA extracted from whole blood as the template, compared with a serologic assay that identified only one positive sample. The PCR assay using DNA extracted from the corresponding serum samples as the template identified three positive samples. The sensitivity of the assay on human samples was examined, and the limit of detection was shown to be fewer than 2 copies of the 16S rRNA gene. The application of the assay to nonhuman samples demonstrated products amplified from template DNA extracted from Ixodes scapularis ticks collected in Rhode Island and from EDTA-blood specimens obtained from white-tailed deer in Maryland. All PCR products were sequenced and identified as specific to granulocytic ehrlichiae. A putative variant granulocytic ehrlichia 16S rRNA gene sequence was detected among products amplified from both the ticks and the deer blood specimens. PMID:9542943

  20. Specific PCR and real-time PCR assays for detection and quantitation of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma phoenicium'.

    PubMed

    Jawhari, Maan; Abrahamian, Peter; Sater, Ali Abdel; Sobh, Hana; Tawidian, Patil; Abou-Jawdah, Yusuf

    2015-02-01

    Almond witches' broom (AlmWB) is a fast-spreading lethal disease of almond, peach and nectarine associated with 'Candidatus Phytoplasma phoenicium'. The development of PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for the sensitive and specific detection of the phytoplasma is of prime importance for early detection of 'Ca. P. phoenicium' and for epidemiological studies. The developed qPCR assay herein uses a TaqMan(®) probe labeled with Black Hole Quencher Plus. The specificity of the PCR and that of the qPCR detection protocols were tested on 17 phytoplasma isolates belonging to 11 phytoplasma 16S rRNA groups, on samples of almond, peach, nectarine, native plants and insects infected or uninfected with the phytoplasma. The developed assays showed high specificity against 'Ca. P. phoenicium' and no cross-reactivity against any other phytoplasma, plant or insect tested. The sensitivity of the developed PCR and qPCR assays was similar to the conventional nested PCR protocol using universal primers. The qPCR assay was further validated by quantitating AlmWB phytoplasma in different hosts, plant parts and potential insect vectors. The highest titers of 'Ca. P. phoenicium' were detected in the phloem tissues of stems and roots of almond and nectarine trees, where they averaged from 10(5) to 10(6) genomic units per nanogram of host DNA (GU/ng of DNA). The newly developed PCR and qPCR protocols are reliable, specific and sensitive methods that are easily applicable to high-throughput diagnosis of AlmWB in plants and insects and can be used for surveys of potential vectors and alternative hosts.

  1. PCR Assay for Species-Specific Identification of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Lee-Jene; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Tsai, Jui-Chang; Chiang, Feng-Lin; Chen, Ching-Yi; Ho, Shen-Wu; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2000-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is the second most frequently encountered species of the anaerobes isolated from clinical specimens. We developed a PCR-based assay for the rapid identification of B. thetaiotaomicron. Specific primers were based on shared amplicons of about 1.2 kb generated from B. thetaiotaomicron by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. This 1.2-kb fragment was sequenced and then used to design a set of PCR amplification primers. This PCR generated an amplification product of 721 bp, which was unique to all 65 isolates of B. thetaiotaomicron tested. There was no amplification with isolates of other bacterial species. Restriction enzyme digestion of the amplification product and dot blot hybridization further verified the specificity of the assay. These results suggest that this PCR assay targets a nucleotide sequence that is strongly conserved in B. thetaiotaomicron. This simple and rapid PCR assay provides a rapid and accurate method for identification of B. thetaiotaomicron and shows promise for the detection of B. thetaiotaomicron in clinical samples. PMID:10747167

  2. Novel real-time PCR detection assay for Brucella suis

    PubMed Central

    Hänsel, C.; Mertens, K.; Elschner, M. C.; Melzer, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Brucella suis is the causative agent of brucellosis in suidae and is differentiated into five biovars (bv). Biovars 1 and 3 possess zoonotic potential and can infect humans, whereas biovar 2 represents the main source of brucellosis in feral and domestic pigs in Europe. Both aspects, the zoonotic threat and the economic loss, emphasize the necessity to monitor feral and domestic pig populations. Available serological or PCR based methods lack sensitivity and specificity. Results Here a bioinformatics approach was used to identify a B. suis specific 17 bp repeat on chromosome II (BS1330_II0657 locus). This repeat is common for B. suis bv 1 to 4 and was used to develop a TaqMan probe assay. The average PCR efficiency was determined as 95% and the limit of detection as 12,5 fg/µl of DNA, equally to 3.7 bacterial genomes. This assay has the highest sensitivity of all previously described B. suis specific PCR assays, making it possible to detect 3-4 bacterial genomes per 1 µl of sample. The assay was tested 100% specific for B. suis and negative for other Brucella spp. and closely related non-Brucella species. Conclusions This novel qPCR assay could become a rapid, inexpensive and reliable screening method for large sample pools of B. suis 1 to 4. This method will be applicable for field samples after validation. PMID:26392898

  3. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Youping; Wang, Zhongkang

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets) are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications. PMID:27427975

  4. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Xia, Qingyan; Yin, Youping; Wang, Zhongkang

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets) are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications. PMID:27427975

  5. Allele-specific DNA methylation reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Izzi, Benedetta; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Cludts, Katrien; Akkor, Pinar; Lambrechts, Diether; Verfaillie, Catherine; Verhamme, Peter; Freson, Kathleen; Hoylaerts, Marc F

    2016-08-18

    Genetic variation in the PEAR1 locus is linked to platelet reactivity and cardiovascular disease. The major G allele of rs12041331, an intronic cytosine guanine dinucleotide-single-nucleotide polymorphism (CpG-SNP), is associated with higher PEAR1 expression in platelets and endothelial cells than the minor A allele. The molecular mechanism underlying this difference remains elusive. We have characterized the histone modification profiles of the intronic region surrounding rs12041331 and identified H3K4Me1 enhancer-specific enrichment for the region that covers the CpG-SNP. Interestingly, methylation studies revealed that the CpG site is fully methylated in leukocytes of GG carriers. Nuclear protein extracts from megakaryocytes, endothelial cells, vs control HEK-293 cells show a 3-fold higher affinity for the methylated G allele compared with nonmethylated G or A alleles in a gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. To understand the positive relationship between methylation and gene expression, we studied DNA methylation at 4 different loci of PEAR1 during in vitro megakaryopoiesis. During differentiation, the CpG-SNP remained fully methylated, while we observed rapid methylation increases at the CpG-island overlapping the first 5'-untranslated region exon, paralleling the increased PEAR1 expression. In the same region, A-allele carriers of rs12041331 showed significantly lower DNA methylation at CGI1 compared with GG homozygote. This CpG-island contains binding sites for the methylation-sensitive transcription factor CTCF, whose binding is known to play a role in enhancer activation and/or repression. In conclusion, we report the molecular characterization of the first platelet function-related CpG-SNP, a genetic predisposition that reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity through allele-specific DNA methylation. PMID:27313330

  6. PCR and real-time PCR assays to detect fungi of Alternaria alternata species.

    PubMed

    Kordalewska, Milena; Brillowska-Dąbrowska, Anna; Jagielski, Tomasz; Dworecka-Kaszak, Bożena

    2015-01-01

    Fungi of the Alternaria genus are mostly associated with allergic diseases. However, with a growing number of immunocompromised patients, these fungi, with A. alternata being the most prevalent one, are increasingly recognized as etiological agents of infections (phaeohyphomycoses) in humans. Nowadays, identification of Alternaria spp. requires their pure culture and is solely based on morphological criteria. Clinically, Alternaria infections may be indistinguishable from other fungal diseases. Therefore, a diagnostic result is often delayed or even not achieved at all. In this paper we present easy to perform and interpret PCR and real-time PCR assays enabling detection of A. alternata species. On the basis of alignment of β-tubulin gene sequences, A. alternata-specific primers were designed. DNA from fungal isolates, extracted in a two-step procedure, were used in PCR and real-time PCR assays followed by electrophoresis or melting temperature analysis, respectively. The assays specificity was confirmed, since positive results were obtained for all A. alternata isolates, and no positive results were obtained neither for other molds, dermatophytes, yeast-like fungi, nor human DNA. The assays developed here enable fast and unambiguous identification of A. alternata pathogens. PMID:26610309

  7. PCR and real-time PCR assays to detect fungi of Alternaria alternata species.

    PubMed

    Kordalewska, Milena; Brillowska-Dąbrowska, Anna; Jagielski, Tomasz; Dworecka-Kaszak, Bożena

    2015-01-01

    Fungi of the Alternaria genus are mostly associated with allergic diseases. However, with a growing number of immunocompromised patients, these fungi, with A. alternata being the most prevalent one, are increasingly recognized as etiological agents of infections (phaeohyphomycoses) in humans. Nowadays, identification of Alternaria spp. requires their pure culture and is solely based on morphological criteria. Clinically, Alternaria infections may be indistinguishable from other fungal diseases. Therefore, a diagnostic result is often delayed or even not achieved at all. In this paper we present easy to perform and interpret PCR and real-time PCR assays enabling detection of A. alternata species. On the basis of alignment of β-tubulin gene sequences, A. alternata-specific primers were designed. DNA from fungal isolates, extracted in a two-step procedure, were used in PCR and real-time PCR assays followed by electrophoresis or melting temperature analysis, respectively. The assays specificity was confirmed, since positive results were obtained for all A. alternata isolates, and no positive results were obtained neither for other molds, dermatophytes, yeast-like fungi, nor human DNA. The assays developed here enable fast and unambiguous identification of A. alternata pathogens.

  8. A simple real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay for authentication of the Chinese Panax ginseng cultivar Damaya from a local ginseng population.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, J; Li, G

    2016-06-27

    Panax ginseng is one of the most important medicinal plants in the Orient. Owing to its increasing demand in the world market, cultivated ginseng has become the main source of medicinal material. Among the Chinese ginseng cultivars, Damaya commands higher prices and is grown in significant proportions among the local ginseng population. Due to the lack of rapid and accurate authentication methods, Damaya is distributed among different cultivars in the local ginseng population in China. Here, we identified a unique, Damaya-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) site present in the second intron of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (cox2). Based on this SNP, a Damaya cultivar-specific primer was designed and an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was optimized for the effective molecular authentication of Damaya. We designed a method by combining a simple DNA isolation method with real-time allele-specific PCR using SYBR Green I fluorescent dye, and proved its efficacy in clearly discriminated Damaya cultivar from other Chinese ginseng cultivars according to the allelic discrimination analysis. Hence, this study provides a simple and rapid assay for the differentiation and conservation of Damaya from the local Chinese ginseng population.

  9. A simple real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay for authentication of the Chinese Panax ginseng cultivar Damaya from a local ginseng population.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, J; Li, G

    2016-01-01

    Panax ginseng is one of the most important medicinal plants in the Orient. Owing to its increasing demand in the world market, cultivated ginseng has become the main source of medicinal material. Among the Chinese ginseng cultivars, Damaya commands higher prices and is grown in significant proportions among the local ginseng population. Due to the lack of rapid and accurate authentication methods, Damaya is distributed among different cultivars in the local ginseng population in China. Here, we identified a unique, Damaya-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) site present in the second intron of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (cox2). Based on this SNP, a Damaya cultivar-specific primer was designed and an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was optimized for the effective molecular authentication of Damaya. We designed a method by combining a simple DNA isolation method with real-time allele-specific PCR using SYBR Green I fluorescent dye, and proved its efficacy in clearly discriminated Damaya cultivar from other Chinese ginseng cultivars according to the allelic discrimination analysis. Hence, this study provides a simple and rapid assay for the differentiation and conservation of Damaya from the local Chinese ginseng population. PMID:27420983

  10. Multiplex real-time PCR assay for Legionella species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Min; Jeong, Yoojung; Sohn, Jang Wook; Kim, Min Ja

    2015-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (sg1) accounts for the majority of infections in humans, but other Legionella species are also associated with human disease. In this study, a new SYBR Green I-based multiplex real-time PCR assay in a single reaction was developed to allow the rapid detection and differentiation of Legionella species by targeting specific gene sequences. Candidate target genes were selected, and primer sets were designed by referring to comparative genomic hybridization data of Legionella species. The Legionella species-specific groES primer set successfully detected all 30 Legionella strains tested. The xcpX and rfbA primers specifically detected L. pneumophila sg1-15 and L. pneumophila sg1, respectively. In addition, this assay was validated by testing clinical samples and isolates. In conclusion, this novel multiplex real-time PCR assay might be a useful diagnostic tool for the rapid detection and differentiation of Legionella species in both clinical and epidemiological studies.

  11. Species identification of cattle and buffalo fat through PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Vaithiyanathan, S; Kulkarni, V V

    2016-04-01

    A method was standardized to isolate quality DNA from cattle and buffalo fat for species identification using QIAamp DNA stool mini kit. The quality of the DNA was sufficient enough to amplify universal primers viz., mt 12S rRNA and mt 16S rRNA, and species specific D loop primers for cattle and buffalo. The sensitivity of the PCR assay in the species specific D loop primer amplification was with a detection level of 0. 47 ng cattle DNA and 0.23 ng buffalo DNA in simplex and, 0. 47 ng cattle DNA and 0.12 ng buffalo DNA in duplex PCR. It is a potentially reliable method for DNA detection to authenticate animal fat. PMID:27413237

  12. Molecular-beacon multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Gubala, Aneta J; Proll, David F

    2006-09-01

    A multiplex real-time PCR assay was developed using molecular beacons for the detection of Vibrio cholerae by targeting four important virulence and regulatory genes. The specificity and sensitivity of this assay, when tested with pure culture and spiked environmental water samples, were high, surpassing those of currently published PCR assays for the detection of this organism.

  13. Comparison of real-time multiplex human papillomavirus (HPV) PCR assays with the linear array HPV genotyping PCR assay and influence of DNA extraction method on HPV detection.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christine C; Swoyer, Ryan; Bryan, Janine T; Taddeo, Frank J

    2011-05-01

    Real-time human papillomavirus (HPV) type-specific multiplex PCR assays were developed to detect HPV DNA in specimens collected for the efficacy determination of the quadrivalent HPV (type 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine (Gardasil). We evaluated the concordance between type-specific multiplex HPV PCR and the widely used, commercially available Roche Linear Array genotyping PCR assay. Female genital swab specimens were tested for the presence of L1, E6, and E7 sequences of HPV type 6 (HPV6), HPV11, HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV45, HPV52, and HPV58 and E6 and E7 sequences of HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV51, HPV56, and HPV59 in type- and gene-specific real-time multiplex PCR assays. Specimens were also tested for the presence of L1 sequences using two versions of the Roche Linear Array genotyping assay. Measures of concordance of a modified version of the Linear Array and the standard Linear Array PCR assay were evaluated. With specimen DNA extraction using the Qiagen Spin blood kit held as the constant, multiplex PCR assays detect more HPV-positive specimens for the 14 HPV types common to both than either version of the Linear Array HPV genotyping assay. Type-specific agreements between the assays were good, at least 0.838, but were often driven by negative agreement in HPV types with low prevalence, as evidenced by reduced proportions of positive agreement. Overall HPV status agreements ranged from 0.615 for multiplex PCR and standard Linear Array to 0.881 for multiplex PCR and modified Linear Array. An alternate DNA extraction technique, that used by the Qiagen MinElute kit, impacted subsequent HPV detection in both the multiplex PCR and Linear Array assays.

  14. A modified approach to identification of the sickle cell anemia mutation by means of allele-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Birikh, K R; Plutalov, O V; Schwartz, E I; Devi, P S; Berlin, Y A

    1992-01-01

    The allele-specific PCR approach has been modified by introducing a second mismatch at the 3'-penultimate link of the primer and used to identify the sickle cell anemia mutation (A-->T transversion in the sixth codon of the human beta-globin gene causing Glu-->Val substitution in the protein), thus obviating the problem of an interpretationally ambiguous 3'-terminal mismatch including T residue. PMID:1301951

  15. A modified approach to identification of the sickle cell anemia mutation by means of allele-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Birikh, K R; Plutalov, O V; Schwartz, E I; Devi, P S; Berlin, Y A

    1992-01-01

    The allele-specific PCR approach has been modified by introducing a second mismatch at the 3'-penultimate link of the primer and used to identify the sickle cell anemia mutation (A-->T transversion in the sixth codon of the human beta-globin gene causing Glu-->Val substitution in the protein), thus obviating the problem of an interpretationally ambiguous 3'-terminal mismatch including T residue.

  16. A real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay for the detection of the three primary mitochondrial mutations in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Fergus; O’Dwyer, Veronica; Neylan, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 95% of patients who are diagnosed with Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have one of three mitochondrial point mutations responsible for the disease, G3460A, G11778A, and T14484C. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel multiplex real-time amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR combined with high-resolution melt curves to identify the individual mutations involved. The study aimed to provide a more robust, cost- and time-effective mutation detection strategy than that offered with currently available methods. The assay reported in this study will allow diagnostic laboratories to avoid costly next-generation sequencing (NGS) assays for most patients with LHON and to focus resources on patients with unknown mutations that require further analysis. Methods The test uses a combination of multiplex allele-specific PCR (ARMS PCR) in combination with a high-resolution melt curve analysis to detect the presence of the mutations in G3460A, G11778A, and T14484C. PCR primer sets were designed to produce a control PCR product and PCR products only in the presence of the mutations in 3460A, 11778A, and 14484C in a multiplex single tube format. Products produce discrete well-separated melt curves to clearly detect the mutations. Results This novel real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay accurately detected 95% of the mutations that cause LHON. The test has proved to be robust, cost- and time-effective with the real-time closed tube system taking approximately 1 h to complete. Conclusions A novel real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay is described for the detection of the three primary mitochondrial mutations in LHON. This test provides a simple, robust, easy-to-read output that is cost- and time-effective, thus providing an alternative method to individual endpoint PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), PCR followed by Sanger sequencing or pyrosequencing, and next-generation sequencing

  17. Allele-specific H3K79 Di- versus trimethylation distinguishes opposite parental alleles at imprinted regions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Han, Li; Rivas, Guillermo E; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Nicholson, Thomas B; Larson, Garrett P; Chen, Taiping; Szabó, Piroska E

    2010-06-01

    Imprinted gene expression corresponds to parental allele-specific DNA CpG methylation and chromatin composition. Histone tail covalent modifications have been extensively studied, but it is not known whether modifications in the histone globular domains can also discriminate between the parental alleles. Using multiplex chromatin immunoprecipitation-single nucleotide primer extension (ChIP-SNuPE) assays, we measured the allele-specific enrichment of H3K79 methylation and H4K91 acetylation along the H19/Igf2 imprinted domain. Whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac displayed a paternal-specific enrichment at the paternally expressed Igf2 locus, H3K79me3 was paternally biased at the maternally expressed H19 locus, including the paternally methylated imprinting control region (ICR). We found that these allele-specific differences depended on CTCF binding in the maternal ICR allele. We analyzed an additional 11 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and found that, in general, H3K79me3 was associated with the CpG-methylated alleles, whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac enrichment was specific to the unmethylated alleles. Our data suggest that allele-specific differences in the globular histone domains may constitute a layer of the "histone code" at imprinted genes.

  18. Performance of two real-time PCR assays for hepatitis B virus DNA detection and quantitation.

    PubMed

    Kania, Dramane; Ottomani, Laure; Meda, Nicolas; Peries, Marianne; Dujols, Pierre; Bolloré, Karine; Rénier, Wendy; Viljoen, Johannes; Ducos, Jacques; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-06-01

    In-house developed real-time PCR (qPCR) techniques could be useful conjunctives to the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in resource-limited settings with high prevalence. Two qPCR assays (qPCR1 and qPCR2), based on primers/probes targeting conserved regions of the X and S genes of HBV respectively, were evaluated using clinical samples of varying HBV genotypes, and compared to the commercial Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HBV Test v2.0. The lower detection limit (LDL) was established at 104 IU/ml for qPCR1, and 91 IU/ml for qPCR2. Good agreement and correlation were obtained between the Roche assay and both qPCR assays (r = 0.834 for qPCR1; and r = 0.870 for qPCR2). Differences in HBV DNA load of > 0.5 Log10 IU/ml between the Roche and the qPCR assays were found in 49/122 samples of qPCR1, and 35/122 samples of qPCR2. qPCR1 tended to underestimate HBV DNA quantity in samples with a low viral load and overestimate HBV DNA concentration in samples with a high viral load when compared to the Roche test. Both molecular tools that were developed, used on an open real-time PCR system, were reliable for HBV DNA detection and quantitation. The qPCR2 performed better than the qPCR1 and had the additional advantage of various HBV genotype detection and quantitation. This low cost quantitative HBV DNA PCR assay may be an alternative solution when implementing national programmes to diagnose, monitor and treat HBV infection in low- to middle-income countries where testing for HBV DNA is not available in governmental health programmes.

  19. Single-tube, non-isotopic, multiplex PCR/OLA assay and sequence-coded separation for simultaneous screening of 31 cystic fibrosis mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Brinson, E.C.; Adriano, T.; Bloch, W.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a rapid, single-tube, non-isotopic assay that screens a patient sample for the presence of 31 cystic fibrosis (CF) mutations. This assay can identify these mutations in a single reaction tube and a single electrophoresis run. Sample preparation is a simple, boil-and-go procedure, completed in less than an hour. The assay is composed of a 15-plex PCR, followed by a 61-plex oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA), and incorporates a novel detection scheme, Sequence Coded Separation. Initially, the multiplex PCR amplifies 15 relevant segments of the CFTR gene, simultaneously. These PCR amplicons serve as templates for the multiplex OLA, which detects the normal or mutant allele at all loci, simultaneously. Each polymorphic site is interrogated by three oligonucleotide probes, a common probe and two allele-specific probes. Each common probe is tagged with a fluorescent dye, and the competing normal and mutant allelic probes incorporate different, non-nucleotide, mobility modifiers. These modifiers are composed of hexaethylene oxide (HEO) units, incorporated as HEO phosphoramidite monomers during automated DNA synthesis. The OLA is based on both probe hybridization and the ability of DNA ligase to discriminate single base mismatches at the junction between paired probes. Each single tube assay is electrophoresed in a single gel lane of a 4-color fluorescent DNA sequencer (Applied Biosystems, Model 373A). Each of the ligation products is identified by its unique combination of electrophoretic mobility and one of three colors. The fourth color is reserved for the in-lane size standard, used by GENESCAN{sup TM} software (Applied Biosystems) to size the OLA electrophoresis products. The Genotyper{sub TM} software (Applied Biosystems) decodes these Sequence-Coded-Separation data to create a patient summary report for all loci tested.

  20. Comparison of quantitative PCR assays for Escherichia coli targeting ribosomal RNA and single copy genes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: Compare specificity and sensitivity of quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting single and multi-copy gene regions of Escherichia coli. Methods and Results: A previously reported assay targeting the uidA gene (uidA405) was used as the basis for comparing the taxono...

  1. Immuno-PCR assay for sensitive detection of proteins in real time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immuno-PCR (IPCR) assay combines the versatility and robustness of immunoassays with the exponential signal amplification power of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Typically, IPCR allows a 10–1,000-fold increase in sensitivity over the analogous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thi...

  2. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for the Detection of Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays available to detect and enumerate fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and probes that target different rRNA genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in concentration es...

  3. Comparison of real-time multiplex human papillomavirus (HPV) PCR assays with INNO-LiPA HPV genotyping extra assay.

    PubMed

    Else, Elizabeth A; Swoyer, Ryan; Zhang, Yuhua; Taddeo, Frank J; Bryan, Janine T; Lawson, John; Van Hyfte, Inez; Roberts, Christine C

    2011-05-01

    Real-time type-specific multiplex human papillomavirus (HPV) PCR assays were developed to detect HPV DNA in samples collected for the efficacy determination of the quadrivalent HPV (type 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine (Gardasil). Additional multiplex (L1, E6, and E7 open reading frame [ORF]) or duplex (E6 and E7 ORF) HPV PCR assays were developed to detect high-risk HPV types, including HPV type 31 (HPV31), HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58, and HPV59. Here, we evaluated clinical specimen concordance and compared the limits of detection (LODs) between multiplex HPV PCR assays and the INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra assay, which detects 28 types, for the 14 HPV types common to both of these methods. Overall HPV detection agreement rates were >90% for swabs and >95% for thin sections. Statistically significant differences in detection were observed for HPV6, HPV16, HPV18, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV56, HPV58, and HPV59 in swabs and for HPV45, HPV58, and HPV59 in thin sections. Where P was <0.05, discordance was due to detection of more HPV-positive samples by the multiplex HPV PCR assays. LODs were similar for eight HPV types, significantly lower in multiplex assays for five HPV types, and lower in INNO-LiPA for HPV6 only. LODs were under 50 copies for all HPV types, with the exception of HPV39, HPV58, and HPV59 in the INNO-LiPA assay. The overall percent agreement for detection of 14 HPV types between the type-specific multiplex HPV PCR and INNO-LiPA genotyping assays was good. The differences in positive sample detection favored multiplex HPV PCR, suggesting increased sensitivity of HPV DNA detection by type-specific multiplex HPV PCR assays.

  4. Genomic landscape of human allele-specific DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Hodges, Emily; Molaro, Antoine; Dean, Matthew; Hannon, Gregory J; Smith, Andrew D

    2012-05-01

    DNA methylation mediates imprinted gene expression by passing an epigenomic state across generations and differentially marking specific regulatory regions on maternal and paternal alleles. Imprinting has been tied to the evolution of the placenta in mammals and defects of imprinting have been associated with human diseases. Although recent advances in genome sequencing have revolutionized the study of DNA methylation, existing methylome data remain largely untapped in the study of imprinting. We present a statistical model to describe allele-specific methylation (ASM) in data from high-throughput short-read bisulfite sequencing. Simulation results indicate technical specifications of existing methylome data, such as read length and coverage, are sufficient for full-genome ASM profiling based on our model. We used our model to analyze methylomes for a diverse set of human cell types, including cultured and uncultured differentiated cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Regions of ASM identified most consistently across methylomes are tightly connected with known imprinted genes and precisely delineate the boundaries of several known imprinting control regions. Predicted regions of ASM common to multiple cell types frequently mark noncoding RNA promoters and represent promising starting points for targeted validation. More generally, our model provides the analytical complement to cutting-edge experimental technologies for surveying ASM in specific cell types and across species. PMID:22523239

  5. Allele-specific chemical genetics: concept, strategies, and applications.

    PubMed

    Islam, Kabirul

    2015-02-20

    The relationship between DNA and protein sequences is well understood, yet because the members of a protein family/subfamily often carry out the same biochemical reaction, elucidating their individual role in cellular processes presents a challenge. Forward and reverse genetics have traditionally been employed to understand protein functions with considerable success. A fundamentally different approach that has gained widespread application is the use of small organic molecules, known as chemical genetics. However, the slow time-scale of genetics and inherent lack of specificity of small molecules used in chemical genetics have limited the applicability of these methods in deconvoluting the role of individual proteins involved in fast, dynamic biological events. Combining the advantages of both the techniques, the specificity achieved with genetics along with the reversibility and tunability of chemical genetics, has led to the development of a powerful approach to uncover protein functions in complex biological processes. This technique is known as allele-specific chemical genetics and is rapidly becoming an essential toolkit to shed light on proteins and their mechanism of action. The current review attempts to provide a comprehensive description of this approach by discussing the underlying principles, strategies, and successful case studies. Potential future implications of this technology in expanding the frontiers of modern biology are discussed.

  6. Extensive allele-specific translational regulation in hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jingyi; Wang, Xi; McShane, Erik; Zauber, Henrik; Sun, Wei; Selbach, Matthias; Chen, Wei

    2015-08-07

    Translational regulation is mediated through the interaction between diffusible trans-factors and cis-elements residing within mRNA transcripts. In contrast to extensively studied transcriptional regulation, cis-regulation on translation remains underexplored. Using deep sequencing-based transcriptome and polysome profiling, we globally profiled allele-specific translational efficiency for the first time in an F1 hybrid mouse. Out of 7,156 genes with reliable quantification of both alleles, we found 1,008 (14.1%) exhibiting significant allelic divergence in translational efficiency. Systematic analysis of sequence features of the genes with biased allelic translation revealed that local RNA secondary structure surrounding the start codon and proximal out-of-frame upstream AUGs could affect translational efficiency. Finally, we observed that the cis-effect was quantitatively comparable between transcriptional and translational regulation. Such effects in the two regulatory processes were more frequently compensatory, suggesting that the regulation at the two levels could be coordinated in maintaining robustness of protein expression.

  7. Genomic landscape of human allele-specific DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Hodges, Emily; Molaro, Antoine; Dean, Matthew; Hannon, Gregory J.; Smith, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation mediates imprinted gene expression by passing an epigenomic state across generations and differentially marking specific regulatory regions on maternal and paternal alleles. Imprinting has been tied to the evolution of the placenta in mammals and defects of imprinting have been associated with human diseases. Although recent advances in genome sequencing have revolutionized the study of DNA methylation, existing methylome data remain largely untapped in the study of imprinting. We present a statistical model to describe allele-specific methylation (ASM) in data from high-throughput short-read bisulfite sequencing. Simulation results indicate technical specifications of existing methylome data, such as read length and coverage, are sufficient for full-genome ASM profiling based on our model. We used our model to analyze methylomes for a diverse set of human cell types, including cultured and uncultured differentiated cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Regions of ASM identified most consistently across methylomes are tightly connected with known imprinted genes and precisely delineate the boundaries of several known imprinting control regions. Predicted regions of ASM common to multiple cell types frequently mark noncoding RNA promoters and represent promising starting points for targeted validation. More generally, our model provides the analytical complement to cutting-edge experimental technologies for surveying ASM in specific cell types and across species. PMID:22523239

  8. Clinical evaluation of a type III secretion system real-time PCR assay for diagnosing melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Meumann, Ella M; Novak, Ryan T; Gal, Daniel; Kaestli, Mirjam E; Mayo, Mark; Hanson, Joshua P; Spencer, Emma; Glass, Mindy B; Gee, Jay E; Wilkins, Patricia P; Currie, Bart J

    2006-08-01

    A Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system real-time PCR assay was evaluated on clinical specimens in a region where melioidosis is endemic. The PCR was positive in 30/33 (91%) patients with culture-confirmed melioidosis. All six patients with melioidosis septic shock were blood PCR positive, suggesting potential for rapid diagnosis and commencement of appropriate therapy.

  9. Evaluation of Roche Amplicor PCR assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wobeser, W L; Krajden, M; Conly, J; Simpson, H; Yim, B; D'costa, M; Fuksa, M; Hian-Cheong, C; Patterson, M; Phillips, A; Bannatyne, R; Haddad, A; Brunton, J L; Krajden, S

    1996-01-01

    The Roche Amplicor Mycobacterium tuberculosis PCR test (RMtb-PCR) was compared with mycobacterial culture, with the BACTEC 460 system and inoculation on Lowenstein-Jensen media. Results were interpreted with an adjusted "gold standard" incorporating clinical diagnosis. A total of 1,480 clinical specimens from 1,155 patients, including tissues and fluids, as well as 141 specimens which demonstrated a positive growth index on the BACTEC 460 system were assessed. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of RMtb-PCR compared with the adjusted gold standard for clinical specimens were 79, 99, 93, and 98%, respectively. In smear-positive specimens, the sensitivity of RMtb-PCR was 98% versus 53% for smear-negative specimens. When RMtb-PCR was performed two times per week, PCR results were available an average of 21 days before the culture results. For specimens demonstrating a positive growth index on the BACTEC 460 system, RMtb-PCR had a sensitivity and specificity of 98 and 100%, respectively. This study demonstrates the value of a commercial nucleic acid amplification kit for rapid diagnosis of M. tuberculosis, particularly in smear-positive specimens or BACTEC culture-positive specimens. PMID:8748289

  10. Detection of Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica by a Rapid and Sensitive Duplex PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wannet, Wim J. B.; Reessink, Michiel; Brunings, Henk A.; Maas, Henny M. E.

    2001-01-01

    A duplex PCR assay targeting the ail and 16S rRNA genes of Yersinia enterocolitica was developed to specifically identify pathogenic Y. enterocolitica from pure culture. Validation of the assay was performed with 215 clinical Yersinia strains and 40 strains of other bacterial species. Within an assay time of 4 h, this assay offers a very specific, reliable, and inexpensive alternative to the conventional phenotypic assays used in clinical laboratories to identify pathogenic Y. enterocolitica. PMID:11724866

  11. Real-time-PCR assay for diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica infection.

    PubMed

    Roy, Shantanu; Kabir, Mamun; Mondal, Dinesh; Ali, Ibne Karim M; Petri, William A; Haque, Rashidul

    2005-05-01

    We developed a real-time-PCR assay utilizing a molecular-beacon probe for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica and compared its sensitivity to stool antigen detection and traditional PCR. A total of 205 stool and liver abscess pus specimens from patients and controls were used for this purpose, 101 (49%) of which were positive by the TechLab E. histolytica-specific antigen detection test, while the other 104 (51%) stool and liver abscess pus specimens were negative by the antigen detection test. DNA was extracted from the stool and liver abscess pus specimens by the QIAGEN method and the small-subunit rRNA gene of E. histolytica and then amplified by traditional and real-time PCR. Out of these 205 stool and liver abscess pus specimens, 124 were positive by the real-time-PCR assay and 90 were positive by the traditional-PCR test. Compared to the real-time-PCR assay, the antigen detection test was 79% sensitive and 96% specific. When the traditional-PCR test results were compared to the real-time-PCR assay, the sensitivity of traditional PCR was 72% and the specificity was 99%. In conclusion, all three methods for the detection of E. histolytica were highly specific, with real-time PCR being the most sensitive.

  12. Development of a novel PCR-RFLP assay for improved detection and typing of bovine papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Kawauchi, Kyoko; Takahashi, Chiaki; Ishihara, Ryoko; Hatama, Shinichi

    2015-06-15

    A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay was developed to detect and type bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) from tumors in cattle. Two degenerate primer sets targeting the BPV L1 gene, subAup/subAdw and subBup/subBdw, and one restriction enzyme RsaI were used in this assay. In silico analyses of the restriction enzyme sites in the PCR fragments of 13 BPV sequences (BPV-1 to -13) revealed that all known BPVs are differentiated by the PCR-RFLP assay. Analyses of 63 previously typed clinical samples, that included teat papillomas and both esophageal and urinary bladder cancer biopsies, show that the assay clearly differentiates between eight clinically important BPV types (BPV-1 to -6, -9, -10), and discriminates between single and multiple infections. To further assess the reliability of the PCR-RFLP method amplified fragments were sequenced. A high correlation (95%) was observed when the results of the PCR-RFLP method were compared with PCR-sequencing. Differences in typing occurred for 3 of 63 specimens; PCR-RFLP identified additional BPV types in these specimens, while the PCR-sequencing identified only one. These results indicate that the PCR-RFLP method reported here is simpler and more reliable in the detection and typing of BPVs from bovine tumor samples than PCR-sequencing.

  13. Allele specific expression in worker reproduction genes in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Amarasinghe, Harindra E; Toghill, Bradley J; Nathanael, Despina; Mallon, Eamonn B

    2015-01-01

    Methylation has previously been associated with allele specific expression in ants. Recently, we found methylation is important in worker reproduction in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. Here we searched for allele specific expression in twelve genes associated with worker reproduction in bees. We found allele specific expression in Ecdysone 20 monooxygenase and IMP-L2-like. Although we were unable to confirm a genetic or epigenetic cause for this allele specific expression, the expression patterns of the two genes match those predicted for imprinted genes.

  14. A Trio of Human Molecular Genetics PCR Assays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, Jeffrey L.; Waldo, Jennifer T.; Dinsmore, Jannett

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates three different analytical forms of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that allow students to genotype themselves at four different loci. Here, we present protocols to allow students to a) genotype a non-coding polymorphic Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) locus on human chromosome 5 using conventional…

  15. Comparison of PCR and Plaque Assay for Detection and Enumeration of Coliphage in Polluted Marine Waters

    PubMed Central

    Rose, J. B.; Zhou, X.; Griffin, D. W.; Paul, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    A total of 68 marine samples from various sites impacted by sewage and storm waters were analyzed by both the plaque assay and a reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR technique for F(sup+)-specific coliphage. The coliphage levels detected by the plaque assay averaged 1.90 x 10(sup4) PFU/100.0 ml. Using a most probable number (MPN) PCR approach, the levels averaged 2.40 x 10(sup6) MPN-PCR units/100.0 ml. Two samples were positive by RT-PCR but negative by plaque assay, and 12 samples were positive by plaque assay but negative by RT-PCR (levels lower than 11.00 PFU/100.0 ml). The host system used for the plaque assay may detect somatic coliphage in addition to the F(sup+)-specific coliphage. When it is used as an indicator of pollution, contamination may be missed with more restrictive systems. The difference in results may be due to the sensitivity, specificity, or inhibition of RT-PCR in marine samples. This study provides information on quantifying PCR results by an MPN method and insights into interpretation of PCR data for detection of viruses in marine environments. PMID:16535737

  16. Performance of MycAssay Aspergillus DNA real-time PCR assay compared with the galactomannan detection assay for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis from serum samples.

    PubMed

    Danylo, Alexis; Courtemanche, Chantal; Pelletier, René; Boudreault, Alexandre A

    2014-08-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a major problem in the immunocompromised population, and its diagnosis is difficult due to the low sensitivity of available tests. Detection of Aspergillus nucleic acid by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in serum samples is a promising diagnostic tool; however, use of multiple "in-house" methods precludes standardization. The first commercial PCR assay, MycAssay Aspergillus (Myconostica, Ltd), became available recently, and its performance in the diagnosis of IA was evaluated and compared with the galactomannan (GM) assay. Serum samples obtained from patients with hematological cancer were tested retrospectively with MycAssay Aspergillus PCR. Per-episode and per-test analyses were undertaken with 146 sera from 35 hematological patients. Sixteen patients had proven or probable IA and 19 had possible or no IA. In per-episode analysis, MycAssay Aspergillus had a sensitivity of 43.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 19.8%-70.1%) and a specificity of 63.2% (95% CI, 38.4%-83.7%) for IA diagnosis. In per-test analyses, MycAssay Aspergillus had a lower specificity than the GM assay (83.3% vs. 93.1%, P = 0.04). The addition of PCR to routine clinical practice would have permitted the diagnosis of one additional probable IA in our cohort. Use of PCR instead of GM assay would have delayed the diagnosis in two cases. Aspergillus DNA detection by PCR with serum specimens using MycAssay showed a lower specificity than the GM assay and was associated with a low sensitivity for IA diagnosis. More studies are needed to determine the exact role of MycAssay in IA diagnosis in patients with hematological malignancy.

  17. A quantitative TaqMan PCR assay for the detection of Ureaplasma diversum.

    PubMed

    Marques, Lucas M; Amorim, Aline T; Martins, Hellen Braga; Rezende, Izadora Souza; Barbosa, Maysa Santos; Lobão, Tassia Neves; Campos, Guilherme B; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2013-12-27

    Ureaplasma diversum in veterinary studies is an undesirable microbe, which may cause infection in bulls and may result in seminal vesiculitis, balanopostitis, and alterations in spermatozoids, whereas in cows, it may cause placentitis, fetal alveolitis, abortion, and birth of weak calves. U. diversum is released through organic secretions, especially semen, preputial and vaginal mucus, conjunctival secretion, and milk. The aim of the present study was to develop a TaqMan probe, highly sensitive and specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection and quantification of U. diversum from genital swabs of bovines. Primers and probes specific to U. diversum 16S rRNA gene were designed. The specificity, detection limit, intra- and inter-assay variability of qPCR to detect this ureaplasma was compared with the results of the conventional PCR assay (cPCR). Swabs of vaginal mucus from 169 cows were tested. The qPCR assay detected as few as 10 copies of U. diversum and was 100-fold more sensitive than the cPCR. No cross-reactivity with other Mollicutes or eubacteria was observed. U. diversum was detected in 79 swabs (46.42%) by qPCR, while using cPCR it was detected in 42 (25%) samples. The difference in cPCR and qPCR ureaplasma detection between healthy and sick animals was not statistically significant. But the U. diversum load in samples from animals with genital disorders was higher than in healthy animals. The qPCR assay developed herein is highly sensitive and specific for the detection and quantification of U. diversum in vaginal bovine samples.

  18. Development of real-time PCR assay for differential detection of Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella parapertussis.

    PubMed

    Tizolova, Anette; Brun, Delphine; Guiso, Nicole; Guillot, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    Bordetella parapertussis is a causative agent of whooping cough in humans, and B. bronchiseptica is causing wide variety of respiratory infections in mammals, including humans. Specific diagnostic tests are not currently available. Our first objective was to develop a real-time PCR test for the specific detection of B. bronchiseptica based on the previously described end-point PCR, targeting an intergenomic sequence of the fla gene locus, but it has not been reached. However, there is cross-reactivity between B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica. Therefore, the targeted region of several clinical isolates of both species was sequenced, and alignment of the sequences allowed the development of a 2-step real-time PCR assay. The first PCR assay detected the DNA of all clinical isolates of both B. bronchiseptica and B. parapertussis tested. The second PCR assay detected only the DNA of B. parapertussis clinical isolates, thereby allowing discrimination between B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica.

  19. Evaluation of Two PCR-Based Swine-Specific Fecal Source Tracking Assays (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR-based methods have been proposed to identify swine fecal pollution in environmental waters. However, the specificity and distribution of these targets have not been adequately assessed. Consequently, the utility of these assays in identifying swine fecal contamination...

  20. Performance Assessment of Human and Cattle Associated Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation overview is (1) Single laboratory performance assessment of human- and cattle associated PCR assays and (2) A Field Study: Evaluation of two human fecal waste management practices in Ohio watershed.

  1. Direct Detection of Erythromycin-Resistant Bordetella pertussis in Clinical Specimens by PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zengguo; Han, Ruijun; Liu, Ying; Du, Quanli; Liu, Jifeng; Ma, Chaofeng; Li, Hengxin; He, Qiushui; Yan, Yongping

    2015-11-01

    Resistance of Bordetella pertussis to erythromycin has been increasingly reported. We developed an allele-specific PCR method for rapid detection of erythromycin-resistant B. pertussis directly from nasopharyngeal (NP) swab samples submitted for diagnostic PCR. Based on the proven association of erythromycin resistance with the A2047G mutation in the 23S rRNA of B. pertussis, four primers, two of which were designed to be specific for either the wild-type or the mutant allele, were used in two different versions of the allele-specific PCR assay. The methods were verified with results obtained by PCR-based sequencing of 16 recent B. pertussis isolates and 100 NP swab samples submitted for diagnostic PCR. The detection limits of the two PCR assays ranged from 10 to 100 fg per reaction for both erythromycin-susceptible and -resistant B. pertussis. Two amplified fragments of each PCR, of 286 and 112 bp, respectively, were obtained from a mutant allele of the isolates and/or NP swab samples containing B. pertussis DNAs. For the wild-type allele, only a 286-bp fragment was visible when the allele-specific PCR assay 1 was performed. No amplification was found when a number of non-Bordetella bacterial pathogens and NP swab samples that did not contain the DNAs of B. pertussis were examined. This assay can serve as an alternative for PCR-based sequencing, especially for local laboratories in resource-poor countries.

  2. Direct Detection of Erythromycin-Resistant Bordetella pertussis in Clinical Specimens by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zengguo; Han, Ruijun; Liu, Ying; Du, Quanli; Liu, Jifeng; Ma, Chaofeng; Li, Hengxin

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of Bordetella pertussis to erythromycin has been increasingly reported. We developed an allele-specific PCR method for rapid detection of erythromycin-resistant B. pertussis directly from nasopharyngeal (NP) swab samples submitted for diagnostic PCR. Based on the proven association of erythromycin resistance with the A2047G mutation in the 23S rRNA of B. pertussis, four primers, two of which were designed to be specific for either the wild-type or the mutant allele, were used in two different versions of the allele-specific PCR assay. The methods were verified with results obtained by PCR-based sequencing of 16 recent B. pertussis isolates and 100 NP swab samples submitted for diagnostic PCR. The detection limits of the two PCR assays ranged from 10 to 100 fg per reaction for both erythromycin-susceptible and -resistant B. pertussis. Two amplified fragments of each PCR, of 286 and 112 bp, respectively, were obtained from a mutant allele of the isolates and/or NP swab samples containing B. pertussis DNAs. For the wild-type allele, only a 286-bp fragment was visible when the allele-specific PCR assay 1 was performed. No amplification was found when a number of non-Bordetella bacterial pathogens and NP swab samples that did not contain the DNAs of B. pertussis were examined. This assay can serve as an alternative for PCR-based sequencing, especially for local laboratories in resource-poor countries. PMID:26224847

  3. A One-Step, Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Rhinovirus

    PubMed Central

    Do, Duc H.; Laus, Stella; Leber, Amy; Marcon, Mario J.; Jordan, Jeanne A.; Martin, Judith M.; Wadowsky, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    One-step, real-time PCR assays for rhinovirus have been developed for a limited number of PCR amplification platforms and chemistries, and some exhibit cross-reactivity with genetically similar enteroviruses. We developed a one-step, real-time PCR assay for rhinovirus by using a sequence detection system (Applied Biosystems; Foster City, CA). The primers were designed to amplify a 120-base target in the noncoding region of picornavirus RNA, and a TaqMan (Applied Biosystems) degenerate probe was designed for the specific detection of rhinovirus amplicons. The PCR assay had no cross-reactivity with a panel of 76 nontarget nucleic acids, which included RNAs from 43 enterovirus strains. Excellent lower limits of detection relative to viral culture were observed for the PCR assay by using 38 of 40 rhinovirus reference strains representing different serotypes, which could reproducibly detect rhinovirus serotype 2 in viral transport medium containing 10 to 10,000 TCID50 (50% tissue culture infectious dose endpoint) units/ml of the virus. However, for rhinovirus serotypes 59 and 69, the PCR assay was less sensitive than culture. Testing of 48 clinical specimens from children with cold-like illnesses for rhinovirus by the PCR and culture assays yielded detection rates of 16.7% and 6.3%, respectively. For a batch of 10 specimens, the entire assay was completed in 4.5 hours. This real-time PCR assay enables detection of many rhinovirus serotypes with the Applied Biosystems reagent-instrument platform. PMID:19948820

  4. Development of a real-time PCR assay for quantification of Citrobacter rodentium.

    PubMed

    Sagaidak, Sofia; Taibi, Amel; Wen, Bijun; Comelli, Elena M

    2016-07-01

    Molecular tools to quantify Citrobacter rodentium are not available. We developed a quantitative PCR assay targeting the espB gene. This assay is specific, has a linearity range of about 6.7×10(1) to 6.7×10(6)cells/PCR reaction (92% efficiency) and a detection limit of about 10(4)cells/g wet feces.

  5. Development and Application of a Universal Hemoplasma Screening Assay Based on the SYBR Green PCR Principle▿

    PubMed Central

    Willi, Barbara; Meli, Marina L.; Lüthy, Ruedi; Honegger, Hanspeter; Wengi, Nicole; Hoelzle, Ludwig E.; Reusch, Claudia E.; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2009-01-01

    Hemotropic mycoplasmas (hemoplasmas) are the causative agents of infectious anemia in several mammalian species. Their zoonotic potential has recently been substantiated by the identification of a feline hemoplasma isolate in an immunocompromised human patient. Although species-specific diagnostic molecular methods have been developed, their application as screening tools is limited due to the species diversity of hemoplasmas. The goals of this study were to develop a universal hemoplasma screening assay with broad specificity based on the SYBR green PCR principle, to compare the assay with hemoplasma-specific TaqMan PCR, and to analyze potential tick vectors and human blood samples to address the zoonotic potential. The newly developed PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene amplified feline, canine, bovine, porcine, camelid, and murine hemoplasmas, as well as Mycoplasma penetrans and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The lower detection limit for feline and canine hemoplasmas was 1 to 10 copies/PCR. The assay exhibited 98.2% diagnostic sensitivity and 92.1% diagnostic specificity for feline hemoplasmas. All 1,950 Ixodes ticks were PCR negative, suggesting that Ixodes ticks are not relevant vectors for the above-mentioned hemoplasma species in Switzerland. None of the 414 blood samples derived from anemic or immunocompromised human patients revealed a clear positive result. The SYBR green PCR assay described here is a suitable tool to screen for known and so-far-undiscovered hemoplasma species. Positive results should be confirmed by specific TaqMan PCR or sequencing. PMID:19828748

  6. A quadruplex PCR (qxPCR) assay for adulteration in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Agrimonti, Caterina; Pirondini, Andrea; Marmiroli, Marta; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2015-11-15

    This study describes the development of a quadruplex quantitative Real Time PCR (qxPCR) based on SYBR®GreenER chemistry, for rapid identification of DNA of cow, goat, sheep and buffalo in dairy products, and for quantification of cow DNA in these products. The platform was applied to: (i) mixes of milks at fixed percentages; (ii) cheeses prepared with the same mixes; (iii) commercial dairy products. The methodology enabled the detection of DNA from cow in mixes of milk and cheeses with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1%. When applied to commercial dairy products the qxPCR gave results comparable with each single-plex Real Time PCR. A good correlation (R(2)>0.9) between peaks' area of derivative of melting curves of amplicons and percentages of cow milk in milk mixes and cheeses, allows for an estimation of cow DNA in a dynamic range varying from 0.1-5% to 1-25%.

  7. Assessing the Validity of Diagnostic Quantitative PCR Assays for Phakopsora pachyrhizi and P. meibomiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are 123 confirmed species in the genus Phakopsora worldwide, with 19 species reported in the continental United States. In 2002, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) diagnostic assay was developed by Frederick et al. that has been used for detecting Phakopsora pachyrhizi in spore trapping studies. Based ...

  8. Efficient CRISPR-rAAV engineering of endogenous genes to study protein function by allele-specific RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Kaulich, Manuel; Lee, Yeon J.; Lönn, Peter; Springer, Aaron D.; Meade, Bryan R.; Dowdy, Steven F.

    2015-01-01

    Gene knockout strategies, RNAi and rescue experiments are all employed to study mammalian gene function. However, the disadvantages of these approaches include: loss of function adaptation, reduced viability and gene overexpression that rarely matches endogenous levels. Here, we developed an endogenous gene knockdown/rescue strategy that combines RNAi selectivity with a highly efficient CRISPR directed recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) mediated gene targeting approach to introduce allele-specific mutations plus an allele-selective siRNA Sensitive (siSN) site that allows for studying gene mutations while maintaining endogenous expression and regulation of the gene of interest. CRISPR/Cas9 plus rAAV targeted gene-replacement and introduction of allele-specific RNAi sensitivity mutations in the CDK2 and CDK1 genes resulted in a >85% site-specific recombination of Neo-resistant clones versus ∼8% for rAAV alone. RNAi knockdown of wild type (WT) Cdk2 with siWT in heterozygotic knockin cells resulted in the mutant Cdk2 phenotype cell cycle arrest, whereas allele specific knockdown of mutant CDK2 with siSN resulted in a wild type phenotype. Together, these observations demonstrate the ability of CRISPR plus rAAV to efficiently recombine a genomic locus and tag it with a selective siRNA sequence that allows for allele-selective phenotypic assays of the gene of interest while it remains expressed and regulated under endogenous control mechanisms. PMID:25586224

  9. Final Report Nucleic Acid System - Hybrid PCR and Multiplex Assay Project Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, R P; Langlois, R G; Nasarabadi, S; Benett, W J; Colston, B W; Johnson, D C; Brown, S B; Stratton, P L; Milanovich, F P

    2002-04-17

    This report covers phase 2 (year 2) of the Nucleic Acid System--Hybrid PCR and Multiplex Assay project. The objective of the project is to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) in a multiplex mode using flow cytometry. The Hybrid instrument consists of a flow-through PCR module capable of handling a multiplexed PCR assay, a hybridizing module capable of hybridizing multiplexed PCR amplicons and beads, and a flow cytometer module for bead-based identification, all controlled by a single computer. Multiplex immunoassay using bead-based Luminex flow cytometry is available, allowing rapid screening for many agents. PCR is highly specific and complements and verifies immunoassay. It can also be multiplexed and detection provided using the bead-based Luminex flow cytometer. This approach allows full access to the speed and 100-fold multiplex capability of flow cytometry for rapid screening as well as the accuracy and specificity of PCR. This project has two principal activities: (1) Design, build and test a prototype hybrid PCR/flow cytometer with the basic capabilities for rapid, broad spectrum detection and identification, and (2) Develop and evaluate multiplex flow analysis assay protocols and reagents for the simultaneous detection of PCR products. This project requires not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This involves development and evaluation of multiplex flow analysis assay protocols and reagents for the simultaneous detection of PCR products.

  10. Detection of Thielaviopsis basicola in soil with real-time quantitative PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junli; Kang, Zhenhui

    2010-07-20

    Thielaviopsis basicola is a soil-borne fungus with a wide host range and a cosmopolitan distribution. It causes disease on many agricultural crops and in China it is the causal agent of black root rot on tobacco plant. Early diagnosis and detection of the pathogen in soil are critical to control this disease in field. The objective of this study was to develop sensitive and effective methods suitable for large-scale detection and quantification of T. basicola. Based on the nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of Thielaviopsis spp, primers and TaqMan probe were designed specifically to amplify DNA from T. basicola and real-time, quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed for rapid, specific and sensitive detection and quantification of T. basicola. It was sensitive with the detection limit of 100 fg microl(-1) genomic DNA of T. basicola in qPCR assays. By combining the qPCR assays with the efficient protocol to extract DNA from soil, it was possible to achieve real-time detection of T. basicola in soil in 4-5 h and the detection limit of 3 conidia per reaction in qPCR was recorded. The assays were applied to survey soils from tobacco fields in China for the presence of T. basicola and the analyses of naturally infested soil showed the reliability of the qPCR assays.

  11. Dried blood spots PCR assays to screen congenital cytomegalovirus infection: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xu, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Huiping; Qian, Jihong; Zhu, Jianxing

    2015-04-14

    The performance of dried blood spots (DBS) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays in screening for congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection varies between different studies. To determine whether the DBS PCR assay has sufficient accuracy to be used as a screening test for cCMV infection, we performed a meta-analysis of 15 studies (n = 26007 neonates) that evaluated the performance of DBS PCR tests in screening for cCMV infection and that met our inclusion criteria. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.844 (95% CI = 0.812-0.872) and 0.999 (95% CI = 0.998-0.999), respectively, and the diagnostic odds ratio was 1362.10 (95%CI = 566.91-3272.60). As sensitivity analysis showed that the results were robust. In conclusion, the performance of DBS PCR assays for testing cCMV was more suitable for retrospective diagnosis than screening.

  12. Development and evaluation of a new PCR assay for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa D genotype.

    PubMed

    Lødeng, A G G; Ahlén, C; Lysvand, H; Mandal, L H; Iversen, O J

    2006-08-01

    This report describes a new PCR-based assay for the detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa genotype D in occupational saturation diving systems in the North Sea. This genotype has persisted in these systems for 11 years (1993-2003) and represents 18% of isolates from infections analysed during this period. The new PCR assay was based on sequences obtained after randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis of a group of isolates related to diving that had been identified previously by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The primer set for the D genotype targets a gene that codes for a hypothetical class 4 protein in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome. A primer set able to detect P. aeruginosa at the species level was also designed, based on the 23S-5S rDNA spacer region. The two assays produced 382-bp and 192-bp amplicons, respectively. The PCR assay was evaluated by analysing 100 P. aeruginosa isolates related to diving, representing 28 PFGE genotypes, and 38 clinical and community P. aeruginosa isolates and strains from other species. The assay identified all of the genotype D isolates tested. Two additional diving-relevant genotypes (TP2 and TP27) were also identified, as well as three isolates of non-diving origin. It was concluded that the new PCR assay is a useful tool for early detection and prevention of infections with the D genotype. PMID:16842571

  13. Quantitative assay of photoinduced DNA strand breaks by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Wiczk, Justyna; Westphal, Kinga; Rak, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    Real-time PCR (qPCR) - a modern methodology primarily used for studying gene expression has been employed for the quantitative assay of an important class of DNA damage - single strand breaks. These DNA lesions which may lead to highly cytotoxic double strand breaks were quantified in a model system where double stranded DNA was sensitized to UV photons by labeling with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. The amount of breaks formed due to irradiation with several doses of 320nm photons was assayed by two independent methods: LC-MS and qPCR. A very good agreement between the relative damage measured by the two completely different analytical tools proves the applicability of qPCR for the quantitative analysis of SSBs. Our results suggest that the popularity of the hitherto underestimated though accurate and site-specific technique of real-time PCR may increase in future DNA damage studies.

  14. Detection of Streptococcus equi subspecies equi using a triplex qPCR assay

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Katy; Barker, Colin; Harrison, Tihana; Heather, Zoe; Steward, Karen F.; Robinson, Carl; Newton, J. Richard; Waller, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing data for Streptococcus equi subspecies equi and zooepidemicus were used to develop a novel diagnostic triplex quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting two genes specific to S. equi (eqbE and SEQ2190) and a unique 100 base pair control DNA sequence (SZIC) inserted into the SZO07770 pseudogene of S. zooepidemicus strain H70. This triplex strangles qPCR assay can provide results within 2 h of sample receipt, has an overall sensitivity of 93.9% and specificity of 96.6% relative to the eqbE singlex assay and detects S. equi at levels below the threshold of the culture assay, even in the presence of contaminating bacteria. PMID:22884566

  15. Viability-qPCR for detecting Legionella: Comparison of two assays based on different amplicon lengths.

    PubMed

    Ditommaso, Savina; Giacomuzzi, Monica; Ricciardi, Elisa; Zotti, Carla M

    2015-08-01

    Two different real-time quantitative PCR (PMA-qPCR) assays were applied for quantification of Legionella spp. by targeting a long amplicon (approx 400 bp) of 16S rRNA gene and a short amplicon (approx. 100 bp) of 5S rRNA gene. Purified DNA extracts from pure cultures of Legionella spp. and from environmental water samples were quantified. Application of the two assays to quantify Legionella in artificially contaminated water achieved that both assays were able to detect Legionella over a linear range of 10 to 10(5) cells ml(-1). A statistical analysis of the standard curves showed that both assays were linear with a good correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.99) between the Ct and the copy number. Amplification with the reference assay was the most effective for detecting low copy numbers (1 bacterium per PCR mixture). Using selective quantification of viable Legionella by the PMA-qPCR method we obtained a greater inhibition of the amplification of the 400-bp 16S gene fragment (Δlog(10) = 3.74 ± 0.39 log(10) GU ml(-1)). A complete inhibition of the PCR signal was obtained when heat-killed cells in a concentration below 1 × 10(5) cells ml(-1) were pretreated with PMA. Analysing short amplicon sizes led to only 2.08 log reductions in the Legionella dead-cell signal. When we tested environmental water samples, the two qPCR assays were in good agreement according to the kappa index (0.741). Applying qPCR combined with PMA treatment, we also obtained a good agreement (kappa index 0.615). The comparison of quantitative results shows that both assays yielded the same quantification sensitivity (mean log = 4.59 vs mean log = 4.31).

  16. Development and Evaluation of an Enterovirus D68 Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Todd N.; Wylie, Kristine M.; Buller, Richard S.; Cannella, Maria

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and evaluated a real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay for the detection of human enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) in clinical specimens. This assay was developed in response to the unprecedented 2014 nationwide EV-D68 outbreak in the United States associated with severe respiratory illness. As part of our evaluation of the outbreak, we sequenced and published the genome sequence of the EV-D68 virus circulating in St. Louis, MO. This sequence, along with other GenBank sequences from past EV-D68 occurrences, was used to computationally select a region of EV-D68 appropriate for targeting in a strain-specific RT-PCR assay. The RT-PCR assay amplifies a segment of the VP1 gene, with an analytic limit of detection of 4 copies per reaction, and it was more sensitive than commercially available assays that detect enteroviruses and rhinoviruses without distinguishing between the two, including three multiplex respiratory panels approved for clinical use by the FDA. The assay did not detect any other enteroviruses or rhinoviruses tested and did detect divergent strains of EV-D68, including the first EV-D68 strain (Fermon) identified in California in 1962. This assay should be useful for identifying and studying current and future outbreaks of EV-D68 viruses. PMID:26063859

  17. Development of real-time PCR assays for detection of megalocytiviruses in imported ornamental fish.

    PubMed

    Gias, E; Johnston, C; Keeling, S; Spence, R P; McDonald, W L

    2011-08-01

    Megalocytiviruses have been associated globally with severe systemic disease and economic loss in farmed food fish and ornamental fish. The viruses have been spread internationally by translocation of live fish. In New Zealand, megalocytiviruses are regarded as exotic. A potential pathway for introduction has been identified, namely imported ornamental fish. In the present study, real-time PCR assays were developed for detection of megalocytiviruses using a conserved major capsid protein gene. A SYBR green assay was developed to target all known megalocytiviruses. A second real-time PCR assay using a molecular beacon was developed to specifically target gourami, Trichogaster trichopterus, iridovirus, a species of iridovirus previously linked to ornamental fish imports in Australia. The analytical sensitivity for the SYBR green and molecular beacon assays were 10 and 100 fg, respectively. The analytical specificity of the real-time PCR assays determined using genomic DNA templates from three target viruses, 12 non-target viruses and 25 aquatic bacterial species were 100%. The intra-run and inter-run coefficients of variation of both assays were <5%. The real-time PCR assays developed in this study provide rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of megalocytiviruses and gourami iridovirus.

