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Sample records for allelic association studies

  1. A genome-wide association study identifies novel alleles associated with hair color and skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiali; Kraft, Peter; Nan, Hongmei; Guo, Qun; Chen, Constance; Qureshi, Abrar; Hankinson, Susan E; Hu, Frank B; Duffy, David L; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Hayward, Nicholas K; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Chanock, Stephen; Hunter, David J

    2008-05-16

    We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of natural hair color in more than 10,000 men and women of European ancestry from the United States and Australia. An initial analysis of 528,173 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped on 2,287 women identified IRF4 and SLC24A4 as loci highly associated with hair color, along with three other regions encompassing known pigmentation genes. We confirmed these associations in 7,028 individuals from three additional studies. Across these four studies, SLC24A4 rs12896399 and IRF4 rs12203592 showed strong associations with hair color, with p = 6.0x10(-62) and p = 7.46x10(-127), respectively. The IRF4 SNP was also associated with skin color (p = 6.2x10(-14)), eye color (p = 6.1x10(-13)), and skin tanning response to sunlight (p = 3.9x10(-89)). A multivariable analysis pooling data from the initial GWAS and an additional 1,440 individuals suggested that the association between rs12203592 and hair color was independent of rs1540771, a SNP between the IRF4 and EXOC2 genes previously found to be associated with hair color. After adjustment for rs12203592, the association between rs1540771 and hair color was not significant (p = 0.52). One variant in the MATP gene was associated with hair color. A variant in the HERC2 gene upstream of the OCA2 gene showed the strongest and independent association with hair color compared with other SNPs in this region, including three previously reported SNPs. The signals detected in a region around the MC1R gene were explained by MC1R red hair color alleles. Our results suggest that the IRF4 and SLC24A4 loci are associated with human hair color and skin pigmentation.

  2. Study on the association of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with clinical mastitis in Norwegian Red cows.

    PubMed

    Kulberg, S; Heringstad, B; Guttersrud, O A; Olsaker, I

    2007-08-01

    Genotyping of bovine leucocyte antigen DRB3.2 (BoLA-DRB3.2) in a total of 523 Norwegian Red (NR) cows from two groups selected for high protein yield and low clinical mastitis, respectively, identified 27 previously reported BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles across the groups. Significant differences in BoLA-DRB3.2 allele frequencies were found between the selection groups. Alleles *13, *18, *22 and *27 had a significantly higher frequency in cows selected for low clinical mastitis, while alleles *3, *9, *11 and *26 had a higher frequency in cows selected for high protein yield. Associations between BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles and clinical mastitis were analysed based on mastitis data from 741,072 first-lactation NR cows, of which 452 were genotyped. Alleles *22 and *26 were found to be associated with increased clinical mastitis, while alleles *7, *11, *18 and *24 had a favourable effect on mastitis resistance. Contradictory results from different studies investigating associations between BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles and mastitis indicate that future studies should focus on associations of mastitis with BoLA haplotypes rather than with single BoLA genes.

  3. Association study of human VN1R1 pheromone receptor gene alleles and gender.

    PubMed

    Mitropoulos, Constantinos; Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Menounos, Panagiotis G; Kolonelou, Christina; Pappa, Magda; Bertolis, George; Gerou, Spiros; Patrinos, George P

    2007-01-01

    Pheromones are water-soluble chemicals that elicit neuroendocrine and physiological changes, while they also provide information about gender within individuals of the same species. VN1R1 is the only functional pheromone receptor in humans. We have undertaken a large mutation screening approach in 425 adult individuals from the Hellenic population to investigate whether the allelic differences, namely alleles 1a and 1b present in the human VN1R1 gene, are gender specific. Here we show that both VN1R1 1a and 1b alleles are found in chromosomes of both male and female subjects at frequency of 26.35% and 73.65%, respectively. Given the fact that those allelic differences potentially cause minor changes in the protein conformation and its transmembrane domains, as simulated by the TMHMM software, our data suggest that the allelic differences in the human VN1R1 gene are unlikely to be associated with gender and hence to contribute to distinct gender-specific behavior.

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies 14 novel risk alleles associated with basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Harvind S.; Wu, Wenting; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Yang, Lingyao; Hedlin, Haley; Desai, Manisha; Lin, Yuan; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Hinds, David A.; Tang, Jean Y.; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y.

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of 2.8 million cases in the United States alone. Previous studies have demonstrated an association between 21 distinct genetic loci and BCC risk. Here, we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of BCC, totalling 17,187 cases and 287,054 controls. We confirm 17 previously reported loci and identify 14 new susceptibility loci reaching genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8, logistic regression). These newly associated SNPs lie within predicted keratinocyte regulatory elements and in expression quantitative trait loci; furthermore, we identify candidate genes and non-coding RNAs involved in telomere maintenance, immune regulation and tumour progression, providing deeper insight into the pathogenesis of BCC. PMID:27539887

  5. Detecting low frequent loss-of-function alleles in genome wide association studies with red hair color as example.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Struchalin, Maksim V; Duijn, Kate van; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Duijn, Cornelia van; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Kayser, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    Multiple loss-of-function (LOF) alleles at the same gene may influence a phenotype not only in the homozygote state when alleles are considered individually, but also in the compound heterozygote (CH) state. Such LOF alleles typically have low frequencies and moderate to large effects. Detecting such variants is of interest to the genetics community, and relevant statistical methods for detecting and quantifying their effects are sorely needed. We present a collapsed double heterozygosity (CDH) test to detect the presence of multiple LOF alleles at a gene. When causal SNPs are available, which may be the case in next generation genome sequencing studies, this CDH test has overwhelmingly higher power than single SNP analysis. When causal SNPs are not directly available such as in current GWA settings, we show the CDH test has higher power than standard single SNP analysis if tagging SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium with the underlying causal SNPs to at least a moderate degree (r²>0.1). The test is implemented for genome-wide analysis in the publically available software package GenABEL which is based on a sliding window approach. We provide the proof of principle by conducting a genome-wide CDH analysis of red hair color, a trait known to be influenced by multiple loss-of-function alleles, in a total of 7,732 Dutch individuals with hair color ascertained. The association signals at the MC1R gene locus from CDH were uniformly more significant than traditional GWA analyses (the most significant P for CDH = 3.11×10⁻¹⁴² vs. P for rs258322 = 1.33×10⁻⁶⁶). The CDH test will contribute towards finding rare LOF variants in GWAS and sequencing studies.

  6. Validation of genome-wide association study (GWAS)-identified disease risk alleles with patient-specific stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin; Li, Yao; Chan, Lawrence; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Nguyen, Huy V.; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Li, Xiaorong; Brown, Lewis M.; Egli, Dieter; Sparrow, Janet R.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    While the past decade has seen great progress in mapping loci for common diseases, studying how these risk alleles lead to pathology remains a challenge. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affects 9 million older Americans, and is characterized by the loss of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Although the closely linked genome-wide association studies ARMS2/HTRA1 genes, located at the chromosome 10q26 locus, are strongly associated with the risk of AMD, their downstream targets are unknown. Low population frequencies of risk alleles in tissue banks make it impractical to study their function in cells derived from autopsied tissue. Moreover, autopsy eyes from end-stage AMD patients, where age-related RPE atrophy and fibrosis are already present, cannot be used to determine how abnormal ARMS2/HTRA1 expression can initiate RPE pathology. Instead, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived RPE from patients provides us with earlier stage AMD patient-specific cells and allows us to analyze the underlying mechanisms at this critical time point. An unbiased proteome screen of A2E-aged patient-specific iPS-derived RPE cell lines identified superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2)-mediated antioxidative defense in the genetic allele's susceptibility of AMD. The AMD-associated risk haplotype (T-in/del-A) impairs the ability of the RPE to defend against aging-related oxidative stress. SOD2 defense is impaired in RPE homozygous for the risk haplotype (T-in/del-A; T-in/del-A), while the effect was less pronounced in RPE homozygous for the protective haplotype (G–Wt–G; G–Wt–G). ARMS2/HTRA1 risk alleles decrease SOD2 defense, making RPE more susceptible to oxidative damage and thereby contributing to AMD pathogenesis. PMID:24497574

  7. Validation of genome-wide association study (GWAS)-identified disease risk alleles with patient-specific stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Li, Yao; Chan, Lawrence; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Nguyen, Huy V; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Li, Xiaorong; Brown, Lewis M; Egli, Dieter; Sparrow, Janet R; Tsang, Stephen H

    2014-07-01

    While the past decade has seen great progress in mapping loci for common diseases, studying how these risk alleles lead to pathology remains a challenge. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affects 9 million older Americans, and is characterized by the loss of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Although the closely linked genome-wide association studies ARMS2/HTRA1 genes, located at the chromosome 10q26 locus, are strongly associated with the risk of AMD, their downstream targets are unknown. Low population frequencies of risk alleles in tissue banks make it impractical to study their function in cells derived from autopsied tissue. Moreover, autopsy eyes from end-stage AMD patients, where age-related RPE atrophy and fibrosis are already present, cannot be used to determine how abnormal ARMS2/HTRA1 expression can initiate RPE pathology. Instead, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived RPE from patients provides us with earlier stage AMD patient-specific cells and allows us to analyze the underlying mechanisms at this critical time point. An unbiased proteome screen of A2E-aged patient-specific iPS-derived RPE cell lines identified superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2)-mediated antioxidative defense in the genetic allele's susceptibility of AMD. The AMD-associated risk haplotype (T-in/del-A) impairs the ability of the RPE to defend against aging-related oxidative stress. SOD2 defense is impaired in RPE homozygous for the risk haplotype (T-in/del-A; T-in/del-A), while the effect was less pronounced in RPE homozygous for the protective haplotype (G-Wt-G; G-Wt-G). ARMS2/HTRA1 risk alleles decrease SOD2 defense, making RPE more susceptible to oxidative damage and thereby contributing to AMD pathogenesis.

  8. Low-penetrance alleles predisposing to sporadic colorectal cancers: a French case-controlled genetic association study

    PubMed Central

    Küry, Sébastien; Buecher, Bruno; Robiou-du-Pont, Sébastien; Scoul, Catherine; Colman, Hélène; Le Neel, Tanguy; Le Houérou, Claire; Faroux, Roger; Ollivry, Jean; Lafraise, Bernard; Chupin, Louis-Dominique; Sébille, Véronique; Bézieau, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    Background Sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC) are multifactorial diseases resulting from the combined effects of numerous genetic, environmental and behavioral risk factors. Genetic association studies have suggested low-penetrance alleles of extremely varied genes to be involved in susceptibility to CRC in Caucasian populations. Methods Through a large genetic association study based on 1023 patients with sporadic CRC and 1121 controls, we tested a panel of these low-penetrance alleles to find out whether they could determine "genotypic profiles" at risk for CRC among individuals of the French population. We examined 52 polymorphisms of 35 genes – drawn from inflammation, xenobiotic detoxification, one-carbon, insulin signaling, and DNA repair pathways – for their possible contribution to colorectal carcinogenesis. The risk of cancer associated with these polymorphisms was assessed by calculation of odds ratios (OR) using multivariate analyses and logistic regression. Results Whereas all these polymorphisms had previously been found to be associated with CRC risk, especially in Caucasian populations, we were able to replicate the association for only five of them. Three SNPs were shown to increase CRC risk: PTGS1 c.639C>A (p.Gly213Gly), IL8 c.-352T>A, and MTHFR c.1286A>C (p.Ala429Glu). On the contrary, two other SNPs, PLA2G2A c.435+230C>T and PPARG c.1431C>T (p.His477His), were associated with a decrease in CRC risk. Further analyses highlighted genotypic combinations having a greater predisposing effect on CRC (OR 1.97, 95%CI 1.31–2.97, p = 0.0009) than the allelic variants that were examined separately. Conclusion The identification of CRC-predisposing combinations, composed of alleles PTGS1 c.639A, PLA2G2A c.435+230C, PPARG c.1431C, IL8 c.-352A, and MTHFR c.1286C, highlights the importance of inflammatory processes in susceptibility to sporadic CRC, as well as a possible crosstalk between inflammation and one-carbon pathways. PMID:18992148

  9. A note on the use of the generalized odds ratio in meta-analysis of association studies involving bi- and tri-allelic polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The generalized odds ratio (GOR) was recently suggested as a genetic model-free measure for association studies. However, its properties were not extensively investigated. We used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate type-I error rates, power and bias in both effect size and between-study variance estimates of meta-analyses using the GOR as a summary effect, and compared these results to those obtained by usual approaches of model specification. We further applied the GOR in a real meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies in Alzheimer's disease. Findings For bi-allelic polymorphisms, the GOR performs virtually identical to a standard multiplicative model of analysis (e.g. per-allele odds ratio) for variants acting multiplicatively, but augments slightly the power to detect variants with a dominant mode of action, while reducing the probability to detect recessive variants. Although there were differences among the GOR and usual approaches in terms of bias and type-I error rates, both simulation- and real data-based results provided little indication that these differences will be substantial in practice for meta-analyses involving bi-allelic polymorphisms. However, the use of the GOR may be slightly more powerful for the synthesis of data from tri-allelic variants, particularly when susceptibility alleles are less common in the populations (≤10%). This gain in power may depend on knowledge of the direction of the effects. Conclusions For the synthesis of data from bi-allelic variants, the GOR may be regarded as a multiplicative-like model of analysis. The use of the GOR may be slightly more powerful in the tri-allelic case, particularly when susceptibility alleles are less common in the populations. PMID:21645382

  10. Association between the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2*2 allele and smoking-related chronic airway obstruction in a Japanese general population: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Morita, Kazunori; Masuda, Natsuki; Oniki, Kentaro; Saruwatari, Junji; Kajiwara, Ayami; Otake, Koji; Ogata, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Kazuko

    2015-07-16

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) detoxifies exogenous and endogenous toxic aldehydes; however, its protective effect against cigarette smoke in airways is unknown. We therefore examined whether the inactive ALDH2*2 allele is associated with smoking-related chronic airway obstruction. We conducted a cross-sectional study including 684 Japanese participants in a health screening program, and a retrospective longitudinal study in the elderly subgroup. The risks of airway obstruction in the ever-smokers with the ALDH2*1/*2 and *2/*2 genotypes were two and three times higher, respectively, than in the never-smokers with the ALDH2*1/*1 genotype. Moreover, the combined effect of smoking and the ALDH2*2 allele was prominent in the asthmatic subjects. In a longitudinal association analysis, the combination of the ALDH2 genotype and pack-years of smoking synergistically increased the risk of airway obstruction. The number of pack-years of smoking at baseline was identified to be a significant predictor of airway obstruction only in the ALDH2*2 allele carriers. In addition, the ALDH2*2 allele was also associated with the incidence of smoking-related airway obstruction, in the Cox proportional hazards model. This pilot study demonstrated for the first time a significant gene-environment interaction between the ALDH2*2 allele and cumulative exposure to cigarette smoke on the risk of airway obstruction.

  11. Genome-wide Association Study of Subtype-Specific Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk Alleles Using Pooled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Madalene A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Swenerton, Kenneth D.; Chenevix–Trench, Georgia; Lu, Yi; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fasching, Peter A.; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Friel, Grace; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Lurie, Galina; Goodman, Marc T.; Carney, Michael E.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H.; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P.; Ness, Roberta B.; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Sellers, Thomas A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa C.; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Chandran, Urmila; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H.; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B.; Bjorge, Line; Halle, Mari K.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T.; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia–Closas, Montserrat; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian G.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Flanagan, James M.; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Phelan, Catherine M.; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Narod, Steven A.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Szafron, Lukasz M; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.; Brooks–Wilson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS (56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC), selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging 6 loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P<0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR=1.17, P=0.029, n=1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P=0.014, n=2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR=0.86, P=0.0043, n=892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR=0.84, P=0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P<0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes. PMID:24190013

  12. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies HLA 8.1 Ancestral Haplotype Alleles as Major Genetic Risk Factors for Myositis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Frederick W.; Chen, Wei; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Cooper, Robert G.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Rider, Lisa G.; Danko, Katalin; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Reed, Ann M.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Padyukov, Leonid; Selva-O’Callaghan, Albert; Radstake, Timothy R.; Isenberg, David A.; Chinoy, Hector; Ollier, William E.R.; Scheet, Paul; Peng, Bo; Lee, Annette; Byun, Jinyoung; Lamb, Janine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Amos, Christopher I.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune muscle diseases (myositis) comprise a group of complex phenotypes influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify genetic risk factors in patients of European ancestry, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the major myositis phenotypes in a total of 1710 cases, which included 705 adult dermatomyositis; 473 juvenile dermatomyositis; 532 polymyositis; and 202 adult dermatomyositis, juvenile dermatomyositis or polymyositis patients with anti-histidyl tRNA synthetase (anti-Jo-1) autoantibodies, and compared them with 4724 controls. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms showing strong associations (P < 5 × 10−8) in GWAS were identified in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region for all myositis phenotypes together, as well as for the four clinical and autoantibody phenotypes studied separately. Imputation and regression analyses found that alleles comprising the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH8.1) defined essentially all the genetic risk in the phenotypes studied. Although the HLA DRB1*03:01 allele showed slightly stronger associations with adult and juvenile dermatomyositis, and HLA B*08:01 with polymyositis and anti-Jo-1 autoantibody-positive myositis, multiple alleles of AH8.1 were required for the full risk effects. Our findings establish that alleles of the AH8.1haplotype comprise the primary genetic risk factors associated with the major myositis phenotypes in geographically diverse Caucasian populations. PMID:26291516

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies HLA 8.1 ancestral haplotype alleles as major genetic risk factors for myositis phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Miller, F W; Chen, W; O'Hanlon, T P; Cooper, R G; Vencovsky, J; Rider, L G; Danko, K; Wedderburn, L R; Lundberg, I E; Pachman, L M; Reed, A M; Ytterberg, S R; Padyukov, L; Selva-O'Callaghan, A; Radstake, T R; Isenberg, D A; Chinoy, H; Ollier, W E R; Scheet, P; Peng, B; Lee, A; Byun, J; Lamb, J A; Gregersen, P K; Amos, C I

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune muscle diseases (myositis) comprise a group of complex phenotypes influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify genetic risk factors in patients of European ancestry, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the major myositis phenotypes in a total of 1710 cases, which included 705 adult dermatomyositis, 473 juvenile dermatomyositis, 532 polymyositis and 202 adult dermatomyositis, juvenile dermatomyositis or polymyositis patients with anti-histidyl-tRNA synthetase (anti-Jo-1) autoantibodies, and compared them with 4724 controls. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms showing strong associations (P<5×10(-8)) in GWAS were identified in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region for all myositis phenotypes together, as well as for the four clinical and autoantibody phenotypes studied separately. Imputation and regression analyses found that alleles comprising the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH8.1) defined essentially all the genetic risk in the phenotypes studied. Although the HLA DRB1*03:01 allele showed slightly stronger associations with adult and juvenile dermatomyositis, and HLA B*08:01 with polymyositis and anti-Jo-1 autoantibody-positive myositis, multiple alleles of AH8.1 were required for the full risk effects. Our findings establish that alleles of the AH8.1 comprise the primary genetic risk factors associated with the major myositis phenotypes in geographically diverse Caucasian populations.

  14. Genome-wide association study of subtype-specific epithelial ovarian cancer risk alleles using pooled DNA.

    PubMed

    Earp, Madalene A; Kelemen, Linda E; Magliocco, Anthony M; Swenerton, Kenneth D; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Lu, Yi; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Friel, Grace; Moysich, Kirsten B; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Lurie, Galina; Goodman, Marc T; Carney, Michael E; Thompson, Pamela J; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P; Ness, Roberta B; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Claus K; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Sellers, Thomas A; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; Vierkant, Robert A; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa C; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Levine, Douglas A; Bisogna, Maria; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Iversen, Edwin S; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Poole, Elizabeth M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Bandera, Elisa V; Chandran, Urmila; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B; Bjorge, Line; Halle, Mari K; van Altena, Anne M; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Pharoah, Paul D P; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian G; Whittemore, Alice S; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H; Flanagan, James M; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Phelan, Catherine M; Risch, Harvey A; McLaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste L; Pike, Malcolm C; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Szafron, Lukasz M; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Brooks-Wilson, Angela

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS [56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low-malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC], selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging six loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P < 0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR = 1.17, P = 0.029, n = 1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P = 0.014, n = 2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR = 0.86, P = 0.0043, n = 892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR = 0.84, P = 0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P < 0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes.

  15. Association between ACE D allele and elite short distance swimming.

    PubMed

    Costa, Aldo Matos; Silva, António José; Garrido, Nuno Domingos; Louro, Hugo; de Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó; Breitenfeld, Luiza

    2009-08-01

    The influence of ACE gene on athletic performance has been widely explored, and most of the published data refers to an I/D polymorphism leading to the presence (I allele) or absence (D allele) of a 287-bp sequence in intron 16, determining ACE activity in serum and tissues. A higher I allele frequency has been reported among elite endurance athletes, while the D allele was more frequent among those engaged in more power-orientated sports. However, on competitive swimming, the reproducibility of such associations is controversial. We thus compared the ACE genotype of elite swimmers with that of non-elite swimming cohort and of healthy control subjects. We thus sought an association of the ACE genotype of elite swimmers with their competitive distance. 39 Portuguese Olympic swimming candidates were classified as: short (<200 m) and middle (400-1,500 m) distance swimmers, respectively. A group of 32 non-elite swimmers were studied and classified as well, and a control group (n = 100) was selected from the Portuguese population. Chelex 100 was used for DNA extraction and genotype was determined by PCR-RFLP methods. We found that ACE genotype distribution and allelic frequency differs significantly by event distance only among elite swimmers (P < or = 0.05). Moreover, the allelic frequency of the elite short distance swimmers differed significantly from that of the controls (P = 0.021). No associations were found between middle distance swimmers and controls. Our results seem to support an association between the D allele and elite short distance swimming.

  16. Rare allelic forms of PRDM9 associated with childhood leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hussin, Julie; Sinnett, Daniel; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; de Malliard, Thibault; Busche, Stephan; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Gibson, Greg; Andersson, Anna; Holmfeldt, Linda; Ma, Jing; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jinghui; Andelfinger, Gregor; Downing, James R.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-01-01

    One of the most rapidly evolving genes in humans, PRDM9, is a key determinant of the distribution of meiotic recombination events. Mutations in this meiotic-specific gene have previously been associated with male infertility in humans and recent studies suggest that PRDM9 may be involved in pathological genomic rearrangements. In studying genomes from families with children affected by B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we characterized meiotic recombination patterns within a family with two siblings having hyperdiploid childhood B-ALL and observed unusual localization of maternal recombination events. The mother of the family carries a rare PRDM9 allele, potentially explaining the unusual patterns found. From exomes sequenced in 44 additional parents of children affected with B-ALL, we discovered a substantial and significant excess of rare allelic forms of PRDM9. The rare PRDM9 alleles are transmitted to the affected children in half the cases; nonetheless there remains a significant excess of rare alleles among patients relative to controls. We successfully replicated this latter observation in an independent cohort of 50 children with B-ALL, where we found an excess of rare PRDM9 alleles in aneuploid and infant B-ALL patients. PRDM9 variability in humans is thought to influence genomic instability, and these data support a potential role for PRDM9 variation in risk of acquiring aneuploidies or genomic rearrangements associated with childhood leukemogenesis. PMID:23222848

  17. Rare allelic forms of PRDM9 associated with childhood leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hussin, Julie; Sinnett, Daniel; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; de Malliard, Thibault; Busche, Stephan; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Gibson, Greg; Andersson, Anna; Holmfeldt, Linda; Ma, Jing; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jinghui; Andelfinger, Gregor; Downing, James R; Mullighan, Charles G; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-03-01

    One of the most rapidly evolving genes in humans, PRDM9, is a key determinant of the distribution of meiotic recombination events. Mutations in this meiotic-specific gene have previously been associated with male infertility in humans and recent studies suggest that PRDM9 may be involved in pathological genomic rearrangements. In studying genomes from families with children affected by B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we characterized meiotic recombination patterns within a family with two siblings having hyperdiploid childhood B-ALL and observed unusual localization of maternal recombination events. The mother of the family carries a rare PRDM9 allele, potentially explaining the unusual patterns found. From exomes sequenced in 44 additional parents of children affected with B-ALL, we discovered a substantial and significant excess of rare allelic forms of PRDM9. The rare PRDM9 alleles are transmitted to the affected children in half the cases; nonetheless there remains a significant excess of rare alleles among patients relative to controls. We successfully replicated this latter observation in an independent cohort of 50 children with B-ALL, where we found an excess of rare PRDM9 alleles in aneuploid and infant B-ALL patients. PRDM9 variability in humans is thought to influence genomic instability, and these data support a potential role for PRDM9 variation in risk of acquiring aneuploidies or genomic rearrangements associated with childhood leukemogenesis.

  18. A Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Risk Alleles in Plasminogen and P4HA2 Associated with Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Carmona, F David; Vaglio, Augusto; Mackie, Sarah L; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Monach, Paul A; Castañeda, Santos; Solans, Roser; Morado, Inmaculada C; Narváez, Javier; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; Pease, Colin T; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Watts, Richard; Khalidi, Nader; Langford, Carol A; Ytterberg, Steven; Boiardi, Luigi; Beretta, Lorenzo; Govoni, Marcello; Emmi, Giacomo; Bonatti, Francesco; Cimmino, Marco A; Witte, Torsten; Neumann, Thomas; Holle, Julia; Schönau, Verena; Sailler, Laurent; Papo, Thomas; Haroche, Julien; Mahr, Alfred; Mouthon, Luc; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P; Voskuyl, Alexandre; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Daikeler, Thomas; Berger, Christoph T; Molloy, Eamonn S; O'Neill, Lorraine; Blockmans, Daniel; Lie, Benedicte A; Mclaren, Paul; Vyse, Timothy J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Allanore, Yannick; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Barrett, Jennifer H; Cid, María C; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A; Morgan, Ann W; González-Gay, Miguel A; Martín, Javier

    2017-01-05

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common form of vasculitis in individuals older than 50 years in Western countries. To shed light onto the genetic background influencing susceptibility for GCA, we performed a genome-wide association screening in a well-powered study cohort. After imputation, 1,844,133 genetic variants were analyzed in 2,134 case subjects and 9,125 unaffected individuals from ten independent populations of European ancestry. Our data confirmed HLA class II as the strongest associated region (independent signals: rs9268905, p = 1.94 × 10(-54), per-allele OR = 1.79; and rs9275592, p = 1.14 × 10(-40), OR = 2.08). Additionally, PLG and P4HA2 were identified as GCA risk genes at the genome-wide level of significance (rs4252134, p = 1.23 × 10(-10), OR = 1.28; and rs128738, p = 4.60 × 10(-9), OR = 1.32, respectively). Interestingly, we observed that the association peaks overlapped with different regulatory elements related to cell types and tissues involved in the pathophysiology of GCA. PLG and P4HA2 are involved in vascular remodelling and angiogenesis, suggesting a high relevance of these processes for the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this type of vasculitis.

  19. Association and linkage studies of the TAQI A1 allele at the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in samples of female and male alcoholics

    SciTech Connect

    Neiswanger, K.; Hill, S.Y.; Kaplan, B.B.

    1995-08-14

    To address the controversy surrounding DRD2 and alcoholism, we performed linkage and association studies utilizing alcoholic men from high density families largely uncontaminated by other psychopathology and female alcoholics for whom secondary drug dependence (averaging 10 years later onset) was a prominent feature. The males and females were combined for a total of 52 alcoholics, and compared to 30 controls screened for the absence of alcoholism and other psychopathology, revealing a significant association between the frequency of the TaqI allele and alcoholism. However, linkage and family-based association study, placed in the context of the literature, suggest that minimizing psychopathology in control groups is probably a more important explanation for divergent results than either sampling error or population stratification. When combined with the complete lack of within-family evidence, we conclude that the association, while not specific to the alcoholism phenotype, per se. 37 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Common Kibra alleles are associated with human memory performance.

    PubMed

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stephan, Dietrich A; Huentelman, Matthew J; Hoerndli, Frederic J; Craig, David W; Pearson, John V; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Brunner, Fabienne; Corneveaux, Jason; Osborne, David; Wollmer, M Axel; Aerni, Amanda; Coluccia, Daniel; Hänggi, Jürgen; Mondadori, Christian R A; Buchmann, Andreas; Reiman, Eric M; Caselli, Richard J; Henke, Katharina; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2006-10-20

    Human memory is a polygenic trait. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify memory-related gene variants. A genomic locus encoding the brain protein KIBRA was significantly associated with memory performance in three independent, cognitively normal cohorts from Switzerland and the United States. Gene expression studies showed that KIBRA was expressed in memory-related brain structures. Functional magnetic resonance imaging detected KIBRA allele-dependent differences in hippocampal activations during memory retrieval. Evidence from these experiments suggests a role for KIBRA in human memory.

  1. Significant Association of HLA-B Alleles and Genotypes in Thai Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Puangpetch, Apichaya; Suwannarat, Pongwut; Chamnanphol, Montri; Koomdee, Napatrupron; Ngamsamut, Nattawat; Limsila, Penkhae; Sukasem, Chonlaphat

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder. Many susceptible causative genes have been identified. Most of the previous reports showed the relationship between the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) gene and etiology of autism. In order to identify HLA-B alleles associated with autism in Thai population, we compared the frequency of HLA-B allele in 364 autistic subjects with 952 normal subjects by using a two-stage sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe system (PCR-SSOP) method based on flow-cytometry technology. HLA-B⁎13:02 (P = 0.019, OR = 2.229), HLA-B⁎38:02 (P = 0.049, OR = 1.628), HLA-B⁎44:03 (P = 0.016, OR = 1.645), and HLA-B⁎56:01 (P = 1.78 × 10−4, OR = 4.927) alleles were significantly increased in autistic subjects compared with normal subjects. Moreover, we found that the HLA-B⁎18:02 (P = 0.016, OR = 0.375) and HLA-B⁎46:12 (P = 0.008, OR = 0.147) alleles were negatively associated with autism when compared to normal controls. Both alleles might have a protective role in disease development. In addition, four HLA-B genotypes of autistic patients had statistically significant relationship with control groups, consisting of HLA-B⁎3905/⁎5801 (P = 0.032, OR = 24.697), HLA-B⁎2704/⁎5801 (P = 0.022, OR = 6.872), HLA-B⁎3501/⁎4403 (P = 0.021, OR = 30.269), and HLA-B⁎1801/⁎4402 (P = 0.017, OR = 13.757). This is the first report on HLA-B associated with Thai autism and may serve as a marker for genetic susceptibility to autism in Thai population. PMID:26819491

  2. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  3. Distribution of coat-color-associated alleles in the domestic horse population and Przewalski's horse.

    PubMed

    Reissmann, Monika; Musa, Lutfi; Zakizadeh, Sonia; Ludwig, Arne

    2016-11-01

    Considering the hidden mode of inheritance of some coat-color-associated alleles, we investigated the presence/absence of coat-color-associated alleles in 1093 domestic horses of 55 breeds and 20 specimens of Przewalski's horse. For coat-color genotyping, allele specific PCR, pyrosequencing and Li-Cor analyses were conducted on 12 coat-color-associated alleles of five genes. Our data provide deep insight into the distribution of coat-color-associated alleles within breeds. We found that the alleles for the basic colorations (bay, black, and chestnut) are widely distributed and occur in nearly all breeds. Alleles leading to dilutions or patterns are rare in domestic breeds and were not found in Przewalski's horse. Higher frequencies of these alleles are only found in breeds that are selected for their expressed phenotypes (e.g., Kinsky horse, Lewitzer, Tinker). Nevertheless, our study produced strong evidence that molecular testing of the coat color is necessary for well-defined phenotyping to avoid unexpected colorations of offspring that can result in legal action.

  4. A Platform for Interrogating Cancer-Associated p53 Alleles

    PubMed Central

    D’Brot, Alejandro; Kurtz, Paula; Regan, Erin; Jakubowski, Brandon; Abrams, John M

    2016-01-01

    p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. Compelling evidence argues that full transformation involves loss of growth suppression encoded by wild-type p53 together with poorly understood oncogenic activity encoded by missense mutations. Furthermore, distinguishing disease alleles from natural polymorphisms is an important clinical challenge. To interrogate the genetic activity of human p53 variants, we leveraged the Drosophila model as an in vivo platform. We engineered strains that replace the fly p53 gene with human alleles, producing a collection of stocks that are, in effect, ‘humanized’ for p53 variants. Like the fly counterpart, human p53 transcriptionally activated a biosensor and induced apoptosis after DNA damage. However, all humanized strains representing common alleles found in cancer patients failed to complement in these assays. Surprisingly, stimulus-dependent activation of hp53 occurred without stabilization, demonstrating that these two processes can be uncoupled. Like its fly counterpart, hp53 formed prominent nuclear foci in germline cells but cancer-associated p53 variants did not. Moreover, these same mutant alleles disrupted hp53 foci and inhibited biosensor activity, suggesting that these properties are functionally linked. Together these findings establish a functional platform for interrogating human p53 alleles and suggest that simple phenotypes could be used to stratify disease variants. PMID:26996664

  5. Amyloid mediates the association of apolipoprotein E e4 allele to cognitive function in older people

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, D; Schneider, J; Wilson, R; Bienias, J; Berry-Kravis, E; Arnold, S

    2005-01-01

    Background: The neurobiological changes underlying the association of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 allele with level of cognition are poorly understood. Objective: To test the hypothesis that amyloid load can account for (mediate) the association of the APOE e4 allele with level of cognition assessed proximate to death. Methods: There were 44 subjects with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease and 50 without dementia, who had participated in the Religious Orders Study. They underwent determination of APOE allele status, had comprehensive cognitive testing in the last year of life, and brain autopsy at death. The percentage area of cortex occupied by amyloid beta and the density of tau positive neurofibrillary tangles were quantified from six brain regions and averaged to yield summary measures of amyloid load and neurofibrillary tangles. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine whether amyloid load could account for the effect of allele status on level of cognition, controlling for age, sex, and education. Results: Possession of at least one APOE e4 allele was associated with lower level of cognitive function proximate to death (p = 0.04). The effect of the e4 allele was reduced by nearly 60% and was no longer significant after controlling for the effect of amyloid load, whereas there was a robust inverse association between amyloid and cognition (p = 0.001). Because prior work had suggested that neurofibrillary tangles could account for the association of amyloid on cognition, we next examined whether amyloid could account for the effect of allele status on tangles. In a series of regression analyses, e4 was associated with density of tangles (p = 0.002), but the effect of the e4 allele was reduced by more than 50% and was no longer significant after controlling for the effect of amyloid load. Conclusion: These findings are consistent with a sequence of events whereby the e4 allele works through amyloid deposition and subsequent tangle formation to

  6. Reintroduction of a Homocysteine Level-Associated Allele into East Asians by Neanderthal Introgression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ya; Ding, Qiliang; He, Yungang; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present an analysis of Neanderthal introgression at the dipeptidase 1 gene, DPEP1. A Neanderthal origin for the putative introgressive haplotypes was demonstrated using an established three-step approach. This introgression was under positive natural selection, reached a frequency of >50%, and introduced a homocysteine level- and pigmentation-associated allele (rs460879-T) into East Asians. However, the same allele was also found in non-East Asians, but not from Neanderthal introgression. It is likely that rs460879-T was lost in East Asians and was reintroduced subsequently through Neanderthal introgression. Our findings suggest that Neanderthal introgression could reintroduce an important previously existing allele into populations where the allele had been lost. This study sheds new light on understanding the contribution of Neanderthal introgression to the adaptation of non-Africans.

  7. No Association Between CEL-HYB Hybrid Allele and Chronic Pancreatitis in Asian Populations.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen-Bin; Boulling, Arnaud; Masamune, Atsushi; Issarapu, Prachand; Masson, Emmanuelle; Wu, Hao; Sun, Xiao-Tian; Hu, Liang-Hao; Zhou, Dai-Zhan; He, Lin; Fichou, Yann; Nakano, Eriko; Hamada, Shin; Kakuta, Yoichi; Kume, Kiyoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Paliwal, Sumit; Mani, K Radha; Bhaskar, Seema; Cooper, David N; Férec, Claude; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Chandak, Giriraj R; Chen, Jian-Min; Li, Zhao-Shen; Liao, Zhuan

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid allele between the carboxyl ester lipase gene (CEL) and its pseudogene, CELP (called CEL-HYB), generated by nonallelic homologous recombination between CEL intron 10 and CELP intron 10', was found to increase susceptibility to chronic pancreatitis in a case-control study of patients of European ancestry. We attempted to replicate this finding in 3 independent cohorts from China, Japan, and India, but failed to detect the CEL-HYB allele in any of these populations. The CEL-HYB allele might therefore be an ethnic-specific risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. An alternative hybrid allele (CEL-HYB2) was identified in all 3 Asian populations (1.7% combined carrier frequency), but was not associated with chronic pancreatitis.

  8. Association of the HLA-B*52 allele with non-progression to AIDS in Brazilian HIV-1-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, S L M; de Sá, N B R; Campos, D P; Coelho, A B; Guimarães, M L; Leite, T C N F; Veloso, V G; Morgado, M G

    2014-04-01

    Several human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles are associated with the susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection and/or AIDS progression. Of these, the HLA-B alleles are considered the strongest genetic determinant of disease outcome. We evaluated the influence of the HLA-B alleles on AIDS progression among HIV-1-positive individuals from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, who were categorized as rapid progressors (RPs), typical progressors (TPs) or long-term non-progressors (LTNPs). In this study, significant differences in HLA-B allele frequencies were observed among the three progression groups for the B*48, B*49 and B*52 alleles. After controlling for other factors associated with AIDS progression, the presence of the B*52 allele was shown to be a significant protective factor (hazard ratio (HR) 0.49 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27-0.90) P<0.03). Although no direct association was observed between the presence of the B*27 or B*57 allele and the LTNP profile compared with the TP or RP groups, the adjusted model confirmed that these alleles are protective factors against AIDS progression (HR 0.62 (95% CI 0.38-0.99) P<0.05), as previously described. These data corroborate the existence of significant differences in HLA-B allele frequencies among the distinct AIDS progression profiles and further elucidate the role of HLA alleles in the outcome of HIV infections in diverse populations.

  9. Allelic Associations between 100 DNA Markers and High versus Low IQ.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; And Others

    1995-01-01

    For DNA markers in or near genes of neurological relevance, allelic frequencies were compared for groups of high- and low-IQ children (total sample of 86). This study adds 40 markers to the 60 already studied. Only one showed a significant association with IQ in original and replication samples. (SLD)

  10. A "successful allele" at Campylobacter jejuni contingency locus Cj0170 regulates motility; "successful alleles" at locus Cj0045 are strongly associated with mouse colonization.

    PubMed

    Artymovich, Katherine; Kim, Joo-Sung; Linz, John E; Hall, David F; Kelley, Lauren E; Kalbach, Harrison L; Kathariou, Sophia; Gaymer, Jean; Paschke, Brenda

    2013-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important foodborne pathogen of humans and its primary reservoir is the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of chickens. Our previous studies demonstrated that phase variation to specific "successful alleles" at C. jejuni contingency loci Cj0045 (successful alleles carry 9G or 10G homopolymeric tracts) and Cj0170 (successful allele carries a 10G homopolymeric tract) in C. jejuni populations is strongly associated with colonization and enteritis in C57BL/6 IL-10 deficient mice. In the current study, we strengthened the association between locus Cj0170, Cj0045, and mouse colonization. We generated 8 independent strains derived from C. jejuni 11168 strain KanR4 that carried a Cj0170 gene disruption and these were all non motile. Two randomly chosen strains with the Cj0170 gene disruption (DM0170-2 and DM0170-6) were gavaged into mice. DM0170-2 and DM0170-6 failed to colonize mice while the control strain that carried a "successful"Cj0170 10G allele was motile and did colonize mice. In parallel studies, when we inoculated C. jejuni strain 33292 into mice, the "unsuccessful"Cj0045 11G allele experienced phase variation to "successful" 9G and 10G alleles in 2 independent experiments prior to d4 post inoculation in mice while the "successful" 9G allele in the control strain remained stable through d21 post inoculation or shifted to other successful alleles. These data confirm that locus Cj0170 regulates motility in C. jejuni strain KanR4 and is a virulence factor in the mouse model. The data also support a possible role of locus Cj0045 as a virulence factor in strain 33292 in infection of mice.

  11. Allelic Variation in a Willow Warbler Genomic Region Is Associated with Climate Clines

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Keith W.; Liedvogel, Miriam; Addison, BriAnne; Kleven, Oddmund; Laskemoen, Terje; Lifjeld, Jan T.; Lundberg, Max; Åkesson, Susanne; Bensch, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Local adaptation is an important process contributing to population differentiation which can occur in continuous or isolated populations connected by various amounts of gene flow. The willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus) is one of the most common songbirds in Fennoscandia. It has a continuous breeding distribution where it is found in all forested habitats from sea level to the tree line and therefore constitutes an ideal species for the study of locally adapted genes associated with environmental gradients. Previous studies in this species identified a genetic marker (AFLP-WW1) that showed a steep north-south cline in central Sweden with one allele associated with coastal lowland habitats and the other with mountainous habitats. It was further demonstrated that this marker is embedded in a highly differentiated chromosome region that spans several megabases. In the present study, we sampled 2,355 individuals at 128 sites across all of Fennoscandia to study the geographic and climatic variables associated with the allele frequency distributions of WW1. Our results demonstrate that 1) allele frequency patterns significantly differ between mountain and lowland populations, 2) these allele differences coincide with extreme temperature conditions and the short growing season in the mountains, and milder conditions in coastal areas, and 3) the northern-allele or “altitude variant” of WW1 occurs in willow warblers that occupy mountainous habitat regardless of subspecies. Finally these results suggest that climate may exert selection on the genomic region associated with these alleles and would allow us to develop testable predictions for the distribution of the genetic marker based on climate change scenarios. PMID:24788148

  12. A single nomenclature and associated database for alleles at the major histocompatibility complex class II DRB1 locus of sheep.

    PubMed

    Ballingall, K T; Herrmann-Hoesing, L; Robinson, J; Marsh, S G E; Stear, M J

    2011-06-01

    The development of standardised nomenclatures with associated databases containing reference sequences for alleles at polymorphic loci within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has been facilitated by the development of the immuno polymorphism database (IPD). Recently, included within IPD-MHC is information on allelic diversity within sheep species (IPD-MHC-OLA). Here, we present the first report of progress in populating the sheep IPD-MHC database with alleles at the class II MHC DRB1 locus. The sequence of 63 Ovar-DRB1 alleles within 24 allelic families is now held within the database, each meeting the minimum requirement of a complete second exon. These sequences are derived from a combination of genomic and cDNA-based approaches and represent the most extensive collection of validated alleles at the sheep DRB1 locus yet described. Although these 63 alleles probably represent only a fraction of the DRB1 allelic diversity in sheep species worldwide, we encourage the research community to use the official allelic nomenclature and to contribute allelic sequences to the database via its web-based submission tool. In time, the IPD-MHC-OLA resource will underpin population-based MHC genotyping studies and help to simplify meta-analyses of multi-source data from wild and domestic sheep populations.

  13. Association between Age and the 7 Repeat Allele of the Dopamine D4 Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Szekely, Anna; Bircher, Julianna; Vereczkei, Andrea; Balota, David A.; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Ronai, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is in part (25%) inherited, and genetic studies aim to uncover allelic variants that play an important role in prolonging life span. Results to date confirm only a few gene variants associated with longevity, while others show inconsistent results. However, GWAS studies concentrate on single nucleotide polymorphisms, and there are only a handful of studies investigating variable number of tandem repeat variations related to longevity. Recently, Grady and colleagues (2013) reported a remarkable (66%) accumulation of those carrying the 7 repeat allele of the dopamine D4 receptor gene in a large population of 90–109 years old Californian centenarians, as compared to an ancestry-matched young population. In the present study we demonstrate the same association using continuous age groups in an 18–97 years old Caucasian sample (N = 1801, p = 0.007). We found a continuous pattern of increase from 18–75, however frequency of allele 7 carriers decreased in our oldest age groups. Possible role of gene-environment interaction effects driven by historical events are discussed. In accordance with previous findings, we observed association preferentially in females (p = 0.003). Our results underlie the importance of investigating non-disease related genetic variants as inherited components of longevity, and confirm, that the 7-repeat allele of the dopamine D4 receptor gene is a longevity enabling genetic factor, accumulating in the elderly female population. PMID:27992450

  14. Loss of RNA expression and allele-specific expression associated with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    McKean, David M.; Homsy, Jason; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Patel, Neil; Gorham, Joshua; DePalma, Steven R.; Ware, James S.; Zaidi, Samir; Ma, Wenji; Patel, Nihir; Lifton, Richard P.; Chung, Wendy K.; Kim, Richard; Shen, Yufeng; Brueckner, Martina; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Sharp, Andrew J.; Seidman, Christine E.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Seidman, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD), a prevalent birth defect occurring in 1% of newborns, likely results from aberrant expression of cardiac developmental genes. Mutations in a variety of cardiac transcription factors, developmental signalling molecules and molecules that modify chromatin cause at least 20% of disease, but most CHD remains unexplained. We employ RNAseq analyses to assess allele-specific expression (ASE) and biallelic loss-of-expression (LOE) in 172 tissue samples from 144 surgically repaired CHD subjects. Here we show that only 5% of known imprinted genes with paternal allele silencing are monoallelic versus 56% with paternal allele expression—this cardiac-specific phenomenon seems unrelated to CHD. Further, compared with control subjects, CHD subjects have a significant burden of both LOE genes and ASE events associated with altered gene expression. These studies identify FGFBP2, LBH, RBFOX2, SGSM1 and ZBTB16 as candidate CHD genes because of significantly altered transcriptional expression. PMID:27670201

  15. An allelic series at pax7a is associated with colour polymorphism diversity in Lake Malawi cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Reade B; Moore, Emily C; Kocher, Thomas D

    2016-12-27

    Despite long-standing interest in the evolution and maintenance of discrete phenotypic polymorphisms, the molecular genetic basis of such polymorphism in the wild is largely unknown. Female sex-associated blotched colour polymorphisms found in cichlids of Lake Malawi, East Africa, represent a highly successful polymorphic phenotype, found and maintained in four genera across the geographic expanse of the lake. Previously, we identified an association with an allelic variant of the paired-box transcription factor gene pax7a and blotched colour morphs in Lake Malawi cichlid fishes. Although a diverse range of blotched phenotypes are present in Lake Malawi cichlid species, they all appeared to result from an allele of pax7a that produces increased levels of transcript. Here, we examine the developmental and genetic basis of variation among blotched morphs. First, we confirm that pax7a-associated blotch morphs result primarily from modulation of melanophore development and survival. From laboratory crosses and natural population studies, we identify at least three alleles of pax7a associated with discrete subtypes of blotched morphs, in addition to the ancestral pax7a allele. Genotypes at pax7a support initial evolution of a novel pax7a allele to produce the blotched class of morphs, followed by subsequent evolution of that pax7a blotched allele to produce additional alleles associated with discrete colour morphs. Variant alleles of pax7a produce different levels of pax7a transcript, correlating with pigmentation phenotype at the cellular level. This naturally selected allelic series should serve as a case study for understanding the molecular genetic control of pax7a expression and the evolution of sex-associated alleles.

  16. Allelic diversity associated with aridity gradient in wild emmer wheat populations.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Zvi; Saranga, Yehoshua; Krugman, Tamar; Abbo, Shahal; Nevo, Eviatar; Fahima, Tzion

    2008-01-01

    The association between allelic diversity and ecogeographical variables was studied in natural populations of wild emmer wheat [Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides (Körn.) Thell.], the tetraploid progenitor of cultivated wheat. Patterns of allelic diversity in 54 microsatellite loci were analyzed in a collection of 145 wild emmer wheat accessions representing 25 populations that were sampled across naturally occurring aridity gradient in Israel and surrounding regions. The obtained results revealed that 56% of the genetic variation resided among accessions within populations, while only 44% of the variation resided between populations. An unweighted pair-group method analysis (UPGMA) tree constructed based on the microsatellite allelic diversity divided the 25 populations into six major groups. Several groups were comprised of populations that were collected in ecologically similar but geographically remote habitats. Furthermore, genetic differentiation between populations was independent of the geographical distances. An interesting evolutionary phenomenon is highlighted by the unimodal relationship between allelic diversity and annual rainfall (r = 0.74, P < 0.0002), indicating higher allelic diversity in populations originated from habitats with intermediate environmental stress (i.e. rainfall 350-550 mm year(-1)). These results show for the first time that the 'intermediate-disturbance hypothesis', explaining biological diversity at the ecosystem level, also dominates the genetic diversity within a single species, the lowest hierarchical element of the biological diversity.

