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Sample records for alleles conferring resistance

  1. Initial frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis poplar in a field population of Chrysomela tremulae.

    PubMed Central

    Génissel, Anne; Augustin, Sylvie; Courtin, Claudine; Pilate, Gilles; Lorme, Philippe; Bourguet, Denis

    2003-01-01

    Globally, the estimated total area planted with transgenic plants producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins was 12 million hectares in 2001. The risk of target pests becoming resistant to these toxins has led to the implementation of resistance-management strategies. The efficiency and sustainability of these strategies, including the high-dose plus refuge strategy currently recommended for North American maize, depend on the initial frequency of resistance alleles. In this study, we estimated the initial frequencies of alleles conferring resistance to transgenic Bt poplars producing Cry3A in a natural population of the poplar pest Chrysomela tremulae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). We used the F(2) screen method developed for detecting resistance alleles in natural pest populations. At least three parents of the 270 lines tested were heterozygous for a major Bt resistance allele. We estimated mean resistance-allele frequency for the period 1999-2001 at 0.0037 (95% confidence interval = 0.00045-0.0080) with a detection probability of 90%. These results demonstrate that (i) the F(2) screen method can be used to detect major alleles conferring resistance to Bt-producing plants in insects and (ii) the initial frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Bt toxin can be close to the highest theoretical values that are expected prior to the use of Bt plants if considering fitness costs and typical mutation rates. PMID:12737656

  2. Frequency of alleles conferring resistance to the Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in Australian populations of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Mahon, R J; Olsen, K M; Downes, S; Addison, S

    2007-12-01

    Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is an important lepidopteran pest of cotton (Gossypium spp.) in Australia and the Old World. From 2002, F2 screens were used to examine the frequency of resistance alleles in Australian populations of H. armigera to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) CrylAc and Cry2Ab, the two insecticidal proteins present in the transgenic cotton Bollgard II. At that time, Ingard (expressing Cry1Ac) cotton had been grown in Australia for seven seasons, and Bollgard II was about to be commercially released. The principal objective of our study was to determine whether sustained exposure caused an elevated frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac in a species with a track record of evolving resistance to conventional insecticides. No major alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac were found. The frequency of resistance alleles for Cry1Ac was <0.0003, with a 95% credibility interval between 0 and 0.0009. In contrast, alleles conferring resistance to Cry2Ab were found at a frequency of 0.0033 (0.0017, 0.0055). The first isolation of this allele was found before the widespread deployment of Bollgard II. For both toxins the experiment-wise detection probability was 94.4%. Our results suggest that alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac are rare and that a relatively high baseline frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Cry2Ab existed before the introduction of Bt cotton containing this toxin. PMID:18232402

  3. Geographical Gradient of the eIF4E Alleles Conferring Resistance to Potyviruses in Pea (Pisum) Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Konečná, Eva; Šafářová, Dana; Navrátil, Milan; Hanáček, Pavel; Coyne, Clarice; Flavell, Andrew; Vishnyakova, Margarita; Ambrose, Mike; Redden, Robert; Smýkal, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Background The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E was shown to be involved in resistance against several potyviruses in plants, including pea. We combined our knowledge of pea germplasm diversity with that of the eIF4E gene to identify novel genetic diversity. Methodology/Principal findings Germplasm of 2803 pea accessions was screened for eIF4E intron 3 length polymorphism, resulting in the detection of four eIF4EA-B-C-S variants, whose distribution was geographically structured. The eIF4EA variant conferring resistance to the P1 PSbMV pathotype was found in 53 accessions (1.9%), of which 15 were landraces from India, Afghanistan, Nepal, and 7 were from Ethiopia. A newly discovered variant, eIF4EB, was present in 328 accessions (11.7%) from Ethiopia (29%), Afghanistan (23%), India (20%), Israel (25%) and China (39%). The eIF4EC variant was detected in 91 accessions (3.2% of total) from India (20%), Afghanistan (33%), the Iberian Peninsula (22%) and the Balkans (9.3%). The eIF4ES variant for susceptibility predominated as the wild type. Sequencing of 73 samples, identified 34 alleles at the whole gene, 26 at cDNA and 19 protein variants, respectively. Fifteen alleles were virologically tested and 9 alleles (eIF4EA-1-2-3-4-5-6-7, eIF4EB-1, eIF4EC-2) conferred resistance to the P1 PSbMV pathotype. Conclusions/Significance This work identified novel eIF4E alleles within geographically structured pea germplasm and indicated their independent evolution from the susceptible eIF4ES1 allele. Despite high variation present in wild Pisum accessions, none of them possessed resistance alleles, supporting a hypothesis of distinct mode of evolution of resistance in wild as opposed to crop species. The Highlands of Central Asia, the northern regions of the Indian subcontinent, Eastern Africa and China were identified as important centers of pea diversity that correspond with the diversity of the pathogen. The series of alleles identified in this study provides the basis

  4. Detection of an allele conferring resistance to Bacillus sphaericus binary toxin in Culex quinquefasciatus populations by molecular screening.

    PubMed

    Chalegre, Karlos Diogo de Melo; Romão, Tatiany Patrícia; Amorim, Liliane Barbosa; Anastacio, Daniela Bandeira; de Barros, Rosineide Arruda; de Oliveira, Cláudia Maria Fontes; Regis, Lêda; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo Pompílio; Silva-Filha, Maria Helena Neves Lobo

    2009-02-01

    The activity of the Bacillus sphaericus binary (Bin) toxin on Culex quinquefasciatus larvae depends on its specific binding to the Cqm1 receptor, a midgut membrane-bound alpha-glucosidase. A 19-nucleotide deletion in the cqm1 gene (cqm1(REC)) mediates high-level resistance to Bin toxin. Here, resistance in nontreated and B. sphaericus-treated field populations of C. quinquefasciatus was assessed through bioassays as well as a specific PCR assay designed to detect the cqm1(REC) allele in individual larvae. Resistance ratios at 90% lethal concentration, gathered through bioassays, were close to 1 and indicate that the selected populations had similar levels of susceptibility to B. sphaericus, comparable to that of a laboratory colony. A diagnostic PCR assay detected the cqm1(REC) allele in all populations investigated, and its frequency in two nontreated areas was 0.006 and 0.003, while the frequency in the B. sphaericus-treated population was significantly higher. Values of 0.053 and 0.055 were detected for two distinct sets of samples, and homozygote resistant larvae were found. Evaluation of Cqm1 expression in individual larvae through alpha-glucosidase assays corroborated the allelic frequency revealed by PCR. The data from this study indicate that the cqm1(REC) allele was present at a detectable frequency in nontreated populations, while the higher frequency in samples from the treated area is, perhaps, correlated with the exposure to B. sphaericus. This is the first report of the molecular detection of a biolarvicide resistance allele in mosquito populations, and it confirms that the PCR-based approach is suitable to track such alleles in target populations. PMID:19098223

  5. Characterization of a New Pm2 Allele Conferring Powdery Mildew Resistance in the Wheat Germplasm Line FG-1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Pengtao; Xu, Hongxng; Li, Lihui; Zhang, Hongxia; Han, Guohao; Xu, Yunfeng; Fu, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Xiaotian; An, Diaoguo

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew has a negative impact on wheat production. Novel host resistance increases the diversity of resistance genes and helps to control the disease. In this study, wheat line FG-1 imported from France showed a high level of powdery mildew resistance at both the seedling and adult stages. An F2 population and F2:3 families from the cross FG-1 × Mingxian 169 both fit Mendelian ratios for a single dominant resistance gene when tested against multiple avirulent Blumeria tritici f. sp. tritici (Bgt) races. This gene was temporarily designated PmFG. PmFG was mapped on the multi-allelic Pm2 locus of chromosome 5DS using seven SSR, 10 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-derived and two SCAR markers with the flanking markers Xbwm21/Xcfd81/Xscar112 (distal) and Xbwm25 (proximal) at 0.3 and 0.5 cM being the closest. Marker SCAR203 co-segregated with PmFG. Allelism tests between PmFG and documented Pm2 alleles confirmed that PmFG was allelic with Pm2. Line FG-1 produced a significantly different reaction pattern compared to other lines with genes at or near Pm2 when tested against 49 Bgt isolates. The PmFG-linked marker alleles detected by the SNP-derived markers revealed significant variation between FG-1 and other lines with genes at or near Pm2. It was concluded that PmFG is a new allele at the Pm2 locus. Data from seven closely linked markers tested on 31 wheat cultivars indicated opportunities for marker-assisted pyramiding of this gene with other genes for powdery mildew resistance and additional traits. PMID:27200022

  6. Frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Bt maize in French and US corn belt populations of the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis.

    PubMed

    Bourguet, D; Chaufaux, J; Séguin, M; Buisson, C; Hinton, J L; Stodola, T J; Porter, P; Cronholm, G; Buschman, L L; Andow, D A

    2003-05-01

    Farmers, industry, governments and environmental groups agree that it would be useful to manage transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins to delay the evolution of resistance in target pests. The main strategy proposed for delaying resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) toxins in transgenic crops is the high-dose/refuge strategy. This strategy is based on the unverified assumption that resistance alleles are initially rare (<10(-3)). We used an F(2) screen on >1,200 isofemale lines of Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) collected in France and the US corn belt during 1999-2001. In none of the isofemale lines did we detect alleles conferring resistance to Bt maize producing the Cry1Ab toxin. A Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the frequency of resistance alleles in France was <9.20 x 10(-4) with 95% probability, and a detection probability of >80%. In the northern US corn belt, the frequency of resistance to Bt maize was <4.23 x 10(-4) with 95% probability, and a detection probability of >90%. Only 95 lines have been screened from the southern US corn belt, so these data are still inconclusive. These results suggest that resistance is probably rare enough in France and the northern US corn belt for the high-dose plus refuge strategy to delay resistance to Bt maize. PMID:12748773

  7. Discovery of a Novel er1 Allele Conferring Powdery Mildew Resistance in Chinese Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Landraces

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Suli; Fu, Haining; Wang, Zhongyi; Duan, Canxing; Zong, Xuxiao; Zhu, Zhendong

    2016-01-01

    Pea powdery mildew, caused by Erysiphe pisi D.C., is an important disease worldwide. Deployment of resistant varieties is the main way to control this disease. This study aimed to screen Chinese pea (Pisum sativum L.) landraces resistant to E. pisi, and to characterize the resistance gene(s) at the er1 locus in the resistant landraces, and to develop functional marker(s) specific to the novel er1 allele. The 322 landraces showed different resistance levels. Among them, 12 (3.73%), 4 (1.24%) and 17 (5.28%) landraces showed immunity, high resistance and resistance to E. pisi, respectively. The other landraces appeared susceptible or highly susceptible to E. pisi. Most of the immune and highly resistant landraces were collected from Yunnan province. To characterize the resistance gene at the er1 locus, cDNA sequences of PsMLO1 gene were determined in 12 immune and four highly resistant accessions. The cDNAs of PsMLO1 from the immune landrace G0005576 produced three distinct transcripts, characterized by a 129-bp deletion, and 155-bp and 220-bp insertions, which were consistent with those of er1-2 allele. The PsMLO1 cDNAs in the other 15 resistant landraces produced identical transcripts, which had a new point mutation (T→C) at position 1121 of PsMLO1, indicating a novel er1 allele, designated as er1-6. This mutation caused a leucine to proline change in the amino acid sequence. Subsequently, the resistance allele er1-6 in landrace G0001778 was confirmed by resistance inheritance analysis and genetic mapping on the region of the er1 locus using populations derived from G0001778 × Bawan 6. Finally, a functional marker specific to er1-6, SNP1121, was developed using the high-resolution melting technique, which could be used in pea breeding via marker-assisted selection. The results described here provide valuable genetic information for Chinese pea landraces and a powerful tool for pea breeders. PMID:26809053

  8. Systematic review of allelic exchange experiments aimed at identifying mutations that confer drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nebenzahl-Guimaraes, Hanna; Jacobson, Karen R.; Farhat, Maha R.; Murray, Megan B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Improving our understanding of the relationship between the genotype and the drug resistance phenotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis will aid the development of more accurate molecular diagnostics for drug-resistant tuberculosis. Studies that use direct genetic manipulation to identify the mutations that cause M. tuberculosis drug resistance are superior to associational studies in elucidating an individual mutation's contribution to the drug resistance phenotype. Methods We systematically reviewed the literature for publications reporting allelic exchange experiments in any of the resistance-associated M. tuberculosis genes. We included studies that introduced single point mutations using specialized linkage transduction or site-directed/in vitro mutagenesis and documented a change in the resistance phenotype. Results We summarize evidence supporting the causal relationship of 54 different mutations in eight genes (katG, inhA, kasA, embB, embC, rpoB, gyrA and gyrB) and one intergenic region (furA-katG) with resistance to isoniazid, the rifamycins, ethambutol and fluoroquinolones. We observed a significant role for the strain genomic background in modulating the resistance phenotype of 21 of these mutations and found examples of where the same drug resistance mutations caused varying levels of resistance to different members of the same drug class. Conclusions This systematic review highlights those mutations that have been shown to causally change phenotypic resistance in M. tuberculosis and brings attention to a notable lack of allelic exchange data for several of the genes known to be associated with drug resistance. PMID:24055765

  9. Prevalent HLA Class II Alleles in Mexico City Appear to Confer Resistance to the Development of Amebic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Eric G.; Granados, Julio; Partida-Rodríguez, Oswaldo; Valenzuela, Olivia; Rascón, Edgar; Magaña, Ulises; Escamilla-Tilch, Mónica; López-Reyes, Alberto; Nieves-Ramírez, Miriam; González, Enrique; Morán, Patricia; Rojas, Liliana; Valadez, Alicia; Luna, Alexandra; Estrada, Francisco J.; Maldonado, Carmen; Ximénez, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Amebiasis is an endemic disease and a public health problem throughout Mexico, although the incidence rates of amebic liver abscess (ALA) vary among the geographic regions of the country. Notably, incidence rates are high in the northwestern states (especially Sonora with a rate of 12.57/100,000 inhabitants) compared with the central region (Mexico City with a rate of 0.69/100,000 inhabitants). These data may be related to host genetic factors that are partially responsible for resistance or susceptibility. Therefore, we studied the association of the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles with resistance or susceptibility to ALA in two Mexican populations, one each from Mexico City and Sonora. Ninety ALA patients were clinically diagnosed by serology and sonography. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. To establish the genetic identity of both populations, 15 short tandem repeats (STRs) were analyzed with multiplexed PCR, and the allelic frequencies of HLA were studied by PCR-SSO using LUMINEX technology. The allele frequencies obtained were compared to an ethnically matched healthy control group (146 individuals). We observed that both affected populations differed genetically from the control group. We also found interesting trends in the population from Mexico City. HLA-DQB1*02 allele frequencies were higher in ALA patients compared to the control group (0.127 vs 0.047; p= 0.01; pc= NS; OR= 2.9, 95% CI= 1.09-8.3). The less frequent alleles in ALA patients were HLA-DRB1*08 (0.118 vs 0.238 in controls; p= 0.01; pc= NS; OR= 0.42, 95% CI= 0.19-0.87) and HLA-DQB1*04 (0.109 vs 0.214; p= 0.02; pc= NS; OR= 0.40, 95% CI= 0.20-0.94). The haplotype HLA-DRB1*08/-DQB1*04 also demonstrated a protective trend against the development of this disease (0.081 vs. 0.178; p=0.02; pc=NS; OR= 0.40, 95% CI= 0.16-0.93). These trends suggest that the prevalent alleles in the population of Mexico City may be associated with protection against the development of ALA

  10. Identification of Stmm3 locus Conferring Resistance to Late-stage Chemically Induced Skin Papillomas on Mouse Chromosome 4 by Congenic Mappingand Allele-specific Alteration Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Megumi; Okumura, Kazuhiro; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Kominami, Ryo; Wakabayashi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed that many low-penetrance cancer susceptibility loci are located throughout the genome; however, a very limited number of genes have been identified so far. Using a forward genetics approach to map such loci in a mouse skin cancer model, we previously identified strong genetic loci conferring resistance to chemically induced skin papillomas on chromosome 4 and 7 with a large number of [(FVB/N × MSM/Ms) F1 × FVB/N] backcross mice. In this report, we describe a combination of congenic mapping and allele-specific alteration analysis of the loci on chromosome 4. We used linkage analysis and a congenic mouse strain, FVB.MSM-Stmm3 to refine the location of Stmm3 (Skin tumor modifier of MSM 3) locus within a physical interval of about 34 Mb on distal chromosome 4. In addition, we used patterns of allele-specific imbalances in tumors from N2 and N10 congenic mice to narrow down further the region of Stmm3 locus to a physical distance of about 25 Mb. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis showed papillomas from congenic mice had less proliferative activity. These results suggest that Stmm3 responsible genes may have an influence on papilloma formation in the two-stage skin carcinogenesis by regulating papilloma growth rather than development. PMID:25077764

  11. Frequency of alleles conferring resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in Australian populations of Helicoverpa punctigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from 2002 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Downes, S; Parker, T L; Mahon, R J

    2009-04-01

    Helicoverpa punctigera and Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) are important pests of field and horticultural crops in Australia. The former is endemic to the continent, whereas the latter is also distributed in Africa and Asia. Although H. armigera rapidly developed resistance to virtually every group of insecticide used against it, there is only one report of resistance to an insecticide in H. punctigera. In 1996 the Australian cotton industry adopted Ingard, which expresses the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin gene cry1Ac. In 2004/2005, Bollgard II (which expresses Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab) replaced Ingard and has subsequently been grown on 80% of the area planted to cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. From 2002/2003 to 2006/2007, F2 screens were used to detect resistance to Cry1Ac or Cry2Ab. We detected no alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac; the frequency was < 0.0005 (n = 2,180 alleles), with a 95% credibility interval between 0 and 0.0014. However, during the same period, we detected alleles that confer resistance to Cry2Ab at a frequency of 0.0018 (n = 2,192 alleles), with a 95% credibility interval between 0.0005 and 0.0040. For both toxins, the experiment-wise detection probability was 94%, i.e., if there actually was a resistance allele in any tested lines, we would have detected it 94% of the time. The first isolation of Cry2Ab resistance in H. punctigera was before the widespread deployment of Bollgard II. This finding supports our published notion for H. armigera that alleles conferring resistance to Cry2Ab may be present at detectable frequencies in populations before selection by transgenic crops. PMID:19449655

  12. Geographical gradient of the eIF4E alleles conferring resistance to potyviruses in pea (Pisum sp.) germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E was shown to be involved in natural resistance against several potyviruses in plants. In this study we have combined our knowledge of pea germplasm diversity with that of the eIF4E gene for virus resistance and screened 2803 accessions with known geogr...

  13. Development of secondary mutations in wild-type and mutant EZH2 alleles cooperates to confer resistance to EZH2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gibaja, V; Shen, F; Harari, J; Korn, J; Ruddy, D; Saenz-Vash, V; Zhai, H; Rejtar, T; Paris, C G; Yu, Z; Lira, M; King, D; Qi, W; Keen, N; Hassan, A Q; Chan, H M

    2016-02-01

    The histone methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) is frequently dysregulated in cancers, and gain-of-function (GOF) EZH2 mutations have been identified in non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Small-molecule inhibitors against EZH2 demonstrated anti-tumor activity in EZH2-mutated lymphomas and entered clinical trials. Here, we developed models of acquired resistance to EZH2 inhibitor EI1 with EZH2-mutated lymphoma cells. Resistance was generated by secondary mutations in both wild-type (WT) and GOF Y641N EZH2 alleles. These EZH2 mutants retained the substrate specificity of their predecessor complexes but became refractory to biochemical inhibition by EZH2 inhibitors. Resistant cells were able to maintain a high level of H3K27Me3 in the presence of inhibitors. Interestingly, mutation of EZH2 WT alone generated an intermediate resistance phenotype, which is consistent with a previously proposed model of cooperation between EZH2 WT and Y641N mutants to promote tumorigenesis. In addition, the findings presented here have implications for the clinical translation of EZH2 inhibitors and underscore the need to develop novel EZH2 inhibitors to target potential resistance emerging in clinical settings. PMID:25893294

  14. Mapping and Confirmation of a New Allele at Rpp1 from Soybean PI 504538A Conferring RB Lesion Type Resistance to Soybean Rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd., is a destructive soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] disease and identification of new resistance genes is essential for effective, long-term rust management. Our research objectives were to map and confirm the location of resistance gene(s) in ...

  15. Identification of alleles conferring resistance to gray leaf spot in maize derived from its wild progenitor species teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gray Leaf Spot [(GLS), causal agent Cercospora zeae-maydis and Cercospora zeina] is an important maize disease in the United States. Current control methods for GLS include using resistant cultivars, crop rotation, chemical applications, and conventional tillage to reduce inoculum levels. Teosinte ...

  16. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2015-10-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs.

  17. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2015-01-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs. PMID:26498172

  18. Alarmingly High Segregation Frequencies of Quinolone Resistance Alleles within Human and Animal Microbiomes Are Not Explained by Direct Clinical Antibiotic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Field, Wesley; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance poses a major threat to human health. It is therefore important to characterize the frequency of resistance within natural bacterial environments. Many studies have focused on characterizing the frequencies with which horizontally acquired resistance genes segregate within natural bacterial populations. Yet, very little is currently understood regarding the frequency of segregation of resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics. We surveyed a large number of metagenomic datasets extracted from a large variety of host-associated and non host-associated environments for such alleles conferring resistance to three groups of broad spectrum antibiotics: streptomycin, rifamycins, and quinolones. We find notable segregation frequencies of resistance alleles occurring within the target genes of each of the three antibiotics, with quinolone resistance alleles being the most frequent and rifamycin resistance alleles being the least frequent. Resistance allele frequencies varied greatly between different phyla and as a function of environment. The frequency of quinolone resistance alleles was especially high within host-associated environments, where it averaged an alarming ∼40%. Within host-associated environments, resistance to quinolones was most often conferred by a specific resistance allele. High frequencies of quinolone resistance alleles were also found within hosts that were not directly treated with antibiotics. Therefore, the high segregation frequency of quinolone resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics in host-associated environments does not seem to be the sole result of clinical antibiotic usage. PMID:26019163

  19. Host mating system and the spread of a disease-resistant allele in a population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Koslow, Jennifer M.; Jiang, J.; Ruan, S.

    2008-01-01

    The model presented here modifies a susceptible-infected (SI) host-pathogen model to determine the influence of mating system on the outcome of a host-pathogen interaction. Both deterministic and stochastic (individual-based) versions of the model were used. This model considers the potential consequences of varying mating systems on the rate of spread of both the pathogen and resistance alleles within the population. We assumed that a single allele for disease resistance was sufficient to confer complete resistance in an individual, and that both homozygote and heterozygote resistant individuals had the same mean birth and death rates. When disease invaded a population with only an initial small fraction of resistant genes, inbreeding (selfing) tended to increase the probability that the disease would soon be eliminated from a small population rather than become endemic, while outcrossing greatly increased the probability that the population would become extinct due to the disease.

  20. Temperature Sensitivity Conferred by ligA Alleles from Psychrophilic Bacteria upon Substitution in Mesophilic Bacteria and a Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Pankowski, Jarosław A.; Puckett, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    We have assembled a collection of 13 psychrophilic ligA alleles that can serve as genetic elements for engineering mesophiles to a temperature-sensitive (TS) phenotype. When these ligA alleles were substituted into Francisella novicida, they conferred a TS phenotype with restrictive temperatures between 33 and 39°C. When the F. novicida ligA hybrid strains were plated above their restrictive temperatures, eight of them generated temperature-resistant variants. For two alleles, the mutations that led to temperature resistance clustered near the 5′ end of the gene, and the mutations increased the predicted strength of the ribosome binding site at least 3-fold. Four F. novicida ligA hybrid strains generated no temperature-resistant variants at a detectable level. These results suggest that multiple mutations are needed to create temperature-resistant variants of these ligA gene products. One ligA allele was isolated from a Colwellia species that has a maximal growth temperature of 12°C, and this allele supported growth of F. novicida only as a hybrid between the psychrophilic and the F. novicida ligA genes. However, the full psychrophilic gene alone supported the growth of Salmonella enterica, imparting a restrictive temperature of 27°C. We also tested two ligA alleles from two Pseudoalteromonas strains for their ability to support the viability of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that lacked its essential gene, CDC9, encoding an ATP-dependent DNA ligase. In both cases, the psychrophilic bacterial alleles supported yeast viability and their expression generated TS phenotypes. This collection of ligA alleles should be useful in engineering bacteria, and possibly eukaryotic microbes, to predictable TS phenotypes. PMID:26773080

  1. Temperature Sensitivity Conferred by ligA Alleles from Psychrophilic Bacteria upon Substitution in Mesophilic Bacteria and a Yeast Species.

    PubMed

    Pankowski, Jarosław A; Puckett, Stephanie M; Nano, Francis E

    2016-01-01

    We have assembled a collection of 13 psychrophilic ligA alleles that can serve as genetic elements for engineering mesophiles to a temperature-sensitive (TS) phenotype. When these ligA alleles were substituted into Francisella novicida, they conferred a TS phenotype with restrictive temperatures between 33 and 39°C. When the F. novicida ligA hybrid strains were plated above their restrictive temperatures, eight of them generated temperature-resistant variants. For two alleles, the mutations that led to temperature resistance clustered near the 5' end of the gene, and the mutations increased the predicted strength of the ribosome binding site at least 3-fold. Four F. novicida ligA hybrid strains generated no temperature-resistant variants at a detectable level. These results suggest that multiple mutations are needed to create temperature-resistant variants of these ligA gene products. One ligA allele was isolated from a Colwellia species that has a maximal growth temperature of 12°C, and this allele supported growth of F. novicida only as a hybrid between the psychrophilic and the F. novicida ligA genes. However, the full psychrophilic gene alone supported the growth of Salmonella enterica, imparting a restrictive temperature of 27°C. We also tested two ligA alleles from two Pseudoalteromonas strains for their ability to support the viability of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that lacked its essential gene, CDC9, encoding an ATP-dependent DNA ligase. In both cases, the psychrophilic bacterial alleles supported yeast viability and their expression generated TS phenotypes. This collection of ligA alleles should be useful in engineering bacteria, and possibly eukaryotic microbes, to predictable TS phenotypes. PMID:26773080

  2. Frequency of Bt resistance alleles in H. armigera during 2006-2008 in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yulin; Wu, Kongming; Gould, Fred

    2009-08-01

    Helicoverpa armigera is an important lepidopteran pest of cotton in China. From 2002, the frequency of Bt resistance alleles and quantitative shifts in larval Cry1Ac tolerance of field H. armigera population were monitored using bioassays of F(1) and F(2) offspring of isofemale lines from Xiajin County of Shandong Province (an intensive Bt cotton planting area) and Anci County of Hebei Province (a multiple-crop system including corn, soybean, peanut, and Bt cotton) in northern China. During 2006-2008, a total of 2,306 isofemale lines from the Xiajin population and a total of 1,270 isofemale lines from the Anci population were successfully screened on Cry1Ac diets. For each year, it was estimated that the major resistance gene frequency in Xiajin population in 2006, 2007, and 2008 was 0, 0.00022, and 0.00033, respectively. No major alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac were found in the Anci population; the frequency of resistance alleles for Cry1Ac was 0. Based on the relative average development rates (RADRs) of H. armigera larvae in F(1) tests, no substantial increase in Cry1Ac tolerance was found in either location over the 3-yr period. There were also significantly positive correlations between RADR of lines in the F(1) generation and the RADR of their F(2) offspring, indicating genetic variation in response to toxin. The low frequency of resistance alleles found in this study and in our previous results from 2002 to 2005 suggest the frequency of resistance alleles has remained low and that natural refugia resistance management strategy maybe effective for delaying resistance evolution in H. armigera to Bt cotton in northern China. PMID:19689916

  3. Geographically Distinct and Domain-Specific Sequence Variations in the Alleles of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pib

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M.; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, which is the most destructive fungal pathogen affecting rice growing regions worldwide. The rice blast resistance gene Pib confers broad-spectrum resistance against Southeast Asian M. oryzae races. We investigated the allelic diversity of Pib in rice germplasm originating from 12 major rice growing countries. Twenty-five new Pib alleles were identified that have unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions and/or deletions, in addition to the polymorphic nucleotides that are shared between the different alleles. These partially or completely shared polymorphic nucleotides indicate frequent sequence exchange events between the Pib alleles. In some of the new Pib alleles, nucleotide diversity is high in the LRR domain, whereas, in others it is distributed among the NB-ARC and LRR domains. Most of the polymorphic amino acids in LRR and NB-ARC2 domains are predicted as solvent-exposed. Several of the alleles and the unique SNPs are country specific, suggesting a diversifying selection of alleles in various geographical locations in response to the locally prevalent M. oryzae population. Together, the new Pib alleles are an important genetic resource for rice blast resistance breeding programs and provide new information on rice-M. oryzae interactions at the molecular level. PMID:27446145

  4. Natural Variation in the Pto Pathogen Resistance Gene Within Species of Wild Tomato (Lycopersicon). I. Functional Analysis of Pto Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Laura E.; Langley, Charles H.; Bernal, Adriana J.; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2005-01-01

    Disease resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) in the cultivated tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum, and the closely related L. pimpinellifolium is triggered by the physical interaction between plant disease resistance protein, Pto, and the pathogen avirulence protein, AvrPto. To investigate the extent to which variation in the Pto gene is responsible for naturally occurring variation in resistance to Pst, we determined the resistance phenotype of 51 accessions from seven species of Lycopersicon to isogenic strains of Pst differing in the presence of avrPto. One-third of the plants displayed resistance specifically when the pathogen expressed AvrPto, consistent with a gene-for-gene interaction. To test whether this resistance in these species was conferred specifically by the Pto gene, alleles of Pto were amplified and sequenced from 49 individuals and a subset (16) of these alleles was tested in planta using Agrobacterium-mediated transient assays. Eleven alleles conferred a hypersensitive resistance response (HR) in the presence of AvrPto, while 5 did not. Ten amino acid substitutions associated with the absence of AvrPto recognition and HR were identified, none of which had been identified in previous structure-function studies. Additionally, 3 alleles encoding putative pseudogenes of Pto were isolated from two species of Lycopersicon. Therefore, a large proportion, but not all, of the natural variation in the reaction to strains of Pst expressing AvrPto can be attributed to sequence variation in the Pto gene. PMID:15944360

  5. Parallel Mapping of Antibiotic Resistance Alleles in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Pooneh; Knight, Rob; Gill, Ryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical genomics expands our understanding of microbial tolerance to inhibitory chemicals, but its scope is often limited by the throughput of genome-scale library construction and genotype-phenotype mapping. Here we report a method for rapid, parallel, and deep characterization of the response to antibiotics in Escherichia coli using a barcoded genome-scale library, next-generation sequencing, and streamlined bioinformatics software. The method provides quantitative growth data (over 200,000 measurements) and identifies contributing antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility alleles. Using multivariate analysis, we also find that subtle differences in the population responses resonate across multiple levels of functional hierarchy. Finally, we use machine learning to identify a unique allelic and proteomic fingerprint for each antibiotic. The method can be broadly applied to tolerance for any chemical from toxic metabolites to next-generation biofuels and antibiotics. PMID:26771672

  6. Frequency of Cry1F Non-Recessive Resistance Alleles in North Carolina Field Populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Guoping; Reisig, Dominic; Miao, Jin; Gould, Fred; Huang, Fangneng; Feng, Hongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a target species of transgenic corn (Zea mays L.) that expresses single and pyramided Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin. In 2014, S. frugiperda were collected from a light trap in North Carolina, and a total of 212 F1/F2 isofemale lines of S. frugiperda were screened for resistance to Bt and non-Bt corn. All of the 212 isolines were susceptible to corn tissue expressing Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, Cry1F + Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, and Cry1F + Cry1Ab + Vip3Aa20. Growth rate bioassays were performed to isolate non-recessive Bt resistance alleles. Seven individuals out of the 212 isofemale lines carried major non-recessive alleles conferring resistance to Cry1F. A pooled colony was created from the seven individuals. This colony was 151.21 times more resistant to Cry1F than a known-susceptible population and was also resistant to Cry1A.105, but was not resistant to Cry2Ab and Vip3Aa20. The results demonstrate that field populations of S. frugiperda collected from North Carolina are generally susceptible to Cry1F, but that some individuals carry resistant alleles. The data generated in this study can be used as baseline data for resistance monitoring. PMID:27119741

  7. Frequency of Cry1F Non-Recessive Resistance Alleles in North Carolina Field Populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoping; Reisig, Dominic; Miao, Jin; Gould, Fred; Huang, Fangneng; Feng, Hongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a target species of transgenic corn (Zea mays L.) that expresses single and pyramided Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin. In 2014, S. frugiperda were collected from a light trap in North Carolina, and a total of 212 F1/F2 isofemale lines of S. frugiperda were screened for resistance to Bt and non-Bt corn. All of the 212 isolines were susceptible to corn tissue expressing Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, Cry1F + Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, and Cry1F + Cry1Ab + Vip3Aa20. Growth rate bioassays were performed to isolate non-recessive Bt resistance alleles. Seven individuals out of the 212 isofemale lines carried major non-recessive alleles conferring resistance to Cry1F. A pooled colony was created from the seven individuals. This colony was 151.21 times more resistant to Cry1F than a known-susceptible population and was also resistant to Cry1A.105, but was not resistant to Cry2Ab and Vip3Aa20. The results demonstrate that field populations of S. frugiperda collected from North Carolina are generally susceptible to Cry1F, but that some individuals carry resistant alleles. The data generated in this study can be used as baseline data for resistance monitoring. PMID:27119741

  8. Specific HLA-DQB and HLA-DRB1 alleles confer susceptibility to pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, S J; Freidmann, A; Steinman, L; Brautbar, C; Erlich, H A

    1989-01-01

    The autoimmune dermatologic disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is associated with the serotypes HLA-DR4 and HLA-DRw6. Based on nucleotide sequence and oligonucleotide probe analysis of enzymatically amplified DNA encoding HLA-DR beta chain (HLA-DRB) and HLA-DQ beta chain (HLA-DQB; henceforth HLA is omitted from designations), we showed previously that the DR4 susceptibility was associated with the Dw10 DRB1 allele [encoding the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC)-defined Dw10 specificity]. The DRw6 susceptibility similarly was shown to be associated with a rare DQB allele (DQB1.3), which differed from another nonsusceptible allele by only a valine-to-aspartic acid substitution at position 57. Given the linkage disequilibrium that characterizes HLA haplotypes, it is difficult to assign disease susceptibility to a specific locus rather than to a closely linked gene(s) on the same haplotype. To address this problem, we have analyzed all of the polymorphic loci of the class II HLA region (DRB1, DRB3, DQA, DQB, and DPB) on the DRw6 haplotypes in patients and controls. In 22 PV patients, 4 different DRw6 haplotypes were found that encode the same DQ beta chain (DQB1.3) but contained silent nucleotide differences at the DQB locus as well as coding sequence differences in the DQA and DRB loci. These results, obtained by using a method for allele-specific polymerase chain reaction amplification, strongly support the hypothesis that the allele DQB1.3 confers susceptibility. This DQB allele is correlated with the MLC-defined Dw9 specificity and is associated with two different DRB1 alleles (the common "6A" associated with DRw13 and the rare "6B" associated with DRw14). Since 86% (19 of 22) of DRw6+ patients contain the DQB1.3 allele (vs. 3% of controls), whereas 64% (14 of 22) contain the DRB1 allele 6B (vs. 6% of the controls), we conclude that most of the DRw6 susceptibility to PV can be accounted for by the DQ beta chain. Images PMID:2503828

  9. Identification of Coupling and Repulsion Phase DNA Marker Associated With an Allele of a Gene Conferring Host Plant Resistance to Pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus (PPSMV) in Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L. Millsp.)

    PubMed Central

    Daspute, Abhijit; Fakrudin, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigeonpea Sterility Mosaic Disease (PSMD) is an important foliar disease caused by Pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus (PPSMV) which is transmitted by eriophyid mites (Aceria cajani Channabasavanna). In present study, a F2 mapping population comprising 325 individuals was developed by crossing PSMD susceptible genotype (Gullyal white) and PSMD resistant genotype (BSMR 736). We identified a set of 32 out of 300 short decamer random DNA markers that showed polymorphism between Gullyal white and BSMR 736 parents. Among them, eleven DNA markers showed polymorphism including coupling and repulsion phase type of polymorphism across the parents. Bulked Segregant Analysis (BSA), revealed that the DNA marker, IABTPPN7, produced a single coupling phase marker (IABTPPN7414) and a repulsion phase marker (IABTPPN7983) co-segregating with PSMD reaction. Screening of 325 F2 population using IABTPPN7 revealed that the repulsion phase marker, IABTPPN7983, was co-segregating with the PSMD responsive SV1 at a distance of 23.9 cM for Bidar PPSMV isolate. On the other hand, the coupling phase marker IABTPPN7414 did not show any linkage with PSMD resistance. Additionally, single marker analysis both IABTPPN7983 (P<0.0001) and IABTPPN 7414 (P<0.0001) recorded a significant association with the PSMD resistance and explained a phenotypic variance of 31 and 36% respectively in F2 population. The repulsion phase marker, IABTPPN7983, could be of use in Marker-Assisted Selection (MAS) in the PPSMV resistance breeding programmes of pigeonpea. PMID:25774108

  10. The same allele of translation initiation factor 4E mediates resistance against two Potyvirus spp. in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Bruun-Rasmussen, M; Møller, I S; Tulinius, G; Hansen, J K R; Lund, O S; Johansen, I E

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenicity of two sequenced isolates of Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) was established on genotypes of Pisum sativum L. reported to carry resistance genes to BYMV and other potyviruses. Resistance to the white lupin strain of BYMV (BYMV-W) is inherited as a recessive gene named wlv that maps to linkage group VI together with other Potyvirus resistances. One of these, sbm1, confers resistance to strains of Pea seedborne mosaic virus and previously has been identified as a mutant allele of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E gene (eIF4E). Sequence comparison of eIF4E from BYMV-W-susceptible and -resistant P. sativum genotypes revealed a polymorphism correlating with the resistance profile. Expression of eIF4E from susceptible plants in resistant plants facilitated BYMV-W infection in inoculated leaves. When cDNA of BYMV-W was agroinoculated, resistance mediated by the wlv gene frequently was overcome, and virus from these plants had a codon change causing an Arg to His change at position 116 of the predicted viral genome-linked protein (VPg). Accordingly, plants carrying the wlv resistance gene were infected upon inoculation with BYMV-W derived from cDNA with a His codon at position 116 of the VPg coding region. These results suggested that VPg determined pathogenicity on plants carrying the wlv resistance gene and that wlv corresponded to the sbm1 allele of eIF4E. PMID:17849710

  11. Multiple Avirulence Loci and Allele-Specific Effector Recognition Control the Pm3 Race-Specific Resistance of Wheat to Powdery Mildew[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Roffler, Stefan; Stirnweis, Daniel; Treier, Georges; Herren, Gerhard; Korol, Abraham B.; Wicker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In cereals, several mildew resistance genes occur as large allelic series; for example, in wheat (Triticum aestivum and Triticum turgidum), 17 functional Pm3 alleles confer agronomically important race-specific resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis). The molecular basis of race specificity has been characterized in wheat, but little is known about the corresponding avirulence genes in powdery mildew. Here, we dissected the genetics of avirulence for six Pm3 alleles and found that three major Avr loci affect avirulence, with a common locus_1 involved in all AvrPm3-Pm3 interactions. We cloned the effector gene AvrPm3a2/f2 from locus_2, which is recognized by the Pm3a and Pm3f alleles. Induction of a Pm3 allele-dependent hypersensitive response in transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana and in wheat demonstrated specificity. Gene expression analysis of Bcg1 (encoded by locus_1) and AvrPm3 a2/f2 revealed significant differences between isolates, indicating that in addition to protein polymorphisms, expression levels play a role in avirulence. We propose a model for race specificity involving three components: an allele-specific avirulence effector, a resistance gene allele, and a pathogen-encoded suppressor of avirulence. Thus, whereas a genetically simple allelic series controls specificity in the plant host, recognition on the pathogen side is more complex, allowing flexible evolutionary responses and adaptation to resistance genes. PMID:26452600

  12. Effective marker alleles associated with type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight infection in fields

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Luo, Meng; Zhang, Dadong; Wu, Di; Li, Lei; Bai, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers associated with known quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in bi-parental mapping population usually have more than two alleles in breeding populations. Therefore, understanding the association of each allele with FHB response is particularly important to marker-assisted enhancement of FHB resistance. In this paper, we evaluated FHB severities of 192 wheat accessions including landraces and commercial varieties in three field growing seasons, and genotyped this panel with 364 genome-wide informative molecular markers. Among them, 11 markers showed reproducible marker-trait association (p < 0.05) in at least two experiments using a mixed model. More than two alleles were identified per significant marker locus. These alleles were classified into favorable, unfavorable and neutral alleles according to the normalized genotypic values. The distributions of effective alleles at these loci in each wheat accession were characterized. Mean FHB severities increased with decreased number of favorable alleles at the reproducible loci. Chinese wheat landraces and Japanese accessions have more favorable alleles at the majority of the reproducible marker loci. FHB resistance levels of varieties can be greatly improved by introduction of these favorable alleles and removal of unfavorable alleles simultaneously at these QTL-linked marker loci. PMID:27436944

  13. Multiple resistance to sulfonylureas and imidazolinones conferred by an acetohydroxyacid synthase gene with separate mutations for selective resistance.

    PubMed

    Hattori, J; Rutledge, R; Labbé, H; Brown, D; Sunohara, G; Miki, B

    1992-03-01

    The acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) gene from the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant line GH90 carrying the imidazolinone resistance allele imr1 was cloned. Expression of the AHAS gene under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in transgenic tobacco resulted in selective imidazolinone resistance, confirming that the single base-pair change found near the 3' end of the coding region of this gene is responsible for imidazolinone resistance. A chimeric AHAS gene containing both the imr1 mutation and the csr1 mutation, responsible for selective resistance to sulfonylurea herbicides, was constructed. It conferred on transgenic tobacco plants resistance to both sulfonylurea and imidazolinone herbicides. The data illustrate that a multiple-resistance phenotype can be achieved in an AHAS gene through combinations of separate mutations, each of which individually confers resistance to only one class of herbicides. PMID:1557022

  14. A viable Arabidopsis pex13 missense allele confers severe peroxisomal defects and decreases PEX5 association with peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Andrew W.; Fleming, Wendell A.; Burkhart, Sarah E.; Ratzel, Sarah E.; Bjornson, Marta; Bartel, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes are organelles that catabolize fatty acids and compartmentalize other oxidative metabolic processes in eukaryotes. Using a forward-genetic screen designed to recover severe peroxisome-defective mutants, we isolated a viable allele of the peroxisome biogenesis gene PEX13 with striking peroxisomal defects. The pex13-4 mutant requires an exogenous source of fixed carbon for pre-photosynthetic development and is resistant to the protoauxin indole-3-butyric acid. Delivery of peroxisome-targeted matrix proteins depends on the PEX5 receptor docking with PEX13 at the peroxisomal membrane, and we found severely reduced import of matrix proteins and less organelle-associated PEX5 in pex13-4 seedlings. Moreover, pex13-4 physiological and molecular defects were partially ameliorated when PEX5 was overexpressed, suggesting that PEX5 docking is partially compromised in this mutant and can be improved by increasing PEX5 levels. Because previously described Arabidopsis pex13 alleles either are lethal or confer only subtle defects, the pex13-4 mutant provides valuable insight into plant peroxisome receptor docking and matrix protein import. PMID:25008153

  15. Expression of cytokeratin confers multiple drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, P.A.; Dalton, W.S.; Anderson, J.M.; Cress, A.E. )

    1994-06-07

    The cytokeratin network is an extensive filamentous structure in the cytoplasm whose biological function(s) is unknown. Based upon previous data showing the modification of cytokeratin by mitoxantrone, the authors investigated the ability of cytokeratin networks to influence the survival response of cells to chemotherapeutic agents. They have compared the survival of mouse L fibroblasts lacking cytokeratins with that of L cells transfected with cytokeratins 8 and 18 in the presence of chemotherapeutic drugs. The expression of cytokeratins 8 and 18 conferred a multiple drug resistance phenotype on cells exposed to mitoxantrone, doxorubicin, methotrexate, melphalan, Colcemid, and vincristine. The degree of drug resistance was 5-454 times that of parental cells, depending upon the agent used. Drug resistance could not be attributed to altered growth characteristics, altered drug accumulation, or an altered drug efflux in the transfected cells. Cytokeratin does not confer resistance to ionizing radiation, which damages DNA independently on intracellular transport mechanisms. These data suggest a role for cytokeratin networks in conferring a drug resistance phenotype.

  16. Allelic analysis of sheath blight resistance with association mapping in rice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Limeng; Yan, Wengui; Zhu, Chengsong; Agrama, Hesham A; Jackson, Aaron; Yeater, Kathleen; Li, Xiaobai; Huang, Bihu; Hu, Biaolin; McClung, Anna; Wu, Dianxing

    2012-01-01

    Sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most devastating diseases in rice world-wide. Global attention has focused on examining individual mapping populations for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for ShB resistance, but to date no study has taken advantage of association mapping to examine hundreds of lines for potentially novel QTLs. Our objective was to identify ShB QTLs via association mapping in rice using 217 sub-core entries from the USDA rice core collection, which were phenotyped with a micro-chamber screening method and genotyped with 155 genome-wide markers. Structure analysis divided the mapping panel into five groups, and model comparison revealed that PCA5 with genomic control was the best model for association mapping of ShB. Ten marker loci on seven chromosomes were significantly associated with response to the ShB pathogen. Among multiple alleles in each identified loci, the allele contributing the greatest effect to ShB resistance was named the putative resistant allele. Among 217 entries, entry GSOR 310389 contained the most putative resistant alleles, eight out of ten. The number of putative resistant alleles presented in an entry was highly and significantly correlated with the decrease of ShB rating (r = -0.535) or the increase of ShB resistance. Majority of the resistant entries that contained a large number of the putative resistant alleles belonged to indica, which is consistent with a general observation that most ShB resistant accessions are of indica origin. These findings demonstrate the potential to improve breeding efficiency by using marker-assisted selection to pyramid putative resistant alleles from various loci in a cultivar for enhanced ShB resistance in rice. PMID:22427867

  17. Co-selection and replacement of resistance alleles to Lysinibacillus sphaericus in a Culex quinquefasciatus colony.

    PubMed

    Chalegre, Karlos Diogo de Melo; Tavares, Daniella A; Romão, Tatiany P; de Menezes, Heverly Suzany G; Nascimento, Nathaly A; de Oliveira, Cláudia Maria F; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo P; Silva-Filha, Maria Helena N L

    2015-09-01

    The Cqm1 α-glucosidase, expressed within the midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito larvae, is the receptor for the Binary toxin (Bin) from the entomopathogen Lysinibacillus sphaericus. Mutations of the Cqm1 α-glucosidase gene cause high resistance levels to this bacterium in both field and laboratory populations, and a previously described allele, cqm1REC, was found to be associated with a laboratory-resistant colony (R2362). This study described the identification of a novel resistance allele, cqm1REC-2, that was co-selected with cqm1REC within the R2362 colony. The two alleles display distinct mutations but both generate premature stop codons that prevent the expression of midgut-bound Cqm1 proteins. Using a PCR-based assay to monitor the frequency of each allele during long-term maintenance of the resistant colony, cqm1REC was found to predominate early on but later was replaced by cqm1REC-2 as the most abundant resistance allele. Homozygous larvae for each allele were then generated that displayed similar high-resistance phenotypes with equivalent low levels of transcript and lack of protein expression for both cqm1REC and cqm1REC-2. In progeny from a cross of homozygous individuals for each allele at a 1 : 1 ratio, analyzed for ten subsequent generations, cqm1REC showed a higher frequency than cqm1REC-2. The replacement of cqm1REC by cqm1REC -2 observed in the R2362 colony, kept for 210 generations, indicates changes in fitness related to traits that are unknown but linked to these two alleles, and constitutes a unique example of evolution of resistance within a controlled laboratory environment. PMID:26131741

  18. The functional importance of sequence versus expression variability of MHC alleles in parasite resistance.

    PubMed

    Axtner, Jan; Sommer, Simone

    2012-12-01

    Understanding selection processes driving the pronounced allelic polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes and its functional associations to parasite load have been the focus of many recent wildlife studies. Two main selection scenarios are currently debated which explain the susceptibility or resistance to parasite infections either by the effects of (1) specific MHC alleles which are selected frequency-dependent in space and time or (2) a heterozygote or divergent allele advantage. So far, most studies have focused only on structural variance in co-evolutionary processes although this might not be the only trait subject to natural selection. In the present study, we analysed structural variance stretching from exon1 through exon3 of MHC class II DRB genes as well as genotypic expression variance in relation to the gastrointestinal helminth prevalence and infection intensity in wild yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis). We found support for the functional importance of specific alleles both on the sequence and expression level. By resampling a previously investigated study population we identified specific MHC alleles affected by temporal shifts in parasite pressure and recorded associated changes in allele frequencies. The allele Apfl-DRB*23 was associated with resistance to infections by the oxyurid nematode Syphacia stroma and at the same time with susceptibility to cestode infection intensity. In line with our expectation, MHC mRNA transcript levels tended to be higher in cestode-infected animals carrying the allele Apfl-DRB*23. However, no support for a heterozygote or divergent allele advantage on the sequence or expression level was detected. The individual amino acid distance of genotypes did not explain individual differences in parasite loads and the genetic distance had no effect on MHC genotype expression. For ongoing studies on the functional importance of expression variance in parasite resistance, allele

  19. Wheat gene bank accessions as a source of new alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3: a large scale allele mining project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the last hundred years, the development of improved wheat cultivars has led to the replacement of landraces and traditional varieties by modern cultivars. This has resulted in a decline in the genetic diversity of agriculturally used wheat. However, the diversity lost in the elite material is somewhat preserved in crop gene banks. Therefore, the gene bank accessions provide the basis for genetic improvement of crops for specific traits and and represent rich sources of novel allelic variation. Results We have undertaken large scale molecular allele mining to isolate new alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3 from wheat gene bank accessions. The search for new Pm3 alleles was carried out on a geographically diverse set of 733 wheat accessions originating from 20 countries. Pm3 specific molecular tools as well as classical pathogenicity tests were used to characterize the accessions. Two new functional Pm3 alleles were identified out of the eight newly cloned Pm3 sequences. These new resistance alleles were isolated from accessions from China and Nepal. Thus, the repertoire of functional Pm3 alleles now includes 17 genes, making it one of the largest allelic series of plant resistance genes. The combined information on resistant and susceptible Pm3 sequences will allow to study molecular function and specificity of functional Pm3 alleles. Conclusions This study demonstrates that molecular allele mining on geographically defined accessions is a useful strategy to rapidly characterize the diversity of gene bank accessions at a specific genetic locus of agronomical importance. The identified wheat accessions with new resistance specificities can be used for marker-assisted transfer of the Pm3 alleles to modern wheat lines. PMID:20470444

  20. Skewed allele frequencies of an Mx gene mutation with potential resistance to avian influenza virus in different chicken populations.

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; Qu, L J; Yao, J F; Yang, N

    2006-07-01

    The Mx gene is considered to confer positive antiviral responses to the orthomyxovirus in many organisms. In the chicken, 1 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (G to A) at position 2,032 of Mx cDNA was demonstrated to confer positive antiviral activity in vitro to avian influenza virus in a previous study. In the current study, 15 Chinese native chicken breeds, 4 highly selected commercial lines, and the Red Jungle Fowl were selected to detect allele frequencies of the Mx mutation. The frequencies of the favorable allele A in native breeds were 0.7241 to 0.9554, which were much higher than those (0.0565 to 0.2742) found in the commercial populations. Whereas most native breeds were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium at this locus (P > 0.01), 3 out of 4 commercial populations were not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P < 0.01). Selection, environment, and negative correlations between production and disease resistant traits could contribute to highly skewed frequencies of the mutation among native breeds and commercial populations. The results suggested that further studies are needed with regard to the genetic resistance to avian influenza in different populations with various domestication background and selection history. PMID:16830876

  1. Determination of permethrin resistance allele frequency of human head louse populations by quantitative sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Deok Ho; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Strycharz, Joseph P; Clark, J Marshall; Lee, Si Hyeock

    2008-09-01

    A quantitative sequencing (QS) protocol that detects the frequencies of sodium channel mutations (M815I, T917I, and L920F) responsible for knockdown resistance in permethrin-resistant head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer) was tested as a population genotyping method for use as a preliminary resistance monitoring tool. Genomic DNA fragments of the sodium channel a-subunit gene that encompass the three mutation sites were polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-1 amplified from individual head lice with either resistant or susceptible genotypes, and combined in various ratios to generate standard DNA template mixtures for QS. After sequencing, the signal ratios between resistant and susceptible nucleotides were calculated and plotted against the corresponding resistance allele frequencies. Quadratic regression coefficients of the plots were close to 1, demonstrating that the signal ratios are highly correlated with the resistance allele frequencies. Resistance allele frequencies predicted by QS, using either "pooled DNA" (DNA extracted from individual louse specimens and pooled) or "pooled specimen DNA" (DNA simultaneously extracted from multiple louse specimens), agreed well with those determined by individual sequencing, confirming the reliability and accuracy of QS as a population genotyping method and validating our approach of using the pooled specimen DNA as the DNA template for QS. Our protocol for QS was determined to be highly reliable for the prediction of resistance allele frequencies higher than approximately 7.4% at the 95% confidence level. According to the resistance allele frequencies determined by QS, pyrethroid resistance varies substantially among different geographical regions, emphasizing the importance of early resistance detection and proper management strategies. PMID:18826035

  2. Assessment of the origins and spread of putative resistance-conferring mutations in Plasmodium vivax dihydropteroate synthase.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Vivian N; Suzuki, Stephanie M; Rungsihirunrat, Kanchana; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige C; Maestre, Amanda; Na-Bangchang, Kesara; Sibley, Carol Hopkins

    2009-08-01

    Infection with Plasmodium vivax is usually treated with chloroquine, but parasites are often exposed inadvertently to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. To infer patterns of selection and spread of resistant parasites in natural populations, we determined haplotypes of P. vivax dihydropteroate synthase ( dhps ) alleles that could confer resistance to sulfadoxine. We amplified the P. vivax pyrophosphokinase ( pppk )- dhps region and its flanking intergenic regions from 92 contemporary global isolates. Introns and exons of pppk-dhps were highly polymorphic, as were the flanking intergenic regions. Eighteen haplotypes were associated with wild-type alleles, but several different putatively sulfadoxine-resistant alleles have arisen in areas of intensive sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine use. Even when they encoded changes to the same amino acid, these mutant alleles were associated with multiple different haplotypes. Two main conclusions can be drawn from these data. First, dhps alleles resistant to sulfadoxine have arisen multiple times under drug pressure. Second, there has been convergent evolution of a variety of alleles that could confer resistance to sulfa drugs. PMID:19635897

  3. One gene in diamondback moth confers resistance to four Bacillus thuringiensis toxins

    PubMed Central

    Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Liu, Yong-Biao; Finson, Naomi; Masson, Luke; Heckel, David G.

    1997-01-01

    Environmentally benign insecticides derived from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are the most widely used biopesticides, but their success will be short-lived if pests quickly adapt to them. The risk of evolution of resistance by pests has increased, because transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bt are being grown commercially. Efforts to delay resistance with two or more Bt toxins assume that independent mutations are required to counter each toxin. Moreover, it generally is assumed that resistance alleles are rare in susceptible populations. We tested these assumptions by conducting single-pair crosses with diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella), the first insect known to have evolved resistance to Bt in open field populations. An autosomal recessive gene conferred extremely high resistance to four Bt toxins (Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, and Cry1F). The finding that 21% of the individuals from a susceptible strain were heterozygous for the multiple-toxin resistance gene implies that the resistance allele frequency was 10 times higher than the most widely cited estimate of the upper limit for the initial frequency of resistance alleles in susceptible populations. These findings suggest that pests may evolve resistance to some groups of toxins much faster than previously expected. PMID:9050831

  4. The wheat durable, multipathogen resistance gene Lr34 confers partial blast resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Krattinger, Simon G; Sucher, Justine; Selter, Liselotte L; Chauhan, Harsh; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Mingzhi; Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Mieulet, Delphine; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Weidenbach, Denise; Schaffrath, Ulrich; Lagudah, Evans S; Keller, Beat

    2016-05-01

    The wheat gene Lr34 confers durable and partial field resistance against the obligate biotrophic, pathogenic rust fungi and powdery mildew in adult wheat plants. The resistant Lr34 allele evolved after wheat domestication through two gain-of-function mutations in an ATP-binding cassette transporter gene. An Lr34-like fungal disease resistance with a similar broad-spectrum specificity and durability has not been described in other cereals. Here, we transformed the resistant Lr34 allele into the japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Transgenic rice plants expressing Lr34 showed increased resistance against multiple isolates of the hemibiotrophic pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast disease. Host cell invasion during the biotrophic growth phase of rice blast was delayed in Lr34-expressing rice plants, resulting in smaller necrotic lesions on leaves. Lines with Lr34 also developed a typical, senescence-based leaf tip necrosis (LTN) phenotype. Development of LTN during early seedling growth had a negative impact on formation of axillary shoots and spikelets in some transgenic lines. One transgenic line developed LTN only at adult plant stage which was correlated with lower Lr34 expression levels at seedling stage. This line showed normal tiller formation and more importantly, disease resistance in this particular line was not compromised. Interestingly, Lr34 in rice is effective against a hemibiotrophic pathogen with a lifestyle and infection strategy that is different from obligate biotrophic rusts and mildew fungi. Lr34 might therefore be used as a source in rice breeding to improve broad-spectrum disease resistance against the most devastating fungal disease of rice. PMID:26471973

  5. Effects of antibiotic resistance alleles on bacterial evolutionary responses to viral parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Alex R.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has wide-ranging effects on bacterial phenotypes and evolution. However, the influence of antibiotic resistance on bacterial responses to parasitic viruses remains unclear, despite the ubiquity of such viruses in nature and current interest in therapeutic applications. We experimentally investigated this by exposing various Escherichia coli genotypes, including eight antibiotic-resistant genotypes and a mutator, to different viruses (lytic bacteriophages). Across 960 populations, we measured changes in population density and sensitivity to viruses, and tested whether variation among bacterial genotypes was explained by their relative growth in the absence of parasites, or mutation rate towards phage resistance measured by fluctuation tests for each phage. We found that antibiotic resistance had relatively weak effects on adaptation to phages, although some antibiotic-resistance alleles impeded the evolution of resistance to phages via growth costs. By contrast, a mutator allele, often found in antibiotic-resistant lineages in pathogenic populations, had a relatively large positive effect on phage-resistance evolution and population density under parasitism. This suggests costs of antibiotic resistance may modify the outcome of phage therapy against pathogenic populations previously exposed to antibiotics, but the effects of any co-occurring mutator alleles are likely to be stronger. PMID:27194288

  6. Effects of antibiotic resistance alleles on bacterial evolutionary responses to viral parasites.

    PubMed

    Arias-Sánchez, Flor I; Hall, Alex R

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance has wide-ranging effects on bacterial phenotypes and evolution. However, the influence of antibiotic resistance on bacterial responses to parasitic viruses remains unclear, despite the ubiquity of such viruses in nature and current interest in therapeutic applications. We experimentally investigated this by exposing various Escherichia coli genotypes, including eight antibiotic-resistant genotypes and a mutator, to different viruses (lytic bacteriophages). Across 960 populations, we measured changes in population density and sensitivity to viruses, and tested whether variation among bacterial genotypes was explained by their relative growth in the absence of parasites, or mutation rate towards phage resistance measured by fluctuation tests for each phage. We found that antibiotic resistance had relatively weak effects on adaptation to phages, although some antibiotic-resistance alleles impeded the evolution of resistance to phages via growth costs. By contrast, a mutator allele, often found in antibiotic-resistant lineages in pathogenic populations, had a relatively large positive effect on phage-resistance evolution and population density under parasitism. This suggests costs of antibiotic resistance may modify the outcome of phage therapy against pathogenic populations previously exposed to antibiotics, but the effects of any co-occurring mutator alleles are likely to be stronger. PMID:27194288

  7. Pistil-function breakdown in a new S-allele of European pear, S21*, confers self-compatibility.

    PubMed

    Sanzol, Javier

    2009-03-01

    European pear exhibits RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility controlled by the polymorphic S-locus. S-allele diversity of cultivars has been extensively investigated; however, no mutant alleles conferring self-compatibility have been reported. In this study, two European pear cultivars, 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño', were classified as self-compatible after fruit/seed setting and pollen tube growth examination. S-genotyping through S-PCR and sequencing identified a new S-RNase allele in the two cultivars, with identical deduced amino acid sequence as S(21), but differing at the nucleotide level. Test-pollinations and analysis of descendants suggested that the new allele is a self-compatible pistil-mutated variant of S(21), so it was named S(21)*. S-genotypes assigned to 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño' were S(10)S(21)* and S(21)*S(25) respectively, of which S(25) is a new functional S-allele of European pear. Reciprocal crosses between cultivars bearing S(21) and S(21)* indicated that both alleles exhibit the same pollen function; however, cultivars bearing S(21)* had impaired pistil-S function as they failed to reject either S(21) or S (21)* pollen. RT-PCR analysis showed absence of S(21)* -RNase gene expression in styles of 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño', suggesting a possible origin for S(21)* pistil dysfunction. Two polymorphisms found within the S-RNase genomic region (a retrotransposon insertion within the intron of S(21)* and indels at the 3'UTR) might explain the different pattern of expression between S(21) and S(21)*. Evaluation of cultivars with unknown S-genotype identified another cultivar 'Azucar Verde' bearing S(21)*, and pollen tube growth examination confirmed self-compatibility for this cultivar as well. This is the first report of a mutated S-allele conferring self-compatibility in European pear. PMID:19096853

  8. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections. PMID:26407876

  9. Allelic Variation of Cytochrome P450s Drives Resistance to Bednet Insecticides in a Major Malaria Vector.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sulaiman S; Riveron, Jacob M; Bibby, Jaclyn; Irving, Helen; Yunta, Cristina; Paine, Mark J I; Wondji, Charles S

    2015-10-01

    Scale up of Long Lasting Insecticide Nets (LLINs) has massively contributed to reduce malaria mortality across Africa. However, resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in malaria vectors threatens its continued effectiveness. Deciphering the detailed molecular basis of such resistance and designing diagnostic tools is critical to implement suitable resistance management strategies. Here, we demonstrated that allelic variation in two cytochrome P450 genes is the most important driver of pyrethroid resistance in the major African malaria vector Anopheles funestus and detected key mutations controlling this resistance. An Africa-wide polymorphism analysis of the duplicated genes CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b revealed that both genes are directionally selected with alleles segregating according to resistance phenotypes. Modelling and docking simulations predicted that resistant alleles were better metabolizers of pyrethroids than susceptible alleles. Metabolism assays performed with recombinant enzymes of various alleles confirmed that alleles from resistant mosquitoes had significantly higher activities toward pyrethroids. Additionally, transgenic expression in Drosophila showed that flies expressing resistant alleles of both genes were significantly more resistant to pyrethroids compared with those expressing the susceptible alleles, indicating that allelic variation is the key resistance mechanism. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis and functional analyses demonstrated that three amino acid changes (Val109Ile, Asp335Glu and Asn384Ser) from the resistant allele of CYP6P9b were key pyrethroid resistance mutations inducing high metabolic efficiency. The detection of these first DNA markers of metabolic resistance to pyrethroids allows the design of DNA-based diagnostic tools to detect and track resistance associated with bednets scale up, which will improve the design of evidence-based resistance management strategies. PMID:26517127

  10. Allelic Variation of Cytochrome P450s Drives Resistance to Bednet Insecticides in a Major Malaria Vector

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Sulaiman S.; Riveron, Jacob M.; Bibby, Jaclyn; Irving, Helen; Yunta, Cristina; Paine, Mark J. I.; Wondji, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Scale up of Long Lasting Insecticide Nets (LLINs) has massively contributed to reduce malaria mortality across Africa. However, resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in malaria vectors threatens its continued effectiveness. Deciphering the detailed molecular basis of such resistance and designing diagnostic tools is critical to implement suitable resistance management strategies. Here, we demonstrated that allelic variation in two cytochrome P450 genes is the most important driver of pyrethroid resistance in the major African malaria vector Anopheles funestus and detected key mutations controlling this resistance. An Africa-wide polymorphism analysis of the duplicated genes CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b revealed that both genes are directionally selected with alleles segregating according to resistance phenotypes. Modelling and docking simulations predicted that resistant alleles were better metabolizers of pyrethroids than susceptible alleles. Metabolism assays performed with recombinant enzymes of various alleles confirmed that alleles from resistant mosquitoes had significantly higher activities toward pyrethroids. Additionally, transgenic expression in Drosophila showed that flies expressing resistant alleles of both genes were significantly more resistant to pyrethroids compared with those expressing the susceptible alleles, indicating that allelic variation is the key resistance mechanism. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis and functional analyses demonstrated that three amino acid changes (Val109Ile, Asp335Glu and Asn384Ser) from the resistant allele of CYP6P9b were key pyrethroid resistance mutations inducing high metabolic efficiency. The detection of these first DNA markers of metabolic resistance to pyrethroids allows the design of DNA-based diagnostic tools to detect and track resistance associated with bednets scale up, which will improve the design of evidence-based resistance management strategies. PMID:26517127

  11. Frequency of Bt resistance alleles in Helicoverpa armigera in the Xinjiang cotton-planting region of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoping; Feng, Hongqiang; Gao, Yulin; Wyckhuys, Kris A G; Wu, Kongming

    2010-10-01

    Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a key insect pest of cotton in Xinjiang cotton-planting region of northwest China. In this region, cotton is grown on average ≈ 1.65 million ha (1.53 ≈ 1.80 million ha) annually in largely monoculture agricultural landscapes, similarly to cropping systems in the United States or Australia. Under such cropping regimes, naturally occurring refuges (with non-Bt crops) may be insufficient to prevent H. armigera resistance development to Bt toxins. Therefore, we assessed frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac toxin of F(1) and F(2) offspring of H. armigera isofemale lines from two distinct localities in the region during 2005-2009. More specifically, a total of 224 isofemale lines was collected from Korla County (≈ 70% Bt cotton adoption) and 402 lines from Shache County (≈ 5% Bt cotton planting). Subsequent offspring was screened on Cry1Ac artificial diet. From 2005 to 2009, resistance gene frequency in Korla fluctuated between 0.0000 and 0.0040, while being 0.0000-0.0008 in individuals collected from Shache, and there were no significant increases in both counties from 2005 to 2009. Relative average development rates (RADRs) of larvae in F(1) tests showed significant increases from Korla, but not in Shache. RADR of F(1) larvae is significantly correlated with RADR of F(2) offspring, indicating genetic variation in response to toxin in field H. armigera population. Although the occurrence of Cry1Ac resistance alleles was low in Xinjiang cotton-planting region of China, particular attention should be given to H. armigera resistance development in Korla County. PMID:22546469

  12. Metabolic and Target-Site Mechanisms Combine to Confer Strong DDT Resistance in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sara N.; Rigden, Daniel J.; Dowd, Andrew J.; Lu, Fang; Wilding, Craig S.; Weetman, David; Dadzie, Samuel; Jenkins, Adam M.; Regna, Kimberly; Boko, Pelagie; Djogbenou, Luc; Muskavitch, Marc A. T.; Ranson, Hilary; Paine, Mark J. I.; Mayans, Olga; Donnelly, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of resistance to insecticides has become a classic exemplar of evolution occurring within human time scales. In this study we demonstrate how resistance to DDT in the major African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae is a result of both target-site resistance mechanisms that have introgressed between incipient species (the M- and S-molecular forms) and allelic variants in a DDT-detoxifying enzyme. Sequencing of the detoxification enzyme, Gste2, from DDT resistant and susceptible strains of An. gambiae, revealed a non-synonymous polymorphism (I114T), proximal to the DDT binding domain, which segregated with strain phenotype. Recombinant protein expression and DDT metabolism analysis revealed that the proteins from the susceptible strain lost activity at higher DDT concentrations, characteristic of substrate inhibition. The effect of I114T on GSTE2 protein structure was explored through X-ray crystallography. The amino acid exchange in the DDT-resistant strain introduced a hydroxyl group nearby the hydrophobic DDT-binding region. The exchange does not result in structural alterations but is predicted to facilitate local dynamics and enzyme activity. Expression of both wild-type and 114T alleles the allele in Drosophila conferred an increase in DDT tolerance. The 114T mutation was significantly associated with DDT resistance in wild caught M-form populations and acts in concert with target-site mutations in the voltage gated sodium channel (Vgsc-1575Y and Vgsc-1014F) to confer extreme levels of DDT resistance in wild caught An. gambiae. PMID:24675797

  13. Non-Recessive Bt Toxin Resistance Conferred by an Intracellular Cadherin Mutation in Field-Selected Populations of Cotton Bollworm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haonan; Wu, Shuwen; Yang, Yihua; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Wu, Yidong

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins have been planted widely to control insect pests, yet evolution of resistance by the pests can reduce the benefits of this approach. Recessive mutations in the extracellular domain of toxin-binding cadherin proteins that confer resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac by disrupting toxin binding have been reported previously in three major lepidopteran pests, including the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Here we report a novel allele from cotton bollworm with a deletion in the intracellular domain of cadherin that is genetically linked with non-recessive resistance to Cry1Ac. We discovered this allele in each of three field-selected populations we screened from northern China where Bt cotton producing Cry1Ac has been grown intensively. We expressed four types of cadherin alleles in heterologous cell cultures: susceptible, resistant with the intracellular domain mutation, and two complementary chimeric alleles with and without the mutation. Cells transfected with each of the four cadherin alleles bound Cry1Ac and were killed by Cry1Ac. However, relative to cells transfected with either the susceptible allele or the chimeric allele lacking the intracellular domain mutation, cells transfected with the resistant allele or the chimeric allele containing the intracellular domain mutation were less susceptible to Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the intracellular domain of cadherin is involved in post-binding events that affect toxicity of Cry1Ac. This evidence is consistent with the vital role of the intracellular region of cadherin proposed by the cell signaling model of the mode of action of Bt toxins. Considered together with previously reported data, the results suggest that both pore formation and cell signaling pathways contribute to the efficacy of Bt toxins. PMID:23285292

  14. Molecular Analysis of Chloroquine and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine Resistance-Associated Alleles in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Sridaran, Sankar; Rodriguez, Betzabe; Mercedes Soto, Aida; Macedo De Oliveira, Alexandre; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2014-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is used as a first-line therapy for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Nicaragua. We investigated the prevalence of molecular markers associated with CQ and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance in P. falciparum isolates obtained from the North Atlantic Autonomous Region of Nicaragua. Blood spots for this study were made available from a CQ and SP drug efficacy trial conducted in 2005 and also from a surveillance study performed in 2011. Polymorphisms in P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter, dihydrofolate reductase, and dihydropteroate synthase gene loci that are associated with resistance to CQ, pyrimethamine, and sulfadoxine, respectively, were detected by DNA sequencing. In the 2005 dataset, only 2 of 53 isolates had a CQ resistance allele (CVIET), 2 of 52 had a pyrimethamine resistance allele, and 1 of 49 had a sulfadoxine resistance allele. In the 2011 dataset, none of 45 isolates analyzed had CQ or SP resistance alleles. PMID:24615126

  15. Recombineering reveals a diverse collection of ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 that confer resistance to macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Diner, Elie J; Hayes, Christopher S

    2009-02-20

    Mutations in ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 confer resistance to erythromycin and other macrolide antibiotics in a variety of bacteria. L4 and L22 have elongated loops whose tips converge in the peptide exit tunnel near the macrolide-binding site, and resistance mutations typically affect residues within these loops. Here, we used bacteriophage lambda Red-mediated recombination, or "recombineering," to uncover new L4 and L22 alleles that confer macrolide resistance in Escherichia coli. We randomized residues at the tips of the L4 and L22 loops using recombineered oligonucleotide libraries and selected the mutagenized cells for erythromycin-resistant mutants. These experiments led to the identification of 341 resistance mutations encoding 278 unique L4 and L22 proteins-the overwhelming majority of which are novel. Many resistance mutations were complex, involving multiple missense mutations, in-frame deletions, and insertions. Transfer of L4 and L22 mutations into wild-type cells by phage P1-mediated transduction demonstrated that each allele was sufficient to confer macrolide resistance. Although L4 and L22 mutants are typically resistant to most macrolides, selections carried out on different antibiotics revealed macrolide-specific resistance mutations. L22 Lys90Trp is one such allele that confers resistance to erythromycin but not to tylosin and spiramycin. Purified L22 Lys90Trp ribosomes show reduced erythromycin binding but have the same affinity for tylosin as wild-type ribosomes. Moreover, dimethyl sulfate methylation protection assays demonstrated that L22 Lys90Trp ribosomes bind tylosin more readily than erythromycin in vivo. This work underscores the exceptional functional plasticity of the L4 and L22 proteins and highlights the utility of Red-mediated recombination in targeted genetic selections. PMID:19150357

  16. Selection and Spread of Artemisinin-Resistant Alleles in Thailand Prior to the Global Artemisinin Resistance Containment Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Talundzic, Eldin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Congpuong, Kanungnit; Plucinski, Mateusz M.; Morton, Lindsay; Goldman, Ira F.; Kachur, Patrick S.; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda; Satimai, Wichai; Barnwell, John W.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2015-01-01

    The recent emergence of artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion poses a major threat to the global effort to control malaria. Tracking the spread and evolution of artemisinin-resistant parasites is critical in aiding efforts to contain the spread of resistance. A total of 417 patient samples from the year 2007, collected during malaria surveillance studies across ten provinces in Thailand, were genotyped for the candidate Plasmodium falciparum molecular marker of artemisinin resistance K13. Parasite genotypes were examined for K13 propeller mutations associated with artemisinin resistance, signatures of positive selection, and for evidence of whether artemisinin-resistant alleles arose independently across Thailand. A total of seven K13 mutant alleles were found (N458Y, R539T, E556D, P574L, R575K, C580Y, S621F). Notably, the R575K and S621F mutations have previously not been reported in Thailand. The most prevalent artemisinin resistance-associated K13 mutation, C580Y, carried two distinct haplotype profiles that were separated based on geography, along the Thai-Cambodia and Thai-Myanmar borders. It appears these two haplotypes may have independent evolutionary origins. In summary, parasites with K13 propeller mutations associated with artemisinin resistance were widely present along the Thai-Cambodia and Thai-Myanmar borders prior to the implementation of the artemisinin resistance containment project in the region. PMID:25836766

  17. Vip3A Resistance Alleles Exist at High Levels in Australian Targets before Release of Cotton Expressing This Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Rod J.; Downes, Sharon J.; James, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Crops engineered to produce insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have revolutionised pest control in agriculture. However field-level resistance to Bt has developed in some targets. Utilising novel vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vips), also derived from Bt but genetically distinct from Cry toxins, is a possible solution that biotechnical companies intend to employ. Using data collected over two seasons we determined that, before deployment of Vip-expressing plants in Australia, resistance alleles exist in key targets as polymorphisms at frequencies of 0.027 (n = 273 lines, 95% CI = 0.019–0.038) in H. armigera and 0.008 (n = 248 lines, 0.004–0.015) in H. punctigera. These frequencies are above mutation rates normally encountered. Homozygous resistant neonates survived doses of Vip3A higher than those estimated in field-grown plants. Fortunately the resistance is largely, if not completely, recessive and does not confer resistance to the Bt toxins Cry1Ac or Cry2Ab already deployed in cotton crops. These later characteristics are favourable for resistance management; however the robustness of Vip3A inclusive varieties will depend on resistance frequencies to the Cry toxins when it is released (anticipated 2016) and the efficacy of Vip3A throughout the season. It is appropriate to pre-emptively screen key targets of Bt crops elsewhere, especially those such as H. zea in the USA, which is not only closely related to H. armigera but also will be exposed to Vip in several varieties of cotton and corn. PMID:22761737

  18. The Rp3 disease resistance gene of maize: mapping and characterization of introgressed alleles.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Alferez, S; Richter, T E; Hulbert, S H; Bennetzen, J L

    1995-07-01

    The Rp3 locus of maize conditions race-specific resistance to a fungal rust pathogen, Puccinia sorghi. Both morphological and DNA markers were employed to characterize alleles of Rp3 and to accurately position Rp3 on the maize genetic map. DNA marker polymorphisms distinctive to each Rp3 allele were identified, allowing the identification of specific Rp3 alleles in cases where rust races that differentiate particular alleles are not available. In a population of 427 progeny, Rp3 and Rg1 were found to be completely linked, while Lg3 was approximately 3 cM proximal on the long arm of chromosome 3. In this same population, 12 RFLP markers were mapped relative to Rp3; the closest markers were UMC102 (about 1cM distal to Rp1) and NPI114 (1-2 cM proximal). These and additional DNA probes were used to characterize the nature and extent of flanking DNA that was carried along when six different Rp3 alleles were backcrossed into a single background. Depending upon the allele investigated, a minimum of 2-10cM of polymorphic DNA flanking the Rp3 locus was retained through the introgression process. In addition, many of the probes that map near Rp3 were found to detect an additional fragment in the Rp3 region, indicating that portions of this chromosomal segment have been tendemly duplicated. The materials and results generated will permit marker-assisted entry of Rp3 into different maize backgrounds and lay the foundation for the eventual map-based cloning of Rp3. PMID:24169663

  19. Simultaneous editing of three homoeoalleles in hexaploid bread wheat confers heritable resistance to powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanpeng; Cheng, Xi; Shan, Qiwei; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Jinxing; Gao, Caixia; Qiu, Jin-Long

    2014-09-01

    Sequence-specific nucleases have been applied to engineer targeted modifications in polyploid genomes, but simultaneous modification of multiple homoeoalleles has not been reported. Here we use transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 (refs. 4,5) technologies in hexaploid bread wheat to introduce targeted mutations in the three homoeoalleles that encode MILDEW-RESISTANCE LOCUS (MLO) proteins. Genetic redundancy has prevented evaluation of whether mutation of all three MLO alleles in bread wheat might confer resistance to powdery mildew, a trait not found in natural populations. We show that TALEN-induced mutation of all three TaMLO homoeologs in the same plant confers heritable broad-spectrum resistance to powdery mildew. We further use CRISPR-Cas9 technology to generate transgenic wheat plants that carry mutations in the TaMLO-A1 allele. We also demonstrate the feasibility of engineering targeted DNA insertion in bread wheat through nonhomologous end joining of the double-strand breaks caused by TALENs. Our findings provide a methodological framework to improve polyploid crops. PMID:25038773

  20. Alleles conferring improved fiber quality from EMS mutagenesis of elite cotton genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The elite gene pool of cotton (Gossypium spp.) has less diversity than those of most other major crops, making identification of novel alleles important to ongoing crop improvement. A total of 3,164 M5 lines resulting from ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of two G. hirsutum breeding lines, TAM 94L...