  18. A highly sensitive telomerase activity assay that eliminates false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    An assay for telomerase activity based on asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR) on magnetic beads (MBs) and subsequent application of cycling probe technology (CPT) is described. In this assay, the telomerase reaction products are immobilized on MBs, which are then washed to remove PCR inhibitors that are commonly found in clinical samples. The guanine-rich sequences (5'-(TTAGGG)n-3') of the telomerase reaction products are then preferentially amplified by A-PCR, and the amplified products are subsequently detected via CPT, where a probe RNA with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3' end is hydrolyzed by RNase H in the presence of the target DNA. The catalyst-mediated cleavage of the probe RNA enhances fluorescence from the 5' end of the probe. The assay allowed us to successfully detect HeLa cells selectively over normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) cells. Importantly, this selectivity produced identical results with regard to detection of HeLa cells in the absence and presence of excess NHDF cells; therefore, this assay can be used for practical clinical applications. The lower limit of detection for HeLa cells was 50 cells, which is lower than that achieved with a conventional telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. Our assay also eliminated false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that this assay is appropriate for screening among G-quadruplex ligands to find those that inhibit telomerase activity.

  19. A highly sensitive telomerase activity assay that eliminates false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    An assay for telomerase activity based on asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR) on magnetic beads (MBs) and subsequent application of cycling probe technology (CPT) is described. In this assay, the telomerase reaction products are immobilized on MBs, which are then washed to remove PCR inhibitors that are commonly found in clinical samples. The guanine-rich sequences (5'-(TTAGGG)n-3') of the telomerase reaction products are then preferentially amplified by A-PCR, and the amplified products are subsequently detected via CPT, where a probe RNA with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3' end is hydrolyzed by RNase H in the presence of the target DNA. The catalyst-mediated cleavage of the probe RNA enhances fluorescence from the 5' end of the probe. The assay allowed us to successfully detect HeLa cells selectively over normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) cells. Importantly, this selectivity produced identical results with regard to detection of HeLa cells in the absence and presence of excess NHDF cells; therefore, this assay can be used for practical clinical applications. The lower limit of detection for HeLa cells was 50 cells, which is lower than that achieved with a conventional telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. Our assay also eliminated false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that this assay is appropriate for screening among G-quadruplex ligands to find those that inhibit telomerase activity. PMID:24071983

  20. Comparison of six real-time PCR assays for qualitative detection of cytomegalovirus in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Binnicker, M J; Espy, M E

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we compared the performance of six real-time PCR assays for the qualitative detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in clinical samples other than plasma. Two hundred specimens (respiratory [n = 72], urine [n = 67], cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] [n = 25], tissue [n = 18], amniotic fluid [n = 10], and bone marrow [n = 8]) submitted for routine testing by CMV real-time PCR analyte-specific reagents (ASR) (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN) were also tested by a laboratory-developed test (LDT) and 4 commercially available PCR assays: EraGen Multicode (Luminex, Austin, TX), Focus Simplexa (Focus Diagnostics, Cypress, CA), Elitech MGB Alert CMV (Fisher Scientific, Hanover Park, IL), and Abbott CMV (Abbott Park, IL). Nucleic acid was extracted using the MagNA Pure system (Roche Diagnostics) and subsequently tested by each PCR method. Results were analyzed by comparing each assay to a "consensus result," which was defined as the result obtained from at least 4 of the 6 assays. In addition to the prospective samples, 13 lower respiratory samples with known positive results by CMV shell vial were tested by each PCR method. Following testing of the 200 prospective specimens, the Abbott, Elitech, EraGen, and Focus PCR assays demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% (46/46), while the Roche analyte-specific reagents (ASR) and LDT showed sensitivities of 89% (41/46) and 98% (45/46), respectively. Percent specificities ranged from 97% (149/154) by Elitech to 100% (154/154) by the LDT. Among the 13 shell vial-positive lower respiratory samples, the percent sensitivities ranged from 69% (9/13) by Elitech to 92% (12/13) by the LDT. The Abbott, EraGen, Elitech, Focus, and LDT PCR assays performed similarly (κ ≥ 0.89) for the detection of CMV in clinical specimens and demonstrated increased sensitivity compared to the Roche ASR.

  1. Analysis of common mitochondrial DNA mutations by allele-specific oligonucleotide and Southern blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sha; Halberg, Michelle C; Floyd, Kristen C; Wang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. There are a set of recurrent point mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that are responsible for common mitochondrial diseases, including MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes), MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibers), LHON (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy), NARP (neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa), and Leigh syndrome. Most of the pathogenic mtDNA point mutations are present in the heteroplasmic state, meaning that the wild-type and mutant-containing mtDNA molecules are coexisting. Clinical heterogeneity may be due to the degree of mutant load (heteroplasmy) and distribution of heteroplasmic mutations in affected tissues. Additionally, Kearns-Sayre syndrome and Pearson syndrome are caused by large mtDNA deletions. In this chapter, we describe a multiplex PCR/allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization method for the screening of 13 common point mutations. This method allows the detection of low percentage of mutant heteroplasmy. In addition, a nonradioactive Southern blot hybridization protocol for the analysis of mtDNA large deletions is also described. PMID:22215554

  2. Rapid deoxyribonucleic acid analysis by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for detection of mutations in the steroid 21-hydroxylase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.C.; Wei, J.Q.; Cheng, K.C.

    1995-05-01

    Rapid DNA analysis based on allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mutation site-specific primers was developed to detect mutations in the CYP21 gene known to cause steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency. In contrast to the previous method, in which PCR of genomic DNA was followed by dot blot analysis with radio active probes and multiple rounds of stripping and reprobing for each of the 8 most common mutation sites, the results using this new method were immediately visualized after the PCR run by ethidium bromide-stained agarose gel electrophoresis. Using allele-specific PCR, mutation(s) were identified on 148 affected chromosomes out of 160 tested. Although mutation(s) were identified on only one chromosome of 11 of these patients, their parents showed a consistent pattern on DNA analysis. The only exception was that in one family, in which the parents each had a detectable mutation, a mutation was detected on only one allele of the patient. Most likely there is a mutation in the patient`s other allele that could have arisen de novo or was inherited from the parent and was not evident in the transmitting parent`s phenotype. When compared with the dot blot procedure, allele-specific PCR is more rapid, less labor-intensive, and avoids the use of radioactivity. 26 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Polymorphism analysis of Chinese Theileria sergenti using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction of the major piroplasm surface protein gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ai Hong; Guan, Gui Quan; Liu, Jun Long; Liu, Zhi Jie; Leblanc, Neil; Li, You Quan; Gao, Jin Liang; Ma, Mi Ling; Niu, Qing Li; Ren, Qiao Yun; Bai, Qi; Yin, Hong; Luo, Jian Xun

    2011-02-01

    Theileria sergenti is a tick-borne parasite found in many parts of the world. The major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP), a conserved protein in all Theileria species, has been used as a marker for epidemiological and phylogenetic studies of benign Theileria species. In this study, Chinese species of T. sergenti were characterized by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequence analysis of the MPSP gene. Using universal or allele-specific primer sets for PCR amplification of the MPSP gene, 98 of 288 cattle blood samples, collected from 6 provinces in China, were found to be positive. Among the positive samples, only 3 allelic MPSP gene types (Chitose [C]-, Ikeda [I]-, and buffeli [B]-type) were successfully amplified. Moreover, the results revealed that the majority of the parasites sampled in this study were C- and I-type (prevalence of 84 and 69%, respectively), whereas the B-type was less common (prevalence of 36%). Co-infections with C-, I-, and B-type T. sergenti also were found. An additional known allele, Thai-type, was not detected. Phylogenetic analysis based on the MPSP gene sequences, including 3 standard stocks generated in the laboratory ( T. sergenti Wenchuan, T. sergenti Ningxian, and T. sergenti Liaoyang), revealed that the isolates of Chinese sergenti were comprised of at least 4 allelic MPSP gene types, i.e., C-, I-, B1-, and B2-type, and these parasites with 6 MPSP types 1-5 and 7 were present in China.

  4. Performance of PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays for mycoplasma detection.

    PubMed

    Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Lopes, Talíria Silva; Ferreira, Nívea; Balthazar, Nathália; Monteiro, Antônio M; Borojevic, Radovan; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2015-11-01

    Contaminated eukaryotic cell cultures are frequently responsible for unreliable results. Regulatory entities request that cell cultures must be mycoplasma-free. Mycoplasma contamination remains a significant problem for cell cultures and may have an impact on biological analysis since they affect many cell parameters. The gold standard microbiological assay for mycoplasma detection involves laborious and time-consuming protocols. PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays have been considered for routine cell culture screening in research laboratories since they are fast, easy and sensitive. Thus, the aim of this work is to compare the performance of two popular commercial assays, PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays, by assessing the level of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures from Rio de Janeiro Cell Bank (RJCB) and also from customers' laboratories. The results obtained by both performed assays were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, we evaluated the limit of detection of the PCR kit under our laboratory conditions and the storage effects on mycoplasma detection in frozen cell culture supernatants. The performance of both assays for mycoplasma detection was not significantly different and they showed very good agreement. The Bioluminescent assay for mycoplasma detection was slightly more dependable than PCR-based due to the lack of inconclusive results produced by the first technique, especially considering the ability to detect mycoplasma contamination in frozen cell culture supernatants. However, cell lines should be precultured for four days or more without antibiotics to obtain safe results. On the other hand, a false negative result was obtained by using this biochemical approach. The implementation of fast and reliable mycoplasma testing methods is an important technical and regulatory issue and PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays may be good candidates. However, validation studies are needed. PMID:26296900

  5. Gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Su-Hua; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Hong; Tsai, I.-Shou; Lu, Huang-Chih; Chuang, Pei-Hsin; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2008-10-01

    Virus isolation and antibody detection are routinely used for diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection, but the low level of transient viremia in some JE patients makes JEV isolation from clinical and surveillance samples very difficult. We describe the use of gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of JEV from its RNA genome. We tested the effect of gold nanoparticles on four different PCR systems, including conventional PCR, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and SYBR green real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays for diagnosis in the acute phase of JEV infection. Gold nanoparticles increased the amplification yield of the PCR product and shortened the PCR time compared to the conventional reaction. In addition, nanogold-based real-time RT-PCR showed a linear relationship between Ct and template amount using ten-fold dilutions of JEV. The nanogold-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays were able to detect low levels (1-10 000 copies) of the JEV RNA genomes extracted from culture medium or whole blood, providing early diagnostic tools for the detection of low-level viremia in the acute-phase infection. The assays described here were simple, sensitive, and rapid approaches for detection and quantitation of JEV in tissue cultured samples as well as clinical samples.

  6. Development of a real-time SYBR Green PCR assay for the rapid detection of Dermatophilus congolensis.

    PubMed

    García, Alfredo; Martínez, Remigio; Benitez-Medina, José Manuel; Risco, David; Garcia, Waldo Luis; Rey, Joaquín; Alonso, Juan Manuel; Hermoso de Mendoza, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Methods such as real time (RT)-PCR have not been developed for the rapid detection and diagnosis of Dermatophilus (D.) congolensis infection. In the present study, a D. congolensis-specific SYBR Green RT-PCR assay was evaluated. The detection limit of the RT-PCR assay was 1 pg of DNA per PCR reaction. No cross-reaction with nucleic acids extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Staphylococcus aureus, or Austwickia chelonae was observed. Finally, the RT-PCR assay was used to evaluate clinical samples collected from naturally infected animals with D. congolensis. The results showed that this assay is a fast and reliable method for diagnosing dermatophilosis.

  7. DNA Sequence Signatures for Rapid Detection of Six Target Bacterial Pathogens Using PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Kenjiro; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Li, Bingjie; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Using Streptococcus pyogenes as a model, we previously established a stepwise computational workflow to effectively identify species-specific DNA signatures that could be used as PCR primer sets to detect target bacteria with high specificity and sensitivity. In this study, we extended the workflow for the rapid development of PCR assays targeting Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium tetani, and Staphylococcus aureus, which are of safety concern for human tissue intended for transplantation. Twenty-one primer sets that had sensitivity of detecting 5–50 fg DNA from target bacteria with high specificity were selected. These selected primer sets can be used in a PCR array for detecting target bacteria with high sensitivity and specificity. The workflow could be widely applicable for the rapid development of PCR-based assays for a wide range of target bacteria, including those of biothreat agents. PMID:26279626

  8. Enhanced specificity of TPMT*2 genotyping using unidirectional wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single tube.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Yang, Zhao; Xia, Han; Huang, Jun-Fu; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Tian-Nun; Wang, Gui-Yu; Chuai, Zheng-Ran; Fu, Wei-Ling; Huang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping of thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is recommended for predicting the adverse drug response of thiopurines. In the current study, a novel version of allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), termed competitive real-time fluorescent AS-PCR (CRAS-PCR) was developed to analyze the TPMT*2 genotype in ethnic Chinese. This technique simultaneously uses wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single reaction. To determine the optimal conditions for both traditional AS-PCR and CRAS-PCR, we used the Taguchi method, an engineering optimization process that balances the concentrations of all components using an orthogonal array rather than a factorial array. Instead of running up to 264 experiments with the conventional factorial method, the Taguchi method achieved the same optimization using only 16 experiments. The optimized CRAS-PCR system completely avoided non-specific amplification occurring in traditional AS-PCR and could be performed at much more relaxed reaction conditions at 1% sensitivity, similar to traditional AS-PCR. TPMT*2 genotyping of 240 clinical samples was consistent with published data. In conclusion, CRAS-PCR is a novel and robust genotyping method, and the Taguchi method is an effective tool for the optimization of molecular analysis techniques. PMID:24705376

  9. Enhanced Specificity of TPMT*2 Genotyping Using Unidirectional Wild-Type and Mutant Allele-Specific Scorpion Primers in a Single Tube

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Yang, Zhao; Xia, Han; Huang, Jun-Fu; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Tian-Nun; Wang, Gui-Yu; Chuai, Zheng-Ran; Fu, Wei-Ling; Huang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping of thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is recommended for predicting the adverse drug response of thiopurines. In the current study, a novel version of allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), termed competitive real-time fluorescent AS-PCR (CRAS-PCR) was developed to analyze the TPMT*2 genotype in ethnic Chinese. This technique simultaneously uses wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single reaction. To determine the optimal conditions for both traditional AS-PCR and CRAS-PCR, we used the Taguchi method, an engineering optimization process that balances the concentrations of all components using an orthogonal array rather than a factorial array. Instead of running up to 264 experiments with the conventional factorial method, the Taguchi method achieved the same optimization using only 16 experiments. The optimized CRAS-PCR system completely avoided non-specific amplification occurring in traditional AS-PCR and could be performed at much more relaxed reaction conditions at 1% sensitivity, similar to traditional AS-PCR. TPMT*2 genotyping of 240 clinical samples was consistent with published data. In conclusion, CRAS-PCR is a novel and robust genotyping method, and the Taguchi method is an effective tool for the optimization of molecular analysis techniques. PMID:24705376

  10. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA in blood culture by a single PCR assay.

    PubMed Central

    Hassan-King, M; Baldeh, I; Adegbola, R; Omosigho, C; Usen, S O; Oparaugo, A; Greenwood, B M

    1996-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay was developed to screen blood cultures from children in The Gambia with suspected pneumonia for the simultaneous detection of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. Analysis of 295 blood cultures showed that PCR detected the organisms in all samples positive by culture in two samples infected with H. influenzae type b and four samples infected with S. pneumoniae that were culture negative, indicating that this method is sensitive for detecting these organisms in blood cultures. PMID:8818907

  11. Self-(in)compatibility inheritance and allele-specific marker development in yellow mustard (Sinapis alba).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fangqin; Cheng, Bifang

    2014-01-01

    Yellow mustard (Sinapis alba) has a sporophytic self-incompatibility reproduction system. Genetically stable self-incompatible (SI) and self-compatible (SC) inbred lines have recently been developed in this crop. Understanding the S haplotype of different inbred lines and the inheritance of the self-(in)compatibility (SI/SC) trait is very important for breeding purposes. In this study, we used the S-locus gene-specific primers in Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea to clone yellow mustard S-locus genes of SI lines Y514 and Y1130 and SC lines Y1499 and Y1501. The PCR amplification results and DNA sequences of the S-locus genes revealed that Y514 carried the class I S haplotype, while Y1130, Y1499, and Y1501 had the class II S haplotype. The results of our genetic studies indicated that self-incompatibility was dominant over self-compatibility and controlled by a one-gene locus in the two crosses of Y514 × Y1499 and Y1130 × Y1501. Of the five S-locus gene polymorphic primer pairs, Sal-SLGI and Sal-SRKI each generated one dominant marker for the SI phenotype of Y514; Sal-SLGII and Sal-SRKII produced dominant marker(s) for the SC phenotype of Y1501 and Y1499; Sal-SP11II generated one dominant marker for Y1130. These markers co-segregated with the SI/SC phenotype in the F2 populations of the two crosses. In addition, co-dominant markers were developed by mixing the two polymorphic primer pairs specific for each parent in the multiplex PCR, which allowed zygosity to be determined in the F2 populations. The SI/SC allele-specific markers have proven to be very useful for the selection of the desirable SC genotypes in our yellow mustard breeding program.

  12. Comparison of Quantitative PCR and Droplet Digital PCR Multiplex Assays for Two Genera of Bloom-Forming Cyanobacteria, Cylindrospermopsis and Microcystis

    PubMed Central

    Te, Shu Harn; Chen, Enid Yingru

    2015-01-01

    The increasing occurrence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms, often linked to deteriorated water quality and adverse public health effects, has become a worldwide concern in recent decades. The use of molecular techniques such as real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) has become increasingly popular in the detection and monitoring of harmful cyanobacterial species. Multiplex qPCR assays that quantify several toxigenic cyanobacterial species have been established previously; however, there is no molecular assay that detects several bloom-forming species simultaneously. Microcystis and Cylindrospermopsis are the two most commonly found genera and are known to be able to produce microcystin and cylindrospermopsin hepatotoxins. In this study, we designed primers and probes which enable quantification of these genera based on the RNA polymerase C1 gene for Cylindrospermopsis species and the c-phycocyanin beta subunit-like gene for Microcystis species. Duplex assays were developed for two molecular techniques—qPCR and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). After optimization, both qPCR and ddPCR assays have high linearity and quantitative correlations for standards. Comparisons of the two techniques showed that qPCR has higher sensitivity, a wider linear dynamic range, and shorter analysis time and that it was more cost-effective, making it a suitable method for initial screening. However, the ddPCR approach has lower variability and was able to handle the PCR inhibition and competitive effects found in duplex assays, thus providing more precise and accurate analysis for bloom samples. PMID:26025892

  13. Comparison of Quantitative PCR and Droplet Digital PCR Multiplex Assays for Two Genera of Bloom-Forming Cyanobacteria, Cylindrospermopsis and Microcystis.

    PubMed

    Te, Shu Harn; Chen, Enid Yingru; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong

    2015-08-01

    The increasing occurrence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms, often linked to deteriorated water quality and adverse public health effects, has become a worldwide concern in recent decades. The use of molecular techniques such as real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) has become increasingly popular in the detection and monitoring of harmful cyanobacterial species. Multiplex qPCR assays that quantify several toxigenic cyanobacterial species have been established previously; however, there is no molecular assay that detects several bloom-forming species simultaneously. Microcystis and Cylindrospermopsis are the two most commonly found genera and are known to be able to produce microcystin and cylindrospermopsin hepatotoxins. In this study, we designed primers and probes which enable quantification of these genera based on the RNA polymerase C1 gene for Cylindrospermopsis species and the c-phycocyanin beta subunit-like gene for Microcystis species. Duplex assays were developed for two molecular techniques-qPCR and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). After optimization, both qPCR and ddPCR assays have high linearity and quantitative correlations for standards. Comparisons of the two techniques showed that qPCR has higher sensitivity, a wider linear dynamic range, and shorter analysis time and that it was more cost-effective, making it a suitable method for initial screening. However, the ddPCR approach has lower variability and was able to handle the PCR inhibition and competitive effects found in duplex assays, thus providing more precise and accurate analysis for bloom samples.

  14. Real-time PCR assay for rapid qualitative and quantitative detection of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Erika; Perkátai, Katalin; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Farkas, Agnes; Kucsera, István

    2012-12-01

    Simple real-time PCR assay with one set of primer and probe for rapid, sensitive qualitative and quantitative detection of Entamoeba histolytica has been used. Consensus sequences were used to amplify a species-specific region of the 16S rRNA gene, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer hybridization probes were used for detection in a LightCycler platform (Roche). The anchor probe sequence was designed to be a perfect match for the 16S rRNA gene of Entamoeba species, while the acceptor probe sequence was designed for Entamoeba histolytica, which allowed differentiation. The performed characteristics of the real-time PCR assay were compared with ELISA antigen and microscopical detection from 77 samples of individuals with suspected clinical diagnosis of imported E. histolytica infection. Stool and liver abscess pus samples were examined with analytical sensitivity of 5 parasites per PCR reaction. The melting curve means Tms (standard deviation) in clinical isolates were 54°C. The real-time assay was 100% sensitive and specific for differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica, compared with conventional ELISA or microscopy. This real-time PCR assay with melting curve analysis is rapid, and specific for the detection and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica. The suitability for routine use of this assay in clinical diagnostic laboratories is discussed.

  15. Multiplex PCR Assay Targeting a Diguanylate Cyclase-Encoding Gene, cgcA, To Differentiate Species within the Genus Cronobacter

    PubMed Central

    Carter, L.; Lindsey, L. A.; Grim, C. J.; Sathyamoorthy, V.; Jarvis, K. G.; Gopinath, G.; Lee, C.; Sadowski, J. A.; Trach, L.; Pava-Ripoll, M.; McCardell, B. A.; Tall, B. D.

    2013-01-01

    In a comparison to the widely used Cronobacter rpoB PCR assay, a highly specific multiplexed PCR assay based on cgcA, a diguanylate cyclase gene, that identified all of the targeted six species among 305 Cronobacter isolates was designed. This assay will be a valuable tool for identifying suspected Cronobacter isolates from food-borne investigations. PMID:23144142

  16. A fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR assay for accurate Pocillopora damicornis species identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Luke; Stat, Michael; Evans, Richard D.; Kennington, W. Jason

    2016-09-01

    Pocillopora damicornis is one of the most extensively studied coral species globally, but high levels of phenotypic plasticity within the genus make species identification based on morphology alone unreliable. As a result, there is a compelling need to develop cheap and time-effective molecular techniques capable of accurately distinguishing P. damicornis from other congeneric species. Here, we develop a fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay to genotype a single nucleotide polymorphism that accurately distinguishes P. damicornis from other morphologically similar Pocillopora species. We trial the assay across colonies representing multiple Pocillopora species and then apply the assay to screen samples of Pocillopora spp. collected at regional scales along the coastline of Western Australia. This assay offers a cheap and time-effective alternative to Sanger sequencing and has broad applications including studies on gene flow, dispersal, recruitment and physiological thresholds of P. damicornis.

  17. Reverse transcription-PCR assays for the differentiation of various US porcine epidemic diarrhea virus strains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinsheng; Wang, Qiuhong

    2016-08-01

    Concurrently, several porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) variants are circulating in US swine farms, including the original US and the spike insertion-deletion (S-INDEL) strains. In this study, reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays for the detection and differentiation of different US PEDV variants were developed based on the differences in the S1 domain of the spike (S) gene. This assay successfully differentiated three PEDV strains: PC22A (the original US virulent), Iowa106 (S-INDEL), and PC177 (S-197DEL) that was derived from cell culture adaptation and has a 197 amino acid-deletion in the S1 domain. The assays did not amplify the porcine deltacoronavirus OH-FD22 strain or transmissible gastroenteritis virus Miller strain. It is the first report on the development of RT-PCR assays allowing the detection and differentiation of all major types of US PEDV variants. PMID:27134071

  18. Development and evaluation of real-time PCR assays for bloodmeal identification in Culicoides midges.

    PubMed

    VAN DER Saag, M R; Gu, X; Ward, M P; Kirkland, P D

    2016-06-01

    Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) midges are the biological vectors of a number of arboviruses of veterinary importance. However, knowledge relating to the basic biology of some species, including their host-feeding preferences, is limited. Identification of host-feeding preferences in haematophagous insects can help to elucidate the transmission dynamics of the arboviruses they may transmit. In this study, a series of semi-quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays to identify the vertebrate host sources of bloodmeals of Culicoides midges was developed. Two pan-reactive species group and seven species-specific qPCR assays were developed and evaluated. The assays are quick to perform and less expensive than nucleic acid sequencing of bloodmeals. Using these assays, it was possible to rapidly test nearly 700 blood-fed midges of various species from several geographic locations in Australia. PMID:26854008

  19. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for human-dog-cat species identification and nuclear DNA quantification.

    PubMed

    Kanthaswamy, S; Premasuthan, A; Ng, J; Satkoski, J; Goyal, V

    2012-03-01

    In the United States, human forensic evidence collected from crime scenes is usually comingled with biomaterial of canine and feline origins. Knowledge of the concentration of nuclear DNA extracted from a crime scene biological sample and the species from which the sample originated is essential for DNA profiling. The ability to accurately detect and quantify target DNA in mixed-species samples is crucial when target DNA may be overwhelmed by non-target DNA. We have designed and evaluated a species-specific (human, dog and cat) nuclear DNA identification assay based on the TaqMan(®) quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technology that can simultaneously detect and measure minute quantities of DNA specific to either humans, dogs and/or cats. The fluorogenic triplex assay employs primers and hydrolysis probes that target the human TH01 locus as well as the dog and cat Melanocortin 1 Receptor (MC1R) sequences in a species-specific manner. We also demonstrate that the assay is a highly sensitive, reliable and robust method for identifying and quantifying mixed-species templates of human-dog-cat origin with as little as 0.4 pg of human and cat nuclear DNA, respectively, and 4.0 pg of dog nuclear DNA.

  20. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Xing, Na; Wang, Zengguo; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Du, Qian; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR) that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus) and PCV2 (DNA virus) from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29%) and TGEV (11.7%) preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility.

  1. A computational workflow to identify allele-specific expression and epigenetic modification in maize.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoxing; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2013-08-01

    Allele-specific expression refers to the preferential expression of one of the two alleles in a diploid genome, which has been thought largely attributable to the associated cis-element variation and allele-specific epigenetic modification patterns. Allele-specific expression may contribute to the heterosis (or hybrid vigor) effect in hybrid plants that are produced from crosses of closely-related species, subspecies and/or inbred lines. In this study, using Illumina high-throughput sequencing of maize transcriptomics, chromatic H3K27me3 histone modification and DNA methylation data, we developed a new computational framework to identify allele-specifically expressed genes by simultaneously tracking allele-specific gene expression patterns and the epigenetic modification landscape in the seedling tissues of hybrid maize. This approach relies on detecting nucleotide polymorphisms and any genomic structural variation between two parental genomes in order to distinguish paternally or maternally derived sequencing reads. This computational pipeline also incorporates a modified Chi-square test to statistically identify allele-specific gene expression and epigenetic modification based on the Poisson distribution.

  2. A PCR assay for gender assignment in dugong (Dugong dugon) and West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus).

    PubMed

    McHale, M; Broderick, D; Ovenden, J R; Lanyon, J M

    2008-05-01

    Gender assignment for some aquatic mammals in the field is difficult. Molecular sexing from tissue biopsies is possible as males are heterogametic. Here we describe a multiplex PCR assay that amplifies the male specific SRY gene and differentiates ZFX and ZFY gametologues in two sirenian species, dugong (Dugong dugon) and West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus). The assay was validated with animals of known gender and proved accurate and robust to experimental failure.

  3. A PCR assay for gender assignment in dugong (Dugong dugon) and West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus).

    PubMed

    McHale, M; Broderick, D; Ovenden, J R; Lanyon, J M

    2008-05-01

    Gender assignment for some aquatic mammals in the field is difficult. Molecular sexing from tissue biopsies is possible as males are heterogametic. Here we describe a multiplex PCR assay that amplifies the male specific SRY gene and differentiates ZFX and ZFY gametologues in two sirenian species, dugong (Dugong dugon) and West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus). The assay was validated with animals of known gender and proved accurate and robust to experimental failure. PMID:21585866

  4. Detection of Cryptococcus neoformans DNA in Tissue Samples by Nested and Real-Time PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Ralf; Weiss, Michael; Bekure-Nemariam, Kubrom; Najvar, Laura K.; Alberdi, Maria B.; Graybill, John R.; Reischl, Udo

    2002-01-01

    Two PCR protocols targeting the 18S rRNA gene of Cryptococcus neoformans were established, compared, and evaluated in murine cryptococcal meningitis. One protocol was designed as a nested PCR to be performed in conventional block thermal cyclers. The other protocol was designed as a quantitative single-round PCR adapted to LightCycler technology. One hundred brain homogenates and dilutions originating from 20 ICR mice treated with different azoles were examined. A fungal burden of 3 × 101 to 2.9 × 104 CFU per mg of brain tissue was determined by quantitative culture. Specific PCR products were amplified by the conventional and the LightCycler methods in 86 and 87 samples, respectively, with products identified by DNA sequencing and real-time fluorescence detection. An analytical sensitivity of 1 CFU of C. neoformans per mg of brain tissue and less than 10 CFU per volume used for extraction was observed for both PCR protocols, while homogenates of 70 organs from mice infected with other fungi were PCR negative. Specificity testing was performed with genomic DNA from 31 hymenomycetous fungal species and from the ustilaginomycetous yeast Malassezia furfur, which are phylogenetically related to C. neoformans. Twenty-four strains, including species of human skin flora like M. furfur and Trichosporon spp., were PCR negative. Amplification was observed with Cryptococcus amylolentus, Filobasidiella depauperata, Cryptococcus laurentii, and five species unrelated to clinical specimens. LightCycler PCR products from F. depauperata and Trichosporon faecale could be clearly discriminated by melting curve analysis. The sensitive and specific nested PCR assay as well as the rapid and quantitative LightCycler PCR assay might be useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of human cryptococcal infections. PMID:11874894

  5. Coupling Spore Traps and Quantitative PCR Assays for Detection of the Downy Mildew Pathogens of Spinach (Peronospora effusa) and Beet (P. schachtii)

    PubMed Central

    Klosterman, Steven J.; Anchieta, Amy; McRoberts, Neil; Koike, Steven T.; Subbarao, Krishna V.; Voglmayr, Hermann; Choi, Young-Joon; Thines, Marco; Martin, Frank N.

    2016-01-01

    Downy mildew of spinach (Spinacia oleracea), caused by Peronospora effusa, is a production constraint on production worldwide, including in California, where the majority of U.S. spinach is grown. The aim of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for detection of airborne inoculum of P. effusa in California. Among oomycete ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences examined for assay development, the highest nucleotide sequence identity was observed between rDNA sequences of P. effusa and P. schachtii, the cause of downy mildew on sugar beet and Swiss chard in the leaf beet group (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were detected between P. effusa and P. schachtii in the 18S rDNA regions for design of P. effusa- and P. schachtii-specific TaqMan probes and reverse primers. An allele-specific probe and primer amplification method was applied to determine the frequency of both P. effusa and P. schachtii rDNA target sequences in pooled DNA samples, enabling quantification of rDNA of P. effusa from impaction spore trap samples collected from spinach production fields. The rDNA copy numbers of P. effusa were, on average, ≈3,300-fold higher from trap samples collected near an infected field compared with those levels recorded at a site without a nearby spinach field. In combination with disease-conducive weather forecasting, application of the assays may be helpful to time fungicide applications for disease management. PMID:24964150

  6. Coupling Spore Traps and Quantitative PCR Assays for Detection of the Downy Mildew Pathogens of Spinach (Peronospora effusa) and Beet (P. schachtii).

    PubMed

    Klosterman, Steven J; Anchieta, Amy; McRoberts, Neil; Koike, Steven T; Subbarao, Krishna V; Voglmayr, Hermann; Choi, Young-Joon; Thines, Marco; Martin, Frank N

    2014-12-01

    Downy mildew of spinach (Spinacia oleracea), caused by Peronospora effusa, is a production constraint on production worldwide, including in California, where the majority of U.S. spinach is grown. The aim of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for detection of airborne inoculum of P. effusa in California. Among oomycete ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences examined for assay development, the highest nucleotide sequence identity was observed between rDNA sequences of P. effusa and P. schachtii, the cause of downy mildew on sugar beet and Swiss chard in the leaf beet group (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were detected between P. effusa and P. schachtii in the 18S rDNA regions for design of P. effusa- and P. schachtii-specific TaqMan probes and reverse primers. An allele-specific probe and primer amplification method was applied to determine the frequency of both P. effusa and P. schachtii rDNA target sequences in pooled DNA samples, enabling quantification of rDNA of P. effusa from impaction spore trap samples collected from spinach production fields. The rDNA copy numbers of P. effusa were, on average, ≈3,300-fold higher from trap samples collected near an infected field compared with those levels recorded at a site without a nearby spinach field. In combination with disease-conducive weather forecasting, application of the assays may be helpful to time fungicide applications for disease management.

  7. Comparison of a Real-Time Multiplex PCR and Sequetyping Assay for Pneumococcal Serotyping

    PubMed Central

    Robberts, Lourens; Wolter, Nicole; Nicol, Paul; Mafofo, Joseph; Africa, Samantha; Zar, Heather J.; Nicol, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pneumococcal serotype identification is essential to monitor pneumococcal vaccine effectiveness and serotype replacement. Serotyping by conventional serological methods are costly, labour-intensive, and require significant technical expertise. We compared two different molecular methods to serotype pneumococci isolated from the nasopharynx of South African infants participating in a birth cohort study, the Drakenstein Child Health Study, in an area with high 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) coverage. Methods A real-time multiplex PCR (rmPCR) assay detecting 21 different serotypes/-groups and a sequetyping assay, based on the sequence of the wzh gene within the pneumococcal capsular locus, were compared. Forty pneumococcal control isolates, with serotypes determined by the Quellung reaction, were tested. In addition, 135 pneumococcal isolates obtained from the nasopharynx of healthy children were tested by both serotyping assays and confirmed by Quellung testing. Discordant results were further investigated by whole genome sequencing of four isolates. Results Of the 40 control isolates tested, 25 had a serotype covered by the rmPCR assay. These were all correctly serotyped/-grouped. Sequetyping PCR failed in 7/40 (18%) isolates. For the remaining isolates, sequetyping assigned the correct serotype/-group to 29/33 (88%) control isolates. Of the 132/135 (98%) nasopharyngeal pneumococcal isolates that could be typed, 69/132 (52%) and 112/132 (85%) were assigned the correct serotype/-group by rmPCR and sequetyping respectively. The serotypes of 63/132 (48%) isolates were not included in the rmPCR panel. All except three isolates (serotype 25A and 38) were theoretically amplified and differentiated into the correct serotype/-group with some strains giving ambigous results (serotype 13/20, 17F/33C, and 11A/D/1818F). Of the pneumococcal serotypes detected in this study, 69/91 (76%) were not included in the current PCV13. The most frequently

  8. BactQuant: An enhanced broad-coverage bacterial quantitative real-time PCR assay

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial load quantification is a critical component of bacterial community analysis, but a culture-independent method capable of detecting and quantifying diverse bacteria is needed. Based on our analysis of a diverse collection of 16 S rRNA gene sequences, we designed a broad-coverage quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay—BactQuant—for quantifying 16 S rRNA gene copy number and estimating bacterial load. We further utilized in silico evaluation to complement laboratory-based qPCR characterization to validate BactQuant. Methods The aligned core set of 4,938 16 S rRNA gene sequences in the Greengenes database were analyzed for assay design. Cloned plasmid standards were generated and quantified using a qPCR-based approach. Coverage analysis was performed computationally using >670,000 sequences and further evaluated following the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines. Results A bacterial TaqMan® qPCR assay targeting a 466 bp region in V3-V4 was designed. Coverage analysis showed that 91% of the phyla, 96% of the genera, and >80% of the 89,537 species analyzed contained at least one perfect sequence match to the BactQuant assay. Of the 106 bacterial species evaluated, amplification efficiencies ranged from 81 to 120%, with r2-value of >0.99, including species with sequence mismatches. Inter- and intra-run coefficient of variance was <3% and <16% for Ct and copy number, respectively. Conclusions The BactQuant assay offers significantly broader coverage than a previously reported universal bacterial quantification assay BactQuant in vitro performance was better than the in silico predictions. PMID:22510143

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF HOMOLOGOUS VIRAL INTERNAL CONTROLS FOR USE IN RT-PCR ASSAYS OF WATERBORNE ENTERIC VIRUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enteric viruses often contaminate water sources causing frequent outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays are commonly used for detection of human enteric viruses in environmental and drinking water samples. RT-PCR provides ...

  10. Identification and Differentiation of Verticillium Species and V. longisporum Lineages by Simplex and Multiplex PCR Assays.

    PubMed

    Inderbitzin, Patrik; Davis, R Michael; Bostock, Richard M; Subbarao, Krishna V

    2013-01-01

    Accurate species identification is essential for effective plant disease management, but is challenging in fungi including Verticillium sensu stricto (Ascomycota, Sordariomycetes, Plectosphaerellaceae), a small genus of ten species that includes important plant pathogens. Here we present fifteen PCR assays for the identification of all recognized Verticillium species and the three lineages of the diploid hybrid V. longisporum. The assays were based on DNA sequence data from the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region, and coding and non-coding regions of actin, elongation factor 1-alpha, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and tryptophan synthase genes. The eleven single target (simplex) PCR assays resulted in amplicons of diagnostic size for V. alfalfae, V. albo-atrum, V. dahliae including V. longisporum lineage A1/D3, V. isaacii, V. klebahnii, V. nonalfalfae, V. nubilum, V. tricorpus, V. zaregamsianum, and Species A1 and Species D1, the two undescribed ancestors of V. longisporum. The four multiple target (multiplex) PCR assays simultaneously differentiated the species or lineages within the following four groups: Verticillium albo-atrum, V. alfalfae and V. nonalfalfae; Verticillium dahliae and V. longisporum lineages A1/D1, A1/D2 and A1/D3; Verticillium dahliae including V. longisporum lineage A1/D3, V. isaacii, V. klebahnii and V. tricorpus; Verticillium isaacii, V. klebahnii and V. tricorpus. Since V. dahliae is a parent of two of the three lineages of the diploid hybrid V. longisporum, no simplex PCR assay is able to differentiate V. dahliae from all V. longisporum lineages. PCR assays were tested with fungal DNA extracts from pure cultures, and were not evaluated for detection and quantification of Verticillium species from plant or soil samples. The DNA sequence alignments are provided and can be used for the design of additional primers.

  11. Identification and Differentiation of Verticillium Species and V. longisporum Lineages by Simplex and Multiplex PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Inderbitzin, Patrik; Davis, R. Michael; Bostock, Richard M.; Subbarao, Krishna V.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate species identification is essential for effective plant disease management, but is challenging in fungi including Verticillium sensu stricto (Ascomycota, Sordariomycetes, Plectosphaerellaceae), a small genus of ten species that includes important plant pathogens. Here we present fifteen PCR assays for the identification of all recognized Verticillium species and the three lineages of the diploid hybrid V. longisporum. The assays were based on DNA sequence data from the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region, and coding and non-coding regions of actin, elongation factor 1-alpha, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and tryptophan synthase genes. The eleven single target (simplex) PCR assays resulted in amplicons of diagnostic size for V. alfalfae, V. albo-atrum, V. dahliae including V. longisporum lineage A1/D3, V. isaacii, V. klebahnii, V. nonalfalfae, V. nubilum, V. tricorpus, V. zaregamsianum, and Species A1 and Species D1, the two undescribed ancestors of V. longisporum. The four multiple target (multiplex) PCR assays simultaneously differentiated the species or lineages within the following four groups: Verticillium albo-atrum, V. alfalfae and V. nonalfalfae; Verticillium dahliae and V. longisporum lineages A1/D1, A1/D2 and A1/D3; Verticillium dahliae including V. longisporum lineage A1/D3, V. isaacii, V. klebahnii and V. tricorpus; Verticillium isaacii, V. klebahnii and V. tricorpus. Since V. dahliae is a parent of two of the three lineages of the diploid hybrid V. longisporum, no simplex PCR assay is able to differentiate V. dahliae from all V. longisporum lineages. PCR assays were tested with fungal DNA extracts from pure cultures, and were not evaluated for detection and quantification of Verticillium species from plant or soil samples. The DNA sequence alignments are provided and can be used for the design of additional primers. PMID:23823707

  12. Pentaplex PCR assay for detection of hemorrhagic bacteria from stool samples.

    PubMed

    Al-Talib, Hassanain; Latif, Baha; Mohd-Zain, Zaini

    2014-09-01

    Diarrheal diseases cause illness and death among children younger than 10 years in developing countries. Conventional testing for the detection of hemorrhagic bacteria takes 2 to 5 days to yield complete information on the organism and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Hence, in the present study, we developed a molecular-based diagnostic assay that identifies common hemorrhagic bacteria in stool samples. A set of specific primers were designed for the detection of Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), and Campylobacter spp., suitable for use in a one-tube PCR assay. The assay in the present study simultaneously detected five genes, namely, ompC for the Salmonella genus, virA for the Shigella genus, eaeA for EHEC, 16S rRNA for the Campylobacter genus, and hemA for an internal control. Specific primer pairs were successfully designed and simultaneously amplified the targeted genes. Validation with 20 Gram-negative and 17 Gram-positive strains yielded 100% specificity. The limit of detection of the multiplex PCR assay was 1 × 10(3) CFU at the bacterial cell level and 100 pg at the genomic DNA level. Further evaluation of the multiplex PCR with 223 bacterium-spiked stool specimens revealed 100% sensitivity and specificity. We conclude that the developed multiplex PCR assay was rapid, giving results within 4 h, which is essential for the identification of hemorrhagic bacteria, and it might be useful as an additional diagnostic tool whenever time is important in the diagnosis of hemorrhagic bacteria that cause diarrhea. In addition, the presence of an internal control in the multiplex PCR assay is important for excluding false-negative cases.

  13. Promising Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow Assay Plus PCR for Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Terao, Yoshitaka; Takeshita, Kana; Nishiyama, Yasutaka; Morishita, Naoki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Morimatsu, Fumiki

    2015-08-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a frequent cause of foodborne infections, and methods for rapid and reliable detection of STEC are needed. A nucleic acid lateral flow assay (NALFA) plus PCR was evaluated for detecting STEC after enrichment. When cell suspensions of 45 STEC strains, 14 non-STEC strains, and 13 non-E. coli strains were tested with the NALFA plus PCR, all of the STEC strains yielded positive results, and all of the non-STEC and non-E. coli strains yielded negative results. The lower detection limit for the STEC strains ranged from 0.1 to 1 pg of genomic DNA (about 20 to 200 CFU) per test, and the NALFA plus PCR was able to detect Stx1- and Stx2-producing E. coli strains with similar sensitivities. The ability of the NALFA plus PCR to detect STEC in enrichment cultures of radish sprouts, tomato, raw ground beef, and beef liver inoculated with 10-fold serially diluted STEC cultures was comparable to that of a real-time PCR assay (at a level of 100 to 100,000 CFU/ml in enrichment culture). The bacterial inoculation test in raw ground beef revealed that the lower detection limit of the NALFA plus PCR was also comparable to that obtained with a real-time PCR assay that followed the U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines. Although further evaluation is required, these results suggest that the NALFA plus PCR is a specific and sensitive method for detecting STEC in a food manufacturing plant. PMID:26219371

  14. Novel PCR Assays Complement Laser Biosensor-Based Method and Facilitate Listeria Species Detection from Food.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Singh, Atul K; Bai, Xingjian; Leprun, Lena; Bhunia, Arun K

    2015-09-08

    The goal of this study was to develop the Listeria species-specific PCR assays based on a house-keeping gene (lmo1634) encoding alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Aad), previously designated as Listeria adhesion protein (LAP), and compare results with a label-free light scattering sensor, BARDOT (bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology). PCR primer sets targeting the lap genes from the species of Listeria sensu stricto were designed and tested with 47 Listeria and 8 non-Listeria strains. The resulting PCR primer sets detected either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or individual L. innocua, L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. marthii without producing any amplified products from other bacteria tested. The PCR assays with Listeria sensu stricto-specific primers also successfully detected all species of Listeria sensu stricto and/or Listeria innocua from mixed culture-inoculated food samples, and each bacterium in food was verified by using the light scattering sensor that generated unique scatter signature for each species of Listeria tested. The PCR assays based on the house-keeping gene aad (lap) can be used for detection of either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or certain individual Listeria species in a mixture from food with a detection limit of about 10⁴ CFU/mL.

  15. Validation of a quantitative PCR assay for detection and quantification of 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis'.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Carolyn S; Wight, Nate; Crosson, Lisa M; White, Samuel J; Strenge, Robyn M

    2014-04-01

    Withering syndrome (WS), a serious disease affecting abalone Haliotis spp., is caused by infection from an intracellular Rickettsia-like organism (WS-RLO). Diagnosis of the disease currently relies on a combination of histological examination and molecular methods (in situ hybridization, standard PCR, and sequence analysis). However, these techniques only provide a semi-quantitative assessment of bacterial load. We created a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to specifically identify and enumerate bacterial loads of WS-RLO in abalone tissue, fecal, and seawater samples based on 16S rDNA gene copy numbers. The qPCR assay designed to detect DNA of the WS-RLO was validated according to standards set by the World Organisation for Animal Health. Standard curves derived from purified plasmid dilutions were linear across 7 logs of concentration, and efficiencies ranged from 90.2 to 97.4%. The limit of detection was 3 gene copies per reaction. Diagnostic sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 99.8%. The qPCR assay was robust, as evidenced by its high level of repeatability and reproducibility. This study has shown for the first time that WS-RLO DNA can be detected and quantified in abalone tissue, fecal, and seawater samples. The ability to detect and quantify RLO gene copies in a variety of materials will enable us to better understand transmission dynamics in both farmed and natural environments. PMID:24695238

  16. Development of rapid canine fecal source identification PCR-based assays.

    PubMed

    Green, Hyatt C; White, Karen M; Kelty, Cathy A; Shanks, Orin C

    2014-10-01

    The extent to which dogs contribute to aquatic fecal contamination is unknown despite the potential for zoonotic transfer of harmful human pathogens. We used genome fragment enrichment (GFE) to identify novel nonribosomal microbial genetic markers potentially useful for detecting dog fecal contamination with PCR-based methods in environmental samples. Of the 679 sequences obtained from GFE, we used 84 for the development of PCR assays targeting putative canine-associated genetic markers. Twelve genetic markers were shown to be prevalent among dog fecal samples and were rarely found in other animals. Three assays, DG3, DG37, and DG72, performed best in terms of specificity and sensitivity and were used for the development of SYBR Green and TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. qPCR analysis of 244 fecal samples collected from a wide geographic range indicated that marker concentrations were below limits of detection in noncanine hosts. As a proof-of-concept, these markers were detected in urban stormwater samples, suggesting a future application of newly developed methods for water quality monitoring.

  17. Novel PCR Assays Complement Laser Biosensor-Based Method and Facilitate Listeria Species Detection from Food

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Singh, Atul K.; Bai, Xingjian; Leprun, Lena; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop the Listeria species-specific PCR assays based on a house-keeping gene (lmo1634) encoding alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Aad), previously designated as Listeria adhesion protein (LAP), and compare results with a label-free light scattering sensor, BARDOT (bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology). PCR primer sets targeting the lap genes from the species of Listeria sensu stricto were designed and tested with 47 Listeria and 8 non-Listeria strains. The resulting PCR primer sets detected either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or individual L. innocua, L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. marthii without producing any amplified products from other bacteria tested. The PCR assays with Listeria sensu stricto-specific primers also successfully detected all species of Listeria sensu stricto and/or Listeria innocua from mixed culture-inoculated food samples, and each bacterium in food was verified by using the light scattering sensor that generated unique scatter signature for each species of Listeria tested. The PCR assays based on the house-keeping gene aad (lap) can be used for detection of either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or certain individual Listeria species in a mixture from food with a detection limit of about 104 CFU/mL. PMID:26371000

  18. DETECTION OF PHAKOPSORA PACHYRHIZI SPORES IN RAIN USING REAL-TIME PCR ASSAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2005, rain samples were collected weekly at selected National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) sites in the eastern and central US and screened for Phakopsora pachyrhizi (Asian soybean rust) spores. A nested real-time PCR assay was used to detect P. pachyrhizi DNA in the filter residue. A su...

  19. Evaluation of Two PCR-based Swine-specific Fecal Source Tracking Assays (Abstract)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR-based methods have been proposed to identify swine fecal pollution in environmental waters. However, the utility of these assays in identifying swine fecal contamination on a broad geographic scale is largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the specificity, distr...

  20. Final Report Nucleic Acid System - PCR, Multiplex Assays and Sample Preparation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, R.P.; Langlois, R.G.; Nasarabadi, S.; Benett, W.J.; Richards, J.B.; Hadley, D.R.; Miles, R.R.; Brown, S.B.; Stratton, P.L.; Milanovich, F.P.

    2001-04-20

    The objective of this project was to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction). This entailed not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This project had two principal deliverables: (1) design, construct, test and deliver a 24 chamber, multiplex capable suitcase sized PCR instrument, and (2) develop and reduce to practice a multiplex assay for the detection of PCR product by flow cytometry. In addition, significant resources were allocated to test and evaluation of the Hand-held Advanced Nucleic Acid Analyzer (HANAA). This project helps provide the signature and intelligence gathering community the ability to perform, on-site or remote, rapid analysis of environmental or like samples for the presence of a suite of biological warfare pathogens.

  1. Detection of pork adulteration by highly-specific PCR assay of mitochondrial D-loop.

    PubMed

    Karabasanavar, Nagappa S; Singh, S P; Kumar, Deepak; Shebannavar, Sunil N

    2014-02-15

    We describe a highly specific PCR assay for the authentic identification of pork. Accurate detection of tissues derived from pig (Sus scrofa) was accomplished by using newly designed primers targeting porcine mitochondrial displacement (D-loop) region that yielded an unique amplicon of 712 base pairs (bp). Possibility of cross-amplification was precluded by testing as many as 24 animal species (mammals, birds, rodent and fish). Suitability of PCR assay was confirmed in raw (n = 20), cooked (60, 80 and 100 °C), autoclaved (121 °C) and micro-oven processed pork. Sensitivity of detection of pork in other species meat using unique pig-specific PCR was established to be at 0.1%; limit of detection (LOD) of pig DNA was 10 pg (pico grams). The technique can be used for the authentication of raw, processed and adulterated pork and products under the circumstances of food adulteration related disputes or forensic detection of origin of pig species.

  2. Real-time PCR assay using molecular beacon for quantitation of hepatitis B virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Sum, Simon Siu-Man; Wong, Danny Ka-Ho; Yuen, Man-Fung; Yuan, He-Jun; Yu, Jian; Lai, Ching-Lung; Ho, David; Zhang, Linqi

    2004-08-01

    Levels of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in the blood serve as an important marker in monitoring the disease progression and treatment efficacy of chronic HBV infection. Several commercial assays are available for accurate measurement of HBV genomic DNA, but many of them are hampered by relatively low sensitivity and limited dynamic range. The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive and accurate assay for measuring HBV genomic DNA using real-time PCR with a molecular beacon (HBV beacon assay). The performance of this assay was validated by testing serial dilutions of the two EUROHEP HBV DNA standards (ad and ay subtypes) of known concentrations. The assay showed low intra-assay (<7%) and interassay (<5%) variations for both subtypes. Its dynamic range was found to be 10(1) to 10(7) copies per reaction (1.0 x 10(2) to 1.0 x 10(9) copies ml(-1)). The assay was further evaluated clinically using serum samples from 175 individuals with chronic hepatitis B. The HBV DNA level measured by this assay showed good correlation with that measured by the commercially available COBAS AMPLICOR HBV Monitor test (r = 0.901; P < 0.001). The higher sensitivity and broader dynamic range of this assay compared to the existing commercial assays will provide an ideal tool for monitoring disease progression and treatment efficacy in HBV-infected patients, in particular for those with low levels of HBV viremia.

  3. Development of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for Different Clades of “Candidatus Accumulibacter”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, An Ni; Mao, Yanping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-05-01

    We designed novel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers for the polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) gene, targeting eight individual “Candidatus Accumulibacter” (referred to as Accumulibacter) clades. An evaluation of primer sets was conducted regarding the coverage, specificity, and PCR efficiency. (i) All primer sets were designed to cover all available sequences of the target clade. (ii) The phylogenetic analysis of the sequences retrieved from the qPCR products by each primer set demonstrated a high level of specificity. (iii) All calibration curves presented high PCR efficiencies in the range of 85–112% (R2 = 0.962–0.998). In addition, the possible interference of non-target amplicons was individually examined using the qPCR assay for 13 Accumulibacter clades, which were either undetected or showed negligible detection. With the primers designed by other research groups, a highly selective and sensitive qPCR-based method was developed to quantify all Accumulibacter clades, with the exception of Clade IE, in one assay, which enables more comprehensive insights into the community dynamics. The applicability to environmental samples was demonstrated by profiling the Accumulibacter clades in activated sludge samples of nine full-scale wastewater treatment plants.

  4. Detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae by Air Sampling with a Nested PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Stärk, Katharina D. C.; Nicolet, Jacques; Frey, Joachim

    1998-01-01

    This article describes the first successful detection of airborne Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae under experimental and field conditions with a new nested PCR assay. Air was sampled with polyethersulfone membranes (pore size, 0.2 μm) mounted in filter holders. Filters were processed by dissolution and direct extraction of DNA for PCR analysis. For the PCR, two nested pairs of oligonucleotide primers were designed by using an M. hyopneumoniae-specific DNA sequence of a repeated gene segment. A nested PCR assay was developed and used to analyze samples collected in eight pig houses where respiratory problems had been common. Air was also sampled from a mycoplasma-free herd. The nested PCR was highly specific and 104 times as sensitive as a one-step PCR. Under field conditions, the sampling system was able to detect airborne M. hyopneumoniae on 80% of farms where acute respiratory disease was present. No airborne M. hyopneumoniae was detected on infected farms without acute cases. The chance of successful detection was increased if air was sampled at several locations within a room and at a lower air humidity. PMID:9464391

  5. Development of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for Different Clades of “Candidatus Accumulibacter”

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, An Ni; Mao, Yanping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    We designed novel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers for the polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) gene, targeting eight individual “Candidatus Accumulibacter” (referred to as Accumulibacter) clades. An evaluation of primer sets was conducted regarding the coverage, specificity, and PCR efficiency. (i) All primer sets were designed to cover all available sequences of the target clade. (ii) The phylogenetic analysis of the sequences retrieved from the qPCR products by each primer set demonstrated a high level of specificity. (iii) All calibration curves presented high PCR efficiencies in the range of 85–112% (R2 = 0.962–0.998). In addition, the possible interference of non-target amplicons was individually examined using the qPCR assay for 13 Accumulibacter clades, which were either undetected or showed negligible detection. With the primers designed by other research groups, a highly selective and sensitive qPCR-based method was developed to quantify all Accumulibacter clades, with the exception of Clade IE, in one assay, which enables more comprehensive insights into the community dynamics. The applicability to environmental samples was demonstrated by profiling the Accumulibacter clades in activated sludge samples of nine full-scale wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27142574

  6. Development of Conventional and Real-Time Quantitative PCR Assays for Diagnosis and Monitoring of Scabies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Samson S. Y.; Poon, Rosana W. S.; Chau, Sandy; Wong, Sally C. Y.; To, Kelvin K. W.; Cheng, Vincent C. C.; Fung, Kitty S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Scabies remains the most prevalent, endemic, and neglected ectoparasitic infestation globally and can cause institutional outbreaks. The sensitivity of routine microscopy for demonstration of Sarcoptes scabiei mites or eggs in skin scrapings is only about 50%. Except for three studies using conventional or two-tube nested PCR on a small number of cases, no systematic study has been performed to improve the laboratory diagnosis of this important infection. We developed a conventional and a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay based on the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of S. scabiei. The cox1 gene is relatively well conserved, with its sequence having no high levels of similarity to the sequences of other human skin mites, pathogenic zoonotic mites, or common house dust mite species. This mitochondrial gene is also present in large quantities in arthropod cells, potentially improving the sensitivity of a PCR-based assay. In our study, both assays were specific and were more sensitive than microscopy in diagnosing scabies, with positive and negative predictive values of 100%. The S. scabiei DNA copy number in the microscopy-positive specimens was significantly higher than that in the microscopy-negative specimens (median S. scabiei DNA copy number, 3.604 versus 2.457 log10 copies per reaction; P = 0.0213). In the patient with crusted scabies, the qPCR assay performed on lesional skin swabs instead of scrapings revealed that the parasite DNA load took about 2 weeks to become negative after treatment. The utility of using lesional skin swabs as an alternative sample for diagnosis of scabies by PCR should be further evaluated. PMID:25903566

  7. Development of Conventional and Real-Time Quantitative PCR Assays for Diagnosis and Monitoring of Scabies.

    PubMed

    Wong, Samson S Y; Poon, Rosana W S; Chau, Sandy; Wong, Sally C Y; To, Kelvin K W; Cheng, Vincent C C; Fung, Kitty S C; Yuen, K Y

    2015-07-01

    Scabies remains the most prevalent, endemic, and neglected ectoparasitic infestation globally and can cause institutional outbreaks. The sensitivity of routine microscopy for demonstration of Sarcoptes scabiei mites or eggs in skin scrapings is only about 50%. Except for three studies using conventional or two-tube nested PCR on a small number of cases, no systematic study has been performed to improve the laboratory diagnosis of this important infection. We developed a conventional and a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay based on the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of S. scabiei. The cox1 gene is relatively well conserved, with its sequence having no high levels of similarity to the sequences of other human skin mites, pathogenic zoonotic mites, or common house dust mite species. This mitochondrial gene is also present in large quantities in arthropod cells, potentially improving the sensitivity of a PCR-based assay. In our study, both assays were specific and were more sensitive than microscopy in diagnosing scabies, with positive and negative predictive values of 100%. The S. scabiei DNA copy number in the microscopy-positive specimens was significantly higher than that in the microscopy-negative specimens (median S. scabiei DNA copy number, 3.604 versus 2.457 log10 copies per reaction; P = 0.0213). In the patient with crusted scabies, the qPCR assay performed on lesional skin swabs instead of scrapings revealed that the parasite DNA load took about 2 weeks to become negative after treatment. The utility of using lesional skin swabs as an alternative sample for diagnosis of scabies by PCR should be further evaluated. PMID:25903566

  8. Amplification refractory mutation system PCR assays for the detection of variola and Orthopoxvirus.

    PubMed

    Pulford, David; Meyer, Hermann; Brightwell, Gale; Damon, Inger; Kline, Richard; Ulaeto, David

    2004-04-01

    PCR assays that can identify the presence of variola virus (VARV) sequences in an unknown DNA sample were developed using principles established for the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS). The assay's specificity utilised unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) identified among Orthopoxvirus (OPV) orthologs of the vaccinia virus Copenhagen strain A13L and A36R genes. When a variola virus specific primer was used with a consensus primer in an ARMS assay with different Orthopoxvirus genomes, a PCR product was only amplified from variola virus DNA. Incorporating a second consensus primer into the assay produced a multiplex PCR that provided Orthopoxvirus generic and variola-specific products with variola virus DNA. We tested two single nucleotide polymorphisms with a panel of 43 variola virus strains, collected over 40 years from countries across the world, and have shown that they provide reliable markers for variola virus identification. The variola virus specific primers did not produce amplicons with either assay format when tested with 50 other Orthopoxvirus DNA samples. Our analysis shows that these two polymorphisms were conserved in variola virus genomes and provide a reliable signature of Orthopoxvirus species identification.

  9. Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Bocavirus in Human Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Olsen, Sonja J.; Mackay, Ian M.; Sloots, Theo P.; Fry, Alicia M.; Erdman, Dean D.