  17. Association of apolipoprotein E allele {epsilon}4 with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; David, F.; Berriche, S.

    1994-09-15

    Apolipoprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE {epsilon}4), is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD) in French patients. The association is highly significant (0.45 AD versus 0.12 controls for {epsilon}4 allele frequencies). These data support the involvement of ApoE {epsilon}4 allele as a very important risk factor for the clinical expression of AD. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Association analysis of fiber quality traits and exploration of elite alleles in Upland cotton cultivars/accessions (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Cai, Caiping; Ye, Wenxue; Zhang, Tianzhen; Guo, Wangzhen

    2014-01-01

    Exploring the elite alleles and germplasm accessions related to fiber quality traits will accelerate the breeding of cotton for fiber quality improvement. In this study, 99 Gossypium hirsutum L. accessions with diverse origins were used to perform association analysis of fiber quality traits using 97 polymorphic microsatellite marker primer pairs. A total of 107 significant marker-trait associations were detected for three fiber quality traits under three different environments, with 70 detected in two or three environments and 37 detected in only one environment. Among the 70 significant marker-trait associations, 52.86% were reported previously, implying that these are stable loci for target traits. Furthermore, we detected a large number of elite alleles associated simultaneously with two or three traits. These elite alleles were mainly from accessions collected in China, introduced to China from the United States, or rare alleles with a frequency of less than 5%. No one cultivar contained more than half of the elite alleles, but 10 accessions were collected from China and the two introduced from the United States did contain more than half of these alleles. Therefore, there is great potential for mining elite alleles from germplasm accessions for use in fiber quality improvement in modern cotton breeding.

  19. Effective marker alleles associated with type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight infection in fields

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Luo, Meng; Zhang, Dadong; Wu, Di; Li, Lei; Bai, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers associated with known quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in bi-parental mapping population usually have more than two alleles in breeding populations. Therefore, understanding the association of each allele with FHB response is particularly important to marker-assisted enhancement of FHB resistance. In this paper, we evaluated FHB severities of 192 wheat accessions including landraces and commercial varieties in three field growing seasons, and genotyped this panel with 364 genome-wide informative molecular markers. Among them, 11 markers showed reproducible marker-trait association (p < 0.05) in at least two experiments using a mixed model. More than two alleles were identified per significant marker locus. These alleles were classified into favorable, unfavorable and neutral alleles according to the normalized genotypic values. The distributions of effective alleles at these loci in each wheat accession were characterized. Mean FHB severities increased with decreased number of favorable alleles at the reproducible loci. Chinese wheat landraces and Japanese accessions have more favorable alleles at the majority of the reproducible marker loci. FHB resistance levels of varieties can be greatly improved by introduction of these favorable alleles and removal of unfavorable alleles simultaneously at these QTL-linked marker loci. PMID:27436944

  20. No Evidence for Enrichment in Schizophrenia for Common Allelic Associations at Imprinted Loci

    PubMed Central

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Kirov, George; Rees, Elliott; Isles, Anthony R.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Most genetic studies assume that the function of a genetic variant is independent of the parent from which it is inherited, but this is not always true. The best known example of parent-of-origin effects arises with respect to alleles at imprinted loci. In classical imprinting, characteristically, either the maternal or paternal copy is expressed, but not both. Only alleles present in one of the parental copies of the gene, the expressed copy, is likely to contribute to disease. It has been postulated that imprinting is important in central nervous system development, and that consequently, imprinted loci may be involved in schizophrenia. If this is true, allowing for parent-of-origin effects might be important in genetic studies of schizophrenia. Here, we use genome-wide association data from one of the world’s largest samples (N = 695) of parent schizophrenia-offspring trios to test for parent-of-origin effects. To maximise power, we restricted our analyses to test two main hypotheses. If imprinting plays a disproportionate role in schizophrenia susceptibility, we postulated a) that alleles showing robust evidence for association to schizophrenia from previous genome-wide association studies should be enriched for parent-of-origin effects and b) that genes at loci imprinted in humans or mice should be enriched both for genome-wide significant associations, and in our sample, for parent-of-origin effects. Neither prediction was supported in the present study. We have shown, that it is unlikely that parent-of-origin effects or imprinting play particularly important roles in schizophrenia, although our findings do not exclude such effects at specific loci nor do they exclude such effects among rare alleles. PMID:26633303

  1. Association of the Apolipoprotein E 2 Allele with Concurrent Occurrence of Endometrial Hyperplasia and Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Tatiana I.; Krikunova, Ludmila I.; Ryabchenko, Nikolay I.; Mkrtchyan, Liana S.; Khorokhorina, Vera A.; Salnikova, Lyubov E.

    2015-01-01

    Genes encoding proteins with antioxidant properties may influence susceptibility to endometrial hyperplasia (EH) and endometrial carcinoma (ECa). Patients with EH (n = 89), EH concurrent with ECa (n = 76), ECa (n = 186), and healthy controls (n = 1110) were genotyped for five polymorphic variants in the genes involved in metabolism of lipoproteins (APOE Cys112Arg and Arg158Cys), iron (HFE Cys282Tyr and His63Asp), and catecholamines (COMT Val158Met). Patients and controls were matched by ethnicity (all Caucasians), age, body mass index (BMI), and incidence of hypertension and diabetes. The frequency of the APOE E 2 allele (158Cys) was higher in patients with EH + ECa than in controls (P = 0.0012, PBonferroni = 0.018, OR = 2.58, 95% CI 1.49–4.45). The APOE E 4 allele (112Arg) was more frequently found in patients with EH than in controls and HFE minor allele G (63Asp) had a protective effect in the ECa group, though these results appeared to be nonsignificant after correction for multiple comparisons. The results of the study indicate that E 2 allele might be associated with concurrent occurrence of EH and ECa. PMID:25741405

  2. No association between MspI allele of the ADRA2A polymorphism and ADHD: meta-analysis of family-based studies.

    PubMed

    Shiffrin, Nina D; Gruber, June; Glatt, Stephen J; Faraone, Stephen V

    2013-08-01

    There is evidence for a genetic contribution to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), although no candidate genes have attained genome-wide significance to date. Given that the noradrenergic system has been implicated in ADHD, the gene for the α2-adrenergic receptor (ADRA2A) has been hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of ADHD. The present investigation reports results from a meta-analysis of family-based studies that did not find a significant association between the MspI polymorphism of the ADRA2A gene and ADHD.

  3. VNTR alleles associated with the {alpha}-globin locus are haplotype and population related

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, J.J.; Clegg, J.B.; Boyce, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    The human {alpha}-globin complex contains several polymorphic restriction-enzyme sites (i.e., RFLPs) linked to form haplotypes and is flanked by two hypervariable VNTR loci, the 5{prime} hypervariable region (HVR) and the more highly polymorphic 3{prime}HVR. Using a combination of RFLP analysis and PCR, the authors have characterized the 5{prime}HVR and 3{prime}HVR alleles associated with the {alpha}-globin haplotypes of 133 chromosomes, and they here show that specific {alpha}-globin haplotypes are each associated with discrete subsets of the alleles observed at these two VNTR loci. This statistically highly significant association is observed over a region spanning {approximately} 100 kb. With the exception of closely related haplotypes, different haplotypes do not share identically sized 3{prime}HVR alleles. Earlier studies have shown that {alpha}-globin haplotype distributions differ between populations; the current findings also reveal extensive population substructure in the repertoire of {alpha}-globin VNTRs. If similar features are characteristic of other VNTR loci, this will have important implications for forensic and anthropological studies. 42 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Association of chronic fatigue syndrome with human leucocyte antigen class II alleles

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J; Fritz, E L; Kerr, J R; Cleare, A J; Wessely, S; Mattey, D L

    2005-01-01

    Background: A genetic component to the development of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has been proposed, and a possible association between human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II antigens and chronic fatigue immune dysfunction has been shown in some, but not all, studies. Aims: To investigate the role of HLA class II antigens in CFS. Methods: Forty nine patients with CFS were genotyped for the HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, and HLA-DQB1 alleles and the frequency of these alleles was compared with a control group comprising 102 normal individuals from the UK. All patients and controls were from the same region of England and, apart from two patients, were white. Results: Analysis by 2 × 2 contingency tables revealed an increased frequency of HLA-DQA1*01 alleles in patients with CFS (51.0% v 35%; odds ratio (OR), 1.93; p  =  0.008). HLA-DQB1*06 was also increased in the patients with CFS (30.2% v 20.0%; OR, 1.73, p  =  0.052). Only the association between HLA-DQA1*01 and CFS was significant in logistic regression models containing HLA-DQA1*01 and HLA-DRQB1*06, and this was independent of HLA-DRB1 alleles. There was a decreased expression of HLA-DRB1*11 in CFS, although this association disappeared after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions: CFS may be associated with HLA-DQA1*01, although a role for other genes in linkage disequilibrium cannot be ruled out. PMID:16049290

  5. Association of low-activity MAOA allelic variants with violent crime in incarcerated offenders

    PubMed Central

    Stetler, Dean A.; Davis, Chad; Leavitt, Kathryn; Schriger, Ilana; Benson, Katie; Bhakta, Samir; Wang, Lam Chee; Oben, Cynthia; Watters, Matthew; Haghnegahdar, Tara; Bortolato, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The main enzyme for serotonin degradation, monoamine oxidase (MAO) A, has recently emerged as a key biological factor in the predisposition to impulsive aggression. Male carriers of low-activity variants of the main functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene (MAOA-uVNTR) have been shown to exhibit a greater proclivity to engage in violent acts. Thus, we hypothesized that low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles may be associated with a higher risk for criminal violence among male offenders. To test this possibility, we analyzed the MAOA-uVNTR variants of violent (n=49) and non-violent (n=40) male Caucasian and African-American convicts in a correctional facility. All participants were also tested with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) to assess their levels of childhood trauma exposure, impulsivity and aggression, respectively. Our results revealed a robust (P<0.0001) association between low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles and violent crime. This association was replicated in the group of Caucasian violent offenders (P<0.01), but reached only a marginal trend (P=0.08) in their African American counterparts. While violent crime charges were not associated with CTQ, BIS-11 and BPAQ scores, carriers of low-activity alleles exhibited a mild, yet significant (P<0.05) increase in BIS-11 total and attentional-impulsiveness scores. In summary, these findings support the role of MAOA gene as a prominent genetic determinant for criminal violence. Further studies are required to confirm these results in larger samples of inmates and evaluate potential interactions between MAOA alleles and environmental vulnerability factors. PMID:25082653

  6. Association of low-activity MAOA allelic variants with violent crime in incarcerated offenders.

    PubMed

    Stetler, Dean A; Davis, Chad; Leavitt, Kathryn; Schriger, Ilana; Benson, Katie; Bhakta, Samir; Wang, Lam Chee; Oben, Cynthia; Watters, Matthew; Haghnegahdar, Tara; Bortolato, Marco

    2014-11-01

    The main enzyme for serotonin degradation, monoamine oxidase (MAO) A, has recently emerged as a key biological factor in the predisposition to impulsive aggression. Male carriers of low-activity variants of the main functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene (MAOA-uVNTR) have been shown to exhibit a greater proclivity to engage in violent acts. Thus, we hypothesized that low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles may be associated with a higher risk for criminal violence among male offenders. To test this possibility, we analyzed the MAOA-uVNTR variants of violent (n = 49) and non-violent (n = 40) male Caucasian and African-American convicts in a correctional facility. All participants were also tested with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) to assess their levels of childhood trauma exposure, impulsivity and aggression, respectively. Our results revealed a robust (P < 0.0001) association between low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles and violent crime. This association was replicated in the group of Caucasian violent offenders (P < 0.01), but reached only a marginal trend (P = 0.08) in their African American counterparts. While violent crime charges were not associated with CTQ, BIS-11 and BPAQ scores, carriers of low-activity alleles exhibited a mild, yet significant (P < 0.05) increase in BIS-11 total and attentional-impulsiveness scores. In summary, these findings support the role of MAOA gene as a prominent genetic determinant for criminal violence. Further studies are required to confirm these results in larger samples of inmates and evaluate potential interactions between MAOA alleles and environmental vulnerability factors.

  7. Association of HLA-A and Non-Classical HLA Class I Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Carlini, Federico; Ferreira, Virginia; Buhler, Stéphane; Tous, Audrey; Eliaou, Jean-François; René, Céline; Chiaroni, Jacques; Picard, Christophe; Di Cristofaro, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The HLA-A locus is surrounded by HLA class Ib genes: HLA-E, HLA-H, HLA-G and HLA-F. HLA class Ib molecules are involved in immuno-modulation with a central role for HLA-G and HLA-E, an emerging role for HLA-F and a yet unknown function for HLA-H. Thus, the principal objective of this study was to describe the main allelic associations between HLA-A and HLA-H, -G, -F and -E. Therefore, HLA-A, -E, -G, -H and -F coding polymorphisms, as well as HLA-G UnTranslated Region haplotypes (referred to as HLA-G UTRs), were explored in 191 voluntary blood donors. Allelic frequencies, Global Linkage Disequilibrium (GLD), Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) for specific pairs of alleles and two-loci haplotype frequencies were estimated. We showed that HLA-A, HLA-H, HLA-F, HLA-G and HLA-G UTRs were all in highly significant pairwise GLD, in contrast to HLA-E. Moreover, HLA-A displayed restricted associations with HLA-G UTR and HLA-H. We also confirmed several associations that were previously found to have a negative impact on transplantation outcome. In summary, our results suggest complex functional and clinical implications of the HLA-A genetic region. PMID:27701438

  8. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; Chen, Jay; Ranjan, Priya; Slavov, Gancho; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Bryan, Anthony C.; Sykes, Robert; Ziebell, Angela L.; Klapste, Jaroslav; Porth, Ilga; Skyba, Oleksandr; Unda, Faride; El-Kassaby, Yousry; Douglas, Carl; Mansfield, Shawn; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Evans, Luke M.; Czarnecki, Olaf; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2015-01-23

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcription factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.

  9. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; ...

    2015-01-23

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcriptionmore » factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.« less

  10. Natalizumab-related anaphylactoid reactions in MS patients are associated with HLA class II alleles

    PubMed Central

    de la Hera, Belén; Urcelay, Elena; Brassat, David; Chan, Andrew; Vidal-Jordana, Angela; Salmen, Anke; Villar, Luisa Maria; Álvarez-Cermeño, José Carlos; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Fernández, Oscar; Oliver, Begoña; Saiz, Albert; Ara, Jose Ramón; Vigo, Ana G.; Arroyo, Rafael; Meca, Virginia; Malhotra, Sunny; Fissolo, Nicolás; Horga, Alejandro; Montalban, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to investigate potential associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II alleles and the development of anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with natalizumab. Methods: HLA class I and II genotyping was performed in patients with MS who experienced anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions and in patients who did not develop infusion-related allergic reactions following natalizumab administration. Results: A total of 119 patients with MS from 3 different cohorts were included in the study: 54 with natalizumab-related anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions and 65 without allergic reactions. HLA-DRB1*13 and HLA-DRB1*14 alleles were significantly increased in patients who developed anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions (pM-H = 3 × 10−7; odds ratio [OR]M-H = 8.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.40–23.64), with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 82%. In contrast, the HLA-DRB1*15 allele was significantly more represented in patients who did not develop anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions to natalizumab (pM-H = 6 × 10−4; ORM-H = 0.2, 95% CI = 0.08–0.50), with a PPV of 81%. Conclusions: HLA-DRB1 genotyping before natalizumab treatment may help neurologists to identify patients with MS at risk for developing serious systemic hypersensitivity reactions associated with natalizumab administration. PMID:25520955

  11. Widespread signatures of positive selection in common risk alleles associated to autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The human brain is the outcome of innumerable evolutionary processes; the systems genetics of psychiatric disorders could bear their signatures. On this basis, we analyzed five psychiatric disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia (SCZ), using GWAS summary statistics from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. Machine learning-derived scores were used to investigate two natural-selection scenarios: complete selection (loci where a selected allele reached fixation) and incomplete selection (loci where a selected allele has not yet reached fixation). ASD GWAS results positively correlated with incomplete-selection (p = 3.53*10−4). Variants with ASD GWAS p<0.1 were shown to have a 19%-increased probability to be in the top-5% for incomplete-selection score (OR = 1.19, 95%CI = 1.11–1.8, p = 9.56*10−7). Investigating the effect directions of minor alleles, we observed an enrichment for positive associations in SNPs with ASD GWAS p<0.1 and top-5% incomplete-selection score (permutation p<10−4). Considering the set of these ASD-positive-associated variants, we observed gene-expression enrichments for brain and pituitary tissues (p = 2.3*10−5 and p = 3*10−5, respectively) and 53 gene ontology (GO) enrichments, such as nervous system development (GO:0007399, p = 7.57*10−12), synapse organization (GO:0050808, p = 8.29*10−7), and axon guidance (GO:0007411, p = 1.81*10−7). Previous genetic studies demonstrated that ASD positively correlates with childhood intelligence, college completion, and years of schooling. Accordingly, we hypothesize that certain ASD risk alleles were under positive selection during human evolution due to their involvement in neurogenesis and cognitive ability. PMID:28187187

  12. No Association Between Apoε4 Alleles, HIV Infection, Age, Neuropsychological Outcome or Death

    PubMed Central

    Becker, James T.; Martinson, Jeremy J.; Penugonda, Sudhir; Kingsley, Lawrence; Molsberry, Samantha; Wolinsky, Steven; Reynolds, Sandra; Aronow, Aaron; Goodkin, Karl; Levine, Andrew; Martin, Eileen; Miller, Eric N.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Ragin, Ann; Sacktor, Ned

    2014-01-01

    The ε4 allele of the ApoE gene may have important interactions with physical health and cognitive function among individuals with HIV disease. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between ε4, HIV disease, age, neuropsychological impairment and death in a large, well-characterized study sample. 2,846 men participating in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study had ApoE genotyping and neuropsychological test data available for analysis. We found a significant association between HIV infection and time to death (from any cause), as well as older age, race, and education. But, ApoE status was not significantly associated with time to death. Similarly, we found a significant association between HIV infection and time to incident cognitive impairment, as well as age, education, and HIV serostatus; Apoε4 status was not related to incident cognitive impairment. There were no significant interactions between ApoE, HIV infection, and age on cognitive impairment. These data replicate and strengthen prior findings of the lack of association between ApoE ε4 and cognitive outcomes in HIV disease. We conclude that within the specific constraints of an exclusively male study in which the majority of participants were less than 65 years of age (range: 22-87 years), it appears reasonable to conclude that the ε4 allele is not significantly interacting with HIV serostatus. PMID:25388225

  13. Modeling the bound conformation of Pemphigus Vulgaris-associated peptides to MHC Class II DR and DQ Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Joo Chuan; Bramson, Jeff; Kanduc, Darja; Chow, Selwyn; Sinha, Animesh A; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2006-01-01

    Background Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a severe autoimmune blistering disorder characterized by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies directed against desmoglein-3 (Dsg3), involving specific DR4 and DR6 alleles in Caucasians and DQ5 allele in Asians. The development of sequence-based predictive algorithms to identify potential Dsg3 epitopes has encountered limited success due to the paucity of PV-associated allele-specific peptides as training data. Results In this work we constructed atomic models of ten PV associated, non-associated and protective alleles. Nine previously identified stimulatory Dsg3 peptides, Dsg3 96–112, Dsg3 191–205, Dsg3 206–220, Dsg3 252–266, Dsg3 342–356, Dsg3 380–394, Dsg3 763–777, Dsg3 810–824 and Dsg3 963–977, were docked into the binding groove of each model to analyze the structural aspects of allele-specific binding. Conclusion Our docking simulations are entirely consistent with functional data obtained from in vitro competitive binding assays and T cell proliferation studies in DR4 and DR6 PV patients. Our findings ascertain that DRB1*0402 plays a crucial role in the selection of specific self-peptides in DR4 PV. DRB1*0402 and DQB1*0503 do not necessarily share the same core residues, indicating that both alleles may have different binding specificities. In addition, our results lend credence to the hypothesis that the alleles DQB1*0201 and *0202 play a protective role by binding Dsg3 peptides with greater affinity than the susceptible alleles, allowing for efficient deletion of autoreactive T cells. PMID:16426456

  14. QTL Detection and Elite Alleles Mining for Stigma Traits in Oryza sativa by Association Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Xiaojing; Liu, Erbao; Liang, Yinfeng; Liu, Qiangming; Breria, Caleb M.; Hong, Delin

    2016-01-01

    Stigma traits are very important for hybrid seed production in Oryza sativa, which is a self-pollinated crop; however, the genetic mechanism controlling the traits is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the phenotypic data of 227 accessions across 2 years and assessed their genotypic variation with 249 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. By combining phenotypic and genotypic data, a genome-wide association (GWA) map was generated. Large phenotypic variations in stigma length (STL), stigma brush-shaped part length (SBPL) and stigma non-brush-shaped part length (SNBPL) were found. Significant positive correlations were identified among stigma traits. In total, 2072 alleles were detected among 227 accessions, with an average of 8.3 alleles per SSR locus. GWA mapping detected 6 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the STL, 2 QTLs for the SBPL and 7 QTLs for the SNBPL. Eleven, 5, and 12 elite alleles were found for the STL, SBPL, and SNBPL, respectively. Optimal cross designs were predicted for improving the target traits. The detected genetic variation in stigma traits and QTLs provides helpful information for cloning candidate STL genes and breeding rice cultivars with longer STLs in the future. PMID:27555858

  15. Evidence for a genetic association between alleles of monoamine oxidase A gene and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L.C.C.; Sham, P.; Castle, D.

    1995-08-14

    We present evidence of a genetic association between bipolar disorder and alleles at 3 monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) markers, but not with alleles of a monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) polymorphism. The 3 MAOA markers, including one associated with low MAOA activity, show strong allelic association with each other but surprisingly not with MAOB. Our results are significantly only for females, though the number of males in our sample is too small to draw any definite conclusions. Our data is consistent with recent reports of reduced MAOA activity in patients with abnormal behavioral phenotypes. The strength of the association is weak, but significant, which suggests that alleles at the MAOA locus contribute to susceptibility to bipolar disorder rather than being a major determinant. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Classical HLA-DRB1 and DPB1 alleles account for HLA associations with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Invernizzi, P; Ransom, M; Raychaudhuri, S; Kosoy, R; Lleo, A; Shigeta, R; Franke, A; Bossa, F; Amos, C I; Gregersen, P K; Siminovitch, K A; Cusi, D; de Bakker, P I W; Podda, M; Gershwin, M E; Seldin, M F

    2012-09-01

    Susceptibility to primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-region polymorphisms. To determine if associations can be explained by classical HLA determinants, we studied Italian, 676 cases and 1440 controls, genotyped with dense single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for which classical HLA alleles and amino acids were imputed. Although previous genome-wide association studies and our results show stronger SNP associations near DQB1, we demonstrate that the HLA signals can be attributed to classical DRB1 and DPB1 genes. Strong support for the predominant role of DRB1 is provided by our conditional analyses. We also demonstrate an independent association of DPB1. Specific HLA-DRB1 genes (*08, *11 and *14) account for most of the DRB1 association signal. Consistent with previous studies, DRB1*08 (P=1.59 × 10(-11)) was the strongest predisposing allele, whereas DRB1*11 (P=1.42 × 10(-10)) was protective. Additionally, DRB1*14 and the DPB1 association (DPB1*03:01; P=9.18 × 10(-7)) were predisposing risk alleles. No signal was observed in the HLA class 1 or class 3 regions. These findings better define the association of PBC with HLA and specifically support the role of classical HLA-DRB1 and DPB1 genes and alleles in susceptibility to PBC.

  17. Classical HLA-DRB1 and DPB1 Alleles Account for HLA Associations with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Invernizzi, Pietro; Ransom, Michael; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kosoy, Roman; Lleo, Ana; Shigeta, Russell; Franke, Andre; Bossa, Fabrizio; Amos, Christopher I.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Cusi, Daniele; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Podda, Mauro; Gershwin, M. Eric; Seldin, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Susceptibility to primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is strongly associated with HLA region polymorphisms. To determine if associations can be explained by classical HLA determinants we studied Italian 676 cases and 1440 controls with genotyped with dense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for which classical HLA alleles and amino acids were imputed. Although previous genome-wide association studies and our results show stronger SNP associations near DQB1, we demonstrate that the HLA signals can be attributed to classical DRB1 and DPB1 genes. Strong support for the predominant role of DRB1 is provided by our conditional analyses. We also demonstrate an independent association of DPB1. Specific HLA-DRB1 genes (*08, *11 and *14) account for most of the DRB1 association signal. Consistent with previous studies, DRB1*08 (p = 1.59 × 10−11) was the strongest predisposing allele where as DRB1*11 (p = 1.42 × 10−10) was protective. Additionally DRB1*14 and the DPB1 association (DPB1*03:01) (p = 9.18 × 10−7) were predisposing risk alleles. No signal was observed in the HLA class 1 or class 3 regions. These findings better define the association of PBC with HLA and specifically support the role of classical HLA-DRB1 and DPB1 genes and alleles in susceptibility to PBC. PMID:22573116

  18. No evidence for allelic association between bipolar disorder and monoamine oxidase A gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Craddock, N.; Daniels, J.; Roberts, E.

    1995-08-14

    We have tested the hypothesis that DNA markers in the MAOA gene show allelic association with bipolar affective disorder. Eighty-four unrelated Caucasian patients with DSM III-R bipolar disorder and 84 Caucasian controls were typed for three markers in MAOA: a dinucleotide repeat in intron 2, a VNTR in intron 1, and an Fnu4HI RFLP in exon 8. No evidence for allelic association was observed between any of the markers and bipolar disorder. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Genetic Diversity and Elite Allele Mining for Grain Traits in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) by Association Mapping.

    PubMed

    Edzesi, Wisdom M; Dang, Xiaojing; Liang, Lijun; Liu, Erbao; Zaid, Imdad U; Hong, Delin

    2016-01-01

    Mining elite alleles for grain size and weight is of importance for the improvement of cultivated rice and selection for market demand. In this study, association mapping for grain traits was performed on a selected sample of 628 rice cultivars using 262 SSRs. Grain traits were evaluated by grain length (GL), grain width (GW), grain thickness (GT), grain length to width ratio (GL/GW), and 1000-grain weight (TGW) in 2013 and 2014. Our result showed abundant phenotypic and genetic diversities found in the studied population. In total, 2953 alleles were detected with an average of 11.3 alleles per locus. The population was divided into seven subpopulations and the levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) ranged from 34 to 84 cM. Genome-wide association mapping detected 10 marker trait association (MTAs) loci for GL, 1MTAs locus for GW, 7 MTAs loci for GT, 3 MTAs loci for GL/GW, and 1 MTAs locus for TGW. Twenty-nine, 2, 10, 5, and 3 elite alleles were found for the GL, GW, GT, GL/GW, and TGW, respectively. Optimal cross designs were predicted for improving the target traits. The accessions containing elite alleles for grain traits mined in this study could be used for breeding rice cultivars and cloning the candidate genes.

  20. Genetic Diversity and Elite Allele Mining for Grain Traits in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) by Association Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Edzesi, Wisdom M.; Dang, Xiaojing; Liang, Lijun; Liu, Erbao; Zaid, Imdad U.; Hong, Delin

    2016-01-01

    Mining elite alleles for grain size and weight is of importance for the improvement of cultivated rice and selection for market demand. In this study, association mapping for grain traits was performed on a selected sample of 628 rice cultivars using 262 SSRs. Grain traits were evaluated by grain length (GL), grain width (GW), grain thickness (GT), grain length to width ratio (GL/GW), and 1000-grain weight (TGW) in 2013 and 2014. Our result showed abundant phenotypic and genetic diversities found in the studied population. In total, 2953 alleles were detected with an average of 11.3 alleles per locus. The population was divided into seven subpopulations and the levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) ranged from 34 to 84 cM. Genome-wide association mapping detected 10 marker trait association (MTAs) loci for GL, 1MTAs locus for GW, 7 MTAs loci for GT, 3 MTAs loci for GL/GW, and 1 MTAs locus for TGW. Twenty-nine, 2, 10, 5, and 3 elite alleles were found for the GL, GW, GT, GL/GW, and TGW, respectively. Optimal cross designs were predicted for improving the target traits. The accessions containing elite alleles for grain traits mined in this study could be used for breeding rice cultivars and cloning the candidate genes. PMID:27375646

  1. HLA-DRB1 and -DRB3 allele frequencies and haplotypic associations in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Young; Park, Hyejin; Roh, Eun Youn; Park, Myoung Hee

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated the frequencies of human leukocyte antigen-DRB1 (HLA-DRB1) and -DRB3 alleles and DRB1-DRB3 haplotypic associations in 800 Koreans. DRB1 genotyping was done using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) and PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) methods. DRB3 genotyping was done on 447 samples carrying DRB3-associated DRB1 alleles (DRB1*03, *11, *12, *13, and *14) using PCR-SSCP method. The allele frequencies of DRB3*0101, DRB3*0202, and DRB3*0301 were 0.073, 0.136, and 0.120, respectively, and we found one case of a probable new allele (DRB3*01new, 0.001). DRB1-DRB3 haplotypes with frequency (HF) > 0.005 exhibited strong associations between DRB3*0101 and DRB1*1201, *1301, and *1403; between DRB3*0301 and DRB1*1202 and *1302; between DRB3*0202 and DRB1*0301, *1101, *1401, *1405, and *1406 alleles. Most of the DRB1 alleles with frequency > 0.005 were exclusively associated with particular DRB3 alleles with relative linkage disequilibrium values of 1.0, except for DRB1*1201, *1202 and *1301; the rare presence (HF < 0.005) of DRB3*0202 associations were observed for these DRB1 alleles. We also investigated and presented rare DRB1-DRB3 associations in additional 6000 Koreans. Comparison with other ethnic groups revealed that DRB1*0301 and *1301 related DRB1-DRB3 haplotypes vary among different populations, in that Koreans and other Asian populations show less diversity compared with Caucasoids or African Americans.

  2. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  3. APOL1 Risk Alleles are Associated with More Severe Arteriosclerosis in Renal Resistance Vessels with Aging and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hughson, Michael D; Hoy, Wendy E; Mott, Susan A; Puelles, Victor G; Bertram, John F; Winkler, Cheryl L; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    The increased risk of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) among hypertensive African Americans is partly related to APOL1 allele variants. Hypertension-associated arterionephrosclerosis consists of arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and cortical fibrosis. The initial glomerulosclerosis, attributed to preglomerular arteriosclerosis and ischemia, consists of focal global glomerulosclerosis (FGGS), but in biopsy studies, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is found with progression to ESKD, particularly in African Americans. This is a study of arterionephrosclerosis in successfully APOL1 genotyped autopsy kidney tissue of 159 African Americans (61 no risk alleles, 68 one risk allele, 30 two risk alleles) and 135 whites aged 18-89 years from a general population with no clinical renal disease. Glomerulosclerosis was nearly exclusively FGGS with only three subjects having FSGS-like lesions that were unrelated to APOL1 risk status. For both races, in multivariable analysis, the dependent variables of arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and cortical fibrosis were all significantly related to the independent variables of older age (P < 0.001) and hypertension (P < 0.001). A relationship between APOL1 genotype and arteriosclerosis was apparent only after 35 years of age when, for any level of elevated blood pressure, more severe arteriosclerosis was found in the interlobular arteries of 14 subjects with two APOL1 risk alleles when compared to African Americans with none (n = 37, P = 0.02) or one risk alleles (n = 35, P = 0.02). With the limitation of the small number of subjects contributing to the positive results, the findings imply that APOL1 risk alleles recessively augment small vessel arteriosclerosis in conjunction with age and hypertension. FSGS was not a significant finding, indicating that in the early stages of arterionephrosclerosis, the primary pathologic influence of APOL1 genotype is vascular rather than glomerular.

  4. Association of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with tick (Boophilus microplus) resistance in cattle.

    PubMed

    Martinez, M L; Machado, M A; Nascimento, C S; Silva, M V G B; Teodoro, R L; Furlong, J; Prata, M C A; Campos, A L; Guimarães, M F M; Azevedo, A L S; Pires, M F A; Verneque, R S

    2006-08-31

    Losses caused by bovine tick burdens in tropical countries have a tremendous economic impact on production systems. Besides reducing production, this parasite can cause death in the most susceptible animals. The use of commercial acaricides has been the major method of control, but their misuse has led to tick resistance to many chemicals. More recently, vaccines have been used in some countries without solving the problem completely. An alternative could be the development of resistant animals and the use of genetic markers and candidate genes that could help with the enormous task of selecting resistant animals. The bovine lymphocyte antigen genes (BoLA) have been shown to be associated with some parasitic infestations and disease incidence. Thus, the objective of the present study was to determine the association of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with tick resistance in cattle. The study was conducted on 231 F2 (Gyr x Holstein) animals that were artificially infested with 10,000 tick larvae. Log of tick count +1 was used as the dependent variable in a mixed animal model with allele substitution effects in addition to fixed effects of year and season at tick count, sex of calves, age of animal at tick count, hair type (short-straight, short-curl, long-straight, and long-curl), coat color (white, >75% white, 50- 75% white, and 25-50% white), and additive genetic, permanent environmental and residual effects as random. Females showed fewer ticks than males. Animals with short-straight hair were more resistant to tick infestation than animals with long-curl hair, and animals with whiter coat color also had fewer ticks. An association between BoLA alleles and lower tick number was found for alleles DRB3.2 *18, *20 and *27 at the 5% significance level. Also, one allele (DRB3.2*16) showed an association at the 10% level. Allele *27 was the most frequent in the population (30.7%), followed by alleles *16 (10.8%), *20 (8.7%) and *18 (2.4%). These results suggest that BoLA-DRB3

  5. Tri-allelic pattern at the TPOX locus: a familial study.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Alvarez, Luís; Amorim, António; Batista Dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2014-02-10

    Alleles at the TPOX STR locus have 6-14 different numbers of a four-nucleotide (AATG) repeat motif arranged in tandem. Although tri-allelic genotypes are generally rare, the TPOX tri-allelic pattern has a higher frequency, varying widely among populations. Despite this, there are few accurate reports to disclose the nature of the TPOX third allele. In this work we present data obtained from 45 individuals belonging to the same pedigree, in which there are cases of tri-allelic TPOX genotypes. The subjects were apparently healthy with a normal biological development. We noticed six tri-allelic cases in this family, and all of them were women. Karyotype analysis showed no occurrence of partial 2p trisomy. All the tri-allelic cases had the genotype 8-10-11, probably due to three copies of the TPOX STR sequence in all cells (Type 2 tri-allelic pattern). Based on previous data we assumed the allele 10 as the TPOX third allele. The pedigree analyses show evidences that the TPOX extra-allele was the allele10, it is placed far from the main TPOX locus, and that there is a potential linkage of the TPOX extra-allele-10 with Xq. This was the first study that included a large pedigree analysis in order to understand the nature TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

  6. The GLO1 C332 (Ala111) allele confers autism vulnerability: family-based genetic association and functional correlates.

    PubMed

    Gabriele, Stefano; Lombardi, Federica; Sacco, Roberto; Napolioni, Valerio; Altieri, Laura; Tirindelli, Maria Cristina; Gregorj, Chiara; Bravaccio, Carmela; Rousseau, Francis; Persico, Antonio M

    2014-12-01

    Glyoxalase I (GLO1) is a homodimeric Zn(2+)-dependent isomerase involved in the detoxification of methylglyoxal and in limiting the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE). We previously found the rs4746 A332 (Glu111) allele of the GLO1 gene, which encodes for glyoxalase I, associated with "unaffected sibling" status in families with one or more children affected by Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). To identify and characterize this protective allele, we sequenced GLO1 exons and exon-intron junctions, detecting two additional SNPs (rs1049346, rs1130534) in linkage disequilibrium with rs4746. A family-based association study involving 385 simplex and 20 multiplex Italian families yielded a significant association with autism driven only by the rs4746 C332 (Ala111) allele itself (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001 under additive and dominant/recessive models, respectively). Glyoxalase enzymatic activity was significantly reduced both in leukocytes and in post-mortem temporocortical tissue (N = 38 and 13, respectively) of typically developing C332 allele carriers (P < 0.05 and <0.01), with no difference in Glo1 protein levels. Conversely, AGE amounts were significantly higher in the same C332 post-mortem brains (P = 0.001), with a strong negative correlation between glyoxalase activity and AGE levels (τ = -0.588, P < 0.01). Instead, 19 autistic brains show a dysregulation of the glyoxalase-AGE axis (τ = -0.209, P = 0.260), with significant blunting of glyoxalase activity and AGE amounts compared to controls (P < 0.05), and loss of rs4746 genotype effects. In summary, the GLO1 C332 (Ala111) allele confers autism vulnerability by reducing brain glyoxalase activity and enhancing AGE formation, but years after an autism diagnosis the glyoxalase-AGE axis appears profoundly disrupted, with loss of C332 allelic effects.

  7. Association of BoLA-DRB3 alleles with mastitis resistance and susceptibility in Japanese Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuyuki; Furuta, Hiroki; Kondo, Yasuko; Mukoyama, Harutaka

    2012-05-01

    In this study, 714 cows from 26 dairy herds were reclassified as healthy or mastitic cows on the basis of long-term somatic cell count (SCC) in milk. Cows with more than three consecutive lactation records of SCC from the first or second to fifth lactation, were selected, and their BoLA-DRB3 (DRB3) alleles were identified using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Cows with an SCC of < 200 000 cells/mL in all monthly records were classified as healthy (n=91). Cows with an SCC of > 300 000 cells/mL in two consecutive tests or four non-consecutive tests or cows with an SCC of > 500 000 cells/mL in any one test during lactation, regardless of parity, were classified as mastitic (n=201). Mastitic cows (n=153) from another 40 herds were considered to be infected if bacteriological testing revealed mastitis pathogens in milk. Their DRB3 alleles were identified using PCR-sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT). The differences in DRB3 allelic frequencies between healthy cows and cows with various degrees of mastitis were re-investigated. Moreover, the associations of various amino acid motifs in DRB3 alleles with resistance or susceptibility to mastitis pathogens were re-examined. DRB3.2*8(DRB3*1201) and DRB3.2*16(DRB3*1501) alleles were found to be associated with susceptibility, while DRB3.2*22(DRB3*1101), DRB3.2*23(DRB3*2703), and DRB3.2*24(DRB3*0101) alleles were found to be associated with resistance.

  8. The novel HLA-Cw*1802 allele is associated with B*5703 in the Bubi population from Equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    Vilches, C; Bunce, M; de Pablo, R; Moreno, M E; Puente, S; Sanz, L; Kreisler, M

    1997-06-01

    The HLA-Cw*1801 specificity, a Cw7/Cw4 hybrid allele, has recently been described in association with B*8101 (formerly B"DT"). In this study, the new Cw*1802 variant, differing from Cw*1801 at exon 5, is found associated with B*5703 in Bubi individuals from Equatorial Guinea. Confirmatory complete coding regions of B*5703 and B*3910 are also reported.

  9. Association of BoLA-DRB3.2 Alleles with BLV Infection Profiles (Persistent Lymphocytosis/Lymphosarcoma) and Lymphocyte Subsets in Iranian Holstein Cattle.

    PubMed

    Nikbakht Brujeni, Gholamreza; Ghorbanpour, Reyhaneh; Esmailnejad, Atefeh

    2016-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is the best-characterized genetic region associated with resistance and susceptibility to a wide range of diseases. In cattle, the most important example of the relationship between the MHC and infectious diseases has been established by the resistance to Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection. The association of the bovine MHC class II BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with BLV infection profiles was examined. BoLA-DRB3.2 allelic diversity was determined in 190 Iranian Holstein cattle using direct sequencing method. Association of the DRB3.2 alleles with BLV infection profiles was found as the odds ratio. Effects of the alleles on lymphocyte subsets were also evaluated by multivariate regression analysis and GLM procedures. The studied cattle were categorized into three groups: BLV seronegative, BLV seropositive with persistent lymphocytosis (PL), and BLV seropositive with lymphosarcoma (LS). The PL profile was significantly associated with the BoLA-DRB3.2*0101, *1101 and *4201 alleles, although the *3202 allele mediating resistance to PL was observed. Significant association was found between the BoLA-DRB3.2*1802, *3202, and *0901 alleles and susceptibility to LS, while the *0101 and *1101 alleles were associated with resistance to LS. BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles also showed a significant correlation with CD4, CD8, CD21 cells and CD4/CD8 ratio. Allelic differences influence the immune response to BLV infection and developing the disease profile. These differences also have important consequences for tumor resistance.

  10. Allelic loss and linkage studies in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Bale, A.E.; Lytton, B.

    1994-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in U.S. males. Many examples of familial aggregation have been reported, and segregration analysis suggests that an autosomal dominant gene with a penetrance of 88% by age 85 accounts for 9% of all cases. Because many dominant cancer predisposition syndromes are related to germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes, we analyzed a series of sporadic and hereditary tumors for allelic loss. High grade sporadic, paraffin-embedded, primary prostate tumors were obtained from the archival collection in the Department of Pathology at Yale and hereditary tumors from three families were obtained by an advertisement in the New York Times and from referrals by urologists. PCR analysis showed loss in 4/7 informative sporadic prostate tumors with NEFL (8p21), in 8/22 informative tumors with D10S169 (10q26-qter), in 2/8 informative tumors with D10S108 (10q) and in 4/23 informative tumors with D10S89 (10p) in agreement with previous studies. PYGM on chromosome 11 and D9S127 on chromosome 9 showed no loss. Linkage analysis with NEFL in 3 prostate cancer families gave strongly negative results for close linkage (Z=-2.1 at {theta}=0.01) but LOD scores were very dependent on parameters, e.g. gene frequency, phenocopy rate, and penetrance. Linkage analysis with chromosome 10 markers and systematic analysis of the genome for other area of allelic loss are underway.

  11. HLA-B*57 Allele Is Associated with Concomitant Anti-tuberculosis and Antiretroviral Drugs Induced Liver Toxicity in Ethiopians

    PubMed Central

    Petros, Zelalem; Kishikawa, Junko; Makonnen, Eyasu; Yimer, Getnet; Habtewold, Abiy; Aklillu, Eleni

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a known adverse effect of both anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB) and antiretroviral (ARV) drugs. Recent studies highlight the implications of genetic predispositions to DILI. We performed a case-control study to identify Human Leukocyte Antigen-B (HLA-B) variant alleles associated with anti-TB and ARV co-treatment induced liver toxicity in Ethiopian TB and HIV co-infected patients. A total of 495 newly diagnosed TB and HIV co-infected patients were enrolled and received rifampicin based anti-TB and efavirenz based ARV therapy. Change in liver enzyme level from baseline was monitored 1st, 2nd, 4th, 8th, 12th, and 24th weeks after treatment initiation to identify patients who developed DILI (cases) and those who did not (treatment tolerants). Genomic DNA from 46 cases and 46 sex and age matched treatment tolerants were genotyped for HLA-B variant alleles using Olerup SSP®HLA-B DNA Typing Kits. The proportion of HLA-B*57 allele carriers in DILI cases (37.0%), particularly in those who developed cholestatic type of DILI (44.8%) was significantly higher compared with those who tolerated the treatment (2.2%). The HLA-B*57 allele frequency was significantly higher in cases (25%) than treatment tolerants (1.1%). In a multivariate logistic analysis, the proportion of patients carrying HLA-B*57 (P = 0.002) and HLA-B*14 (P = 0.014) alleles were significantly higher in DILI cases compared with treatment tolerants. HLA-B*57 was significantly associated with cholestatic (P = 0.001) and mixed (P = 0.017) types of liver toxicity, and mild-to-moderate severity (P = 0.001). Of all HLA-B*57 alleles detected, HLA-B*57:03 accounted 58.3% and HLA-B*57:02 accounted 41.7%. HLA-B*57:01 was not detected. The variant allele frequencies of HLA-B*57:03 (15.2 vs. 0%) and HLA-B*57:02 (9.8 vs. 1.1%) were significantly higher in the DILI cases than treatment tolerants (P < 0.03). We conclude that HLA-B*57 alleles (B*57:03 and B*57:02) confer susceptibility to the

  12. The allele combinations of three loci based on, liver, stomach cancers, hematencephalon, COPD and normal population: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Gai, Liping; Liu, Hui; Cui, Jing-Hui; Yu, Weijian; Ding, Xiao-Dong

    2017-03-20

    The purpose of this study was to examine the specific allele combinations of three loci connected with the liver cancers, stomach cancers, hematencephalon and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to explore the feasibility of the research methods. We explored different mathematical methods for statistical analyses to assess the association between the genotype and phenotype. At the same time we still analyses the statistical results of allele combinations of three loci by difference value method and ratio method. All the DNA blood samples were collected from patients with 50 liver cancers, 75 stomach cancers, 50 hematencephalon, 72 COPD and 200 normal populations. All the samples were from Chinese. Alleles from short tandem repeat (STR) loci were determined using the STR Profiler plus PCR amplification kit (15 STR loci). Previous research was based on combinations of single-locus alleles, and combinations of cross-loci (two loci) alleles. Allele combinations of three loci were obtained by computer counting and stronger genetic signal was obtained. The methods of allele combinations of three loci can help to identify the statistically significant differences of allele combinations between liver cancers, stomach cancers, patients with hematencephalon, COPD and the normal population. The probability of illness followed different rules and had apparent specificity. This method can be extended to other diseases and provide reference for early clinical diagnosis.

  13. Three cadherin alleles associated with resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis in pink bollworm

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Shai; Biggs, Robert W.; Sisterson, Mark S.; Shriver, Laura; Ellers-Kirk, Christa; Higginson, Dawn; Holley, Daniel; Gahan, Linda J.; Heckel, David G.; Carrière, Yves; Dennehy, Timothy J.; Brown, Judith K.; Tabashnik, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    Evolution of resistance by pests is the main threat to long-term insect control by transgenic crops that produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins. Because inheritance of resistance to the Bt toxins in transgenic crops is typically recessive, DNA-based screening for resistance alleles in heterozygotes is potentially much more efficient than detection of resistant homozygotes with bioassays. Such screening, however, requires knowledge of the resistance alleles in field populations of pests that are associated with survival on Bt crops. Here we report that field populations of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella), a major cotton pest, harbored three mutant alleles of a cadherin-encoding gene linked with resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac and survival on transgenic Bt cotton. Each of the three resistance alleles has a deletion expected to eliminate at least eight amino acids upstream of the putative toxin-binding region of the cadherin protein. Larvae with two resistance alleles in any combination were resistant, whereas those with one or none were susceptible to Cry1Ac. Together with previous evidence, the results reported here identify the cadherin gene as a leading target for DNA-based screening of resistance to Bt crops in lepidopteran pests. PMID:12695565

  14. Allelic association at the D14S43 locus in early onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, A.; Tardieu, S.; Campion, D.; Martinez, M.