  1. Effective marker alleles associated with type II resistance of wheat to Fusarium head blight infection in fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular markers associated with known quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in bi-parental mapping populations usually have more than two alleles in breeding populations. Therefore, understanding the association of each allele with FHB response is parti...

  2. BCR-ABL1 compound mutations combining key kinase domain positions confer clinical resistance to ponatinib in Ph chromosome-positive leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zabriskie, Matthew S; Eide, Christopher A; Tantravahi, Srinivas K; Vellore, Nadeem A; Estrada, Johanna; Nicolini, Franck E; Khoury, Hanna J; Larson, Richard A; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge E; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias J; Kornblau, Steven M; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Rea, Delphine; Stenke, Leif; Barbany, Gisela; Lange, Thoralf; Hernández-Boluda, Juan-Carlos; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Press, Richard D; Chuah, Charles; Goldberg, Stuart L; Wetzler, Meir; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; Etienne, Gabriel; Baccarani, Michele; Soverini, Simona; Rosti, Gianantonio; Rousselot, Philippe; Friedman, Ran; Deininger, Marie; Reynolds, Kimberly R; Heaton, William L; Eiring, Anna M; Pomicter, Anthony D; Khorashad, Jamshid S; Kelley, Todd W; Baron, Riccardo; Druker, Brian J; Deininger, Michael W; O'Hare, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Ponatinib is the only currently approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that suppresses all BCR-ABL1 single mutants in Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) leukemia, including the recalcitrant BCR-ABL1(T315I) mutant. However, emergence of compound mutations in a BCR-ABL1 allele may confer ponatinib resistance. We found that clinically reported BCR-ABL1 compound mutants center on 12 key positions and confer varying resistance to imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, ponatinib, rebastinib, and bosutinib. T315I-inclusive compound mutants confer high-level resistance to TKIs, including ponatinib. In vitro resistance profiling was predictive of treatment outcomes in Ph(+) leukemia patients. Structural explanations for compound mutation-based resistance were obtained through molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings demonstrate that BCR-ABL1 compound mutants confer different levels of TKI resistance, necessitating rational treatment selection to optimize clinical outcome. PMID:25132497

  3. Transcriptome and Allele Specificity Associated with a 3BL Locus for Fusarium Crown Rot Resistance in Bread Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Stiller, Jiri; Zhao, Qiang; Feng, Qi; Cavanagh, Colin; Wang, Penghao; Gardiner, Donald; Choulet, Frédéric; Feuillet, Catherine; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yuming; Yan, Guijun; Han, Bin; Manners, John M.; Liu, Chunji

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium pathogens cause two major diseases in cereals, Fusarium crown rot (FCR) and head blight (FHB). A large-effect locus conferring resistance to FCR disease was previously located to chromosome arm 3BL (designated as Qcrs-3B) and several independent sets of near isogenic lines (NILs) have been developed for this locus. In this study, five sets of the NILs were used to examine transcriptional changes associated with the Qcrs-3B locus and to identify genes linked to the resistance locus as a step towards the isolation of the causative gene(s). Of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) detected between the NILs, 12.7% was located on the single chromosome 3B. Of the expressed genes containing SNP (SNP-EGs) detected, 23.5% was mapped to this chromosome. Several of the DEGs and SNP-EGs are known to be involved in host-pathogen interactions, and a large number of the DEGs were among those detected for FHB in previous studies. Of the DEGs detected, 22 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and they included eight which were detected in the resistant isolines only. The enrichment of DEG, and not necessarily those containing SNPs between the resistant and susceptible isolines, around the Qcrs-3B locus is suggestive of local regulation of this region by the resistance allele. Functions for 13 of these DEGs are known. Of the SNP-EGs, 28 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and biological functions for 16 of them are known. These results provide insights into responses regulated by the 3BL locus and identify a tractable number of target genes for fine mapping and functional testing to identify the causative gene(s) at this QTL. PMID:25405461

  4. Transcriptome and allele specificity associated with a 3BL locus for Fusarium crown rot resistance in bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Stiller, Jiri; Zhao, Qiang; Feng, Qi; Cavanagh, Colin; Wang, Penghao; Gardiner, Donald; Choulet, Frédéric; Feuillet, Catherine; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yuming; Yan, Guijun; Han, Bin; Manners, John M; Liu, Chunji

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium pathogens cause two major diseases in cereals, Fusarium crown rot (FCR) and head blight (FHB). A large-effect locus conferring resistance to FCR disease was previously located to chromosome arm 3BL (designated as Qcrs-3B) and several independent sets of near isogenic lines (NILs) have been developed for this locus. In this study, five sets of the NILs were used to examine transcriptional changes associated with the Qcrs-3B locus and to identify genes linked to the resistance locus as a step towards the isolation of the causative gene(s). Of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) detected between the NILs, 12.7% was located on the single chromosome 3B. Of the expressed genes containing SNP (SNP-EGs) detected, 23.5% was mapped to this chromosome. Several of the DEGs and SNP-EGs are known to be involved in host-pathogen interactions, and a large number of the DEGs were among those detected for FHB in previous studies. Of the DEGs detected, 22 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and they included eight which were detected in the resistant isolines only. The enrichment of DEG, and not necessarily those containing SNPs between the resistant and susceptible isolines, around the Qcrs-3B locus is suggestive of local regulation of this region by the resistance allele. Functions for 13 of these DEGs are known. Of the SNP-EGs, 28 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and biological functions for 16 of them are known. These results provide insights into responses regulated by the 3BL locus and identify a tractable number of target genes for fine mapping and functional testing to identify the causative gene(s) at this QTL. PMID:25405461

  5. ERK Mutations Confer Resistance to Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Eva M.; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Treacy, Daniel J.; Wagle, Nikhil; Garraway, Levi A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of targeted therapeutics directed against BRAFV600-mutant metastatic melanoma improves progression-free survival in many patients; however, acquired drug resistance remains a major medical challenge. By far, the most common clinical resistance mechanism involves reactivation of the MAPK (RAF/MEK/ERK) pathway by a variety of mechanisms. Thus, targeting ERK itself has emerged as an attractive therapeutic concept, and several ERK inhibitors have entered clinical trials. We sought to preemptively determine mutations in ERK1/2 that confer resistance to either ERK inhibitors or combined RAF/MEK inhibition in BRAFV600-mutant melanoma. Using a random mutagenesis screen, we identified multiple point mutations in ERK1 (MAPK3) and ERK2 (MAPK1) that could confer resistance to ERK or RAF/MEK inhibitors. ERK inhibitor–resistant alleles were sensitive to RAF/ MEK inhibitors and vice versa, suggesting that the future development of alternating RAF/MEK and ERK inhibitor regimens might help circumvent resistance to these agents. PMID:25320010

  6. Identification of QTLs conferring resistance to downy mildew in legacy cultivars of lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Simko, Ivan; Atallah, Amy J.; Ochoa, Oswaldo E.; Antonise, Rudie; Galeano, Carlos H.; Truco, Maria Jose; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Many cultivars of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), the most popular leafy vegetable, are susceptible to downy mildew disease caused by Bremia lactucae. Cultivars Iceberg and Grand Rapids that were released in the 18th and 19th centuries, respectively, have high levels of quantitative resistance to downy mildew. We developed a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) originating from a cross between these two legacy cultivars, constructed a linkage map, and identified two QTLs for resistance on linkage groups 2 (qDM2.1) and 5 (qDM5.1) that determined resistance under field conditions in California and the Netherlands. The same QTLs determined delayed sporulation at the seedling stage in laboratory experiments. Alleles conferring elevated resistance at both QTLs originate from cultivar Iceberg. An additional QTL on linkage group 9 (qDM9.1) was detected through simultaneous analysis of all experiments with mixed-model approach. Alleles for elevated resistance at this locus originate from cultivar Grand Rapids. PMID:24096732

  7. Geographical distribution of pyrethroid resistance allele frequency in head lice (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Toloza, Ariel Ceferino; Ascunce, Marina S; Reed, David; Picollo, María Inés

    2014-01-01

    The human head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae), is an obligate ectoparasite that causes pediculosis capitis and has parasitized humans since the beginning of humankind. Head louse infestations are widespread throughout the world and have been increasing since the early 1990s partially because of ineffective pediculicides. In Argentina, the overuse of products containing pyrethroids has led to the development of resistant louse populations. Pyrethroid insecticides act on the nervous system affecting voltage-sensitive sodium channels. Three point mutations at the corresponding amino acid sequence positions M815I, T917I, and L920F in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene are responsible for contributing to knockdown resistance (kdr). The management of pyrethroid resistance requires either early detection or the characterization of the mechanisms involved in head louse populations. In the current study, we estimated the distribution of kdr alleles in 154 head lice from six geographical regions of Argentina. Pyrethroid resistance kdr alleles were found in high frequencies ranging from 67 to 100%. Of these, 131 (85.1%) were homozygous resistant, 13 (8.4%) were homozygous susceptible, and 10 (6.5%) were heterozygous. Exact tests for the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for each location showed that genotype frequencies differed significantly from expectation in four of the six sites studied. These results show that pyrethroid resistance is well established reaching an overall frequency of 88%, thus close to fixation. With 30 yr of pyrethroid-based pediculicides use in Argentina, kdr resistance has evolved rapidly among these head louse populations. PMID:24605463

  8. F1 Screening for Resistance Gene Alleles to Bt Cotton in Helicoverpa armigera: How to Differentiate S and R Genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The F1 screening method relies on the availability in the laboratory of an insecticide-resistant insect strain that is used to detect resistance alleles at the same loci in field populations. This technique was used in this study to survey a field population of Helicoverpa armigera for Bt-resistant ...

  9. Mutation in promoter region of a serine protease inhibitor confers Perkinsus marinus resistance in the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica).

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Yu, Haiyang; Bao, Zhenmin; Zhang, Quanqi; Guo, Ximing

    2012-08-01

    Protease inhibitors from the host may inhibit proteases from invading pathogens and confer resistance. We have previously shown that a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP198C) in a serine protease inhibitor gene (cvSI-1) is associated with Perkinsus marinus resistance in the eastern oyster. As SNP198 is synonymous, we studied whether its linkage to polymorphism at the promoter region could explain the resistance. A 631 bp fragment of the promoter region was cloned by genome-walking and resequenced, revealing 22 SNPs and 3 insertion/deletions (indels). A 25 bp indel at position -404 was genotyped along with SNP198 for association analysis using before- and after-mortality samples. After mortalities that were primarily caused by P. marinus, the frequency of deletion allele at -404indel increased by 15.6% (p = 0.0437), while that of SNP198C increased by only 3.4% (p = 0.5756). The resistance alleles at the two loci were coupled in 79.6% of the oysters. Oysters with the deletion allele at -404indel showed significant (p = 0.0189) up-regulation of cvSI-1 expression under P. marinus challenge. Our results suggest that mutation at the promoter region causes increased transcription of cvSI-1, which in turn confers P. marinus resistance in the eastern oyster likely through inhibiting pathogenic proteases from the parasite. PMID:22683517

  10. Molecular mapping of stripe rust resistance gene YrCH42 in Chinese wheat cultivar Chuanmai 42 and its allelism with Yr24 and Yr26.

    PubMed

    Li, G Q; Li, Z F; Yang, W Y; Zhang, Y; He, Z H; Xu, S C; Singh, R P; Qu, Y Y; Xia, X C

    2006-05-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (PST), is one of the most devastating diseases in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. The objectives of this study were to map a stripe rust resistance gene in Chinese wheat cultivar Chuanmai 42 using molecular markers and to investigate its allelism with Yr24 and Yr26. A total of 787 F2 plants and 186 F3 lines derived from a cross between resistant cultivar Chuanmai 42 and susceptible line Taichung 29 were used for resistance gene tagging. Also 197 F2 plants from the cross Chuanmai 42xYr24/3*Avocet S and 726 F2 plants from Chuanmai 42xYr26/3*Avocet S were employed for allelic test of the resistance genes. In all, 819 pairs of wheat SSR primers were used to test the two parents, as well as resistant and susceptible bulks. Subsequently, nine polymorphic markers were employed for genotyping the F2 and F3 populations. Results indicated that the stripe rust resistance in Chuanmai 42 was conferred by a single dominant gene, temporarily designated YrCH42, located close to the centromere of chromosome 1B and flanked by nine SSR markers Xwmc626, Xgwm273, Xgwm11, Xgwm18, Xbarc137, Xbarc187, Xgwm498, Xbarc240 and Xwmc216. The resistance gene was closely linked to Xgwm498 and Xbarc187 with genetic distances of 1.6 and 2.3 cM, respectively. The seedling tests with 26 PST isolates and allelic tests indicated that YrCH42, Yr24 and Yr26 are likely to be the same gene. PMID:16525837

  11. Impact of protective IL-2 allelic variants on CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cell function in situ and resistance to autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Sgouroudis, Evridiki; Albanese, Alexandre; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A

    2008-11-01

    Type I diabetes (T1D) susceptibility is inherited through multiple insulin-dependent diabetes (Idd) genes. NOD.B6 Idd3 congenic mice, introgressed with an Idd3 allele from T1D-resistant C57BL/6 mice (Idd3(B6)), show a marked resistance to T1D compared with control NOD mice. The protective function of the Idd3 locus is confined to the Il2 gene, whose expression is critical for naturally occurring CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (nT(reg)) cell development and function. In this study, we asked whether Idd3(B6) protective alleles in the NOD mouse model confer T1D resistance by promoting the cellular frequency, function, or homeostasis of nT(reg) cells in vivo. We show that resistance to T1D in NOD.B6 Idd3 congenic mice correlates with increased levels of IL-2 mRNA and protein production in Ag-activated diabetogenic CD4(+) T cells. We also observe that protective IL2 allelic variants (Idd3(B6) resistance allele) also favor the expansion and suppressive functions of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) nT(reg) cells in vitro, as well as restrain the proliferation, IL-17 production, and pathogenicity of diabetogenic CD4(+) T cells in vivo more efficiently than control do nT(reg) cells. Lastly, the resistance to T1D in Idd3 congenic mice does not correlate with an augmented systemic frequency of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) nT(reg) cells but more so with the ability of protective IL2 allelic variants to promote the expansion of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) nT(reg) cells directly in the target organ undergoing autoimmune attack. Thus, protective, IL2 allelic variants impinge the development of organ-specific autoimmunity by bolstering the IL-2 producing capacity of self-reactive CD4(+) T cells and, in turn, favor the function and homeostasis of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) nT(reg) cells in vivo. PMID:18941219

  12. Absence of kdr resistance alleles in the Union of the Comoros, East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoosook; Olson, Natalie; Yamasaki, Youki; Chang, Allison; Marsden, Clare; Ouledi, Ahmed; Lanzaro, Gregory; Cornel, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Knockdown resistance ( kdr) and CYP9K1 genotypes were detected by a MOLDI-TOF based SNP genotyping assay (Sequenom iPLEX) in samples of Anopheles gambiae collected at 13 sites throughout the Union of the Comoros and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania during February and March 2011. All A. gambiae specimens collected in the Comoros were homozygous for the susceptible kdr alleles (+/+) while 96% of A. gambiae from Dar es Salaam were homozygous for the East African kdr resistant genotype (E/E). In contrast, all specimens from Dar es Salaam and the Comoros were homozygous for the cyp3 allele (c3/c3) at the CYP9K1 locus; the locus has been implicated in metabolic resistance against pyrethroid insecticides in West Africa. All specimens had typical A. gambiae genotypes for SNPs within the divergence Islands on all three chromosomes. Although further spatial and temporal studies are needed, the distribution of kdr genotypes between the Comoros and Tanzania further supports isolation of the Comoros populations from A. gambiae populations on mainland Africa . PMID:26339473

  13. Rapid Detection of Rifampicin- and Isoniazid-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis using TaqMan Allelic Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Darban-Sarokhalil, Davood; Nasiri, Mohammad J.; Fooladi, Abbas A.I.; Heidarieh, Parvin; Feizabadi, Mohammad M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a global problem that many countries are challenged with. Rapid and accurate detection of MDR-TB is critical for appropriate treatment and controlling of TB. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the TaqMan allelic discrimination without minor groove binder (MGB) as a rapid, efficient, and low-cost method for detection of drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Methods A total of 112 M. tuberculosis isolates from cases with diagnosed TB were subjected to drug susceptibility testing (DST), using the proportion method. Resistant isolates were tested for characterization of mutations in the rpoB and KatG genes by TaqMan genotyping. Results Of 112 M. tuberculosis isolates for which DST was performed, three, one, and two isolates were MDR, rifampin (RIF) resistant, and isoniazid (INH) resistant, respectively. According to the threshold cycle (Ct) and curve pattern of mutants, TaqMan probes detect all of the mutations in the analyzed genes (katG 315, AGC→ACC, rpoB 531, TCG→TTG, and rpoB 531, TCG→TGG). Conclusion The present study suggests that drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis can be detected by pattern’s curve or Ct with TaqMan probes without MGB in real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PMID:27169012

  14. The bipolar disorder risk allele at CACNA1C also confers risk of recurrent major depression and of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Green, E K; Grozeva, D; Jones, I; Jones, L; Kirov, G; Caesar, S; Gordon-Smith, K; Fraser, C; Forty, L; Russell, E; Hamshere, M L; Moskvina, V; Nikolov, I; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Holmans, P A; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C; Craddock, N

    2010-01-01

    Molecular genetic analysis offers opportunities to advance our understanding of the nosological relationship between psychiatric diagnostic categories in general, and the mood and psychotic disorders in particular. Strong evidence (P=7.0 × 10−7) of association at the polymorphism rs1006737 (within CACNA1C, the gene encoding the α-1C subunit of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel) with the risk of bipolar disorder (BD) has recently been reported in a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies of BD, including our BD sample (N=1868) studied within the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Here, we have used our UK case samples of recurrent major depression (N=1196) and schizophrenia (N=479) and UK non-psychiatric comparison groups (N=15316) to examine the spectrum of phenotypic effect of the bipolar risk allele at rs1006737. We found that the risk allele conferred increased risk for schizophrenia (P=0.034) and recurrent major depression (P=0.013) with similar effect sizes to those previously observed in BD (allelic odds ratio ∼1.15). Our findings are evidence of some degree of overlap in the biological underpinnings of susceptibility to mental illness across the clinical spectrum of mood and psychotic disorders, and show that at least some loci can have a relatively general effect on susceptibility to diagnostic categories, as currently defined. Our findings will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of major psychiatric illness, and such knowledge should be useful in providing an etiological rationale for shaping psychiatric nosology, which is currently reliant entirely on descriptive clinical data. PMID:19621016

  15. Any trait or trait-related allele can confer drought tolerance: just design the right drought scenario.

    PubMed

    Tardieu, François

    2012-01-01

    Most traits associated with drought tolerance have a dual effect, positive in very severe scenarios and negative in milder scenarios, or the opposite trend. Their effects also depend on other climatic conditions such as evaporative demand or light, and on management practices. This is the case for processes associated with cell protection and with avoidance, but also for the maintenance of growth or photosynthesis, high water use efficiency, large root systems or reduced abortion rate under water deficit. Therefore, spectacular results obtained in one drought scenario may have a limited interest for improving food security in other geographical areas with water scarcity. The most relevant questions on drought tolerance are probably, 'Does a given allele confer a positive effect on yield in an appreciable proportion of years/scenarios in a given area or target population of environment (TPE)?'; 'In a given site or TPE, what is the trade-off between risk avoidance and maintained performance?'; and 'Will a given allele or trait have an increasingly positive effect with climate change?' Considerable progress has already occurred in drought tolerance. Nevertheless, explicitly associating traits for tolerance to drought scenarios may have profound consequences on the genetic strategies, with a necessary involvement of modelling. PMID:21963615

  16. Initial frequency of alleles for resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins in field populations of Heliothis virescens

    PubMed Central

    Gould, F.; Anderson, A.; Jones, A.; Sumerford, D.; Heckel, D. G.; Lopez, J.; Micinski, S.; Leonard, R.; Laster, M.

    1997-01-01

    The risk of rapid pest adaptation to an insecticide is highly dependent on the initial frequency of resistance alleles in field populations. Because we have lacked empirical estimates of these frequencies, population–genetic models of resistance evolution have relied on a wide range of theoretical estimates. The recent commercialization of genetically engineered cotton that constitutively produces an insecticidal protein derived from the biocontrol agent, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has raised concern that we lack data needed to quantify the risk of insect pests such as Heliothis virescens rapidly adapting to this ecologically valuable class of toxins. By individually mating over 2,000 male H. virescens moths collected in four states to females of a Bt toxin-resistant laboratory strain, and screening F1 and F2 offspring for tolerance of the toxic protein, we were able to directly estimate the field frequency of alleles for resistance as 1.5 × 10−3. This high initial frequency underscores the need for caution in deploying transgenic cotton to control insect pests. Our single-pair mating technique greatly increases the efficiency of detecting recessive resistance alleles. Because alleles that decrease target site sensitivity to Bt toxins and other insecticides are often recessive, this technique could be useful in estimating resistance allele frequencies in other insects exposed to transgenic insecticidal crops or conventional insecticides. PMID:11038613

  17. Determination of knockdown resistance allele frequencies in global human head louse populations using the serial invasive signal amplification reaction

    PubMed Central

    Hodgdon, Hilliary E.; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Previte, Domenic J.; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Aboelghar, Gamal E.; Lee, Si Hyeock; Clark, J. Marshall

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pediculosis is the most prevalent parasitic infestation of humans. Resistance to pyrethrin- and pyrethroid-based pediculicides is due to knockdown (kdr)-type point mutations in the voltage-sensitive sodium channel α-subunit gene. Early detection of resistance is crucial for the selection of effective management strategies. RESULTS Kdr allele frequencies of lice from 14 countries were determined using serial invasive signal amplification reaction. Lice collected from Uruguay, UK and Australia had kdr allele frequencies of 100% while lice from Ecuador, Papua New Guinea, South Korea and Thailand had kdr allele frequencies of 0%. The remaining 7 countries investigated, including seven US populations, two Argentina, Brazil, Denmark, Czech Republic, Egypt and Israel, displayed variable kdr allele frequencies, ranging from 11% to 97%. CONCLUSION The newly developed and validated SISAR method is suitable for accurate monitoring of kdr allele frequencies in head lice. Proactive management is needed where kdr-type resistance is not yet saturated. Based on sodium channel insensitivity and its occurrence in louse populations resistant to pyrethrin- and pyrethroid-based pediculicides, the T917I mutation appears a key marker for resistance. Results from the Egyptian population, however, indicate that phenotypic resistance of lice with single or double mutations (M815I and/or L920F) should also be determined. PMID:20564731

  18. Allelic Heterogeneity at the Serotonin Transporter Locus (SLC6A4) Confers Susceptibility to Autism and Rigid-Compulsive Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, James S.; Delahanty, Ryan J.; Prasad, Harish C.; McCauley, Jacob L.; Han, Qiao; Jiang, Lan; Li, Chun; Folstein, Susan E.; Blakely, Randy D.

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders with a primarily genetic etiology exhibiting deficits in (1) development of language and (2) social relationships and (3) patterns of repetitive, restricted behaviors or interests and resistance to change. Elevated platelet serotonin (5-HT) in 20%–25% of cases and efficacy of selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in treating anxiety, depression, and repetitive behaviors points to the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT; SERT) as a strong candidate gene. Association studies involving the functional insertion/deletion polymorphism in the promoter (5-HTTLPR) and a polymorphism in intron 2 are inconclusive, possibly because of phenotypic heterogeneity. Nonetheless, mounting evidence for genetic linkage of autism to the chromosome 17q11.2 region that harbors the SERT locus (SLC6A4) supports a genetic effect at or near this gene. We confirm recent reports of sex-biased genetic effects in 17q by showing highly significant linkage driven by families with only affected males. Association with common alleles fails to explain observed linkage; therefore, we hypothesized that preferential transmission of multiple alleles does explain it. From 120 families, most contributing to linkage at 17q11.2, we found four coding substitutions at highly conserved positions and 15 other variants in 5′ noncoding and other intronic regions transmitted in families exhibiting increased rigid-compulsive behaviors. In the aggregate, these variants show significant linkage to and association with autism. Our data provide strong support for a collection of multiple, often rare, alleles at SLC6A4 as imposing risk of autism. PMID:15995945

  19. Economics versus alleles: balancing integrated pest management and insect resistance management for rotation-resistant western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Onstad, D W; Crowder, D W; Mitchell, P D; Guse, C A; Spencer, J L; Levine, E; Gray, M E

    2003-12-01

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, has overcome crop rotation in several areas of the central United States. We expanded a simple model of adult behavior and population genetics to explain how rotation resistance may have developed and to study ways to manage the western corn rootworm in a landscape of corn, soybean, and winter wheat where evolution of resistance may occur. We modeled six alternative management strategies over a 15-yr time horizon, as well as a strategy involving a 2-yr rotation of corn and soybean in 85% of the landscape, to investigate their effectiveness from both a biological and economic perspective. Generally, resistance to crop rotation evolves in fewer than 15 yr, and the rate of evolution increases as the level of rotated landscape (selection pressure) increases. When resistance is recessive, all six alternative strategies were effective at preventing evolution of rotation resistance. The two most successful strategies were the use of transgenic rotated corn in a 2-yr rotation and a 3-yr rotation of corn, soybean, and wheat with unattractive wheat (for oviposition) preceding corn. Results were most sensitive to increases in the initial allele frequency and modifications of the density-dependent survival function. Economically, three alternative strategies were robust solutions to the problem, if technology fees were not too high. Repellant soybean, attractive rotated corn, and transgenic rotated corn, all in 2-yr rotations, were economically valuable approaches. However, even the currently common 2-yr rotation was economical when resistance was recessive and the actual costs of resistance would not be paid until far in the future. PMID:14977129

  20. Multiple rare alleles at LDLR and APOA5 confer risk for early-onset myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Do, Ron; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Won, Hong-Hee; Jørgensen, Anders Berg; Duga, Stefano; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Kiezun, Adam; Farrall, Martin; Goel, Anuj; Zuk, Or; Guella, Illaria; Asselta, Rosanna; Lange, Leslie A.; Peloso, Gina M.; Auer, Paul L.; Girelli, Domenico; Martinelli, Nicola; Farlow, Deborah N.; DePristo, Mark A.; Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexander F.R.; Saleheen, Danish; Danesh, John; Epstein, Stephen E.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kastelein, John J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Shah, Svati H.; Kraus, William E.; Davies, Robert; Nikpay, Majid; Johansen, Christopher T.; Wang, Jian; Hegele, Robert A.; Hechter, Eliana; Marz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E.; Huang, Jie; Johnson, Andrew D.; Li, Mingyao; Burke, Greg L.; Gross, Myron; Liu, Yongmei; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Heiss, Gerardo; Lange, Ethan M.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Taylor, Herman A.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Hamsten, Anders; Clarke, Robert; Reilly, Dermot F.; Yin, Wu; Rivas, Manuel A.; Donnelly, Peter; Rossouw, Jacques E.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Herrington, David M.; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Tracy, Russell P.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Spertus, John A.; Cresci, Sharon; Hartiala, Jaana; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Hazen, Stanley L.; Allayee, Hooman; Reiner, Alex P.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lander, Eric S.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; McPherson, Ruth; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Watkins, Hugh; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Ardissino, Diego; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Myocardial infarction (MI), a leading cause of death around the world, displays a complex pattern of inheritance1,2. When MI occurs early in life, the role of inheritance is substantially greater1. Previously, rare mutations in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) genes have been shown to contribute to MI risk in individual families3–8 whereas common variants at more than 45 loci have been associated with MI risk in the population9–15. Here, we evaluate the contribution of rare mutations to MI risk in the population. We sequenced the protein-coding regions of 9,793 genomes from patients with MI at an early age (≤50 years in males and ≤60 years in females) along with MI-free controls. We identified two genes where rare coding-sequence mutations were more frequent in cases versus controls at exome-wide significance. At low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), carriers of rare, damaging mutations (3.1% of cases versus 1.3% of controls) were at 2.4-fold increased risk for MI; carriers of null alleles at LDLR were at even higher risk (13-fold difference). This sequence-based estimate of the proportion of early MI cases due to LDLR mutations is remarkably similar to an estimate made more than 40 years ago using total cholesterol16. At apolipoprotein A-V (APOA5), carriers of rare nonsynonymous mutations (1.4% of cases versus 0.6% of controls) were at 2.2-fold increased risk for MI. When compared with non-carriers, LDLR mutation carriers had higher plasma LDL cholesterol whereas APOA5 mutation carriers had higher plasma triglycerides. Recent evidence has connected MI risk with coding sequence mutations at two genes functionally related to APOA5, namely lipoprotein lipase15,17 and apolipoprotein C318,19. When combined, these observations suggest that, beyond LDL cholesterol, disordered metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins contributes to MI risk. PMID:25487149

  1. Exome sequencing identifies rare LDLR and APOA5 alleles conferring risk for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Do, Ron; Stitziel, Nathan O; Won, Hong-Hee; Jørgensen, Anders Berg; Duga, Stefano; Angelica Merlini, Pier; Kiezun, Adam; Farrall, Martin; Goel, Anuj; Zuk, Or; Guella, Illaria; Asselta, Rosanna; Lange, Leslie A; Peloso, Gina M; Auer, Paul L; Girelli, Domenico; Martinelli, Nicola; Farlow, Deborah N; DePristo, Mark A; Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexander F R; Saleheen, Danish; Danesh, John; Epstein, Stephen E; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Hovingh, G Kees; Kastelein, John J; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Shah, Svati H; Kraus, William E; Davies, Robert; Nikpay, Majid; Johansen, Christopher T; Wang, Jian; Hegele, Robert A; Hechter, Eliana; Marz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Huang, Jie; Johnson, Andrew D; Li, Mingyao; Burke, Greg L; Gross, Myron; Liu, Yongmei; Assimes, Themistocles L; Heiss, Gerardo; Lange, Ethan M; Folsom, Aaron R; Taylor, Herman A; Olivieri, Oliviero; Hamsten, Anders; Clarke, Robert; Reilly, Dermot F; Yin, Wu; Rivas, Manuel A; Donnelly, Peter; Rossouw, Jacques E; Psaty, Bruce M; Herrington, David M; Wilson, James G; Rich, Stephen S; Bamshad, Michael J; Tracy, Russell P; Cupples, L Adrienne; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Spertus, John A; Cresci, Sharon; Hartiala, Jaana; Tang, W H Wilson; Hazen, Stanley L; Allayee, Hooman; Reiner, Alex P; Carlson, Christopher S; Kooperberg, Charles; Jackson, Rebecca D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lander, Eric S; Schwartz, Stephen M; Siscovick, David S; McPherson, Ruth; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Watkins, Hugh; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ardissino, Diego; Sunyaev, Shamil R; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2015-02-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI), a leading cause of death around the world, displays a complex pattern of inheritance. When MI occurs early in life, genetic inheritance is a major component to risk. Previously, rare mutations in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) genes have been shown to contribute to MI risk in individual families, whereas common variants at more than 45 loci have been associated with MI risk in the population. Here we evaluate how rare mutations contribute to early-onset MI risk in the population. We sequenced the protein-coding regions of 9,793 genomes from patients with MI at an early age (≤50 years in males and ≤60 years in females) along with MI-free controls. We identified two genes in which rare coding-sequence mutations were more frequent in MI cases versus controls at exome-wide significance. At low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), carriers of rare non-synonymous mutations were at 4.2-fold increased risk for MI; carriers of null alleles at LDLR were at even higher risk (13-fold difference). Approximately 2% of early MI cases harbour a rare, damaging mutation in LDLR; this estimate is similar to one made more than 40 years ago using an analysis of total cholesterol. Among controls, about 1 in 217 carried an LDLR coding-sequence mutation and had plasma LDL cholesterol > 190 mg dl(-1). At apolipoprotein A-V (APOA5), carriers of rare non-synonymous mutations were at 2.2-fold increased risk for MI. When compared with non-carriers, LDLR mutation carriers had higher plasma LDL cholesterol, whereas APOA5 mutation carriers had higher plasma triglycerides. Recent evidence has connected MI risk with coding-sequence mutations at two genes functionally related to APOA5, namely lipoprotein lipase and apolipoprotein C-III (refs 18, 19). Combined, these observations suggest that, as well as LDL cholesterol, disordered metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins contributes to MI risk. PMID:25487149

  2. Mhc supertypes confer both qualitative and quantitative resistance to avian malaria infections in a wild bird population

    PubMed Central

    Sepil, Irem; Lachish, Shelly; Hinks, Amy E.; Sheldon, Ben C.

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) genes are believed to play a key role in the genetic basis of disease control. Although numerous studies have sought links between Mhc and disease prevalence, many have ignored the ecological and epidemiological aspects of the host–parasite interaction. Consequently, interpreting associations between prevalence and Mhc has been difficult, whereas discriminating alleles for qualitative resistance, quantitative resistance and susceptibility remains challenging. Moreover, most studies to date have quantified associations between genotypes and disease status, overlooking the complex relationship between genotype and the properties of the Mhc molecule that interacts with parasites. Here, we address these problems and demonstrate avian malaria (Plasmodium) parasite species-specific associations with functional properties of Mhc molecules (Mhc supertypes) in a wild great tit (Parus major) population. We further show that correctly interpreting these associations depends crucially on understanding the spatial variation in risk of infection and the fitness effects of infection. We report that a single Mhc supertype confers qualitative resistance to Plasmodium relictum, whereas a different Mhc supertype confers quantitative resistance to Plasmodium circumflexum infections. Furthermore, we demonstrate common functional properties of Plasmodium-resistance alleles in passerine birds, suggesting this is a model system for parasite–Mhc associations in the wild. PMID:23516242

  3. Ancestral QTL Alleles from Wild Emmer Wheat Improve Drought Resistance and Productivity in Modern Wheat Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Merchuk-Ovnat, Lianne; Barak, Vered; Fahima, Tzion; Ordon, Frank; Lidzbarsky, Gabriel A.; Krugman, Tamar; Saranga, Yehoshua

    2016-01-01

    Wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides) is considered a promising source for improving stress resistances in domesticated wheat. Here we explored the potential of selected quantitative trait loci (QTLs) from wild emmer wheat, introgressed via marker-assisted selection, to enhance drought resistance in elite durum (T. turgidum ssp. durum) and bread (T. aestivum) wheat cultivars. The resultant near-isogenic lines (BC3F3 and BC3F4) were genotyped using SNP array to confirm the introgressed genomic regions and evaluated in two consecutive years under well-watered (690–710 mm) and water-limited (290–320 mm) conditions. Three of the introgressed QTLs were successfully validated, two in the background of durum wheat cv. Uzan (on chromosomes 1BL and 2BS), and one in the background of bread wheat cvs. Bar Nir and Zahir (chromosome 7AS). In most cases, the QTL x environment interaction was validated in terms of improved grain yield and biomass—specifically under drought (7AS QTL in cv. Bar Nir background), under both treatments (2BS QTL), and a greater stability across treatments (1BL QTL). The results provide a first demonstration that introgression of wild emmer QTL alleles can enhance productivity and yield stability across environments in domesticated wheat, thereby enriching the modern gene pool with essential diversity for the improvement of drought resistance. PMID:27148287

  4. Transgenic strategies to confer resistance against viruses in rice plants

    PubMed Central

    Sasaya, Takahide; Nakazono-Nagaoka, Eiko; Saika, Hiroaki; Aoki, Hideyuki; Hiraguri, Akihiro; Netsu, Osamu; Uehara-Ichiki, Tamaki; Onuki, Masatoshi; Toki, Seichi; Saito, Koji; Yatou, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is cultivated in more than 100 countries and supports nearly half of the world’s population. Developing efficient methods to control rice viruses is thus an urgent necessity because viruses cause serious losses in rice yield. Most rice viruses are transmitted by insect vectors, notably planthoppers and leafhoppers. Viruliferous insect vectors can disperse their viruses over relatively long distances, and eradication of the viruses is very difficult once they become widespread. Exploitation of natural genetic sources of resistance is one of the most effective approaches to protect crops from virus infection; however, only a few naturally occurring rice genes confer resistance against rice viruses. Many investigators are using genetic engineering of rice plants as a potential strategy to control viral diseases. Using viral genes to confer pathogen-derived resistance against crops is a well-established procedure, and the expression of various viral gene products has proved to be effective in preventing or reducing infection by various plant viruses since the 1990s. RNA interference (RNAi), also known as RNA silencing, is one of the most efficient methods to confer resistance against plant viruses on their respective crops. In this article, we review the recent progress, mainly conducted by our research group, in transgenic strategies to confer resistance against tenuiviruses and reoviruses in rice plants. Our findings also illustrate that not all RNAi constructs against viral RNAs are equally effective in preventing virus infection and that it is important to identify the viral “Achilles’ heel” gene to target for RNAi attack when engineering plants. PMID:24454308

  5. Allelic analysis of stripe rust resistance genes on wheat chromosome 2BS.

    PubMed

    Luo, P G; Hu, X Y; Ren, Z L; Zhang, H Y; Shu, K; Yang, Z J

    2008-11-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiormis Westend f. sp. tritici, is one of the most important foliar diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. Stripe rust resistance genes Yr27, Yr31, YrSp, YrV23, and YrCN19 on chromosome 2BS confer resistance to some or all Chinese P. striiormis f. sp. tritici races CYR31, CYR32, SY11-4, and SY11-14 in the greenhouse. To screen microsatellite (SSR) markers linked with YrCN19, F1, F2, and F3 populations derived from cross Ch377/CN19 were screened with race CYR32 and 35 SSR primer pairs. Linkage analysis indicated that the single dominant gene YrCN19 in cultivar CN19 was linked with SSR markers Xgwm410, Xgwm374, Xwmc477, and Xgwm382 on chromosome 2BS with genetic distances of 0.3, 7.9, 12.3, and 21.2 cM, respectively. Crosses of CN19 with wheat lines carrying other genes on chromosome 2B showed that all were located at different loci. YrCN19 is thus different from the other reported Yr genes in chromosomal location and resistance response and was therefore named Yr41. Prospects and strategies of using Yr41 and other Yr genes in wheat improvement for stripe rust resistance are discussed. PMID:18956025

  6. Two alleles of the sulfite resistance genes are differentially regulated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Noriyuki; Nakagawa, Youji; Hayakawa, Masayuki; Iimura, Yuzuru

    2005-08-01

    The sulfite resistance gene, SSU1-R, is widely distributed in wine yeasts. This gene has an upstream region distinct from that of the allelic gene, SSU1 and SSU1-R is expressed at a much higher level than SSU1. We characterized the promoters of both of these genes by analysis of their activity using the LacZ gene as a reporter. FZF1, the activator gene of SSU1, was shown to regulate SSU1-R expression indirectly. SSU1-R expression was activated under microaerobic conditions, and four 76-bp repeats, present within the SSU1-R promoter region, was essential for high expression. These results indicate that SSU1-R expression is regulated in different manner from that of SSU1. By deletion analysis of the SSU1-R promoter region, we found that at least two of the 76-bp repeats are necessary for promoter activity, and that the number of 76-bp repeats influences the activity. Hence, it was suggested that the number of 76-bp repeats increases in wine yeasts that require strong sulfite resistance. PMID:16116289

  7. Insecticide resistance in house flies from the United States: Resistance levels and frequency of pyrethroid resistance alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although insecticide resistance is a widespread problem for most insect pests, frequently the assessment of resistance occurs over a limited geographic range. Herein we report the first widespread survey of insecticide resistance ever undertaken for the house fly, Musca domestica, a major pest of a...

  8. Unlocking wheat genetic resources for the molecular identification of previously undescribed functional alleles at the Pm3 resistance locus

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Navreet K.; Street, Kenneth; Mackay, Michael; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Keller, Beat

    2009-01-01

    The continuous improvement of crop plants is essential for agriculture in the coming decades and relies on the use of genetic variability through breeding. However, domestication and modern breeding have reduced diversity in the crop germplasm. Global gene banks conserve diversity, but these resources remain underexplored owing to a lack of efficient strategies to isolate important alleles. Here we describe a large-scale allele-mining project at the molecular level. We first selected a set of 1,320 bread wheat landraces from a database of 16,089 accessions, using the focused identification of germplasm strategy. On the basis of a hierarchical selection procedure on this set, we then isolated 7 resistance alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3, doubling the known functional allelic diversity at this locus. This targeted approach for molecular utilization of gene bank accessions reveals landraces as a rich resource of new functional alleles. This strategy can be implemented for other studies on the molecular diversity of agriculturally important genes, as well as for molecular breeding. PMID:19470492

  9. Unlocking wheat genetic resources for the molecular identification of previously undescribed functional alleles at the Pm3 resistance locus.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Navreet K; Street, Kenneth; Mackay, Michael; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Keller, Beat

    2009-06-01

    The continuous improvement of crop plants is essential for agriculture in the coming decades and relies on the use of genetic variability through breeding. However, domestication and modern breeding have reduced diversity in the crop germplasm. Global gene banks conserve diversity, but these resources remain underexplored owing to a lack of efficient strategies to isolate important alleles. Here we describe a large-scale allele-mining project at the molecular level. We first selected a set of 1,320 bread wheat landraces from a database of 16,089 accessions, using the focused identification of germplasm strategy. On the basis of a hierarchical selection procedure on this set, we then isolated 7 resistance alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3, doubling the known functional allelic diversity at this locus. This targeted approach for molecular utilization of gene bank accessions reveals landraces as a rich resource of new functional alleles. This strategy can be implemented for other studies on the molecular diversity of agriculturally important genes, as well as for molecular breeding. PMID:19470492

  10. Molecular characterization and a multiplex allele-specific PCR method for detection of thiabendazole resistance in Penicillium expansum from apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thiabendazole (TBZ) is commonly used as a postharvest treatment for control of blue mold in apples caused by Penicillium expansum. Different point mutations in the ß-tubulin gene conferring benzimidazole resistance have been reported in plant pathogens, but molecular mechanisms of TBZ resistance in ...

  11. Dominance variation across six herbicides of the Arabidopsis thaliana csr1-1 and csr1-2 resistance alleles.

    PubMed

    Roux, Fabrice; Matéjicek, Annick; Gasquez, Jacques; Reboud, Xavier

    2005-11-01

    Dominance of a resistance trait can be defined as a measure of the relative position of the phenotype of the heterozygote RS compared with the phenotype of the two corresponding homozygotes, SS and RR. This parameter has been shown to have primary importance in the dynamics of pesticide resistance evolution. Literature on insecticide resistance suggests that dominance levels in the presence of insecticide vary greatly from completely recessive to completely dominant. With insecticides, both the chemical applied and the dosages used have been demonstrated to affect the dominance. By contrast, almost all herbicide resistances have been found to be inherited as partially to totally dominant traits. This discrepancy between weeds and insects may partly result from the methodologies applied to measure the dominance, ie a single dose for herbicide versus several doses for insecticide. Using two well-known resistances (csr1-1 and csr1-2) to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors in Arabidopsis thaliana (L) Heynh (mouse-ear cress), we used several herbicide doses to determine the dominance level to six ALS-inhibiting herbicides. The dominance level in the presence of herbicide varied from completely dominant to completely recessive, depending on the resistance allele and the herbicide tested. The dominance of the csr1-1 and csr1-2 resistance alleles ranged from 0 (completely recessive) to 1.1 (dominant) and from 0 to 0.3 (partially dominant), respectively. The recessivity of some resistance alleles in the presence of herbicide could lead to the development of improved resistance management in order to delay or avoid herbicide resistance evolution, especially in the control of outcrossing weed species. PMID:16007690

  12. Acquisition of a single EZH2 D1 domain mutation confers acquired resistance to EZH2-targeted inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Theresa; Nerle, Sujata; Pritchard, Justin; Zhao, Boyang; Rivera, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Although targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment, overcoming acquired resistance remains a major clinical challenge. EZH2 inhibitors (EZH2i), EPZ-6438 and GSK126, are currently in the early stages of clinical evaluation and the first encouraging signs of efficacy have recently emerged in the clinic. To anticipate mechanisms of resistance to EZH2i, we used a forward genetic platform combining a mutagenesis screen with next generation sequencing technology and identified a hotspot of secondary mutations in the EZH2 D1 domain (Y111 and I109). Y111D mutation within the WT or A677G EZH2 allele conferred robust resistance to both EPZ-6438 and GSK126, but it only drove a partial resistance within the Y641F allele. EZH2 mutants required histone methyltransferase (HMT) catalytic activity and the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) components, SUZ12 and EED, to drive drug resistance. Furthermore, D1 domain mutations not only blocked the ability of EZH2i to bind to WT and A677G mutant, but also abrogated drug binding to the Y641F mutant. These data provide the first cellular validation of the mechanistic model underpinning the oncogenic function of WT and mutant EZH2. Importantly, our findings suggest that acquired-resistance to EZH2i may arise in WT and mutant EZH2 patients through a single mutation that remains targetable by second generation EZH2i. PMID:26360609

  13. Prion protein genotype survey confirms low frequency of scrapie-resistant K222 allele in British goat herds.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, W; Marier, E; Stewart, P; Konold, T; Street, S; Langeveld, J; Windl, O; Ortiz-Pelaez, A

    2016-02-13

    Scrapie in goats is a transmissible, fatal prion disease, which is endemic in the British goat population. The recent success in defining caprine PRNP gene variants that provide resistance to experimental and natural classical scrapie has prompted the authors to conduct a survey of PRNP genotypes in 10 goat breeds and 52 herds to find goats with the resistant K222 allele. They report here the frequencies in 1236 tested animals of the resistance-associated K222 and several other alleles by breed and herd. Eight animals were found to be heterozygous QK222 goats (0.64 per cent genotype frequency, 95 per cent CI 0.28 to 1.27 per cent) but no homozygous KK222 goats were detected. The K222 allele was found in Saanen, Toggenburg and Anglo-Nubian goats. The fact that only a few goats with the K222 allele have been identified does not preclude the possibility to design and implement successful breeding programmes at national level. PMID:26755614

  14. Prion protein genotype survey confirms low frequency of scrapie-resistant K222 allele in British goat herds

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, W.; Stewart, P.; Konold, T.; Street, S.; Langeveld, J.; Windl, O.; Ortiz-Pelaez, A.

    2016-01-01

    Scrapie in goats is a transmissible, fatal prion disease, which is endemic in the British goat population. The recent success in defining caprine PRNP gene variants that provide resistance to experimental and natural classical scrapie has prompted the authors to conduct a survey of PRNP genotypes in 10 goat breeds and 52 herds to find goats with the resistant K222 allele. They report here the frequencies in 1236 tested animals of the resistance-associated K222 and several other alleles by breed and herd. Eight animals were found to be heterozygous QK222 goats (0.64 per cent genotype frequency, 95 per cent CI 0.28 to 1.27 per cent) but no homozygous KK222 goats were detected. The K222 allele was found in Saanen, Toggenburg and Anglo-Nubian goats. The fact that only a few goats with the K222 allele have been identified does not preclude the possibility to design and implement successful breeding programmes at national level. PMID:26755614

  15. ATP7B expression confers multidrug resistance through drug sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Moinuddin, F M; Shinsato, Yoshinari; Komatsu, Masaharu; Mitsuo, Ryoichi; Minami, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Masatatsu; Kawahara, Kohich; Hirano, Hirofumi; Arita, Kazunori; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that ATP7B is involved in cisplatin resistance and ATP7A confers multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. In this study, we show that ATP7B expressing cells also are resistant to doxorubicin, SN-38, etoposide, and paclitaxel as well as cisplatin. In ATP7B expressing cells, doxorubicin relocated from the nuclei to the late-endosome at 4 hours after doxorubicin exposure. EGFP-ATP7B mainly colocalized with doxorubicin. ATP7B has six metal binding sites (MBSs) in the N-terminal cytoplasmic region. To investigate the role of the MBSs of ATP7B in doxorubicin resistance, we used three mutant ATP7B (Cu0, Cu6 and M6C/S) expressing cells. Cu0 has no MBSs, Cu6 has only the sixth MBS and M6C/S carries CXXC to SXXS mutation in the sixth MBS. Cu6 expressing cells were less resistance to the anticancer agents than wild type ATP7B expressing cells, and had doxorubicin sequestration in the late-endosome. Cu0- and M6C/S-expressing cells were sensitive to doxorubicin. In these cells, doxorubicin did not relocalize to the late-endosome. EGFP-M6C/S mainly localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) even in the presence of copper. Thus the cysteine residues in the sixth MBS of ATP7B are essential for MDR phenotype. Finally, we found that ammonium chloride and tamoxifen suppressed late endosomal sequestration of doxorubicin, thereby attenuating drug resistance. These results suggest that the sequestration depends on the acidity of the vesicles partly. We here demonstrate that ATP7B confers MDR by facilitating nuclear drug efflux and late endosomal drug sequestration. PMID:26988911

  16. Identification of QTLs conferring resistance to downy mildews of maize in Asia.

    PubMed

    George, M L C; Prasanna, B M; Rathore, R S; Setty, T A S; Kasim, F; Azrai, M; Vasal, S; Balla, O; Hautea, D; Canama, A; Regalado, E; Vargas, M; Khairallah, M; Jeffers, D; Hoisington, D

    2003-08-01

    Downy mildew is one of the most destructive diseases of maize in subtropical and tropical regions in Asia. As a prerequisite for improving downy mildew resistance in maize, we analyzed quantitative trait loci (QTLs) involved in resistance to the important downy mildew pathogens--Peronosclerospora sorghi (sorghum downy mildew) and P. heteropogoni (Rajasthan downy mildew) in India, P. maydis (Java downy mildew) in Indonesia, P. zeae in Thailand and P. philippinensis in the Philippines--using a recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between Ki3 (downy mildew resistant) and CML139 (susceptible). Resistance was evaluated as percentage disease incidence in replicated field trials at five downy mildew 'hotspots' in the four countries. Heritability estimates of individual environments ranged from 0.58 to 0.75 with an across environment heritability of 0.50. Composite interval mapping was applied for QTL detection using a previously constructed restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage map. The investigation resulted in the identification of six genomic regions on chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 7 and 10 involved in the resistance to the downy mildews under study, explaining, in total, 26-57% of the phenotypic variance for disease response. Most QTL alleles conferring resistance to the downy mildews were from Ki3. All QTLs showed significant QTL x environment interactions, suggesting that the expression of the QTL may be environment-dependent. A strong QTL on chromosome 6 was stable across environments, significantly affecting disease resistance at the five locations in four Asian countries. Simple-sequence repeat markers tightly linked to this QTL were identified for potential use in marker-assisted selection. PMID:12759731

  17. QTL conferring fusarium crown rot resistance in the elite bread wheat variety EGA Wylie.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi; Kilian, Andrzej; Yan, Guijun; Liu, Chunji

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium crown rot (FCR) is one of the most damaging cereal diseases in semi-arid regions worldwide. The genetics of FCR resistance in the bread wheat (Triticum eastivum L.) variety EGA Wylie, the most resistant commercial variety available, was studied by QTL mapping. Three populations of recombinant inbred lines were developed with this elite variety as the resistant parent. Four QTL conferring FCR resistance were detected and resistance alleles of all of them were derived from the resistant parent EGA Wylie. One of these loci was located on the short arm of chromosome 5D (designated as Qcrs.cpi-5D). This QTL explains up to 31.1% of the phenotypic variance with an LOD value of 9.6. The second locus was located on the long arm of chromosome 2D (designated as Qcrs.cpi-2D) and explained up to 20.2% of the phenotypic variance with an LOD value of 4.5. Significant effects of both Qcrs.cpi-5D and Qcrs.cpi-2D were detected in each of the three populations assessed. Another two QTL (designated as Qcrs.cpi-4B.1 and Qcrs.cpi-4B.2, respectively) were located on the short arm of chromosome 4B. These two QTL explained up to 16.9% and 18.8% of phenotypic variance, respectively. However, significant effects of Qcrs.cpi-4B.1 and Qcrs.cpi-4B.2 were not detected when the effects of plant height was accounted for by covariance analysis. The elite characteristics of this commercial variety should facilitate the incorporation of the resistance loci it contains into breeding programs. PMID:24776887

  18. Knockdown resistance allele frequencies in North American head louse (Anoplura: Pediculidae) populations.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kyong Sup; Previte, Domenic J; Hodgdon, Hilliary E; Poole, Bryan C; Kwon, Deok Ho; El-Ghar, Gamal E Abo; Lee, Si Hyeock; Clark, J Marshall

    2014-03-01

    The study examines the extent and frequency of a knockdown-type resistance allele (kdr type) in North American populations of human head lice. Lice were collected from 32 locations in Canada and the United States. DNA was extracted from individual lice and used to determine their zygosity using the serial invasive signal amplification technique to detect the kdr-type T917I (TI) mutation, which is most responsible for nerve insensitivity that results in the kdr phenotype and permethrin resistance. Previously sampled sites were resampled to determine if the frequency of the TI mutation was changing. The TI frequency was also reevaluated using a quantitative sequencing method on pooled DNA samples from selected sites to validate this population genotyping method. Genotyping substantiated that TI occurs at high levels in North American lice (88.4%). Overall, the TI frequency in U.S. lice was 84.4% from 1999 to 2009, increased to 99.6% from 2007 to 2009, and was 97.1% in Canadian lice in 2008. Genotyping results using the serial invasive signal amplification reaction (99.54%) and quantitative sequencing (99.45%) techniques were highly correlated. Thus, the frequencies of TI in North American head louse populations were found to be uniformly high, which may be due to the high selection pressure from the intensive and widespread use of the pyrethrins- or pyrethroid-based pediculicides over many years, and is likely a main cause of increased pediculosis and failure of pyrethrins- or permethrin-based products in Canada and the United States. Alternative approaches to treatment of head lice infestations are critically needed. PMID:24724296

  19. Knockdown Resistance Allele Frequencies in North American Head Louse (Anoplura: Pediculidae) Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyong Sup; Previte, Domenic J.; Hodgdon, Hilliary E.; Poole, Bryan C.; Kwon, Deok Ho; El-Ghar, Gamal E. Abo; Lee, Si Hyeock; Clark, J. Marshall

    2014-01-01

    The study examines the extent and frequency of a knockdown-type resistance allele (kdr type) in North American populations of human head lice. Lice were collected from 32 locations in Canada and the United States. DNA was extracted from individual lice and used to determine their zygosity using the serial invasive signal amplification technique to detect the kdr-type T917I (TI) mutation, which is most responsible for nerve insensitivity that results in the kdr phenotype and permethrin resistance. Previously sampled sites were resampled to determine if the frequency of the TI mutation was changing. The TI frequency was also reevaluated using a quantitative sequencing method on pooled DNA samples from selected sites to validate this population genotyping method. Genotyping substantiated that TI occurs at high levels in North American lice (88.4%). Overall, the TI frequency in U.S. lice was 84.4% from 1999 to 2009, increased to 99.6% from 2007 to 2009, and was 97.1% in Canadian lice in 2008. Genotyping results using the serial invasive signal amplification reaction (99.54%) and quantitative sequencing (99.45%) techniques were highly correlated. Thus, the frequencies of TI in North American head louse populations were found to be uniformly high, which may be due to the high selection pressure from the intensive and widespread use of the pyrethrins- or pyrethroid-based pediculicides over many years, and is likely a main cause of increased pediculosis and failure of pyrethrins- or permethrin-based products in Canada and the United States. Alternative approaches to treatment of head lice infestations are critically needed. PMID:24724296

  20. RCY1, an Arabidopsis thaliana RPP8/HRT family resistance gene, conferring resistance to cucumber mosaic virus requires salicylic acid, ethylene and a novel signal transduction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideki; Miller, Jennifer; Nozaki, Yukine; Takeda, Megumi; Shah, Jyoti; Hase, Shu; Ikegami, Masato; Ehara, Yoshio; Dinesh-Kumar, S P

    2002-12-01

    The dominant locus, RCY1, in the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype C24 confers resistance to the yellow strain of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV-Y). The RCY1 locus was mapped to a 150-kb region on chromosome 5. Sequence comparison of this region from C24 and a CMV-Y-susceptible C24 mutant predicts that the RCY1 gene encodes a 104-kDa CC-NBS-LRR-type protein. The RCY1 gene from C24, when expressed in the susceptible ecotype Wassilewskija (Ws), restricted the systemic spread of virus. RCY1 is allelic to the resistance genes RPP8 from the ecotype Landsberg erecta and HRT from the ecotype Dijon-17, which confer resistance to Peronospora parasitica biotype Emco5 and turnip crinkle virus (TCV), respectively. Examination of RCY1 plants defective in salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene signaling revealed a requirement for SA and ethylene signaling in mounting a resistance response to CMV-Y. The RCY1 nahG etr1 double mutants exhibited an intermediate level of susceptibility to CMV-Y, compared to the resistant ecotype C24 and the susceptible ecotypes Columbia and Nossen. This suggests that in addition to SA and ethylene, a novel signaling mechanism is associated with the induction of resistance in CMV-Y-infected C24 plants. Moreover, our results suggest that the signaling pathways downstream of the RPP8, HRT, and RCY1 have evolved independently. PMID:12472683

  1. Allele characterization of genes required for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance identifies Rpg5 as the R gene.

    PubMed

    Arora, D; Gross, T; Brueggeman, R

    2013-11-01

    A highly virulent form of the wheat stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK is virulent on both wheat and barley, presenting a major threat to world food security. The recessive and temperature-sensitive rpg4 gene is the only effective source of resistance identified in barley (Hordeum vulgare) against P. graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK. Efforts to position clone rpg4 localized resistance to a small interval on barley chromosome 5HL, tightly linked to the rye stem rust (P. graminis f. sp. secalis) resistance (R) gene Rpg5. High-resolution genetic analysis and post-transcriptional gene silencing of the genes at the rpg4/Rpg5 locus determined that three tightly linked genes (Rpg5, HvRga1, and HvAdf3) are required together for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance. Alleles of the three genes were analyzed from a diverse set of 14 domesticated barley lines (H. vulgare) and 8 wild barley accessions (H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum) to characterize diversity that may determine incompatibility (resistance). The analysis determined that HvAdf3 and HvRga1 code for predicted functional proteins that do not appear to contain polymorphisms determining the compatible (susceptible) interactions with the wheat stem rust pathogen and were expressed at the transcriptional level from both resistant and susceptible barley lines. The HvAdf3 alleles shared 100% amino acid identity among all 22 genotypes examined. The P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines with HvRga1 alleles containing the limited amino acid substitutions unique to the susceptible varieties also contained predicted nonfunctional rpg5 alleles. Thus, susceptibility in these lines is likely due to the nonfunctional RPG5 proteins. The Rpg5 allele analysis determined that 9 of the 13 P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines contain alleles that either code for predicted truncated proteins as the result of a single nucleotide substitution, resulting in a

  2. Food supply confers calcifiers resistance to ocean acidification

    PubMed Central

    Ramajo, Laura; Pérez-León, Elia; Hendriks, Iris E.; Marbà, Núria; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Sejr, Mikael K.; Blicher, Martin E.; Lagos, Nelson A.; Olsen, Ylva S.; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-01-01

    Invasion of ocean surface waters by anthropogenic CO2 emitted to the atmosphere is expected to reduce surface seawater pH to 7.8 by the end of this century compromising marine calcifiers. A broad range of biological and mineralogical mechanisms allow marine calcifiers to cope with ocean acidification, however these mechanisms are energetically demanding which affect other biological processes (trade-offs) with important implications for the resilience of the organisms against stressful conditions. Hence, food availability may play a critical role in determining the resistance of calcifiers to OA. Here we show, based on a meta-analysis of existing experimental results assessing the role of food supply in the response of organisms to OA, that food supply consistently confers calcifiers resistance to ocean acidification. PMID:26778520

  3. Food supply confers calcifiers resistance to ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Ramajo, Laura; Pérez-León, Elia; Hendriks, Iris E; Marbà, Núria; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Sejr, Mikael K; Blicher, Martin E; Lagos, Nelson A; Olsen, Ylva S; Duarte, Carlos M

    2016-01-01

    Invasion of ocean surface waters by anthropogenic CO2 emitted to the atmosphere is expected to reduce surface seawater pH to 7.8 by the end of this century compromising marine calcifiers. A broad range of biological and mineralogical mechanisms allow marine calcifiers to cope with ocean acidification, however these mechanisms are energetically demanding which affect other biological processes (trade-offs) with important implications for the resilience of the organisms against stressful conditions. Hence, food availability may play a critical role in determining the resistance of calcifiers to OA. Here we show, based on a meta-analysis of existing experimental results assessing the role of food supply in the response of organisms to OA, that food supply consistently confers calcifiers resistance to ocean acidification. PMID:26778520

  4. Human placental trophoblasts confer viral resistance to recipient cells

    PubMed Central

    Delorme-Axford, Elizabeth; Donker, Rogier B.; Mouillet, Jean-Francois; Chu, Tianjiao; Bayer, Avraham; Ouyang, Yingshi; Wang, Tianyi; Stolz, Donna B.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.; Morelli, Adrian E.; Sadovsky, Yoel; Coyne, Carolyn B.

    2013-01-01

    Placental trophoblasts form the interface between the fetal and maternal environments and serve to limit the maternal–fetal spread of viruses. Here we show that cultured primary human placental trophoblasts are highly resistant to infection by a number of viruses and, importantly, confer this resistance to nonplacental recipient cells by exosome-mediated delivery of specific microRNAs (miRNAs). We show that miRNA members of the chromosome 19 miRNA cluster, which are almost exclusively expressed in the human placenta, are packaged within trophoblast-derived exosomes and attenuate viral replication in recipient cells by the induction of autophagy. Together, our findings identify an unprecedented paracrine and/or systemic function of placental trophoblasts that uses exosome-mediated transfer of a unique set of placental-specific effector miRNAs to directly communicate with placental or maternal target cells and regulate their immunity to viral infections. PMID:23818581

  5. Mutation of environmental mycobacteria to resist silver nanoparticles also confers resistance to a common antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Larimer, Curtis; Islam, Mohammad Shyful; Ojha, Anil; Nettleship, Ian

    2014-08-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria are a threat to human health, gaining entry to the body through contaminated water systems, where they form persistent biofilms despite extensive attempts at disinfection. Silver is a natural antibacterial agent and in nanoparticle form activity is increased by a high surface area. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as alternative disinfectants in circulating water systems, washing machines and even clothing. However, nanoparticles, like any other antibiotic that has a pervasive durable presence, carry the risk of creating a resistant population. In this study Mycobacterium smegmatis strain mc(2)155 was cultured in AgNP enriched agar such that only a small population survived. Surviving cultures were isolated and re-exposed to AgNPs and AgNO3 and resistance to silver was compared to a negative control. After only a single exposure, mutant M. smegmatis populations were resistant to AgNPs and AgNO3. Further, the silver resistant mutants were exposed to antibiotics to determine if general resistance had been conferred. The minimum inhibitory concentration of isoniazid was four times higher for silver resistant mutants than for strain mc(2)155. However, core resistance was not conferred to other toxic metal ions. The mutants had lower resistance to CuSO4 and ZnSO4 than the mc(2)155 strain. PMID:24989695

  6. Relation of the Allelic Variants of Multidrug Resistance Gene to Agranulocytosis Associated With Clozapine.

    PubMed

    Anil Yağcioğlu, A Elif; Yoca, Gökhan; Ayhan, Yavuz; Karaca, R Özgür; Çevik, Lokman; Müderrisoğlu, Ahmet; Göktaş, Mustafa T; Eni, Nurhayat; Yazici, M Kâzim; Bozkurt, Atilla; Babaoğlu, Melih O

    2016-06-01

    Clozapine use is associated with leukopenia and more rarely agranulocytosis, which may be lethal. The drug and its metabolites are proposed to interact with the multidrug resistance transporter (ABCB1/MDR1) gene product, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Among various P-glycoprotein genetic polymorphisms, nucleotide changes in exons 26 (C3435T), 21 (G2677T), and 12 (C1236T) have been implicated for changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many substrate drugs. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between these specific ABCB1 polymorphisms and clozapine-associated agranulocytosis (CAA). Ten patients with a history of CAA and 91 control patients without a history of CAA, despite 10 years of continuous clozapine use, were included. Patient recruitment and blood sample collection were conducted at the Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, in collaboration with the members of the Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders Section of the Psychiatric Association of Turkey, working in various psychiatry clinics. After DNA extraction from peripheral blood lymphocytes, genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction and endonuclease digestion. Patients with CAA had shorter duration of clozapine use but did not show any significant difference in other clinical, sociodemographic characteristics and in genotypic or allelic distributions of ABCB1 variants and haplotypes compared with control patients. Among the 10 patients with CAA, none carried the ABCB1 all-variant haplotype (TT-TT-TT), whereas the frequency of this haplotype was approximately 12% among the controls. Larger sample size studies and thorough genetic analyses may reveal both genetic risk and protective factors for this serious adverse event. PMID:27043126

  7. aadA Confers Streptomycin Resistance in Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kristi L.; Bundle, Sharyl F.; Kresge, Michele E.; Eggers, Christian H.; Samuels, D. Scott

    2003-01-01

    To enhance genetic manipulation of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, we assayed the aadA gene for the ability to confer resistance to the antibiotics spectinomycin and streptomycin. Using the previously described pBSV2 as a backbone, a shuttle vector, termed pKFSS1, which carries the aadA open reading frame fused to the B. burgdorferi flgB promoter was constructed. The hybrid flgB promoter-aadA cassette confers resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin in both B. burgdorferi and Escherichia coli. pKFSS1 has a replication origin derived from the 9-kb circular plasmid and can be comaintained in B. burgdorferi with extant shuttle vector pCE320, which has a replication origin derived from a 32-kb circular plasmid, or pBSV2, despite the fact that pKFSS1 and pBSV2 have the same replication origin. Our results demonstrate the availability of a new selectable marker and shuttle vector for genetically dissecting B. burgdorferi at the molecular level. PMID:14594849

  8. Temporal trends in prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance alleles over two decades of changing antimalarial policy in coastal Kenya.