    2006-01-01

    The recently discovered human bocavirus (HBoV) is the first member of the family Parvoviridae, genus Bocavirus, to be potentially associated with human disease. Several studies have identified HBoV in respiratory specimens from children with acute respiratory disease, but the full spectrum of clinical disease and the epidemiology of HBoV infection remain unclear. The availability of rapid and reliable molecular diagnostics would therefore aid future studies of this novel virus. To address this, we developed two sensitive and specific real-time TaqMan PCR assays that target the HBoV NS1 and NP-1 genes. Both assays could reproducibly detect 10 copies of a recombinant DNA plasmid containing a partial region of the HBoV genome, with a dynamic range of 8 log units (101 to 108 copies). Eight blinded clinical specimen extracts positive for HBoV by an independent PCR assay were positive by both real-time assays. Among 1,178 NP swabs collected from hospitalized pneumonia patients in Sa Kaeo Province, Thailand, 53 (4.5%) were reproducibly positive for HBoV by one or both targets. Our data confirm the possible association of HBoV infection with pneumonia and demonstrate the utility of these real-time PCR assays for HBoV detection. PMID:16954253

  10. Temporal Assessment of the Impact of Exposure to Cow Feces in Two Watersheds by Multiple Host-Specific PCR Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to feces in two watersheds with different management histories was assessed by tracking cattle feces bacterial populations using multiple host-specific PCR assays. In addition, environmental factors affecting the occurrence of these markers were identified. Each assay wa...

  11. Strategies to develop strain-specific PCR based assays for probiotics.

    PubMed

    Treven, P

    2015-01-01

    Since health benefits conferred by probiotics are strain-specific, identification to the strain level is mandatory to allow the monitoring of the presence and the abundance of specific probiotic in a product or in a gastrointestinal tract. Compared to standard plate counts, the reduced duration of the assays and higher specificity makes PCR-based methods (standard PCR and quantitative PCR) very appropriate for detection or quantification of probiotics. Development of strain-specific assay consists of 4 main stages: (1) strain-specific marker identification; (2) construction of potential strain-specific primers; (3) validation on DNA from pure cultures of target and related strains; and (4) validation on spiked samples. The most important and also the most challenging step is the identification of strain-specific sequences, which can be subsequently targeted by specific primers or probes. Such regions can be identified on sequences derived from 16S-23S internally transcribed spacers, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA, representational difference analysis and suppression subtractive hybridisation. Already known phenotypic or genotypic characteristics of the target strain can also be used to develop the strain-specific assay. However, the initial stage of strain-specific assay development can be replaced by comparative genomics analysis of target genome with related genomes in public databases. Advances in whole genome sequencing (WGS) have resulted in a cost reduction for bacterial genome sequencing and consequently have made this approach available to most laboratories. In the present paper I reviewed the available literature on PCR and qPCR assays developed for detection of a specific probiotic strain and discussed future WGS and comparative genomics-based approaches.

  12. Allele-specific copy-number discovery from whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, WeiBo; Wang, Wei; Sun, Wei; Crowley, James J; Szatkiewicz, Jin P

    2015-08-18

    Copy-number variants (CNVs) are a major form of genetic variation and a risk factor for various human diseases, so it is crucial to accurately detect and characterize them. It is conceivable that allele-specific reads from high-throughput sequencing data could be leveraged to both enhance CNV detection and produce allele-specific copy number (ASCN) calls. Although statistical methods have been developed to detect CNVs using whole-genome sequence (WGS) and/or whole-exome sequence (WES) data, information from allele-specific read counts has not yet been adequately exploited. In this paper, we develop an integrated method, called AS-GENSENG, which incorporates allele-specific read counts in CNV detection and estimates ASCN using either WGS or WES data. To evaluate the performance of AS-GENSENG, we conducted extensive simulations, generated empirical data using existing WGS and WES data sets and validated predicted CNVs using an independent methodology. We conclude that AS-GENSENG not only predicts accurate ASCN calls but also improves the accuracy of total copy number calls, owing to its unique ability to exploit information from both total and allele-specific read counts while accounting for various experimental biases in sequence data. Our novel, user-friendly and computationally efficient method and a complete analytic protocol is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/asgenseng/. PMID:25883151

  13. Real-time PCR assays for genotyping of Cryptococcus gattii in North America

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryptococcus gattii has been the cause of an ongoing outbreak starting in 1999 on Vancouver Island, British Columbia and spreading to mainland Canada and the US Pacific Northwest. In the course of the outbreak, C. gattii has been identified outside of its previously documented climate, habitat, and host disease. Genotyping of C. gattii is essential to understand the ecological and geographical expansion of this emerging pathogen. Methods We developed and validated a mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) real-time PCR panel for genotyping C. gattii molecular types VGI-VGIV and VGII subtypes a,b,c. Subtype assays were designed based on whole-genome sequence of 20 C. gattii strains. Publically available multilocus sequence typing (MLST) data from a study of 202 strains was used for the molecular type (VGI-VGIV) assay design. All assays were validated across DNA from 112 strains of diverse international origin and sample types, including animal, environmental and human. Results Validation revealed each assay on the panel is 100% sensitive, specific and concordant with MLST. The assay panel can detect down to 0.5 picograms of template DNA. Conclusions The (MAMA) real-time PCR panel for C. gattii accurately typed a collection of 112 diverse strains and demonstrated high sensitivity. This is a time and cost efficient method of genotyping C. gattii best suited for application in large-scale epidemiological studies. PMID:24886039

  14. Allele-Specific Reduction of the Mutant Huntingtin Allele Using Transcription Activator-Like Effectors in Human Huntington's Disease Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fink, Kyle D; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Josh; Anderson, Joseph S; Torrest, Audrey; Komarla, Anvita; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cary, Whitney; Anderson, Johnathon D; Gruenloh, William; Duffy, Alexandra; Tempkin, Teresa; Annett, Geralyn; Wheelock, Vicki; Segal, David J; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats. Although pathogenesis has been attributed to this polyglutamine expansion, the underlying mechanisms through which the huntingtin protein functions have yet to be elucidated. It has been suggested that postnatal reduction of mutant huntingtin through protein interference or conditional gene knockout could prove to be an effective therapy for patients suffering from HD. For allele-specific targeting, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) were designed to target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the mutant allele and packaged into a vector backbone containing KRAB to promote transcriptional repression of the disease-associated allele. Additional TALEs were packaged into a vector backbone containing heterodimeric FokI and were designed to be used as nucleases (TALEN) to cause a CAG-collapse in the mutant allele. Human HD fibroblasts were treated with each TALE-SNP or TALEN. Allele-expression was measured using a SNP-genotyping assay and mutant protein aggregation was quantified with Western blots for anti-ubiquitin. The TALE-SNP and TALEN significantly reduced mutant allele expression (p < 0.05) when compared to control transfections while not affecting expression of the nondisease allele. This study demonstrates the potential of allele-specific gene modification using TALE proteins, and provides a foundation for targeted treatment for individuals suffering from Huntington's or other genetically linked diseases. PMID:26850319

  15. Universal Single-Probe RT-PCR Assay for Diagnosis of Dengue Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Alm, Erik; Lesko, Birgitta; Lindegren, Gunnel; Ahlm, Clas; Söderholm, Sandra; Falk, Kerstin I.; Lagerqvist, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that has become more prevalent in the last few decades. Most patients are viremic when they present with symptoms, and early diagnosis of dengue is important in preventing severe clinical complications associated with this disease and also represents a key factor in differential diagnosis. Here, we designed and validated a hydrolysis-probe-based one-step real-time RT-PCR assay that targets the genomes of dengue virus serotypes 1–4. Methodology/Principal Findings The primers and probe used in our RT-PCR assay were designed to target the 3′ untranslated region of all complete genome sequences of dengue virus available in GenBank (n = 3,305). Performance of the assay was evaluated using in vitro transcribed RNA, laboratory-adapted virus strains, external control panels, and clinical specimens. The linear dynamic range was found to be 104–1011 GCE/mL, and the detection limit was between 6.0×102 and 1.1×103 GCE/mL depending on target sequence. The assay did not cross-react with human RNA, nor did it produce false-positive results for other human pathogenic flaviviruses or clinically important etiological agents of febrile illnesses. We used clinical serum samples obtained from returning travelers with dengue-compatible symptomatology (n = 163) to evaluate the diagnostic relevance of our assay, and laboratory diagnosis performed by the RT-PCR assay had 100% positive agreement with diagnosis performed by NS1 antigen detection. In a retrospective evaluation including 60 archived serum samples collected from confirmed dengue cases 1–9 days after disease onset, the RT-PCR assay detected viral RNA up to 9 days after appearance of symptoms. Conclusions/Significance The validation of the RT-PCR assay presented here indicates that this technique can be a reliable diagnostic tool, and hence we suggest that it be introduced as the method of choice during the first 5 days of dengue symptoms. PMID:25522325

  16. Development and Validation of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Diagnosis of Scedosporiosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Maria V.; Buitrago, Maria J.; Bernal-Martinez, Leticia; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum and Scedosporium prolificans are fungal pathogens that can cause severe human infections, including disseminated mycosis in immunocompromised patients. Two real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assays for the diagnosis of these species were developed and validated for the classification of clinical strains and for the detection of DNA in clinical samples by use of a murine model of invasive infection. A total of 14 clinical strains and 141 samples, including blood, serum, and lung samples from infected CD1 mice, were analyzed. Each RT-PCR methodology used a species-specific molecular beacon probe targeting a highly conserved region of the fungal ribosomal DNA gene. Results showed 100% specificity and a detection limit of 10 fg of DNA for both assays. The sensitivities for the S. prolificans-specific PCR assay were 100% for cultured clinical strains, 95.5% for lung tissues, 85% for serum, and 83.3% for blood. For S. apiospermum, the sensitivities were 100% for clinical strains and 97.2%, 81.8%, and 54.5% for lung tissues, serum, and blood, respectively. Both techniques can be useful for clinical diagnosis, and further studies are warranted. PMID:18684999

  17. Reverse Transcription-PCR-Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Rapid Detection and Differentiation of Alphavirus Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eryu; Paessler, Slobodan; Aguilar, Patricia V.; Carrara, Anne-Sophie; Ni, Haolin; Greene, Ivorlyne P.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2006-01-01

    Due to the lack of a rapid, simple, and inexpensive assay for detecting alphavirus infections, we combined a reverse transcription-PCR with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (RT-PCR-ELISA) to identify human pathogenic alphaviruses that are endemic in the New World. By combining the sensitivity of PCR, the detection simplicity of ELISA, and the specificities of DNA probes, this method rapidly detected and differentiated closely related species and subtypes of several medically important alphaviruses. After an amplification using RT-PCR with primers targeting conserved sequences in the nonstructural protein 1 gene, sequence-specific, biotin-labeled probes targeted against Venezuelan, eastern, and western equine encephalitis or Mayaro virus genes were used for the detection of amplicons using ELISA. The assay is simple, fast, and easy to perform in an ordinary diagnostic laboratory or clinical setting. Nucleic acid derived from cell cultures infected with several alphaviruses, clinical specimens, and mosquito pools as well as frozen and paraffin-embedded animal tissues were detected and identified within 6 to 7 h in a sensitive and specific manner. PMID:16957044

  18. Development and validation of a quantitative PCR assay for diagnosis of scedosporiosis.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Maria V; Buitrago, Maria J; Bernal-Martinez, Leticia; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2008-10-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum and Scedosporium prolificans are fungal pathogens that can cause severe human infections, including disseminated mycosis in immunocompromised patients. Two real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assays for the diagnosis of these species were developed and validated for the classification of clinical strains and for the detection of DNA in clinical samples by use of a murine model of invasive infection. A total of 14 clinical strains and 141 samples, including blood, serum, and lung samples from infected CD1 mice, were analyzed. Each RT-PCR methodology used a species-specific molecular beacon probe targeting a highly conserved region of the fungal ribosomal DNA gene. Results showed 100% specificity and a detection limit of 10 fg of DNA for both assays. The sensitivities for the S. prolificans-specific PCR assay were 100% for cultured clinical strains, 95.5% for lung tissues, 85% for serum, and 83.3% for blood. For S. apiospermum, the sensitivities were 100% for clinical strains and 97.2%, 81.8%, and 54.5% for lung tissues, serum, and blood, respectively. Both techniques can be useful for clinical diagnosis, and further studies are warranted.

  19. Development and validation of a real-time PCR assay for the detection of Aeromonas salmonicida.

    PubMed

    Keeling, S E; Brosnahan, C L; Johnston, C; Wallis, R; Gudkovs, N; McDonald, W L

    2013-05-01

    A real-time PCR assay using a molecular beacon was developed and validated to detect the vapA (surface array protein) gene in the fish pathogen, Aeromonas salmonicida. The assay had 100% analytical specificity and analytical sensitivities of 5 ± 0 fg (DNA), 2.2 × 10(4) ± 1 × 10(4) CFU g(-1) (without enrichment) and 40 ± 10 CFU g(-1) (with enrichment) in kidney tissue. The assay was highly repeatable and proved to be robust following equivalency testing using a different real-time PCR platform. Following analytical validation, diagnostic specificity was determined using New Zealand farmed Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), (n = 750) and pink shubunkin, Carassius auratus (L.) (n = 157). The real-time PCR was run in parallel with culture and all fish tested were found to be negative by both methods for A. salmonicida, resulting in 100% diagnostic specificity (95% confidence interval). The molecular beacon real-time PCR system is specific, sensitive and a reproducible method for the detection of A. salmonicida. It can be used for diagnostic testing, health certification and active surveillance programmes.

  20. Frequencies of immune hypersensitivity reaction-associated HLA class I alleles in healthy South African Indian and mixed ancestry populations determined by a novel real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Loubser, S; Paximadis, M; Gentle, N; Puren, A; Gray, C M; Tiemessen, C T

    2014-10-01

    We have determined the frequencies of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B*57:01, HLA-B*35:05, HLA-C*04 and HLA-C*08 in healthy individuals of South African Indian (SAI) ethnicity (n = 50) and South African mixed (SAM) ancestry (n = 50) using real-time allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) assay. HLA-B*57:01 associates with immune hypersensitivity reaction (IHR) in individuals exposed to abacavir (ABC), while nevirapine (NVP) IHR associates with HLA-B*35:05, HLA-C*04 and HLA-C*08. Real-time AS-PCR assays typically use less DNA, are more cost-effective and rapid compared with conventional genotyping methods, such as sequence-based typing (SBT). The assay was developed using samples of known HLA class I genotype and subsequently applied to the SAI and SAM samples. HLA-B*57:01 was detected in SAM and SAI populations at frequencies of 8.0% and 12.0%, respectively, while HLA-B*35:05 was not found in SAI individuals, but was present in 6.0% of SAM individuals. HLA-C*04 was detected in 22.0% and 24.0% of SAM and SAI individuals, respectively, while 10.0% and 8.0% of SAM and SAI individuals, respectively, were HLA-C*08 positive. This study reports the development of a novel real-time AS-PCR assay to identify HLA class I alleles associated with ABC and NVP IHR and has established the frequencies of these alleles present in healthy SAI and SAM populations. Using South African demographic data, our hypothetical analysis suggests that a substantial number of individuals would benefit from the assay.

  1. Rapid diagnosis of Argentine hemorrhagic fever by reverse transcriptase PCR-based assay.

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, M E; Enría, D; Maiztegui, J I; Grau, O; Romanowski, V

    1995-01-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) is an endemo-epidemic disease caused by Junín virus. This report demonstrates that a reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR-based assay developed in our laboratory to detect Junín virus in whole blood samples is sensitive and specific. The experiments were conducted in a double-blinded manner using 94 clinical samples collected in the area in which AHF is endemic. The RT-PCR-based assay was compared with traditional methodologies, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, plaque neutralization tests, and occasionally viral isolation. The calculated parameters for RT-PCR diagnosis, with seroconversion as the "gold standard," were 98% sensitivity and 76% specificity. It is noteworthy that 94% of the patients with putative false-positive results (RT-PCR positive and no seroconversion detected) exhibited febrile syndromes of undefined etiology. These results could be interpreted to mean that most of those patients with febrile syndromes were actually infected with Junín virus but did not develop a detectable immune response. Furthermore, 8 laboratory-fabricated samples and 25 blood samples of patients outside the area in which AHF is endemic tested in a similar way were disclosed correctly (100% match). The RT-PCR assay is the only laboratory test available currently for the early and rapid diagnosis of AHF. It is sensitive enough to detect the low viremia found during the period in which immune plasma therapy can be used effectively, reducing mortality rates from 30% to less than 1%. PMID:7542268

  2. Development of a versatile and stable internal control system for RT-qPCR assays.

    PubMed

    Felder, Eva; Wölfel, Roman

    2014-11-01

    RT-qPCR, an established method for the detection of RNA viruses, requires internal RNA controls for the correct interpretation of PCR results. Robust and versatile RT-PCR controls can be achieved for example by packaging RNA into a virus-derived protein shell. In this study a MS2-based internal control system was developed, that allows stable and universal packing of different RNAs into non-infectious, non-lytic MS2-based viral like particles (VLPs). Two competitive internal controls for a hantavirus assay and a Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (CCHFV) assay were cloned for the expression of VLPs. The expression of VLPs containing the RNA of interest could be induced with arabinose in Escherichia coli. The VLPs proved to be temperature resistant and could be frozen and thawed several times without degradation. Distinction of IC RNA from the target RNA was facilitated by a clear shift in the melting temperature or by specific hybridization signals. Furthermore, target and IC PCR amplification could be easily distinguished by their size in gel-electrophoretic analyses. Limits of detection were determined, demonstrating that the application of the IC did not reduce the sensitivity of the target RT-qPCR reactions. The system can be adapted to nearly any required sequence, resulting in a highly flexible method with broad range applications.

  3. Quantitative analysis of amplifiable DNA in tissues exposed to various environments using competitive PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Imaizuml, K; Miyasaka, S; Yoshino, M

    2004-01-01

    Competitive PCR assays were established for the mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region I and the human amelogenin locus. Using these assays, the copy numbers of DNA participating in PCR (amplifiable DNA) were quantified in tissues exposed to different environments. Human ribs, skin and nails were left in three exposure conditions (in the open air, in soil and in water). The amounts of amplifiable DNA in these tissues were quantified during a time period of up to two months. The amount of amplifiable DNA was well preserved in hard tissues (ribs and nails) regardless of the exposure conditions, whereas the soft tissues immersed in water showed a rapid decrease in amplifiable DNA. Strong PCR inhibition was observed in the DNA extracts obtained from buried bones. This phenomenon was clearly identified from an amplification failure of the internal standards in the competitive PCR. A preliminary examination to identify the PCR inhibitor suggested that the soil itself contributed to the inhibition. In addition, the amounts of amplifiable DNA in case samples were also investigated.

  4. Detection of Dientamoeba fragilis in animal faeces using species specific real time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Chan, Douglas; Barratt, Joel; Roberts, Tamalee; Phillips, Owen; Šlapeta, Jan; Ryan, Una; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John; Stark, Damien

    2016-08-30

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a potentially pathogenic, enteric, protozoan parasite with a worldwide distribution. While clinical case reports and prevalence studies appear regularly in the scientific literature, little attention has been paid to this parasite's biology, life cycle, host range, and possible transmission routes. Overall, these aspects of Dientamoeba biology remain poorly understood at best. In this study, a total of 420 animal samples, collected from Australia, were surveyed for the presence of Dientamoeba fragilis using PCR. Several PCR assays were evaluated for sensitivity and specificity. Two previously published PCR methods demonstrated cross reactivity with other trichomonads commonly found in animal samples. Only one assay exhibited excellent specificity. Using this assay D. fragilis was detected from one dog and one cat sample. This is the first report of D. fragilis from these animals and highlights the role companion animals may play in D. fragilis transmission. This study demonstrated that some published D. fragilis molecular assays cross react with other closely related trichomonads and consequently are not suitable for animal prevalence studies.

  5. Detection of Dientamoeba fragilis in animal faeces using species specific real time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Chan, Douglas; Barratt, Joel; Roberts, Tamalee; Phillips, Owen; Šlapeta, Jan; Ryan, Una; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John; Stark, Damien

    2016-08-30

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a potentially pathogenic, enteric, protozoan parasite with a worldwide distribution. While clinical case reports and prevalence studies appear regularly in the scientific literature, little attention has been paid to this parasite's biology, life cycle, host range, and possible transmission routes. Overall, these aspects of Dientamoeba biology remain poorly understood at best. In this study, a total of 420 animal samples, collected from Australia, were surveyed for the presence of Dientamoeba fragilis using PCR. Several PCR assays were evaluated for sensitivity and specificity. Two previously published PCR methods demonstrated cross reactivity with other trichomonads commonly found in animal samples. Only one assay exhibited excellent specificity. Using this assay D. fragilis was detected from one dog and one cat sample. This is the first report of D. fragilis from these animals and highlights the role companion animals may play in D. fragilis transmission. This study demonstrated that some published D. fragilis molecular assays cross react with other closely related trichomonads and consequently are not suitable for animal prevalence studies. PMID:27523936

  6. Profound inhibition of the PCR step of CF V3 multiplex PCR/OLA assay by the use of UV-irradiated plastic reaction tubes.

    PubMed

    Fox, David H; Huang, Chih-Kang; Du, Juan; Chang, Tylis Y; Pan, Qiulu

    2007-06-01

    Supplies, such as bags of plastic reaction tubes, are sometimes left in the laminar flow hoods unintentionally while the ultraviolet (UV) lamp is illuminated overnight. In addition, UV irradiation is used for sterilization and amplicon inactivation to avoid contamination. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is a unique approach to mutation detection of point mutations, small deletions, and small insertions. Recently, we encountered problems with this assay and peak heights were much lower or disappeared. After going through systemic trouble-shooting, we found that profound inhibition of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) step of CF V3 multiplex PCR/OLA assay by the use of UV-irradiated plastic reaction tubes. When UV-irradiated tubes used throughout the assay, tubes exposed for 8 weeks at 0.7 m from the UV source gave a reduction of 60% and 67% in the assay products on the basis of sum of peak heights. Tubes exposed for 3 weeks at 0.1 m from the UV source totally eliminated assay product yielding no peaks. Further experiments showed that the inhibition happened mostly in the PCR step. Burgess and Hall had reported that inhibition of PCR of human glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase transcripts after UV irradiating the tubes. This showed that the inhibition was not assay-specific. The reason that the inhibition of PCR was more profound could be due to a multiplex PCR assay and small reaction volume. The mechanism of PCR inhibition by UV irradiation is not clear. In conclusion, plastic reaction tubes intended for PCR/OLA assays should not be exposed to UV.

  7. Development of viral disinfectant assays for duck hepatitis B virus using cell culture/PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Young J; Giambrone, Joseph J; Smith, Bruce F

    2002-10-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a worldwide public health problem with chronic carriers at risk for developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Accidental nosocomial infections from inadequately disinfected equipment or exposure to blood and body fluids from patients are major routes. To solve such problems, disinfectants to inactivate HBV must be validated. Duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) is accepted as a surrogate for HBV, due to their similar sensitivities to disinfectants and its safety. Ducklings are used for disinfectant efficacy assays; however, the same virus titer is obtained using duck embryonic hepatocytes. Viral titration in disinfectant efficacy assay is conducted using Southern hybridization of infected duck serum. However, this test requires radioisotopes. Therefore, disinfectant assessment protocols were developed using duck embryonic hepatocytes with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or nested PCR. The ease of handling, lowered cost and enhanced sensitivity make PCR desirable. Chicken embryonic hepatocytes were applied to DHBV disinfectant efficacy assay. Results were consistent and could be used under certain conditions. The virucidal activities of two quaternary ammonium chloride disinfectants, n-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride and alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (10C-12C) were compared and effective concentrations were 1200 and 1800 ppm, respectively. Efficacies of these disinfectants were validated using real-time quantitative PCR. Results confirmed that the efficacy of n-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride was higher than alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (10C-12C). This assay was useful for rapid discrimination of killing potentials of disinfectants. In conclusion, these assays can be applied to other viruses that are unable to cause CPE in cell cultures and broadened the utility of DHBV as animal model for HBV.

  8. A novel measurement of allele discrimination for assessment of allele-specific silencing by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masaki; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2014-11-01

    Allele-specific silencing by RNA interference (ASP-RNAi) is an atypical RNAi that is capable of discriminating target alleles from non-target alleles, and may be therapeutically useful for specific inhibition of disease-causing alleles without affecting their corresponding normal alleles. However, it is difficult to design and select small interfering RNA (siRNAs) that confer ASP-RNAi. A major problem is that there are few appropriate measures in determining optimal allele-specific siRNAs. Here we show two novel formulas for calculating a new measure of allele-discrimination, named "ASP-score". The formulas and ASP-score allow for an unbiased determination of optimal siRNAs, and may contribute to characterizing such allele-specific siRNAs.

  9. Predictive value of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal swab PCR assay for MRSA pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Dangerfield, Benjamin; Chung, Andrew; Webb, Brandon; Seville, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Pneumonia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with poor outcomes and frequently merits empirical antibiotic consideration despite its relatively low incidence. Nasal colonization with MRSA is associated with clinical MRSA infection and can be reliably detected using the nasal swab PCR assay. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the nasal swab MRSA PCR in predicting MRSA pneumonia. A retrospective cohort study was performed in a tertiary care center from January 2009 to July 2011. All patients with confirmed pneumonia who had both a nasal swab MRSA PCR test and a bacterial culture within predefined time intervals were included in the study. These data were used to calculate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for clinically confirmed MRSA pneumonia. Four hundred thirty-five patients met inclusion criteria. The majority of cases were classified as either health care-associated (HCAP) (54.7%) or community-acquired (CAP) (34%) pneumonia. MRSA nasal PCR was positive in 62 (14.3%) cases. MRSA pneumonia was confirmed by culture in 25 (5.7%) cases. The MRSA PCR assay demonstrated 88.0% sensitivity and 90.1% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 35.4% and a negative predictive value of 99.2%. In patients with pneumonia, the MRSA PCR nasal swab has a poor positive predictive value but an excellent negative predictive value for MRSA pneumonia in populations with low MRSA pneumonia incidence. In cases of culture-negative pneumonia where initial empirical antibiotics include an MRSA-active agent, a negative MRSA PCR swab can be reasonably used to guide antibiotic de-escalation.

  10. Serial Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection, Species Discrimination, and Quantification of Leishmania spp. in Human Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    Weirather, Jason L.; Jeronimo, Selma M. B.; Gautam, Shalini; Sundar, Shyam; Kang, Mitchell; Kurtz, Melissa A.; Haque, Rashidul; Schriefer, Albert; Talhari, Sinésio; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Donelson, John E.; Wilson, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    The Leishmania species cause a variety of human disease syndromes. Methods for diagnosis and species differentiation are insensitive and many require invasive sampling. Although quantitative PCR (qPCR) methods are reported for leishmania detection, no systematic method to quantify parasites and determine the species in clinical specimens is established. We developed a serial qPCR strategy to identify and rapidly differentiate Leishmania species and quantify parasites in clinical or environmental specimens. SYBR green qPCR is mainly employed, with corresponding TaqMan assays for validation. The screening primers recognize kinetoplast minicircle DNA of all Leishmania species. Species identification employs further qPCR set(s) individualized for geographic regions, combining species-discriminating probes with melt curve analysis. The assay was sufficient to detect Leishmania parasites, make species determinations, and quantify Leishmania spp. in sera, cutaneous biopsy specimens, or cultured isolates from subjects from Bangladesh or Brazil with different forms of leishmaniasis. The multicopy kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) probes were the most sensitive and useful for quantification based on promastigote standard curves. To test their validity for quantification, kDNA copy numbers were compared between Leishmania species, isolates, and life stages using qPCR. Maxicircle and minicircle copy numbers differed up to 6-fold between Leishmania species, but the differences were smaller between strains of the same species. Amastigote and promastigote leishmania life stages retained similar numbers of kDNA maxi- or minicircles. Thus, serial qPCR is useful for leishmania detection and species determination and for absolute quantification when compared to a standard curve from the same Leishmania species. PMID:22042830

  11. A multiplex PCR assay to diagnose and quantify Nosema infections in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Hamiduzzaman, Mollah Md; Guzman-Novoa, Ernesto; Goodwin, Paul H

    2010-10-01

    Correct identification of the microsporidia, Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae, is key to the study and control of Nosema disease of honey bees (Apis mellifera). A rapid DNA extraction method combined with multiplex PCR to amplify the 16S rRNA gene with species-specific primers was compared with a previously published assay requiring spore-germination buffer and a DNA extraction kit. When the spore germination-extraction kit method was used, 10 or more bees were required to detect the pathogens, whereas the new extraction method made it possible to detect the pathogens in single bees. Approx. 4-8 times better detection of N. ceranae was found with the new method compared to the spore germination-extraction kit method. In addition, the time and cost required to process samples was lower with the proposed method compared to using a kit. Using the new DNA extraction method, a spore quantification procedure was developed using a triplex PCR involving co-amplifying the N. apis and N. ceranae 16S rRNA gene with the ribosomal protein gene, RpS5, from the honey bee. The accuracy of this semi-quantitative PCR was determined by comparing the relative band intensities to the number of spores per bee determined by microscopy for 23 samples, and a high correlation (R(2)=0.95) was observed. This method of Nosema spore quantification revealed that spore numbers as low as 100 spores/bee could be detected by PCR. The new semi-quantitative triplex PCR assay is more sensitive, economical, rapid, simple, and reliable than previously published standard PCR-based methods for detection of Nosema and will be useful in laboratories where real-time PCR is not available.

  12. Real-time PCR assays for detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing molds in foods.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alicia; Rodríguez, Mar; Luque, M Isabel; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2012-08-01

    Aflatoxins are among the most toxic mycotoxins. Early detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing species is crucial to improve food safety. In the present work, two protocols of real-time PCR (qPCR) based on SYBR Green and TaqMan were developed, and their sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Primers and probes were designed from the o-methyltransferase gene (omt-1) involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. Fifty-three mold strains representing aflatoxin producers and non-producers of different species, usually reported in food products, were used as references. All strains were tested for aflatoxins production by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The functionality of the proposed qPCR method was demonstrated by the strong linear relationship of the standard curves constructed with the omt-1 gene copy number and Ct values for the different aflatoxin producers tested. The ability of the qPCR protocols to quantify aflatoxin-producing molds was evaluated in different artificially inoculated foods. A good linear correlation was obtained over the range 4 to 1 log cfu/g per reaction for all qPCR assays in the different food matrices (peanuts, spices and dry-fermented sausages). The detection limit in all inoculated foods ranged from 1 to 2 log cfu/g for SYBR Green and TaqMan assays. No significant effect was observed due to the different equipment, operator, and qPCR methodology used in the tests of repeatability and reproducibility for different foods. The proposed methods quantified with high efficiency the fungal load in foods. These qPCR protocols are proposed for use to quantify aflatoxin-producing molds in food products. PMID:22475946

  13. Real-time PCR assays for detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing molds in foods.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alicia; Rodríguez, Mar; Luque, M Isabel; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2012-08-01

    Aflatoxins are among the most toxic mycotoxins. Early detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing species is crucial to improve food safety. In the present work, two protocols of real-time PCR (qPCR) based on SYBR Green and TaqMan were developed, and their sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Primers and probes were designed from the o-methyltransferase gene (omt-1) involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. Fifty-three mold strains representing aflatoxin producers and non-producers of different species, usually reported in food products, were used as references. All strains were tested for aflatoxins production by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The functionality of the proposed qPCR method was demonstrated by the strong linear relationship of the standard curves constructed with the omt-1 gene copy number and Ct values for the different aflatoxin producers tested. The ability of the qPCR protocols to quantify aflatoxin-producing molds was evaluated in different artificially inoculated foods. A good linear correlation was obtained over the range 4 to 1 log cfu/g per reaction for all qPCR assays in the different food matrices (peanuts, spices and dry-fermented sausages). The detection limit in all inoculated foods ranged from 1 to 2 log cfu/g for SYBR Green and TaqMan assays. No significant effect was observed due to the different equipment, operator, and qPCR methodology used in the tests of repeatability and reproducibility for different foods. The proposed methods quantified with high efficiency the fungal load in foods. These qPCR protocols are proposed for use to quantify aflatoxin-producing molds in food products.

  14. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https

  15. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https

  16. Detection of 12 respiratory viruses by duplex real time PCR assays in respiratory samples.

    PubMed

    Arvia, Rosaria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Ciccone, Nunziata; Della Malva, Nunzia; Azzi, Alberta

    2015-12-01

    Different viruses can be responsible for similar clinical manifestations of respiratory infections. Thus, the etiological diagnosis of respiratory viral diseases requires the detection of a large number of viruses. In this study, 6 duplex real-time PCR assays, using EvaGreen intercalating dye, were developed to detect 12 major viruses responsible for respiratory diseases: influenza A and B viruses, enteroviruses (including enterovirus spp, and rhinovirus spp), respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus, coronaviruses group I (of which CoV 229E and CoV NL63 are part) and II (including CoV OC43 and CoV HKU1), parainfluenza viruses type 1, 2, 3 and 4, human adenoviruses and human bocaviruses. The 2 target viruses of each duplex reaction were distinguishable by the melting temperatures of their amplicons. The 6 duplex real time PCR assays were applied for diagnostic purpose on 202 respiratory samples from 157 patients. One hundred fifty-seven samples were throat swabs and 45 were bronchoalveolar lavages. The results of the duplex PCR assays were confirmed by comparison with a commercial, validated, assay; in addition, the positive results were confirmed by sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of the duplex PCR assays varied from 10(3) copies/ml to 10(4) copies/ml. For parainfluenza virus 2 only it was 10(5) copies/ml. Seventy clinical samples (35%) from 55 patients (30 children and 25 adults) were positive for 1 or more viruses. In adult patients, influenza A virus was the most frequently detected respiratory virus followed by rhinoviruses. In contrast, respiratory syncytial virus was the most common virus in children, followed by enteroviruses, influenza A virus and coronavirus NL63. The small number of samples/patients does not allow us to draw any epidemiological conclusion. Altogether, the results of this study indicate that the 6 duplex PCR assays described in this study are sensitive, specific and cost-effective. Thus, this assay could be

  17. Comparison of cell-based and PCR-based assays as methods for measuring infectivity of Tulane virus.

    PubMed

    Shan, Lei; Yang, David; Wang, Dapeng; Tian, Peng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we used Tulane virus (TV) as a surrogate for HuNoV to evaluate for correlation between two cell-based assays and three PCR-based assays. Specifically, the cell-based plaque and TCID50 assays measure for infectious virus particles, while the PCR-based RNase exposure, porcine gastric mucin in-situ-capture qRT-PCR (PGM-ISC-qRT-PCR), and antibody in-situ-capture qRT-PCR (Ab-ISC-qRT-PCR) assays measure for an amplicon within encapsidated viral genome. Ten batches of viral stocks ranging from 3.41 × 10(5) to 6.67 × 10(6) plaque forming units (PFUs) were used for side by side comparison with PFU as a reference. The results indicate that one PFU was equivalent to 6.69 ± 2.34 TCID50 units, 9.75 ± 10.87 RNase-untreated genomic copies (GCs), 2.87 ± 3.05 RNase-treated GCs, 0.07 ± 0.07 PGM-ISC-qRT-PCR GCs, and 0.52 ± 0.39 Ab-ISC-qRT-PCR GCs. We observed that while the cell-based assays were consistent with each other, the TCID50 assay was more sensitive than the plaque assay. In contrast, the PCR-based assays were not always consistent with the cell-based assays. The very high variations in GCs as measured by both ISC-RT-qPCR assays made them difficult to correlate against the relatively small variations (<20-fold) in the PFUs or TCID50 units as measured by the cell-based assays.

  18. The genetic association of RUNX3 with ankylosing spondylitis can be explained by allele-specific effects on IRF4 recruitment that alter gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Vecellio, Matteo; Roberts, Amity R; Cohen, Carla J; Cortes, Adrian; Knight, Julian C; Bowness, Paul; Wordsworth, B Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify the functional basis for the genetic association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), upstream of the RUNX3 promoter, with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods We performed conditional analysis of genetic association data and used ENCODE data on chromatin remodelling and transcription factor (TF) binding sites to identify the primary AS-associated regulatory SNP in the RUNX3 region. The functional effects of this SNP were tested in luciferase reporter assays. Its effects on TF binding were investigated by electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. RUNX3 mRNA levels were compared in primary CD8+ T cells of AS risk and protective genotypes by real-time PCR. Results The association of the RUNX3 SNP rs4648889 with AS (p<7.6×10−14) was robust to conditioning on all other SNPs in this region. We identified a 2 kb putative regulatory element, upstream of RUNX3, containing rs4648889. In reporter gene constructs, the protective rs4648889 ‘G’ allele increased luciferase activity ninefold but significantly less activity (4.3-fold) was seen with the AS risk ‘A’ allele (p≤0.01). The binding of Jurkat or CD8+ T-cell nuclear extracts to the risk allele was decreased and IRF4 recruitment was reduced. The AS-risk allele also affected H3K4Me1 histone methylation and associated with an allele-specific reduction in RUNX3 mRNA (p<0.05). Conclusion We identified a regulatory region upstream of RUNX3 that is modulated by rs4648889. The risk allele decreases TF binding (including IRF4) and reduces reporter activity and RUNX3 expression. These findings may have important implications for understanding the role of T cells and other immune cells in AS. PMID:26452539

  19. Real-time PCR assay for detection of a new simulant for poxvirus biothreat agents.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Laurence; Gaudin, Jean-Christophe; Bensadoun, Paul; Rebillat, Isabelle; Morel, Yannick

    2009-03-01

    Research and financial efforts spent on biodefense technologies highlight the current concern for biothreat event preparedness. Nonhazardous but relevant "simulant" microorganisms are typically used to simplify technological developments, testing, and staff training. The bacteriophage MS2, a small RNA virus, is classically used as the reference simulant for biothreat viruses within the biodefense community. However, variola virus, considered a major threat, displays very different features (size, envelope, and double-stranded DNA genome). The size parameter is critical for aerosol sampling, detection, and protection/filtration technologies. Therefore, a panel of relevant simulants should be used to cover the diversity of biothreat agents. Thus, we investigated a new virus model, the Cydia pomonella granulovirus (baculovirus), which is currently used as a biopesticide. It displays a size similar to that of poxviruses, is enveloped, and contains double-stranded DNA. To provide a molecular tool to detect and quantify this model virus, we developed an assay based on real-time PCR, with a limit of detection ranging from roughly 10 to a few tens of target copies per microl according to the sample matrix. The specificity of the assay against a large panel of potential cross-reactive microorganisms was checked, and the suitability of the assay for environmental samples, especially aerosol studies, was determined. In conclusion, we suggest that our PCR assay allows Cydia pomonella granulovirus to be used as a simulant for poxviruses. This assay may also be useful for environmental or crop treatment studies. PMID:19168659

  20. Testing the feasibility of DNA typing for human identification by PCR and an oligonucleotide ligation assay

    SciTech Connect

    Delahunty, C.; Ankener, W.; Deng, Qiang

    1996-06-01

    The use of DNA typing in human genome analysis is increasing and finding widespread application in the area of forensic and paternity testing. In this report, we explore the feasibility of typing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by using a semiautomated method for analyzing human DNA samples. In this approach, PCR is used to amplify segments of human DNA containing a common SNP. Allelic nucleotides in the amplified product are then typed by a calorimetric implementation of the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA). The results of the combined assay, PCR/OLA, are read directly by a spectrophotometer; the absorbances are compiled and the genotypes are automatically determined. A panel of 20 markers has been developed for DNA typing and has been tested using a sample panel from the CEPH pedigrees (CEPH parents). The results of this typing, as well as the potential to apply this method to larger populations, are discussed. 62 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Direct-multiplex PCR assay for meat species identification in food products.

    PubMed

    Kitpipit, Thitika; Sittichan, Kuangtiwa; Thanakiatkrai, Phuvadol

    2014-11-15

    This is the first time that direct PCR - DNA amplification without prior DNA extraction - was successfully developed and fully validated for rapid and economical simultaneous identification of six commonly consumed meat species. To achieve this, six species-specific primers were selected from previous reports and newly designed from the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b), cytochrome oxidase I (COI), and 12s rRNA gene. The assay generated PCR products of 100, 119, 133, 155, 253, and 311 bp for pork, lamb/mutton, chicken, ostrich meat, horsemeat and beef, respectively. Validation showed that the assay is robust, rapid, economical, reproducible, specific, and sensitive down to 12,500 mitochondrial copy (equating to seven fg). It could be used with a variety of raw meats and products, including highly degraded and processed food samples. This proposed method will be greatly beneficial to the consumers, food industry, and law enforcement.

  2. Development of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Thermophilic Spore-Forming Geobacillus stearothermophilus in Canned Food.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miyo

    2015-01-01

    The thermophilic spore forming bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus is recognized as a major cause of spoilage in canned food. A quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed to specifically detect and quantify the species G. stearothermophilus in samples from canned food. The selected primer pairs amplified a 163-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene in a specific PCR assay with a detection limit of 12.5 fg of pure culture DNA, corresponding to DNA extracted from approximately 0.7 CFU/mL of G. stearothermophilus. Analysis showed that the bacterial species G. stearothermophilus was not detected in any canned food sample. Our approach presented here will be useful for tracking or quantifying species G. stearotethermophilus in canned food and ingredients. PMID:26412704

  3. Quantitative multiplex real-time PCR assay for shrimp allergen: comparison of commercial master mixes and PCR platforms in rapid cycling.

    PubMed

    Eischeid, Anne C; Kasko, Sasha M

    2015-01-01

    Real-time PCR has been used widely in numerous fields. In food safety, it has been applied to detection of microbes and other contaminants, including food allergens. Interest in rapid (fast) cycling real-time PCR has grown because it yields results in less time than does conventional cycling. However, fast cycling can adversely affect assay performance. Here we report on tests of commercial master mixes specifically designed for fast real-time PCR using a shrimp allergen assay we previously developed and validated. The objective of this work was to determine whether specialized commercial master mixes lead to improved assay performance in rapid cycling. Real-time PCR assays were carried out using four different master mixes and two different rapid cycling protocols. Results indicated that specialized master mixes did yield quality results. In many cases, linear ranges spanned up to 7 orders of magnitude, R(2) values were at least 0.95, and reaction efficiencies were within or near the optimal range of 90 to 110%. In the faster of the two rapid cycling protocols tested, assay performance and PCR amplification were markedly better for the shorter PCR product. In conclusion, specialized commercial master mixes were effective as part of rapid cycling protocols, but conventional cycling as used in our previous work is more reliable for the shrimp assay tested.

  4. Development of PCR assays for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis in urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Bandea, Claudiu I; Joseph, Kahaliah; Secor, Evan W; Jones, Laurie A; Igietseme, Joseph U; Sautter, Robert L; Hammerschlag, Margaret R; Fajman, Nancy N; Girardet, Rebecca G; Black, Carolyn M

    2013-04-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis infections are usually asymptomatic or can result in nonspecific clinical symptoms, which makes laboratory-based detection of this protozoan parasite essential for diagnosis and treatment. We report the development of a battery of highly sensitive and specific PCR assays for detection of T. vaginalis in urine, a noninvasive specimen, and development of a protocol for differentiating among Trichomonas species that commonly infect humans.

  5. Rapid diagnosis of human brucellosis by peripheral-blood PCR assay.

    PubMed Central

    Queipo-Ortuño, M I; Morata, P; Ocón, P; Manchado, P; Colmenero, J D

    1997-01-01

    A single-step PCR assay with genus-specific primers for the amplification of a 223-bp region of the sequence encoding a 31-kDa immunogenetic Brucella abortus protein (BCSP31) was used for the rapid diagnosis of human brucellosis. We examined peripheral blood from 47 patients, with a total of 50 cases of brucellosis, and a group of 60 control subjects, composed of patients with febrile syndromes of several etiologies other than brucellosis, asymptomatic subjects seropositive for Brucella antibodies, and healthy subjects. Diagnosis of brucellosis was established in 35 cases (70%) by isolation of Brucella in blood culture and in the other 15 cases (30%) by clinical and serological means. The sensitivity of our PCR assay was 100%, since it correctly identified all 50 cases of brucellosis, regardless of the duration of the disease, the positivity of the blood culture, or the presence of focal forms. The specificity of the test was 98.3%, and the only false-positive result was for a patient who had had brucellosis 2 months before and possibly had a self-limited relapse. In those patients who relapsed, the results of our PCR assay were positive for both the initial infection and the relapse, becoming negative once the relapse treatment was completed and remaining negative in the follow-up tests at 2, 4, and 6 months. In conclusion, these results suggest that the PCR assay is rapid and easy to perform and highly sensitive and specific, and it may therefore be considered a useful tool for diagnosis of human brucellosis. PMID:9350761

  6. Real-time immuno-PCR assay for detecting PCBs in soil samples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Yu; Zhuang, Hui-Sheng

    2009-06-01

    A fast and robust assay, based on immuno-polymerase chain reaction (IPCR) techniques, was developed for the detection of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil samples. Real-time IPCR (rt-IPCR) is a powerful technique that combines enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the specificity and sensitivity of PCR. In our assay, indirect ELISAs based on immobilization of PCB37 hapten-ovalbumin conjugates was used for evaluation of the immune response. The effect of optimal reagent concentrations to reduce background fluorescence was also investigated. Using the optimized assay, the linear sensitivity range of the assay covered more than six orders of magnitude, and the minimum detection limits reached 5 fg ml(-1) antigen. Rt-IPCR was tested for its cross-reactivity profiles using four selected congeners and four Aroclor products. The assays were highly specific for congeners but less specific for Aroclor1242. We took four soil samples to validate the method, and the results were confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The rt-IPCR results for soil samples correlated well with the concentrations of PCBs obtained by GC/MS (r = 0.99, n = 6). These data indicate that this highly specific, sensitive, and robust assay can be modified for detecting PCB compounds in the environment.

  7. Monitoring toxic Ostreopsis cf. ovata in recreational waters using a qPCR based assay.

    PubMed

    Casabianca, Silvia; Perini, Federico; Casabianca, Anna; Battocchi, Cecilia; Giussani, Valentina; Chiantore, Mariachiara; Penna, Antonella

    2014-11-15

    Ostreopsis sp. is a toxic marine benthic dinoflagellate that causes high biomass blooms, posing a threat to human health, marine biota and aquaculture activities, and negatively impacting coastal seawater quality. Species-specific identification and enumeration is fundamental because it can allow the implementation of all the necessary preventive measures to properly manage Ostreopsis spp. bloom events in recreational waters and aquaculture farms. The aim of this study was to apply a rapid and sensitive qPCR method to quantify Ostreopsis cf. ovata abundance in environmental samples collected from Mediterranean coastal sites and to develop site-specific environmental standard curves. Similar PCR efficiencies of plasmid and environmental standard curves allowed us to estimate the LSU rDNA copy number per cell. Moreover, we assessed the effectiveness of mitochondrial COI and cob genes as alternative molecular markers to ribosomal genes in qPCR assays for Ostreopsis spp. quantification.

  8. Monitoring toxic Ostreopsis cf. ovata in recreational waters using a qPCR based assay.

    PubMed

    Casabianca, Silvia; Perini, Federico; Casabianca, Anna; Battocchi, Cecilia; Giussani, Valentina; Chiantore, Mariachiara; Penna, Antonella

    2014-11-15

    Ostreopsis sp. is a toxic marine benthic dinoflagellate that causes high biomass blooms, posing a threat to human health, marine biota and aquaculture activities, and negatively impacting coastal seawater quality. Species-specific identification and enumeration is fundamental because it can allow the implementation of all the necessary preventive measures to properly manage Ostreopsis spp. bloom events in recreational waters and aquaculture farms. The aim of this study was to apply a rapid and sensitive qPCR method to quantify Ostreopsis cf. ovata abundance in environmental samples collected from Mediterranean coastal sites and to develop site-specific environmental standard curves. Similar PCR efficiencies of plasmid and environmental standard curves allowed us to estimate the LSU rDNA copy number per cell. Moreover, we assessed the effectiveness of mitochondrial COI and cob genes as alternative molecular markers to ribosomal genes in qPCR assays for Ostreopsis spp. quantification. PMID:25282181

  9. Diagnosis of gastric cryptosporidiosis in birds using a duplex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Alex A; Homem, Camila G; da Silva, Adriana M J; Meireles, Marcelo V

    2014-09-15

    Three species and several genotypes of Cryptosporidium can infect the epithelial surface of the bursa of Fabricius, the respiratory tract, the proventriculus, the intestine, and the urinary tract in birds. There is reason to believe that gastric cryptosporidiosis in birds is caused by Cryptosporidium galli and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III, resulting in a chronic illness of the proventriculus that can lead to a debilitating and fatal clinical condition in birds of the orders Passeriformes and Psittaciformes. The objectives of the present study were to develop a duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that targets the 18S rRNA gene to simultaneously detect C. galli and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III DNA and to compare the duplex real-time PCR results to those of nested PCR targeting a partial fragment of the 18S rRNA gene, followed by sequencing of the amplified products (nPCR/S). A total of 1027 fecal samples were collected from birds of the orders Psittaciformes and Passeriformes originating either from captivity or the wild. Duplex real-time PCR results were positive in 580 (56.47%) and 21 (2.04%) samples, respectively, for C. galli and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III, whereas nPCR/S was positive in 28 (2.73%) and three (0.29%) samples, respectively, for C. galli and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III. Novel host birds were identified for both of the above gastric species, and it was also possible to identify Cryptosporidium baileyi and, for the first time in Brazil, Cryptosporidium avian genotype V. The duplex real-time PCR assay developed in the present study represents a sensitive and specific method for the detection of C. galli and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III in bird fecal samples. Moreover, this method may serve as an alternative to nPCR/S as a gold standard for the diagnosis of gastric cryptosporidiosis in birds.

  10. Evaluation of Various Campylobacter-Specific Quantitative PCR (qPCR) Assays for Detection and Enumeration of Campylobacteraceae in Irrigation Water and Wastewater via a Miniaturized Most-Probable-Number–qPCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Banting, Graham S.; Braithwaite, Shannon; Scott, Candis; Kim, Jinyong; Jeon, Byeonghwa; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Ruecker, Norma; Tymensen, Lisa; Charest, Jollin; Pintar, Katarina; Checkley, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Campylobacter spp. are the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, and water is increasingly seen as a risk factor in transmission. Here we describe a most-probable-number (MPN)–quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay in which water samples are centrifuged and aliquoted into microtiter plates and the bacteria are enumerated by qPCR. We observed that commonly used Campylobacter molecular assays produced vastly different detection rates. In irrigation water samples, detection rates varied depending upon the PCR assay and culture method used, as follows: 0% by the de Boer Lv1-16S qPCR assay, 2.5% by the Van Dyke 16S and Jensen glyA qPCR assays, and 75% by the Linton 16S endpoint PCR when cultured at 37°C. Primer/probe specificity was the major confounder, with Arcobacter spp. routinely yielding false-positive results. The primers and PCR conditions described by Van Dyke et al. (M. I. Van Dyke, V. K. Morton, N. L. McLellan, and P. M. Huck, J Appl Microbiol 109:1053–1066, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2010.04730.x) proved to be the most sensitive and specific for Campylobacter detection in water. Campylobacter occurrence in irrigation water was found to be very low (<2 MPN/300 ml) when this Campylobacter-specific qPCR was used, with the most commonly detected species being C. jejuni, C. coli, and C. lari. Campylobacters in raw sewage were present at ∼102/100 ml, with incubation at 42°C required for reducing microbial growth competition from arcobacters. Overall, when Campylobacter prevalence and/or concentration in water is reported using molecular methods, considerable validation is recommended when adapting methods largely developed for clinical applications. Furthermore, combining MPN methods with molecular biology-based detection algorithms allows for the detection and quantification of Campylobacter spp. in environmental samples and is potentially suited to quantitative microbial risk assessment for improved public health disease

  11. [Study of real-time PCR assays for rapid detection of food-borne pathogens].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hiroshi; Tsunomori, Yoshie

    2005-09-01

    A duplex real-time SYBR Green LightCycler PCR (LC-PCR) assay with DNA extraction using QIAamp DNA Stool Minikit was evaluated for detection of 8 of 19 species of food-borne pathogens, including Plesiomonas shigelloides, Providencia alcalifaciens, in five stool specimens. The time frame was within 2h or less. The protocol used the same LC-PCR with 22 pairs of specific primers. The rapid amplification and reliable detection of specific genes were determined by this LC-PCR assay from 10 cases of food-borne outbreaks in Shimane Prefecture from 2002 to 2005. These cases included Campylobacter jejuni (4), Clostridium perfringens (2), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and astA positive E. coli (1), and astA positive E. coli, enterohemorrhagic E. coli 026, and Bacillus cereus (1 each). Rapid amplification and reliable detection of specific genes of food-or water-borne pathogenic bacteria in fecal samples should facilitate the diagnosis and management of food-borne outbreaks.

  12. Rapid duplex PCR assay for the detection of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica strains.

    PubMed

    Aarts, H J; Joosten, R G; Henkens, M H; Stegeman, H; van Hoek, A H

    2001-11-01

    For the detection of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica strains, a duplex PCR has been developed based on differences observed between the fingerprint profiles of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. The profiles were obtained by using a primer derived from the Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC) sequences. From the sequence of one pathogen-specific amplified fragment, a discriminative primer has been designed bridging the sequence of the highly conserved core region and 3' end of the ERIC element. In combination with three other primers, all located within the detected open reading frame that resembled the sequence of the bipA gene, this primer was applied in a duplex PCR assay to simultaneously detect Y. enterocolitica and to discriminate between pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. The same primer combinations were used in an on line rapid cycling real-time PCR assay. The used SYBR Green I format allowed for the easy translation of the PCR conditions and confirmation of the resulting amplicons. The time of analysis was reduced to approximately 60 min. PMID:11576685

  13. High prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in saliva demonstrated by a novel PCR assay.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Musich, P R; Ha, T; Ferguson, D A; Patel, N R; Chi, D S; Thomas, E

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in the saliva of patients infected with this bacterium. METHODS--A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect H pylori in saliva and gastric biopsy specimens from patients undergoing endoscopy. RESULTS--Our PCR assay amplified a 417 base pair fragment of DNA from all 21 DNAs derived from H pylori clinical isolates but did not amplify DNA from 23 non-H pylori strains. Sixty three frozen gastric biopsy and 56 saliva specimens were tested. H pylori specific DNA was detected by PCR in all 39 culture positive biopsy specimens and was also identified from another seven biopsy specimens which were negative by culture but positive by histology. H pylori specific DNA was identified by PCR in saliva specimens from 30 (75%) of 40 patients with H pylori infection demonstrated by culture or histological examination, or both, and in three patients without H pylori infection in the stomach. CONCLUSION--The results indicate that the oral cavity harbours H pylori and may be the source of infection and transmission. Images PMID:7560176

  14. Specific PCR assays for the identification of common anisakid nematodes with zoonotic potential.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Yu, H Q; Lun, Z R; Chen, X G; Song, H Q; Lin, R Q; Zhu, X Q

    2008-12-01

    Based on the sequences of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) for six taxa of anisakids, namely, Anisakis simplex (s.s.), Anisakis typica, Anisakis pegreffii, Hysterothylacium aduncum, Hysterothylacium sp, and Contracaccum osculatum C, specific primers were designed in the ITS-1 and/or ITS-2 for each of the six anisakid taxa. These specific primers were used to develop polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tools for the identification of these anisakid taxa of sea fish by amplifying partial ITS-1 and/or ITS-2 of rDNA from anisakid nematodes. This approach allowed their specific identification, with no amplicons being amplified from heterogeneous DNA samples, and sequencing confirmed the identity of the DNA fragments amplified. The minimum amounts of DNA detectable using the PCR assays were 0.5-1 ng. These PCR tools were then applied to ascertain the specific identity of 143 anisakid larval samples collected from fish in China, Canada, Thailand, and Indonesia, and these anisakid samples were identified to represent one of the six anisakid taxa. These PCR assays based on ITS sequences should provide useful molecular tools for the accurate identification and molecular epidemiological investigations of anisakid infections in humans and fish. PMID:18758823

  15. Specific PCR assays for the identification of common anisakid nematodes with zoonotic potential.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Yu, H Q; Lun, Z R; Chen, X G; Song, H Q; Lin, R Q; Zhu, X Q

    2008-12-01

    Based on the sequences of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) for six taxa of anisakids, namely, Anisakis simplex (s.s.), Anisakis typica, Anisakis pegreffii, Hysterothylacium aduncum, Hysterothylacium sp, and Contracaccum osculatum C, specific primers were designed in the ITS-1 and/or ITS-2 for each of the six anisakid taxa. These specific primers were used to develop polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tools for the identification of these anisakid taxa of sea fish by amplifying partial ITS-1 and/or ITS-2 of rDNA from anisakid nematodes. This approach allowed their specific identification, with no amplicons being amplified from heterogeneous DNA samples, and sequencing confirmed the identity of the DNA fragments amplified. The minimum amounts of DNA detectable using the PCR assays were 0.5-1 ng. These PCR tools were then applied to ascertain the specific identity of 143 anisakid larval samples collected from fish in China, Canada, Thailand, and Indonesia, and these anisakid samples were identified to represent one of the six anisakid taxa. These PCR assays based on ITS sequences should provide useful molecular tools for the accurate identification and molecular epidemiological investigations of anisakid infections in humans and fish.

  16. Improved HF183 Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay for Characterization of Human Fecal Pollution in Ambient Surface Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Green, Hyatt C.; Haugland, Richard A.; Varma, Manju; Millen, Hana T.; Borchardt, Mark A.; Field, Katharine G.; Walters, William A.; Knight, R.; Sivaganesan, Mano; Kelty, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster within members of the genus Bacteroides are among the most widely used methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. In this study, we show that a current TaqMan HF183 qPCR assay (HF183/BFDrev) routinely forms nonspecific amplification products and introduce a modified TaqMan assay (HF183/BacR287) that alleviates this problem. The performance of each qPCR assay was compared in head-to-head experiments investigating limits of detection, analytical precision, predicted hybridization to 16S rRNA gene sequences from a reference database, and relative marker concentrations in fecal and sewage samples. The performance of the modified HF183/BacR287 assay is equal to or improves upon that of the original HF183/BFDrev assay. In addition, a qPCR chemistry designed to combat amplification inhibition and a multiplexed internal amplification control are included. In light of the expanding use of PCR-based methods that rely on the detection of extremely low concentrations of DNA template, such as qPCR and digital PCR, the new TaqMan HF183/BacR287 assay should provide more accurate estimations of human-derived fecal contaminants in ambient surface waters. PMID:24610857

  17. Improved HF183 quantitative real-time PCR assay for characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface water samples.

    PubMed

    Green, Hyatt C; Haugland, Richard A; Varma, Manju; Millen, Hana T; Borchardt, Mark A; Field, Katharine G; Walters, William A; Knight, R; Sivaganesan, Mano; Kelty, Catherine A; Shanks, Orin C

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster within members of the genus Bacteroides are among the most widely used methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. In this study, we show that a current TaqMan HF183 qPCR assay (HF183/BFDrev) routinely forms nonspecific amplification products and introduce a modified TaqMan assay (HF183/BacR287) that alleviates this problem. The performance of each qPCR assay was compared in head-to-head experiments investigating limits of detection, analytical precision, predicted hybridization to 16S rRNA gene sequences from a reference database, and relative marker concentrations in fecal and sewage samples. The performance of the modified HF183/BacR287 assay is equal to or improves upon that of the original HF183/BFDrev assay. In addition, a qPCR chemistry designed to combat amplification inhibition and a multiplexed internal amplification control are included. In light of the expanding use of PCR-based methods that rely on the detection of extremely low concentrations of DNA template, such as qPCR and digital PCR, the new TaqMan HF183/BacR287 assay should provide more accurate estimations of human-derived fecal contaminants in ambient surface waters.

  18. A PCR-based assay for discriminating Cervus and Rangifer (Cervidae) antlers with mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Hwa; Kim, Eung Soo; Ko, Byong Seob; Oh, Seung-Eun; Ryuk, Jin-Ah; Chae, Seong Wook; Lee, Hye Won; Choi, Go Ya; Seo, Doo Won; Lee, Mi Young

    2012-07-01

    This study describes a method for discriminating Rangifer antlers from true Cervus antlers using agarose gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, quantitative real-time PCR, and allelic discrimination. Specific primers labeled with fluorescent tags were designed to amplify fragments from the mitochondrial D-loop genes for various Cervus subspecies and Rangifer tarandus differentially. A 466-bp fragment that was observed for both Cervus and Rangifer antlers served as a positive control, while a 270-bp fragment was specifically amplified only from Rangifer antlers. Allelic discrimination was used to differentiate between Cervus and Rangifer antlers, based on the amplification of specific alleles for both types of antlers. These PCR-based assays can be used for forensic and quantitative analyses of Cervus and Rangifer antlers in a single step, without having to obtain any sequence information. In addition, multiple PCR-based assays are more accurate and reproducible than a single assay for species-specific analysis and are especially useful in this study for the identification of original Cervus deer products from fraudulent Rangifer antlers.