    1995-04-24

    The D14S43 marker is closely linked to the major gene for early onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer`s disease on chromosome 14. Allelic frequencies at the D14S43 locus were compared in 113 familial and isolated cases of early onset Alzheimer`s disease (<60 years of age at onset) (EOAD) and 109 unaffected individuals of the same geographic origin. Allele 7 was significantly (P = 0.033) more frequent in type 1 EOAD patients (13.2%), defined by the presence of at least another first degree relative with EOAD, than in controls (4.1%). Since an autosomal dominant gene is probably responsible for type 1 patients, allelic association may reflect linkage disequilibrium at the D14S43 locus. This would mean that some patients share a common ancestral mutation. However, since multiple tests were carried out, this result must be interpreted with caution, and needs confirmation in an independent sample. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Major histocompatibility complex alleles associated with parasite susceptibility in wild giant pandas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Wu, Q; Hu, Y; Wu, H; Wei, F

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism is thought to be driven by antagonistic coevolution between pathogens and hosts, mediated through either overdominance or frequency-dependent selection. However, investigations under natural conditions are still rare for endangered mammals which often exhibit depleted variation, and the mechanism of selection underlying the maintenance of characteristics remains a considerable debate. In this study, 87 wild giant pandas were used to investigate MHC variation associated with parasite load. With the knowledge of the MHC profile provided by the genomic data of the giant panda, seven DRB1, seven DQA1 and eight DQA2 alleles were identified at each single locus. Positive selection evidenced by a significantly higher number of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous codon site relative to synonymous substitutions per synonymous codon site could only be detected at the DRB1 locus, which leads to the speculation that DRB1 may have a more important role in dealing with parasite infection for pandas. Coprological analyses revealed that 55.17% of individuals exhibited infection with 1–2 helminthes and 95.3% of infected pandas carried Baylisascaris shroederi. Using a generalized linear model, we found that Aime-DRB1*10 was significantly associated with parasite infection, but no resistant alleles could be detected. MHC heterozygosity of the pandas was found to be uncorrelated with the infection status or the infection intensity. These results suggested that the possible selection mechanisms in extant wild pandas may be frequency dependent rather than being determined by overdominance selection. Our findings could guide the candidate selection for the ongoing reintroduction or translocation of pandas. PMID:25248466

  16. New York State TrueAllele® Casework Validation Study*

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, Mark W; Belrose, Jamie L; Duceman, Barry W

    2013-01-01

    DNA evidence can pose interpretation challenges, particularly with low-level or mixed samples. It would be desirable to make full use of the quantitative data, consider every genotype possibility, and objectively produce accurate and reproducible DNA match results. Probabilistic genotype computing is designed to achieve these goals. This validation study assessed TrueAllele® probabilistic computer interpretation on 368 evidence items in 41 test cases and compared the results with human review of the same data. Whenever there was a human result, the computer's genotype was concordant. Further, the computer produced a match statistic on 81 mixture items (for 87 inferred matching genotypes) in the test cases, while human review reported a statistic on 25 of these items (30.9%). Using match statistics to quantify information, probabilistic genotyping was shown to be sensitive, specific, and reproducible. These results demonstrate that objective probabilistic genotyping of biological evidence can reliably preserve DNA identification information. PMID:23865896

  17. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. Results The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Conclusion Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations. PMID:20701755

  18. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.; Montgomery, A.; Sheridan, P.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The allelic association of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene with the binding characteristics of the D2 dopamine receptor was determined in 66 brains of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects. In a blinded experiment, DNA from the cerebral cortex was treated with the restriction endonuclease Taql and probed with a 1.5-kilobase (kb) digest of a clone (lambda hD2G1) of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene. The binding characteristics (Kd (binding affinity) and Bmax (number of binding sites)) of the D2 dopamine receptor were determined in the caudate nuclei of these brains using tritiated spiperone as the ligand. The adjusted Kd was significantly lower in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic subjects. In subjects with the A1 allele, in whom a high association with alcoholism was found, the Bmax was significantly reduced compared with the Bmax of subjects with the A2 allele. Moreover, a progressively reduced Bmax was found in subjects with A2/A2, A1/A2, and A1/A1 alleles, with subjects with A2/A2 having the highest mean values, and subjects with A1/A1, the lowest. The polymorphic pattern of the D2 dopamine receptor gene and its differential expression of receptors suggests the involvement of the dopaminergic system in conferring susceptibility to at least one subtype of severe alcoholism.

  19. A novel JK null allele associated with typing discrepancies among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Billingsley, Katrina L; Posadas, Jeff B; Moulds, Joann M; Gaur, Lakshmi K

    2013-01-01

    The Jknun (Jk-3) phenotype, attributable to null or silenced alleles, has predominantly been found in persons of Polynesian descent. With the increased use of molecular genotyping, many new silencing mutations have been identified in persons of other ethnic backgrounds. To date, only two JK null alleles have been reported in African Americans, JK*01N.04 and JK*OlN.OS.A comparative study was undertaken to determine whether JK mutations were present in the regional African American population. Results of donor genotyping were compared with previously recorded results of serologic tests, and discrepant results were investigated. Although the two previously identified polymorphisms were not detected in the discrepant samples, a novel allele (191G>A) was identified and was assigned the ISBT number JK*02N.09. This study illustrates a limitation of using single-nucleotide polymorphisms for prediction of blood group antigens.

  20. Allele-specific methylation occurs at genetic variants associated with complex disease.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, John N; Raj, Towfique; Fagerness, Jes; Stahl, Eli; Viloria, Fernando T; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Seddon, Johanna; Daly, Mark; Chess, Andrew; Plenge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesize that the phenomenon of allele-specific methylation (ASM) may underlie the phenotypic effects of multiple variants identified by Genome-Wide Association studies (GWAS). We evaluate ASM in a human population and document its genome-wide patterns in an initial screen at up to 380,678 sites within the genome, or up to 5% of the total genomic CpGs. We show that while substantial inter-individual variation exists, 5% of assessed sites show evidence of ASM in at least six samples; the majority of these events (81%) are under genetic influence. Many of these cis-regulated ASM variants are also eQTLs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes and/or in high linkage-disequilibrium with variants linked to complex disease. Finally, focusing on autoimmune phenotypes, we extend this initial screen to confirm the association of cis-regulated ASM with multiple complex disease-associated variants in an independent population using next-generation bisulfite sequencing. These four variants are implicated in complex phenotypes such as ulcerative colitis and AIDS progression disease (rs10491434), Celiac disease (rs2762051), Crohn's disease, IgA nephropathy and early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (rs713875) and height (rs6569648). Our results suggest cis-regulated ASM may provide a mechanistic link between the non-coding genetic changes and phenotypic variation observed in these diseases and further suggests a route to integrating DNA methylation status with GWAS results.

  1. Altered cell surface expression of human MC1R variant receptor alleles associated with red hair and skin cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Kimberley A; Newton, Richard A; Smit, Darren J; Leonard, J Helen; Stow, Jennifer L; Sturm, Richard A

    2005-08-01

    The human melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R) encodes a G-protein coupled receptor that is primarily expressed on melanocytes, where it plays a key role in pigmentation regulation. Variant alleles are associated with red hair colour and fair skin, known as the RHC phenotype, as well as skin cancer risk. The R151C, R160W and D294H alleles, designated 'R', are strongly associated with the RHC phenotype and have been proposed to result in loss of function receptors due to impaired G-protein coupling. We recently provided evidence that the R151C and R160W variants can efficiently couple to G-proteins in response to alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone. The possibility that altered cellular localization of the R151C and R160W variant receptors could underlie their association with RHC was therefore considered. Using immunofluorescence and ligand binding studies, we found that melanocytic cells exogenously or endogenously expressing MC1R show strong surface localization of the wild-type and D294H alleles but markedly reduced cell surface expression of the R151C and R160W receptors. In additional exogenous expression studies, the R variant D84E and the rare I155T variant, also demonstrated a significant reduction in plasma membrane receptor numbers. The V60L, V92M and R163Q weakly associated RHC alleles, designated 'r', were expressed with normal or intermediate cell surface receptor levels. These results indicate that reduced receptor coupling activity may not be the only contributing factor to the genetic association between the MC1R variants and the RHC phenotype, with MC1R polymorphisms now linked to a change in receptor localization.

  2. MicroRNA Genetic Variation: From Population Analysis to Functional Implications of Three Allele Variants Associated with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Torruella-Loran, Ignasi; Laayouni, Hafid; Dobon, Begoña; Gallego, Alicia; Balcells, Ingrid; Garcia-Ramallo, Eva; Espinosa-Parrilla, Yolanda

    2016-10-01

    Nucleotide variants in microRNA regions have been associated with disease; nevertheless, few studies still have addressed the allele-dependent effect of these changes. We studied microRNA genetic variation in human populations and found that while low-frequency variants accumulate indistinctly in microRNA regions, the mature and seed regions tend to be depleted of high-frequency variants, probably as a result of purifying selection. Comparison of pairwise population fixation indexes among regions showed that the seed had higher population fixation indexes than the other regions, suggesting the existence of local adaptation in the seed region. We further performed functional studies of three microRNA variants associated with cancer (rs2910164:C > G in MIR146A, rs11614913:C > T in MIR196A2, and rs3746444:A > G in both MIR499A and MIR499B). We found differences in the expression between alleles and in the regulation of several genes involved in cancer, such as TP53, KIT, CDH1, CLH, and TERT, which may result in changes in regulatory networks related to tumorigenesis. Furthermore, luciferase-based assays showed that MIR499A could be regulating the cadherin CDH1 and the cell adhesion molecule CLH1 in an allele-dependent fashion. A better understanding of the effect of microRNA variants associated with disease could be key in our way to a more personalized medicine.

  3. Effective marker alleles associated with type II resistance of wheat to Fusarium head blight infection in fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular markers associated with known quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in bi-parental mapping populations usually have more than two alleles in breeding populations. Therefore, understanding the association of each allele with FHB response is parti...

  4. Association of HLA-DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to mixed connective tissue disease in Polish patients.

    PubMed

    Paradowska-Gorycka, A; Stypińska, B; Olesińska, M; Felis-Giemza, A; Mańczak, M; Czuszynska, Z; Zdrojewski, Z; Wojciechowicz, J; Jurkowska, M

    2015-11-09

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease, originally defined as a connective tissue inflammatory syndrome with overlapping features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc), characterized by the presence of antibodies against components of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1snRNP). The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of (high-resolution-typed) DRB1 alleles in a cohort of Polish patients with MCTD (n = 103). Identification of the variants potentially associated with risk and protection was carried out by comparison with the DKMS Polish Bone Marrow Donor Registry (41306 alleles). DRB1*15:01 (odds ratio (OR): 6.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.55-8.06), DRB1*04 (OR: 3.69; 95% CI 2.69-5.01) and *09:01 (OR: 8.12; 95% CI 2.15-21.75) were identified as risk alleles for MCTD, while HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele was found to be protective (OR: 0.50; 95% CI 0.28-0.83). The carrier frequency of the DRB1*01 was higher in MCTD patients compared with controls, although the differences were not statistically significant. Our results confirm the modulating influence of HLA-DRB1 genotypes on development of connective tissue diseases such as MCTD.

  5. Association of HLA-DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to mixed connective tissue disease in Polish patients.

    PubMed

    Paradowska-Gorycka, A; Stypińska, B; Olesińska, M; Felis-Giemza, A; Mańczak, M; Czuszynska, Z; Zdrojewski, Z; Wojciechowicz, J; Jurkowska, M

    2016-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease, originally defined as a connective tissue inflammatory syndrome with overlapping features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc), characterized by the presence of antibodies against components of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1snRNP). The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of (high-resolution-typed) DRB1 alleles in a cohort of Polish patients with MCTD (n = 103). Identification of the variants potentially associated with risk and protection was carried out by comparison with the DKMS Polish Bone Marrow Donor Registry (41306 alleles). DRB1*15:01 (odds ratio (OR): 6.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.55-8.06), DRB1*04 (OR: 3.69; 95% CI 2.69-5.01) and *09:01 (OR: 8.12; 95% CI 2.15-21.75) were identified as risk alleles for MCTD, while HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele was found to be protective (OR: 0.50; 95% CI 0.28-0.83). The carrier frequency of the DRB1*01 was higher in MCTD patients compared with controls, although the differences were not statistically significant. Our results confirm the modulating influence of HLA-DRB1 genotypes on development of connective tissue diseases such as MCTD.

  6. G Allele of the IGF2 ApaI Polymorphism Is Associated With Judo Status.

    PubMed

    Itaka, Toshio; Agemizu, Kenichiro; Aruga, Seiji; Machida, Shuichi

    2016-07-01

    Itaka, T, Agemizu, K, Aruga, S, and Machida, S. G allele of the IGF2 ApaI polymorphism is associated with judo status. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2043-2048, 2016-Previous studies have reported that the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) ApaI polymorphism is associated with body mass index, fat mass, and grip strength. Competitive judo requires high levels of strength and power. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the IGF2 ApaI and ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and judo status. The subjects were 156 male judo athletes from a top-level university in Japan. They were divided into 3 groups based on their competitive history: international-level athletes, national-level athletes, and others. Genomic DNA was extracted from the saliva of each athlete, and the maximal isometric strength of the trunk muscles and handgrip strength were measured. Genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to detect IGF2 (rs680) and α-actinin-3 (ACTN3) (rs1815739) gene polymorphisms. The genotype frequencies of the 2 gene polymorphisms were compared among the 3 groups of judo athletes and controls. International-level judo athletes showed a higher frequency of the GG + GA genotype of the IGF2 gene than that of the national-level athletes and others. There was an inverse linear correlation between the frequency of the IGF2 AA genotype and level of judo performance (p = 0.041). Back muscle strength relative to height and weight was higher in subjects with the GG + GA genotype than in those with the AA genotype. Conversely, the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism was not associated with judo status. Additionally, no differences were found in back muscle or handgrip strength among the ACTN3 genotypes. In conclusion, the results indicate that the IGF2 gene polymorphism may be associated with judo status.

  7. Association between prostate cancer in black Americans and an allele of the PADPRP pseudogene locus on chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, J.A.; Suarez, B.K.; Donis-Keller, H.

    1996-02-01

    Black American men have a higher incidence of cancer of the prostate (CAP), multiple myeloma, and lung cancer than do white American men. The basis for these differences no doubt includes environmental influences, because American blacks have also been found to have a higher incidence of CAP than do African blacks. However, genetic factors may play a role as well. For example, Lyn et al. reported an increase in the frequency of an allele of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) pseudogene locus on chromosome 13 in black Americans with CAP, suggesting the presence of a disease-susceptibility locus. Since only nine CAP patients were studied, proof of the significance of the finding for the general population of black Americans will rely on independent replication of the result and studies with larger sample sizes. We have doubled the number of black American CAP patients studied at the PADPRP pseudogene locus on chromosome 13 and compared them with white Americans with CAP, along with reference samples. In addition, we have determined allele frequencies by using a larger number of white individuals, from the CEPH reference pedigree resource, and a larger number of black Americans than previously reported, which may reflect more accurately the allele frequencies in these populations. We also find a statistically significant association between an allele at the PADPRP pseudogene locus and CAP in black Americans; however, it is not the same allele reported by Lyn et al. Furthermore, we tested CAP tumor DNA for chromosome 13 PADPRP pseudogene region deletions. In contrast to the report of Bhatia et al., we found no evidence for deletions that would suggest the presence of a tumor-suppressor gene in this region of chromosome 13. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Associations of Moyamoya patients with HLA class I and class II alleles in the Korean population.

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hoon; Pyo, Chul-Woo; Yoo, Do-Sung; Huh, Pil-Woo; Cho, Kyung-Souk; Kim, Dal-Soo

    2003-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is characterized by progressive cerebrovascular occlusion at the peripheral internal carotid artery and development of abnormal collateral circulation at the cerebral basal region. Although abnormal thrombogenesis, inflammation and autoimmune process might be involved in the etiology, the genetic pathogenesis of Moyamoya disease is still unknown. To evaluate the association of Moyamoya disease with HLA alleles in the Korean population, we investigated HLA class I and class II alleles in 28 Moyamoya patients and 198 unrelated healthy controls. The frequency of HLA-B35 allele was significantly increased in the patients compared to the controls (32.1% vs. 10.1%, RR=4.2, p<0.008). Further analysis of HLA-B35 on onset age and sex showed that this allele was significantly increased compared to the controls in both late-onset and female group. Especially, HLA-B35 was the most significantly increased in female of late-onset group compared to the controls. These results suggest that HLA-B35 may be an useful genetic marker for Moyamoya disease, and particularly in females of late onset group in the Korean population. PMID:14676447

  9. Worldwide ethnic distribution of the G protein beta3 subunit 825T allele and its association with obesity in Caucasian, Chinese, and Black African individuals.

    PubMed

    Siffert, W; Forster, P; Jöckel, K H; Mvere, D A; Brinkmann, B; Naber, C; Crookes, R; Du P Heyns, A; Epplen, J T; Fridey, J; Freedman, B I; Müller, N; Stolke, D; Sharma, A M; Al Moutaery, K; Grosse-Wilde, H; Buerbaum, B; Ehrlich, T; Ahmad, H R; Horsthemke, B; Du Toit, E D; Tiilikainen, A; Ge, J; Wang, Y; Rosskopf, D

    1999-09-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that one allele (825T) of the gene encoding the G protein beta3 subunit (GNB3) is associated with hypertension in Germans. This study investigates a possible association with obesity in young male Germans, Chinese, and black South Africans with low, intermediate, and high 825T allele frequencies, respectively. In each of these three distinct cohorts, the 825T allele frequency was increased significantly in overweight (body mass index [BMI] > or =25 kg/m2) and obese individuals (BMI >27 kg/m2) compared to those with normal weight. The 825T allele frequencies in these three BMI groups were, respectively, 29.5, 39.3, and 47.7% in Germans, 46.8, 53.9, and 58.6% in Chinese, and 83.1, 87.7, and 90.9% in South Africans. In each of these three distinct groups, the 825T allele was significantly associated with obesity with odds ratios between 2 and 3. More urban than rural black Africans were overweight despite similar 825T allele frequencies in both populations, which underscores the role of both genetic and environmental factors. BP values in young male whites increased significantly with increasing BMI values but were independent of the C825T polymorphism, suggesting that hypertension associated with the 825T allele could be a consequence of obesity. Genotyping of 5254 individuals from 55 native population samples from Africa, the Americas, Europe, Asia, Australia, and New Guinea demonstrated highest 825T allele frequencies in black Africans (82%) and intermediate values in east Asians (47%). It is anticipated that high frequencies of the 825T allele in Africans and Asians may contribute to an obesity and hypertension epidemic if Westernization of lifestyles continues.

  10. Association of BoLA DRB3 and DQA1 alleles with susceptibility to Neospora caninum and reproductive outcome in Quebec Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Anne E; Geary, Timothy G; Baillargeon, Paul; Schwab, Andreas J; Fecteau, Gilles

    2009-10-28

    The BoLA DRB3 and DQA1 genes are part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II in cattle. These genes are highly polymorphic and have been associated with resistance to several diseases, such as mastitis, Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) and dermatophilis. Sequenced based typing of these genes has been carried out extensively from blood samples; however it is often impractical or expensive to obtain such samples. Repositories of well-characterized serum from cattle are readily available in many veterinary research facilities. This paper reports a retrospective analysis of BoLA class II genotypes of cattle obtained from stored serum samples from Holstein cattle from Québec dairy farms, which were obtained as part of a previous study on bovine neosporosis. It was possible to genotype 56 cattle with known infection status for Neospora caninum. We identified 14 different DRB3 and 10 different DQA1 alleles in this population. The allele frequency distribution was consistent with previously studied cattle populations, and alleles known to be associated with BLV and mastitis were present. No association was found between allele frequency distribution of DRB3 or DQA genes and infection with N. caninum. However, an association of allele DRB3*1001 and allele DRB3*2703 with resistance and susceptibility to pregnancy loss, irrespective of infection status, was identified.

  11. Lack of association of apoE ε4 allele with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ragogna, Francesca; Lattuada, Guido; Ruotolo, Giacomo; Luzi, Livio; Perseghin, Gianluca

    2012-02-01

    ApoE is a polymorphic protein involved in the metabolism of plasma lipoproteins; the ε4 allele was shown to be associated with coronary and aortic atherosclerosis in age-dependent fashion mediated by unknown mechanisms. This study was undertaken to assess whether the apoE isoforms in humans were associated with normal glucose tolerance and with metabolic and inflammatory risk factors of CVD. ApoE genotype was assessed in 365 individuals. Of those, 309 were studied in the postabsorptive conditions and 142 of them also underwent a 3h-OGTT; 56 additional subjects were studied by means of the insulin clamp in combination with [6,6-2H2] glucose infusion. ApoE genotype frequencies were similar to those previously reported and were not influenced by age and BMI. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, FFA, the lipid profile, surrogate markers (HOMA-IR, OGTT-derived index) as well as the clamp-derived parameters or insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion were not different by apoE genotypes. Serum adipokines concentrations (leptin, adiponectin, resistin) and markers of inflammation (serum fasting hsCRP and MCP1/CCL2) were also not different by apoE genotypes. In the subgroup of young ε4 carriers which underwent the clamp procedure, a higher fasting endogenous glucose production was detected. ApoE genotype was not associated with insulin resistance or altered insulin secretion, and no abnormalities in the typical circulating endocrine, metabolic, and inflammatory features of the insulin resistance syndrome were detected.

  12. Helicobacter pylori outer membrane protein Q allele distribution is associated with distinct pathologies in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Javed; Abbas, Zaigham; Khan, Rustam; Salim, Saima Azhar; Awan, Safia; Abrar, Ambar; Jafri, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) strains expressing outer membrane protein Q (HopQ) promote adherence to the gastric epithelial cell. We characterized HopQ alleles in relation to H. pylori-related disease, histology and virulence markers. Gastric biopsies were obtained at esophagogastroduodenoscopy from patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. H. pylori culture, histology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HopQ types, cagA, cagA-promoter and vacA alleles were performed. DNA extracted was used for PCR. Sequencing of PCR products of HopQ types 1 and 2 was followed by BLAST query. We examined 241 H. pylori isolates. HopQ type 1 was positive in 70 (29%) isolates, type 2 in 60 (25%) isolates, while both type 1 and type 2 in 111 (46%) H. pylori isolates, respectively. Nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) was associated with HopQ type 2 in 48 (41%) isolates, while gastric carcinoma (GC) in 37 (53%) (P<0.001) with type 1 isolates. Gastric ulcers (GU) were 39 (46%) (P<0.001) in H. pylori infection with multiple HopQ alleles compared to 6 (23%) in HopQ type 1. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that multiple HopQ alleles were associated with GU OR 2.9 (1.07-7.8) (P=0.03). HopQ type 1 was associated with cagA 58 (84%) (P<0.001) and cagA-promoter 58 (83%) (P<0.001) compared to 14 (23%) and 17 (28%) respectively, in type 2. VacAs1a was associated with HopQ type 1 in 59 (84%) isolates compared to HopQ type 2 in 35 (58%) (P=0.002) isolates. VacAm1 was associated with HopQ type 1 in 53 (76%) isolates compared to HopQ type 2 in 32 (53%) (P=0.004) isolates. H. pylori infection with multiple HopQ alleles was predominant. H. pylori infection with single HopQ type 1 was associated with GC in the presence of other H. pylori virulence markers.

  13. Allelic association of human dopamine D sub 2 receptor gene in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, K.; Sheridan, P.J.; Montgomery, A.; Jagadeeswaran, P.; Nogami, H.; Briggs, A.H. ); Noble, E.P.; Ritchie, T.; Cohn, J.B. )

    1990-04-18

    In a blinded experiment, the authors report the first allelic association of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in alcoholism. From 70 brain samples of alcoholics and nonalcoholics, DNA was digested with restriction endonucleases and probed with a clone that contained the entire 3{prime} coding exon, the polyadenylation signal, and approximately 16.4 kilobases of noncoding 3{prime} sequence of the human dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene ({lambda}hD2G1). In the present samples, the presence of A1 allele of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene correctly classified 77% of alcoholics, and its absence classified 72% of nonalcoholics. The polymorphic pattern of this receptor gene suggests that a gene that confers susceptibility to at least one form of alcoholism is located on the q22-q23 region of chromosome 11.

  14. Allele dynamics plots for the study of evolutionary dynamics in viral populations.

    PubMed

    Steinbrück, Lars; McHardy, Alice Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Phylodynamic techniques combine epidemiological and genetic information to analyze the evolutionary and spatiotemporal dynamics of rapidly evolving pathogens, such as influenza A or human immunodeficiency viruses. We introduce 'allele dynamics plots' (AD plots) as a method for visualizing the evolutionary dynamics of a gene in a population. Using AD plots, we propose how to identify the alleles that are likely to be subject to directional selection. We analyze the method's merits with a detailed study of the evolutionary dynamics of seasonal influenza A viruses. AD plots for the major surface protein of seasonal influenza A (H3N2) and the 2009 swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) viruses show the succession of substitutions that became fixed in the evolution of the two viral populations. They also allow the early identification of those viral strains that later rise to predominance, which is important for the problem of vaccine strain selection. In summary, we describe a technique that reveals the evolutionary dynamics of a rapidly evolving population and allows us to identify alleles and associated genetic changes that might be under directional selection. The method can be applied for the study of influenza A viruses and other rapidly evolving species or viruses.

  15. Lack of association between TaqI A1 Allele of dopamine D2 receptor gene and alcohol-use disorders in Atayal natives of Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chia-Hsiang Chen; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Hai-Gwo Hwu

    1996-09-20

    Association studies between the A1 allele of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene TaqI A polymorphism and alcoholism remain controversial. A recent study from Japan demonstrated that the A1 allele is associated with severe alcoholism in the Japanese population. We were interested in knowing if this association also exists in the Atayals of Taiwan, who were found to have a higher prevalence of alcohol-use disorders than the Han Chinese in Taiwan. Genotype and allele frequencies were determined in alcohol-abusing, alcohol-dependent, and nonalcoholic control Atayal natives in Taiwan. A1 allele frequencies in alcohol-dependent, alcohol-abusing, and normal control Atayals were 0.39, 0.42, and 0.39, respectively. No difference in A1 allele frequency was found among these three groups. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the A1 allele of the TaqI A polymorphism of the DRD2 gene increases susceptibility to alcohol-use disorders in the Atayals of Taiwan. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Genotypic and allelic frequencies of gene polymorphisms associated with meat tenderness in Nellore beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M E; Eler, J P; Bonin, M N; Rezende, F M; Biase, F H; Meirelles, F V; Regitano, L C A; Coutinho, L L; Balieiro, J C C; Ferraz, J B S

    2017-02-16

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the allelic and genotypic frequencies of polymorphisms in the µ-calpain and calpastatin genes, and to assess their association with meat tenderness and animal growth in Nellore cattle. We evaluated 605 Nellore animals at 24 months of age, on average, at slaughter. The polymorphisms were determined for the molecular markers CAPN316, CAPN530, CAPN4751, CAPN4753, and UOGACAST1. Analyses of meat tenderness at 7, 14, and 21 days of maturation were performed in samples of longissimus thoracis obtained between the 12th and 13th rib and sheared using a Warner Bratzler Shear Force. Significant effects were observed for meat tenderness at days 7, 14, and 21 of maturation for the marker CAPN4751, at day 21 for the marker CAPN4753, and at days 14 and 21 for the marker UOGCAST1. For genotypic combinations of markers, the results were significant for the combination CAPN4751/UOGCAST1 in the three maturation periods and CAPN4753/UOGCAST1 at days 14 and 21 of maturation.

  17. Lack of associations between HLA class II alleles and resistance to HIV-1 infection among white, non-Hispanic homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenglong; Carrington, Mary; Kaslow, Richard A; Gao, Xiaojiang; Rinaldo, Charles R; Jacobson, Lisa P; Margolick, Joseph B; Phair, John; O'Brien, Stephen J; Detels, Roger

    2004-10-01

    HLA class II alleles were molecularly typed for 100 high-risk seronegative men and 184 low-risk seroconverters from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). Seven resistant individuals homozygous for CCR5 Delta32 deletions were excluded from analysis. In the univariate analysis, no significant HLA class II associations with resistance/susceptibility to HIV type 1 infection were identified. However, the transporter associated with antigen presentation 2 (TAP2) Ala 665 variant associated with resistance in earlier analyses in the MACS was in linkage disequilibrium with some HLA class II alleles. After adjusting for the established associations with HLA-A*0205 subgroup and TAP2 Ala 665 variant, no HLA class II alleles were independently associated with resistance/susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Other genetic factors in the HLA class II-TAP region of the major histocompatibility complex might be involved.

  18. Allelic heterogeneity in NCF2 associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility across four ethnic populations

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Howard, Xana; Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E.; Maiti, Amit K.; Chandru, Hema; Adler, Adam; Wiley, Graham B.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kottyan, Leah; Guthridge, Joel M.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Kelly, Jennifer; Sánchez, Elena; Raj, Prithvi; Li, Quan-Zhen; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Han, Bok-Ghee; Olsen, Nancy J.; Karp, David R.; Moser, Kathy; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; James, Judith A.; Harley, John B.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Looger, Loren L.; Nath, Swapan K.; Acevedo, Eduardo; Acevedo, Eduardo; La Torre, Ignacio García-De; Maradiaga-Ceceña, Marco A.; Cardiel, Mario H.; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A.; Rodriguez-Amado, Jacqueline; Moctezuma, José Francisco; Miranda, Pedro; Perandones, Carlos; Aires, Buenos; Castel, Cecilia; Laborde, Hugo A.; Alba, Paula; Musuruana, Jorge; Goecke, Annelise; Foster, Carola; Orozco, Lorena; Baca, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have associated NCF2, encoding a core component of the multi-protein NADPH oxidase (NADPHO), with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility in individuals of European ancestry. To identify ethnicity-specific and -robust variants within NCF2, we assessed 145 SNPs in and around the NCF2 gene in 5325 cases and 21 866 controls of European-American (EA), African-American (AA), Hispanic (HS) and Korean (KR) ancestry. Subsequent imputation, conditional, haplotype and bioinformatic analyses identified seven potentially functional SLE-predisposing variants. Association with non-synonymous rs17849502, previously reported in EA, was detected in EA, HS and AA (PEA = 1.01 × 10−54, PHS = 3.68 × 10−10, PAA = 0.03); synonymous rs17849501 was similarly significant. These SNPs were monomorphic in KR. Novel associations were detected with coding variants at rs35937854 in AA (PAA = 1.49 × 10−9), and rs13306575 in HS and KR (PHS = 7.04 × 10−7, PKR = 3.30 × 10−3). In KR, a 3-SNP haplotype was significantly associated (P = 4.20 × 10−7), implying that SLE predisposing variants were tagged. Significant SNP–SNP interaction (P = 0.02) was detected between rs13306575 and rs17849502 in HS, and a dramatically increased risk (OR = 6.55) with a risk allele at each locus. Molecular modeling predicts that these non-synonymous mutations could disrupt NADPHO complex assembly. The risk allele of rs17849501, located in a conserved transcriptional regulatory region, increased reporter gene activity, suggesting in vivo enhancer function. Our results not only establish allelic heterogeneity within NCF2 associated with SLE, but also emphasize the utility of multi-ethnic cohorts to identify predisposing variants explaining additional phenotypic variance (‘missing heritability’) of complex diseases like SLE. PMID:24163247

  19. CCR5-delta 32 allele is associated with the risk of developing multiple sclerosis in the Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Majid; Ebadi, Hamid; Fathi, Davood; Roshandel, Danial; Mahamadhoseeni, Mana; Rashidbaghan, Azam; Mahammadi, Narges; Mahammadi, Mahammad Reza; Zamani, Mahdi

    2009-12-01

    The 32-base pair deletion on the C-C chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5-delta 32) is known as a protective allele against immune system disorders. We have studied this variation in Iranian multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and healthy controls. DNA samples were prepared from the whole blood of 254 patients with MS and 380 healthy controls. We amplified the fragment including the CCR5-delta 32 polymorphism and visualized the products in a documentation system after agarose gel electrophoresis. Data were analysed using one-way ANOVA and Fisher's exact tests with SPSS-v13 and STATA-v8 software. The delta 32 allele was more frequent in MS patients when compared with controls (OR = 2.3, P < 0.0001). Also, we found a significant difference in the frequency of the delta 32/delta 32 genotype among patients and controls (OR = 7.4, P < 0.001). The mean age at onset and progression index was not significantly different between patients with various genotypes. According to our study, the delta 32 allele of the CCR5 gene might be a predisposing factor for MS development in the Iranian population. However, there were no associations between this polymorphism and the clinical course of the disease in this study.

  20. [Frequent allelic losses in tumor-associated stromal cells and tumor epitelium of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kekeeva, T V; Popova, O P; Shegaĭ, P V; Zavalishina, L E; Andreeva, Iu Iu; Zaletaev, D V; Nemtsova, M V

    2008-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Accumulation of genetic alterations is typical not only for cancer epithelial cells but tumor-associated fibroblasts as well. Tumor epithelia, tumor-associated stroma from prostatectomy specimens of patients with prostate cancer and cells from prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adjacent stroma from males with PIN were isolated by using laser capture microdissection. Microsatellite allelotyping was evaluated using 4 highly polymorphic markers for chromosomal regions 8p22, 16q23-24 and 13q14. Incidences of alterations (loss of heterozygosity or allelic imbalance) were 48% for region 8p22, 72% for 16q23 and 37% for 13q14. The LOH frequencies in tumor-associated stroma cells were very similar. Alterations at chromosome 13q were significantly associated with advanced tumor stage, whereas AI at 16q was also associated with high Gleason score and lymph node metastasis. We find some incidences of allelic imbalance in premalignant lesions in epithelial (16-27%) and stromal (7-22%) components. Our results show that the frequencies of genetic aberrations are as high in stromal cells as in tumor cells.

  1. EcoTILLING-Based Association Mapping Efficiently Delineates Functionally Relevant Natural Allelic Variants of Candidate Genes Governing Agronomic Traits in Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Deepak; Srivastava, Rishi; Nath, Manoj; Tripathi, Shailesh; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2016-01-01

    The large-scale mining and high-throughput genotyping of novel gene-based allelic variants in natural mapping population are essential for association mapping to identify functionally relevant molecular tags governing useful agronomic traits in chickpea. The present study employs an alternative time-saving, non-laborious and economical pool-based EcoTILLING approach coupled with agarose gel detection assay to discover 1133 novel SNP allelic variants from diverse coding and regulatory sequence components of 1133 transcription factor (TF) genes by genotyping in 192 diverse desi and kabuli chickpea accessions constituting a seed weight association panel. Integrating these SNP genotyping data with seed weight field phenotypic information of 192 structured association panel identified eight SNP alleles in the eight TF genes regulating seed weight of chickpea. The associated individual and combination of all SNPs explained 10–15 and 31% phenotypic variation for seed weight, respectively. The EcoTILLING-based large-scale allele mining and genotyping strategy implemented for association mapping is found much effective for a diploid genome crop species like chickpea with narrow genetic base and low genetic polymorphism. This optimized approach thus can be deployed for various genomics-assisted breeding applications with optimal expense of resources in domesticated chickpea. The seed weight-associated natural allelic variants and candidate TF genes delineated have potential to accelerate marker-assisted genetic improvement of chickpea. PMID:27148286

  2. Validation study of the TrueAllele automated data review system.

    PubMed

    Kadash, Kristy; Kozlowski, Brian E; Biega, Lisa A; Duceman, Barry W

    2004-07-01

    The New York State Convicted Offender DNA Databank is the first U.S. lab to complete an internal validation of the TrueAllele expert data review system. TrueAllele is designed to assess short tandem repeat (STR) DNA data based on several key features such as peak height, shape, area, and position relative to a standard ladder and use this information to make accurate allele calls. The software then prioritizes the allele calls based on several user-defined rules. As a result, the user need only review low-quality data. The validation of this system consisted of an extensive optimization phase and a large concordance phase. During optimization, the rule settings were tailored to minimize the amount of high-quality data viewed by the user. In the concordance phase, a large dataset was typed in parallel with the ABI software Gene Scan and Genotyper (manual review) and TrueAllele (automated review) for comparison of allele calls and sample state assignment. Only one significant difference was discovered out of 2048 samples in the concordance study. In this case, TrueAllele revealed a spike in the profile that was interpreted as a DNA peak by the analyst in Genotyper. TrueAllele was designed to focus the review on poor data and to eliminate the need for complete reanalysis technical review. This validation project proved TrueAllele to be dependable for use at the NYS Convicted Offender DNA Databank.

  3. The Mechanism of Allelic Competition in the ABO 547G>A Mutant is Associated with Decreased Activity of Glycosyltransferase B.

    PubMed

    Park, Geon; Cho, Yong Gon

    2016-01-01

    The 547G>A polymorphism demonstrates significant allelic competition in people who harbor the B306 allele. We have performed the full sequencing of ABO gene in family members and measured their serum glycosyltransferase activity for demonstrating the cause of allelic competition. Genetic study including two regulatory regions and exon 1, and exons 2-7 of ABO gene demonstrated c.547G>A in exon 7 of the proband and her second son. The ABO genotype of the proband, husband, first son, and other son was ABO*A102/ABO*B306, ABO*A105/ABO*O02, ABO*A102/ABO*O02, and ABO*B306/ABO*O02 respectively. Serum glycosyltransferse B activity in the proband and her second son was lower than in normal B controls. We infer that allelic competition in the the 547G>A carrying individuals is associated with reduced activity of glycosyltransferase B.

  4. Associations of High-Grade Glioma With Glioma Risk Alleles and Histories of Allergy and Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Daniel H.; Yang, Ping; Johnson, Derek R.; Decker, Paul A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Rice, Terri; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Ali-Osman, Francis; Wang, Frances; Stoddard, Shawn M.; Sprau, Debra J.; Kosel, Matthew L.; Wiencke, John K.; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Patoka, Joseph S.; Davis, Faith; McCarthy, Bridget; Rynearson, Amanda L.; Worra, Joel B.; Fridley, Brooke L.; O’Neill, Brian Patrick; Buckner, Jan C.; Il’yasova, Dora; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2011-01-01

    Glioma risk has consistently been inversely associated with allergy history but not with smoking history despite putative biologic plausibility. Data from 855 high-grade glioma cases and 1,160 controls from 4 geographic regions of the United States during 1997–2008 were analyzed for interactions between allergy and smoking histories and inherited variants in 5 established glioma risk regions: 5p15.3 (TERT), 8q24.21 (CCDC26/MLZE), 9p21.3 (CDKN2B), 11q23.3 (PHLDB1/DDX6), and 20q13.3 (RTEL1). The inverse relation between allergy and glioma was stronger among those who did not (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.40, 95% confidence interval: 0.28, 0.58) versus those who did (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.97; Pinteraction = 0.02) carry the 9p21.3 risk allele. However, the inverse association with allergy was stronger among those who carried (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.44, 95% confidence interval: 0.29, 0.68) versus those who did not carry (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.54, 0.86) the 20q13.3 glioma risk allele, but this interaction was not statistically significant (P = 0.14). No relation was observed between glioma risk and smoking (odds ratio = 0.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.77, 1.10; P = 0.37), and there were no interactions for glioma risk of smoking history with any of the risk alleles. The authors’ observations are consistent with a recent report that the inherited glioma risk variants in chromosome regions 9p21.3 and 20q13.3 may modify the inverse association of allergy and glioma. PMID:21742680

  5. Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ϵ4 Allele Is Associated with Increased Symptom Reporting Following Sports Concussion.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Victoria C; Arnett, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Exploring the relationship between genetic factors and outcome following brain injury has received increased attention in recent years. However, few studies have evaluated the influence of genes on specific sequelae of concussion. The purpose of this study was to determine how the ϵ4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene influences symptom expression following sports-related concussion. Participants included 42 collegiate athletes who underwent neuropsychological testing, including completion of the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS), within 3 months after sustaining a concussion (73.8% were evaluated within 1 week). Athletes provided buccal samples that were analyzed to determine the make-up of their APOE genotype. Dependent variables included a total symptom score and four symptom clusters derived from the PCSS. Mann-Whitney U tests showed higher scores reported by athletes with the ϵ4 allele compared to those without it on the total symptom score and the physical and cognitive symptom clusters. Furthermore, logistic regression showed that the ϵ4 allele independently predicted those athletes who reported physical and cognitive symptoms following concussion. These findings illustrate that ϵ4+ athletes report greater symptomatology post-concussion than ϵ4- athletes, suggesting that the ϵ4 genotype may confer risk for poorer post-concussion outcome. (JINS, 2016, 22, 89-94).

  6. Pharmacogenetic relevance of the CYP2C9*3 allele in a tenoxicam bioequivalence study performed on Spaniards.

    PubMed

    Peiró, A M; Novalbos, J; Zapater, P; Moreu, R; López-Rodríguez, R; Rodríguez, V; Abad-Santos, F; Horga, J F

    2009-01-01

    We performed a study to quantify CYP2C9 and CYP2C8 alleles influence on the variability observed in tenoxicam pharmacokinetic (PK) and implication in a bioequivalence study design performed on Spaniards. Eighteen healthy volunteers were included in an open, randomized, crossover, phase I bioequivalence study. Significant increases were found in CYP2C9*3 alleles vs. *1 and *2 in AUC(0-infinity) (median (min-max)): 256 (230-516) vs. 150 (100-268) and 169 (124-197) microg h/mL (p<0.01) and half-life time (t1/2) 102 (79-36) vs. 56 (45-94) and 64 (60-80)h (p<0.01). Non-significant differences were observed in C(max) 1.9 (1.8-2.9) vs. 2.4 (1.7-3.4), 2.5 (1.6-2.9) microg/mL or in according to CYP2C8 alleles presence. CYP2C9*3 allele is associated to a longer elimination time of tenoxicam. PK parameters calculated in bioequivalence studies (AUC(0-infinity), t1/2) may be influenced by the presence of CYP2C9*3 allele resulting in a high variability. Thus, bioequivalence studies of tenoxicam formulations should be designed considering genotype profile.

  7. Several different lactase persistence associated alleles and high diversity of the lactase gene in the admixed Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Santos, Sidney E B; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea K C; Hutz, Mara H

    2012-01-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a common phenotype caused by the lactase enzyme deficiency. The -13910 C>T polymorphism, located 14 Kb upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) in the MCM6 gene was associated with lactase persistence (LP) in Europeans. This polymorphism is rare in Africa but several other variants associated with lactase persistence were observed in Africans. The aims of this study were to identify polymorphisms in the MCM6 region associated with the lactase persistence phenotype and to determine the distribution of LCT gene haplotypes in 981 individuals from North, Northeast and South Brazil. These polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR based methods and sequencing. The -13779*C,-13910*T, -13937*A, -14010*C, -14011*T LP alleles previously described in the MCM6 gene region that acts as an enhancer for the LCT gene were identified in Brazilians. The most common LP allele was -13910*T. Its frequency was highly correlated with European ancestry in the Brazilian populations investigated. The -13910*T was higher (0.295) in southern Brazilians of European ancestry and lower (0.175) in the Northern admixed population. LCT haplotypes were derived from the 10 LCT SNPs genotyped. Overall twenty six haplotypes previously described were identified in the four Brazilian populations studied. The Multidimensional Scaling analysis showed that Belém, in the north, was closer to Amerindians. Northeastern and southern Afro-descendants were more related with Bantu-speaking South Africans whereas the Southern population with European ancestry grouped with Southern and Northern Europeans. This study shows a high variability considering the number of LCT haplotypes observed. Due to the highly admixed nature of the Brazilian populations, the diagnosis of hypolactasia in Brazil, based only in the investigation of the -13910*T allele is an oversimplification.

  8. Association of BLV infection profiles with alleles of the BoLA-DRB3.2 gene.

    PubMed

    Juliarena, M A; Poli, M; Sala, L; Ceriani, C; Gutierrez, S; Dolcini, G; Rodríguez, E M; Mariño, B; Rodríguez-Dubra, C; Esteban, E N

    2008-08-01

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) causes lymphosarcoma and persistent lymphocytosis (PL). Some MHC class II gene polymorphisms have been associated with resistance and susceptibility to the development of lymphosarcoma and PL, as well as with a reduced number of circulating BLV-infected lymphocytes. Previously, 230 BLV-infected Holstein cattle were classified into two infection profiles characterized by low and high proviral loads (LPL and HPL respectively). Here, the influence of the polymorphism at the BoLA-DRB3.2* gene of these animals was examined. After genotyping, the association between the BoLA-DRB3.2* alleles and the BLV infection profile was determined as the odds ratio (OR). Two subtypes of allele *11 were identified (ISAG*0901 and *0902). Allele ISAG*0902 showed a stronger association with the LPL profile (OR = 8.24; P < 0.0001) than allele *11 itself (OR = 5.82; P < 0.0001). Allele ISAG*1701 (*12) also showed significant association with the LPL profile (OR = 3.46; P < 0.0055). Only one allele, ISAG*1501 or 03 (*16), showed significant association with HPL (OR = 0.36; P < 0.0005). The DRB3.2* alleles were assigned to three categories: resistant (R), susceptible (S) and neutral (N). Based on their DRB3 genotypes, cattle were classified as homozygous or heterozygous. The RR and RN genotypes were associated with the LPL profile, while the SS and NS genotypes were associated with the HPL profile. The RS genotype could not be associated with any particular profile. Our results show that allele ISAG*0902 appears to be the best BLV resistance marker in Holstein cattle.

  9. Allelic diversification at the C (OsC1) locus of wild and cultivated rice: nucleotide changes associated with phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kumi; Onishi, Kazumitsu; Mikami, Ichiho; Thidar, Khin; Sano, Yoshio

    2004-10-01

    Divergent phenotypes are often detected in domesticated plants despite the existence of invariant phenotypes in their wild forms. One such example in rice is the occurrence of varying degrees of apiculus coloration due to anthocyanin pigmentation, which was previously reported to be caused by a series of alleles at the C locus. The present study reveals, on the basis of comparison of its maps, that the C gene appears to be the rice homolog (OsC1) of maize C1, which belongs to the group of R2R3-Myb factors. Two different types of deletions causing a frameshift were detected in the third exon, and both of the deleted nucleotides corresponded to the positions of putative base-contacting residues, suggesting that the Indica and Japonica types carry loss-of-function mutations with independent origins. In addition, replacement substitutions were frequently detected in OsC1 of strains carrying the previously defined C alleles. Molecular population analysis revealed that 17 haplotypes were found in 39 wild and cultivated rices, and the haplotypes of most cultivated forms could be classified into one of three distinct groups, with few shared haplotypes among taxa, including Indica and Japonica types. The genealogy of the OsC1 gene suggests that allelic diversification causing phenotypic change might have resulted from mutations in the coding region rather than from recombination between preexisting alleles. The McDonald and Kreitman test revealed that the changes in amino acids might be associated with selective forces acting on the lineage of group A whose haplotypes were carried by most Asian cultivated forms. The results regarding a significant implication for genetic diversity in landraces of rice are also discussed.

  10. CYP3A7*1C allele is associated with reduced levels of 2-hydroxylation pathway oestrogen metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Deepti; Johnson, Nichola; Jain, Pooja; Siskos, Alexandros P; Bennett, Mark; Gilham, Clare; Busana, Marta Cecilia; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Keun, Hector C; Fletcher, Olivia

    2017-01-01

    Background: Endogenous sex hormones are well-established risk factors for breast cancer; the contribution of specific oestrogen metabolites (EMs) and/or ratios of specific EMs is less clear. We have previously identified a CYP3A7*1C allele that is associated with lower urinary oestrone (E1) levels in premenopausal women. The purpose of this analysis was to determine whether this allele was associated with specific pathway EMs. Methods: We measured successfully 12 EMs in mid-follicular phase urine samples from 30 CYP3A7*1C carriers and 30 non-carriers using HPLC-MS/MS. Results: In addition to having lower urinary E1 levels, CYP3A7*1C carriers had significantly lower levels of four of the 2-hydroxylation pathway EMs that we measured (2-hydroxyestrone, P=1.1 × 10−12; 2-hydroxyestradiol, P=2.7 × 10−7; 2-methoxyestrone, P=1.9 × 10−12; and 2-methoxyestradiol, P=0.0009). By contrast, 16α-hydroxylation pathway EMs were slightly higher in carriers and significantly so for 17-epiestriol (P=0.002). Conclusions: The CYP3A7*1C allele is associated with a lower urinary E1 levels, a more pronounced reduction in 2-hydroxylation pathway EMs and a lower ratio of 2-hydroxylation:16α-hydroxylation EMs in premenopausal women. To further characterise the association between parent oestrogens, EMs and subsequent risk of breast cancer, characterisation of additional genetic variants that influence oestrogen metabolism and large prospective studies of a broad spectrum of EMs will be required. PMID:28072767

  11. Unraveling multiple MHC gene associations with systemic lupus erythematosus: model choice indicates a role for HLA alleles and non-HLA genes in Europeans.

    PubMed

    Morris, David L; Taylor, Kimberly E; Fernando, Michelle M A; Nititham, Joanne; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Barcellos, Lisa F; Behrens, Timothy W; Cotsapas, Chris; Gaffney, Patrick M; Graham, Robert R; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Gregersen, Peter K; Harley, John B; Hauser, Stephen L; Hom, Geoffrey; Langefeld, Carl D; Noble, Janelle A; Rioux, John D; Seldin, Michael F; Criswell, Lindsey A; Vyse, Timothy J

    2012-11-02

    We have performed a meta-analysis of the major-histocompatibility-complex (MHC) region in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to determine the association with both SNPs and classical human-leukocyte-antigen (HLA) alleles. More specifically, we combined results from six studies and well-known out-of-study control data sets, providing us with 3,701 independent SLE cases and 12,110 independent controls of European ancestry. This study used genotypes for 7,199 SNPs within the MHC region and for classical HLA alleles (typed and imputed). Our results from conditional analysis and model choice with the use of the Bayesian information criterion show that the best model for SLE association includes both classical loci (HLA-DRB1(∗)03:01, HLA-DRB1(∗)08:01, and HLA-DQA1(∗)01:02) and two SNPs, rs8192591 (in class III and upstream of NOTCH4) and rs2246618 (MICB in class I). Our approach was to perform a stepwise search from multiple baseline models deduced from a priori evidence on HLA-DRB1 lupus-associated alleles, a stepwise regression on SNPs alone, and a stepwise regression on HLA alleles. With this approach, we were able to identify a model that was an overwhelmingly better fit to the data than one identified by simple stepwise regression either on SNPs alone (Bayes factor [BF] > 50) or on classical HLA alleles alone (BF > 1,000).

  12. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 allele associations in an Albanian patient population with rheumatoid arthritis: correlations with the specific autoantibody markers and inter-population DRB1 allele frequency variability.