    PubMed

    Okombo, John; Kamau, Alice W; Marsh, Kevin; Sutherland, Colin J; Ochola-Oyier, Lynette Isabella

    2014-12-01

    Molecular surveillance of drug resistance markers through time provides crucial information on genomic adaptations, especially in parasite populations exposed to changing drug pressures. To assess temporal trends of established genotypes associated with tolerance to clinically important antimalarials used in Kenya over the last two decades, we sequenced a region of the pfcrt locus encompassing codons 72-76 of the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, full-length pfmdr1 - encoding multi-drug resistance protein, P-glycoprotein homolog (Pgh1) and pfdhfr encoding dihydrofolate reductase, in 485 archived Plasmodium falciparum positive blood samples collected in coastal Kenya at four different time points between 1995 and 2013. Microsatellite loci were also analyzed to compare the genetic backgrounds of parasite populations circulating before and after the withdrawal of chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine. Our results reveal a significant increase in the prevalence of the pfcrt K76 wild-type allele between 1995 and 2013 from 38% to 81.7% (p < 0.0001). In contrast, we noted a significant decline in wild-type pfdhfr S108 allele (p < 0.0001) culminating in complete absence of this allele in 2013. We also observed a significant increase in the prevalence of the wild-type pfmdr1 N86/Y184/D1246 haplotype from 14.6% in 1995 to 66.0% in 2013 (p < 0.0001) and a corresponding decline of the mutant pfmdr1 86Y/184Y/1246Y allele from 36.4% to 0% in 19 years (p < 0.0001). We also show extensive genetic heterogeneity among the chloroquine-sensitive parasites before and after the withdrawal of the drug in contrast to a selective sweep around the triple mutant pfdhfr allele, leading to a mono-allelic population at this locus. These findings highlight the importance of continual surveillance and characterization of parasite genotypes as indicators of the therapeutic efficacy of antimalarials, particularly in the context of changes in malaria treatment

  9. Antiseptic and antibiotic resistance plasmid in Staphylococcus aureus that possesses ability to confer chlorhexidine and acrinol resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Tamura, Y; Yokota, T

    1988-01-01

    Plasmid pSAJ1 from a methicillin- and gentamicin-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus had am molecular size of 50 kilobases and conferred resistance not only to kanamycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, benzalkonium chloride, acriflavin, and ethidium bromide but also to chlorhexidine. In addition, the cloned antiseptic resistance gene(s) manifested acrinol resistance in Escherichia coli. Images PMID:3415214

  10. UV Crosslinking of Donor Corneas Confers Resistance to Keratolysis

    PubMed Central

    Arafat, Samer N.; Robert, Marie-Claude; Shukla, Anita N.; Dohlman, Claes H.; Chodosh, James; Ciolino, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a modified ex vivo corneal crosslinking method that increases stromal resistance to enzymatic degradation for use as a carrier for the Boston keratoprosthesis. Methods Ex vivo crosslinking of human corneas was performed using Barron® artificial anterior chambers. The corneas were de-epithelialized, pre-treated with riboflavin solution (0.1% riboflavin/20% dextran) and irradiated with ultraviolet A (UVA) light (λ=370nm, irradiance=3mW/cm2) for various durations. The combined effect of UVA and gamma (γ) irradiation was also assessed using the commercially available γ-irradiated corneal donors. The corneas were then trephined and incubated at 37 degrees Celsius with 0.3% collagenase A solution. The time to dissolution of each cornea was compared across treatments. Results De-epithelialized corneas (no UV light, no riboflavin) dissolved in 5.8 ± 0.6 hours. Crosslinked corneas demonstrated increased resistance to dissolution, with a time to dissolution of 17.8 +/− 2.6 hours (p < 0.0001). The corneal tissues’ resistance to collagenase increased with longer UVA exposure, reaching a plateau at 30 minutes. Crosslinking both the anterior and posterior corneas did not provide added resistance when compared to crosslinking the anterior corneas only (p>0.05). γ-irradiated corneas dissolved as readily as de-epithelialized controls regardless of whether they were further crosslinked (5.6 ± 1.2 hours) or not (6.1 ± 0.6 hours) (p=0.43) Conclusions Collagen crosslinking of the de-epithelialized anterior cornea surface for 30 minutes conferred optimal resistance to in vitro keratolysis by collagenase A. PMID:25014151

  11. Allele-Specific Virulence Attenuation of the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ1a Type III Effector via the Arabidopsis ZAR1 Resistance Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jennifer D.; Wu, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Plant resistance (R) proteins provide a robust surveillance system to defend against potential pathogens. Despite their importance in plant innate immunity, relatively few of the ∼170 R proteins in Arabidopsis have well-characterized resistance specificity. In order to identify the R protein responsible for recognition of the Pseudomonas syringae type III secreted effector (T3SE) HopZ1a, we assembled an Arabidopsis R gene T–DNA Insertion Collection (ARTIC) from publicly available Arabidopsis thaliana insertion lines and screened it for plants lacking HopZ1a-induced immunity. This reverse genetic screen revealed that the Arabidopsis R protein HOPZ-ACTIVATED RESISTANCE 1 (ZAR1; At3g50950) is required for recognition of HopZ1a in Arabidopsis. ZAR1 belongs to the coiled-coil (CC) class of nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat (NBS–LRR) containing R proteins; however, the ZAR1 CC domain phylogenetically clusters in a clade distinct from other related Arabidopsis R proteins. ZAR1–mediated immunity is independent of several genes required by other R protein signaling pathways, including NDR1 and RAR1, suggesting that ZAR1 possesses distinct signaling requirements. The closely-related T3SE protein, HopZ1b, is still recognized by zar1 Arabidopsis plants indicating that Arabidopsis has evolved at least two independent R proteins to recognize the HopZ T3SE family. Also, in Arabidopsis zar1 plants HopZ1a promotes P. syringae growth indicative of an ancestral virulence function for this T3SE prior to the evolution of recognition by the host resistance protein ZAR1. Our results demonstrate that the Arabidopsis resistance protein ZAR1 confers allele-specific recognition and virulence attenuation of the Pseudomonas syringae T3SE protein HopZ1a. PMID:20368970

  12. High Susceptibility to Cry1Ac and Low Resistance Allele Frequency Reduce the Risk of Resistance of Helicoverpa armigers to Bt Soybean in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dourado, Patrick M; Bacalhau, Fabiana B; Amado, Douglas; Carvalho, Renato A; Martinelli, Samuel; Head, Graham P; Omoto, Celso

    2016-01-01

    The Old World bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner), was recently introduced into Brazil, where it has caused extensive damage to cotton and soybean crops. MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean, which expresses the Bt protein Cry1Ac, was recently deployed in Brazil, providing high levels of control against H. armigera. To assess the risk of resistance to the Cry1Ac protein expressed by MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean in Brazil, we conducted studies to evaluate the baseline susceptibility of H. armigera to Cry1Ac, in planta efficacy including the assessment of the high-dose criterion, and the initial resistance allele frequency based on an F2 screen. The mean Cry1Ac lethal concentration (LC50) ranged from 0.11 to 1.82 μg·mL-1 of diet among all H. armigera field populations collected from crop seasons 2013/14 to 2014/15, which indicated about 16.5-fold variation. MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean exhibited a high level of efficacy against H. armigera and most likely met the high dose criterion against this target species in leaf tissue dilution bioassays up to 50 times. A total of 212 F2 family lines of H. armigera were established from field collections sampled from seven locations across Brazil and were screened for the presence of MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean resistance alleles. None of the 212 families survived on MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean leaf tissue (estimated allele frequency = 0.0011). The responses of H. armigera to Cry1Ac protein, high susceptibility to MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean, and low frequency of resistance alleles across the main soybean-producing regions support the assumptions of a high-dose/refuge strategy. However, maintenance of reasonable compliance with the refuge recommendation will be essential to delay the evolution of resistance in H. armigera to MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean in Brazil. PMID:27532632

  13. High Susceptibility to Cry1Ac and Low Resistance Allele Frequency Reduce the Risk of Resistance of Helicoverpa armigers to Bt Soybean in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bacalhau, Fabiana B.; Amado, Douglas; Carvalho, Renato A.; Martinelli, Samuel; Head, Graham P.; Omoto, Celso

    2016-01-01

    The Old World bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner), was recently introduced into Brazil, where it has caused extensive damage to cotton and soybean crops. MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean, which expresses the Bt protein Cry1Ac, was recently deployed in Brazil, providing high levels of control against H. armigera. To assess the risk of resistance to the Cry1Ac protein expressed by MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean in Brazil, we conducted studies to evaluate the baseline susceptibility of H. armigera to Cry1Ac, in planta efficacy including the assessment of the high-dose criterion, and the initial resistance allele frequency based on an F2 screen. The mean Cry1Ac lethal concentration (LC50) ranged from 0.11 to 1.82 μg·mL−1 of diet among all H. armigera field populations collected from crop seasons 2013/14 to 2014/15, which indicated about 16.5-fold variation. MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean exhibited a high level of efficacy against H. armigera and most likely met the high dose criterion against this target species in leaf tissue dilution bioassays up to 50 times. A total of 212 F2 family lines of H. armigera were established from field collections sampled from seven locations across Brazil and were screened for the presence of MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean resistance alleles. None of the 212 families survived on MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean leaf tissue (estimated allele frequency = 0.0011). The responses of H. armigera to Cry1Ac protein, high susceptibility to MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean, and low frequency of resistance alleles across the main soybean-producing regions support the assumptions of a high-dose/refuge strategy. However, maintenance of reasonable compliance with the refuge recommendation will be essential to delay the evolution of resistance in H. armigera to MON 87701 × MON 89788 soybean in Brazil. PMID:27532632

  14. Recent Rapid Rise of a Permethrin Knock Down Resistance Allele in Aedes aegypti in México

    PubMed Central

    García, Gustavo Ponce; Flores, Adriana E.; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; Saavedra-Rodríguez, Karla; Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Guillermo Bond, J.; Casas-Martínez, Mauricio; Ramsey, Janine M.; García-Rejón, Julián; Domínguez-Galera, Marco; Ranson, Hilary; Hemingway, Janet; Eisen, Lars; Black, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Aedes aegypti, the ‘yellow fever mosquito’, is the primary vector to humans of dengue and yellow fever flaviviruses (DENV, YFV), and is a known vector of the chikungunya alphavirus (CV). Because vaccines are not yet available for DENV or CV or are inadequately distributed in developing countries (YFV), management of Ae. aegypti remains the primary option to prevent and control outbreaks of the diseases caused by these arboviruses. Permethrin is one of the most widely used active ingredients in insecticides for suppression of adult Ae. aegypti. In 2007, we documented a replacement mutation in codon 1,016 of the voltage-gated sodium channel gene (para) of Ae. aegypti that encodes an isoleucine rather than a valine and confers resistance to permethrin. Ile1,016 segregates as a recessive allele conferring knockdown resistance to homozygous mosquitoes at 5–10 µg of permethrin in bottle bioassays. Methods and Findings A total of 81 field collections containing 3,951 Ae. aegypti were made throughout México from 1996 to 2009. These mosquitoes were analyzed for the frequency of the Ile1,016 mutation using a melting-curve PCR assay. Dramatic increases in frequencies of Ile1,016 were recorded from the late 1990's to 2006–2009 in several states including Nuevo León in the north, Veracruz on the central Atlantic coast, and Yucatán, Quintana Roo and Chiapas in the south. From 1996 to 2000, the overall frequency of Ile1,016 was 0.04% (95% confidence interval (CI95) = 0.12%; n = 1,359 mosquitoes examined). The earliest detection of Ile1,016 was in Nuevo Laredo on the U.S. border in 1997. By 2003–2004 the overall frequency of Ile1,016 had increased ∼100-fold to 2.7% (±0.80% CI95; n = 808). When checked again in 2006, the frequency had increased slightly to 3.9% (±1.15% CI95; n = 473). This was followed in 2007–2009 by a sudden jump in Ile1,016 frequency to 33.2% (±1.99% CI95; n = 1,074 mosquitoes). There was spatial heterogeneity

  15. Complete nucleotide sequence of a gene conferring polymyxin B resistance on yeast: similarity of the predicted polypeptide to protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, G; Polazzi, J O

    1987-08-01

    Polymyxin B is an antibiotic that kills sensitive cells by disrupting their membranes. We have cloned a wild-type yeast gene that, when present on a high-copy-number plasmid, renders the cells resistant to the drug. The nucleotide sequence of this gene is presented. A single open reading frame within the sequence has the potential to encode a polypeptide (molecular mass of 77.5 kDa) that shows strong homologies to polypeptides of the protein kinase family. The gene, PBS2, located on chromosome X, is not allelic to the previously described PBS1 gene (where PBS signifies polymyxin B sensitivity). Although pbs1 mutations confer resistance to high levels of polymyxin B, double mutants, pbs1 pbs2, are not resistant to the drug, indicating that PBS2 is essential for pbs1 activity. Models based on the proposed protein kinase activity of the PBS2 gene product are presented to explain the interaction between PBS1 and PBS2 gene products involved in conferring polymyxin B resistance on yeast cells. PMID:3039511

  16. Characterization of Klebsiella sp. strain 10982, a colonizer of humans that contains novel antibiotic resistance alleles and exhibits genetic similarities to plant and clinical Klebsiella isolates.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Tracy H; Zhao, LiCheng; Sahl, Jason W; Robinson, Gwen; Harris, Anthony D; Rasko, David A; Johnson, J Kristie

    2014-01-01

    A unique Klebsiella species strain, 10982, was cultured from a perianal swab specimen obtained from a patient in the University of Maryland Medical Center intensive care unit. Klebsiella sp. 10982 possesses a large IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid encoding a novel FOX AmpC β-lactamase designated FOX-10. A novel variant of the LEN β-lactamase was also identified. Genome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that this isolate contains genes associated with nitrogen fixation, allantoin metabolism, and citrate fermentation. These three gene regions are typically present in either Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates or Klebsiella nitrogen-fixing endophytes but usually not in the same organism. Phylogenomic analysis of Klebsiella sp. 10982 and sequenced Klebsiella genomes demonstrated that Klebsiella sp. 10982 is present on a branch that is located intermediate between the genomes of nitrogen-fixing endophytes and K. pneumoniae clinical isolates. Metabolic features identified in the genome of Klebsiella sp. 10982 distinguish this isolate from other Klebsiella clinical isolates. These features include the nitrogen fixation (nif) gene cluster, which is typically present in endophytic Klebsiella isolates and is absent from Klebsiella clinical isolates. Additionally, the Klebsiella sp. 10982 genome contains genes associated with allantoin metabolism, which have been detected primarily in K. pneumoniae isolates from liver abscesses. Comparative genomic analysis of Klebsiella sp. 10982 demonstrated that this organism has acquired genes conferring new metabolic strategies and novel antibiotic resistance alleles, both of which may enhance its ability to colonize the human body. PMID:24395222

  17. Identification of multiple interacting alleles conferring low glycerol and high ethanol yield in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanolic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic engineering of industrial microorganisms often suffers from undesirable side effects on essential functions. Reverse engineering is an alternative strategy to improve multifactorial traits like low glycerol/high ethanol yield in yeast fermentation. Previous rational engineering of this trait always affected essential functions like growth and stress tolerance. We have screened Saccharomyces cerevisiae biodiversity for specific alleles causing lower glycerol/higher ethanol yield, assuming higher compatibility with normal cellular functionality. Previous work identified ssk1E330N…K356N as causative allele in strain CBS6412, which displayed the lowest glycerol/ethanol ratio. Results We have now identified a unique segregant, 26B, that shows similar low glycerol/high ethanol production as the superior parent, but lacks the ssk1E330N…K356N allele. Using segregants from the backcross of 26B with the inferior parent strain, we applied pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis and identified three minor quantitative trait loci (QTLs) linked to low glycerol/high ethanol production. Within these QTLs, we identified three novel alleles of known regulatory and structural genes of glycerol metabolism, smp1R110Q,P269Q, hot1P107S,H274Y and gpd1L164P as causative genes. All three genes separately caused a significant drop in the glycerol/ethanol production ratio, while gpd1L164P appeared to be epistatically suppressed by other alleles in the superior parent. The order of potency in reducing the glycerol/ethanol ratio of the three alleles was: gpd1L164P > hot1P107S,H274Y ≥ smp1R110Q,P269Q. Conclusions Our results show that natural yeast strains harbor multiple specific alleles of genes controlling essential functions, that are apparently compatible with survival in the natural environment. These newly identified alleles can be used as gene tools for engineering industrial yeast strains with multiple subtle changes, minimizing the risk of

  18. Recombinant Rp1 genes confer necrotic or nonspecific resistance phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shavannor M; Steinau, Martin; Trick, Harold N; Hulbert, Scot H

    2010-06-01

    Genes at the Rp1 rust resistance locus of maize confer race-specific resistance to the common rust fungus Puccinia sorghi. Three variant genes with nonspecific effects (HRp1 -Kr1N, -D*21 and -MD*19) were found to be generated by intragenic crossing over within the LRR region. The LRR region of most NBS-LRR encoding genes is quite variable and codes for one of the regions in resistance gene proteins that controls specificity. Sequence comparisons demonstrated that the Rp1-Kr1N recombinant gene was identical to the N-terminus of the rp1-kp2 gene and C-terminus of another gene from its HRp1-K grandparent. The Rp1-D*21 recombinant gene consists of the N-terminus of the rp1-dp2 gene and C-terminus of the Rp1-D gene from the parental haplotype. Similarly, a recombinant gene from the Rp1-MD*19 haplotype has the N-terminus of an rp1 gene from the HRp1-M parent and C-terminus of the rp1-D19 gene from the HRp1-D parent. The recombinant Rp1 -Kr1N, -D*21 and -MD*19 genes activated defense responses in the absence of their AVR proteins triggering HR (hypersensitive response) in the absence of the pathogen. The results indicate that the frequent intragenic recombination events that occur in the Rp1 gene cluster not only recombine the genes into novel haplotypes, but also create genes with nonspecific effects. Some of these may contribute to nonspecific quantitative resistance but others have severe consequences for the fitness of the plant. PMID:20443026

  19. Drug resistance. K13-propeller mutations confer artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Straimer, Judith; Gnädig, Nina F; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Duru, Valentine; Ramadani, Arba Pramundita; Dacheux, Mélanie; Khim, Nimol; Zhang, Lei; Lam, Stephen; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Fairhurst, Rick M; Ménard, Didier; Fidock, David A

    2015-01-23

    The emergence of artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asia imperils efforts to reduce the global malaria burden. We genetically modified the Plasmodium falciparum K13 locus using zinc-finger nucleases and measured ring-stage survival rates after drug exposure in vitro; these rates correlate with parasite clearance half-lives in artemisinin-treated patients. With isolates from Cambodia, where resistance first emerged, survival rates decreased from 13 to 49% to 0.3 to 2.4% after the removal of K13 mutations. Conversely, survival rates in wild-type parasites increased from ≤0.6% to 2 to 29% after the insertion of K13 mutations. These mutations conferred elevated resistance to recent Cambodian isolates compared with that of reference lines, suggesting a contemporary contribution of additional genetic factors. Our data provide a conclusive rationale for worldwide K13-propeller sequencing to identify and eliminate artemisinin-resistant parasites. PMID:25502314

  20. Resistance to the Novel Fungicide Pyrimorph in Phytophthora capsici: Risk Assessment and Detection of Point Mutations in CesA3 That Confer Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Zhili; Shao, Jingpeng; Chen, Lei; Lu, Xiaohong; Hu, Jian; Qin, Zhaohai; Liu, Xili

    2013-01-01

    Pyrimorph is a novel fungicide with high activity against the plant pathogen Phytophthora capsici. We investigated the risk that P. capsici can develop resistance to pyrimorph. The baseline sensitivities of 226 P. capsici isolates, tested by mycelial growth inhibition, showed a unimodal distribution with a mean EC50 value of 1.4261 (±0.4002) µg/ml. Twelve pyrimorph-resistant mutants were obtained by repeated exposure to pyrimorph in vitro with a frequency of approximately 1×10−4. The resistance factors of the mutants ranged from 10.67 to 56.02. Pyrimorph resistance of the mutants was stable after 10 transfers on pyrimorph-free medium. Fitness in sporulation, cystospore germination, and pathogenicity in the pyrimorph-resistant mutants was similar to or less than that in the parental wild-type isolates. On detached pepper leaves and pepper plants treated with the recommended maximum dose of pyrimorph, however, virulence was greater for mutants with a high level of pyrimorph resistance than for the wild type. The results suggest that the risk of P. capsici developing resistance to pyrimorph is low to moderate. Among mutants with a high level of pyrimorph resistance, EC50 values for pyrimorph and CAA fungicides flumorph, dimethomorph, and mandipropamid were positively correlated. This indicated that point mutations in cellulose synthase 3 (CesA3) may confer resistance to pyrimorph. Comparison of CesA3 in isolates with a high level of pyrimorph resistance and parental isolates showed that an amino acid change from glutamine to lysine at position 1077 resulted in stable, high resistance in the mutants. Based on the point mutations, an allele-specific PCR method was developed to detect pyrimorph resistance in P. capsici populations. PMID:23431382

  1. Human trophoblasts confer resistance to viruses implicated in perinatal infection

    PubMed Central

    BAYER, Avraham; DELORME-AXFORD, Elizabeth; SLEIGHER, Christie; FREY, Teryl K.; TROBAUGH, Derek W.; KLIMSTRA, William B.; EMERT-SEDLAK, Lori A.; SMITHGALL, Thomas E.; KINCHINGTON, Paul R.; VADIA, Stephen; SEVEAU, Stephanie; Boyle, Jon P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) Primary human trophoblasts were previously shown to be resistant to viral infection, and able to confer this resistance to non-trophoblast cells. Can trophoblasts protect non-trophoblastic cells from infection by viruses or other intracellular pathogens that are implicated in perinatal infection? Study Design Isolated primary term human trophoblasts were cultured for 72 h. Diverse non-placental human cell lines (U2OS, HFF, TZM-bl, MeWo, and Caco-2) were pre-exposed to either trophoblast conditioned, non-conditioned medium, or miR-517-3p for 24 h. Cells were infected with several viral and non-viral pathogens known to be associated with perinatal infections. Cellular infection was defined and quantified by plaque assays, luciferase assays, microscopy, and/or colonization assays. Differences in infection were assessed by Student's t-test or ANOVA with Bonferroni's correction. Results Infection by rubella and other togaviruses, HIV-1, and varicella zoster, was attenuated in cells pre-exposed to trophoblast conditioned medium (p <0.05), and a partial effect by the Ch.19 microRNA miR-517-3p on specific pathogens. The conditioned medium had no effect on infection by Toxoplasma gondii or Listeria monocytogenes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that medium conditioned by primary human trophoblasts attenuate viral infection in non-trophoblastic cells. Our data point to a trophoblast-specific antiviral effect that may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:25108145

  2. Independent origins of loss-of-function mutations conferring oxamniquine resistance in a Brazilian schistosome population.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Frédéric D; Le Clec'h, Winka; Eng, Nina; Rugel, Anastasia R; Assis, Rafael Ramiro de; Oliveira, Guilherme; Holloway, Stephen P; Cao, Xiaohang; Hart, P John; LoVerde, Philip T; Anderson, Timothy J C

    2016-06-01

    Molecular surveillance provides a powerful approach to monitoring the resistance status of parasite populations in the field and for understanding resistance evolution. Oxamniquine was used to treat Brazilian schistosomiasis patients (mid-1970s to mid-2000s) and several cases of parasite infections resistant to treatment were recorded. The gene underlying resistance (SmSULT-OR) encodes a sulfotransferase required for intracellular drug activation. Resistance has a recessive basis and occurs when both SmSULT-OR alleles encode for defective proteins. Here we examine SmSULT-OR sequence variation in a natural schistosome population in Brazil ∼40years after the first use of this drug. We sequenced SmSULT-OR from 189 individual miracidia (1-11 per patient) recovered from 49 patients, and tested proteins expressed from putative resistance alleles for their ability to activate oxamniquine. We found nine mutations (four non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms, three non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms and two indels). Both mutations (p.E142del and p.C35R) identified previously were recovered in this field population. We also found two additional mutations (a splice site variant and 1bp coding insertion) predicted to encode non-functional truncated proteins. Two additional substitutions (p.G206V, p.N215Y) tested had no impact on oxamniquine activation. Three results are of particular interest: (i) we recovered the p.E142del mutation from the field: this same deletion is responsible for resistance in an oxamniquine selected laboratory parasite population; (ii) frequencies of resistance alleles are extremely low (0.27-0.8%), perhaps due to fitness costs associated with carriage of these alleles; (iii) that four independent resistant alleles were found is consistent with the idea that multiple mutations can generate loss-of-function alleles. PMID:27073078

  3. Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab Is Conferred by Mutations in an ABC Transporter Subfamily A Protein.

    PubMed

    Tay, Wee Tek; Mahon, Rod J; Heckel, David G; Walsh, Thomas K; Downes, Sharon; James, William J; Lee, Sui-Fai; Reineke, Annette; Williams, Adam K; Gordon, Karl H J

    2015-11-01

    The use of conventional chemical insecticides and bacterial toxins to control lepidopteran pests of global agriculture has imposed significant selection pressure leading to the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. Transgenic crops (e.g., cotton) expressing the Bt Cry toxins are now used world wide to control these pests, including the highly polyphagous and invasive cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. Since 2004, the Cry2Ab toxin has become widely used for controlling H. armigera, often used in combination with Cry1Ac to delay resistance evolution. Isolation of H. armigera and H. punctigera individuals heterozygous for Cry2Ab resistance in 2002 and 2004, respectively, allowed aspects of Cry2Ab resistance (level, fitness costs, genetic dominance, complementation tests) to be characterised in both species. However, the gene identity and genetic changes conferring this resistance were unknown, as was the detailed Cry2Ab mode of action. No cross-resistance to Cry1Ac was observed in mutant lines. Biphasic linkage analysis of a Cry2Ab-resistant H. armigera family followed by exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC) marker mapping and candidate gene sequencing identified three independent resistance-associated INDEL mutations in an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter gene we named HaABCA2. A deletion mutation was also identified in the H. punctigera homolog from the resistant line. All mutations truncate the ABCA2 protein. Isolation of further Cry2Ab resistance alleles in the same gene from field H. armigera populations indicates unequal resistance allele frequencies and the potential for Bt resistance evolution. Identification of the gene involved in resistance as an ABC transporter of the A subfamily adds to the body of evidence on the crucial role this gene family plays in the mode of action of the Bt Cry toxins. The structural differences between the ABCA2, and that of the C subfamily required for Cry1Ac toxicity, indicate differences in the detailed mode

  4. Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab Is Conferred by Mutations in an ABC Transporter Subfamily A Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Wee Tek; Mahon, Rod J.; Heckel, David G.; Walsh, Thomas K.; Downes, Sharon; James, William J.; Lee, Sui-Fai; Reineke, Annette; Williams, Adam K.; Gordon, Karl H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of conventional chemical insecticides and bacterial toxins to control lepidopteran pests of global agriculture has imposed significant selection pressure leading to the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. Transgenic crops (e.g., cotton) expressing the Bt Cry toxins are now used world wide to control these pests, including the highly polyphagous and invasive cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. Since 2004, the Cry2Ab toxin has become widely used for controlling H. armigera, often used in combination with Cry1Ac to delay resistance evolution. Isolation of H. armigera and H. punctigera individuals heterozygous for Cry2Ab resistance in 2002 and 2004, respectively, allowed aspects of Cry2Ab resistance (level, fitness costs, genetic dominance, complementation tests) to be characterised in both species. However, the gene identity and genetic changes conferring this resistance were unknown, as was the detailed Cry2Ab mode of action. No cross-resistance to Cry1Ac was observed in mutant lines. Biphasic linkage analysis of a Cry2Ab-resistant H. armigera family followed by exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC) marker mapping and candidate gene sequencing identified three independent resistance-associated INDEL mutations in an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter gene we named HaABCA2. A deletion mutation was also identified in the H. punctigera homolog from the resistant line. All mutations truncate the ABCA2 protein. Isolation of further Cry2Ab resistance alleles in the same gene from field H. armigera populations indicates unequal resistance allele frequencies and the potential for Bt resistance evolution. Identification of the gene involved in resistance as an ABC transporter of the A subfamily adds to the body of evidence on the crucial role this gene family plays in the mode of action of the Bt Cry toxins. The structural differences between the ABCA2, and that of the C subfamily required for Cry1Ac toxicity, indicate differences in the detailed mode

  5. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav) Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Sayono, Sayono; Hidayati, Anggie Puspa Nur; Fahri, Sukmal; Sumanto, Didik; Dharmana, Edi; Hadisaputro, Suharyo; Asih, Puji Budi Setia; Syafruddin, Din

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNaV gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide susceptibility tests demonstrated Ae, aegypti resistance to the pyrethroids, with mortality rates ranging from 1.6%-15.2%. Three non-synonymous polymorphisms (S989P, V1016G and F1534C) and one synonymous polymorphism (codon 982) were detected in the AaNaV gene. Eight AaNaV alleles were observed in specimens from Central Java. Allele 3 (SGF) and allele 7 (PGF) represent the most common alleles found and demonstrated strong associations with resistance to pyrethroids (OR = 2.75, CI: 0.97-7.8 and OR = 7.37, CI: 2.4-22.5, respectively). This is the first report of 8 Ae. aegypti AaNaV alleles, and it indicates the development of resistance in Ae. aegypti in response to pyrethroid insecticide-based selective pressure. These findings strongly suggest the need for an appropriate integrated use of insecticides in the region. The 989P, 1016G and 1534C polymorphisms in the AaNaV gene are potentially valuable molecular markers for pyrethroid insecticide resistance monitoring. PMID:26939002

  6. Quantitative Sequencing for the Determination of Kdr-type Resistance Allele (V419L, L925I, I936F) Frequencies in Common Bed Bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) Populations Collected from Israel.

    PubMed

    Palenchar, Daniel J; Gellatly, Kyle J; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y; Shalom, Uri; Clark, J Marshall

    2015-09-01

    Human bed bug infestations have dramatically increased worldwide since the mid-1990s. A similar phenomenon was also observed in Israel since 2005, when infestations were reported from all over the country. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (V419L and L925I) in the bed bug voltage-sensitive sodium channel confer kdr-type resistance to pyrethroids. Using quantitative sequencing (QS), the resistance allele frequencies of Israeli bed bug populations from across the country were determined. Genomic DNA was extracted from samples of 12 populations of bed bugs collected from Israel and DNA fragments containing the V419L or L925I and I936F mutations sites were PCR amplified. The PCR products were analyzed by QS and the nucleotide signal ratios calculated and used to predict the resistance allele frequencies of the unknown populations. Results of the genetic analysis show that resistant nucleotide signals are highly correlated to resistance allele frequencies for both mutations. Ten of the 12 tested populations had 100% of the L925I mutation and 0% of the V419L mutation. One population was heterogeneous for the L925I mutation and had 0% of the V419L mutation and another population was heterogeneous for the V419L mutation and had 100% of the L925I mutation. I936F occurred only at low levels. These results indicate that bed bugs in Israel are genetically resistant to pyrethroids. Thus, pyrethroids should only be used for bed bug management with caution using effective application and careful monitoring procedures. Additionally, new and novel-acting insecticides and nonchemical means of controlling bed bugs should be explored. PMID:26336243

  7. Academic Conferences: Representative and Resistant Sites for Higher Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Emily F.

    2015-01-01

    The overarching argument made in this article is twofold. Firstly, academic conferences are posited as sites for higher education research. Secondly, the well-recognised emotional and social processes of conferences are used to make space at the boundaries of higher education research for psychosocial analysis. The article theorises conferences in…

  8. Different Alleles of a Gene Encoding Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase (PaLAR3) Influence Resistance against the Fungus Heterobasidion parviporum in Picea abies.

    PubMed

    Nemesio-Gorriz, Miguel; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Ihrmark, Katarina; Källman, Thomas; Olson, Åke; Lascoux, Martin; Stenlid, Jan; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Elfstrand, Malin

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that fungal diseases are a growing menace for conifers in modern silviculture, only a very limited number of molecular markers for pathogen resistance have been validated in conifer species. A previous genetic study indicated that the resistance of Norway spruce (Picea abies) to Heterobasidion annosum s.l., a pathogenic basidiomycete species complex, is linked to a quantitative trait loci that associates with differences in fungal growth in sapwood (FGS) that includes a gene, PaLAR3, which encodes a leucoanthocyanidin reductase. In this study, gene sequences showed the presence of two PaLAR3 allelic lineages in P. abies. Higher resistance was associated with the novel allele, which was found in low frequency in the four P. abies populations that we studied. Norway spruce plants carrying at least one copy of the novel allele showed a significant reduction in FGS after inoculation with Heterobasidion parviporum compared to their half-siblings carrying no copies, indicating dominance of this allele. The amount of (+) catechin, the enzymatic product of PaLAR3, was significantly higher in bark of trees homozygous for the novel allele. Although we observed that the in vitro activities of the enzymes encoded by the two alleles were similar, we could show that allele-specific transcript levels were significantly higher for the novel allele, indicating that regulation of gene expression is responsible for the observed effects in resistance, possibly caused by differences in cis-acting elements that we observe in the promoter region of the two alleles. PMID:27317690

  9. Coordination between apoplastic and symplastic detoxification confers plant aluminum resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Lei, Gui Jie; Wang, Zhi Wei; Shi, Yuan Zhi; Braam, Janet; Li, Gui Xin; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2013-08-01

    Whether aluminum toxicity is an apoplastic or symplastic phenomenon is still a matter of debate. Here, we found that three auxin overproducing mutants, yucca, the recessive mutant superroot2, and superroot1 had increased aluminum sensitivity, while a transfer DNA insertion mutant, xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolases15 (xth15), showed enhanced aluminum resistance, accompanied by low endogenous indole-3-acetic acid levels, implying that auxin may be involved in plant responses to aluminum stress. We used yucca and xth15 mutants for further study. The two mutants accumulated similar total aluminum in roots and had significantly reduced cell wall aluminum and increased symplastic aluminum content relative to the wild-type ecotype Columbia, indicating that altered aluminum levels in the symplast or cell wall cannot fully explain the differential aluminum resistance of these two mutants. The expression of Al sensitive1 (ALS1), a gene that functions in aluminum redistribution between the cytoplasm and vacuole and contributes to symplastic aluminum detoxification, was less abundant in yucca and more abundant in xth15 than the wild type, consistent with possible ALS1 function conferring altered aluminum sensitivity in the two mutants. Consistent with the idea that xth15 can tolerate more symplastic aluminum because of possible ALS1 targeting to the vacuole, morin staining of yucca root tip sections showed more aluminum accumulation in the cytosol than in the wild type, and xth15 showed reduced morin staining of cytosolic aluminum, even though yucca and xth15 had similar overall symplastic aluminum content. Exogenous application of an active auxin analog, naphthylacetic acid, to the wild type mimicked the aluminum sensitivity and distribution phenotypes of yucca, verifying that auxin may regulate aluminum distribution in cells. Together, these data demonstrate that auxin negatively regulates aluminum tolerance through altering ALS1 expression and aluminum distribution

  10. Global analysis of Plasmodium falciparum Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (pfnhe-1) allele polymorphism and its usefulness as a marker of in vitro resistance to quinine.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Didier; Andriantsoanirina, Valérie; Khim, Nimol; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Witkowski, Benoit; Benedet, Christophe; Canier, Lydie; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Durand, Rémy

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive analysis of the worldwide genetic polymorphism of ms4760 alleles of the pfnhe-1 gene and to discuss their usefulness as molecular marker of quinine resistance (QNR). A new numbering of ms4760 allele, classification grouping ms4760 alleles according to the number of DNNND and DDNHNDNHNND repeat motifs in blocks II and V was also proposed. A total of 1508 ms4760 sequences from isolates, culture-adapted parasites or reference strains from various geographical regions were retrieved from GenBank (last update on 15th June 2012) or from publications and were used for genetic analyses. The association of different alleles of pfnhe-1 with resistance to quinoline antimalarial drugs showed marked geographic disparities. The validity and reliability of candidate polymorphisms in pfnhe-1 gene as molecular markers of QNR appeared restricted to endemic areas from South Asia or possibly East African countries and needs to be confirmed. PMID:24533289

  11. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum Cyclic Amine Resistance Locus (PfCARL) Confer Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    LaMonte, Gregory; Lim, Michelle Yi-Xiu; Wree, Melanie; Reimer, Christin; Nachon, Marie; Corey, Victoria; Gedeck, Peter; Plouffe, David; Du, Alan; Figueroa, Nelissa; Yeung, Bryan; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum cyclic amine resistance locus (PfCARL) are associated with parasite resistance to the imidazolopiperazines, a potent class of novel antimalarial compounds that display both prophylactic and transmission-blocking activity, in addition to activity against blood-stage parasites. Here, we show that pfcarl encodes a protein, with a predicted molecular weight of 153 kDa, that localizes to the cis-Golgi apparatus of the parasite in both asexual and sexual blood stages. Utilizing clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-mediated gene introduction of 5 variants (L830V, S1076N/I, V1103L, and I1139K), we demonstrate that mutations in pfcarl are sufficient to generate resistance against the imidazolopiperazines in both asexual and sexual blood-stage parasites. We further determined that the mutant PfCARL protein confers resistance to several structurally unrelated compounds. These data suggest that PfCARL modulates the levels of small-molecule inhibitors that affect Golgi-related processes, such as protein sorting or membrane trafficking, and is therefore an important mechanism of resistance in malaria parasites. PMID:27381290

  12. Microsatellite markers linked to stem rust resistance allele Sr9a in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers.: Pers. f.sp. tritici Eriks. & E Henn., is one of the most serious diseases of wheat worldwide. Host resistance is more effective and durable when several stem rust resistance (Sr) genes are pyramided into a single genotype, a process that can be ...

  13. A Novel Phakopsora pachyrhizi Resistance Allele (Rpp) Contributed by PI 567068A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean rust (SBR) caused by the obligate, fungal pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi is an economic threat to soybean production, especially in the Americas. Host plant resistance is an important management strategy for SBR. The most recently described resistance to P. pachyrhizi (Rpp) gene is Rpp6 co...

  14. Alloreactive T Cells to Identify Risk HLA Alleles for Retransplantation After Acute Accelerated Steroid-Resistant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Leyking, S; Wolf, M; Mihm, J; Schaefer, M; Bohle, R M; Fliser, D; Sester, M; Sester, U

    2015-10-01

    The risk of rejection by cellular alloreactivity to the transplant donor is not routinely assessed. Here we analyzed alloreactive T cells in kidney transplant recipients and report how their detection may have helped to prevent rejection of a second kidney graft in a patient with a history of acute accelerated steroid-resistant nonhumoral rejection. Alloreactive CD4 and CD8 T cells were quantified using a flow-cytometric mixed lymphocyte reaction assay based on interferon-γ induction. A group of 16 nonrejecting transplant recipients did not show any alloreactive T-cell immunity to their respective donors, whereas alloreactivity to third-party controls was detectable. In the patient with rejection, HLA-specific antibodies were not detectable before and shortly after rejection, but after transplantation the patient showed exceptionally high frequencies of alloreactive T cells against 2 of 11 HLA-typed controls (0.604% and 0.791% alloreactive CD4 T cells and 0.792% and 0.978% alloreactive CD8 T cells) who shared HLA alleles (HLA-A*24, -B*44, -C*02, -DQB1*5) with the kidney donor. These HLA alleles were subsequently excluded for allocation of a second graft. No alloreactive T cells were observed toward the second kidney donor, and this transplantation was performed successfully. Thus, shared HLA alleles between the donor and third-party controls may suggest that alloreactive T cells had contributed to rejection of the first graft. The rejecting patient highlights that determination of cellular alloreactivity before transplantation may be applied to identify unacceptable mismatches and to reduce the risk for acute cellular rejection episodes. PMID:26518945

  15. Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii from Brazil: role of carO alleles expression and blaOXA-23 gene

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbapenems are the antibiotics of choice to treat infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii, and resistance to this class can be determined by loss of membrane permeability and enzymatic mechanisms. Here, we analyzed the basis of carbapenem resistance in clinical A. baumannii isolates from different Brazilian regions. Results The analyses addressed the carbapenemase activity of OXA-23, CarO expression and alterations in its primary structure. Susceptibility test revealed that the strains presented the COS (Colistin-Only-Sensitive) profile. PCR and sequencing showed the presence of the chromosomally-encoded blaOXA-51 in all isolates. The majority of strains (53%) carried the carbapenemase blaOXA-23 gene associated with ISAba1. The Hodge test indicated that these strains are carbapenemase producers. PFGE revealed 14 genotypes among strains from Rio de Janeiro and Maranhão. The influence of carO on imipenem resistance was evaluated considering two aspects: the composition of the primary amino acid sequence; and the expression level of this porin. Sequencing and in silico analyses showed the occurrence of CarOa, CarOb and undefined CarO types, and Real Time RT-PCR revealed basal and reduced carO transcription levels among isolates. Conclusions We concluded that, in general, for these Brazilian isolates, the major carbapenem resistance mechanism was due to OXA-23 carbapenemase activity and that loss of CarO porin plays a minor role in this phenotype. However, it was possible to associate the carO alleles and their expression with imipenem resistance. Therefore, these findings underline the complexity in addressing the role of different mechanisms in carbapenem resistance and highlight the possible influence of CarO type in this phenotype. PMID:24195496

  16. Molecular evolutionary analysis of resistance gene eIF4E and creation of novel resistance alleles in potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to viruses has long been an important breeding objective for researchers working with a number of different crops. As molecular techniques have identified the genes underlying virus resistance it has become increasingly apparent that the eukaryotic translation Initiation Factor 4E (eIF4E)...

  17. Allelic and haplotypic diversity at the rp1 rust resistance locus of maize.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Shavannor M; Pryor, Anthony J; Hulbert, Scot H

    2004-01-01

    The maize Rp1 rust resistance locus is a complex consisting of a family of closely related resistance genes. The number of Rp1 paralogs in different maize lines (haplotypes) varied from a single gene in some stocks of the inbred A188 to >50 genes in haplotypes carrying the Rp1-A and Rp1-H specificities. The sequences of paralogs in unrelated haplotypes differ, indicating that the genetic diversity of Rp1-related genes is extremely broad in maize. Two unrelated haplotypes with five or nine paralogs had identical resistance phenotypes (Rp1-D) encoded in genes that differed by three nucleotides resulting in a single amino acid substitution. Genes in some haplotypes are more similar to each other than to any of the genes in other haplotypes indicating that they are evolving in a concerted fashion. PMID:15342531

  18. Evidence of a monogenic nature of the Nz Gene conferring resistance against Potato virus Y Strain Z (PVYZ) in potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hypersensitive resistance (HR) to Potato virus Y (PVY) in potato (Solanum tuberosum) is conferred by strain-specific N genes. Two such genes have been identified in potato so far, Nytbr conferring HR to PVYo, and Nctbr conferring HR to PVYc. A third, putative gene Nztbr was proposed to confer HR aga...

  19. Multidrug resistance genes in staphylococci from animals that confer resistance to critically and highly important antimicrobial agents in human medicine.

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, Sarah; Shen, Jianzhong; Kadlec, Kristina; Wang, Yang; Li, Beibei; Zhang, Wan-Jiang; Feßler, Andrea T; Wu, Congming; Schwarz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Most antimicrobial resistance genes known so far to occur in staphylococci of animal origin confer resistance to a specific class of antimicrobial agents or to selected members within such a class. However, there are also a few examples of multidrug resistance (MDR) genes that confer resistance to antimicrobial agents of different classes by either target site methylation or active efflux via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The present review provides an overview of these MDR genes with particular reference to those genes involved in resistance to critically or highly important antimicrobial agents used in human and veterinary medicine. Moreover, their location on mobile genetic elements and colocated resistance genes, which may play a role in coselection and persistence of the MDR genes, are addressed. PMID:25455417

  20. Leaf rust resistance in wheat line RL6062 is an allele at the Lr3 locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RL6062, a 'Thatcher' backcross line of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has resistance to leaf rust (caused by Puccinia triticina) derived from a line of common wheat from Iran. RL6062 has an intermediate infection type (IT) of small to moderate uredinia surrounded by distinct chlorosis. RL6062 was cros...

  1. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav) Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Sayono, Sayono; Hidayati, Anggie Puspa Nur; Fahri, Sukmal; Sumanto, Didik; Dharmana, Edi; Hadisaputro, Suharyo; Asih, Puji Budi Setia; Syafruddin, Din

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNaV gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide susceptibility tests demonstrated Ae, aegypti resistance to the pyrethroids, with mortality rates ranging from 1.6%–15.2%. Three non-synonymous polymorphisms (S989P, V1016G and F1534C) and one synonymous polymorphism (codon 982) were detected in the AaNaV gene. Eight AaNaV alleles were observed in specimens from Central Java. Allele 3 (SGF) and allele 7 (PGF) represent the most common alleles found and demonstrated strong associations with resistance to pyrethroids (OR = 2.75, CI: 0.97–7.8 and OR = 7.37, CI: 2.4–22.5, respectively). This is the first report of 8 Ae. aegypti AaNaV alleles, and it indicates the development of resistance in Ae. aegypti in response to pyrethroid insecticide-based selective pressure. These findings strongly suggest the need for an appropriate integrated use of insecticides in the region. The 989P, 1016G and 1534C polymorphisms in the AaNaV gene are potentially valuable molecular markers for pyrethroid insecticide resistance monitoring. PMID:26939002

  2. Characterization of Vibrio fluvialis qnrVC5 Gene in Native and Heterologous Hosts: Synergy of qnrVC5 with other Determinants in Conferring Quinolone Resistance.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Kittappa; Kumar, G N; Bhardwaj, Ashima K

    2016-01-01

    Resistance of various pathogens toward quinolones has emerged as a serious threat to combat infections. Analysis of plethora of genes and resistance mechanisms associated with quinolone resistance reveals chromosome-borne and transferable determinants. qnr genes have been found to be responsible for transferable quinolone resistance. In the present work, a new allele qnrVC5 earlier reported in Vibrio fluvialis from this laboratory was characterized in detail for its sequence, genetic context and propensity to decrease the susceptibility for quinolones. The study has revealed persistence of qnrVC5 in clinical isolates of V. fluvialis from Kolkata region through the years 2002-2006. qnrVC5 existed in the form of a gene cassette with the open reading frame being flanked by an upstream promoter and a downstream V. cholerae repeat region suggestive of its superintegron origin. Sequence analysis of different qnrVC alleles showed that qnrVC5 was closely related to qnrVC2 and qnrVC4 and these alleles were associated with V. cholerae repeats. In contrast, qnrVC1, qnrVC3, and qnrVC6 belonging to another group were associated with V. parahaemolyticus repeats. The gene manifested its activity in native V. fluvialis host as well as in Escherichia coli transformants harboring it by elevating the MIC toward various quinolones by twofold to eightfold. In combination with other quinolone resistance factors such as topoisomerase mutations and aac(6')-Ib-cr gene, qnrVC5 gene product contributed toward higher quinolone resistance displayed by V. fluvialis isolates. Silencing of the gene using antisense peptide nucleic acid sensitized the V. fluvialis parent isolates toward ciprofloxacin. Recombinant QnrVC5 vividly demonstrated its role in conferring quinolone resistance. qnrVC5 gene, its synergistic effect and global dissemination should be perceived as a menace for quinolone-based therapies. PMID:26913027

  3. Characterization of Vibrio fluvialis qnrVC5 Gene in Native and Heterologous Hosts: Synergy of qnrVC5 with other Determinants in Conferring Quinolone Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kittappa; Kumar, G. N.; Bhardwaj, Ashima K.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance of various pathogens toward quinolones has emerged as a serious threat to combat infections. Analysis of plethora of genes and resistance mechanisms associated with quinolone resistance reveals chromosome-borne and transferable determinants. qnr genes have been found to be responsible for transferable quinolone resistance. In the present work, a new allele qnrVC5 earlier reported in Vibrio fluvialis from this laboratory was characterized in detail for its sequence, genetic context and propensity to decrease the susceptibility for quinolones. The study has revealed persistence of qnrVC5 in clinical isolates of V. fluvialis from Kolkata region through the years 2002–2006. qnrVC5 existed in the form of a gene cassette with the open reading frame being flanked by an upstream promoter and a downstream V. cholerae repeat region suggestive of its superintegron origin. Sequence analysis of different qnrVC alleles showed that qnrVC5 was closely related to qnrVC2 and qnrVC4 and these alleles were associated with V. cholerae repeats. In contrast, qnrVC1, qnrVC3, and qnrVC6 belonging to another group were associated with V. parahaemolyticus repeats. The gene manifested its activity in native V. fluvialis host as well as in Escherichia coli transformants harboring it by elevating the MIC toward various quinolones by twofold to eightfold. In combination with other quinolone resistance factors such as topoisomerase mutations and aac(6’)-Ib-cr gene, qnrVC5 gene product contributed toward higher quinolone resistance displayed by V. fluvialis isolates. Silencing of the gene using antisense peptide nucleic acid sensitized the V. fluvialis parent isolates toward ciprofloxacin. Recombinant QnrVC5 vividly demonstrated its role in conferring quinolone resistance. qnrVC5 gene, its synergistic effect and global dissemination should be perceived as a menace for quinolone-based therapies. PMID:26913027

  4. An isochromosome confers drug resistance in vivo by amplification of two genes, ERG11 and TAC1.

    PubMed

    Selmecki, Anna; Gerami-Nejad, Maryam; Paulson, Carsten; Forche, Anja; Berman, Judith

    2008-05-01

    Acquired azole resistance is a serious clinical problem that is often associated with the appearance of aneuploidy and, in particular, with the formation of an isochromosome [i(5L)] in the fungal opportunist Candida albicans. Here we exploited a series of isolates from an individual patient during the rapid acquisition of fluconazole resistance (Flu(R)). Comparative genome hybridization arrays revealed that the presence of two extra copies of Chr5L, on the isochromosome, conferred increased Flu(R) and that partial truncation of Chr5L reduced Flu(R). In vitro analysis of the strains by telomere-mediated truncations and by gene deletion assessed the contribution of all Chr5L genes and of four specific genes. Importantly, ERG11 (encoding the drug target) and a hyperactive allele of TAC1 (encoding a transcriptional regulator of drug efflux pumps) made independent, additive contributions to Flu(R) in a gene copy number-dependent manner that was not different from the contributions of the entire Chr5L arm. Thus, the major mechanism by which i(5L) formation causes increased azole resistance is by amplifying two genes: ERG11 and TAC1. PMID:18363649

  5. Allele Mining in Barley Genetic Resources Reveals Genes of Race-Non-Specific Powdery Mildew Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Spies, Annika; Korzun, Viktor; Bayles, Rosemary; Rajaraman, Jeyaraman; Himmelbach, Axel; Hedley, Pete E.; Schweizer, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Race-non-specific, or quantitative, pathogen resistance is of high importance to plant breeders due to its expected durability. However, it is usually controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL) and therefore difficult to handle in practice. Knowing the genes that underlie race-non-specific resistance (NR) would allow its exploitation in a more targeted manner. Here, we performed an association-genetic study in a customized worldwide collection of spring barley accessions for candidate genes of race-NR to the powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh) and combined data with results from QTL mapping as well as functional-genomics approaches. This led to the identification of 11 associated genes with converging evidence for an important role in race-NR in the presence of the Mlo gene for basal susceptibility. Outstanding in this respect was the gene encoding the transcription factor WRKY2. The results suggest that unlocking plant genetic resources and integrating functional-genomic with genetic approaches can accelerate the discovery of genes underlying race-NR in barley and other crop plants. PMID:22629270

  6. Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations of HIV-1 Subtype B Viruses from Dried Blood Spot Specimens by Multiplex Allele-Specific Assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqing; Cai, Fangping; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Zhou, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jing; Nkengasong, John; Gao, Feng; Yang, Chunfu

    2016-01-01

    A multiplex allele-specific (MAS) assay has been developed for the detection of HIV-1 subtype C drug resistance mutations (DRMs). We have optimized the MAS assay to determine subtype B DRMs in dried blood spots (DBS) collected from patients on antiretroviral therapy. The new assay accurately detected DRMs, including low-abundance mutations that were often missed by Sanger sequencing. PMID:26560533

  7. Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations of HIV-1 Subtype B Viruses from Dried Blood Spot Specimens by Multiplex Allele-Specific Assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guoqing; Cai, Fangping; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Zhou, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jing; Nkengasong, John

    2015-01-01

    A multiplex allele-specific (MAS) assay has been developed for the detection of HIV-1 subtype C drug resistance mutations (DRMs). We have optimized the MAS assay to determine subtype B DRMs in dried blood spots (DBS) collected from patients on antiretroviral therapy. The new assay accurately detected DRMs, including low-abundance mutations that were often missed by Sanger sequencing. PMID:26560533

  8. Allele mining in the gene pool of wild Solanum species for homologues of late blight resistance gene RB/Rpi-blb1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solanum bulbocastanum comprising a CC-NBS-LRR gene RB/Rpi-blb1 confers broad-spectrum resistance to Phytophthora infestans and is currently employed in potato breeding for durable late blight (LB) resistance. Genomes of several Solanum species were reported to contain RB homologues with confirmed b...

  9. Variant allele of HSD3B1 increases progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nastiuk, Kent L.; Li, Jinliang; Gu, Jun; Wu, Ming; Zhang, Qimin; Lin, Hanqing; Wu, Denglong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (3βHSD1), which is a rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of adrenal-derived steroid dehydroepiandrosterone to DHT, may be a promising target for treating castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). METHODS From 2004 to 2011, a total of 103 consecutive patients presenting with advanced prostate cancer were included in this study. All patients were treated with surgical castration as androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Germline DNA was extracted from archived tissue from each patient and sequenced. PSA half-time (representing rate to PSA nadir after ADT), the incidence of, and time to CRPC occurrence, and cause-specific mortality rates were determined during the 3-10 year follow-up. The perioperative data and postoperative outcomes are compared. The patients were retrospectively analyzed for survival time. RESULTS Of the 103 patient samples analyzed, 18 harbored a heterozygous variant (1245C) HSD3B1 gene, while 85 patients were homozygous wild-type (1245A) for HSD3B1. The two groups were homogenous for age, PSA, Gleason and metastases rate preoperatively. The incidence of CRPC observed in the variant group was significantly higher than that of wild-type group (100% vs 64.7%, respectively; p = 0.003). Despite this higher incidence of CRPC, there were no significant differences in time to develop CRPC, or in cause-specific mortality. Further, neither PSA half-time, nor time to biochemical recurrence (rising PSA is only one of the defining characteristics of CRPC) were different between the variant and wild-type groups. CONCLUSION Prostate cancer patients who harbored the heterozygous variant HSD3B1 (1245C) are more likely to develop to CRPC, but do not have shorter time to biochemical recurrence, shorter survival time or higher mortality risk. PMID:25731771

  10. [Allelic state of the molecular marker for the golden nematode (Globodera rostochiensis) resistance gene H1 among Ukrainian and world cultivars of potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum)].

    PubMed

    Karelov, A V; Pilipenko, L A; Kozub, N A; Bondus, R A; Borzykh, A U; Sozinov, I A; Blium, Ia B; Sozinov, A A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was determination of allelic state of the H1 resistance gene against the pathotypes Ro1 and Ro4 of golden potato cyst nematode (Globodera rostochiensis) among Ukrainian and world potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum) cultivars. The allelic condition of the TG689 marker was determined by PCR with DNA samples isolated from tubers of potato and primers, one pair of which flanks the allele-specific region and the other one was used for the control of DNA quality. Among analyzed 77 potato cultivars the allele of marker associated with the H1-type resistance was found in 74% of Ukrainian and 90% foreign ones although some of those cultivars proved to be susceptible to the golden potato nematode in field. The obtained data confirm the presence of H1-resistance against golden nematode pathotypes Ro1 and Ro4 among the Ukrainian potato cultivars and efficiency of the used marker within the accuracy that has been declared by its authors. PMID:24228497

  11. Gene amplification confers glyphosate resistance in Amaranthus palmeri

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Todd A.; Zhang, Wenli; Wang, Dafu; Bukun, Bekir; Chisholm, Stephen T.; Shaner, Dale L.; Nissen, Scott J.; Patzoldt, William L.; Tranel, Patrick J.; Culpepper, A. Stanley; Grey, Timothy L.; Webster, Theodore M.; Vencill, William K.; Sammons, R. Douglas; Jiang, Jiming; Preston, Christopher; Leach, Jan E.; Westra, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the United States and other parts of the world after the commercialization of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops have constitutive overexpression of a glyphosate-insensitive form of the herbicide target site gene, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Increased use of glyphosate over multiple years imposes selective genetic pressure on weed populations. We investigated recently discovered glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus palmeri populations from Georgia, in comparison with normally sensitive populations. EPSPS enzyme activity from resistant and susceptible plants was equally inhibited by glyphosate, which led us to use quantitative PCR to measure relative copy numbers of the EPSPS gene. Genomes of resistant plants contained from 5-fold to more than 160-fold more copies of the EPSPS gene than did genomes of susceptible plants. Quantitative RT-PCR on cDNA revealed that EPSPS expression was positively correlated with genomic EPSPS relative copy number. Immunoblot analyses showed that increased EPSPS protein level also correlated with EPSPS genomic copy number. EPSPS gene amplification was heritable, correlated with resistance in pseudo-F2 populations, and is proposed to be the molecular basis of glyphosate resistance. FISH revealed that EPSPS genes were present on every chromosome and, therefore, gene amplification was likely not caused by unequal chromosome crossing over. This occurrence of gene amplification as an herbicide resistance mechanism in a naturally occurring weed population is particularly significant because it could threaten the sustainable use of glyphosate-resistant crop technology. PMID:20018685

  12. Determination of genomic DNA sequences for beta-tubulin isotype 1 from multiple species of cyathostomin and detection of resistance alleles in third-stage larvae from horses with naturally acquired infections

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Sarah L; Matthews, Jacqueline B; Kaplan, Ray M; Hodgkinson, Jane E

    2009-01-01

    Background Genetic resistance against benzimidazole (BZ) anthelmintics is widespread in cyathostomins, the commonest group of intestinal parasitic nematodes of horses. Studies of BZ-resistant nematodes of sheep, particularly Haemonchus contortus, have indicated that an anthelmintic resistance-conferring T/A polymorphism, encoding an F (phenylalanine) to Y (tyrosine) substitution, in beta-tubulin isotype 1 is present at two loci, codons 167 and 200 (F167Y, F200Y). Recent studies using complementary (c) DNA derived from BZ-susceptible and -resistant cyathostomins identified statistical differences in the frequency of the BZ-resistant A allele at these loci. However, the lack of high-throughput genomic DNA-based detection of polymorphisms limits the study of eggs or larvae from field isolates. In the present study, we report genomic DNA sequences for beta-tubulin isotype 1 from multiple cyathostomin species, thus facilitating the development of pyrosequencing assays to genetically characterize third-stage larvae (L3s) of cyathostomins from mixed-species field isolates. Results Sequence analysis of the beta-tubulin isotype 1 gene in a common species, Cylicocyclus nassatus, indicates a revised genomic structure to published data, revealing that codons 167 and 200 are located on separate exons. A consensus sequence was generated from 91 and 76 individual cyathostomins for the regions spanning codons 167 and 200, respectively. A multi-species genomic DNA-based assay was established to directly pyrosequence individual L3 from field samples of unknown species and BZ sensitivity in a 96-well plate. In this format, the assay to detect F167Y gave a 50-90% success rate. The optimisation of the assay at codon 200 is currently underway. Subsequently, the genotype at F167Y was determined for 241 L3s, collected prior to and after BZ treatment. These results demonstrated a reduction in the heterozygous genotype, TTC/TAC, and an increase in the homozygous resistant genotype TAC

  13. Mutant Alleles of lptD Increase the Permeability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Define Determinants of Intrinsic Resistance to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Grabowicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria provide a particular challenge to antibacterial drug discovery due to their cell envelope structure. Compound entry is impeded by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the outer membrane (OM), and those molecules that overcome this barrier are often expelled by multidrug efflux pumps. Understanding how efflux and permeability affect the ability of a compound to reach its target is paramount to translating in vitro biochemical potency to cellular bioactivity. Herein, a suite of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were constructed in either a wild-type or efflux-null background in which mutations were engineered in LptD, the final protein involved in LPS transport to the OM. These mutants were demonstrated to be defective in LPS transport, resulting in compromised barrier function. Using isogenic strain sets harboring these newly created alleles, we were able to define the contributions of permeability and efflux to the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to a variety of antibiotics. These strains will be useful in the design and optimization of future antibiotics against Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:26596941

  14. A pigeonpea gene confers resistance to Asian soybean rust in soybean.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Cintia G; Guimarães, Gustavo Augusto; Nogueira, Sônia Regina; MacLean, Dan; Cook, Doug R; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Baek, Jongmin; Bouyioukos, Costas; Melo, Bernardo do V A; Tristão, Gustavo; de Oliveira, Jamile Camargos; Rauscher, Gilda; Mittal, Shipra; Panichelli, Lisa; Bacot, Karen; Johnson, Ebony; Iyer, Geeta; Tabor, Girma; Wulff, Brande B H; Ward, Eric; Rairdan, Gregory J; Broglie, Karen E; Wu, Gusui; van Esse, H Peter; Jones, Jonathan D G; Brommonschenkel, Sérgio H

    2016-06-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR), caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is one of the most economically important crop diseases, but is only treatable with fungicides, which are becoming less effective owing to the emergence of fungicide resistance. There are no commercial soybean cultivars with durable resistance to P. pachyrhizi, and although soybean resistance loci have been mapped, no resistance genes have been cloned. We report the cloning of a P. pachyrhizi resistance gene CcRpp1 (Cajanus cajan Resistance against Phakopsora pachyrhizi 1) from pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) and show that CcRpp1 confers full resistance to P. pachyrhizi in soybean. Our findings show that legume species related to soybean such as pigeonpea, cowpea, common bean and others could provide a valuable and diverse pool of resistance traits for crop improvement. PMID:27111723

  15. A Novel Membrane Protein, VanJ, Conferring Resistance to Teicoplanin

    PubMed Central

    Novotna, Gabriela; Hill, Chris; Vincent, Karen; Liu, Chang

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to the glycopeptide antibiotic teicoplanin shows some important differences from the closely related compound vancomycin. They are currently poorly understood but may reflect significant differences in the mode of action of each antibiotic. Streptomyces coelicolor possesses a vanRSJKHAX gene cluster that when expressed confers resistance to both vancomycin and teicoplanin. The resistance to vancomycin is mediated by the enzymes encoded by vanKHAX, but not by vanJ. vanHAX effect a reprogramming of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, which is considered to be generic, conferring resistance to all glycopeptide antibiotics. Here, we show that vanKHAX are not in fact required for teicoplanin resistance in S. coelicolor, which instead is mediated solely by vanJ. vanJ is shown to encode a membrane protein oriented with its C-terminal active site exposed to the extracytoplasmic space. VanJ also confers resistance to the teicoplanin-like antibiotics ristocetin and A47934 and to a broad range of semisynthetic teicoplanin derivatives, but not generally to antibiotics or semisynthetic derivatives with vancomycin-like structures. vanJ homologues are found ubiquitously in streptomycetes and include staP from the Streptomyces toyocaensis A47934 biosynthetic gene cluster. While overexpression of staP also conferred resistance to teicoplanin, similar expression of other vanJ homologues (SCO2255, SCO7017, and SAV5946) did not. The vanJ and staP orthologues, therefore, appear to represent a subset of a larger protein family whose members have acquired specialist roles in antibiotic resistance. Future characterization of the divergent enzymatic activity within this new family will contribute to defining the molecular mechanisms important for teicoplanin activity and resistance. PMID:22232274

  16. Physiological, biochemical and molecular characterization of an induced mutation conferring imidazolinone resistance in wheat.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Francisco; Rojano-Delgado, Antonia M; Fernández, Pablo Tomas; Rodríguez-Suárez, Cristina; Atienza, Sergio G; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-09-01

    The Clearfield(®) wheat cultivars possessing imidazolinone (IMI)-resistant traits provide an efficient option for controlling weeds. The imazamox-resistant cultivar Pantera (Clearfield(®) ) was compared with a susceptible cultivar (Gazul). Target and non-target mechanisms of resistance were studied to characterize the resistance of Pantera and to identify the importance of each mechanism involved in this resistance. Pantera is resistant to imazamox as was determined in previous experiments. The molecular study confirmed that it carries a mutation Ser-Asn627 conferring resistance to imazamox in two out of three acetolactate synthase (ALS) genes (imi1 and imi2), located in wheat on chromosomes 6B and 6D, respectively. However, the last gene (imi3) located on chromosome 6A does not carry any mutation conferring resistance. As a result, photosynthetic activity and chlorophyll content were reduced after imazamox treatment. Detoxification was higher in the resistant biotype as shown by metabolomic study while imazamox translocation was higher in the susceptible cultivar. Interestingly, imazamox metabolism was higher at higher doses of herbicide, which suggests that the detoxification process is an inducible mechanism in which the upregulation of key gene coding for detoxification enzymes could play an important role. Thus, the identification of cultivars with a higher detoxification potential would allow the development of more resistant varieties. PMID:26991509

  17. Mutations of acetylcholinesterase which confer insecticide resistance in Drosophila melanogaster populations

    PubMed Central

    Menozzi, Philippe; Shi, Ming An; Lougarre, Andrée; Tang, Zhen Hua; Fournier, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Background Organophosphate and carbamate insecticides irreversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterase causing death of insects. Resistance-modified acetylcholinesterases(AChEs) have been described in many insect species and sequencing of their genes allowed several point mutations to be described. However, their relative frequency and their cartography had not yet been addressed. Results To analyze the most frequent mutations providing insecticide resistance in Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase, the Ace gene was cloned and sequenced in several strains harvested from different parts of the world. Sequence comparison revealed four widespread mutations, I161V, G265A, F330Y and G368A. We confirm here that mutations are found either isolated or in combination in the same protein and we show that most natural populations are heterogeneous, composed of a mixture of different alleles. In vitro expression of mutated proteins showed that combining mutations in the same protein has two consequences: it increases resistance level and provides a wide spectrum of resistance. Conclusion The presence of several alleles in natural populations, offering various resistance to carbamate and organophosphate compounds will complicate the establishment of resistance management programs. PMID:15018651

  18. Conference on Fire Resistant Materials: A compilation of presentations and papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A. (Editor); Johnson, G. A. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The proceedings of the NASA IRE Resistant Materials Engineering (FIREMEN) Program held at Boeing Commercial Airplane Company, Seattle, Washington, on March 1-2, 1979 are reported. The conference was to discuss the results of research by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in the field of aircraft fire safety and fire-resistant materials. The program topics include the following: (1) large-scale testing; (2) fire toxicology; (3) polymeric materials; and (4) fire modeling.

  19. Conference on Fire Resistant Materials (FIREMEN): A compilation of presentations and papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The proceedings of the NASA Fire Resistant Materials Engineering (FIREMEN) Program held at Ames Research Center on April, 13, 14, 1978 are reported. The purpose of the conference was to discuss the results of NASA in the field of aircraft fire safety and fire resistant materials. The program components include the following: (1) large-scale testing; (2) fire toxicology; (3) polymeric materials; and (4) bibliography related and/or generated from the program.

  20. The ars operon of Escherichia coli confers arsenical and antimonial resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, A; Shi, W; Dey, S; Rosen, B P

    1995-01-01

    The chromosomally encoded arsenical resistance (ars) operon subcloned into a multicopy plasmid was found to confer a moderate level of resistance to arsenite and antimonite in Escherichia coli. When the operon was deleted from the chromosome, the cells exhibited hypersensitivity to arsenite, antimonite, and arsenate. Expression of the ars genes was inducible by arsenite. By Southern hybridization, the operon was found in all strains of E. coli examined but not in Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Bacillus subtilis. PMID:7860609

  1. Identification of wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium alien disomic addition lines conferring resistance to stripe rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thinopyrum intermedium carries many useful traits for wheat genetic improvement. To identify genes conferring resistance to stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici in Zhong 4 (Z4) derived from a cross between common wheat and Th. intermedium, a cross was made between Z4 and a ‘Chin...

  2. CONSTRUCTION OF EXPRESSION CASSETTES TO CONFER RESISTANCE TO ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS IN COTTON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have been working to develop cotton that is resistant to the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus using a genetic engineering approach. Success of this project depends upon the identification of appropriate regulatory elements, as well as structural genes that can be linked to confer a new pathoge...

  3. Molecular survey of turfgrass species for mutations conferring resistance to ACCase inhibiting herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The control of grassy weeds in turfgrass is often problematic due to lack of herbicide selectivity. Seven different naturally occurring mutation sites have been reported to confer resistance to Acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase inhibiting herbicides. One or more of these mutation sites may hold potentia...

  4. Inheritance and linkage map positions of genes conferring resistance to stemphylium blight in lentil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stemphylium blight (caused by Stemphylium botryosum Wallr.) is one of the major diseases of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) in South Asia and North America. The objective of the study was to identify linkage map position of the genes conferring resistance to stemphylium blight and the markers linked ...

  5. Locations of quantitative trait loci conferring Russian wheat aphid resistance in barley germplasm STARS-9301B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Russian wheat aphid (RWA, Diuraphis noxia Mordvilko) infestations of barley reduce grain yield and quality and have caused more than $1 billion in losses in the Western United States since 1986. Our objective was to map genes conferring resistance to RWA feeding damage in the germplasm line STARS-93...

  6. Pyocyanin Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Confers Resistance to Ionic Silver

    PubMed Central

    Merrett, Neil D.

    2014-01-01

    Silver in its ionic form (Ag+), but not the bulk metal (Ag0), is toxic to microbial life forms and has been used for many years in the treatment of wound infections. The prevalence of bacterial resistance to silver is considered low due to the nonspecific nature of its toxicity. However, the recent increased use of silver as an antimicrobial agent for medical, consumer, and industrial products has raised concern that widespread silver resistance may emerge. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen that produces pyocyanin, a redox toxin and a reductant for molecular oxygen and ferric (Fe3+) ions. The objective of this study was to determine whether pyocyanin reduces Ag+ to Ag0, which may contribute to silver resistance due to lower bioavailability of the cation. Using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, pyocyanin was confirmed to be a reductant for Ag+, forming Ag0 nanoparticles and reducing the bioavailability of free Ag+ by >95% within minutes. Similarly, a pyocyanin-producing strain of P. aeruginosa (PA14) reduced Ag+ but not a pyocyanin-deficient (ΔphzM) strain of the bacterium. Challenge of each strain with Ag+ (as AgNO3) gave MICs of 20 and 5 μg/ml for the PA14 and ΔphzM strains, respectively. Removal of pyocyanin from the medium strain PA14 was grown in or its addition to the medium that ΔphzM mutant was grown in gave MICs of 5 and 20 μg/ml, respectively. Clinical isolates demonstrated similar pyocyanin-dependent resistance to Ag+. We conclude that pseudomonal silver resistance exists independently of previously recognized intracellular mechanisms and may be more prevalent than previously considered. PMID:25001302

  7. Ovine progressive pneumonia provirus levels are unaffected by the prion 171R allele in an Idaho sheep flock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selective breeding of sheep for arginine (R) at prion gene (PRNP) codon 171 confers resistance to Scrapie. The 171R allele naturally occurs at low frequency, possibly because it imparts a deleterious trait such as impaired disease resistance. Ovine Progressive Pneumonia/Maedi-Visna virus (OPPV) is...

  8. Two genes conferring resistance to Pythium stalk rot in maize inbred line Qi319.

    PubMed

    Song, Feng-Jing; Xiao, Ming-Gang; Duan, Can-Xing; Li, Hong-Jie; Zhu, Zhen-Dong; Liu, Bao-Tao; Sun, Su-Li; Wu, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Stalk rots are destructive diseases in maize around the world, and are most often caused by the pathogen Pythium, Fusarium and other fungi. The most efficient management for controlling stalk rots is to breed resistant cultivars. Pythium stalk rot can cause serious yield loss on maize, and to find the resistance genes from the existing germplasm is the basis to develop Pythium-resistance hybrid lines. In this study, we investigated the genetic resistance to Pythium stalk rot in inbred line Qi319 using F2 and F2:3 population, and found that the resistance to Pythium inflatum in Qi319 was conferred by two independently inherited dominant genes, RpiQI319-1 and RpiQI319-2. Linkage analysis uncovered that the RpiQI319-1 co-segregated with markers bnlg1203, and bnlg2057 on chromosome 1, and that the RpiQI319-2 locus co-segregated with markers umc2069 and bnlg1716 on chromosome 10. The RpiQI319-1 locus was further mapped into a ~500-kb interval flanked by markers SSRZ33 and SSRZ47. These results will facilitate marker-assisted selection of Pythium stalk rot-resistant cultivars in maize breeding. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the resistance to P. inflatum in the inbred line Qi319, and is also the first description of two independently inherited dominant genes conferring the resistance of Pythium stalk rot in maize. PMID:25724693

  9. pfmdr2 confers heavy metal resistance to Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Elli; Litus, Ilena; Schwarzfuchs, Nurit; Sinay, Rosa; Schlesinger, Pnina; Golenser, Jacob; Baumeister, Stefan; Lingelbach, Klaus; Pollack, Yaakov

    2006-09-15

    Heavy metals are required by all organisms for normal function, but high levels of heavy metals are toxic. Therefore, homeostasis of these metals is crucial. In the human malaria-causing agent Plasmodium falciparum, the mechanisms of heavy metal transport have yet to be characterized. We have developed a P. falciparum line resistant to heavy metals from a wild-type line sensitive to heavy metals. A molecular and biochemical analysis of the involvement of the P. falciparum multidrug resistance 2 (pfmdr2) gene, an ABC-type transporter, in heavy metal homeostasis was studied. Using a novel uptake assay applied on these two strains, it was demonstrated that, when exposed to heavy metals, the sensitive line accumulates metal, whereas no accumulation was observed in the resistant line. The accumulation occurs within the parasite itself and not in the cytoplasm of the red blood cell. This difference in the accumulation pattern is not a result of amplification of the pfmdr2 gene or of a change in the expression pattern of the gene in the two lines. Sequencing of the gene from both lines revealed a major difference; a stop codon is found in the sensitive line upstream of the normal termination, resulting in a truncated protein that lacks 188 amino acids that contain a portion of the essential cytoplasmatic transporter domain, thereby rendering it inactive. In contrast, the resistant line harbors a full-length, active protein. These findings strongly suggest that the PFMDR2 protein acts as an efflux pump of heavy metals. PMID:16849328

  10. Identification of dfrA14 in two distinct plasmids conferring trimethoprim resistance in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Bossé, Janine T.; Li, Yanwen; Walker, Stephanie; Atherton, Tom; Fernandez Crespo, Roberto; Williamson, Susanna M.; Rogers, Jon; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Weinert, Lucy A.; Oshota, Olusegun; Holden, Matt T. G.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Tucker, Alexander W.; Wren, Brendan W.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Langford, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the distribution and genetic basis of trimethoprim resistance in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolates from pigs in England. Methods Clinical isolates collected between 1998 and 2011 were tested for resistance to trimethoprim and sulphonamide. The genetic basis of trimethoprim resistance was determined by shotgun WGS analysis and the subsequent isolation and sequencing of plasmids. Results A total of 16 (out of 106) A. pleuropneumoniae isolates were resistant to both trimethoprim (MIC >32 mg/L) and sulfisoxazole (MIC ≥256 mg/L), and a further 32 were resistant only to sulfisoxazole (MIC ≥256 mg/L). Genome sequence data for the trimethoprim-resistant isolates revealed the presence of the dfrA14 dihydrofolate reductase gene. The distribution of plasmid sequences in multiple contigs suggested the presence of two distinct dfrA14-containing plasmids in different isolates, which was confirmed by plasmid isolation and sequencing. Both plasmids encoded mobilization genes, the sulphonamide resistance gene sul2, as well as dfrA14 inserted into strA, a streptomycin-resistance-associated gene, although the gene order differed between the two plasmids. One of the plasmids further encoded the strB streptomycin-resistance-associated gene. Conclusions This is the first description of mobilizable plasmids conferring trimethoprim resistance in A. pleuropneumoniae and, to our knowledge, the first report of dfrA14 in any member of the Pasteurellaceae. The identification of dfrA14 conferring trimethoprim resistance in A. pleuropneumoniae isolates will facilitate PCR screens for resistance to this important antimicrobial. PMID:25957382

  11. Mutations in the Pneumocystis jirovecii DHPS Gene Confer Cross-Resistance to Sulfa Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Iliades, Peter; Meshnick, Steven R.; Macreadie, Ian G.