  19. A one step multiplex PCR assay for rapid screening of East Asian mtDNA haplogroups on forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; Yoon, Jung Ah; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup typing has become an essential tool to study human evolutionary history and to infer the matrilineal bio-geographic ancestry. In forensic field, the screening of mtDNA haplogroups by genotyping of mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can help guarantee the quality of mtDNA sequence data as well as can reduce the need to sequence samples that do not match. Here, a multiplex mutagenically separated (MS) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system was developed for simultaneous rapid detection of 14 coding region SNPs and one deletion motif representing common mtDNA haplogroups of East Asia. The multiplex MS PCR system we developed has the advantage of being a one step procedure that requires only a single PCR amplification with allele-specific primers and allowing straightforward designation of haplogroups along the branches of the phylogenetic tree. Therefore, it would be a simple, rapid, and reliable detection method useful for large-scale screening of mtDNA variations to determine East Asian mtDNA haplogroups.

  20. ACNE: a summarization method to estimate allele-specific copy numbers for Affymetrix SNP arrays

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Estevez, Maria; Bengtsson, Henrik; Rubio, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Current algorithms for estimating DNA copy numbers (CNs) borrow concepts from gene expression analysis methods. However, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays have special characteristics that, if taken into account, can improve the overall performance. For example, cross hybridization between alleles occurs in SNP probe pairs. In addition, most of the current CN methods are focused on total CNs, while it has been shown that allele-specific CNs are of paramount importance for some studies. Therefore, we have developed a summarization method that estimates high-quality allele-specific CNs. Results: The proposed method estimates the allele-specific DNA CNs for all Affymetrix SNP arrays dealing directly with the cross hybridization between probes within SNP probesets. This algorithm outperforms (or at least it performs as well as) other state-of-the-art algorithms for computing DNA CNs. It better discerns an aberration from a normal state and it also gives more precise allele-specific CNs. Availability: The method is available in the open-source R package ACNE, which also includes an add on to the aroma.affymetrix framework (http://www.aroma-project.org/). Contact: arubio@ceit.es Supplementaruy information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20529889

  1. RT-qPCR-based microneutralization assay for human cytomegalovirus using fibroblasts and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Peden, Keith; Murata, Haruhiko

    2015-12-16

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a leading cause of congenital infection that can result in serious disabilities in affected children. To facilitate HCMV vaccine development, a microscale neutralization assay based on reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was developed to quantify HCMV-neutralizing antibodies. Our approach relies on the generation of crude lysates from virus-infected cells that are amenable to direct analysis by RT-qPCR, thereby circumventing rate-limiting procedures associated with sample RNA extraction and purification. By serial passaging of the laboratory HCMV strain AD169 in epithelial cells (ARPE-19), a revertant virus with restored epithelial cell tropism, designated AD169(wt131), was obtained. AD169 and AD169(wt131) were evaluated in both epithelial cells (ARPE-19) and fibroblasts (MRC-5) by one-step RT-qPCR targeting the immediate-early gene IE1 transcript of HCMV. Expression kinetics indicated that RT-qPCR assessment could be conducted as early as 6h post-infection. Human serum samples (n=30) from healthy donors were tested for HCMV-specific IgG using a commercially available ELISA and for HCMV-neutralizing activity using our RT-qPCR-based neutralization assay. In agreement with the ELISA results, higher neutralizing activity was observed in the HCMV IgG seropositive group when compared with the HCMV IgG seronegative group. In addition, HCMV IgG seropositive human sera exhibited higher neutralizing titers using epithelial cells compared with using fibroblasts (geometric mean titers of 344 and 8 in ARPE-19 cells and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Our assay was robust to variation in input virus dose. In addition, a simple lysis buffer containing a non-ionic detergent was successfully demonstrated to be a less costly alternative to commercial reagents for cell-lysate preparation. Thus, our rapid HCMV neutralization assay may be a straightforward and flexible high-throughput tool for measuring antibody responses induced by vaccination

  2. Real-Time PCR Assay for a Unique Chromosomal Sequence of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Elizabeth; Hurtle, William; Norwood, David

    2004-01-01

    Real-time PCR has become an important method for the rapid identification of Bacillus anthracis since the 2001 anthrax mailings. Most real-time PCR assays for B. anthracis have been developed to detect virulence genes located on the pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids. In contrast, only two published chromosomal targets exist, the rpoB gene and the gyrA gene. In the present study, subtraction-hybridization with a plasmid-cured B. anthracis tester strain and a Bacillus cereus driver was used to find a unique chromosomal sequence. By targeting this region, a real-time assay was developed with the Ruggedized Advanced Pathogen Identification Device. Further testing has revealed that the assay has 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity, with a limit of detection of 50 fg of DNA. The results of a search for sequences with homology with the BLAST program demonstrated significant alignment to the recently published B. anthracis Ames strain, while an inquiry for protein sequence similarities indicated homology with an abhydrolase from B. anthracis strain A2012. The importance of this chromosomal assay will be to verify the presence of B. anthracis independently of plasmid occurrence. PMID:15583318

  3. Dr(a-) polymorphism of decay accelerating factor. Biochemical, functional, and molecular characterization and production of allele-specific transfectants.

    PubMed Central

    Lublin, D M; Thompson, E S; Green, A M; Levene, C; Telen, M J

    1991-01-01

    The Dra antigen belongs to the Cromer-related blood group system, a series of antigens on decay accelerating factor (DAF), a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane protein that protects host cells from complement-mediated damage. We studied the rare inherited Dr(a-) phenotype to ascertain the associated biochemical and functional changes in DAF and to characterize the basis for this polymorphism. Radioimmunoassay assay and flow cytometric analysis of Dr(a-) erythrocytes demonstrated 40% of normal surface expression of DAF but normal levels of several other glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, distinguishing this phenotype from that of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Western blots confirmed this reduced DAF expression and indicated a slightly faster mobility of the molecule on SDS-PAGE. Despite the reduced DAF expression, Dr(a-) erythrocytes functioned normally in the complement lysis sensitivity assay. Utilization of the polymerase chain reaction to amplify mononuclear cell genomic DNA from three unrelated Dr(a-) individuals demonstrated that a point mutation underlies the Dr(a-) phenotype: a C to T change in nucleotide 649 resulting in a serine165 to leucine change. This defines the Drb allele of DAF, which can be distinguished from Dra by a Taq I restriction fragment length polymorphism. We created transfected Chinese hamster ovary cell lines expressing either the Dra or the Drb allelic form of DAF. These allele-specific transfectants were tested by inhibition of hemagglutination or flow cytometry and confirmed the specificity of anti-Dra alloantisera. The allele-specific transfectants could form the basis of a new serological approach to immunohematology. Images PMID:1710232

  4. Absolute quantification of the alleles in somatic point mutations by bioluminometric methods based on competitive polymerase chain reaction in the presence of a locked nucleic acid blocker or an allele-specific primer.

    PubMed

    Iliadi, Alexandra; Petropoulou, Margarita; Ioannou, Penelope C; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Anagnostopoulos, Nikolaos I; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Traeger-Synodinos, Jan

    2011-09-01

    In somatic (acquired) point mutations, the challenge is to quantify minute amounts of the mutant allele in the presence of a large excess of the normal allele that differs only in a single base pair. We report two bioluminometric methods that enable absolute quantification of the alleles. The first method exploits the ability of a locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotide to bind to and inhibit effectively the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the normal allele while the amplification of the mutant allele remains unaffected. The second method employs allele-specific PCR primers, thereby allowing the amplification of the corresponding allele only. DNA internal standards (competitors) are added to the PCR mixture to compensate for any sample-to-sample variation in the amplification efficiency. The amplification products from the two alleles and the internal standards are quantified by a microtiter well-based bioluminometric hybridization assay using the photoprotein aequorin as a reporter. The methods allow absolute quantification of less than 300 copies of the mutant allele even in samples containing less than 1% of the mutant allele.

  5. Detection of mandarin in orange juice by single-nucleotide polymorphism qPCR assay.

    PubMed

    Aldeguer, Miriam; López-Andreo, María; Gabaldón, José A; Puyet, Antonio

    2014-02-15

    A dual-probe real time PCR (qPCR) DNA-based analysis was devised for the identification of mandarin in orange juice. A single nucleotide polymorphism at the trnL-trnF intergenic region of the chloroplast chromosome was confirmed in nine orange (Citrus sinensis) and thirteen commercial varieties of mandarin, including Citrus reticulata and Citrus unshiu species and a mandarin × tangelo hybrid. Two short minor-groove binding fluorescent probes targeting the polymorphic sequence were used in the dual-probe qPCR, which allowed the detection of both species in single-tube reactions. The similarity of PCR efficiencies allowed a simple estimation of the ratio mandarin/orange in the juice samples, which correlated to the measured difference of threshold cycle values for both probes. The limit of detection of the assay was 5% of mandarin in orange juice, both when the juice was freshly prepared (not from concentrate) or reconstituted from concentrate, which would allow the detection of fraudulently added mandarin juice. The possible use of the dual-probe system for quantitative measurements was also tested on fruit juice mixtures. qPCR data obtained from samples containing equal amounts of mandarin and orange juice revealed that the mandarin target copy number was approximately 2.6-fold higher than in orange juice. The use of a matrix-adapted control as calibrator to compensate the resulting C(T) bias allowed accurate quantitative measurements to be obtained.

  6. Detection of mandarin in orange juice by single-nucleotide polymorphism qPCR assay.

    PubMed

    Aldeguer, Miriam; López-Andreo, María; Gabaldón, José A; Puyet, Antonio

    2014-02-15

    A dual-probe real time PCR (qPCR) DNA-based analysis was devised for the identification of mandarin in orange juice. A single nucleotide polymorphism at the trnL-trnF intergenic region of the chloroplast chromosome was confirmed in nine orange (Citrus sinensis) and thirteen commercial varieties of mandarin, including Citrus reticulata and Citrus unshiu species and a mandarin × tangelo hybrid. Two short minor-groove binding fluorescent probes targeting the polymorphic sequence were used in the dual-probe qPCR, which allowed the detection of both species in single-tube reactions. The similarity of PCR efficiencies allowed a simple estimation of the ratio mandarin/orange in the juice samples, which correlated to the measured difference of threshold cycle values for both probes. The limit of detection of the assay was 5% of mandarin in orange juice, both when the juice was freshly prepared (not from concentrate) or reconstituted from concentrate, which would allow the detection of fraudulently added mandarin juice. The possible use of the dual-probe system for quantitative measurements was also tested on fruit juice mixtures. qPCR data obtained from samples containing equal amounts of mandarin and orange juice revealed that the mandarin target copy number was approximately 2.6-fold higher than in orange juice. The use of a matrix-adapted control as calibrator to compensate the resulting C(T) bias allowed accurate quantitative measurements to be obtained. PMID:24128588

  7. Edesign: Primer and Enhanced Internal Probe Design Tool for Quantitative PCR Experiments and Genotyping Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Naoko; Delobel, Diane; Hanami, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuki; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Usui, Kengo; Harbers, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Analytical PCR experiments preferably use internal probes for monitoring the amplification reaction and specific detection of the amplicon. Such internal probes have to be designed in close context with the amplification primers, and may require additional considerations for the detection of genetic variations. Here we describe Edesign, a new online and stand-alone tool for designing sets of PCR primers together with an internal probe for conducting quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and genotypic experiments. Edesign can be used for selecting standard DNA oligonucleotides like for instance TaqMan probes, but has been further extended with new functions and enhanced design features for Eprobes. Eprobes, with their single thiazole orange-labelled nucleotide, allow for highly sensitive genotypic assays because of their higher DNA binding affinity as compared to standard DNA oligonucleotides. Using new thermodynamic parameters, Edesign considers unique features of Eprobes during primer and probe design for establishing qPCR experiments and genotyping by melting curve analysis. Additional functions in Edesign allow probe design for effective discrimination between wild-type sequences and genetic variations either using standard DNA oligonucleotides or Eprobes. Edesign can be freely accessed online at http://www.dnaform.com/edesign2/, and the source code is available for download. PMID:26863543

  8. Monitoring Acidophilic Microbes with Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Frank F. Roberto

    2008-08-01

    Many techniques that are used to characterize and monitor microbial populations associated with sulfide mineral bioleaching require the cultivation of the organisms on solid or liquid media. Chemolithotrophic species, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, or thermophilic chemolithotrophs, such as Acidianus brierleyi and Sulfolobus solfataricus can grow quite slowly, requiring weeks to complete efforts to identify and quantify these microbes associated with bioleach samples. Real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assays in which DNA targets are amplified in the presence of fluorescent oligonucleotide primers, allowing the monitoring and quantification of the amplification reactions as they progress, provide a means of rapidly detecting the presence of microbial species of interest, and their relative abundance in a sample. This presentation will describe the design and use of such assays to monitor acidophilic microbes in the environment and in bioleaching operations. These assays provide results within 2-3 hours, and can detect less than 100 individual microbial cells.

  9. Development of a Single-Reaction Multiplex PCR Toxin Typing Assay for Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naresh K.; Rees, Catherine E. D.; Dodd, Christine E. R.

    2000-01-01

    We describe here the development of a single-reaction multiplex PCR assay for the enterotoxin genes from Staphylococcus aureus that utilizes a universal toxin gene primer in combination with toxin-specific primers to amplify characteristic toxin gene products. In combination with a new DNA purification method, the assay can detect enterotoxin genes A to E from a pure culture within 3 to 4 h. The test was used to characterize a diverse set of environmental S. aureus isolates, and a 99% correlation with toxin typing using standard immunological tests was found. The design of the assay allows it to be extended to include both newly characterized and as-yet-unknown toxin genes. PMID:10742210

  10. Multiplex PCR assay for the detection of five meat species forbidden in Islamic foods.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Eaqub; Razzak, Md Abdur; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Rahman, Md Mahfujur; Amin, Md Al; Rashid, Nur Raifana Abd; Asing

    2015-06-15

    Food falsification has direct impact on public health, religious faith, fair-trades and wildlife. For the first time, here we described a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the accurate identification of five meat species forbidden in Islamic foods in a single assay platform. Five pairs of species-specific primers were designed targeting mitochondrial ND5, ATPase 6, and cytochrome b genes to amplify 172, 163, 141, 129 and 108 bp DNA fragments from cat, dog, pig, monkey and rat meats, respectively. All PCR products were identified in gel-images and electrochromatograms obtained from Experion Bioanalyzer. Species-specificity checking against 15 important meat and fish and 5 plant species detected no cross-species amplification. Screening of target species in model and commercial meatballs reflected its application to detect target species in process foods. The assay was tested to detect 0.01-0.02 ng DNA under raw states and 1% suspected meats in meatball formulation.

  11. A PCR-based microwell-plate hybrid capture assay for high-risk human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yumei; Liu, Yan; Ding, Yaping; Sun, Nan; Gong, Yafang; Gao, Shangxian

    2014-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with cervical cancer. In this study, we developed a high-throughput microwell-plate hybrid capture (MPHC) method for epidemiological studies of high-risk HPV (HRHPV). The results with 1238 cervical specimens from female outpatients showed a concordance rate of 94.3 % between the MPHC and Hybrid Capture II assay. The MPHC assay showed an average HRHPV rate of 29.3 % for high-risk populations in populous cities of China. The established MPHC assay could sensitively and specifically detect 13 types of HRHPV and is suitable for large-scale screening, especially in areas where real-time PCR or fluorescence equipment is unavailable.

  12. A multiplex-PCR assay for identification of the quarantine plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli.

    PubMed

    Boureau, T; Kerkoud, M; Chhel, F; Hunault, G; Darrasse, A; Brin, C; Durand, K; Hajri, A; Poussier, S; Manceau, C; Lardeux, F; Saubion, F; Jacques, M-A

    2013-01-01

    In this study we developed an algorithm to screen for all exact molecular signatures of the quarantine pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap), based on available data of the presence or absence of virulence-associated genes. The simultaneous presence of genes avrBsT and xopL is specific to Xap. Therefore we developed a multiplex PCR assay targeting avrBsT and xopL for the molecular identification of Xap. The specificity of this multiplex was validated by comparison to that of other molecular identification assays aimed at Xap, on a wide collection of reference strains. This multiplex was further validated on a blind collection of Xanthomonas isolates for which pathogenicity was assayed by stem wounding and by dipping leaves into calibrated inocula. This multiplex was combined to the previously described X4c/X4e molecular identification assay for Xap. Such a combination enables the molecular identification of all strains of Xanthomonas pathogenic on bean. Results also show that assay by stem wounding does not give reliable results in the case of Xap, and that pathogenicity assays by dipping should be preferred. PMID:23142341

  13. Development and validation of a quantitative real time PCR assay for BK virus.

    PubMed

    Mitui, Midori; Leos, N Kristine; Lacey, Damon; Doern, Christopher; Rogers, Beverly B; Park, Jason Y

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that BK viral load in plasma and urine are reliable markers for the detection of BK virus associated nephropathy (BKVAN) in renal transplant patients. We developed a quantitative real time PCR assay based on TaqMan technology for the measurement of BK viral load in plasma and urine. Considering the high similarity of the nucleotide sequence of the BK virus (BKV) with the JC virus (JCV), we designed this assay to specifically amplify BKV. We determined the viral DNA recovery rate on manual (QIAGEN's QIAamp DNA Blood Mini Kit) and automated (BioMerieux's NucliSENS EasyMAG) extraction methods. The comparison showed a higher viral DNA recovery rate on the automated extraction (61-76% in plasma and 52-65% in urine) as compared to the manual method (49-52% in plasma and 33-56% in urine). Quantitation of the viral load was performed using an external standard curve that was constructed with serial dilution of a plasmid containing the full length of the BKV genome. Commercially available quantitative BKV standards showed good correlation with the plasmid standard. The reproducibility of the assay was determined based on the Ct values of the amplified products as well as in BK copies per milliliter of sample. This assay is linear over a 7 log range (10 to 1 × 10(7) copies per reaction), no cross-reactivity was detected with the closest-related polyomavirus JCV, as well as other viruses that may be found in immunocompromised patients, and human genomic DNA. The limit of detection of the assay is 300 copies per milliliter in both plasma and urine and the limit of quantitation is 1000 copies per milliliter using the NATtrol BK Virus Linearity Panel (ZeptoMetrix). This real time PCR assay provides a reliable and sensitive method for the quantitation of BKV in plasma and urine samples.

  14. A qRT-PCR assay for the expression of all Mal d 1 isoallergen genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A considerable number of individuals suffer from oral allergy syndrome (OAS) to apple, resulting in the avoidance of apple consumption. Apple cultivars differ greatly in their allergenic properties, but knowledge of the causes for such differences is incomplete. Mal d 1 is considered the major apple allergen. For Mal d 1, a wide range of isoallergens and variants exist, and they are encoded by a large gene family. To identify the specific proteins/genes that are potentially involved in the allergy, we developed a PCR assay to monitor the expression of each individual Mal d 1 gene. Gene-specific primer pairs were designed for the exploitation of sequence differences among Mal d 1 genes. The specificity of these primers was validated using both in silico and in vitro techniques. Subsequently, this assay was applied to the peel and flesh of fruits from the two cultivars ‘Florina’ and ‘Gala’. Results We successfully developed gene-specific primer pairs for each of the 31 Mal d 1 genes and incorporated them into a qRT-PCR assay. The results from the application of the assay showed that 11 genes were not expressed in fruit. In addition, differential expression was observed among the Mal d 1 genes that were expressed in the fruit. Moreover, the expression levels were tissue and cultivar dependent. Conclusion The assay developed in this study facilitated the first characterisation of the expression levels of all known Mal d 1 genes in a gene-specific manner. Using this assay on different fruit tissues and cultivars, we obtained knowledge concerning gene relevance in allergenicity. This study provides new perspectives for research on both plant breeding and immunotherapy. PMID:23522122

  15. Evaluation of four endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays for common wheat quantification in GMOs detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huali; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Ruoan; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-01-01

    Proper selection of endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays is quite important in genetically modified organisms (GMOs) detection. To find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) DNA content or copy number quantification, four previously reported wheat endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays were comprehensively evaluated for the target gene sequence variation and their real-time PCR performance among 37 common wheat lines. Three SNPs were observed in the PKABA1 and ALMT1 genes, and these SNPs significantly decreased the efficiency of real-time PCR amplification. GeNorm analysis of the real-time PCR performance of each gene among common wheat lines showed that the Waxy-D1 assay had the lowest M values with the best stability among all tested lines. All results indicated that the Waxy-D1 gene and its real-time PCR assay were most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference gene for common wheat DNA content quantification. The validated Waxy-D1 gene assay will be useful in establishing accurate and creditable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM wheat. PMID:24098735

  16. Evaluation of four endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays for common wheat quantification in GMOs detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huali; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Ruoan; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-01-01

    Proper selection of endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays is quite important in genetically modified organisms (GMOs) detection. To find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) DNA content or copy number quantification, four previously reported wheat endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays were comprehensively evaluated for the target gene sequence variation and their real-time PCR performance among 37 common wheat lines. Three SNPs were observed in the PKABA1 and ALMT1 genes, and these SNPs significantly decreased the efficiency of real-time PCR amplification. GeNorm analysis of the real-time PCR performance of each gene among common wheat lines showed that the Waxy-D1 assay had the lowest M values with the best stability among all tested lines. All results indicated that the Waxy-D1 gene and its real-time PCR assay were most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference gene for common wheat DNA content quantification. The validated Waxy-D1 gene assay will be useful in establishing accurate and creditable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM wheat.

  17. Tracking the Invasion of Small Numbers of Cells in Paper-Based Assays with Quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Truong, Andrew S; Lochbaum, Christian A; Boyce, Matthew W; Lockett, Matthew R

    2015-11-17

    Paper-based scaffolds are an attractive material for culturing mammalian cells in a three-dimensional environment. There are a number of previously published studies, which utilize these scaffolds to generate models of aortic valves, cardiac ischemia and reperfusion, and solid tumors. These models have largely relied on fluorescence imaging and microscopy to quantify cells in the scaffolds. We present here a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method, capable of quantifying multiple cell types in a single culture with the aid of DNA barcodes: unique sequences of DNA introduced to the genome of individual cells or cell types through lentiviral transduction. PCR-based methods are highly specific and are amenable to high-throughput and multiplexed analyses. To validate this method, we engineered two different breast cancer lines to constitutively express either a green or red fluorescent protein. These cells lines allowed us to directly compare the ability of fluorescence imaging (of the fluorescent proteins) and qPCR (of the unique DNA sequences of the fluorescent proteins) to quantify known numbers of cells in the paper based-scaffolds. We also used both methods to quantify the distribution of these breast cell lines in homotypic and heterotypic invasion assays. In the paper-based invasion assays, a single sheet of paper containing cells suspended in a hydrogel was sandwiched between sheets of paper containing only hydrogel. The stack was incubated, and the cells invaded the adjacent layers. The individual sheets of the invasion assay were then destacked and the number of cells in each layer quantified. Our results show both methods can accurately detect cell populations of greater than 500 cells. The qPCR method can repeatedly and accurately detect as few as 50 cells, allowing small populations of highly invasive cells to be detected and differentiated from other cell types.

  18. Reproducibility of Digital PCR Assays for Circulating Tumor DNA Analysis in Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hrebien, Sarah; O’Leary, Ben; Beaney, Matthew; Schiavon, Gaia; Fribbens, Charlotte; Bhambra, Amarjit; Johnson, Richard; Turner, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) analysis has the potential to allow non-invasive analysis of tumor mutations in advanced cancer. In this study we assessed the reproducibility of digital PCR (dPCR) assays of circulating tumor DNA in a cohort of patients with advanced breast cancer and assessed delayed plasma processing using cell free DNA preservative tubes. We recruited a cohort of 96 paired samples from 71 women with advanced breast cancer who had paired blood samples processed either immediately or delayed in preservative tubes with processing 48–72 hours after collection. Plasma DNA was analysed with multiplex digital PCR (mdPCR) assays for hotspot mutations in PIK3CA, ESR1 and ERBB2, and for AKT1 E17K. There was 94.8% (91/96) agreement in mutation calling between immediate and delayed processed tubes, kappa 0.88 95% CI 0.77–0.98). Discordance in mutation calling resulted from low allele frequency and likely stochastic effects. In concordant samples there was high correlation in mutant copies per ml plasma (r2 = 0.98; p<0.0001). There was elevation of total cell free plasma DNA concentrations in 10.3% of delayed processed tubes, although overall quantification of total cell free plasma DNA had similar prognostic effects in immediate (HR 3.6) and delayed (HR 3.0) tubes. There was moderate agreement in changes in allele fraction between sequential samples in quantitative mutation tracking (r = 0.84, p = 0.0002). Delayed processing of samples using preservative tubes allows for centralized ctDNA digital PCR mutation screening in advanced breast cancer. The potential of preservative tubes in quantitative mutation tracking requires further research. PMID:27760227

  19. Rapid identification of bacterial pathogens using a PCR- and microarray-based assay

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background During the course of a bacterial infection, the rapid identification of the causative agent(s) is necessary for the determination of effective treatment options. We have developed a method based on a modified broad-range PCR and an oligonucleotide microarray for the simultaneous detection and identification of 12 bacterial pathogens at the species level. The broad-range PCR primer mixture was designed using conserved regions of the bacterial topoisomerase genes gyrB and parE. The primer design allowed the use of a novel DNA amplification method, which produced labeled, single-stranded DNA suitable for microarray hybridization. The probes on the microarray were designed from the alignments of species- or genus-specific variable regions of the gyrB and parE genes flanked by the primers. We included mecA-specific primers and probes in the same assay to indicate the presence of methicillin resistance in the bacterial species. The feasibility of this assay in routine diagnostic testing was evaluated using 146 blood culture positive and 40 blood culture negative samples. Results Comparison of our results with those of a conventional culture-based method revealed a sensitivity of 96% (initial sensitivity of 82%) and specificity of 98%. Furthermore, only one cross-reaction was observed upon investigating 102 culture isolates from 70 untargeted bacteria. The total assay time was only three hours, including the time required for the DNA extraction, PCR and microarray steps in sequence. Conclusion The assay rapidly provides reliable data, which can guide optimal antimicrobial treatment decisions in a timely manner. PMID:19664269

  20. Evaluation of a commercially developed semiautomated PCR-surface-enhanced raman scattering assay for diagnosis of invasive fungal disease.

    PubMed

    White, P Lewis; Hibbitts, Samantha J; Perry, Michael D; Green, Julie; Stirling, Emma; Woodford, Luke; McNay, Graeme; Stevenson, Ross; Barnes, Rosemary A

    2014-10-01

    Nonculture-based tests are gaining popularity in the diagnosis of invasive fungal disease (IFD), but PCR is excluded from disease-defining criteria because of limited standardization and a lack of commercial assays. Commercial PCR assays may have a standardized methodology while providing quality assurance. The detection of PCR products by a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) assay potentially provides superior analytical sensitivity and multiplexing capacity compared to that of real-time PCR. Using this approach, the RenDx Fungiplex assay was developed to detect Candida and Aspergillus. Analytical and clinical evaluations of the assay were undertaken using extraction methods according to European Aspergillus PCR Initiative (EAPCRI) recommendations. A total of 195 previously extracted samples (133 plasma, 49 serum, and 13 whole blood) from 112 patients (29 with proven/probable IFD) were tested. The 95% limit of detection of Candida and Aspergillus was 200 copies per reaction, with an overall reproducibility of 92.1% for detecting 20 input copies per PCR, and 89.8% for the nucleic acid extraction-PCR-SERS process for detecting fungal burdens of <20 genome equivalents per sample. A clinical evaluation showed that assay positivity significantly correlated with IFD (P < 0.0001). The sensitivity of the assay was 82.8% and was similar for both Candida (80.0%) and Aspergillus (85.7%). The specificity was 87.5% and was increased (97.5%) by using a multiple (≥ 2 samples) PCR-positive threshold. In summary, the RenDx Fungiplex assay is a PCR-SERS assay for diagnosing IFD and demonstrates promising clinical performance on a variety of samples. This was a retrospective clinical evaluation, and performance is likely to be enhanced through a prospective analysis of clinical validity and by determining clinical utility. PMID:25031443

  1. Quantification of substance p mRNA in human immune cells by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jian-Ping; Douglas, Steven D; Shaheen, Farida; Pleasure, David E; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2002-01-01

    We have applied a newly developed real-time reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR (RT-PCR) assay for quantification of substance P (SP) mRNA expression (the SP real-time RT-PCR assay) in human blood monocyte-derived macrophages, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and microglia isolated from fetal brain. The SP real-time RT-PCR assay had a sensitivity of 60 mRNA copies, with a dynamic range of detection between 60 and 600,000 copies of the SP gene transcript per reaction mixture. The coefficient of variation of the threshold cycle number between the SP real-time RT-PCR assays was less than 1.16%. This assay with an SP-specific primer pair efficiently recognizes all four isoforms of preprotachykinin A (the SP precursor) gene transcripts. In order to use this assay to measure the levels of SP mRNA in the human immune cells quantitatively, we designed a specific probe (molecular beacon) derived from exon 3 of the SP gene. We demonstrated that the real-time RT-PCR quantitatively detected SP mRNA in the human immune cells, among which the microglia isolated from fetal brain had the highest levels of SP mRNA. The SP real-time PCR assay yielded reproducible data, as the intra-assay variation was less than 1%. Thus, it is feasible to apply the real-time RT-PCR assay for quantification of SP mRNA levels in human immune cells, as well as in other nonneuronal cells. Since SP is a major modulator of neuroimmunoregulation, this assay has the potential for widespread application for basic and clinical investigations.

  2. Detection of Nicotiana DNA in Tobacco Products Using a Novel Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Korchinski, Katie L; Land, Adrian D; Craft, David L; Brzezinski, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    Establishing that a product contains tobacco is a requirement for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's regulation and/or prosecution of tobacco products. Therefore, a multiplex real-time PCR method was designed to determine if Nicotiana (tobacco) DNA is present in tobacco products. The PCR method simultaneously amplifies a 73 bp fragment of the cytochrome P450 monoxygenase CYP82E4 gene and 66 bp fragment in the nia-1 gene for nitrate reductase, which are detected using dual-labeled TaqMan probes. The assay is capable of detecting approximately 7.8 pg purified tobacco DNA, with a similar sensitivity for either gene target while incorporating an internal positive control (IPC). DNA was extracted from prepared tobacco products-including chewing tobacco, pipe tobacco, and snuff-or from the cut fill (no wrapper) of cigarettes and cigars. Of the 13 products analyzed, 12 were positive for both tobacco-specific markers and the IPC. DNA was also extracted from the fill of five varieties of herbal cigarettes, which were negative for both tobacco-specific gene targets and positive for the IPC. Our method expands on current assays by introducing a multiplex reaction, targeting two sequences in two different genes of interest, incorporating an IPC into the reaction, and lowering the LOD and LOQ while increasing the efficiency of the PCR. PMID:27143320

  3. Detection of Nicotiana DNA in Tobacco Products Using a Novel Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Korchinski, Katie L; Land, Adrian D; Craft, David L; Brzezinski, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    Establishing that a product contains tobacco is a requirement for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's regulation and/or prosecution of tobacco products. Therefore, a multiplex real-time PCR method was designed to determine if Nicotiana (tobacco) DNA is present in tobacco products. The PCR method simultaneously amplifies a 73 bp fragment of the cytochrome P450 monoxygenase CYP82E4 gene and 66 bp fragment in the nia-1 gene for nitrate reductase, which are detected using dual-labeled TaqMan probes. The assay is capable of detecting approximately 7.8 pg purified tobacco DNA, with a similar sensitivity for either gene target while incorporating an internal positive control (IPC). DNA was extracted from prepared tobacco products-including chewing tobacco, pipe tobacco, and snuff-or from the cut fill (no wrapper) of cigarettes and cigars. Of the 13 products analyzed, 12 were positive for both tobacco-specific markers and the IPC. DNA was also extracted from the fill of five varieties of herbal cigarettes, which were negative for both tobacco-specific gene targets and positive for the IPC. Our method expands on current assays by introducing a multiplex reaction, targeting two sequences in two different genes of interest, incorporating an IPC into the reaction, and lowering the LOD and LOQ while increasing the efficiency of the PCR.

  4. Comparison of the conventional multiplex RT-PCR, real time RT-PCR and Luminex xTAG® RVP fast assay for the detection of respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Manohar L; Anand, Siddharth P; Tikhe, Shamal A; Walimbe, Atul M; Potdar, Varsha A; Chadha, Mandeep S; Mishra, Akhilesh C

    2016-01-01

    Detection of respiratory viruses using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive, specific and cost effective, having huge potential for patient management. In this study, the performance of an in-house developed conventional multiplex RT-PCR (mRT-PCR), real time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) and Luminex xTAG(®) RVP fast assay (Luminex Diagnostics, Toronto, Canada) for the detection of respiratory viruses was compared. A total 310 respiratory clinical specimens predominantly from pediatric patients, referred for diagnosis of influenza A/H1N1pdm09 from August 2009 to March 2011 were tested to determine performance characteristic of the three methods. A total 193 (62.2%) samples were detected positive for one or more viruses by mRT-PCR, 175 (56.4%) samples by real time monoplex RT-PCR, and 138 (44.5%) samples by xTAG(®) RVP fast assay. The overall sensitivity of mRT-PCR was 96.9% (95% CI: 93.5, 98.8), rtRT-PCR 87.9% (95% CI: 82.5, 92.1) and xTAG(®) RVP fast was 68.3% (95% CI: 61.4, 74.6). Rhinovirus was detected most commonly followed by respiratory syncytial virus group B and influenza A/H1N1pdm09. The monoplex real time RT-PCR and in-house developed mRT-PCR are more sensitive, specific and cost effective than the xTAG(®) RVP fast assay.

  5. Development and Evaluation of Serotype- and Group-Specific Fluorogenic Reverse Transcriptase PCR (TaqMan) Assays for Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Johnny D.; Wu, Shuenn-Jue L.; Dion-Schultz, Amanda; Mangold, Beverly E.; Peruski, Leonard F.; Watts, Douglas M.; Porter, Kevin R.; Murphy, Gerald R.; Suharyono, Wuryadi; King, Chwan-Chuen; Hayes, Curtis G.; Temenak, Joseph J.

    2001-01-01

    Five fluorogenic probe hydrolysis (TaqMan) reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assays were developed for serotypes 1 to 4 and group-specific detection of dengue virus. Serotype- and group-specific oligonucleotide primers and fluorogenic probes were designed against conserved regions of the dengue virus genome. The RT-PCR assay is a rapid single-tube method consisting of a 30-min RT step linked to a 45-cycle PCR at 95 and 60°C that generates a fluorogenic signal in positive samples. Assays were initially evaluated against cell culture-derived dengue stock viruses and then with 67 dengue viremic human sera received from Peru, Indonesia, and Taiwan. The TaqMan assays were compared to virus isolation using C6/36 cells followed by an immunofluorescence assay using serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies. Viral titers in sera were determined by plaque assay in Vero cells. The serotype-specific TaqMan RT-PCR assay detected 62 of 67 confirmed dengue virus-positive samples, for a sensitivity of 92.5%, while the group-specific assay detected 66 of 67 confirmed dengue virus-positive samples, for a sensitivity of 98.5%. The TaqMan RT-PCR assays have a specificity of 100% based on the serotype concordance of all assays compared to cell culture isolation and negative results obtained when 21 normal human sera and plasma samples were tested. Our results demonstrate that the dengue virus TaqMan RT-PCR assays may be utilized as rapid, sensitive, and specific screening and serotyping tools for epidemiological studies of dengue virus infections. PMID:11682539

  6. A real-time PCR assay for detection and quantification of Verticillium dahliae in spinach seed.

    PubMed

    Duressa, Dechassa; Rauscher, Gilda; Koike, Steven T; Mou, Beiquan; Hayes, Ryan J; Maruthachalam, Karunakaran; Subbarao, Krishna V; Klosterman, Steven J

    2012-04-01

    Verticillium dahliae is a soilborne fungus that causes Verticillium wilt on multiple crops in central coastal California. Although spinach crops grown in this region for fresh and processing commercial production do not display Verticillium wilt symptoms, spinach seeds produced in the United States or Europe are commonly infected with V. dahliae. Planting of the infected seed increases the soil inoculum density and may introduce exotic strains that contribute to Verticillium wilt epidemics on lettuce and other crops grown in rotation with spinach. A sensitive, rapid, and reliable method for quantification of V. dahliae in spinach seed may help identify highly infected lots, curtail their planting, and minimize the spread of exotic strains via spinach seed. In this study, a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was optimized and employed for detection and quantification of V. dahliae in spinach germplasm and 15 commercial spinach seed lots. The assay used a previously reported V. dahliae-specific primer pair (VertBt-F and VertBt-R) and an analytical mill for grinding tough spinach seed for DNA extraction. The assay enabled reliable quantification of V. dahliae in spinach seed, with a sensitivity limit of ≈1 infected seed per 100 (1.3% infection in a seed lot). The quantification was highly reproducible between replicate samples of a seed lot and in different real-time PCR instruments. When tested on commercial seed lots, a pathogen DNA content corresponding to a quantification cycle value of ≥31 corresponded with a percent seed infection of ≤1.3%. The assay is useful in qualitatively assessing seed lots for V. dahliae infection levels, and the results of the assay can be helpful to guide decisions on whether to apply seed treatments.

  7. Detection of enteroviruses and parechoviruses by a multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Pabbaraju, Kanti; Wong, Sallene; Wong, Anita A; Tellier, Raymond

    2015-04-01

    Detection of all enteroviruses while excluding cross-detection of rhinoviruses is challenging because of sequence similarities in the commonly used conserved targets for molecular assays. In addition, simultaneous detection and differentiation of enteroviruses and parechoviruses would be beneficial because of a similar clinical picture presented by these viruses. A sensitive and specific real-time RT-PCR protocol that can address these clinical needs would be valuable to molecular diagnostic laboratories. Here we report a multiplex nucleic acid based assay using hydrolysis probes targeting the 5' non-translated region for the detection and differentiation of enteroviruses and parechoviruses without cross-detection of rhinoviruses. This assay has been shown to detect enteroviruses belonging to the different species in a variety of specimen types without detecting the different species of rhinoviruses. Laboratory validation shows the assay to be sensitive, specific, reproducible, easy to set up and uses generic cycling conditions. This assay can be implemented for diagnostic testing of patient samples in a high throughput fashion.

  8. Detection of four important Eimeria species by multiplex PCR in a single assay.

    PubMed

    You, Myung-Jo

    2014-06-01

    The oocysts of some of the recognized species of chicken coccidiosis are difficult to distinguish morphologically. Diagnostic laboratories are increasingly utilizing DNA-based technologies for the specific identification of Eimeria species. This study reports a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay based on internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS-1) for the simultaneous diagnosis of the Eimeria tenella, Eimeria acervulina, Eimeria maxima, and Eimeria necatrix species, which infect domestic fowl. Primer pairs specific to each species were designed in order to generate a ladder of amplification products ranging from 20 to 25 bp, and a common optimum annealing temperature for these species was determined to be 52.5 °C. Sensitivity tests were performed for each species, showing a detection threshold of 1-5 pg. All the species were amplified homogeneously, and a homogenous band ladder was observed, indicating that the assay permitted the simultaneous detection of all the species in a single-tube reaction. In the phylogenic study, there was a clear species clustering, which was irrespective of geographical location, for all the ITS-1 sequences used. This multiplex PCR assay represents a rapid and potential cost-effective diagnostic method for the detection of some key Eimeria species that infect domestic fowl.

  9. Real-time FRET PCR assay for Salmonella enterica serotype detection in food.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Eric V; Gibbins, Carl S; Grayson, J Kevin

    2009-09-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes are leading etiological agents of food-borne gastroenteritis. Traditional identification is laborious and time intensive. Faster molecular methods may allow early identification in contaminated food products. We developed a real-time, fluorescence resonance energy transfer hybridization probe polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for S. enterica serotypes on the basis of the exclusive presence of the apeE gene in Salmonella Typhimurium. Assay sensitivity for 12 S. enterica serotypes was as low as 1.87 x 10(2) genomic equivalents per milliliter. PCR efficiency was 94% and the dynamic range was linear over six orders of magnitude from 10(0) to 10(6) copies. The lower limit of detection for 12 different food matrices was between 1.5 x 10(2) and 1.5 x 10(5) CFU/mL without pre-enrichment. When combined with high-throughput automated DNA extraction, 32 food specimens were processed and assayed in less than 2 hours, allowing rapid, specific, sensitive detection of S. enterica serotypes in food products.

  10. Specific detection of Aspergillus parasiticus in wheat flour using a highly sensitive PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Sardiñas, Noelia; Vázquez, Covadonga; Gil-Serna, Jessica; González-Jaen, M Teresa; Patiño, Belén

    2010-06-01

    Aspergillus parasiticus is one of the most important aflatoxin-producing species that contaminates foodstuffs and beverages for human consumption. In this work, a specific and highly sensitive PCR protocol was developed to detect A. parasiticus using primers designed on the multicopy internal transcribed region of the rDNA unit (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA). The assay proved to be highly specific for A. parasiticus when tested on a wide range of related and other fungal species commonly found in commodities, and allowing discrimination from the closely related A. flavus. Accuracy of detection and quantification by conventional PCR were tested with genomic DNA obtained from wheat flour artificially contaminated with spore suspensions of known concentrations. Spore concentrations equal or higher than 10(6) spore/g could be detected by the assay directly without prior incubation of the samples. The assay described is suitable for incorporation in routine analyses at critical points of the food chain within HACCP strategies. PMID:20486001

  11. A multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay for simultaneous detection of five tobacco viruses in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin; Cheng, Julong; Huang, Ting; Zheng, Xuan; Wu, Yunfeng

    2012-07-01

    Tobacco viruses including Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tobacco etch virus (TEV), Potato virus Y (PVY) and Tobacco vein banding mosaic virus (TVBMV) are major viruses infecting tobacco and can cause serious crop losses. A multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay was developed to detect simultaneously and differentiate all five viruses. The system used specific primer sets for each virus producing five distinct fragments 237, 273, 347, 456 and 547 bp, representing TMV, CMV subgroup I, TEV, PVY(O) and TVBMV, respectively. These primers were used for detection of the different viruses by single PCR and multiplex PCR and the results were confirmed by DNA sequencing analysis. The protocol was used to detect viruses from different parts of China. The simultaneous and sensitive detection of different viruses using the multiplex PCR is more efficient and economical than other conventional methods for tobacco virus detection. This multiplex PCR provides a rapid and reliable method for the detection and identification of major tobacco viruses, and will be useful for epidemiological studies.

  12. Multiplex SYBR Green Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of Respiratory Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sultani, Mozhdeh; Mokhtari Azad, Talat; Eshragian, Mohammadreza; Shadab, Azadeh; Naseri, Maryam; Eilami, Owrang; Yavarian, Jila

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is often difficult for a physician to distinguish between viral and bacterial causes of respiratory infections and this may result in overuse of antibiotics. In many cases of community-acquired respiratory infections, clinicians treat patients empirically. The development of molecular methods for direct detection of viruses has been progressed recently. Objectives: The objective of this study was recognizing the panel of respiratory RNA viruses by multiplex SYBR Green real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: Randomized 172 influenza-negative respiratory specimens of all age groups of hospitalized patients were collected. After RNA extraction, cDNA was synthesized. Three SYBR Green multiplex real-time PCR assays were developed for simultaneous detection of 12 respiratory RNA viruses. Each set of multiplex methods detected four viruses, the first set: respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus, rhinovirus, enterovirus; the second set: parainfluenza viruses 1 - 4 (PIV1-4); the third set: coronaviruses NL63, 229E, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and OC43. Results: Application of the multiplex SYBR Green real-time PCR in clinical samples from 172 patients in a one-year study resulted in detection of 19 (11.04%) PIV3, 9 (5.23%) PIV4, and 1 (0.58%) coronavirus NL63. All the positive samples were detected during December to March (2011 - 2012). Conclusions: Multiplex SYBR Green real-time PCR is a rapid and relatively inexpensive method for detection of respiratory viruses. PMID:26468358

  13. Considerations for optimization of microRNA PCR assays for molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Dellett, Margaret; Simpson, David Arthur

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable stability of microRNAs in biofluids underlies their potential as biomarkers, but their small size presents challenges for detection by RT-qPCR. The heterogeneity of microRNAs, with each one comprising a series of variants or 'isomiRs', adds additional complexity. Presented here are the key considerations for use of RT-qPCR to measure microRNAs and their isomiRs, with a focus on plasma. Modified nucleotides can be incorporated into primer sequences to enhance affinity and provide increased specificity and sensitivity for RT-qPCR assays. Approaches based upon polyA tailing and use of a common oligo(dT)-based reverse transcription oligonucleotide will detect most isomiRs. Conversely, stem-loop RT oligonucleotides and sequence specific probes can enable detection of specific isomiRs of interest. Next generation sequencing of all the products of a microRNA RT-PCR reaction is a promising new approach for both microRNA quantification and characterization. PMID:26854938

  14. Real-time PCR TaqMan assay for rapid screening of bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sepsis is one of the main causes of mortality and morbidity. The rapid detection of pathogens in blood of septic patients is essential for adequate antimicrobial therapy and better prognosis. This study aimed to accelerate the detection and discrimination of Gram-positive (GP) and Gram-negative (GN) bacteria and Candida species in blood culture samples by molecular methods. Methods The Real-GP®, -GN®, and -CAN® real-time PCR kit (M&D, Wonju, Republic of Korea) assays use the TaqMan probes for detecting pan-GP, pan-GN, and pan-Candida species, respectively. The diagnostic performances of the real-time PCR kits were evaluated with 115 clinical isolates, 256 positive and 200 negative blood culture bottle samples, and the data were compared to results obtained from conventional blood culture. Results Eighty-seven reference strains and 115 clinical isolates were correctly identified with specific probes corresponding to GP-bacteria, GN-bacteria and Candida, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the real-time PCR kit with blood culture samples were 99.6% and 89.5%, respectively. Conclusions The Real-GP®, -GN®, and -CAN® real-time PCR kits could be useful tools for the rapid and accurate screening of bloodstream infections (BSIs). PMID:24393579

  15. Low cost HIV-1 quantitative RT-PCR assay in resource-limited settings: improvement and implementation.

    PubMed

    Fibriani, Azzania; Farah, Nadya; Kusumadewi, Inri; Pas, Suzan D; van Crevel, Reinout; van der Ven, Andre; Boucher, Charles A B; Schutten, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring of HIV viral load in low and middle income settings is limited by high cost of the commercial assays. Therefore, we developed a novel RT-PCR quantitative assay was developed. This assay targets the HIV-1 pol integrase gene (INT). Subsequently, the performance of the INT assay, described previously as a Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) assay and a combined INT/LTR dual target RT-PCR assay was compared. The LTR-assay was found to be sensitive and cost-effective (50-70% cheaper than commercial assays) with the lowest coefficient of variation (%CV). Introduction of an internal standard further improved assay reliability. Therefore, this LTR assay was implemented in West Java, Indonesia. Linearity and precision of the LTR assay were good: %CV ranged from 1.0% to 10.4%. The limit of quantitation was 616 copies/ml. Performance was comparable with the commercial assay (Abbott assay) (r(2)=0.01), although on average the viral loads were 0.39 log(10)copies/ml lower. In clinical practice, it had excellent capability for monitoring treatment failure, the positive predictive value was 99% and the negative predictive value was 93%. In conclusion, the implementation of the improved HIV-1 viral load LTR-assay for routine diagnosis in resource poor settings can be a good alternative when commercial assays are unaffordable.

  16. Comparative analysis of two broad-range PCR assays for pathogen detection in positive-blood-culture bottles: PCR-high-resolution melting analysis versus PCR-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Kevin; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Blyn, Lawrence B; Yang, Samuel; Won, Helen; Matthews, Heather; Toleno, Donna; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Carroll, Karen C; Hardick, Justin; Masek, Billy; Kecojevic, Alexander; Sampath, Rangarajan; Peterson, Stephen; Rothman, Richard E

    2012-10-01

    Detection of pathogens in bloodstream infections is important for directing antimicrobial treatment, but current culture-based approaches can be problematic. Broad-range PCR assays which target conserved genomic motifs for postamplification amplicon analysis permit detection of sepsis-causing pathogens. Comparison of different broad-range assays is important for informing future implementation strategies. In this study, we compared positive-blood-culture bottles processed by PCR coupled to high-resolution melting curve analysis (PCR/HRMA) and PCR coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) to microbiology culture results. Genus-level concordance was 90% (confidence interval [CI], 80 to 96%) for PCR/HRMA and 94% (CI, 85 to 98%) for PCR/ESI-MS. Species-level concordance was 90% (CI, 80 to 96%) for PCR/HRMA and 86% (CI, 75 to 93%) for PCR/ESI-MS. Unlike PCR/HRMA, PCR/ESI-MS was able to resolve polymicrobial samples. Our results demonstrated that the two assays have similar overall concordance rates but may have different roles as potential adjunctive tests with standard blood culture, since each method has different capabilities, advantages, and disadvantages.

  17. Multiplex RT-PCR assay for the differential diagnosis of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Downing, J. R.; Khandekar, A.; Shurtleff, S. A.; Head, D. R.; Parham, D. M.; Webber, B. L.; Pappo, A. S.; Hulshof, M. G.; Conn, W. P.; Shapiro, D. N.

    1995-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis has defined specific translocations associated with two of the most common small round cell tumors of childhood, t(11;22) in Ewing's sarcoma and t(2;13) in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. We and others have previously demonstrated the diagnostic utility of a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for the detection of the t(11;22) encoded EWS/FLI-1 chimeric message in Ewing's sarcoma. More recently, we have cloned the t(2;13)(q35;q14) translocation and have shown that it results in the fusion of the PAX3 gene on chromosome 2 to FKHR, a novel member of the fork-head family of transcription factors on chromosome 13. To define the morphological spectrum of childhood sarcomas that express the t(2;13) encoded PAX3/FKHR chimeric message, we have performed RT-PCR analysis on samples from 44 primary pediatric sarcomas and 8 sarcoma cell lines. PAX3/FKHR chimeric messages were detected in 24 of 27 alveolar, 2 of 12 embryonal, and 0 of 1 pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma and in 1 of 2 ectomesenchymomas. In contrast, none of 8 Ewing's sarcomas or 2 undifferentiated sarcomas expressed this message. Chimeric transcripts were detected in all cases with cytogenetic evidence of the (2;13) translocation, and in each case the chimeric PAX3/FKHR message had the identical junction sequence, suggesting that genomic chromosome breaks were clustered in a single intron in both genes. By combining the PAX3/FKHR RT-PCR assay with primers for detection of the Ewing's sarcoma t(11;22) encoded EWS/FLI-1 chimeric transcript, we have developed a multiplex RT-PCR reaction that allows the rapid and accurate identification of either translocation in a biopsy sample. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7887445

  18. Two-stage PCR assay for detection of human brucellosis in endemic areas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is a common zoonosis that can cause a severe febrile illness in humans. It constitutes a persistent health problem in many developing countries around the world. It is one of the most frequently reported diseases in Saudi Arabia and incidence is particularly high in the Central region, and around the city of Riyadh. The aim of this study was to evaluate a two-stage PCR assay for detection of human brucellosis particularly in endemic areas. Methods A total of 101 serum samples were collected from patients with acute febrile illness (AFI) of unknown cause from two different locations in the Western region of Saudi Arabia. The first location (Northern) is characterized by a nomadic rural population while the second (Central) is a modern urban city. All samples were subjected to DNA extraction and Brucella genus-specific PCR amplification using B4/B5 primers of the bcsp31 gene. Positive B4/B5 samples were subjected to multiplex species-specific Brucella PCR amplification. Results In the Northern location, 81.9% of the AFI samples were confirmed Brucella positive, while all the samples collected from the Central region proved to be Brucella negative. Samples positive for Brucella were subjected to multiplex species-specific Brucella amplification. B. abortus was detected in 10% and B. melitensis in 8% of the samples, while the majority (82%) of samples showed both B. abortus and B. melitensis. As expected, B. suis was not detected in any of the samples. Conclusions This study concluded that a two-stage PCR assay could be useful as a rapid diagnostic tool to allow the consideration of brucellosis as a possible cause of AFI, particularly in non-urban locations. It also recommends the collection of epidemiological data for such patients to obtain further information that may help in rapid diagnosis. PMID:23517532

  19. Inhibition controls for qualitative real-time PCR assays: are they necessary for all specimen matrices?

    PubMed

    Buckwalter, S P; Sloan, L M; Cunningham, S A; Espy, M J; Uhl, J R; Jones, M F; Vetter, E A; Mandrekar, J; Cockerill, F R; Pritt, B S; Patel, R; Wengenack, N L

    2014-06-01

    A retrospective analysis of 386,706 specimens representing a variety of matrix types used in qualitative real-time PCR assays determined the overall inhibition rate to be 0.87% when the inhibition control was added preextraction to 5,613 specimens and 0.01% when the inhibition control was added postextraction but preamplification in 381,093 specimens. Inhibition rates of ≤ 1% were found for all specimen matrix types except urine and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue.

  20. Dual-probe real-time PCR assay for detection of variola or other orthopoxviruses with dried reagents.

    PubMed

    Aitichou, Mohamed; Saleh, Sharron; Kyusung, Park; Huggins, John; O'Guinn, Monica; Jahrling, Peter; Ibrahim, Sofi

    2008-11-01

    A real-time, multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay based on dried PCR reagents was developed. Only variola virus could be specifically detected by a FAM (6-carboxyfluorescein)-labeled probe while camelpox, cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia viruses could be detected by a TET (6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine)-labeled probe in a single PCR reaction. Approximately 25 copies of cloned variola virus DNA and 50 copies of genomic orthopoxviruses DNA could be detected with high reproducibility. The assay exhibited a dynamic range of seven orders of magnitude with a correlation coefficient value greater than 0.97. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay, as determined from 100 samples that contained nucleic acids from a multitude of bacterial and viral species were 96% and 98%, respectively. The limit of detection, sensitivity and specificity of the assay were comparable to standard real-time PCR assays with wet reagents. Employing a multiplexed format in this assay allows simultaneous discrimination of the variola virus from other closely related orthopoxviruses. Furthermore, the implementation of dried reagents in real-time PCR assays is an important step towards simplifying such assays and allowing their use in areas where cold storage is not easily accessible.

  1. Novel Real-Time PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum in Clostridial Myonecrosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Halm, Anna; Wagner, Martin; Köfer, Josef; Hein, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence was designed for differentiation of blackleg-causing Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum, a phylogenetically closely related bacterium responsible for malignant edema. In order to exclude false-negative results, an internal amplification control was included in the assay. A set of three probes, one specific for C. chauvoei, one specific for C. septicum, and one specific for both species, permitted unequivocal detection of C. chauvoei in tests of 32 Clostridium sp. strains and 10 non-Clostridium strains. The assay proved to be sensitive, detecting one genome of C. chauvoei or C. septicum per PCR and 1.79 × 103 C. chauvoei cells/g artificially contaminated muscle tissue. In tests of 11 clinical specimens, the real-time PCR assay yielded the same results as an established conventional PCR method. PMID:20129968

  2. Single-tube real-time PCR assay for differentiation of Ixodes affinis and Ixodes scapularis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Chelsea L.; Hynes, Wayne L.; White, Breanna T.; Marshall, Mindy N.; Gaff, Holly D.; Gauthier, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Ixodes affinis Neumann (1899) and Ixodes scapularis Say (1821) are tick vectors of the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. Ixodes affinis and I. scapularis are morphologically very similar, and as they are sympatric in the mid- and south-Atlantic U.S. coastal states, their accurate identification is crucial to studies of disease and vector ecology in this area. This work describes a rapid, single-tube SYBR® Green-based real-time PCR assay for differentiation of I. affinis and I. scapularis at all life stages. The assay employs 2 pairs of species-specific primers directed against the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of the nuclear rRNA operon. Amplification products for these primer pairs differ in size and may be differentiated with a melt curve analysis. This tool is intended as a supplement to morphological methods for accurate identification of these ticks. PMID:24192510

  3. Real-Time PCR Assay for the Identification of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys)

    PubMed Central

    Dhami, Manpreet K.; Dsouza, Melissa; Waite, David W.; Anderson, Diane; Li, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    The brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), is a gregarious crop pest that has rapidly spread across the world in the last two decades. It is an excellent hitchhiker species, especially as an over-wintering adult. During this period it is often associated with non-biological commodities such as shipping containers and machinery that travel long distances. Inadequate identification keys and similarity to common species has assisted its spread across Europe, while accurate identification from immature stages or eggs is not possible. We developed a real-time TaqMan PCR assay for the accurate and sensitive detection of the brown marmorated stink bug from all life stages. The assay performance against required diagnostic criterion and within a quarantine framework are described. PMID:26955631

  4. Detection of mutation by allele-specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (AS-LAMP).

    PubMed

    Aonuma, Hiroka; Badolo, Athanase; Okado, Kiyoshi; Kanuka, Hirotaka

    2013-01-01

    For effective control of pathogen-transmitting mosquitoes, precise surveillance data of mosquito distribution are essential. Recently, an increase of insecticide resistance due to the kdr mutation in Anopheles gambiae, a mosquito that transmits the malaria parasite, has been reported. With the aim of developing a simple and effective method for surveying resistant mosquitoes, LAMP was applied to the allele-specific detection of the kdr gene in An. gambiae. Allele-specific LAMP (AS-LAMP) method successfully distinguished the kdr homozygote from the heterozygote and the wild type. The robustness of AS-LAMP suggests its usefulness for routine identification of insects, not only mosquitoes but also other vectors and agricultural pests. Here we describe the method of AS-LAMP to detect mutation in Anopheles mosquitoes. PMID:24026691

  5. Allele-Specific Reprogramming of Cancer Metabolism by the Long Non-coding RNA CCAT2.

    PubMed

    Redis, Roxana S; Vela, Luz E; Lu, Weiqin; Ferreira de Oliveira, Juliana; Ivan, Cristina; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Adamoski, Douglas; Pasculli, Barbara; Taguchi, Ayumu; Chen, Yunyun; Fernandez, Agustin F; Valledor, Luis; Van Roosbroeck, Katrien; Chang, Samuel; Shah, Maitri; Kinnebrew, Garrett; Han, Leng; Atlasi, Yaser; Cheung, Lawrence H; Huang, Gilbert Y; Monroig, Paloma; Ramirez, Marc S; Catela Ivkovic, Tina; Van, Long; Ling, Hui; Gafà, Roberta; Kapitanovic, Sanja; Lanza, Giovanni; Bankson, James A; Huang, Peng; Lai, Stephen Y; Bast, Robert C; Rosenblum, Michael G; Radovich, Milan; Ivan, Mircea; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey; Liang, Han; Fraga, Mario F; Widger, William R; Hanash, Samir; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Ambrosio, Andre L B; Gomes Dias, Sandra M; Calin, George A

    2016-02-18

    Altered energy metabolism is a cancer hallmark as malignant cells tailor their metabolic pathways to meet their energy requirements. Glucose and glutamine are the major nutrients that fuel cellular metabolism, and the pathways utilizing these nutrients are often altered in cancer. Here, we show that the long ncRNA CCAT2, located at the 8q24 amplicon on cancer risk-associated rs6983267 SNP, regulates cancer metabolism in vitro and in vivo in an allele-specific manner by binding the Cleavage Factor I (CFIm) complex with distinct affinities for the two subunits (CFIm25 and CFIm68). The CCAT2 interaction with the CFIm complex fine-tunes the alternative splicing of Glutaminase (GLS) by selecting the poly(A) site in intron 14 of the precursor mRNA. These findings uncover a complex, allele-specific regulatory mechanism of cancer metabolism orchestrated by the two alleles of a long ncRNA. PMID:26853146

  6. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci Directly from Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hye-young; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Jungho; Park, Soon-Deok

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most prevalent cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and is recognized as a major nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to evaluate a newly designed multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of the simultaneous detection of mecA, S. aureus, and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in blood culture specimens. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays (M&D, Republic of Korea) use the TaqMan probes 16S rRNA for Staphylococcus spp., the nuc gene for S. aureus, and the mecA gene for methicillin resistance. The detection limit of the multiplex real-time PCR assay was 103 CFU/ml per PCR for each gene target. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was evaluated using 118 clinical isolates from various specimen types and a total of 350 positive blood cultures from a continuous monitoring blood culture system. The results obtained with the multiplex real-time PCR assay for the three targets were in agreement with those of conventional identification and susceptibility testing methods except for one organism. Of 350 positive bottle cultures, the sensitivities of the multiplex real-time PCR kit were 100% (166/166 cultures), 97.2% (35/36 cultures), and 99.2% (117/118 cultures) for the 16S rRNA, nuc, and mecA genes, respectively, and the specificities for all three targets were 100%. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays are very useful for the rapid accurate diagnosis of staphylococcal BSIs. In addition, the Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays could have an important impact on the choice of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, based on detection of the mecA gene. PMID:24648566

  7. Development of Real-Time PCR Assays for Rapid Detection of Pfiesteria piscicida and Related Dinoflagellates†

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Holly A.; Tengs, Torstein; Glasgow, Howard B.; Burkholder, JoAnn M.; Rublee, Parke A.; Oldach, David W.