    PubMed

    Prifti-Kurti, Margarita; Nunes, José Manuel; Shyti, Erkena; Ylli, Zamira; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Sulcebe, Genc

    2014-08-01

    The prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis and its specific autoantibodies varies in different populations. This variability depends on the genetic polymorphism of the immune response genes among which the HLA system plays a major role. In this context, we studied the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 first-level allele frequencies in 100 Albanian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and taking into account their rheumatoid factor (RF) and anticitrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) serologic subgroups, we compared them with the respective frequencies in a population of 191 Albanian individuals without known pathology. No differences were found between the controls and the RA patient group as a whole, but three statistically significant differences were found: an increase in DRB1*04 among ACPA+, RF+ and ACPA+/RF+ patients, a significant decrease in DRB1*11 among ACPA+/RF+ and also a decrease in DRB1*13 among RF+ patient subgroups. Comparing allele frequencies of putatively associated RA alleles in different European populations revealed a significant negative correlation between the RA predisposing DRB1*04 and protective DRB1*11 allele frequencies. A statistically significant correlation was also found between RA prevalence rates and DRB1*04 as well as DRB1*11 frequencies. The relatively low frequencies of DRB1*04 and high DRB1*11 in the Albanian population might explain the rather low positivity rate of ACPA and RF antibodies among the Albanian RA patients. These specific association patterns suggest that this first study of RA in an Albanian population should be followed up to include second level or higher definition of HLA alleles and to compare RA patterns among European populations.

  13. Association of BoLA-DRB3 alleles with tick-borne disease tolerance in dairy cattle in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Duangjinda, M; Jindatajak, Y; Tipvong, W; Sriwarothai, J; Pattarajinda, V; Katawatin, S; Boonkum, W

    2013-09-23

    Tick-borne disease is one of the most harmful tropical diseases in dairy production. Selection of dairy cows for tolerance to tick-borne disease is a challenging concept for dairy breeders in the tropics. The objectives of this study were (1) to detect specific tick-borne pathogen in cattle of different genetics and (2) to examine the polymorphisms of DRB3.2 alleles in Thai dairy cattle and find the allelic association with tick-borne disease tolerance. Specific primers to Anaplasma marginale (AM), Babesia bigemina (BG) and Babesia bovis (BB) were used to detect the infections by PCR. The results showed that the high proportion of infections were found in Bos indicus (Sahiwal, n=95) and crossbred Holstein × Zebu (75:25 Holstein:Zebu, n=101), compared to high Holstein fraction crossbreed (≥ 87.5% Holstein, n=187). The proportion of triple infections was also highly found in high Holstein fractions crossbreed. This study confirmed that Zebuine (Bos indicus) had a higher degree of tolerance, even when infected by tick-borne pathogens, compared to high Holstein fraction crossbred. The associated alleles of DRB3.2 for tick-borne pathogen infection tolerance were found: DRB3*14 and *41 were found to be tolerant to A. marginale; *14 to B. bovis; and *10 and *51 to B. bigemina. These tolerance alleles could be used as potential markers for selection in dairy genetic evaluation. The associated alleles for susceptibility were also found: *2 was found to be susceptible to A. marginale; *3 and *16 to B. bovis; and *20 to B. bigemina. These susceptibility alleles could be used as markers for culling, and selection favoring susceptibility alleles should be considered to maintain heterozygote advantage and pathogen-specific memories in the herd.

  14. Association of aplastic anaemia and Fanconi's disease with HLA-DRB1 alleles.

    PubMed

    Yari, F; Sobhani, M; Vaziri, M Z; Bagheri, N; Sabaghi, F; Talebian, A

    2008-12-01

    One of the most fascinating areas of research within the field of histocompatibility at present time concerns an observation that a major human histocompatibility system, human leucocyte antigen (HLA), is deeply involved in the development of a great number of diseases. Major histocompatibility complex is the most polymorphic system in the genome of different species. Recognition of HLA alleles could be useful in transplantation and disease studies. Genetic construct of HLA DRB1 was studied in Iranian normal populations and patients with aplastic anaemia and Fanconi's disease. DNA was extracted from the whole blood of 466 normal, 35 aplastic anaemia and 10 Fanconi's individuals. Then DRB1 gene polymorphism was studied by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer method. The HLA DRB1 gene analysis showed increase of DRB1*07 in aplastic anaemia patients compared to normal population (P = 0.02). According to this study, the frequency of DRB1*07 in normal individuals was 8.3, and in aplastic anaemia patients, 15.7%. Additionally, the frequency of DRB1*04 in normal, aplastic anaemia and Fanconi's individuals was 10, 5.7 and 20%, respectively. Our results of investigation showed correlation between some HLA alleles with the studied diseases. We reported the frequency of various DR types in aplastic and Fanconi's patients. This study could imply the possible role of HLA-DRB1*07 in the incidence of aplastic anaemia. Moreover, the frequency of DRB1*04, DRB1*03 and DRB1*15 alleles showed intermediate correlation with Fanconi's anaemia.

  15. Efficient CRISPR-rAAV engineering of endogenous genes to study protein function by allele-specific RNAi.

    PubMed

    Kaulich, Manuel; Lee, Yeon J; Lönn, Peter; Springer, Aaron D; Meade, Bryan R; Dowdy, Steven F

    2015-04-20

    Gene knockout strategies, RNAi and rescue experiments are all employed to study mammalian gene function. However, the disadvantages of these approaches include: loss of function adaptation, reduced viability and gene overexpression that rarely matches endogenous levels. Here, we developed an endogenous gene knockdown/rescue strategy that combines RNAi selectivity with a highly efficient CRISPR directed recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) mediated gene targeting approach to introduce allele-specific mutations plus an allele-selective siRNA Sensitive (siSN) site that allows for studying gene mutations while maintaining endogenous expression and regulation of the gene of interest. CRISPR/Cas9 plus rAAV targeted gene-replacement and introduction of allele-specific RNAi sensitivity mutations in the CDK2 and CDK1 genes resulted in a >85% site-specific recombination of Neo-resistant clones versus ∼8% for rAAV alone. RNAi knockdown of wild type (WT) Cdk2 with siWT in heterozygotic knockin cells resulted in the mutant Cdk2 phenotype cell cycle arrest, whereas allele specific knockdown of mutant CDK2 with siSN resulted in a wild type phenotype. Together, these observations demonstrate the ability of CRISPR plus rAAV to efficiently recombine a genomic locus and tag it with a selective siRNA sequence that allows for allele-selective phenotypic assays of the gene of interest while it remains expressed and regulated under endogenous control mechanisms.

  16. Radiosensitivity of Human Fibroblasts is Associated With Amino Acid Substitution Variants in Susceptible Genes And Correlates With The Number of Risk Alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Alsbeih, Ghazi . E-mail: galsbeih@kfshrc.edu.sa; El-Sebaie, Medhat; Al-Harbi, Najla; Al-Buhairi, Muneera; Al-Hadyan, Khaled; Al-Rajhi, Nasser

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: Genetic predictive markers of radiosensitivity are being sought for stratifying radiotherapy for cancer patients and risk assessment of radiation exposure. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in susceptible genes are associated with, and the number of risk alleles has incremental effect on, individual radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: Six amino acid substitution variants (ATM 1853 Asp/Asn G>A, p53 72 Arg/Pro G>C, p21 31 Ser/Arg C>A, XRCC1 399 Arg/Gln G>A, XRCC3 241 Thr/Met C>T, and TGF{beta}1 10 Leu/Pro T>C) were genotyped by direct sequencing in 54 fibroblast strains of different radiosensitivity. Results: The clonogenic survival fraction at 2 Gy range was 0.15-0.50 (mean, 0.34, standard deviation, 0.08). The mean survival fraction at 2 Gy divided the cell strains into radiosensitive (26 cases) and normal (28 controls). A significant association was observed between the survival fraction at 2 Gy and ATM 1853 Asn, XRCC3 241 Met, and TGF{beta}1 10 Leu alleles (p = 0.05, p = 0.02, and p = 0.02, respectively). The p53 72 Arg allele showed a borderline association (p = 0.07). The number of risk alleles increased with increasing radiosensitivity, and the group comparison showed a statistically significant difference between the radiosensitive and control groups (p {<=}0.001). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms in susceptible genes influence cellular radiation response and that the number of risk alleles has a combined effect on radiosensitivity. Individuals with multiple risk alleles could be more susceptible to radiation effects than those with fewer risk alleles. These results may have implications in predicting normal tissue reactions to radiotherapy and risk assessment of radiation exposure.

  17. Association between allelic variation due to short tandem repeats in tRNA gene of Entamoeba histolytica and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Virendra; Ghoshal, Ujjala; Mittal, Balraj; Dhole, Tapan N; Ghoshal, Uday C

    2014-05-01

    Genotypes of Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) may contribute clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis such as amoebic liver abscess (ALA), dysentery and asymptomatic cyst passers state. Hence, we evaluated allelic variation due to short tandem repeats (STRs) in tRNA gene of E. histolytica and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis. Asymptomatic cyst passers (n=24), patients with dysentery (n=56) and ALA (n=107) were included. Extracted DNA from stool (dysentery, asymptomatic cyst passers) and liver aspirate was amplified using 6 E. histolytica specific tRNA-linked STRs (D-A, A-L, N-K2, R-R, S-Q, and S(TGA)-D) primers. PCR products were subjected to sequencing. Association between allelic variation and clinical phenotypes was analyzed. A total of 9 allelic variations were found in D-A, 8 in A-L, 4 in N-K2, 5 in R-R, 10 in S(TAG)-D and 7 in S-Q loci. A significant association was found between allelic variants and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis. This study reveals that allelic variation due to short tandem repeats (STRs) in tRNA gene of E. histolytica is associated different clinical outcome of amoebiasis.

  18. Homology modelling of frequent HLA class-II alleles: A perspective to improve prediction of HLA binding peptide and understand the HLA associated disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Manju; Farooq, Umar; Jaiswal, Varun

    2016-10-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) plays significant role via the regulation of immune system and contribute in the progression and protection of many diseases. HLA molecules bind and present peptides to T- cell receptors which generate the immune response. HLA peptide interaction and molecular function of HLA molecule is the key to predict peptide binding and understanding its role in different diseases. The availability of accurate three dimensional (3D) structures is the initial step towards this direction. In the present work, homology modelling of important and frequent HLA-DRB1 alleles (07:01, 11:01 and 09:01) was done and acceptable models were generated. These modelled alleles were further refined and cross validated by using several methods including Ramachandran plot, Z-score, ERRAT analysis and root mean square deviation (RMSD) calculations. It is known that numbers of allelic variants are related to the susceptibility or protection of various infectious diseases. Difference in amino acid sequences and structures of alleles were also studied to understand the association of HLA with disease susceptibility and protection. Susceptible alleles showed more amino acid variations than protective alleles in three selected diseases caused by different pathogens. Amino acid variations at binding site were found to be more than other part of alleles. RMSD values were also higher at variable positions within binding site. Higher RMSD values indicate that mutations occurring at peptide binding site alter protein structure more than rest of the protein. Hence, these findings and modelled structures can be used to design HLA-DRB1 binding peptides to overcome low prediction accuracy of HLA class II binding peptides. Furthermore, it may help to understand the allele specific molecular mechanisms involved in susceptibility/resistance against pathogenic diseases.

  19. Association of the apolipoprotein E {epsilon}4 allele with clinical subtypes of autopsy-confirmed Alzheimer`s Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zubenko, G.S.; Stiffler, S.; Kopp, U.

    1994-09-15

    Consistent with previous reports, we observed a significant association of the APOE {epsilon}4 allele with Alzheimer`s Disease (AD) in a series of 91 autopsy-confirmed cases. The {epsilon}4 allele frequency was higher in cases with a family history of AD-like dementia (0.54 {+-} 0.07), although the {epsilon}4 allele frequency in the AD cases with a negative family history (0.38 {+-} 0.05) remained significantly greater than that for the non-AD control group (0.13 {+-} 0.03). A similar increase in {epsilon}4 allele frequency (0.54 {+-} 0.07) was observed in the AD cases with amyloid angiopathy, compared to those who did not have amyloid angiopathy (0.35 {+-} 0.04). Contrary to previous reports, no effect of the dosage of the {epsilon}4 allele was found on the age of onset of dementia among the AD cases and, contrary to reports suggesting an association of {epsilon}4 and atherosclerosis, the {epsilon}4 allele frequency was similar in cases with or without concurrent brain infarcts. Modest but consistent correlations were observed between the dosage of {epsilon}4 alleles and the cortical density of senile plaques, but not neurofibrillary tangles. The last finding suggests that the pathogenic events mediated by the {epsilon}4 allele may be more directly involved in the formation of senile plaques, the identifying lesions in AD, than neurofibrillary tangles. A robust association of both the presence of an {epsilon}4 allele and a family history of AD-like dementia with concurrent amyloid angiopathy occurred within our sample of AD cases. This association arose from an interaction of the {epsilon}4 allele with a separate familial factor for which a family history of dementia served as a surrogate. These results suggest that amyloid angiopathy may be a common or central feature of a form of familial AD that is associated with the transmission of the APOE {epsilon}4 allele. 22 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Allele frequency net 2015 update: new features for HLA epitopes, KIR and disease and HLA adverse drug reaction associations.

    PubMed

    González-Galarza, Faviel F; Takeshita, Louise Y C; Santos, Eduardo J M; Kempson, Felicity; Maia, Maria Helena Thomaz; da Silva, Andrea Luciana Soares; Teles e Silva, André Luiz; Ghattaoraya, Gurpreet S; Alfirevic, Ana; Jones, Andrew R; Middleton, Derek

    2015-01-01

    It has been 12 years since the Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND; http://www.allelefrequencies.net) was first launched, providing the scientific community with an online repository for the storage of immune gene frequencies in different populations across the world. There have been a significant number of improvements from the first version, making AFND a primary resource for many clinical and scientific areas including histocompatibility, immunogenetics, pharmacogenetics and anthropology studies, among many others. The most widely used part of AFND stores population frequency data (alleles, genes or haplotypes) related to human leukocyte antigens (HLA), killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes (MIC) and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. AFND now contains >1400 populations from more than 10 million healthy individuals. Here, we report how the main features of AFND have been updated to include a new section on 'HLA epitope' frequencies in populations, a new section capturing the results of studies identifying HLA associations with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and one for the examination of infectious and autoimmune diseases associated with KIR polymorphisms-thus extending AFND to serve a new user base in these growing areas of research. New criteria on data quality have also been included.

  1. HLA class I alleles are associated with peptide-binding repertoires of different size, affinity, and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sinu; Weiskopf, Daniela; Angelo, Michael A; Sidney, John; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-12-15

    Prediction of HLA binding affinity is widely used to identify candidate T cell epitopes, and an affinity of 500 nM is routinely used as a threshold for peptide selection. However, the fraction (percentage) of peptides predicted to bind with affinities of 500 nM varies by allele. For example, of a large collection of ~30,000 dengue virus-derived peptides only 0.3% were predicted to bind HLA A*0101, whereas nearly 5% were predicted for A*0201. This striking difference could not be ascribed to variation in accuracy of the algorithms used, as predicted values closely correlated with affinity measured in vitro with purified HLA molecules. These data raised the question whether different alleles would also vary in terms of epitope repertoire size, defined as the number of associated epitopes or, alternatively, whether alleles vary drastically in terms of the affinity threshold associated with immunogenicity. To address this issue, strains of HLA transgenic mice with wide (A*0201), intermediate (B*0702), or narrow (A*0101) repertoires were immunized with peptides of varying binding affinity and relative percentile ranking. The results show that absolute binding capacity is a better predictor of immunogenicity, and analysis of epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database revealed that predictive efficacy is increased using allele-specific affinity thresholds. Finally, we investigated the genetic and structural basis of the phenomenon. Although no stringent correlate was defined, on average HLA B alleles are associated with significantly narrower repertoires than are HLA A alleles.

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Allele PTPRC Is Also Associated With Response to Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor α Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jing; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Thomson, Brian; Padyukov, Leonid; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; Nititham, Joanne; Hughes, Laura B.; de Vries, Niek; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Alfredsson, Lars; Askling, Johan; Wedrén, Sara; Ding, Bo; Guiducci, Candace; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Crusius, J. Bart A.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; Herenius, Marieke; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Worthington, Jane; Batliwalla, Franak; Kern, Marlena; Morgan, Ann W.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Isaacs, John D.; Hyrich, Kimme; Seldin, Michael F.; Moreland, Larry W.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Tak, Paul P.; Bridges, S. Louis; Toes, Rene E. M.; Barton, Anne; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anti–tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNF) therapy is a mainstay of treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to test established RA genetic risk factors to determine whether the same alleles also influence the response to anti-TNF therapy. Methods A total of 1,283 RA patients receiving etanercept, infliximab, or adalimumab therapy were studied from among an international collaborative consortium of 9 different RA cohorts. The primary end point compared RA patients with a good treatment response according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria (n = 505) with RA patients considered to be nonresponders (n = 316). The secondary end point was the change from baseline in the level of disease activity according to the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (ΔDAS28). Clinical factors such as age, sex, and concomitant medications were tested as possible correlates of treatment response. Thirty-one single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of RA were genotyped and tested for any association with treatment response, using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Results Of the 31 RA-associated risk alleles, a SNP at the PTPRC (also known as CD45) gene locus (rs10919563) was associated with the primary end point, a EULAR good response versus no response (odds ratio [OR] 0.55, P = 0.0001 in the multivariate model). Similar results were obtained using the secondary end point, the ΔDAS28 (P = 0.0002). There was suggestive evidence of a stronger association in autoantibody-positive patients with RA (OR 0.55, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.39–0.76) as compared with autoantibody-negative patients (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.41–1.99). Conclusion Statistically significant associations were observed between the response to anti-TNF therapy and an RA risk allele at the PTPRC gene locus. Additional studies will be required to replicate this finding in additional patient collections

  3. Mechanisms and Disease Associations of Haplotype-Dependent Allele-Specific DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Do, Catherine; Lang, Charles F.; Lin, John; Darbary, Huferesh; Krupska, Izabela; Gaba, Aulona; Petukhova, Lynn; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Gallagher, Mary P.; Goland, Robin S.; Clynes, Raphael A.; Dwork, Andrew; Kral, John G.; Monk, Catherine; Christiano, Angela M.; Tycko, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Haplotype-dependent allele-specific methylation (hap-ASM) can impact disease susceptibility, but maps of this phenomenon using stringent criteria in disease-relevant tissues remain sparse. Here we apply array-based and Methyl-Seq approaches to multiple human tissues and cell types, including brain, purified neurons and glia, T lymphocytes, and placenta, and identify 795 hap-ASM differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and 3,082 strong methylation quantitative trait loci (mQTLs), most not previously reported. More than half of these DMRs have cell type-restricted ASM, and among them are 188 hap-ASM DMRs and 933 mQTLs located near GWAS signals for immune and neurological disorders. Targeted bis-seq confirmed hap-ASM in 12/13 loci tested, including CCDC155, CD69, FRMD1, IRF1, KBTBD11, and S100A∗-ILF2, associated with immune phenotypes, MYT1L, PTPRN2, CMTM8 and CELF2, associated with neurological disorders, NGFR and HLA-DRB6, associated with both immunological and brain disorders, and ZFP57, a trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting. Polymorphic CTCF and transcription factor (TF) binding sites were over-represented among hap-ASM DMRs and mQTLs, and analysis of the human data, supplemented by cross-species comparisons to macaques, indicated that CTCF and TF binding likelihood predicts the strength and direction of the allelic methylation asymmetry. These results show that hap-ASM is highly tissue specific; an important trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting is regulated by this phenomenon; and variation in CTCF and TF binding sites is an underlying mechanism, and maps of hap-ASM and mQTLs reveal regulatory sequences underlying supra- and sub-threshold GWAS peaks in immunological and neurological disorders. PMID:27153397

  4. Combined Effects of GSTM1 Null Allele and APOL1 Renal Risk Alleles in CKD Progression in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension Trial.

    PubMed

    Bodonyi-Kovacs, Gabor; Ma, Jennie Z; Chang, Jamison; Lipkowitz, Michael S; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Winkler, Cheryl Ann; Le, Thu H

    2016-10-01

    Apolipoprotein L-1 (APOL1) high-risk alleles and the glutathione-S-transferase-μ1 (GSTM1) null allele have been shown separately to associate with CKD progression in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) trial participants. Here, we determined combined effects of GSTM1 null and APOL1 high-risk alleles on clinical outcomes in 682 AASK participants who were classified into four groups by GSTM1 null or active genotype and APOL1 high- or low-risk genotype. We assessed survival differences among these groups by log-rank test and Cox regression adjusted for important clinical variables for time to GFR event (change in GFR of 50% or 25-ml/min per 1.73 m(2) decline), incident ESRD, death, or composite outcomes. The groups differed significantly in event-free survival for incident ESRD and composite outcomes (P≤0.001 by log-rank test). Compared with the reference GSTM1 active/APOL1 low-risk group, other groups had these hazard ratios for the composite outcome of incident ESRD and change in GFR: GSTM1 active/APOL1 high-risk hazard ratio, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.76 to 5.90 (P=0.15); GSTM1 null/APOL1 low-risk hazard ratio, 2.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.08 to 3.88 (P=0.03); and GSTM1 null/APOL1 high-risk hazard ratio, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.51 to 5.96 (P=0.002). In conclusion, GSTM1 null and APOL1 high-risk alleles deleteriously affect CKD progression among blacks with hypertension, and subjects with both GSTM1 null and APOL1 high-risk genotypes had highest risk of adverse renal outcomes. Larger cohorts are needed to fully explore interactions of GSTM1 and APOL1 genotypes in other subgroups.

  5. Neuronal fiber bundle lengths in healthy adult carriers of the ApoE4 allele: A quantitative tractography DTI study

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Peter R.; Lane, Elizabeth M.; Heaps, Jodi M.; Pierce, Kerrie D.; Cabeen, Ryan; Laidlaw, David H.; Akbudak, Erbil; Conturo, Thomas E.; Correia, Stephen; Paul, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The epsilon 4 (e4) isoform of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is a known genetic risk factor for suboptimal brain health. Morphometry studies of brains with Alzheimer’s disease have reported significant alterations in temporal lobe brain structure of e4 carriers, yet it remains unclear if the presence of an e4 allele is associated with alterations in the microstructure of white matter fiber bundles in healthy populations. The present study used quantitative tractography based on diffusion tensor imaging (qtDTI) to examine the influence of the e4 allele on temporal lobe fiber bundle lengths (FBLs) in 64 healthy older adults with at least one e4 allele (carriers, N=23) versus no e4 allele (non-carriers, N=41). Subtests from the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) were also analyzed to examine memory performance between groups. Analyses revealed shorter FBLs in the left uncinate fasciculus (UF) (p=.038) of e4 carriers compared to non-carriers. By contrast, neither FBLs specific to the temporal lobe nor memory performances differed significantly between groups. Increased age correlated significantly with shorter FBL in the temporal lobe and UF, and with decreased performance on tests of memory. This is the first study to utilize qtDTI to examine relationships between FBL and ApoE genotype. Results suggest that FBL in the UF is influenced by the presence of an ApoE e4 allele (ApoE4) in healthy older adults. Temporal lobe FBLs, however, are more vulnerable to aging than the presence of an e4 allele. PMID:23475756

  6. No allelic association between Parkinson`s disease and dopamine D2, D3, and D4 receptor gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nanko, S.; Hattori, M.; Dai, X.Y.

    1994-12-15

    Parkinson`s disease is thought to be caused by a combination of unknown environmental, genetic, and degenerative factors. Evidence from necropsy brain samples and pharmacokinetics suggests involvement of dopamine receptors in the pathogenesis or pathophysiology of Parkinson`s disease. Genetic association studies between Parkinson`s disease and dopamine D2, D3 and D4 receptor gene polymorphisms were conducted. The polymorphism was examined in 71 patients with Parkinson`s disease and 90 controls. There were no significant differences between two groups in allele frequencies at the D2, D3, and D4 dopamine receptor loci. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that susceptibility to Parkinson`s disease is associated with the dopamine receptor polymorphisms examined. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. HLA-DPB1*04:01 allele is associated with non-obstructive azoospermia in Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Jinam, Timothy A; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Mitsunaga, Shigeki; Okada, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Atsushi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Inoue, Ituro

    2013-12-01

    Azoospermia is defined by absence of sperm in the semen and can either be caused by obstruction of the seminal tract (obstructive azoospermia) or by defects in spermatogenesis (non-obstructive azoospermia, NOA). Previous studies reported that specific alleles and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were associated with NOA in East Asians. We attempt to expand upon previous findings by genotyping more HLA genes and to replicate SNP associations by focusing on Japanese NOA patients. HLA typing of six genes (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1, and -DPB1) was done on 355 NOA patients using SSO-Luminex assay while genotyping of two previously reported SNPs (rs498422 and rs3129878) was done on 443 patients and 544 fertile males using TaqMan assay. Association between the HLA alleles and SNP with NOA was assessed with Chi squared and logistic regression tests. We found that HLA-DPB1*04:01 [corrected p value, P(c) 7.13 × 10(-6); odds ratio (OR) 2.52], DRB1*13:02 (P(c) 4.93 × 10(-4), OR 1.97), DQB1*06:04 (P(c) 8.94 × 10(-4), OR 1.91) and rs3129878 (p value 3.98 × 10(-4); OR 1.32) showed significant association with NOA, however, these loci are in linkage disequilibrium with each other. The conditional logistic regression tests showed that DPB1*04:01 is independently associated with NOA, confirming the involvement of the HLA region in the etiology of NOA in Japanese patients.

  8. Association of the CYP1B1*3 allele with survival in patients with prostate cancer receiving docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Sissung, Tristan M; Danesi, Romano; Price, Douglas K; Steinberg, Seth M; de Wit, Ronald; Zahid, Muhammad; Gaikwad, Nilesh; Cavalieri, Ercole; Dahut, William L; Sackett, Dan L; Figg, William D; Sparreboom, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Using a single nucleotide polymorphism association study in 52 men with prostate cancer receiving docetaxel, we found that individuals carrying two copies of the CYP1B1*3 polymorphic variant had a poor prognosis after docetaxel-based therapies compared with individuals carrying at least one copy of the CYP1B1*1 allele (30.6 versus 12.8 months; P=0.0004). The association between CYP1B1*3 and response to therapy was not observed in similar subjects receiving non-taxane-based therapy (P=0.18). The systemic clearance of docetaxel was also unrelated to CYP1B1 genotype status (P=0.39), indicating that the association of CYP1B1*3 with clinical response is not due to docetaxel metabolism. To explain these results, we hypothesized that an indirect gene-drug interaction was interfering with the primary mechanism of action of docetaxel, tubulin polymerization. We therefore conducted tubulin polymerization experiments with taxanes in the presence or absence of certain CYP1B1 estrogen metabolites, which are known to bind to nucleophilic sites in proteins and DNA, that revealed the primary estrogen metabolite of CYP1B1, 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), when oxidized to estradiol-3,4-quinone strongly inhibits tubulin polymerization. The 4-OHE2 is also formed more readily by the protein encoded by the CYP1B1*3 allele, validating further our data in patients. Furthermore, estradiol-3,4-quinone reacted in vitro with docetaxel to form the 4-OHE2-docetaxel adduct. This pilot study provides evidence that CYP1B1*3 may be an important marker for estimating docetaxel efficacy in patients with prostate cancer. This link is likely associated with CYP1B1*3 genotype-dependent estrogen metabolism.

  9. Association of the C47T Polymorphism in SOD2 with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease in Carriers of the APOEε4 Allele

    PubMed Central

    Gamarra, David; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Fernández-Martínez, Manuel; de Pancorbo, Marian M.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important part in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), the prodromal phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidence shows that polymorphisms in the SOD2 gene affect the elimination of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in mitochondria. The aim of this study was to determine whether the functional rs4880 SNP in the SOD2 gene is a risk factor associated with aMCI and sporadic AD. 216 subjects with aMCI, 355 with AD, and 245 controls have been studied. The SNP rs4880 of the SOD2 gene was genotyped by RT-PCR and the APOE genotype was determined by PCR and RFLPs. Different multinomial logistic regression models were used to determine the risk levels for aMCI and AD. Although the T allele of the SOD2 rs4880 SNP gene (rs4880-T) is not an independent risk for aMCI or AD, this allele increases the risk to aMCI patients carrying at least one APOEε4 allele. Moreover, rs4880-T allele and APOEε4 allele combination has been found to produce an increased risk for AD compared to aMCI reference patients. These results suggest that APOEε4 and rs4880-T genotype may be a risk for aMCI and a predictor of progression from aMCI to AD. PMID:26696693

  10. The Birth Weight Lowering C-Allele of rs900400 Near LEKR1 and CCNL1 Associates with Elevated Insulin Release following an Oral Glucose Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ehm A.; Harder, Marie N.; Pilgaard, Kasper; Pisinger, Charlotta; Stančáková, Alena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Grarup, Niels; Færch, Kristine; Poulsen, Pernille; Witte, Daniel R.; Jørgensen, Torben; Vaag, Allan; Laakso, Markku; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim The first genome-wide association study on birth weight was recently published and the most significant associated birth weight lowering variant was the rs900400 C-allele located near LEKR1 and CCNL1. We aimed to replicate the association with birth weight in the Danish Inter99 study and furthermore to evaluate associations between rs900400 and indices of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity obtained by oral glucose tolerance tests in adults from the Danish Inter99 study and the Finnish, Metabolic Syndrome in Men (METSIM) sample. Methods For 4,744 of 6,784 Inter99 participants, midwife journals were traced through the Danish State Archives and association of rs900400 with birth weight was examined. Associations between rs900400 and fasting serum insulin, fasting plasma glucose, insulinogenic index, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and disposition index were studied in 5,484 Danish and 6,915 Finnish non-diabetic individuals and combined in meta-analyses. Results The C-allele of rs900400 was associated with a 22.1 g lower birth weight ([−41.3;−3.0], P = 0.024) per allele. Moreover, in combined analyses of the Danish Inter99 study and the Finnish METSIM study we found that the birth weight lowering allele was associated with increased insulin release measured by the insulinogenic index (β = 2.25% [0.59; 3.91], P = 0.008) and with an increased disposition index (β = 1.76% [0.04; 3.49], P = 0.05). Conclusion The birth weight lowering effect of the C-allele of rs900400 located near LEKR1 and CCNL1 was replicated in the Danish population. Furthermore the C-allele was associated with increased insulin response following oral glucose stimulation in a meta-analysis based on Danish and Finnish non-diabetic individuals. PMID:22073261

  11. YY1 binding association with sex-biased transcription revealed through X-linked transcript levels and allelic binding analyses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-yu; Shi, Wenqiang; Balaton, Bradley P.; Matthews, Allison M.; Li, Yifeng; Arenillas, David J.; Mathelier, Anthony; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Brown, Carolyn J.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences in susceptibility and progression have been reported in numerous diseases. Female cells have two copies of the X chromosome with X-chromosome inactivation imparting mono-allelic gene silencing for dosage compensation. However, a subset of genes, named escapees, escape silencing and are transcribed bi-allelically resulting in sexual dimorphism. Here we conducted in silico analyses of the sexes using human datasets to gain perspectives into such regulation. We identified transcription start sites of escapees (escTSSs) based on higher transcription levels in female cells using FANTOM5 CAGE data. Significant over-representations of YY1 transcription factor binding motif and ChIP-seq peaks around escTSSs highlighted its positive association with escapees. Furthermore, YY1 occupancy is significantly biased towards the inactive X (Xi) at long non-coding RNA loci that are frequent contacts of Xi-specific superloops. Our study suggests a role for YY1 in transcriptional activity on Xi in general through sequence-specific binding, and its involvement at superloop anchors. PMID:27857184

  12. Lack of association between the pancreatitis risk allele CEL-HYB and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Koji; Yu, Jun; Suenaga, Masaya; Fesharakizadeh, Shahriar; Tamura, Koji; Almario, Jose Alejandro Navarro; Brant, Aaron; Borges, Michael; Siddiqui, Abdulrehman; Datta, Lisa; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Hruban, Ralph H; Klein, Alison Patricia; Goggins, Michael

    2017-02-07

    CEL-HYB is a hybrid allele that arose from a crossover between the 3' end of the Carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) gene and the nearby CEL pseudogene (CELP) and was recently identified as a risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Since chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer, we compared the prevalence of the CEL-HYB allele in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma to spousal controls and disease controls. The CEL-HYB allele was detected using Sanger and next generation sequencing. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of the CEL-HYB allele between cases with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma compared to controls; 2.6% (22/850) vs. 1.8% (18/976) (p=0.35). CEL-HYB carriers were not more likely to report a history of pancreatitis. Patients with pancreatic cancer are not more likely than controls to be carriers of the CEL-HYB allele.

  13. Association of BoLA DRB3 alleles with variability in immune response among the crossbred cattle vaccinated for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD).

    PubMed

    Gowane, G R; Sharma, A K; Sankar, M; Narayanan, K; Das, Biswajit; Subramaniam, S; Pattnaik, B

    2013-08-01

    Polymorphism of bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) DRB3 gene is being intensively investigated for potential association with economically important diseases of cattle. Accordingly, we investigated the association of DRB3 Exon 2 polymorphism as evidenced by the variation in the binding pockets with variability in immune response to inactivated trivalent (O, A and Asia1) foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine in a closed population of crossbred cattle. Antibody titer of ≥ 1.8 was set as the cut off value to distinguish the protected (≥ 1.8) and unprotected (<1.8) animals. Eleven different alleles of over 3% frequency were detected in the population. We found that DRB3 alleles 0201, 0801 and 1501 always ranked high for protective immune response whereas alleles 0701, 1103 and 1101 consistently ranked low for unprotected immune response for all the three serotypes. Rank correlation of DRB3 alleles among the three serotypes was positive, high in magnitude and statistically significant (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that odds of protection from the vaccine were highest for all the three serotypes if allele (∗)1501 was present and strengthened the results of allele ranking. Predicted amino acid substitution in the peptide binding pockets revealed that all the important sites had high Wu-Kabat index. Similarly, specific residues in pockets were crucial for immune response to FMD vaccine. There were specific substitutions in un-protected alleles such as absence of acidic amino acids substituted by basic amino acid at β71, presence of non-polar cysteine or basic histidine at β30 and presence of polar tyrosine at β37. From the observations, we hypothesize that the substitutions lead to unique conformational changes in the protein products of the studied alleles that would associate with the protective or unprotective antibody response to FMDV vaccine. The knowledge has potential implications in future selection programs if integrated with the

  14. Pleiotropic Associations of Allelic Variants in a 2q22 Region with Risks of Major Human Diseases and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kulminski, Alexander M.; He, Liang; Culminskaya, Irina; Loiko, Elena; Arbeeva, Liubov; Bagley, Olivia; Yashkin, Arseniy; Fang, Fang; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V.; Wu, Deqing; Yashin, Anatoliy I.

    2016-01-01

    Gaining insights into genetic predisposition to age-related diseases and lifespan is a challenging task complicated by the elusive role of evolution in these phenotypes. To gain more insights, we combined methods of genome-wide and candidate-gene studies. Genome-wide scan in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (N = 9,573) was used to pre-select promising loci. Candidate-gene methods were used to comprehensively analyze associations of novel uncommon variants in Caucasians (minor allele frequency~2.5%) located in band 2q22.3 with risks of coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure (HF), stroke, diabetes, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases (ND), and mortality in the ARIC study, the Framingham Heart Study (N = 4,434), and the Health and Retirement Study (N = 9,676). We leveraged the analyses of pleiotropy, age-related heterogeneity, and causal inferences. Meta-analysis of the results from these comprehensive analyses shows that the minor allele increases risks of death by about 50% (p = 4.6×10−9), CHD by 35% (p = 8.9×10−6), HF by 55% (p = 9.7×10−5), stroke by 25% (p = 4.0×10−2), and ND by 100% (p = 1.3×10−3). This allele also significantly influences each of two diseases, diabetes and cancer, in antagonistic fashion in different populations. Combined significance of the pleiotropic effects was p = 6.6×10−21. Causal mediation analyses show that endophenotypes explained only small fractions of these effects. This locus harbors an evolutionary conserved gene-desert region with non-coding intergenic sequences likely involved in regulation of protein-coding flanking genes ZEB2 and ACVR2A. This region is intensively studied for mutations causing severe developmental/genetic disorders. Our analyses indicate a promising target region for interventions aimed to reduce risks of many major human diseases and mortality. PMID:27832070

  15. Endochondral ossification pathway genes and postmenopausal osteoporosis: Association and specific allele related serum bone sialoprotein levels in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunzhi; Liu, Haiyan; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Tianxiao; Zhang, Bo; Li, Lu; Chen, Gang; Fu, Dongke; Wang, KunZheng

    2015-11-16

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder characterized by reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and disrupted bone architecture, predisposing the patient to increased fracture risk. Evidence from early genetic epidemiological studies has indicated a major role for genetics in the development of osteoporosis and the variation in BMD. In this study, we focused on two key genes in the endochondral ossification pathway, IBSP and PTHLH. Over 9,000 postmenopausal Han Chinese women were recruited, and 54 SNPs were genotyped. Two significant SNPs within IBSP, rs1054627 and rs17013181, were associated with BMD and postmenopausal osteoporosis by the two-stage strategy, and rs17013181 was also significantly associated with serum IBSP levels. Moreover, one haplotype (rs12425376-rs10843047-rs42294) covering the 5' end of PTHLH was associated with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our results provide evidence for the association of these two key endochondral ossification pathway genes with BMD and osteoporosis in postmenopausal Han Chinese women. Combined with previous findings, we provide evidence that a particular SNP in IBSP has an allele-specific effect on mRNA levels, which would, in turn, reflect serum IBSP levels.

  16. Multiple rare variants as a cause of a common phenotype: several different lactase persistence associated alleles in a single ethnic group.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Catherine J E; Raga, Tamiru Oljira; Tarekegn, Ayele; Browning, Sarah L; Elamin, Mohamed F; Bekele, Endashaw; Thomas, Mark G; Weale, Michael E; Bradman, Neil; Swallow, Dallas M

    2009-12-01

    Persistence of intestinal lactase into adulthood allows humans to use milk from other mammals as a source of food and water. This genetic trait has arisen by convergent evolution and the derived alleles of at least three different single nucleotide polymorphisms (-13910C>T, -13915T>G, -14010G>C) are associated with lactase persistence in different populations. Each allele occurs on an extended haplotype, consistent with positive directional selection. The SNPs are located in an 'enhancer' sequence in an intron of a neighboring gene (MCM6) and modulate lactase transcription in vitro. However, a number of lactase persistent individuals carry none of these alleles, but other low-frequency single nucleotide polymorphisms have been observed in the same region. Here we examine a cohort of 107 milk-drinking Somali camel-herders from Ethiopia. Eight polymorphic sites are identified in the enhancer. -13915*G and -13907*G (a previously reported candidate) are each significantly associated with lactase persistence. A new allele, -14009*G, has borderline association with lactase persistence, but loses significance after correction for multiple testing. Sequence diversity of the enhancer is significantly higher in the lactase persistent members of this and a second cohort compared with non-persistent members of the two groups (P = 7.7 x 10(-9) and 1.0 x 10(-3)). By comparing other loci, we show that this difference is not due to population sub-structure, demonstrating that increased diversity can accompany selection. This contrasts with the well-documented observation that positive selection decreases diversity by driving up the frequency of a single advantageous allele, and has implications for association studies.

  17. A yeast model reveals biochemical severity associated with each of three variant alleles of galactose-1P uridylyltransferase segregating in a single family.

    PubMed

    Chhay, J S; Openo, K K; Eaton, J S; Gentile, M; Fridovich-Keil, J L

    2008-02-01

    Classic galactosaemia is a potentially lethal inborn error of metabolism that results from profound impairment of galactose-1P uridylyltransferase (GALT). Like many autosomal recessive disorders, classic galactosaemia demonstrates marked allelic heterogeneity; many if not most patients are compound heterozygotes. Owing in part to the fact that most GALT mutations are never observed in patients in the homozygous state, in part to concerns of possible allelic interaction, and in part to the broad range of GALT activity levels associated with the affected, carrier, and control states, definition of the specific functional consequence of individual variant GALT alleles from studies of clinical samples alone can be a challenging task. To overcome this problem we previously developed and applied a null-background yeast system to enable functional analyses of human GALT alleles expressed individually or in defined pairs. We report here the application of this system to characterize three distinct variant alleles of GALT identified within a single family. Of these alleles, one carried a missense mutation (K285N) that has previously been reported and characterized, one carried a nonsense mutation (R204X) that has previously been reported but not characterized, and the third carried a missense substitution (T268N) that was novel. Our studies reported here reconfirm the profound nature of the K285N mutation, demonstrate that the R204X mutation severely compromises both expression and function of human GALT, and finally implicate T268N as one of a very small number of naturally occurring rare but neutral missense polymorphisms in human GALT.

  18. Alleles of HLA-DRB1*04 Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Amazon Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Porto dos Santos, Maisa; de Melo Silva, Cláudia Maria; Alves de Almeida, Vanessa; Assumpção Antunes, Irineide

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenetic host factors are associated with susceptibility or protection to tuberculosis (TB). Strong associations of HLA class II genes with TB are reported. We analyzed the HLA-DRB1*04 alleles to identify subtypes associated with pulmonary TB and their interaction with risk factors such as alcohol, smoking, and gender in 316 pulmonary TB patients and 306 healthy individuals from the Brazilian Amazon. The HLA-DRB1*04 was prevalent in patients with pulmonary TB (p<0.0001; OR = 2.94; 95% CI = 2.12 to 4.08). Direct nucleotide sequencing of DRB1 exon 2 identified nine subtypes of HLA-DRB1*04. The subtype HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 (p = 0.0019; OR = 2.23; 95% CI = 1.34 to 3.70) was associated with susceptibility to pulmonary TB while DRB1*04:07:01 (p<0.0001; OR = 0.02; 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.33) to protection. Notably, the interaction between alcohol and HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 increased the risk for developing pulmonary TB (p = 0.0001; OR = 51.3; 95% CI = 6.81 to 386). Multibacillary pulmonary TB, the clinical presentation of disease transmission, was strongly associated with interaction to alcohol (p = 0.0026; OR = 11.1; 95% CI = 3.99 to 30.9), HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 (p = 0.0442; OR = 2.01; 95% CI = 1.03 to 3.93) and DRB1*04:92 (p = 0.0112; OR = 8.62; 95% CI = 1.63 to 45.5). These results show that HLA-DRB1*04 are associated with pulmonary TB. Interestingly, three subtypes, DRB1*04:07:01, DRB1*04:11:01 and DRB1*04:92 of the HLA-DRB1*04 could be potential immunogenetic markers that may help to explain mechanisms involved in disease development. PMID:26901036

  19. Sequencing-based typing of HLA-B*51 alleles and the significant association of HLA-B*5101 and -B*5108 with Behçet's disease in Greek patients.

    PubMed

    Mizuki, N; Ota, M; Katsuyama, Y; Yabuki, K; Ando, H; Shiina, T; Palimeris, G D; Kaklamani, E; Ito, D; Ohno, S; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2002-02-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is widely known to be strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B51 in many different ethnic groups.Recently, HLA-B51 allele typing of Greek BD patients was performed to study the distribution of B*5101-B*5107 alleles in this Greek population, the B51 antigen strongly associated with BD was found to be predominantly encoded by allele B*5101. As it is now known that the B51 antigen can be encoded by 21 alleles, B*5101-B*5121, we performed HLA-B*51 allele genotyping among 58 Greek patients with BD. After serological HLA typing, typing of HLA-B*51 alleles was performed using the polymerase chain reaction-sequencing-based typing (PCR-SBT) method. The frequency of the B51 antigen was found to be significantly higher in the patient group as compared with the control group (75.9% of patients vs 22.0% of controls. In the genotyping of B51 alleles, 34 out of 44 B51-positive patients possessed B*5101, 13 out of the 44 carried B*5108. In contrast, all of the 9 B51-positive normal controls carried B*5101. This study revealed a strong association between Greeks with BD, both B*5101, B*5108, provided important insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the association between HLA status, this disease.