    2005-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a major opportunistic pathogen that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) and results in a high degree of mortality in immunocompromised individuals. The drug of choice for PCP is typically sulfamethoxazole (SMX) or dapsone in conjunction with trimethoprim. Drug treatment failure and sulfa drug resistance have been implicated epidemiologically with point mutations in dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) of P. jirovecii. P. jirovecii cannot be cultured in vitro; however, heterologous complementation of the P. jirovecii trifunctional folic acid synthesis (PjFAS) genes with an E. coli DHPS-disrupted strain was recently achieved. This enabled the evaluation of SMX resistance conferred by DHPS mutations. In this study, we sought to determine whether DHPS mutations conferred sulfa drug cross-resistance to 15 commonly available sulfa drugs. It was established that the presence of amino acid substitutions (T517A or P519S) in the DHPS domain of PjFAS led to cross-resistance against most sulfa drugs evaluated. The presence of both mutations led to increased sulfa drug resistance, suggesting cooperativity and the incremental evolution of sulfa drug resistance. Two sulfa drugs (sulfachloropyridazine [SCP] and sulfamethoxypyridazine [SMP]) that had a higher inhibitory potential than SMX were identified. In addition, SCP, SMP, and sulfadiazine (SDZ) were found to be capable of inhibiting the clinically observed drug-resistant mutants. We propose that SCP, SMP, and SDZ should be considered for clinical evaluation against PCP or for future development of novel sulfa drug compounds. PMID:15673759

  12. Co-Occurrence of Two Allelic Variants of CYP51 in Erysiphe necator and Their Correlation with Over-Expression for DMI Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rallos, Lynn Esther E.; Baudoin, Anton B.

    2016-01-01

    Demethylation inhibitors (DMIs) have been an important tool in the management of grapevine powdery mildew caused by Erysiphe necator. Long-term, intensive use of DMIs has resulted in reduced sensitivity in field populations. To further characterize DMI resistance and understand resistance mechanisms in this pathogen, we investigated the cyp51 sequence of 24 single-spored isolates from Virginia and surrounding states and analyzed gene expression in isolates representing a wide range of sensitivity. Two cyp51 alleles were found with respect to the 136th codon of the predicted EnCYP51 sequence: the wild-type (TAT) and the mutant (TTT), which results in the known Y136F amino acid change. Some isolates possessed both alleles, demonstrating gene duplication or increased gene copy number and possibly a requirement for at least one mutant copy of CYP51 for resistance. Cyp51 was over-expressed 1.4- to 19-fold in Y136F-mutant isolates. However, the Y136F mutation was absent in one isolate with moderate to high resistance factor. Two additional synonymous mutations were detected as well, one of which, A1119C was present only in isolates with high cyp51 expression. Overall, our results indicate that at least two mechanisms, cyp51 over-expression and the known target-site mutation in CYP51, contribute to resistance in E. necator, and may be working in conjunction with each other. PMID:26839970

  13. Co-Occurrence of Two Allelic Variants of CYP51 in Erysiphe necator and Their Correlation with Over-Expression for DMI Resistance.

    PubMed

    Rallos, Lynn Esther E; Baudoin, Anton B

    2016-01-01

    Demethylation inhibitors (DMIs) have been an important tool in the management of grapevine powdery mildew caused by Erysiphe necator. Long-term, intensive use of DMIs has resulted in reduced sensitivity in field populations. To further characterize DMI resistance and understand resistance mechanisms in this pathogen, we investigated the cyp51 sequence of 24 single-spored isolates from Virginia and surrounding states and analyzed gene expression in isolates representing a wide range of sensitivity. Two cyp51 alleles were found with respect to the 136th codon of the predicted EnCYP51 sequence: the wild-type (TAT) and the mutant (TTT), which results in the known Y136F amino acid change. Some isolates possessed both alleles, demonstrating gene duplication or increased gene copy number and possibly a requirement for at least one mutant copy of CYP51 for resistance. Cyp51 was over-expressed 1.4- to 19-fold in Y136F-mutant isolates. However, the Y136F mutation was absent in one isolate with moderate to high resistance factor. Two additional synonymous mutations were detected as well, one of which, A1119C was present only in isolates with high cyp51 expression. Overall, our results indicate that at least two mechanisms, cyp51 over-expression and the known target-site mutation in CYP51, contribute to resistance in E. necator, and may be working in conjunction with each other. PMID:26839970

  14. APOL1 Risk Alleles are Associated with More Severe Arteriosclerosis in Renal Resistance Vessels with Aging and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hughson, Michael D; Hoy, Wendy E; Mott, Susan A; Puelles, Victor G; Bertram, John F; Winkler, Cheryl L; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2016-01-01

    The increased risk of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) among hypertensive African Americans is partly related to APOL1 allele variants. Hypertension-associated arterionephrosclerosis consists of arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and cortical fibrosis. The initial glomerulosclerosis, attributed to preglomerular arteriosclerosis and ischemia, consists of focal global glomerulosclerosis (FGGS), but in biopsy studies, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is found with progression to ESKD, particularly in African Americans. This is a study of arterionephrosclerosis in successfully APOL1 genotyped autopsy kidney tissue of 159 African Americans (61 no risk alleles, 68 one risk allele, 30 two risk alleles) and 135 whites aged 18–89 years from a general population with no clinical renal disease. Glomerulosclerosis was nearly exclusively FGGS with only three subjects having FSGS-like lesions that were unrelated to APOL1 risk status. For both races, in multivariable analysis, the dependent variables of arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and cortical fibrosis were all significantly related to the independent variables of older age (P < 0.001) and hypertension (P < 0.001). A relationship between APOL1 genotype and arteriosclerosis was apparent only after 35 years of age when, for any level of elevated blood pressure, more severe arteriosclerosis was found in the interlobular arteries of 14 subjects with two APOL1 risk alleles when compared to African Americans with none (n = 37, P = 0.02) or one risk alleles (n = 35, P = 0.02). With the limitation of the small number of subjects contributing to the positive results, the findings imply that APOL1 risk alleles recessively augment small vessel arteriosclerosis in conjunction with age and hypertension. FSGS was not a significant finding, indicating that in the early stages of arterionephrosclerosis, the primary pathologic influence of APOL1 genotype is vascular rather than glomerular.

  15. The miR9863 Family Regulates Distinct Mla Alleles in Barley to Attenuate NLR Receptor-Triggered Disease Resistance and Cell-Death Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Cheng, Xiliu; Liu, Da; Xu, Weihui; Wise, Roger; Shen, Qian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Mla alleles encode coiled-coil (CC), nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors that trigger isolate-specific immune responses against the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). How Mla or NB-LRR genes in grass species are regulated at post-transcriptional level is not clear. The microRNA family, miR9863, comprises four members that differentially regulate distinct Mla alleles in barley. We show that miR9863 members guide the cleavage of Mla1 transcripts in barley, and block or reduce the accumulation of MLA1 protein in the heterologous Nicotiana benthamiana expression system. Regulation specificity is determined by variation in a unique single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) in mature miR9863 family members and two SNPs in the Mla miR9863-binding site that separates these alleles into three groups. Further, we demonstrate that 22-nt miR9863s trigger the biogenesis of 21-nt phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs) and together these sRNAs form a feed-forward regulation network for repressing the expression of group I Mla alleles. Overexpression of miR9863 members specifically attenuates MLA1, but not MLA10-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling. We propose a key role of the miR9863 family in dampening immune response signaling triggered by a group of MLA immune receptors in barley. PMID:25502438

  16. Interferon Consensus Sequence Binding Protein Confers Resistance against Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Joachim; Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Diebold, Joachim; Bücheler, Nicole; Preger, Sonja; Horak, Ivan; Sing, Andreas; Kramer, Uwe; Autenrieth, Ingo B.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon consensus sequence binding protein (ICSBP)-deficient mice display enhanced susceptibility to intracellular pathogens. At least two distinct immunoregulatory defects are responsible for this phenotype. First, diminished production of reactive oxygen intermediates in macrophages results in impaired intracellular killing of microorganisms. Second, defective early interleukin-12 (IL-12) production upon microbial challenge leads to a failure in gamma interferon (IFN-γ) induction and subsequently in T helper 1 immune responses. Here, we investigated the role of ICSBP in resistance against the extracellular bacterium Yersinia enterocolitica. ICSBP−/− mice failed to produce IL-12 and IFN-γ, but also IL-4, after Yersinia challenge. In addition, granuloma formation was highly disturbed in infected ICSBP−/− mice, leading to multiple necrotic abscesses in affected organs. Consequently, ICSBP−/− mice rapidly succumbed to acute Yersinia infection. In vitro treatment of spleen cells from ICSBP−/− mice with recombinant IL-12 (rIL-12) or rIL-18 in combination with a second stimulus resulted in IFN-γ induction. In experimental therapy of infected ICSBP−/− mice, we observed that administration of rIL-12 induced IFN-γ production which was associated with improved resistance to Yersinia. In contrast, treatment with rIL-18 failed to enhance endogenous IFN-γ production but nevertheless reduced bacterial burden in ICSBP−/− mice. Although cytokine therapy with rIL-12 or rIL-18 ameliorated the course of Yersinia infection in ICSBP−/− mice, both cytokines failed to completely restore impaired immunity. Taken together, the results indicate that the transcription factor ICSBP is essential for efficient host immune defense against Yersinia. These results are important for understanding the complex host immune responses in bacterial infections. PMID:10678954

  17. C239S Mutation in the β-Tubulin of Phytophthora sojae Confers Resistance to Zoxamide.

    PubMed

    Cai, Meng; Miao, Jianqiang; Song, Xi; Lin, Dong; Bi, Yang; Chen, Lei; Liu, Xili; Tyler, Brett M

    2016-01-01

    Zoxamide is the sole β-tubulin inhibitor registered for the control of oomycete pathogens. The current study investigated the activity of zoxamide against Phytophthora sojae and baseline sensitivity was established with a mean EC50 of 0.048 μg/ml. The data is critical for monitoring changes in zoxamide-sensitivity in the field. Three stable resistant mutants with a high resistance level were obtained by selection on zoxamide amended media. Although the development of resistance occurred at a low frequency, there were no apparent fitness penalty in the acquired mutants in terms of growth rate, sporulation, germination and pathogenicity. Based on the biological profiles and low mutagenesis rate, the resistance risk of P. sojae to zoxamide can be estimated as low to medium. Further investigation revealed all the zoxamide-resistant mutants had a point mutation of C239S in their β-tubulin. Zoxamide also exhibited high activity against most species from the genus Pythium in which only Pythium aphanidermatum was found naturally resistant to zoxamide and harboring the natural point mutation S239 in the β-tubulin. Back-transformation in P. sojae with the mutated allele (S239) confirmed the C239S mutation can induce resistance to zoxamide, and the resistance level was positively related to the expression level of the mutated gene. In contrast, the overexpression of the wild type gene was unable to cause zoxamide resistance. It is the first report on the resistance molecular mechanism of zoxamide in oomycetes. Based on our study, C239 is supposed to be a key target site of zoxamide, which distinguishes zoxamide from benzimidazoles and accounts for its low resistance risk. The result can provide advice on the design of new β-tubulin inhibitors in future. PMID:27242773

  18. C239S Mutation in the β-Tubulin of Phytophthora sojae Confers Resistance to Zoxamide

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Meng; Miao, Jianqiang; Song, Xi; Lin, Dong; Bi, Yang; Chen, Lei; Liu, Xili; Tyler, Brett M.

    2016-01-01

    Zoxamide is the sole β-tubulin inhibitor registered for the control of oomycete pathogens. The current study investigated the activity of zoxamide against Phytophthora sojae and baseline sensitivity was established with a mean EC50 of 0.048 μg/ml. The data is critical for monitoring changes in zoxamide-sensitivity in the field. Three stable resistant mutants with a high resistance level were obtained by selection on zoxamide amended media. Although the development of resistance occurred at a low frequency, there were no apparent fitness penalty in the acquired mutants in terms of growth rate, sporulation, germination and pathogenicity. Based on the biological profiles and low mutagenesis rate, the resistance risk of P. sojae to zoxamide can be estimated as low to medium. Further investigation revealed all the zoxamide-resistant mutants had a point mutation of C239S in their β-tubulin. Zoxamide also exhibited high activity against most species from the genus Pythium in which only Pythium aphanidermatum was found naturally resistant to zoxamide and harboring the natural point mutation S239 in the β-tubulin. Back-transformation in P. sojae with the mutated allele (S239) confirmed the C239S mutation can induce resistance to zoxamide, and the resistance level was positively related to the expression level of the mutated gene. In contrast, the overexpression of the wild type gene was unable to cause zoxamide resistance. It is the first report on the resistance molecular mechanism of zoxamide in oomycetes. Based on our study, C239 is supposed to be a key target site of zoxamide, which distinguishes zoxamide from benzimidazoles and accounts for its low resistance risk. The result can provide advice on the design of new β-tubulin inhibitors in future. PMID:27242773

  19. Novel channel enzyme fusion proteins confer arsenate resistance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binghua; Song, Jie; Beitz, Eric

    2010-12-17

    Steady exposure to environmental arsenic has led to the evolution of vital cellular detoxification mechanisms. Under aerobic conditions, a two-step process appears most common among microorganisms involving reduction of predominant, oxidized arsenate (H(2)As(V)O(4)(-)/HAs(V)O(4)(2-)) to arsenite (As(III)(OH)(3)) by a cytosolic enzyme (ArsC; Escherichia coli type arsenate reductase) and subsequent extrusion via ArsB (E. coli type arsenite transporter)/ACR3 (yeast type arsenite transporter). Here, we describe novel fusion proteins consisting of an aquaglyceroporin-derived arsenite channel with a C-terminal arsenate reductase domain of phosphotyrosine-phosphatase origin, providing transposable, single gene-encoded arsenate resistance. The fusion occurred in actinobacteria from soil, Frankia alni, and marine environments, Salinispora tropica; Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes an analogous ACR3-ArsC fusion. Mutations rendered the aquaglyceroporin channel more polar resulting in lower glycerol permeability and enhanced arsenite selectivity. The arsenate reductase domain couples to thioredoxin and can complement arsenate-sensitive yeast strains. A second isoform with a nonfunctional channel may use the mycothiol/mycoredoxin cofactor pool. These channel enzymes constitute prototypes of a novel concept in metabolism in which a substrate is generated and compartmentalized by the same molecule. Immediate diffusion maintains the dynamic equilibrium and prevents toxic accumulation of metabolites in an energy-saving fashion. PMID:20947511

  20. Novel Channel Enzyme Fusion Proteins Confer Arsenate Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Binghua; Song, Jie; Beitz, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Steady exposure to environmental arsenic has led to the evolution of vital cellular detoxification mechanisms. Under aerobic conditions, a two-step process appears most common among microorganisms involving reduction of predominant, oxidized arsenate (H2AsVO4−/HAsVO42−) to arsenite (AsIII(OH)3) by a cytosolic enzyme (ArsC; Escherichia coli type arsenate reductase) and subsequent extrusion via ArsB (E. coli type arsenite transporter)/ACR3 (yeast type arsenite transporter). Here, we describe novel fusion proteins consisting of an aquaglyceroporin-derived arsenite channel with a C-terminal arsenate reductase domain of phosphotyrosine-phosphatase origin, providing transposable, single gene-encoded arsenate resistance. The fusion occurred in actinobacteria from soil, Frankia alni, and marine environments, Salinispora tropica; Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes an analogous ACR3-ArsC fusion. Mutations rendered the aquaglyceroporin channel more polar resulting in lower glycerol permeability and enhanced arsenite selectivity. The arsenate reductase domain couples to thioredoxin and can complement arsenate-sensitive yeast strains. A second isoform with a nonfunctional channel may use the mycothiol/mycoredoxin cofactor pool. These channel enzymes constitute prototypes of a novel concept in metabolism in which a substrate is generated and compartmentalized by the same molecule. Immediate diffusion maintains the dynamic equilibrium and prevents toxic accumulation of metabolites in an energy-saving fashion. PMID:20947511

  1. The Nematode Resistance Allele at the rhg1 Locus Alters the Proteome and Primary Metabolism of Soybean Roots1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Ahmed J.; Natarajan, Aparna; Saini, Navinder; Iqbal, M. Javed; Geisler, Matt; El Shemy, Hany A.; Mungur, Rajsree; Willmitzer, Lothar; Lightfoot, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Heterodera glycines, the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), causes the most damaging chronic disease of soybean (Glycine max). Host resistance requires the resistance allele at rhg1. Resistance destroys the giant cells created in the plant's roots by the nematodes about 24 to 48 h after commencement of feeding. In addition, 4 to 8 d later, a systemic acquired resistance develops that discourages later infestations. The molecular mechanisms that control the rhg1-mediated resistance response appear to be multigenic and complex, as judged by transcript abundance changes, even in near isogenic lines (NILs). This study aimed to focus on key posttranscriptional changes by identifying proteins and metabolites that were increased in abundance in both resistant and susceptible NILs. Comparisons were made among NILs 10 d after SCN infestation and without SCN infestation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis resolved more than 1,000 protein spots on each gel. Only 30 protein spots with a significant (P < 0.05) difference in abundance of 1.5-fold or more were found among the four treatments. The proteins in these spots were picked, trypsin digested, and analyzed using quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Protein identifications could be made for 24 of the 30 spots. Four spots contained two proteins, so that 28 distinct proteins were identified. The proteins were grouped into six functional categories. Metabolite analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified 131 metabolites, among which 58 were altered by one or more treatment; 28 were involved in primary metabolism. Taken together, the data showed that 17 pathways were altered by the rhg1 alleles. Pathways altered were associated with systemic acquired resistance-like responses, including xenobiotic, phytoalexin, ascorbate, and inositol metabolism, as well as primary metabolisms like amino acid synthesis and glycolysis. The pathways impacted by the rhg1 allelic state and SCN infestation agreed with

  2. Intracrine androgens and AKR1C3 activation confer resistance to enzalutamide in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengfei; Lou, Wei; Zhu, Yezi; Yang, Joy C.; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Evans, Christopher P.; Gao, Allen C.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of enzalutamide and abiraterone has led to improvement in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). However, acquired resistance to enzalutamide and abiraterone therapies frequently develops within a short period in many patients. In the present study, we developed enzalutamide resistant prostate cancer cells in an effort to understand the mechanisms of resistance. Global gene expression analysis showed that steroid biosynthesis pathway is activated in enzalutamide resistant prostate cancer cells. One of the crucial steroidogenic enzymes, AKR1C3, was significantly elevated in enzalutamide resistant cells. In addition, AKR1C3 is highly expressed in metastatic and recurrent prostate cancer and in enzalutamide resistant prostate xenograft tumors. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of the steroid metabolites revealed that androgen precursors such as cholesterol, DHEA and progesterone, as well as androgens are highly up regulated in enzalutamide resistant prostate cancer cells compared to the parental cells. Knock down of AKR1C3 expression by shRNA or inhibition of AKR1C3 enzymatic activity by indomethacin resensitized enzalutamide resistant prostate cancer cells to enzalutamide treatment both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, overexpression of AKR1C3 confers resistance to enzalutamide. Furthermore, the combination of indomethacin and enzalutamide resulted in significant inhibition of enzalutamide-resistant tumor growth. These results suggest that AKR1C3 activation is a critical resistance mechanism associated with enzalutamide resistance, targeting intracrine androgens and AKR1C3 will overcome enzalutamide resistance and improve survival of advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:25649766

  3. Intracrine Androgens and AKR1C3 Activation Confer Resistance to Enzalutamide in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengfei; Lou, Wei; Zhu, Yezi; Yang, Joy C; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W; Evans, Christopher P; Gao, Allen C

    2015-04-01

    The introduction of enzalutamide and abiraterone has led to improvement in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, acquired resistance to enzalutamide and abiraterone therapies frequently develops within a short period in many patients. In the present study, we developed enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cells in an effort to understand the mechanisms of resistance. Global gene-expression analysis showed that the steroid biosynthesis pathway is activated in enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cells. One of the crucial steroidogenic enzymes, AKR1C3, was significantly elevated in enzalutamide-resistant cells. In addition, AKR1C3 is highly expressed in metastatic and recurrent prostate cancer and in enzalutamide-resistant prostate xenograft tumors. LC/MS analysis of the steroid metabolites revealed that androgen precursors such as cholesterol, DHEA and progesterone, as well as androgens are highly upregulated in enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cells compared to the parental cells. Knockdown of AKR1C3 expression by shRNA or inhibition of AKR1C3 enzymatic activity by indomethacin resensitized enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cells to enzalutamide treatment both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, overexpression of AKR1C3 confers resistance to enzalutamide. Furthermore, the combination of indomethacin and enzalutamide resulted in significant inhibition of enzalutamide-resistant tumor growth. These results suggest that AKR1C3 activation is a critical resistance mechanism associated with enzalutamide resistance; targeting intracrine androgens and AKR1C3 will overcome enzalutamide resistance and improve survival of advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:25649766

  4. Identification of TCT, a novel knockdown resistance allele mutation and analysis of resistance detection methods in the voltage-gated Na⁺ channel of Culex pipiens pallens from Shandong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Mei; Cheng, Peng; Huang, Xiaodan; Dai, Yu-Hua; Wang, Hai-Fang; Liu, Li-Juan; Zhao, Yu-Qiang; Wang, Huai-Wei; Gong, Mao-Qing

    2013-02-01

    The present study aimed to investigate deltamethrin resistance in Culex pipiens pallens (C. pipiens pallens) mosquitoes and its correlation with knockdown resistance (kdr) mutations. In addition, mosquito‑resistance testing methods were analyzed. Using specific primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and allele-specific (AS)-PCR, kdr gene sequences isolated from wild C. pipiens pallens mosquitoes were sequenced. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the correlation between the mutations and deltamethrin resistance. A kdr allelic gene was cloned and sequenced. Analysis of the DNA sequences revealed the presence of two point mutations at the L1014 residue in the IIS6 transmembrane segment of the voltage‑gated sodium channel (VGSC): L1014F, TTA→TTT, replacing a leucine (L) with a phenylalanine (F); L1014S, TTA→TCA, replacing leucine (L) with serine (S). Two alternative kdr-like mutations, L1014F and L1014S, were identified to be positively correlated with the deltamethrin-resistant phenotype. In addition a novel mutation, TCT, was identified in the VGSC of C. pipiens pallens. PCR and AS-PCR yielded consistent results with respect to mosquito resistance. However, the detection rate of PCR was higher than that of AS-PCR. Further studies are required to determine the specific resistance mechanism. PCR and AS-PCR demonstrated suitability for mosquito resistance field tests, however, the former method may be superior to the latter. PMID:23151871

  5. K13-propeller mutations confer artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Straimer, Judith; Gnädig, Nina F.; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Duru, Valentine; Ramadani, Arba Pramundita; Dacheux, Mélanie; Khim, Nimol; Zhang, Lei; Lam, Stephen; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Ménard, Didier; Fidock, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asia imperils efforts to reduce the global malaria burden. We genetically modified the Plasmodium falciparum K13 locus using zinc-finger nucleases and measured ring-stage survival rates after drug exposure in vitro; these rates correlate with parasite clearance half-lives in artemisinin-treated patients. With isolates from Cambodia, where resistance first emerged, survival rates decreased from 13 to 49% to 0.3 to 2.4% after the removal of K13 mutations. Conversely, survival rates in wild-type parasites increased from ≤0.6% to 2 to 29% after the insertion of K13 mutations. These mutations conferred elevated resistance to recent Cambodian isolates compared with that of reference lines, suggesting a contemporary contribution of additional genetic factors. Our data provide a conclusive rationale for worldwide K13-propeller sequencing to identify and eliminate artemisinin-resistant parasites. PMID:25502314

  6. Diversified mcr-1-Harbouring Plasmid Reservoirs Confer Resistance to Colistin in Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Huiyan; Li, Yihui; Li, Zhencui; Gao, Rongsui; Zhang, Han; Wen, Ronghui; Gao, George F.; Hu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colistin is an ultimate line of refuge against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Very recently, the emergence of plasmid-mediated mcr-1 colistin resistance has become a great challenge to global public health, raising the possibility that dissemination of the mcr-1 gene is underestimated and diversified. Here, we report three cases of plasmid-carried MCR-1 colistin resistance in isolates from gut microbiota of diarrhea patients. Structural and functional analyses determined that the colistin resistance is conferred purely by the single mcr-1 gene. Genetic and sequence mapping revealed that mcr-1-harbouring plasmid reservoirs are present in diversity. Together, the data represent the first evidence of diversity in mcr-1-harbouring plasmid reservoirs of human gut microbiota. PMID:27048797

  7. Members of the Arabidopsis HRT/RPP8 Family of Resistance Genes Confer Resistance to Both Viral and Oomycete Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Michael B.; Pathirana, Sudam; Wu, Hui-Ju; Kachroo, Pradeep; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2000-01-01

    Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) inoculation onto TCV-resistant Arabidopsis leads to a hypersensitive response (HR) controlled by the dominant gene HRT. HRT is a member of the class of resistance (R) genes that contain a leucine zipper, a nucleotide binding site, and leucine-rich repeats. The chromosomal position of HRT and its homology to resistance gene RPP8 and two RPP8 homologs indicate that unequal crossing over and gene conversion may have contributed to HRT evolution. RPP8 confers resistance to an oomycete pathogen, Peronospora parasitica. Despite very strong similarities within the HRT/RPP8 family, HRT and RPP8 are specific for the respective pathogens they detect. Hence, the HRT/RPP8 family provides molecular evidence that sequence changes between closely related members of multigene families can generate novel specificities for radically different pathogens. Transgenic plants expressing HRT developed an HR but generally remained susceptible to TCV because of a second gene, RRT, that regulates resistance to TCV. However, several transgenic plants that overexpressed HRT produced micro-HRs or no HR when inoculated with TCV and were resistant to infection. Expression of the TCV coat protein gene in seedlings containing HRT resulted in massive necrosis and death, indicating that the avirulence factor detected by the HRT-encoded protein is the TCV coat protein. PMID:10810142

  8. Plant eR Genes That Encode Photorespiratory Enzymes Confer Resistance against Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taler, Dvir; Galperin, Marjana; Benjamin, Ido; Cohen, Yigal; Kenigsbuch, David

    2004-01-01

    Downy mildew caused by the oomycete pathogen Pseudoperonospora cubensis is a devastating foliar disease of cucurbits worldwide. We previously demonstrated that the wild melon line PI 124111F (PI) is highly resistant to all pathotypes of P. cubensis. That resistance was controlled genetically by two partially dominant, complementary loci. Here, we show that unlike other plant disease resistance genes, which confer an ability to resist infection by pathogens expressing corresponding avirulence genes, the resistance of PI to P. cubensis is controlled by enhanced expression of the enzymatic resistance (eR) genes At1 and At2. These constitutively expressed genes encode the photorespiratory peroxisomal enzyme proteins glyoxylate aminotransferases. The low expression of At1 and At2 in susceptible melon lines is regulated mainly at the transcriptional level. This regulation is independent of infection with the pathogen. Transgenic melon plants overexpressing either of these eR genes displayed enhanced activity of glyoxylate aminotransferases and remarkable resistance against P. cubensis. The cloned eR genes provide a new resource for developing downy mildew–resistant melon varieties. PMID:14688292

  9. Diverse genetic basis of field-evolved resistance to Bt cotton in cotton bollworm from China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haonan; Tian, Wen; Zhao, Jing; Jin, Lin; Yang, Jun; Liu, Chunhui; Yang, Yihua; Wu, Shuwen; Wu, Kongming; Cui, Jinjie; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Wu, Yidong

    2012-01-01

    Evolution of pest resistance reduces the efficacy of insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) used in sprays or in transgenic crops. Although several pests have evolved resistance to Bt crops in the field, information about the genetic basis of field-evolved resistance to Bt crops has been limited. In particular, laboratory-selected resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac based on recessive mutations in a gene encoding a toxin-binding cadherin protein has been identified in three major cotton pests, but previous work has not determined if such mutations are associated with field-selected resistance to Bt cotton. Here we show that the most common resistance alleles in field populations of cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, selected with Bt cotton in northern China, had recessive cadherin mutations, including the deletion mutation identified via laboratory selection. However, unlike all previously studied cadherin resistance alleles, one field-selected cadherin resistance allele conferred nonrecessive resistance. We also detected nonrecessive resistance that was not genetically linked with the cadherin locus. In field-selected populations, recessive cadherin alleles accounted for 75–84% of resistance alleles detected. However, most resistance alleles occurred in heterozygotes and 59–94% of resistant individuals carried at least one nonrecessive resistance allele. The results suggest that resistance management strategies must account for diverse resistance alleles in field-selected populations, including nonrecessive alleles. PMID:22689968

  10. Graft Transmission of RNA Silencing to Non-Transgenic Scions for Conferring Virus Resistance in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Md. Ali, Emran; Kobayashi, Kappei; Yamaoka, Naoto; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Nishiguchi, Masamichi

    2013-01-01

    RNA silencing is a mechanism of gene regulation by sequence specific RNA degradation and is involved in controlling endogenous gene expression and defense against invasive nucleic acids such as viruses. RNA silencing has been proven to be transmitted between scions and rootstocks through grafting, mostly using transgenic plants. It has been reported that RNA silencing of tobacco endogenous genes, NtTOM1 and NtTOM3, that are required for tobamovirus multiplication, resulted in high resistance against several tobamoviruses. In the present study, we examined the graft transmission of RNA silencing for conferring virus resistance to non-transgenic scions of the same and different Nicotiana species grafted onto rootstocks in which both NtTOM1 and NtTOM3 were silenced. Non-transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (cvs. Samsun and Xanthi nc) and N. benthamiana were used as scions for grafting onto the rootstocks silenced with both genes. Short interfering RNA (siRNA) of NtTOM1 and NtTOM3 was detected in both the scions and the rootstocks eight weeks after grafting. The leaves were detached from the scions and inoculated with several tobamoviruses. The virus accumulation was tested by ELISA and northern blot analysis. The viruses were detected in grafted scions at extremely low levels, showing that virus resistance was conferred. These results suggest that RNA silencing was induced in and virus resistance was conferred to the non-transgenic scions by grafting onto silenced rootstocks. The effect of low temperature on siRNA accumulation and virus resistance was not significantly observed in the scions. PMID:23717405

  11. Complex long-distance effects of mutations that confer linezolid resistance in the large ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Fulle, Simone; Saini, Jagmohan S.; Homeyer, Nadine; Gohlke, Holger

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens will make current antibiotics ineffective. For linezolid, a member of the novel oxazolidinone class of antibiotics, 10 nucleotide mutations in the ribosome have been described conferring resistance. Hypotheses for how these mutations affect antibiotics binding have been derived based on comparative crystallographic studies. However, a detailed description at the atomistic level of how remote mutations exert long-distance effects has remained elusive. Here, we show that the G2032A-C2499A double mutation, located > 10 Å away from the antibiotic, confers linezolid resistance by a complex set of effects that percolate to the binding site. By molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we identify U2504 and C2452 as spearheads among binding site nucleotides that exert the most immediate effect on linezolid binding. Structural reorganizations within the ribosomal subunit due to the mutations are likely associated with mutually compensating changes in the effective energy. Furthermore, we suggest two main routes of information transfer from the mutation sites to U2504 and C2452. Between these, we observe cross-talk, which suggests that synergistic effects observed for the two mutations arise in an indirect manner. These results should be relevant for the development of oxazolidinone derivatives that are active against linezolid-resistant strains. PMID:26202966

  12. Bactobolin Resistance Is Conferred by Mutations in the L2 Ribosomal Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Josephine R.; Truong, Thao T.; Silva, Patricia M.; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.; Carr, Gavin; Radey, Matthew; Jacobs, Michael A.; Sims, Elizabeth H.; Clardy, Jon; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia thailandensis produces a family of polyketide-peptide molecules called bactobolins, some of which are potent antibiotics. We found that growth of B. thailandensis at 30°C versus that at 37°C resulted in increased production of bactobolins. We purified the three most abundant bactobolins and determined their activities against a battery of bacteria and mouse fibroblasts. Two of the three compounds showed strong activities against both bacteria and fibroblasts. The third analog was much less potent in both assays. These results suggested that the target of bactobolins might be conserved across bacteria and mammalian cells. To learn about the mechanism of bactobolin activity, we isolated four spontaneous bactobolin-resistant Bacillus subtilis mutants. We used genomic sequencing technology to show that each of the four resistant variants had mutations in rplB, which codes for the 50S ribosome-associated L2 protein. Ectopic expression of a mutant rplB gene in wild-type B. subtilis conferred bactobolin resistance. Finally, the L2 mutations did not confer resistance to other antibiotics known to interfere with ribosome function. Our data indicate that bactobolins target the L2 protein or a nearby site and that this is not the target of other antibiotics. We presume that the mammalian target of bactobolins involves the eukaryotic homolog of L2 (L8e). PMID:23249812

  13. Introgression of resistance-conferring ALS mutations in herbicide-resistant weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy red rice (Oryza sativa) competes aggressively with rice, reducing yields and grain quality. Clearfield™ rice, a nontransgenic, herbicide-resistant (HR) rice introduced in 2002 to control weedy rice, has resulted in some ALS-resistant weedy rice apparently due to gene flow. Studies were conduct...

  14. Artificial MicroRNAs highly accessible to targets confer efficient virus resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Chun-Han; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2008-11-01

    Short-hairpin RNAs based on microRNA (miRNA) precursors to express the artificial miRNAs (amiRNAs) can specifically induce gene silencing and confer virus resistance in plants. The efficacy of RNA silencing depends not only on the nature of amiRNAs but also on the local structures of the target mRNAs. However, the lack of tools to accurately and reliably predict secondary structures within long RNAs makes it very hard to predict the secondary structures of a viral genome RNA in the natural infection conditions in vivo. In this study, we used an experimental approach to dissect how the endogenous silencing machinery acts on the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) genome. Transiently expressed 3'UTR RNAs were degraded by site-specific cleavage. By comparing the natural cleavage hotspots within the 3'UTR of the CMV-infected wild-type Arabidopsis to those of the triple dcl2/3/4 mutant, we acquired true small RNA programmed RNA-induced silencing complex (siRISC)-mediated cleavage sites to design valid amiRNAs. We showed that the tRNA-like structure within the 3'UTR impeded target site access and restricted amiRNA-RISC-mediated cleavage of the target viral RNA. Moreover, target recognition in the less-structured area also influenced siRISC catalysis, thereby conferring different degrees of resistance to CMV infection. Transgenic plants expressing the designed amiRNAs that target the putative RISC accessible target sites conferred high resistance to the CMV challenge from both CMV subgroup strains. Our work suggests that the experimental approach is credible for studying the course of RISC target recognition to engineer effective gene silencing and virus resistance in plants by amiRNAs. PMID:18768978

  15. Polar flagella rotation in Vibrio parahaemolyticus confers resistance to bacteriophage infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Lu; Zhao, Zhe; Peng, Daxin; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage has been recognized as a novel approach to treat bacterial infectious diseases. However, phage resistance may reduce the efficacy of phage therapy. Here, we described a mechanism of bacterial resistance to phage infections. In Gram-negative enteric pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus, we found that polar flagella can reduce the phage infectivity. Deletion of polar flagella, but not the lateral flagella, can dramatically promote the adsorption of phage to the bacteria and enhances the phage infectivity to V. parahaemolyticus, indicating that polar flagella play an inhibitory role in the phage infection. Notably, it is the rotation, not the physical presence, of polar flagella that inhibits the phage infection of V. parahaemolyticus. Strikingly, phage dramatically reduces the virulence of V. parahaemolyticus only when polar flagella were absent both in vitro and in vivo. These results indicated that polar flagella rotation is a previously unidentified mechanism that confers bacteriophage resistance. PMID:27189325

  16. Polar flagella rotation in Vibrio parahaemolyticus confers resistance to bacteriophage infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Lu; Zhao, Zhe; Peng, Daxin; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage has been recognized as a novel approach to treat bacterial infectious diseases. However, phage resistance may reduce the efficacy of phage therapy. Here, we described a mechanism of bacterial resistance to phage infections. In Gram-negative enteric pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus, we found that polar flagella can reduce the phage infectivity. Deletion of polar flagella, but not the lateral flagella, can dramatically promote the adsorption of phage to the bacteria and enhances the phage infectivity to V. parahaemolyticus, indicating that polar flagella play an inhibitory role in the phage infection. Notably, it is the rotation, not the physical presence, of polar flagella that inhibits the phage infection of V. parahaemolyticus. Strikingly, phage dramatically reduces the virulence of V. parahaemolyticus only when polar flagella were absent both in vitro and in vivo. These results indicated that polar flagella rotation is a previously unidentified mechanism that confers bacteriophage resistance. PMID:27189325

  17. Glucocorticoid Receptor Confers Resistance to Anti-Androgens by Bypassing Androgen Receptor Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Vivek K.; Schenkein, Emily; Murali, Rajmohan; Subudhi, Sumit K.; Wongvipat, John; Balbas, Minna D.; Shah, Neel; Cai, Ling; Efstathiou, Eleni; Logothetis, Chris; Zheng, Deyou; Sawyers, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The treatment of advanced prostate cancer has been transformed by novel antiandrogen therapies such as enzalutamide. Here we identify induction of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression as a common feature of drug resistant tumors in a credentialed preclinical model, a finding also confirmed in patient samples. GR substituted for the androgen receptor (AR) to activate a similar but distinguishable set of target genes and was necessary for maintenance of the resistant phenotype. The GR agonist dexamethasone was sufficient to confer enzalutamide resistance whereas a GR antagonist restored sensitivity. Acute AR inhibition resulted in GR upregulation in a subset of prostate cancer cells due to relief of AR-mediated feedback repression of GR expression. These findings establish a novel mechanism of escape from AR blockade through expansion of cells primed to drive AR target genes via an alternative nuclear receptor upon drug exposure. PMID:24315100

  18. Distinct detoxification mechanisms confer resistance to mesotrione and atrazine in a population of waterhemp.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong; Kaundun, Shiv S; Tranel, Patrick J; Riggins, Chance W; McGinness, Daniel L; Hager, Aaron G; Hawkes, Tim; McIndoe, Eddie; Riechers, Dean E

    2013-09-01

    Previous research reported the first case of resistance to mesotrione and other 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) herbicides in a waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus) population designated MCR (for McLean County mesotrione- and atrazine-resistant). Herein, experiments were conducted to determine if target site or nontarget site mechanisms confer mesotrione resistance in MCR. Additionally, the basis for atrazine resistance was investigated in MCR and an atrazine-resistant but mesotrione-sensitive population (ACR for Adams County mesotrione-sensitive but atrazine-resistant). A standard sensitive population (WCS for Wayne County herbicide-sensitive) was also used for comparison. Mesotrione resistance was not due to an alteration in HPPD sequence, HPPD expression, or reduced herbicide absorption. Metabolism studies using whole plants and excised leaves revealed that the time for 50% of absorbed mesotrione to degrade in MCR was significantly shorter than in ACR and WCS, which correlated with previous phenotypic responses to mesotrione and the quantity of the metabolite 4-hydroxy-mesotrione in excised leaves. The cytochrome P450 monooxygenase inhibitors malathion and tetcyclacis significantly reduced mesotrione metabolism in MCR and corn (Zea mays) excised leaves but not in ACR. Furthermore, malathion increased mesotrione activity in MCR seedlings in greenhouse studies. These results indicate that enhanced oxidative metabolism contributes significantly to mesotrione resistance in MCR. Sequence analysis of atrazine-resistant (MCR and ACR) and atrazine-sensitive (WCS) waterhemp populations detected no differences in the psbA gene. The times for 50% of absorbed atrazine to degrade in corn, MCR, and ACR leaves were shorter than in WCS, and a polar metabolite of atrazine was detected in corn, MCR, and ACR that cochromatographed with a synthetic atrazine-glutathione conjugate. Thus, elevated rates of metabolism via distinct detoxification mechanisms contribute to

  19. MRP1 expression in CTCs confers resistance to irinotecan-based chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Emne Ali; Fanelli, Marcello Ferretti; Souza E Silva, Virgílio; Machado Netto, Marcelo Calil; Gasparini Junior, José Luiz; Araújo, Daniel Vilarim; Ocea, Luciana Menezes Mendonça; Buim, Marcilei Eliza Cavicchioli; Tariki, Milena Shizue; Alves, Vanessa da Silva; Piana de Andrade, Victor; Dettino, Aldo Lourenço Abbade; Abdon Lopes de Mello, Celso; Chinen, Ludmilla Thomé Domingos

    2016-08-15

    Circulating tumor cells are important markers of tumor progression and can reflect tumor behavior in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Identification of proteins that confer resistance to treatment is an important step to predict response and better selection of treatment for patients. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and Multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) play a role in irinotecan-resistance, and Excision Repair Cross-Complementation group 1 (ERCC1) expression can confer resistance to platinum compounds. Here, we included 34 patients with mCRC and most of them received FOLFIRI or FOLFOX chemotherapy (91.1%). CTCs were isolated by ISET(®) Technology and identified in 30 patients (88.2%), with a median of 2.0 CTCs/mL (0-31.0). We analyzed the immunocytochemical expression of MRP1, MRP4 and ERCC1 only in patients who had previously detectable CTCs, accordingly to treatment received (n = 19, 15 and 13 patients, respectively). Among patients treated with irinotecan-based chemotherapy, 4 out of 19 cases with MRP1 positive CTCs showed a worse progression free survival (PFS) in comparison to those with MRP1 negative CTCs (2.1 months vs. 9.1 months; p = 0.003). None of the other proteins studied in CTCs had significant association with PFS. We analyzed also histological sections of primary tumors and metastases by immunohistochemistry, and found no association with clinicopathological characteristics or with PFS. Our results show MRP1 as a potential biomarker of resistance to treatment with irinotecan when found in CTCs from mCRC patients. This is a small proof-of-principle study and these early findings need to be validated in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:26950035

  20. Haplotype variation of Glu-D1 locus and the origin of Glu-D1d allele conferring superior end-use qualities in common wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In common wheat (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD), the Glu-D1 locus possesses multiple alleles, with Glu-D1a (coding for 1Dx2 and 1Dy12 subunits) and Glu-D1d (encoding 1Dx5 and 1Dy10 subunits) being intensively used in the genetic improvement of end-use qualities. Here, we studied the molecular variatio...

  1. ADAM10-mediated release of heregulin confers resistance to trastuzumab by activating HER3

    PubMed Central

    Ebbing, Eva A.; Medema, Jan Paul; Damhofer, Helene; Meijer, Sybren L.; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases of the HER-family are involved in the development and progression of multiple epithelial tumors, and have consequently become widely used targets for new anti-cancer therapies. Trastuzumab, an antibody against HER2, has shown potent growth inhibitory effects on HER2 overexpressing tumors, including gastro-esophageal cancer, however, resistance to this therapy is inevitable. Unfortunately, a paucity of data on the cellular mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapeutic agents exists in esophageal adenocarcinoma. Using primary established HER2-overexpressing cultures and patient-derived xenograft models, we now reveal a novel resistance mechanism to trastuzumab in esophageal cancer: In response to trastuzumab, both HER3 and the metalloprotease ADAM10 are simultaneously upregulated. The proteolytic activity of the latter then releases the HER3 ligand heregulin from the cell surface to activate HER3 and confer resistance to trastuzumab by inducing compensatory growth factor receptor signaling. Blocking either HER3 or ADAM10 effectively reverts the acquired resistance to trastuzumab. Our data thus provide strategies to inhibit this signaling and circumvent resistance to trastuzumab. PMID:26863569

  2. Bulk segregant RNA-seq reveals expression and positional candidate genes and allele-specific expression for disease resistance against enteric septicemia of catfish

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The application of RNA-seq has accelerated gene expression profiling and identification of gene-associated SNPs in many species. However, the integrated studies of gene expression along with SNP mapping have been lacking. Coupling of RNA-seq with bulked segregant analysis (BSA) should allow correlation of expression patterns and associated SNPs with the phenotypes. Results In this study, we demonstrated the use of bulked segregant RNA-seq (BSR-Seq) for the analysis of differentially expressed genes and associated SNPs with disease resistance against enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC). A total of 1,255 differentially expressed genes were found between resistant and susceptible fish. In addition, 56,419 SNPs residing on 4,304 unique genes were identified as significant SNPs between susceptible and resistant fish. Detailed analysis of these significant SNPs allowed differentiation of significant SNPs caused by genetic segregation and those caused by allele-specific expression. Mapping of the significant SNPs, along with analysis of differentially expressed genes, allowed identification of candidate genes underlining disease resistance against ESC disease. Conclusions This study demonstrated the use of BSR-Seq for the identification of genes involved in disease resistance against ESC through expression profiling and mapping of significantly associated SNPs. BSR-Seq is applicable to analysis of genes underlining various performance and production traits without significant investment in the development of large genotyping platforms such as SNP arrays. PMID:24373586

  3. TWO MAJOR RESISTANCE GENES CONFER RESISTANCE TO RACE SHIFT ISOLATES OVERCOMING BLAST RESISTANCE GENC PI-TA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the major challenges for blast disease management is that major resistance genes are often defeated by new virulent isolates. The goal of this project is to identify and characterize blast resistance genes to facilitate the development of blast resistant US cultivars by marker-assisted selec...

  4. High-level cefixime- and ceftriaxone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in France: novel penA mosaic allele in a successful international clone causes treatment failure.

    PubMed

    Unemo, Magnus; Golparian, Daniel; Nicholas, Robert; Ohnishi, Makoto; Gallay, Anne; Sednaoui, Patrice

    2012-03-01

    Recently, the first Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain (H041) highly resistant to the expanded-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) ceftriaxone and cefixime, which are the last remaining options for first-line gonorrhea treatment, was isolated in Japan. Here, we confirm and characterize a second strain (F89) with high-level cefixime and ceftriaxone resistance which was isolated in France and most likely caused a treatment failure with cefixime. F89 was examined using six species-confirmatory tests, antibiograms (33 antimicrobials), porB sequencing, N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and sequencing of known gonococcal resistance determinants (penA, mtrR, penB, ponA, and pilQ). F89 was assigned to MLST sequence type 1901 (ST1901) and NG-MAST ST1407, which is a successful gonococcal clone that has spread globally. F89 has high-level resistance to cefixime (MIC = 4 μg/ml) and ceftriaxone (MIC = 1 to 2 μg/ml) and resistance to most other antimicrobials examined. A novel penA mosaic allele (penA-CI), which was penA-XXXIV with an additional A501P alteration in penicillin-binding protein 2, was the primary determinant for high-level ESC resistance, as determined by transformation into a set of recipient strains. N. gonorrhoeae appears to be emerging as a superbug, and in certain circumstances and settings, gonorrhea may become untreatable. Investigations of the biological fitness and enhanced understanding and monitoring of the ESC-resistant clones and their international transmission are required. Enhanced disease control activities, antimicrobial resistance control and surveillance worldwide, and public health response plans for global (and national) perspectives are also crucial. Nevertheless, new treatment strategies and/or drugs and, ideally, a vaccine are essential to develop for efficacious gonorrhea management. PMID:22155830

  5. MicroRNAs Suppress NB Domain Genes in Tomato That Confer Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Shouqiang; Park, Gyungsoon; Atamian, Hagop S.; Han, Cliff S.; Stajich, Jason E.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2014-10-16

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) suppress the transcriptional and post-transcriptional expression of genes in plants. Several miRNA families target genes encoding nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) plant innate immune receptors. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici causes vascular wilt disease in tomato. Here, we explored a role for miRNAs in tomato defense against F. oxysporum using comparative miRNA profiling of susceptible (Moneymaker) and resistant (Motelle) tomato cultivars. slmiR482f and slmiR5300 were repressed during infection of Motelle with F. oxysporum. Two predicted mRNA targets each of slmiR482f and slmiR5300 exhibited increased expression in Motelle and the ability of these four targets to be regulated by the miRNAs was confirmed by co-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Silencing of the targets in the resistant Motelle cultivar revealed a role in fungal resistance for all four genes. All four targets encode proteins with full or partial nucleotide-binding (NB) domains. One slmiR5300 target corresponds to tm-2, a susceptible allele of the Tomato Mosaic Virus resistance gene, supporting functions in immunity to a fungal pathogen. The observation that none of the targets correspond to I-2, the only known resistance (R) gene for F. oxysporum in tomato, supports roles for additional R genes in the immune response. In conclusion, taken together, our findings suggest that Moneymaker is highly susceptible because its potential resistance is insufficiently expressed due to the action of miRNAs.

  6. MicroRNAs Suppress NB Domain Genes in Tomato That Confer Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ouyang, Shouqiang; Park, Gyungsoon; Atamian, Hagop S.; Han, Cliff S.; Stajich, Jason E.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2014-10-16

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) suppress the transcriptional and post-transcriptional expression of genes in plants. Several miRNA families target genes encoding nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) plant innate immune receptors. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici causes vascular wilt disease in tomato. Here, we explored a role for miRNAs in tomato defense against F. oxysporum using comparative miRNA profiling of susceptible (Moneymaker) and resistant (Motelle) tomato cultivars. slmiR482f and slmiR5300 were repressed during infection of Motelle with F. oxysporum. Two predicted mRNA targets each of slmiR482f and slmiR5300 exhibited increased expression in Motelle and the ability of these four targets to be regulatedmore » by the miRNAs was confirmed by co-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Silencing of the targets in the resistant Motelle cultivar revealed a role in fungal resistance for all four genes. All four targets encode proteins with full or partial nucleotide-binding (NB) domains. One slmiR5300 target corresponds to tm-2, a susceptible allele of the Tomato Mosaic Virus resistance gene, supporting functions in immunity to a fungal pathogen. The observation that none of the targets correspond to I-2, the only known resistance (R) gene for F. oxysporum in tomato, supports roles for additional R genes in the immune response. In conclusion, taken together, our findings suggest that Moneymaker is highly susceptible because its potential resistance is insufficiently expressed due to the action of miRNAs.« less

  7. MicroRNAs Suppress NB Domain Genes in Tomato That Confer Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Shouqiang; Park, Gyungsoon; Atamian, Hagop S.; Han, Cliff S.; Stajich, Jason E.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) suppress the transcriptional and post-transcriptional expression of genes in plants. Several miRNA families target genes encoding nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) plant innate immune receptors. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici causes vascular wilt disease in tomato. We explored a role for miRNAs in tomato defense against F. oxysporum using comparative miRNA profiling of susceptible (Moneymaker) and resistant (Motelle) tomato cultivars. slmiR482f and slmiR5300 were repressed during infection of Motelle with F. oxysporum. Two predicted mRNA targets each of slmiR482f and slmiR5300 exhibited increased expression in Motelle and the ability of these four targets to be regulated by the miRNAs was confirmed by co-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Silencing of the targets in the resistant Motelle cultivar revealed a role in fungal resistance for all four genes. All four targets encode proteins with full or partial nucleotide-binding (NB) domains. One slmiR5300 target corresponds to tm-2, a susceptible allele of the Tomato Mosaic Virus resistance gene, supporting functions in immunity to a fungal pathogen. The observation that none of the targets correspond to I-2, the only known resistance (R) gene for F. oxysporum in tomato, supports roles for additional R genes in the immune response. Taken together, our findings suggest that Moneymaker is highly susceptible because its potential resistance is insufficiently expressed due to the action of miRNAs. PMID:25330340

  8. Rapid Detection of rpoB Gene Mutations Conferring Rifampin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Wanyuan; Aldous, Stephen; Woodruff, Evelyn; Hicke, Brian; Rea, Larry; Kreiswirth, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are widespread and present a challenge to effective treatment of this infection. The need for a low-cost and rapid detection method for clinically relevant mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis that confer multidrug resistance is urgent, particularly for developing countries. We report here a novel test that detects the majority of clinically relevant mutations in the beta subunit of the RNA polymerase (rpoB) gene that confer resistance to rifampin (RIF), the treatment of choice for tuberculosis (TB). The test, termed TB ID/R, combines a novel target and temperature-dependent RNase H2-mediated cleavage of blocked DNA primers to initiate isothermal helicase-dependent amplification of a rpoB gene target sequence. Amplified products are detected by probes arrayed on a modified silicon chip that permits visible detection of both RIF-sensitive and RIF-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. DNA templates of clinically relevant single-nucleotide mutations in the rpoB gene were created to validate the performance of the TB ID/R test. Except for one rare mutation, all mutations were unambiguously detected. Additionally, 11 RIF-sensitive and 25 RIF-resistant clinical isolates were tested by the TB ID/R test, and 35/36 samples were classified correctly (96.2%). This test is being configured in a low-cost test platform to provide rapid diagnosis and drug susceptibility information for TB in the point-of-care setting in the developing world, where the need is acute. PMID:22518852

  9. Rapidly evolving R genes in diverse grass species confer resistance to rice blast disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sihai; Li, Jing; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Qijun; Huang, Ju; Chen, Jian-Qun; Hartl, Daniel L.; Tian, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    We show that the genomes of maize, sorghum, and brachypodium contain genes that, when transformed into rice, confer resistance to rice blast disease. The genes are resistance genes (R genes) that encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains (NBS–LRR proteins). By using criteria associated with rapid molecular evolution, we identified three rapidly evolving R-gene families in these species as well as in rice, and transformed a randomly chosen subset of these genes into rice strains known to be sensitive to rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The transformed strains were then tested for sensitivity or resistance to 12 diverse strains of M. oryzae. A total of 15 functional blast R genes were identified among 60 NBS–LRR genes cloned from maize, sorghum, and brachypodium; and 13 blast R genes were obtained from 20 NBS–LRR paralogs in rice. These results show that abundant blast R genes occur not only within species but also among species, and that the R genes in the same rapidly evolving gene family can exhibit an effector response that confers resistance to rapidly evolving fungal pathogens. Neither conventional evolutionary conservation nor conventional evolutionary convergence supplies a satisfactory explanation of our findings. We suggest a unique mechanism termed “constrained divergence,” in which R genes and pathogen effectors can follow only limited evolutionary pathways to increase fitness. Our results open avenues for R-gene identification that will help to elucidate R-gene vs. effector mechanisms and may yield new sources of durable pathogen resistance. PMID:24145399

  10. Precisely mapping a major gene conferring resistance to Hessian fly in bread wheat using genotyping-by-sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background One of the reasons hard red winter wheat cultivar ‘Duster’ (PI 644016) is widely grown in the southern Great Plains is that it confers a consistently high level of resistance to biotype GP of Hessian fly (Hf). However, little is known about the genetic mechanism underlying Hf resistance i...

  11. A compensating wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium Robertsonian translocation conferring resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), is a potentially devastating disease of common wheat in the Great Plains of North America. So far, two genes conferring resistance to WSMV have been named and used in cultivar improvement. Here we report a new source of resistance that was derived from a wheat-Th. i...

  12. Systematic identification of signaling pathways with potential to confer anticancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Martz, Colin A; Ottina, Kathleen A; Singleton, Katherine R; Jasper, Jeff S; Wardell, Suzanne E; Peraza-Penton, Ashley; Anderson, Grace R; Winter, Peter S; Wang, Tim; Alley, Holly M; Kwong, Lawrence N; Cooper, Zachary A; Tetzlaff, Michael; Chen, Pei-Ling; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Flaherty, Keith T; Wargo, Jennifer A; McDonnell, Donald P; Sabatini, David M; Wood, Kris C

    2014-12-23

    Cancer cells can activate diverse signaling pathways to evade the cytotoxic action of drugs. We created and screened a library of barcoded pathway-activating mutant complementary DNAs to identify those that enhanced the survival of cancer cells in the presence of 13 clinically relevant, targeted therapies. We found that activation of the RAS-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), Notch1, PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)-mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin), and ER (estrogen receptor) signaling pathways often conferred resistance to this selection of drugs. Activation of the Notch1 pathway promoted acquired resistance to tamoxifen (an ER-targeted therapy) in serially passaged breast cancer xenografts in mice, and treating mice with a γ-secretase inhibitor to inhibit Notch signaling restored tamoxifen sensitivity. Markers of Notch1 activity in tumor tissue correlated with resistance to tamoxifen in breast cancer patients. Similarly, activation of Notch1 signaling promoted acquired resistance to MAPK inhibitors in BRAF(V600E) melanoma cells in culture, and the abundance of Notch1 pathway markers was increased in tumors from a subset of melanoma patients. Thus, Notch1 signaling may be a therapeutic target in some drug-resistant breast cancers and melanomas. Additionally, multiple resistance pathways were activated in melanoma cell lines with intrinsic resistance to MAPK inhibitors, and simultaneous inhibition of these pathways synergistically induced drug sensitivity. These data illustrate the potential for systematic identification of the signaling pathways controlling drug resistance that could inform clinical strategies and drug development for multiple types of cancer. This approach may also be used to advance clinical options in other disease contexts. PMID:25538079

  13. Systematic identification of signaling pathways with potential to confer anticancer drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Martz, Colin A.; Ottina, Kathleen A.; Singleton, Katherine R.; Jasper, Jeff S.; Wardell, Suzanne E.; Peraza-Penton, Ashley; Anderson, Grace R.; Winter, Peter S.; Wang, Tim; Alley, Holly M.; Kwong, Lawrence N.; Cooper, Zachary A.; Tetzlaff, Michael; Chen, Pei-Ling; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; McDonnell, Donald P.; Sabatini, David M.; Wood, Kris C.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells can activate diverse signaling pathways to evade the cytotoxic action of drugs. We created and screened a library of barcoded pathway-activating mutant cDNAs to identify those that enhanced the survival of cancer cells in the presence of 13 clinically relevant, targeted therapies. We found that activation of the RAS– MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), Notch1, PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)–mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin), and ER (estrogen receptor) signaling pathways often conferred resistance to this selection of drugs. Activation of the Notch1 pathway promoted acquired resistance to tamoxifen (an ER-targeted therapy) in serially-passaged breast cancer xenografts in mice, and treating mice with a γ-secretase inhibitor to inhibit Notch signaling restored tamoxifen sensitivity. Markers of Notch1 activity in tumor tissue correlated with resistance to tamoxifen in breast cancer patients. Similarly, activation of Notch1 signaling promoted acquired resistance to MAPK inhibitors in BRAFV600E melanoma cells in culture, and the abundance of Notch1 pathway markers were increased in tumors from a subset of melanoma patients. Thus, Notch1 signaling may be a therapeutic target in some drug-resistant breast cancers and melanomas. Additionally, multiple resistance pathways were activated in melanoma cell lines with intrinsic resistance to MAPK inhibitors, and simultaneous inhibition of these pathways synergistically induced drug sensitivity. These data illustrate the potential for systematic identification of the signaling pathways controlling drug resistance that could inform clinical strategies and drug development for multiple types of cancer. This approach may also be used to advance clinical options in other disease contexts. PMID:25538079

  14. The Arabidopsis NPR1 gene confers broad-spectrum disease resistance in strawberry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Katchen Julliany P; Brunings, Asha; Peres, Natalia A; Mou, Zhonglin; Folta, Kevin M

    2015-08-01

    Although strawberry is an economically important fruit crop worldwide, production of strawberry is limited by its susceptibility to a wide range of pathogens and the lack of major commercial cultivars with high levels of resistance to multiple pathogens. The objective of this study is to ectopically express the Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene (AtNPR1) in the diploid strawberry Fragaria vesca L. and to test transgenic plants for disease resistance. AtNPR1 is a key positive regulator of the long-lasting broad-spectrum resistance known as systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and has been shown to confer resistance to a number of pathogens when overexpressed in Arabidopsis or ectopically expressed in several crop species. We show that ectopic expression of AtNPR1 in strawberry increases resistance to anthracnose, powdery mildew, and angular leaf spot, which are caused by different fungal or bacterial pathogens. The increased resistance is related to the relative expression levels of AtNPR1 in the transgenic plants. In contrast to Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtNPR1, which grow normally and do not constitutively express defense genes, the strawberry transgenic plants are shorter than non-transformed controls, and most of them fail to produce runners and fruits. Consistently, most of the transgenic lines constitutively express the defense gene FvPR5, suggesting that the SAR activation mechanisms in strawberry and Arabidopsis are different. Nevertheless, our results indicate that overexpression of AtNPR1 holds the potential for generation of broad-spectrum disease resistance in strawberry. PMID:25812515

  15. Quinolone resistance locus nfxD of Escherichia coli is a mutant allele of the parE gene encoding a subunit of topoisomerase IV.

    PubMed Central

    Breines, D M; Ouabdesselam, S; Ng, E Y; Tankovic, J; Shah, S; Soussy, C J; Hooper, D C

    1997-01-01

    The locus nfxD, which contributes to high-level quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli KF111b (gyrAr nfxB nfxD), is only expressed in the presence of a gyrA mutation, and maps to the region of the parC and parE genes, was outcrossed into strain KF130, creating strain DH161 (gyrAr nfxD). DNA sequence analysis of DH161 revealed no changes in the topoisomerase IV parC quinolone resistance-determining region but did identify a single T-to-A mutation in parE at codon 445, leading to a change from Leu to His. Full-length cloned parE+ partially complemented the resistance phenotype in KF111b and DH161, but did not complement the resistance phenotype in strain KF130 (gyrAr). No complementation was seen with cloned, truncated parE+. To confirm these findings, gyrAr was first outcrossed from KF130 into E. coli W3110parE10 [parE temperature sensitive(Ts)] and KL16. The transduced strains KL16 and W3110parE10 were subsequently transformed with plasmids containing cloned parE from DH161 or KL16. Cloned parE from DH161 increased norfloxacin resistance in the parE(Ts) background twofold at 30 degrees C and fourfold at 42 degrees C compared to those for cloned parE from KL16. The same experiment with a non-Ts background revealed a twofold increase in the norfloxacin MIC at both 30 and 42 degrees C. These data identify the nfxD conditional resistance locus as a mutant allele of parE. This report is the first of a quinolone-resistant parE mutant and confirms the role of topoisomerase IV as a secondary target of norfloxacin in E. coli. PMID:8980775

  16. An antibody that confers plant disease resistance targets a membrane-bound glyoxal oxidase in Fusarium.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiu-Shi; Xing, Shu; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Qu, Bo; Jiang, Jin-He; Fan, Chao; Yang, Peng; Liu, Jin-Long; Hu, Zu-Quan; Xue, Sheng; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-05-01

    Plant germplasm resources with natural resistance against globally important toxigenic Fusarium are inadequate. CWP2, a Fusarium genus-specific antibody, confers durable resistance to different Fusarium pathogens that infect cereals and other crops, producing mycotoxins. However, the nature of the CWP2 target is not known. Thus, investigation of the gene coding for the CWP2 antibody target will likely provide critical insights into the mechanism underlying the resistance mediated by this disease-resistance antibody. Immunoblots and mass spectrometry analysis of two-dimensional electrophoresis gels containing cell wall proteins from Fusarium graminearum (Fg) revealed that a glyoxal oxidase (GLX) is the CWP2 antigen. Cellular localization studies showed that GLX is localized to the plasma membrane. This GLX efficiently catalyzes hydrogen peroxide production; this enzymatic activity was specifically inhibited by the CWP2 antibody. GLX-deletion strains of Fg, F. verticillioides (Fv) and F. oxysporum had significantly reduced virulence on plants. The GLX-deletion Fg and Fv strains had markedly reduced mycotoxin accumulation, and the expression of key genes in mycotoxin metabolism was downregulated. This study reveals a single gene-encoded and highly conserved cellular surface antigen that is specifically recognized by the disease-resistance antibody CWP2 and regulates both virulence and mycotoxin biosynthesis in Fusarium species. PMID:26720747

  17. Concurrent MEK2 mutation and BRAF amplification confer resistance to BRAF and MEK inhibitors in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Jessie; Infante, Jeffrey R.; Krepler, Clemens; Reyes-Uribe, Patricia; Samanta, Minu; Chen, Hsin-Yi; Li, Bin; Swoboda, Rolf K.; Wilson, Melissa; Vultur, Adina; Fukunaba-Kalabis, Mizuho; Wubbenhorst, Bradley; Chen, Thomas Y.; Liu, Qin; Sproesser, Katrin; DeMarini, Douglas J.; Gilmer, Tona M.; Martin, Anne-Marie; Marmorstein, Ronen; Schultz, David C.; Speicher, David W.; Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Xu, Wei; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Xu, Xiaowe; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Herlyn, Meenhard; Nathanson, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although BRAF and MEK inhibitors have proven clinical benefits in melanoma, most patients develop resistance. We report a de novo MEK2-Q60P mutation and BRAF gain in a melanoma from a patient who progressed on the MEK inhibitor trametinib and did not respond to the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib. We also identified the same MEK2-Q60P mutation along with BRAF amplification in a xenograft tumor derived from a second melanoma patient resistant to the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib. Melanoma cells chronically exposed to trametinib acquired concurrent MEK2-Q60P mutation and BRAF-V600E amplification, which conferred resistance to MEK and BRAF inhibitors. The resistant cells had sustained MAPK activation and persistent phosphorylation of S6K. A triple combination of dabrafenib, trametinib, and the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor GSK2126458 led to sustained tumor growth inhibition. Hence, concurrent genetic events that sustain MAPK signaling can underlie resistance to both BRAF and MEK inhibitors, requiring novel therapeutic strategies to overcome it. PMID:24055054

  18. Pathogens of Bovine Respiratory Disease in North American Feedlots Conferring Multidrug Resistance via Integrative Conjugative Elements

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Cassidy L.; Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R.; Booker, Calvin W.; Hendrick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we determined the prevalence of bovine respiratory disease (BRD)-associated viral and bacterial pathogens in cattle and characterized the genetic profiles, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and nature of antimicrobial resistance determinants in collected bacteria. Nasopharyngeal swab and lung tissue samples from 68 BRD mortalities in Alberta, Canada (n = 42), Texas (n = 6), and Nebraska (n = 20) were screened using PCR for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, parainfluenza type 3 virus, Mycoplasma bovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Excepting bovine herpesvirus 1, all agents were detected. M. haemolytica (91%) and BVDV (69%) were the most prevalent, with cooccurrence in 63% of the cattle. Isolates of M. haemolytica (n = 55), P. multocida (n = 8), and H. somni (n = 10) from lungs were also collected. Among M. haemolytica isolates, a clonal subpopulation (n = 8) was obtained from a Nebraskan feedlot. All three bacterial pathogens exhibited a high rate of antimicrobial resistance, with 45% exhibiting resistance to three or more antimicrobials. M. haemolytica (n = 18), P. multocida (n = 3), and H. somni (n = 3) from Texas and Nebraska possessed integrative conjugative elements (ICE) that conferred resistance for up to seven different antimicrobial classes. ICE were shown to be transferred via conjugation from P. multocida to Escherichia coli and from M. haemolytica and H. somni to P. multocida. ICE-mediated multidrug-resistant profiles of bacterial BRD pathogens could be a major detriment to many of the therapeutic antimicrobial strategies currently used to control BRD. PMID:24478472

  19. Herbicide resistance in Aster squamatus conferred by a less sensitive form of acetolactate synthase.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Maria D; Fischer, Albert J; De Prado, Rafael

    2003-11-01

    A biotype of Aster squamatus (Sprengel) Hieronymus with suspected resistance to the ALS-inhibiting herbicide imazapyr was detected in a chicken farm in the province of Seville, Spain, which had been treated once a year with imazapyr for 10 years. Resistance to imazapyr in this biotype was studied using dose-response experiments, absorption and translocation assays, metabolism studies and ALS activity assays. The rate of imazapyr required to inhibit A squamatus growth by 50% (ED50) was 15 times higher for the R (resistant) than for the S (susceptible) biotype. Cross-resistance existed for the ALS-inhibitors imazamox, imazethapyr, amidosulfuron, nicosulfuron, rimsulfuron, triasulfuron and tribenuron, but not for bensulfuron. Control of A squamatus using alternative herbicides was poor with clopyralid, intermediate with quinclorac, amitrole and MCPA, and excellent with 2,4-D, glufosinate and glyphosate. Absorption of [14C]imazapyr increased over time for both the R and S biotypes, and translocation from the treated leaf to shoots and roots was similar in both biotypes, with most of the radioactivity remaining in the treated leaf. No metabolites of imazapyr were detected in either biotype. Sensitivity of the ALS enzyme (target site) to imazapyr was lower for the R biotype (I50(R) = 4.28 x I50(S)). The mechanism of imazapyr resistance in this R biotype appears to be an altered ALS conferring decreased sensitivity to imazapyr at the whole-plant level. PMID:14620047

  20. 4th international conference on tumor progression and therapeutic resistance: meeting report

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Varun V; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2015-01-01

    The fourth international conference on tumor progression and therapeutic resistance organized in association with GTCbio was held in Boston, MA from March 9 to 11, 2014. The meeting attracted a diverse group of experts in the field of cancer biology, therapeutics and medical oncology from academia and industry. The meeting addressed the current challenges in the treatment of cancer including tumor heterogeneity, therapy resistance and metastasis along with the need for improved biomarkers of tumor progression and clinical trial design. Keynote speakers included Clifton Leaf, Editor at Fortune Magazine, Dr. Mina Bissell from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Dr. Levi Garraway from the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. The meeting featured cutting edge tools, preclinical models and the latest basic, translational and clinical research findings in the field. PMID:25782066

  1. Draft genome sequences of two Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida isolates harboring plasmids conferring antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Antony T; Tanaka, Katherine H; Trudel, Melanie V; Frenette, Michel; Derome, Nicolas; Charette, Steve J

    2015-02-01

    The bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida is the etiological agent of furunculosis, a widespread fish disease causing important economic losses to the fish farming industry. Antibiotic treatments in fish farms may be challenging given the existence of multidrug-resistant isolates of this bacterium. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of the 2004-05MF26 and 2009-144K3 isolates, which harbor plasmids conferring antibiotic resistance. Both isolates also carry the large plasmid pAsa5, which is known to encode a type three secretion system (TTSS) and the pAsal1 plasmid which has the aopP gene producing a TTSS effector. These two isolates are good representatives of the plasmid diversity in A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida. PMID:25724776

  2. The Bcg/Ity/Lsh locus: genetic transfer of resistance to infections in C57BL/6J mice transgenic for the Nramp1 Gly169 allele.

    PubMed Central

    Govoni, G; Vidal, S; Gauthier, S; Skamene, E; Malo, D; Gros, P

    1996-01-01

    The murine Bcg/Ity/Lsh locus determines the susceptibilities of inbred strains to infection with unrelated intracellular parasites, such as Mycobacterium bovis, Salmonella typhimurium, and Leishmania donovani. A candidate for Bcg/Ity/Lsh, designated Nramp1, has been recently identified and shown to encode a novel integral membrane protein that is expressed exclusively in professional phagocytes but whose function remains unknown. In inbred strains, the susceptibility to infection is associated with a single glycine-to-aspartic acid substitution at position 169 (G169D) in the predicted TM4 of the protein. To confirm the candidacy of Nramp1 as Bcg/Ity/Lsh and to determine the importance of the G169D mutation on Nramp1 function, we constructed transgenic mice in which the G169 allele of Nramp1 was transferred onto the background of a homozygous D169 allele. These transgenic mice were analyzed for their sensitivity to infections under the control of Bcg/Ity/Lsh. The transgene constructed for these studies contained the entire Nramp1G169 gene together with approximately 5 kb of sequences upstream of the transcription initiation site of this gene. We observed that these sequences were sufficient to direct Nramp1G169 expression in transgenic macrophages, resulting in the appearance of a mature protein of 90 to 100 kDa over a background of Nramp1G169 characterized by the complete absence of the mature Nramp1 polypeptide. The appearance of the Nramp1G169-encoded protein in transgenic macrophages was concomitant with the emergence of resistance to infection by M. bovis BCG, as measured by the extent of bacteria] replication in the spleen, and by S. typhimurium, as measured by survival after an intravenous challenge. The gain of function detected in transgenic Nramp1G169 animals establishes unambiguously that Nramp1 and Bcg/Ity/Lsh are allelic. PMID:8757814

  3. Is the European spatial distribution of the HIV-1-resistant CCR5-Delta32 allele formed by a breakdown of the pathocenosis due to the historical Roman expansion?