    2000-01-01

    Pfiesteria complex species are heterotrophic and mixotrophic dinoflagellates that have been recognized as harmful algal bloom species associated with adverse fish and human health effects along the East Coast of North America, particularly in its largest (Chesapeake Bay in Maryland) and second largest (Albermarle-Pamlico Sound in North Carolina) estuaries. In response to impacts on human health and the economy, monitoring programs to detect the organism have been implemented in affected areas. However, until recently, specific identification of the two toxic species known thus far, Pfiesteria piscicida and P. shumwayae (sp. nov.), required scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM is a labor-intensive process in which a small number of cells can be analyzed, posing limitations when the method is applied to environmental estuarine water samples. To overcome these problems, we developed a real-time PCR-based assay that permits rapid and specific identification of these organisms in culture and heterogeneous environmental water samples. Various factors likely to be encountered when assessing environmental samples were addressed, and assay specificity was validated through screening of a comprehensive panel of cultures, including the two recognized Pfiesteria species, morphologically similar species, and a wide range of other estuarine dinoflagellates. Assay sensitivity and sample stability were established for both unpreserved and fixative (acidic Lugol's solution)-preserved samples. The effects of background DNA on organism detection and enumeration were also explored, and based on these results, we conclude that the assay may be utilized to derive quantitative data. This real-time PCR-based method will be useful for many other applications, including adaptation for field-based technology. PMID:11055905

  8. Allele-Specific Deletions in Mouse Tumors Identify Fbxw7 as Germline Modifier of Tumor Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Losada, Jesus; Wu, Di; DelRosario, Reyno; Balmain, Allan; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in finding associations between specific genetic variants and cancer susceptibility in human populations. These studies have identified a range of highly statistically significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and susceptibility to development of a range of human tumors. However, the effect of each SNP in isolation is very small, and all of the SNPs combined only account for a relatively minor proportion of the total genetic risk (5–10%). There is therefore a major requirement for alternative routes to the discovery of genetic risk factors for cancer. We have previously shown using mouse models that chromosomal regions harboring susceptibility genes identified by linkage analysis frequently exhibit allele-specific genetic alterations in tumors. We demonstrate here that the Fbxw7 gene, a commonly mutated gene in a wide range of mouse and human cancers, shows allele-specific deletions in mouse lymphomas and skin tumors. Lymphomas from three different F1 hybrids show 100% allele-specificity in the patterns of allelic loss. Parental alleles from 129/Sv or Spretus/Gla mice are lost in tumors from F1 hybrids with C57BL/6 animals, due to the presence of a specific non-synonymous coding sequence polymorphism at the N-terminal portion of the gene. A specific genetic test of association between this SNP and lymphoma susceptibility in interspecific backcross mice showed a significant linkage (p = 0.001), but only in animals with a functional p53 gene. These data therefore identify Fbxw7 as a p53-dependent tumor susceptibility gene. Increased p53-dependent tumor susceptibility and allele-specific losses were also seen in a mouse skin model of skin tumor development. We propose that analysis of preferential allelic imbalances in tumors may provide an efficient means of uncovering genetic variants that affect mouse and human tumor susceptibility. PMID:22348067

  9. Multiplex PCR Assay for Detection of Vibrio vulnificus Biotype 2 and Simultaneous Discrimination of Serovar E Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuán, Eva; Amaro, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    In the present work we develop a multiplex PCR assay for the detection and identification of the fish pathogen Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2 with discriminating potential for zoonotic strains (serovar E). The PCR assay allowed the identification of two new biotype 2 serovar E human isolates from culture collections. Finally, the multiplex was successfully applied to both diagnosis and carrier detection in field samples. PMID:17277209

  10. Novel wide-range quantitative nested real-time PCR assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA: development and methodology.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Teruyuki; Tamura, Masato; Asami, Yukihiro; Kitamura, Eiko; Saito, Kosuke; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Takahashi, Sachiko Nonaka; Matsumoto, Koichi; Sawada, Shigemasa; Yokoyama, Eise; Takasu, Toshiaki

    2008-05-01

    Previously, we designed an internally controlled quantitative nested real-time (QNRT) PCR assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in order to rapidly diagnose tuberculous meningitis. This technique combined the high sensitivity of nested PCR with the accurate quantification of real-time PCR. In this study, we attempted to improve the original QNRT-PCR assay and newly developed the wide-range QNRT-PCR (WR-QNRT-PCR) assay, which is more accurate and has a wider detection range. For use as an internal-control "calibrator" to measure the copy number of M. tuberculosis DNA, an original new-mutation plasmid (NM-plasmid) was developed. It had artificial random nucleotides in five regions annealing specific primers and probes. The NM-plasmid demonstrated statistically uniform amplifications (F = 1.086, P = 0.774) against a range (1 to 10(5)) of copy numbers of mimic M. tuberculosis DNA and was regarded as appropriate for use as a new internal control in the WR-QNRT-PSR assay. In addition, by the optimization of assay conditions in WR-QNRT-PCR, two-step amplification of target DNA was completely consistent with the standard curve of this assay. Due to the development of the NM-plasmid as the new internal control, significantly improved quantitative accuracy and a wider detection range were realized with the WR-QNRT-PCR assay. In the next study, we will try to use this novel assay method with actual clinical samples and examine its clinical usefulness.

  11. Linear allele-specific long-range amplification: a novel method of long-range molecular haplotyping.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Ming; Tsai, Hsiang-Ju; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Wang, Hsin-Shih; Hong, Hong-Shang; Lee, Yun-Shien

    2005-10-01

    Haplotypes have been repeatedly shown to be more powerful than collections of single-locus markers in gene-mapping studies. Various haplotyping methods including statistical estimation are employed but molecular haplotyping, the acquisition of information directly on physical DNA sequences, has been in demand for its accuracy and independence from family pedigrees. We investigated the allelic specificity of long-range PCR, which was successful for long-range haplotyping in recent reports, and found problems of initial mispriming and crossover amplification significantly confounded its application. Based on these observations, we designed a novel method based on linear amplification of a hemizygous DNA segment with a single phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotide. Our results revealed, with a single nucleotide polymorphism as the discriminative marker, downstream haplotypes of 14-15 kb DNA segment could be confidently scored. With two rounds of the method and five single nucleotide polymorphisms, molecular haplotypes of 29.3 kb spanning the HCR and CDSN genes, two genes associated with the susceptibility of psoriasis, of 11 members, belonging to a CEPH family, were revealed. Clear Mendelian segregation of 35 highly heterozygous SNPs confirmed the accuracy of the method. Problems of low specificity associated with long-range PCR were not observed. The simplicity, along with long-sequence accessibility and feasibility of a single nucleotide difference as the discriminative marker indicated our method holds promise for future gene-mapping studies.

  12. Cell culture-Taqman PCR assay for evaluation of Cryptosporidium parvum disinfection.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Alexandra R; Fanok, Stella; Monis, Paul T; Saint, Christopher P

    2003-05-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum represents a challenge to the water industry and a threat to public health. In this study, we developed a cell culture-quantitative PCR assay to evaluate the inactivation of C. parvum with disinfectants. The assay was validated by using a range of disinfectants in common use in the water industry, including low-pressure UV light (LP-UV), ozone, mixed oxidants (MIOX), and chlorine. The assay was demonstrated to be reliable and sensitive, with a lower detection limit of a single infectious oocyst. Effective oocyst inactivation was achieved (>2 log(10) units) with LP-UV (20 mJ/cm(2)) or 2 mg of ozone/liter (for 10 min). MIOX and chlorine treatments of oocysts resulted in minimal effective disinfection, with <0.1 log(10) unit being inactivated. These results demonstrate the inability of MIOX to inactivate Cryptosporidium. The assay is a valuable tool for the evaluation of disinfection systems for drinking water and recycled water.

  13. SNPsplit: Allele-specific splitting of alignments between genomes with known SNP genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Felix; Andrews, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing reads overlapping polymorphic sites in diploid mammalian genomes may be assigned to one allele or the other. This holds the potential to detect gene expression, chromatin modifications, DNA methylation or nuclear interactions in an allele-specific fashion. SNPsplit is an allele-specific alignment sorter designed to read files in SAM/BAM format and determine the allelic origin of reads or read-pairs that cover known single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) positions. For this to work libraries must have been aligned to a genome in which all known SNP positions were masked with the ambiguity base 'N' and aligned using a suitable mapping program such as Bowtie2, TopHat, STAR, HISAT2, HiCUP or Bismark. SNPsplit also provides an automated solution to generate N-masked reference genomes for hybrid mouse strains based on the variant call information provided by the Mouse Genomes Project. The unique ability of SNPsplit to work with various different kinds of sequencing data including RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Bisulfite-Seq or Hi-C opens new avenues for the integrative exploration of allele-specific data. PMID:27429743

  14. A uniform survey of allele-specific binding and expression over 1000-Genomes-Project individuals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jieming; Rozowsky, Joel; Galeev, Timur R; Harmanci, Arif; Kitchen, Robert; Bedford, Jason; Abyzov, Alexej; Kong, Yong; Regan, Lynne; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-04-18

    Large-scale sequencing in the 1000 Genomes Project has revealed multitudes of single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Here, we provide insights into the functional effect of these variants using allele-specific behaviour. This can be assessed for an individual by mapping ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reads to a personal genome, and then measuring 'allelic imbalances' between the numbers of reads mapped to the paternal and maternal chromosomes. We annotate variants associated with allele-specific binding and expression in 382 individuals by uniformly processing 1,263 functional genomics data sets, developing approaches to reduce the heterogeneity between data sets due to overdispersion and mapping bias. Since many allelic variants are rare, aggregation across multiple individuals is necessary to identify broadly applicable 'allelic elements'. We also found SNVs for which we can anticipate allelic imbalance from the disruption of a binding motif. Our results serve as an allele-specific annotation for the 1000 Genomes variant catalogue and are distributed as an online resource (alleledb.gersteinlab.org).

  15. A uniform survey of allele-specific binding and expression over 1000-Genomes-Project individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jieming; Rozowsky, Joel; Galeev, Timur R.; Harmanci, Arif; Kitchen, Robert; Bedford, Jason; Abyzov, Alexej; Kong, Yong; Regan, Lynne; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale sequencing in the 1000 Genomes Project has revealed multitudes of single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Here, we provide insights into the functional effect of these variants using allele-specific behaviour. This can be assessed for an individual by mapping ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reads to a personal genome, and then measuring ‘allelic imbalances' between the numbers of reads mapped to the paternal and maternal chromosomes. We annotate variants associated with allele-specific binding and expression in 382 individuals by uniformly processing 1,263 functional genomics data sets, developing approaches to reduce the heterogeneity between data sets due to overdispersion and mapping bias. Since many allelic variants are rare, aggregation across multiple individuals is necessary to identify broadly applicable ‘allelic elements'. We also found SNVs for which we can anticipate allelic imbalance from the disruption of a binding motif. Our results serve as an allele-specific annotation for the 1000 Genomes variant catalogue and are distributed as an online resource (alleledb.gersteinlab.org). PMID:27089393

  16. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of. beta. -globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.Y.; Ugozzoli, L.; Pal, B.K.; Wallace, B. )

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell {beta}-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3{prime} nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  17. SNPsplit: Allele-specific splitting of alignments between genomes with known SNP genotypes.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Felix; Andrews, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing reads overlapping polymorphic sites in diploid mammalian genomes may be assigned to one allele or the other. This holds the potential to detect gene expression, chromatin modifications, DNA methylation or nuclear interactions in an allele-specific fashion. SNPsplit is an allele-specific alignment sorter designed to read files in SAM/BAM format and determine the allelic origin of reads or read-pairs that cover known single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) positions. For this to work libraries must have been aligned to a genome in which all known SNP positions were masked with the ambiguity base 'N' and aligned using a suitable mapping program such as Bowtie2, TopHat, STAR, HISAT2, HiCUP or Bismark. SNPsplit also provides an automated solution to generate N-masked reference genomes for hybrid mouse strains based on the variant call information provided by the Mouse Genomes Project. The unique ability of SNPsplit to work with various different kinds of sequencing data including RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Bisulfite-Seq or Hi-C opens new avenues for the integrative exploration of allele-specific data. PMID:27429743

  18. Correction of Hair Shaft Defects through Allele-Specific Silencing of Mutant Krt75.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yanfeng; Huang, Lan; Jones, Evan C; Zhang, Lianfeng; Clark, Richard A; Roop, Dennis R; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in keratin genes can cause a number of inheritable skin disorders characterized by intraepidermal blistering, epidermal hyperkeratosis, or abnormalities in skin appendages, such as nail plate dystrophy and structural defects in hair. Allele-specific silencing of mutant keratins through RNA interference is a promising therapeutic approach for suppressing the expression of mutant keratins and related phenotypes in the epidermis. However, its effectiveness on skin appendages remains to be confirmed in vivo. In this study, we developed allele-specific small interfering RNAs capable of selectively suppressing the expression of a mutant Krt75, which causes hair shaft structural defects characterized by the development of blebs along the hair shaft in mice. Hair regenerated from epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cells isolated from mutant Krt75 mouse models reproduced the blebbing phenotype when grafted in vivo. In contrast, mutant cells manipulated with a lentiviral vector expressing mutant Krt75-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) persistently suppressed this phenotype. The phenotypic correction was associated with a significant reduction of mutant Krt75 mRNA in the skin grafts. Thus, data obtained from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing RNA interference to achieve durable correction of hair structural phenotypes through allele-specific silencing of mutant keratin genes. PMID:26763422

  19. Development of PCR and TaqMan PCR Assays to Detect Pseudomonas coronafaciens, a Causal Agent of Halo Blight of Oats

    PubMed Central

    An, Ji-Hye; Noh, Young-Hee; Kim, Yong-Eon; Lee, Hyok-In; Cha, Jae-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas coronafaciens causes halo blight on oats and is a plant quarantine bacterium in many countries, including the Republic of Korea. Using of the certificated seed is important for control of the disease. Since effective detection method of P. coronafaciens is not available yet, PCR and TaqMan PCR assays for specific detection of P. coronafaciens were developed in this study. PCR primers were designed from the draft genome sequence of P. coronafaciens LMG 5060 which was obtained by the next-generation sequencing in this study. The PCR primer set Pc-12-F/Pc-12-R specifically amplified 498 bp from the 13 strains of P. coronafaciens isolated in the seven different countries (Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Germany, and New Zealand) and the nested primer set Pc-12-ne-F/Pc-12-ne-R specifically amplified 298 bp from those strains. The target-size PCR product was not amplified from the non-target bacteria with the PCR and nested primer sets. TaqMan PCR with Pc-12-ne-F/Pc-12-ne-R and a TaqMan probe, Pc-taqman, which were designed inside of the nested PCR amplicon, generated Ct values which in a dose-dependent manner to the amount of the target DNA and the Ct values of all the P. coronafaciens strains were above the threshold Ct value for positive detection. The TaqMan PCR generated positive Ct values from the seed extracts of the artificially inoculated oat seeds above 10 cfu/ml inoculation level. PCR and TaqMan PCR assays developed in this study will be useful tools to detect and identify the plant quarantine pathogen, P. coronafaciens. PMID:25774107

  20. Development and validation of a real-time PCR assay for the detection of anguillid herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    van Beurden, S J; Voorbergen-Laarman, M A; Roozenburg, I; van Tellingen, J; Haenen, O L M; Engelsma, M Y

    2016-01-01

    Anguillid herpesvirus 1 (AngHV1) causes a haemorrhagic disease with increased mortality in wild and farmed European eel, Anguilla anguilla (L.) and Japanese eel Anguilla japonica, Temminck & Schlegel). Detection of AngHV1 is currently based on virus isolation in cell culture, antibody-based typing assays or conventional PCR. We developed, optimized and concisely validated a diagnostic TaqMan probe based real-time PCR assay for the detection of AngHV1. The primers and probe target AngHV1 open reading frame 57, encoding the capsid protease and scaffold protein. Compared to conventional PCR, the developed real-time PCR is faster, less labour-intensive and has a reduced risk of cross-contamination. The real-time PCR assay was shown to be analytically sensitive and specific and has a high repeatability, efficiency and r(2) -value. The diagnostic performance of the assay was determined by testing 10% w/v organ suspensions and virus cultures from wild and farmed European eels from the Netherlands by conventional and real-time PCR. The developed real-time PCR assay is a useful tool for the rapid and sensitive detection of AngHV1 in 10% w/v organ suspensions from wild and farmed European eels.

  1. Multi-laboratory comparison of quantitative PCR assays for detection and quantification of Fusarium virguliforme from soybean roots and soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate identification and quantification of Fusarium virguliforme, the cause of sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean, within root tissue and soil are important tasks. Several quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays have been developed but there are no reports comparing their use in sensitive and specific...

  2. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection of Human Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods available to detect and enumerate human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and/or probes and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in method ...

  3. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection of Human Fecal Pollution - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods available to detect and enumerate human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and/or probes and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in method p...

  4. Duplex Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Haemophilus influenzae That Distinguishes Fucose- and Protein D-Negative Strains.

    PubMed

    de Gier, Camilla; Pickering, Janessa L; Richmond, Peter C; Thornton, Ruth B; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a specific Haemophilus influenzae quantitative PCR (qPCR) that also identifies fucose-negative and protein D-negative strains. Analysis of 100 H. influenzae isolates, 28 Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates, and 14 other bacterial species revealed 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 96% to 100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 92% to 100%) for this assay. The evaluation of 80 clinical specimens demonstrated a strong correlation between semiquantitative culture and the qPCR (P < 0.001).

  5. RAPHIDOPHYCEAE [CHADEFAUD EX SILVA] SYSTEMATICS AND RAPID IDENTIFICATION: SEQUENCE ANALYSES AND REAL-TIME PCR ASSAYS

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Holly A.; Tomas, Carmelo; Tengs, Torstein; Kempton, Jason W.; Lewitus, Alan J.; Oldach, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Species within the class Raphidophyceae were associated with fish kill events in Japanese, European, Canadian, and U.S. coastal waters. Fish mortality was attributable to gill damage with exposure to reactive oxygen species (peroxide, superoxide, and hydroxide radicals), neurotoxins, physical clogging, and hemolytic substances. Morphological identification of these organisms in environmental water samples is difficult, particularly when fixatives are used. Because of this difficulty and the continued global emergence of these species in coastal estuarine waters, we initiated the development and validation of a suite of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Sequencing was used to generate complete data sets for nuclear encoded small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA; 18S); internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, 5.8S; and plastid encoded SSU rRNA (16S) for confirmed raphidophyte cultures from various geographic locations. Sequences for several Chattonella species (C. antiqua, C. marina, C. ovata, C. subsalsa, and C. verruculosa), Heterosigma akashiwo, and Fibrocapsa japonica were generated and used to design rapid and specific PCR assays for several species including C. verruculosa Hara et Chihara, C. subsalsa Biecheler, the complex comprised of C. marina Hara et Chihara, C. antiqua Ono and C. ovata, H. akashiwo Ono, and F. japonica Toriumi et Takano using appropriate loci. With this comprehensive data set, we were also able to perform phylogenetic analyses to determine the relationship between these species. PMID:20411032

  6. Quantitative real-time PCR assay for Clostridium septicum in poultry gangrenous dermatitis associated samples.

    PubMed

    Neumann, A P; Dunham, S M; Rehberger, T G; Siragusa, G R

    2010-08-01

    Clostridium septicum is a spore-forming anaerobe frequently implicated in cases of gangrenous dermatitis (GD) and other spontaneously occurring myonecrotic infections of poultry. Although C. septicum is readily cultured from diseased tissues it can be difficult to enumerate due to its tendency to swarm over the surface of agar plates. In this study a quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed in order to more accurately measure the levels of C. septicum in healthy as well as GD associated poultry samples. The assay was specifically designed to target the C. septicum alpha toxin gene, csa, which is, to our knowledge, carried by all strains of C. septicum and has been shown to be essential for virulence. Genomic DNAs from a diverse collection of bacterial species, including closely related Clostridium chauvoei, Clostridium carnis, Clostridium tertium as well as several strains of Clostridium perfringens, all failed to produce a positive reaction. An approximate reproducible limit of detection in spiked extracts of at least 10(3) cfu/g of C. septicum was observed for a variety of different sample types. C. septicum levels in broiler chicken field samples estimated from the results of qPCR were statistically correlated to culture based enumerations obtained from those same tissues.

  7. An epidemiological survey on the determination of Taenia saginata cysticercosis in Iran, using a PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, S; Setayesh, A; Shekarforoush, S S; Fariman, S H

    2013-04-27

    Bovine cysticercosis caused by Taenia saginata is a zoonotic disease affirming routine inspection measures for the postmortem detection of cysticerci (cysts) in beef destined for human consumption. Detection is based on gross examination of traditional carcase predilection sites; although there is evidence to suggest that examination of other sites may offer improvements in sensitivity. In the current study, a biomolecular-based assay was employed to confirm and differentiate T saginata cysticercosis from other comparable parasitic infection in cattle carcases. Out of 7371 cattle carcases routinely inspected, 72 (0.97 per cent) were initially detected, from which 57 (79.16 per cent), 11(15.27 per cent) and 4 (5.55 per cent) were recorded in masseter muscle, heart and diaphragm, respectively. The PCR assay was also conducted to confirm different stages of the cysts, being able to detect the cyst, and to discriminate its various degenerative stages with other parasitic structures. The technique was proposed as a reliable tool to differentiate the cysticerci and, thus, could be used in further epidemiological studies as there was no difference in view of negative PCR results in lesions found by routine inspection. PMID:23571031

  8. Utilizing Low-Volume Aqueous Acoustic Transfer with the Echo 525 to Enable Miniaturization of qRT-PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sony; Cifelli, Steven; Johnstone, Richard; Pechter, David; Barbey, Deborah A; Lin, Karen; Allison, Tim; Agrawal, Shree; Rivera-Gines, Aida; Milligan, James A; Schneeweis, Jonathan; Houle, Kevin; Struck, Alice J; Visconti, Richard; Sills, Matthew; Wildey, Mary Jo

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a valuable tool for characterizing the effects of inhibitors on viral replication. The amplification of target viral genes through the use of specifically designed fluorescent probes and primers provides a reliable method for quantifying RNA. Due to reagent costs, use of these assays for compound evaluation is limited. Until recently, the inability to accurately dispense low volumes of qRT-PCR assay reagents precluded the routine use of this PCR assay for compound evaluation in drug discovery. Acoustic dispensing has become an integral part of drug discovery during the past decade; however, acoustic transfer of microliter volumes of aqueous reagents was time consuming. The Labcyte Echo 525 liquid handler was designed to enable rapid aqueous transfers. We compared the accuracy and precision of a qPCR assay using the Labcyte Echo 525 to those of the BioMek FX, a traditional liquid handler, with the goal of reducing the volume and cost of the assay. The data show that the Echo 525 provides higher accuracy and precision compared to the current process using a traditional liquid handler. Comparable data for assay volumes from 500 nL to 12 µL allowed the miniaturization of the assay, resulting in significant cost savings of drug discovery and process streamlining.

  9. Performance of 3 real-time PCR assays for direct detection of Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA from clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Maitry S; McClure, J T; Mangold, Kathy; Peterson, Lance R

    2015-11-01

    We compared 3 real-time PCR assays: off-label use of 2 commercial assays (BD-GeneOhm™ MRSA assay for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] detection and BD-GeneOhm StaphSR™ for MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus detection) and an in-house real-time PCR assay for detection of total S. aureus from clinical specimens. Testing was performed on 200 distinct specimens. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated using culture as the gold standard. The prevalence of S. aureus in the samples was 44.5%, and MRSA was 20%. For total S. aureus, the StaphSR-PCR and the in-house PCR assays had a sensitivity and specificity of 94.4% and 96.4% and 93.3% and 99.1%, respectively. For MRSA detection, the StaphSR and the BD GeneOhm assay had a sensitivity and specificity of 92.5% and 98.8% and 92.5% and 96.3%, respectively. This study demonstrates the potential use of tests like the StaphSR-PCR assay for rapid detection of S. aureus and MRSA directly from clinical specimens; however, culture follow-up would be needed to identify other potential pathogens in the specimen.

  10. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for detection of a mutation in the relax circular DNA and the covalently closed circular DNA of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wan-Long; Hu, Jie-Li; Fang, Yan; Luo, Qiang; Xu, Ge; Xu, Lei; Jing, Zhou-Hong; Shan, Xue-Feng; Zhu, Yan-Ling; Huang, Ai-Long

    2013-12-01

    The relax circle DNA (rcDNA) sequence and the covalently closed circle DNA (cccDNA) sequence in hepatitis B virus (HBV) are crucial regions for HBV infections. To analyze mutations in rcDNA and cccDNA, DNA sequencing is often used, although it is time-consuming and expensive. Herein, we report a simple, economic, albeit accurate allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) to detect mutations in these regions of HBV. This method can be extensively used to screen for mutations at specific positions of HBV genome.

  11. Development of a caseinase assay for PCR independent detection of esp gene carriage among enterococci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Asmat, Ahmad; Lee, Yook Heng; Usup, Gires

    2013-11-01

    Currently, there is no known relationship between caseinase and carriage of esp gene. Also, no breakpoints exist for phenotypic assays that are used to infer virulence characteristics among Enterococci. In the present study, caseinase activity was measured by a radial diffusion assay for 113 enterococci isolates. A standard curve with predictive r2 value of 0.939 was produced by dispensing several doubling dilutions of proteinase K into 3% skimmed milk agar wells. Caseinase activity for all tested enterococci was subsequently converted into proteinase K activity, using the obtained chart. Caseinase activity ranged from 1.74 × 10-8 to 4.47 × 10-7ug/ml and 6.37 × 10-8 to 8.82 × 10-8 ug/ml per colony of environmental and clinical enterocococci tested, proportionate to proteinase K activity. Caseinase activity among environmental strains was five-fold higher than was observed among clinical strains. Fishers exact test revealed significant associations between esp gene carriage and caseinase activity (diameter on skimmed milk, z=8 to 13mm) at p<0.1. However, the probability of association was strongest at z=13 mm (p=0.033) suggesting a range of diameter cut-offs that was exclusive to and may be used to predict the presence of environmental enterococci strains harbouring esp gene. Results obtained from sensitivity analysis showed increasing assay sensitivity from cut-off of 9 mm (61.54%) up to 84.62% (13 mm). Specificity of the caseinase assay slightly decreased from 50% to 42.86% as cut-off increased from 9 to 13 mm. The caseinase assay described here potentially proves useful in preliminary PCR independent screening of environmental enterococci isolates for the detection of strains which carry the esp gene known to increase the severity of enterococcal infections.

  12. A molecular-beacon-based asymmetric PCR assay for easy visualization of amplicons in the diagnosis of trichomoniasis.

    PubMed

    Sonkar, Subash C; Sachdev, Divya; Mishra, Prashant K; Kumar, Anita; Mittal, Pratima; Saluja, Daman

    2016-12-15

    The currently available nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for trichomoniasis are accurate, quick and confirmative with superior sensitivity than traditional culture-based microbiology assays. However, these assays are associated with problems of carry over contamination, false positive results, requirement of technical expertise for performance and detection of end product. Hence, a diagnostic assay with easy visualization of the amplified product will be profitable. An in-house, rapid, sensitive, specific molecular-beacon-based PCR assay, using primers against pfoB gene of Trichomonas vaginalis, was developed and evaluated using dry ectocervical swabs (n=392) from symptomatic females with vaginal discharge. Total DNA was isolated and used as template for the PCR assays. The performance and reproducibility of PCR assay was evaluated by composite reference standard (CRS). For easy visualization of the amplified product, molecular-beacon was designed and amplicons were visualized directly using fluorescent handheld dark reader or by Micro-Plate Reader. Molecular-beacons are single-stranded hairpin shaped nucleic acid probes composed of a stem, with fluorophore/quencher pair and a loop region complementary to the desired DNA. The beacon-based PCR assay designed in the present study is highly specific as confirmed by competition experiments and extremely sensitive with detection limit of 20fg of genomic DNA (3-4 pathogens). The minimum infrastructure requirement and ease to perform the assay makes this method highly useful for resource poor countries for better disease management. PMID:27318568

  13. Rapid Detection of Acquired and Inducible Clarithromycin Resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus Group by a Simple Real-Time PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Luo, Robert F; Curry, Cheyenne; Taylor, Nathan; Budvytiene, Indre; Banaei, Niaz

    2015-07-01

    By targeting the erm(41) and rrl genes in the Mycobacterium abscessus group, a multiplex real-time PCR assay for clarithromycin resistance showed 95% (38/40) concordance with nucleic acid testing and 95% (37/39) concordance with phenotypic testing. This assay provides a simple and rapid alternative to extended incubation or erm(41) sequencing. PMID:25903572

  14. A molecular-beacon-based asymmetric PCR assay for easy visualization of amplicons in the diagnosis of trichomoniasis.

    PubMed

    Sonkar, Subash C; Sachdev, Divya; Mishra, Prashant K; Kumar, Anita; Mittal, Pratima; Saluja, Daman

    2016-12-15

    The currently available nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for trichomoniasis are accurate, quick and confirmative with superior sensitivity than traditional culture-based microbiology assays. However, these assays are associated with problems of carry over contamination, false positive results, requirement of technical expertise for performance and detection of end product. Hence, a diagnostic assay with easy visualization of the amplified product will be profitable. An in-house, rapid, sensitive, specific molecular-beacon-based PCR assay, using primers against pfoB gene of Trichomonas vaginalis, was developed and evaluated using dry ectocervical swabs (n=392) from symptomatic females with vaginal discharge. Total DNA was isolated and used as template for the PCR assays. The performance and reproducibility of PCR assay was evaluated by composite reference standard (CRS). For easy visualization of the amplified product, molecular-beacon was designed and amplicons were visualized directly using fluorescent handheld dark reader or by Micro-Plate Reader. Molecular-beacons are single-stranded hairpin shaped nucleic acid probes composed of a stem, with fluorophore/quencher pair and a loop region complementary to the desired DNA. The beacon-based PCR assay designed in the present study is highly specific as confirmed by competition experiments and extremely sensitive with detection limit of 20fg of genomic DNA (3-4 pathogens). The minimum infrastructure requirement and ease to perform the assay makes this method highly useful for resource poor countries for better disease management.

  15. Rapid Detection of Ceratocystis platani Inoculum by Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ghelardini, Luisa; Belbahri, Lassaâd; Quartier, Marion; Santini, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Ceratocystis platani is the causal agent of canker stain of plane trees, a lethal disease able to kill mature trees in one or two successive growing seasons. The pathogen is a quarantine organism and has a negative impact on anthropogenic and natural populations of plane trees. Contaminated sawdust produced during pruning and sanitation fellings can contribute to disease spread. The goal of this study was to design a rapid, real-time quantitative PCR assay to detect a C. platani airborne inoculum. Airborne inoculum traps (AITs) were placed in an urban setting in the city of Florence, Italy, where the disease was present. Primers and TaqMan minor groove binder (MGB) probes were designed to target cerato-platanin (CP) and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) genes. The detection limits of the assay were 0.05 pg/μl and 2 fg/μl of fungal DNA for CP and ITS, respectively. Pathogen detection directly from AITs demonstrated specificity and high sensitivity for C. platani, detecting DNA concentrations as low as 1.2 × 10−2 to 1.4 × 10−2 pg/μl, corresponding to ∼10 conidia per ml. Airborne inoculum traps were able to detect the C. platani inoculum within 200 m of the closest symptomatic infected plane tree. The combination of airborne trapping and real-time quantitative PCR assay provides a rapid and sensitive method for the specific detection of a C. platani inoculum. This technique may be used to identify the period of highest risk of pathogen spread in a site, thus helping disease management. PMID:23811499

  16. Development and validation of two SYBR green PCR assays and a multiplex real-time PCR for the detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in meat.

    PubMed

    Brusa, Victoria; Galli, Lucía; Linares, Luciano H; Ortega, Emanuel E; Lirón, Juan P; Leotta, Gerardo A

    2015-12-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are recognized as food-borne pathogens. We developed and validated two SYBR green PCR (SYBR-PCR) and a real-time multiplex PCR (RT-PCR) to detect stx1 and stx2 genes in meat samples, and compared these techniques in ground beef samples from retail stores. One set of primers and one hydrolysis probe were designed for each stx gene. For RT-PCR, an internal amplification control (IAC) was used. All PCR intra-laboratory validations were performed using pure strains and artificially contaminated ground beef samples. A total of 50 STEC and 30 non-STEC strains were used. Naturally contaminated ground beef samples (n=103) were obtained from retail stores and screened with SYBR-PCR and RT-PCR, and stx-positive samples were processed for STEC isolation. In the intra-laboratory validation, each PCR obtained a 1×10(2) CFU mL(-1) limit of detection and 100% inclusivity and exclusivity. The same results were obtained when different laboratory analysts in alternate days performed the assay. The level of agreement obtained with SYBR-PCR and RT-PCR was kappa=0.758 and 0.801 (P<0.001) for stx1 and stx2 gene detection, respectively. Two PCR strategies were developed and validated, and excellent performance with artificially contaminated ground beef samples was obtained. However, the efforts made to isolate STEC from retail store samples were not enough. Only 11 STEC strains were isolated from 35 stx-positive ground beef samples identically detected by all PCRs. The combination of molecular approaches based on the identification of a virulence genotypic profile of STEC must be considered to improve isolation.

  17. Development and validation of two SYBR green PCR assays and a multiplex real-time PCR for the detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in meat.

    PubMed

    Brusa, Victoria; Galli, Lucía; Linares, Luciano H; Ortega, Emanuel E; Lirón, Juan P; Leotta, Gerardo A

    2015-12-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are recognized as food-borne pathogens. We developed and validated two SYBR green PCR (SYBR-PCR) and a real-time multiplex PCR (RT-PCR) to detect stx1 and stx2 genes in meat samples, and compared these techniques in ground beef samples from retail stores. One set of primers and one hydrolysis probe were designed for each stx gene. For RT-PCR, an internal amplification control (IAC) was used. All PCR intra-laboratory validations were performed using pure strains and artificially contaminated ground beef samples. A total of 50 STEC and 30 non-STEC strains were used. Naturally contaminated ground beef samples (n=103) were obtained from retail stores and screened with SYBR-PCR and RT-PCR, and stx-positive samples were processed for STEC isolation. In the intra-laboratory validation, each PCR obtained a 1×10(2) CFU mL(-1) limit of detection and 100% inclusivity and exclusivity. The same results were obtained when different laboratory analysts in alternate days performed the assay. The level of agreement obtained with SYBR-PCR and RT-PCR was kappa=0.758 and 0.801 (P<0.001) for stx1 and stx2 gene detection, respectively. Two PCR strategies were developed and validated, and excellent performance with artificially contaminated ground beef samples was obtained. However, the efforts made to isolate STEC from retail store samples were not enough. Only 11 STEC strains were isolated from 35 stx-positive ground beef samples identically detected by all PCRs. The combination of molecular approaches based on the identification of a virulence genotypic profile of STEC must be considered to improve isolation. PMID:26410309

  18. Development of molecular approach based on PCR assay for detection of histamine producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wongsariya, Karn; Bunyapraphatsara, Nuntavan; Yasawong, Montri; Chomnawang, Mullika Traidej

    2016-01-01

    Histamine fish poisoning becomes highly concern not only in public health but also economic aspect. Histamine is produced from histidine in fish muscles by bacterial decarboxylase enzyme. Several techniques have been developed to determine the level of histamine in fish and their products but the effective method for detecting histamine producing bacteria is still required. This study was attempted to detect histamine producing bacteria by newly developed PCR condition. Histamine producing bacteria were isolated from scombroid fish and determined the ability to produce histamine of isolated bacteria by biochemical and TLC assays. PCR method was developed to target the histidine decarboxylase gene (hdc). The result showed that fifteen histamine producing bacterial isolates and three standard strains produced an amplicon at the expected size of 571 bp after amplified by PCR using Hdc_2F/2R primers. Fifteen isolates of histamine producing bacteria were classified as M. morganii, E. aerogenes, and A. baumannii. The lowest detection levels of M. morganii and E. aerogenes were 10(2) and 10(5) Cfu/mL in culture media and 10(3) and 10(6) Cfu/mL in fish homogenates, respectively. The limit of detection by this method was clearly shown to be sensitive because the primers could detect the presence of M. morganii and E. aerogenes before the histamine level reached the regulation level at 50 ppm. Therefore, this PCR method exhibited the potential efficiency for detecting the hdc gene from histamine producing bacteria and could be used to prevent the proliferation of histamine producing bacteria in fish and fish products.

  19. Discrimination between E. granulosus sensu stricto, E. multilocularis and E. shiquicus Using a Multiplex PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Yan, Hong-Bin; Blair, David; Lei, Meng-Tong; Cai, Jin-Zhong; Fan, Yan-Lei; Li, Jian-Qiu; Fu, Bao-Quan; Yang, Yu-Rong; McManus, Donald P.; Jia, Wan-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s), E. multilocularis and E. shiquicus are commonly found co-endemic on the Qinghai-Tibet plateau, China, and an efficient tool is needed to facilitate the detection of infected hosts and for species identification. Methodology/Principal Findings A single-tube multiplex PCR assay was established to differentiate the Echinococcus species responsible for infections in intermediate and definitive hosts. Primers specific for E. granulosus, E. multilocularis and E. shiquicus were designed based on sequences of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1), NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (nad5) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) genes, respectively. This multiplex PCR accurately detected Echinococcus DNA without generating nonspecific reaction products. PCR products were of the expected sizes of 219 (nad1), 584 (nad5) and 471 (cox1) bp. Furthermore, the multiplex PCR enabled diagnosis of multiple infections using DNA of protoscoleces and copro-DNA extracted from fecal samples of canine hosts. Specificity of the multiplex PCR was 100% when evaluated using DNA isolated from other cestodes. Sensitivity thresholds were determined for DNA from protoscoleces and from worm eggs, and were calculated as 20 pg of DNA for E. granulosus and E. shiquicus, 10 pg of DNA for E. multilocularis, 2 eggs for E. granulosus, and 1 egg for E. multilocularis. Positive results with copro-DNA could be obtained at day 17 and day 26 after experimental infection of dogs with larval E. multilocularis and E. granulosus, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The multiplex PCR developed in this study is an efficient tool for discriminating E. granulosus, E. multilocularis and E. shiquicus from each other and from other taeniid cestodes. It can be used for the detection of canids infected with E. granulosus s.s. and E. multilocularis using feces collected from these definitive hosts. It can also be used for the identification

  20. Detection and quantification by PCR assay of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 on apples.

    PubMed

    Soto-Muñoz, Lourdes; Teixidó, Neus; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada; Torres, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    The registration of biological control agents requires the development of monitoring systems to detect and quantify the agent in the environment. Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 is an effective biocontrol agent for postharvest diseases of citrus and pome fruits. The monitoring of CPA-2 in postharvest semi-commercial trials was evaluated by Rodac impression plates and the colonies isolated were confirmed by conventional PCR using the SCAR primers PAGA1 and PAGB1. Samples were taken from different surfaces that had contact with CPA-2, the surrounding environment and working clothes worn by handlers. Moreover, population dynamics of the strain CPA-2 were determined on apple surfaces using both the classical plating technique and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). A qPCR assay using a 3'-minor groove-binding (MGB) probe was developed for the specific detection and quantification of P. agglomerans strain CPA-2. Based on the nucleotide sequence of a SCAR fragment of CPA-2, one primer set and TaqMan MGB probe were designed. The primers SP2-F/SP2-R and the TaqMan MGB probe showed a specific detection of strain CPA-2 on apple surfaces, which was verified tested against purified DNA from 17 strains of P. agglomerans, 4 related Pantoea species, and 21 bacterial strains from other genera isolated from whole and also freshly-cut fruit and vegetables. The detection level was approximately 10(3) cells per reaction, and the standard curve was linear within a range of 5log units. Results from semi-commercial trials showed that CPA-2 had a low impact. The maximum persistence of P. agglomerans CPA-2 was not longer than 5days in plastic boxes stored at 0°C. Significant differences in CPA-2 population level dynamics were observed in results obtained by qPCR and dilution plating. These differences may indicate the presence of non-degraded DNA from non-viable cells. In conclusion, qPCR is a novel potential tool to quickly and specifically monitor recent surface colonisation by CPA-2

  1. Detection and quantification by PCR assay of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 on apples.

    PubMed

    Soto-Muñoz, Lourdes; Teixidó, Neus; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada; Torres, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    The registration of biological control agents requires the development of monitoring systems to detect and quantify the agent in the environment. Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 is an effective biocontrol agent for postharvest diseases of citrus and pome fruits. The monitoring of CPA-2 in postharvest semi-commercial trials was evaluated by Rodac impression plates and the colonies isolated were confirmed by conventional PCR using the SCAR primers PAGA1 and PAGB1. Samples were taken from different surfaces that had contact with CPA-2, the surrounding environment and working clothes worn by handlers. Moreover, population dynamics of the strain CPA-2 were determined on apple surfaces using both the classical plating technique and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). A qPCR assay using a 3'-minor groove-binding (MGB) probe was developed for the specific detection and quantification of P. agglomerans strain CPA-2. Based on the nucleotide sequence of a SCAR fragment of CPA-2, one primer set and TaqMan MGB probe were designed. The primers SP2-F/SP2-R and the TaqMan MGB probe showed a specific detection of strain CPA-2 on apple surfaces, which was verified tested against purified DNA from 17 strains of P. agglomerans, 4 related Pantoea species, and 21 bacterial strains from other genera isolated from whole and also freshly-cut fruit and vegetables. The detection level was approximately 10(3) cells per reaction, and the standard curve was linear within a range of 5log units. Results from semi-commercial trials showed that CPA-2 had a low impact. The maximum persistence of P. agglomerans CPA-2 was not longer than 5days in plastic boxes stored at 0°C. Significant differences in CPA-2 population level dynamics were observed in results obtained by qPCR and dilution plating. These differences may indicate the presence of non-degraded DNA from non-viable cells. In conclusion, qPCR is a novel potential tool to quickly and specifically monitor recent surface colonisation by CPA-2

  2. Development of a multiplex PCR assay for detection and discrimination of Theileria annulata and Theileria sergenti in cattle.

    PubMed

    Junlong, Liu; Li, Youquan; Liu, Aihong; Guan, Guiquan; Xie, Junren; Yin, Hong; Luo, Jianxun

    2015-07-01

    Aim to construct a simple and efficient diagnostic assay for Theileria annulata and Theileria sergenti, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed in this study. Following the alignment of the related sequences, two primer sets were designed specific targeting on T. annulata cytochrome b (COB) gene and T. sergenti internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. It was found that the designed primers could react in one PCR system and generating amplifications of 818 and 393 base pair for T. sergenti and T. annulata, respectively. The standard genomic DNA of both species Theileria was serial tenfold diluted for testing the sensitivity, while specificity test confirmed both primer sets have no cross-reaction with other Theileria and Babesia species. In addition, 378 field samples were used for evaluation of the utility of the multiplex PCR assay for detection of the pathogens infection. The detection results were compared with the other two published PCR methods which targeting on T. annulata COB gene and T. sergenti major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) gene, respectively. The developed multiplex PCR assay has similar efficient detection with COB and MPSP PCR, which indicates this multiplex PCR may be a valuable assay for the epidemiological studies for T. annulata and T. sergenti.

  3. Improved PCR assay for the species-specific identification and quantitation of Legionella pneumophila in water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Seok; Ahn, Tae-Young; Joh, Kiseong; Lee, Eui Seok; Park, Dong Suk

    2015-11-01

    Legionellosis outbreak is a major global health care problem. However, current Legionella risk assessments may be compromised by uncertainties in Legionella detection methods, infectious dose, and strain infectivity. These limitations may place public health at significant risk, leading to significant monetary losses in health care. However, there are still unmet needs for its rapid identification and monitoring of legionellae in water systems. Therefore, in the present study, a primer set was designed based on a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) family protein gene of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pneumophila str. Philadelphia 1 because it was found that this gene is structurally diverse among species through BLAST searches. The specificity of the primer set was evaluated using genomic DNA from 6 strains of L. pneumophila, 5 type strains of other related Legionella species, and other 29 reference pathogenic bacteria. The primer set used in the PCR assay amplified a 264-bp product for only targeted six strains of L. pneumophila. The assay was also able to detect at least 1.39 × 10(3) copies/μl of cloned amplified target DNA using purified DNA or 7.4 × 10(0) colony-forming unit per reaction when using calibrated cell suspension. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of this assay were confirmed by successful detection of Legionella pneumophila in environmental water samples. PMID:26142386

  4. Viral Multiplex Quantitative PCR Assays for Tracking Sources of Fecal Contamination▿

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Sandro; Hewitt, Joanne; Greening, Gail E.

    2010-01-01

    Human and animal fecal pollution of the environment presents a risk to human health because of the presence of pathogenic viruses and bacteria. To distinguish between human and animal sources of pollution, we designed specific real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays for human and animal enteric viruses, including norovirus genogroups I, II, and III; porcine adenovirus types 3 and 5; ovine adenovirus; atadenovirus; and human adenovirus species C and F, which are excreted by infected humans, pigs, cattle, sheep, deer, and goats, and for the detection of F+ RNA bacteriophage genogroups I to IV, which are associated with human and animal wastes. The sensitivity of this viral toolbox (VTB) was tested against 10-fold dilution series of DNA plasmids that carry the target sequences of the respective viruses and was shown to detect at least 10 plasmid copies for each assay. A panel of human and animal enteric and respiratory viruses showed these assays to be highly sensitive and specific to their respective targets. The VTB was used to detect viruses in fecal and environmental samples, including raw sewage and biosolids from municipal sewage treatment plants, abattoir sewage, and fecally contaminated shellfish and river water, which were likely to contain animal or human viruses. PMID:20061455

  5. Real time PCR assay for detection of all known lineages of West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Ana; Herrero, Laura; Negredo, Anabel; Hernández, Lourdes; Sánchez-Seco, María Paz; Tenorio, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is one of the most widespread arbovirus and a large variety of WNV strains and lineages have been described. The molecular methods for the diagnosis of WNV target mainly lineages 1 and 2, which have caused outbreaks in humans, equines and birds. But the last few years new and putative WNV lineages of unknown pathogenicity have been described. Here we describe a new sensitive and specific real-time PCR assay for the detection and quantification of all the WNV lineages described until now. Primers and probe were designed in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the WNV genome and were designed to match all sequenced WNV strains perfectly. The sensitivity of the assay ranged from 1,5 to 15 copies per reaction depending on the WNV lineage tested. The method was validated for WNV diagnosis using different viral strains, human samples (cerebrospinal fluid, biopsies, serum and plasma) and mosquito pools. The assay did not amplify any other phylogenetically or symptomatically related viruses. All of the above make it a very suitable tool for the diagnosis of WNV and for surveillance studies. PMID:27481597

  6. Improved PCR assay for the species-specific identification and quantitation of Legionella pneumophila in water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Seok; Ahn, Tae-Young; Joh, Kiseong; Lee, Eui Seok; Park, Dong Suk

    2015-11-01

    Legionellosis outbreak is a major global health care problem. However, current Legionella risk assessments may be compromised by uncertainties in Legionella detection methods, infectious dose, and strain infectivity. These limitations may place public health at significant risk, leading to significant monetary losses in health care. However, there are still unmet needs for its rapid identification and monitoring of legionellae in water systems. Therefore, in the present study, a primer set was designed based on a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) family protein gene of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pneumophila str. Philadelphia 1 because it was found that this gene is structurally diverse among species through BLAST searches. The specificity of the primer set was evaluated using genomic DNA from 6 strains of L. pneumophila, 5 type strains of other related Legionella species, and other 29 reference pathogenic bacteria. The primer set used in the PCR assay amplified a 264-bp product for only targeted six strains of L. pneumophila. The assay was also able to detect at least 1.39 × 10(3) copies/μl of cloned amplified target DNA using purified DNA or 7.4 × 10(0) colony-forming unit per reaction when using calibrated cell suspension. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of this assay were confirmed by successful detection of Legionella pneumophila in environmental water samples.

  7. Determination of phenanthrene by antibody-coated competitive real-time immuno-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun; Wang, Qiong-E; Zhuang, Hui-Sheng

    2008-08-01

    A reliable selective and sensitive antibody-coated competitive real-time immuno-PCR (RT-IPCR) assay for the determination of phenanthrene (PH) was developed. Phenanthrene butanoic acid (gamma-oxo-PHA) was synthesized as the hapten of PH. An active ester method was used to couple the PHA to bovine serum albumin to form an artificial immune antigen. Male New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with immune antigen to obtain polyclonal antibodies, with which a novel RT-IPCR assay for determination of PH was developed. Under the optimized assay conditions, PH can be determined in the concentration range from 10 fg/mL to 100 pg/mL with a detection limit of 5 fg/mL. The cross-reactivities of the anti-PH antibody to seven structurally related compounds were below 12.5%. Some environmental water samples were analyzed with satisfactory results, which showed good accuracy and suitability to analyze PH in environmental water. Compared with high-performance liquid chromatography, the recovery was lower or higher with agitation but would still be acceptable for use in an on-site field test to provide rapid, semiquantitative, and reliable test results for making environmental decisions. PMID:18587564

  8. Single-tube nested PCR assay for the detection of avian botulism in cecal contents of chickens.

    PubMed

    Jang, Il; Lee, Jae-Il; Kwon, Yong-Kuk; Kang, Min-Su; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Park, Ji-Young; Lee, Song-Hyun; Lee, Hee-Soo; Bae, You-Chan

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a novel diagnostic method for the detection of avian botulism caused by Clostridium botulinum type C and C/D, using single-tube nested PCR assay. This assay was developed to overcome the disadvantages of bioassays used in experiments with mice. Three primer pairs including an antisense primer were designed to target the N-terminal of the toxin gene from C. botulinum types C and C/D. The specificity of the PCR assay was confirmed by using 33 bacterial strains and chicken cecal contents from farms that experienced botulism outbreaks. The detection limit for purified DNA was 1.1 fg/μl, and for bacterial spores was 4.3 spores/200 mg of cecal contents. While checking for specificity of the PCR assay, the reactions with the templates form C. botulinum type C and C/D which were tested became positive, but the rest of the reactions turned negative. However, the results for all clinical samples (n = 8) were positive. The PCR assay results for cecal samples obtained from 300 healthy chickens (150 Korean native chickens and 150 broilers) were all negative. This assay is rapid and straightforward and evades ethical issues associated with mouse bioassay. Moreover, it is more economical than real-time PCR.

  9. Rapid detection of drug-resistant mutations in hepatitis B virus by the PCR-Invader assay.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Kenichi; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Kobayashi, Mariko; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Nagano, Makoto; Egashira, Toru; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2011-01-01

    Early detection of resistant mutations of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is important for patients on nucleos(t)ide analog therapy. An assay based on the PCR-Invader technology was developed to detect resistant mutations with high sensitivity. The assay specifically detects mutations at codons 180, 181, 184, 202, 204, and 250 of the HBV polymerase reverse transcriptase domain. These mutations result in resistance to lamivudine and entecavir. In mixtures of plasmids containing wild-type and resistant mutants, fold-over-zero values for resistant mutations were detected in 2% of the total. Seventy-five serum samples from patients, whose treatment had been switched from lamivudine to entecavir, were examined by the PCR-Invader assay and direct sequencing. The PCR-Invader assay detected all resistant mutations that were detected by direct sequencing and even detected the presence of mutants that direct sequencing could not. Cloning sequencing confirmed those mutations found by the PCR-Invader assay and not by direct sequencing. The PCR-Invader assay is a useful tool for the early detection of drug-resistant mutations. PMID:20950650

  10. Rapid real-time PCR assay for detecting Salmonella in raw and ready-to-eat meats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jitu R; Bhagwat, Arvind A

    2008-12-01

    A real-time PCR assay was evaluated for the rapid detection (10 h) of Salmonella in meats using molecular beacon probes available as a commercial kit (iQ-Check, Bio-Rad laboratories). Raw (chicken, pork) and ready-to-eat (RTE) meats were artificially contaminated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium at the estimated level of 2 to 4 cells per 25 g. After 8 h of pre-enrichment in buffered peptone water, a molecular beacon-based PCR assay was performed to detect contamination in raw and RTE meats. The sensitivity and accuracy of the assay were compared with the conventional USDA microbiological procedure. Comparative evaluation of the USDA procedure with the rapid PCR assay for meat samples (n = 63) revealed 1 false negative pork sample with the PCR assay. All uninoculated controls (n = 34) but one sample were negative by both the 10-h PCR assay and the USDA procedure. Developing rapid pathogen detection methods with shorter pre-enrichment times (8-h) and real-time data monitoring capabilities will benefit the industry in preventing recall of contaminated meats by stopping the contaminated products from being introduced into the marketplace.

  11. A multiplex real-time PCR panel assay for simultaneous detection and differentiation of 12 common swine viruses.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiju; Liu, Xuming; Wang, Qin; Das, Amaresh; Ma, Guiping; Xu, Lu; Sun, Qing; Peddireddi, Lalitha; Jia, Wei; Liu, Yanhua; Anderson, Gary; Bai, Jianfa; Shi, Jishu

    2016-10-01

    Mixed infection with different pathogens is common in swine production systems especially under intensive production conditions. Quick and accurate detection and differentiation of different pathogens are necessary for epidemiological surveillance, disease management and import and export controls. In this study, we developed and validated a panel of multiplex real-time PCR/RT-PCR assays composed of four subpanels, each detects three common swine pathogens. The panel detects 12 viruses or viral serotypes, namely, VSV-IN, VSV-NJ, SVDV, CSFV, ASFV, FMDV, PCV2, PPV, PRV, PRRSV-NA, PRRSV-EU and SIV. Correlation coefficients (R(2)) and PCR amplification efficiencies of all singular and triplex real-time PCR reactions are within the acceptable range. Comparison between singular and triplex real-time PCR assays of each subpanel indicates that there is no significant interference on assay sensitivities caused by multiplexing. Specificity tests on 226 target clinical samples or 4 viral strains and 91 non-target clinical samples revealed that the real-time PCR panel is 100% specific, and there is no cross amplification observed. The limit of detection of each triplex real-time PCR is less than 10 copies per reaction for DNA, and less than 16 copies per reaction for RNA viruses. The newly developed multiplex real-time PCR panel also detected different combinations of co-infections as confirmed by other means of detections.

  12. A multiplex real-time PCR panel assay for simultaneous detection and differentiation of 12 common swine viruses.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiju; Liu, Xuming; Wang, Qin; Das, Amaresh; Ma, Guiping; Xu, Lu; Sun, Qing; Peddireddi, Lalitha; Jia, Wei; Liu, Yanhua; Anderson, Gary; Bai, Jianfa; Shi, Jishu

    2016-10-01

    Mixed infection with different pathogens is common in swine production systems especially under intensive production conditions. Quick and accurate detection and differentiation of different pathogens are necessary for epidemiological surveillance, disease management and import and export controls. In this study, we developed and validated a panel of multiplex real-time PCR/RT-PCR assays composed of four subpanels, each detects three common swine pathogens. The panel detects 12 viruses or viral serotypes, namely, VSV-IN, VSV-NJ, SVDV, CSFV, ASFV, FMDV, PCV2, PPV, PRV, PRRSV-NA, PRRSV-EU and SIV. Correlation coefficients (R(2)) and PCR amplification efficiencies of all singular and triplex real-time PCR reactions are within the acceptable range. Comparison between singular and triplex real-time PCR assays of each subpanel indicates that there is no significant interference on assay sensitivities caused by multiplexing. Specificity tests on 226 target clinical samples or 4 viral strains and 91 non-target clinical samples revealed that the real-time PCR panel is 100% specific, and there is no cross amplification observed. The limit of detection of each triplex real-time PCR is less than 10 copies per reaction for DNA, and less than 16 copies per reaction for RNA viruses. The newly developed multiplex real-time PCR panel also detected different combinations of co-infections as confirmed by other means of detections. PMID:27506582

  13. Detection limits and cost comparisons of human- and gull-associated conventional and quantitative PCR assays in artificial and environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Timothy E; Zimmer-Faust, Amity G; Thulsiraj, Vanessa; Madi, Tania; Hanley, Kaitlyn T; Ebentier, Darcy L; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Layton, Blythe; Raith, Meredith; Boehm, Alexandria B; Griffith, John F; Holden, Patricia A; Shanks, Orin C; Weisberg, Stephen B; Jay, Jennifer A

    2014-04-01

    Some molecular methods for tracking fecal pollution in environmental waters have both PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays available for use. To assist managers in deciding whether to implement newer qPCR techniques in routine monitoring programs, we compared detection limits (LODs) and costs of PCR and qPCR assays with identical targets that are relevant to beach water quality assessment. For human-associated assays targeting Bacteroidales HF183 genetic marker, qPCR LODs were 70 times lower and there was no effect of target matrix (artificial freshwater, environmental creek water, and environmental marine water) on PCR or qPCR LODs. The PCR startup and annual costs were the lowest, while the per reaction cost was 62% lower than the Taqman based qPCR and 180% higher than the SYBR based qPCR. For gull-associated assays, there was no significant difference between PCR and qPCR LODs, target matrix did not effect PCR or qPCR LODs, and PCR startup, annual, and per reaction costs were lower. Upgrading to qPCR involves greater startup and annual costs, but this increase may be justified in the case of the human-associated assays with lower detection limits and reduced cost per sample.

  14. Detection limits and cost comparisons of human- and gull-associated conventional and quantitative PCR assays in artificial and environmental waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riedel, Timothy E.; Zimmer-Faust, Amity G.; Thulsiraj, Vanessa; Madi, Tania; Hanley, Kaitlyn T.; Ebentier, Darcy L.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Layton, Blythe; Raith, Meredith; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Griffith, John F.; Holden, Patricia A.; Shanks, Orin C.; Weisberg, Stephen B.; Jay, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Some molecular methods for tracking fecal pollution in environmental waters have both PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays available for use. To assist managers in deciding whether to implement newer qPCR techniques in routine monitoring programs, we compared detection limits (LODs) and costs of PCR and qPCR assays with identical targets that are relevant to beach water quality assessment. For human-associated assays targeting Bacteroidales HF183 genetic marker, qPCR LODs were 70 times lower and there was no effect of target matrix (artificial freshwater, environmental creek water, and environmental marine water) on PCR or qPCR LODs. The PCR startup and annual costs were the lowest, while the per reaction cost was 62% lower than the Taqman based qPCR and 180% higher than the SYBR based qPCR. For gull-associated assays, there was no significant difference between PCR and qPCR LODs, target matrix did not effect PCR or qPCR LODs, and PCR startup, annual, and per reaction costs were lower. Upgrading to qPCR involves greater startup and annual costs, but this increase may be justified in the case of the human-associated assays with lower detection limits and reduced cost per sample.