  20. Vitamin D Responsive Elements within the HLA-DRB1 Promoter Region in Sardinian Multiple Sclerosis Associated Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Murru, Maria Rita; Corongiu, Daniela; Tranquilli, Stefania; Fadda, Elisabetta; Murru, Raffaele; Schirru, Lucia; Secci, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Gianna; Asunis, Isadora; Cuccu, Stefania; Fenu, Giuseppe; Lorefice, Lorena; Carboni, Nicola; Mura, Gioia; Rosatelli, Maria Cristina; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D response elements (VDREs) have been found in the promoter region of the MS-associated allele HLA-DRB1*15∶01, suggesting that with low vitamin D availability VDREs are incapable of inducing *15∶01 expression allowing in early life autoreactive T-cells to escape central thymic deletion. The Italian island of Sardinia exhibits a very high frequency of MS and high solar radiation exposure. We test the contribution of VDREs analysing the promoter region of the MS-associated DRB1 *04∶05, *03∶01, *13∶01 and *15∶01 and non-MS-associated *16∶01, *01, *11, *07∶01 alleles in a cohort of Sardinians (44 MS patients and 112 healthy subjects). Sequencing of the DRB1 promoter region revealed a homozygous canonical VDRE in all *15∶01, *16∶01, *11 and in 45/73 *03∶01 and in heterozygous state in 28/73 *03∶01 and all *01 alleles. A new mutated homozygous VDRE was found in all *13∶03, *04∶05 and *07∶01 alleles. Functionality of mutated and canonical VDREs was assessed for its potential to modulate levels of DRB1 gene expression using an in vitro transactivation assay after stimulation with active vitamin D metabolite. Vitamin D failed to increase promoter activity of the *04∶05 and *03∶01 alleles carrying the new mutated VDRE, while the *16∶01 and *03∶01 alleles carrying the canonical VDRE sequence showed significantly increased transcriptional activity. The ability of VDR to bind the mutant VDRE in the DRB1 promoter was evaluated by EMSA. Efficient binding of VDR to the VDRE sequence found in the *16∶01 and in the *15∶01 allele reduced electrophoretic mobility when either an anti-VDR or an anti-RXR monoclonal antibody was added. Conversely, the Sardinian mutated VDRE sample showed very low affinity for the RXR/VDR heterodimer. These data seem to exclude a role of VDREs in the promoter region of the DRB1 gene in susceptibility to MS carried by DRB1* alleles in Sardinian patients. PMID:22848563

  1. MicroRNA-3148 Modulates Allelic Expression of Toll-Like Receptor 7 Variant Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Daisuke; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Scofield, R. Hal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Freedman, Barry I.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Sivils, Kathy Moser; James, Judith A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Niewold, Timothy B.; Merrill, Joan T.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Stevens, Anne M.; Boackle, Susan A.; Cantor, Rita M.; Chen, Weiling; Grossman, Jeniffer M.; Hahn, Bevra H.; Harley, John B.; Alarcόn-Riquelme, Marta E.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Tsao, Betty P.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the G allele of rs3853839 at 3′untranslated region (UTR) of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) was associated with elevated transcript expression and increased risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 9,274 Eastern Asians [P = 6.5×10−10, odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.27 (1.17–1.36)]. Here, we conducted trans-ancestral fine-mapping in 13,339 subjects including European Americans, African Americans, and Amerindian/Hispanics and confirmed rs3853839 as the only variant within the TLR7-TLR8 region exhibiting consistent and independent association with SLE (P meta = 7.5×10−11, OR = 1.24 [1.18–1.34]). The risk G allele was associated with significantly increased levels of TLR7 mRNA and protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and elevated luciferase activity of reporter gene in transfected cells. TLR7 3′UTR sequence bearing the non-risk C allele of rs3853839 matches a predicted binding site of microRNA-3148 (miR-3148), suggesting that this microRNA may regulate TLR7 expression. Indeed, miR-3148 levels were inversely correlated with TLR7 transcript levels in PBMCs from SLE patients and controls (R2 = 0.255, P = 0.001). Overexpression of miR-3148 in HEK-293 cells led to significant dose-dependent decrease in luciferase activity for construct driven by TLR7 3′UTR segment bearing the C allele (P = 0.0003). Compared with the G-allele construct, the C-allele construct showed greater than two-fold reduction of luciferase activity in the presence of miR-3148. Reduced modulation by miR-3148 conferred slower degradation of the risk G-allele containing TLR7 transcripts, resulting in elevated levels of gene products. These data establish rs3853839 of TLR7 as a shared risk variant of SLE in 22,613 subjects of Asian, EA, AA, and Amerindian/Hispanic ancestries (Pmeta = 2.0×10−19, OR = 1.25 [1.20–1.32]), which confers allelic effect on transcript turnover via differential binding to the

  2. MicroRNA-3148 modulates allelic expression of toll-like receptor 7 variant associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun; Zhao, Jian; Sakurai, Daisuke; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Jacob, Chaim O; Scofield, R Hal; Langefeld, Carl D; Kelly, Jennifer A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Alarcón, Graciela S; Vyse, Timothy J; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Freedman, Barry I; Gaffney, Patrick M; Sivils, Kathy Moser; James, Judith A; Gregersen, Peter K; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Niewold, Timothy B; Merrill, Joan T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Stevens, Anne M; Boackle, Susan A; Cantor, Rita M; Chen, Weiling; Grossman, Jeniffer M; Hahn, Bevra H; Harley, John B; Alarcόn-Riquelme, Marta E; Brown, Elizabeth E; Tsao, Betty P

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the G allele of rs3853839 at 3'untranslated region (UTR) of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) was associated with elevated transcript expression and increased risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 9,274 Eastern Asians [P = 6.5×10(-10), odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.27 (1.17-1.36)]. Here, we conducted trans-ancestral fine-mapping in 13,339 subjects including European Americans, African Americans, and Amerindian/Hispanics and confirmed rs3853839 as the only variant within the TLR7-TLR8 region exhibiting consistent and independent association with SLE (Pmeta = 7.5×10(-11), OR = 1.24 [1.18-1.34]). The risk G allele was associated with significantly increased levels of TLR7 mRNA and protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and elevated luciferase activity of reporter gene in transfected cells. TLR7 3'UTR sequence bearing the non-risk C allele of rs3853839 matches a predicted binding site of microRNA-3148 (miR-3148), suggesting that this microRNA may regulate TLR7 expression. Indeed, miR-3148 levels were inversely correlated with TLR7 transcript levels in PBMCs from SLE patients and controls (R(2) = 0.255, P = 0.001). Overexpression of miR-3148 in HEK-293 cells led to significant dose-dependent decrease in luciferase activity for construct driven by TLR7 3'UTR segment bearing the C allele (P = 0.0003). Compared with the G-allele construct, the C-allele construct showed greater than two-fold reduction of luciferase activity in the presence of miR-3148. Reduced modulation by miR-3148 conferred slower degradation of the risk G-allele containing TLR7 transcripts, resulting in elevated levels of gene products. These data establish rs3853839 of TLR7 as a shared risk variant of SLE in 22,613 subjects of Asian, EA, AA, and Amerindian/Hispanic ancestries (Pmeta  = 2.0×10(-19), OR = 1.25 [1.20-1.32]), which confers allelic effect on transcript turnover via differential binding to the epigenetic factor

  3. Vitamin D responsive elements within the HLA-DRB1 promoter region in Sardinian multiple sclerosis associated alleles.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Eleonora; Meloni, Alessandra; Murru, Maria Rita; Corongiu, Daniela; Tranquilli, Stefania; Fadda, Elisabetta; Murru, Raffaele; Schirru, Lucia; Secci, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Gianna; Asunis, Isadora; Cuccu, Stefania; Fenu, Giuseppe; Lorefice, Lorena; Carboni, Nicola; Mura, Gioia; Rosatelli, Maria Cristina; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D response elements (VDREs) have been found in the promoter region of the MS-associated allele HLA-DRB1*15:01, suggesting that with low vitamin D availability VDREs are incapable of inducing *15:01 expression allowing in early life autoreactive T-cells to escape central thymic deletion. The Italian island of Sardinia exhibits a very high frequency of MS and high solar radiation exposure. We test the contribution of VDREs analysing the promoter region of the MS-associated DRB1 *04:05, *03:01, *13:01 and *15:01 and non-MS-associated *16:01, *01, *11, *07:01 alleles in a cohort of Sardinians (44 MS patients and 112 healthy subjects). Sequencing of the DRB1 promoter region revealed a homozygous canonical VDRE in all *15:01, *16:01, *11 and in 45/73 *03:01 and in heterozygous state in 28/73 *03:01 and all *01 alleles. A new mutated homozygous VDRE was found in all *13:03, *04:05 and *07:01 alleles. Functionality of mutated and canonical VDREs was assessed for its potential to modulate levels of DRB1 gene expression using an in vitro transactivation assay after stimulation with active vitamin D metabolite. Vitamin D failed to increase promoter activity of the *04:05 and *03:01 alleles carrying the new mutated VDRE, while the *16:01 and *03:01 alleles carrying the canonical VDRE sequence showed significantly increased transcriptional activity. The ability of VDR to bind the mutant VDRE in the DRB1 promoter was evaluated by EMSA. Efficient binding of VDR to the VDRE sequence found in the *16:01 and in the *15:01 allele reduced electrophoretic mobility when either an anti-VDR or an anti-RXR monoclonal antibody was added. Conversely, the Sardinian mutated VDRE sample showed very low affinity for the RXR/VDR heterodimer. These data seem to exclude a role of VDREs in the promoter region of the DRB1 gene in susceptibility to MS carried by DRB1* alleles in Sardinian patients.

  4. MtDNA meta-analysis reveals both phenotype specificity and allele heterogeneity: a model for differential association

    PubMed Central

    Marom, Shani; Friger, Michael; Mishmar, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Human mtDNA genetic variants have traditionally been considered markers for ancient population migrations. However, during the past three decades, these variants have been associated with altered susceptibility to various phenotypes, thus supporting their importance for human health. Nevertheless, mtDNA disease association has frequently been supported only in certain populations, due either to population stratification or differential epistatic compensations among populations. To partially overcome these obstacles, we performed meta-analysis of the multiple mtDNA association studies conducted until 2016, encompassing 53,975 patients and 63,323 controls. Our findings support the association of mtDNA haplogroups and recurrent variants with specific phenotypes such as Parkinson’s disease, type 2 diabetes, longevity, and breast cancer. Strikingly, our assessment of mtDNA variants’ involvement with multiple phenotypes revealed significant impact for Caucasian haplogroups H, J, and K. Therefore, ancient mtDNA variants could be divided into those that affect specific phenotypes, versus others with a general impact on phenotype combinations. We suggest that the mtDNA could serve as a model for phenotype specificity versus allele heterogeneity. PMID:28230165

  5. Allelic variants of human beta-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) promoter: evolutionary relationships and predictable associations with HIV-1 disease progression.

    PubMed

    Tang, J; Rivers, C; Karita, E; Costello, C; Allen, S; Fultz, P N; Schoenbaum, E E; Kaslow, R A

    1999-09-01

    Variability in the natural history of HIV-1 infection has been repeatedly associated with genetic variants in the beta-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) locus. While CCR5 coding sequences have demonstrated relatively limited variation, sequences of its promoter appear polymorphic in all major populations. Our studies revealed five major CCR5 promoter alleles with distributions that differed widely among the four distinct ethnic groups from Kigali, Rwanda and Bronx, New York. In particular, promoter allele P*0103 (G59029-T59353-T59356-A59402-C59653) was largely restricted to black subjects. The promoter allele P*0202 (A59029-C59353-C59356-A59402-T59653) was tightly linked to the slightly less frequent CCR2b-641, a variant of the CCR2b gene, which is about 12.7 kbp upstream from the promoter region. Another closely related promoter allele P*0201 (A59029-C59353-C59356-A59402-C59653) exclusively carried the far less common CCR5-delta 32, a 32-bp deletion in the CCR5 coding sequence 2 kbp downstream from the promoter. The homozygous P*0201/*0201 genotype can be predicted as a risk factor for more rapid disease progression. Among human, chimpanzee, pig-tailed macaque, and sooty mangabey promoter allelic sequences, the apparent ancestral lineage of the promoter sequence (G59029-T59353-C59356-A59402-C59653 = human P*0102) was highly conserved across the primate species analyzed here while P*0201 and P*0202 arose more recently than the other three major alleles. Further effort to establish the mechanism by which CCR chemokine receptor polymorphisms govern the initiation and pathogenesis of primate lentivirus infection apparently requires fully detailed genotypic characterization of the affected populations.

  6. Allelic association but only weak evidence for linkage to the apolipoprotein E locus in late-onset Swedish Alzheimer families

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Forsell, C.; Lilius, L.

    1996-05-31

    An association between the {epsilon}4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) and late-onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) was recently demonstrated. In order to confirm the association and to gauge the ability of standard genetic linkage methods to identify susceptibility genes, we investigated 15 Swedish late-onset AD families. We found an association of familial AD to the APOE {epsilon}4 allele (P = 0.01) but no indication of linkage to the APOE region using 2-point linkage analysis, and only weak evidence using the affected pedigree-member (APM) method. Our results confirm an APOE {epsilon}4 association with late-onset familial AD and indicate that susceptibility genes can easily be missed when using standard lod score and APM genetic linkage analysis. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Coding variants at hexa-allelic amino acid 13 of HLA-DRB1 explain independent SNP associations with follicular lymphoma risk.

    PubMed

    Foo, Jia Nee; Smedby, Karin E; Akers, Nicholas K; Berglund, Mattias; Irwan, Ishak D; Jia, Xiaoming; Li, Yi; Conde, Lucia; Darabi, Hatef; Bracci, Paige M; Melbye, Mads; Adami, Hans-Olov; Glimelius, Bengt; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Padyukov, Leonid; Humphreys, Keith; Enblad, Gunilla; Skibola, Christine F; de Bakker, Paul I W; Liu, Jianjun

    2013-07-11

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma represents a diverse group of blood malignancies, of which follicular lymphoma (FL) is a common subtype. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II region multiple independent SNPs that are significantly associated with FL risk. To dissect these signals and determine whether coding variants in HLA genes are responsible for the associations, we conducted imputation, HLA typing, and sequencing in three independent populations for a total of 689 cases and 2,446 controls. We identified a hexa-allelic amino acid polymorphism at position 13 of the HLA-DR beta chain that showed the strongest association with FL within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region (multiallelic p = 2.3 × 10⁻¹⁵). Out of six possible amino acids that occurred at that position within the population, we classified two as high risk (Tyr and Phe), two as low risk (Ser and Arg), and two as moderate risk (His and Gly). There was a 4.2-fold difference in risk (95% confidence interval = 2.9-6.1) between subjects carrying two alleles encoding high-risk amino acids and those carrying two alleles encoding low-risk amino acids (p = 1.01 × 10⁻¹⁴). This coding variant might explain the complex SNP associations identified by GWASs and suggests a common HLA-DR antigen-driven mechanism for the pathogenesis of FL and rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Allelic and genotypic frequencies in polymorphic Booroola fecundity gene and their association with multiple birth and postnatal growth in Chhotanagpuri sheep

    PubMed Central

    Oraon, Thanesh; Singh, D. K.; Ghosh, Mayukh; Kullu, S. S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, L. B.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Chhotanagpuri breed of sheep reared for mutton in Jharkhand, India, having problem of low litter size and body weight. The response of genetic improvement for traits with low heritability through traditional selection method is time-consuming. Therefore, marker-assisted selection based on a polymorphism study of suitable candidate gene can response quickly. Thus, this study was aimed at identification of different allelic and genotypic frequencies of Booroola fecundity (FecB) gene and its association with multiple birth and postnatal growth in Chhotanagpuri sheep. Materials and Methods: DNA isolation and gene-specific amplification of FecB gene was performed from blood samples of from 92 Chhotanagpuri lambs maintained under similar feeding and management conditions. Custom nucleotide sequencing and single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis were performed to identify different genotypes with respect to the target gene. Statistical analysis was performed for determination of allelic and genotypic frequencies of FecB gene polymorphisms and its association with multiple birth and postnatal growth of lambs from birth to 52 weeks age. Results: “AA,” “AB,” and “BB” genotypes were found at locus-1 as it is polymorphic for FecB gene while locus-2 was found to be monomorphic for FecB gene. Higher frequency of “A” allele at locus-1 was found in single born lambs, whereas “B” allele was predominant among multiple born lambs. The lambs having “BB” genotype weighed significantly (p≤0.01) heavier than those of “AB” and “AA” genotype at 52 weeks of age. Conclusion: “BB” genotype has emerged as favored genotype for multiple births and better growth indicator. Therefore, homozygous lambs for “B” allele should be selected and utilized in breeding program for better growth rate. PMID:27956784

  9. The role of allelic variation in estrogen receptor genes and major depression in the Nurses Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, K.; Agnew-Blais, J.; Roberts, A.; Hamilton, A.; De Vivo, I.; Ranu, H.; Koenen, K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The role of exogenous and endogenous sex hormones in the etiology of depression remains elusive, in part because sex hormone variation is often correlated with behaviors, life stage changes, and other factors that may influence depression. Estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) and beta (ESR2) are known to regulate gene expression and estrogen response in areas of the brain associated with major depression and are unlikely to be correlated with exogenous factors that may influence depression. Methods We examined whether functional polymorphisms in these genes are associated with lifetime major depression and chronic major depression among a sample of women from the Nurses’ Health Study II (N=2,576). DSM-IV depressive disorder symptoms were assessed by structured interview in 2007. Genotyping was performed on DNA extracted from blood using Taq-man. Results Women with the AA alleles of ESR2 RS4986938 had the higher prevalence of lifetime major depression than women with other allele frequencies (36.7% for those with AA versus 28.5% with GA and 29.1% with GG, p=0.02) and chronic major depression (14.7% for those with AA versus 9.3% with GA and 9.1 % with GG, p=0.01). History of post-menopausal hormone (PMH) use modified the association of ESR1 polymorphism RS2234693 with any lifetime depression; specifically, those with the TT allele had the highest risk of lifetime depression among PMH users, and the lowest risk of depression among non-PMH users (p-value for interaction=0.02). Further, carriers of the AA alleles in ESR1 polymorphism RS9340799 had increased prevalence of lifetime major depression only among lifetime PMH-users (p=0.007). Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that estrogen receptor polymorphisms influence risk for major depression; the role of estrogen receptors and other sex steroid-related genetic factors may provide unique insights into etiology. PMID:26169989

  10. Identification of doublesex alleles associated with the female-limited Batesian mimicry polymorphism in Papilio memnon.

    PubMed

    Komata, Shinya; Lin, Chung-Ping; Iijima, Takuro; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Sota, Teiji

    2016-10-06

    The female-limited Batesian mimicry polymorphism in Papilio butterflies is an intriguing system for investigating the mechanism of maintenance of genetic polymorphisms. In Papilio polytes, an autosomal region encompassing the sex-determinant gene doublesex controls female-limited mimicry polymorphism. In the closely related species P. memnon, which also exhibits female-limited Batesian mimicry polymorphism, we identified two allelic sequences of the doublesex gene that corresponded exactly with the mimetic and non-mimetic female phenotypes. Thus, the genetic basis of the mimicry polymorphism in P. memnon is similar to that in P. polytes. However, the mimetic and non-mimetic alleles of the two species were not identical, and the divergence of alleles occurred independently in P. memnon and P. polytes. Different mutation-selection processes may have resulted in the convergent patterns of mimicry polymorphism in these Papilio butterflies.

  11. Identification of doublesex alleles associated with the female-limited Batesian mimicry polymorphism in Papilio memnon

    PubMed Central

    Komata, Shinya; Lin, Chung-Ping; Iijima, Takuro; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Sota, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    The female-limited Batesian mimicry polymorphism in Papilio butterflies is an intriguing system for investigating the mechanism of maintenance of genetic polymorphisms. In Papilio polytes, an autosomal region encompassing the sex-determinant gene doublesex controls female-limited mimicry polymorphism. In the closely related species P. memnon, which also exhibits female-limited Batesian mimicry polymorphism, we identified two allelic sequences of the doublesex gene that corresponded exactly with the mimetic and non-mimetic female phenotypes. Thus, the genetic basis of the mimicry polymorphism in P. memnon is similar to that in P. polytes. However, the mimetic and non-mimetic alleles of the two species were not identical, and the divergence of alleles occurred independently in P. memnon and P. polytes. Different mutation-selection processes may have resulted in the convergent patterns of mimicry polymorphism in these Papilio butterflies. PMID:27708422

  12. Novel association of the obesity risk-allele near Fas Apoptotic Inhibitory molecule 2 (FAIM2) gene with heart rate and study of its effects on myocardial infarction in diabetic participants of the PREDIMED trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Fas apoptotic pathway has been implicated in type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although a polymorphism (rs7138803; G'>'A) near the Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (FAIM2) locus has been related to obesity, its association with other cardiovascular risk factors and disease remains u...

  13. Uncommon HLA alleles identified by hemizygous ultra-high Sanger sequencing: haplotype associations and reconsideration of their assignment in the Common and Well-Documented catalogue.

    PubMed

    Voorter, Christina E M; Groeneweg, Mathijs; Groeneveld, Lisette; Tilanus, Marcel G J

    2016-02-01

    Although the number of HLA alleles still increases, many of them have been reported being uncommon. This is partly due to lack of full length gene sequencing, especially for those alleles belonging to an allele ambiguity in which the first discovered allele has been assigned as the most frequent one. As members of the working group on Common and Well Documented (CWD) alleles and since we implemented full length group-specific sequencing as standard method routinely, we have investigated the presence of presumably rare alleles in our collection of HLA typing data. We identified 50 alleles, that were not previously encountered as Common or Well Documented. Sixteen of them should be added to the CWD catalogue, since we encountered them in 5 or more unrelated individuals. Another 11 could be added, based upon our results and the data present in the IMGT database and the rare allele section of the allele frequencies database. Furthermore, tight associations were observed between several different alleles even at the level of synonymous and non-coding sequences. In addition, in several cases the uncommon allele was found to be more frequent than its common counterpart.

  14. Prevalence of bovine dermatophilosis and disease-associated alleles in zebu Goudali cattle and their Italian Simmental crosses ranching in the western highland plateau savannah of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ojong, Bessong Willington; Saccà, Elena; Bessong, Pascal; Piasentier, Edi

    2016-10-01

    Abundance of native pastures makes Cameroon's western highland savannah (WHS) a hotspot for low-input beef-type cattle. Dumbo Ranch is central to cattle seed stock multiplication in WHS and holds that Dermatophilus congolensis infection undermines production. The bovine BoLA-DRB3 has been variously demonstrated as the principal gene of the major histocompatibility locus associated with immunity and resistance to dermatophilosis in cattle. We studied the profile of dermatophilosis prevalence in zebu Goudali (G) and its Simmental composite, SimGoud (SG), at Dumbo Ranch and determined the distribution of a dermatophilosis-associated susceptibility allele of the BoLA-DRB3 gene by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We recorded a 42 % prevalence of dermatophilosis in the studied cohort (337 animals). Dermatophilosis was more common in older cattle than in cattle ≤36 months (p ≤ 0.05). G was more affected compared to SG, because of the prevalence of the disease in the oldest animals and the age distribution of the experimental subjects. No susceptible homozygote was observed. About 85 and 15 % of the cohort carried the homozygous resistant and heterozygous condition, respectively. This genotype distribution was not affected by cattle type. The study confirms the presence of dermatophilosis among G and SG cattle in WHS. However, there was no correlation between the presence of the disease-associated susceptible allele considered and clinical manifestation. Screening for this dermatophilosis resistance-associated allele of BoLA-DRB3 gene appeared not useful for selection of G and SG in WHS.

  15. Favorable alleles for stem water-soluble carbohydrates identified by association analysis contribute to grain weight under drought stress conditions in wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyu; Zhang, Bin; Li, Runzhi; Chang, Xiaoping; Jing, Ruilian

    2015-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental constraint to crop distribution and productivity. Stem water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) buffer wheat grain yield against conditions unfavorable for photosynthesis during the grain filling stage. In this study, 262 winter wheat accessions and 209 genome-wide SSR markers were collected and used to undertake association analysis based on a mixed linear model (MLM). The WSC in different internodes at three growth stages and 1000-grain weight (TGW) were investigated under four environmental regimes (well-watered, drought stress during the whole growth period, and two levels of terminal drought stress imposed by chemical desiccation under the well-watered and drought stress during the whole growth period conditions). Under diverse drought stress conditions, WSC in lower internodes showed significant positive correlations with TGW, especially at the flowering stage under well-watered conditions and at grain filling under drought stress. Sixteen novel WSC-favorable alleles were identified, and five of them contributed to significantly higher TGW. In addition, pyramiding WSC favorable alleles was not only effective for obtaining accessions with higher WSC, but also for enhancing TGW under different water regimes. During the past fifty years of wheat breeding, WSC was selected incidentally. The average number of favorable WSC alleles increased from 1.13 in the pre-1960 period to 4.41 in the post-2000 period. The results indicate a high potential for using marker-assisted selection to pyramid WSC favorable alleles in improving WSC and TGW in wheat.

  16. Cytochrome P450 allele CYP3A7*1C associates with adverse outcomes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, breast and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nick; Broderick, Peter; Catovsky, Daniel; Matakidou, Athena; Eisen, Timothy; Goldsmith, Christy; Dudbridge, Frank; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Ashworth, Alan; Ross, Gillian; Houlston, Richard S; Fletcher, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    CYP3A enzymes metabolize endogenous hormones and chemotherapeutic agents used to treat cancer, thereby potentially impacting drug effectiveness. Here we refined the genetic basis underlying the functional effects of a CYP3A haplotype on urinary estrone glucuronide (E1G) levels and tested for an association between CYP3A genotype and outcome in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), breast, or lung cancers. The most significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was rs45446698, a SNP that tags the CYP3A7*1C allele; this SNP was associated with a 54% decrease in urinary E1G levels. Genotyping this SNP in 1,008 breast cancer, 1,128 lung cancer, and 347 CLL patients, we found that rs45446698 was associated with breast cancer mortality (hazard ratio [HR]=1.74, P=0.03), all-cause mortality in lung cancer patients (HR=1.43, P=0.009), and CLL progression (HR=1.62, P=0.03). We also found borderline evidence of a statistical interaction between the CYP3A7*1C allele, treatment of patients with a cytotoxic agent that is a CYP3A substrate and clinical outcome (Pinteraction=0.06). The CYP3A7*1C allele, which results in adult expression of the fetal CYP3A7 gene, is likely to be the functional allele influencing levels of circulating endogenous sex hormones and outcome in these various malignancies. Further studies confirming these associations and determining the mechanism by which CYP3A7*1C influences outcome are required. One possibility is that standard chemotherapy regimens that include CYP3A substrates may not be optimal for the approximately 8% of cancer patients who are CYP3A7*1C carriers. PMID:26964624

  17. Association of deletion allele of insertion/deletion polymorphism in α2B adrenoceptor gene and hypertension with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tayel, Safaa I; Khader, Heba F; El-Helbawy, Nesreen G; Ibrahim, Waleed A

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular α2B-adrenoreceptors have the potential to increase blood pressure by mediating vasoconstriction. A nine-nucleotide deletion in the receptor enhances vasoconstriction and exacerbates hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine the association between insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the α2B-adrenoceptor and hypertension with and without diabetes. Methods The study was carried out in 35 hypertensive patients with diabetes, 35 hypertensive patients without diabetes, and 30 healthy controls. Clinical data, blood lipid profiles, and I/D polymorphism were assessed. Results Hypertensive patients were significantly older, with significantly higher systolic/diastolic blood pressures and worse plasma lipid profiles than controls. The frequency of the DD genotype was significantly higher in both hypertensive patients with (77.14%, P < 0.01) and without (71.43%, P < 0.05) diabetes versus controls (40%). Also, the D allele was significantly more common in both hypertensive patients with (84.29%, P < 0.01) and without (80%, P < 0.05) diabetes versus controls (58.33%). Hypertensive patients were more likely to have the D allele with (3.83-fold) and without (2.85-fold) diabetes. The frequencies of the DD genotype and the D allele were not significantly (P > 0.05) different between the patient groups. The DD genotype was associated with significantly lower high-density lipoprotein (P = 0.001) and significantly higher low-density lipoprotein (P = 0.017) levels versus the II and ID genotypes in the hypertensive group without diabetes. Conclusion A marked and statistically significant association between DD genotype and D allele of I/D polymorphism in the α2B-adrenoceptor gene may be a risk factor for hypertension ± diabetes. The association between the DD genotype and dyslipidemia may partially explain its role in precipitating hypertension. PMID:23776387

  18. Molecular lesions associated with alleles of decapentaplegic identify residues necessary for TGF/{beta}/BMP cell signaling in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, K.; Ray, R.P.; Gelbart, W.M.

    1996-02-01

    We have identified the molecular lesions associated with six point mutations in the Drosophila TGF-{beta} homologue decapentaplegic (dpp). The sites of these mutations define residues within both the pro and ligand regions that are essential for dpp function in vivo. While all of these mutations affect residues that are highly conserved among TGF-{beta} superfamily members, the phenotypic consequences of the different alleles are quite distinct. Through an analysis of these mutant phenotypes, both in cuticle preparations and with molecular probes, we have assessed the functional significance of specific residues that are conserved among the different members of the superfamily. In addition, we have tested for conditional genetic interactions between the different alleles. We show that two of the alleles are temperature sensitive for the embryonic functions of dpp, such that these alleles are not only embryonic viable as homozygotes but also partially complement other dpp hypomorphs at low temperatures. Our results are discussed with regard to in vitro mutagenesis data on other TGF-{beta}-like molecules, as well as with regard to the regulation of dpp cell signaling in Drosophila. 57 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. A genomic study on distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A and HLA-B alleles in Lak population of Iran.

    PubMed

    Shahsavar, Farhad; Varzi, Ali-Mohammad; Ahmadi, Seyyed Amir Yasin

    2017-03-01

    Anthropological studies based on the highly polymorphic gene, human leukocyte antigen (HLA), provide useful information for bone marrow donor registry, forensic medicine, disease association studies, as well as infertility treatment, designing peptide vaccines against tumors, and infectious or autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to determine HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies in 100 unrelated Lak/lᴂk/individuals from Lorestan province of Iran. Finally, we compared the results with that previously described in Iranian population. Commercial HLA-Type kits from BAG (Lich, Germany) company were used for determination of the HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies in genomic DNA, based on polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) assay. The differences between the populations in distribution of HLA-A and HLA-B alleles were estimated by chi-squared test with Yate's correction. The most frequent HLA-A alleles were *24 (20%), *02 (18%), *03 (12%) and *11 (10%), and the most frequent HLA-B alleles were *35 (24%), *51 (16%), *18 (6%) and *38 (6%) in Lak population. HLA-A*66 (1%), *74(1%) and HLA-B*48 (1%), *55(1%) were the least observed frequencies in Lak population. Our results based on HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies showed that Lak population possesses the previously reported general features of Iranians but still with unique.

  20. HS1,2 Ig enhancer alleles association to AIDS progression in a pediatric cohort infected with a monophyletic HIV-strain.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Carla; Giambra, Vincenzo; Frezza, Domenico; Palma, Paolo; Serone, Eliseo; Gattinara, Guido Castelli; Mattei, Maurizio; Mancino, Giorgio; Colizzi, Vittorio; Amicosante, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Alteration in the humoral immune response has been observed during HIV infection. The polymorphisms of enhancer HS1,2, member of the 3(') regulatory region of the Ig heavy chain cluster, may play a role in the variation of the humoral response leading to pathological conditions. To assess the role of the HS1,2 polymorphic variants in the progression of AIDS, the HS1,2-A allelic frequencies were investigated in a cohort of HIV infected pediatric subjects from a nosocomial outbreak with a monophyletic strain of HIV. From a total group of 418 HIV infected children in the outbreak cohort, 42 nonprogressors and 31 progressors without bias due to antiretroviral therapy were evaluated. HS1,2 allele (∗)1 has been associated with nonprogressors (allelic frequency: 51.19% versus 33.87% in progressors, OR 0.5, and P = 0.0437), while allele (∗)2 has been associated with progression (allelic frequency: 48.39% versus 30.95% in nonprogressors, OR 2.1, and P = 0.0393). Further, only subjects carrying allele (∗)2 in absence of allele (∗)1, either in homozygous condition for allele (∗)2 [nonprogressors 2/42 (4.76%), Progressors 7/31 (22.58%), OR 5.8, and P = 0.0315] or in combination with other allelic variants [nonprogressors 7/42 (16.67%), Progressors 13/31 (41.93%), OR 3.61, and P = 0.0321], have been associated with HIV progression to AIDS. In conclusion, while the HS1,2 allele (∗)1 has a protective effect on HIV progression when present, allele (∗)2 is associated with progression toward AIDS when allele (∗)1 is absent.

  1. Tannerella forsythia and the HLA-DQB1 allele are associated with susceptibility to periodontal disease in Japanese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Shimomura-Kuroki, Junko; Yamashita, Kie; Shimooka, Shohachi

    2009-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a multiple factor disease caused by genetic factors, environmental factors, and periodontal bacteria (periodontal pathogens). The present study aimed to elucidate the risk factors for periodontal disease in Japanese adolescents. Subjects (11-16 years old) were classified into three groups: localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP), periodontal attachment loss (PAL), and periodontally healthy (PH) groups. Genomic DNA isolated from the buccal mucosa was used for single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses of the candidate genes (interleukin-1alpha-889; interleukin-1alpha +4845; interleukin-1beta +3954; an immunoglobulin G Fc gamma receptor, FcgammaRIIa-R/H131; and a human leukocyte antigen class II allele, HLA-DQB1) of aggressive periodontitis. Subgingival plaque samples obtained from the same subjects were used for 16S rRNAbased polymerase chain reaction analysis of five important periodontal pathogens (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia). Tannerella forsythia was detected in the deepest periodontal pockets in all subjects in the LAP and PAL groups. The prevalence of an atypical BamHI restriction site in HLA-DQB1 of the LAP group was significantly higher than that in the PH and PAL groups. Furthermore, all subjects who had the atypical BamHI restriction site in HLA-DQB1 had T. forsythia infection. These results suggested that T. forsythia is associated with periodontal disease in Japanese adolescents and also suggested that HLA-DQB1 is related to LAP and is associated with T. forsythia infection.

  2. Association of Allelic Variants of Thyroid-Binding Globulin With Puberty in Boars and Responses to Hemicastration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hemicastration of males increases weight of remaining testis when conducted before terminal differentiation of Sertoli cells. The current studies re-examined responses to hemicastration in one-quarter Meishan crossbred boars that differed for 2 alleles of thyroid-binding globulin (TBG). In the first...

  3. Synergism between paraoxonase Arg 192 and the angiotensin converting enzyme D allele is associated with severity of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Vaisi-Raygani, Asad; Rahimi, Zohreh; Tavilani, Haidar; Vaisi-Raygani, Hadiss; Kiani, A; Aminian, M; Shakiba, E; Shakiba, Y; Pourmotabbed, Tayebeh

    2012-03-01

    We have previously shown that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene D allele is an independent risk factor for early onset coronary artery disease (CAD). Little is known about the concomitant presence of the ACE gene D allele and paraoxonase (PON1) codon 192 arginine (Arg) on the severity of CAD. Regarding the high rate of CAD among Iranians the aim of present study was to examine the hypothesis of synergistic effects between ACE-D and PON1-Arg alleles on predisposition and the severity of CAD in our population. The PON1 192 and ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) genotypes were detected by PCR-RFLP and PCR, respectively in 414 individuals undergoing their first coronary angiography. Patients were placed into one of two groups: CAD and control without CAD or diabetes. We mentioned the synergistic effects of both genes and not ACE gene alone is a risk factor for CAD. We found that PON1 Arg 192 and ACE D allele act synergistically to increase the risk of CAD (OR 1.3, P = 0.044). Our results showed a significant correlation between the possession of both PON1 192 Arg and the ACE D allele and the extent of CAD in CAD patients and CAD subjects without diabetes, represented by the increased frequency of three-vessel disease with OR 2.7, P = 0.046; χ(2) = 4, P = 0.046 and OR 2.4, P = 0.051; χ(2) = 3.8, P = 0.051, respectively. We found that PON1 Arg 192 and ACE D alleles act synergistically to increase the risk of CAD in CAD patients and CAD subjects without diabetes from west of Iran, who have high frequency of three-vessel disease. Our data suggest that PON1 192 Arg and the ACE D allele in combination with each other can be important independent risk factor for severity of CAD in patients carrying both PON1 192 Arg and the ACE D allele in a west population of Iran.

  4. The Frequency of HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 Alleles in Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in the Turkish Population: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Patıroğlu, Türkan; Akar, H. Haluk

    2016-01-01

    We studied the frequencies of human leukocyte antigen alleles (A, B, and DRB1) in 90 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and then compared them with 126 controls in this study. Although the frequencies of the A*03 allele, the DRB1*03 allele, the DRB1*04 allele, the A*02/B*35/DRB1*13 haplotype, and homozygosity of A*02 were higher in patients (p=0.006, p=0.003, p=0.002, p=0.01, and p=0.02, respectively), the frequencies of the A*23, B*13, B*40, and DRB1*13 alleles were lower (p=0.002, p=0.07, p=0.002, and p=0.003, respectively) in patients than controls. The frequencies of the DRB1*04 and DRB1*07 alleles were higher in patients in the high-risk group and standard-risk group, respectively (p=0.009 and p=0.007, respectively). This study indicated that the frequency of the A*03 allele, the DRB1*03 allele, the DRB1*04 allele, the A*02/B*35/DRB1*13 haplotype, and A*02 homozygosity may play a predisposing role in patients with ALL in the Turkish population. The frequency of the DRB1*04 and DRB1*07 alleles may also be associated with high risk and standard risk in patients with ALL, respectively. PMID:27095065

  5. The Frequency of HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 Alleles in Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in the Turkish Population: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Patıroğlu, Türkan; Akar, H Haluk

    2016-12-01

    We studied the frequencies of human leukocyte antigen alleles (A, B, and DRB1) in 90 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and then compared them with 126 controls in this study. Although the frequencies of the A*03 allele, the DRB1*03 allele, the DRB1*04 allele, the A*02/B*35/DRB1*13 haplotype, and homozygosity of A*02 were higher in patients (p=0.006, p=0.003, p=0.002, p=0.01, and p=0.02, respectively), the frequencies of the A*23, B*13, B*40, and DRB1*13 alleles were lower (p=0.002, p=0.07, p=0.002, and p=0.003, respectively) in patients than controls. The frequencies of the DRB1*04 and DRB1*07 alleles were higher in patients in the high-risk group and standard-risk group, respectively (p=0.009 and p=0.007, respectively). This study indicated that the frequency of the A*03 allele, the DRB1*03 allele, the DRB1*04 allele, the A*02/B*35/DRB1*13 haplotype, and A*02 homozygosity may play a predisposing role in patients with ALL in the Turkish population. The frequency of the DRB1*04 and DRB1*07 alleles may also be associated with high risk and standard risk in patients with ALL, respectively.

  6. Association of HLA class II alleles with hepatitis C virus clearance and persistence in thalassemia patients from Iran.

    PubMed

    Samimi-Rad, Katayoun; Sadeghi, Farzin; Amirzargar, Aliakbar; Eshraghian, Mohamad Reza; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed; Rahimnia, Ramin

    2015-09-01

    There is no published data on association of HLA class II alleles with clearance or persistence after acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients from Iran. HLA DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 alleles were determined using polymerase chain reaction amplification with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) on a total of 117 thalassemia patients (63 with chronic infection, and 54 with viral clearance) and 120 healthy controls. HLA-DRB1*0301 and DQA1*0501 alleles were found significantly present in patients with HCV clearance compared to those with chronic infection (P = 0.03 and P = 0.0007, respectively). By contrast, DRB1*0701, DQA1*0201, and DQB1*0602 alleles occurred significantly in those with chronic infection compared to those with viral clearance (P = 0.004, P = 0.007, and P = 0.02, respectively). As compared to the controls, DRB1*0301, DRB1*11, DQA1*0501, and DQB1*0301 alleles showed a significant decrease in chronic patients (P = 0.002, P = 0.001, P = 0.0001, and P = 0.0004, respectively). Furthermore, the haplotype frequencies of DRB1*0301, DQA1*0501, DQB1*0201, and DRB1*1101, DQA1*0501, DQB1*0301 were found significantly higher (P = 0.004 and P = 0.04, respectively) in patients with HCV clearance than those with chronic infection. By contrast, the haplotype DRB1*0701, DQA1*0201, DQB1*0201 occurred more frequently (P = 0.02) in those with chronic infection compared with those with viral clearance. These findings suggest that particular HLA alleles and related haplotypes may have an influence on the outcome of HCV infection among the Iranian patients. Some of the HLA alleles found in the Iranian patients are different from those reported elsewhere, suggesting that the immunogenetic makeup for HCV clearance or persistence may vary based on the ethnicity.

  7. Association between a high-expressing interferon-gamma allele and a lower frequency of kidney angiomyolipomas in TSC2 patients.

    PubMed

    Dabora, Sandra L; Roberts, Penelope; Nieto, Andres; Perez, Ron; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Franz, David; Bissler, John; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Sims, Katherine; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2002-10-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a familial hamartoma syndrome in which renal involvement is common and, at times, life threatening. We have investigated the potential effect of a non-TSC gene on renal disease in a cohort of 172 TSC patients with TSC2 mutations. Patients were genotyped for an interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) microsatellite polymorphism, within intron 1, for which one common allele (allele 2, with 12 CA repeats) has been shown to have a higher expression of IFN-gamma. A chi(2) analysis was used to examine the association between IFN-gamma allele 2 and the development of kidney angiomyolipomas (KAMLs) in this TSC2 cohort. Because of the age-dependent development of KAMLs in TSC, we initially focused on the 127 patients who were >5 years old. Additional subgroup analyses were done to investigate the influence of age and gender. The transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) was also performed in a subset of this cohort (46 probands) for whom parent and/or sibling samples were available for analysis. Both chi(2) analysis and TDT suggested an association between IFN-gamma allele 2 and the absence of KAMLs in patients who have known TSC2 mutations. Among the 127 patients who were >5 years old, KAMLs were present in 95 (75%) and were absent in 32 (25%). In the group with KAML present, the frequency of IFN-gamma allele 2 was 56%; in the group with KAML absent, the frequency of IFN-gamma allele 2 was significantly higher, at 78% (P=.02, by chi(2) analysis). The family-based TDT analysis gave similar results, with a TDT statistic (TDT chi2=5.45) corresponding to a P value of.02. Subgroup analyses show that both age and gender may influence the impact of this association. Although these results should be replicated in other populations with TSC, the present study suggests that modifier genes play a role in the variable expression of TSC and also suggests a potential therapy for KAMLs in patients with TSC.

  8. Allelic variants of IL1R1 gene associate with severe hand osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In search for genes predisposing to osteoarthritis (OA), several genome wide scans have provided evidence for linkage on 2q. In this study we targeted a 470 kb region on 2q11.2 presenting the locus with most evidence for linkage to severe OA of distal interphalangeal joints (DIP) in our genome wide scan families. Methods We genotyped 32 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in this 470 kb region comprising six genes belonging to the interleukin 1 superfamily and monitored for association with individual SNPs and SNP haplotypes among severe familial hand OA cases (material extended from our previous linkage study; n = 134), unrelated end-stage bilateral primary knee OA cases (n = 113), and population based controls (n = 436). Results Four SNPs in the IL1R1 gene, mapping to a 125 kb LD block, provided evidence for association with hand OA in family-based and case-control analysis, the strongest association being with SNP rs2287047 (p-value = 0.0009). Conclusions This study demonstrates an association between severe hand OA and IL1R1 gene. This gene represents a highly relevant biological candidate since it encodes protein that is a known modulator of inflammatory processes associated with joint destruction and resides within a locus providing consistent evidence for linkage to hand OA. As the observed association did not fully explain the linkage obtained in the previous study, it is plausible that also other variants in this genome region predispose to hand OA. PMID:20353565

  9. [Association of allelic polymorphisms of genes matrix Gla-protein system with ischemic atherothrombotic stroke].

    PubMed

    Garbuzova, V Yu; Stroy, D A; Dosenko, V E; Dubovyk, Ye I; Borodenko, A O; Shimko, K A; Obukhova, O A; Ataman, O V

    2015-01-01

    There are results of the determination of 10 polymorphisms of matrix Gla-protein system (gene MGP-T(-138)-->C (rs1800802), G(-7)-->A (rs1800801), Thr83-->Ala (rs4236), gene VDR-FokI (rs2228570), BsmI (rs1544410), ApaI (rs7975232), TaqI (rs731236), gene GGCX-Arg325-->Gln (rs699664), gene VKORS1-T(2255)-->C (rs2359612), gene BMP-2-Ser37-->Ala (rs2273073)) into 170 patients with ischemic atherothrombotic stroke (IATS) and 124 healthy individual is (control group). It is established that there is a connection between the IATS and polymorphic variants of genes MGP (G(-7)-->A) and VKORC1 (T(2255)-->C). The risk of IATS in carriers of minor allele A/A (G(-7)-->A polymorphism) in 2.6 times higher than in carriers of the major allele (G/A + G/G), and C/C genotype (T(2255)-->C polymorphism) in 2.2 times higher than the homozygotes of major allele. The coincidence of patients T/C and G/G, C/C and G/A genotypes, and A/A genotype (G(-7)-->A polymorphism) with any genotype T(2255)-->C polymorphism are increases the risk of IATS.

  10. Triglyceride-increasing alleles associated with protection against type-2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) levels are an established risk factor for type-2 diabetes (T2D). However, recent studies have hinted at the possibility that genetic risk for TG may paradoxically protect against T2D. In this study, we examined the association of genetic risk for TG with incident T2...

  11. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-12-06

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas.

  12. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    PubMed Central

    Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Investigators, kConFab/AOCS; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas. PMID:27792995

  13. Ruminant rhombencephalitis-associated Listeria monocytogenes alleles linked to a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis complex.

    PubMed

    Balandyté, Lina; Brodard, Isabelle; Frey, Joachim; Oevermann, Anna; Abril, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is among the most important food-borne pathogens and is well adapted to persist in the environment. To gain insight into the genetic relatedness and potential virulence of L. monocytogenes strains causing central nervous system (CNS) infections, we used multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) to subtype 183 L. monocytogenes isolates, most from ruminant rhombencephalitis and some from human patients, food, and the environment. Allelic-profile-based comparisons grouped L. monocytogenes strains mainly into three clonal complexes and linked single-locus variants (SLVs). Clonal complex A essentially consisted of isolates from human and ruminant brain samples. All but one rhombencephalitis isolate from cattle were located in clonal complex A. In contrast, food and environmental isolates mainly clustered into clonal complex C, and none was classified as clonal complex A. Isolates of the two main clonal complexes (A and C) obtained by MLVA were analyzed by PCR for the presence of 11 virulence-associated genes (prfA, actA, inlA, inlB, inlC, inlD, inlE, inlF, inlG, inlJ, and inlC2H). Virulence gene analysis revealed significant differences in the actA, inlF, inlG, and inlJ allelic profiles between clinical isolates (complex A) and nonclinical isolates (complex C). The association of particular alleles of actA, inlF, and newly described alleles of inlJ with isolates from CNS infections (particularly rhombencephalitis) suggests that these virulence genes participate in neurovirulence of L. monocytogenes. The overall absence of inlG in clinical complex A and its presence in complex C isolates suggests that the InlG protein is more relevant for the survival of L. monocytogenes in the environment.

  14. Three intragenic suppressors of a GTPase-deficient allele of GNAS associated with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turcic, Kyle; Tobar-Rubin, Raquel; Janevska, Daniela; Carroll, Julie; Din, Eraj; Alvarez, Rebecca; Haick, Jennifer; Pals-Rylaarsdam, Robin

    2014-06-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in heterotrimeric G-protein α subunits are associated with a variety of human diseases. McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is caused by mutations in GNAS, the gene encoding Gs. Alterations at Arg201 significantly reduce the GTPase activity of the protein, rendering it constitutively active. In this study, we have constructed a library of random mutations in a constitutively active yeast GPA1 gene carrying a mutation homologous to the McCune-Albright allele (Arg297His). Intragenic suppressors found at sites with homology to the human Gs protein were tested for their ability to suppress the constitutive activity of an Arg201His mutation in Gs. Three intragenic suppressors, at Phe142, Arg231, and Leu266, were able to suppress elevated basal cAMP responses caused by Arg201His when expressed in HEK293 cells. A range of amino acid substitutions was introduced at each of these sites to investigate the chemical requirements for intragenic suppression. The ability of Gs proteins carrying the suppressor mutations alone to mediate receptor-induced cAMP production was measured. These results offer potential sites on Gs that could serve as drug targets for MAS therapies.

  15. A study of allelic diversity underlying flowering-time adaptation in maize landraces.

    PubMed

    Romero Navarro, J Alberto; Willcox, Martha; Burgueño, Juan; Romay, Cinta; Swarts, Kelly; Trachsel, Samuel; Preciado, Ernesto; Terron, Arturo; Delgado, Humberto Vallejo; Vidal, Victor; Ortega, Alejandro; Banda, Armando Espinoza; Montiel, Noel Orlando Gómez; Ortiz-Monasterio, Ivan; Vicente, Félix San; Espinoza, Armando Guadarrama; Atlin, Gary; Wenzl, Peter; Hearne, Sarah; Buckler, Edward S

    2017-03-01

    Landraces (traditional varieties) of domesticated species preserve useful genetic variation, yet they remain untapped due to the genetic linkage between the few useful alleles and hundreds of undesirable alleles. We integrated two approaches to characterize the diversity of 4,471 maize landraces. First, we mapped genomic regions controlling latitudinal and altitudinal adaptation and identified 1,498 genes. Second, we used F-one association mapping (FOAM) to map the genes that control flowering time, across 22 environments, and identified 1,005 genes. In total, we found that 61.4% of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with altitude were also associated with flowering time. More than half of the SNPs associated with altitude were within large structural variants (inversions, centromeres and pericentromeric regions). The combined mapping results indicate that although floral regulatory network genes contribute substantially to field variation, over 90% of the contributing genes probably have indirect effects. Our dual strategy can be used to harness the landrace diversity of plants and animals.

  16. Molecular basis of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and emphysema associated with the alpha 1-antitrypsin Mmineral springs allele.

    PubMed Central

    Curiel, D T; Vogelmeier, C; Hubbard, R C; Stier, L E; Crystal, R G

    1990-01-01

    The Mmineral springs alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) allele, causing alpha 1AT deficiency and emphysema, is unique among the alpha 1AT-deficiency alleles in that it was observed in a black family, whereas most mutations causing alpha 1AT deficiency are confined to Caucasian populations of European descent. Immobilized pH gradient analysis of serum demonstrated that alpha 1AT Mmineral springs migrated cathodal to the normal M2 allele. Evaluation of Mmineral springs alpha 1AT as an inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, its natural substrate, demonstrated markedly lower than normal function. Characterization of the alpha 1AT Mmineral springs gene demonstrated that it differed from the common normal M1(Ala213) allele by a single-base substitution causing the amino acid substitution Gly-67 (GGG)----Glu-67 (GAG). Capitalizing on the fact that this mutation creates a polymorphism for the restriction endonuclease AvaII, family analysis demonstrated that the Mmineral springs alpha 1AT allele was transmitted in an autosomal-codominant fashion. Evaluation of genomic DNA showed that the index case was homozygous for the alpha 1AT Mmineral springs allele. Cytoplasmic blot analysis of blood monocytes of the Mmineral springs homozygote demonstrated levels of alpha 1AT mRNA transcripts comparable to those in cells of a normal M1 (Val213) homozygote control. Evaluation of in vitro translation of Mmineral springs alpha 1AT mRNA transcripts demonstrated a normal capacity to direct the translation of alpha 1AT. Evaluation of secretion of alpha 1AT by the blood monocytes by pulse-chase labeling with [35S]methionine, however, demonstrated less secretion by the Mmineral springs cells than normal cells. To characterize the posttranslational events causing the alpha 1AT-secretory defect associated with the alpha 1AT Mmineral springs gene, retroviral gene transfer was used to establish polyclonal populations of murine fibroblasts containing either a normal human M1 alpha 1AT cDNA or an Mmineral

  17. The A3 allele of the HLA-DQA1 locus is associated with susceptibility to type 1 diabetes in Japanese.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, J A; Fukui, Y; Kitagawa, T; Sasazuki, T

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of the frequencies of class II HLA-DR and HLA-DQ alleles by serological and DNA typing in 49 Japanese patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes and 31 Japanese controls indicates the following. (i) Susceptibility is more strongly associated with the HLA-DQ subregion than with the HLA-DR subregion. (ii) Of the class II alleles detected, the A3 allele of the DQA1 locus was the most strongly associated with disease. Ninety-six percent of the patients were positive for the A3 allele compared to 53% of the controls (P = 0.001; relative risk = 19.7; confidence limits = 3.72-188.64). (iii) The DQw8 allele of the DQB1 locus, which is associated with susceptibility to type 1 diabetes in Caucasians and Blacks, was not increased in frequency in Japanese patients (22%) versus controls (19%). (iv) Asp-57-encoding DQB1 alleles are associated with reduced susceptibility to type 1 diabetes in Caucasians. The major predisposing haplotypes in Japanese are DR4 and DR9. By DNA sequence analysis, both of these Japanese haplotypes have Asp-57-encoding DQB1 alleles. Oligonucleotide dot blot analysis showed that all, except 1, of the 49 Japanese patients and all of the 31 controls have at least one Asp-57-encoding DQB1 allele. In addition, 40% of the patients were homozygous for Asp-57-encoding DQB1 alleles versus 35% of the controls. The high frequencies of Asp-57-encoding DQB1 alleles in this ethnic group may account for the rarity of type 1 diabetes in Japan. PMID:2300572

  18. A pol I transcriptional body associated with VSG mono-allelic expression in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Navarro, M; Gull, K

    2001-12-13

    In the mammalian host, African trypanosomes generate consecutive waves of parasitaemia by changing their antigenic coat. Because this coat consists of a single type of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), the question arises of how a trypanosome accomplishes the transcription of only one of a multi-allelic family of VSG expression site loci to display a single VSG type on the surface at any one time. No major differences have been detected between the single active expression site and the cohort of inactive expression sites. Here we identify an extranucleolar body containing RNA polymerase I (pol I) that is transcriptionally active and present only in the bloodstream form of the parasite. Visualization of the active expression site locus by tagging with green fluorescent protein shows that it is specifically located at this unique pol I transcriptional factory. The presence of this transcriptional body in postmitotic nuclei and its stability in the nucleus after DNA digestion provide evidence for a coherent structure. We propose that the recruitment of a single expression site and the concomitant exclusion of inactive loci from a discrete transcriptional body define the mechanism responsible for VSG mono-allelic expression.