    PubMed

    Faure, Eric; Royer-Carenzi, Manuela

    2008-12-01

    We studied the possible effects of the expansion of ancient Mediterranean civilizations during the five centuries before and after Christ on the European distribution of the mutant allele for the chemokine receptor gene CCR5 which has a 32-bp deletion (CCR5-Delta32). There is a strong evidence for the unitary origin of the CCR5-Delta32 mutation, this it is found principally in Europe and Western Asia, with generally a north-south downhill cline frequency. Homozygous carriers of this mutation show a resistance to HIV-1 infection and a slower progression towards AIDS. However, HIV has clearly emerged too recently to have been the selective force on CCR5. Our analyses showed strong negative correlations in Europe between the allele frequency and two historical parameters, i.e. the first colonization dates by the great ancient Mediterranean civilizations, and the distances from the Northern frontiers of the Roman Empire in its greatest expansion. Moreover, other studies have shown that the deletion frequencies in both German Bronze Age and Swedish Neolithic populations were similar to those found in the corresponding modern populations, and this deletion has been found in ancient DNA of around 7000 years ago, suggesting that in the past, the deletion frequency could have been relatively high in European populations. In addition, in West Nile virus pathogenesis, CCR5 plays an antimicrobial role showing that host genetic factors are highly pathogen-specific. Our results added to all these previous data suggest that the actual European allele frequency distribution might not be due to genes spreading, but to a negative selection resulting in the spread of pathogens principally during Roman expansion. Indeed, as gene flows from colonizers to European native populations were extremely low, the mutational changes might be associated with vulnerability to imported infections. To date, the nature of the parasites remains unknown; however, zoonoses could be incriminated. PMID

  4. Diversity of Molecular Mechanisms Conferring Carbapenem Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Jeannot, Katy; El-Mahdy, Taghrid S.; Samaha, Hassan A.; Shibl, Atef M.; Plésiat, Patrick; Courvalin, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study described various molecular and epidemiological characters determining antibiotic resistance patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Methods. A total of 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were isolated from samples collected at a tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January to December 2011. Susceptibility testing, serotyping, molecular characterization of carbapenem resistance, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed. Results. All isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, and more than half were highly resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) > 256 mg/L). Fifteen isolates had MIC values ≥64 mg/L for any of the carbapenems examined. Vietnamese extended-spectrum β-lactamase (VEB-1) (n = 16/34) and oxacillinase (OXA-10) (n = 14/34) were the most prevalent extended-spectrum β-lactamase and penicillinase, respectively. Verona imipenemase (VIM-1, VIM-2, VIM-4, VIM-11, and VIM-28) and imipenemase (IMP-7) variants were found in metallo-β-lactamase producers. A decrease in outer membrane porin gene (oprD) expression was seen in nine isolates, and an increase in efflux pump gene (MexAB) expression was detected in five isolates. Six serotypes (O:1, O:4, O:7, O:10, O:11, and O:15) were found among the 34 isolates. The predominant serotype was O:11 (16 isolates), followed by O:15 (nine isolates). PFGE analysis of the 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates revealed 14 different pulsotypes. Conclusions. These results revealed diverse mechanisms conferring carbapenem resistance to P. aeruginosa isolates from Saudi Arabia. PMID:27597874

  5. Apoptosis-related genes confer resistance to Fusarium wilt in transgenic 'Lady Finger' bananas.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jean-Yves; Becker, Douglas K; Dickman, Martin B; Harding, Robert M; Khanna, Harjeet K; Dale, James L

    2011-12-01

    Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc), is one of the most devastating diseases of banana (Musa spp.). Apart from resistant cultivars, there are no effective control measures for the disease. We investigated whether the transgenic expression of apoptosis-inhibition-related genes in banana could be used to confer disease resistance. Embryogenic cell suspensions of the banana cultivar, 'Lady Finger', were stably transformed with animal genes that negatively regulate apoptosis, namely Bcl-xL, Ced-9 and Bcl-2 3' UTR, and independently transformed plant lines were regenerated for testing. Following a 12-week exposure to Foc race 1 in small-plant glasshouse bioassays, seven transgenic lines (2 × Bcl-xL, 3 × Ced-9 and 2 × Bcl-2 3' UTR) showed significantly less internal and external disease symptoms than the wild-type susceptible 'Lady Finger' banana plants used as positive controls. Of these, one Bcl-2 3' UTR line showed resistance that was equivalent to that of wild-type Cavendish bananas that were included as resistant negative controls. Further, the resistance of this line continued for 23-week postinoculation at which time the experiment was terminated. Using TUNEL assays, Foc race 1 was shown to induce apoptosis-like features in the roots of wild-type 'Lady Finger' plants consistent with a necrotrophic phase in the life cycle of this pathogen. This was further supported by the observed reduction in these effects in the roots of the resistant Bcl-2 3' UTR-transgenic line. This is the first report on the generation of transgenic banana plants with resistance to Fusarium wilt. PMID:21819535

  6. Diversity of Molecular Mechanisms Conferring Carbapenem Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Agamy, Mohamed H; Jeannot, Katy; El-Mahdy, Taghrid S; Samaha, Hassan A; Shibl, Atef M; Plésiat, Patrick; Courvalin, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study described various molecular and epidemiological characters determining antibiotic resistance patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Methods. A total of 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were isolated from samples collected at a tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January to December 2011. Susceptibility testing, serotyping, molecular characterization of carbapenem resistance, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed. Results. All isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, and more than half were highly resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) > 256 mg/L). Fifteen isolates had MIC values ≥64 mg/L for any of the carbapenems examined. Vietnamese extended-spectrum β-lactamase (VEB-1) (n = 16/34) and oxacillinase (OXA-10) (n = 14/34) were the most prevalent extended-spectrum β-lactamase and penicillinase, respectively. Verona imipenemase (VIM-1, VIM-2, VIM-4, VIM-11, and VIM-28) and imipenemase (IMP-7) variants were found in metallo-β-lactamase producers. A decrease in outer membrane porin gene (oprD) expression was seen in nine isolates, and an increase in efflux pump gene (MexAB) expression was detected in five isolates. Six serotypes (O:1, O:4, O:7, O:10, O:11, and O:15) were found among the 34 isolates. The predominant serotype was O:11 (16 isolates), followed by O:15 (nine isolates). PFGE analysis of the 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates revealed 14 different pulsotypes. Conclusions. These results revealed diverse mechanisms conferring carbapenem resistance to P. aeruginosa isolates from Saudi Arabia. PMID:27597874

  7. A Brachypodium UDP-Glycosyltransferase Confers Root Tolerance to Deoxynivalenol and Resistance to Fusarium Infection.

    PubMed

    Pasquet, Jean-Claude; Changenet, Valentin; Macadré, Catherine; Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Soulhat, Camille; Bouchabké-Coussa, Oumaya; Dalmais, Marion; Atanasova-Pénichon, Vessela; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Saindrenan, Patrick; Dufresne, Marie

    2016-09-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a cereal disease caused by Fusarium graminearum, a fungus able to produce type B trichothecenes on cereals, including deoxynivalenol (DON), which is harmful for humans and animals. Resistance to FHB is quantitative, and the mechanisms underlying resistance are poorly understood. Resistance has been related to the ability to conjugate DON into a glucosylated form, deoxynivalenol-3-O-glucose (D3G), by secondary metabolism UDP-glucosyltransferases (UGTs). However, functional analyses have never been performed within a single host species. Here, using the model cereal species Brachypodium distachyon, we show that the Bradi5g03300 UGT converts DON into D3G in planta. We present evidence that a mutation in Bradi5g03300 increases root sensitivity to DON and the susceptibility of spikes to F. graminearum, while overexpression confers increased root tolerance to the mycotoxin and spike resistance to the fungus. The dynamics of expression and conjugation suggest that the speed of DON conjugation rather than the increase of D3G per se is a critical factor explaining the higher resistance of the overexpressing lines. A detached glumes assay showed that overexpression but not mutation of the Bradi5g03300 gene alters primary infection by F. graminearum, highlighting the involvement of DON in early steps of infection. Together, these results indicate that early and efficient UGT-mediated conjugation of DON is necessary and sufficient to establish resistance to primary infection by F. graminearum and highlight a novel strategy to promote FHB resistance in cereals. PMID:27378816

  8. Crenolanib is a potent inhibitor of FLT3 with activity against resistance-conferring point mutants

    PubMed Central

    Galanis, Allison; Ma, Hayley; Rajkhowa, Trivikram; Ramachandran, Abhijit; Small, Donald; Cortes, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3 occur in approximately 30% of acute myeloid leukemia patients and lead to constitutive activation. This has made FLT3-activating mutations an attractive drug target because they are probable driver mutations of this disease. As more potent FLT3 inhibitors are developed, a predictable development of resistance-conferring point mutations, commonly at residue D835, has been observed. Crenolanib is a highly selective and potent FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with activity against the internal tandem duplication (FLT3/ITD) mutants and the FLT3/D835 point mutants. We tested crenolanib against a panel of D835 mutant cell lines and primary patient blasts and observed superior cytotoxic effects when compared with other available FLT3 TKIs such as quizartinib and sorafenib. Another potential advantage of crenolanib is its reduced inhibition of c-Kit compared with quizartinib. In progenitor cell assays, crenolanib was less disruptive of erythroid colony growth, which may result in relatively less myelosuppression than quizartinib. Finally, correlative data from an ongoing clinical trial demonstrate that acute myeloid leukemia patients can achieve sufficient levels of crenolanib to inhibit both FLT3/ITD and resistance-conferring FLT3/D835 mutants in vivo. Crenolanib is thus an important next-generation FLT3 TKI. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov (ID: NCT01657682). PMID:24227820

  9. The eEF2 Kinase Confers Resistance to Nutrient Deprivation by Blocking Translation Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Leprivier, Gabriel; Remke, Marc; Rotblat, Barak; Dubuc, Adrian; Mateo, Abigail-Rachele F.; Kool, Marcel; Agnihotri, Sameer; El-Naggar, Amal; Yu, Bin; Somasekharan, Syam Prakash; Faubert, Brandon; Bridon, Gaëlle; Tognon, Cristina E.; Mathers, Joan; Thomas, Ryan; Li, Amy; Barokas, Adi; Kwok, Brian; Bowden, Mary; Smith, Stephanie; Wu, Xiaochong; Korshunov, Andrey; Hielscher, Thomas; Northcott, Paul A.; Galpin, Jason D.; Ahern, Christopher A.; Wang, Ye; McCabe, Martin G.; Collins, V. Peter; Jones, Russell G.; Pollak, Michael; Delattre, Olivier; Gleave, Martin E.; Jan, Eric; Pfister, Stefan M.; Proud, Christopher G.; Derry, W. Brent; Taylor, Michael D.; Sorensen, Poul H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Metabolic adaptation is essential for cell survival during nutrient deprivation. We report that eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K), which is activated by AMP-kinase (AMPK), confers cell survival under acute nutrient depletion by blocking translation elongation. Tumor cells exploit this pathway to adapt to nutrient deprivation by reactivating the AMPK-eEF2K axis. Adaptation of transformed cells to nutrient withdrawal is severely compromised in cells lacking eEF2K. Moreover, eEF2K knockdown restored sensitivity to acute nutrient deprivation in highly resistant human tumor cell lines. In vivo, overexpression of eEF2K rendered murine tumors remarkably resistant to caloric restriction. Expression of eEF2K strongly correlated with overall survival in human medulloblastoma and glioblastoma multiforme. Finally, C. elegans strains deficient in efk-1, the eEF2K ortholog, were severely compromised in their response to nutrient depletion. Our data highlight a conserved role for eEF2K in protecting cells from nutrient deprivation and in conferring tumor cell adaptation to metabolic stress. PMID:23706743

  10. Mutations in human cytomegalovirus UL97 gene confer clinical resistance to ganciclovir and can be detected directly in patient plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, D G; Smith, I L; Lee, D J; Freeman, W R; Flores-Aguilar, M; Spector, S A

    1995-01-01

    Specific mutations in the UL97 region of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) have been found to confer resistance to laboratory-adapted strains subjected to ganciclovir selection. In this study, mutations in the UL97 region of HCMV isolates obtained from patients receiving ganciclovir therapy were examined to determine whether they would confer ganciclovir resistance, and if these mutations could be detected directly in the plasma of AIDS patients with progressive HCMV disease despite ganciclovir treatment. A single nucleotide change within a conserved region of UL97 was found in five resistant isolates, resulting in an amino acid substitution in residue 595: from leucine to phenylalanine in one, and from leucine to serine in four resistant isolates. A sixth resistant isolate demonstrated a single nucleotide change, leading to a threonine to isoleucine substitution in residue 659. The role of the 595 amino acid substitution in conferring ganciclovir resistance was confirmed by marker transfer experiments. In further studies, direct sequencing of HCMV DNA present in plasma obtained from persons with resistant viruses revealed the identical amino acid substitutions in plasma as those present in the cultured viruses. These findings indicate that clinical resistance to ganciclovir can result from specific point mutations in the UL97 gene, and that the emergence of the resistant genotype can be detected directly in patient plasma. Images PMID:7814623

  11. Inherited resistance to HIV-1 conferred by an inactivating mutation in CC chemokine receptor 5: studies in populations with contrasting clinical phenotypes, defined racial background, and quantified risk.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, P. A.; Buckler-White, A.; Alkhatib, G.; Spalding, T.; Kubofcik, J.; Combadiere, C.; Weissman, D.; Cohen, O.; Rubbert, A.; Lam, G.; Vaccarezza, M.; Kennedy, P. E.; Kumaraswami, V.; Giorgi, J. V.; Detels, R.; Hunter, J.; Chopek, M.; Berger, E. A.; Fauci, A. S.; Nutman, T. B.; Murphy, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a cell entry cofactor for macrophage-tropic isolates of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Recently, an inactive CCR5 allele (designated here as CCR5-2) was identified that confers resistance to HIV-1 infection in homozygotes and slows the rate of progression to AIDS in heterozygotes. The reports conflict on the effect of heterozygous CCR5-2 on HIV-1 susceptibility, and race and risk levels have not yet been fully analyzed. Here we report our independent identification of CCR5-2 and test its effects on HIV-1 pathogenesis in individuals with contrasting clinical outcomes, defined race, and quantified risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mutant CCR5 alleles were sought by directed heteroduplex analysis of genomic DNA from random blood donors. Genotypic frequencies were then determined in (1) random blood donors from North America, Asia, and Africa; (2) HIV-1+ individuals; and (3) highly exposed-seronegative homosexuals with quantified risk. RESULTS: CCR5-2 was the only mutant allele found. It was common in Caucasians, less common in other North American racial groups, and not detected in West Africans or Tamil Indians. Homozygous CCR5-2 frequencies differed reciprocally in highly exposed-seronegative (4.5%, n = 111) and HIV-1-seropositive (0%, n = 614) Caucasians relative to Caucasian random blood donors (0.8%, n = 387). This difference was highly significant (p < 0.0001). By contrast, heterozygous CCR5-2 frequencies did not differ significantly in the same three groups (21.6, 22.6, and 21.7%, respectively). A 55% increase in the frequency of heterozygous CCR5-2 was observed in both of two cohorts of Caucasian homosexual male, long-term nonprogressors compared with other HIV-1+ Caucasian homosexuals (p = 0.006) and compared with Caucasian random blood donors. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier estimates indicated that CCR5-2 heterozygous seroconvertors had a 52.6% lower risk of developing AIDS than homozygous wild-type seroconvertors

  12. Combination of essential oils and antibiotics reduce antibiotic resistance in plasmid-conferred multidrug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yap, Polly Soo Xi; Lim, Swee Hua Erin; Hu, Cai Ping; Yiap, Beow Chin

    2013-06-15

    In this study we investigated the relationship between several selected commercially available essential oils and beta-lactam antibiotics on their antibacterial effect against multidrug resistant bacteria. The antibacterial activity of essential oils and antibiotics was assessed using broth microdilution. The combined effects between essential oils of cinnamon bark, lavender, marjoram, tea tree, peppermint and ampicillin, piperacillin, cefazolin, cefuroxime, carbenicillin, ceftazidime, meropenem, were evaluated by means of the checkerboard method against beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli. In the latter assays, fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) values were calculated to characterize interaction between the combinations. Substantial susceptibility of the bacteria toward natural antibiotics and a considerable reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the antibiotics were noted in some paired combinations of antibiotics and essential oils. Out of 35 antibiotic-essential oil pairs tested, four of them showed synergistic effect (FIC≤0.5) and 31 pairs showed no interaction (FIC>0.5-4.0). The preliminary results obtained highlighted the occurrence of a pronounced synergistic relationship between piperacillin/cinnamon bark oil, piperacillin/lavender oil, piperacillin/peppermint oil as well as meropenem/peppermint oil against two of the three bacteria under study with a FIC index in the range 0.26-0.5. The finding highlighted the potential of peppermint, cinnamon bark and lavender essential oils being as antibiotic resistance modifying agent. Reduced usage of antibiotics could be employed as a treatment strategy to decrease the adverse effects and possibly to reverse the beta-lactam antibiotic resistance. PMID:23537749

  13. A maize wall-associated kinase confers quantitative resistance to head smut.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Weiliang; Chao, Qing; Zhang, Nan; Ye, Jianrong; Tan, Guoqing; Li, Bailin; Xing, Yuexian; Zhang, Boqi; Liu, Haijun; Fengler, Kevin A; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Xianrong; Chen, Yongsheng; Lai, Jinsheng; Yan, Jianbing; Xu, Mingliang

    2015-02-01

    Head smut is a systemic disease in maize caused by the soil-borne fungus Sporisorium reilianum that poses a grave threat to maize production worldwide. A major head smut quantitative resistance locus, qHSR1, has been detected on maize chromosome bin2.09. Here we report the map-based cloning of qHSR1 and the molecular mechanism of qHSR1-mediated resistance. Sequential fine mapping and transgenic complementation demonstrated that ZmWAK is the gene within qHSR1 conferring quantitative resistance to maize head smut. ZmWAK spans the plasma membrane, potentially serving as a receptor-like kinase to perceive and transduce extracellular signals. ZmWAK was highly expressed in the mesocotyl of seedlings where it arrested biotrophic growth of the endophytic S. reilianum. Impaired expression in the mesocotyl compromised ZmWAK-mediated resistance. Deletion of the ZmWAK locus appears to have occurred after domestication and spread among maize germplasm, and the ZmWAK kinase domain underwent functional constraints during maize evolution. PMID:25531751

  14. More about the Viking hypothesis of origin of the delta32 mutation in the CCR5 gene conferring resistance to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard; Dieterlen, Florent

    2003-11-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 constitutes the major coreceptor for the HIV-1, because a mutant allele of the CCR5 gene named delta32 was shown to provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection. In the present study the frequency of the delta32 allele was collected in 36 European populations and in Cyprus, and the highest allele frequencies were found in Nordic countries. We constructed an allele map of delta32 frequencies in Europe; the map is in accordance to the Vikings hypothesis of the origin of the mutation and his dissemination during the eighth to the tenth centuries. PMID:14636691

  15. Overcoming MITF-conferred drug resistance through dual AURKA/MAPK targeting in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Pathria, G; Garg, B; Borgdorff, V; Garg, K; Wagner, C; Superti-Furga, G; Wagner, S N

    2016-01-01

    MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor) is a frequently amplified lineage-specific oncogene in human melanoma, whose role in intrinsic drug resistance has not been systematically investigated. Utilizing chemical inhibitors for major signaling pathways/cellular processes, we witness MITF as an elicitor of intrinsic drug resistance. To search kinase(s) targets able to bypass MITF-conferred drug resistance, we employed a multi-kinase inhibitor-directed chemical proteomics-based differential affinity screen in human melanocytes carrying ectopic MITF overexpression. A subsequent methodical interrogation informed mitotic Ser/Thr kinase Aurora Kinase A (AURKA) as a crucial regulator of melanoma cell proliferation and migration, independent of the underlying molecular alterations, including TP53 functional status and MITF levels. Crucially, assessing the efficacy of investigational AURKA inhibitor MLN8237, we pre-emptively witness the procurement of a molecular program consistent with acquired drug resistance. This involved induction of multiple MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signaling pathway components and their downstream proliferation effectors (Cyclin D1 and c-JUN) and apoptotic regulators (MITF and Bcl-2). A concomitant AURKA/BRAF and AURKA/MEK targeting overcame MAPK signaling activation-associated resistance signature in BRAF- and NRAS-mutated melanomas, respectively, and elicited heightened anti-proliferative activity and apoptotic cell death. These findings reveal a previously unreported MAPK signaling-mediated mechanism of immediate resistance to AURKA inhibitors. These findings could bear significant implications for the application and the success of anti-AURKA approaches that have already entered phase-II clinical trials for human melanoma. PMID:26962685

  16. Overcoming MITF-conferred drug resistance through dual AURKA/MAPK targeting in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pathria, G; Garg, B; Borgdorff, V; Garg, K; Wagner, C; Superti-Furga, G; Wagner, S N

    2016-01-01

    MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor) is a frequently amplified lineage-specific oncogene in human melanoma, whose role in intrinsic drug resistance has not been systematically investigated. Utilizing chemical inhibitors for major signaling pathways/cellular processes, we witness MITF as an elicitor of intrinsic drug resistance. To search kinase(s) targets able to bypass MITF-conferred drug resistance, we employed a multi-kinase inhibitor-directed chemical proteomics-based differential affinity screen in human melanocytes carrying ectopic MITF overexpression. A subsequent methodical interrogation informed mitotic Ser/Thr kinase Aurora Kinase A (AURKA) as a crucial regulator of melanoma cell proliferation and migration, independent of the underlying molecular alterations, including TP53 functional status and MITF levels. Crucially, assessing the efficacy of investigational AURKA inhibitor MLN8237, we pre-emptively witness the procurement of a molecular program consistent with acquired drug resistance. This involved induction of multiple MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signaling pathway components and their downstream proliferation effectors (Cyclin D1 and c-JUN) and apoptotic regulators (MITF and Bcl-2). A concomitant AURKA/BRAF and AURKA/MEK targeting overcame MAPK signaling activation-associated resistance signature in BRAF- and NRAS-mutated melanomas, respectively, and elicited heightened anti-proliferative activity and apoptotic cell death. These findings reveal a previously unreported MAPK signaling-mediated mechanism of immediate resistance to AURKA inhibitors. These findings could bear significant implications for the application and the success of anti-AURKA approaches that have already entered phase-II clinical trials for human melanoma. PMID:26962685

  17. Lr41, Lr39, and a leaf rust resistance gene from Aegilops cylindrica may be allelic and are located on wheat chromosome 2DS.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhwinder; Franks, C D; Huang, L; Brown-Guedira, G L; Marshall, D S; Gill, B S; Fritz, A

    2004-02-01

    The leaf rust resistance gene Lr41 in wheat germplasm KS90WGRC10 and a resistance gene in wheat breeding line WX93D246-R-1 were transferred to Triticum aestivum from Aegilops tauschii and Ae. cylindrica, respectively. The leaf rust resistance gene in WX93D246-R-1 was located on wheat chromosome 2D by monosomic analysis. Molecular marker analysis of F(2) plants from non-critical crosses determined that this gene is 11.2 cM distal to marker Xgwm210 on the short arm of 2D. No susceptible plants were detected in a population of 300 F(2) plants from a cross between WX93D246-R-1 and TA 4186 ( Lr39), suggesting that the gene in WX93D246-R-1 is the same as, or closely linked to, Lr39. In addition, no susceptible plants were detected in a population of 180 F(2) plants from the cross between KS90WGRC10 and WX93D246-R-1. The resistance gene in KS90WGRC10, Lr41, was previously reported to be located on wheat chromosome 1D. In this study, no genetic association was found between Lr41 and 51 markers located on chromosome 1D. A population of 110 F(3 )lines from a cross between KS90WGRC10 and TAM 107 was evaluated with polymorphic SSR markers from chromosome 2D and marker Xgdm35 was found to be 1.9 cM proximal to Lr41. When evaluated with diverse isolates of Puccinia triticina, similar reactions were observed on WX93D246-R-1, KS90WGRC10, and TA 4186. The results of mapping, allelism, and race specificity test indicate that these germplasms likely have the same gene for resistance to leaf rust. PMID:14534751

  18. Sequence variation at the rice blast resistance gene Pi-km locus: Implications for the development of allele specific markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recently cloned blast resistance (R) gene Pi-km protects rice crops against specific races of the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae in a gene-for-gene manner. The use of blast R genes remains the most cost-effective method for an integrated disease management strategy. To facilitate rice breed...

  19. Allele, genotype, and haplotype data for BSE-resistance polymorphisms from healthy U.S. holstein cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a neurodegenerative disease of cattle caused by abnormally folded prion proteins. Two regulatory region polymorphisms in the bovine prion gene are associated with resistance to classical BSE disease: a 23 bp region in the promoter that contains a binding si...

  20. RNA-Seq Analysis of a Soybean Near-Isogenic Line Carrying Bacterial Leaf Pustule-Resistant and -Susceptible Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kil Hyun; Kang, Yang Jae; Kim, Dong Hyun; Yoon, Min Young; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Kim, Moon Young; Van, Kyujung; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial leaf pustule (BLP) disease is caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines (Xag). To investigate the plant basal defence mechanisms induced in response to Xag, differential gene expression in near-isogenic lines (NILs) of BLP-susceptible and BLP-resistant soybean was analysed by RNA-Seq. Of a total of 46 367 genes that were mapped to soybean genome reference sequences, 1978 and 783 genes were found to be up- and down-regulated, respectively, in the BLP-resistant NIL relative to the BLP-susceptible NIL at 0, 6, and 12h after inoculation (hai). Clustering analysis revealed that these genes could be grouped into 10 clusters with different expression patterns. Functional annotation based on gene ontology (GO) categories was carried out. Among the putative soybean defence response genes identified (GO:0006952), 134 exhibited significant differences in expression between the BLP-resistant and -susceptible NILs. In particular, pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) receptors and the genes induced by these receptors were highly expressed at 0 hai in the BLP-resistant NIL. Additionally, pathogenesis-related (PR)-1 and -14 were highly expressed at 0 hai, and PR-3, -6, and -12 were highly expressed at 12 hai. There were also significant differences in the expression of the core JA-signalling components MYC2 and JASMONATE ZIM-motif. These results indicate that powerful basal defence mechanisms involved in the recognition of PAMPs or DAMPs and a high level of accumulation of defence-related gene products may contribute to BLP resistance in soybean. PMID:21987089

  1. RNA-Seq analysis of a soybean near-isogenic line carrying bacterial leaf pustule-resistant and -susceptible alleles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kil Hyun; Kang, Yang Jae; Kim, Dong Hyun; Yoon, Min Young; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Kim, Moon Young; Van, Kyujung; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial leaf pustule (BLP) disease is caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines (Xag). To investigate the plant basal defence mechanisms induced in response to Xag, differential gene expression in near-isogenic lines (NILs) of BLP-susceptible and BLP-resistant soybean was analysed by RNA-Seq. Of a total of 46 367 genes that were mapped to soybean genome reference sequences, 1978 and 783 genes were found to be up- and down-regulated, respectively, in the BLP-resistant NIL relative to the BLP-susceptible NIL at 0, 6, and 12h after inoculation (hai). Clustering analysis revealed that these genes could be grouped into 10 clusters with different expression patterns. Functional annotation based on gene ontology (GO) categories was carried out. Among the putative soybean defence response genes identified (GO:0006952), 134 exhibited significant differences in expression between the BLP-resistant and -susceptible NILs. In particular, pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) receptors and the genes induced by these receptors were highly expressed at 0 hai in the BLP-resistant NIL. Additionally, pathogenesis-related (PR)-1 and -14 were highly expressed at 0 hai, and PR-3, -6, and -12 were highly expressed at 12 hai. There were also significant differences in the expression of the core JA-signalling components MYC2 and JASMONATE ZIM-motif. These results indicate that powerful basal defence mechanisms involved in the recognition of PAMPs or DAMPs and a high level of accumulation of defence-related gene products may contribute to BLP resistance in soybean. PMID:21987089

  2. Rapid Microarray-Based Identification of Different mecA Alleles in Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Elke; Schwarz, Stefan; Hotzel, Helmut; Ehricht, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    To screen isolates and to identify mecA alleles, published mecA sequences were analyzed, and a microarray for the rapid discrimination of mecA alleles was designed. A GenBank analysis yielded 135 full-length gene sequences annotated as mecA. These sequences clustered into 32 different alleles corresponding to 28 unique amino acid sequences and to 15 distinct hybridization patterns on this microarray. A collection of 78 clinical and veterinary isolates of Staphylococcus spp. was characterized using this assay. Nine of the 15 expected patterns, as well as one as-yet-unknown pattern, were identified. These patterns were detected in various epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, in S. pseudintermedius, and in coagulase-negative species such as S. epidermidis, S. fleurettii, or S. haemolyticus. There was no correlation between the different mecA hybridization patterns and the SCCmec type. Determination of MICs showed that mecA alleles corresponding to only four of these nine patterns were associated with β-lactam resistance. The mecA alleles that did not confer β-lactam resistance were largely restricted to coagulase-negative staphylococci of animal origin, such as S. sciuri and S. vitulinus. Because of the diversity of sequences and the different impact on β-lactam susceptibility, the existence of different mecA alleles needs to be taken into account when designing diagnostic assays for the detection of mecA. PMID:22890767

  3. Mapping QTL conferring resistance in maize to gray leaf spot disease caused by Cercospora zeina

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gray leaf spot (GLS) is a globally important foliar disease of maize. Cercospora zeina, one of the two fungal species that cause the disease, is prevalent in southern Africa, China, Brazil and the eastern corn belt of the USA. Identification of QTL for GLS resistance in subtropical germplasm is important to support breeding programmes in developing countries where C. zeina limits production of this staple food crop. Results A maize RIL population (F7:S6) from a cross between CML444 and SC Malawi was field-tested under GLS disease pressure at five field sites over three seasons in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Thirty QTL identified from eleven field trials (environments) were consolidated to seven QTL for GLS resistance based on their expression in at least two environments and location in the same core maize bins. Four GLS resistance alleles were derived from the more resistant parent CML444 (bin 1.10, 4.08, 9.04/9.05, 10.06/10.07), whereas the remainder were from SC Malawi (bin 6.06/6.07, 7.02/7.03, 9.06). QTLs in bin 4.08 and bin 6.06/6.07 were also detected as joint QTLs, each explained more than 11% of the phenotypic variation, and were identified in four and seven environments, respectively. Common markers were used to allocate GLS QTL from eleven previous studies to bins on the IBM2005 map, and GLS QTL “hotspots” were noted. Bin 4.08 and 7.02/7.03 GLS QTL from this study overlapped with hotspots, whereas the bin 6.06/6.07 and bin 9.06 QTLs appeared to be unique. QTL for flowering time (bin 1.07, 4.09) in this population did not correspond to QTL for GLS resistance. Conclusions QTL mapping of a RIL population from the subtropical maize parents CML444 and SC Malawi identified seven QTL for resistance to gray leaf spot disease caused by C. zeina. These QTL together with QTL from eleven studies were allocated to bins on the IBM2005 map to provide a basis for comparison. Hotspots of GLS QTL were identified on chromosomes one, two, four, five and

  4. Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1), slow (exon 3, 113His) and fast (exon 4, 139Arg) alleles confer susceptibility to squamous cell esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Meenu; Tilak, Anup Raj; Upadhyay, Rohit; Kumar, Ashwani; Mittal, Balraj

    2008-07-15

    Genetic polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes may alter risk of various cancers. Present case-control study evaluated the influence of EPHX1 genetic variations on squamous cell esophageal cancer (ESCC) susceptibility in 107 patients and 320 controls. EPHX1 polymorphic alleles were genotyped by direct sequencing (exon 3, Tyr113His) or PCR-RFLP (exon 4, His139Arg). Patients with exon 3 genotypes (Tyr113His, His113His) and 113His allele were at risk of ESCC (OR{sub Tyr113His} 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2-3.4, p = 0.007; OR{sub His113His} 2.3 95% CI = 1.0-5.2, p = 0.03 and OR{sub His} 1.5, 95% CI = 1.0-2.1, p = 0.01). In contrast, individuals with exon 4, 139Arg allele were at low risk of cancer (OR 0.34, 95% CI = 0.20-0.56, p = 0.001). However, none of haplotype combinations of exon 3 (Tyr113His) and exon 4 (His139Arg) polymorphisms showed modulation of risk for ESCC. Sub-grouping of patients based on anatomical location of tumor predicted that patients with exon 3, His113His and Tyr113His genotypes were at higher risk for developing ESCC tumor at upper and middle third locations (OR 4.4, 95% CI = 1.0-18.5, p = 0.04; OR 2.5, 95% CI = 1.3-5.0, p = 0.005 respectively). The frequency of exon 4, His139Arg genotype was significantly lower in ESCC patients with lower third tumor location as compared to controls (14.8% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.02). In case-only study, gene-environment interaction of EPHX1 genotypes with tobacco, alcohol and occupational exposures did not appear to modulate the cancer susceptibility. In conclusion, exon 3, Tyr113His genotype was associated with higher risk of ESCC particularly at upper and middle-third anatomical locations of tumor. However, His139Arg genotype of exon 4, exhibited low risk for ESCC as well as its clinical characteristics.

  5. Prolactin confers resistance against cisplatin in breast cancer cells by activating glutathione-S-transferase.

    PubMed

    LaPensee, Elizabeth W; Schwemberger, Sandy J; LaPensee, Christopher R; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Afton, Scott E; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2009-08-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle for successful treatment of breast cancer patients. Given that prolactin (PRL) acts as an anti-apoptotic/survival factor in the breast, we postulated that it antagonizes cytotoxicity by chemotherapeutic drugs. Treatment of breast cancer cells with PRL caused variable resistance to taxol, vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin. PRL prevented cisplatin-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In the presence of PRL, significantly less cisplatin was bound to DNA, as determined by mass spectroscopy, and little DNA damage was seen by gamma-H2AX staining. PRL dramatically increased the activity of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), which sequesters cisplatin in the cytoplasm; this increase was abrogated by Jak and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. PRL upregulated the expression of the GSTmu, but not the pi, isozyme. A GST inhibitor abrogated antagonism of cisplatin cytotoxicity by PRL. In conclusion, PRL confers resistance against cisplatin by activating a detoxification enzyme, thereby reducing drug entry into the nucleus. These data provide a rational explanation for the ineffectiveness of cisplatin in breast cancer, which is characterized by high expression of both PRL and its receptor. Suppression of PRL production or blockade of its actions should benefit patients undergoing chemotherapy by allowing for lower drug doses and expanded drug options. PMID:19443905

  6. NUMB inactivation confers resistance to imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    García-Alegría, Eva; Lafita-Navarro, M Carmen; Aguado, Rocío; García-Gutiérrez, Lucia; Sarnataro, Kyle; Ruiz-Herguido, Cristina; Martín, Francisco; Bigas, Anna; Canelles, Matilde; León, Javier

    2016-05-28

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progresses from a chronic to a blastic phase, where the leukemic cells are proliferative and undifferentiated. The CML is nowadays successfully treated with BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors as imatinib and its derivatives. NUMB is an evolutionary well-conserved protein initially described as a functional antagonist of NOTCH function. NUMB is an endocytic protein associated with receptor internalization, involved in multiple cellular functions. It has been reported that MSI2 protein, a NUMB inhibitor, is upregulated in CML blast crisis, whereas NUMB itself is downregulated. This suggest that NUMB plays a role in the malignant progression of CML. Here we have generated K562 cells (derived from CML in blast crisis) constitutively expressing a dominant negative form of NUMB (dnNUMB). We show that dnNUMB expression confers a high proliferative phenotype to the cells. Importantly, dnNUMB triggers a partial resistance to imatinib in these cells, antagonizing the apoptosis mediated by the drug. Interestingly, imatinib resistance is not linked to p53 status or NOTCH signaling, as K562 lack p53 and imatinib resistance is reproduced in the presence of NOTCH inhibitors. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that NUMB activation could be a new therapeutic target in CML. PMID:26944313

  7. Identification of wheat gene Sr35 that confers resistance to Ug99 stem rust race group.

    PubMed

    Saintenac, Cyrille; Zhang, Wenjun; Salcedo, Andres; Rouse, Matthew N; Trick, Harold N; Akhunov, Eduard; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2013-08-16

    Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is a devastating disease that can cause severe yield losses. A previously uncharacterized Pgt race, designated Ug99, has overcome most of the widely used resistance genes and is threatening major wheat production areas. Here, we demonstrate that the Sr35 gene from Triticum monococcum is a coiled-coil, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat gene that confers near immunity to Ug99 and related races. This gene is absent in the A-genome diploid donor and in polyploid wheat but is effective when transferred from T. monococcum to polyploid wheat. The cloning of Sr35 opens the door to the use of biotechnological approaches to control this devastating disease and to analyses of the molecular interactions that define the wheat-rust pathosystem. PMID:23811222

  8. Identification and Characterization of Mutations Conferring Resistance to d-Amino Acids in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Leiman, Sara A.; Richardson, Charles; Foulston, Lucy; Elsholz, Alexander K. W.; First, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria produce d-amino acids for incorporation into the peptidoglycan and certain nonribosomally produced peptides. However, d-amino acids are toxic if mischarged on tRNAs or misincorporated into protein. Common strains of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis are particularly sensitive to the growth-inhibitory effects of d-tyrosine due to the absence of d-aminoacyl-tRNA deacylase, an enzyme that prevents misincorporation of d-tyrosine and other d-amino acids into nascent proteins. We isolated spontaneous mutants of B. subtilis that survive in the presence of a mixture of d-leucine, d-methionine, d-tryptophan, and d-tyrosine. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that these strains harbored mutations affecting tRNATyr charging. Three of the most potent mutations enhanced the expression of the gene (tyrS) for tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. In particular, resistance was conferred by mutations that destabilized the terminator hairpin of the tyrS riboswitch, as well as by a mutation that transformed a tRNAPhe into a tyrS riboswitch ligand. The most potent mutation, a substitution near the tyrosine recognition site of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, improved enzyme stereoselectivity. We conclude that these mutations promote the proper charging of tRNATyr, thus facilitating the exclusion of d-tyrosine from protein biosynthesis in cells that lack d-aminoacyl-tRNA deacylase. IMPORTANCE Proteins are composed of l-amino acids. Mischarging of tRNAs with d-amino acids or the misincorporation of d-amino acids into proteins causes toxicity. This work reports on mutations that confer resistance to d-amino acids and their mechanisms of action. PMID:25733611

  9. Two Non-target Recessive Genes Confer Resistance to the Anti-Oomycete Microtubule Inhibitor Zoxamide in Phytophthora capsici

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Meng; Zhu, Shusheng; Pang, Zhili; Liu, Xili

    2014-01-01

    This study characterized isolates of P. capsici that had developed a novel mechanism of resistance to zoxamide, which altered the minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) but not the EC50. Molecular analysis revealed that the β-tubulin gene of the resistant isolates contained no mutations and was expressed at the same level as in zoxamide-sensitive isolates. This suggested that P. capsici had developed a novel non-target-site-based resistance to zoxamide. Analysis of the segregation ratio of zoxamide-resistance in the sexual progeny of the sensitive isolates PCAS1 and PCAS2 indicated that the resistance to zoxamide was controlled by one or more recessive nuclear genes. Furthermore, the segregation of resistance in the F1, F2, and BC1 progeny was in accordance with the theoretical ratios of the χ2 test (P>0.05), which suggested that the resistance to zoxamide was controlled by two recessive genes, and that resistance to zoxamide occurred when at least one pair of these alleles was homozygous. This implies that the risk of zoxamide-resistance in P. capsici is low to moderate. Nevertheless this potential for resistance should be monitored closely, especially if two compatible mating types co-exist in the same field. PMID:24586697

  10. Fine mapping of QTL and genomic prediction using allele-specific expression SNPs demonstrates that the complex trait of genetic resistance to Marek’s disease is predominantly determined by transcriptional regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypothesis that polymorphisms associated with transcriptional regulation are critical for viral disease resistance was tested by selecting birds using SNPs exhibiting allele-specific expression (ASE) in response to viral challenge. Analysis indicates ASE markers account for 83% of the disease re...

  11. Molecular mapping and characterization of two genes conferring resistance to Phytophthora sojae in a soybean landrace PI 567139B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root and stem rot (PRR), caused by the soil-borne oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae, is one of the most destructive diseases of soybean. PRR can be effectively controlled by race-specific genes conferring resistance to P. sojae (Rps). However, the Rps genes are usually non-durable, a...

  12. Anthelmintic resistance in Swedish sheep flocks based on a comparison of the results from the faecal egg count reduction test and resistant allele frequencies of the beta-tubulin gene.

    PubMed

    Höglund, Johan; Gustafsson, Katarina; Ljungström, Britt-Louise; Engström, Annie; Donnan, Alison; Skuce, Philip

    2009-04-01

    A faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) survey was conducted during the grazing season 2006 and 2007 to provide an updated indication of the prevalence of anthelmintic resistance in sheep flocks in Sweden. A total of 1330 faecal samples from 90 flocks on 45 farms, with a minimum of 20 ewes each, was collected by local sheep veterinarians. Per treatment group, approximately 15 lambs were dewormed either with oral suspensions of ivermectin (Ivomec vet.) or albendazole (Valbazen vet.). The efficacy on each farm was investigated either in 2006 or 2007 by faecal egg counts collected on the day of treatment and in a new sample from the same animals 7-10 days later. Third-stage larvae (L3) were initially identified morphologically from pooled cultures. These were then used as the source of genomic DNA template for two molecular tests. The first was a PCR-based test for specific identification of Haemonchus contortus, and the second was a Pyrosequencing assay for the analysis of benzimidazole (BZ) resistance targeting the P200 mutation in the parasite's beta-tubulin gene. Larval cultures indicated that Teladorsagia and Trichostrongylus were the predominant genera, but Haemonchus was diagnosed in 37% of the flocks. The PCR results revealed an almost 100% agreement with those farms that had previously been shown to have Haemonchus present, even when the % prevalence was low (approximately 3%). Only two (4%) of the surveyed farms showed evidence of BZ-resistant worm populations, with H. contortus being the species implicated according to post-treatment larval culture results. The Pyrosequencing assay detected BZ resistant allele frequencies of >40% in the Haemonchus-positive farms and 100% resistant alleles in the clinically most resistant farms. These preliminary results suggest that the FECRT is less sensitive than the molecular test at detecting BZ resistance. However, both tests need to be interpreted carefully, bearing in mind the relative proportions of species

  13. Activation of the Met kinase confers acquired drug resistance in FGFR-targeted lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-M; Kim, H; Yun, M R; Kang, H N; Pyo, K-H; Park, H J; Lee, J M; Choi, H M; Ellinghaus, P; Ocker, M; Paik, S; Kim, H R; Cho, B C

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) activation/expression is a common feature in lung cancer (LC). In this study, we evaluated the antitumor activity of and the mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to two potent selective FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547 and BAY116387, in LC cell lines. The antitumor activity of AZD4547 and BAY1163877 was screened in 24 LC cell lines, including 5 with FGFR1 amplification. Two cell lines containing FGFR1 amplifications, H1581 and DMS114, were sensitive to FGFR inhibitors (IC50<250 nm). Clones of FGFR1-amplified H1581 cells resistant to AZD4547 or BAY116387 (H1581AR and H1581BR cells, respectively) were established. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) array and immunoblotting analyses showed strong overexpression and activation of Met in H1581AR/BR cells, compared with that in the parental cells. Gene set enrichment analysis against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database showed that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathways were significantly enriched in H1581AR/BR cells, with Met contributing significantly to the core enrichment. Genomic DNA quantitative PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses showed MET amplification in H1581AR, but not in H1581BR, cells. Met amplification drives acquired resistance to AZD4547 in H1581AR cells by activating ErbB3. Combination treatment with FGFR inhibitors and an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)/Met inhibitor, crizotinib, or Met-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA) synergistically inhibited cell proliferation in both H1581AR and H1581BR cells. Conversely, ectopic expression of Met in H1581 cells conferred resistance to AZD4547 and BAY1163877. Acquired resistance to FGFR inhibitors not only altered cellular morphology, but also promoted migration and invasion of resistant clones, in part by inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Taken together, our data suggest that Met activation is sufficient to bypass dependency on FGFR signaling. Concurrent

  14. HDAC6 promotes cell proliferation and confers resistance to temozolomide in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihao; Hu, Pengchao; Tang, Fang; Lian, Haiwei; Chen, Xiong; Zhang, Yingying; He, Xiaohua; Liu, Wanhong; Xie, Conghua

    2016-08-28

    Histone deacetylases are considered to be among the most promising targets in drug development for cancer therapy. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a unique cytoplasmic enzyme that regulates many biological processes involved in tumorigenesis through its deacetylase and ubiquitin-binding activities. Here, we report that HDAC6 is overexpressed in glioblastoma tissues and cell lines. Overexpression of HDAC6 promotes the proliferation and spheroid formation of glioblastoma cells. HDAC6 overexpression confers resistance to temozolomide (TMZ) mediated cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction. Conversely, knockdown of HDAC6 inhibits cell proliferation, impairs spheroid formation and sensitizes glioblastoma cells to TMZ. The inhibition of HDAC6 deacetylase activity by selective inhibitors inhibits the proliferation of glioblastoma cells and induces apoptosis. HDAC6 selective inhibitors can sensitize glioblastoma cells to TMZ. Moreover, we showed that HDAC6 mediated EGFR stabilization might partly account for its oncogenic role in glioblastoma. TMZ resistant glioblastoma cells showed higher expression of HDAC6 and more activation of EGFR. HDAC6 inhibitors decrease EGFR protein levels and impair the activation of the EGFR pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibition of HDAC6 may be a promising strategy for the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:27267806

  15. Disruptive environmental chemicals and cellular mechanisms that confer resistance to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Ali, Manaf; Barclay, Barry J.; Cheng, Qiang (Shawn); D’Abronzo, Leandro; Dornetshuber-Fleiss, Rita; Ghosh, Paramita M.; Gonzalez Guzman, Michael J.; Lee, Tae-Jin; Leung, Po Sing; Li, Lin; Luanpitpong, Suidjit; Ratovitski, Edward; Rojanasakul, Yon; Romano, Maria Fiammetta; Romano, Simona; Sinha, Ranjeet K.; Yedjou, Clement; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Brown, Dustin G.; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Colacci, Anna Maria; Hamid, Roslida A.; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Salem, Hosni K.; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, A.Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Kim, Seo Yun; Bisson, William H.; Lowe, Leroy; Park, Hyun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Cell death is a process of dying within biological cells that are ceasing to function. This process is essential in regulating organism development, tissue homeostasis, and to eliminate cells in the body that are irreparably damaged. In general, dysfunction in normal cellular death is tightly linked to cancer progression. Specifically, the up-regulation of pro-survival factors, including oncogenic factors and antiapoptotic signaling pathways, and the down-regulation of pro-apoptotic factors, including tumor suppressive factors, confers resistance to cell death in tumor cells, which supports the emergence of a fully immortalized cellular phenotype. This review considers the potential relevance of ubiquitous environmental chemical exposures that have been shown to disrupt key pathways and mechanisms associated with this sort of dysfunction. Specifically, bisphenol A, chlorothalonil, dibutyl phthalate, dichlorvos, lindane, linuron, methoxychlor and oxyfluorfen are discussed as prototypical chemical disruptors; as their effects relate to resistance to cell death, as constituents within environmental mixtures and as potential contributors to environmental carcinogenesis. PMID:26106145

  16. Specific calcineurin targeting in macrophages confers resistance to inflammation via MKP-1 and p38

    PubMed Central

    Escolano, Amelia; Martínez-Martínez, Sara; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Urso, Katia; Izquierdo, Helena M; Delgado, Mario; Martín, Francisco; Sabio, Guadalupe; Sancho, David; Gómez-del Arco, Pablo; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages contribute to tissue homeostasis and influence inflammatory responses by modulating their phenotype in response to the local environment. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing this plasticity would open new avenues for the treatment for inflammatory disorders. We show that deletion of calcineurin (CN) or its inhibition with LxVP peptide in macrophages induces an anti-inflammatory population that confers resistance to arthritis and contact hypersensitivity. Transfer of CN-targeted macrophages or direct injection of LxVP-encoding lentivirus has anti-inflammatory effects in these models. Specific CN targeting in macrophages induces p38 MAPK activity by downregulating MKP-1 expression. However, pharmacological CN inhibition with cyclosporin A (CsA) or FK506 did not reproduce these effects and failed to induce p38 activity. The CN-inhibitory peptide VIVIT also failed to reproduce the effects of LxVP. p38 inhibition prevented the anti-inflammatory phenotype of CN-targeted macrophages, and mice with defective p38-activation were resistant to the anti-inflammatory effect of LxVP. Our results identify a key role for CN and p38 in the modulation of macrophage phenotype and suggest an alternative treatment for inflammation based on redirecting macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory status. PMID:24596247

  17. Specific calcineurin targeting in macrophages confers resistance to inflammation via MKP-1 and p38.

    PubMed

    Escolano, Amelia; Martínez-Martínez, Sara; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Urso, Katia; Izquierdo, Helena M; Delgado, Mario; Martín, Francisco; Sabio, Guadalupe; Sancho, David; Gómez-del Arco, Pablo; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2014-05-16

    Macrophages contribute to tissue homeostasis and influence inflammatory responses by modulating their phenotype in response to the local environment. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing this plasticity would open new avenues for the treatment for inflammatory disorders. We show that deletion of calcineurin (CN) or its inhibition with LxVP peptide in macrophages induces an anti-inflammatory population that confers resistance to arthritis and contact hypersensitivity. Transfer of CN-targeted macrophages or direct injection of LxVP-encoding lentivirus has anti-inflammatory effects in these models. Specific CN targeting in macrophages induces p38 MAPK activity by downregulating MKP-1 expression. However, pharmacological CN inhibition with cyclosporin A (CsA) or FK506 did not reproduce these effects and failed to induce p38 activity. The CN-inhibitory peptide VIVIT also failed to reproduce the effects of LxVP. p38 inhibition prevented the anti-inflammatory phenotype of CN-targeted macrophages, and mice with defective p38-activation were resistant to the anti-inflammatory effect of LxVP. Our results identify a key role for CN and p38 in the modulation of macrophage phenotype and suggest an alternative treatment for inflammation based on redirecting macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory status. PMID:24596247

  18. Loss of the RNA polymerase III repressor MAF1 confers obesity resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bonhoure, Nicolas; Byrnes, Ashlee; Moir, Robyn D.; Hodroj, Wassim; Preitner, Frédéric; Praz, Viviane; Marcelin, Genevieve; Chua, Streamson C.; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Singh, Rajat; Moullan, Norman; Auwerx, Johan; Willemin, Gilles; Shah, Hardik; Hartil, Kirsten; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Kurland, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    MAF1 is a global repressor of RNA polymerase III transcription that regulates the expression of highly abundant noncoding RNAs in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. Thus, MAF1 function is thought to be important for metabolic economy. Here we show that a whole-body knockout of Maf1 in mice confers resistance to diet-induced obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by reducing food intake and increasing metabolic inefficiency. Energy expenditure in Maf1−/− mice is increased by several mechanisms. Precursor tRNA synthesis was increased in multiple tissues without significant effects on mature tRNA levels, implying increased turnover in a futile tRNA cycle. Elevated futile cycling of hepatic lipids was also observed. Metabolite profiling of the liver and skeletal muscle revealed elevated levels of many amino acids and spermidine, which links the induction of autophagy in Maf1−/− mice with their extended life span. The increase in spermidine was accompanied by reduced levels of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, which promotes polyamine synthesis, enables nicotinamide salvage to regenerate NAD+, and is associated with obesity resistance. Consistent with this, NAD+ levels were increased in muscle. The importance of MAF1 for metabolic economy reveals the potential for MAF1 modulators to protect against obesity and its harmful consequences. PMID:25934505

  19. Lung-specific loss of the laminin α3 subunit confers resistance to mechanical injury.

    PubMed

    Urich, Daniela; Eisenberg, Jessica L; Hamill, Kevin J; Takawira, Desire; Chiarella, Sergio E; Soberanes, Saul; Gonzalez, Angel; Koentgen, Frank; Manghi, Tomas; Hopkinson, Susan B; Misharin, Alexander V; Perlman, Harris; Mutlu, Gokhan M; Budinger, G R Scott; Jones, Jonathan C R

    2011-09-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix that are secreted by epithelial cells and which are crucial for the normal structure and function of the basement membrane. We have generated a mouse harboring a conditional knockout of α3 laminin (Lama3(fl/fl)), one of the main laminin subunits in the lung basement membrane. At 60 days after intratracheal treatment of adult Lama3(fl/fl) mice with an adenovirus encoding Cre recombinase (Ad-Cre), the protein abundance of α3 laminin in whole lung homogenates was more than 50% lower than that in control-treated mice, suggesting a relatively long half-life for the protein in the lung. Upon exposure to an injurious ventilation strategy (tidal volume of 35 ml per kg of body weight for 2 hours), the mice with a knockdown of the α3 laminin subunit had less severe injury, as shown by lung mechanics, histology, alveolar capillary permeability and survival when compared with Ad-Null-treated mice. Knockdown of the α3 laminin subunit resulted in evidence of lung inflammation. However, this did not account for their resistance to mechanical ventilation. Rather, the loss of α3 laminin was associated with a significant increase in the collagen content of the lungs. We conclude that the loss of α3 laminin in the alveolar epithelium results in an increase in lung collagen, which confers resistance to mechanical injury. PMID:21878500

  20. Disruptive environmental chemicals and cellular mechanisms that confer resistance to cell death.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Ali, Manaf; Barclay, Barry J; Cheng, Qiang Shawn; D'Abronzo, Leandro; Dornetshuber-Fleiss, Rita; Ghosh, Paramita M; Gonzalez Guzman, Michael J; Lee, Tae-Jin; Leung, Po Sing; Li, Lin; Luanpitpong, Suidjit; Ratovitski, Edward; Rojanasakul, Yon; Romano, Maria Fiammetta; Romano, Simona; Sinha, Ranjeet K; Yedjou, Clement; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Brown, Dustin G; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Colacci, Annamaria; Hamid, Roslida A; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Salem, Hosni K; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Kim, Seo Yun; Bisson, William H; Lowe, Leroy; Park, Hyun Ho

    2015-06-01

    Cell death is a process of dying within biological cells that are ceasing to function. This process is essential in regulating organism development, tissue homeostasis, and to eliminate cells in the body that are irreparably damaged. In general, dysfunction in normal cellular death is tightly linked to cancer progression. Specifically, the up-regulation of pro-survival factors, including oncogenic factors and antiapoptotic signaling pathways, and the down-regulation of pro-apoptotic factors, including tumor suppressive factors, confers resistance to cell death in tumor cells, which supports the emergence of a fully immortalized cellular phenotype. This review considers the potential relevance of ubiquitous environmental chemical exposures that have been shown to disrupt key pathways and mechanisms associated with this sort of dysfunction. Specifically, bisphenol A, chlorothalonil, dibutyl phthalate, dichlorvos, lindane, linuron, methoxychlor and oxyfluorfen are discussed as prototypical chemical disruptors; as their effects relate to resistance to cell death, as constituents within environmental mixtures and as potential contributors to environmental carcinogenesis. PMID:26106145

  1. Loss of the RNA polymerase III repressor MAF1 confers obesity resistance.

    PubMed

    Bonhoure, Nicolas; Byrnes, Ashlee; Moir, Robyn D; Hodroj, Wassim; Preitner, Frédéric; Praz, Viviane; Marcelin, Genevieve; Chua, Streamson C; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Singh, Rajat; Moullan, Norman; Auwerx, Johan; Willemin, Gilles; Shah, Hardik; Hartil, Kirsten; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Kurland, Irwin; Hernandez, Nouria; Willis, Ian M

    2015-05-01

    MAF1 is a global repressor of RNA polymerase III transcription that regulates the expression of highly abundant noncoding RNAs in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. Thus, MAF1 function is thought to be important for metabolic economy. Here we show that a whole-body knockout of Maf1 in mice confers resistance to diet-induced obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by reducing food intake and increasing metabolic inefficiency. Energy expenditure in Maf1(-/-) mice is increased by several mechanisms. Precursor tRNA synthesis was increased in multiple tissues without significant effects on mature tRNA levels, implying increased turnover in a futile tRNA cycle. Elevated futile cycling of hepatic lipids was also observed. Metabolite profiling of the liver and skeletal muscle revealed elevated levels of many amino acids and spermidine, which links the induction of autophagy in Maf1(-/-) mice with their extended life span. The increase in spermidine was accompanied by reduced levels of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, which promotes polyamine synthesis, enables nicotinamide salvage to regenerate NAD(+), and is associated with obesity resistance. Consistent with this, NAD(+) levels were increased in muscle. The importance of MAF1 for metabolic economy reveals the potential for MAF1 modulators to protect against obesity and its harmful consequences. PMID:25934505

  2. HPV-18 confers resistance to TNF-{alpha} in organotypic cultures of human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Boccardo, Enrique . E-mail: eboccardo@ludwig.org.br; Noya, Francisco; Broker, Thomas R.; Chow, Louise T.; Villa, Luisa L.

    2004-10-25

    The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) inhibits normal keratinocytes proliferation. However, many human papillomavirus (HPV)-immortalized or transformed cell lines are resistant to TNF-{alpha} antiproliferative effect. The present study analyzes the effects of TNF-{alpha} on organotypic cultures of primary human keratinocytes (PHKs) that express HPV-18 oncogenes. Raft cultures prepared with PHKs acutely transfected with HPV-18 whole genome or infected with recombinant retroviruses containing only E6/E7 or E7 were treated with 2 nM TNF-{alpha}. While BrdU incorporation into basal/parabasal cells of normal PHKs cultures was markedly inhibited by TNF-{alpha} cultures transfected with HPV-18 whole genome showed proliferation in all cell strata. Furthermore, BrdU incorporation into cultures expressing E6/E7 or E7 was not significantly reduced, indicating that E7 alone confers partial resistance to TNF-{alpha}. Besides, TNF-{alpha} treatment did not alter p16{sup ink4a}, p21{sup cip1}, p27{sup kip1}, or cyclin E levels, but did reduce cyclin A and PCNA levels in sensitive cells.

  3. Genome-wide identification and quantification of cis- and trans-regulated genes responding to Marek's disease virus infection via analysis of allele-specific expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Marek’s disease (MD) is a commercially important neoplastic disease of chickens caused by the Marek’s disease virus (MDV), a naturally-occurring oncogenic alphaherpesvirus. We attempted to identify genes conferring MD resistance, by completing a genome-wide screen for allele-specific expr...

  4. Kinase domain mutations confer resistance to novel inhibitors targeting JAK2V617F in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, A; Reddy, M M; Schade, G O M; Ray, A; Chowdary, T K; Griffin, J D; Sattler, M

    2012-04-01

    The transforming JAK2V617F kinase is frequently associated with myeloproliferative neoplasms and thought to be instrumental for the overproduction of myeloid lineage cells. Several small molecule drugs targeting JAK2 are currently in clinical development for treatment in these diseases. We performed a high-throughput in vitro screen to identify point mutations in JAK2V617F that would be predicted to have potential clinical relevance and associated with drug resistance to the JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib (INCB018424). Seven libraries of mutagenized JAK2V617F cDNA were screened to specifically identify mutations in the predicted drug-binding region that would confer resistance to ruxolitinib, using a BaF3 cell-based assay. We identified five different non-synonymous point mutations that conferred drug resistance. Cells containing mutations had a 9- to 33-fold higher EC(50) for ruxolitinib compared with native JAK2V617F. Our results further indicated that these mutations also conferred cross-resistance to all JAK2 kinase inhibitors tested, including AZD1480, TG101348, lestaurtinib (CEP-701) and CYT-387. Surprisingly, introduction of the 'gatekeeper' mutation (M929I) in JAK2V617F affected only ruxolitinib sensitivity (fourfold increase in EC(50)). These results suggest that JAK2 inhibitors currently in clinical trials may be prone to resistance as a result of point mutations and caution should be exercised when administering these drugs. PMID:21926964

  5. Bcl-2 stabilization by paxillin confers 5-fluorouracil resistance in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, D-W; Huang, C-C; Chang, S-W; Chen, T-H; Lee, H

    2015-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is chemotherapeutic agent widely used for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Unfortunately, advanced colorectal cancer is often resistance to such chemotherapy and poor outcome. An adaptor protein paxillin (PXN) is phosphorylated at Y31/Y118 (pPXN-Y31/Y118) by Src contributes to cell mobility and Ser (S)272 of PXN in LD4 domain is important to the interaction between PXN and Bcl-2. We thus hypothesized that pPXN-Y31/Y118 may be required for Bcl-2 protein stability via PXN interacting with Bcl-2 to confer 5-FU resistance in colorectal cancer. Mechanistically, pPXN-S272 is phosphorylated through pPXN-Y31/Y118-mediated p21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) activation and pPXN-S272 is required for PXN to interact with Bcl-2. The interaction between PXN and Bcl-2 is essential for Bcl-2 protein stability through phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at S87 (pBcl-2-S87) by pPXN-Y31/Y118-mediated ERK activation. An increase in Bcl-2 expression by PXN is responsible for resistance to 5-FU. The resistance to 5-FU can be abolished by inhibitor of Src and PAK1 or Bcl-2 antagonist in cell and animal models. Among patients, Bcl-2 expression is positively correlated with expression of PXN and pPXN-S272, respectively. Patients with high PXN/high Bcl-2 or high pPXN-S272/high Bcl-2 tumors are commonly to have an unfavorable response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy, compared with patients who have high PXN, high pPXN-S272 or high Bcl-2 tumors alone. Therefore, we suggest that Src, PAK1 or Bcl-2 inhibitor may potentially overcome the resistance of 5-FU-based chemotherapy and consequently to improve outcomes in patients with PXN/Bcl-2 and pPXN-S272/Bcl-2-positive tumors. PMID:25323586

  6. Characterization of Sr9h, a Ug99-resistant allele of wheat stem rust resistance gene Sr9, and coupling to Sr28 on chromosome arm 2BL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Race TTKSK (Ug99) of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal fungus of stem rust, threatens global wheat production because of its broad virulence to current wheat cultivars. A recently identified Ug99 resistance gene from cultivar Webster, temporarily designated as SrWeb, mapped near the stem ...

  7. SURVEY OF RESISTANCE TO PERMETHRIN AND DIAZINON AND THE USE OF A MULTIPLEX PCR ASSAY TO DETECH RESISTANCE ALLELES IN THE HORN FLY, HAEMATOBIO IRRITANS IRRITANS (L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field survey was conducted in 2001 to evaluate resistance to pyrethroid and organophosphate (OP) insecticides of horn flies, Haematobia irritans irritans (L.), from seven ranches in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico and from three locations in central Texas. Filter papers impregnated with either tec...

  8. Irradiation-resistance conferred by superoxide dismutase: possible adaptive role of a natural polymorphism in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, T.X.; Moya, A.; Ayala, F.J.

    1986-02-01

    The toxic effects of ionizing radiation to DNA are thought to be due to the generation of the superoxide radical, 02-. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), which scavenges 02-., has been invoked as a protecting enzyme against ionizing radiation in viruses, bacteria, mammalian cells in culture, and live mice. We now demonstrate that SOD is involved in the resistance of Drosophila melanogaster against irradiation. The protection is greatest when flies carry the S form of the enzyme (which exhibits highest in vitro specific activity), intermediate when they carry the F form of the enzyme, and lowest when they are homozygous for N, an allele that reduces the amount of the enzyme to 3.5% of the normal level. Natural selection experiments show that the fitness of the high-activity S allele is increased in an irradiated population relative to the nonirradiated control. These results point towards a possible adaptive function of the S/F polymorphism found in natural populations of D. melanogaster.

  9. Loss-of-Function Mutations in CsMLO1 Confer Durable Powdery Mildew Resistance in Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingtao; Wang, Yunli; He, Huanle; Guo, Chunli; Zhu, Wenying; Pan, Jian; Li, Dandan; Lian, Hongli; Pan, Junsong; Cai, Run

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a serious fungal disease of cucumber worldwide. The identification of resistance genes is very important for resistance breeding to ensure cucumber production. Here, natural loss-of-function mutations at an MLO homologous locus, CsMLO1, were found to confer durable PM resistance in cucumber. CsMLO1 encoded a cell membrane protein, was mainly expressed in leaves and cotyledons, and was up-regulated by PM at the early stage of host–pathogen interaction. Ectopic expression of CsMLO1 rescued the phenotype of the PM resistant Atmlo2 Atmlo12 double mutant to PM susceptible in Arabidopsis. Domesticated and wild resistant cucumbers originating from various geographical regions of the world were found to harbor three independent natural mutations that resulted in CsMLO1 loss of function. In addition, between the near-isogenic lines (NILs) of PM resistant and susceptible, S1003 and NIL(Pm5.1), quantitative RT-PCR revealed that there is no difference at expression levels of several genes in the pathways of ethylene, jasmonic acid or salicylic acid. Moreover, the two NILs were used for transcriptome profiling to explore the mechanism underlying the resistance. Several genes correlated with plant cell wall thickening are possibly involved in the PM resistance. This study revealed that loss of function of CsMLO1 conferred durable PM resistance, and that this loss of function is necessary but alone may not be sufficient for PM resistance in cucumber. These findings will facilitate the molecular breeding of PM resistant varieties to control this destructive disease in cucumber. PMID:26734050

  10. ALK F1174V mutation confers sensitivity while ALK I1171 mutation confers resistance to alectinib. The importance of serial biopsy post progression.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong; Milliken, Jeffrey C; Azada, Michele C; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Klempner, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Many acquired resistant mutations to the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene have been identified during treatment of ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib. These various acquired resistant ALK mutations confer differential sensitivities to various ALK inhibitors and may provide guidance on how to sequence the use of many of the second generation ALK inhibitors. We described a patient who developed an acquired ALK F1174V resistant mutation on progression from crizotinib that responded to alectinib for 18 months but then developed an acquired ALK I1171S mutation to alectinib. Both tumor samples had essentially the same genomic profile by comprehensive genomic profiling otherwise. This is the first patient report that demonstrates ALK F1174V mutation is sensitive to alectinib and further confirms missense acquired ALK I1171 mutation is resistant to alectinib. Sequential tumor re-biopsy for comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) is important to appreciate the selective pressure during treatment with various ALK inhibitors underpinning the evolution of the disease course of ALK+NSCLC patients while on treatment with the various ALK inhibitors. This approach will likely help inform the optimal sequencing strategy as more ALK inhibitors become available. This case report also validates the importance of developing structurally distinct ALK inhibitors for clinical use to overcome non-cross resistant ALK mutations. PMID:26464158

  11. Two missense mutations, E123Q and K151E, identified in the ERG11 allele of an azole-resistant isolate of Candida kefyr recovered from a stem cell transplant patient for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Couzigou, Célia; Gabriel, Frédéric; Biteau, Nicolas; Fitton-Ouhabi, Valérie; Noël, Thierry; Accoceberry, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    We report on the first cloning and nucleotide sequencing of an ERG11 allele from a clinical isolate of Candida kefyr cross-resistant to azole antifungals. It was recovered from a stem cell transplant patient, in an oncohematology unit exhibiting unexpected high prevalence of C. kefyr. Two amino acid substitutions were identified: K151E, whose role in fluconazole resistance was already demonstrated in Candida albicans, and E123Q, a new substitution never described so far in azole-resistant Candida yeast. PMID:24936404

  12. Two missense mutations, E123Q and K151E, identified in the ERG11 allele of an azole-resistant isolate of Candida kefyr recovered from a stem cell transplant patient for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Couzigou, Célia; Gabriel, Frédéric; Biteau, Nicolas; Fitton-Ouhabi, Valérie; Noël, Thierry; Accoceberry, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first cloning and nucleotide sequencing of an ERG11 allele from a clinical isolate of Candida kefyr cross-resistant to azole antifungals. It was recovered from a stem cell transplant patient, in an oncohematology unit exhibiting unexpected high prevalence of C. kefyr. Two amino acid substitutions were identified: K151E, whose role in fluconazole resistance was already demonstrated in Candida albicans, and E123Q, a new substitution never described so far in azole-resistant Candida yeast. PMID:24936404

  13. Overcoming super-knock down resistance (super-kdr) mediated resistance: multi-halogenated benzyl pyrethroids are more toxic to super-kdr than kdr house flies.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Tong, K P; Kasai, S; Scott, J G

    2016-04-01

    Target site insensitivity because of mutations in the voltage-sensitive sodium channel gene (Vssc) is a major mechanism of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in the house fly, Musca domestica. There are three known Vssc alleles that confer resistance to pyrethroids in the house fly: knock down resistance (kdr; L1014F), super-kdr (M918T + L1014F) and kdr-his (L1014H), but there has been no side-by-side comparison of the resistance levels that they confer. We compared the levels of resistance conferred by the three Vssc alleles in congenic strains to 19 structurally diverse pyrethroids, and compared the full-length Vssc cDNA sequences from each strain. Generally, the levels of resistance conferred were kdr-his < kdr < super-kdr. However, there was significant variation in this pattern, especially for super-kdr, for which both high and low resistance ratios were observed for several pyrethroids. We also examined the levels of resistance in heterozygotes. Resistance in each of the hybrids was generally inherited as an incompletely recessive trait, except for the kdr-his/kdr hybrids, which showed incompletely to completely dominant resistance (ie had resistance levels comparable to kdr homozygotes). The importance of these results to understanding the frequencies of these resistance alleles in natural populations, the evolution of insecticide resistance and resistance management strategies are discussed. PMID:26691197

  14. Genetic resistance to flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Margo A; Perelygin, Andrey A

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to flavivirus-induced disease in mice was first discovered in the 1920s and was subsequently shown to be controlled by the resistant allele of a single dominant autosomal gene. While the majority of current laboratory mouse stains have a homozygous-susceptible phenotype, the resistant allele has been found to segregate in wild mouse populations in many different parts of the world. Resistance is flavivirus specific and extends to both mosquito- and tick-borne flaviviruses. Resistant animals are infected productively by flaviviruses but produce lower virus titers, especially in their brains, as compared to susceptible mice. Decreased virus production is observed in resistant animals even during a lethal infection and the times of disease onset and death are also delayed as compared to susceptible mice. An intact immune response is required to clear flaviviruses from resistant mice. The resistant phenotype is expressed constitutively and does not require interferon induction. The Flv gene was discovered using a positional cloning approach and identified as Oas1b. Susceptible mice produce a truncated Oas1b protein. A C820T transition in the fourth exon of the gene introduced a premature stop codon and was found in all susceptible mouse strains tested. Possible mechanisms by which the product of the resistant allele could confer the resistant phenotype are discussed. PMID:14689691

  15. A new point mutation in the iron-sulfur subunit of succinate dehydrogenase confers resistance to boscalid in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Duan, Yabing; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, Mingguo

    2015-09-01

    Research has established that mutations in highly conserved amino acids of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex in various fungi confer SDH inhibitor (SDHI) resistance. For Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, a necrotrophic fungus with a broad host range and a worldwide distribution, boscalid resistance has been attributed to the mutation H132R in the highly conserved SdhD subunit protein of the SDH complex. In our previous study, however, only one point mutation, A11V in SdhB (GCA to GTA change in SdhB), was detected in S. sclerotiorum boscalid-resistant (BR) mutants. In the current study, replacement of the SdhB gene in a boscalid-sensitive (BS) S. sclerotiorum strain with the mutant SdhB gene conferred resistance. Compared with wild-type strains, BR and GSM (SdhB gene in the wild-type strain replaced by the mutant SdhB gene) mutants were more sensitive to osmotic stress, lacked the ability to produce sclerotia and exhibited lower expression of the pac1 gene. Importantly, the point mutation was not located in the highly conserved sequence of the iron-sulfur subunit of SDH. These results suggest that resistance based on non-conserved vs. conserved protein domains differs in mechanism. In addition to increasing our understanding of boscalid resistance in S. sclerotiorum, the new information will be useful for the development of alternative antifungal drugs. PMID:25441450

  16. The Batten disease gene CLN3 confers resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by tunicamycin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Liu, Jing; Wu, Baiyan; Tu, Bo; Zhu, Weiguo; Luo, Jianyuan

    2014-04-25

    Mutations in CLN3 gene cause juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or Batten disease), an early-onset neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of ceroid lipofuscin within lysosomes. The function of the CLN3 protein remains unclear and is presumed to be related to Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. To investigate the function of CLN3 in the ER stress signaling pathway, we measured proliferation and apoptosis in cells transfected with normal and mutant CLN3 after treatment with the ER stress inducer tunicamycin (TM). We found that overexpression of CLN3 was sufficient in conferring increased resistance to ER stress. Wild-type CLN3 protected cells from TM-induced apoptosis and increased cell proliferation. Overexpression of wild-type CLN3 enhanced expression of the ER chaperone protein, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), and reduced expression of the proapoptotic protein CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). In contrast, overexpression of mutant CLN3 or siRNA knockdown of CLN3 produced the opposite effect. Together, our data suggest that the lack of CLN3 function in cells leads to a failure of management in the response to ER stress and this may be the key deficit in JNCL that causes neuronal degeneration. PMID:24699413

  17. HDAC6 promotes cell proliferation and confers resistance to gefitinib in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihao; Tang, Fang; Hu, Pengchao; Wang, Ying; Gong, Jun; Sun, Shaoxing; Xie, Conghua

    2016-07-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are promising targets for cancer therapy, and first-generation HDAC inhibitors are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer patients. HDAC6, which is a key regulator of many signaling pathways that are linked to cancer, has recently emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of cancer. In the present study, HDAC6 was found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and was negatively correlated with the prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Overexpression of HDAC6 promoted the proliferation of lung adenocarcinoma cells in a deacetylase activity-dependent manner. HDAC6 overexpression conferred resistance to gefitinib via the stabilization of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The inhibition of HDAC6 by CAY10603, a potent and selective inhibitor of HDAC6, inhibited the proliferation of lung adenocarcinoma cells and induced apoptosis. CAY10603 downregulated the levels of EGFR protein, which in turn inhibited activation of the EGFR signaling pathway. Moreover, CAY10603 synergized with gefitinib to induce apoptosis of the lung adenocarcinoma cell lines via the destabilization of EGFR. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibition of HDAC6 may be a promising strategy for the treatment of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27221381

  18. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab in Trichoplusia ni Is Conferred by a Novel Genetic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaozhao; Kain, Wendy; Cassidy, Douglas; Wang, Ping

    2015-08-01

    The resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin Cry2Ab in a greenhouse-originated Trichoplusia ni strain resistant to both Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab was characterized. Biological assays determined that the Cry2Ab resistance in the T. ni strain was a monogenic recessive trait independent of Cry1Ac resistance, and there existed no significant cross-resistance between Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in T. ni. From the dual-toxin-resistant T. ni strain, a strain resistant to Cry2Ab only was isolated, and the Cry2Ab resistance trait was introgressed into a susceptible laboratory strain to facilitate comparative analysis of the Cry2Ab resistance with the susceptible T. ni strain. Results from biochemical analysis showed no significant difference between the Cry2Ab-resistant and -susceptible T. ni larvae in midgut proteases, including caseinolytic proteolytic activity and zymogram profile and serine protease activities, in midgut aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase activity, and in midgut esterases and hemolymph plasma melanization activity. For analysis of genetic linkage of Cry2Ab resistance with potential Cry toxin receptor genes, molecular markers for the midgut cadherin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and aminopeptidase N (APN) genes were identified between the original greenhouse-derived dual-toxin-resistant and the susceptible laboratory T. ni strains. Genetic linkage analysis showed that the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni was not genetically associated with the midgut genes coding for the cadherin, ALP, and 6 APNs (APN1 to APN6) nor associated with the ABC transporter gene ABCC2. Therefore, the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni is conferred by a novel but unknown genetic mechanism. PMID:26025894

  19. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab in Trichoplusia ni Is Conferred by a Novel Genetic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaozhao; Kain, Wendy; Cassidy, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin Cry2Ab in a greenhouse-originated Trichoplusia ni strain resistant to both Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab was characterized. Biological assays determined that the Cry2Ab resistance in the T. ni strain was a monogenic recessive trait independent of Cry1Ac resistance, and there existed no significant cross-resistance between Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in T. ni. From the dual-toxin-resistant T. ni strain, a strain resistant to Cry2Ab only was isolated, and the Cry2Ab resistance trait was introgressed into a susceptible laboratory strain to facilitate comparative analysis of the Cry2Ab resistance with the susceptible T. ni strain. Results from biochemical analysis showed no significant difference between the Cry2Ab-resistant and -susceptible T. ni larvae in midgut proteases, including caseinolytic proteolytic activity and zymogram profile and serine protease activities, in midgut aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase activity, and in midgut esterases and hemolymph plasma melanization activity. For analysis of genetic linkage of Cry2Ab resistance with potential Cry toxin receptor genes, molecular markers for the midgut cadherin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and aminopeptidase N (APN) genes were identified between the original greenhouse-derived dual-toxin-resistant and the susceptible laboratory T. ni strains. Genetic linkage analysis showed that the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni was not genetically associated with the midgut genes coding for the cadherin, ALP, and 6 APNs (APN1 to APN6) nor associated with the ABC transporter gene ABCC2. Therefore, the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni is conferred by a novel but unknown genetic mechanism. PMID:26025894

  20. Mutations in the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase gene can confer resistance to 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine.