  15. Development of a PCR Assay for Detection of Yersinia ruckeri in Tissues of Inoculated and Naturally Infected Trout

    PubMed Central

    Gibello, A.; Blanco, M. M.; Moreno, M. A.; Cutuli, M. T.; Domenech, A.; Domínguez, L.; Fernández-Garayzábal, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    A PCR-based method was developed for the specific detection of Yersinia ruckeri in tissues of inoculated trout and naturally infected trout. No amplification products were obtained with other yersiniae, bacterial fish pathogens, or phylogenetically related bacteria (n = 34). The sensitivity of PCR detection was 60 to 65 bacterial cells per PCR tube, which was decreased to 10 to 20 cells by hybridization with a nonradioactive probe. The PCR assay proved to be as reliable as and faster than the conventional culture method for the detection of Y. ruckeri in infected trout tissues. PMID:9872807

  16. Evaluation of a Multiplex Real-time PCR Assay for the Detection of Respiratory Viruses in Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Rheem, Insoo; Park, Joowon; Kim, Tae-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, we evaluated the analytical performance and clinical potential of a one-step multiplex real-time PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of 14 types of respiratory viruses using the AdvanSure RV real-time PCR Kit (LG Life Sciences, Korea). Methods Three hundred and twenty clinical specimens were tested with the AdvanSure RV real-time PCR Kit and conventional multiplex reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay. The assay results were analyzed and the one-step AdvanSure RV real-time PCR Kit was compared with the conventional multiplex RT-PCR assay with respect to the sensitivity and specificity of the detection of respiratory viruses. Results The limit of detection (LOD) was 1.31 plaque-forming units (PFU)/mL for human rhinoviruses (hRVs), 4.93 PFU/mL for human coronavirus HCoV-229E/NL63, 2.67 PFU/mL for human coronavirus HCoV-OC43, 18.20 PFU/mL for parainfluenza virus 1 (PIV)-1, 24.57 PFU/mL for PIV-2, 1.73 PFU/mL for PIV-3, 1.79 PFU/mL for influenza virus group (Flu) A, 59.51 PFU/mL for FluB, 5.46 PFU/mL for human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV)-A, 17.23 PFU/mL for hRSV-B, 9.99 PFU/mL for human adenovirus (ADVs). The cross-reactivity test for this assay against 23 types of non-respiratory viruses showed negative results for all viruses tested. The agreement between the one-step AdvanSure multiplex real-time PCR assay and the conventional multiplex RT-PCR assay was 98%. Conclusions The one-step AdvanSure RV multiplex real-time PCR assay is a simple assay with high potential for specific, rapid and sensitive laboratory diagnosis of respiratory viruses compared to conventional multiplex RT-PCR. PMID:23130338

  17. Evaluation of a gp63–PCR Based Assay as a Molecular Diagnosis Tool in Canine Leishmaniasis in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Guerbouj, Souheila; Djilani, Fattouma; Bettaieb, Jihene; Lambson, Bronwen; Diouani, Mohamed Fethi; Ben Salah, Afif; Ben Ismail, Riadh; Guizani, Ikram

    2014-01-01

    A gp63PCR method was evaluated for the detection and characterization of Leishmania (Leishmania) (L.) parasites in canine lymph node aspirates. This tool was tested and compared to other PCRs based on the amplification of 18S ribosomal genes, a L. infantum specific repetitive sequence and kinetoplastic DNA minicircles, and to classical parasitological (smear examination and/or culture) or serological (IFAT) techniques on a sample of 40 dogs, originating from different L. infantum endemic regions in Tunisia. Sensitivity and specificity of all the PCR assays were evaluated on parasitologically confirmed dogs within this sample (N = 18) and control dogs (N = 45) originating from non–endemic countries in northern Europe and Australia. The gp63 PCR had 83.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity, a performance comparable to the kinetoplast PCR assay and better than the other assays. These assays had comparable results when the gels were southern transferred and hybridized with a radioactive probe. As different infection rates were found according to the technique, concordance of the results was estimated by (κ) test. Best concordance values were between the gp63PCR and parasitological methods (74.6%, 95% confidence intervals CI: 58.8–95.4%) or serology IFAT technique (47.4%, 95% CI: 23.5–71.3%). However, taken together Gp63 and Rib assays covered most of the samples found positive making of them a good alternative for determination of infection rates. Potential of the gp63PCR-RFLP assay for analysis of parasite genetic diversity within samples was also evaluated using 5 restriction enzymes. RFLP analysis confirmed assignment of the parasites infecting the dogs to L. infantum species and illustrated occurrence of multiple variants in the different endemic foci. Gp63 PCR assay thus constitutes a useful tool in molecular diagnosis of L. infantum infections in dogs in Tunisia. PMID:25153833

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF SEMI-QUANTITATIVE PCR ASSAYS FOR THE DETECTION AND ENUMERATION OF GAMBIERDISCUS SPECIES (GONYAULACALES, DINOPHYCEAE)(1).

    PubMed

    Vandersea, Mark W; Kibler, Steven R; Holland, William C; Tester, Patricia A; Schultz, Thomas F; Faust, Maria A; Holmes, Michael J; Chinain, Mirelle; Wayne Litaker, R

    2012-08-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a serious health problem in tropical regions and is caused by the bioaccumulation of lipophilic toxins produced by dinoflagellates in the genus Gambierdiscus. Gambierdiscus species are morphologically similar and are difficult to distinguish from one another even when using scanning electron microscopy. Improved identification and detection methods that are sensitive and rapid are needed to identify toxic species and investigate potential distribution and abundance patterns in relation to incidences of CFP. This study presents the first species-specific, semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays that can be used to address these questions. These assays are specific for five Gambierdiscus species and one undescribed ribotype. The assays utilized a SYBR green format and targeted unique sequences found within the SSU, ITS, and the D1/D3 LSU ribosomal domains. Standard curves were constructed using known concentrations of cultured cells and 10-fold serial dilutions of rDNA PCR amplicons containing the target sequence for each specific assay. Assay sensitivity and accuracy were tested using DNA extracts purified from known concentrations of multiple Gambierdiscus species. The qPCR assays were used to assess Gambierdiscus species diversity and abundance in samples collected from nearshore areas adjacent to Ft. Pierce and Jupiter, Florida USA. The results indicated that the practical limit of detection for each assay was 10 cells per sample. Most interestingly, the qPCR analysis revealed that as many as four species of Gambierdiscus were present in a single macrophyte sample.

  19. Development and evaluation of a quantitative PCR assay targeting sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Lu, Jingrang; Vogel, Jason; Elk, Michael; Chávez-Ramírez, Felipe; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Santo Domingo, Jorge

    2012-06-01

    While the microbial water quality in the Platte River is seasonally impacted by excreta from migrating cranes, there are no methods available to study crane fecal contamination. Here we characterized microbial populations in crane feces using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene fecal clone libraries. Using these sequences, a novel crane quantitative PCR (Crane1) assay was developed, and its applicability as a microbial source tracking (MST) assay was evaluated by determining its host specificity and detection ability in environmental waters. Bacteria from crane excreta were dominated by bacilli and proteobacteria, with a notable paucity of sequences homologous to Bacteroidetes and Clostridia. The Crane1 marker targeted a dominant clade of unclassified Lactobacillales sequences closely related to Catellicoccus marimammalium. The host distribution of the Crane1 marker was relatively high, being positive for 69% (66/96) of the crane excreta samples tested. The assay also showed high host specificity, with 95% of the nontarget fecal samples (i.e., n = 553; 20 different free-range hosts) being negative. Of the presumed crane-impacted water samples (n = 16), 88% were positive for the Crane1 assay, whereas none of the water samples not impacted by cranes were positive (n = 165). Bayesian statistical models of the Crane1 MST marker demonstrated high confidence in detecting true-positive signals and a low probability of false-negative signals from environmental water samples. Altogether, these data suggest that the newly developed marker could be used in environmental monitoring studies to study crane fecal pollution dynamics.

  20. Development and evaluation of a quantitative PCR assay targeting sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Lu, Jingrang; Vogel, Jason; Elk, Michael; Chávez-Ramírez, Felipe; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Santo Domingo, Jorge

    2012-06-01

    While the microbial water quality in the Platte River is seasonally impacted by excreta from migrating cranes, there are no methods available to study crane fecal contamination. Here we characterized microbial populations in crane feces using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene fecal clone libraries. Using these sequences, a novel crane quantitative PCR (Crane1) assay was developed, and its applicability as a microbial source tracking (MST) assay was evaluated by determining its host specificity and detection ability in environmental waters. Bacteria from crane excreta were dominated by bacilli and proteobacteria, with a notable paucity of sequences homologous to Bacteroidetes and Clostridia. The Crane1 marker targeted a dominant clade of unclassified Lactobacillales sequences closely related to Catellicoccus marimammalium. The host distribution of the Crane1 marker was relatively high, being positive for 69% (66/96) of the crane excreta samples tested. The assay also showed high host specificity, with 95% of the nontarget fecal samples (i.e., n = 553; 20 different free-range hosts) being negative. Of the presumed crane-impacted water samples (n = 16), 88% were positive for the Crane1 assay, whereas none of the water samples not impacted by cranes were positive (n = 165). Bayesian statistical models of the Crane1 MST marker demonstrated high confidence in detecting true-positive signals and a low probability of false-negative signals from environmental water samples. Altogether, these data suggest that the newly developed marker could be used in environmental monitoring studies to study crane fecal pollution dynamics. PMID:22492437

  1. Development and Evaluation of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) Fecal Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hodon; Lu, Jingrang; Vogel, Jason; Elk, Michael; Chávez-Ramírez, Felipe; Ashbolt, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    While the microbial water quality in the Platte River is seasonally impacted by excreta from migrating cranes, there are no methods available to study crane fecal contamination. Here we characterized microbial populations in crane feces using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene fecal clone libraries. Using these sequences, a novel crane quantitative PCR (Crane1) assay was developed, and its applicability as a microbial source tracking (MST) assay was evaluated by determining its host specificity and detection ability in environmental waters. Bacteria from crane excreta were dominated by bacilli and proteobacteria, with a notable paucity of sequences homologous to Bacteroidetes and Clostridia. The Crane1 marker targeted a dominant clade of unclassified Lactobacillales sequences closely related to Catellicoccus marimammalium. The host distribution of the Crane1 marker was relatively high, being positive for 69% (66/96) of the crane excreta samples tested. The assay also showed high host specificity, with 95% of the nontarget fecal samples (i.e., n = 553; 20 different free-range hosts) being negative. Of the presumed crane-impacted water samples (n = 16), 88% were positive for the Crane1 assay, whereas none of the water samples not impacted by cranes were positive (n = 165). Bayesian statistical models of the Crane1 MST marker demonstrated high confidence in detecting true-positive signals and a low probability of false-negative signals from environmental water samples. Altogether, these data suggest that the newly developed marker could be used in environmental monitoring studies to study crane fecal pollution dynamics. PMID:22492437

  2. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes. PMID:27465215

  3. Evaluation of IFN-γ polymorphism+874 T/A in patients with recurrent tonsillitis by PCR real time mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA real time PCR).

    PubMed

    Bergallo, Massimiliano; Gambarino, Stefano; Loiacono, Elisa; Vergano, Luca; Galliano, Ilaria; Montanari, Paola; Astegiano, Sara; Tavormina, Paolo; Tovo, Pier-Angelo

    2015-02-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is an important cytokine that plays a crucial role in the balance between normal and pathological immune response. Defect of IFN-γ can give a predisposition to infectious disease, autoimmune pathologies and tumours. Different polymorphisms in this gene have been described, in particular the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)+874∗T/A that may affect IFN-γ gene expression. Several techniques can be used for the detection of SNPs. In this work two PCR Real Time assays were developed, an Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) and a Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay (MAMA). Twenty-seven samples from patients (tonsillectomy) and 85 from donor's blood bank were considered. As a result, 78/85 controls (91.7%) and 25/27 patients (92.6%) were heterozygosis, considering the ARMS-PCR; 55/85 (64.7%) and 14/27 (51.9%) were heterozygosis using MAMA-PCR assay. Fourteen of 85 (16.5%) and 8/27 (29.6%) were homozygosis A, 16/85 (18.8%) and 5/27 (18.5%) presented homozygosis T, taking into account the MAMA-PCR. There are statistically difference between the two assay with p<0.0001 at Chi-square test. Our preliminary data suggest that tonsillectomy patients had a statistical trend to possess the low IFN-γ polymorphism when compared with control subject (p=0.3) but is not statistically significant. In conclusion the Real time MAMA-PCR assay has several advantages over other SNP identification techniques such as rapidity, reliability, easily to perform in one working day and applicable in clinical molecular diagnostic laboratories, although sequencing remains the gold standard.

  4. Allele-specific silencing of mutant Ataxin-7 in SCA7 patient-derived fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Scholefield, Janine; Watson, Lauren; Smith, Danielle; Greenberg, Jacquie; Wood, Matthew JA

    2014-01-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) disorders are inherited neurodegenerative conditions defined by a common pathogenic CAG repeat expansion leading to a toxic gain-of-function of the mutant protein. Consequences of this toxicity include activation of heat-shock proteins (HSPs), impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and transcriptional dysregulation. Several studies in animal models have shown that reducing levels of toxic protein using small RNAs would be an ideal therapeutic approach for such disorders, including spinocerebellar ataxia-7 (SCA7). However, testing such RNA interference (RNAi) effectors in genetically appropriate patient cell lines with a disease-relevant phenotype has yet to be explored. Here, we have used primary adult dermal fibroblasts from SCA7 patients and controls to assess the endogenous allele-specific silencing of ataxin-7 by two distinct siRNAs. We further identified altered expression of two disease-relevant transcripts in SCA7 patient cells: a twofold increase in levels of the HSP DNAJA1 and a twofold decrease in levels of the de-ubiquitinating enzyme, UCHL1. After siRNA treatment, the expression of both genes was restored towards normal levels. To our knowledge, this is the first time that allele-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-7, targeting a common SNP, has been demonstrated in patient cells. These findings highlight the advantage of an allele-specific RNAi-based therapeutic approach, and indicate the value of primary patient-derived cells as useful models for mechanistic studies and for measuring efficacy of RNAi effectors on a patient-to-patient basis in the polyQ diseases. PMID:24667781

  5. Allele-specific silencing of mutant Ataxin-7 in SCA7 patient-derived fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Scholefield, Janine; Watson, Lauren; Smith, Danielle; Greenberg, Jacquie; Wood, Matthew J A

    2014-12-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) disorders are inherited neurodegenerative conditions defined by a common pathogenic CAG repeat expansion leading to a toxic gain-of-function of the mutant protein. Consequences of this toxicity include activation of heat-shock proteins (HSPs), impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and transcriptional dysregulation. Several studies in animal models have shown that reducing levels of toxic protein using small RNAs would be an ideal therapeutic approach for such disorders, including spinocerebellar ataxia-7 (SCA7). However, testing such RNA interference (RNAi) effectors in genetically appropriate patient cell lines with a disease-relevant phenotype has yet to be explored. Here, we have used primary adult dermal fibroblasts from SCA7 patients and controls to assess the endogenous allele-specific silencing of ataxin-7 by two distinct siRNAs. We further identified altered expression of two disease-relevant transcripts in SCA7 patient cells: a twofold increase in levels of the HSP DNAJA1 and a twofold decrease in levels of the de-ubiquitinating enzyme, UCHL1. After siRNA treatment, the expression of both genes was restored towards normal levels. To our knowledge, this is the first time that allele-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-7, targeting a common SNP, has been demonstrated in patient cells. These findings highlight the advantage of an allele-specific RNAi-based therapeutic approach, and indicate the value of primary patient-derived cells as useful models for mechanistic studies and for measuring efficacy of RNAi effectors on a patient-to-patient basis in the polyQ diseases.

  6. A comparative study of culture methods and PCR assay for Salmonella detection in poultry drinking water.

    PubMed

    Soria, M C; Soria, M A; Bueno, D J

    2013-01-01

    The present work compared 2 culture methods and PCR assays for motile and nonmotile Salmonella detection using artificially contaminated poultry drinking water. The specificity was 1 for all methods studied. The accuracy and sensitivity were 1 for all motile strains, whereas these parameters were between 0 and 0.7 for nonmotile Salmonella strains. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 1 for all motile Salmonella strains in the 3 methods used. Nonmotile Salmonella strains showed a positive predictive value of 1 in the PCR method. However, the positive predictive value was indeterminate in the tetrathionate (TT) methods for both strains tested and in the modified semisolid Rappaport-Vassiliadis (MSRV) method for Salmonella Pullorum. On the other hand, the negative predictive value was between 0.20 and 0.43 for the 3 methods. The detection level of motile strains was 4 to 7 cfu/25 mL for all methods. Nonmotile Salmonella strains could not be detected in the TT method, whereas only Salmonella Gallinarum could be recovered from 1.1 × 10(1) cfu/25 mL in the MSRV method. In relation to the molecular methods, PCR could detect these strains from 1.1 × 10(4) cfu/25 mL. Extending incubation time of the enrichment medium to 6 d in the TT method did not improve the isolation rates. In general, all selective plating media did not show any statistical differences in the parameters of performance studied. The kappa coefficient showed that there was an excellent agreement between the 3 methods for motile strains. For nonmotile strains, the agreement was poor between the MSRV and the PCR; there was no agreement when the TT method was compared with the MSRV and the PCR methods. The difference in detection levels obtained with the methods used for motile and nonmotile Salmonella strains and the difficulty in detecting these last strains represents a potential problem when a poultry water sample is considered negative for the presence of Salmonella.

  7. Improved PCR-Based Detection of Soil Transmitted Helminth Infections Using a Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Assay Design

    PubMed Central

    Pilotte, Nils; Papaiakovou, Marina; Grant, Jessica R.; Bierwert, Lou Ann; Llewellyn, Stacey; McCarthy, James S.; Williams, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The soil transmitted helminths are a group of parasitic worms responsible for extensive morbidity in many of the world’s most economically depressed locations. With growing emphasis on disease mapping and eradication, the availability of accurate and cost-effective diagnostic measures is of paramount importance to global control and elimination efforts. While real-time PCR-based molecular detection assays have shown great promise, to date, these assays have utilized sub-optimal targets. By performing next-generation sequencing-based repeat analyses, we have identified high copy-number, non-coding DNA sequences from a series of soil transmitted pathogens. We have used these repetitive DNA elements as targets in the development of novel, multi-parallel, PCR-based diagnostic assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Utilizing next-generation sequencing and the Galaxy-based RepeatExplorer web server, we performed repeat DNA analysis on five species of soil transmitted helminths (Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis). Employing high copy-number, non-coding repeat DNA sequences as targets, novel real-time PCR assays were designed, and assays were tested against established molecular detection methods. Each assay provided consistent detection of genomic DNA at quantities of 2 fg or less, demonstrated species-specificity, and showed an improved limit of detection over the existing, proven PCR-based assay. Conclusions/Significance The utilization of next-generation sequencing-based repeat DNA analysis methodologies for the identification of molecular diagnostic targets has the ability to improve assay species-specificity and limits of detection. By exploiting such high copy-number repeat sequences, the assays described here will facilitate soil transmitted helminth diagnostic efforts. We recommend similar analyses when designing PCR-based diagnostic tests for the detection of other

  8. Genome-wide survey of allele-specific splicing in humans

    PubMed Central

    Nembaware, Victoria; Lupindo, Bukiwe; Schouest, Katherine; Spillane, Charles; Scheffler, Konrad; Seoighe, Cathal

    2008-01-01

    Background Accurate mRNA splicing depends on multiple regulatory signals encoded in the transcribed RNA sequence. Many examples of mutations within human splice regulatory regions that alter splicing qualitatively or quantitatively have been reported and allelic differences in mRNA splicing are likely to be a common and important source of phenotypic diversity at the molecular level, in addition to their contribution to genetic disease susceptibility. However, because the effect of a mutation on the efficiency of mRNA splicing is often difficult to predict, many mutations that cause disease through an effect on splicing are likely to remain undiscovered. Results We have combined a genome-wide scan for sequence polymorphisms likely to affect mRNA splicing with analysis of publicly available Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) and exon array data. The genome-wide scan uses published tools and identified 30,977 SNPs located within donor and acceptor splice sites, branch points and exonic splicing enhancer elements. For 1,185 candidate splicing polymorphisms the difference in splicing between alternative alleles was corroborated by publicly available exon array data from 166 lymphoblastoid cell lines. We developed a novel probabilistic method to infer allele-specific splicing from EST data. The method uses SNPs and alternative mRNA isoforms mapped to EST sequences and models both regulated alternative splicing as well as allele-specific splicing. We have also estimated heritability of splicing and report that a greater proportion of genes show evidence of splicing heritability than show heritability of overall gene expression level. Our results provide an extensive resource that can be used to assess the possible effect on splicing of human polymorphisms in putative splice-regulatory sites. Conclusion We report a set of genes showing evidence of allele-specific splicing from an integrated analysis of genomic polymorphisms, EST data and exon array data, including several

  9. Development of an FgMito assay: A highly sensitive mitochondrial based qPCR assay for quantification of Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Tomasz; Ostrowska, Anna; Buśko, Maciej; Pasquali, Matias; Beyer, Marco; Stenglein, Sebastian; Załuski, Dariusz; Sawicki, Jakub; Treder, Kinga; Perkowski, Juliusz

    2015-10-01

    An ascomycete fungus, Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto (s.s.), is the major cause of Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease of cereals worldwide. The fungus contaminates crops with mycotoxins, which pose a serious threat to food and feed safety. In this study, we developed a highly sensitive mitochondrial based qPCR assay (FgMito qPCR) for quantification of F. graminearum s.s. To ensure high sensitivity of the assay, primers and a Minor-groove binding (MGB) probe were designed based on multi-copy mitochondrial DNA. The FgMito assay was successfully validated against a range of geographically diverse F. graminearum s.s. strains to ensure uniformity of the assay at an intraspecific level, as well as with other fungal species to ensure specificity. The assay was further evaluated in terms of efficiency and sensitivity against a test panel of different F. graminearum s.s. strains with various levels of pure fungal DNA and in the presence of wheat background DNA. The results showed a high efficiency of the assay developed, ranging from 93% to 101% with r(2)-values of >0.99. We further showed that three low concentrations of fungal template 2 pg, 0.6 pg and 0.2 pg could be reliably quantified in the presence of wheat background DNA. The FgMito assay was used to quantify F. graminearum s.s. DNA on 65 field samples from a range of hosts with defined levels of trichothecenes. We revealed a significant positive correlation between fungal DNA quantity and the sum of trichothecenes. Lastly, we showed a higher sensitivity of the FgMito assay than the nuclear based qPCR assay for F. graminearum s.s. by comparing Ct-values from both assays.

  10. Development of an FgMito assay: A highly sensitive mitochondrial based qPCR assay for quantification of Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Tomasz; Ostrowska, Anna; Buśko, Maciej; Pasquali, Matias; Beyer, Marco; Stenglein, Sebastian; Załuski, Dariusz; Sawicki, Jakub; Treder, Kinga; Perkowski, Juliusz

    2015-10-01

    An ascomycete fungus, Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto (s.s.), is the major cause of Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease of cereals worldwide. The fungus contaminates crops with mycotoxins, which pose a serious threat to food and feed safety. In this study, we developed a highly sensitive mitochondrial based qPCR assay (FgMito qPCR) for quantification of F. graminearum s.s. To ensure high sensitivity of the assay, primers and a Minor-groove binding (MGB) probe were designed based on multi-copy mitochondrial DNA. The FgMito assay was successfully validated against a range of geographically diverse F. graminearum s.s. strains to ensure uniformity of the assay at an intraspecific level, as well as with other fungal species to ensure specificity. The assay was further evaluated in terms of efficiency and sensitivity against a test panel of different F. graminearum s.s. strains with various levels of pure fungal DNA and in the presence of wheat background DNA. The results showed a high efficiency of the assay developed, ranging from 93% to 101% with r(2)-values of >0.99. We further showed that three low concentrations of fungal template 2 pg, 0.6 pg and 0.2 pg could be reliably quantified in the presence of wheat background DNA. The FgMito assay was used to quantify F. graminearum s.s. DNA on 65 field samples from a range of hosts with defined levels of trichothecenes. We revealed a significant positive correlation between fungal DNA quantity and the sum of trichothecenes. Lastly, we showed a higher sensitivity of the FgMito assay than the nuclear based qPCR assay for F. graminearum s.s. by comparing Ct-values from both assays. PMID:26087129

  11. A duplex PCR assay for the detection of Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype II strains in Musa spp.

    PubMed

    Cellier, Gilles; Moreau, Aurélie; Chabirand, Aude; Hostachy, Bruno; Ailloud, Florent; Prior, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Banana wilt outbreaks that are attributable to Moko disease-causing strains of the pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (Rs) remain a social and economic burden for both multinational corporations and subsistence farmers. All known Moko strains belong to the phylotype II lineage, which has been previously recognized for its broad genetic basis. Moko strains are paraphyletic and are distributed among seven related but distinct phylogenetic clusters (sequevars) that are potentially major threats to Musaceae, Solanaceae, and ornamental crops in many countries. Although clustered within the Moko IIB-4 sequevar, strains of the epidemiologically variant IIB-4NPB do not cause wilt on Cavendish or plantain bananas; instead, they establish a latent infection in the vascular tissues of plantains and demonstrate an expanded host range and high aggressiveness toward Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae. Although most molecular diagnostic methods focus on strains that wilt Solanaceae (particularly potato), no relevant protocol has been described that universally detects strains of the Musaceae-infecting Rs phylotype II. Thus, a duplex PCR assay targeting Moko and IIB-4NPB variant strains was developed, and its performance was assessed using an extensive collection of 111 strains representing the known diversity of Rs Moko-related strains and IIB-4NPB variant strains along with certain related strains and families. The proposed diagnostic protocol demonstrated both high accuracy (inclusivity and exclusivity) and high repeatability, detected targets on either pure culture or spiked plant extracts. Although they did not belong to the Moko clusters described at the time of the study, recently discovered banana-infecting strains from Brazil were also detected. According to our comprehensive evaluation, this duplex PCR assay appears suitable for both research and diagnostic laboratories and provides reliable detection of phylotype II Rs strains that infect Musaceae. PMID:25811378

  12. Performance of a real-time PCR assay for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-young; Kim, Hyunjung; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Do-kyoon; Cho, Sang-Nae; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria cause a variety of illnesses that differ in severity and public health implications. The differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is of primary importance for infection control and choice of antimicrobial therapy. The diagnosis of diseases caused by NTM is difficult because NTM species are prevalent in the environment and because they have fastidious properties. In the present study, we evaluated 279 clinical isolates grown in liquid culture provided by The Catholic University of Korea, St. Vincent's Hospital using real-time PCR based on mycobacterial rpoB gene sequences. The positive rate of real-time PCR assay accurately discriminated 100% (195/195) and 100% (84/84) between MTB and NTM species. Comparison of isolates identified using the MolecuTech REBA Myco-ID(®) and Real Myco-ID® were completely concordant except for two samples. Two cases that were identified as mixed infection (M. intracellulare-M. massiliense and M. avium-M. massiliense co-infection) by PCRREBA assay were only detected using M. abscessus-specific probes by Real Myco-ID(®). Among a total of 84 cases, the most frequently identified NTM species were M. intracellulare (n=38, 45.2%), M. avium (n=18, 23.7%), M. massiliense (n=10, 13.2%), M. fortuitum (n=5, 6%), M. abscessus (n=3, 3.9%), M. gordonae (n=3, 3.9%), M. kansasii (n=2, 2.4%), M. mucogenicum (n=2, 2.4%), and M. chelonae (n= 1, 1.2%). Real Myco-ID(®) is an efficient tool for the rapid detection of NTM species as well as MTB and sensitive and specific and comparable to conventional methods.

  13. A duplex PCR assay for the detection of Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype II strains in Musa spp.

    PubMed

    Cellier, Gilles; Moreau, Aurélie; Chabirand, Aude; Hostachy, Bruno; Ailloud, Florent; Prior, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Banana wilt outbreaks that are attributable to Moko disease-causing strains of the pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (Rs) remain a social and economic burden for both multinational corporations and subsistence farmers. All known Moko strains belong to the phylotype II lineage, which has been previously recognized for its broad genetic basis. Moko strains are paraphyletic and are distributed among seven related but distinct phylogenetic clusters (sequevars) that are potentially major threats to Musaceae, Solanaceae, and ornamental crops in many countries. Although clustered within the Moko IIB-4 sequevar, strains of the epidemiologically variant IIB-4NPB do not cause wilt on Cavendish or plantain bananas; instead, they establish a latent infection in the vascular tissues of plantains and demonstrate an expanded host range and high aggressiveness toward Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae. Although most molecular diagnostic methods focus on strains that wilt Solanaceae (particularly potato), no relevant protocol has been described that universally detects strains of the Musaceae-infecting Rs phylotype II. Thus, a duplex PCR assay targeting Moko and IIB-4NPB variant strains was developed, and its performance was assessed using an extensive collection of 111 strains representing the known diversity of Rs Moko-related strains and IIB-4NPB variant strains along with certain related strains and families. The proposed diagnostic protocol demonstrated both high accuracy (inclusivity and exclusivity) and high repeatability, detected targets on either pure culture or spiked plant extracts. Although they did not belong to the Moko clusters described at the time of the study, recently discovered banana-infecting strains from Brazil were also detected. According to our comprehensive evaluation, this duplex PCR assay appears suitable for both research and diagnostic laboratories and provides reliable detection of phylotype II Rs strains that infect Musaceae.

  14. A Duplex PCR Assay for the Detection of Ralstonia solanacearum Phylotype II Strains in Musa spp.

    PubMed Central

    Cellier, Gilles; Moreau, Aurélie; Chabirand, Aude; Hostachy, Bruno; Ailloud, Florent; Prior, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Banana wilt outbreaks that are attributable to Moko disease-causing strains of the pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (Rs) remain a social and economic burden for both multinational corporations and subsistence farmers. All known Moko strains belong to the phylotype II lineage, which has been previously recognized for its broad genetic basis. Moko strains are paraphyletic and are distributed among seven related but distinct phylogenetic clusters (sequevars) that are potentially major threats to Musaceae, Solanaceae, and ornamental crops in many countries. Although clustered within the Moko IIB-4 sequevar, strains of the epidemiologically variant IIB-4NPB do not cause wilt on Cavendish or plantain bananas; instead, they establish a latent infection in the vascular tissues of plantains and demonstrate an expanded host range and high aggressiveness toward Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae. Although most molecular diagnostic methods focus on strains that wilt Solanaceae (particularly potato), no relevant protocol has been described that universally detects strains of the Musaceae-infecting Rs phylotype II. Thus, a duplex PCR assay targeting Moko and IIB-4NPB variant strains was developed, and its performance was assessed using an extensive collection of 111 strains representing the known diversity of Rs Moko-related strains and IIB-4NPB variant strains along with certain related strains and families. The proposed diagnostic protocol demonstrated both high accuracy (inclusivity and exclusivity) and high repeatability, detected targets on either pure culture or spiked plant extracts. Although they did not belong to the Moko clusters described at the time of the study, recently discovered banana-infecting strains from Brazil were also detected. According to our comprehensive evaluation, this duplex PCR assay appears suitable for both research and diagnostic laboratories and provides reliable detection of phylotype II Rs strains that infect Musaceae. PMID:25811378

  15. Utility of IgM ELISA, TaqMan real-time PCR, reverse transcription PCR, and RT-LAMP assay for the diagnosis of Chikungunya fever.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vijayalakshmi; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Desai, Anita; Parida, Manmohan; Powers, Ann M; Johnson, Barbara W

    2012-11-01

    Chikungunya fever a re-emerging infection with expanding geographical boundaries, can mimic symptoms of other infections like dengue, malaria which makes the definitive diagnosis of the infection important. The present study compares the utility of four laboratory diagnostic methods viz. IgM capture ELISA, an in house reverse transcription PCR for the diagnosis of Chikungunya fever, TaqMan real-time PCR, and a one step reverse transcription-loop mediated isothermal amplification assay (RT-LAMP). Out of the 70 serum samples tested, 29 (41%) were positive for Chikungunya IgM antibody by ELISA and 50 (71%) samples were positive by one of the three molecular assays. CHIKV specific nucleic acid was detected in 33/70 (47%) by reverse transcription PCR, 46/70 (66%) by TaqMan real-time PCR, and 43/70 (62%) by RT-LAMP assay. A majority of the samples (62/70; 89%) were positive by at least one of the four assays used in the study. The molecular assays were more sensitive for diagnosis in the early stages of illness (2-5 days post onset) when antibodies were not detectable. In the later stages of illness, the IgM ELISA is a more sensitive diagnostic test. In conclusion we recommend that the IgM ELISA be used as an initial screening test followed one of the molecular assays in samples that are collected in the early phase of illness and negative for CHIKV IgM antibodies. Such as approach would enable rapid confirmation of the diagnosis and implementation of public health measures especially during outbreaks.

  16. Real-time PCR assays compared to culture-based approaches for identification of aerobic bacteria in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Melendez, J H; Frankel, Y M; An, A T; Williams, L; Price, L B; Wang, N-Y; Lazarus, G S; Zenilman, J M

    2010-12-01

    Chronic wounds cause substantial morbidity and disability. Infection in chronic wounds is clinically defined by routine culture methods that can take several days to obtain a final result, and may not fully describe the community of organisms or biome within these wounds. Molecular diagnostic approaches offer promise for a more rapid and complete assessment. We report the development of a suite of real-time PCR assays for rapid identification of bacteria directly from tissue samples. The panel of assays targets 14 common, clinically relevant, aerobic pathogens and demonstrates a high degree of sensitivity and specificity using a panel of organisms commonly associated with chronic wound infection. Thirty-nine tissue samples from 29 chronic wounds were evaluated and the results compared with those obtained by culture. As revealed by culture and PCR, the most common organisms were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) followed by Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The sensitivities of the PCR assays were 100% and 90% when quantitative and qualitative culture results were used as the reference standard, respectively. The assays allowed the identification of bacterial DNA from ten additional organisms that were not revealed by quantitative or qualitative cultures. Under optimal conditions, the turnaround time for PCR results is as short as 4-6 h. Real-time PCR is a rapid and inexpensive approach that can be easily introduced into clinical practice for detection of organisms directly from tissue samples. Characterization of the anaerobic microflora by real-time PCR of chronic wounds is warranted.

  17. Identification of cytoplasm types in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) accessions by a multiplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H X; Li, Z J; Hu, S W; Sun, G L; Chang, J J; Zhang, Z H

    2010-08-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has widely been used as an efficient pollination control system in rapeseed hybrid production. Identification of cytoplasm type of rapeseed accessions is becoming the most important basic work for hybrid-rapeseed breeding. In this study, we report a simple multiplex PCR method to distinguish the existing common cytoplasm resources, Pol, Nap, Cam, Ogu and Ogu-NWSUAF cytoplasm, in rapeseed. Cytoplasm type of 35 F(1) hybrids and 140 rapeseed open pollinated varieties or breeding lines in our rapeseed breeding programme were tested by this method. The results indicated that 10 of 35 F(1) hybrids are the Nap, and 25 the Pol cytoplasm type, which is consistent with the information provided by the breeders. Out of 140 accessions tested, 100 (71.4%), 21 (15%) and 19 (13.6%) accessions possess Nap, Cam and Pol cytoplasm, respectively. All 19 accessions with Pol cytoplasm are from China. Pedigree analysis indicated that these accessions with Pol cytoplasm were either restorers for Pol CMS, including Shaan 2C, Huiyehui, 220, etc. or derived from hybrids with Pol CMS as female parent. Our molecular results are consistent with those of the classical testcross, suggesting the reliability of this method. The multiplex PCR assay method can be applied to CMS "three-line" breeding, selection and validation of hybrid rapeseed. PMID:20401459

  18. Development of a consensus reverse transcription PCR assay for the specific detection of tortoise picornaviruses.

    PubMed

    Marschang, Rachel E; Ihász, Katalin; Kugler, Renáta; Lengyel, György; Fehér, Enikő; Marton, Szilvia; Bányai, Krisztián; Aqrawi, Tara; Farkas, Szilvia L

    2016-05-01

    Picornaviruses (PVs) of different terrestrial tortoise species, previously designated as Virus "X," have been frequently detected from various tissues by virus isolation in Terrapene heart cell culture as the preferred laboratory method for diagnosis. Here, we describe the development of 2 diagnostic reverse transcription (RT)-PCR-based assays for the identification and characterization of tortoise PVs belonging to the tentative genus Topivirus To test the novel diagnostic systems, PVs were isolated from swab and tissue samples collected in Germany, Italy, and Hungary between 2000 and 2013. All 25 tested isolates gave positive results with both novel consensus primer sets. Sequencing of the amplified products confirmed that all studied viruses were members of the new proposed genus Topivirus Phylogenetic analyses clearly distinguished 2 lineages within the genus. Based on sequence analysis, no association was observed between the geographic distribution and genetic relatedness. Furthermore, no strict host specificity was indicated. The PCR-based diagnosis may provide a time-saving and sensitive method to detect tortoise PVs, and evaluation of PV presence in these animals may help control virus spread. PMID:27034342

  19. A nested PCR assay exhibits enhanced sensitivity for detection of Theileria parva infections in bovine blood samples from carrier animals.

    PubMed

    Odongo, David O; Sunter, Jack D; Kiara, Henry K; Skilton, Robert A; Bishop, Richard P

    2010-01-01

    Theileria parva causes East Coast fever, an economically important disease of cattle in sub-Saharan Africa. We describe a nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) assay for the detection of T. parva DNA in cattle blood spotted onto filter paper using primers derived from the T. parva-specific 104-kDa antigen (p104) gene. The sensitivity of this assay was compared to a previously described p104-based PCR and also the reverse line blot (RLB) technique, using serial dilutions of blood from a calf with known T. parva piroplasm parasitaemia. The relative sensitivities of the three assays were 0.4, 1.4 and 4 parasites/microl corresponding to blood parasitaemias of 9.2 x 10(-6)%, 2.8 x 10(-5)% and 8.3 x 10(-5)%, respectively. The three assays were applied to samples from two calves infected with the T. parva Muguga stock. Parasite DNA was consistently detectable by the two p104 PCR assays until 48 and 82 days post-infection, respectively, and thereafter sporadically. RLB detected parasite DNA in the two infected calves until days 43 and 45. Field samples from 151 Kenyan cattle exhibited 37.7% positivity for T. parva by regular p104 PCR and 42.3% positivity using p104 nPCR. Among 169 cattle blood samples from Southern Sudan, 36% were positive for T. parva using nPCR. The nPCR assay represents a highly sensitive tool for detection and monitoring of asymptomatic carrier state infections of T. parva in the blood of cattle. PMID:19902251

  20. Development of a rapid PCR assay specific for Staphylococcus saprophyticus and application to direct detection from urine samples.

    PubMed

    Martineau, F; Picard, F J; Ménard, C; Roy, P H; Ouellette, M; Bergeron, M G

    2000-09-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is one of the most frequently encountered microorganisms associated with acute urinary tract infections (UTIs) in young, sexually active female outpatients. Conventional identification methods based on biochemical characteristics can efficiently identify S. saprophyticus, but the rapidities of these methods need to be improved. Rapid and direct identification of this bacterium from urine samples would be useful to improve time required for the diagnosis of S. saprophyticus infections in the clinical microbiology laboratory. We have developed a PCR-based assay for the specific detection of S. saprophyticus. An arbitrarily primed PCR amplification product of 380 bp specific for S. saprophyticus was sequenced and used to design a set of S. saprophyticus-specific PCR amplification primers. The PCR assay was specific for S. saprophyticus when tested with DNA from 49 gram-positive and 31 gram-negative bacterial species. This assay was also able to amplify efficiently DNA from all 60 strains of S. saprophyticus from various origins tested. This assay was adapted for direct detection from urine samples. The sensitivity levels achieved with urine samples was 19 CFU with 30 cycles of amplification and 0.5 CFU with 40 cycles of amplification. This PCR assay for the specific detection of S. saprophyticus is simple and rapid (approximately 90 min, including the time for urine specimen preparation).

  1. A FRET-Based Real-Time PCR Assay to Identify the Main Causal Agents of New World Tegumentary Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    De Los Santos, Maxy; Soberón, Valeria; Lucas, Carmen M.; Matlashewski, Greg; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Ore, Marianela; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Lescano, Andres G.; Graf, Paul C. F.; Bacon, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In South America, various species of Leishmania are endemic and cause New World tegumentary leishmaniasis (NWTL). The correct identification of these species is critical for adequate clinical management and surveillance activities. We developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and evaluated its diagnostic performance using 64 archived parasite isolates and 192 prospectively identified samples collected from individuals with suspected leishmaniasis enrolled at two reference clinics in Lima, Peru. The real-time PCR assay was able to detect a single parasite and provided unambiguous melting peaks for five Leishmania species of the Viannia subgenus that are highly prevalent in South America: L. (V.) braziliensis, L. (V.) panamensis, L. (V.) guyanensis, L. (V.) peruviana and L. (V.) lainsoni. Using kinetoplastid DNA-based PCR as a gold standard, the real-time PCR had sensitivity and specificity values of 92% and 77%, respectively, which were significantly higher than those of conventional tests such as microscopy, culture and the leishmanin skin test (LST). In addition, the real-time PCR identified 147 different clinical samples at the species level, providing an overall agreement of 100% when compared to multilocus sequence typing (MLST) data performed on a subset of these samples. Furthermore, the real-time PCR was three times faster and five times less expensive when compared to PCR - MLST for species identification from clinical specimens. In summary, this new assay represents a cost-effective and reliable alternative for the identification of the main species causing NWTL in South America. PMID:23301111

  2. Rapid and sensitive detection of Feline immunodeficiency virus using an insulated isothermal PCR-based assay with a point-of-need PCR detection platform.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Rebecca Penrose; Kania, Stephen A; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Chang, Hsiu-Hui; Ma, Li-Juan; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace; Wang, Hwa-Tang Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is an important infectious agent of cats. Clinical syndromes resulting from FIV infection include immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections, and neoplasia. In our study, a 5' long terminal repeat/gag region-based reverse transcription insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) was developed to amplify all known FIV strains to facilitate point-of-need FIV diagnosis. The RT-iiPCR method was applied in a point-of-need PCR detection platform--a field-deployable device capable of generating automatically interpreted RT-iiPCR results from nucleic acids within 1 hr. Limit of detection 95% of FIV RT-iiPCR was calculated to be 95 copies standard in vitro transcription RNA per reaction. Endpoint dilution studies with serial dilutions of an ATCC FIV type strain showed that the sensitivity of lyophilized FIV RT-iiPCR reagent was comparable to that of a reference nested PCR. The established reaction did not amplify any nontargeted feline pathogens, including Felid herpesvirus 1, feline coronavirus, Feline calicivirus, Feline leukemia virus, Mycoplasma haemofelis, and Chlamydophila felis. Based on analysis of 76 clinical samples (including blood and bone marrow) with the FIV RT-iiPCR, test sensitivity was 97.78% (44/45), specificity was 100.00% (31/31), and agreement was 98.65% (75/76), determined against a reference nested-PCR assay. A kappa value of 0.97 indicated excellent correlation between these 2 methods. The lyophilized FIV RT-iiPCR reagent, deployed on a user-friendly portable device, has potential utility for rapid and easy point-of-need detection of FIV in cats. PMID:26185125

  3. TqPCR: A Touchdown qPCR Assay with Significantly Improved Detection Sensitivity and Amplification Efficiency of SYBR Green qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jing; Deng, Fang; Yan, Zhengjian; Xia, Yinglin; Wang, Zhongliang; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Li, Ruifang; Denduluri, Sahitya K.; Wei, Qiang; Zhao, Lianggong; Lu, Shun; Wang, Xin; Tang, Shengli; Liu, Hao; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; He, Tong-Chuan; Jiang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The advent of fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has revolutionized the quantification of gene expression analysis in many fields, including life sciences, agriculture, forensic science, molecular diagnostics, and medicine. While SYBR Green-based qPCR is the most commonly-used platform due to its inexpensive nature and robust chemistry, quantifying the expression of genes with low abundance or RNA samples extracted from highly restricted or limited sources can be challenging because the detection sensitivity of SYBR Green-based qPCR is limited. Here, we develop a novel and effective touchdown qPCR (TqPCR) protocol by incorporating a 4-cycle touchdown stage prior to the quantification amplification stage. Using the same cDNA templates, we find that TqPCR can reduce the average Cq values for Gapdh, Rps13, and Hprt1 reference genes by 4.45, 5.47, and 4.94 cycles, respectively, when compared with conventional qPCR; the overall average Cq value reduction for the three reference genes together is 4.95. We further find that TqPCR can improve PCR amplification efficiency and thus increase detection sensitivity. When the quantification of Wnt3A-induced target gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells is analyzed, we find that, while both conventional qPCR and TqPCR can detect the up-regulation of the relatively abundant target Axin2, only TqPCR can detect the up-regulation of the lowly-expressed targets Oct4 and Gbx2. Finally, we demonstrate that the MRQ2 and MRQ3 primer pairs derived from mouse reference gene Tbp can be used to validate the RNA/cDNA integrity of qPCR samples. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that TqPCR may increase detection sensitivity and PCR amplification efficiency. Overall, TqPCR should be advantageous over conventional qPCR in expression quantification, especially when the transcripts of interest are lowly expressed, and/or the availability of total RNA is highly restricted or limited. PMID:26172450

  4. Multilaboratory Comparison of Quantitative PCR Assays for Detection and Quantification of Fusarium virguliforme from Soybean Roots and Soil.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Yuba R; Haudenshield, James S; Srour, Ali Y; Islam, Kazi Tariqul; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Santos, Patricia; Wang, Jie; Chilvers, Martin I; Hartman, Glen L; Malvick, Dean K; Floyd, Crystal M; Mueller, Daren S; Leandro, Leonor F S

    2015-12-01

    The ability to accurately detect and quantify Fusarium virguliforme, the cause of sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean, in samples such as plant root tissue and soil is extremely valuable for accurate disease diagnoses and to address research questions. Numerous quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays have been developed for this pathogen but their sensitivity and specificity for F. virguliforme have not been compared. In this study, six qPCR assays were compared in five independent laboratories using the same set of DNA samples from fungi, plants, and soil. Multicopy gene-based assays targeting the ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer (IGS) or the mitochondrial small subunit (mtSSU) showed relatively high sensitivity (limit of detection [LOD] = 0.05 to 5 pg) compared with a single-copy gene (FvTox1)-based assay (LOD = 5 to 50 pg). Specificity varied greatly among assays, with the FvTox1 assay ranking the highest (100%) and two IGS assays being slightly less specific (95 to 96%). Another IGS assay targeting four SDS-causing fusaria showed lower specificity (70%), while the two mtSSU assays were lowest (41 and 47%). An IGS-based assay showed consistently highest sensitivity (LOD = 0.05 pg) and specificity and inclusivity above 94% and, thus, is suggested as the most useful qPCR assay for F. virguliforme diagnosis and quantification. However, specificity was also above 94% in two other assays and their selection for diagnostics and research will depend on objectives, samples, and materials used. These results will facilitate both fundamental and disease management research pertinent to SDS.

  5. Multilaboratory Comparison of Quantitative PCR Assays for Detection and Quantification of Fusarium virguliforme from Soybean Roots and Soil.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Yuba R; Haudenshield, James S; Srour, Ali Y; Islam, Kazi Tariqul; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Santos, Patricia; Wang, Jie; Chilvers, Martin I; Hartman, Glen L; Malvick, Dean K; Floyd, Crystal M; Mueller, Daren S; Leandro, Leonor F S

    2015-12-01

    The ability to accurately detect and quantify Fusarium virguliforme, the cause of sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean, in samples such as plant root tissue and soil is extremely valuable for accurate disease diagnoses and to address research questions. Numerous quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays have been developed for this pathogen but their sensitivity and specificity for F. virguliforme have not been compared. In this study, six qPCR assays were compared in five independent laboratories using the same set of DNA samples from fungi, plants, and soil. Multicopy gene-based assays targeting the ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer (IGS) or the mitochondrial small subunit (mtSSU) showed relatively high sensitivity (limit of detection [LOD] = 0.05 to 5 pg) compared with a single-copy gene (FvTox1)-based assay (LOD = 5 to 50 pg). Specificity varied greatly among assays, with the FvTox1 assay ranking the highest (100%) and two IGS assays being slightly less specific (95 to 96%). Another IGS assay targeting four SDS-causing fusaria showed lower specificity (70%), while the two mtSSU assays were lowest (41 and 47%). An IGS-based assay showed consistently highest sensitivity (LOD = 0.05 pg) and specificity and inclusivity above 94% and, thus, is suggested as the most useful qPCR assay for F. virguliforme diagnosis and quantification. However, specificity was also above 94% in two other assays and their selection for diagnostics and research will depend on objectives, samples, and materials used. These results will facilitate both fundamental and disease management research pertinent to SDS. PMID:26368513

  6. Detection of Brugia malayi in laboratory and wild-caught Mansonioides mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) using Hha I PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Hoti, S L; Vasuki, V; Lizotte, M W; Patra, K P; Ravi, G; Vanamail, P; Manonmani, A; Sabesan, S; Krishnamoorthy, K; Williams, S A

    2001-04-01

    An Hha 1 based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay developed for the detection of Brugia malayi, the causative agent of Brugian lymphatic filariasis, was evaluated for its sensitivity in the laboratory and for its usefulness in measuring changes in transmission of the disease in the field. Laboratory studies showed that the new assay was highly sensitive in comparison with the standard dissection and microscopy technique. The assay can detect as little as 4 pg of parasite DNA or a single microfilaria in pools of up to 100 mosquitoes. The optimum pool size for convenience was found to be 50 mosquitoes per pool. The efficacy of PCR assay was evaluated in filariasis control programmes in operation in endemic areas of Kerala State, South India. The infection rates obtained by the Hha I PCR assay and the conventional dissection and microscopy technique were 1.2% and 1.7% respectively in operational areas and 8.3% and 4.4% respectively, in check areas, which were not significantly different (P < 0.05). Thus, the Hha I PCR assay was found to be as sensitive as the conventional technique and hence it can be used as a new epidemiological tool for assessing parasite infection in field-collected mosquitoes. PMID:11260722

  7. Evaluation of the Cepheid herpes simplex virus typing real-time PCR assay using dermal and genital specimens.

    PubMed

    Podzorski, Raymond P

    2006-10-01

    The Cepheid herpes simplex virus (HSV) (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA) typing multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was evaluated for its ability to detect HSV in dermal and genital specimens stored in M5 media. Swab specimens (n = 114) for HSV testing were placed in M5 media and split between our laboratory and a highly experienced reference laboratory. Aliquots for testing with the Cepheid assay were processed using a simple boil-and-go procedure and then run in a SmartCycler II (Cepheid). Aliquots tested at the reference laboratory were processed using a MagNA Pure LC DNA extractor (Roche Molecular Systems, Alameda, CA) and tested by the Roche HSV real-time PCR assay. Both laboratories detected 35 positives. Of the positive specimens, the Cepheid assay typed 16 as HSV 1 and 19 as HSV 2; the reference laboratory typed 15 as HSV 1, 19 as HSV 2, and 1 as HSV indeterminate. Our results demonstrate that the Cepheid real-time PCR assay, using specimens subjected to minimal specimen processing, performed as well as the Roche real-time PCR assay, using DNA extracts, for the detection of HSV DNA in genital and dermal specimens.

  8. Development of a nested PCR assay to detect the pathogenic free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Réveiller, Fabienne L; Cabanes, Pierre-André; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2002-05-01

    Naegleria fowleri is the causative agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a fatal disease of the central nervous system that is acquired while swimming or diving in freshwater. A cDNA clone designated Mp2C15 obtained from N. fowleri was used as a probe to distinguish N. fowleri from other free-living amoebae. The Mp2C15 probe hybridized to genomic DNA from pathogenic N. fowleri and antigenically related non-pathogenic N. lovaniensis. Mp2C15 was digested with the restriction enzyme XbaI, resulting in two fragments, Mp2C15.G and Mp2C15.P. Four species of Naegleria and four species of Acanthamoeba were examined for reactivity with Mp2C15.P. Mp2C15.P was specific for N. fowleri and was used in the development of a nested PCR assay which is capable of detecting as little as 5 pg of N. fowleri DNA or five intact N. fowleri amoebae. In summary, a rapid, sensitive, and specific assay for the detection of N. fowleri was developed.

  9. Regulation of the imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 locus by allele-specific enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhuojuan; Lin, Chengqi; Woodfin, Ashley R; Bartom, Elizabeth T; Gao, Xin; Smith, Edwin R; Shilatifard, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a critical developmental process characteristic of parent of origin-specific gene expression. It is well accepted that differentially DNA-methylated regions (DMRs) and enhancers are two major classes of cis-elements determining parent of origin-specific gene expression, with each recruiting different sets of transcription factors. Previously, we identified the AF4/FMR2 (AFF) family protein AFF3 within the transcription elongation complex SEC-L3. Here, we report that AFF3 can specifically bind both gametic DMRs (gDMRs) and enhancers within imprinted loci in an allele-specific manner. We identify the molecular regulators involved in the recruitment of AFF3 to gDMRs and provide mechanistic insight into the requirement of AFF3 at an enhancer for the expression of an ∼200-kb polycistronic transcript within the imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 locus. Our data suggest that the heterochromatic environment at the gDMR reinforces silencing of its related enhancer by controlling the binding and activity of AFF3 in an allele-specific manner. In summary, this study provides molecular details about the regulation of dosage-critical imprinted gene expression through the regulated binding of the transcription elongation factor AFF3 between a DMR and an enhancer. PMID:26728555

  10. In Vivo Evaluation of Candidate Allele-specific Mutant Huntingtin Gene Silencing Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Southwell, Amber L; Skotte, Niels H; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; Østergaard, Michael E; Watt, Andrew T; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Doty, Crystal N; Villanueva, Erika B; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Xie, Yuanyun; Freier, Susan M; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P; Bennett, Clarence Frank; Hayden, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a dominant, genetic neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of voluntary motor control, psychiatric disturbance, and cognitive decline, for which there is currently no disease-modifying therapy. HD is caused by the expansion of a CAG tract in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. The mutant HTT protein (muHTT) acquires toxic functions, and there is significant evidence that muHTT lowering would be therapeutically efficacious. However, the wild-type HTT protein (wtHTT) serves vital functions, making allele-specific muHTT lowering strategies potentially safer than nonselective strategies. CAG tract expansion is associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that can be targeted by gene silencing reagents such as antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to accomplish allele-specific muHTT lowering. Here we evaluate ASOs targeted to HD-associated SNPs in acute in vivo studies including screening, distribution, duration of action and dosing, using a humanized mouse model of HD, Hu97/18, that is heterozygous for the targeted SNPs. We have identified four well-tolerated lead ASOs that potently and selectively silence muHTT at a broad range of doses throughout the central nervous system for 16 weeks or more after a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection. With further validation, these ASOs could provide a therapeutic option for individuals afflicted with HD. PMID:25101598

  11. Microarrays for high-throughput genotyping of MICA alleles using allele-specific primer extension.

    PubMed

    Baek, I C; Jang, J-P; Choi, H-B; Choi, E-J; Ko, W-Y; Kim, T-G

    2013-10-01

    The role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene A (MICA), a ligand of NKG2D, has been defined in human diseases by its allele associations with various autoimmune diseases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and cancer. This study describes a practical system to develop MICA genotyping by allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) on microarrays. From the results of 20 control primers, strict and reliable cut-off values of more than 30,000 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) as positive and less than 3000 MFI as negative, were applied to select high-quality specific extension primers. Among 55 allele-specific primers, 44 primers could be initially selected as optimal primer. Through adjusting the length, six primers were improved. The other failed five primers were corrected by refractory modification. MICA genotypes by ASPE on microarrays showed the same results as those by nucleotide sequencing. On the basis of these results, ASPE on microarrays may provide high-throughput genotyping for MICA alleles for population studies, disease-gene associations and HSCT.

  12. Allele-specific RNAi Mitigates Phenotypic Progression in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lebrón, Edgardo; Gouvion, Cynthia M; Moore, Steven A; Davidson, Beverly L; Paulson, Henry L

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent advances suggesting new therapeutic targets, Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains incurable. Aberrant production and accumulation of the Aβ peptide resulting from altered processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is central to the pathogenesis of disease, particularly in dominantly inherited forms of AD. Thus, modulating the production of APP is a potential route to effective AD therapy. Here, we describe the successful use of an allele-specific RNA interference (RNAi) approach targeting the Swedish variant of APP (APPsw) in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV), we delivered an anti-APPsw short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) to the hippocampus of AD transgenic mice (APP/PS1). In short- and long-term transduction experiments, reduced levels of APPsw transprotein were observed throughout targeted regions of the hippocampus while levels of wild-type murine APP remained unaltered. Moreover, intracellular production of transfer RNA (tRNA)-valine promoter–driven shRNAs did not lead to detectable neuronal toxicity. Finally, long-term bilateral hippocampal expression of anti-APPsw shRNA mitigated abnormal behaviors in this mouse model of AD. The difference in phenotype progression was associated with reduced levels of soluble Aβ but not with a reduced number of amyloid plaques. Our results support the development of allele-specific RNAi strategies to treat familial AD and other dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19532137

  13. Regulation of the imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 locus by allele-specific enhancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhuojuan; Lin, Chengqi; Woodfin, Ashley R.; Bartom, Elizabeth T.; Gao, Xin; Smith, Edwin R.; Shilatifard, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a critical developmental process characteristic of parent of origin-specific gene expression. It is well accepted that differentially DNA-methylated regions (DMRs) and enhancers are two major classes of cis-elements determining parent of origin-specific gene expression, with each recruiting different sets of transcription factors. Previously, we identified the AF4/FMR2 (AFF) family protein AFF3 within the transcription elongation complex SEC-L3. Here, we report that AFF3 can specifically bind both gametic DMRs (gDMRs) and enhancers within imprinted loci in an allele-specific manner. We identify the molecular regulators involved in the recruitment of AFF3 to gDMRs and provide mechanistic insight into the requirement of AFF3 at an enhancer for the expression of an ∼200-kb polycistronic transcript within the imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 locus. Our data suggest that the heterochromatic environment at the gDMR reinforces silencing of its related enhancer by controlling the binding and activity of AFF3 in an allele-specific manner. In summary, this study provides molecular details about the regulation of dosage-critical imprinted gene expression through the regulated binding of the transcription elongation factor AFF3 between a DMR and an enhancer. PMID:26728555

  14. Comparison of TaqMan PCR assays for detection of the melioidosis agent Burkholderia pseudomallei in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Kaestli, Mirjam; Richardson, Leisha J; Colman, Rebecca E; Tuanyok, Apichai; Price, Erin P; Bowers, Jolene R; Mayo, Mark; Kelley, Erin; Seymour, Meagan L; Sarovich, Derek S; Pearson, Talima; Engelthaler, David M; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul S; Schupp, James M; Currie, Bart J

    2012-06-01

    Melioidosis is an emerging infectious disease caused by the soil bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. In diagnostic and forensic settings, molecular detection assays need not only high sensitivity with low limits of detection but also high specificity. In a direct comparison of published and newly developed TaqMan PCR assays, we found the TTS1-orf2 assay to be superior in detecting B. pseudomallei directly from clinical specimens. The YLF/BTFC multiplex assay (targeting the Yersinia-like fimbrial/Burkholderia thailandensis-like flagellum and chemotaxis region) also showed high diagnostic sensitivity and provides additional information on possible geographic origin.

  15. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical assay versus oncotype DX(®) qRT-PCR assay for estrogen and progesterone receptors: an independent quality assurance study.

    PubMed

    Kraus, James A; Dabbs, David J; Beriwal, Sushil; Bhargava, Rohit

    2012-06-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) status is a strong predictor of response to hormonal therapy in breast cancer patients. Presence of ER and level of expression have been shown to correlate with time to recurrence in patients undergoing therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors. Risk reduction is also known to occur in ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-positive patients treated with hormonal therapy. Since the 1990s, immunohistochemistry has been the primary method for assessing hormone receptor status. Recently, as a component of its oncotype DX(®) assay, Genomic Health began reporting quantitative estrogen and PR results determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). As part of an ongoing quality assurance program at our institution, we reviewed 464 breast cancer cases evaluated by both immunohistochemistry and oncotype DX(®) assay for estrogen and PR. We found good correlation for ER status between both assays (98.9% concordance), with immunohistochemistry being slightly more sensitive. Concordance for PR was 94.2% between immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR with immunohistochemistry again more sensitive than RT-PCR. The results also showed linear correlation between immunohistochemistry H-scores and qRT-PCR expression values for ER (correlation coefficient of 0.579), and PR (correlation coefficient of 0.685). Due to the higher sensitivity of hormone receptor immunohistochemistry and additional advantages (ie preservation of morphology, less expensive, faster, more convenient), we conclude immunohistochemistry is preferable to qRT-PCR for determination of estrogen and PR expression.

  16. PCR-Reverse Blot Hybridization Assay for Screening and Identification of Pathogens in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeonim; Wang, Hye-Young; Lee, Gyusang; Park, Soon-Deok; Jeon, Bo-Young; Uh, Young; Kim, Jong Bae

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of the pathogens involved in bloodstream infections is crucial for the prompt initiation of appropriate therapy, as this can decrease morbidity and mortality rates. A PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay for sepsis, the reverse blot hybridization assay (REBA) Sepsis-ID test, was developed; it uses pan-probes to distinguish Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and fungi. In addition, the assay was designed to identify bacteria and fungi using six genus-specific and 13 species-specific probes; it uses additional probes for antibiotic resistance genes, i.e., the mecA gene of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the vanA and vanB genes of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). The REBA Sepsis-ID test successfully identified clinical isolates and blood culture samples as containing Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, or fungi. The results matched those obtained with conventional microbiological methods. For the REBA Sepsis-ID test, of the 115 blood culture samples tested, 47 (40.8%) and 49 (42.6%) samples were identified to the species and genus levels, respectively, and the remaining 19 samples (16.5%), which included five Gram-positive rods, were identified as Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, or fungi. The antibiotic resistances of the MRSA and VRE strains were identified using both conventional microbiological methods and the REBA Sepsis-ID test. In conclusion, the REBA Sepsis-ID test developed for this study is a fast and reliable test for the identification of Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, and antibiotic resistance genes (including mecA for MRSA and the vanA and vanB genes for VRE) in bloodstream infections. PMID:23447637

  17. Development of a quantitative PCR assay for rapid detection of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum in cocoa bean fermentation.