  19. Albinism and disease causing pathogens in Tanzania: are alleles that are associated with OCA2 being maintained by balancing selection?

    PubMed

    Tuli, Abbas M; Valenzuela, Robert K; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Brilliant, Murray H

    2012-12-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) is present at significantly higher frequencies in sub-Saharan African populations compared to populations in other regions of the world. In Tanzania and other sub-Saharan countries, most OCA2 is associated with a common 2.7kb deletion allele. Leprosy is also in high prevalence in sub-Saharan African populations. The infectious agent of leprosy, Mycobacterium leprae, contains a gene, 38L, that is similar to OCA2. Hypopigmented patches of skin are early symptoms that present with infection of leprosy. In consideration of both the genetic similarity of OCA2 and the 38L gene of M. leprae and the involvement of pigmentation in both disorders, we hypothesized that the high rates of OCA2 may be due to heterozygote advantage. Hence, we hypothesized that carriers of the 2.7kb deletion allele of OCA2 may provide a protective advantage from infection with leprosy. We tested this hypothesis by determining the carrier frequency of the 2.7kb deletion allele from a sample of 240 individuals with leprosy from Tanzania. The results were inconclusive due to the small sample size; however, they enabled us to rule out a large protective effect, but perhaps not a small advantage. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is another infectious organism prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa that contains a gene, arsenic-transport integral membrane protein that is also similar to OCA2. Interestingly, chromosomal region 15q11-13, which also contains OCA2, was reported to be linked to tuberculosis susceptibility. Although variants within OCA2 were tested for association, the 2.7kb deletion allele of OCA2 was not tested. This led us to hypothesize that the deletion allele may confer resistance to susceptibility. Confirmation of our hypothesis would enable development of novel pharmocogenetic therapies for the treatment of tuberculosis, which in turn, may enable development of drugs that target other pathogens that utilize a similar infection mechanism as M. tuberculosis

  20. Parent-of-origin specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zhao, Jing Hua; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J. Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coveillo, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D’adamo, Adamo Pio; Smith, George Davey; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco EJ; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul DP; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth JF; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild IA; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F

    2014-01-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality1. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation2,3, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P<5×10−8) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1/WDR25, MKRN3/MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signaling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition. PMID:25231870

  1. Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche.

    PubMed

    Perry, John R B; Day, Felix; Elks, Cathy E; Sulem, Patrick; Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Hua Zhao, Jing; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Davey Smith, George; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco E J; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth J F; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F; Stefansson, Kari; Murabito, Joanne M; Ong, Ken K

    2014-10-02

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1-WDR25, MKRN3-MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signalling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition.

  2. Methotrexate-induced mucositis in acute leukemia patients is not associated with the MTHFR 677T allele in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J; Coconi-Linares, Lucia Nancy; Garcés-Eisele, Javier; Reyes-Núñez, Virginia

    2007-10-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) has two common variants with reduced activity due to polymorphisms at nucleotides 677 and 1298. Both affect folate metabolism and thus remethylation of homocysteine, but are also thought to affect nucleotide synthesis and DNA methylation. Methotrexate (MTX), which interrupts folate metabolism, is used in the treatment of a variety of diseases including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but exerts in some patients toxic effects on fast dividing tissues such as mucosal epithelia. The enhanced toxicity may be due to cooperative effects between MTX and MTHFR variants. Accordingly, it has been reported that carrying the 677T allele of the MTHFR is a risk factor for MTX-associated mucositis. As in the Mexican population, which is characterized by a high prevalence of the 677T MTHFR variant, several of its commonly associated defects have not been observed, we investigated the relationship between MTX toxicity and the 677T allele. Out of 28 patients with ALL (CC: 2, CT: 10, TT: 16), 16 had episodes of MTX-associated mucositis (CC: 0, CT: 6, TT: 10). Neither at the gene level nor at the genotype level was a significant association with mucositis found. It may be postulated that the risk of higher MTX toxicity in patients with decreased MTHFR activity could be neutralized by the normally folate rich diet in Mexico.

  3. The MS Risk Allele of CD40 Is Associated with Reduced Cell-Membrane Bound Expression in Antigen Presenting Cells: Implications for Gene Function.

    PubMed

    Field, Judith; Shahijanian, Fernando; Schibeci, Stephen; Johnson, Laura; Gresle, Melissa; Laverick, Louise; Parnell, Grant; Stewart, Graeme; McKay, Fiona; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Butzkueven, Helmut; Booth, David

    2015-01-01

    Human genetic and animal studies have implicated the costimulatory molecule CD40 in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the cell specific gene and protein expression variation controlled by the CD40 genetic variant(s) associated with MS, i.e. the T-allele at rs1883832. Previously we had shown that the risk allele is expressed at a lower level in whole blood, especially in people with MS. Here, we have defined the immune cell subsets responsible for genotype and disease effects on CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein level. In cell subsets in which CD40 is most highly expressed, B lymphocytes and dendritic cells, the MS-associated risk variant is associated with reduced CD40 cell-surface protein expression. In monocytes and dendritic cells, the risk allele additionally reduces the ratio of expression of full-length versus truncated CD40 mRNA, the latter encoding secreted CD40. We additionally show that MS patients, regardless of genotype, express significantly lower levels of CD40 cell-surface protein compared to unaffected controls in B lymphocytes. Thus, both genotype-dependent and independent down-regulation of cell-surface CD40 is a feature of MS. Lower expression of a co-stimulator of T cell activation, CD40, is therefore associated with increased MS risk despite the same CD40 variant being associated with reduced risk of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Our results highlight the complexity and likely individuality of autoimmune pathogenesis, and could be consistent with antiviral and/or immunoregulatory functions of CD40 playing an important role in protection from MS.

  4. The MS Risk Allele of CD40 Is Associated with Reduced Cell-Membrane Bound Expression in Antigen Presenting Cells: Implications for Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Field, Judith; Shahijanian, Fernando; Schibeci, Stephen; Johnson, Laura; Gresle, Melissa; Laverick, Louise; Parnell, Grant; Stewart, Graeme; McKay, Fiona; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Butzkueven, Helmut; Booth, David

    2015-01-01

    Human genetic and animal studies have implicated the costimulatory molecule CD40 in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the cell specific gene and protein expression variation controlled by the CD40 genetic variant(s) associated with MS, i.e. the T-allele at rs1883832. Previously we had shown that the risk allele is expressed at a lower level in whole blood, especially in people with MS. Here, we have defined the immune cell subsets responsible for genotype and disease effects on CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein level. In cell subsets in which CD40 is most highly expressed, B lymphocytes and dendritic cells, the MS-associated risk variant is associated with reduced CD40 cell-surface protein expression. In monocytes and dendritic cells, the risk allele additionally reduces the ratio of expression of full-length versus truncated CD40 mRNA, the latter encoding secreted CD40. We additionally show that MS patients, regardless of genotype, express significantly lower levels of CD40 cell-surface protein compared to unaffected controls in B lymphocytes. Thus, both genotype-dependent and independent down-regulation of cell-surface CD40 is a feature of MS. Lower expression of a co-stimulator of T cell activation, CD40, is therefore associated with increased MS risk despite the same CD40 variant being associated with reduced risk of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Our results highlight the complexity and likely individuality of autoimmune pathogenesis, and could be consistent with antiviral and/or immunoregulatory functions of CD40 playing an important role in protection from MS. PMID:26068105

  5. Utilizing Murine Inducible Telomerase Alleles in the Studies of Tissue Degeneration/Regeneration and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shingu, Takashi; Jaskelioff, Mariela; Yuan, Liang; Ding, Zhihu; Protopopov, Alexei; Kost-Alimova, Maria; Hu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction-induced loss of genome integrity and its associated DNA damage signaling and checkpoint responses are well-established drivers that cause tissue degeneration during ageing. Cancer, with incidence rates greatly increasing with age, is characterized by short telomere lengths and high telomerase activity. To study the roles of telomere dysfunction and telomerase reactivation in ageing and cancer, the protocol shows how to generate two murine inducible telomerase knock-in alleles 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT)-inducible TERT-Estrogen Receptor (mTERT-ER) and Lox-Stopper-LoxTERT (LSL-mTERT). The protocol describes the procedures to induce telomere dysfunction and reactivate telomerase activity in mTERT-ER and LSL-mTERT mice in vivo. The representative data show that reactivation of telomerase activity can ameliorate the tissue degenerative phenotypes induced by telomere dysfunction. In order to determine the impact of telomerase reactivation on tumorigenesis, we generated prostate tumor model G4 PB-Cre4 PtenL/L p53L/L LSL-mTERTL/L and thymic T-cell lymphoma model G4 Atm-/- mTERTER/ER. The representative data show that telomerase reactivation in the backdrop of genomic instability induced by telomere dysfunction can greatly enhance tumorigenesis. The protocol also describes the procedures used to isolate neural stem cells (NSCs) from mTERT-ER and LSL-mTERT mice and reactivate telomerase activity in NSCs in vitro. The representative data show that reactivation of telomerase can enhance the self-renewal capability and neurogenesis in vitro. Finally, the protocol describes the procedures for performing telomere FISH (Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization) on both mouse FFPE (Formalin Fixed and Paraffin Embedded) brain tissues and metaphase chromosomes of cultured cells. PMID:25938254

  6. The Minor Allele of rs7574865 in the STAT4 Gene Is Associated with Increased mRNA and Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lamana, Amalia; López-Santalla, Mercedes; Castillo-González, Raquel; Ortiz, Ana María; Martín, Javier; García-Vicuña, Rosario; González-Álvaro, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 confers risk of developing autoimmune disorders. However, its functional significance remains unclear. Here we analyze how rs7574865 affects the transcription of STAT4 and its protein expression. Methods We studied 201 patients (80% female; median age, 54 years; median disease duration, 5.4 months) from PEARL study. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic data were collected at each visit. IL-6 serum levels were measured by enzyme immune assay. The rs7574865 was genotyped using TaqMan probes. The expression levels of STAT4 mRNA were determined at 182 visits from 69 patients using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. STAT4 protein was assessed by western blot in 62 samples from 34 patients. To determine the effect of different variables on the expression of STAT4 mRNA and protein, we performed multivariate longitudinal analyses using generalized linear models. Results After adjustment for age, disease activity and glucocorticoid dose as confounders, the presence of at least one copy of the T allele of rs7574865 was significantly associated with higher levels of STAT4 mRNA. Similarly, TT patients showed significantly higher levels of STAT4 protein than GG patients. IL-6 induced STAT4 and STAT5 phosphorylation in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Patients carrying at least one T allele of rs7574865 displayed lower levels of serum IL-6 compared to GG homozygous; by contrast the production of C-reactive protein was similar in both populations. Conclusion Our data suggest that the presence of the rs7574865 T allele enhances STAT4 mRNA transcription and protein expression. It may enhance the signaling of molecules depending on the STAT4 pathway. PMID:26569609

  7. A single nomenclature and associated database for alleles at the MHC class II DRB1 locus of sheep: IPD-MHC-OLA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of standardised nomenclatures with associated databases containing reference sequences for alleles at polymorphic loci within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) has been facilitated by the development of the Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD-MHC). Recently, included within I...

  8. Transcriptome and allele specificity associated with a 3BL locus for Fusarium crown rot resistance in bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Stiller, Jiri; Zhao, Qiang; Feng, Qi; Cavanagh, Colin; Wang, Penghao; Gardiner, Donald; Choulet, Frédéric; Feuillet, Catherine; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yuming; Yan, Guijun; Han, Bin; Manners, John M; Liu, Chunji

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium pathogens cause two major diseases in cereals, Fusarium crown rot (FCR) and head blight (FHB). A large-effect locus conferring resistance to FCR disease was previously located to chromosome arm 3BL (designated as Qcrs-3B) and several independent sets of near isogenic lines (NILs) have been developed for this locus. In this study, five sets of the NILs were used to examine transcriptional changes associated with the Qcrs-3B locus and to identify genes linked to the resistance locus as a step towards the isolation of the causative gene(s). Of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) detected between the NILs, 12.7% was located on the single chromosome 3B. Of the expressed genes containing SNP (SNP-EGs) detected, 23.5% was mapped to this chromosome. Several of the DEGs and SNP-EGs are known to be involved in host-pathogen interactions, and a large number of the DEGs were among those detected for FHB in previous studies. Of the DEGs detected, 22 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and they included eight which were detected in the resistant isolines only. The enrichment of DEG, and not necessarily those containing SNPs between the resistant and susceptible isolines, around the Qcrs-3B locus is suggestive of local regulation of this region by the resistance allele. Functions for 13 of these DEGs are known. Of the SNP-EGs, 28 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and biological functions for 16 of them are known. These results provide insights into responses regulated by the 3BL locus and identify a tractable number of target genes for fine mapping and functional testing to identify the causative gene(s) at this QTL.

  9. The ADA*2 allele of the adenosine deaminase gene (20q13.11) and recurrent spontaneous abortions: an age-dependent association

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Daniela Prudente Teixeira; Spegiorin, Lígia Cosentino Junqueira Franco; de Mattos, Cinara Cássia Brandão; Oliani, Antonio Helio; Vaz-Oliani, Denise Cristina Mós; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adenosine deaminase acts on adenosine and deoxyadenosine metabolism and modulates the immune response. The adenosine deaminase G22A polymorphism (20q.11.33) influences the level of adenosine deaminase enzyme expression, which seems to play a key role in maintaining pregnancy. The adenosine deaminase 2 phenotype has been associated with a protective effect against recurrent spontaneous abortions in European Caucasian women. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the G22A polymorphism of the adenosine deaminase gene is associated with recurrent spontaneous abortions in Brazilian women. METHODS: A total of 311 women were recruited to form two groups: G1, with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortions (N = 129), and G2, without a history of abortions (N = 182). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood with a commercial kit and PCR-RFLP analysis was used to identify the G22A genetic polymorphism. Fisher's exact test and odds ratio values were used to compare the proportions of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between women with and without a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion (p<0.05). The differences between mean values for categorical data were calculated using unpaired t tests. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was assessed with a chi-square test. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were identified for the frequencies of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between the G1 and G2 groups when adjusted for maternal age. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the adenosine deaminase *2 allele is associated with a low risk for recurrent spontaneous abortions, but this association is dependent on older age. PMID:22086524

  10. Novel Allelic Variants in the Canine Cyclooxgenase-2 (Cox-2) Promoter Are Associated with Renal Dysplasia in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, Mary H.; Bell, Jerold S.; Rothman, Debby A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal dysplasia (RD) in dogs is a complex disease with a highly variable phenotype and mode of inheritance that does not follow a simple Mendelian pattern. Cox-2 (Cyclooxgenase-2) deficient mice have renal abnormalities and a pathology that has striking similarities to RD in dogs suggesting to us that mutations in the Cox-2 gene could be the cause of RD in dogs. Our data supports this hypothesis. Sequencing of the canine Cox-2 gene was done from clinically affected and normal dogs. Although no changes were detected in the Cox-2 coding region, small insertions and deletions of GC boxes just upstream of the ATG translation start site were found. These sequences are putative SP1 transcription factor binding sites that may represent important cis-acting DNA regulatory elements that govern the expression of Cox-2. A pedigree study of a family of Lhasa apsos revealed an important statistical correlation of these mutant alleles with the disease. We examined an additional 22 clinical cases from various breeds. Regardless of the breed or severity of disease, all of these had one or two copies of the Cox-2 allelic variants. We suggest that the unusual inheritance pattern of RD is due to these alleles, either by changing the pattern of expression of Cox-2 or making Cox-2 levels susceptible to influences of other genes or environmental factors that play an unknown but important role in the development of RD in dogs. PMID:21346820

  11. Preferential Binding to Elk-1 by SLE-Associated IL10 Risk Allele Upregulates IL10 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Jennifer A.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Harley, John B.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Alarcόn-Riquelme, Marta E.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Sivils, Kathy Moser; James, Judith A.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Merrill, Joan T.; Scofield, R. Hal; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Stevens, Anne M.; Boackle, Susan A.; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jiyoung; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Freedman, Barry I.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Martin, Javier; Yu, C. Yung; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Langefeld, Carl D.; Chen, Weiling; Grossman, Jennifer M.; Cantor, Rita M.; Hahn, Bevra H.; Tsao, Betty P.

    2013-01-01

    Immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) is elevated in sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlating with disease activity. The established association of IL10 with SLE and other autoimmune diseases led us to fine map causal variant(s) and to explore underlying mechanisms. We assessed 19 tag SNPs, covering the IL10 gene cluster including IL19, IL20 and IL24, for association with SLE in 15,533 case and control subjects from four ancestries. The previously reported IL10 variant, rs3024505 located at 1 kb downstream of IL10, exhibited the strongest association signal and was confirmed for association with SLE in European American (EA) (P = 2.7×10−8, OR = 1.30), but not in non-EA ancestries. SNP imputation conducted in EA dataset identified three additional SLE-associated SNPs tagged by rs3024505 (rs3122605, rs3024493 and rs3024495 located at 9.2 kb upstream, intron 3 and 4 of IL10, respectively), and SLE-risk alleles of these SNPs were dose-dependently associated with elevated levels of IL10 mRNA in PBMCs and circulating IL-10 protein in SLE patients and controls. Using nuclear extracts of peripheral blood cells from SLE patients for electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified specific binding of transcription factor Elk-1 to oligodeoxynucleotides containing the risk (G) allele of rs3122605, suggesting rs3122605 as the most likely causal variant regulating IL10 expression. Elk-1 is known to be activated by phosphorylation and nuclear localization to induce transcription. Of interest, phosphorylated Elk-1 (p-Elk-1) detected only in nuclear extracts of SLE PBMCs appeared to increase with disease activity. Co-expression levels of p-Elk-1 and IL-10 were elevated in SLE T, B cells and monocytes, associated with increased disease activity in SLE B cells, and were best downregulated by ERK inhibitor. Taken together, our data suggest that preferential binding of activated Elk-1 to the IL10 rs3122605-G allele upregulates IL

  12. Preferential binding to Elk-1 by SLE-associated IL10 risk allele upregulates IL10 expression.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Daisuke; Zhao, Jian; Deng, Yun; Kelly, Jennifer A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Harley, John B; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Alarcόn-Riquelme, Marta E; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Alarcón, Graciela S; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Vyse, Timothy J; Jacob, Chaim O; Gaffney, Patrick M; Sivils, Kathy Moser; James, Judith A; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Niewold, Timothy B; Merrill, Joan T; Scofield, R Hal; Criswell, Lindsey A; Stevens, Anne M; Boackle, Susan A; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jiyoung; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Freedman, Barry I; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Martin, Javier; Yu, C Yung; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Langefeld, Carl D; Chen, Weiling; Grossman, Jennifer M; Cantor, Rita M; Hahn, Bevra H; Tsao, Betty P

    2013-01-01

    Immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) is elevated in sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlating with disease activity. The established association of IL10 with SLE and other autoimmune diseases led us to fine map causal variant(s) and to explore underlying mechanisms. We assessed 19 tag SNPs, covering the IL10 gene cluster including IL19, IL20 and IL24, for association with SLE in 15,533 case and control subjects from four ancestries. The previously reported IL10 variant, rs3024505 located at 1 kb downstream of IL10, exhibited the strongest association signal and was confirmed for association with SLE in European American (EA) (P = 2.7×10⁻⁸, OR = 1.30), but not in non-EA ancestries. SNP imputation conducted in EA dataset identified three additional SLE-associated SNPs tagged by rs3024505 (rs3122605, rs3024493 and rs3024495 located at 9.2 kb upstream, intron 3 and 4 of IL10, respectively), and SLE-risk alleles of these SNPs were dose-dependently associated with elevated levels of IL10 mRNA in PBMCs and circulating IL-10 protein in SLE patients and controls. Using nuclear extracts of peripheral blood cells from SLE patients for electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified specific binding of transcription factor Elk-1 to oligodeoxynucleotides containing the risk (G) allele of rs3122605, suggesting rs3122605 as the most likely causal variant regulating IL10 expression. Elk-1 is known to be activated by phosphorylation and nuclear localization to induce transcription. Of interest, phosphorylated Elk-1 (p-Elk-1) detected only in nuclear extracts of SLE PBMCs appeared to increase with disease activity. Co-expression levels of p-Elk-1 and IL-10 were elevated in SLE T, B cells and monocytes, associated with increased disease activity in SLE B cells, and were best downregulated by ERK inhibitor. Taken together, our data suggest that preferential binding of activated Elk-1 to the IL10 rs3122605-G allele upregulates

  13. Dual matrilineal geographic distribution of Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus-associated -11,377 G adiponectin allele.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jee-Hye; Min, Na Young; Park, Sang Kil; Gavaachimed, Lkhagvasuren; Ko, Young Jong; Han, Sung Hoon; Kim, Kyung Yong; Kim, Kijung; Lee, Kwang Ho; Park, Ae Ja

    2014-12-01

    The present study was performed to identify the susceptible single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for the prediction of Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to clarify the matrilineal origin of Korean T2DM‑specific SNPs. Fourteen SNPs from the adiponectin (ADIPOQ), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 and glucokinase genes in the Korean population were analyzed. Only one SNP, ‑11,377 C/G on the ADIPOQ gene, was finally determined to be responsible for the incidence of Korean T2DM (P=0.028). The G‑T‑T‑A haplotype at positions ‑11,377, +45, +276 and +349 on the ADIPOQ gene was also associated with a high incidence of Korean T2DM (P=0.023). In addition, the susceptibility of Korean individuals to T2DM appears to be affected by their matrilineal origin. Of note, the group of Southern origin, consisting of mitochondrial DNA macrohaplogroups F and R, was predisposed to T2DM, whereas the group of Northern origin, consisting of haplogroups A and Y, was resistant to T2DM. This implied that the differential genetics between the two groups, which were formed from the initial peopling of the proto‑Korean population via Southern and Northern routes to the present time, may explain their differing susceptibility to T2DM. In conclusion, from Southern Asia Northward, a matrilineal origin of Korean individuals appears to be responsible for the prevalence of Korean T2DM caused by the ‑11,377 G allele.

  14. Allelic variation in PtoPsbW associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties in Populus tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Longxin; Wang, Bowen; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Tian, Jiaxing; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Deqiang

    2017-02-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the most important reactions on earth. PsbW, a nuclear-encoded subunit of photosystem II (PSII), stabilizes PSII structure and plays an important role in photosynthesis. Here, we used candidate gene-based linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping to detect significant associations between allelic variations of PtoPsbW and traits related to photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties in Populus tomentosa. PtoPsbW showed the highest expression in leaves and it increased during the development of these leaves, suggesting that PtoPsbW may play an important role in plant growth and development. Analysis of nucleotide diversity and LD revealed that PtoPsbW has low single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity (π tot = 0.0048 and θ w = 0.0050) and relatively low average value of LD (0.1500), indicating that PtoPsbW is conserved due to its indispensable function. Using single-SNP associations in an association population of 435 individuals, we identified five significant associations at the threshold of P ≤ 0.05, explaining 3.28-15.98 % of the phenotypic variation. Haplotype-based association analyses indicated that 13 haplotypes (P ≤ 0.05) from six blocks were associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties. Our work shows that identifying allelic variation and LD can help to decipher the genetic basis of photosynthesis and could potentially be applied for molecular marker-assisted selection in Populus.

  15. Characterization of Sucrose transporter alleles and their association with seed yield-related traits in Brassica napus L

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sucrose is the primary photosynthesis product and the principal translocating form within higher plants. Sucrose transporters (SUC/SUT) play a critical role in phloem loading and unloading. Photoassimilate transport is a major limiting factor for seed yield. Our previous research demonstrated that SUT co-localizes with yield-related quantitative trait loci. This paper reports the isolation of BnA7.SUT1 alleles and their promoters and their association with yield-related traits. Results Two novel BnA7.SUT1 genes were isolated from B. napus lines 'Eagle' and 'S-1300' and designated as BnA7.SUT1.a and BnA7.SUT1.b, respectively. The BnA7.SUT1 protein exhibited typical SUT features and showed high amino acid homology with related species. Promoters of BnA7.SUT1.a and BnA7.SUT1.b were also isolated and classified as pBnA7.SUT1.a and pBnA7.SUT1.b, respectively. Four dominant sequence-characterized amplified region markers were developed to distinguish BnA7.SUT1.a and BnA7.SUT1.b. The two genes were estimated as alleles with two segregating populations (F2 and BC1) obtained by crossing '3715'×'3769'. BnA7.SUT1 was mapped to the A7 linkage group of the TN doubled haploid population. In silico analysis of 55 segmental BnA7.SUT1 alleles resulted three BnA7.SUT1 clusters: pBnA7.SUT1.a- BnA7.SUT1.a (type I), pBnA7.SUT1.b- BnA7.SUT1.a (type II), and pBnA7.SUT1.b- BnA7.SUT1.b (type III). Association analysis with a diverse panel of 55 rapeseed lines identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in promoter and coding domain sequences of BnA7.SUT1 that were significantly associated with one of three yield-related traits: number of effective first branches (EFB), siliques per plant (SP), and seed weight (n = 1000) (TSW) across all four environments examined. SNPs at other BnA7.SUT1 sites were also significantly associated with at least one of six yield-related traits: EFB, SP, number of seeds per silique, seed yield per plant, block yield, and TSW. Expression levels

  16. Allele variations in the OCA2 gene (pink-eyed-dilution locus) are associated with genetic susceptibility to melanoma.

    PubMed

    Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Meziani, Roubila; Bertrand, Guylene; Gérard, Benedicte; Descamps, Vincent; Archimbaud, Alain; Picard, Catherine; Ollivaud, Laurence; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Kerob, Delphine; Lanternier, Guy; Lebbe, Celeste; Saiag, P; Crickx, Beatrice; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Grandchamp, Bernard; Soufir, Nadem; Melan-Cohort

    2005-08-01

    The occuloalbinism 2 (OCA2) gene, localized at 15q11, encodes a melanosomal transmembrane protein that is involved in the most common form of human occulo-cutaneous albinism, a human genetic disorder characterized by fair pigmentation and susceptibility to skin cancer. We wondered whether allele variations at this locus could influence susceptibility to malignant melanoma (MM). In all, 10 intragenic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 113 patients with melanomas and in 105 Caucasian control subjects with no personal or family history of skin cancer. By comparing allelic distribution between cases and controls, we show that MM and OCA2 are associated (p value=0.030 after correction for multiple testing). Then, a recently developed strategy, the 'combination test' enabled us to show that a combination formed by two SNPs was most strongly associated to MM, suggesting a possible interaction between intragenic SNPs. In addition, the role of OCA2 on MM risk was also detected using a logistic model taking into account the presence of variants of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R, a key pigmentation gene) and all pigmentation characteristics as melanoma risk factors. Our data demonstrate that a second pigmentation gene, in addition to MC1R, is involved in genetic susceptibility to melanoma.

  17. Mixtec Mexican Amerindians: an HLA alleles study for America peopling, pharmacogenomics and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Areces, Cristina; Enríquez-de-Salamanca, Mercedes; Abd-El-Fatah-Khalil, Sedeka; Fernández-Honrado, Mercedes; Marco, Javier; Martín-Villa, José Manuel; Rey, Diego

    2014-01-01

    HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 alleles have been studied in a Mixtec Mexican Amerindian population by indirect DNA sequencing. HLA relatedness has been tested by comparing results with other Amerindians and worldwide populations; a total of 15,681 chromosomes have been used. Genetic distances between populations, Neighbour Joining (NJ) dendrograms and correspondence analyses have been carried out. Conclusions are: 1) Our Mixtec sample from Oaxaca Coastal Mexican area shows an HLA profile different to that of Oaxaca Central Mountains area showing that genes and languages do not correlate which is inferred both by plane genetic distances and NJ dendrograms and correspondence analyses. 2) Genetic distances and NJ dendrograms join together Mazatecan Mexican Amerindians with our studied Coastal Mixtec group; it fits with the historical relationship between Mixtec and Mazatecans. 3) A*24:02-B*35:14-DRB1*04:11, A*02:01-B*15:15-DRB1*04:11 and A*68:03-B*39:08-DRB1*08:02 extended HLA haplotypes have been "de novo" found in our Mixtec Coastal sample. 4) Shared HLA alleles are found between our Pacific Coast Mixtec Amerindians and Pacific Islanders. 5) These results are useful for establishing a future area transplantation waiting list, for the study of HLA linked diseases epidemiology and for pharmacogenomics in certain drug therapy.

  18. A leucine-to-proline substitution causes a defective [alpha]-antichymotrypsin allele associated with familial obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Poller, W.; Scholz, S.; Fischer, M. ); Faber, J.P.; Tief, K.; Olek, K.; Kirchgesser, M. ); Weidinger, S. ); Heidtmann, H.H. )

    1993-09-01

    Using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and direct sequencing of amplified genomic DNA, the authors have identified two defective mutants of the human [alpha][sub 1]-antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A leucine 55-to-proline substitution causing a defective ACT allele (Bochum-1) was observed in a family with COPD in three subsequent generations. Another mutation, proline 229-to-alanine (Bonn-1), was associated with ACT serum deficiency in four patients with a positive family history. These mutations were not detected among 100 healthy control subjects, suggesting a possible pathogenetic role of ACT gene defects in a subset of patients with COPD. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Cancer of the ampulla of Vater: chromosome 17p allelic loss is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, A; Di, P; Talamini, G; Falconi, M; Lemoine, N; Iacono, C; Achille, A; Baron, A; Zamboni, G

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Cancer of the ampulla of Vater kills 60% of affected patients. Local spread of the tumour (T stage) is the only reliable prognostic factor. Nevertheless, any cancer stage includes long term survivors and patients dying from the disease. The molecular anomalies involved in this process have the potential to serve as additional prognostic markers.
AIM—To evaluate if allelic losses (LOH) of chromosomes 17p and 18q may be of prognostic value in multivariate survival analysis.
METHODS—We examined 53 ampullary cancers for chromosome 17p and 18q LOH using microsatellite markers and DNA from paraffin embedded tumours. All patients were treated by surgery alone (pancreaticoduodenectomy). Multivariate survival analysis included age, sex, tumour size, macroscopic appearance, grade of differentiation, T stage, lymph node metastasis, and chromosome 17p and 18q status.
RESULTS—Chromosome 17p and 18q LOH were detected in 28 (53%) and 18 (34%) cancers, respectively. Multivariate survival analysis indicated chromosome 17p status as an independent prognostic factor together with T stage. The five year survival for chromosome 17p retention and 17p loss was 80% and 7%, respectively. The risk of death from cancer within the five year follow up period for patients with cancers harbouring chromosome 17p LOH was 11 times higher than that of patients with cancers retaining chromosome 17p (p<0.0001), regardless of the tumour stage at diagnosis.
CONCLUSIONS—Chromosome 17p status is an independent prognostic factor among ampullary cancers at the same stage. The combined use of T stage and chromosome 17p status may help in deciding whether ampullary cancer patients require additional therapy other than surgery alone.


Keywords: ampulla of Vater; cancer; loss of heterozygosity; microsatellites; allelotyping; microsatellite instability PMID:10807898

  20. Allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation studies show genetic influence on chromatin state in human genome.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Mitsutaka; Yang, Howard H; Hu, Nan; Wang, Chaoyu; Hu, Ying; Taylor, Philip R; Buetow, Kenneth H; Lee, Maxwell P

    2007-05-18

    Several recent studies have shown a genetic influence on gene expression variation, including variation between the two chromosomes within an individual and variation between individuals at the population level. We hypothesized that genetic inheritance may also affect variation in chromatin states. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed chromatin states in 12 lymphoblastoid cells derived from two Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain families using an allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-on-chip) assay with Affymetrix 10K SNP chip. We performed the allele-specific ChIP-on-chip assays for the 12 lymphoblastoid cells using antibodies targeting at RNA polymerase II and five post-translation modified forms of the histone H3 protein. The use of multiple cell lines from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain families allowed us to evaluate variation of chromatin states across pedigrees. These studies demonstrated that chromatin state clustered by family. Our results support the idea that genetic inheritance can determine the epigenetic state of the chromatin as shown previously in model organisms. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration in humans that genetics may be an important factor that influences global chromatin state mediated by histone modification, the hallmark of the epigenetic phenomena.

  1. T-cell receptor V alpha and C alpha alleles associated with multiple and myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Oksenberg, J R; Sherritt, M; Begovich, A B; Erlich, H A; Bernard, C C; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Steinman, L

    1989-01-01

    Polymorphic markers in genes encoding that alpha chain of the human T-cell receptor (TcR) have been detected by Southern blot analysis in Pss I digests. Polymorphic bands were observed at 6.3 and 2.0 kilobases (kb) with frequencies of 0.30 and 0.44, respectively, in the general population. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, we amplified selected sequences derived from the full-length TcR alpha cDNA probe. These PCR products were used as specific probes to demonstrate that the 6.3-kb polymorphic fragment hybridizes to the variable (V)-region probe and the 2.0-kb fragment hybridizes to the constant (C)-region probe. Segregation of the polymorphic bands was analyzed in family studies. To look for associations between these markers and autoimmune diseases, we have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism distribution of the Pss I markers in patients with multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and Graves disease. Significant differences in the frequency of the polymorphic V alpha and C alpha markers were identified between patients and healthy individuals. Images PMID:2915992

  2. A viable Arabidopsis pex13 missense allele confers severe peroxisomal defects and decreases PEX5 association with peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Andrew W.; Fleming, Wendell A.; Burkhart, Sarah E.; Ratzel, Sarah E.; Bjornson, Marta; Bartel, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes are organelles that catabolize fatty acids and compartmentalize other oxidative metabolic processes in eukaryotes. Using a forward-genetic screen designed to recover severe peroxisome-defective mutants, we isolated a viable allele of the peroxisome biogenesis gene PEX13 with striking peroxisomal defects. The pex13-4 mutant requires an exogenous source of fixed carbon for pre-photosynthetic development and is resistant to the protoauxin indole-3-butyric acid. Delivery of peroxisome-targeted matrix proteins depends on the PEX5 receptor docking with PEX13 at the peroxisomal membrane, and we found severely reduced import of matrix proteins and less organelle-associated PEX5 in pex13-4 seedlings. Moreover, pex13-4 physiological and molecular defects were partially ameliorated when PEX5 was overexpressed, suggesting that PEX5 docking is partially compromised in this mutant and can be improved by increasing PEX5 levels. Because previously described Arabidopsis pex13 alleles either are lethal or confer only subtle defects, the pex13-4 mutant provides valuable insight into plant peroxisome receptor docking and matrix protein import. PMID:25008153

  3. Allele-specific PCR for detecting the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Liu, Qi; Li, Mei-Ya; Huang, Shui-Xian; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2016-10-10

    Mutations in mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1) are the important causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Of these mutations, the homoplasmic m.1555A>G or m.1494C>T mutation in the highly conserved A-site of MT-RNR1 gene has been found to be associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss in many families worldwide. Since the m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations are sensitive to ototoxic drugs, therefore, screening for the presence of these mutations is important for early diagnosis and prevention of deafness. For this purpose, we recently developed a novel allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) which is able to simultaneously detect these mutations. To assess its accuracy, in this study, we employed this method to screen the frequency of m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations in 200 deafness patients and 120 healthy subjects. Consequently, four m.1555A>G and four m.1494C>T mutations were identified; among these, only one patient with the m.1494C>T mutation had an obvious family history of hearing loss. Strikingly, clinical evaluation showed that this family exhibited a high penetrance of hearing loss. In particular, the penetrances of hearing loss were 80% with the aminoglycoside included and 20% when excluded. PCR-Sanger sequencing of the mitochondrial genomes confirmed the presence of the m.1494C>T mutation and identified a set of polymorphisms belonging to mitochondrial haplogroup A. However, the lack of functional variants in mitochondrial and nuclear modified genes (GJB2 and TRMU) in this family indicated that mitochondrial haplogroup and nuclear genes may not play important roles in the phenotypic expression of the m.1494C>T mutation. Thus, other modification factors, such as environmental factor, aminoglycosides or epigenetic modification may have contributed to the high penetrance of hearing loss in this family. Taken together, our data showed that this assay is an effective approach that could be used for detection the deafness-associated MT-RNR1

  4. GABRA2 alcohol dependence risk allele is associated with reduced expression of chromosome 4p12 GABAA subunit genes in human neural cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Richard; Kranzler, Henry R.; Joshi, Pujan; Shin, Dong-Guk; Covault, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic variation in a region of chromosome 4p12 that includes the GABAA-subunit gene GABRA2 has been reproducibly associated with alcohol dependence (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the association are unknown. This study examined correlates of in vitro gene expression of the AD-associated GABRA2 rs279858*C-allele in human neural cells using an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) model system. Methods We examined mRNA expression of chromosome 4p12 GABAA subunit genes (GABRG1, GABRA2, GABRA4, and GABRB1 in 36 human neural cell lines differentiated from iPSCs using quantitative PCR and Next Generation RNA Sequencing. mRNA expression in adult human brain was examined using the BrainCloud and Braineac datasets. Results We found significantly lower levels of GABRA2 mRNA in neural cell cultures derived from rs279858*C-allele carriers. Levels of GABRA2 RNA were correlated with those of the other three chromosome 4p12 GABAA genes, but not other neural genes. Cluster analysis based on the relative RNA levels of the four chromosome 4p12 GABAA genes identified two distinct clusters of cell lines, a low-expression cluster associated with rs279858*C-allele carriers and a high-expression cluster enriched for the rs279858*T/T genotype. In contrast, there was no association of genotype with chromosome 4p12 GABAA gene expression in post-mortem adult cortex in either the BrainCloud or Braineac datasets. Conclusions AD-associated variation in GABRA2 is associated with differential expression of the entire cluster of GABAA subunit genes on chromosome 4p12 in human iPSC-derived neural cell cultures. The absence of a parallel effect in post-mortem human adult brain samples suggests that AD-associated genotype effects on GABAA expression, although not present in mature cortex, could have effects on regulation of the chromosome 4p12 GABAA cluster during neural development. PMID:26250693

  5. HLA-B*51 allele analysis by the PCR-SBT method and a strong association of HLA-B*5101 with Japanese patients with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Mizuki, N; Ota, M; Katsuyama, Y; Yabuki, K; Ando, H; Shiina, T; Nomura, E; Onari, K; Ohno, S; Inoko, H

    2001-09-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is known to be associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B51 in many different ethnic groups. An increased incidence of HLA-B51 in the patient group has also been reported in a Japanese population. Recently, the B51 antigen has been identified to comprise 21 alleles, B*5101-B*5121. Further, not only HLA-B*5101 but also HLA-B*5108 were found to be relatively increased in the patient groups among Italian and Saudi Arabian populations. Therefore, we performed HLA-B*51 allele genotyping by the polymerase chain reaction-sequencing based typing (PCR-SBT) method in order to investigate whether there is any correlation of one particular B51-associated allele with Japanese BD. Ninety-six Japanese patients with BD and 132 healthy Japanese volunteers were enrolled in this study. As a result, the phenotype frequency of the B51 antigen was confirmed to be remarkably increased in the patient group as compared to the ethnically matched control group (59.4% in patients vs. 13.6% in controls; Pc=0.0000000000098, R.R.=9.3). In the B*51 allele genotyping, 56 out of 57 B51-positive patients were defined as B*5101 and the remaining one was B*5102. In contrast, all of 18 B51-positive normal controls were B*5101. None of the Japanese patients and healthy controls carried the HLA-B*5108 allele. This study revealed that B*51 allelic distribution in Japanese was different from those in Italian and Saudi Arabian populations, and that the significantly high incidence of the HLA-B51 antigen in the Japanese BD patient group was mostly caused by the significant increase of the HLA-B*5101 allele.

  6. KRAS mutant allele-specific imbalance is associated with worse prognosis in pancreatic cancer and progression to undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Moser, A James; Saka, Burcu; Adsay, N Volkan; Chiosea, Simion I

    2013-10-01

    KRAS codon 12 mutations are present in about 90% of ductal adenocarcinomas and in undifferentiated carcinomas of the pancreas. The role of KRAS copy number changes and resulting KRAS mutant allele-specific imbalance (MASI) in ductal adenocarcinoma (n=94), and its progression into undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas (n=25) was studied by direct sequencing and KRAS fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Semi-quantitative evaluation of sequencing electropherograms showed KRAS MASI (ie, mutant allele peak higher than or equal to the wild-type allele peak) in 22 (18.4%) cases. KRAS FISH (performed on 45 cases) revealed a trend for more frequent KRAS amplification among cases with KRAS MASI (7/20, 35% vs 3/25, 12%, P=0.08). KRAS amplification by FISH was seen only in undifferentiated carcinomas (10/24, 42% vs 0/21 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, 0%, P=0.0007). In 6 of 11 cases with both undifferentiated and well-differentiated components, transition to undifferentiated carcinoma was associated with an increase in KRAS copy number, due to amplification and/or chromosome 12 hyperploidy. Pancreatic carcinomas with KRAS MASI (compared to those without MASI) were predominantly undifferentiated (16/22, 73% vs 9/97, 9%, P<0.001), more likely to present at clinical stage IV (5/22, 23% vs 7/97, 7%, P=0.009), and were associated with shorter overall survival (9 months, 95% confidence interval, 5-13, vs 22 months, 95% confidence interval, 17-27; P=0.015) and shorter disease-free survival (5 months, 95% confidence interval, 2-8 vs 13 months, 95% confidence interval, 10-16; P=0.02). Our findings suggest that in a subset of ductal adenocarcinomas, KRAS MASI correlates with the progression to undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas.

  7. Association between HLA-Class I and HLA-Class II Alleles and Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection in Iraqi Patients from Baghdad City

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Nidhal Abdulmohaimen; Qassem, Haitham; Hassen, Farouk

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (PT) is one of the endemic diseases in Iraq, and among the suggested predisposing factors are alleles of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system. We sought to investigate the association between HLA-class I (A and B) and -class II (DR and DQ) alleles in a sample of PT Iraqi patients. Methods: lymphocytes of 105 PT patients and 40 controls were phenotyped for HLA-A, -B, -DR, and -DQ alleles by means of the microlymphocytotoxicity test using a panel of monoclonal antisera. Results: HLA frequencies of B18 (16.2 vs. 2.5%; OD=7.53) and DR1 (51.4 vs. 10.0%; OD=9.53) alleles were significantly increased in the patients as compared with the controls, while B5 (6.7 vs. 25.0%), DR8 (1.9 vs. 17.5%), and DQ3 (11.4 vs. 45.0%) alleles were significantly decreased. However, a significant corrected level was maintained for only DR1, DR8, and DQ3 alleles (Pc=1.9×10-5, 0.02 and 1.0×10-4, respectively). Conclusion: The results confirm the predisposing and protecting roles of HLA alleles in PT. PMID:24753642

  8. FMR1 alleles in Tasmania: a screening study of the special educational needs population.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R J; Holden, J J A; Zhang, C; Curlis, Y; Slater, H R; Burgess, T; Kirkby, K C; Carmichael, A; Heading, K D; Loesch, D Z

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of fragile X mental retardation-1 (FMR1) allele categories, classified by the number of CGG repeats, in the population of Tasmania was investigated in 1253 males with special educational needs (SEN). The frequencies of these FMR1 categories were compared with those seen in controls as represented by 578 consecutive male births. The initial screening was based on polymerase chain reaction analysis of dried blood spots. Inconclusive results were verified by Southern analysis of a venous blood sample. The frequencies of common FMR1 alleles in both samples, and of grey zone alleles in the controls, were similar to those in other Caucasian populations. Consistent with earlier reports, we found some (although insignificant) increase of grey zone alleles in SEN subjects compared with controls. The frequencies of predisposing flanking haplotypes among grey zone males FMR1 alleles were similar to those seen in other Caucasian SEN samples. Contrary to expectation, given the normal frequency of grey zone alleles, no premutation (PM) or full mutation (FM) allele was detected in either sample, with only 15 fragile X families diagnosed through routine clinical admissions registered in Tasmania up to 2002. An explanation of this discrepancy could be that the C19th founders of Tasmania carried few PM or FM alleles. The eight to ten generations since white settlement of Tasmania has been insufficient time for susceptible grey zone alleles to evolve into the larger expansions.

  9. Antibody response against three widespread bovine viruses is not impaired in Holstein cattle carrying bovine leukocyte antigen DRB3.2 alleles associated with bovine leukemia virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Juliarena, M A; Poli, M; Ceriani, C; Sala, L; Rodríguez, E; Gutierrez, S; Dolcini, G; Odeon, A; Esteban, E N

    2009-01-01

    Due to the wide dissemination of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection among dairy cattle, control and eradication programs based on serological detection of infected cattle and subsequent culling face a major economic task. In Argentina, genetic selection of cattle carrying alleles of the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) DRB3.2 gene associated with BLV-infection resistance, like *0902, emerges as the best additional tool toward controlling virus spread. A potential risk in expanding or segregating BoLA selected populations of cattle is that it might increase susceptibility to other common viruses. Special concern raises the strong association found between low proviral load and low antibody titer against major BLV structural proteins. This phenomenon might depend on host genetic factors influencing other viruses requiring, unlike BLV, strong and long-lasting humoral immune response to prevent infection. In this study, we demonstrate that there is no association among neutralizing antibody titers against foot and mouth disease virus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, or bovine herpesvirus type 1 and polymorphism of the BoLA DRB3.2 gene. Conversely, there is strong association between BoLA DRB3.2*0902 and low antibody titers against 2 BLV structural proteins--env gp51 and gag p24--to date, the best BLV resistance marker. There is also significant association between low antibody titers against gp51 and p24 and BoLA DRB3.2*1701 and low antibody titers against p24 and BoLA DRB3.2*1101 or 02. Our data suggest that increasing BoLA-selected BLV-resistant cattle or segregating BoLA-associated alleles to BLV susceptibility would not affect the resistance or the predisposition to bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine herpesvirus type 1, or foot and mouth disease virus infection.

  10. Further evidence for an association of ABCR alleles with age-related macular degeneration. The International ABCR Screening Consortium.

    PubMed

    Allikmets, R

    2000-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) accounts for >50% of the registered visual disability among North American and Western European populations and has been associated both with environmental factors, such as smoking, and with genetic factors. Previously we have reported disease-associated variants in the ABCR (also called ABCA4) gene in a subset of patients affected with this complex disorder. We have now tested our original hypothesis, that ABCR is a dominant susceptibility locus for AMD, by screening 1,218 unrelated AMD patients of North American and Western European origin and 1,258 comparison individuals from 15 centers in North America and Europe for the two most frequent AMD-associated variants found in ABCR. These two sequence changes, G1961E and D2177N, were found in one allele of ABCR in 40 patients ( approximately 3.4%), and in 13 control subjects ( approximately 0.95%). Fisher's two-sided exact test confirmed that these two variants are associated with AMD at a statistically significant level (P<.0001). The risk of AMD is elevated approximately threefold in D2177N carriers and approximately fivefold in G1961E carriers. The identification of a gene that confers risk of AMD is an important step in unraveling this complex disorder.