    PubMed Central

    Coen, D M; Furman, P A; Gelep, P T; Schaffer, P A

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 resistant to the antiviral drug 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine (araA) have been isolated and characterized. AraA-resistant mutants can be isolated readily and appear at an appreciable frequency in low-passage stocks of wild-type virus. Of 13 newly isolated mutants, at least 11 were also resistant to phosphonoacetic acid (PAA). Of four previously described PAA-resistant mutants, two exhibited substantial araA resistance. The araA resistance phenotype of one of these mutants, PAAr5, has been mapped to the HpaI-B fragment of herpes simplex virus DNA by marker transfer, and araA resistance behaved in marker transfer experiments as if it were closely linked to PAA resistance, a recognized marker for the viral DNA polymerase locus. PAAr5 induced viral DNA polymerase activity which was much less susceptible to inhibition by the triphosphate derivative of araA than was wild-type DNA polymerase. These genetic and biochemical data indicate that the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase gene is a locus which, when mutated, can confer resistance to araA and thus that the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase is a target for this antiviral drug. PMID:6284981

  1. Genome-wide identification of QTLs conferring high-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance to stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) is a durable type of resistance in wheat. The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring HTAP resistance to stripe rust in a population consisting of 16...

  2. The Cfr rRNA Methyltransferase Confers Resistance to Phenicols, Lincosamides, Oxazolidinones, Pleuromutilins, and Streptogramin A Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Long, Katherine S.; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Kehrenberg, Corinna; Schwarz, Stefan; Vester, Birte

    2006-01-01

    A novel multidrug resistance phenotype mediated by the Cfr rRNA methyltransferase is observed in Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The cfr gene has previously been identified as a phenicol and lincosamide resistance gene on plasmids isolated from Staphylococcus spp. of animal origin and recently shown to encode a methyltransferase that modifies 23S rRNA at A2503. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing shows that S. aureus and E. coli strains expressing the cfr gene exhibit elevated MICs to a number of chemically unrelated drugs. The phenotype is named PhLOPSA for resistance to the following drug classes: Phenicols, Lincosamides, Oxazolidinones, Pleuromutilins, and Streptogramin A antibiotics. Each of these five drug classes contains important antimicrobial agents that are currently used in human and/or veterinary medicine. We find that binding of the PhLOPSA drugs, which bind to overlapping sites at the peptidyl transferase center that abut nucleotide A2503, is perturbed upon Cfr-mediated methylation. Decreased drug binding to Cfr-methylated ribosomes has been confirmed by footprinting analysis. No other rRNA methyltransferase is known to confer resistance to five chemically distinct classes of antimicrobials. In addition, the findings described in this study represent the first report of a gene conferring transferable resistance to pleuromutilins and oxazolidinones. PMID:16801432

  3. Agrobacterium mediated transfer of a mutant Arabidopsis acetolactate synthase gene confers resistance to chlorsulfuron in chicory (Cichorium intybus L.).

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, A; Vaucheret, H; Pautot, V; Chupeau, Y

    1992-06-01

    Leaf discs of C. intybus were inoculated with an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain harboring a neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) gene for kanamycin resistance and a mutant acetolactate synthase gene (csr1-1) from Arabidopsis thaliana conferring resistance to sulfonylurea herbicides. A regeneration medium was optimized which permitted an efficient shoot regeneration from leaf discs. Transgenic shoots were selected on rooting medium containing 100 mg/l kanamycin sulfate. Integration of the csr1-1 gene into genomic DNA of kanamycin resistant chicory plants was confirmed by Southern blot hybridizations. Analysis of the selfed progenies (S1 and S2) of two independent transformed clones showed that kanamycin and chlorsulfuron resistances were inherited as dominant Mendelian traits. The method described here for producing transformed plants will allow new opportunities for chicory breeding. PMID:24203132

  4. The cold-induced defensin TAD1 confers resistance against snow mold and Fusarium head blight in transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Kuwabara, Chikako; Umeki, Natsuki; Fujioka, Mari; Saburi, Wataru; Matsui, Hirokazu; Abe, Fumitaka; Imai, Ryozo

    2016-06-20

    TAD1 (Triticum aestivum defensin 1) is induced during cold acclimation in winter wheat and encodes a plant defensin with antimicrobial activity. In this study, we demonstrated that recombinant TAD1 protein inhibits hyphal growth of the snow mold fungus, Typhula ishikariensis in vitro. Transgenic wheat plants overexpressing TAD1 were created and tested for resistance against T. ishikariensis. Leaf inoculation assays revealed that overexpression of TAD1 confers resistance against the snow mold. In addition, the TAD1-overexpressors showed resistance against Fusarium graminearum, which causes Fusarium head blight, a devastating disease in wheat and barley. These results indicate that TAD1 is a candidate gene to improve resistance against multiple fungal diseases in cereal crops. PMID:27080445

  5. 3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine resistance suppressed by a mutation conferring human immunodeficiency virus type 1 resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Larder, B A

    1992-01-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (NNRT) inhibitors (R82913; (+)-S-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-9-chloro-5-methyl-6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)- imidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione; Cl-TIBO; and BI-RG-587, nevirapine) were used to select resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants by passage in cell cultures of wild-type or 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (zidovudine; AZT)-resistant strains. Similar to other NNRT inhibitors, Cl-TIBO induced a single mutation (Y181 to C) in reverse transcriptase (RT) that accounted for the resistance. BI-RG-587 induced a different mutation (V106-->A) in AZT resistance backgrounds. A series of viable HIV-1 variants was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the RT, which harbored multiple drug resistance mutations, including Y181 to C. HIV-1 that was co-resistant to NNRT inhibitors and 2',3'-dideoxyinosine resulted when a 2',3'-dideoxyinosine resistance mutation (L74 to V) was also present in RT. By contrast, however, the Y181 to C mutation in an AZT resistance background significantly suppressed resistance to AZT, while it conferred resistance to NNRT inhibitors. However, the V106-->A substitution did not cause suppression of preexisting AZT resistance. Since certain combinations of nucleoside analogs and NNRT inhibitors might result in the development of co-resistance, careful analysis of clinical isolates obtained during combination therapy will be needed to determine the potential significance of these observations. PMID:1282792

  6. Overexpression of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi recA gene confers fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli DH5α.

    PubMed

    Yassien, M A M; Elfaky, M A

    2015-11-01

    A spontaneous fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant (STM1) was isolated from its parent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) clinical isolate. Unlike its parent isolate, this mutant has selective resistance to fluoroquinolones without any change in its sensitivity to various other antibiotics. DNA gyrase assays revealed that the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype of the STM1 mutant did not result from alteration of the fluoroquinolone sensitivity of the DNA gyrase isolated from it. To study the mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance, a genomic library from the STM1 mutant was constructed in Escherichia coli DH5α and two recombinant plasmids were obtained. Only one of these plasmids (STM1-A) conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. The chromosomal insert from STM1-A, digested with EcoRI and HindIII restriction endonucleases, produced two DNA fragments and these were cloned separately into pUC19 thereby generating two new plasmids, STM1-A1 and STM1-A2. Only STM1-A1 conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. Sequence and subcloning analyses of STM1-A1 showed the presence of an intact RecA open reading frame. Unlike that of the wild-type E. coli DH5α, protein analysis of a crude STM1-A1 extract showed overexpression of a 40 kDa protein. Western blotting confirmed the 40 kDa protein band to be RecA. When a RecA PCR product was cloned into pGEM-T and introduced into E. coli DH5α, the STM1-A11 subclone retained fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggest that overexpression of RecA causes selective fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli DH5α. PMID:26375447

  7. IFITMs from Mycobacteria Confer Resistance to Influenza Virus When Expressed in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, William J.; McMichael, Temet M.; Chesarino, Nicholas M.; Hach, Jocelyn C.; Yount, Jacob S.

    2015-01-01

    Interferon induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) found in vertebrates restrict infections by specific viruses. IFITM3 is known to be essential for restriction of influenza virus infections in both mice and humans. Vertebrate IFITMs are hypothesized to have derived from a horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to a primitive unicellular eukaryote. Since bacterial IFITMs share minimal amino acid identity with human IFITM3, we hypothesized that examination of bacterial IFITMs in human cells would provide insight into the essential characteristics necessary for antiviral activity of IFITMs. We examined IFITMs from Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium abscessus for potential antiviral activity. Both of these IFITMs conferred a moderate level of resistance to influenza virus in human cells, identifying them as functional homologues of IFITM3. Analysis of sequence elements shared by bacterial IFITMs and IFITM3 identified two hydrophobic domains, putative S-palmitoylation sites, and conserved phenylalanine residues associated with IFITM3 interactions, which are all necessary for IFITM3 antiviral activity. We observed that, like IFITM3, bacterial IFITMs were S-palmitoylated, albeit to a lesser degree. We also demonstrated the ability of a bacterial IFITM to co-immunoprecipitate with IFITM3 suggesting formation of a complex, and also visualized strong co-localization of bacterial IFITMs with IFITM3. However, the mycobacterial IFITMs lack the endocytic-targeting motif conserved in vertebrate IFITM3. As such, these bacterial proteins, when expressed alone, had diminished colocalization with cathepsin B-positive endolysosomal compartments that are the primary site of IFITM3-dependent influenza virus restriction. Though the precise evolutionary origin of vertebrate IFITMs is not known, our results support a model whereby transfer of a bacterial IFITM gene to eukaryotic cells may have provided a selective advantage against viral infection that was refined through the course of

  8. The Batten disease gene CLN3 confers resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by tunicamycin

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dan; Liu, Jing; Wu, Baiyan; Tu, Bo; Zhu, Weiguo; Luo, Jianyuan

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • The work reveals a protective properties of CLN3 towards TM-induced apoptosis. • CLN3 regulates expression of the GRP78 and the CHOP in response to the ER stress. • CLN3 plays a specific role in the ERS response. - Abstract: Mutations in CLN3 gene cause juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or Batten disease), an early-onset neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of ceroid lipofuscin within lysosomes. The function of the CLN3 protein remains unclear and is presumed to be related to Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. To investigate the function of CLN3 in the ER stress signaling pathway, we measured proliferation and apoptosis in cells transfected with normal and mutant CLN3 after treatment with the ER stress inducer tunicamycin (TM). We found that overexpression of CLN3 was sufficient in conferring increased resistance to ER stress. Wild-type CLN3 protected cells from TM-induced apoptosis and increased cell proliferation. Overexpression of wild-type CLN3 enhanced expression of the ER chaperone protein, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), and reduced expression of the proapoptotic protein CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). In contrast, overexpression of mutant CLN3 or siRNA knockdown of CLN3 produced the opposite effect. Together, our data suggest that the lack of CLN3 function in cells leads to a failure of management in the response to ER stress and this may be the key deficit in JNCL that causes neuronal degeneration.

  9. Resistance Assessment for Oxathiapiprolin in Phytophthora capsici and the Detection of a Point Mutation (G769W) in PcORP1 that Confers Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jianqiang; Cai, Meng; Dong, Xue; Liu, Li; Lin, Dong; Zhang, Can; Pang, Zhili; Liu, Xili

    2016-01-01

    The potential for oxathiapiprolin resistance in Phytophthora capsici was evaluated. The baseline sensitivities of 175 isolates to oxathiapiprolin were initially determinated and found to conform to a unimodal curve with a mean EC50 value of 5.61 × 10-4 μg/ml. Twelve stable oxathiapiprolin-resistant mutants were generated by fungicide adaptation in two sensitive isolates, LP3 and HNJZ10. The fitness of the LP3-mutants was found to be similar to or better than that of the parental isolate LP3, while the HNJZ10-mutants were found to have lost the capacity to produce zoospores. Taken together these results suggest that the risk of P. capsici developing resistance to oxathiapiprolin is moderate. Comparison of the PcORP1 genes in the LP3-mutants and wild-type parental isolate, which encode the target protein of oxathiapiprolin, revealed that a heterozygous mutation caused the amino acid substitution G769W. Transformation and expression of the mutated PcORP1-769W allele in the sensitive wild-type isolate BYA5 confirmed that the mutation in PcORP1 was responsible for the observed oxathiapiprolin resistance. Finally diagnostic tests including As-PCR and CAPs were developed to detect the oxathiapiprolin resistance resulting from the G769W point mutation in field populations of P. capsici. PMID:27199944

  10. Resistance Assessment for Oxathiapiprolin in Phytophthora capsici and the Detection of a Point Mutation (G769W) in PcORP1 that Confers Resistance.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianqiang; Cai, Meng; Dong, Xue; Liu, Li; Lin, Dong; Zhang, Can; Pang, Zhili; Liu, Xili

    2016-01-01

    The potential for oxathiapiprolin resistance in Phytophthora capsici was evaluated. The baseline sensitivities of 175 isolates to oxathiapiprolin were initially determinated and found to conform to a unimodal curve with a mean EC50 value of 5.61 × 10(-4) μg/ml. Twelve stable oxathiapiprolin-resistant mutants were generated by fungicide adaptation in two sensitive isolates, LP3 and HNJZ10. The fitness of the LP3-mutants was found to be similar to or better than that of the parental isolate LP3, while the HNJZ10-mutants were found to have lost the capacity to produce zoospores. Taken together these results suggest that the risk of P. capsici developing resistance to oxathiapiprolin is moderate. Comparison of the PcORP1 genes in the LP3-mutants and wild-type parental isolate, which encode the target protein of oxathiapiprolin, revealed that a heterozygous mutation caused the amino acid substitution G769W. Transformation and expression of the mutated PcORP1-769W allele in the sensitive wild-type isolate BYA5 confirmed that the mutation in PcORP1 was responsible for the observed oxathiapiprolin resistance. Finally diagnostic tests including As-PCR and CAPs were developed to detect the oxathiapiprolin resistance resulting from the G769W point mutation in field populations of P. capsici. PMID:27199944

  11. Isoniazid-resistance conferring mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis KatG: Catalase, peroxidase, and INH-NADH adduct formation activities

    PubMed Central

    Cade, Christine E; Dlouhy, Adrienne C; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Salas-Castillo, Saida Patricia; Ghiladi, Reza A

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG) is a bifunctional hemoprotein that has been shown to activate isoniazid (INH), a pro-drug that is integral to frontline antituberculosis treatments. The activated species, presumed to be an isonicotinoyl radical, couples to NAD+/NADH forming an isoniazid-NADH adduct that ultimately confers anti-tubercular activity. To better understand the mechanisms of isoniazid activation as well as the origins of KatG-derived INH-resistance, we have compared the catalytic properties (including the ability to form the INH-NADH adduct) of the wild-type enzyme to 23 KatG mutants which have been associated with isoniazid resistance in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. Neither catalase nor peroxidase activities, the two inherent enzymatic functions of KatG, were found to correlate with isoniazid resistance. Furthermore, catalase function was lost in mutants which lacked the Met-Tyr-Trp crosslink, the biogenic cofactor in KatG which has been previously shown to be integral to this activity. The presence or absence of the crosslink itself, however, was also found to not correlate with INH resistance. The KatG resistance-conferring mutants were then assayed for their ability to generate the INH-NADH adduct in the presence of peroxide (t-BuOOH and H2O2), superoxide, and no exogenous oxidant (air-only background control). The results demonstrate that residue location plays a critical role in determining INH-resistance mechanisms associated with INH activation; however, different mutations at the same location can produce vastly different reactivities that are oxidant-specific. Furthermore, the data can be interpreted to suggest the presence of a second mechanism of INH-resistance that is not correlated with the formation of the INH-NADH adduct. PMID:20054829

  12. The Fd-GOGAT1 mutant gene lc7 confers resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae in rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Honglin; Li, Chunrong; Liu, Liping; Zhao, Jiying; Cheng, Xuzhen; Jiang, Guanghuai; Zhai, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Disease resistance is an important goal of crop improvement. The molecular mechanism of resistance requires further study. Here, we report the identification of a rice leaf color mutant, lc7, which is defective in chlorophyll synthesis and photosynthesis but confers resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae (Xoo). Map-based cloning revealed that lc7 encodes a mutant ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase1 (Fd-GOGAT1). Fd-GOGAT1 has been proposed to have great potential for improving nitrogen-use efficiency, but its function in bacterial resistance has not been reported. The lc7 mutant accumulates excessive levels of ROS (reactive oxygen species) in the leaves, causing the leaf color to become yellow after the four-leaf stage. Compared to the wild type, lc7 mutants have a broad-spectrum high resistance to seven Xoo strains. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and qRT-PCR analysis indicate that many defense pathways that are involved in this broad-spectrum resistance are activated in the lc7 mutant. These results suggest that Fd-GOGAT1 plays an important role in broad-spectrum bacterial blight resistance, in addition to modulating nitrogen assimilation and chloroplast development. PMID:27211925

  13. The Fd-GOGAT1 mutant gene lc7 confers resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae in rice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Honglin; Li, Chunrong; Liu, Liping; Zhao, Jiying; Cheng, Xuzhen; Jiang, Guanghuai; Zhai, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Disease resistance is an important goal of crop improvement. The molecular mechanism of resistance requires further study. Here, we report the identification of a rice leaf color mutant, lc7, which is defective in chlorophyll synthesis and photosynthesis but confers resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae (Xoo). Map-based cloning revealed that lc7 encodes a mutant ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase1 (Fd-GOGAT1). Fd-GOGAT1 has been proposed to have great potential for improving nitrogen-use efficiency, but its function in bacterial resistance has not been reported. The lc7 mutant accumulates excessive levels of ROS (reactive oxygen species) in the leaves, causing the leaf color to become yellow after the four-leaf stage. Compared to the wild type, lc7 mutants have a broad-spectrum high resistance to seven Xoo strains. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and qRT-PCR analysis indicate that many defense pathways that are involved in this broad-spectrum resistance are activated in the lc7 mutant. These results suggest that Fd-GOGAT1 plays an important role in broad-spectrum bacterial blight resistance, in addition to modulating nitrogen assimilation and chloroplast development. PMID:27211925

  14. Introgression and pyramiding into common bean market class fabada of genes conferring resistance to anthracnose and potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Juan José; Campa, Ana; Pérez-Vega, Elena; Rodríguez-Suárez, Cristina; Giraldez, Ramón

    2012-03-01

    Anthracnose and bean common mosaic (BCM) are considered major diseases in common bean crop causing severe yield losses worldwide. This work describes the introgression and pyramiding of genes conferring genetic resistance to BCM and anthracnose local races into line A25, a bean genotype classified as market class fabada. Resistant plants were selected using resistance tests or combining resistance tests and marker-assisted selection. Lines A252, A321, A493, Sanilac BC6-Are, and BRB130 were used as resistance sources. Resistance genes to anthracnose (Co-2 ( C ), Co-2 ( A252 ) and Co-3/9) and/or BCM (I and bc-3) were introgressed in line A25 through six parallel backcrossing programs, and six breeding lines showing a fabada seed phenotype were obtained after six backcross generations: line A1258 from A252; A1231 from A321; A1220 from A493; A1183 and A1878 from Sanilac BC6-Are; and line A2418 from BRB130. Pyramiding of different genes were developed using the pedigree method from a single cross between lines obtained in the introgression step: line A1699 (derived from cross A1258 × A1220), A2438 (A1220 × A1183), A2806 (A1878 × A2418), and A3308 (A1699 × A2806). A characterization based on eight morpho-agronomic traits revealed a limited differentiation among the obtained breeding lines and the recurrent line A25. However, using a set of seven molecular markers linked to the loci used in the breeding programs it was possible to differentiate the 11 fabada lines. Considering the genetic control of the resistance in resistant donor lines, the observed segregations in the last backcrossing generation, the reaction against the pathogens, and the expression of the molecular markers it was also possible to infer the genotype conferring resistance in the ten fabada breeding lines obtained. As a result of these breeding programs, genetic resistance to three anthracnose races controlled by genes included in clusters Co-2 and Co-3/9, and genetic resistance to BCM controlled

  15. Distinct Detoxification Mechanisms Confer Resistance to Mesotrione and Atrazine in a Population of Waterhemp1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rong; Kaundun, Shiv S.; Tranel, Patrick J.; Riggins, Chance W.; McGinness, Daniel L.; Hager, Aaron G.; Hawkes, Tim; McIndoe, Eddie; Riechers, Dean E.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research reported the first case of resistance to mesotrione and other 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) herbicides in a waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus) population designated MCR (for McLean County mesotrione- and atrazine-resistant). Herein, experiments were conducted to determine if target site or nontarget site mechanisms confer mesotrione resistance in MCR. Additionally, the basis for atrazine resistance was investigated in MCR and an atrazine-resistant but mesotrione-sensitive population (ACR for Adams County mesotrione-sensitive but atrazine-resistant). A standard sensitive population (WCS for Wayne County herbicide-sensitive) was also used for comparison. Mesotrione resistance was not due to an alteration in HPPD sequence, HPPD expression, or reduced herbicide absorption. Metabolism studies using whole plants and excised leaves revealed that the time for 50% of absorbed mesotrione to degrade in MCR was significantly shorter than in ACR and WCS, which correlated with previous phenotypic responses to mesotrione and the quantity of the metabolite 4-hydroxy-mesotrione in excised leaves. The cytochrome P450 monooxygenase inhibitors malathion and tetcyclacis significantly reduced mesotrione metabolism in MCR and corn (Zea mays) excised leaves but not in ACR. Furthermore, malathion increased mesotrione activity in MCR seedlings in greenhouse studies. These results indicate that enhanced oxidative metabolism contributes significantly to mesotrione resistance in MCR. Sequence analysis of atrazine-resistant (MCR and ACR) and atrazine-sensitive (WCS) waterhemp populations detected no differences in the psbA gene. The times for 50% of absorbed atrazine to degrade in corn, MCR, and ACR leaves were shorter than in WCS, and a polar metabolite of atrazine was detected in corn, MCR, and ACR that cochromatographed with a synthetic atrazine-glutathione conjugate. Thus, elevated rates of metabolism via distinct detoxification mechanisms contribute to

  16. Identification and distribution of a GABA receptor mutation conferring dieldrin resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles funestus in Africa.

    PubMed

    Wondji, Charles S; Dabire, Roch K; Tukur, Zainab; Irving, Helen; Djouaka, Rousseau; Morgan, John C

    2011-07-01

    Growing problems of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles funestus have intensified efforts to identify alternative insecticides. Many agrochemicals target the GABA receptors, but cross-resistance from dieldrin resistance may preclude their introduction. Dieldrin resistance was detected in An. funestus populations from West (Burkina Faso) and central (Cameroon) Africa, but populations from East (Uganda) and Southern Africa (Mozambique and Malawi) were fully susceptible to this insecticide. Partial sequencing of the dieldrin target site, the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor, identified two amino acid substitutions, A296S and V327I. The A296S mutation has been associated with dieldrin resistance in other species. The V327I mutations was detected in the resistant sample from Burkina Faso and Cameroon and consistently associated with the A296S substitution. The full-length of the An. funestus GABA-receptor gene, amplified by RT-PCR, generated a sequence of 1674 bp encoding 557 amino acid of the protein in An. funestus with 98% similarity to that of Anopheles gambiae. Two diagnostic assays were developed to genotype the A296S mutation (pyrosequencing and PCR-RFLP), and use of these assays revealed high frequency of the resistant allele in Burkina Faso (60%) and Cameroon (82%), moderate level in Benin (16%) while low frequency or absence of the mutation was observed respectively in Uganda (7.5%) or 0% in Malawi and Mozambique. The distribution of the Rdl(R) mutation in An. funestus populations in Africa suggests extensive barriers to gene flow between populations from different regions. PMID:21501685

  17. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mutation conferring target-site resistance to imidacloprid in Nilaparvata lugens (brown planthopper).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zewen; Williamson, Martin S; Lansdell, Stuart J; Denholm, Ian; Han, Zhaojun; Millar, Neil S

    2005-06-14

    Neonicotinoids, such as imidacloprid, are nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists with potent insecticidal activity. Since its introduction in the early 1990s, imidacloprid has become one of the most extensively used insecticides for both crop protection and animal health applications. As with other classes of insecticides, resistance to neonicotinoids is a significant threat and has been identified in several pest species, including the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, a major rice pest in many parts of Asia. In this study, radioligand binding experiments have been conducted with whole-body membranes prepared from imidacloprid-susceptible and imidacloprid-resistant strains of N. lugens. The results reveal a much higher level of [3H]imidacloprid-specific binding to the susceptible strain than to the resistant strain (16.7 +/- 1.0 and 0.34 +/- 0.21 fmol/mg of protein, respectively). With the aim of understanding the molecular basis of imidacloprid resistance, five nAChR subunits (Nlalpha1-Nlalpha4 and Nlbeta1) have been cloned from N. lugens.A comparison of nAChR subunit genes from imidacloprid-sensitive and imidacloprid-resistant populations has identified a single point mutation at a conserved position (Y151S) in two nAChR subunits, Nlalpha1 and Nlalpha3. A strong correlation between the frequency of the Y151S point mutation and the level of resistance to imidacloprid has been demonstrated by allele-specific PCR. By expression of hybrid nAChRs containing N. lugens alpha and rat beta2 subunits, evidence was obtained that demonstrates that mutation Y151S is responsible for a substantial reduction in specific [3H]imidacloprid binding. This study provides direct evidence for the occurrence of target-site resistance to a neonicotinoid insecticide. PMID:15937112

  18. Development of pyramidal lines with two major QTLs conferring resistance to sheath blight in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Jena, Kshirod; Bhuiyan, Md Atiqur Rahman; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2014-09-01

    Sheath blight is an emerging threat in rice cultivation. It is animportant disease caused by the soil-borne necrotrophic pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani Kühn. However, to date neither known major genes for quantitative resistance, nor any rice lines immune to this disease has been identified. The disease resistance is quantitative in nature. Numerous genes are involved in this resistance process. There are few quantitative trait loci (QTLs) detected conferring improved resistance against the disease. Teqing and Tetepshowimproved resistance having QTLs, qSB-9 and qSBR11-1, respectively. Since, these QTLs demonstrates additive effects, pyramiding of these QTLs might be an option to increase the sheath blight resistance in rice. Nine rice cultivars were screened at greenhouse conditions. Results showed that Tetep and Teqing had the lowest disease ratings. UKMRC2a new high yielding cultivar was as recipient parent. Crosses between UKMRC2 and Teqing, and UKMRC2 and Tetep were made and confirmed. Subsequently 4-way crosses between the two F1s were performed to develop pyramidal lines.

  19. Genetic characterization and targeted mapping of a Triticum timopheevii-dervied powdery mildew resistance gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are five alleles conferring race-specific resistance to powdery mildew (caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici) at the Pm1 locus on the long arm of chromosome 7A of wheat (Triticum aestivum. L). A dominant powdery mildew resistance gene transferred to the hexaploid germplasm line NC99BGTAG...

  20. Dissection of two soybean QTL conferring partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae through sequence and gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Phytophthora sojae is the primary pathogen of soybeans that are grown on poorly drained soils. Race-specific resistance to P. sojae in soybean is gene-for-gene, although in many areas of the US and worldwide there are populations that have adapted to the most commonly deployed resistance to P. sojae ( Rps) genes. Hence, this system has received increased attention towards identifying mechanisms and molecular markers associated with partial resistance to this pathogen. Several quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been identified in the soybean cultivar ‘Conrad’ that contributes to the expression of partial resistance to multiple P. sojae isolates. Results In this study, two of the Conrad QTL on chromosome 19 were dissected through sequence and expression analysis of genes in both resistant (Conrad) and susceptible (‘Sloan’) genotypes. There were 1025 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 87 of 153 genes sequenced from Conrad and Sloan. There were 304 SNPs in 54 genes sequenced from Conrad compared to those from both Sloan and Williams 82, of which 11 genes had SNPs unique to Conrad. Eleven of 19 genes in these regions analyzed with qRT-PCR had significant differences in fold change of transcript abundance in response to infection with P. sojae in lines with QTL haplotype from the resistant parent compared to those with the susceptible parent haplotype. From these, 8 of the 11 genes had SNPs in the upstream, untranslated region, exon, intron, and/or downstream region. These 11 candidate genes encode proteins potentially involved in signal transduction, hormone-mediated pathways, plant cell structural modification, ubiquitination, and basal resistance. Conclusions These findings may indicate a complex defense network with multiple mechanisms underlying these two soybean QTL conferring resistance to P. sojae. SNP markers derived from these candidate genes can contribute to fine mapping of QTL and marker assisted breeding for resistance to P. sojae

  1. Characterization and mapping of Rpi1, a gene that confers dominant resistance to stalk rot in maize.

    PubMed

    Yang, D E; Jin, D M; Wang, B; Zhang, D S; Nguyen, H-T; Zhang, C L; Chen, S J

    2005-10-01

    The maize inbred lines 1145 (resistant) and Y331 (susceptible), and the F(1), F(2) and BC(1)F(1) populations derived from them were inoculated with the pathogen Pythium inflatum Matthews, which causes stalk rot in Zea mays. Field data revealed that the ratio of resistant to susceptible plants was 3:1 in the F(2) population, and 1:1 in the BC(1)F(1)population, indicating that the resistance to P. inflatum Matthews was controlled by a single dominant gene in the 1145xY331 cross. The gene that confers resistance to P. inflatum Matthews was designated Rpi1 for resistance to P. inflatum) according to the standard nomenclature for plant disease resistance genes. Fifty SSR markers from 10 chromosomes were first screened in the F(2) population to find markers linked to the Rpi1 gene. The results indicated that umc1702 and mmc0371 were both linked to Rpi1, placing the resistance gene on chromosome 4. RAPD (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA) markers were then tested in the F(2)population using bulked segregant analysis (BSA). Four RAPD products were found to show linkage to the Rpi1 gene. Then 27 SSR markers and 8 RFLP markers in the region encompassing Rpi1 were used for fine-scale mapping of the resistance gene. Two SSR markers and four RFLP markers were linked to the Rpi1 gene. Finally, the Rpi1 gene was mapped between the SSR markers bnlg1937 and agrr286 on chromosome 4, 1.6 cM away from the former and 4.1 cM distant from the latter. This is the first time that a dominant gene for resistance to maize stalk rot caused by P. inflatum Matthews has been mapped with molecular marker techniques. PMID:16133168

  2. Irradiation-resistance conferred by superoxide dismutase: possible adaptive role of a natural polymorphism in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Peng, T X; Moya, A; Ayala, F J

    1986-01-01

    The toxic effects of ionizing radiation to DNA are thought to be due to the generation of the superoxide radical, 02-. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), which scavenges 02-., has been invoked as a protecting enzyme against ionizing radiation in viruses, bacteria, mammalian cells in culture, and live mice. We now demonstrate that SOD is involved in the resistance of Drosophila melanogaster against irradiation. The protection is greatest when flies carry the S form of the enzyme (which exhibits highest in vitro specific activity), intermediate when they carry the F form of the enzyme, and lowest when they are homozygous for N, an allele that reduces the amount of the enzyme to 3.5% of the normal level. Natural selection experiments show that the fitness of the high-activity S allele is increased in an irradiated population relative to the nonirradiated control. These results point towards a possible adaptive function of the S/F polymorphism found in natural populations of D. melanogaster. PMID:3080745

  3. Mutations in pepQ Confer Low-Level Resistance to Bedaquiline and Clofazimine in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Deepak; Ioerger, Thomas; Tyagi, Sandeep; Li, Si-Yang; Mdluli, Khisimuzi; Andries, Koen; Grosset, Jacques; Sacchettini, Jim; Nuermberger, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The novel ATP synthase inhibitor bedaquiline recently received accelerated approval for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and is currently being studied as a component of novel treatment-shortening regimens for drug-susceptible and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. In a limited number of bedaquiline-treated patients reported to date, ≥4-fold upward shifts in bedaquiline MIC during treatment have been attributed to non-target-based mutations in Rv0678 that putatively increase bedaquiline efflux through the MmpS5-MmpL5 pump. These mutations also confer low-level clofazimine resistance, presumably by a similar mechanism. Here, we describe a new non-target-based determinant of low-level bedaquiline and clofazimine cross-resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: loss-of-function mutations in pepQ (Rv2535c), which corresponds to a putative Xaa-Pro aminopeptidase. pepQ mutants were selected in mice by treatment with clinically relevant doses of bedaquiline, with or without clofazimine, and were shown to have bedaquiline and clofazimine MICs 4 times higher than those for the parental H37Rv strain. Coincubation with efflux inhibitors verapamil and reserpine lowered bedaquiline MICs against both mutant and parent strains to a level below the MIC against H37Rv in the absence of efflux pump inhibitors. However, quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed no significant differences in expression of Rv0678, mmpS5, or mmpL5 between mutant and parent strains. Complementation of a pepQ mutant with the wild-type gene restored susceptibility, indicating that loss of PepQ function is sufficient for reduced susceptibility both in vitro and in mice. Although the mechanism by which mutations in pepQ confer bedaquiline and clofazimine cross-resistance remains unclear, these results may have clinical implications and warrant further evaluation of clinical isolates with reduced susceptibility to either drug for mutations in this gene. PMID:27185800

  4. A Novel Glycolipid Biosurfactant Confers Grazing Resistance upon Pantoea ananatis BRT175 against the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek D N; Nickzad, Arvin; Déziel, Eric; Stavrinides, John

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea is a versatile genus of bacteria with both plant- and animal-pathogenic strains, some of which have been suggested to cause human infections. There is, however, limited knowledge on the potential determinants used for host association and pathogenesis in animal systems. In this study, we used the model host Dictyostelium discoideum to show that isolates of Pantoea ananatis exhibit differential grazing susceptibility, with some being resistant to grazing by the amoebae. We carried out a high-throughput genetic screen of one grazing-resistant isolate, P. ananatis BRT175, using the D. discoideum pathosystem to identify genes responsible for the resistance phenotype. Among the 26 candidate genes involved in grazing resistance, we identified rhlA and rhlB, which we show are involved in the biosynthesis of a biosurfactant that enables swarming motility in P. ananatis BRT175. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), the biosurfactant was shown to be a glycolipid with monohexose-C10-C10 as the primary congener. We show that this novel glycolipid biosurfactant is cytotoxic to the amoebae and is capable of compromising cellular integrity, leading to cell lysis. The production of this biosurfactant may be important for bacterial survival in the environment and could contribute to the establishment of opportunistic infections. IMPORTANCE The genetic factors used for host interaction by the opportunistic human pathogen Pantoea ananatis are largely unknown. We identified two genes that are important for the production of a biosurfactant that confers grazing resistance against the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. We show that the biosurfactant, which exhibits cytotoxicity toward the amoebae, is a glycolipid that incorporates a hexose rather than rhamnose. The production of this biosurfactant may confer a competitive advantage in the environment and could potentially contribute to the establishment of opportunistic infections. PMID:27303689

  5. A Novel Glycolipid Biosurfactant Confers Grazing Resistance upon Pantoea ananatis BRT175 against the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Derek D. N.; Nickzad, Arvin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pantoea is a versatile genus of bacteria with both plant- and animal-pathogenic strains, some of which have been suggested to cause human infections. There is, however, limited knowledge on the potential determinants used for host association and pathogenesis in animal systems. In this study, we used the model host Dictyostelium discoideum to show that isolates of Pantoea ananatis exhibit differential grazing susceptibility, with some being resistant to grazing by the amoebae. We carried out a high-throughput genetic screen of one grazing-resistant isolate, P. ananatis BRT175, using the D. discoideum pathosystem to identify genes responsible for the resistance phenotype. Among the 26 candidate genes involved in grazing resistance, we identified rhlA and rhlB, which we show are involved in the biosynthesis of a biosurfactant that enables swarming motility in P. ananatis BRT175. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), the biosurfactant was shown to be a glycolipid with monohexose-C10-C10 as the primary congener. We show that this novel glycolipid biosurfactant is cytotoxic to the amoebae and is capable of compromising cellular integrity, leading to cell lysis. The production of this biosurfactant may be important for bacterial survival in the environment and could contribute to the establishment of opportunistic infections. IMPORTANCE The genetic factors used for host interaction by the opportunistic human pathogen Pantoea ananatis are largely unknown. We identified two genes that are important for the production of a biosurfactant that confers grazing resistance against the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. We show that the biosurfactant, which exhibits cytotoxicity toward the amoebae, is a glycolipid that incorporates a hexose rather than rhamnose. The production of this biosurfactant may confer a competitive advantage in the environment and could potentially contribute to the establishment of opportunistic infections. PMID

  6. Characterization of Small ColE1-Like Plasmids Conferring Kanamycin Resistance in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovars Typhimurium and Newport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-antibiotic resistant (MR) Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Newport are an increasing concern in human and animal health. Many strains are known to carry antibiotic resistance determinants on multiple plasmids, yet detailed information is scarce. Three plasmids conferring kanamycin...

  7. Gene-specific markers for the wheat gene Lr34/Yr18/Pm38 which confers resistance to multiple fungal pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The locus Lr34/Yr18/Pm38 confers partial and durable resistance against the devastating fungal pathogens leaf rust, stripe rust, and powdery mildew. In previous studies, this broad-spectrum resistance was shown to be controlled by a single gene which encodes a putative ATP-binding cassette transport...

  8. The miR9863 family regulates distinct Mla alleles in barley to attenuate NLR receptor-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley Mla alleles encode coiled-coil (CC), nucleotide binding and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) intracellular receptors that trigger isolate-specific immune responses against the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). How Mla or NB-LRR genes in grass species are regulated at p...

  9. Antisense expression of peach mildew resistance locus O (PpMlo1) gene confers cross-species resistance to powdery mildew in Fragaria x ananassa.

    PubMed

    Jiwan, Derick; Roalson, Eric H; Main, Dorrie; Dhingra, Amit

    2013-12-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is one of the major plant pathogens. The conventional method of PM control includes frequent use of sulfur-based fungicides adding to production costs and potential harm to the environment. PM remains a major scourge for Rosaceae crops where breeding approaches mainly resort to gene-for-gene resistance. We have tested an alternate source of PM resistance in Rosaceae. Mildew resistance locus O (MLO) has been well studied in barley due to its role in imparting broad spectrum resistance to PM. We identified PpMlo1 (Prunus persica Mlo) in peach and characterized it further to test if a similar mechanism of resistance is conserved in Rosaceae. Due to its recalcitrance in tissue culture, reverse genetic studies involving PpMloI were not feasible in peach. Therefore, Fragaria x ananassa LF9 line, a taxonomic surrogate, was used for functional analysis of PpMlo1. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation yielded transgenic strawberry plants expressing PpMlo1 in sense and antisense orientation. Antisense expression of PpMlo1 in transgenic strawberry plants conferred resistance to Fragaria-specific powdery mildew, Podosphaera macularis. Phylogenetic analysis of 208 putative Mlo gene copies from 35 plant species suggests a large number of duplications of this gene family prior to the divergence of monocots and eudicots, early in eudicot diversification. Our results indicate that the Mlo-based resistance mechanism is functional in Rosaceae, and that Fragaria can be used as a host to test mechanistic function of genes derived from related tree species. To the best of our knowledge, this work is one of the first attempts at testing the potential of using a Mlo-based resistance strategy to combat powdery mildew in Rosaceae. PMID:23728780

  10. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Johnston, Geoffrey L; Dhingra, Satish K; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp P; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria. PMID:25898991

  11. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Johnston, Geoffrey L.; Dhingra, Satish K.; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E.; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp H.; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J.; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M.; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria. PMID:25898991

  12. Retroviral transfer of a murine cDNA for multidrug resistance confers pleiotropic drug resistance to cells without prior drug selection

    SciTech Connect

    Guild, B.C.; Mulligan, R.C.; Gros, P.; Housman, D.E.

    1988-03-01

    The authors have constructed a retrovirus expression vector that carries the murine mdr cDNA transcribed under the control of the human H4 histone promoter to examine the feasibility of efficiently transferring a multidrug resistance phenotype to cells without requiring drug selection. This approach will facilitate the transfer of mdr cDNA to hematopoietic progenitor cells for the study of multidrug resistance in vivo. The retrovirus vector pHmdr has been used for transmission and expression of the mdr cDNA in initially drug-sensitive NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Selection of pHmdr infectants in the cytotoxic agents colchicine or doxorubicin gave rise to highly multidrug-resistant colonies containing a single gene copy of the vector. Moreover, in the analysis of 12 cloned unselected NIH 3T3 cell infectants, a multidrug resistance phenotype was conferred by as few as two copies of the pHmdr vector. Overexpression of the mdr cDNA in drug-selected and unselected pHmdr infectants was directly related to cell survival in three cytotoxic agents tested. These results hold significant implications for the study of multidrug resistance in vivo.

  13. Disruption of a mitochondrial MutS DNA repair enzyme homologue confers drug resistance in the parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Erin M; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2009-04-01

    MutS homologues (MSHs) are critical components of the eukaryotic mismatch repair machinery. In addition to repairing mismatched DNA, mismatch repair enzymes are known in higher eukaryotes to directly signal cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA-damaging agents. Accordingly, mammalian cells lacking certain MSHs are resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, we have discovered that the disruption of TgMSH-1, an MSH in the pathogenic parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, confers drug resistance. Through a genetic selection for T. gondii mutants resistant to the antiparasitic drug monensin, we have isolated a strain that is resistant not only to monensin but also to salinomycin and the alkylating agent, methylnitrosourea. We have shown that this phenotype is due to the disruption of TgMSH-1 as the multidrug-resistance phenotype is complemented by a wild-type copy of TgMSH-1 and is recapitulated by a directed disruption of this gene in a wild-type strain. We have also shown that, unlike previously described MSHs involved in signalling, TgMSH-1 localizes to the parasite mitochondrion. These results provide the first example of a mitochondrial MSH that is involved in drug sensitivity and implicate the induction of mitochondrial stress as a mode of action of the widely used drug, monensin. PMID:19291232

  14. Disruption of a Mitochondrial MutS DNA Repair Enzyme Homolog Confers Drug Resistance in the Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Erin M.; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY MutS homologs (MSHs) are critical components of the eukaryotic mismatch repair machinery. In addition to repairing mismatched DNA, mismatch repair enzymes are known in higher eukaryotes to directly signal cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damaging agents. Accordingly, mammalian cells lacking certain MSHs are resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, we have discovered that the disruption of TgMSH-1, an MSH in the pathogenic parasite, T. gondii, confers drug resistance. Through a genetic selection for T. gondii mutants resistant to the antiparasitic drug monensin, we have isolated a strain that is resistant not only to monensin but also to salinomycin and the alkylating agent, methylnitrosourea. We have shown that this phenotype is due to the disruption of TgMSH-1 as the multi-drug resistance phenotype is complemented by a wild-type copy of TgMSH-1 and is recapitulated by a directed disruption of this gene in a wild-type strain. We have also shown that, unlike previously described MSHs involved in signaling, TgMSH-1 localizes to the parasite mitochondrion. These results provide the first example of a mitochondrial MutS Homolog that is involved in drug sensitivity and implicate the induction of mitochondrial stress as a mode of action of the widely used drug, monensin. PMID:19291232

  15. FHIT loss confers cisplatin resistance in lung cancer via the AKT/NF-κB/Slug-mediated PUMA reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, D-W; Lee, M-C; Hsu, N-Y; Wu, T-C; Wu, J-Y; Wang, Y-C; Cheng, Y-W; Chen, C-Y; Lee, H

    2015-05-01

    Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) loss by the two-hit mechanism of loss of heterozygosity and promoter hypermethylation commonly occurrs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and may confer cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of FHIT loss in cisplatin resistance and the response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in NSCLC patients have not yet been reported. In the present study, inhibition concentration of 50% cell viability induced by cisplatin (IC50) and soft agar growth and invasion capability were increased and decreased in FHIT-knockdown and -overexpressing cells, respectively. Mechanistically, Slug transcription is upregulated by AKT/NF-κB activation due to FHIT loss and, in turn, Slug suppresses PUMA expression; this decrease of PUMA by FHIT loss is responsible for cisplatin resistance. In addition, cisplatin resistance due to FHIT loss can be conquered by AKT inhibitor-perifosine in xenograft tumors. Among NSCLC patients, low FHIT, high p-AKT, high Slug and low PUMA were correlated with shorter overall survival, relapse-free survival and poorer response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Therefore, the AKT inhibitor perifosine might potentially overcome the resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in NSCLC patients with low-FHIT tumors, and consequently improve the outcome. PMID:24998847

  16. The A395T mutation in ERG11 gene confers fluconazole resistance in Candida tropicalis causing candidemia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jingwen; Zhang, Jinqing; Chen, Wei; Sun, Yi; Wan, Zhe; Li, Ruoyu; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida tropicalis is still unclear. Recently, we isolated a fluconazole-resistant strain of C. tropicalis from the blood specimen of a patient with candidemia in China. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of the isolate was determined by using CLSI M27-A3 and E-test methods. The sequence of ERG11 gene was then analyzed, and the three-dimensional model of Erg11p encoded by ERG11 gene was also investigated. The sequencing of ERG11 gene revealed the mutation of A395T in this fluconazole-resistant isolate of C. tropicalis, resulting in the Y132F substitution in Erg11p. Sequence alignment and three-dimensional model comparison of Erg11ps showed high similarity between fluconazole-susceptible isolates of C. tropicalis and Candida albicans. The comparison of the three-dimensional models of Erg11ps demonstrated that the position of the Y132F substitution in this isolate of C. tropicalis is identical to the isolate of C. albicans with fluconazole resistance resulting from Y132F substitution in Erg11p. Hence, we ascertain that the Y132F substitution of Erg11p caused by A395T mutation in ERG11 gene confers the fluconazole resistance in C. tropicalis. PMID:25398256

  17. Synergistic interaction of glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and ArsJ, a novel organoarsenical efflux permease, confers arsenate resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Garbinski, Luis D; Rosen, Barry P

    2016-06-01

    Microbial biotransformations are major contributors to the arsenic biogeocycle. In parallel with transformations of inorganic arsenic, organoarsenicals pathways have recently been recognized as important components of global cycling of arsenic. The well-characterized pathway of resistance to arsenate is reduction coupled to arsenite efflux. Here, we describe a new pathway of arsenate resistance involving biosynthesis and extrusion of an unusual pentavalent organoarsenical. A number of arsenic resistance (ars) operons have two genes of unknown function that are linked in these operons. One, gapdh, encodes the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The other, arsJ, encodes a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) protein. The two genes were cloned from the chromosome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. When expressed together, but not alone, in Escherichia coli, gapdh and arsJ specifically conferred resistance to arsenate and decreased accumulation of As(V). Everted membrane vesicles from cells expressing arsJ accumulated As(V) in the presence of purified GAPDH, D-glceraldehylde 3-phosphate (G3P) and NAD(+) . GAPDH forms the unstable organoarsenical 1-arseno-3-phosphoglycerate (1As3PGA). We propose that ArsJ is an efflux permease that extrudes 1As3PGA from cells, where it rapidly dissociates into As(V) and 3-phosphoglycerate (3PGA), creating a novel pathway of arsenate resistance. PMID:26991003

  18. Mutations conferring resistance to quinol oxidation (Qz) inhibitors of the cyt bc1 complex of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Daldal, F; Tokito, M K; Davidson, E; Faham, M

    1989-01-01

    Several spontaneous mutants of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus resistant to myxothiazol, stigmatellin and mucidin--inhibitors of the ubiquinol: cytochrome c oxidoreductase (cyt bc1 complex)--were isolated. They were grouped into eight different classes based on their genetic location, growth properties and inhibitor cross-resistance. The petABC (fbcFBC) cluster that encodes the structural genes for the Rieske FeS protein, cyt b and cyt c1 subunits of the cyt bc1 complex was cloned out of the representative isolates and the molecular basis of inhibitor-resistance was determined by DNA sequencing. These data indicated that while one group of mutations was located outside the petABC(fbcFBC) cluster, the remainder were single base pair changes in codons corresponding to phylogenetically conserved amino acid residues of cyt b. Of these substitutions, F144S conferred resistance to myxothiazol, T163A and V333A to stigmatellin, L106P and G152S to myxothiazol + mucidin and M140I and F144L to myxothiazol + stigmatellin. In addition, a mutation (aer126) which specifically impairs the quinol oxidase (Qz) activity of the cyt bc1 complex of a non-photosynthetic mutant (R126) was identified to be a glycine to an aspartic acid replacement at position 158 of cyt b. Six of these mutations were found between amino acid residues 140 and 163, in a region linking the putative third and fourth transmembrane helices of cyt b. The non-random clustering of several inhibitor-resistance mutations around the non-functional aer126 mutation suggests that this region may be involved in the formation of the Qz inhibitor binding/quinol oxidation domain(s) of the cyt bc1 complex. Of the two remaining mutations, the V333A replacement conferred resistance to stigmatellin exclusively and was located in another region toward the C terminus of cyt b. The L106P substitution, on the other hand, was situated in the transmembrane helix II that carries two conserved histidine residues

  19. A CLAG3 mutation in an amphipathic transmembrane domain alters malaria parasite nutrient channels and confers leupeptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Paresh; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Ito, Daisuke; Basore, Katherine; Desai, Sanjay A

    2015-06-01

    Erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites have increased permeability to ions and nutrients, as mediated by the plasmodial surface anion channel (PSAC) and recently linked to parasite clag3 genes. Although the encoded protein is integral to the host membrane, its precise contribution to solute transport remains unclear because it lacks conventional transmembrane domains and does not have homology to ion channel proteins in other organisms. Here, we identified a probable CLAG3 transmembrane domain adjacent to a variant extracellular motif. Helical-wheel analysis revealed strict segregation of polar and hydrophobic residues to opposite faces of a predicted α-helical transmembrane domain, suggesting that the domain lines a water-filled pore. A single CLAG3 mutation (A1210T) in a leupeptin-resistant PSAC mutant falls within this transmembrane domain and may affect pore structure. Allelic-exchange transfection and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that this mutation alters solute selectivity in the channel. The A1210T mutation also reduces the blocking affinity of PSAC inhibitors that bind on opposite channel faces, consistent with global changes in channel structure. Transfected parasites carrying this mutation survived a leupeptin challenge significantly better than a transfection control did. Thus, the A1210T mutation contributes directly to both altered PSAC activity and leupeptin resistance. These findings reveal the molecular basis of a novel antimalarial drug resistance mechanism, provide a framework for determining the channel's composition and structure, and should guide the development of therapies targeting the PSAC. PMID:25870226

  20. Evolution and diversity of the mechanisms endowing resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate-synthase (ALS) in corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas L.).

    PubMed

    Délye, Christophe; Pernin, Fanny; Scarabel, Laura

    2011-02-01

    We investigated the diversity of mechanisms conferring resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) in corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas L.) and the processes underlying the selection for resistance. Six mutant ALS alleles, Arg₁₉₇, His₁₉₇, Leu₁₉₇, Ser₁₉₇, Thr₁₉₇ and Leu₅₇₄ were identified in five Italian populations. Different alleles were found in a same population or a same plant. Comparison of individual plant phenotype (herbicide sensitivity) and genotype (amino-acid substitution(s) at codon 197) showed that all mutant ALS alleles conferred dominant resistance to the field rate of the sulfonylurea tribenuron and moderate or no resistance to the field rate of the triazolopyrimidine florasulam. Depending on the allele, dominant or partially dominant resistance to the field rate of the imidazolinone imazamox was observed. Putative non-target-site resistance mechanisms were also likely present in the populations investigated. The derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence assays targeting ALS codons crucial for herbicide sensitivity developed in this work will facilitate the detection of resistance due to mutant ALS alleles. Nucleotide variation around codon 197 indicated that mutant ALS alleles evolved by multiple, independent appearances. Resistance to ALS inhibitors in P. rhoeas clearly evolved by redundant evolution of a set of mutant ALS alleles and likely of non-target-site mechanisms. PMID:21421378

  1. Phloem-specific expression of the lectin gene from Allium sativum confers resistance to the sap-sucker Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Kottakota; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Vani, Kalasamudramu; Kaul, Tanushri; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2014-05-01

    Rice production is severely hampered by insect pests. Garlic lectin gene (ASAL) holds great promise in conferring protection against chewing (lepidopteran) and sap-sucking (homopteran) insect pests. We have developed transgenic rice lines resistant to sap-sucking brown hopper (Nilaparvata lugens) by ectopic expression of ASAL in their phloem tissues. Molecular analyses of T0 lines confirmed stable integration of transgene. T1 lines (NP 1-2, 4-3, 11-6 & 17-7) showed active transcription and translation of ASAL transgene. ELISA revealed ASAL expression was as high as 0.95% of total soluble protein. Insect bioassays on T2 homozygous lines (NP 18 & 32) revealed significant reduction (~74-83%) in survival rate, development and fecundity of brown hoppers in comparison to wild type. Transgenics exhibited enhanced resistance (1-2 score) against brown hoppers, minimal plant damage and no growth penalty or phenotypic abnormalities. PMID:24563293

  2. Prevalence of mutations conferring resistance among multi- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Bing; Liu, Hai-can; Sun, Qing; Zhao, Xiu-qin; Liu, Zhi-guang; Wan, Kang-lin; Zhao, Li-li

    2016-03-01

    To identify the mutations in multi- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis isolates and to evaluate the use of molecular markers of resistance, we analyzed 257 multi- and extensively drug-resistant isolates and 64 pan-sensitive isolates from 23 provinces in China. Seven loci associated with drug resistance, including rpoB for rifampin (RIF), katG, inhA and oxyR-ahpC for isoniazid (INH), gyrA and gyrB for ofloxacin (OFX), and rrs for kanmycin (KAN), were examined by DNA sequencing. Compared with the phenotypic data, the sensitivity and specificity for DNA sequencing were 91.1% and 98.4% for RIF, 80.2% and 98.4% for INH, 72.2% and 98.3% for OFX and 40% and 98.2% for KAN, respectively. The most common mutations found in RIF, INH, OFX and KAN resistance were Ser531Leu (48.2%) in rpoB, Ser315Thr (49.8%) in katG, C(-15)T (10.5%) in inhA, Asp94Gly (20.3%), Asp94Ala (12.7%) and Ala90Val (21.5%) in gyrA, and A1401G (40%) in rrs. This molecular information will be helpful to establish new molecular biology-based methods for diagnosing multi- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in China. PMID:26486879

  3. Binding Pocket Alterations in Dihydrofolate Synthase Confer Resistance to para-Aminosalicylic Acid in Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Wang, Xu-De; Erber, Luke N.; Luo, Ming; Guo, Ai-zhen; Yang, Shan-shan; Gu, Jing; Turman, Breanna J.; Gao, Yun-rong; Li, Dong-fang; Cui, Zong-qiang; Zhang, Zhi-ping; Bi, Li-jun; Baughn, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanistic basis for the resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS), an important agent in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, has yet to be fully defined. As a substrate analog of the folate precursor para-aminobenzoic acid, PAS is ultimately bioactivated to hydroxy dihydrofolate, which inhibits dihydrofolate reductase and disrupts the operation of folate-dependent metabolic pathways. As a result, the mutation of dihydrofolate synthase, an enzyme needed for the bioactivation of PAS, causes PAS resistance in M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv. Here, we demonstrate that various missense mutations within the coding sequence of the dihydropteroate (H2Pte) binding pocket of dihydrofolate synthase (FolC) confer PAS resistance in laboratory isolates of M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. From a panel of 85 multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates, 5 were found to harbor mutations in the folC gene within the H2Pte binding pocket, resulting in PAS resistance. While these alterations in the H2Pte binding pocket resulted in reduced dihydrofolate synthase activity, they also abolished the bioactivation of hydroxy dihydropteroate to hydroxy dihydrofolate. Consistent with this model for abolished bioactivation, the introduction of a wild-type copy of folC fully restored PAS susceptibility in folC mutant strains. Confirmation of this novel PAS resistance mechanism will be beneficial for the development of molecular method-based diagnostics for M. tuberculosis clinical isolates and for further defining the mode of action of this important tuberculosis drug. PMID:24366731

  4. Keeping the Teacher at Arm's Length: Student Resistance in Writing Conferences in Two High School Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consalvo, Annamary; Maloch, Beth

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore a subset of findings taken from yearlong qualitative study of writing conferences in two diversely populated, urban high school classrooms. Drawing on multiple data sources, we used case study and discourse analytic methods to follow two focal students across the year in order to examine instructional and…

  5. Upregulation of AKT3 Confers Resistance to the AKT Inhibitor MK2206 in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Stottrup, Casey; Tsang, Tiffany; Chin, Y Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    Acquired resistance to molecular targeted therapy represents a major challenge for the effective treatment of cancer. Hyperactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently observed in virtually all human malignancies, and numerous PI3K and AKT inhibitors are currently under clinical evaluation. However, mechanisms of acquired resistance to AKT inhibitors have yet to be described. Here, we use a breast cancer preclinical model to identify resistance mechanisms to a small molecule allosteric AKT inhibitor, MK2206. Using a step-wise and chronic high-dose exposure, breast cancer cell lines harboring oncogenic PI3K resistant to MK2206 were established. Using this model, we reveal that AKT3 expression is markedly upregulated in AKT inhibitor-resistant cells. Induction of AKT3 is regulated epigenetically by the bromodomain and extra terminal domain proteins. Importantly, knockdown of AKT3, but not AKT1 or AKT2, in resistant cells restores sensitivity to MK2206. AKT inhibitor-resistant cells also display an epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype as assessed by alterations in the levels of E-Cadherin, N-Cadherin, and vimentin, as well as enhanced invasiveness of tumor spheroids. Notably, the invasive morphology of resistant spheroids is diminished upon AKT3 depletion. We also show that resistance to MK2206 is reversible because upon drug removal resistant cells regain sensitivity to AKT inhibition, accompanied by reexpression of epithelial markers and reduction of AKT3 expression, implying that epigenetic reprogramming contributes to acquisition of resistance. These findings provide a rationale for developing therapeutics targeting AKT3 to circumvent acquired resistance in breast cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1964-74. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27297869

  6. Expression of a radish defensin in transgenic wheat confers increased resistance to Fusarium graminearum and Rhizoctonia cerealis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Zhou, Miaoping; Zhang, Zengyan; Ren, Lijuan; Du, Lipu; Zhang, Boqiao; Xu, Huijun; Xin, Zhiyong

    2011-03-01

    Fusarium head blight (scab), primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a devastating disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. Wheat sharp eyespot, mainly caused by Rhizoctonia cerealis, is one of the major diseases of wheat in China. The defensin RsAFP2, a small cyteine-rich antifungal protein from radish (Raphanus sativus), was shown to inhibit growth in vitro of agronomically important fungal pathogens, such as F. graminearum and R. cerealis. The RsAFP2 gene was transformed into Chinese wheat variety Yangmai 12 via biolistic bombardment to assess the effectiveness of the defensin in protecting wheat from the fungal pathogens in multiple locations and years. The genomic PCR and Southern blot analyses indicated that RsAFP2 was integrated into the genomes of the transgenic wheat lines and heritable. RT-PCR and Western blot proved that the RsAFP2 was expressed in these transgenic wheat lines. Disease tests showed that four RsAFP2 transgenic lines (RA1-RA4) displayed enhanced resistance to F. graminearum compared to the untransformed Yangmai 12 and the null-segregated plants. Assays on Q-RT-PCR and disease severity showed that the express level of RsAFP2 was associated with the enhanced resistance degree. Two of these transgenic lines (RA1 and RA2) also exhibited enhanced resistance to R. cerealis. These results indicated that the expression of RsAFP2 conferred increased resistance to F. graminearum and R. cerealis in transgenic wheat. PMID:21279533

  7. incurvata13, a Novel Allele of AUXIN RESISTANT6, Reveals a Specific Role for Auxin and the SCF Complex in Arabidopsis Embryogenesis, Vascular Specification, and Leaf Flatness1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Esteve-Bruna, David; Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Auxin plays a pivotal role in plant development by modulating the activity of SCF ubiquitin ligase complexes. Here, we positionally cloned Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) incurvata13 (icu13), a mutation that causes leaf hyponasty and reduces leaf venation pattern complexity and auxin responsiveness. We found that icu13 is a novel recessive allele of AUXIN RESISTANT6 (AXR6), which encodes CULLIN1, an invariable component of the SCF complex. Consistent with a role for auxin in vascular specification, the vascular defects in the icu13 mutant were accompanied by reduced expression of auxin transport and auxin perception markers in provascular cells. This observation is consistent with the expression pattern of AXR6, which we found to be restricted to vascular precursors and hydathodes in wild-type leaf primordia. AXR1, RELATED TO UBIQUITIN1-CONJUGATING ENZYME1, CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC9 SIGNALOSOME5A, and CULLIN-ASSOCIATED NEDD8-DISSOCIATED1 participate in the covalent modification of CULLIN1 by RELATED TO UBIQUITIN. Hypomorphic alleles of these genes also display simple venation patterns, and their double mutant combinations with icu13 exhibited a synergistic, rootless phenotype reminiscent of that caused by loss of function of MONOPTEROS (MP), which forms an auxin-signaling module with BODENLOS (BDL). The phenotypes of double mutant combinations of icu13 with either a gain-of-function allele of BDL or a loss-of-function allele of MP were synergistic. In addition, a BDL:green fluorescent protein fusion protein accumulated in icu13, and BDL loss of function or MP overexpression suppressed the phenotype of icu13. Our results demonstrate that the MP-BDL module is required not only for root specification in embryogenesis and vascular postembryonic development but also for leaf flatness. PMID:23319550

  8. Low inducible expression of p21Cip1 confers resistance to paclitaxel in BRAF mutant melanoma cells with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gun-Hee; Kim, Na-Yeon; Lee, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of oncogenic BRAF inhibitor is limited by the onset of acquired resistance. In this study, we investigated the potential therapeutic effects of the mitotic inhibitor paclitaxel on three melanoma cell lines with differing sensitivity to the BRAF inhibitor. Of the two BRAF inhibitor-resistant cell lines, A375P/Mdr cells harboring the BRAF V600E mutant were resistant and the wild-type BRAF SK-MEL-2 cells were sensitive to paclitaxel. In particular, paclitaxel caused the growth inhibition of SK-MEL-2 cells to a much greater extent than it caused growth inhibition of A375P cells. Paclitaxel exhibited no significant effect on the phosphorylation of MEK-ERK in any cell lines tested, regardless of both the BRAF mutation and the drug resistance, implying that paclitaxel activity is independent of MEK-ERK inhibition. In A375P cells, paclitaxel treatment resulted in a marked emergence of apoptotic cells after mitotic arrest, concomitant with a remarkable induction of p21(Cip1). However, paclitaxel only moderately increased the levels of p21(Cip1) in A375P/Mdr cells, which exhibited a strong resistance to paclitaxel. The p21(Cip1) overexpression partially conferred paclitaxel sensitivity to A375P/Mdr cells. Interestingly, we found an extremely low background expression level of p21(Cip1) in SK-MEL-2 cells lacking normal p53 function, which caused much greater G2/M arrest than that seen in A375P cells. Taken together, these results suggest that paclitaxel may be an effective anticancer agent through regulating the expression of p21(Cip1) for the treatment of BRAF mutant melanoma cells resistant to BRAF inhibitors. PMID:25912549

  9. The chromosomal arsenic resistance genes of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans have an unusual arrangement and confer increased arsenic and antimony resistance to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Butcher, B G; Deane, S M; Rawlings, D E

    2000-05-01

    The chromosomal arsenic resistance genes of the acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic, biomining bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were cloned and sequenced. Homologues of four arsenic resistance genes, arsB, arsC, arsH, and a putative arsR gene, were identified. The T. ferrooxidans arsB (arsenite export) and arsC (arsenate reductase) gene products were functional when they were cloned in an Escherichia coli ars deletion mutant and conferred increased resistance to arsenite, arsenate, and antimony. Therefore, despite the fact that the ars genes originated from an obligately acidophilic bacterium, they were functional in E. coli. Although T. ferrooxidans is gram negative, its ArsC was more closely related to the ArsC molecules of gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, a functional trxA (thioredoxin) gene was required for ArsC-mediated arsenate resistance in E. coli; this finding confirmed the gram-positive ArsC-like status of this resistance and indicated that the division of ArsC molecules based on Gram staining results is artificial. Although arsH was expressed in an E. coli-derived in vitro transcription-translation system, ArsH was not required for and did not enhance arsenic resistance in E. coli. The T. ferrooxidans ars genes were arranged in an unusual manner, and the putative arsR and arsC genes and the arsBH genes were translated in opposite directions. This divergent orientation was conserved in the four T. ferrooxidans strains investigated. PMID:10788346

  10. HER2 confers drug resistance of human breast cancer cells through activation of NRF2 by direct interaction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyo Jin; Yi, Yong Weon; Hong, Young Bin; Kim, Hee Jeong; Jang, Young-Joo; Seong, Yeon-Sun; Bae, Insoo

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression and/or activation of HER2 confers resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. NRF2 also gives drug resistance of cancer cells through induction of detoxification and/or drug efflux proteins. Although several upstream effectors of NRF2 overlapped with the downstream molecules of HER2 pathway, no direct link between HER2 and NRF2 has ever been established. Here, we identified that co-expression of a constitutively active HER2 (HER2CA) and NRF2 increased the levels of NRF2 target proteins, HO-1 and MRP5. We also identified HER2CA activated the DNA-binding of NRF2 and the antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated transcription in an NRF2-dependent manner. In addition, NRF2 and HER2CA cooperatively up-regulated the mRNA expression of various drug-resistant and detoxifying enzymes including GSTA2, GSTP1, CYP3A4, HO-1, MRP1, and MRP5. We also demonstrated that NRF2 binds to HER2 not only in transiently transfected HEK293T cells but also in HER2-amplified breast cancer cells. Functionally, overexpression of HER2CA gave resistance of MCF7 breast cancer cells to either paraquat or doxorubicin. Overexpression of dominant negative NRF2 (DN-NRF2) reduced the HER2CA-induced resistance of MCF7 cells to these agents. Taken together, these results suggest that active HER2 binds and regulates the NRF2-dependent transcriptional activation and induces drug resistance of cancer cells. PMID:25467193

  11. Rapid, high-throughput, multiplex, real-time PCR for identification of mutations in the cyp51A gene of Aspergillus fumigatus that confer resistance to itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Balashov, Sergey V; Gardiner, Rebecca; Park, Steven; Perlin, David S

    2005-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an important cause of life-threatening invasive fungal disease in patients with compromised immune systems. Resistance to itraconazole in A. fumigatus is closely linked to amino acid substitutions in Cyp51A that replace Gly54. In an effort to develop a new class of molecular diagnostic assay that can rapidly assess drug resistance, a multiplexed assay was established. This assay uses molecular beacons corresponding to the wild-type cyp51A gene and seven mutant alleles encoding either Arg54, Lys54, Val54, Trp54, or Glu54. Molecular beacon structure design and real-time PCR conditions were optimized to increase the assay specificity. The multiplex assay was applied to the analysis of chromosomal DNA samples from a collection of 48 A. fumigatus clinical and laboratory-derived isolates, most with reduced susceptibility to itraconazole. The cyp51A allelic identities for codon 54 were established for all of the strains tested, and mutations altering Gly54 in 23 strains were revealed. These mutations included G(54)W (n = 1), G(54)E (n = 12), G(54)K (n = 3), G(54)R (n = 3), and G(54)V (n = 4). Molecular beacon assay results were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Multiplex real-time PCR with molecular beacons is a powerful technique for allele differentiation and analysis of resistance mutations that is dynamic and suitable for rapid high-throughput assessment of drug resistance. PMID:15634974

  12. Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

    2000-10-11

    Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  13. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scheible, Wolf

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  14. Bacteriophage-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Mutant Confers Broad Immunity against Staphylococcal Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Capparelli, Rosanna; Nocerino, Nunzia; Lanzetta, Rosa; Silipo, Alba; Amoresano, Angela; Giangrande, Chiara; Becker, Karsten; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Evidente, Antonio; Cimmino, Alessio; Iannaccone, Marco; Parlato, Marianna; Medaglia, Chiara; Roperto, Sante; Roperto, Franco; Ramunno, Luigi; Iannelli, Domenico

    2010-01-01

    In the presence of a bacteriophage (a bacteria-attacking virus) resistance is clearly beneficial to the bacteria. As expected in such conditions, resistant bacteria emerge rapidly. However, in the absence of the phage, resistant bacteria often display reduced fitness, compared to their sensitive counterparts. The present study explored the fitness cost associated with phage-resistance as an opportunity to isolate an attenuated strain of S. aureus. The phage-resistant strain A172 was isolated from the phage-sensitive strain A170 in the presence of the MSa phage. Acquisition of phage-resistance altered several properties of A172, causing reduced growth rate, under-expression of numerous genes and production of capsular polysaccharide. In vivo, A172 modulated the transcription of the TNF-α, IFN-γ and Il-1β genes and, given intramuscularly, protected mice from a lethal dose of A170 (18/20). The heat-killed vaccine also afforded protection from heterologous methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (8/10 mice) or vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) (9/10 mice). The same vaccine was also effective when administered as an aerosol. Anti-A172 mouse antibodies, in the dose of 10 µl/mouse, protected the animals (10/10, in two independent experiments) from a lethal dose of A170. Consisting predominantly of the sugars glucose and galactose, the capsular polysaccharide of A172, given in the dose of 25 µg/mouse, also protected the mice (20/20) from a lethal dose of A170. The above results demonstrate that selection for phage-resistance can facilitate bacterial vaccine preparation. PMID:20661301

  15. Structure and function of efflux pumps that confer resistance to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Borges-Walmsley, M Ines; McKeegan, Kenneth S; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to therapeutic drugs encompasses a diverse range of biological systems, which all have a human impact. From the relative simplicity of bacterial cells, fungi and protozoa to the complexity of human cancer cells, resistance has become problematic. Stated in its simplest terms, drug resistance decreases the chance of providing successful treatment against a plethora of diseases. Worryingly, it is a problem that is increasing, and consequently there is a pressing need to develop new and effective classes of drugs. This has provided a powerful stimulus in promoting research on drug resistance and, ultimately, it is hoped that this research will provide novel approaches that will allow the deliberate circumvention of well understood resistance mechanisms. A major mechanism of resistance in both microbes and cancer cells is the membrane protein-catalysed extrusion of drugs from the cell. Resistant cells exploit proton-driven antiporters and/or ATP-driven ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters to extrude cytotoxic drugs that usually enter the cell by passive diffusion. Although some of these drug efflux pumps transport specific substrates, many are transporters of multiple substrates. These multidrug pumps can often transport a variety of structurally unrelated hydrophobic compounds, ranging from dyes to lipids. If we are to nullify the effects of efflux-mediated drug resistance, we must first of all understand how these efflux pumps can accommodate a diverse range of compounds and, secondly, how conformational changes in these proteins are coupled to substrate translocation. These are key questions that must be addressed. In this review we report on the advances that have been made in understanding the structure and function of drug efflux pumps. PMID:13678421

  16. Association of tellurium resistance and bacteriophage inhibition conferred by R plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D E; Summers, A O

    1979-01-01

    Concomitant resistance to tellurium compounds (Ter) and inhibition of coli-phage development (Phi) are properties mediated by many H2 incompatibility group R plasmids which have been isolated from diverse bacterial and geographic sources. Ter plasmids from tellurium-resistant bacteria that were isolated from sewage and industrial wastes also mediated phage inhibition. Of these Ter plasmids, three from Citrobacter freundii belonged to the H incompatibility group, whereas three from Klebsiella pneumoniae did not. Images PMID:374351

  17. SU-C-303-01: Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Confers Cancer Resistance to Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S; La Count, S; Liu, J; Bai, X; Lu, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the role of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in malignant cell resistance to radiation therapy. Methods: We first developed several small devices that could be used to adopt radiation beams from clinical high dose rate brachy therapy (HDR) or linac-based megavoltage machines to perform pre-clinical cell and mouse experiments. Then we used these devices to deliver radiation to AID-positive and AID-silenced cancer cells or tumors formed by these cells in mice. Cells and mice bearing tumors received the same dose under the same experimental conditions. For cells, we observed the apoptosis and the cell survival rate over time. For mice bearing tumors, we measured and recorded the tumor sizes every other day for 4 weeks. Results: For cell experiments, we found that the AID-positive cells underwent much less apoptosis compared with AID-silenced cells upon radiation. And for mouse experiments, we found that AID-positive tumors grew significantly faster than the AID-silenced tumors despite of receiving the same doses of radiation. Conclusion: Our study suggests that AID may confer cancer resistance to radiation therapy, and AID may be a significant biomarker predicting cancer resistance to radiation therapy for certain cancer types.