    PubMed

    Schwendimann, Livia; Kauf, Peter; Fieseler, Lars; Gantenbein-Demarchi, Corinne; Miescher Schwenninger, Susanne

    2015-08-01

    To monitor dominant species of lactic acid bacteria during cocoa bean fermentation, i.e. Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum, a fast and reliable culture-independent qPCR assay was developed. A modified DNA isolation procedure using a commercial kit followed by two species-specific qPCR assays resulted in 100% sensitivity for L. plantarum and L. fermentum. Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc analyses of data obtained from experiments with cocoa beans that were artificially spiked with decimal concentrations of L. plantarum and L. fermentum strains allowed the calculation of a regression line suitable for the estimation of both species with a detection limit of 3 to 4 Log cells/g cocoa beans. This process was successfully tested for efficacy through the analyses of samples from laboratory-scale cocoa bean fermentations with both the qPCR assay and a culture-dependent method which resulted in comparable results.

  18. Multi-Fluorescence Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of RIF and INH Resistance of M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jingfu; Yu, Xiaoli; Cui, Zhenling; Xue, Wenfei; Luo, Ziyi; Wen, Zilu; Liu, Minghua; Jiang, Danqing; Zheng, Heping; Wu, Hai; Zhang, Shulin; Li, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Failure to early detect multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) results in treatment failure and poor clinical outcomes, and highlights the need to rapidly detect resistance to rifampicin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH). Methods: In Multi-Fluorescence quantitative Real-Time PCR (MF-qRT-PCR) assay, 10 probes labeled with four kinds of fluorophores were designed to detect the mutations in regions of rpoB, katG, mabA-inhA, oxyR-ahpC, and rrs. The efficiency of MF-qRT-PCR assay was tested using 261 bacterial isolates and 33 clinical sputum specimens. Among these samples, 227 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were analyzed using drug susceptibility testing (DST), DNA sequencing and MF-qRT-PCR assay. Results: Compared with DST, MF-qRT-PCR sensitivity and specificity for RIF-resistance were 94.6 and 100%, respectively. And the detection sensitivity and specificity for INH-resistance were 85.9 and 95.3%, respectively. Compared with DNA sequencing, the sensitivity and specificity of our assay were 97.2 and 100% for RIF-resistance and 97.9 and 96.4% for INH-resistance. Compared with Phenotypic strain identification, MF-qRT-PCR can distinguish 227 M. tuberculosis complexes (MTC) from 34 Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolates with 100% accuracy rate. Conclusions: MF-qRT-PCR assay was an efficient, accurate, reliable, and easy-operated method for detection of RIF and INH-resistance, and distinction of MTC and NTM of clinical isolates. PMID:27199947

  19. High-throughput analysis of candidate imprinted genes and allele-specific gene expression in the human term placenta

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Imprinted genes show expression from one parental allele only and are important for development and behaviour. This extreme mode of allelic imbalance has been described for approximately 56 human genes. Imprinting status is often disrupted in cancer and dysmorphic syndromes. More subtle variation of gene expression, that is not parent-of-origin specific, termed 'allele-specific gene expression' (ASE) is more common and may give rise to milder phenotypic differences. Using two allele-specific high-throughput technologies alongside bioinformatics predictions, normal term human placenta was screened to find new imprinted genes and to ascertain the extent of ASE in this tissue. Results Twenty-three family trios of placental cDNA, placental genomic DNA (gDNA) and gDNA from both parents were tested for 130 candidate genes with the Sequenom MassArray system. Six genes were found differentially expressed but none imprinted. The Illumina ASE BeadArray platform was then used to test 1536 SNPs in 932 genes. The array was enriched for the human orthologues of 124 mouse candidate genes from bioinformatics predictions and 10 human candidate imprinted genes from EST database mining. After quality control pruning, a total of 261 informative SNPs (214 genes) remained for analysis. Imprinting with maternal expression was demonstrated for the lymphocyte imprinted gene ZNF331 in human placenta. Two potential differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were found in the vicinity of ZNF331. None of the bioinformatically predicted candidates tested showed imprinting except for a skewed allelic expression in a parent-specific manner observed for PHACTR2, a neighbour of the imprinted PLAGL1 gene. ASE was detected for two or more individuals in 39 candidate genes (18%). Conclusions Both Sequenom and Illumina assays were sensitive enough to study imprinting and strong allelic bias. Previous bioinformatics approaches were not predictive of new imprinted genes in the human term

  20. A pentaplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Panton-Valentine Leucocidin

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), which causes a wide range of hospital and community-acquired infections worldwide. Conventional testing for detection of MRSA takes 2–5 days to yield complete information of the organism and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Results The present study focused on the development of a pentaplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of MRSA. The assay simultaneously detected five genes, namely 16S rRNA of the Staphylococcus genus, femA of S. aureus, mecA that encodes methicillin resistance, lukS that encodes production of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a necrotizing cytotoxin, and one internal control. Specific primer pairs were successfully designed and simultaneously amplified the targeted genes. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of the pentaplex PCR assay was evaluated by comparing it with the conventional method. The analytical sensitivity of the pentaplex PCR at the DNA level was found to be 10 ng DNA. The analytical specificity was evaluated with 34 reference staphylococci and non-staphylococcal strains and was found to be 100%. The diagnostic evaluation of MRSA carried out using 230 clinical isolates, showed 97.6% of sensitivity, 99.3% of specificity, 98.8% of positive predictive value and 98.6% of negative predictive value compared to the conventional method. The presence of an internal control in the pentaplex PCR assay is important to exclude false-negative cases. Conclusion The pentaplex PCR assay developed was rapid and gave results within 4 h, which is essential for the identification of Staphylococcus spp., virulence and their resistance to methicillin. Our PCR assay may be used as an effective surveillance tool to survey the prevalence of MRSA and PVL-producing strains in hospitals and the community. PMID:19476638

  1. Real-time PCR assay for detection and quantification of hepatitis B virus genotypes A to G.

    PubMed

    Welzel, Tania M; Miley, Wendell J; Parks, Thomas L; Goedert, James J; Whitby, Denise; Ortiz-Conde, Betty A

    2006-09-01

    The detection and quantification of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA play an important role in diagnosing and monitoring HBV infection as well as assessing therapeutic response. The great variability among HBV genotypes and the enormous range of clinical HBV DNA levels present challenges for PCR-based amplification techniques. In this study, we describe the development, evaluation, and validation of a novel real-time PCR assay designed to provide accurate quantification of DNA from all eight HBV genotypes in patient plasma specimens. A computer algorithm was used to design degenerate real-time PCR primers and probes based upon a large number (n = 340) of full-length genomic sequences including HBV genotypes A to H from Europe, Africa, Asia, and North and South America. Genotype performance was tested and confirmed using 59 genotype A to G specimens from two commercially available worldwide genotype panels. This assay has a dynamic range of at least 8 log(10) without the need for specimen dilution, good clinical intra- and interassay precision, and excellent correlation with the Bayer Diagnostics VERSANT HBV DNA 3.0 (branched DNA) assay (r = 0.93). Probit analysis determined the 95% detection level was 56 IU/ml, corresponding to 11 copies per PCR well. The high sensitivity, wide linear range, good reproducibility, and genotype inclusivity, combined with a small sample volume requirement and low cost, make this novel quantitative HBV real-time PCR assay particularly well suited for application to large clinical and epidemiological studies.

  2. Novel light-upon-extension real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection, quantification, and genogrouping of group A rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Johan; Bucardo, Filemón; Svensson, Lennart; Lindgren, Per-Eric

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a light-upon-extension (LUX) real-time PCR assay for detection, quantification, and genogrouping of group A rotavirus (RV), the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in children. The LUX system uses a fluorophore attached to one primer and having a self-quenching hairpin structure, making it cost-effective and specific. We designed genogroup-specific primers having different fluorophores, making it possible to differentiate between the two main genogroups of human group A RVs. The assay was applied on clinical stool specimens from Sweden and Central America (n=196) and compared to immunological and conventional PCR assays. The genogrouping ability was further validated against a subset of clinical specimens, which had been genogrouped using monoclonal antibodies. Our real-time PCR assay detected and quantified all positive specimens (n=145) and exhibited higher sensitivity than immunological assays and conventional PCR. The assay exhibited a wide dynamic range, detecting from 5 to >10(7) genes per PCR, resulting in a theoretical lower detection limit of <10,000 viruses per gram of stool. No cross-reaction was observed with specimens containing norovirus, sapovirus, astrovirus, or adenovirus. In total, 22 (15%) of the positive clinical specimens were identified as genogroup I, 122 (84%) were identified as genogroup II, and 1 specimen was found to contain a mix of both genogroups. All genogroup I-positive specimens were associated with capsid glycoprotein 2 (G2). No significant difference in viral load was found between genogroups or geographic region. The detection and quantification, combined with the genogrouping ability, make this assay a valuable tool both for diagnostics and for molecular epidemiological investigations.

  3. Development and application of two independent real-time PCR assays to detect clinically relevant Mucorales species.

    PubMed

    Springer, Jan; Goldenberger, Daniel; Schmidt, Friderike; Weisser, Maja; Wehrle-Wieland, Elisabeth; Einsele, Hermann; Frei, Reno; Löffler, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    PCR-based detection of Mucorales species could improve diagnosis of suspected invasive fungal infection, leading to a better patient outcome. This study describes two independent probe-based real-time PCR tests for detection of clinically relevant Mucorales, targeting specific fragments of the 18S and the 28S rRNA genes. Both assays have a short turnaround time, allow fast, specific and very sensitive detection of clinically relevant Mucorales and have the potential to be used as quantitative tests. They were validated on various clinical samples (fresh and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, mainly biopsies, n = 17). The assays should be used as add-on tools to complement standard techniques; a combined approach of both real-time PCR assays has 100 % sensitivity. Genus identification by subsequent sequencing is possible for amplicons of the 18S PCR assay. In conclusion, combination of the two independent Mucorales assays described in this study, 18S and 28S, detected all clinical samples associated with proven Mucorales infection (n = 10). Reliable and specific identification of Mucorales is a prerequisite for successful antifungal therapy as these fungi show intrinsic resistance to voriconazole and caspofungin.

  4. Development of one-step real-time PCR assay for titrating trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yang; Du, Dongchuan; Ge, Peng; Xu, Yongqing; Liu, Xintao; Zhang, Yan; Su, Weiheng; Kiseleva, Irina; Rudenko, Larisa; Xu, Fei; Kong, Wei; Jiang, Chunlai

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, infectivity of a trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs) is titrated by determining the 50% egg infectious dose assay (EID50) or plaque forming units (PFU), which requires specific monoclonal antibodies to neutralize 2 strains while estimating the titer of the non-neutralized strain. Compared to this time-consuming, laborious, subjective and variable process, reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) technology has advantages of rapidity, sensitivity, reproducibility and reduced contamination, thus has been applied widely for detecting pathogens and measuring viral titers. In this study, the critical harvest time was determined to be 18 h post-infection (hpi) for type A influenza and 12 hpi for type B influenza, but no significant difference between titers at 12 hpi and 18 hpi for the type B strain was observed. In conclusion, trivalent LAIVs can be titrated simultaneously within 24 h by this one-step RT-qPCR assay, which yielded titers comparable to those obtained by the traditional EID50 assay. Therefore, the RT-qPCR assay may be used as a highly specific, sensitive, precise and rapid alternative to the EID50 assay for titering LAIVs.

  5. A multi-target real-time PCR assay for rapid identification of meningitis-associated microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Marco; Savini, Vincenzo; Favalli, Cartesio; Fontana, Carla

    2013-01-01

    A central nervous system (CNS) infection, such as meningitis, is a serious and life-threatening condition. Bacterial meningitis can be severe and may result in brain damage, disability or even death. Rapid diagnosis of CNS infections and identification of the pathogenic microorganisms are needed to improve the patient outcome. Bacterial culture of a patient's cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is currently considered the "gold standard" for diagnosing bacterial meningitis. From the CSF cultures researchers can assess the in vitro susceptibility of the causative microorganism to determine the best antibiotic treatment. However, many of the culture assays, such as microscopy and the latex agglutination test are not sensitive. To enhance pathogen detection in CSF samples we developed a multi-target real-time PCR assay that can rapidly identify six different microorganisms: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Listeria monocytogenes and Cryptococcus neoformans. In this study we applied this PCR analysis to 296 CSF samples from patients who were suspected of having meningitis. Of the 296 samples that were examined, 59 samples were positive according to the CSF culture and/or molecular assays. Forty-six CSF samples were positive for both the CSF culture and our real-time PCR assay, while 13 samples were positive for the real-time PCR but negative for the traditional assays. This discrepancy may have been caused by the fact that these samples were collected from 23 patients who were treated with antimicrobials before CSF sampling.

  6. Validation of a real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR assay for the detection of H7 avian influenza virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pedersen, J.; Killian, M.L.; Hines, N.; Senne, D.; Panigrahy, B.; Ip, H.S.; Spackman, Erica

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the validation of an avian influenza virus (AIV) H7 subtype-specific real-time reverse transcriptasePCR (rRT-PCR) assay developed at the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) for the detection of H7 AI in North and South American wild aquatic birds and poultry. The validation was a collaborative effort by the SEPRL and the National Veterinary Services Laboratories. The 2008 H7 rRT-PCR assay detects 101 50% embryo infectious doses per reaction, or 103104 copies of transcribed H7 RNA. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were estimated to be 97.5% and 82.4%, respectively; the assay was shown to be specific for H7 AI when tested with >270 wild birds and poultry viruses. Following validation, the 2008 H7 rRT-PCR procedure was adopted as an official U.S. Department of Agriculture procedure for the detection of H7 AIV. The 2008 H7 assay replaced the previously used (2002) assay, which does not detect H7 viruses currently circulating in wild birds in North and South America. ?? 2010 American Association of Avian Pathologists.

  7. Development and validation of a quantitative real-time PCR assay for the early diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Gago, Sara; Buitrago, María José; Clemons, Karl V; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Mirels, Laurence F; Stevens, David A

    2014-06-01

    A new real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay based on a Coccidioides genus-specific molecular beacon probe was developed for the detection of coccidioidomycosis and validated with tissues from animal models and clinical samples. The assay showed high analytic reproducibility (r(2) > 0.99) and specificity for cultured strains (100%); the lower limit of detection was 1 fg of genomic DNA/μL of reaction. Fungal burdens in the organs of mice infected with Coccidioides posadasii strain Silveira were more accurately quantified by RT-PCR compared to colony-forming unit for all tissues. The RT-PCR assay was positive for 97.7% of spleen and 100% of liver or lung. Progression of infection in all organs was similar by both methods (P > 0.05). The sensitivity of the assay also was 100% for paraffin-embedded samples and samples from patients with positive cultures. Our RT-PCR assay is effective for the diagnosis and monitoring of Coccidioides infection, and its use also avoids the biohazard and time delay of identifying cultures in the clinical setting.

  8. Duplex Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Haemophilus influenzae That Distinguishes Fucose- and Protein D-Negative Strains.

    PubMed

    de Gier, Camilla; Pickering, Janessa L; Richmond, Peter C; Thornton, Ruth B; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a specific Haemophilus influenzae quantitative PCR (qPCR) that also identifies fucose-negative and protein D-negative strains. Analysis of 100 H. influenzae isolates, 28 Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates, and 14 other bacterial species revealed 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 96% to 100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 92% to 100%) for this assay. The evaluation of 80 clinical specimens demonstrated a strong correlation between semiquantitative culture and the qPCR (P < 0.001). PMID:27335148

  9. Nested-PCR and TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR assays for human adenoviruses in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chien; Chou, Yi-Pen; Kao, Po-Min; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Su, Hung-Chang; Ho, Ying-Ning; Yang, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Bing-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) infections can occur throughout the year. Cases of HAdV-associated respiratory disease have been more common in the late winter, spring, and early summer. In this study, to provide viral pollution data for further epidemiological studies and governmental actions, the presence of HAdV in the aquatic environment was quantitatively surveyed in the summer. This study was conducted to compare the efficiencies of nested-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and qPCR (quantitative PCR) for detecting HAdV in environmental waters. A total of 73 water samples were collected from Puzi River in Taiwan and subjected to virus concentration methods. In the results, qPCR had much better efficiency for specifying the pathogen in river sample. HAdV41 was detected most frequently in the river water sample (10.9%). The estimated HAdV concentrations ranged between 6.75 × 10(2) and 2.04 × 10(9) genome copies/L. Significant difference was also found in heterotrophic plate counts, conductivity, water temperature, and water turbidity between presence/absence of HAdV. HAdV in the Puzi River may pose a significant health risk. PMID:27120637

  10. SNP genotyping using single-tube fluorescent bidirectional PCR.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Christy M; Cobb, Benjamin D

    2002-07-01

    SNP genotyping is a well-populatedfield with a large number of assay formats offering accurate allelic discrimination. However, there remains a discord between the ultimate goal of rapid, inexpensive assays that do not require complex design considerations and involved optimization strategies. We describe the first integration of bidirectional allele-specific amplification, SYBR Green I, and rapid-cycle PCR to provide a homogeneous SNP-typing assay. Wild-type, mutant, and heterozygous alleles were easily discriminated in a single tube using melt curve profiling of PCR products alone. We demonstrate the effectiveness and reliability of this assay with a blinded trial using clinical samples from individuals with sickle cell anemia, sickle cell trait, or unaffected individuals. The tests were completed in less than 30 min without expensive fluorogenic probes, prohibiting design rules, or lengthy downstream processing for product analysis.

  11. Development of a real time quantitative PCR assay for the hard clam pathogen Quahog Parasite Unknown (QPX).

    PubMed

    Lyons, M Maille; Smolowitz, Roxanna; Dungan, Christopher F; Roberts, Steven B

    2006-09-14

    Quahog Parasite Unknown (QPX) is a thraustochytrid pathogen responsible for catastrophic mortalities of the northern quahog (hard clam) Mercenaria mercenaria. A real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed to assist research efforts on QPX ecology and pathology. Sensitivity of the assay was evaluated with serial dilutions of QPX-cultured cells to determine the lowest concentration of DNA that remained detectable in both the presence and absence of extraneous environmental substances. QPX cells were quantified before DNA extraction to calibrate standard curves to cell counts. Based on our results, the qPCR assay is able to quantify QPX within the range of 1 to several thousand organisms per reaction. Specificity of the assay was assessed by testing 29 thraustochytrid-like protists isolated from suspension-feeding bivalves from China, Oregon, Maryland, and Virginia. Application of the assay was demonstrated with positive qPCR results from naturally contaminated environmental samples including marine aggregates (i.e. marine snow), clam pseudofeces, and inflammatory nodules from infected clams. This quantitative assay for QPX will provide a valuable tool for characterizing QPX parasite abundances in coastal environments and for improving clam disease diagnostics.

  12. [Establishment and Preliminary Application of the SYBR Green I Real-time PCR Assay for Detection of the Bovine Enterovirus].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tong; Zhao, Guimin; Shen, Furao; Hou Peili; Wang, Hongmei; Li, Jie; He, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    The bovine enterovirus (BEV) is a pathogen found the digestive tracts of cattle. Recently, the BEV was discovered in cattle in a province in China. A rapid and effective detection method for the BEV is essential. An assay was carried out using two specific primers designed to amplify a highly conserved sequence of the 3D gene. A recombinant plasmid containing the target gene 3D was constructed as a standard control. The limit of detection of the reaction was 7.13 x 10(1) plasmid copies/μL of initial templates, which was tenfold more sensitive than the conventional reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Moreover, the assay was highly specific because all negative controls and other viruses of clinical relevance did not develop positive results. Assay performance on field samples was evaluated on 44 (41 diarrhea and 3 aerosol) samples and compared with the conventional RT-PCR assay. Sixteen diarrhea samples were positive (16/41, 39. 02%) and 3 aerosol samples were positive (3/3, 100%). Preliminary results for clinical detection showed that the SYBR Green I real-time PCR assay was highly sensitive, specific and reproducible. The robustness and high-throughput performance of the developed assay make it a powerful tool in diagnostic applications for epidemics and in BEV research. PMID:26738285

  13. Multiplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of Acanthamoeba spp., Balamuthia mandrillaris, and Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Visvesvara, Govinda S; Sriram, Rama; da Silva, Alexandre J

    2006-10-01

    Infections caused by Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., and Balamuthia mandrillaris occur throughout the world and pose many diagnostic challenges. To date, at least 440 cases of severe central nervous system infections caused by these amebas have been documented worldwide. Rapid and specific identification of these free-living amebas in clinical samples is of crucial importance for efficient case management. We have developed a triplex real-time TaqMan PCR assay that can simultaneously identify Acanthamoeba spp., B. mandrillaris, and N. fowleri in the same PCR vessel. The assay was validated with 22 well-characterized amebic strains harvested from cultures and nine clinical specimens that were previously characterized by in vitro culture and/or immunofluorescence assay. The triplex assay demonstrated high specificity and a rapid test completion time of less than 5 h from the reception of the specimen in the laboratory. This assay was able to detect one single ameba per sample analyzed, as determined with cerebrospinal fluid spiked with diluted cultured amebas. This assay could become useful for fast laboratory diagnostic assessment of amebic infections (caused by free-living amebas) in laboratories with adequate infrastructure to perform real-time PCR testing.

  14. Rapid Diagnosis of Mycobacterial Infections and Quantitation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Load by Two Real-Time Calibrated PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Broccolo, Francesco; Scarpellini, Paolo; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Zingale, Anna; Brambilla, Anna M.; Cichero, Paola; Sechi, Leonardo A.; Lazzarin, Adriano; Lusso, Paolo; Malnati, Mauro S.

    2003-01-01

    Sensitive and specific techniques to detect and identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly in clinical specimens are important for the diagnosis and management of patients with tuberculosis (TB). We developed two real-time PCR assays, based on the IS6110 multicopy element and on the senX3-regX3 intergenic region, which provide a rapid method for the diagnosis of mycobacterial infections. The sensitivity and specificity of both assays were established by using purified DNA from 71 clinical isolates and 121 clinical samples collected from 83 patients, 20 of whom were affected by TB. Both assays are accurate, sensitive, and specific, showing a complementary pattern of Mycobacterium recognition: broader for the IS6110-based assay and restricted to the M. tuberculosis complex for the senX3-regX3-based assay. Moreover, the addition of a synthetic DNA calibrator prior to DNA extraction allowed us to measure the efficiency of DNA recovery and to control for the presence of PCR inhibitors. The mycobacterial burden of the clinical samples, as assessed by direct microscopy, correlates with the M. tuberculosis DNA load measured by the senX3-regX3-based assay. In addition, reduced levels of M. tuberculosis DNA load are present in those patients subjected to successful therapy, suggesting a potential use of this assay for monitoring treatment efficacy. Therefore, these assays represent a fully controlled high-throughput system for the evaluation of mycobacterial burden in clinical specimens. PMID:14532183

  15. Evaluation of a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay for molecular epidemiological study of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Norihiko; Shima, Kensuke; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Asakura, Masahiro; Matsuhisa, Akio; Watanabe, Haruo; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we have evaluated our recently developed polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay for the molecular subtyping of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). A total of 200 STEC strains including O157 (n=100), O26 (n=50), O111 (n=10), and non-O26/O111/O157 (n=40) serogroups isolated during 2005-2006 in Japan, which were identified to be clonally different by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were further analyzed by the PCR-RFLP assay in comparison to PFGE. Ninety-five of O157, 48 of O26, five of O111 and 19 of non-O26/O111/O157 STEC strains yielded one to three amplicons ranging from 6.0 to 15.5 kb in size by the specific primer set targeting region V which is located in the upstream of stx genes. These strains were classified into 41 (O157), 8 (O26), 4 (O111) and 17 (non-O26/O111/O157) groups based on the RFLP patterns obtained by subsequent restriction digestion, respectively. Although the discriminatory power of PCR-RFLP assay was somewhat less than that of PFGE, it is more convenient for molecular subtyping of STEC strains especially for O157, the most important serogroup implicated in human diseases, as well as to identify the outbreak-associated isolates because of its simplicity, rapidity, ease and good reproducibility.

  16. Allele-Specific Interactions between CAST AWAY and NEVERSHED Control Abscission in Arabidopsis Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Groner, William D.; Christy, Megan E.; Kreiner, Catherine M.; Liljegren, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    An advantage of analyzing abscission in genetically tractable model plants is the ability to make use of classic genetic tools such as suppression analysis. We have investigated the regulation of organ abscission by carrying out suppression analysis in Arabidopsis flowers. Plants carrying mutations in the NEVERSHED (NEV) gene, which encodes an ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein, retain their outer floral organs after fertilization. Mutant alleles of CAST AWAY (CST), which encodes a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, were found to restore organ abscission in nev flowers in an allele-specific manner. To further explore the basis of the interactions between CST and NEV, we tested whether the site of a nev mutation is predictive of its ability to be suppressed. Our results suggest instead that the strength of a nev allele influences whether organ abscission can be rescued by a specific allele of CST.

  17. Loss of RNA expression and allele-specific expression associated with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    McKean, David M.; Homsy, Jason; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Patel, Neil; Gorham, Joshua; DePalma, Steven R.; Ware, James S.; Zaidi, Samir; Ma, Wenji; Patel, Nihir; Lifton, Richard P.; Chung, Wendy K.; Kim, Richard; Shen, Yufeng; Brueckner, Martina; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Sharp, Andrew J.; Seidman, Christine E.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Seidman, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD), a prevalent birth defect occurring in 1% of newborns, likely results from aberrant expression of cardiac developmental genes. Mutations in a variety of cardiac transcription factors, developmental signalling molecules and molecules that modify chromatin cause at least 20% of disease, but most CHD remains unexplained. We employ RNAseq analyses to assess allele-specific expression (ASE) and biallelic loss-of-expression (LOE) in 172 tissue samples from 144 surgically repaired CHD subjects. Here we show that only 5% of known imprinted genes with paternal allele silencing are monoallelic versus 56% with paternal allele expression—this cardiac-specific phenomenon seems unrelated to CHD. Further, compared with control subjects, CHD subjects have a significant burden of both LOE genes and ASE events associated with altered gene expression. These studies identify FGFBP2, LBH, RBFOX2, SGSM1 and ZBTB16 as candidate CHD genes because of significantly altered transcriptional expression. PMID:27670201

  18. Selection of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real Time PCR (qPCR) Assays in Tissue from Human Ascending Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Rueda-Martínez, Carmen; Lamas, Oscar; Mataró, María José; Robledo-Carmona, Juan; Sánchez-Espín, Gemma; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel; Such-Martínez, Miguel; Fernández, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Dilatation of the ascending aorta (AAD) is a prevalent aortopathy that occurs frequently associated with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), the most common human congenital cardiac malformation. The molecular mechanisms leading to AAD associated with BAV are still poorly understood. The search for differentially expressed genes in diseased tissue by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is an invaluable tool to fill this gap. However, studies dedicated to identify reference genes necessary for normalization of mRNA expression in aortic tissue are scarce. In this report, we evaluate the qPCR expression of six candidate reference genes in tissue from the ascending aorta of 52 patients with a variety of clinical and demographic characteristics, normal and dilated aortas, and different morphologies of the aortic valve (normal aorta and normal valve n = 30; dilated aorta and normal valve n = 10; normal aorta and BAV n = 4; dilated aorta and BAV n = 8). The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was determined with three statistical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper. The expression analyses showed that the most stable genes for the three algorithms employed were CDKN1β, POLR2A and CASC3, independently of the structure of the aorta and the valve morphology. In conclusion, we propose the use of these three genes as reference genes for mRNA expression analysis in human ascending aorta. However, we suggest searching for specific reference genes when conducting qPCR experiments with new cohort of samples. PMID:24841551

  19. Comparison of BD GeneOhm Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) PCR versus the CHROMagar MRSA Assay for Screening Patients for the Presence of MRSA Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, John M.; Havill, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    We compared the BD GeneOhm methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) real-time PCR assay with the CHROMagar MRSA assay for the detection of MRSA in 286 nasal surveillance specimens. Compared with the CHROMagar MRSA assay, PCR had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values of 100%, 98.6%, 95.8%, and 100%, respectively. The mean PCR turnaround time was 14.5 h. PMID:18032616

  20. Development of real-time PCR assay for genetic identification of the mottled skate, Beringraja pulchra.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Kwan; Lee, Hae Young; Kim, Min-Hee; Jo, Hyun-Su; Choi, Dong-Ho; Kang, Pil-Won; Lee, Yang-Han; Cho, Nam-Soo; Park, Ki-Won; Chae, Ho Zoon

    2015-10-01

    The mottled skate, Beringraja pulchra is one of the commercially important fishes in the market today. However, B. pulchra identification methods have not been well developed. The current study reports a novel real-time PCR method based on TaqMan technology developed for the genetic identification of B. pulchra. The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) nucleotide sequences of 29 B. pulchra, 157 skates and rays reported in GenBank DNA database were comparatively analyzed and the COI sequences specific to B. pulchra was identified. Based on this information, a system of specific primers and Minor Groove Binding (MGB) TaqMan probe were designed. The assay successfully discriminated in 29 specimens of B. pulchra and 27 commercial samples with unknown species identity. For B. pulchra DNA, an average Threshold Cycle (Ct) value of 19.1±0.1 was obtained. Among 27 commercial samples, two samples showed average Ct values 19.1±0.0 and 26.7±0.1, respectively and were confirmed to be B. pulchra based on sequencing. The other samples tested showed undetectable or extremely weak signals for the target fragment, which was also consistent with the sequencing results. These results reveal that the method developed is a rapid and efficient tool to identify B. pulchra and might prevent fraud or mislabeling during the distribution of B. pulchra products.

  1. PCR assay confirms diagnosis in syndrome with variably expressed phenotype: mutation detection in Stickler syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, N N; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Dixon, P; Zackai, E H; Tasman, W S

    1996-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease with ocular (severe myopia, vitreal degeneration, and retinal detachment) and other systemic manifestations (hearing loss, cleft palate, epiphyseal dysplasia, and premature osteoarthritis). As with other dominantly inherited conditions, the clinical phenotype of Stickler syndrome varies considerably. To date, all mutations have been located in the type II procollagen (COL2A1) gene. Analysis of a C-->T mutation we had identified previously, in COL2A1 gene in exon 40, in a three generation pedigree showed the loss of a cleavage site for the TaqI restriction enzyme. We designed a rapid PCR based restriction enzyme assay to detect this mutation and used it to establish the diagnosis in a neonate from the same pedigree, presenting with the first occurrence of the Pierre-Robin sequence in the family and minimal ocular findings. These results underline the potential diagnostic value of many as yet undetected DNA mutations in families affected with Stickler syndrome, since the variability of the phenotype can impede accurate diagnosis, appropriate genetic counselling, and effective intervention and prophylactic treatment for affected people. Images PMID:8863161

  2. Microbiological Diagnosis of Severe Diarrhea in Kidney Transplant Recipients by Use of Multiplex PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Jean-François; Vuiblet, Vincent; Moustapha, Betoul; Bouin, Alexis; Lavaud, Sylvie; Toupance, Olivier; de Rougemont, Alexis; Benejat, Lucie; Megraud, Francis; Wolak-Thierry, Aurore; Villena, Isabelle; Chemla, Cathy; Le Magrex, Elisabeth; de Champs, Christophe; Andreoletti, Laurent; Rieu, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is a frequent complication after kidney transplantation, ascribed to adverse effects of the immunosuppressive therapy in case of negative microbiological examination of the stools. The aim of this study was to improve the microbiological diagnosis by implementing molecular tests. Fifty-four severe diarrhea events that occurred in 49 adult kidney transplant recipients from September 2010 to November 2011 were investigated. One or several enteric pathogens were detected in 13 (23%) stool samples using classical microbiological methods versus 39 (72%) for the seven commercially available multiplex PCR assays used retrospectively (P = 0.006). Interestingly, molecular diagnosis identified 15 multiple infections compared to none using classical techniques. The primary pathogens detected were enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) (n = 15; 38%), Campylobacter spp. (n = 15; 38%), and Norovirus (n = 14; 36%). Specificities for Campylobacter and Norovirus infection diagnosis were 75 and 100%, respectively, by comparison to reference methods. Based on molecular findings, a cyclosporine-mycophenolate mofetil combination was identified as a risk factor for developing Norovirus-induced diarrhea. Norovirus infections were also responsible for higher weight loss than all the other causes of diarrhea. In samples from asymptomatic immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, EPEC but not Norovirus and Campylobacter infections were detected at a frequency similar to that observed in symptomatic kidney transplant recipients. In conclusion, molecular tools significantly improved the detection of single and multiple enteric infections by comparison to classical techniques and could quickly become the key element in the management of severe acute diarrhea in transplant recipients. PMID:23554205

  3. Genotoxicity Evaluation of Acephate and Profenofos by the PCR-RFLP Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Preety; Chaudhry, Asha

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In this study we have evaluated the genotoxic potential of pesticides acephate and profenofos by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay with the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus taken as experimental model. Material and Methods: Second instar larvae were treated with LC20 of each pesticide for 24 h and induced mutations in the sequence of mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene were studied from restriction patterns generated with PacI and PsiI restriction endonucleases. Results: Variations in the number and size of digested fragments were recorded from treated individuals compared with controls showing that the restriction enzymes created a cut at different locations. In addition, sequences of the 16S gene from control and treated individuals were also used to confirm the RFLP patterns. From the sequence alignment data, it was found that mutations caused the destruction and generation of restriction sites in the gene sequence of treated individuals. Conclusion: This study indicates that both the pesticides had significant potential to induce mutations in the 16S gene of Culex quinquefasciatus. PMID:24748740

  4. Duplex PCR assay and in situ hybridization for detection of Francisella spp. and Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis in red tilapia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ha T; Gangnonngiw, Warachin; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee; Charoensapsri, Walaiporn; Nguyen, Vuong V; Nilsen, Pål; Pradeep, Padmaja J; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Senapin, Saengchan; Rodkhum, Channarong

    2016-06-15

    Conventional isolation and identification based on phenotypic characteristics is challenging with the highly fastidious, intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno). Here, we developed a duplex PCR method for simultaneous detection of the Francisella genus and Fno in one PCR reaction and an in situ hybridization method for paraffin section based diagnosis of Fno. The PCR results showed genus- and species-specific bands (1140 and 203 bp) from Fno but only one genus-specific band (1140 bp) from F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis. Sensitivity of the duplex PCR assay revealed a detection limit of 20 to 200 fg genomic DNA (~10 to 100 genome equivalents) depending on DNA template extraction methods. The newly developed duplex PCR assay could be used to detect Fno from clinically sick fish exhibiting signs of visceral granulomas and would also be able to detect Fno infection in naturally diseased fish without symptoms of francisellosis, indicating potential application for diagnosis of field samples. The in situ hybridization assay using Fno species-specific probe revealed positive signals in multiple organs including the spleen, liver, kidney, gills and intestine of infected fish. PMID:27304869

  5. Development of a magnetic capture hybridization real-time PCR assay for detection of tumorigenic Agrobacterium vitis in grapevines.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kameka L; Zheng, Desen; Kaewnum, Supaporn; Reid, Cheryl Lynn; Burr, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Agrobacterium vitis, the causal agent of grape crown gall, can have severe economic effects on grape production. The bacterium survives systemically in vines and, therefore, is disseminated in propagation material. We developed an assay for use in indexing programs that is efficient and sensitive for detecting A. vitis in grape tissue. Initially, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers specific for diverse tumorigenic strains of A. vitis were developed using the virD2 gene sequence. To overcome the effects of PCR inhibitors present in plant tissue, DNA extraction methods that included magnetic capture hybridization (MCH), immunomagnetic separation (IMS), and extraction with the Mo Bio Powerfood kit were compared. The assays incorporating MCH or IMS followed by real-time PCR were 10,000-fold more sensitive than direct real-time PCR when tested using boiled bacterial cell suspensions, with detection thresholds of 10(1) CFU/ml compared with 10(5) CFU/ml. DNA extraction with the Powerfood DNA extraction kit was 10-fold more sensitive than direct real-time PCR, with a detection threshold of 10(4) CFU/ml. All three assays were able to detect A. vitis in healthy-appearing grapevine cuttings taken from infected vines. PMID:23324046

  6. A novel poisson distribution-based approach for testing boundaries of real-time PCR assays for food pathogen quantification.

    PubMed

    Rossmanith, Peter; Wagner, Martin

    2011-09-01

    The validation of quantitative real-time PCR systems and above all, proof of the detection limit of this method, is a frequently and intensively discussed topic in food pathogen detection. Among proper sample collection, assay design, careful experimental design, execution of real-time PCR, and data analysis, the validation of the method per se ensuring reliable quantification data is of prime importance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel validation tool for real-time PCR assays, based on the theoretical possibility of the amplification of a single DNA target. The underlying mathematical basis for the work is Poisson distribution, which describes patterns of low particle numbers in a volume. In this context, we focused on the quantitative aspect of real-time PCR for the first time. This allowed for demonstration of the reliable amplification of a lone target DNA molecule and the demonstration of the distinct discrimination between integer molecular numbers when using low initial copy numbers. A real-time PCR assay amplifying a 274-bp fragment of the positive regulatory protein A locus of Listeria monocytogenes was used for this work. Evidence for a linear range of quantification from a single target copy to 10 ng of target DNA was experimentally demonstrated, and evidence for the significance of this novel validation approach is presented here.

  7. A sensitive and specific PCR assay for the detection of Baylisascaris schroederi eggs in giant panda feces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Li, De-Sheng; Zhou, Xuan; Xie, Yue; Liang, Yi-Nan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Yu, Hua; Chen, Shi-Jie; Yan, Yu-Bo; Gu, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Shu-Xian; Peng, Xue-Rong; Yang, Guang-You

    2013-10-01

    Baylisascaris schroederi is one of the most common intestinal nematodes in giant pandas. It can cause severe baylisascariasis which is highly infectious in its natural hosts. A rapid and reliable diagnosis of parasite infections is crucial to protect giant pandas, as well as for environmental monitoring and disease surveillance. Here, we established a specific PCR assay for B. schroederi detection which was targeting a 331-bp long fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene. Fifty fresh fecal samples collected from captive giant pandas were tested by the established PCR assay and the traditional flotation technique. DNA extracted from a single B. schroederi egg could be successfully amplified, while no cross-reactivity was found with DNA from Ancylostoma caninum eggs. The detection rate of the PCR assay was 68%, which was higher than that of the traditional egg flotation (46%). Our findings demonstrated that the PCR assay is sensitive and specific for the detection and identification of B. schroederi eggs. Therefore, it could become a useful tool for the investigation of B. schroederi infections in giant pandas.

  8. In situ detection of the Clostridium botulinum type C1 toxin gene in wetland sediments with a nested PCR assay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, J.L.; Rocke, T.E.; Aiken, Judd M.

    1999-01-01

    A nested PCR was developed for detection of the Clostridium botulinum type C1 toxin gene in sediments collected from wetlands where avian botulism outbreaks had or had not occurred. The C1 toxin gene was detected in 16 of 18 sites, demonstrating both the ubiquitous distribution of C. botulinum type C in wetland sediments and the sensitivity of the detection assay.

  9. Quantitative real-time PCR assays for sensitive detection of Canada goose-specific fecal pollution in water sources.

    PubMed

    Fremaux, B; Boa, T; Yost, C K

    2010-07-01

    Canada geese (Branta canadensis) are prevalent in North America and may contribute to fecal pollution of water systems where they congregate. This work provides two novel real-time PCR assays (CGOF1-Bac and CGOF2-Bac) allowing for the specific and sensitive detection of Bacteroides 16S rRNA gene markers present within Canada goose feces.

  10. Generic detection of poleroviruses using an RT-PCR assay targeting the RdRp coding sequence.

    PubMed

    Lotos, Leonidas; Efthimiou, Konstantinos; Maliogka, Varvara I; Katis, Nikolaos I

    2014-03-01

    In this study a two-step RT-PCR assay was developed for the generic detection of poleroviruses. The RdRp coding region was selected as the primers' target, since it differs significantly from that of other members in the family Luteoviridae and its sequence can be more informative than other regions in the viral genome. Species specific RT-PCR assays targeting the same region were also developed for the detection of the six most widespread poleroviral species (Beet mild yellowing virus, Beet western yellows virus, Cucurbit aphid-borne virus, Carrot red leaf virus, Potato leafroll virus and Turnip yellows virus) in Greece and the collection of isolates. These isolates along with other characterized ones were used for the evaluation of the generic PCR's detection range. The developed assay efficiently amplified a 593bp RdRp fragment from 46 isolates of 10 different Polerovirus species. Phylogenetic analysis using the generic PCR's amplicon sequence showed that although it cannot accurately infer evolutionary relationships within the genus it can differentiate poleroviruses at the species level. Overall, the described generic assay could be applied for the reliable detection of Polerovirus infections and, in combination with the specific PCRs, for the identification of new and uncharacterized species in the genus. PMID:24374125

  11. Development of a non invasion real-time PCR assay for the quantitation of chicken parvovirus in fecal swabs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study describes the development of a real time Taqman polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using a fluorescent labeled probe for the detection and quantitation of chicken parvovirus (ChPV) in feces. The primers and probes were designed based on the nucleotide sequence of the non struct...

  12. A sensitive and specific PCR assay for the detection of Baylisascaris schroederi eggs in giant panda feces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Li, De-Sheng; Zhou, Xuan; Xie, Yue; Liang, Yi-Nan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Yu, Hua; Chen, Shi-Jie; Yan, Yu-Bo; Gu, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Shu-Xian; Peng, Xue-Rong; Yang, Guang-You

    2013-10-01

    Baylisascaris schroederi is one of the most common intestinal nematodes in giant pandas. It can cause severe baylisascariasis which is highly infectious in its natural hosts. A rapid and reliable diagnosis of parasite infections is crucial to protect giant pandas, as well as for environmental monitoring and disease surveillance. Here, we established a specific PCR assay for B. schroederi detection which was targeting a 331-bp long fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene. Fifty fresh fecal samples collected from captive giant pandas were tested by the established PCR assay and the traditional flotation technique. DNA extracted from a single B. schroederi egg could be successfully amplified, while no cross-reactivity was found with DNA from Ancylostoma caninum eggs. The detection rate of the PCR assay was 68%, which was higher than that of the traditional egg flotation (46%). Our findings demonstrated that the PCR assay is sensitive and specific for the detection and identification of B. schroederi eggs. Therefore, it could become a useful tool for the investigation of B. schroederi infections in giant pandas. PMID:23688803

  13. Two quantitative real-time PCR assays for the detection of penaeid shrimp and blue crab, crustacean shellfish allergens.

    PubMed

    Eischeid, Anne C; Kim, Bang-hyun; Kasko, Sasha M

    2013-06-19

    Food allergen detection methods must be able to specifically detect minute quantities of an allergenic food in a complex food matrix. One technique that can be used is real-time PCR. For the work described here, real-time PCR assays were developed to detect penaeid shrimp and blue crab, crustacean shellfish allergens. The method was tested using shrimp meat and crab meat spiked into several types of foods, including canned soups, deli foods, meat, seafood, and prepared seafood products. Foods were spiked with either shrimp or crab at levels ranging from 0.1 to 10⁶ parts per million (ppm) and analyzed either raw or cooked by a variety of methods. Real-time PCR data were used to generate linear standard curves, and assays were evaluated with respect to linear range and reaction efficiency. Results indicate that both assays performed well in a variety of food types. High reaction efficiencies were achieved across a linear range of 6-8 orders of magnitude. Limits of detection were generally between 0.1 and 1 ppm. Cooking methods used to simulate thermal processing of foods had little effect on assay performance. This work demonstrates that real-time PCR can be a valuable tool in the detection of crustacean shellfish.

  14. Development of PCR-based assays for detecting and differentiating three species of botrytis infecting broad bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botrytis cinerea, B. fabae and B. fabiopsis are known to cause chocolate spot on broad bean. This study was conducted to develop PCR-based assays to detect and differentiate this three species. Two sets of primers, Bc-f/Bc-r for B. cinerea and Bfab-f/Bfab-r for B. fabiopsis, were designed based on t...

  15. Comparison of real-time PCR detection chemistries and cycling modes using Mon810 event-specific assays as model.

    PubMed

    La Paz, José Luis; Esteve, Teresa; Pla, Maria

    2007-05-30

    The most widely accepted methods for accurate quantitative detection of genetically modified organisms rely on real-time PCR. Various detection chemistries are available for real-time PCR. They include sequence-unspecific DNA labeling dyes such SYBR-Green I and the use of both universal (e.g., AmpliFluor) and sequence-specific double-labeled probes, the latter comprising hybridization (e.g., Molecular Beacon) and hydrolysis (e.g., TaqMan or MGB) probes. Also, new real-time PCR devices and reagents allowing fast cycling reactions exist. Five Mon810 real-time PCR assays were developed in which the event specificity was based on the detection of transgene and plant rearranged sequences found to 3' flank the insertion site. Every assay was specifically designed for one particular detection chemistry, that is, AmpliFluor, Molecular Beacon, MGB, TaqMan, and SYBR-Green I. When possible, the assays were adapted to fast cycling mode. All assays displayed satisfactory performance parameters, although Molecular Beacon, MGB, and TaqMan chemistries were the most suitable for quantification purposes in both conventional and fast cycling modes.

  16. Improved HF183 quantitative real-time PCR assay for characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface water samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time quantitative PCR assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster are considered to be some of the top performing methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. In response, the United States Environmental Protectio...

  17. A duplex PCR-based assay for simultaneous detection of Trypanosoma evansi and Theileria annulata infections in water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Vikrant; Jaiswal, Amit Kumar; Parashar, Rahul; Shanker, Daya

    2015-06-01

    Trypanosomosis and bovine tropical theileriosis are important vector-borne protozoan diseases imposing some of the serious constraints on the health and productivity of domestic cattle in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Following recovery from primary infection of both these conditions, animals become persistent carriers and act as reservoirs of infection thereby playing a critical role in disease epidemiology. The present study describes development and evaluation of duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for simultaneous detection of Trypanosoma evansi and Theileria annulata in buffaloes. Following in silico screening for candidate target genes representing each of the pathogens, an optimized duplex PCR assay was established using TBR F/R and TAMS F/R as primer sets encoding for products of 164 and 721 bp for T. evansi and T. annulata, respectively. The results were compared and correlated with conventional Giemsa-stained thin blood smear examination and the single PCR assay. The duplex PCR detected each pathogen with the same level of sensitivity, irrespective of whether its DNA was amplified in isolation or together with DNA of another pathogen. Moreover, single and duplex PCRs were able to detect each species with equal sensitivity in serially diluted DNA representing mixtures of T. evansi and T. annulata, and no evidence of nonspecific amplification from nontarget species was observed. The developed assay may be seen as a good tool for epidemiological studies aiming at assessing the burden of dual infections and improving control of the associated diseases in endemic regions.

  18. Development of a quantitative immunocapture real-time PCR assay for detecting structurally intact adenoviral particles in water.

    PubMed

    Ogorzaly, Leslie; Bonot, Sébastien; Moualij, Benaissa El; Zorzi, Willy; Cauchie, Henry-Michel

    2013-12-01

    Development of rapid, sensitive and specific methods for detection of infectious enteric viruses in water is challenging but crucial for gaining reliable information for risk assessment. An immunocapture real-time PCR (IC-qPCR) was designed to detect jointly the two major viral particle components, i.e. the capsid protein and the viral genome. Targeting both constituents helps circumventing the technical limits of cell culture approaches and the inability of PCR based methods to predict the infectious status. Two waterborne pathogenic virus models, human adenovirus types 2 and 41, were chosen for this study. IC-qPCR showed a detection limit of 10MPNCU/reaction with a dynamic range from 10(2) to 10(6)MPNCU/reaction. Sensitivity was thus 100-fold higher compared to ELISA-based capture employing the same anti-hexon antibodies. After optimisation, application on environmental water samples was validated, and specificity towards the targeted virus types was obtained through the qPCR step. Heat-treated pure samples as well as surface water samples brought evidence that this method achieves detection of encapsidated viral genomes while excluding free viral genome amplification. As a consequence, adenovirus concentrations estimated by IC-qPCR were below those calculated by direct qPCR. The results demonstrate that the IC-qPCR method is a sensitive and rapid tool for detecting, in a single-tube assay, structurally intact and thus potentially infectious viral particles in environmental samples. PMID:23850702

  19. Multiplex PCR assay for the detection of enterotoxic Bacillus cereus group strains and its application in food matrices.

    PubMed

    Kalyan Kumar, T D; Murali, H S; Batra, H V

    2010-06-01

    Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis are the major concerns for the food safety in terms of frequency and/or seriousness of the disease. Being members of the same group and sharing DNA homology to a larger extent, they do create problems when their specific detection/identification is attempted from different food and environmental sources. Numerous individual polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and few multiplex PCR (mPCR) methods have been employed to detect these organisms by targeting toxin genes but with lack of internal amplification control (IAC). Therefore, we attempted a mPCR with IAC for the detection of enterotoxic B. cereus group strains by selecting hbl A, nhe A and cyt K genes from B. cereus, indicative of the diarrheal potential and cry I A and pag genes, the plasmid borne phenotypic markers specific to B. thuringiensis and B. anthracis strains, respectively. Multiplex PCR assay validation was performed by simultaneous comparison with the results of single-target PCR assays and correlated to the classical conventional and biochemical identification of the organisms. The mPCR was able to detect as low as 10(1)-10(2) organisms per ml following overnight enrichment of spiked food samples (vegetable biriyani and milk) in buffered peptone water (BPW). The presence of these organisms could also be detected by mPCR in naturally contaminated samples of rice based dishes and milk. The high throughput and cost-effective mPCR method described could provide a powerful tool for simultaneous, rapid and reliable detection of enterotoxic B. cereus group organisms.

  20. A real-time PCR assay for the quantitative detection of Ralstonia solanacearum in the horticultural soil and plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Zhang, Wen-Zhi; Liu, Xin; Ma, Zhong-Hua; Li, Bo; Allen, Caitilyn; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2010-01-01

    A specific and rapid real-time PCR assay for detecting Ralstonia solanacearum in the horticultural soil and plant tissues was developed in this study. The specific primers RSF/RSR were designed based on the upstream region of UDP-3-O-acyl-GlcNAc deacetylase gene from R. solanacearum, and a PCR product of 159 bp was amplified specifically from 28 strains of R. solanacearum, which represent all genetically diverse AluI types and all 6 biovars, but not from any other nontarget species. The detection limit of 102 CFU/g tomato stem and horticultural soil was achieved in this real-time PCR assay. The high sensitivity and specificity observed with filed samples as well as with artificially infected samples suggested that this method might be a useful tool for detection and quantification of R. solanacearum in precise forecast and diagnosis.

  1. siRNA-mediated Allele-specific Silencing of a COL6A3 Mutation in a Cellular Model of Dominant Ullrich Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, Véronique; Zou, Yaqun; Ko, Dayoung; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2014-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy type Ullrich (UCMD) is a severe disorder of early childhood onset for which currently there is no effective treatment. UCMD commonly is caused by dominant-negative mutations in the genes coding for collagen type VI, a major microfibrillar component of the extracellular matrix surrounding the muscle fibers. To explore RNA interference (RNAi) as a potential therapy for UCMD, we designed a series of small interfering RNA (siRNA) oligos that specifically target the most common mutations resulting in skipping of exon 16 in the COL6A3 gene and tested them in UCMD-derived dermal fibroblasts. Transcript analysis by semiquantitative and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that two of these siRNAs were the most allele-specific, i.e., they efficiently knocked down the expression from the mutant allele, without affecting the normal allele. In HEK293T cells, these siRNAs selectively suppressed protein expression from a reporter construct carrying the mutation, with no or minimal suppression of the wild-type (WT) construct, suggesting that collagen VI protein levels are as also reduced in an allele-specific manner. Furthermore, we found that treating UCMD fibroblasts with these siRNAs considerably improved the quantity and quality of the collagen VI matrix, as assessed by confocal microscopy. Our current study establishes RNAi as a promising molecular approach for treating dominant COL6-related dystrophies. PMID:24518369

  2. A novel one cycle allele specific primer extension--molecular beacon displacement method for DNA point mutation detection with improved specificity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomin; Huang, Yong; Guan, Yuan; Zhao, Meiping; Li, Yuanzong

    2007-02-12

    We report here a new method for the real-time detection of DNA point mutations with molecular beacon as the fluorescence tracer and 3' (exo-) Bst DNA polymerase large fragment as the polymerase. The method is based on the mechanism of allele specific primer extension-strand displacement (ASPE-SD). To improve the specificity of the method only one cycle of the allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used that could largely eliminate the non-specific reactions between the primers and template of the "wrong" genotype. At first, the primer and molecular beacon both hybridize to the DNA template, and the molecular beacon emits intensive fluorescence. The role of 3' exonuclease excision of Bst DNA polymerase large fragment is utilized for primer extension. When 3'-termini matches its corresponding template, the primer would efficiently extend and replace the molecular beacon that would simultaneously return to its closed form leading to the quenching of the fluorescence. However, when 3'-termini of the primer mismatches its corresponding template primer extension and molecular beacon displacement would not happen and fluorescence of the hybridized molecular beacon holds the line without fluorescence quenching. This approach was fully demonstrated in synthetic template systems and applied to detect point mutation at codon 259, a possible point mutation site in exon 7 of p53 gene, obtained from human genomic DNA samples with unambiguous differentiation power.

  3. A multiple RT-PCR assay for simultaneous detection and differentiation of latent viruses and apscarviroids in apple trees.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lu; Xie, Jipeng; Chen, Shanyi; Wang, Shaojie; Gong, Zhuoqun; Ling, Kai-Shu; Guo, Liyun; Fan, Zaifeng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV), Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), and Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV) are three latent viruses frequently occurring in apple trees worldwide. In field orchards, these viruses are frequently found in a mixed infection with viroids in the genus Apscarviroid, including Apple scar skin viroid, and Apple dimple fruit viroid. Together these viruses and viroids could cause serious damage to apple fruit production worldwide. Rapid and efficient detection methods are pivotal to identify and select the virus-free propagation material for healthy apple orchard management. In this study a multiplex Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) was developed and optimized for simultaneous detection and differentiation of the three latent viruses and apscarviroids. With newly designed specific primers for ACLSV, ASGV, APSV, and EF-1α (as an internal control), and a pair of degenerate primers for apscarviroids, optimized parameters for multiplex RT-PCR were determined. The resulting PCR products from each target virus and viroid could be easily identified because their product sizes differ by at least a 100bp. The multiplex RT-PCR method is expected to detect different variants of the viruses as the test results showed that a variety of isolates from different regions in China gave positive results. To the best of our knowledge, this multiplex RT-PCR assay is the first to simultaneously detect multiple viruses and viroids infecting apple trees in a single reaction tube. This assay, therefore, offers a useful tool for routine certification and quarantine programs. PMID:27054889

  4. A multiple RT-PCR assay for simultaneous detection and differentiation of latent viruses and apscarviroids in apple trees.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lu; Xie, Jipeng; Chen, Shanyi; Wang, Shaojie; Gong, Zhuoqun; Ling, Kai-Shu; Guo, Liyun; Fan, Zaifeng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV), Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), and Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV) are three latent viruses frequently occurring in apple trees worldwide. In field orchards, these viruses are frequently found in a mixed infection with viroids in the genus Apscarviroid, including Apple scar skin viroid, and Apple dimple fruit viroid. Together these viruses and viroids could cause serious damage to apple fruit production worldwide. Rapid and efficient detection methods are pivotal to identify and select the virus-free propagation material for healthy apple orchard management. In this study a multiplex Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) was developed and optimized for simultaneous detection and differentiation of the three latent viruses and apscarviroids. With newly designed specific primers for ACLSV, ASGV, APSV, and EF-1α (as an internal control), and a pair of degenerate primers for apscarviroids, optimized parameters for multiplex RT-PCR were determined. The resulting PCR products from each target virus and viroid could be easily identified because their product sizes differ by at least a 100bp. The multiplex RT-PCR method is expected to detect different variants of the viruses as the test results showed that a variety of isolates from different regions in China gave positive results. To the best of our knowledge, this multiplex RT-PCR assay is the first to simultaneously detect multiple viruses and viroids infecting apple trees in a single reaction tube. This assay, therefore, offers a useful tool for routine certification and quarantine programs.

  5. Quantification of Hantaan virus with a SYBR green I-based one-step qRT-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Yu, Hai-tao; Zhao, Ke; Zhang, Ye; Du, Hong; Wang, Ping-zhong; Bai, Xue-fan

    2013-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) is a major zoonotic pathogen that causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Asia, especially in China. Shaanxi province, which is located in northwest of China, is one of the areas in China most severely afflicted with HFRS epidemics annually. This study aims to establish a quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assay to detect HTNV both in cell culture and clinical serum samples. We established a SYBR Green I-based one-step qRT-PCR assay that targets the S segment of the HTNV genome for rapid detection and quantification. The HTNV cRNA standards were constructed by in vitro transcription, and the copy numbers of the HTNV cRNA were quantified. Standard curve was generated by determining the mean cycle threshold (Ct) values versus 10-fold serial dilutions of the HTNV cRNA over a range of 1 × 10(8) to 1 × 10(3) copies/μl. The standard curve had a reaction efficiency of 102.1%, a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.998, and a slope of -3.273. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the intra- and inter-assays ranged from 0.68% to 3.00% and from 0.86% to 3.21%, respectively. The cycle intervals of the qRT-PCR assay between each dilution ranged from 2.9 to 3.8 cycles, and the lowest detection limit of the qRT-PCR assay was 10 copies/μl. The assay exhibited high specificity that was confirmed by melting curve analysis, and no cross reaction with the Seoul virus (SEOV) and other viruses (HBV, HCV and HIV) was observed. HTNV RNA was also detected in the 27 serum samples of clinical HFRS patients using the assay, and the HTNV RNA viral load ranged from 2.06 × 10(1) to 1.95 × 10(5) copies/μl. The SYBR Green I-based one-step qRT-PCR assay is a sensitive, specific, reproducible, and simple method for detecting and quantifying HTNV in cell culture and clinical samples.

  6. Quantification of Hantaan virus with a SYBR green I-based one-step qRT-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Yu, Hai-tao; Zhao, Ke; Zhang, Ye; Du, Hong; Wang, Ping-zhong; Bai, Xue-fan

    2013-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) is a major zoonotic pathogen that causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Asia, especially in China. Shaanxi province, which is located in northwest of China, is one of the areas in China most severely afflicted with HFRS epidemics annually. This study aims to establish a quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assay to detect HTNV both in cell culture and clinical serum samples. We established a SYBR Green I-based one-step qRT-PCR assay that targets the S segment of the HTNV genome for rapid detection and quantification. The HTNV cRNA standards were constructed by in vitro transcription, and the copy numbers of the HTNV cRNA were quantified. Standard curve was generated by determining the mean cycle threshold (Ct) values versus 10-fold serial dilutions of the HTNV cRNA over a range of 1 × 10(8) to 1 × 10(3) copies/μl. The standard curve had a reaction efficiency of 102.1%, a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.998, and a slope of -3.273. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the intra- and inter-assays ranged from 0.68% to 3.00% and from 0.86% to 3.21%, respectively. The cycle intervals of the qRT-PCR assay between each dilution ranged from 2.9 to 3.8 cycles, and the lowest detection limit of the qRT-PCR assay was 10 copies/μl. The assay exhibited high specificity that was confirmed by melting curve analysis, and no cross reaction with the Seoul virus (SEOV) and other viruses (HBV, HCV and HIV) was observed. HTNV RNA was also detected in the 27 serum samples of clinical HFRS patients using the assay, and the HTNV RNA viral load ranged from 2.06 × 10(1) to 1.95 × 10(5) copies/μl. The SYBR Green I-based one-step qRT-PCR assay is a sensitive, specific, reproducible, and simple method for detecting and quantifying HTNV in cell culture and clinical samples. PMID:24278449

  7. Duplex real-time PCR assay for rapid identification of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from dairy cow milk.