  11. Cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 genotypes: association with hair colour, Breslow thickness and melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor alleles in patients with malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Strange, R C; Ellison, T; Ichii-Jones, F; Bath, J; Hoban, P; Lear, J T; Smith, A G; Hutchinson, P E; Osborne, J; Bowers, B; Jones, P W; Fryer, A A

    1999-06-01

    We previously identified associations between polymorphism in the cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 gene and outcome in several cancers. We have now examined the hypothesis that homozygosity for the mutant alleles, CYP2D6*4 and CYP2D6*3, is associated with susceptibility and outcome in malignant melanoma. Outcome was assessed by Breslow thickness. We first confirmed previous reports that these mutant alleles are associated with increased susceptibility to malignant melanoma. For example, the frequency of homozygosity for CYP2D6*4 was significantly greater (P = 0.006, chi-squared 1 d.f. = 7.4, odds ratio 2.2, 95% confidence interval 1.2, 3.9) in cases (9.1%) than in control individuals (4.3%). The frequency of homozygosity for the mutant alleles was next examined in the malignant melanoma cases grouped on the basis of characteristics associated with malignant melanoma risk. Homozygosity was significantly more common (P = 0.038) in cases with red/blonde hair than in those with brown/black hair. We found no associations between the CYP2D6 genotype and sex, skin type or eye colour. The possible association of CYP2D6 with outcome was assessed by comparing genotype frequencies in patients with tumours of Breslow thickness < 1.5 mm with those whose tumours were > or = 1.5 mm. In patients with red/blonde, but not brown or black hair, homozygosity for CYP2D6*4 was significantly associated with thicker lesions in a multivariate model (P = 0.036). We further examined the association of CYP2D6*4 homozygosity with red/blonde hair by classifying patients on the basis of homo- or heterozygosity for wild-type or val92met, asp294his or asp84glu melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor (MC1R) alleles. None of the nine patients with brown/black hair with the asp294his allele were homozygotes for CYP2D6*4. By contrast, in the patients with red/blonde hair, three of five cases with asp294his were homozygotes for the mutant CYP2D6 allele. The difference in the frequency of CYP2D6*4 homozygotes in

  12. A commonly carried allele of the obesity-related FTO gene is associated with reduced brain volume in the healthy elderly.

    PubMed

    Ho, April J; Stein, Jason L; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek P; Leow, Alex D; Dinov, Ivo D; Toga, Arthur W; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Gerber, Jill D; Allen, April N; Corneveaux, Jason J; Stephan, Dietrich A; DeCarli, Charles S; DeChairo, Bryan M; Potkin, Steven G; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Raji, Cyrus A; Lopez, Oscar L; Becker, James T; Carmichael, Owen T; Thompson, Paul M

    2010-05-04

    A recently identified variant within the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is carried by 46% of Western Europeans and is associated with an approximately 1.2 kg higher weight, on average, in adults and an approximately 1 cm greater waist circumference. With >1 billion overweight and 300 million obese persons worldwide, it is crucial to understand the implications of carrying this very common allele for the health of our aging population. FTO is highly expressed in the brain and elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with brain atrophy, but it is unknown how the obesity-associated risk allele affects human brain structure. We therefore generated 3D maps of regional brain volume differences in 206 healthy elderly subjects scanned with MRI and genotyped as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We found a pattern of systematic brain volume deficits in carriers of the obesity-associated risk allele versus noncarriers. Relative to structure volumes in the mean template, FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers had an average brain volume difference of approximately 8% in the frontal lobes and 12% in the occipital lobes-these regions also showed significant volume deficits in subjects with higher BMI. These brain differences were not attributable to differences in cholesterol levels, hypertension, or the volume of white matter hyperintensities; which were not detectably higher in FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers. These brain maps reveal that a commonly carried susceptibility allele for obesity is associated with structural brain atrophy, with implications for the health of the elderly.

  13. Allelic associations and homozygosity at loci from HLA-B to D6S299 in genetic haemochromatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Raha-Chowdhury, R; Bowen, D J; Burnett, A K; Worwood, M

    1995-01-01

    Haemochromatosis (GH) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which increased iron absorption causes iron overload. The gene (HFE) is closely linked to HLA-A on chromosome 6 (6p21.3) but has not yet been identified. We have examined eight polymorphic loci, HLA-B (most centromeric), I82, D6S265, HLA-A, D6S128, HLA-F, D6S105, and D6S299 (most telomeric) in 37 unrelated patients and 60 control subjects. There are also significant positive associations between GH and alleles at all loci except D6S299. Analysis of 48 GH chromosomes in which haplotypes could be established showed that the most common haplotype was I82-2:D6S265-1:HLA-A3:D6S128-2:HLA-F1:D6S105-8. This was present in 28 of 48 chromosomes. In 14 the haplotype included HLA-B7 but only in seven did this extend beyond the telomere to D6S299-2 (the most common allele on GH chromosomes at this locus). In 36 out of 48 chromosomes the two locus haplotype, F1:D6S105-8 was present. Since haemochromatosis appears to originate from a founder mutation we have examined linkage disequilibrium between these various loci and GH using calculations of pexcess. The maximum value (0.72, 95% CI 0.55-0.85) is given by D6S105-8 but is not significantly different from values for HLA-A3 and HLA-F1 (0.50, 95% CI 0.34-0.61 and 0.49, 0.25-0.66 respectively). However, both HLA-A and D6S105 give a value for pexcess which is significantly higher than that for the most centromeric marker, HLA-B (0.17, 95% CI 0.02-0.30). We have counted the number of patients who are homozygous for the common allele at each locus. At D6S105, 22 patients are homozygous for allele 8, with 18 homozygous for HLA-F1 and 10 homozygous for A3. The pattern of cumulative homozygosity suggests a gene location closer to D6S105 than HLA-A. We have also analysed our data for divergence from the apparent founder haplotype (A3:F1:105-8) and have calculated the theoretical frequencies of crossovers between loci. These data suggest a location telomeric to D6S105. A more

  14. Reduced 3-O-methyl-dopa levels in OCD patients and their unaffected parents is associated with the low activity M158 COMT allele

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Richard; Betancur, Catalina; Chaste, Pauline; Kernéis, Solen; Stopin, Astrid; Mouren, Marie-Christine; Collet, Corinne; Bourgeron, Thomas; Leboyer, Marion; Launay, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Background The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene is considered as a candidate gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Specifically, the COMT low-activity M158 allele has been suggested to be associated with OCD. However, there is no study reporting that COMT activity is decreased in OCD patients and that the decrease is mediated by the V158M polymorphism. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to assess COMT activity in OCD by measuring plasma levels of 3-O-methyl-dopa (3-OMD), which result from the methylation of levodopa by COMT, and to investigate the relationship between 3-OMD levels and the V158M polymorphism. We also examined whether 3-OMD levels represented an endophenotype, associated with the genetic liability to OCD, by assessing unaffected relatives of OCD patients. Method We assessed plasma 3-OMD levels in a sample of drug-free OCD probands (n = 34) and their unaffected parents (n = 63), and compared them with controls (n = 85). The COMT V158M polymorphism was genotyped in all participants. Results Lower plasma 3-OMD levels were found in OCD probands and their unaffected parents compared to controls. The COMT M158 allele was associated with reduced plasma 3-OMD levels in a co-dominant manner, both in OCD probands and their relatives, but not in controls. Conclusion Our results suggest that COMT activity could act as a limiting factor for the production of 3-OMD in OCD patients and in their relatives. These findings further support a role of COMT in the susceptibility to OCD and provide evidence that 3-OMD levels could represent an endophenotype in OCD. PMID:19676096

  15. HLA-B*40 Allele Plays a Role in the Development of Acute Leukemia in Mexican Population: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Torres, Javier; Flores-Jiménez, Denhi; Arroyo-Pérez, Antonio; Granados, Julio; López-Reyes, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Among oncohematological diseases, acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are characterized by the uncontrolled production and accumulation of blasts that can lead to death. Although the physiopathology of these diseases is multifactorial, a genetic factor seems to be at play. Several studies worldwide have shown association of ALL and AML with several alleles of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Objective. To determine gene frequencies of HLA-B alleles in Mexicans (individuals with Native American genetic background admixed with European descent) with ALL and AML. Methods. We compared the HLA-B alleles in 213 patients with ALL and 85 patients with AML to those present in 731 umbilical cord blood (UCB) samples as a control group; this was done by means of the PCR-SSP technique. Results. We found an increased frequency of the HLA-B*40 allele in ALL patients as compared to the control group (14.5% versus 9.84%, P = 0.003, OR = 1.67); this was particularly evident in a subgroup of young (less than 18 years old) ALL patients (P = 0.002, OR = 1.76); likewise, a decreased frequency of HLA-B*40 allele in AML patients was observed as compared to the control group (4.70% versus 9.84%, P = 0.02, OR = 0.42). Conclusions. These results might suggest opposing effects of the HLA-B*40 in the genetic susceptibility to develop ALL or AML and offer the possibility to study further the molecular mechanisms of cell differentiation within the bone marrow lineage. PMID:24364037

  16. Association of the amino acid motifs of BoLA-DRB3 alleles with mastitis pathogens in Japanese Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuyuki; Mukoyama, Harutaka; Furuta, Hiroki; Kondo, Yasuko; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Aida, Yoko; Kosugiyama, Motoaki; Tomogane, Hiroshi

    2009-10-01

    The association of the polymorphism of bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) genes, identified by the polymerase chain reaction sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT) method, with resistance and susceptibility to mastitis caused by Streptococci, coagulase-negative Staphylococci, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was investigated. Blood samples for DNA extraction were collected from 170 Holstein cows (129 mastitis and 41 healthy cows) from 5 districts in Chiba prefecture, Japan. Susceptibility or resistance to the mastitis-causing pathogens was thought to vary by the presence of amino acid substitutions at the 9, 11, 13, and 30 positions. DRB3*0101 and DRB3*1501 had amino acid motifs of Glu(9), Ser(11), Ser(13), and Tyr(30), and they were considered to have susceptibility to all 4 mastitis pathogens. In contrast, DRB3*1101 and DRB3*1401 had amino acid motifs of Gln(9), His(11), Gly(13), and His(30) in these positions, and they also had Val(86), so these alleles were considered to have resistance to Streptococcal and coagulase-negative Staphylococcal mastitis. However, in the case of Escherichia coli mastitis, amino acid substitutions at the 9, 11, 13, and 30 positions had little effect, but rather substitutions at the 47, 67 positions of pocket 7, and at the 71, 74 positions of pocket 4, Tyr(47), Ile(67), Ala(71), and Ala(74), were associated with resistance. This motif was present in DRB3*1201.

  17. Divergent Antibody Subclass and Specificity Profiles but Not Protective HLA-B Alleles Are Associated with Variable Antibody Effector Function among HIV-1 Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jennifer I.; Licht, Anna F.; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Suscovich, Todd; Choi, Ickwon; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Alter, Galit

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding the coordination between humoral and cellular immune responses may be the key to developing protective vaccines, and because genetic studies of long-term HIV-1 nonprogressors have associated specific HLA-B alleles with spontaneous control of viral replication, this subject group presents an opportunity to investigate relationships between arms of the adaptive immune system. Given evidence suggesting that cellular immunity may play a role in viral suppression, we sought to determine whether and how the humoral immune response might vary among controllers. Significantly, Fc-mediated antibody effector functions have likewise been associated with durable viral control. In this study, we compared the effector function and biophysical features of HIV-specific antibodies in a cohort of controllers with and without protective HLA-B alleles in order to investigate whether there was evidence for multiple paths to HIV-1 control, or whether cellular and humoral arms of immunity might exhibit coordinated profiles. However, with the exception of IgG2 antibodies to gp41, HLA status was not associated with divergent humoral responses. This finding did not result from uniform antibody responses across subjects, as controllers could be regrouped according to strong differences in their HIV-specific antibody subclass specificity profiles. These divergent antibody profiles were further associated with significant differences in nonneutralizing antibody effector function, with levels of HIV-specific IgG1 acting as the major distinguishing factor. Thus, while HLA background among controllers was associated with minimal differences in humoral function, antibody subclass and specificity profiles were associated with divergent effector function, suggesting that these features could be used to make functional predictions. Because these nonneutralizing antibody activities have been associated with spontaneous viral control, reduced viral load, and nonprogression in

  18. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (CAPN3): mapping using allelic association.

    PubMed

    Lonjou, C; Collins, A; Beckmann, J; Allamand, V; Morton, N

    1998-01-01

    Recently a graphical study of linkage disequilibrium around the CAPN3 locus failed to refine the 1.3-Mb interval suggested by haplotype sharing. On the contrary, the Malecot model as implemented in the ALLASS program maps CAPN3 within 3 kb of its true location (23 kb from the locus midpoint), overcoming identified problems with small samples, interrelated sibships, and short duration.

  19. Physical and genetic mapping of the serpin gene cluster at 14q32.1: allelic association and a unique haplotype associated with alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Byth, B. C.; Billingsley, G. D.; Cox, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    The alpha 1-antitrypsin (PI) gene is part of a cluster of structurally related serine protease inhibitor genes localized at chromosome 14q32.1, a cluster that includes the alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (AACT), protein C inhibitor (PCI), and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) genes and the alpha 1-antitrypsin-like pseudogene (PIL). The order of the genes is refined here by genetic mapping using simple tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) and by physical mapping in YACs. The order of the genes is (centromere)-CBG-PIL-PI-PCI-AACT-(telomere). Analysis of DNA haplotypes comprising STRP and RFLP markers in the serpin genes reveals considerable allelic association throughout the cluster. Furthermore, the common alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency allele, PI*Z, has a unique DNA haplotype at the CBG, PIL, and PI loci, which extends over 60 kb in 97% of cases and in 44% of cases includes the PCI and AACT loci. This unique haplotype will be of use in examining a number of other diseases, particularly those with an inflammatory component, thought to be associated with alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency or partial deficiency. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7912884

  20. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav) Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Sayono, Sayono; Hidayati, Anggie Puspa Nur; Fahri, Sukmal; Sumanto, Didik; Dharmana, Edi; Hadisaputro, Suharyo; Asih, Puji Budi Setia; Syafruddin, Din

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNaV gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide susceptibility tests demonstrated Ae, aegypti resistance to the pyrethroids, with mortality rates ranging from 1.6%-15.2%. Three non-synonymous polymorphisms (S989P, V1016G and F1534C) and one synonymous polymorphism (codon 982) were detected in the AaNaV gene. Eight AaNaV alleles were observed in specimens from Central Java. Allele 3 (SGF) and allele 7 (PGF) represent the most common alleles found and demonstrated strong associations with resistance to pyrethroids (OR = 2.75, CI: 0.97-7.8 and OR = 7.37, CI: 2.4-22.5, respectively). This is the first report of 8 Ae. aegypti AaNaV alleles, and it indicates the development of resistance in Ae. aegypti in response to pyrethroid insecticide-based selective pressure. These findings strongly suggest the need for an appropriate integrated use of insecticides in the region. The 989P, 1016G and 1534C polymorphisms in the AaNaV gene are potentially valuable molecular markers for pyrethroid insecticide resistance monitoring.

  1. Association of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified by a sequence-based typing method with mastitis pathogens in Japanese Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuyuki; Mukoyama, Harutaka; Furuta, Hiroki; Kondo, Yasuko; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Aida, Yoko; Kosugiyama, Motoaki; Tomogane, Hiroshi

    2009-10-01

    The association of the polymorphism of bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) genes identified by the polymerase chain reaction sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT) method with resistance and susceptibility to mastitis caused by pathogenic bacteria was investigated. Blood samples for DNA extraction were collected from 194 Holstein cows (41 healthy cows and 153 mastitis cows including 24 mixed-infection cows infected with 2 or 3 species of pathogens) from 5 districts of Chiba prefecture, Japan. Sixteen BoLA-DRB3 alleles were detected. The 4 main alleles of DRB3*0101, *1501, *1201, and *1101 constituted 56.8% of the total number of alleles detected. Mastitis cows were divided into 2 groups: group 1 with single-infection cows and group 2 with all mastitis cows including 24 mixed-infection cows. The differences in the frequencies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles and the number of cows homozygous or heterozygous for each BoLA-DRB3 allele between healthy cows and the 2 groups of mastitis cows were evaluated. Furthermore, similar comparisons were performed between healthy cows and the 2 groups of mastitis cows for each mastitis pathogen. It was considered that the 4 alleles, namely, DRB3*0101, *1501, *1201, and *1101 had specific resistance and susceptibility to 4 different mastitis pathogens. Thus, DRB3*0101 might be associated with susceptibility to coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Escherichia coli, and DRB3*1501 might be associated with susceptibility to Escherichia coli. However, DRB3*1101 might be associated with resistance to Streptococci and coagulase-negative Staphylococci, and DRB3*1201, with resistance to Streptococci, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus.

  2. Polymorphic SVA retrotransposons at four loci and their association with classical HLA class I alleles in Japanese, Caucasians and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Kulski, Jerzy K; Shigenari, Atsuko; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2010-04-01

    Polymorphic insertion frequencies of the retrotransposons known as the "SVA" elements were investigated at four loci in the MHC class I genomic region to determine their allele and haplotype frequencies and associations with the HLA-A, -B or -C genes for 100 Japanese, 100 African Americans, 174 Australian Caucasians and 66 reference cell lines obtained from different ethnic groups. The SVA insertions representing different subfamily members varied in frequency between none for SVA-HF in Japanese and 65% for SVA-HB in Caucasians or African Americans with significant differences in frequencies between the three populations at least at three loci. The SVA loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium except for the SVA-HA locus which deviated significantly in African Americans and Caucasians possibly because of a genomic deletion of this locus in individuals with the HLA-A*24 allele. Strong linkage disequilibria and high percentage associations between the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I gene alleles and some of the SVA insertions were detected in all three populations in spite of significant frequency differences for the SVA and HLA class I alleles between the three populations. The highest percentage associations (>86%) were between SVA-HB and HLA-B*08, -B*27, -B*37 to -B*41, -B*52 and -B*53; SVA-HC and HLA-B*07; SVA-HA and HLA-A*03, -A*11 and -A*30; and SVA-HF and HLA-A*03 and HLA-B*47. From pairwise associations in the three populations and the homozygous cell line results, it was possible to deduce the SVA and HLA class I allelic combinations (haplotypes), population differences and the identity by descent of several common HLA-A allelic lineages.

  3. The Cys326 allele of the 8-oxoguanine DNA N-glycosylase 1 gene as a risk factor in smoking- and drinking-associated larynx cancer.

    PubMed

    Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Rydzanicz, Malgorzata; Zuk, Karolina; Kaczmarczyk, Dariusz; Olszewski, Jurek; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Blasiak, Janusz; Morawiec-Sztandera, Alina

    2009-12-01

    Tobacco smoke-related products and ethanol would induce oxidative modifications to the DNA bases, thereby contributing to larynx cancer. Human 8-oxoguanine DNA N-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) deals with oxidative DNA damage, and the base changes in the hOGG1 gene may alter the susceptibility of the human cells to tobacco smoke-related compounds and/or ethanol. In the present work, we investigated the association between smoking, drinking or the Ser326Cys polymorphism of the hOGG1 gene and the risk of larynx cancer in a Polish population. It has been reported that the Ser326 allele exhibits higher activity than the Cys326 variant. In this study, 253 age-matched controls and 253 patients with larynx cancer were enrolled. The polymorphism was determined with DNA from blood lymphocytes by polymerase chain reaction. The frequencies (%) of the genotypes were Ser/Ser 65.6, Ser/Cys 30.4, and Cys/Cys 4.0 in the controls and those in patients were 55.7, 36.0 and 8.3, respectively. Stratification of individuals according to their smoking and drinking habits indicated that these habits might be significant risk factors in larynx cancer. The Ser/Cys and Cys/Cys genotypes are significantly associated with the increased risk of larynx cancer. These genotypes increased the risk ratio of larynx cancer among heavy smokers, but did not change the risk in former smokers and moderate smokers. These genotypes also increased the risk of larynx cancer in moderate and heavy drinkers. Therefore, the Cys326 allele of the hOGG1 gene may increase the risk of larynx cancer associated with smoking or alcohol consumption.

  4. Identification and Molecular Analysis of Four New Alleles at the W1 Locus Associated with Flower Color in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramoorthy, Jagadeesh; Park, Gyu Tae; Chang, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Kim, Jeong Hoe; Seo, Hak Soo; Chung, Gyuhwa; Song, Jong Tae

    2016-01-01

    In soybean, flavonoid 3′5′-hydroxylase (F3′5′H) and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) play a crucial role in the production of anthocyanin pigments. Loss-of-function of the W1 locus, which encodes the former, or W3 and W4, which encode the latter, always produces white flowers. In this study, we searched for new genetic components responsible for the production of white flowers in soybean and isolated four white-flowered mutant lines, i.e., two Glycine soja accessions (CW12700 and CW13381) and two EMS-induced mutants of Glycine max (PE1837 and PE636). F3′5′H expression in CW12700, PE1837, and PE636 was normal, whereas that in CW13381 was aberrant and missing the third exon. Sequence analysis of F3′5′H of CW13381 revealed the presence of an indel (~90-bp AT-repeat) in the second intron. In addition, the F3′5′H of CW12700, PE1837, and PE636 harbored unique single-nucleotide substitutions. The single nucleotide polymorphisms resulted in substitutions of amino acid residues located in or near the SRS4 domain of F3′5′H, which is essential for substrate recognition. 3D structure modeling of F3′5′H indicated that the substitutions could interfere with an interaction between the substrate and heme group and compromise the conformation of the active site of F3′5′H. Recombination analysis revealed a tight correlation between all of the mutant alleles at the W1 locus and white flower color. On the basis of the characterization of the new mutant alleles, we discussed the biological implications of F3′5′H and DFR in the determination of flower colors in soybean. PMID:27442124

  5. Disparities in allele frequencies and population differentiation for 101 disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms between Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic whites

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Josiemer; Parnell, Laurence D; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Garcia-Bailo, Bibiana; Adiconis, Xian; Shen, Jian; Arnett, Donna; Demissie, Serkalem; Tucker, Katherine L; Ordovas, Jose M

    2009-01-01

    Background Variations in gene allele frequencies can contribute to differences in the prevalence of some common complex diseases among populations. Natural selection modulates the balance in allele frequencies across populations. Population differentiation (FST) can evidence environmental selection pressures. Such genetic information is limited in Puerto Ricans, the second largest Hispanic ethnic group in the US, and a group with high prevalence of chronic disease. We determined allele frequencies and population differentiation for 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 30 genes involved in major metabolic and disease-relevant pathways in Puerto Ricans (n = 969, ages 45–75 years) and compared them to similarly aged non-Hispanic whites (NHW) (n = 597). Results Minor allele frequency (MAF) distributions for 45.5% of the SNPs assessed in Puerto Ricans were significantly different from those of NHW. Puerto Ricans carried risk alleles in higher frequency and protective alleles in lower frequency than NHW. Patterns of population differentiation showed that Puerto Ricans had SNPs with exceptional FST values in intronic, non-synonymous and promoter regions. NHW had exceptional FST values in intronic and promoter region SNPs only. Conclusion These observations may serve to explain and broaden studies on the impact of gene polymorphisms on chronic diseases affecting Puerto Ricans. PMID:19682384

  6. Association of H2A{sup b} with resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in H2-recombinant mouse strains: An allele associated with reduction of several apparently unrelated responses

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, N.A.; Brunner, M.C.

    1995-02-01

    HLA class II alleles can protect against immunological diseases. Seeking an animal model for a naturally occurring protective allele, we screened a panel of H2-congenic and recombinant mouse strains for ability to protect against collagen-induced arthritis. The strains were crossed with the susceptible strain DBA/1, and the F{sub 1} hybrids immunized with cattle and chicken type II collagen. Hybrids having the H2A{sup b} allele displayed a reduced incidence and duration of the disease. They also had a reduced level of pre-disease inflammation, but not of anti-collagen antibodies. The allele is already known to be associated with reduction of other apparently unrelated immune responses, suggesting that some form of functional differentiation may operate that is not exclusively related to epitope-binding. It is suggested that this may reflect allelic variation in the class II major histocompatibility complex promoter region. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Distribution of the lactase persistence-associated variant alleles -13910* T and -13915* G among the people of Oman and Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Abri, Abdul Rahim; Al-Rawas, Omar; Al-Yahyaee, Saeed; Al-Habori, Molham; Al-Zubairi, Adel Sharaf; Bayoumi, Riad

    2012-06-01

    The high prevalence of lactase persistence (LP) among the people of Saudi Arabia is associated with the -13915(*)G variant allele upstream of the lactase gene (LCT). We, therefore, examined the frequency of the commonly known LP associated SNPs among randomly collected samples from Omani and Yemeni adult populations and obtained further data on the distribution of the two most common LP-associated variants, -13910(*)T and -13915T(*)G, in the Arabian Peninsula. The DNA fragment containing all the reported LP- associated SNPs was amplified and genotyped. The frequency of the -13915(*)G allele was highest among Dhofari Arabs of southern Oman (0.72) followed by Yemeni Arabs (0.54) and Arabs of northern Oman (0.14). It was not detected in Omanis of Asian origin. The frequency of the -13910(*)T allele was extremely low in Arabs of northern and southern Oman (0.00-0.01) and Yemenis (0.002). However, it had a frequency of 0.160 among Omanis of Asian origin. Results show that the highest frequency of the LCT -13915(*)G variant allele appears to be in the south of the Arabian Peninsula with clinal decrease within the Peninsula and further out in surrounding countries.

  8. Study of MICA alleles in 201 African Americans by multiplexed single nucleotide extension (MSNE) typing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanzheng; Han, Mei; Vorhaben, Robert; Giang, Chris; Lavingia, Bhavna; Stastny, Peter

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a method for major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) genotyping using multiplexed single nucleotide extension (MSNE) and flow cytometric analysis of an array of fluorescent microspheres. This technique employs a polymerase chain reaction-derived target DNA containing all the polymorphic sites of MICA, synthetic complementary primers, biotinylated dideoxynucleotide triphosphate, fluorescent reporter molecules (streptavidin-phycoerythrin), and thermophilic DNA polymerase. Genomic DNA was amplified by MICA locus-specific primers and the MSNE reactions were carried out in the presence of 30 MSNE primers used to assay polymorphisms in exons 2, 3, and 4 of the MICA genes. Thirty-two previously typed cell lines were used as reference material. The MICA gene frequencies among 201 African-American unrelated donors were determined. Of 51 previously known alleles, 18 were observed in African-Americans, compared to 16 that were found in North American Caucasians and 9 in South American Indians, suggesting a more diversified allelic distribution in African-Americans. MICA*00201 and MICA*00801 were the two most frequent alleles in African-Americans. We observed a high degree of linkage disequilibrium between certain alleles of MICA and of human leukocyte antigen-B in the African-American population. The methodology described here offers a powerful new approach to DNA typing of the MICA alleles.

  9. Allelic Variation in TAS2R Bitter Receptor Genes Associates with Variation in Sensations from and Ingestive Behaviors toward Common Bitter Beverages in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, John E.; Wallace, Margaret R.; Knopik, Valerie S.; Herbstman, Deborah M.; Bartoshuk, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    The 25 human bitter receptors and their respective genes (TAS2Rs) contain unusually high levels of allelic variation, which may influence response to bitter compounds in the food supply. Phenotypes based on the perceived bitterness of single bitter compounds were first linked to food preference over 50 years ago. The most studied phenotype is propylthiouracil bitterness, which is mediated primarily by the TAS2R38 gene and possibly others. In a laboratory-based study, we tested for associations between TAS2R variants and sensations, liking, or intake of bitter beverages among healthy adults who were primarily of European ancestry. A haploblock across TAS2R3, TAS2R4, and TAS2R5 explained some variability in the bitterness of espresso coffee. For grapefruit juice, variation at a TAS2R19 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was associated with increased bitterness and decreased liking. An association between a TAS2R16 SNP and alcohol intake was identified, and the putative TAS2R38–alcohol relationship was confirmed, although these polymorphisms did not explain sensory or hedonic responses to sampled scotch whisky. In summary, TAS2R polymorphisms appear to influence the sensations, liking, or intake of common and nutritionally significant beverages. Studying perceptual and behavioral differences in vivo using real foods and beverages may potentially identify polymorphisms related to dietary behavior even in the absence of known ligands. PMID:21163912

  10. When is the absence of evidence, evidence of absence? Use of equivalence-based analyses in genetic epidemiology and a conclusion for the KIF1B rs10492972*C allelic association in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine

    2011-09-01

    Statistical equivalence methods have been in development since the late 1980s in order to provide an appropriate statistical methodology to address nondifferences in biological experiments. This is analogous to genetic association studies in which a polymorphism "is not associated" with a trait. We applied the equivalence method to genetic data to confirm that an association between the KIF1B (kinesin family member1B) rs10492972 allele and multiple sclerosis (MS), reported in Nature Genetics in 2008, is present neither in eight data sets of cases and controls nor in three independent data sets of the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetic Consortium. When the data sets are considered together, a nonsuperiority test excludes the rs10492972*C allele as a major "risk" allele for MS with a high degree of confidence (P = 1.18 × 10(-4) ). We propose that equivalence methods are more appropriate for stating that a polymorphism does not contribute to disease susceptibility. If an equivalence test applied to genetic data sets fails to reveal an association based on standard methods, it demonstrates that there is no genetic association-i.e., the absence of evidence is evidence of absence. When reporting genetic association based on a cohort of a limited size, caution is needed regardless of how attractive the underlying biological rationale is. The data gathered for KIF1B in MS also underscore the need for very large sample sizes with the appropriate equivalence statistical methods in order to exclude reported false-positive results.

  11. Interaction between BDNF rs6265 met allele and low family cohesion is associated with smaller left hippocampal volume in pediatric bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zeni, Cristian Patrick; Mwangi, Benson; Cao, Bo; Hasan, Khader M.; Walss-Bass, Consuelo; Zunta-Soares, Giovana; Soares, Jair C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic and environmental factors are implicated in the onset and evolution of pediatric bipolar disorder, and may be associated to structural brain abnormalities. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of the interaction between the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) rs6265 polymorphism and family functioning on hippocampal volumes of children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, and typically-developing controls. Methods We evaluated the family functioning cohesion subscale using the Family Environment Scale-Revised, genotyped the BDNF rs6265 polymorphism, and performed structural brain imaging in 29 children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, and 22 healthy controls. Results We did not find significant differences between patients with BD or controls in left or right hippocampus volume (p=0.44, and p=0.71, respectively). However, we detected a significant interaction between low scores on the cohesion subscale and the presence of the Met allele at BNDF on left hippocampal volume of patients with bipolar disorder (F=3.4, p=0.043). None of the factors independently (BDNF Val66Met, cohesion scores) was significantly associated with hippocampal volume differences. Limitations small sample size, cross-sectional study. Conclusions These results may lead to a better understanding of the impact of the interaction between genes and environment factors on brain structures associated to bipolar disorder and its manifestations. PMID:26432032

  12. Association of HLA-A, B, DRB1* and DQB1* alleles and haplotypes in south Indian T2DM patients.

    PubMed

    Chinniah, Rathika; Vijayan, Murali; Sivanadham, Ramgopal; Ravi, Padma Malini; Panneerselvam, Dharmarajan; Karuppiah, Balakrishnan

    2016-10-30

    The genes of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) system are implicated in the susceptibility of several diseases including Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of HLA alleles with T2DM in south India. A total of 344 patients (195 males; 149 females) and 309 controls (186 males; 123 females) were genotyped for HLA-DR/-DQ alleles. Based on predominant DR/DQ haplotypes, 222 patients and 222 age/sex matched controls were HLA-A/-B genotyped. HLA alleles were typed by PCR-SSP methods. Susceptible association was observed for the alleles A*33 (OR=13.8), A*01 (OR=3.69), A*02 (OR=2.91), B*07 (OR=4.12), DRB1*11 (OR=2.23), DRB1*04 (OR=1.51), DRB1*03 (OR=1.90) and DQB1*02 (OR=1.49). Protective association was observed for the alleles A*11 (OR=0.59), A*68 (OR=0.68), B*40 (OR=0.50), B*54 (OR=0.42), B*57 (OR=0.31), B*51 (OR=0.29) and DRB1*10 (OR=0.45). Gender stratified analysis too confirmed many of these associations. Predominant susceptible haplotypes were A*33-B*40 (OR=10.27), A*01-B*07 (OR=4.97), A*02-B*07 (OR=6.50), DRB1*03-DQB1*05 (OR=1.88), DRB1*03-DQB1*06 (OR=3.01), DRB1*04-DQB1*05 (2.63), A*01-B*07-DRB1*10 (OR=8.26) and A*11-B*35-DRB1*07 (OR=9.338). Haplotypes A*03-B*07 (OR=0.57; p<0.034) and DRB1*10-DQB1*05 (OR=0.57; p<0.033) were protectively associated. Further, a very strong susceptible association was documented for four-locus haplotypes such as A*11-B*40-DRB1*15-DQB1*06 (n=15; OR=16.01; p<0.001); A*01-B*07-DRB1*10-DQB1*05 (n=8; OR=8.26; p<0.043) and A*11-B*07-DRB1*07-DQB1*05 (n=8; OR=8.26; p<0.043). Thus, a number of HLA alleles and haplotypes showed susceptible and protective association(s) in T2DM patients from south India.

  13. Nonfrequent but well-documented, rare and very rare HLA alleles observed in the Croatian population.

    PubMed

    Grubic, Z; Burek Kamenaric, M; Maskalan, M; Stingl Jankovic, K; Zunec, R

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of nonfrequent, rare and very rare alleles among Croats and to estimate whether they are associated with specific alleles at other human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci. This retrospective study included the typing results from the last 10 years; total number of individuals included was approximately 45,000. Among 17 alleles so far observed only once in our population, 6 (A*24:41, B*07:02:28, B*35:03:03, B*39:40N, DRB1*13:23 and DRB1*14:111) belong to very rare alleles, 2 (B*44:16 and DRB1*01:31) belong to rare alleles according to the 'Rare Alleles Detector' tool ( www.allelefrequencies.net), while for the B*35:101:01 allele published data exist only in the IMGT/HLA database. The remaining eight HLA alleles observed only once among Croats are considered as frequent according to the 'Rare Alleles Detector'. Those 17 HLA alleles are not declared as common well defined (CWD) alleles in the CWD allele catalogue 2.0.0. Haplotype analysis of nonfrequent alleles detected in our sample supports the idea that different populations, although similar in some aspects regarding HLA allele and haplotype distribution, still have some unique characteristics. This is the case for A*01:02, B*39:10 and DRB1*13:32 which form haplotypes unreported to date among our subjects.

  14. A FDG-PET Study of Metabolic Networks in Apolipoprotein E ε4 Allele Carriers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhijun; Hu, Bin; Zheng, Jiaxiang; Zheng, Weihao; Chen, Xuejiao; Gao, Xiang; Xie, Yuanwei; Fang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Recently, some studies have applied the graph theory in brain network analysis in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). However, relatively little research has specifically explored the properties of the metabolic network in apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele carriers. In our study, all the subjects, including ADs, MCIs and NCs (normal controls) were divided into 165 APOE ε4 carriers and 165 APOE ε4 noncarriers. To establish the metabolic network for all brain regions except the cerebellum, cerebral glucose metabolism data obtained from FDG-PET (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) were segmented into 90 areas with automated anatomical labeling (AAL) template. Then, the properties of the networks were computed to explore the between-group differences. Our results suggested that both APOE ε4 carriers and noncarriers showed the small-world properties. Besides, compared with APOE ε4 noncarriers, the carriers showed a lower clustering coefficient. In addition, significant changes in 6 hub brain regions were found in between-group nodal centrality. Namely, compared with APOE ε4 noncarriers, significant decreases of the nodal centrality were found in left insula, right insula, right anterior cingulate, right paracingulate gyri, left cuneus, as well as significant increases in left paracentral lobule and left heschl gyrus in APOE ε4 carriers. Increased local short distance interregional correlations and disrupted long distance interregional correlations were found, which may support the point that the APOE ε4 carriers were more similar with AD or MCI in FDG uptake. In summary, the organization of metabolic network in APOE ε4 carriers indicated a less optimal pattern and APOE ε4 might be a risk factor for AD.

  15. A novel allele of L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase is associated with enhanced drought tolerance through affecting stomatal aperture in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juncheng; Li, Bin; Yang, Yanping; Mu, Peiyuan; Qian, Weiqiang; Dong, Lingli; Zhang, Kunpu; Liu, Xin; Qin, Huanju; Ling, Hongqing; Wang, Daowen

    2016-07-22

    In higher plants, L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) plays important roles in ascorbic acid (AsA) biosynthesis and assembly of respiration complex I. Here we report three homoeologous genes (TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1) encoding common wheat GLDH isozymes and a unique allelic variant (TaGLDH-A1b) associated with enhanced drought tolerance. TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1 were located on chromosomes 5A, 5B and 5D, respectively, and their transcripts were found in multiple organs. The three homoeologs each conferred increased GLDH activity when ectopically expressed in tobacco. Decreasing TaGLDH expression in wheat significantly reduced GLDH activity and AsA content. TaGLDH-A1b differed from wild type allele TaGLDH-A1a by an in-frame deletion of three nucleotides. TaGLDH-A1b was biochemically less active than TaGLDH-A1a, and the total GLDH activity levels were generally lower in the cultivars carrying TaGLDH-A1b relative to those with TaGLDH-A1a. Interestingly, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars showed stronger water deficiency tolerance than TaGLDH-A1a cultivars, and TaGLDH-A1b co-segregated with decreased leaf water loss in a F2 population. Finally, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars generally exhibited smaller leaf stomatal aperture than TaGLDH-A1a varieties in control or water deficiency environments. Our work provides new information on GLDH genes and function in higher plants. TaGLDH-A1b is likely useful for further studying and improving wheat tolerance to drought stress.

  16. A novel allele of L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase is associated with enhanced drought tolerance through affecting stomatal aperture in common wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juncheng; Li, Bin; Yang, Yanping; Mu, Peiyuan; Qian, Weiqiang; Dong, Lingli; Zhang, Kunpu; Liu, Xin; Qin, Huanju; Ling, Hongqing; Wang, Daowen

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) plays important roles in ascorbic acid (AsA) biosynthesis and assembly of respiration complex I. Here we report three homoeologous genes (TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1) encoding common wheat GLDH isozymes and a unique allelic variant (TaGLDH-A1b) associated with enhanced drought tolerance. TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1 were located on chromosomes 5A, 5B and 5D, respectively, and their transcripts were found in multiple organs. The three homoeologs each conferred increased GLDH activity when ectopically expressed in tobacco. Decreasing TaGLDH expression in wheat significantly reduced GLDH activity and AsA content. TaGLDH-A1b differed from wild type allele TaGLDH-A1a by an in-frame deletion of three nucleotides. TaGLDH-A1b was biochemically less active than TaGLDH-A1a, and the total GLDH activity levels were generally lower in the cultivars carrying TaGLDH-A1b relative to those with TaGLDH-A1a. Interestingly, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars showed stronger water deficiency tolerance than TaGLDH-A1a cultivars, and TaGLDH-A1b co-segregated with decreased leaf water loss in a F2 population. Finally, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars generally exhibited smaller leaf stomatal aperture than TaGLDH-A1a varieties in control or water deficiency environments. Our work provides new information on GLDH genes and function in higher plants. TaGLDH-A1b is likely useful for further studying and improving wheat tolerance to drought stress. PMID:27443220

  17. Binding Patterns Associated Aß-HSP60 p458 Conjugate to HLA-DR-DRB Allele of Human in Alzheimer's Disease: An In Silico Approach.

    PubMed

    Padmadas, Naveen; Panda, Pritam Kumar; Durairaj, Sudarsanam

    2016-04-23

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex, irreversible, progressive brain disorder, which diminishes memory in a slow pace and thinking skills; ranked third by experts. It is a complex disorder that involves numerous cellular and subcellular alterations. The pathogenesis of AD is still unknown, but for better understanding, we proposed an in silico analysis to find out the binding patterns associated with HSP60. Several experimental conclusions have been drawn to understand the actual mechanism behind the forming of aggregation due to misfolding. Protein misfolding disorder is experimentally identified by the accumulation of protein aggregates at the intracellular or extracellular region of brain that adversely affects the cell functioning by disrupting the connection between the cells and ultimately leading to cell death. To unravel the mystery behind the mechanism of AD through computational approach, the current proposal shows the designing of Aß-HSP60 p458 conjugate followed by secondary structure analysis, which is further targeted to HLA-DR-DRB allele of human. The antigenicity of Aß (1-42) peptide is the major concern in our study predicted through PVS server, which provides an insight into the immunogenic behavior of Aß peptide. The mechanism involved in the interaction of HSP60-Aß conjugate with HLA-DR-DRB allele considering the fact that Aß (1-42) is highly immunogenic in human and interactions evoked highly robust T-cell response through MHC class II binding predictions. It was assisted by molecular dynamics simulation of predicted HSP60 structure followed by validation through Ramachandran plot analysis and protein-protein interaction of Aß (1-42) with HSP60.

  18. Searching for missing heritability: Designing rare variant association studies

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Or; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Samocha, Kaitlin; Do, Ron; Hechter, Eliana; Kathiresan, Sekar; Daly, Mark J.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Lander, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies have revealed thousands of loci predisposing to hundreds of human diseases and traits, revealing important biological pathways and defining novel therapeutic hypotheses. However, the genes discovered to date typically explain less than half of the apparent heritability. Because efforts have largely focused on common genetic variants, one hypothesis is that much of the missing heritability is due to rare genetic variants. Studies of common variants are typically referred to as genomewide association studies, whereas studies of rare variants are often simply called sequencing studies. Because they are actually closely related, we use the terms common variant association study (CVAS) and rare variant association study (RVAS). In this paper, we outline the similarities and differences between RVAS and CVAS and describe a conceptual framework for the design of RVAS. We apply the framework to address key questions about the sample sizes needed to detect association, the relative merits of testing disruptive alleles vs. missense alleles, frequency thresholds for filtering alleles, the value of predictors of the functional impact of missense alleles, the potential utility of isolated populations, the value of gene-set analysis, and the utility of de novo mutations. The optimal design depends critically on the selection coefficient against deleterious alleles and thus varies across genes. The analysis shows that common variant and rare variant studies require similarly large sample collections. In particular, a well-powered RVAS should involve discovery sets with at least 25,000 cases, together with a substantial replication set. PMID:24443550

  19. Leukemia-associated NOTCH1 alleles are weak tumor initiators but accelerate K-ras–initiated leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Mark Y.; Xu, Lanwei; Shestova, Olga; Histen, Gavin; L’Heureux, Sarah; Romany, Candice; Childs, M. Eden; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Aster, Jon C.; Pear, Warren S.

    2008-01-01

    Gain-of-function NOTCH1 mutations are found in 50%–70% of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL) cases. Gain-of-function NOTCH1 alleles that initiate strong downstream signals induce leukemia in mice, but it is unknown whether the gain-of-function NOTCH1 mutations most commonly found in individuals with T-ALL generate downstream signals of sufficient strength to induce leukemia. We addressed this question by expressing human gain-of-function NOTCH1 alleles of varying strength in mouse hematopoietic precursors. Uncommon gain-of-function NOTCH1 alleles that initiated strong downstream signals drove ectopic T cell development and induced leukemia efficiently. In contrast, although gain-of-function alleles that initiated only weak downstream signals also induced ectopic T cell development, these more common alleles failed to efficiently initiate leukemia development. However, weak gain-of-function NOTCH1 alleles accelerated the onset of leukemia initiated by constitutively active K-ras and gave rise to tumors that were sensitive to Notch signaling pathway inhibition. These data show that induction of leukemia requires doses of Notch1 greater than those needed for T cell development and that most NOTCH1 mutations found in T-ALL cells do not generate signals of sufficient strength to initiate leukemia development. Furthermore, low, nonleukemogenic levels of Notch1 can complement other leukemogenic events, such as activation of K-ras. Even when Notch1 participates secondarily, the resulting tumors show “addiction” to Notch, providing a further rationale for evaluating Notch signaling pathway inhibitors in leukemia. PMID:18677410

  20. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav) Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Sayono, Sayono; Hidayati, Anggie Puspa Nur; Fahri, Sukmal; Sumanto, Didik; Dharmana, Edi; Hadisaputro, Suharyo; Asih, Puji Budi Setia; Syafruddin, Din

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNaV gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide susceptibility tests demonstrated Ae, aegypti resistance to the pyrethroids, with mortality rates ranging from 1.6%–15.2%. Three non-synonymous polymorphisms (S989P, V1016G and F1534C) and one synonymous polymorphism (codon 982) were detected in the AaNaV gene. Eight AaNaV alleles were observed in specimens from Central Java. Allele 3 (SGF) and allele 7 (PGF) represent the most common alleles found and demonstrated strong associations with resistance to pyrethroids (OR = 2.75, CI: 0.97–7.8 and OR = 7.37, CI: 2.4–22.5, respectively). This is the first report of 8 Ae. aegypti AaNaV alleles, and it indicates the development of resistance in Ae. aegypti in response to pyrethroid insecticide-based selective pressure. These findings strongly suggest the need for an appropriate integrated use of insecticides in the region. The 989P, 1016G and 1534C polymorphisms in the AaNaV gene are potentially valuable molecular markers for pyrethroid insecticide resistance monitoring. PMID:26939002

  1. Ancestry of the Timorese: age-related macular degeneration associated genotype and allele sharing among human populations from throughout the world

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Margaux A.; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Ramke, Jacqueline; Smith, Silvia E.; Ennis, Sean; Simpson, Claire L.; Portas, Laura; Murgia, Federico; Ahn, Jeeyun; Dardenne, Caitlin; Mayne, Katie; Robinson, Rosann; Morgan, Denise J.; Brian, Garry; Lee, Lucy; Woo, Se J.; Zacharaki, Fani; Tsironi, Evangelia E.; Miller, Joan W.; Kim, Ivana K.; Park, Kyu H.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Stambolian, Dwight; DeAngelis, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    We observed that the third leading cause of blindness in the world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), occurs at a very low documented frequency in a population-based cohort from Timor-Leste. Thus, we determined a complete catalog of the ancestry of the Timorese by analysis of whole exome chip data and haplogroup analysis of SNP genotypes determined by sequencing the Hypervariable I and II regions of the mitochondrial genome and 17 genotyped YSTR markers obtained from 535 individuals. We genotyped 20 previously reported AMD-associated SNPs in the Timorese to examine their allele frequencies compared to and between previously documented AMD cohorts of varying ethnicities. For those without AMD (average age > 55 years), genotype and allele frequencies were similar for most SNPs with a few exceptions. The major risk allele of HTRA1 rs11200638 (10q26) was at a significantly higher frequency in the Timorese, as well as 3 of the 5 protective CFH (1q32) SNPs (rs800292, rs2284664, and rs12066959). Additionally, the most commonly associated AMD-risk SNP, CFH rs1061170 (Y402H), was also seen at a much lower frequency in the Korean and Timorese populations than in the assessed Caucasian populations (C ~7 vs. ~40%, respectively). The difference in allele frequencies between the Timorese population and the other genotyped populations, along with the haplogroup analysis, also highlight the genetic diversity of the Timorese. Specifically, the most common ancestry groupings were Oceanic (Melanesian and Papuan) and Eastern Asian (specifically Han Chinese). The low prevalence of AMD in the Timorese population (2 of 535 randomly selected participants) may be due to the enrichment of protective alleles in this population at the 1q32 locus. PMID:26217379

  2. Presence of specific MHC Class II expressed alleles associates with clinical disease in ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) infected sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic tool hypothesized to predict which OPPV infected sheep will progress to debilitating clinical disease is MHC Class II Ovis aries (Ovar)-DRB1. Previously, fifteen Ovar-DRB1 beta 1 expressed alleles were identified in a ewe-lamb flock of 32 originating from an Idaho flock using RT-PCR, clon...

  3. A genome-wide study of allelic imbalance in human testicular germ cell tumors using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Bergthorsson, Jon Thor; Agnarsson, Bjarni Agnar; Gudbjartsson, Tomas; Magnusson, Kjartan; Thoroddsen, Asgeir; Palsson, Birgir; Bjornsson, Johannes; Stefansson, Kari; Gulcher, Jeffrey; Einarsson, Gudmundur Vikar; Amundadottir, Laufey Thora; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork

    2006-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) arise by multistep carcinogenesis pathways involving selective losses and gains of chromosome material. To locate cancer genes underlying this selection, we performed a genome-wide study of allelic imbalance (AI) in 32 tumors, using 710 microsatellite markers. The highest prevalence of AI was found at 12p, in line with previous studies finding consistent gain of the region in TGCTs. High frequency of AI was also observed at chromosome arms 4p, 9q, 10p, 11q, 11p, 13q, 16q, 18p, and 22q. Within 39 candidate regions identified by mapping of smallest regions of overlap (SROs), the highest frequency of AI was at 12p11.21 approximately p11.22 (62%), 12p12.1 approximately p13.1 (53%), 12p13.1 approximately p13.2 (53%), 11q14.1 approximately q14.2 (53%), 11p13 approximately p14.3 (47%), 9q21.13 approximately q21.32 (47%), and 4p15.1 approximately p15.2 (44%). Two genes known to be involved in cancer reside in these regions, ETV6 at 12p13.2 (TEL oncogene) and WT1 at 11p13. We also found a significant association (P = 0.02) between AI at 10q21.1 approximately q22.2 and higher clinical stage. This study contributes to the ongoing search for genes involved in transformation of germ cells and provides a useful reference point to previous studies using cytogenetic techniques to map chromosome changes in TGCTs.