  18. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangquan; Li, Wenqi; Zhu, Jinyan; Fan, Fangjun; Wang, Jun; Zhong, Weigong; Wang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Qing; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Zhou, Tong; Lan, Ying; Zhou, Yijun; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA) construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21–24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA). By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species. PMID:27187354

  19. Splice form variant and amino acid changes in MDR49 confers DDT resistance in transgenic Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Seong, Keon Mook; Sun, Weilin; Clark, John M; Pittendrigh, Barry R

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters represent a superfamily of proteins that have important physiological roles in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In insects, ABC transporters have previously been implicated in insecticide resistance. The 91-R strain of Drosophila melanogaster has been intensely selected with DDT over six decades. A recent selective sweeps analysis of 91-R implicated the potential role of MDR49, an ABC transporter, in DDT resistance, however, to date the details of how MDR49 may play a role in resistance have not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the impact of structural changes and an alternative splicing event in MDR49 on DDT-resistance in 91-R, as compared to the DDT susceptible strain 91-C. We observed three amino acid differences in MDR49 when 91-R was compared with 91-C, and only one isoform (MDR49B) was implicated in DDT resistance. A transgenic Drosophila strain containing the 91-R-MDR49B isoform had a significantly higher LD50 value as compared to the 91-C-MDR49B isoform at the early time points (6 h to 12 h) during DDT exposure. Our data support the hypothesis that the MDR49B isoform, with three amino acid mutations, plays a role in the early aspects of DDT resistance in 91-R. PMID:27003579

  20. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangquan; Li, Wenqi; Zhu, Jinyan; Fan, Fangjun; Wang, Jun; Zhong, Weigong; Wang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Qing; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Zhou, Tong; Lan, Ying; Zhou, Yijun; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA) construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21-24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA). By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species. PMID:27187354

  1. Splice form variant and amino acid changes in MDR49 confers DDT resistance in transgenic Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Keon Mook; Sun, Weilin; Clark, John M.; Pittendrigh, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters represent a superfamily of proteins that have important physiological roles in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In insects, ABC transporters have previously been implicated in insecticide resistance. The 91-R strain of Drosophila melanogaster has been intensely selected with DDT over six decades. A recent selective sweeps analysis of 91-R implicated the potential role of MDR49, an ABC transporter, in DDT resistance, however, to date the details of how MDR49 may play a role in resistance have not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the impact of structural changes and an alternative splicing event in MDR49 on DDT-resistance in 91-R, as compared to the DDT susceptible strain 91-C. We observed three amino acid differences in MDR49 when 91-R was compared with 91-C, and only one isoform (MDR49B) was implicated in DDT resistance. A transgenic Drosophila strain containing the 91-R-MDR49B isoform had a significantly higher LD50 value as compared to the 91-C-MDR49B isoform at the early time points (6 h to 12 h) during DDT exposure. Our data support the hypothesis that the MDR49B isoform, with three amino acid mutations, plays a role in the early aspects of DDT resistance in 91-R. PMID:27003579

  2. Specific Arabidopsis HSP90.2 alleles recapitulate RAR1 cochaperone function in plant NB-LRR disease resistance protein regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, David A.; He, Yijian; McNulty, Brian C.; Tornero, Pablo; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2009-01-01

    Both plants and animals require the activity of proteins containing nucleotide binding (NB) domain and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains for proper immune system function. NB-LRR proteins in plants (NLR proteins in animals) also require conserved regulation via the proteins SGT1 and cytosolic HSP90. RAR1, a protein specifically required for plant innate immunity, interacts with SGT1 and HSP90 to maintain proper NB-LRR protein steady-state levels. Here, we present the identification and characterization of specific mutations in Arabidopsis HSP90.2 that suppress all known phenotypes of rar1. These mutations are unique with respect to the many mutant alleles of HSP90 identified in all systems in that they can bypass the requirement for a cochaperone and result in the recovery of client protein accumulation and function. Additionally, these mutations separate HSP90 ATP hydrolysis from HSP90 function in client protein folding and/or accumulation. By recapitulating the activity of RAR1, these novel hsp90 alleles allow us to propose that RAR1 regulates the physical open–close cycling of a known “lid structure” that is used as a dynamic regulatory HSP90 mechanism. Thus, in rar1, lid cycling is locked into a conformation favoring NB-LRR client degradation, likely via SGT1 and the proteasome. PMID:19487680

  3. ClpP-Independent Function of ClpX Interferes with Telithromycin Resistance Conferred by Msr(A) in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Vimberg, Vladimir; Lenart, Jakub; Janata, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    The ABCF family protein Msr(A) confers high resistance to macrolides but only low resistance to ketolides in staphylococci. Mutations in conserved functional regions of ClpX as well as deletion of clpX significantly increased Msr(A)-mediated resistance to the ketolide antibiotic telithromycin. ClpX is the chaperone component of the ClpXP two-component proteolytic system. Nevertheless, no changes in resistance were observed in a clpP knockout strain expressing msr(A), demonstrating that ClpX affects Msr(A) independently of ClpP. PMID:25801573

  4. Identification of two new genes conferring resistance to Colletotrichum acutatum in Capsicum baccatum.

    PubMed

    Mahasuk, P; Taylor, P W J; Mongkolporn, O

    2009-09-01

    Resistance to anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum capsici and C. acutatum, was investigated in Capsicum baccatum PBC80 and PBC1422 and C. chinense PBC932. Mature green and ripe fruit were inoculated with 13 isolates of the two Colletotrichum species PBC80 contained the broadest spectrum of resistance to both Colletotrichum species because none of the isolates were able to infect the genotype. At both fruit maturity stages, PBC1422 was infected by only Colletotrichum acutatum. PBC932 at ripe fruit stage was infected by both C. capsici and C. acutatum, except for one isolate, 158ci, that did not infect PBC932. PBC932 at the mature green fruit stage was infected by only C. acutatum. An intraspecific cross between PBC80 and PBC1422 was developed to determine inheritance of resistance to C. acutatum. Anthracnose resistance was assessed at mature green and ripe fruit stages using 0 to 9 disease severity scores. Frequency distribution of the disease scores in the F(2) and BC(1) populations suggested a single recessive gene responsible for the resistance at mature green fruit stage and a single dominant gene for the resistance at ripe fruit stage. Linkage analysis between the two genes identified in both fruit maturity stages showed the genes to be independent. Based on phenotypic data, the two newly identified genes, co4 and Co5, from PBC80 appeared to be different loci from the co1 and co2 previously identified from PBC932 and will be valuable sources of resistance to anthracnose in chili breeding programs. PMID:19671013

  5. The second annual conference of International ovarian cancer consortium and the symposium on tumor microenvironment and therapeutic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Isidoro, Ciro; Song, Yong Sang; Surh, Young-Joon; Dhanasekaran, Danny N.

    2016-01-01

    The second Annual Meeting of the International Ovarian Cancer Consortium (IOCC) was held in conjunction with the Symposium on Tumor Microenvironment and Therapeutic Resistance at the Stephenson Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and USA. A brief welcoming event along with the banquet on Aug 16th was followed by the eight thematic scientific sessions from August 16 to 18, 2015. Forty-three lectures, organized in eight sessions, were discussed in front of an audience of more than hundred attendees. Emphasis was put on oncogene signaling in cancer genesis and progression, new approaches in Precision Medicine and therapy of ovarian cancer, the role of tumor microenvironment in carcinogenesis, and preventive/curative potential of natural products. In this meeting-report, we highlight the findings and the perspectives in cancer biology and therapeutic strategies that emerged during the conference.

  6. An Empirical Test of the F2 Screen for Detection of Bacillus thuringiensis-Resistance Alleles in Tobacco Budworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insects exposed to genetically-modified crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins are under intense selection pressure that could result in widespread Bt resistance. Screening for early indications of Bt resistance developing in targeted Lepidoptera is conducted in many of the regions wher...

  7. Genetic mapping of two genes conferring resistance to powdery mildew in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vega, Elena; Trabanco, Noemí; Campa, Ana; Ferreira, Juan José

    2013-06-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a serious disease in many legume species, including the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). This study investigated the genetic control behind resistance reaction to PM in the bean genotype, Cornell 49242. The results revealed evidence supporting a qualitative mode of inheritance for resistance and the involvement of two independent genes in the resistance reaction. The location of these resistance genes was investigated in a linkage genetic map developed for the XC RIL population. Contingency tests revealed significant associations for 28 loci out of a total of 329 mapped loci. Fifteen were isolated or formed groups with less than two loci. The thirteen remaining loci were located at three regions in linkage groups Pv04, Pv09, and Pv11. The involvement of Pv09 was discarded due to the observed segregation in the subpopulation obtained from the Xana genotype for the loci located in this region. In contrast, the two subpopulations obtained from the Xana genotype for the BM161 locus, linked to the Co-3/9 anthracnose resistance gene (Pv04), and from the Xana genotype for the SCAReoli locus, linked to the Co-2 anthracnose resistance gene (Pv11), exhibited monogenic segregations, suggesting that both regions were involved in the genetic control of resistance. A genetic dissection was carried out to verify the involvement of both regions in the reaction to PM. Two resistant recombinant lines were selected, according to their genotypes, for the block of loci included in the Co-2 and Co-3/9 regions, and they were crossed with the susceptible parent, Xana. Linkage analysis in the respective F2 populations supported the hypothesis that a dominant gene (Pm1) was located in the linkage group Pv11 and another gene (Pm2) was located in the linkage group Pv04. This is the first report showing the localization of resistance genes against powdery mildew in Phaseolus vulgaris and the results offer the opportunity to increase the efficiency of breeding

  8. Identification of QTLs Conferring Resistance to Deltamethrin in Culex pipiens pallens

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Daibin; Shen, Bo; Zhang, Donghui; Guo, Qin; Wang, Weijie; Yu, Jing; Lv, Yuan; Lei, Zhentao; Ma, Kai; Ma, Lei; Zhu, Changliang; Yan, Guiyun

    2015-01-01

    Culex pipiens pallens is the most abundant Culex mosquito species in northern China and is an important vector of bancroftian filariasis and West Nile virus. Deltamethrin is an insecticide that is widely used for mosquito control, however resistance to this and other insecticides has become a major challenge in the control of vector-borne diseases that appear to be inherited quantitatively. Furthermore, the genetic basis of insecticide resistance remains poorly understood. In this study, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of resistance to deltamethrin was conducted in F2 intercross segregation populations using bulked segregation analysis (BSA) and amplified fragment length polymorphism markers (AFLP) in Culex pipiens pallens. A genetic linkage map covering 381 cM was constructed and a total of seven QTL responsible for resistance to deltamethrin were detected by composite interval mapping (CIM), which explained 95% of the phenotypic variance. The major QTL in linkage group 2 accounted for 62% of the variance and is worthy of further study. 12 AFLP markers in the map were cloned and the genomic locations of these marker sequences were determined by applying the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) tool to the genome sequence of the closely related Culex quinquefasciatus. Our results suggest that resistance to deltamethrin is a quantitative trait under the control of a major QTL in Culex pipiens pallens. Cloning of related AFLP markers confirm the potential utility for anchoring the genetic map to the physical map. The results provide insight into the genetic architecture of the trait. PMID:26484540

  9. Transgenic banana expressing Pflp gene confers enhanced resistance to Xanthomonas wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Namukwaya, B; Tripathi, L; Tripathi, J N; Arinaitwe, G; Mukasa, S B; Tushemereirwe, W K

    2012-08-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum, is one of the most important diseases of banana (Musa sp.) and currently considered as the biggest threat to banana production in Great Lakes region of East and Central Africa. The pathogen is highly contagious and its spread has endangered the livelihood of millions of farmers who rely on banana for food and income. The development of disease resistant banana cultivars remains a high priority since farmers are reluctant to employ labor-intensive disease control measures and there is no host plant resistance among banana cultivars. In this study, we demonstrate that BXW can be efficiently controlled using transgenic technology. Transgenic bananas expressing the plant ferredoxin-like protein (Pflp) gene under the regulation of the constitutive CaMV35S promoter were generated using embryogenic cell suspensions of banana. These transgenic lines were characterized by molecular analysis. After challenge with X. campestris pv. musacearum transgenic lines showed high resistance. About 67% of transgenic lines evaluated were completely resistant to BXW. These transgenic lines did not show any disease symptoms after artificial inoculation of in vitro plants under laboratory conditions as well as potted plants in the screen-house, whereas non-transgenic control plants showed severe symptoms resulting in complete wilting. This study confirms that expression of the Pflp gene in banana results in enhanced resistance to BXW. This transgenic technology can provide a timely solution to the BXW pandemic. PMID:22101927

  10. MEK Inhibition Overcomes Cisplatin Resistance Conferred by SOS/MAPK Pathway Activation in Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Li Ren; Chua, Kian Ngiap; Sim, Wen Jing; Ng, Hsien Chun; Bi, Chonglei; Ho, Jingshan; Nga, Min En; Pang, Yin Huei; Ong, Weijie Richard; Soo, Ross Andrew; Huynh, Hung; Chng, Wee Joo; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Goh, Boon Cher

    2015-07-01

    Genomic analyses of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) have yet to yield significant strategies against pathway activation to improve treatment. Platinum-based chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for SCC of different histotypes either as a single-agent or alongside other chemotherapeutic drugs or radiotherapy; however, resistance inevitably emerges, which limits the duration of treatment response. To elucidate mechanisms that mediate resistance to cisplatin, we compared drug-induced perturbations to gene and protein expression between cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant SCC cells, and identified MAPK-ERK pathway upregulation and activation in drug-resistant cells. ERK-induced resistance appeared to be activated by Son of Sevenless (SOS) upstream, and mediated through Bim degradation downstream. Clinically, elevated p-ERK expression was associated with shorter disease-free survival in patients with locally advanced head and neck SCC treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Inhibition of MEK/ERK, but not that of EGFR or RAF, augmented cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and demonstrated efficacy and tolerability in vivo. Collectively, these findings suggest that inhibition of the activated SOS-MAPK-ERK pathway may augment patient responses to cisplatin treatment. PMID:25939760

  11. Acid ceramidase upregulation in prostate cancer cells confers resistance to radiation: AC inhibition, a potential radiosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Mahdy, Ayman E M; Cheng, Joseph C; Li, Jun; Elojeimy, Saeed; Meacham, William D; Turner, Lorianne S; Bai, Aiping; Gault, Christopher R; McPherson, Alex S; Garcia, Nicole; Beckham, Thomas H; Saad, Antonio; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Hannun, Yusuf A; Keane, Thomas E; Taha, Mohhammed I; Hammouda, Hisham M; Norris, James S; Liu, Xiang

    2009-03-01

    Radiation resistance in a subset of prostate tumors remains a challenge to prostate cancer radiotherapy. The current study on the effects of radiation on prostate cancer cells reveals that radiation programs an unpredicted resistance mechanism by upregulating acid ceramidase (AC). Irradiated cells demonstrated limited changes of ceramide levels while elevating levels of sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate. By genetically downregulating AC with small interfering RNA (siRNA), we observed radiosensitization of cells using clonogenic and cytotoxicity assays. Conversely, AC overexpression further decreased sensitivity to radiation. We also observed that radiation-induced AC upregulation was sufficient to create cross-resistance to chemotherapy as demonstrated by decreased sensitivity to Taxol and C(6) ceramide compared to controls. Lower levels of caspase 3/7 activity were detected in cells pretreated with radiation, also indicating increased resistance. Finally, utilization of the small molecule AC inhibitor, LCL385, sensitized PPC-1 cells to radiation and significantly decreased tumor xenograft growth. These data suggest a new mechanism of cancer cell resistance to radiation, through upregulation of AC that is, in part, mediated by application of the therapy itself. An improved understanding of radiotherapy and the application of combination therapy achieved in this study offer new opportunities for the modulation of radiation effects in the treatment of cancer. PMID:19107118

  12. Autocrine production of interleukin-8 confers cisplatin and paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Qu, Ye; Niu, Xiu Long; Sun, Wei Jia; Zhang, Xiao Lei; Li, Ling Zhi

    2011-11-01

    It has been widely reported that interleukin-8 (IL-8) is overexpressed in ovarian cyst fluid, ascites, serum, and tumor tissue from ovarian cancer (OVCA) patients, and elevated IL-8 expression correlates with a poor final outcome and chemosensitivity. However, the role of IL-8 expression in the acquisition of the chemoresistance phenotype and the underlining mechanisms of drug resistance in OVCA cells are not yet fully understood. Here we show that both exogenous (a relatively short period of treatment with recombination IL-8) and endogenous IL-8 (by transfecting with plasmid encoding for sense IL-8) induce cisplatin and paclitaxel resistance in non-IL-8-expressing A2780 cells, while deleting of endogenous IL-8 expression in IL-8-overexpressing SKOV-3 cells (by transfecting with plasmid encoding for antisense IL-8) promotes the sensitivity of these cells to anticancer drugs. IL-8-mediated resistance of OVCA cells exhibits decreased proteolytic activation of caspase-3. Meanwhile, the further study demonstrates that the chemoresistance caused by IL-8 is associated with increased expression of both multidrug resistance-related genes (MDR1) and apoptosis inhibitory proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and XIAP), as well as activation of PI3K/Akt and Ras/MEK/ERK signaling. Therefore, modulation of IL-8 expression or its related signaling pathway may be a promising strategy of treatment for drug-resistant OVCA. PMID:21742513

  13. A common Greenlandic TBC1D4 variant confers muscle insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Moltke, Ida; Grarup, Niels; Jørgensen, Marit E; Bjerregaard, Peter; Treebak, Jonas T; Fumagalli, Matteo; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S; Andersen, Marianne A; Nielsen, Thomas S; Krarup, Nikolaj T; Gjesing, Anette P; Zierath, Juleen R; Linneberg, Allan; Wu, Xueli; Sun, Guangqing; Jin, Xin; Al-Aama, Jumana; Wang, Jun; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Pedersen, Oluf; Nielsen, Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Anders; Hansen, Torben

    2014-08-14

    The Greenlandic population, a small and historically isolated founder population comprising about 57,000 inhabitants, has experienced a dramatic increase in type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence during the past 25 years. Motivated by this, we performed association mapping of T2D-related quantitative traits in up to 2,575 Greenlandic individuals without known diabetes. Using array-based genotyping and exome sequencing, we discovered a nonsense p.Arg684Ter variant (in which arginine is replaced by a termination codon) in the gene TBC1D4 with an allele frequency of 17%. Here we show that homozygous carriers of this variant have markedly higher concentrations of plasma glucose (β = 3.8 mmol l(-1), P = 2.5 × 10(-35)) and serum insulin (β = 165 pmol l(-1), P = 1.5 × 10(-20)) 2 hours after an oral glucose load compared with individuals with other genotypes (both non-carriers and heterozygous carriers). Furthermore, homozygous carriers have marginally lower concentrations of fasting plasma glucose (β = -0.18 mmol l(-1), P = 1.1 × 10(-6)) and fasting serum insulin (β = -8.3 pmol l(-1), P = 0.0014), and their T2D risk is markedly increased (odds ratio (OR) = 10.3, P = 1.6 × 10(-24)). Heterozygous carriers have a moderately higher plasma glucose concentration 2 hours after an oral glucose load than non-carriers (β = 0.43 mmol l(-1), P = 5.3 × 10(-5)). Analyses of skeletal muscle biopsies showed lower messenger RNA and protein levels of the long isoform of TBC1D4, and lower muscle protein levels of the glucose transporter GLUT4, with increasing number of p.Arg684Ter alleles. These findings are concomitant with a severely decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle, leading to postprandial hyperglycaemia, impaired glucose tolerance and T2D. The observed effect sizes are several times larger than any previous findings in large-scale genome-wide association studies of these traits and constitute further proof of the value of

  14. Structural Analysis of Base Substitutions in Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA Conferring Streptomycin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Hasan; Murphy, Frank V.; Murphy, Eileen L.; Connetti, Jacqueline L.; Dahlberg, Albert E.; Jogl, Gerwald

    2014-01-01

    Streptomycin is a bactericidal antibiotic that induces translational errors. It binds to the 30S ribosomal subunit, interacting with ribosomal protein S12 and with 16S rRNA through contacts with the phosphodiester backbone. To explore the structural basis for streptomycin resistance, we determined the X-ray crystal structures of 30S ribosomal subunits from six streptomycin-resistant mutants of Thermus thermophilus both in the apo form and in complex with streptomycin. Base substitutions at highly conserved residues in the central pseudoknot of 16S rRNA produce novel hydrogen-bonding and base-stacking interactions. These rearrangements in secondary structure produce only minor adjustments in the three-dimensional fold of the pseudoknot. These results illustrate how antibiotic resistance can occur as a result of small changes in binding site conformation. PMID:24820088

  15. Identification of loci in Arabidopsis that confer resistance to geminivirus infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Stenger, D C; Bisaro, D M; Davis, K R

    1994-10-01

    The infection of susceptible plant hosts by single-stranded DNA viruses in the geminivirus group depends on the interaction of host and viral factors for the replication of viral DNA, the expression of viral genes, and the movement of virus throughout the plant. This paper reports that two strains of the geminivirus, beet curly top virus (BCTV) differ in their ability to infect certain ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana. Symptoms appeared on susceptible plants approximately 2-3 weeks after inoculation with BCTV-Logan and after 10-15 days with BCTV-CFH. Symptoms were more severe in BCTV-CFH-infected plants and included leaf curling, the formation of stunted, deformed inflorescence structures and the accumulation of anthocyanin pigments in symptomatic tissues. Analysis of viral DNA accumulation indicated that symptom development and severity were correlated with the amount of viral DNA present in the plants. Viral DNA was undetectable in two ecotypes that were phenotypically resistant to BCTV-Logan. Studies of viral DNA replication in excised inflorescence pieces demonstrated that BCTV-Logan could replicate in tissues from these resistant ecotypes, suggesting that resistance was due to a block in viral movement. Genetic studies of these two ecotypes indicate that resistance is due to a single, recessive locus. This is the first example of a single resistance locus to any geminivirus. The identification of resistant and susceptible interactions between different BCTV strains and A. thaliana ecotypes provides an excellent model system for the genetic and molecular analysis of the interaction of a plant host with this important group of plant pathogens. PMID:7987411

  16. Transcription factor StWRKY1 regulates phenylpropanoid metabolites conferring late blight resistance in potato

    PubMed Central

    Yogendra, Kalenahalli N.; Kumar, Arun; Sarkar, Kobir; Li, Yunliang; Pushpa, Doddaraju; Mosa, Kareem A.; Duggavathi, Raj; Kushalappa, Ajjamada C.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative resistance is polygenically controlled and durable, but the underlying molecular and biochemical mechanisms are poorly understood. Secondary cell wall thickening is a critical process in quantitative resistance, regulated by transcriptional networks. This paper provides compelling evidence on the functionality of StWRKY1 transcription factor, in a compatible interaction of potato–Phytophthora infestans, to extend our knowledge on the regulation of the metabolic pathway genes leading to strengthening the secondary cell wall. A metabolomics approach was used to identify resistance-related metabolites belonging to the phenylpropanoid pathway and their biosynthetic genes regulated by StWRKY1. The StWRKY1 gene in resistant potato was silenced to decipher its role in the regulation of phenylpropanoid pathway genes to strengthen the secondary cell wall. Sequencing of the promoter region of StWRKY1 in susceptible genotypes revealed the absence of heat shock elements (HSEs). Simultaneous induction of both the heat shock protein (sHSP17.8) and StWRKY1 following pathogen invasion enables functioning of the latter to interact with the HSE present in the resistant StWRKY1 promoter region. EMSA and luciferase transient expression assays further revealed direct binding of StWRKY1 to promoters of hydroxycinnamic acid amide (HCAA) biosynthetic genes encoding 4-coumarate:CoA ligase and tyramine hydroxycinnamoyl transferase. Silencing of the StWRKY1 gene was associated with signs of reduced late blight resistance by significantly increasing the pathogen biomass and decreasing the abundance of HCAAs. This study provides convincing evidence on the role of StWRKY1 in the regulation of downstream genes to biosynthesize HCAAs, which are deposited to reinforce secondary cell walls. PMID:26417019

  17. Overexpression of inhA, but not kasA, confers resistance to isoniazid and ethionamide in Mycobacterium smegmatis, M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Michelle H; Vilchèze, Catherine; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S; Parsons, Linda; Salfinger, Max; Heifets, Leonid; Hazbon, Manzour H; Alland, David; Sacchettini, James C; Jacobs, William R

    2002-10-01

    The inhA and kasA genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have each been proposed to encode the primary target of the antibiotic isoniazid (INH). Previous studies investigating whether overexpressed inhA or kasA could confer resistance to INH yielded disparate results. In this work, multicopy plasmids expressing either inhA or kasA genes were transformed into M. smegmatis, M. bovis BCG and three different M. tuberculosis strains. The resulting transformants, as well as previously published M. tuberculosis strains with multicopy inhA or kasAB plasmids, were tested for their resistance to INH, ethionamide (ETH) or thiolactomycin (TLM). Mycobacteria containing inhA plasmids uniformly exhibited 20-fold or greater increased resistance to INH and 10-fold or greater increased resistance to ETH. In contrast, the kasA plasmid conferred no increased resistance to INH or ETH in any of the five strains, but it did confer resistance to thiolactomycin, a known KasA inhibitor. INH is known to increase the expression of kasA in INH-susceptible M. tuberculosis strains. Using molecular beacons, quantified inhA and kasA mRNA levels showed that increased inhA mRNA levels corre--lated with INH resistance, whereas kasA mRNA levels did not. In summary, analysis of strains harbouring inhA or kasA plasmids yielded the same conclusion: overexpressed inhA, but not kasA, confers INH and ETH resistance to M. smegmatis, M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis. Therefore, InhA is the primary target of action of INH and ETH in all three species. PMID:12406221

  18. A mutation in reverse transcriptase of bis(heteroaryl)piperazine-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 that confers increased sensitivity to other nonnucleoside inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Dueweke, T J; Pushkarskaya, T; Poppe, S M; Swaney, S M; Zhao, J Q; Chen, I S; Stevenson, M; Tarpley, W G

    1993-01-01

    Several nonnucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) have been described, including Nevirapine, thiobenzimidazolone (TIBO) derivatives, pyridinone derivatives such as L-697,661, and the bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs). HIV-1 resistant to L-697,661 or Nevirapine emerges rapidly in infected patients treated with these drugs, and the resistance is caused primarily by substitutions at amino acids 181 and 103 of RT that also confer cross resistance to the other nonnucleoside inhibitors. We describe derivation and characterization of two BHAP-resistant HIV-1 variants that differ from this pattern of cross resistance. With both variants, HIV-1 resistance to BHAP RT inhibitors was caused by a RT mutation that results in a proline-to-leucine substitution at amino acid 236 (P236L). Rather than conferring cross resistance to other RT inhibitors, this substitution sensitized RT 7- to 10-fold to Nevirapine, TIBO R82913, and L-697,661 without influencing sensitivity to nucleoside analogue RT inhibitors. This sensitization caused by P236L was also observed in cell culture with BHAP-resistant HIV-1. The effects of the P236L RT substitution suggest that emergence of BHAP-resistant virus in vivo could produce a viral population sensitized to inhibition by these other nonnucleoside RT inhibitors. PMID:7685109

  19. CspA-Mediated Binding of Human Factor H Inhibits Complement Deposition and Confers Serum Resistance in Borrelia burgdorferi▿

    PubMed Central

    Kenedy, Melisha R.; Vuppala, Santosh R.; Siegel, Corinna; Kraiczy, Peter; Akins, Darrin R.

    2009-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi has developed efficient mechanisms for evading the innate immune response during mammalian infection and has been shown to be resistant to the complement-mediated bactericidal activity of human serum. It is well recognized that B. burgdorferi expresses multiple lipoproteins on its surface that bind the human complement inhibitors factor H and factor H-like protein 1 (FH/FHL-1). The binding of FH/FHL-1 on the surface of B. burgdorferi is thought to enhance its ability to evade serum-mediated killing during the acute phase of infection. One of the key B. burgdorferi FH/FHL-1 binding proteins identified thus far was designated CspA. While it is known that CspA binds FH/FHL-1, it is unclear how the interaction between CspA and FH/FHL-1 specifically enhances serum resistance. To better understand how CspA mediates serum resistance in B. burgdorferi, we inactivated cspA in a virulent strain of B. burgdorferi. An affinity ligand blot immunoassay and indirect immunofluorescence revealed that the CspA mutant does not efficiently bind human FH to its surface. Consistent with the lack of FH binding, the CspA mutant was also highly sensitive to killing by human serum. Additionally, the deposition of complement components C3, C6, and C5b-9 was enhanced on the surface of the CspA mutant compared to that of the wild-type strain. The combined data lead us to conclude that the CspA-mediated binding of human FH confers serum resistance by directly inhibiting complement deposition on the surface of B. burgdorferi. PMID:19451251

  20. Comparison of 454 Ultra-Deep Sequencing and Allele-Specific Real-Time PCR with Regard to the Detection of Emerging Drug-Resistant Minor HIV-1 Variants after Antiretroviral Prophylaxis for Vertical Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Andrea; Kuecherer, Claudia; Kunz, Andrea; Dabrowski, Piotr Wojtek; Radonić, Aleksandar; Nitsche, Andreas; Theuring, Stefanie; Bannert, Norbert; Sewangi, Julius; Mbezi, Paulina; Dugange, Festo; Harms, Gundel; Meixenberger, Karolin

    2015-01-01

    Background Pregnant HIV-infected women were screened for the development of HIV-1 drug resistance after implementation of a triple-antiretroviral transmission prophylaxis as recommended by the WHO in 2006. The study offered the opportunity to compare amplicon-based 454 ultra-deep sequencing (UDS) and allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR) for the detection of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Methods Plasma samples from 34 Tanzanian women were previously analysed by ASPCR for key resistance mutations in the viral RT selected by AZT, 3TC, and NVP (K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, T215Y/F). In this study, the RT region of the same samples was investigated by amplicon-based UDS for resistance mutations using the 454 GS FLX System. Results Drug-resistant HIV-variants were identified in 69% (20/29) of women by UDS and in 45% (13/29) by ASPCR. The absolute number of resistance mutations identified by UDS was twice that identified by ASPCR (45 vs 24). By UDS 14 of 24 ASPCR-detected resistance mutations were identified at the same position. The overall concordance between UDS and ASPCR was 61.0% (25/41). The proportions of variants quantified by UDS were approximately 2–3 times lower than by ASPCR. Amplicon generation from samples with viral loads below 20,000 copies/ml failed more frequently by UDS compared to ASPCR (limit of detection = 650 copies/ml), resulting in missing or insufficient sequence coverage. Conclusions Both methods can provide useful information about drug-resistant minor HIV-1 variants. ASPCR has a higher sensitivity than UDS, but is restricted to single resistance mutations. In contrast, UDS is limited by its requirement for high viral loads to achieve sufficient sequence coverage, but the sequence information reveals the complete resistance patterns within the genomic region analysed. Improvements to the UDS limit of detection are in progress, and UDS could then facilitate monitoring of drug-resistant minor variants in

  1. A kinase-START gene confers temperature-dependent resistance to wheat stripe rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stripe rust is a devastating fungal disease that afflicts wheat in many regions of the world. New races of Puccinia striiformis, the pathogen responsible for this disease, are virulent on most of the known race-specific resistance genes. We report here the map-based cloning of the gene Yr36 (WKS1), ...

  2. Identification of quantitative trait loci conferring blast resistance in Bodao, a japonica rice landrace.

    PubMed

    Huan, J; Bao, Y M; Wu, Y Y; Zeng, G Y; He, W W; Dang, L L; Wang, J F; Zhang, H S

    2014-01-01

    Bodao, a japonica landrace from the Taihu Lake region of China, is highly resistant to most Chinese isolates of Magnaporthe oryzea, a form of rice blast. To effectively dissect the influence of genetics on this blast resistance, a population of 155 recombinant inbred lines (F2:8) derived from a cross of Bodao x Suyunuo was inoculated with 12 blast isolates. Using a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping approach, 13 QTL on chromosomes 1, 2, 9, 11, and 12 were detected from Bodao. Five QTL, including qtl11-1-1, qtl11-3-7, qtl11-4-9, qtl12-1-1, and qtl12-2-3, have not been previously reported. The qtl11-3-7 and qtl11-4-9 may be the two main effective QTL and resistant to 7 and 9 isolates, respectively. The results of the present study will be valuable for the fine mapping and cloning of these two new resistance genes. PMID:25501185

  3. Identification of genes conferring genetic resistance to Marek’s disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic resistance to Marek’s disease (MD) is complex and controlled by many genes with the majority having small effect making them difficult to detect. Thus, to identify specific genes, we have been employing and integrating a variety of genomic and functional genomic approaches that capitalize on...

  4. The efficiency of RNA interference for conferring stable resistance to Plum Pox Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plum transformed with an intron hairpin RNA CP (ihRNA-CP) were resistant to PPV infection through the specific process of RNA silencing involving both small interfering -RNA interfering (siRNA) and a methylated virus transgene. This recognition process specifically targeted the triggered PPV genome...

  5. Overexpression of a soybean salicylic acid methlyltransferase gene confers resistance to soybean cyst nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines Ichinohe, SCN) is the most pervasive pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in the USA and worldwide. SCN reduced soybean yields worldwide by an estimated billion dollars annually. These losses remained stable with the use of resistant cultivars but over ...

  6. Tolerance to powdery mildew conferred in susceptible watermelon scion by grafting on resistant rootstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucurbit powdery mildew (PM) caused by Podosphaera xanthii, can impact seedling growth and cause serious losses in greenhouse and open field production. We have developed several watermelon and bottle gourd germplasm lines with high levels of resistance to PM. A PM susceptible cultivar Mickey Lee ...

  7. Potentially Deceptive Health Nutrition-Related Advertising Claims: The Role of Inoculation in Conferring Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Alicia M.; Miller, Claude H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to examine the efficacy of inoculation message treatments to facilitate resistance to health nutrition-related (HNR) commercial food advertising claims. Design: Data were collected across three phases extending across a 5-week period conducted over two semesters at a Midwest US university. A 2 × 3 between-subjects…

  8. Novel plasmid conferring kanamycin and tetracycline resistance in turkey-derived Campylobacter jejuni strain 11601MD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Campylobacter spp., resistance to the antibiotics kanamycin and tetracycline is frequently associated with plasmid-borne genes. However, relatively few plasmids of Campylobacter jejuni have been fully characterized to date. A novel plasmid (p11601MD; 44,095 bp.) harboring tet(O) was identified in...

  9. Chicks and single-nucleotide polymorphisms: an entree into identifying genes conferring disease resistance in chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease (MD) is one of the most serious chronic infectious disease threats to the U.S. poultry industry. Selecting for increased genetic resistance to MD is a control strategy that can augment current vaccinal control measures. Although our previous efforts integrating various genomic scre...

  10. mTOR target NDRG1 confers MGMT-dependent resistance to alkylating chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Markus; Blaes, Jonas; Pusch, Stefan; Sahm, Felix; Czabanka, Marcus; Luger, Sebastian; Bunse, Lukas; Solecki, Gergely; Eichwald, Viktoria; Jugold, Manfred; Hodecker, Sibylle; Osswald, Matthias; Meisner, Christoph; Hielscher, Thomas; Rübmann, Petra; Pfenning, Philipp-Niklas; Ronellenfitsch, Michael; Kempf, Tore; Schnölzer, Martina; Abdollahi, Amir; Lang, Florian; Bendszus, Martin; von Deimling, Andreas; Winkler, Frank; Weller, Michael; Vajkoczy, Peter; Platten, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    A hypoxic microenvironment induces resistance to alkylating agents by activating targets in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The molecular mechanisms involved in this mTOR-mediated hypoxia-induced chemoresistance, however, are unclear. Here we identify the mTOR target N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) as a key determinant of resistance toward alkylating chemotherapy, driven by hypoxia but also by therapeutic measures such as irradiation, corticosteroids, and chronic exposure to alkylating agents via distinct molecular routes involving hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha, p53, and the mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2)/serum glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 1 (SGK1) pathway. Resistance toward alkylating chemotherapy but not radiotherapy was dependent on NDRG1 expression and activity. In posttreatment tumor tissue of patients with malignant gliomas, NDRG1 was induced and predictive of poor response to alkylating chemotherapy. On a molecular level, NDRG1 bound and stabilized methyltransferases, chiefly O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a key enzyme for resistance to alkylating agents in glioblastoma patients. In patients with glioblastoma, MGMT promoter methylation in tumor tissue was not more predictive for response to alkylating chemotherapy in patients who received concomitant corticosteroids. PMID:24367102

  11. Identification of wheat gene Sr35 that confers resistance to Ug99 stem rust race group

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) is a devastating disease that can cause severe yield losses. A new Pgt race designated Ug99 has overcome most of the widely used resistance genes and is spreading through Africa and Asia threatening major wheat production areas. We re...

  12. Expression of siRNA Conferring Resistance to PVY in Transgenic Potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus resistance by expression of viral coat protein (CP) is well documented. The mechanism of virus suppression by small RNAs (sRNA) has only recently been described. Next generation sequencing provides large data sets to analyze sRNAs resulting from transcript degradation and to identify regulat...

  13. Fine mapping of barley locus Rps6 conferring resistance to wheat stripe rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is a major disease of wheat that is causing large economic losses in many wheat-growing regions of the world. Deployment of Pst resistance genes has been an effective strategy for controlling this pathogen, but many of these gen...

  14. Identification of QTLs conferring resistance to downy mildew in legacy cultivars of lettuce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many cultivars of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), the most popular leafy vegetable, are susceptible to downy mildew disease caused by Bremia lactucae. Cultivars Iceberg and Grand Rapids that were released in 18th and 19th century, respectively, have high levels of quantitative resistance to downy milde...

  15. 30S Subunit-Dependent Activation of the Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 Aminoglycoside Resistance-Conferring 16S rRNA Methyltransferase Kmr

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Miloje; Sunita, S.; Zelinskaya, Natalia; Desai, Pooja M.; Macmaster, Rachel; Vinal, Kellie

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of bacterial 16S rRNA within the ribosomal decoding center confers exceptionally high resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. This resistance mechanism is exploited by aminoglycoside producers for self-protection while functionally equivalent methyltransferases have been acquired by human and animal pathogenic bacteria. Here, we report structural and functional analyses of the Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 aminoglycoside resistance-conferring methyltransferase Kmr. Our results demonstrate that Kmr is a 16S rRNA methyltransferase acting at residue A1408 to confer a canonical aminoglycoside resistance spectrum in Escherichia coli. Kmr possesses a class I methyltransferase core fold but with dramatic differences in the regions which augment this structure to confer substrate specificity in functionally related enzymes. Most strikingly, the region linking core β-strands 6 and 7, which forms part of the S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) binding pocket and contributes to base flipping by the m1A1408 methyltransferase NpmA, is disordered in Kmr, correlating with an exceptionally weak affinity for SAM. Kmr is unexpectedly insensitive to substitutions of residues critical for activity of other 16S rRNA (A1408) methyltransferases and also to the effects of by-product inhibition by S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). Collectively, our results indicate that adoption of a catalytically competent Kmr conformation and binding of the obligatory cosubstrate SAM must be induced by interaction with the 30S subunit substrate. PMID:25733511

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis pncA Polymorphisms That Do Not Confer Pyrazinamide Resistance at a Breakpoint Concentration of 100 Micrograms per Milliliter in MGIT

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Michael G.; Streicher, Elizabeth M.; Sampson, Samantha L.; Sirgel, Frik A.; van Helden, Paul D.; Mercante, Alexandra; Willby, Melisa; Hughes, Kelsey; Birkness, Kris; Morlock, Glenn; van Rie, Annelies; Posey, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis pncA gene allows for pyrazinamide susceptibility testing. We summarize data on pncA polymorphisms that do not confer resistance at a susceptibility breakpoint of 100 μg/ml pyrazinamide in MGIT within a cohort of isolates from South Africa and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. PMID:26292310

  17. The Gastrodia anti-fungal protein confers increased resistance to Phytophthora root rot and the root-knot nematode in a fruit tree species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Gastrodia Anti-Fungal Protein (GAFP) is a monocot mannose-binding lectin isolated from the Asiatic orchid Gastrodia elata. This protein, among others, enables the orchid to live parasitically off the basidiomycete pathogen Armillaria mellea. GAFP has been shown to confer resistance to transgenic...

  18. Candidate gene analysis and identification of TRAP and SSR markers linked to the Or5 gene, which confers sunflower resistance to race E of broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.) is a root holoparasitic angiosperm considered as being one of the major constraints for sunflower production in Mediterranean areas. Breeding for resistance has been crucial for protecting sunflowers from broomrape damage. The Or5 gene, which confers re...

  19. Development of a novel strategy for fungal transformation based on a mutant locus conferring carboxin-resistance in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Zhu, Xiaolei; Li, Hongxia; Tan, Leyong; Pan, Yuemin

    2016-12-01

    The accurate manipulation of genomic integration of mutant alleles or fluorescent fusion-protein constructs is necessary for understanding of pathogenic mechanism of Magnaporthe oryzae. Recently, this can be achieved by integrating of exogenous DNA randomly into genome of this pathogen, but ectopic integration may result in alteration of gene expression or gene disruption due to unpredictable position effects and/or disruption of protein-coding regions. In this study, we establish a novel strategy for locus-specific integration of exogenous DNA via carboxin-resistance reconstitution by a point-mutation (H245L) on succinate dehydrogenase subunit Mosdi1. Independent transformants derived from the same reconstitution construct showed consistent fluorescent signal and undiversified phenotypes, including hyphae growth, conidiation and pathogenicity, in M. oryzae. Meanwhile, 96 % of all transformants integrate correctly into the Mosdi1 locus as a single copy. Furthermore, we provide a vector carrying yeast recombination cassette and thus allow assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments by yeast in vivo recombination for gene complementation and protein localization assay. PMID:27558019

  20. Salicylic acid confers enhanced resistance to Glomerella leaf spot in apple.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Shi, Xiangpeng; Li, Baohua; Zhang, Qingming; Liang, Wenxing; Wang, Caixia

    2016-09-01

    Glomerella leaf spot (GLS) caused by Glomerella cingulata is a newly emergent disease that results in severe defoliation and fruit spots in apple. Currently, there are no effective means to control this disease except for the traditional fungicide sprays. Induced resistance by elicitors against pathogens infection is a widely accepted eco-friendly strategy. In the present study, we investigated whether exogenous application of salicylic acid (SA) could improve resistance to GLS in a highly susceptible apple cultivar (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. 'Gala') and the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that pretreatment with SA, at 0.1-1.0 mM, induced strong resistance against GLS in 'Gala' apple leaves, with SA treated leaves showing significant reduction in lesion numbers and disease index. Concurrent with the enhanced disease resistance, SA treatment markedly increased the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and defence-related enzyme activities, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO). As expected, SA treatment also induced the expression levels of five pathogenesis-related (PR) genes including PR1, PR5, PR8, Chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase. Furthermore, the most pronounced and/or rapid increase was observed in leaves treated with SA and subsequently inoculated with G. cingulata compared to the treatment with SA or inoculation with the pathogen. Together, these results suggest that exogenous SA triggered increase in reactive oxygen species levels and the antioxidant system might be responsible for enhanced resistance against G. cingulata in 'Gala' apple leaves. PMID:27139585

  1. M233I Mutation in the β-Tubulin of Botrytis cinerea Confers Resistance to Zoxamide

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Meng; Lin, Dong; Chen, Lei; Bi, Yang; Xiao, Lu; Liu, Xi-li

    2015-01-01

    Three phenotypes were detected in 161 Botrytis cinerea field isolates, including ZoxSCarS (sensitive to zoxamide and carbendazim), ZoxSCarR (sensitive to zoxamide and resistant to carbendazim), and ZoxRCarR (resistant to zoxamide and carbendazim), but not ZoxRCarS (resistant to zoxamide and sensitive to carbendazim). The baseline sensitivity to zoxamide was determined with a mean EC50 of 0.76 μg/ml. Two stable ZoxRCarS isolates were obtained with a resistance factor of 13.28 and 20.43; there was a fitness penalty in mycelial growth rate, sporulation, virulence and sclerotium production. The results suggest that the resistance risk of B. cinerea to zoxamide is low where benzimidazoles have not been used. E198V, E198K and M233I, were detected in the β-tubulin of ZoxSCarR, ZoxRCarR, ZoxRCarS, respectively. Molecular docking indicated that position 198 in β-tubulin were targets for both zoxamide and carbendazim. The mutations at 198 prevented formation of hydrogen bonds between β-tubulin and carbendazim (E198V/K), and changed the conformation of the binding pocket of zoxamide (E198K). M233I had no effect on the binding of carbendazim but resulted in loss of a hydrogen bond between zoxamide and F200. M233 is suggested to be a unique target site for zoxamide and be very important in the function of β tubulin. PMID:26596626

  2. Environmentally co‐occurring mercury resistance plasmids are genetically and phenotypically diverse and confer variable context‐dependent fitness effects

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Ellie; Lilley, Andrew K.; Paterson, Steve; Spiers, Andrew J.; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Plasmids are important mobile elements that can facilitate genetic exchange and local adaptation within microbial communities. We compared the sequences of four co‐occurring pQBR family environmental mercury resistance plasmids and measured their effects on competitive fitness of a P seudomonas fluorescens  SBW25 host, which was isolated at the same field site. Fitness effects of carriage differed between plasmids and were strongly context dependent, varying with medium, plasmid status of competitor and levels of environmental mercury. The plasmids also varied widely in their rates of conjugation and segregational loss. We found that few of the plasmid‐borne accessory genes could be ascribed functions, although we identified a putative chemotaxis operon, a type IV pilus‐encoding cluster and a region encoding putative arylsulfatase enzymes, which were conserved across geographically distant isolates. One plasmid, pQBR55, conferred the ability to catabolize sucrose. Transposons, including the mercury resistance Tn5042, appeared to have been acquired by different pQBR plasmids by recombination, indicating an important role for horizontal gene transfer in the recent evolution of pQBR plasmids. Our findings demonstrate extensive genetic and phenotypic diversity among co‐occurring members of a plasmid community and suggest a role for environmental heterogeneity in the maintenance of plasmid diversity. PMID:25969927

  3. Epigenetic inactivation of the putative DNA/RNA helicase SLFN11 in human cancer confers resistance to platinum drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Vanesa; Reinhold, William C.; Varma, Sudhir; Martinez-Cardus, Anna; Moutinho, Catia; Moran, Sebastian; Heyn, Holger; Sebio, Ana; Barnadas, Agusti; Pommier, Yves; Esteller, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Platinum-derived drugs such as cisplatin and carboplatin are among the most commonly used cancer chemotherapy drugs, but very few specific molecular and cellular markers predicting differential sensitivity to these agents in a given tumor type have been clearly identified. Epigenetic gene silencing is increasingly being recognized as a factor conferring distinct tumoral drug sensitivity, so we have used a comprehensive DNA methylation microarray platform to interrogate the widely characterized NCI60 panel of human cancer cell lines with respect to CpG methylation status and cisplatin/carboplatin sensitivity. Using this approach, we have found promoter CpG island hypermethylation-associated silencing of the putative DNA/RNA helicase Schlafen-11 (SLFN11) to be associated with increased resistance to platinum compounds. We have also experimentally validated these findings in vitro. In this setting, we also identified the BRCA1 interacting DHX9 RNA helicase (also known as RHA) as a protein partner for SLFN11, suggesting a mechanistic pathway for the observed chemoresistance effect. Most importantly, we have been able to extend these findings clinically, following the observation that those patients with ovarian and non-small cell lung cancer carrying SLFN11 hypermethylation had a poor response to both cisplatin and carboplatin treatments. Overall, these results identify SLFN11 epigenetic inactivation as a predictor of resistance to platinum drugs in human cancer. PMID:26625211

  4. A novel mechanism of protein thermostability: a unique N-terminal domain confers heat resistance to Fe/Mn-SODs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Ting; Zhang, Baoliang; Yao, Nana; Li, Mingchang; Cui, Lianlei; Li, Guoqiang; Ma, Zhenping; Cheng, Jiansong

    2014-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs), especially thermostable SODs, are widely applied in medical treatments, cosmetics, food, agriculture, and other industries given their excellent antioxidant properties. A novel thermostable cambialistic SOD from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2 exhibits maximum activity at 70 °C and high thermostability over a broad range of temperatures (20-80 °C). Unlike other reported SODs, this enzyme contains an extra repeat-containing N-terminal domain (NTD) of 244 residues adjacent to the conserved functional SODA domain. Deletion of the NTD dramatically decreased its optimum active temperature (OAT) to 30 °C and also impaired its thermostability. Conversely, appending the NTD to a mesophilic counterpart from Bacillus subtilis led to a moderately thermophilic enzyme (OAT changed from 30 to 55 °C) with improved heat resistance. Temperature-dependant circular dichroism analysis revealed the enhanced conformational stability of SODs fused with this NTD. Furthermore, the NTD also contributes to the stress resistance of host proteins without altering their metal ion specificity or oligomerisation form except for a slight effect on their pH profile. We therefore demonstrate that the NTD confers outstanding thermostability to the host protein. To our knowledge, this is the first discovery of a peptide capable of remarkably improving protein thermostability and provides a novel strategy for bioengineering thermostable SODs. PMID:25445927

  5. Down-regulation of Bcl-2-interacting protein BAG-1 confers resistance to anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Noriko; Yanagihara, Miyako; Ogawa, Yuzi; Yamanoha, Banri; Andoh, Toshiwo

    2003-02-14

    BAG-1 was originally identified as a binding partner of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 [Takayama et al., Cell 80 (1995) 279-284]. Exogenous expression of BAG-1 was reported to confer cells resistance to several stresses [Chen et al., Oncogene 21 (2002) 7050]. We have obtained human cervical cancer HeLa cells with down-regulated BAG-1 levels by using a highly specific and efficient RNA interference approach. Surprisingly, cells with down-regulated BAG-1 exhibited significantly lower sensitivity against several anti-cancer drugs than parental cells expressing normal levels of the protein. Furthermore, growth rate of the cells was reduced when BAG-1 was down-regulated. Activity of ERK pathway appeared to be decreased in BAG-1 down-regulated cells, as shown by the reduced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 proteins. Taken together resistance against anti-cancer drugs acquired by BAG-1 down-regulated cells may well be accounted for by the retardation of cell cycle progression, implicating the importance of BAG-1 in cell growth regulation. PMID:12565851

  6. A novel mechanism of protein thermostability: a unique N-terminal domain confers heat resistance to Fe/Mn-SODs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Ting; Zhang, Baoliang; Yao, Nana; Li, Mingchang; Cui, Lianlei; Li, Guoqiang; Ma, Zhenping; Cheng, Jiansong

    2014-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs), especially thermostable SODs, are widely applied in medical treatments, cosmetics, food, agriculture, and other industries given their excellent antioxidant properties. A novel thermostable cambialistic SOD from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2 exhibits maximum activity at 70°C and high thermostability over a broad range of temperatures (20–80°C). Unlike other reported SODs, this enzyme contains an extra repeat-containing N-terminal domain (NTD) of 244 residues adjacent to the conserved functional SODA domain. Deletion of the NTD dramatically decreased its optimum active temperature (OAT) to 30°C and also impaired its thermostability. Conversely, appending the NTD to a mesophilic counterpart from Bacillus subtilis led to a moderately thermophilic enzyme (OAT changed from 30 to 55°C) with improved heat resistance. Temperature-dependant circular dichroism analysis revealed the enhanced conformational stability of SODs fused with this NTD. Furthermore, the NTD also contributes to the stress resistance of host proteins without altering their metal ion specificity or oligomerisation form except for a slight effect on their pH profile. We therefore demonstrate that the NTD confers outstanding thermostability to the host protein. To our knowledge, this is the first discovery of a peptide capable of remarkably improving protein thermostability and provides a novel strategy for bioengineering thermostable SODs. PMID:25445927

  7. A Novel I221L Substitution in Neuraminidase Confers High-Level Resistance to Oseltamivir in Influenza B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Escuret, Vanessa; Collins, Patrick J.; Casalegno, Jean-Sébastien; Vachieri, Sebastien G.; Cattle, Nicholas; Ferraris, Olivier; Sabatier, Murielle; Frobert, Emilie; Caro, Valérie; Skehel, John J.; Gamblin, Steve; Valla, Frédéric; Valette, Martine; Ottmann, Michèle; McCauley, John W.; Daniels, Rodney S.; Lina, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Influenza B viruses with a novel I221L substitution in neuraminidase (NA) conferring high-level resistance to oseltamivir were isolated from an immunocompromised patient after prolonged oseltamivir treatment. Methods. Enzymatic characterization of the NAs (Km, Ki) and the in vitro fitness of viruses carrying wild-type or mutated (I221L) NA genes were evaluated. Proportions of wild-type and mutated NA genes were directly quantified in the patient samples. Structural characterizations by X-ray crystallography of a wild-type and I221L variant NA were performed. Results. The Km and Ki revealed that the I221L variant NA had approximately 84 and 51 times lower affinity for oseltamivir carboxylate and zanamivir, respectively, compared with wild-type NA. Viruses with a wild-type or I221L variant NA had similar growth kinetics in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and 5 passages in MDCK cells revealed no reversion of the I221L substitution. The crystal structure of the I221L NA and oseltamivir complex showed that the leucine side chain protrudes into the hydrophobic pocket of the active site that accommodates the pentyloxy substituent of oseltamivir. Conclusions. Enzyme kinetic and NA structural analyses provide an explanation for the high level of resistance to oseltamivir while retaining good fitness of viruses carrying I221L variant NA. PMID:24795482

  8. Overexpression of the pathogen-inducible wheat TaWRKY45 gene confers disease resistance to multiple fungi in transgenic wheat plants.

    PubMed

    Bahrini, Insaf; Ogawa, Taiichi; Kobayashi, Fuminori; Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Handa, Hirokazu

    2011-12-01

    Recently we cloned and characterized the gene for the wheat transcription factor TaWRKY45 and showed that TaWRKY45 was upregulated in response to benzothiadiazole (BTH) and Fusarium head blight (FHB) and that its overexpression conferred enhanced resistance against F. graminearum. To characterize the functional role of TaWRKY45 in the disease resistance of wheat, in the present study we conducted expression analyses of TaWRKY45 with inoculations of powdery mildew and leaf rust and evaluated TaWRKY45-overexpressing wheat plants for resistance to these diseases. TaWRKY45 was upregulated in response to infections with Blumeria graminis, a causal fungus for powdery mildew, and Puccinia triticina, a causal fungus for leaf rust. Constitutive overexpression of the TaWRKY45 transgene conferred enhanced resistance against these two fungi on transgenic wheat plants grown under greenhouse conditions. However, the expression of two resistance-related genes, Pm3 and Lr34, was not induced by the inoculation with powdery mildew in TaWRKY45-overexpressing wheat plants. These results suggest that TaWRKY45 is involved in the defense responses for multiple fungal diseases in wheat but that resistance involving TaWRKY45 differs from at least Pm3 and/or Lr34-related resistance. Our present and previous studies indicate that TaWRKY45 may be potentially utilized to improve a wide range of disease resistance in wheat. PMID:23136468

  9. Overexpression of the pathogen-inducible wheat TaWRKY45 gene confers disease resistance to multiple fungi in transgenic wheat plants

    PubMed Central

    Bahrini, Insaf; Ogawa, Taiichi; Kobayashi, Fuminori; Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Handa, Hirokazu

    2011-01-01

    Recently we cloned and characterized the gene for the wheat transcription factor TaWRKY45 and showed that TaWRKY45 was upregulated in response to benzothiadiazole (BTH) and Fusarium head blight (FHB) and that its overexpression conferred enhanced resistance against F. graminearum. To characterize the functional role of TaWRKY45 in the disease resistance of wheat, in the present study we conducted expression analyses of TaWRKY45 with inoculations of powdery mildew and leaf rust and evaluated TaWRKY45-overexpressing wheat plants for resistance to these diseases. TaWRKY45 was upregulated in response to infections with Blumeria graminis, a causal fungus for powdery mildew, and Puccinia triticina, a causal fungus for leaf rust. Constitutive overexpression of the TaWRKY45 transgene conferred enhanced resistance against these two fungi on transgenic wheat plants grown under greenhouse conditions. However, the expression of two resistance-related genes, Pm3 and Lr34, was not induced by the inoculation with powdery mildew in TaWRKY45-overexpressing wheat plants. These results suggest that TaWRKY45 is involved in the defense responses for multiple fungal diseases in wheat but that resistance involving TaWRKY45 differs from at least Pm3 and/or Lr34-related resistance. Our present and previous studies indicate that TaWRKY45 may be potentially utilized to improve a wide range of disease resistance in wheat. PMID:23136468

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of Brassica rapa Near-Isogenic Lines Carrying Clubroot-Resistant and -Susceptible Alleles in Response to Plasmodiophora brassicae during Early Infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingjing; Pang, Wenxing; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Chunyu; Piao, Zhongyun

    2015-01-01

    Although Plasmodiophora brassicae is one of the most common pathogens worldwide, the causal agent of clubroot disease in Brassica crops, resistance mechanisms to it are still only poorly understood. To study the early defense response induced by P. brassicae infection, a global transcriptome profiling of the roots of two near-isogenic lines (NILs) of clubroot-resistant (CR BJN3-2) and clubroot-susceptible (BJN3-2) Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) was performed by RNA-seq. Among the 42,730 unique genes mapped to the reference genome of B. rapa, 1875, and 2103 genes were found to be up- and down-regulated between CR BJN3-2 and BJN3-2, respectively, at 0, 12, 72, and 96 h after inoculation (hai). Functional annotation showed that most of the differently expressed genes are involved in metabolism, transport, signal transduction, and defense. Of the genes assigned to plant-pathogen interactions, 151 showed different expression patterns between two NILs, including genes associated with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and effectors recognition, calcium ion influx, hormone signaling, pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, transcription factors, and cell wall modification. In particular, the expression level of effector receptors (resistance proteins), PR genes involved in salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway, were higher in clubroot-resistant NIL, while half of the PAMP receptors were suppressed in CR BJN3-2. This suggests that there was a more robust effector-triggered immunity (ETI) response in CR BJN3-2 and that SA signaling was important to clubroot resistance. The dataset generated by our transcriptome profiling may prove invaluable for further exploration of the different responses to P. brassicae between clubroot-resistant and clubroot-susceptible genotypes, and it will strongly contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of resistance genes of B. rapa against P. brassicae infection. PMID:26779217

  11. Transcriptome Analysis of Brassica rapa Near-Isogenic Lines Carrying Clubroot-Resistant and –Susceptible Alleles in Response to Plasmodiophora brassicae during Early Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingjing; Pang, Wenxing; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Chunyu; Piao, Zhongyun

    2016-01-01

    Although Plasmodiophora brassicae is one of the most common pathogens worldwide, the causal agent of clubroot disease in Brassica crops, resistance mechanisms to it are still only poorly understood. To study the early defense response induced by P. brassicae infection, a global transcriptome profiling of the roots of two near-isogenic lines (NILs) of clubroot-resistant (CR BJN3-2) and clubroot-susceptible (BJN3-2) Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) was performed by RNA-seq. Among the 42,730 unique genes mapped to the reference genome of B. rapa, 1875, and 2103 genes were found to be up- and down-regulated between CR BJN3-2 and BJN3-2, respectively, at 0, 12, 72, and 96 h after inoculation (hai). Functional annotation showed that most of the differently expressed genes are involved in metabolism, transport, signal transduction, and defense. Of the genes assigned to plant-pathogen interactions, 151 showed different expression patterns between two NILs, including genes associated with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and effectors recognition, calcium ion influx, hormone signaling, pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, transcription factors, and cell wall modification. In particular, the expression level of effector receptors (resistance proteins), PR genes involved in salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway, were higher in clubroot-resistant NIL, while half of the PAMP receptors were suppressed in CR BJN3-2. This suggests that there was a more robust effector-triggered immunity (ETI) response in CR BJN3-2 and that SA signaling was important to clubroot resistance. The dataset generated by our transcriptome profiling may prove invaluable for further exploration of the different responses to P. brassicae between clubroot-resistant and clubroot-susceptible genotypes, and it will strongly contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of resistance genes of B. rapa against P. brassicae infection. PMID:26779217

  12. De-Differentiation Confers Multidrug Resistance Via Noncanonical PERK-Nrf2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Del Vecchio, Catherine A.; Feng, Yuxiong; Sokol, Ethan S.; Tillman, Erik J.; Sanduja, Sandhya; Reinhardt, Ferenc; Gupta, Piyush B.

    2014-01-01

    Malignant carcinomas that recur following therapy are typically de-differentiated and multidrug resistant (MDR). De-differentiated cancer cells acquire MDR by up-regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS)–scavenging enzymes and drug efflux pumps, but how these genes are up-regulated in response to de-differentiation is not known. Here, we examine this question by using global transcriptional profiling to identify ROS-induced genes that are already up-regulated in de-differentiated cells, even in the absence of oxidative damage. Using this approach, we found that the Nrf2 transcription factor, which is the master regulator of cellular responses to oxidative stress, is preactivated in de-differentiated cells. In de-differentiated cells, Nrf2 is not activated by oxidation but rather through a noncanonical mechanism involving its phosphorylation by the ER membrane kinase PERK. In contrast, differentiated cells require oxidative damage to activate Nrf2. Constitutive PERK-Nrf2 signaling protects de-differentiated cells from chemotherapy by reducing ROS levels and increasing drug efflux. These findings are validated in therapy-resistant basal breast cancer cell lines and animal models, where inhibition of the PERK-Nrf2 signaling axis reversed the MDR of de-differentiated cancer cells. Additionally, analysis of patient tumor datasets showed that a PERK pathway signature correlates strongly with chemotherapy resistance, tumor grade, and overall survival. Collectively, these results indicate that de-differentiated cells up-regulate MDR genes via PERK-Nrf2 signaling and suggest that targeting this pathway could sensitize drug-resistant cells to chemotherapy. PMID:25203443

  13. The Ablation of Mitochondrial Protein Phosphatase Pgam5 Confers Resistance Against Metabolic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Shiori; Yao, Akari; Hattori, Kazuki; Sugawara, Sho; Naguro, Isao; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Takeda, Kohsuke; Ichijo, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5) is a mitochondrial protein phosphatase that has been reported to be involved in various stress responses from mitochondrial quality control to cell death. However, its roles in vivo are largely unknown. Here, we show that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to several metabolic insults. Under cold stress combined with fasting, Pgam5-deficient mice better maintained body temperature than wild-type mice and showed an extended survival rate. Serum triglycerides and lipid content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), a center of adaptive thermogenesis, were severely reduced in Pgam5-deficient mice. Moreover, although Pgam5 deficiency failed to maintain proper mitochondrial integrity in BAT, it reciprocally resulted in the dramatic induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) that activates various functions of BAT including thermogenesis. Thus, the enhancement of lipid metabolism and FGF21 may contribute to the cold resistance of Pgam5-deficient mice under fasting condition. Finally, we also found that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Our study uncovered that PGAM5 is involved in the whole-body metabolism in response to stresses that impose metabolic challenges on mitochondria. PMID:27077115

  14. The Ablation of Mitochondrial Protein Phosphatase Pgam5 Confers Resistance Against Metabolic Stress.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shiori; Yao, Akari; Hattori, Kazuki; Sugawara, Sho; Naguro, Isao; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Takeda, Kohsuke; Ichijo, Hidenori

    2016-03-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5) is a mitochondrial protein phosphatase that has been reported to be involved in various stress responses from mitochondrial quality control to cell death. However, its roles in vivo are largely unknown. Here, we show that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to several metabolic insults. Under cold stress combined with fasting, Pgam5-deficient mice better maintained body temperature than wild-type mice and showed an extended survival rate. Serum triglycerides and lipid content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), a center of adaptive thermogenesis, were severely reduced in Pgam5-deficient mice. Moreover, although Pgam5 deficiency failed to maintain proper mitochondrial integrity in BAT, it reciprocally resulted in the dramatic induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) that activates various functions of BAT including thermogenesis. Thus, the enhancement of lipid metabolism and FGF21 may contribute to the cold resistance of Pgam5-deficient mice under fasting condition. Finally, we also found that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Our study uncovered that PGAM5 is involved in the whole-body metabolism in response to stresses that impose metabolic challenges on mitochondria. PMID:27077115

  15. Distinction between the Cfr Methyltransferase Conferring Antibiotic Resistance and the Housekeeping RlmN Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Gemma C.; Hansen, Lykke H.; Tenson, Tanel; Rasmussen, Anette; Kirpekar, Finn

    2013-01-01

    The cfr gene encodes the Cfr methyltransferase that primarily methylates C-8 in A2503 of 23S rRNA in the peptidyl transferase region of bacterial ribosomes. The methylation provides resistance to six classes of antibiotics of clinical and veterinary importance. The rlmN gene encodes the RlmN methyltransferase that methylates C-2 in A2503 in 23S rRNA and A37 in tRNA, but RlmN does not significantly influence antibiotic resistance. The enzymes are homologous and use the same mechanism involving radical S-adenosyl methionine to methylate RNA via an intermediate involving a methylated cysteine in the enzyme and a transient cross-linking to the RNA, but they differ in which carbon atom in the adenine they methylate. Comparative sequence analysis identifies differentially conserved residues that indicate functional sequence divergence between the two classes of Cfr- and RlmN-like sequences. The differentiation between the two classes is supported by previous and new experimental evidence from antibiotic resistance, primer extensions, and mass spectrometry. Finally, evolutionary aspects of the distribution of Cfr- and RlmN-like enzymes are discussed. PMID:23752511

  16. The immune-microenvironment confers resistance to MAP kinase pathway inhibitors through macrophage-derived TNFα

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kate; Brunton, Holly; Ferguson, Jennifer; Young, Helen; Dhomen, Nathalie; Flaherty, Keith T.; Frederick, Dennie T.; Cooper, Zachary A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Marais, Richard; Wellbrock, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Recently the rationale for combining targeted therapy with immunotherapy has come to light, but our understanding of the immune response during MAPK pathway inhibitor treatment is limited. We discovered that the immune-microenvironment can act as source of resistance to MAPK pathway-targeted therapy, and moreover during treatment this source becomes reinforced. In particular, we identified macrophage-derived TNFα as a crucial melanoma-growth factor that provides resistance to MAPK pathway inhibitors through the lineage-transcription factor MITF. Most strikingly, in BRAF mutant melanomas of patients and BRafV600E-melanoma allografts MAPK pathway inhibitors increased the number of tumor-associated macrophages, and TNFα and MITF expression. Inhibiting TNFα-signaling with IκB-kinase inhibitors profoundly enhanced the efficacy of MAPK pathway inhibitors by targeting not only the melanoma cells, but also the microenvironment. In summary, we identify the immune-microenvironment as a novel source of resistance and reveal a new strategy to improve the efficacy of targeted therapy in melanoma. PMID:25256614

  17. MIMIVIRE is a defence system in mimivirus that confers resistance to virophage.

    PubMed

    Levasseur, Anthony; Bekliz, Meriem; Chabrière, Eric; Pontarotti, Pierre; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-03-10

    Since their discovery, giant viruses have revealed several unique features that challenge the conventional definition of a virus, such as their large and complex genomes, their infection by virophages and their presence of transferable short element transpovirons. Here we investigate the sensitivity of mimivirus to virophage infection in a collection of 59 viral strains and demonstrate lineage specificity in the resistance of mimivirus to Zamilon, a unique virophage that can infect lineages B and C of mimivirus but not lineage A. We hypothesized that mimiviruses harbour a defence mechanism resembling the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas system that is widely present in bacteria and archaea. We performed de novo sequencing of 45 new mimivirus strains and searched for sequences specific to Zamilon in a total of 60 mimivirus genomes. We found that lineage A strains are resistant to Zamilon and contain the insertion of a repeated Zamilon sequence within an operon, here named the 'mimivirus virophage resistance element' (MIMIVIRE). Further analyses of the surrounding sequences showed that this locus is reminiscent of a defence mechanism related to the CRISPR-Cas system. Silencing the repeated sequence and the MIMIVIRE genes restores mimivirus susceptibility to Zamilon. The MIMIVIRE proteins possess the typical functions (nuclease and helicase) involved in the degradation of foreign nucleic acids. The viral defence system, MIMIVIRE, represents a nucleic-acid-based immunity against virophage infection. PMID:26934229

  18. MUC1 extracellular domain confers resistance of epithelial cancer cells to anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Q; Piyush, T; Chen, C; Hollingsworth, M A; Hilkens, J; Rhodes, J M; Yu, L-G

    2014-01-01

    Anoikis, a special apoptotic process occurring in response to loss of cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, is a fundamental surveillance process for maintaining tissue homeostasis. Resistance to anoikis characterises cancer cells and is a pre-requisite for metastasis. This study shows that overexpression of the transmembrane mucin protein MUC1 prevents initiation of anoikis in epithelial cancer cells in response to loss of adhesion. We show that this effect is largely attributed to the elongated and heavily glycosylated extracellular domain of MUC1 that protrudes high above the cell membrane and hence prevents activation of the cell surface anoikis-initiating molecules such as integrins and death receptors by providing them a mechanically ‘homing' microenvironment. As overexpression of MUC1 is a common feature of epithelial cancers and as resistance to anoikis is a hallmark of both oncogenic epithelial–mesenchymal transition and metastasis, MUC1-mediated cell resistance to anoikis may represent one of the fundamental regulatory mechanisms in tumourigenesis and metastasis. PMID:25275599

  19. Lr68: a new gene conferring slow rusting resistance to leaf rust in wheat.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Foessel, Sybil A; Singh, Ravi P; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Rosewarne, Garry M; Periyannan, Sambasivam K; Viccars, Libby; Calvo-Salazar, Violeta; Lan, Caixia; Lagudah, Evans S

    2012-05-01

    The common wheat cultivar Parula possesses a high level of slow rusting, adult plant resistance (APR) to all three rust diseases of wheat. Previous mapping studies using an Avocet-YrA/Parula recombinant inbred line (RIL) population showed that APR to leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) in Parula is governed by at least three independent slow rusting resistance genes: Lr34 on 7DS, Lr46 on 1BL, and a previously unknown gene on 7BL. The use of field rust reaction and flanking markers identified two F(6) RILs, Arula1 and Arula2, from the above population that lacked Lr34 and Lr46 but carried the leaf rust resistance gene in 7BL, hereby designated Lr68. Arula1 and Arula2 were crossed with Apav, a highly susceptible line from the cross Avocet-YrA/Pavon 76, and 396 F(4)-derived F(5) RILs were developed for mapping Lr68. The RILs were phenotyped for leaf rust resistance for over 2 years in Ciudad Obregon, Mexico, with a mixture of P. triticina races MBJ/SP and MCJ/SP. Close genetic linkages with several DNA markers on 7BL were established using 367 RILs; Psy1-1 and gwm146 flanked Lr68 and were estimated at 0.5 and 0.6 cM, respectively. The relationship between Lr68 and the race-specific seedling resistance gene Lr14b, located in the same region and present in Parula, Arula1 and Arula2, was investigated by evaluating the RILs with Lr14b-avirulent P. triticina race TCT/QB in the greenhouse. Although Lr14b and Lr68 homozygous recombinants in repulsion were not identified in RILs, γ-irradiation-induced deletion stocks that lacked Lr68 but possessed Lr14b showed that Lr68 and Lr14b are different loci. Flanking DNA markers that are tightly linked to Lr68 in a wide array of genotypes can be utilized for selection of APR to leaf rust. PMID:22297565

  20. Mutations in Novel Lipopolysaccharide Biogenesis Genes Confer Resistance to Amoebal Grazing in Synechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed

    Simkovsky, Ryan; Effner, Emily E; Iglesias-Sánchez, Maria José; Golden, Susan S

    2016-05-01

    In natural and artificial aquatic environments, population structures and dynamics of photosynthetic microbes are heavily influenced by the grazing activity of protistan predators. Understanding the molecular factors that affect predation is critical for controlling toxic cyanobacterial blooms and maintaining cyanobacterial biomass production ponds for generating biofuels and other bioproducts. We previously demonstrated that impairment of the synthesis or transport of the O-antigen component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) enables resistance to amoebal grazing in the model predator-prey system consisting of the heterolobosean amoeba HGG1 and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongates PCC 7942 (R. S. Simkovsky et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:16678-16683, 2012,http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1214904109). In this study, we used this model system to identify additional gene products involved in the synthesis of O antigen, the ligation of O antigen to the lipid A-core conjugated molecule (including a novel ligase gene), the generation of GDP-fucose, and the incorporation of sugars into the lipid A core oligosaccharide ofS. elongatus Knockout of any of these genes enables resistance to HGG1, and of these, only disruption of the genes involved in synthesis or incorporation of GDP-fucose into the lipid A-core molecule impairs growth. Because these LPS synthesis genes are well conserved across the diverse range of cyanobacteria, they enable a broader understanding of the structure and synthesis of cyanobacterial LPS and represent mutational targets for generating resistance to amoebal grazers in novel biomass production strains. PMID:26921432

  1. A Locus at 5q33.3 Confers Resistance to Tuberculosis in Highly Susceptible Individuals.

    PubMed

    Sobota, Rafal S; Stein, Catherine M; Kodaman, Nuri; Scheinfeldt, Laura B; Maro, Isaac; Wieland-Alter, Wendy; Igo, Robert P; Magohe, Albert; Malone, LaShaunda L; Chervenak, Keith; Hall, Noemi B; Modongo, Chawangwa; Zetola, Nicola; Matee, Mecky; Joloba, Moses; Froment, Alain; Nyambo, Thomas B; Moore, Jason H; Scott, William K; Lahey, Timothy; Boom, W Henry; von Reyn, C Fordham; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Sirugo, Giorgio; Williams, Scott M

    2016-03-01

    Immunosuppression resulting from HIV infection increases the risk of progression to active tuberculosis (TB) both in individuals newly exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and in those with latent infections. We hypothesized that HIV-positive individuals who do not develop TB, despite living in areas where it is hyperendemic, provide a model of natural resistance. We performed a genome-wide association study of TB resistance by using 581 HIV-positive Ugandans and Tanzanians enrolled in prospective cohort studies of TB; 267 of these individuals developed active TB, and 314 did not. A common variant, rs4921437 at 5q33.3, was significantly associated with TB (odds ratio = 0.37, p = 2.11 × 10(-8)). This variant lies within a genomic region that includes IL12B and is embedded in an H3K27Ac histone mark. The locus also displays consistent patterns of linkage disequilibrium across African populations and has signals of strong selection in populations from equatorial Africa. Along with prior studies demonstrating that therapy with IL-12 (the cytokine encoded in part by IL12B, associated with longer survival following MTB infection in mice deficient in CD4 T cells), our results suggest that this pathway might be an excellent target for the development of new modalities for treating TB, especially for HIV-positive individuals. Our results also indicate that studying extreme disease resistance in the face of extensive exposure can increase the power to detect associations in complex infectious disease. PMID:26942285

  2. RNAi-mediated oncogene silencing confers resistance to crown gall tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Escobar, M A; Civerolo, E L; Summerfelt, K R; Dandekar, A M

    2001-11-01

    Crown gall disease, caused by the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens, results in significant economic losses in perennial crops worldwide. A. tumefaciens is one of the few organisms with a well characterized horizontal gene transfer system, possessing a suite of oncogenes that, when integrated into the plant genome, orchestrate de novo auxin and cytokinin biosynthesis to generate tumors. Specifically, the iaaM and ipt oncogenes, which show approximately 90% DNA sequence identity across studied A. tumefaciens strains, are required for tumor formation. By expressing two self-complementary RNA constructions designed to initiate RNA interference (RNAi) of iaaM and ipt, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and Lycopersicon esculentum plants that are highly resistant to crown gall disease development. In in vitro root inoculation bioassays with two biovar I strains of A. tumefaciens, transgenic Arabidopsis lines averaged 0.0-1.5% tumorigenesis, whereas wild-type controls averaged 97.5% tumorigenesis. Similarly, several transformed tomato lines that were challenged by stem inoculation with three biovar I strains, one biovar II strain, and one biovar III strain of A. tumefaciens displayed between 0.0% and 24.2% tumorigenesis, whereas controls averaged 100% tumorigenesis. This mechanism of resistance, which is based on mRNA sequence homology rather than the highly specific receptor-ligand binding interactions characteristic of traditional plant resistance genes, should be highly durable. If successful and durable under field conditions, RNAi-mediated oncogene silencing may find broad applicability in the improvement of tree crop and ornamental rootstocks. PMID:11687652

  3. Establishing a CRISPR-Cas-like immune system conferring DNA virus resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiang; Zhang, Huawei; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yanpeng; Gao, Caixia

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated proteins) is an adaptive immune system in many archaea and bacteria that cleaves foreign DNA on the basis of sequence complementarity. Here, using the geminivirus, beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV), transient assays performed in Nicotiana benthamiana demonstrate that the sgRNA-Cas9 constructs inhibit virus accumulation and introduce mutations at the target sequences. Further, transgenic Arabidopsis and N. benthamiana plants overexpressing sgRNA-Cas9 are highly resistant to virus infection. PMID:27251395

  4. Identification of yeast genes that confer resistance to chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) using chemogenomics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chitosan oligosaccharide (COS), a deacetylated derivative of chitin, is an abundant, and renewable natural polymer. COS has higher antimicrobial properties than chitosan and is presumed to act by disrupting/permeabilizing the cell membranes of bacteria, yeast and fungi. COS is relatively non-toxic to mammals. By identifying the molecular and genetic targets of COS, we hope to gain a better understanding of the antifungal mode of action of COS. Results Three different chemogenomic fitness assays, haploinsufficiency (HIP), homozygous deletion (HOP), and multicopy suppression (MSP) profiling were combined with a transcriptomic analysis to gain insight in to the mode of action and mechanisms of resistance to chitosan oligosaccharides. The fitness assays identified 39 yeast deletion strains sensitive to COS and 21 suppressors of COS sensitivity. The genes identified are involved in processes such as RNA biology (transcription, translation and regulatory mechanisms), membrane functions (e.g. signalling, transport and targeting), membrane structural components, cell division, and proteasome processes. The transcriptomes of control wild type and 5 suppressor strains overexpressing ARL1, BCK2, ERG24, MSG5, or RBA50, were analyzed in the presence and absence of COS. Some of the up-regulated transcripts in the suppressor overexpressing strains exposed to COS included genes involved in transcription, cell cycle, stress response and the Ras signal transduction pathway. Down-regulated transcripts included those encoding protein folding components and respiratory chain proteins. The COS-induced transcriptional response is distinct from previously described environmental stress responses (i.e. thermal, salt, osmotic and oxidative stress) and pre-treatment with these well characterized environmental stressors provided little or any resistance to COS. Conclusions Overexpression of the ARL1 gene, a member of the Ras superfamily that regulates membrane trafficking, provides

  5. Barley Germplasm STARS-9577B lacks a Russian Wheat Aphid Resistance Allele at a Quantitative Trait Locus Present in STARS-9301B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Russian wheat aphid (RWA, Diuraphis noxia Kurdjumov) infestations of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in the western U.S.A. have reduced yield and quality of barley since its introduction in 1986. Resistant germplasm lines have been released and used for cultivar development, including ‘STARS-9577B’, a s...