    PubMed

    Pilla, Rachel; Snel, Gustavo G M; Malvisi, Michela; Piccinini, Renata

    2013-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus isolates from dairy cow mastitis are not always consistent with the characteristic morphology described, and molecular investigation is often needed. The aim of the study was to develop a duplex real-time PCR assay for rapid identification of Staph. aureus isolates, targeting both nuc and Sa442. Overall, 140 isolates collected from dairy cow mastitis in 90 different herds, were tested. All strains had been identified using morphological and biochemical characteristics. DNA from each strain was amplified in real-time PCR assay, to detect nuc or Sa442. Thereafter, a duplex real-time PCR assay was performed, and specificity of the amplified products was assessed by high resolution melting curve analysis. Out of 124 Staph. aureus isolates, 33 did not show the typical morphology or enzymic activity; in 118 strains, the two melt-curve peaks consistent with nuc and Sa442 were revealed, while 2 isolates showed only the peak consistent with Sa442. Four isolates bacteriologically identified as Staph. aureus, were PCR-negative and were further identified as Staph. pseudintermedius by sequencing. Staph. pseudintermedius and coagulase-negative staphylococci did not carry nuc or Sa442. The results showed the correct identification of all isolates, comprehending also coagulase-or nuc-negative Staph. aureus, while other coagulase-positive Staphylococci were correctly identified as non-Staph. aureus. Both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. High resolution melting analysis allowed easy detection of unspecific products. Finally, the duplex real-time PCR was applied directly to 40 milk samples, to detect infected mammary quarters. The assay confirmed the results of bacteriological analysis, on Staph. aureus-positive or-negative samples. Therefore, the proposed duplex real-time PCR could be used in laboratory routine as a cost-effective and powerful tool for high-throughput identification of atypical Staph. aureus isolates causing dairy cow mastitis. Also, it

  8. Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus and look-alike disease viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Hindson, B J; Reid, S M; Baker, B R; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; King, D P

    2007-07-26

    A high-throughput multiplexed assay was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRT-PCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

  9. Temporal Assessment of the Impact of Exposure to Cow Feces inTwo Watersheds by Multiple Host-Specific PCR Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal exposure in two watersheds with different management histories was assessed by tracking cattle fecal bacterial populations using multiple host-specific PCR assays. In addition, environmental factors affecting the occurrence of these markers were identified. Each assay was t...

  10. A PCR assay used to study aerosol transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae from samples of live pigs under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Savoye, C; Jobert, J L; Berthelot-Hérault, F; Keribin, A M; Cariolet, R; Morvan, H; Madec, F; Kobisch, M

    2000-05-11

    The study describes a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. The test is based on the amplification of the omlA gene coding for an outer membrane protein of A. pleuropneumoniae. To test the specificity of the reaction, 19 other bacterial species related to A. pleuropneumoniae or isolated from pigs were assayed. They were all found negative in the PCR assay. The detection threshold of the test was 10(2) A. pleuropneumoniae CFU/assay. The test was then applied to the detection of A. pleuropneumoniae from tonsillar biopsies and tracheobronchial lavage fluids of pigs without a culture step. The detection of A. pleuropneumoniae in these samples was performed by PCR, by conventional culture and by bacteriology with immunomagnetic beads. The number of samples that were found positive by PCR was almost three times higher than the number of samples from which A. pleuropneumoniae was isolated by both bacteriological techniques. The detection of A. pleuropneumoniae in these samples allowed us to demonstrate its aerosol transmission to pigs under experimental conditions. The trial involved 18 specific pathogen free pigs. Six pigs, infected with A. pleuropneumoniae, were located in a unit A, together with four non-infected animals (contact pigs). Eight non-infected pigs (reporter pigs) were located in a unit B, adjacent to A. We detected A. pleuropneumoniae in samples from infected animals but also from 'contact' (unit A) and 'reporter' (unit B) pigs. The results of this study show that the simple preparation of the samples followed by the PCR assay may be a useful tool for epidemiological studies. PMID:10781732

  11. A rapid real-time qRT-PCR assay for ovine beta-actin mRNA.

    PubMed

    Bjarnadottir, Helga; Jonsson, Jon J

    2005-05-01

    Beta-Actin mRNA is often used for normalization in gene expression experiments. We describe a sensitive, rapid and specific quantitative assay for the cytoplasmic ovine beta-actin mRNA. The assay was based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements to amplify cDNA products reverse transcribed from mRNA. A part of the ovine beta-actin sequence was amplified from cDNA from fetal ovine synovial (FOS) cells with mRNA-specific primers and cloned into a plasmid clone. The assay standard curve was constructed with dilutions of this plasmid. The assay was linear over five orders of magnitude and detected down to 600 copies per reaction of target DNA. Intraassay coefficient of variation was 12%. Detection of the beta-actin gene was eliminated by designing FRET probes at splice junctions and detection of putative processed pseudogenes was minimized by using FRET assay design with four oligonucleotides. We measured 0.2 copies per cell in RNA preparations without reverse transcription and DNase digestion. This might represent processed pseudogenes. In constrast, we measured 1400 beta-actin mRNA copies per cell in RNA preparations after the RT and DNase steps. The assay should, therefore, be sensitive enough to measure beta-actin from a single individual cell. Dilution of target DNA in murine RNA or ovine cDNA preparations did not effect efficiency of PCR or linearity of the assay. The quantitative assay described in this work can be used to correct for variations in various real-time qRT-PCR experiments in ovine cells with diverse goals, including gene expression studies, quantitation of viral load in infected cells and in various gene therapy experiments measuring vector load and expression in transduced cells. PMID:15823406

  12. Rapid Differential Diagnosis between Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis and Focal Complications of Brucellosis Using a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Queipo-Ortuño, María Isabel; Colmenero, Juan D.; Bermudez, Pilar; Bravo, María José; Morata, Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Background Arduous to differ clinically, extrapulmonary tuberculosis and focal complications of brucellosis remain important causes of morbidity and mortality in many countries. We developed and applied a multiplex real-time PCR assay (M RT-PCR) for the simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Brucella spp. Methodology Conventional microbiological techniques and M RT-PCR for M. tuberculosis complex and Brucella spp were performed on 45 clinical specimens from patients with focal complications of brucellosis or extrapulmonary tuberculosis and 26 control samples. Fragments of 207 bp and 164 bp from the conserved region of the genes coding for an immunogenic membrane protein of 31 kDa of B. abortus (BCSP31) and the intergenic region SenX3-RegX3 were used for the identification of Brucella and M. tuberculosis complex, respectively. Conclusions The detection limit of the M RT-PCR was 2 genomes per reaction for both pathogens and the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were 0.44% and 0.93% for Brucella and 0.58% and 1.12% for Mycobacterium. M RT-PCR correctly identified 42 of the 45 samples from patients with tuberculosis or brucellosis and was negative in all the controls. Thus, the overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV values of the M RT PCR assay were 93.3%, 100%, 100% and 89.7%, respectively, with an accuracy of 95.8% (95% CI, 91.1%–100%). Since M RT-PCR is highly reproducible and more rapid and sensitive than conventional microbiological tests, this technique could be a promising and practical approach for the differential diagnosis between extrapulmonary tuberculosis and focal complications of brucellosis. PMID:19225565

  13. Establishment of a 10-Plex Quantitative Fluorescent-PCR Assay for rapid diagnosis of sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xingmei; Liang, Qiaoyi

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosome aneuploidies occur commonly in the general population, with an incidence of 1 in 400 newborns. However, no tests specifically targeting sex chromosomes have been carried out in prenatal diagnosis or newborn screening, resulting in late recognition of these diseases. In this study, a rapid diagnostic method for sex chromosome aneuploidies was established using Quantitative Fluorescent-PCR (QF-PCR). Ten markers were included in one multiplex QF-PCR assay, including two sex determination genes (AMXY and SRY), five X-linked short tandem repeats (STRs; DXS1053, DXS981, DXS6809, DXS1187, and DXS8377), one X/Y-common STR (X22), and two autosomal STRs (D13S305 and D21S11). Retrospective tests of 70 cases with known cytogenetic results indicated that the 10-plex QF-PCR assay could well determine sex chromosome copy numbers by both allelic peak numbers and a sex chromosome dosage calculation with the autosomal STRs as internal controls. Prospective comparison with cytogenetic karyotyping on 534 cases confirmed that the 10-plex QF-PCR assay could be well employed for sex chromosome aneuploidy diagnosis in at least the Chinese Han population. This is the first QF-PCR test for the diagnosis of sex chromosome aneuploidies in the Chinese population. This test is superior to previous designs by including up to 8 sex-linked markers covering different parts of sex chromosomes as well as employing internal controls for copy number dosage calculation in a single PCR reaction. Due to simple technique and data analysis, as well as easy implementation within routine clinical services, this method is of great clinical application value and could be widely applied.

  14. Specific detection of common pathogens of acute bacterial meningitis using an internally controlled tetraplex-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Hamidreza; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Mondanizadeh, Mahdieh; MirabSamiee, Siamak; Khansarinejad, Behzad

    2016-08-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis is critical for antimicrobial treatment of patients. Although PCR-based methods have been widely used for the diagnosis of acute meningitis caused by bacterial pathogens, the main disadvantage of these methods is their high cost. This disadvantage has hampered the widespread use of molecular assays in many developing countries. The application of multiplex assays and "in-house" protocols are two main approaches that can reduce the overall cost of a molecular test. In the present study, an internally controlled tetraplex-PCR was developed and validated for the specific detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. The analysis of a panel of other human pathogens showed no cross-reactivity in the assay. The analytical sensitivity of the in-house assay was 792.3 copies/ml, when all three bacteria were presentin the specimens. This value was calculated as 444.5, 283.7, 127.8 copies/ml when only S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis and H. influenzae, respectively, were present. To demonstrate the diagnostic performance of the assay, a total of 150 archival CSF samples were tested and compared with a commercial multiplex real-time PCR kit. A diagnostic sensitivity of 92.8% and a specificity of 95.1% were determined for the present tetraplex-PCR assay. The results indicate that the established method is sensitive, specific and cost-effective, and can be used particularly in situations where the high cost of commercial kits prevents the use of molecular methods for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. PMID:27401970

  15. Development and Evaluation of Three Real-Time PCR Assays for Genotyping and Source Tracking Cryptosporidium spp. in Water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Neumann, Norman F.; Ruecker, Norma; Alderisio, Kerri A.; Sturbaum, Gregory D.; Villegas, Eric N.; Chalmers, Rachel; Monis, Paul; Feng, Yaoyu

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in drinking source water can present a serious public health risk. To rapidly and effectively assess the source and human-infective potential of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water, sensitive detection and correct identification of oocysts to the species level (genotyping) are essential. In this study, we developed three real-time PCR genotyping assays, two targeting the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene (18S-LC1 and 18S-LC2 assays) and one targeting the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90) gene (hsp90 assay), and evaluated the sensitivity and Cryptosporidium species detection range of these assays. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes and melt curve analysis, the 18S-LC1 and hsp90 assays could differentiate common human-pathogenic species (C. parvum, C. hominis, and C. meleagridis), while the 18S-LC2 assay was able to differentiate nonpathogenic species (such as C. andersoni) from human-pathogenic ones commonly found in source water. In sensitivity evaluations, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays could detect as few as 1 Cryptosporidium oocyst per sample. Thus, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays might be used in environmental monitoring, whereas the 18S-LC1 genotyping assay could be useful for genotyping Cryptosporidium spp. in clinical specimens or wastewater samples. PMID:26092455

  16. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis with allele-specific oligonucleotide primers for individual IgH VDJ regions to evaluate tumor burden in myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Sata, Hiroshi; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Maeda, Ikuhiro; Habuchi, Yoko; Nakatani, Eiji; Fukushima, Kentaro; Fujita, Jiro; Ezoe, Sachiko; Tadokoro, Seiji; Maeda, Tetsuo; Mizuki, Masao; Kosugi, Satoru; Nakagawa, Masashi; Ueda, Shuji; Iida, Masato; Tokumine, Yukihiro; Azenishi, Yasuhiko; Mitsui, Hideki; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with patient-specific, allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) primers for individual immunoglobulin H VDJ region (ASO-PCR) amplification was performed using several sources of clinical material, including mRNA from peripheral blood cells (PBMNCs), whole bone marrow cells (BMMNCs), and the CD20+ CD38- B-cell population in bone marrow, as well as cell-free DNA from the sera of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). We designed the ASO primers and produced sufficient PCR fragments to evaluate tumor burden in 20 of 30 bone marrow samples at diagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction amplification efficiency depended on primer sequences because the production of ASO-PCR fragments did not correlate with serum M-protein levels. However, the ASO-PCR levels in BMMNCs showed statistically significant correlations with those in PBMNCs and CD20+ CD38- B-cells. The good association between the BMMNC and PBMNC data indicated that PBMNCs could be a suitable source for monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD). In the case of cell-free DNA, ASO-PCR levels showed a unique pattern and remained high even after treatment. Because the sequence information for each ASO-PCR product was identical to the original, the cell-free DNA might also be useful for evaluating MRD. Moreover, the ASO-PCR products were clearly detected in 17 of 22 mRNA samples from CD20+ CD38- populations, suggesting that MM clones might exist in relatively earlier stages of B cells than in plasma cells. Thus, ASO-PCR analysis using various clinical materials is useful for detecting MRD in MM patients as well as for clarifying MM pathogenesis. PMID:25591497

  17. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis with allele-specific oligonucleotide primers for individual IgH VDJ regions to evaluate tumor burden in myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Sata, Hiroshi; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Maeda, Ikuhiro; Habuchi, Yoko; Nakatani, Eiji; Fukushima, Kentaro; Fujita, Jiro; Ezoe, Sachiko; Tadokoro, Seiji; Maeda, Tetsuo; Mizuki, Masao; Kosugi, Satoru; Nakagawa, Masashi; Ueda, Shuji; Iida, Masato; Tokumine, Yukihiro; Azenishi, Yasuhiko; Mitsui, Hideki; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with patient-specific, allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) primers for individual immunoglobulin H VDJ region (ASO-PCR) amplification was performed using several sources of clinical material, including mRNA from peripheral blood cells (PBMNCs), whole bone marrow cells (BMMNCs), and the CD20+ CD38- B-cell population in bone marrow, as well as cell-free DNA from the sera of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). We designed the ASO primers and produced sufficient PCR fragments to evaluate tumor burden in 20 of 30 bone marrow samples at diagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction amplification efficiency depended on primer sequences because the production of ASO-PCR fragments did not correlate with serum M-protein levels. However, the ASO-PCR levels in BMMNCs showed statistically significant correlations with those in PBMNCs and CD20+ CD38- B-cells. The good association between the BMMNC and PBMNC data indicated that PBMNCs could be a suitable source for monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD). In the case of cell-free DNA, ASO-PCR levels showed a unique pattern and remained high even after treatment. Because the sequence information for each ASO-PCR product was identical to the original, the cell-free DNA might also be useful for evaluating MRD. Moreover, the ASO-PCR products were clearly detected in 17 of 22 mRNA samples from CD20+ CD38- populations, suggesting that MM clones might exist in relatively earlier stages of B cells than in plasma cells. Thus, ASO-PCR analysis using various clinical materials is useful for detecting MRD in MM patients as well as for clarifying MM pathogenesis.

  18. A novel COLD-PCR/FMCA assay enhances the detection of low-abundance IDH1 mutations in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pang, Brendan; Durso, Mary B; Hamilton, Ronald L; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2013-03-01

    Point mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) have been identified in many gliomas. The detection of IDH1 mutations becomes challenging on suboptimal glioma biopsies when a limited number of tumor cells is available for analysis. Coamplification at lower denaturing-polymerase chain reaction (COLD-PCR) is a PCR technique that deliberately lowers the denaturing cycle temperature to selectively favor amplification of mutant alleles, allowing for the sensitive detection of low-abundance mutations. We developed a novel COLD-PCR assay on the LightCycler platform (Roche, Applied Science, Indianapolis, IN), using post-PCR fluorescent melting curve analysis (FMCA) for the detection of mutant IDH1 with a detection limit of 1%. Thirty-five WHO grade I to IV gliomas and 9 non-neoplastic brain and spinal cord biopsies were analyzed with this technique and the results were compared with the conventional real-time PCR and the Sanger sequencing analysis. COLD-PCR/FMCA was able to detect the most common IDH1 R132H mutation and rare mutation types including R132H, R132C, R132L, R132S, and R132G mutations. Twenty-five glioma cases were positive for IDH1 mutations by COLD-PCR/FMCA, and 23 gliomas were positive by the conventional real-time PCR and Sanger sequencing. A pilocytic astrocytoma (PA I) and a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM IV) showed low-abundance IDH1 mutations detected by COLD-PCR/FMCA. The remaining 10 glioma and 9 non-neoplastic samples were negative by all the 3 methods. In summary, we report a novel COLD-PCR/FMCA method that provides rapid and sensitive detection of IDH1 mutations in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and can be used in the clinical setting to assess the small brain biopsies.

  19. Genome-wide identification of allele-specific expression in response to Streptococcus suis 2 infection in two differentially susceptible pig breeds.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huayu; Gaur, Uma; Mekchay, Supamit; Peng, Xianwen; Li, Lianghua; Sun, Hua; Song, Zhongxu; Dong, Binke; Li, Mingbo; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Li, Kui; Mei, Shuqi; Liu, Guisheng

    2015-11-01

    Although allele expression imbalance has been recognized in many species, and strongly linked to diseases, no whole transcriptome allele imbalance has been detected in pigs during pathogen infections. The pathogen Streptococcus suis 2 (SS2) causes serious zoonotic disease. Different pig breeds show differential susceptibility/resistance to pathogen infection, but the biological insight is little known. Here we analyzed allele-specific expression (ASE) using the spleen transcriptome of four pigs belonging to two phenotypically different breeds after SS2 infection. The comparative analysis of allele specific SNPs between control and infected animals revealed 882 and 1096 statistically significant differentially expressed allele SNPs (criteria: ratio ≧ 2 or ≦ 0.5) in Landrace and Enshi black pig, respectively. Twenty nine allelically imbalanced SNPs were further verified by Sanger sequencing, and later six SNPs were quantified by pyrosequencing assay. The pyrosequencing results are in agreement with the RNA-seq results, except two SNPs. Looking at the role of ASE in predisposition to diseases, the discovery of causative variants by ASE analysis might help the pig industry in long term to design breeding programs for improving SS2 resistance.

  20. New prediction model for probe specificity in an allele-specific extension reaction for haplotype-specific extraction (HSE) of Y chromosome mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Jessica; Watkins, Norman E; Nagy, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Allele-specific extension reactions (ASERs) use 3' terminus-specific primers for the selective extension of completely annealed matches by polymerase. The ability of the polymerase to extend non-specific 3' terminal mismatches leads to a failure of the reaction, a process that is only partly understood and predictable, and often requires time-consuming assay design. In our studies we investigated haplotype-specific extraction (HSE) for the separation of male DNA mixtures. HSE is an ASER and provides the ability to distinguish between diploid chromosomes from one or more individuals. Here, we show that the success of HSE and allele-specific extension depend strongly on the concentration difference between complete match and 3' terminal mismatch. Using the oligonucleotide-modeling platform Visual Omp, we demonstrated the dependency of the discrimination power of the polymerase on match- and mismatch-target hybridization between different probe lengths. Therefore, the probe specificity in HSE could be predicted by performing a relative comparison of different probe designs with their simulated differences between the duplex concentration of target-probe match and mismatches. We tested this new model for probe design in more than 300 HSE reactions with 137 different probes and obtained an accordance of 88%.

  1. Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth and look-alike disease viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Hindson, B J; Baker, B R; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; Reid, S M; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; King, D P

    2007-09-18

    A high-throughput multiplexed assay (Multiplex Version 1.0) was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRTPCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

  2. Development of a PCR-RFLP assay for the detection and differentiation of canine parvovirus and mink enteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanmei; Yu, Yongle; Yang, Haiyan; Li, Guimei; Yu, Zekun; Zhang, Hongliang; Shan, Hu

    2014-12-15

    A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay has been developed to detect and differentiate between canine parvovirus (CPV) and mink enteritis virus (MEV). Eight CPV and three MEV epidemic strains isolated from 28 pathological samples from dogs and minks suspected of being infected with parvovirus were amplified by PCR using a pair of specific primers designed based on the CPV-N strain (M19296). PCR amplified a fragment of 1016bp from the genomic DNA of both MEV and CPV. The MEV-derived fragment could be digested with the restriction enzyme BSP1407I into three fragments of 102bp, 312bp and 602bp, while the fragment amplified from the CPV genomic DNA was digested into only two fragments of 414bp and 602bp. The lowest DNA concentration of CPV and MEV that could be detected using this assay was 0.004μg/ml and 0.03μg/ml, respectively. The PCR-RFLP assay developed in the present study can, therefore, be used to detect and differentiate MEV from CPV with high specificity and sensitivity.

  3. Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay for Detection of Mumps Virus RNA in Clinical Specimens▿

    PubMed Central

    Boddicker, Jennifer D.; Rota, Paul A.; Kreman, Trisha; Wangeman, Andrea; Lowe, Louis; Hummel, Kimberly B.; Thompson, Robert; Bellini, William J.; Pentella, Michael; DesJardin, Lucy E.

    2007-01-01

    The mumps virus is a negative-strand RNA virus in the family Paramyxoviridae. Mumps infection results in an acute illness with symptoms including fever, headache, and myalgia, followed by swelling of the salivary glands. Complications of mumps can include meningitis, deafness, pancreatitis, orchitis, and first-trimester abortion. Laboratory confirmation of mumps infection can be made by the detection of immunoglobulin M-specific antibodies to mumps virus in acute-phase serum samples, the isolation of mumps virus in cell culture, or by detection of the RNA of the mumps virus by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. We developed and validated a multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid mumps diagnosis in a clinical setting. This assay used oligonucleotide primers and a TaqMan probe targeting the mumps SH gene, as well as primers and a probe that targeted the human RNase P gene to assess the presence of PCR inhibitors and as a measure of specimen quality. The test was specific, since it did not amplify a product from near-neighbor viruses, as well as sensitive and accurate. Real-time RT-PCR results showed 100% correlation with results from viral culture, the gold standard for mumps diagnostic testing. Assay efficiency was over 90% and displayed good precision after performing inter- and intraassay replicates. Thus, we have developed and validated a molecular method for rapidly diagnosing mumps infection that may be used to complement existing techniques. PMID:17652480

  4. Concurrent Analysis of Nose and Groin Swab Specimens by the IDI-MRSA PCR Assay Is Comparable to Analysis by Individual-Specimen PCR and Routine Culture Assays for Detection of Colonization by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Emma J.; Grabsch, Elizabeth A.; Ballard, Susan A.; Mayall, Barrie; Xie, Shirley; Martin, Rhea; Grayson, M. Lindsay

    2006-01-01

    The IDI-MRSA assay (Infectio Diagnostic, Inc., Sainte-Foy, Quebec, Canada) with the Smart Cycler II rapid DNA amplification system (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA) appears to be sensitive and specific for the rapid detection of nasal colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of this assay under conditions in which both the nose and cutaneous groin specimens were analyzed together and compared the accuracy of this PCR approach to that when these specimens were tested separately and by culture assays in an inpatient population with known high rates (12 to 15%) of MRSA colonization. Of 211 patients screened, 192 had results assessable by all three methods (agar-broth culture, separate nose and groin IDI-MRSA assay, and combined nose-groin IDI-MRSA assay), with MRSA carriage noted in 31/192 (16.1%), 41/192 (21.4%), and 36/192 (18.8%) patients by each method, respectively. Compared to agar culture results, the sensitivity and specificity of the combined nose-groin IDI-MRSA assay were 88.0% and 91.6%, respectively, whereas when each specimen was processed separately, the sensitivities were 90.0% (nose) and 83.3% (groin) and the specificities were 91.7% (nose) and 90.2% (groin). IDI-MRSA assay of a combined nose-groin specimen appears to have an accuracy similar to that of the current recommended PCR protocol, providing results in a clinically useful time frame, and may represent a more cost-effective approach to using this assay for screening for MRSA colonization. PMID:16891510

  5. Concurrent analysis of nose and groin swab specimens by the IDI-MRSA PCR assay is comparable to analysis by individual-specimen PCR and routine culture assays for detection of colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Emma J; Grabsch, Elizabeth A; Ballard, Susan A; Mayall, Barrie; Xie, Shirley; Martin, Rhea; Grayson, M Lindsay

    2006-08-01

    The IDI-MRSA assay (Infectio Diagnostic, Inc., Sainte-Foy, Quebec, Canada) with the Smart Cycler II rapid DNA amplification system (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA) appears to be sensitive and specific for the rapid detection of nasal colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of this assay under conditions in which both the nose and cutaneous groin specimens were analyzed together and compared the accuracy of this PCR approach to that when these specimens were tested separately and by culture assays in an inpatient population with known high rates (12 to 15%) of MRSA colonization. Of 211 patients screened, 192 had results assessable by all three methods (agar-broth culture, separate nose and groin IDI-MRSA assay, and combined nose-groin IDI-MRSA assay), with MRSA carriage noted in 31/192 (16.1%), 41/192 (21.4%), and 36/192 (18.8%) patients by each method, respectively. Compared to agar culture results, the sensitivity and specificity of the combined nose-groin IDI-MRSA assay were 88.0% and 91.6%, respectively, whereas when each specimen was processed separately, the sensitivities were 90.0% (nose) and 83.3% (groin) and the specificities were 91.7% (nose) and 90.2% (groin). IDI-MRSA assay of a combined nose-groin specimen appears to have an accuracy similar to that of the current recommended PCR protocol, providing results in a clinically useful time frame, and may represent a more cost-effective approach to using this assay for screening for MRSA colonization.

  6. Development and comparison of the real-time amplification based methods--NASBA-Beacon, RT-PCR taqman and RT-PCR hybridization probe assays--for the qualitative detection of sars coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Chantratita, Wasun; Pongtanapisit, Wiroj; Piroj, Wantanich; Srichunrasmi, Chutatip; Seesuai, Somying

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a rapid, sensitive and robust procedure for the qualitative detection of SARS coronavirus RNA. Three unique detection formats were developed for real-time RNA amplification assays: a post amplification detection step with a virus-specific internal capture probe based on Taqman (RT-PCR TaqMan assay), hybridization probe (RT-PCR hybridization probe assay) and a real-time assay with virus-specific molecular beacon probes (NASBA-Beacon assay). The analytical sensitivity or reproducibility of the test results among those three assays was compared. All assays yielded results by detecting SARS coronavirus targeting the BNI-1 region in less than 2 hours. RNA detection by all the formats was unaffected by the presence of human sputum. The limits of detection were at least 10 copies of input RNA for both RT-PCR formats (RT-PCR TaqMan and RT-PCR hybridization probe assays), while the NASBA-Beacon assay could detect as little as 1 copy per reaction, with high reproducibility of the coefficient of variation (CV) of <10. These results demonstrate that real-time NASBA provides a rapid and sensitive alternative to RT-PCR for the routine qualitative assay of sputum for SARS corona viral RNA detection.

  7. Burkholderia pseudomallei in soil samples from an oceanarium in Hong Kong detected using a sensitive PCR assay

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna KP; Chan, San-Yuen; Curreem, Shirly OT; Hui, Suk-Wai; Lau, Candy CY; Lee, Paul; Ho, Chi-Chun; Martelli, Paolo; Woo, Patrick CY

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an emerging infectious disease with an expanding geographical distribution. Although assessment of the environmental load of B. pseudomallei is important for risk assessment in humans or animals in endemic areas, traditional methods of bacterial culture for isolation have low sensitivities and are labor-intensive. Using a specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting a Tat domain protein in comparison with a bacterial culture method, we examined the prevalence of B. pseudomallei in soil samples from an oceanarium in Hong Kong where captive marine mammals and birds have contracted melioidosis. Among 1420 soil samples collected from various sites in the oceanarium over a 15-month period, B. pseudomallei was detected in nine (0.6%) soil samples using bacterial culture, whereas it was detected in 96 (6.8%) soil samples using the specific PCR assay confirmed by sequencing. The PCR-positive samples were detected during various months, with higher detection rates observed during summer months. Positive PCR detection was significantly correlated with ambient temperature (P<0.0001) and relative humidity (P=0.011) but not with daily rainfall (P=0.241) or a recent typhoon (P=0.787). PCR-positive samples were obtained from all sampling locations, with the highest detection rate in the valley. Our results suggest that B. pseudomallei is prevalent and endemic in the oceanarium. The present PCR assay is more sensitive than the bacterial culture method, and it may be used to help better assess the transmission of melioidosis and to design infection control measures for captive animals in this unique and understudied environment. PMID:26038496

  8. Real-time PCR-based assay for quantitative detection of Hematodinium sp. in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Nagle, L; Place, A R; Schott, E J; Jagus, R; Messick, G; Pitula, J S

    2009-03-01

    Hematodinium sp. is a parasitic dinoflagellate infecting the blue crab Callinectes sapidus and other crustaceans. PCR-based assays are currently being used to identify infections in crabs that would have been undetectable by traditional microscopic examination. We therefore sought to define the limits of quantitative PCR (qPCR) detection within the context of field collection protocols. We present a qPCR assay based on the Hematodinium sp. 18S rRNA gene that can detect 10 copies of the gene per reaction. Analysis of a cell dilution series vs. defined numbers of a cloned Hematodinium sp. 18S rRNA gene suggests a copy number of 10,000 per parasite and predicts a sensitivity of 0.001 cell equivalents. In practice, the assays are based on analysis of 1% of the DNA extracted from 200 microl of serum, yielding a theoretical detection limit of 5 cells ml(-1) hemolymph, assuming that 1 cell is present per sample. When applied to a limited field survey of blue crabs collected in Maryland coastal bays from May to August 2005, 24 of 128 crabs (18.8%) were identified as positive for Hematodinium sp. infection using qPCR. In comparison, only 6 of 128 crabs (4.7%) were identified as positive using traditional hemolymph microscopic examination. The qPCR method also detected the parasite in gill, muscle, heart and hepatopancreas tissues, with 17.2% of the crabs showing infection in at least one of these tissues. Importantly, it is now possible to enumerate parasites within defined quantities of crab tissue, which permits collection of more detailed information on the epizootiology of the pathogen.

  9. Differential Detection of Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeba moshkovskii by a Single-Round PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Hamzah, Zulhainan; Petmitr, Songsak; Mungthin, Mathirut; Leelayoova, Saovanee; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip

    2006-01-01

    A single-round PCR assay was developed for detection and differential diagnosis of the three Entamoeba species found in humans, Entamoeba moshkovskii, Entamoeba histolytica, and Entamoeba dispar, that are morphologically identical as both cysts and trophozoites. A conserved forward primer was derived from the middle of the small-subunit rRNA gene, and reverse primers were designed from signature sequences specific to each of these three Entamoeba species. PCR generates a 166-bp product with E. histolytica DNA, a 752-bp product with E. dispar DNA, and a 580-bp product with E. moshkovskii DNA. Thirty clinical specimens were examined, and the species present were successfully detected and differentiated using this assay. It was possible to detect as little as 10 pg of E. moshkovskii and E. histolytica DNA, while for E. dispar the sensitivity was about 20 pg of DNA. Testing with DNA from different pathogens, including bacteria and other protozoa, confirmed the high specificity of the assay. We propose the use of this PCR assay as an accurate, rapid, and effective diagnostic method for the detection and discrimination of these three morphologically indistinguishable Entamoeba species in both routine diagnosis of amoebiasis and epidemiological surveys. PMID:16954247

  10. Development of a multiplex PCR assay to detect Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus iniae in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Bin; Kwon, Kyoung; Cha, In Seok; Jang, Ho Bin; Nho, Seong Won; Fagutao, Fernand F; Kim, Young Kyu; Yu, Jong Earn; Jung, Tae Sung

    2014-01-01

    A multiplex PCR protocol was established to simultaneously detect major bacterial pathogens in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) including Edwardsiella (E.) tarda, Streptococcus (S.) parauberis, and S. iniae. The PCR assay was able to detect 0.01 ng of E. tarda, 0.1 ng of S. parauberis, and 1 ng of S. iniae genomic DNA. Furthermore, this technique was found to have high specificity when tested with related bacterial species. This method represents a cheaper, faster, and reliable alternative for identifying major bacterial pathogens in olive flounder, the most important farmed fish in Korea.

  11. Quantitative real-time PCR assay for detection of Paenibacillus polymyxa using membrane-fusion protein-based primers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Seok; Park, Dong Suk; Lee, Jung Won; Chi, Hee Youn; Sohn, Soo-In; Jeon, Bong-Kyun; Ma, Jong-Beom

    2012-11-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa is known to be a plant-growthpromoting rhizobacterium. The present study describes a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for the specific detection and quantitation of P. polymyxa using a primer pair based on the sequence of a membranefusion protein for the amplification of a 268 bp DNA fragment. This study reports that the qPCR-based method is applicable for the rapid and sensitive detection of P. polymyxa and can be used as an alternative method for agricultural soil monitoring.

  12. Development and Evaluation of a Blood Culture PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liqing; Jones, Claire; Gibani, Malick M.; Dobinson, Hazel; Thomaides-Brears, Helena; Shrestha, Sonu; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Darton, Thomas C.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteric fever remains an important cause of morbidity in many low-income countries and Salmonella Paratyphi A has emerged as the aetiological agent in an increasing proportion of cases. Lack of adequate diagnostics hinders early diagnosis and prompt treatment of both typhoid and paratyphoid but development of assays to identify paratyphoid has been particularly neglected. Here we describe the development of a rapid and sensitive blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A from blood, potentially allowing for appropriate diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment to be initiated on the same day. Methods Venous blood samples from volunteers experimentally challenged orally with Salmonella Paratyphi A, who subsequently developed paratyphoid, were taken on the day of diagnosis; 10 ml for quantitative blood culture and automated blood culture, and 5 ml for blood culture PCR. In the latter assay, bacteria were grown in tryptone soy broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease for 5 hours (37°C) before bacterial DNA was isolated for PCR detection targeting the fliC-a gene of Salmonella Paratyphi A. Results An optimized broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease, as well as a PCR test was developed for a blood culture PCR assay of Salmonella Paratyphi A. The volunteers diagnosed with paratyphoid had a median bacterial burden of 1 (range 0.1–6.9) CFU/ml blood. All the blood culture PCR positive cases where a positive bacterial growth was shown by quantitative blood culture had a bacterial burden of ≥ 0.3 CFU/ ml blood. The blood culture PCR assay identified an equal number of positive cases as automated blood culture at higher bacterial loads (≥0.3 CFU/ml blood), but utilized only half the volume of specimens. Conclusions The blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A can be completed within 9 hours and offers the potential for same-day diagnosis of enteric fever. Using 5 ml blood, it exhibited a

  13. Quantification Bias Caused by Plasmid DNA Conformation in Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Hui; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is the gold standard for the quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences. However, a serious concern has been revealed in a recent report: supercoiled plasmid standards cause significant over-estimation in qPCR quantification. In this study, we investigated the effect of plasmid DNA conformation on the quantification of DNA and the efficiency of qPCR. Our results suggest that plasmid DNA conformation has significant impact on the accuracy of absolute quantification by qPCR. DNA standard curves shifted significantly among plasmid standards with different DNA conformations. Moreover, the choice of DNA measurement method and plasmid DNA conformation may also contribute to the measurement error of DNA standard curves. Due to the multiple effects of plasmid DNA conformation on the accuracy of qPCR, efforts should be made to assure the highest consistency of plasmid standards for qPCR. Thus, we suggest that the conformation, preparation, quantification, purification, handling, and storage of standard plasmid DNA should be described and defined in the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) to assure the reproducibility and accuracy of qPCR absolute quantification. PMID:22194997

  14. Allele-specific analysis of DNA replication origins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bartholdy, Boris; Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna; Lajugie, Julien; Aladjem, Mirit I; Bouhassira, Eric E

    2015-05-19

    The mechanisms that control the location and timing of firing of replication origins are poorly understood. Using a novel functional genomic approach based on the analysis of SNPs and indels in phased human genomes, we observe that replication asynchrony is associated with small cumulative variations in the initiation efficiency of multiple origins between the chromosome homologues, rather than with the activation of dormant origins. Allele-specific measurements demonstrate that the presence of G-quadruplex-forming sequences does not correlate with the efficiency of initiation. Sequence analysis reveals that the origins are highly enriched in sequences with profoundly asymmetric G/C and A/T nucleotide distributions and are almost completely depleted of antiparallel triplex-forming sequences. We therefore propose that although G4-forming sequences are abundant in replication origins, an asymmetry in nucleotide distribution, which increases the propensity of origins to unwind and adopt non-B DNA structure, rather than the ability to form G4, is directly associated with origin activity.

  15. Allele-Specific Methylation Occurs at Genetic Variants Associated with Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, John N.; Raj, Towfique; Fagerness, Jes; Stahl, Eli; Viloria, Fernando T.; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Seddon, Johanna; Daly, Mark; Chess, Andrew; Plenge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesize that the phenomenon of allele-specific methylation (ASM) may underlie the phenotypic effects of multiple variants identified by Genome-Wide Association studies (GWAS). We evaluate ASM in a human population and document its genome-wide patterns in an initial screen at up to 380,678 sites within the genome, or up to 5% of the total genomic CpGs. We show that while substantial inter-individual variation exists, 5% of assessed sites show evidence of ASM in at least six samples; the majority of these events (81%) are under genetic influence. Many of these cis-regulated ASM variants are also eQTLs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes and/or in high linkage-disequilibrium with variants linked to complex disease. Finally, focusing on autoimmune phenotypes, we extend this initial screen to confirm the association of cis-regulated ASM with multiple complex disease-associated variants in an independent population using next-generation bisulfite sequencing. These four variants are implicated in complex phenotypes such as ulcerative colitis and AIDS progression disease (rs10491434), Celiac disease (rs2762051), Crohn's disease, IgA nephropathy and early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (rs713875) and height (rs6569648). Our results suggest cis-regulated ASM may provide a mechanistic link between the non-coding genetic changes and phenotypic variation observed in these diseases and further suggests a route to integrating DNA methylation status with GWAS results. PMID:24911414

  16. Allele-specific deposition of macroH2A1 in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, J H; Kim, J D; Chung, J H; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-01-13

    In the current study, we analyzed the deposition patterns of macroH2A1 at a number of different genomic loci located in X chromosome and autosomes. MacroH2A1 is preferentially deposited at methylated CpG CpG-rich regions located close to promoters. The macroH2A1 deposition patterns at the methylated CpG islands of several imprinted domains, including the Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) of Xist, Peg3, H19/Igf2 Igf2, Gtl2/Dlk1, and Gnas domains, show consistent allele-specificity towards inactive, methylated alleles. The macroH2A1 deposition levels at the ICRs and other Differentially Methylated Regions (DMRs) of these domains are also either higher or comparable to those observed at the inactive X chromosome of female mammals. Overall, our results indicate that besides DNA methylation macroH2A1 is another epigenetic component in the chromatin of ICRs displaying differential association with two parental alleles.

  17. Allele-specific methylation occurs at genetic variants associated with complex disease.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, John N; Raj, Towfique; Fagerness, Jes; Stahl, Eli; Viloria, Fernando T; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Seddon, Johanna; Daly, Mark; Chess, Andrew; Plenge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesize that the phenomenon of allele-specific methylation (ASM) may underlie the phenotypic effects of multiple variants identified by Genome-Wide Association studies (GWAS). We evaluate ASM in a human population and document its genome-wide patterns in an initial screen at up to 380,678 sites within the genome, or up to 5% of the total genomic CpGs. We show that while substantial inter-individual variation exists, 5% of assessed sites show evidence of ASM in at least six samples; the majority of these events (81%) are under genetic influence. Many of these cis-regulated ASM variants are also eQTLs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes and/or in high linkage-disequilibrium with variants linked to complex disease. Finally, focusing on autoimmune phenotypes, we extend this initial screen to confirm the association of cis-regulated ASM with multiple complex disease-associated variants in an independent population using next-generation bisulfite sequencing. These four variants are implicated in complex phenotypes such as ulcerative colitis and AIDS progression disease (rs10491434), Celiac disease (rs2762051), Crohn's disease, IgA nephropathy and early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (rs713875) and height (rs6569648). Our results suggest cis-regulated ASM may provide a mechanistic link between the non-coding genetic changes and phenotypic variation observed in these diseases and further suggests a route to integrating DNA methylation status with GWAS results.

  18. The allele-specific suppressor sup-39 alters use of cryptic splice sites in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Roller, A B; Hoffman, D C; Zahler, A M

    2000-01-01

    Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans sup-39 gene cause allele-specific suppression of the uncoordination defect of unc-73(e936). e936 is a point mutation that changes the canonical G at the 5' end of intron 16 to a U. This mutation activates three splice donors, two of which define introns beginning with the canonical GU. Use of these two cryptic splice sites causes loss of reading frame; interestingly these messages are not substrates for nonsense-mediated decay. The third splice donor, used in 10% of steady-state e936 messages, is the mutated splice donor at the wild-type position, which defines an intron beginning with UU. In the presence of a sup-39 mutation, these same three splice donors are used, but the ratio of messages produced by splicing at these sites changes. The percentage of unc-73(e936) messages containing the wild-type splice junction is increased to 33% with a corresponding increase in the level of UNC-73 protein. This sup-39-induced change was also observed when the e936 mutant intron region was inserted into a heterologous splicing reporter construct transfected into worms. Experiments with splicing reporter constructs showed that the degree of 5' splice site match to the splicing consensus sequence can strongly influence cryptic splice site choice. We propose that mutant SUP-39 is a new type of informational suppressor that alters the use of weak splice donors. PMID:10757761

  19. Assessing allele-specific expression across multiple tissues from RNA-seq read data

    PubMed Central

    Pirinen, Matti; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Zaitlen, Noah A.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Donnelly, Peter; McCarthy, Mark I.; Rivas, Manuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: RNA sequencing enables allele-specific expression (ASE) studies that complement standard genotype expression studies for common variants and, importantly, also allow measuring the regulatory impact of rare variants. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project is collecting RNA-seq data on multiple tissues of a same set of individuals and novel methods are required for the analysis of these data. Results: We present a statistical method to compare different patterns of ASE across tissues and to classify genetic variants according to their impact on the tissue-wide expression profile. We focus on strong ASE effects that we are expecting to see for protein-truncating variants, but our method can also be adjusted for other types of ASE effects. We illustrate the method with a real data example on a tissue-wide expression profile of a variant causal for lipoid proteinosis, and with a simulation study to assess our method more generally. Availability and implementation: http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/~rivas/mamba/. R-sources and data examples http://www.iki.fi/mpirinen/ Contact: matti.pirinen@helsinki.fi or rivas@well.ox.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25819081

  20. Extensive allele-specific translational regulation in hybrid mice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jingyi; Wang, Xi; McShane, Erik; Zauber, Henrik; Sun, Wei; Selbach, Matthias; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Translational regulation is mediated through the interaction between diffusible trans-factors and cis-elements residing within mRNA transcripts. In contrast to extensively studied transcriptional regulation, cis-regulation on translation remains underexplored. Using deep sequencing-based transcriptome and polysome profiling, we globally profiled allele-specific translational efficiency for the first time in an F1 hybrid mouse. Out of 7,156 genes with reliable quantification of both alleles, we found 1,008 (14.1%) exhibiting significant allelic divergence in translational efficiency. Systematic analysis of sequence features of the genes with biased allelic translation revealed that local RNA secondary structure surrounding the start codon and proximal out-of-frame upstream AUGs could affect translational efficiency. Finally, we observed that the cis-effect was quantitatively comparable between transcriptional and translational regulation. Such effects in the two regulatory processes were more frequently compensatory, suggesting that the regulation at the two levels could be coordinated in maintaining robustness of protein expression. PMID:26253569

  1. Allele-specific FKBP5 DNA demethylation mediates gene-childhood trauma interactions.

    PubMed

    Klengel, Torsten; Mehta, Divya; Anacker, Christoph; Rex-Haffner, Monika; Pruessner, Jens C; Pariante, Carmine M; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Mercer, Kristina B; Mayberg, Helen S; Bradley, Bekh; Nemeroff, Charles B; Holsboer, Florian; Heim, Christine M; Ressler, Kerry J; Rein, Theo; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2013-01-01

    Although the fact that genetic predisposition and environmental exposures interact to shape development and function of the human brain and, ultimately, the risk of psychiatric disorders has drawn wide interest, the corresponding molecular mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. We found that a functional polymorphism altering chromatin interaction between the transcription start site and long-range enhancers in the FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5) gene, an important regulator of the stress hormone system, increased the risk of developing stress-related psychiatric disorders in adulthood by allele-specific, childhood trauma-dependent DNA demethylation in functional glucocorticoid response elements of FKBP5. This demethylation was linked to increased stress-dependent gene transcription followed by a long-term dysregulation of the stress hormone system and a global effect on the function of immune cells and brain areas associated with stress regulation. This identification of molecular mechanisms of genotype-directed long-term environmental reactivity will be useful for designing more effective treatment strategies for stress-related disorders. PMID:23201972

  2. A novel quantitative PCR assay for the detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae using the competence regulator gene target comX.

    PubMed

    Habets, Marrit N; Cremers, Amelieke J H; Bos, Martine P; Savelkoul, Paul; Eleveld, Marc J; Meis, Jacques F; Hermans, Peter W M; Melchers, Willem J; de Jonge, Marien I; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for an estimated 1.6 million deaths worldwide every year. While rapid detection and timely treatment with appropriate antibiotics is preferred, this is often difficult due to the amount of time that detection with blood cultures takes. In this study, a novel quantitative PCR assay for the detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae was developed. To identify novel targets, we analysed the pneumococcal genome for unique, repetitive DNA sequences. This approach identified comX, which is conserved and present in duplicate copies in Streptococcus pneumoniae but not in other bacterial species. Comparison with lytA, the current 'gold standard' for detection by quantitative PCR, demonstrated an analytic specificity of 100% for both assays on a panel of 10 pneumococcal and 18 non-pneumococcal isolates, but a reduction of 3.5 quantitation cycle values (± 0.23 sem), resulting in an increased analytical detection rate of comX. We validated our assay on DNA extracted from the serum of 30 bacteraemic patients who were blood culture positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae and 51 serum samples that were culture positive for other bacteria. This resulted in a similar clinical sensitivity between the comX and lytA assays (47%) and in a diagnostic specificity of 98.2 and 100% for the lytA and comX assays, respectively. In conclusion, we have developed a novel quantitative PCR assay with increased analytical sensitivity for the detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae, which may be used to develop a rapid bedside test for the direct detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae in clinical specimens.

  3. Molecular characterization and a multiplex allele-specific PCR method for detection of thiabendazole resistance in Penicillium expansum from apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thiabendazole (TBZ) is commonly used as a postharvest treatment for control of blue mold in apples caused by Penicillium expansum. Different point mutations in the ß-tubulin gene conferring benzimidazole resistance have been reported in plant pathogens, but molecular mechanisms of TBZ resistance in ...

  4. Detection limits of quantitative and digital PCR assays and their influence in presence-absence surveys of environmental DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret; Dorazio, Robert M.; Butterfield, John S.; Meigs-Friend, Gaia; Nico, Leo; Ferrante, Jason

    2016-01-01

    A set of universal guidelines is needed to determine the limit of detection (LOD) in PCR-based analyses of low concentration DNA. In particular, environmental DNA (eDNA) studies require sensitive and reliable methods to detect rare and cryptic species through shed genetic material in environmental samples. Current strategies for assessing detection limits of eDNA are either too stringent or subjective, possibly resulting in biased estimates of species’ presence. Here, a conservative LOD analysis grounded in analytical chemistry is proposed to correct for overestimated DNA concentrations predominantly caused by the concentration plateau, a nonlinear relationship between expected and measured DNA concentrations. We have used statistical criteria to establish formal mathematical models for both quantitative and droplet digital PCR. To assess the method, a new Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) TaqMan assay was developed and tested on both PCR platforms using eDNA in water samples. The LOD adjustment reduced Grass Carp occupancy and detection estimates while increasing uncertainty – indicating that caution needs to be applied to eDNA data without LOD correction. Compared to quantitative PCR, digital PCR had higher occurrence estimates due to increased sensitivity and dilution of inhibitors at low concentrations. Without accurate LOD correction, species occurrence and detection probabilities based on eDNA estimates are prone to a source of bias that cannot be reduced by an increase in sample size or PCR replicates. Other applications also could benefit from a standardized LOD such as GMO food analysis, and forensic and clinical diagnostics.

  5. Rapid, sensitive, and validated method for detection of Salmonella in food by an enrichment broth culture - nested PCR combination assay.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Sunil D; Shashidhar, R; Karani, Manisha; Bandekar, Jayant R

    2008-06-01

    A rapid nested PCR assay for detection of Salmonella from food was developed. The sensitivity of the assay developed was comparable to the traditional culture based methods with an advantage in reduction of assay time. The assay procedure with artificially contaminated samples was able to detect as low as 4CFU Salmonella/25g of food samples (sprout, carrot, cucumber and poultry meat). With two synthetic primers of 26 mer TS11 and 25 mer TS4, a 1.2kb fragment was amplified which served as a template for amplification of final 375bp product using TS11 and TS5 primers. No non-specific amplification from the native microbial flora of food samples was observed. The reaction generates a single band specific to Salmonella which allows the analyst to interpret data at ease and without any confusion. Enriched broth serves as template for the reaction which removes labour intensive DNA isolation procedures. In case of artificially contaminated samples, 6h enriched lactose broth can serve as template. However, for market samples where the organisms are under environmental stress, it is desirable to use template from Rappaport Vasiliadis medium. The assay also employes internal amplification control, which is amplified into a 300bp fragment and thus serves as positive control for the reaction and any possibility of false negative due to inhibitory action of food components on PCR reaction can be ruled out. PMID:18406104

  6. Development of RT-qPCR assays for the specific identification of two major genotypes of avian infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Marandino, Ana; Tomás, Gonzalo; Hernández, Martín; Panzera, Yanina; Craig, María Isabel; Vagnozzi, Ariel; Vera, Federico; Techera, Claudia; Grecco, Sofía; Banda, Alejandro; Hernández, Diego; Pérez, Ruben

    2016-09-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (Gammacoronavirus, Coronaviridae) is a genetically variable RNA virus (27.6kb) that causes one of the most persistent respiratory disease in poultry. The virus is classified in genotypes with different epidemiological relevance and clinical implications. The present study reports the development and validation of specific RT-qPCR assays for the detection of two major IBV genotypes: South America I (SAI) and Asia/South America II (A/SAII). The SAI genotype is an exclusive and widespread South American lineage while the A/SAII genotype is distributed in Asia, Europe and South America. Both identification assays employ TaqMan probes that hybridize with unique sequences in the spike glycoprotein gene. The assays successfully detected all the assessed strains belonging to both genotypes, showing high specificity and absence of cross-reactivity. Using serial dilutions of in vitro-transcribed RNA we obtained acceptable determination coefficients, PCR efficiencies and relatively small intra- and inter-assay variability. The assays demonstrated a wide dynamic range between 10(1)-10(7) and 10(2)-10(7) RNA copies/reaction for SAI and A/SAII strains, respectively. The possibility to characterize a large number of samples in a rapid, sensitive and reproducible way makes these techniques suitable tools for routine testing, IBV control, and epidemiological research in poultry.

  7. Quantitative PCR Assays for Detecting Loach Minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and Spikedace (Meda fulgida) in the Southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Dysthe, Joseph C; Carim, Kellie J; Paroz, Yvette M; McKelvey, Kevin S; Young, Michael K; Schwartz, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Loach minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and spikedace (Meda fulgida) are legally protected with the status of Endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and are endemic to the Gila River basin of Arizona and New Mexico. Efficient and sensitive methods for monitoring these species' distributions are critical for prioritizing conservation efforts. We developed quantitative PCR assays for detecting loach minnow and spikedace DNA in environmental samples. Each assay reliably detected low concentrations of target DNA without detection of non-target species, including other cyprinid fishes with which they co-occur.

  8. Quantitative PCR Assays for Detecting Loach Minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and Spikedace (Meda fulgida) in the Southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Dysthe, Joseph C; Carim, Kellie J; Paroz, Yvette M; McKelvey, Kevin S; Young, Michael K; Schwartz, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Loach minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and spikedace (Meda fulgida) are legally protected with the status of Endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and are endemic to the Gila River basin of Arizona and New Mexico. Efficient and sensitive methods for monitoring these species' distributions are critical for prioritizing conservation efforts. We developed quantitative PCR assays for detecting loach minnow and spikedace DNA in environmental samples. Each assay reliably detected low concentrations of target DNA without detection of non-target species, including other cyprinid fishes with which they co-occur. PMID:27583576

  9. Sensitive and specific nested PCR assay for detection of rotavirus A in samples with a low viral load☆

    PubMed Central

    Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D.; Williams, Alice L.; Bowen, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Techniques such as the real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) can detect RNA in samples with a low viral load. However, these amplicons typically are either too short or at insufficient concentrations for use in subsequent sequencing reactions for genotyping and detection confirmation. The assay developed in this study detects rotavirus G genotypes and P genotypes with viral loads as low as 6.2 and 8.2 copies per reaction, respectively. The assay was validated using a panel of 91 stool samples, 32 reference rotavirus strains, and 6 non-target enteric virus samples. PMID:27421626

  10. Quantitative PCR Assays for Detecting Loach Minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and Spikedace (Meda fulgida) in the Southwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Carim, Kellie J.; Paroz, Yvette M.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Young, Michael K.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Loach minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and spikedace (Meda fulgida) are legally protected with the status of Endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and are endemic to the Gila River basin of Arizona and New Mexico. Efficient and sensitive methods for monitoring these species’ distributions are critical for prioritizing conservation efforts. We developed quantitative PCR assays for detecting loach minnow and spikedace DNA in environmental samples. Each assay reliably detected low concentrations of target DNA without detection of non-target species, including other cyprinid fishes with which they co-occur. PMID:27583576

  11. Sensitive and specific nested PCR assay for detection of rotavirus A in samples with a low viral load.

    PubMed

    Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D; Williams, Alice L; Bowen, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Techniques such as the real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) can detect RNA in samples with a low viral load. However, these amplicons typically are either too short or at insufficient concentrations for use in subsequent sequencing reactions for genotyping and detection confirmation. The assay developed in this study detects rotavirus G genotypes and P genotypes with viral loads as low as 6.2 and 8.2 copies per reaction, respectively. The assay was validated using a panel of 91 stool samples, 32 reference rotavirus strains, and 6 non-target enteric virus samples. PMID:27421626

  12. Quantitative one-step RT-PCR assay for rapid and sensitive identification and titration of polioviruses in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Laassri, Majid; Dipiazza, Anthony; Bidzhieva, Bella; Zagorodnyaya, Tatiana; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2013-04-01

    Rapid identification and quantitation of polioviruses in clinical specimens is important for surveillance and analysis of virus shedding by vaccine recipients, which could be used to assess the level of mucosal immunity. A quantitative one step RT-PCR was developed for identification and titration of all three poliovirus serotypes. The assay could be an alternative to the traditional procedure based on cell culture isolation and subsequent determination of poliovirus serotype and virus titration. The method is based on quantitative PCR performed with reverse transcription reaction in the same tube. The multiplex assay that quantifies all three serotypes of poliovirus was found to be highly specific, sensitive, and takes only one day to complete.

  13. Development of a multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for simultaneous detection of dengue and chikungunya viruses.

    PubMed

    Cecilia, D; Kakade, M; Alagarasu, K; Patil, J; Salunke, A; Parashar, D; Shah, P S

    2015-01-01

    Dengue and chikungunya viruses co-circulate and cause infections that start with similar symptoms but progress to radically different outcomes. Therefore, an early diagnostic test that can differentiate between the two is needed. A single-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay was developed that can simultaneously detect and quantitate RNA of all dengue virus (DENV) serotypes and chikungunya virus (CHIKV). The sensitivity was 100 % for DENV and 95.8 % for CHIKV, whilst the specificity was 100 % for both viruses when compared with conventional RT-PCR. The detection limit ranged from 1 to 50 plaque-forming units. The assay was successfully used for differential diagnosis of dengue and chikungunya in Pune, where the viruses co-circulate.

  14. A highly specific q-RT-PCR assay to address the relevance of the JAK2WT and JAK2V617F expression levels and control genes in Ph-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Fantasia, Francesca; Di Capua, Emma Nora; Cenfra, Natalia; Pessina, Gloria; Mecarocci, Sergio; Rago, Angela; Cotroneo, Ettore; Busanello, Anna; Equitani, Francesco; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Nervi, Clara; Cimino, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    In Ph- myeloproliferative neoplasms, the quantification of the JAK2V617F transcripts may provide some advantages over the DNA allele burden determination. We developed a q-RT-PCR to assess the JAK2WT and JAK2V617F mRNA expression in 105 cases (23 donors, 13 secondary polycythemia, 22 polycythemia vera (PV), 38 essential thrombocythemia (ET), and 9 primary myelofibrosis (PMF)). Compared with the standard allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO)-PCR technique, our assay showed a 100 % concordance rate detecting the JAK2V617F mutation in 22/22 PV (100 %), 29/38 (76.3 %) ET, and 5/9 (55.5 %) PMF cases, respectively. The sensitivity of the assay was 0.01 %. Comparing DNA and RNA samples, we found that the JAK2V617F mutational ratios were significantly higher at the RNA level both in PV (p = 0.005) and ET (p = 0.001) samples. In PV patients, JAK2WT expression levels positively correlated with the platelets (PLTs) (p = 0.003) whereas a trend to negative correlation was observed with the Hb levels (p = 0.051). JAK2V617F-positive cases showed the lowest JAK2WT and ABL1 mRNA expression levels. In all the samples, the expression pattern of beta-glucoronidase (GUSB) was more homogeneous than that of ABL1 or β2 microglobulin (B2M). Using GUSB as normalizator gene, a significant increase of the JAK2V617F mRNA levels was seen in two ET patients at time of progression to PV. In conclusion, the proposed q-RT-PCR is a sensitive and accurate method to quantify the JAK2 mutational status that can also show clinical correlations suggesting the impact of the residual amount of the JAK2WT allele on the Ph- MPN disease phenotype. Our observations also preclude the use of ABL1 as a housekeeping gene for these neoplasms.

  15. Development and validation of a multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay for simultaneous detection of three papaya viruses.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yang, Yong; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2014-10-21

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV), and Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) produce similar symptoms in papaya. Each threatens commercial production of papaya on Hainan Island, China. In this study, a multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay was developed to detect simultaneously these three viruses by screening combinations of mixed primer pairs and optimizing the multiplex RT-PCR reaction conditions. A mixture of three specific primer pairs was used to amplify three distinct fragments of 613 bp from the P3 gene of PRSV, 355 bp from the CP gene of PLDMV, and 205 bp from the CP gene of PapMV, demonstrating the assay's specificity. The sensitivity of the multiplex RT-PCR was evaluated by showing plasmids containing each of the viral target genes with 1.44 × 103, 1.79 × 103, and 1.91 × 102 copies for the three viruses could be detected successfully. The multiplex RT-PCR was applied successfully for detection of three viruses from 341 field samples collected from 18 counties of Hainan Island, China. Rates of single infections were 186/341 (54.5%), 93/341 (27.3%), and 3/341 (0.9%), for PRSV, PLDMV, and PapMV, respectively; 59/341 (17.3%) of the samples were co-infected with PRSV and PLDMV, which is the first time being reported in Hainan Island. This multiplex RT-PCR assay is a simple, rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective method for detecting multiple viruses in papaya and can be used for routine molecular diagnosis and epidemiological studies in papaya.

  16. Multiplex real-time PCR melting curve assay to detect drug-resistant mutations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Tao; Jiang, Lili; Sun, Weiming; Fu, G; Mei, Jian; Gao, Qian

    2011-09-01

    Early diagnosis of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is urgently needed to optimize treatment regimens and to prevent the transmission of resistant strains. Real-time PCR assays have been developed to detect drug resistance rapidly, but none of them have been widely applied due to their complexity, high cost, or requirement for advanced instruments. In this study, we developed a real-time PCR method based on melting curve analysis of dually labeled probes. Six probes targeting the rpoB 81-bp core region, katG315, the inhA promoter, the ahpC promoter, and embB306 were designed and validated with clinical isolates. First, 10 multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains with a wide mutation spectrum were used to analyze the melting temperature (T(m)) deviations of different mutations by single real-time PCR. All mutations can be detected by significant T(m) reductions compared to the wild type. Then, three duplex real-time PCRs, with two probes in each, were developed to detect mutations in 158 MDR isolates. Comparison of the results with the sequencing data showed that all mutations covered by the six probes were detected with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Our method provided a new way to rapidly detect drug-resistant mutations in M. tuberculosis. Compared to other real-time PCR methods, we use fewer probes, which are labeled with the same fluorophore, guaranteeing that this assay can be used for detection in a single fluorescent channel or can be run on single-channel instruments. In conclusion, we have developed a widely applicable real-time PCR assay to detect drug-resistant mutations in M. tuberculosis.

  17. Evaluation of real-time PCR assays and standard curve optimisation for enhanced accuracy in quantification of Campylobacter environmental water isolates.

    PubMed

    Gosselin-Théberge, Maxime; Taboada, Eduardo; Guy, Rebecca A

    2016-10-01

    Campylobacter is a major public health and economic burden in developed and developing countries. This study evaluated published real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for detection of Campylobacter to enable selection of the best assays for quantification of C. spp. and C. jejuni in environmental water samples. A total of 9 assays were compared: three for thermotolerant C. spp. targeting the