  6. Allele-Specific Expression Screening Demonstrates that Variation in Genetic Resistance to Marek’s Disease in Chicken is Mainly Controlled at the Transcriptional Level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a T cell lymphoma disease of chickens induced by the Marek’s disease virus (MDV). Selecting for increased genetic resistance to MD is a control strategy that can augment MD vaccinal protection. To identify genetic markers and gain a better biological understanding, RNA sequen...

  7. Potyviral resistance derived from cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris carrying bc-3 is associated with the homozygotic presence of a mutated eIF4E allele

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs) play a central role in potyviral infection. Accordingly, mutations in the gene encoding eIF4E have been identified as a source of recessive resistance in several plant species. In common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, four recessive genes, bc-1, bc-2, bc-3...

  8. An allele-specific SNP mutation in the eIF4E gene is associated with the Zucchini yellow mosaic virus resistance in watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is one of the most economically important potyviruses infecting cucurbit crops worldwide. Using a candidate gene approach, we cloned and sequenced an eIF4E gene in the ZYMV-resistant PI 595203 (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) and the ZYMV-susceptible watermelon c...

  9. Insect peptide metchnikowin confers on barley a selective capacity for resistance to fungal ascomycetes pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rahnamaeian, Mohammad; Langen, Gregor; Imani, Jafargholi; Khalifa, Walaa; Altincicek, Boran; von Wettstein, Diter; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The potential of metchnikowin, a 26-amino acid residue proline-rich antimicrobial peptide synthesized in the fat body of Drosophila melanogaster was explored to engineer disease resistance in barley against devastating fungal plant pathogens. The synthetic peptide caused strong in vitro growth inhibition (IC50 value ∼1 μM) of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum. Transgenic barley expressing the metchnikowin gene in its 52-amino acid pre-pro-peptide form under the control of the inducible mannopine synthase (mas) gene promoter from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens displayed enhanced resistance to powdery mildew as well as Fusarium head blight and root rot. In response to these pathogens, metchnikowin accumulated in plant apoplastic space, specifying that the insect signal peptide is functional in monocotyledons. In vitro and in vivo tests revealed that the peptide is markedly effective against fungal pathogens of the phylum Ascomycota but, clearly, less active against Basidiomycota fungi. Importantly, germination of the mutualistic basidiomycete mycorrhizal fungus Piriformospora indica was affected only at concentrations beyond 50 μM. These results suggest that antifungal peptides from insects are a valuable source for crop plant improvements and their differential activities toward different phyla of fungi denote a capacity for insect peptides to be used as selective measures on specific plant diseases. PMID:19734262

  10. Runx1 deficiency decreases ribosome biogenesis and confers stress resistance to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiongwei; Gao, Long; Teng, Li; Ge, Jingping; Oo, Zaw Min; Kumar, Ashish R.; Gilliland, D. Gary; Mason, Philip J.; Tan, Kai; Speck, Nancy A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor RUNX1 is frequently mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia. RUNX1 mutations can be early events, creating pre-leukemic stem cells that expand in the bone marrow. Here we show, counter-intuitively, that Runx1 deficient hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have a slow growth, low biosynthetic, small cell phenotype and markedly reduced ribosome biogenesis (Ribi). The reduced Ribi involved decreased levels of rRNA and many mRNAs encoding ribosome proteins. Runx1 appears to directly regulate Ribi; Runx1 is enriched on the promoters of genes encoding ribosome proteins, and binds the ribosomal DNA repeats. Runx1 deficient HSPCs have lower p53 levels, reduced apoptosis, an attenuated unfolded protein response, and accordingly are resistant to genotoxic and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The low biosynthetic activity and corresponding stress resistance provides a selective advantage to Runx1 deficient HSPCs, allowing them to expand in the bone marrow and outcompete normal HSPCs. PMID:26165925

  11. Does selection on increased cold tolerance in the adult stage confer resistance throughout development?

    PubMed

    Dierks, A; Kölzow, N; Franke, K; Fischer, K

    2012-08-01

    Artificial selection is a powerful approach to unravel constraints on genetic adaptation. Although it has been frequently used to reveal genetic trade-offs among different fitness-related traits, only a few studies have targeted genetic correlations across developmental stages. Here, we test whether selection on increased cold tolerance in the adult stage increases cold resistance throughout ontogeny in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana. We used lines selected for decreased chill-coma recovery time and corresponding controls, which had originally been set up from three levels of inbreeding (outbred control, one or two full-sib matings). Four generations after having terminated selection, a response to selection was found in 1-day-old butterflies (the age at which selection took place). Older adults showed a very similar although weaker response. Nevertheless, cold resistance did not increase in either egg, larval or pupal stage in the selection lines but was even lower compared to control lines for eggs and young larvae. These findings suggest a cost of increased adult cold tolerance, presumably reducing resource availability for offspring provisioning and thereby stress tolerance during development, which may substantially affect evolutionary trajectories. PMID:22686583

  12. Characterization of Mobile Staphylococcus equorum Plasmids Isolated from Fermented Seafood That Confer Lincomycin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Hoon; Jeong, Do-Won

    2015-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of lincomycin-resistance gene (lnuA)-containing plasmids in Staphylococcus equorum strains isolated from the high-salt-fermented seafood jeotgal were determined. These plasmids, designated pSELNU1-3, are 2638-bp long, have two polymorphic sites, and encode typical elements found in plasmids that replicate via a rolling-circle mechanism including the replication protein gene (rep), a double-stranded origin of replication, a single-stranded origin of replication, and counter-transcribed RNA sequence, as well as lnuA. Plasmid sequences exhibit over 83% identity to other Staphylococcus plasmids that harbor rep and lnuA genes. Further, three pairs of identified direct repeats may be involved in inter-plasmid recombination. One plasmid, pSELNU1, was successfully transferred to other Staphylococcus species, Enterococcus faecalis, and Tetragenococcus halophilus in vitro. Antibiotic susceptibility of the transconjugants was host-dependent, and transconjugants maintained a lincomycin resistance phenotype in the absence of selective pressure over 60 generations. PMID:26448648

  13. Characterization of Mobile Staphylococcus equorum Plasmids Isolated from Fermented Seafood That Confer Lincomycin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Hoon; Jeong, Do-Won

    2015-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of lincomycin-resistance gene (lnuA)-containing plasmids in Staphylococcus equorum strains isolated from the high-salt-fermented seafood jeotgal were determined. These plasmids, designated pSELNU1–3, are 2638-bp long, have two polymorphic sites, and encode typical elements found in plasmids that replicate via a rolling-circle mechanism including the replication protein gene (rep), a double-stranded origin of replication, a single-stranded origin of replication, and counter-transcribed RNA sequence, as well as lnuA. Plasmid sequences exhibit over 83% identity to other Staphylococcus plasmids that harbor rep and lnuA genes. Further, three pairs of identified direct repeats may be involved in inter-plasmid recombination. One plasmid, pSELNU1, was successfully transferred to other Staphylococcus species, Enterococcus faecalis, and Tetragenococcus halophilus in vitro. Antibiotic susceptibility of the transconjugants was host-dependent, and transconjugants maintained a lincomycin resistance phenotype in the absence of selective pressure over 60 generations. PMID:26448648

  14. A novel class C beta-lactamase (FOX-2) in Escherichia coli conferring resistance to cephamycins.

    PubMed Central

    Bauernfeind, A; Wagner, S; Jungwirth, R; Schneider, I; Meyer, D

    1997-01-01

    An Escherichia coli strain resistant to a broad spectrum of beta-lactams, including cephamycins, was isolated from a patient suffering from urinary tract infection. A resistance plasmid (pMVP-7) was transferred from the clinical isolate to an Escherichia coli recipient. Both strains produce a cefoxitin-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase focusing at pI 6.7. The phenotype was similar to that of a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain producing cephamycinase FOX-1, so primers were selected from the FOX-1 sequence to amplify the bla gene of the transconjugant. The PCR product obtained was sequenced. The percentage of identity of the deduced amino acid sequence with sequences of other AmpC-type beta-lactamases was 96.9% with FOX-1, 74.9% with CMY-1, and 67.7% with MOX-1. This new plasmid-mediated enzyme is most closely related to FOX-1 (11 amino acid exchanges). We therefore propose the designation FOX-2. PMID:9303413

  15. Inter- and intraspecies transfer of a Clostridium difficile conjugative transposon conferring resistance to MLSB.

    PubMed

    Wasels, François; Monot, Marc; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Dupuy, Bruno; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2014-12-01

    Resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B group of antibiotics in Clostridium difficile is generally due to erm(B) genes. Tn6194, a conjugative transposon initially detected in PCR-ribotype 027 isolates, is an erm(B)-containing element also detected in other relevant C. difficile PCR-ribotypes. In this study, the genome of a C. difficile PCR-ribotype 001 strain was sequenced, and an element with two nucleotidic changes compared to Tn6194 was detected. This element was transferred by filter mating assays to recipient strains of C. difficile belonging to PCR-ribotype 009 and 027 and to a recipient strain of Enterococcus faecalis. Transconjugants were characterized by Southern blotting and genome sequencing, and integration sites in all transconjugants were identified. The element integrated the genome of C. difficile at different sites and the genome of E. faecalis at a unique site. This study is the first molecular characterization of an erm(B)-containing conjugative transposon in C. difficile and provides additional evidence of the antibiotic resistance transmission risk among pathogenic bacteria occupying the same human intestinal niche. PMID:25055190

  16. Cnr2 Deficiency Confers Resistance to Inflammation-Induced Preterm Birth in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofei; Cappelletti, Monica; Li, Yingju; Karp, Christopher L.; Divanovic, Senad

    2014-01-01

    Infection-induced inflammation, frequently associated with increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, is considered a significant contributor to preterm birth. A G protein-coupled cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), encoded by Cnr2, is expressed in various immune cells and was shown to modulate immune responses. We show here that Cnr2, but not Cnr1, deficient mice are resistant to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-driven preterm birth and suppression of serum progesterone levels. After LPS challenge, Cnr2−/− mice exhibited increased serum levels of IL-10 with decreased IL-6 levels. These changes were associated with reduced LPS-induced Ptgs2 expression at the maternal-conceptus interface on day 16 of pregnancy. LPS stimulation of Cnr2−/− dendritic cells in vitro resulted in increased IL-10 with reduced IL-6 production and correlated with increased cAMP accumulation. Collectively, our results suggest that increased IL-10 production occurring via augmented cAMP accumulation represents a potential mechanism for the resistance of Cnr2−/− mice to LPS-induced preterm birth. These results may have clinical relevance, because currently, there are limited options to prevent preterm birth. PMID:25051450

  17. The C lostridium difficile cell wall protein CwpV confers phase‐variable phage resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sekulovic, Ognjen; Ospina Bedoya, Maicol; Fivian‐Hughes, Amanda S.; Fairweather, Neil F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacteriophages are present in virtually all ecosystems, and bacteria have developed multiple antiphage strategies to counter their attacks. C lostridium difficile is an important pathogen causing severe intestinal infections in humans and animals. Here we show that the conserved cell‐surface protein CwpV provides antiphage protection in C . difficile. This protein, for which the expression is phase‐variable, is classified into five types, each differing in their repeat‐containing C‐terminal domain. When expressed constitutively from a plasmid or the chromosome of locked ‘ON’ cells of C . difficile  R20291, CwpV conferred antiphage protection. Differences in the level of phage protection were observed depending on the phage morphological group, siphophages being the most sensitive with efficiency of plaquing (EOP) values of < 5 × 10−7 for phages ϕCD38‐2, ϕCD111 and ϕCD146. Protection against the myophages ϕMMP01 and ϕCD52 was weaker, with EOP values between 9.0 × 10−3 and 1.1 × 10−1. The C‐terminal domain of CwpV carries the antiphage activity and its deletion, or part of it, significantly reduced the antiphage protection. CwpV does not affect phage adsorption, but phage DNA replication is prevented, suggesting a mechanism reminiscent of superinfection exclusion systems normally encoded on prophages. CwpV thus represents a novel ubiquitous host‐encoded and phase‐variable antiphage system in C . difficile. PMID:26179020

  18. The Cytochrome P450 gene CYP6P12 confers pyrethroid resistance in kdr-free Malaysian populations of the dengue vector Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Ishak, Intan H.; Riveron, Jacob M.; Ibrahim, Sulaiman S.; Stott, Rob; Longbottom, Joshua; Irving, Helen; Wondji, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Control of Aedes albopictus, major dengue and chikungunya vector, is threatened by growing cases of insecticide resistance. The mechanisms driving this resistance remain poorly characterised. This study investigated the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in Malaysian populations of Ae. albopictus. Microarray-based transcription profiling revealed that metabolic resistance (cytochrome P450 up-regulation) and possibly a reduced penetration mechanism (consistent over-expression of cuticular protein genes) were associated with pyrethroid resistance. CYP6P12 over-expression was strongly associated with pyrethroid resistance whereas CYP6N3 was rather consistently over-expressed across carbamate and DDT resistant populations. Other detoxification genes also up-regulated in permethrin resistant mosquitoes included a glucuronosyltransferase (AAEL014279-RA) and the glutathione-S transferases GSTS1 and GSTT3. Functional analyses further supported that CYP6P12 contributes to pyrethroid resistance in Ae. albopictus as transgenic expression of CYP6P12 in Drosophila was sufficient to confer pyrethroid resistance in these flies. Furthermore, molecular docking simulations predicted CYP6P12 possessing enzymatic activity towards pyrethroids. Patterns of polymorphism suggested early sign of selection acting on CYP6P12 but not on CYP6N3. The major role played by P450 in the absence of kdr mutations suggests that addition of the synergist PBO to pyrethroids could improve the efficacy of this insecticide class and overcome resistance in field populations of Ae. albopictus. PMID:27094778

  19. The Cytochrome P450 gene CYP6P12 confers pyrethroid resistance in kdr-free Malaysian populations of the dengue vector Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Intan H; Riveron, Jacob M; Ibrahim, Sulaiman S; Stott, Rob; Longbottom, Joshua; Irving, Helen; Wondji, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Control of Aedes albopictus, major dengue and chikungunya vector, is threatened by growing cases of insecticide resistance. The mechanisms driving this resistance remain poorly characterised. This study investigated the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in Malaysian populations of Ae. albopictus. Microarray-based transcription profiling revealed that metabolic resistance (cytochrome P450 up-regulation) and possibly a reduced penetration mechanism (consistent over-expression of cuticular protein genes) were associated with pyrethroid resistance. CYP6P12 over-expression was strongly associated with pyrethroid resistance whereas CYP6N3 was rather consistently over-expressed across carbamate and DDT resistant populations. Other detoxification genes also up-regulated in permethrin resistant mosquitoes included a glucuronosyltransferase (AAEL014279-RA) and the glutathione-S transferases GSTS1 and GSTT3. Functional analyses further supported that CYP6P12 contributes to pyrethroid resistance in Ae. albopictus as transgenic expression of CYP6P12 in Drosophila was sufficient to confer pyrethroid resistance in these flies. Furthermore, molecular docking simulations predicted CYP6P12 possessing enzymatic activity towards pyrethroids. Patterns of polymorphism suggested early sign of selection acting on CYP6P12 but not on CYP6N3. The major role played by P450 in the absence of kdr mutations suggests that addition of the synergist PBO to pyrethroids could improve the efficacy of this insecticide class and overcome resistance in field populations of Ae. albopictus. PMID:27094778

  20. QUES, a new Phaseolus vulgaris genotype resistant to common bean weevils, contains the Arcelin-8 allele coding for new lectin-related variants.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Isabelle; Magni, Chiara; Panzeri, Dario; Daminati, Maria Gloria; Bollini, Roberto; Benrey, Betty; Bacher, Sven; Sparvoli, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    In common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), the most abundant seed proteins are the storage protein phaseolin and the family of closely related APA proteins (arcelin, phytohemagglutinin and α-amylase inhibitor). High variation in APA protein composition has been described and the presence of arcelin (Arc) has been associated with bean resistance against two bruchid beetles, the bean weevil (Acanthoscelides obtectus Say) and the Mexican bean weevil (Zabrotes subfasciatus Bohemian). So far, seven Arc variants have been identified, all in wild accessions, however, only those containing Arc-4 were reported to be resistant to both species. Although many efforts have been made, a successful breeding of this genetic trait into cultivated genotypes has not yet been achieved. Here, we describe a newly collected wild accession (named QUES) and demonstrate its resistance to both A. obtectus and Z. subfasciatus. Immunological and proteomic analyses of QUES seed protein composition indicated the presence of new Arc and arcelin-like (ARL) polypeptides of about 30 and 27 kDa, respectively. Sequencing of cDNAs coding for QUES APA proteins confirmed that this accession contains new APA variants, here referred to as Arc-8 and ARL-8. Moreover, bioinformatic analysis showed the two proteins are closely related to APA components present in the G12949 wild bean accession, which contains the Arc-4 variant. The presence of these new APA components, combined with the observations that they are poorly digested and remain very abundant in A. obtectus feces, so-called frass, suggest that the QUES APA locus is involved in the bruchid resistance. Moreover, molecular analysis indicated a lower complexity of the locus compared to that of G12949, suggesting that QUES should be considered a valuable source of resistance for further breeding purposes. PMID:23117719

  1. Presence of New mecA and mph(C) Variants Conferring Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus spp. Isolated from the Skin of Horses before and after Clinic Admission▿

    PubMed Central

    Schnellmann, Christina; Gerber, Vinzenz; Rossano, Alexandra; Jaquier, Valentine; Panchaud, Yann; Doherr, Marcus G.; Thomann, Andreas; Straub, Reto; Perreten, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Because of the frequency of multiple antibiotic resistance, Staphylococcus species often represent a challenge in incisional infections of horses undergoing colic surgery. To investigate the evolution of antibiotic resistance patterns before and after preventative peri- and postoperative penicillin treatment, staphylococci were isolated from skin and wound samples at different times during hospitalization. Most staphylococci were normal skin commensals and belonged to the common coagulase-negative group. In some cases they turned out to be opportunistic pathogens present in wound infections. MICs were determined for 12 antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance genes were detected by microarray. At hospital admission, horses harbored staphylococci that were susceptible to antibiotics or resistant to one group of drugs, mainly due to the presence of new variants of the methicillin and macrolide resistance genes mecA and mph(C), respectively. After 3 days, the percentage of Staphylococcus isolates displaying antibiotic resistance, as well as the number of resistance genes per isolate, increased moderately in hospitalized horses without surgery or penicillin treatment but dramatically in hospitalized horses after colic surgery as well as penicillin treatment. Staphylococcus species displaying multiple resistance were found to harbor mainly genes conferring resistance to β-lactams (mecA and blaZ), aminoglycosides [str and aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2′)-Ia], and trimethoprim [dfr(A) and dfr(D)]. Additional genes conferring resistance to macrolides [mph(C), erm(C), and erm(B)], tetracycline [tet(K) and tet(M)], chloramphenicol [cat(pC221) and cat(pC223)], and streptothricin (sat4) appeared in several strains. Hospitalization and preventive penicillin use were shown to act as selection agents for multidrug-resistant commensal staphylococcal flora. PMID:17005735

  2. Experimental prediction of the evolution of cefepime resistance from the CMY-2 AmpC beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Miriam; Hall, Barry G

    2003-01-01

    Understanding of the evolutionary histories of many genes has not yet allowed us to predict the evolutionary potential of those genes. Intuition suggests that current biochemical activity of gene products should be a good predictor of the potential to evolve related activities; however, we have little evidence to support that intuition. Here we use our in vitro evolution method to evaluate biochemical activity as a predictor of future evolutionary potential. Neither the class C Citrobacter freundii CMY-2 AmpC beta-lactamase nor the class A TEM-1 beta-lactamase confer resistance to the beta-lactam antibiotic cefepime, nor do any of the naturally occurring alleles descended from them. However, the CMY-2 AmpC enzyme and some alleles descended from TEM-1 confer high-level resistance to the structurally similar ceftazidime. On the basis of the comparison of TEM-1 and CMY-2, we asked whether biochemical activity is a good predictor of the evolutionary potential of an enzyme. If it is, then CMY-2 should be more able than the TEMs to evolve the ability to confer higher levels of cefepime resistance. Although we generated CMY-2 evolvants that conferred increased cefepime resistance, we did not recover any CMY-2 evolvants that conferred resistance levels as high as the best cefepime-resistant TEM alleles. PMID:12750318

  3. Nuclear PIM1 confers resistance to rapamycin-impaired endothelial proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Walpen, Thomas; Kalus, Ina; Schwaller, Juerg; Peier, Martin A.; Battegay, Edouard J.; Humar, Rok

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pim1{sup -/-} endothelial cell proliferation displays increased sensitivity to rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mTOR inhibition by rapamycin enhances PIM1 cytosolic and nuclear protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Truncation of Pim1 beyond serine 276 results in nuclear localization of the kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear PIM1 increases endothelial proliferation independent of rapamycin. -- Abstract: The PIM serine/threonine kinases and the mTOR/AKT pathway integrate growth factor signaling and promote cell proliferation and survival. They both share phosphorylation targets and have overlapping functions, which can partially substitute for each other. In cancer cells PIM kinases have been reported to produce resistance to mTOR inhibition by rapamycin. Tumor growth depends highly on blood vessel infiltration into the malignant tissue and therefore on endothelial cell proliferation. We therefore investigated how the PIM1 kinase modulates growth inhibitory effects of rapamycin in mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAEC). We found that proliferation of MAEC lacking Pim1 was significantly more sensitive to rapamycin inhibition, compared to wildtype cells. Inhibition of mTOR and AKT in normal MAEC resulted in significantly elevated PIM1 protein levels in the cytosol and in the nucleus. We observed that truncation of the C-terminal part of Pim1 beyond Ser 276 resulted in almost exclusive nuclear localization of the protein. Re-expression of this Pim1 deletion mutant significantly increased the proliferation of Pim1{sup -/-} cells when compared to expression of the wildtype Pim1 cDNA. Finally, overexpression of the nuclear localization mutant and the wildtype Pim1 resulted in complete resistance to growth inhibition by rapamycin. Thus, mTOR inhibition-induced nuclear accumulation of PIM1 or expression of a nuclear C-terminal PIM1 truncation mutant is sufficient to increase endothelial cell proliferation

  4. Microsatellite allele frequencies in humans and chimpanzees, with implications for constraints on allele size.

    PubMed

    Garza, J C; Slatkin, M; Freimer, N B

    1995-07-01

    The distributions of allele sizes at eight simple-sequence repeat (SSR) or microsatellite loci in chimpanzees are found and compared with the distributions previously obtained from several human populations. At several loci, the differences in average allele size between chimpanzees and humans are sufficiently small that there might be a constraint on the evolution of average allele size. Furthermore, a model that allows for a bias in the mutation process shows that for some loci a weak bias can account for the observations. Several alleles at one of the loci (Mfd 59) were sequenced. Differences between alleles of different lengths were found to be more complex than previously assumed. An 8-base-pair deletion was present in the nonvariable region of the chimpanzee locus. This locus contains a previously unrecognized repeated region, which is imperfect in humans and perfect in chimpanzees. The apparently greater opportunity for mutation conferred by the two perfect repeat regions in chimpanzees is reflected in the higher variance in repeat number at Mfd 59 in chimpanzees than in humans. These data indicate that interspecific differences in allele length are not always attributable to simple changes in the number of repeats. PMID:7659015

  5. IL-27 Found to Play Significant Role in Conferring HIV Resistance | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets specific immune cells in the body known as macrophages because these are the cells that eliminate foreign material such as bacteria or viruses. HIV is able to reproduce and spread throughout the body if it can avoid destruction by macrophages. A recent study by Lue Dai, Ph.D., and colleagues revealed that the human cytokine IL-27 helps promote the body’s production of macrophages that are resistant to HIV. The study further found that IL-27 suppresses a gene known as SPTBN1, which facilitates the survival of HIV cells. This breakthrough research was recently published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

  6. IL-27 Found to Play Significant Role in Conferring HIV Resistance | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets specific immune cells in the body known as macrophages because these are the cells that eliminate foreign material such as bacteria or viruses. HIV is able to reproduce and spread throughout the body if it can avoid destruction by macrophages. A recent study by Lue Dai, Ph.D., and colleagues revealed that the human cytokine IL-27 helps promote the body’s production of macrophages that are resistant to HIV. The study further found that IL-27 suppresses a gene known as SPTBN1, which facilitates the survival of HIV cells. This breakthrough research was recently published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

  7. Expression of Monstera deliciosa agglutinin gene (mda) in tobacco confers resistance to peach-potato aphids.

    PubMed

    Kai, Guoyin; Ji, Qian; Lu, Yang; Qian, Zhongying; Cui, Lijie

    2012-08-01

    The aphid is one of the most serious pests that causes damage to crops worldwide. Lectins from Araceae plant had been proved useful to control the aphid. Herein, the full-length cDNA of Monstera deliciosa agglutinin (mda) gene was cloned and then introduced into tobacco and the influence of the expression of mda in transgenic tobacco against peach-potato aphids (Myzus persicae) was investigated. Among 92 regenerated plants, 59 positive tobacco lines were obtained. Real-time PCR assays and aphid bioassay test revealed that there is a positive correlation between the expression level of mda and the inhibitory effect on peach-potato aphids. The average anti-pests ability of mda transgenic tobacco was 74%, which was higher than that of other reported lectins from Araceae plant. These results indicated that MDA is one of promising insect resistance proteins selected for the control of peach-potato aphids. PMID:22660606

  8. Fast and Accurate Large-Scale Detection of β-Lactamase Genes Conferring Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Jin; Lee, Jung Hun; Kwon, Dae Beom; Jeon, Jeong Ho; Park, Kwang Seung; Lee, Chang-Ro

    2015-01-01

    Fast detection of β-lactamase (bla) genes allows improved surveillance studies and infection control measures, which can minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance. Although several molecular diagnostic methods have been developed to detect limited bla gene types, these methods have significant limitations, such as their failure to detect almost all clinically available bla genes. We developed a fast and accurate molecular method to overcome these limitations using 62 primer pairs, which were designed through elaborate optimization processes. To verify the ability of this large-scale bla detection method (large-scaleblaFinder), assays were performed on previously reported bacterial control isolates/strains. To confirm the applicability of the large-scaleblaFinder, the assays were performed on unreported clinical isolates. With perfect specificity and sensitivity in 189 control isolates/strains and 403 clinical isolates, the large-scaleblaFinder detected almost all clinically available bla genes. Notably, the large-scaleblaFinder detected 24 additional unreported bla genes in the isolates/strains that were previously studied, suggesting that previous methods detecting only limited types of bla genes can miss unexpected bla genes existing in pathogenic bacteria, and our method has the ability to detect almost all bla genes existing in a clinical isolate. The ability of large-scaleblaFinder to detect bla genes on a large scale enables prompt application to the detection of almost all bla genes present in bacterial pathogens. The widespread use of the large-scaleblaFinder in the future will provide an important aid for monitoring the emergence and dissemination of bla genes and minimizing the spread of resistant bacteria. PMID:26169415

  9. Leptin receptor deficiency confers resistance to behavioral effects of fluoxetine and desipramine via separable substrates

    PubMed Central

    Guo, M; Lu, X-Y

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a complex, heterogeneous mental disorder. Currently available antidepressants are only effective in about one-third to one-half of all patients. The mechanisms underlying antidepressant response and treatment resistance are poorly understood. Recent clinical evidence implicates the involvement of leptin in treatment response to antidepressants. In this study, we determined the functional role of the leptin receptor (LepRb) in behavioral responses to the selective serotonergic antidepressant fluoxetine and the noradrenergic antidepressant desipramine. While acute and chronic treatment with fluoxetine or desipramine in wild-type mice elicited antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test, mice null for LepRb (db/db) displayed resistance to treatment with either fluoxetine or desipramine. Fluoxetine stimulated phosphorylation of Akt(Thr308) and GSK-3β(Ser9) in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of wild-type mice but not in db/db mice. Desipramine failed to induce measurable changes in Akt, GSK-3β or ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the hippocampus and PFC, as well as hypothalamus of either genotype of mice. Deletion of LepRb specifically from hippocampal and cortical neurons resulted in fluoxetine insensitivity in the forced swim test and tail suspension test while leaving the response to desipramine intact. These results suggest that functional LepRb is critically involved in regulating the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of both fluoxetine and desipramine. The antidepressant effects of fluoxetine but not desipramine are dependent on the presence of functional LepRb in the hippocampus and cortex. PMID:25463972

  10. Fast and Accurate Large-Scale Detection of β-Lactamase Genes Conferring Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Jin; Lee, Jung Hun; Kwon, Dae Beom; Jeon, Jeong Ho; Park, Kwang Seung; Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Sang Hee

    2015-10-01

    Fast detection of β-lactamase (bla) genes allows improved surveillance studies and infection control measures, which can minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance. Although several molecular diagnostic methods have been developed to detect limited bla gene types, these methods have significant limitations, such as their failure to detect almost all clinically available bla genes. We developed a fast and accurate molecular method to overcome these limitations using 62 primer pairs, which were designed through elaborate optimization processes. To verify the ability of this large-scale bla detection method (large-scaleblaFinder), assays were performed on previously reported bacterial control isolates/strains. To confirm the applicability of the large-scaleblaFinder, the assays were performed on unreported clinical isolates. With perfect specificity and sensitivity in 189 control isolates/strains and 403 clinical isolates, the large-scaleblaFinder detected almost all clinically available bla genes. Notably, the large-scaleblaFinder detected 24 additional unreported bla genes in the isolates/strains that were previously studied, suggesting that previous methods detecting only limited types of bla genes can miss unexpected bla genes existing in pathogenic bacteria, and our method has the ability to detect almost all bla genes existing in a clinical isolate. The ability of large-scaleblaFinder to detect bla genes on a large scale enables prompt application to the detection of almost all bla genes present in bacterial pathogens. The widespread use of the large-scaleblaFinder in the future will provide an important aid for monitoring the emergence and dissemination of bla genes and minimizing the spread of resistant bacteria. PMID:26169415

  11. Knockout of PARG110 confers resistance to cGMP-induced toxicity in mammalian photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Sahaboglu, A; Tanimoto, N; Bolz, S; Garrido, M G; Ueffing, M; Seeliger, M W; Löwenheim, H; Ekström, P; Paquet-Durand, F

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary retinal degeneration (RD) relates to a heterogeneous group of blinding human diseases in which the light sensitive neurons of the retina, the photoreceptors, die. RD is currently untreatable and the underlying cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. However, the activity of the enzyme poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP1) and excessive generation of poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) polymers in photoreceptor nuclei have been shown to be causally involved in RD. The activity of PARP1 is to a large extent governed by its functional antagonist, poly-ADP-glycohydrolase (PARG), which thus also may have a role in RD. To investigate this, we analyzed PARG expression in the retina of wild-type (wt) mice and in the rd1 mouse model for human RD, and detected increased PARG protein in a subset of degenerating rd1 photoreceptors. Knockout (KO) animals lacking the 110 kDa nuclear PARG isoform were furthermore analyzed, and their retinal morphology and function were indistinguishable from wild-type animals. Organotypic wt retinal explants can be experimentally treated to induce rd1-like photoreceptor death, but PARG110 KO retinal explants were unexpectedly highly resistant to such treatment. The resistance was associated with decreased PAR accumulation and low PARP activity, indicating that PARG110 may positively regulate PARP1, an event that therefore is absent in PARG110 KO tissue. Our study demonstrates a causal involvement of PARG110 in the process of photoreceptor degeneration. Contrasting its anticipated role as a functional antagonist, absence of PARG110 correlated with low PARP activity, suggesting that PARG110 and PARP1 act in a positive feedback loop, which is especially active under pathologic conditions. This in turn highlights both PARG110 and PARP1 as potential targets for neuroprotective treatments for RD. PMID:24853412

  12. Interaction between yeast mitochondrial and nuclear genomes: null alleles of RTG genes affect resistance to the alkaloid lycorine in rho0 petites of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Luigi; Massardo, Domenica Rita; Pontieri, Paola; Wolf, Klaus

    2005-07-18

    Some nuclear genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) respond to signals from the mitochondria in a process called by Butow (Cell Death Differ. 9 (2002) 1043-1045) retrograde regulation. Expression of these genes is activated in cells lacking mitochondrial function by involvement of RTG1, RTG2 and RTG3 genes whose protein products bind to "R-boxes" in the promoter region; RTG2p is a cytoplasmic protein. Since S. cerevisiae rho0 strains, lacking the entire mitochondrial genome, are resistant to lycorine, an alkaloid extracted from Amaryllis plants, it could be hypothesized that in rho0 cells the dysfunctional mitochondrial status stimulates overexpression of nuclear genes very likely involved in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication. In this report we show that the resistance of rho0 cells to lycorine is affected by the deletion of RTG genes. PMID:15893890

  13. Frequency of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis in field populations of pink bollworm

    PubMed Central

    Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Patin, Amanda L.; Dennehy, Timothy J.; Liu, Yong-Biao; Carrière, Yves; Sims, Maria A.; Antilla, Larry

    2000-01-01

    Strategies for delaying pest resistance to genetically modified crops that produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins are based primarily on theoretical models. One key assumption of such models is that genes conferring resistance are rare. Previous estimates for lepidopteran pests targeted by Bt crops seem to meet this assumption. We report here that the estimated frequency of a recessive allele conferring resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac was 0.16 (95% confidence interval = 0.05–0.26) in strains of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella) derived from 10 Arizona cotton fields during 1997. Unexpectedly, the estimated resistance allele frequency did not increase from 1997 to 1999 and Bt cotton remained extremely effective against pink bollworm. These results demonstrate that the assumptions and predictions of resistance management models must be reexamined. PMID:11087854

  14. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 confers resistance to chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer by regulating reactive oxygen species and caspase-3-dependent apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiqi; Zhang, Chang; Wang, Hao; Xing, Junjie; Gong, Haifeng; Yu, Enda; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Cao, Guangwen; Fu, Chuangang

    2014-10-28

    This study aimed to clarify the role of multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3) in resistance to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and long-term prognosis of advanced rectal cancer. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure MRP3 expression in biopsy specimens of 144 stage II-III rectal cancer patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy. The effect of MRP3 expression on short-term pathological response and postoperative long-term prognosis were assessed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Short interfering RNAs targeting MRP3 were synthesized and used to transfect human colorectal carcinoma cell lines. The effect of MRP3 down-regulation on cell proliferation and apoptosis in response to 5-fluorouracil and/or irradiation were examined in vitro and in xenograft mouse models, respectively. The content of intracellular reactive oxygen species and the activity of caspase-3-dependent apoptotic pathway in response to irradiation were further evaluated. High expression (immunoreactive score > 6) of MRP3 significantly predicted poor pathological response to chemoradiotherapy (tumor regression grade ≤ 2 vs. ≥3, p = 0.002) in univariate analysis and unfavorable long-term prognosis (5-year overall survival: HR = 1.612, 95% CI, 1.094-2.375, p = 0.016; 5-year disease-free survival: HR = 1.513, 95% CI, 1.041-2.200, p = 0.030) in multivariate Cox analysis. MRP3 down-regulation significantly increased 5-fluorouracil or irradiation-induced cell apoptosis and attenuated tumor growth following irradiation in animal models. MRP3 inhibition significantly reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species exporting from cells following irradiation, and increased expression of cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase and caspase-3. Aberrant expression of MRP3 in rectal cancer confers chemo-radioresistance. MRP3 might be a predictive factor and an attractive target in treating advanced rectal cancer. PMID:25088576

  15. A Naturally Occurring Domestic Cat APOBEC3 Variant Confers Resistance to Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Izumi, Taisuke; Yamada, Eri; Nakano, Yusuke; Misawa, Naoko; Ren, Fengrong; Carpenter, Michael A.; Ikeda, Terumasa; Münk, Carsten; Harris, Reuben S.; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3; A3) DNA cytosine deaminases can be incorporated into progeny virions and inhibit lentiviral replication. On the other hand, viral infectivity factor (Vif) of lentiviruses antagonizes A3-mediated antiviral activities by degrading A3 proteins. It is known that domestic cat (Felis catus) APOBEC3Z3 (A3Z3), the ortholog of human APOBEC3H, potently suppresses the infectivity of vif-defective feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Although a recent report has shown that domestic cat encodes 7 haplotypes (hap I to hap VII) of A3Z3, the relevance of A3Z3 polymorphism in domestic cats with FIV Vif has not yet been addressed. In this study, we demonstrated that these feline A3Z3 variants suppress vif-defective FIV infectivity. We also revealed that codon 65 of feline A3Z3 is a positively selected site and that A3Z3 hap V is subject to positive selection during evolution. It is particularly noteworthy that feline A3Z3 hap V is resistant to FIV Vif-mediated degradation and still inhibits vif-proficient viral infection. Moreover, the side chain size, but not the hydrophobicity, of the amino acid at position 65 determines the resistance to FIV Vif-mediated degradation. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses have led to the inference that feline A3Z3 hap V emerged approximately 60,000 years ago. Taken together, these findings suggest that feline A3Z3 hap V may have been selected for escape from an ancestral FIV. This is the first evidence for an evolutionary “arms race” between the domestic cat and its cognate lentivirus. IMPORTANCE Gene diversity and selective pressure are intriguing topics in the field of evolutionary biology. A direct interaction between a cellular protein and a viral protein can precipitate an evolutionary arms race between host and virus. One example is primate APOBEC3G, which potently restricts the replication of primate lentiviruses (e.g., human immunodeficiency virus type 1

  16. The effect of deleterious alleles on adaptation in asexual populations.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Toby; Barton, Nick H

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the fixation probability of a beneficial allele that arises as the result of a unique mutation in an asexual population that is subject to recurrent deleterious mutation at rate U. Our analysis is an extension of previous works, which make a biologically restrictive assumption that selection against deleterious alleles is stronger than that on the beneficial allele of interest. We show that when selection against deleterious alleles is weak, beneficial alleles that confer a selective advantage that is small relative to U have greatly reduced probabilities of fixation. We discuss the consequences of this effect for the distribution of effects of alleles fixed during adaptation. We show that a selective sweep will increase the fixation probabilities of other beneficial mutations arising during some short interval afterward. We use the calculated fixation probabilities to estimate the expected rate of fitness improvement in an asexual population when beneficial alleles arise continually at some low rate proportional to U. We estimate the rate of mutation that is optimal in the sense that it maximizes this rate of fitness improvement. Again, this analysis relaxes the assumption made previously that selection against deleterious alleles is stronger than on beneficial alleles. PMID:12242249

  17. Estrogen receptor alpha somatic mutations Y537S and D538G confer breast cancer endocrine resistance by stabilizing the activating function-2 binding conformation

    PubMed Central

    Fanning, Sean W; Mayne, Christopher G; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Carlson, Kathryn E; Martin, Teresa A; Novick, Scott J; Toy, Weiyi; Green, Bradley; Panchamukhi, Srinivas; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Griffin, Patrick R; Shen, Yang; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Greene, Geoffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) gene (ESR1), especially Y537S and D538G, have been linked to acquired resistance to endocrine therapies. Cell-based studies demonstrated that these mutants confer ERα constitutive activity and antiestrogen resistance and suggest that ligand-binding domain dysfunction leads to endocrine therapy resistance. Here, we integrate biophysical and structural biology data to reveal how these mutations lead to a constitutively active and antiestrogen-resistant ERα. We show that these mutant ERs recruit coactivator in the absence of hormone while their affinities for estrogen agonist (estradiol) and antagonist (4-hydroxytamoxifen) are reduced. Further, they confer antiestrogen resistance by altering the conformational dynamics of the loop connecting Helix 11 and Helix 12 in the ligand-binding domain of ERα, which leads to a stabilized agonist state and an altered antagonist state that resists inhibition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12792.001 PMID:26836308

  18. Transgenic expression of the rice Xa21 pattern-recognition receptor in banana (Musa sp.) confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Jaindra N; Lorenzen, Jim; Bahar, Ofir; Ronald, Pamela; Tripathi, Leena

    2014-08-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm), is the most devastating disease of banana in east and central Africa. The spread of BXW threatens the livelihood of millions of African farmers who depend on banana for food security and income. There are no commercial chemicals, biocontrol agents or resistant cultivars available to control BXW. Here, we take advantage of the robust resistance conferred by the rice pattern-recognition receptor (PRR), XA21, to the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). We identified a set of genes required for activation of Xa21-mediated immunity (rax) that were conserved in both Xoo and Xcm. Based on the conservation, we hypothesized that intergeneric transfer of Xa21 would confer resistance to Xcm. We evaluated 25 transgenic lines of the banana cultivar 'Gonja manjaya' (AAB) using a rapid bioassay and 12 transgenic lines in the glasshouse for resistance against Xcm. About 50% of the transgenic lines showed complete resistance to Xcm in both assays. In contrast, all of the nontransgenic control plants showed severe symptoms that progressed to complete wilting. These results indicate that the constitutive expression of the rice Xa21 gene in banana results in enhanced resistance against Xcm. Furthermore, this work demonstrates the feasibility of PRR gene transfer between monocotyledonous species and provides a valuable new tool for controlling the BXW pandemic of banana, a staple food for 100 million people in east Africa. PMID:24612254

  19. Transgenic expression of the rice Xa21 pattern recognition receptor in banana (Musa sp.) confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Jaindra Nath; Lorenzen, Jim; Bahar, Ofir; Ronald, Pamela; Tripathi, Leena

    2014-01-01

    Summary Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm), is the most devastating disease of banana in east and central Africa. The spread of BXW threatens the livelihood of millions of African farmers who depend on banana for food security and income. There are no commercial chemicals, bio-control agents or resistant cultivars available to control BXW. Here we take advantage of the robust resistance conferred by the rice pattern recognition receptor (PRR), XA21, to the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). We identified a set of genes required for activation of Xa21 mediated immunity (rax) that were conserved in both Xoo and Xcm. Based on the conservation, we hypothesized that intergeneric transfer of Xa21 would confer resistance to Xcm. We evaluated 25 transgenic lines of the banana cultivar ‘Gonja manjaya’ (AAB) using a rapid bioassay and 12 transgenic plants in the glass house for resistance against Xcm. About fifty percent of the transgenic lines showed complete resistance to Xcm in both assays. In contrast, all of the non-transgenic control plants showed severe symptoms that progressed to complete wilting. These results indicate that the constitutive expression of the rice Xa21 gene in banana results in enhanced resistance against Xcm. Furthermore this work demonstrates the feasibility of PRR gene transfer between monocotyledonous species and provides a valuable new tool for controlling the BXW pandemic of banana, a staple food for 100 million people in east Africa. PMID:24612254

  20. Heme Catabolism by Heme Oxygenase-1 Confers Host Resistance to Mycobacterium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Gomes, Sandro; Appelberg, Rui; Larsen, Rasmus; Soares, Miguel Parreira

    2013-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the rate-limiting step of heme degradation. The cytoprotective action of the inducible HO-1 isoform, encoded by the Hmox1 gene, is required for host protection against systemic infections. Here we report that upregulation of HO-1 expression in macrophages (Mϕ) is strictly required for protection against mycobacterial infection in mice. HO-1-deficient (Hmox1−/−) mice are more susceptible to intravenous Mycobacterium avium infection, failing to mount a protective granulomatous response and developing higher pathogen loads, than infected wild-type (Hmox1+/+) controls. Furthermore, Hmox1−/− mice also develop higher pathogen loads and ultimately succumb when challenged with a low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protective effect of HO-1 acts independently of adaptive immunity, as revealed in M. avium-infected Hmox1−/− versus Hmox1+/+ SCID mice lacking mature B and T cells. In the absence of HO-1, heme accumulation acts as a cytotoxic pro-oxidant in infected Mϕ, an effect mimicked by exogenous heme administration to M. avium-infected wild-type Mϕ in vitro or to mice in vivo. In conclusion, HO-1 prevents the cytotoxic effect of heme in Mϕ, contributing critically to host resistance to Mycobacterium infection. PMID:23630967

  1. A red and far-red light receptor mutation confers resistance to the herbicide glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Sharkhuu, Altanbadralt; Narasimhan, Meena L; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Bressan, Ray A; Weller, Steve; Gehring, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Glyphosate is a widely applied broad-spectrum systemic herbicide that inhibits competitively the penultimate enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) from the shikimate pathway, thereby causing deleterious effects. A glyphosate-resistant Arabidopsis mutant (gre1) was isolated and genetic analyses indicated that a dysfunctional red (R) and far-red (FR) light receptor, phytochrome B (phyB), caused this phenotype. This finding is consistent with increased glyphosate sensitivity and glyphosate-induced shikimate accumulation in low R:FR light, and the induction of genes encoding enzymes of the shikimate pathway in high R:FR light. Expression of the shikimate pathway genes exhibited diurnal oscillation and this oscillation was altered in the phyB mutant. Furthermore, transcript analysis suggested that this diurnal oscillation was not only dependent on phyB but was also due to circadian regulatory mechanisms. Our data offer an explanation of the well documented observation that glyphosate treatment at various times throughout the day, with their specific composition of light quality and intensity, results in different efficiencies of the herbicide. PMID:24654847

  2. A red and far-red light receptor mutation confers resistance to the herbicide glyphosate

    PubMed Central

    Sharkhuu, Altanbadralt; Narasimhan, Meena L; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Bressan, Ray A; Weller, Steve; Gehring, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Glyphosate is a widely applied broad-spectrum systemic herbicide that inhibits competitively the penultimate enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) from the shikimate pathway, thereby causing deleterious effects. A glyphosate-resistant Arabidopsis mutant (gre1) was isolated and genetic analyses indicated that a dysfunctional red (R) and far-red (FR) light receptor, phytochrome B (phyB), caused this phenotype. This finding is consistent with increased glyphosate sensitivity and glyphosate-induced shikimate accumulation in low R:FR light, and the induction of genes encoding enzymes of the shikimate pathway in high R:FR light. Expression of the shikimate pathway genes exhibited diurnal oscillation and this oscillation was altered in the phyB mutant. Furthermore, transcript analysis suggested that this diurnal oscillation was not only dependent on phyB but was also due to circadian regulatory mechanisms. Our data offer an explanation of the well documented observation that glyphosate treatment at various times throughout the day, with their specific composition of light quality and intensity, results in different efficiencies of the herbicide. PMID:24654847

  3. Mutations that confer resistance to 2-deoxyglucose reduce the specific activity of hexokinase from Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Youderian, P; Lawes, M C; Creighton, C; Cook, J C; Saier, M H

    1999-04-01

    The glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose (2dGlc) inhibits the growth and multicellular development of Myxococcus xanthus. Mutants of M. xanthus resistant to 2dGlc, designated hex mutants, arise at a low spontaneous frequency. Expression of the Escherichia coli glk (glucokinase) gene in M. xanthus hex mutants restores 2dGlc sensitivity, suggesting that these mutants arise upon the loss of a soluble hexokinase function that phosphorylates 2dGlc to form the toxic intermediate, 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate. Enzyme assays of M. xanthus extracts reveal a soluble hexokinase (ATP:D-hexose-6-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.1) activity but no phosphotransferase system activities. The hex mutants have lower levels of hexokinase activities than the wild type, and the levels of hexokinase activity exhibited by the hex mutants are inversely correlated with the ability of 2dGlc to inhibit their growth and sporulation. Both 2dGlc and N-acetylglucosamine act as inhibitors of glucose turnover by the M. xanthus hexokinase in vitro, consistent with the finding that glucose and N-acetylglucosamine can antagonize the toxic effects of 2dGlc in vivo. PMID:10094702

  4. Repurposing of tetracyclines to overcome resistance pathways associated with photochemotherapy in cancer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Joyce; Huang, Huang-Chiao; Rizvi, Imran; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Given the consistently poor prognoses for some of the most difficult-to-treat cancers, rapidly translatable treatment regimens that offer improvements in outcomes are much needed. The repurposing of FDA approved non-cancer drugs presents an opportunity to design clinically feasible, novel combinations of therapies with a mechanistic rationale, to overcome resistance and survival pathways that render many current treatments ineffective. Tetracyclines are a class of antibiotics that demonstrate potential for such repurposing, as they have also been shown by others to affect a wide range of targets in cancer. Notably, the unique structure of tetracyclines allows them to act through both light activated and non-light mediated mechanisms. While light activation of tetracyclines can result in singlet oxygen production, their non-light mediated targets include inhibition of DNA repair enzymes and modulation of hypoxia-inducible markers, among others. With these mechanisms in mind, we seek to elucidate the benefit of including tetracyclines as part of an already promising, mechanistically cooperative photochemotherapy combination for ovarian cancer. In ovarian cancer, the dismal rates of recurrence and survival associated with the aggressive disease further emphasize the need to mechanistically reinforce treatments regimens. Thus, the results will highlight insights into the cooperative effect of repurposed tetracyclines on treatment response and molecular markers, both in vitro and in a challenging mouse model of disseminated ovarian cancer.

  5. Root defense analysis against Fusarium oxysporum reveals new regulators to confer resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi Chung; Wong, Chin Lin; Muzzi, Frederico; Vlaardingerbroek, Ido; Kidd, Brendan N.; Schenk, Peer M.

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a root-infecting fungal pathogen that causes wilt disease on a broad range of plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana. Investigation of the defense response against this pathogen had primarily been conducted using leaf tissue and little was known about the root defense response. In this study, we profiled the expression of root genes after infection with F. oxysporum by microarray analysis. In contrast to the leaf response, root tissue did not show a strong induction of defense-associated gene expression and instead showed a greater proportion of repressed genes. Screening insertion mutants from differentially expressed genes in the microarray uncovered a role for the transcription factor ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR72 (ERF72) in susceptibility to F. oxysporum. Due to the role of ERF72 in suppressing programmed cell death and detoxifying reactive oxygen species (ROS), we examined the pub22/pub23/pub24 U-box type E3 ubiquitin ligase triple mutant which is known to possess enhanced ROS production in response to pathogen challenge. We found that the pub22/23/24 mutant is more resistant to F. oxysporum infection, suggesting that a heightened innate immune response provides protection against F. oxysporum. We conclude that root-mediated defenses against soil-borne pathogens can be provided at multiple levels. PMID:24998294

  6. Expression of a plant defensin in rice confers resistance to fungal phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sanjay; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2010-06-01

    Transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Pusa basmati 1), overexpressing the Rs-AFP2 defensin gene from the Raphanus sativus was generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Expression levels of Rs-AFP2 ranged from 0.45 to 0.53% of total soluble protein in transgenic plants. It was observed that constitutive expression of Rs-AFP2 suppresses the growth of Magnaporthe oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani by 77 and 45%, respectively. No effect on plant morphology was observed in the Rs-AFP2 expressing rice lines. The inhibitory activity of protein extracts prepared from leaves of Rs-AFP2 plants on the in vitro growth of M. oryzae indicated that the Rs-AFP2 protein produced by transgenic rice plants was biologically active. Transgene expression of Rs-AFP2 was not accompanied by an induction of pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression, suggesting that the expression of Rs-AFP2 directly inhibits the pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that transgenic rice plants expressing the Rs-AFP2 gene show enhanced resistance to M. oryzae and R. solani, two of the most important pathogens of rice. PMID:19690975

  7. Structural basis for carbapenem-hydrolyzing mechanisms of carbapenemases conferring antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jung Hun; Lee, Jae Jin; Park, Kwang Seung; Karim, Asad Mustafa; Lee, Chang-Ro; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, biapenem, ertapenem, and doripenem) are β-lactam antimicrobial agents. Because carbapenems have the broadest spectra among all β-lactams and are primarily used to treat infections by multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, the emergence and spread of carbapenemases became a major public health concern. Carbapenemases are the most versatile family of β-lactamases that are able to hydrolyze carbapenems and many other β-lactams. According to the dependency of divalent cations for enzyme activation, carbapenemases can be divided into metallo-carbapenemases (zinc-dependent class B) and non-metallo-carbapenemases (zinc-independent classes A, C, and D). Many studies have provided various carbapenemase structures. Here we present a comprehensive and systematic review of three-dimensional structures of carbapenemase-carbapenem complexes as well as those of carbapenemases. We update recent studies in understanding the enzymatic mechanism of each class of carbapenemase, and summarize structural insights about regions and residues that are important in acquiring the carbapenemase activity. PMID:25938965

  8. Histone variant macroH2A confers resistance to nuclear reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Pasque, Vincent; Gillich, Astrid; Garrett, Nigel; Gurdon, John B

    2011-01-01

    How various layers of epigenetic repression restrict somatic cell nuclear reprogramming is poorly understood. The transfer of mammalian somatic cell nuclei into Xenopus oocytes induces transcriptional reprogramming of previously repressed genes. Here, we address the mechanisms that restrict reprogramming following nuclear transfer by assessing the stability of the inactive X chromosome (Xi) in different stages of inactivation. We find that the Xi of mouse post-implantation-derived epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs) can be reversed by nuclear transfer, while the Xi of differentiated or extraembryonic cells is irreversible by nuclear transfer to oocytes. After nuclear transfer, Xist RNA is lost from chromatin of the Xi. Most epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation and Polycomb-deposited H3K27me3 do not explain the differences between reversible and irreversible Xi. Resistance to reprogramming is associated with incorporation of the histone variant macroH2A, which is retained on the Xi of differentiated cells, but absent from the Xi of EpiSCs. Our results uncover the decreased stability of the Xi in EpiSCs, and highlight the importance of combinatorial epigenetic repression involving macroH2A in restricting transcriptional reprogramming by oocytes. PMID:21552206

  9. The bacterial DNA repair protein Mfd confers resistance to the host nitrogen immune response.

    PubMed

    Guillemet, Elisabeth; Leréec, Alain; Tran, Seav-Ly; Royer, Corinne; Barbosa, Isabelle; Sansonetti, Philippe; Lereclus, Didier; Ramarao, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive nitrogen species (NO) is a key step in the immune response following infections. NO induces lesions to bacterial DNA, thus limiting bacterial growth within hosts. Using two pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus cereus and Shigella flexneri, we show that the DNA-repair protein Mfd (Mutation-Frequency-Decline) is required for bacterial resistance to the host-NO-response. In both species, a mutant deficient for mfd does not survive to NO, produced in vitro or by phagocytic cells. In vivo, the ∆mfd mutant is avirulent and unable to survive the NO-stress. Moreover, NO induces DNA-double-strand-breaks and point mutations in the Δmfd mutant. In overall, these observations demonstrate that NO damages bacterial DNA and that Mfd is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity. This unexpected discovery reveals that Mfd, a typical housekeeping gene, turns out to be a true virulence factor allowing survival and growth of the pathogen in its host, due to its capacity to protect the bacterium against NO, a key molecule of the innate immune defense. As Mfd is widely conserved in the bacterial kingdom, these data highlight a mechanism that may be used by a large spectrum of bacteria to overcome the host immune response and especially the mutagenic properties of NO. PMID:27435260

  10. Structural Basis for Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing Mechanisms of Carbapenemases Conferring Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jung Hun; Lee, Jae Jin; Park, Kwang Seung; Karim, Asad Mustafa; Lee, Chang-Ro; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, biapenem, ertapenem, and doripenem) are β-lactam antimicrobial agents. Because carbapenems have the broadest spectra among all β-lactams and are primarily used to treat infections by multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, the emergence and spread of carbapenemases became a major public health concern. Carbapenemases are the most versatile family of β-lactamases that are able to hydrolyze carbapenems and many other β-lactams. According to the dependency of divalent cations for enzyme activation, carbapenemases can be divided into metallo-carbapenemases (zinc-dependent class B) and non-metallo-carbapenemases (zinc-independent classes A, C, and D). Many studies have provided various carbapenemase structures. Here we present a comprehensive and systematic review of three-dimensional structures of carbapenemase-carbapenem complexes as well as those of carbapenemases. We update recent studies in understanding the enzymatic mechanism of each class of carbapenemase, and summarize structural insights about regions and residues that are important in acquiring the carbapenemase activity. PMID:25938965

  11. The bacterial DNA repair protein Mfd confers resistance to the host nitrogen immune response

    PubMed Central

    Guillemet, Elisabeth; Leréec, Alain; Tran, Seav-Ly; Royer, Corinne; Barbosa, Isabelle; Sansonetti, Philippe; Lereclus, Didier; Ramarao, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive nitrogen species (NO) is a key step in the immune response following infections. NO induces lesions to bacterial DNA, thus limiting bacterial growth within hosts. Using two pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus cereus and Shigella flexneri, we show that the DNA-repair protein Mfd (Mutation-Frequency-Decline) is required for bacterial resistance to the host-NO-response. In both species, a mutant deficient for mfd does not survive to NO, produced in vitro or by phagocytic cells. In vivo, the ∆mfd mutant is avirulent and unable to survive the NO-stress. Moreover, NO induces DNA-double-strand-breaks and point mutations in the Δmfd mutant. In overall, these observations demonstrate that NO damages bacterial DNA and that Mfd is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity. This unexpected discovery reveals that Mfd, a typical housekeeping gene, turns out to be a true virulence factor allowing survival and growth of the pathogen in its host, due to its capacity to protect the bacterium against NO, a key molecule of the innate immune defense. As Mfd is widely conserved in the bacterial kingdom, these data highlight a mechanism that may be used by a large spectrum of bacteria to overcome the host immune response and especially the mutagenic properties of NO. PMID:27435260

  12. Site-specific Genome Editing in PBMCs With PLGA Nanoparticle-delivered PNAs Confers HIV-1 Resistance in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schleifman, Erica B; McNeer, Nicole Ali; Jackson, Andrew; Yamtich, Jennifer; Brehm, Michael A; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Kumar, Priti; Saltzman, W Mark; Glazer, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) encapsulating triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and donor DNAs for recombination-mediated editing of the CCR5 gene were synthesized for delivery into human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). NPs containing the CCR5-targeting molecules efficiently entered PBMCs with low cytotoxicity. Deep sequencing revealed that a single treatment with the formulation resulted in a targeting frequency of 0.97% in the CCR5 gene and a low off-target frequency of 0.004% in the CCR2 gene, a 216-fold difference. NP-treated PBMCs efficiently engrafted immunodeficient NOD-scid IL-2rγ-/- mice, and the targeted CCR5 modification was detected in splenic lymphocytes 4 weeks posttransplantation. After infection with an R5-tropic strain of HIV-1, humanized mice with CCR5-NP–treated PBMCs displayed significantly higher levels of CD4+ T cells and significantly reduced plasma viral RNA loads compared with control mice engrafted with mock-treated PBMCs. This work demonstrates the feasibility of PLGA-NP–encapsulated PNA-based gene-editing molecules for the targeted modification of CCR5 in human PBMCs as a platform for conferring HIV-1 resistance. PMID:24253260

  13. The sRNA SorY confers resistance during photooxidative stress by affecting a metabolite transporter in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Fazal; Weber, Lennart; Klug, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to oxygen and light generates photooxidative stress by the bacteriochlorophyll a mediated formation of singlet oxygen (1O2) in the facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We have identified SorY as an sRNA, which is induced under several stress conditions and confers increased resistance against 1O2. SorY by direct interaction affects the takP mRNA, encoding a TRAP-T transporter. We present a model in which SorY reduces the metabolite flux into the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) by reducing malate import through TakP. It was previously shown that oxidative stress in bacteria leads to switch from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway and to reduced activity of the TCA cycle. As a consequence the production of the prooxidant NADH is reduced and production of the protective NADPH is enhanced. In R. sphaeroides enzymes for glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, Entner–Doudoroff pathway and gluconeogenesis are induced in response to 1O2 by the alternative sigma factor RpoHII. The same is true for the sRNA SorY. By limiting malate import SorY thus contributes to the balance of the metabolic fluxes under photooxidative stress conditions. This assigns a so far unknown function to an sRNA in oxidative stress response. PMID:25833751

  14. Alkamides Activate Jasmonic Acid Biosynthesis and Signaling Pathways and Confer Resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Bravo, Alfonso; Calderón-Vázquez, Carlos; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Raya-González, Javier; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Guevara-García, Angel A.; López-Bucio, José; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Alkamides are fatty acid amides of wide distribution in plants, structurally related to N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) from Gram-negative bacteria and to N- acylethanolamines (NAEs) from plants and mammals. Global analysis of gene expression changes in Arabidopsis thaliana in response to N-isobutyl decanamide, the most highly active alkamide identified to date, revealed an overrepresentation of defense-responsive transcriptional networks. In particular, genes encoding enzymes for jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis increased their expression, which occurred in parallel with JA, nitric oxide (NO) and H2O2 accumulation. The activity of the alkamide to confer resistance against the necrotizing fungus Botrytis cinerea was tested by inoculating Arabidopsis detached leaves with conidiospores and evaluating disease symptoms and fungal proliferation. N-isobutyl decanamide application significantly reduced necrosis caused by the pathogen and inhibited fungal proliferation. Arabidopsis mutants jar1 and coi1 altered in JA signaling and a MAP kinase mutant (mpk6), unlike salicylic acid- (SA) related mutant eds16/sid2-1, were unable to defend from fungal attack even when N-isobutyl decanamide was supplied, indicating that alkamides could modulate some necrotrophic-associated defense responses through JA-dependent and MPK6-regulated signaling pathways. Our results suggest a role of alkamides in plant immunity induction. PMID:22076141

  15. Neutrophils confer T cell resistance to myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated suppression to promote chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sean O; Johnson, Jenny L; Cobb, Brian A

    2013-05-15

    Low-grade chronic inflammation can persist in aging humans unnoticed for years or even decades, inflicting continuous damage that can culminate later in life as organ dysfunction, physical frailty, and some of the most prominent debilitating and deadly age-associated diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Despite the near universal acceptance of these associations, the mechanisms underlying unresolved inflammation remain poorly understood. In this study, we describe a novel inducible method to examine systemic chronic inflammation using susceptible animal models. Induced inflammation results in unresolved innate cellular responses and persistence of the same serum proinflammatory molecules used as diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for chronic inflammation in humans. Surprisingly, we found long-term persistence of an inflammation-associated neutrophil cell population constitutively producing the proinflammatory IFN-γ cytokine, which until now has only been detected transiently in acute inflammatory responses. Interestingly, these cells appear to confer T cell resistance to the otherwise potent anti-inflammatory function of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, revealing a novel mechanism for the maintenance of chronic inflammatory responses over time. This discovery represents an attractive target to resolve inflammation and prevent the inflammation-induced pathologies that are of critical concern for the well-being of the aging population. PMID:23576679

  16. Proteophosphoglycan confers resistance of Leishmania major to midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding in vector sand flies.

    PubMed

    Secundino, Nagila; Kimblin, Nicola; Peters, Nathan C; Lawyer, Phillip; Capul, Althea A; Beverley, Stephen M; Turco, Salvatore J; Sacks, David

    2010-07-01

    Leishmania synthesize abundant phosphoglycan-containing molecules made up of [Gal-Man-PO(4)] repeating units, including the surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG), and the surface and secreted proteophosphoglycan (PPG). The vector competence of Phlebotomus duboscqi and Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies was tested using L. major knockout mutants deficient in either total phosphoglycans (lpg2(-) or lpg5A(-)/5B(-)) or LPG alone (lpg1(-)) along with their respective gene add-back controls. Our results confirm that LPG, the major cell surface molecule of Leishmania promastigotes known to mediate attachment to the vector midgut, is necessary to prevent the loss of infection during excretion of the blood meal remnants from a natural vector, P. duboscqi, but not an unnatural vector, L. longipalpis. Midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding pose another potential barrier to parasite survival. Our results show that 36-72 h after the infective feed, all parasites developed well except the lpg2(-) and lpg5A(-)/5B(-) mutants, which showed significantly reduced survival and growth. Protease inhibitors promoted the early survival and growth of lpg2(-) in the blood meal. PPG was shown to be the key molecule conferring resistance to midgut digestive enzymes, as it prevented killing of lpg2(-) promastigotes exposed to midgut lysates prepared from blood-fed flies. The protection was not associated with inhibition of enzyme activities, but with cell surface acquisition of the PPG, which appears to function similar to mammalian mucins to protect the surface of developing promastigotes against proteolytic damage. PMID:20088949

  17. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favorova, Olga O; Favorov, Alexander V; Boiko, Alexey N; Andreewski, Timofey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Alekseenkov, Alexey D; Kulakova, Olga G; Gusev, Eugenyi I; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion) of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGFβ1, CCR5 and CTLA4 gen