  4. Novel PLA2G6 mutations associated with an exonic deletion due to non-allelic homologous recombination in a patient with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Shibata, Takashi; Akiyama, Mari; Oka, Makio; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Novel PLA2G6 mutations associated with p.Asp283Asn and a unique intragenic deletion of exons 4 and 5 due to non-allelic homologous recombination were identified in a Japanese female patient with typical infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. The patient showed progressive tetraplegia beginning at 9 months. An electroencephalogram showed a diffuse increase in fast waves, and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed progressive brain atrophy and T2 hypointensity in the globus pallidus. PMID:27081553

  5. Comparison of HLA allelic imputation programs.

    PubMed

    Karnes, Jason H; Shaffer, Christian M; Bastarache, Lisa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Glazer, Andrew M; Steiner, Heidi E; Mosley, Jonathan D; Mallal, Simon; Denny, Joshua C; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Roden, Dan M

    2017-01-01

    Imputation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles from SNP-level data is attractive due to importance of HLA alleles in human disease, widespread availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data, and expertise required for HLA sequencing. However, comprehensive evaluations of HLA imputations programs are limited. We compared HLA imputation results of HIBAG, SNP2HLA, and HLA*IMP:02 to sequenced HLA alleles in 3,265 samples from BioVU, a de-identified electronic health record database coupled to a DNA biorepository. We performed four-digit HLA sequencing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1 using long-read 454 FLX sequencing. All samples were genotyped using both the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip platform and a GWAS platform. Call rates and concordance rates were compared by platform, frequency of allele, and race/ethnicity. Overall concordance rates were similar between programs in European Americans (EA) (0.975 [SNP2HLA]; 0.939 [HLA*IMP:02]; 0.976 [HIBAG]). SNP2HLA provided a significant advantage in terms of call rate and the number of alleles imputed. Concordance rates were lower overall for African Americans (AAs). These observations were consistent when accuracy was compared across HLA loci. All imputation programs performed similarly for low frequency HLA alleles. Higher concordance rates were observed when HLA alleles were imputed from GWAS platforms versus the HumanExome BeadChip, suggesting that high genomic coverage is preferred as input for HLA allelic imputation. These findings provide guidance on the best use of HLA imputation methods and elucidate their limitations.

  6. Comparison of HLA allelic imputation programs

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Christian M.; Bastarache, Lisa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Glazer, Andrew M.; Steiner, Heidi E.; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Mallal, Simon; Denny, Joshua C.; Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Roden, Dan M.

    2017-01-01

    Imputation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles from SNP-level data is attractive due to importance of HLA alleles in human disease, widespread availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data, and expertise required for HLA sequencing. However, comprehensive evaluations of HLA imputations programs are limited. We compared HLA imputation results of HIBAG, SNP2HLA, and HLA*IMP:02 to sequenced HLA alleles in 3,265 samples from BioVU, a de-identified electronic health record database coupled to a DNA biorepository. We performed four-digit HLA sequencing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1 using long-read 454 FLX sequencing. All samples were genotyped using both the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip platform and a GWAS platform. Call rates and concordance rates were compared by platform, frequency of allele, and race/ethnicity. Overall concordance rates were similar between programs in European Americans (EA) (0.975 [SNP2HLA]; 0.939 [HLA*IMP:02]; 0.976 [HIBAG]). SNP2HLA provided a significant advantage in terms of call rate and the number of alleles imputed. Concordance rates were lower overall for African Americans (AAs). These observations were consistent when accuracy was compared across HLA loci. All imputation programs performed similarly for low frequency HLA alleles. Higher concordance rates were observed when HLA alleles were imputed from GWAS platforms versus the HumanExome BeadChip, suggesting that high genomic coverage is preferred as input for HLA allelic imputation. These findings provide guidance on the best use of HLA imputation methods and elucidate their limitations. PMID:28207879

  7. [Prognostic implications of GP3a glucoprotein gene PLA1/PLA2 allele in prostatic cancer: pilot results of the study].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Itkes, A V; Seregin, A A; Miandina, G I

    2005-01-01

    We studied the role of integrins, primarily, the role of allele distribution of GP3a gene in development of prostatic cancer (PC) and assessment of its prognostic significance. From November 2003 to May 2004 we examined 32 patients with PC: 11 patients with local PC T1-2N0M0; 14 patients with locally advanced cancer T3N0M0 and 7 patients with invasive and/or metastatic cancer T3-4N10-1 or T3-4N0-1M1. The blood from all the patients we studied with PCR for alleles of GP3a gene, PSA. Seventeen patients were found to have alleles PLA1A1, 14(44%)--alleles PLA1A2, 1(3%)--alleles PLA2A2. Alleles PLA1A2 occurred significantly more often than in the population (p < 0.005). The group analysis has found that 8 patients with local PC had alleles PLA1A1, 3 patients--alleles PLA1A2 (27%). We discovered alleles PLA2A2, PLA1A1 and PLA1A2 in 1(7%), 5(36%) and 8(57%) patients with locally advanced PC, respectively. Among patients with metastatic and/or invasive prostatic cancer, there were 4 (57%) and 3 (43%) cases of alleles PLA1A1 and PLA1A2, respectively. Our study demonstrated influence of carriage of PLA2 allele on occurrence of PC risk (5-fold higher) and its invasive forms (10-fold higher and more). Probability to develop local invasion among patients with prostatic cancer--carriers allele PLA1A2 is 6 times higher than among carriers of alleles PLA1A1. A PC course in carriers of alleles PLA1A2 may be characterized by faster development of local invasion and metastasizing vs carriers of alleles PLA1A1. These findings can be used in design of nomograms for prognostication of invasion of clinically small tumors in verification of significance on greater number of the patients.

  8. Allelic frequencies of 3' Ig heavy chain locus enhancer HS1,2-A associated with Ig levels in patients with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    Frezza, Domenico; Giambra, Vincenzo; Mattioli, Claudia; Piccoli, Katia; Massoud, Renato; Siracusano, Alberto; Giannantonio, Massimo Di; Birshtein, Barbara K.; Rubino, I. Alex

    2009-01-01

    Infectious and autoimmune pathogenic hypotheses of schizophrenia have been proposed, prompting searches for antibodies against viruses or brain structures, and for altered levels of immunoglobulins. Previous experiments have shown that allele frequencies of the Ig heavy chain 3' enhancer HS1,2*A are associated with several autoimmune diseases, suggesting a possible correlation between HS1,2 alleles and Ig production. To test this, we analyzed levels of serum Igs and HS1,2*A genotypes in two independent cohorts, one of 88 schizophrenic inpatients (24 women) and a second of 133 healthy subjects (59 women). Both groups were similar in the frequency of individuals with altered serum concentration of Ig classes and IgG subclasses (schizophrenia panel-80%; controls-68%). With the possible exception of a stabilizing effect of olanzapine, no psychopharmacological drug consumed during the month prior to serum sampling in the schizophrenia group significantly affected Ig levels. In both patient and control cohorts, an increased frequency of the HS1,2 *2A allele corresponded to increased Ig plasma levels, while an increased frequency of the HS1,2*1A allele corresponded to decreased Ig plasma levels. EMSA analysis with nuclear extracts from human B cells showed that the transcription factor SP1 bound to the polymorphic region of both HS1,2*1A and HS1,2*2A while NF-κB bound only to the HS1,2*2A. We predict that differences in transcription factor binding sites in the two allelic variants of the 3' IgH enhancer HS1,2 may provide a mechanism by which differences in Ig expression are affected. PMID:19309558

  9. Expansion of the Parkinson disease-associated SNCA-Rep1 allele upregulates human alpha-synuclein in transgenic mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Kenneth D; Ge, Dongliang; Manninger, Paul; Linnertz, Colton; Rossoshek, Anna; Orrison, Bonnie M; Bernard, David J; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Schlossmacher, Michael G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Chiba-Falek, Ornit

    2009-09-01

    Alpha-synuclein (SNCA) gene has been implicated in the development of rare forms of familial Parkinson disease (PD). Recently, it was shown that an increase in SNCA copy numbers leads to elevated levels of wild-type SNCA-mRNA and protein and is sufficient to cause early-onset, familial PD. A critical question concerning the molecular pathogenesis of PD is what contributory role, if any, is played by the SNCA gene in sporadic PD. The expansion of SNCA-Rep1, an upstream, polymorphic microsatellite of the SNCA gene, is associated with elevated risk for sporadic PD. However, whether SNCA-Rep1 is the causal variant and the underlying mechanism with which its effect is mediated by remained elusive. We report here the effects of three distinct SNCA-Rep1 variants in the brains of 72 mice transgenic for the entire human SNCA locus. Human SNCA-mRNA and protein levels were increased 1.7- and 1.25-fold, respectively, in homozygotes for the expanded, PD risk-conferring allele compared with homozygotes for the shorter, protective allele. When adjusting for the total SNCA-protein concentration (endogenous mouse and transgenic human) expressed in each brain, the expanded risk allele contributed 2.6-fold more to the SNCA steady-state than the shorter allele. Furthermore, targeted deletion of Rep1 resulted in the lowest human SNCA-mRNA and protein concentrations in murine brain. In contrast, the Rep1 effect was not observed in blood lysates from the same mice. These results demonstrate that Rep1 regulates human SNCA expression by enhancing its transcription in the adult nervous system and suggest that homozygosity for the expanded Rep1 allele may mimic locus multiplication, thereby elevating PD risk.

  10. Distinct Transcript Isoforms of the Atypical Chemokine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) / Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) Gene Are Expressed in Lymphoblasts and Altered Isoform Levels Are Associated with Genetic Ancestry and the Duffy-Null Allele

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melissa B.; Walens, Andrea; Hire, Rupali; Mumin, Kauthar; Brown, Andrea M.; Ford, DeJuana; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Monteil, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atypical ChemoKine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) gene, better known as Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC or Duffy), is responsible for the Duffy Blood Group and plays a major role in regulating the circulating homeostatic levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines. Previous studies have shown that one common variant, the Duffy Null (Fy-) allele that is specific to African Ancestry groups, completely removes expression of the gene on erythrocytes; however, these individuals retain endothelial expression. Additional alleles are associated with a myriad of clinical outcomes related to immune responses and inflammation. In addition to allele variants, there are two distinct transcript isoforms of DARC which are expressed from separate promoters, and very little is known about the distinct transcriptional regulation or the distinct functionality of these protein isoforms. Our objective was to determine if the African specific Fy- allele alters the expression pattern of DARC isoforms and therefore could potentially result in a unique signature of the gene products, commonly referred to as antigens. Our work is the first to establish that there is expression of DARC on lymphoblasts. Our data indicates that people of African ancestry have distinct relative levels of DARC isoforms expressed in these cells. We conclude that the expression of both isoforms in combination with alternate alleles yields multiple Duffy antigens in ancestry groups, depending upon the haplotypes across the gene. Importantly, we hypothesize that DARC isoform expression patterns will translate into ancestry-specific inflammatory responses that are correlated with the axis of pro-inflammatory chemokine levels and distinct isoform-specific interactions with these chemokines. Ultimately, this work will increase knowledge of biological mechanisms underlying disparate clinical outcomes of inflammatory-related diseases among ethnic and geographic ancestry groups. PMID:26473357

  11. Allele-specific transcriptional activity of the variable number of tandem repeats of the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene is associated with idiopathic achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Michela; Palumbo, Ilaria; Pesce, Marcella; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Annese, Vito; Petruzzelli, Raffaella; Izzo, Paola; Sepulveres, Rossana; Bruzzese, Dario; Esposito, Giuseppe; Cuomo, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms of genes involved in the regulation of the immune response are risk factors for achalasia, but their contribution to disease pathogenesis is unknown. Nitric oxide is involved both in immune function and inhibitory neurotransmission. Objective The objective of this article is to assess the association and the functional relevance of the CCTTT-inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) gene promoter polymorphism in achalasia. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from 181 achalasia patients and 220 controls. Genotyping of the (CCTTT)n repeats was performed by PCR and capillary electrophoresis, and data analyzed by considering the frequency of the different alleles. HT29 cells were transfected with iNOS luciferase promoter-reporter plasmids containing different (CCTTT)n. Results The alleles’ distribution ranged from 7 to 18, with a peak frequency at 12 repeats. Analysis of the allele frequencies revealed that individuals carrying 10 and 13 CCTTT repeats were respectively less and more frequent in achalasia (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3–0.5 and OR 1.6, 95% CI 1–2.4, all p < 0.05). Long repeats were also significantly associated with an earlier onset of the disease (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.13–2.53, p = 0.01). Transfection experiments revealed a similar allele-specific iNOS transcriptional activity. Conclusion The functional polymorphism (CCTTT) of NOS2 promoter is associated with achalasia, likely by an allele-specific modulation of nitric oxide production. PMID:28344787

  12. CYP2C19 loss-of-function alleles are not associated with clinical outcome of clopidogrel therapy in patients treated with newer-generation drug-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ik Jun; Koh, Yoon-Seok; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung Ho; Choi, Yun-Seok; Park, Chul-Soo; Park, Hun-Jun; Kim, Pum-Joon; Chung, Wook-Sung; Kim, Ho-Sook; Shin, Jae-Gook; Seung, Ki-Bae; Chang, Kiyuk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract CYP2C19 loss-of-function (LOF) alleles adversely affect clinical outcome of clopidogrel therapy. Recent introduction of a newer-generation drug-eluting stent (DES) has significantly reduced the occurrence of stent thrombosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of CYP2C19 LOF alleles on clinical outcome in patients treated with the newer-generation DES. The effects of CYP2C19 genotypes were evaluated on clinical outcome of clopidogrel therapy in 2062 patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention using either first-generation DES (sirolimus- and paclitaxel-eluting stent, n = 1349) or newer-generation DES (everolimus- and zotarolimus-eluting stent, n = 713). The primary clinical outcome was major cardiac and cerebrovascular event (MACCE) including cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, and stent thrombosis during 1 year of follow-up. CYP2C19 LOF alleles were significantly associated with a higher risk of MACCE in patients treated with first-generation DES (hazard ratio [HR] 2.599, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.047–6.453; P = 0.034). In contrast, CYP2C19 LOF alleles were not associated with primary outcome in newer-generation DES (HR 0.716, 95% CI 0.316–1.622; P = 0.522). In the further multivariate analysis, CYP2C19 LOF alleles were not associated with MACCE in patients receiving newer-generation DES (adjusted HR 0.540, 95% CI 0.226–1.291; P = 0.166), whereas they were demonstrated to be an independent risk factor for MACCE in those implanted with first-generation DES (adjusted HR 3.501, 95% CI 1.194–10.262; P = 0.022). In contradiction to their clinical impact in first-generation DES era, CYP2C19 LOF alleles may not affect clinical outcome of clopidogrel therapy in patients treated with newer-generation DES. PMID:27368038

  13. The allelic variant of LAR gene promoter -127 bp T-->A is associated with reduced risk of obesity and other features related to insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Miscio, Giuseppe; Tassi, Vittorio; Coco, Angelo; Soccio, Teresa; Di Paola, Rosa; Prudente, Sabrina; Baratta, Roberto; Frittitta, Lucia; Ludovico, Ornella; Padovano, Libera; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Di Mario, Umberto; De Cosmo, Salvatore; Trischitta, Vincenzo

    2004-07-01

    Insulin resistance, which is pathogenic for type 2 diabetes (T2D), is under the control of largely unknown genetic determinants. LAR, a protein-tyrosine phosphatase which inhibits insulin signalling, is overexpressed in animal and human models of insulin resistance. We studied the entire sequence of the LAR gene by SSCP analysis and automatic DNA sequencing, with the aim of verifying whether its sequence variants might be associated with insulin resistance. In the 276 bp sequence upstream of the transcriptional start site (i.e. a region we have identified as having basal promoter activity) a -127 bp T-->A SNP (5% frequency) was associated with lower body mass index (BMI) ( P=0.03), waist circumference ( P=0.01), blood pressure ( P=0.01) and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio ( P=0.04) in 589 non-diabetic unrelated individuals from the Gargano region (central east coast of Italy). To quantify the risk for a high body weight conferred by the -127 T-->A SNP, the whole cohort was divided into tertiles according to the individual BMI. The risk of belonging to the heavier tertile, as compared to the leaner one, was reduced by approximately 60%. In a population from East Sicily ( n=307), T/A genotype carriers ( n=13) showed lower triglyceride levels ( P=0.04) and higher insulin sensitivity as indicated by lower plasma glucose ( P=0.03) and serum insulin ( P=0.006) during oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT). Promoter activity, studied by cDNA transfection experiments, was similar for the A and T alleles. In conclusion, a genetic variant of the LAR gene promoter is consistently associated with features of insulin resistance in two different Caucasian populations. Although the biological relevance of this variant has yet to be determined, this finding underlines the potential importance of the LAR gene in dysregulation of insulin sensitivity and related disorders.

  14. Mice heterozygous for an inactivated allele of the schizophrenia associated Brd1 gene display selective cognitive deficits with translational relevance to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Qvist, Per; Rajkumar, Anto P; Redrobe, John P; Nyegaard, Mette; Christensen, Jane H; Mors, Ole; Wegener, Gregers; Didriksen, Michael; Børglum, Anders D

    2017-03-21

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating brain disorder characterized by disturbances of emotion, perception and cognition. Cognitive impairments predict functional outcome in schizophrenia and are detectable even in the prodromal stage of the disorder. However, our understanding of the underlying neurobiology is limited and procognitive treatments remain elusive. We recently demonstrated that mice heterozygous for an inactivated allele of the schizophrenia-associated Brd1 gene (Brd1(+/)(-) mice) display behaviors reminiscent of schizophrenia, including impaired social cognition and long-term memory. Here, we further characterize performance of these mice by following the preclinical guidelines recommended by the 'Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS)' and 'Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (CNTRICS)' initiatives to maximize translational value. Brd1(+/-) mice exhibit relational encoding deficits, compromised working and long term memory, as well as impaired executive cognitive functioning with cognitive behaviors relying on medial prefrontal cortex being particularly affected. Akin to patients with schizophrenia, the cognitive deficits displayed by Brd1(+/)(-) mice are not global, but selective. Our results underline the value of Brd1(+/)(-) mice as a promising tool for studying the neurobiology of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  15. Identification of a member of the catalase multigene family on wheat chromosome 7A associated with flour b* colour and biological significance of allelic variation.

    PubMed

    Li, Dora A; Walker, Esther; Francki, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    Carotenoids (especially lutein) are known to be the pigment source for flour b* colour in bread wheat. Flour b* colour variation is controlled by a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on wheat chromosome 7AL and one gene from the carotenoid pathway, phytoene synthase, was functionally associated with the QTL on 7AL in some, but not all, wheat genotypes. A SNP marker within a sequence similar to catalase (Cat3-A1snp) derived from full-length (FL) cDNA (AK332460), however, was consistently associated with the QTL on 7AL and implicated in regulating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to control carotenoid accumulation affecting flour b* colour. The number of catalase genes on chromosome 7AL was investigated in this study to identify which gene may be implicated in flour b* variation and two were identified through interrogation of the draft wheat genome survey sequence consisting of five exons and a further two members having eight exons identified through comparative analysis with the single catalase gene on rice chromosome 6, PCR amplification and sequencing. It was evident that the catalase genes on chromosome 7A had duplicated and diverged during evolution relative to its counterpart on rice chromosome 6. The detection of transcripts in seeds, the co-location with Cat3-A1snp marker and maximised alignment of FL-cDNA (AK332460) with cognate genomic sequence indicated that TaCat3-A1 was the member of the catalase gene family associated with flour b* colour variation. Re-sequencing identified three alleles from three wheat varieties, TaCat3-A1a, TaCat3-A1b and TaCat3-A1c, and their predicted protein identified differences in peroxisomal targeting signal tri-peptide domain in the carboxyl terminal end providing new insights into their potential role in regulating cellular H2O2 that contribute to flour b* colour variation.

  16. Ovine MHC class II DRB1 alleles associated with resistance or susceptibility to development of bovine leukemia virus-induced ovine lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Y; Kabeya, H; Onuma, M; Kasai, N; Okada, K; Aida, Y

    1999-02-15

    For the further characterization of bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-induced leukemogenesis, we investigated the association between polymorphism of ovine leukocyte antigen (OLA)-DRB1 gene and tumor development after infection of sheep with BLV. We infected 28 sheep with BLV and cloned exon 2 of the OLA-DRB1 gene from asymptomatic animals and from animals with lymphoma Sequence analysis revealed that, among 12 healthy sheep without any evidence of tumor, ten (83.3%) carried DRB1 alleles encoding Arg-Lys (RK) at positions beta70/71 as compared with only 6 (37.5%) of the 16 sheep with lymphoma, which suggested that alleles encoding the RK motif might protect against development of tumors after infection by BLV. By contrast, alleles encoding Ser-Arg (SR) at positions beta70/71 were present at a significantly elevated frequency in sheep with lymphoma as compared with the healthy carriers, which indicated that OLA-DRB1 alleles encoding the SR motif might be positively related to susceptibility to tumor development. The two amino acids in these motifs line a pocket that accommodates the side chain of a bound peptide according to a model of the crystal structure of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR1. To analyze immunoreactions of sheep with alleles that encoded RK or SR at beta70/71, we selected sheep with either the RK/SR genotypes or the SR/SR genotypes and immunized them with a mixture of multiple synthetic antigenic peptides that corresponded to T-helper, T-cytotoxic, and B-cell epitopes of the BLV envelope glycoprotein gp51. Two weeks after the last immunization, all of the sheep were challenged with BLV. Sheep with the RK/SR genotype produced neutralizing antibodies against BLV; they eliminated BLV completely within 28 weeks of the BLV challenge, and they gave strong lymphocyte-proliferative responses to the peptides used for immunization. Moreover, such animals did not develop lymphoma. By contrast, sheep with the SR/SR genotype continued to produce BLV throughout the

  17. Strong association of the HLA-DP6 supertype with childhood leukaemia is due to a single allele, DPB1*0601.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G M; Hussain, A; Verhage, V; Thompson, P D; Fergusson, W D; Watkins, G; Lightfoot, T; Harrison, C J; Birch, J M

    2009-05-01

    We previously reported that susceptibility to childhood B cell precursor ALL (BCP ALL) is associated with HLA-DPB1 alleles having glutamic acid (E) rather than lysine (K) in the P4 antigenic peptide-binding pocket. Clustering approximately 90% of DPB1 alleles into DPB69E (DP2, 6, 8) and DPB69K (DP1, 3, 4) supertypes revealed that DP2 and DP8 are associated with BCP ALL, but DP6 is also associated with non-BCP leukaemia. Here, we report that only one of seven alleles with the DP6 supertype (DPB1(*)0601) is associated with childhood leukaemia (leukaemia vs controls: odds ratio, 95% confidence interval [OR, CI]: 4.6, 2.0-10.4; corrected P=0.019), but not with childhood solid tumours or lymphomas. DPB1(*)0601 is also significantly associated with leukaemia subtypes, including BCP ALL, Pro-B ALL, T-ALL and AML. DPB1(*)0601 is significantly over-transmitted (76.9%) from parents to children with BCP ALL (OR; CI: 4.7; 1.01-22.2). Sequencing the coding region of DPB1(*)0601 revealed an exon 1-4 haplotype [T-DEAV-KIL-RVI] shared with DPB1(*)0301 and 0901, but no evidence of germline mutations in childhood leukaemia. These results suggest that the DPbeta0601 molecule may be functionally involved in childhood leukaemia. Analysis of peptide binding and T-cell activation by DPbeta0601-peptide complexes should help determine its role in childhood leukaemia causation.

  18. Regulation of human melanocortin 1 receptor signaling and trafficking by Thr-308 and Ser-316 and its alteration in variant alleles associated with red hair and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Laorden, Berta L; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José C

    2007-02-02

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase, is a key regulator of melanocyte proliferation and differentiation and a determinant of pigmentation, skin phototype, and skin cancer risk. MC1R activation stimulates melanogenesis and increases the ratio of black, strongly photoprotective eumelanins to yellowish and poorly photoprotective pheomelanin pigments. Desensitization and internalization are key regulatory mechanisms of GPCR signaling. Agonist-induced desensitization usually depends on phosphorylation by a GPCR kinase (GRK) followed by receptor internalization in endocytic vesicles. We have shown that MC1R desensitization is mediated by two GRKs expressed in melanocytes and melanoma cells, GRK2 and GRK6. Here we show that in contrast with this dual specificity for desensitization, GRK6 but not GRK2 mediated MC1R internalization. Mutagenesis studies suggested that the targets of GRK6 are two residues located in the MC1R cytosolic C terminus, Thr-308 and Ser-316. A T308D/S316D mutant mimicking their phosphorylated state was constitutively desensitized and associated with endosomes, whereas a T308A/S316A mutant was resistant to desensitization and internalization. We studied the desensitization and internalization of three variant MC1R forms associated with red hair and increased skin cancer risk: R151C, R160W, and D294H. These variants showed a less efficient desensitization. Moreover, D294H was resistant to internalization, thus accounting for its abnormally high surface expression. Co-expression of variant and wild type MC1R modified its desensitization and internalization behavior. These data suggest that MC1R might be regulated by novel mechanisms including differential effects of GRKs and altered desensitization rates of certain allelic combinations.

  19. A-1012G promoter polymorphism of vitamin D receptor gene is associated with psoriasis risk and lower allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Richetta, Antonio Giovanni; Silvestri, Valentina; Giancristoforo, Simona; Rizzolo, Piera; D'Epiro, Sara; Graziano, Veronica; Mattozzi, Carlo; Navazio, Anna Sara; Campoli, Marco; D'Amico, Cristina; Scarnò, Marco; Calvieri, Stefano; Ottini, Laura

    2014-02-01

    Psoriasis is caused by a combination of genetic, immunologic, and environmental factors. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is involved in antiproliferative and prodifferentiation pathways in keratinocytes and exerts immunosuppressive effects. We aimed to investigate possible associations between VDR polymorphisms and psoriasis susceptibility and to evaluate functional effects of potential psoriasis-associated polymorphisms. We genotyped 108 patients with psoriasis and 268 healthy controls at 5 VDR polymorphisms (A-1012G, FokI, BsmI, ApaI, and TaqI) by TaqMan allelic-discrimination real-time polymerase chain reaction. We found a significant increased overall risk of psoriasis for the VDR A-1012G promoter polymorphism (odds ratio [OR]=2.43, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.15-5.13; p=0.05). A significant higher frequency (p=0.035) of the A allele was found in psoriatic cases compared with controls. In a case-case analysis, a statistically significant association between A-1012G and family history emerged (p=0.033). Furthermore, a significant association of A-1012G risk genotypes with a lower expression of VDR mRNA emerged (p=0.0028). Our data show that VDR promoter A-1012G polymorphism is associated with psoriasis risk and suggest that this polymorphism may modulate psoriasis risk by affecting VDR expression.

  20. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Genes Associated with Fusarium Ear Rot Resistance in a Maize Core Diversity Panel

    PubMed Central

    Zila, Charles T.; Samayoa, L. Fernando; Santiago, Rogelio; Butrón, Ana; Holland, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium ear rot is a common disease of maize that affects food and feed quality globally. Resistance to the disease is highly quantitative, and maize breeders have difficulty incorporating polygenic resistance alleles from unadapted donor sources into elite breeding populations without having a negative impact on agronomic performance. Identification of specific allele variants contributing to improved resistance may be useful to breeders by allowing selection of resistance alleles in coupling phase linkage with favorable agronomic characteristics. We report the results of a genome-wide association study to detect allele variants associated with increased resistance to Fusarium ear rot in a maize core diversity panel of 267 inbred lines evaluated in two sets of environments. We performed association tests with 47,445 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) while controlling for background genomic relationships with a mixed model and identified three marker loci significantly associated with disease resistance in at least one subset of environments. Each associated SNP locus had relatively small additive effects on disease resistance (±1.1% on a 0–100% scale), but nevertheless were associated with 3 to 12% of the genotypic variation within or across environment subsets. Two of three identified SNPs colocalized with genes that have been implicated with programmed cell death. An analysis of associated allele frequencies within the major maize subpopulations revealed enrichment for resistance alleles in the tropical/subtropical and popcorn subpopulations compared with other temperate breeding pools. PMID:24048647

  1. A real-time PCR assay for the rapid identification of the autoimmune disease-associated allele HLA-DQB1*0602

    PubMed Central

    Gersuk, Vivian H.; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2011-01-01

    Many autoimmune diseases share a genetic association with the presence or absence of HLA-DQB1*0602, including type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and narcolepsy. High resolution HLA typing to determine the presence of this allele is cumbersome and expensive by currently available techniques. We present a real-time PCR assay for the identification of HLA-DQB1*0602, using sequence-specific primers and probes, that provides rapid and sensitive identification of this allele, involves minimal hands-on time, and provides a major cost savings compared to existing methods. The assay allows the simultaneous determination of both the presence and the number of copies of this allele. Since there is no post-PCR handling, the risk of contamination is avoided. We have validated the assay using 44 blinded and 32 unblinded samples, previously typed by standard techniques, which were identified with 100% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. Further, using a narcolepsy cohort of 734 subjects, we demonstrated the robustness of the assay to analyze DNA isolated from buccal swabs, demonstrating the applicability of this assay as an alternative approach to traditional HLA typing methods. PMID:19317743

  2. Allele-specific recognition by LILRB3 and LILRA6 of a cytokeratin 8 - associated ligand on necrotic glandular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    López-Álvarez, María R.; Jahnke, Martin; Russell, Alasdair I.; Radjabova, Valeria; Trowsdale, Alice R.Z.; Trowsdale, John

    2016-01-01

    The LILRs are a family of receptors that regulate the activities of myelomonocytic cells. We found that specific allelic variants of two related members of the LILR family, LILRB3 and LILRA6, interact with a ligand exposed on necrotic glandular epithelial cells. The extracellular domains of LILRB3 and LILRA6 are very similar and their genes are highly polymorphic. A commonly occurring allele, LILRB3*12, displayed particularly strong binding of these necrotic cells and further screening of the products of LILRB3 alleles identified motifs that correlated with binding. Immunoprecipitation of the ligand from epithelial cell lysates using recombinant LILRB3*12, identified cytokeratins 8, 18 and 19. Purified proteins obtained from epithelial cell lysates, using anti-cytokeratin 8 antibodies, were able to activate LILRB3*12 reporter cells. Knock-down of cytokeratin 8 in epithelial cells abrogated expression of the LILRB3 ligand, while staining with recombinant LILRB3*12 showed co-localisation with cytokeratin 8 and 18 in permeabilised breast cancer cells. Necrosis is a common feature of tumours. The finding of a necrosis-associated ligand for these two receptors raises the possibility of a novel interaction that alters immune responses within the tumour microenvironment. Since LILRB3 and LILRA6 genes are highly polymorphic the interaction may influence an individual's immune response to tumours. PMID:26769854

  3. Genetic invalidation of Lp-PLA2 as a therapeutic target: Large-scale study of five functional Lp-PLA2-lowering alleles.

    PubMed

    Gregson, John M; Freitag, Daniel F; Surendran, Praveen; Stitziel, Nathan O; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Burgess, Stephen; Kaptoge, Stephen; Gao, Pei; Staley, James R; Willeit, Peter; Nielsen, Sune F; Caslake, Muriel; Trompet, Stella; Polfus, Linda M; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kontto, Jukka; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Veronesi, Giovanni; Gianfagna, Francesco; Männistö, Satu; Kimura, Akinori; Lin, Honghuang; Reilly, Dermot F; Gorski, Mathias; Mijatovic, Vladan; Munroe, Patricia B; Ehret, Georg B; Thompson, Alex; Uria-Nickelsen, Maria; Malarstig, Anders; Dehghan, Abbas; Vogt, Thomas F; Sasaoka, Taishi; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Kato, Norihiro; Yamada, Yoshiji; Kee, Frank; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ferrières, Jean; Arveiler, Dominique; Amouyel, Philippe; Salomaa, Veikko; Boerwinkle, Eric; Thompson, Simon G; Ford, Ian; Wouter Jukema, J; Sattar, Naveed; Packard, Chris J; Shafi Majumder, Abdulla Al; Alam, Dewan S; Deloukas, Panos; Schunkert, Heribert; Samani, Nilesh J; Kathiresan, Sekar; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Saleheen, Danish; Howson, Joanna Mm; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Butterworth, Adam S; Danesh, John

    2017-03-01

    Aims Darapladib, a potent inhibitor of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), has not reduced risk of cardiovascular disease outcomes in recent randomized trials. We aimed to test whether Lp-PLA2 enzyme activity is causally relevant to coronary heart disease. Methods In 72,657 patients with coronary heart disease and 110,218 controls in 23 epidemiological studies, we genotyped five functional variants: four rare loss-of-function mutations (c.109+2T > C (rs142974898), Arg82His (rs144983904), Val279Phe (rs76863441), Gln287Ter (rs140020965)) and one common modest-impact variant (Val379Ala (rs1051931)) in PLA2G7, the gene encoding Lp-PLA2. We supplemented de-novo genotyping with information on a further 45,823 coronary heart disease patients and 88,680 controls in publicly available databases and other previous studies. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials to compare effects of darapladib treatment on soluble Lp-PLA2 activity, conventional cardiovascular risk factors, and coronary heart disease risk with corresponding effects of Lp-PLA2-lowering alleles. Results Lp-PLA2 activity was decreased by 64% ( p = 2.4 × 10(-25)) with carriage of any of the four loss-of-function variants, by 45% ( p < 10(-300)) for every allele inherited at Val279Phe, and by 2.7% ( p = 1.9 × 10(-12)) for every allele inherited at Val379Ala. Darapladib 160 mg once-daily reduced Lp-PLA2 activity by 65% ( p < 10(-300)). Causal risk ratios for coronary heart disease per 65% lower Lp-PLA2 activity were: 0.95 (0.88-1.03) with Val279Phe; 0.92 (0.74-1.16) with carriage of any loss-of-function variant; 1.01 (0.68-1.51) with Val379Ala; and 0.95 (0.89-1.02) with darapladib treatment. Conclusions In a large-scale human genetic study, none of a series of Lp-PLA2-lowering alleles was related to coronary heart disease risk, suggesting that Lp-PLA2 is unlikely to be a causal risk factor.

  4. Cooperation of Adhesin Alleles in Salmonella-Host Tropism

    PubMed Central

    De Masi, Leon; Yue, Min; Hu, Changmin; Rakov, Alexey V.; Rankin, Shelley C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Allelic combinations and host specificities for three fimbrial adhesins, FimH, BcfD, and StfH, were compared for 262 strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport, a frequent human and livestock pathogen. Like FimH, BcfD had two major alleles (designated A and B), whereas StfH had two allelic groups, each with two alleles (subgroup A1 and A2 and subgroup B1 and B2). The most prevalent combinations of FimH/BcfD/StfH alleles in S. Newport were A/A/A1 and B/B/B1. The former set was most frequently found in bovine and porcine strains, whereas the latter combination was most frequently found in environmental and human isolates. Bacteria genetically engineered to express Fim, Bcf, or Stf fimbriae on their surface were tested with the different alleles for binding to human, porcine, and bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The major allelic combinations with bovine and porcine strains (A/A/A1) or with human isolates (B/B/B1) provided at least two alleles capable of binding significantly better than the other alleles to an intestinal epithelial cell line from the respective host(s). However, each combination of alleles kept at least one allele mediating binding to an intestinal epithelial cell from another host. These findings indicated that allelic variation in multiple adhesins of S. Newport contributes to bacterial adaptation to certain preferential hosts without losing the capacity to maintain a broad host range. IMPORTANCE Salmonella enterica remains a leading foodborne bacterial pathogen in the United States; infected livestock serve often as the source of contaminated food products. A study estimated that over a billion Salmonella gastroenteritis cases and up to 33 million typhoid cases occur annually worldwide, with 3.5 million deaths. Although many Salmonella strains with a broad host range present preferential associations with certain host species, it is not clear what determines the various levels of host adaptation. Here, causal properties of host

  5. Association of low C2 and C4 serum levels with the HLA-DW2 allele in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    HLA typed unrelated healthy individuals (HLA-DW2 positive n = 64, and HLA-DW2 negative n = 72) were investigated for their C2 functional activity and C4 serum protein levels. For the C2 and C4 levels a bimodal distribution was found in HLA-DW2 positive and HLA-DW2 negative individuals. HLA-DW2 positive persons had a significantly higher incidence of low C2 and C4 serum levels. Our data support the concept that genes governing C2 as well as C4 serum levels are in linkage disequilibrium with the HLA-DW2 allele of the major histocompatibility complex. PMID:702053

  6. [Features of the distribution of BoLA-A antigens and alleles of the BoLA-DRB3 gene in Black Pied cattle in relation to association with leukemia].

    PubMed

    Ernst, L K; Sulimova, G E; Orlova, A R; Udina, I G; Pavlenko, S P

    1997-01-01

    The character of distribution of BoLA class-I antigens was studied in Black Pied cattle populations differing in status in relation to leukemia. Associative relationships of distinct antigens with resistance and susceptibility to leukemia were revealed. Using the statusmetria method, an integral estimate of predisposition to leukemia (Z) was calculated taking into consideration the contribution of each antigen in the immunogenetic status of the animal. The interval of Z values was determined, which allowed animals to be divided into groups according to resistance or susceptibility to leukemia. Alleles of the BoLA-DRB3 gene were typed in subsamples of animals with leukemia and healthy animals by the PCR-RFLP method. Twenty alleles of the gene were detected, and their frequencies were determined in both subsamples. Alleles mediating resistance of animals to leukemia (BoLA-DRB3.2*11, *23, and *28) were distributed in the group of healthy animals with frequencies of 0.079, 0.132, and 0.053, respectively; they were completely absent in animals with leukemia. The data on the estimate of animal status in relation to leukemia, which were obtained by the method of statusmetria taking in consideration the real contribution of the each class-I antigen in the detection of the disease risk (value Z), and data of allele typing by the PCR-RFLP method were shown to be in good agreement. The possibility of using BoLA class-I antigen typing in herds to determine the number of animals with leukemia was demonstrated.

  7. Pomology observations, morphometric analysis, ultrastructural study and allelic profiles of "olivastra Seggianese" endocarps from ancient olive trees (Olea europaea L.).

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Claudio; Sorbi, Andrea; Paolucci, Elisa; Antonucci, Francesca; Menesatti, Paolo; Costa, Corrado; Pallottino, Federico; Vignani, Rita; Cimato, Antonio; Ciacci, Andrea; Cresti, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary studies of historical sources and remote sensing were used to identify ancient olive trees near archaeological sites and heritage buildings in the Orcia Valley (Siena, Italy). Distinctive characters were assessed by traditional pomological observation. Trees with similar characters were selected on the basis of the features of endocarps, the only structure that survives aerobic deterioration and conserves useful botanical information for centuries. Non-invasive morphometric analysis of endocarp size and shape established morphological variations in individuals of different populations. Plastid organization in the endocarp and location of DNA in the endocarp tegument were detected by morphological and ultrastructural observations using light and electron microscopy. Cytoplasmic markers with high polymorphism were used to test similarity of endocarp and leaf DNA within individuals and to confirm low variability and minimal divergence between individuals. The ancient trees studied showed the same allelic profiles and therefore belonged to a distinct cultivar. The traditional pomological descriptions of the trees, leaves and fruits, morphometric analysis of size, and shape elliptic Fourier analysis of endocarp outline, ultrastructural observations and allelic profiles of endocarp tegument delineated the general species-specific qualities of the cultivar "olivastra Seggianese" of the Orcia Valley.

  8. Allele-Specific Reduction of the Mutant Huntingtin Allele Using Transcription Activator-Like Effectors in Human Huntington's Disease Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fink, Kyle D; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Josh; Anderson, Joseph S; Torrest, Audrey; Komarla, Anvita; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cary, Whitney; Anderson, Johnathon D; Gruenloh, William; Duffy, Alexandra; Tempkin, Teresa; Annett, Geralyn; Wheelock, Vicki; Segal, David J; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats. Although pathogenesis has been attributed to this polyglutamine expansion, the underlying mechanisms through which the huntingtin protein functions have yet to be elucidated. It has been suggested that postnatal reduction of mutant huntingtin through protein interference or conditional gene knockout could prove to be an effective therapy for patients suffering from HD. For allele-specific targeting, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) were designed to target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the mutant allele and packaged into a vector backbone containing KRAB to promote transcriptional repression of the disease-associated allele. Additional TALEs were packaged into a vector backbone containing heterodimeric FokI and were designed to be used as nucleases (TALEN) to cause a CAG-collapse in the mutant allele. Human HD fibroblasts were treated with each TALE-SNP or TALEN. Allele-expression was measured using a SNP-genotyping assay and mutant protein aggregation was quantified with Western blots for anti-ubiquitin. The TALE-SNP and TALEN significantly reduced mutant allele expression (p < 0.05) when compared to control transfections while not affecting expression of the nondisease allele. This study demonstrates the potential of allele-specific gene modification using TALE proteins, and provides a foundation for targeted treatment for individuals suffering from Huntington's or other genetically linked diseases.

  9. Allele-specific H3K79 Di- versus trimethylation distinguishes opposite parental alleles at imprinted regions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Han, Li; Rivas, Guillermo E; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Nicholson, Thomas B; Larson, Garrett P; Chen, Taiping; Szabó, Piroska E

    2010-06-01

    Imprinted gene expression corresponds to parental allele-specific DNA CpG methylation and chromatin composition. Histone tail covalent modifications have been extensively studied, but it is not known whether modifications in the histone globular domains can also discriminate between the parental alleles. Using multiplex chromatin immunoprecipitation-single nucleotide primer extension (ChIP-SNuPE) assays, we measured the allele-specific enrichment of H3K79 methylation and H4K91 acetylation along the H19/Igf2 imprinted domain. Whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac displayed a paternal-specific enrichment at the paternally expressed Igf2 locus, H3K79me3 was paternally biased at the maternally expressed H19 locus, including the paternally methylated imprinting control region (ICR). We found that these allele-specific differences depended on CTCF binding in the maternal ICR allele. We analyzed an additional 11 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and found that, in general, H3K79me3 was associated with the CpG-methylated alleles, whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac enrichment was specific to the unmethylated alleles. Our data suggest that allele-specific differences in the globular histone domains may constitute a layer of the "histone code" at imprinted genes.

  10. Novel Loci Associated with Usual Sleep Duration: The CHARGE Consortium Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Hek, Karin; Chen, Ting-hsu; Watson, Nathaniel F.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Byrne, Enda M.; Cornelis, Marilyn; Warby, Simon C.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Cherkas, Lynn; Evans, Daniel S.; Grabe, Hans J.; Lahti, Jari; Li, Man; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lumley, Thomas; Marciante, Kristin D.; Pérusse, Louis; Psaty, Bruce M.; Robbins, John; Tranah, Gregory J.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Bellis, Claire; Biffar, Reiner; Bouchard, Claude; Cade, Brian; Curhan, Gary C.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ewert, Ralf; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fülöp, Tibor; Gehrman, Philip R.; Goodloe, Robert; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hernandez, Dena; Hofman, Albert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hunter, David J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Kähönen, Mika; Kao, Linda; Kraft, Peter; Larkin, Emma K.; Lauderdale, Diane S.; Luik, Annemarie I.; Medici, Marco; Montgomery, Grant W.; Palotie, Aarno; Patel, Sanjay R.; Pistis, Giorgio; Porcu, Eleonora; Quaye, Lydia; Raitakari, Olli; Redline, Susan; Rimm, Eric B.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Smith, Albert V.; Spector, Tim D.; Teumer, Alexander; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Young, Terry; Zhang, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hu, Frank; Mangino, Massimo; Martin, Nicholas G.; O’Connor, George T.; Stone, Katie L.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Viikari, Jorma; Gharib, Sina A.; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Räikkönen, Katri; Völzke, Henry; Mignot, Emmanuel; Tiemeier, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Usual sleep duration is a heritable trait correlated with psychiatric morbidity, cardiometabolic disease and mortality, although little is known about the genetic variants influencing this trait. A genome-wide association study of usual sleep duration was conducted using 18 population-based cohorts totaling 47,180 individuals of European ancestry. Genome-wide significant association was identified at two loci. The strongest is located on chromosome 2, in an intergenic region 35–80 kb upstream from the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 (lowest p=1.1 ×10−9). This finding was replicated in an African-American sample of 4771 individuals (lowest p=9.3 × 10−4). The strongest combined association was at rs1823125 (p=1.5 × 10−10, minor allele frequency 0.26 in the discovery sample, 0.12 in the replication sample), with each copy of the minor allele associated with a sleep duration 3.1 minutes longer per night. The alleles associated with longer sleep duration were associated in previous genome-wide association studies with a more favorable metabolic profile and a lower risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these associations may help elucidate biological mechanisms influencing sleep duration and its association with psychiatric, metabolic and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25469926

  11. [Study on identification of "Digeda" raw materials in Mongolian patent medicine by PCR amplification of specific alleles].

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhan-hu; Huang, Xian-zhang; Long, Ping; Zhang, Le; Zhao, Dong-dong; Wang, Ying-li; Li, Min-hui

    2015-03-01

    To explore a new method for identification of Mongolian patent medicine (MPM) by PCR amplification of specific alleles. Eight kinds of MPM were used to study the identification of "Digeda" raw materials. The total DNA of Lomatogonium rotatum and Corydalis bungeana samples were extracted through modified CTAB method, psbA-trnH sequence was amplified by PCR and sequenced directionally. Specific primer was designed. The DNA of 8 kinds of MPM also was extracted and purified by the commercial DNA purification kits. The rbcL and two pair of specific primers sequences were amplified. The specific amplified products were sequenced in forward directions. All specific sequences were aligned and were analyzed. The results indicated that L rotatum can be identified by specific primers from Digeda-4 Tang, Digeda-8 San, Digeda-4 San, and C. bungeana medicinal materials can be identified by specific primers from Li Dan Ba Wei San, Yi He Ha Ri-12 and A Ga Ri-35. PCR amplification of specific alleles can stably and accurately distinguish raw medicinal materials in MPM.

  12. Natural variation in male-induced ‘cost-of-mating’ and allele-specific association with male reproductive genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Fiumera, Anthony C; Dumont, Bethany L; Clark, Andrew G

    2006-01-01

    One of the most sharply defined sexual conflicts arises when the act of mating is accompanied by an inflated risk of death. Several reports have documented an increased death rate of female Drosophila as a result of recurrent mating. Transgenic and mutation experiments have further identified components of seminal fluid that are at least in part responsible for this toxicity. Variation among males in their tendency for matings to be toxic to their partners has also been documented, but here for the first time we identify polymorphism within particular genes conferring differential post-mating female mortality. Such polymorphism is important, as it raises the challenge of whether sexual conflict models can provide means for maintenance of polymorphism. Using a set of second chromosome extraction lines, we scored differences in post-mating female fecundity and longevity subsequent to mating, and identified significant among-line differences. Seventy polymorphisms in ten male reproductive genes were scored and permutation tests were used to identify significant associations between genotype and phenotype. One polymorphism upstream of PEBII and an amino acid substitution in CG17331 were both associated with male-induced female mortality. The same allele of CG17331 that is toxic to females also induces greater refractoriness to remating in the females, providing an example of an allele-specific sexual conflict. Postcopulatory sexual selection could lead to sexual conflict by favouring males that prevent their mates from mating, even when there is a viability cost to those females. PMID:16612893

  13. Disparities in allele frequencies and population differentiation for 101 disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms between Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic whites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Variations in gene allele frequencies can contribute to differences in the prevalence of some common complex diseases among populations. Natural selection modulates the balance in allele frequencies across populations. Population differentiation (FST) can evidence environmental selection...

  14. Six new DR52-associated DRB1 alleles, three of DR8, two of DR11, and one of DR6, reflect a variety of mechanisms which generate polymorphism in the MHC.

    PubMed

    Smith, A G; Nelson, J L; Regen, L; Guthrie, L A; Donadi, E; Mickelson, E M; Hansen, J A

    1996-08-01

    We have sequenced DNA from six new DR52-associated DRB1 alleles initially detected by PCR/SSOP analysis. Three DR8 associated alleles differed from previously known alleles by single nucleotide substitutions. DRB1*0807 and DRB1*0811 both vary from DRB1*08021 at codon 57 resulting in two different amino acids at this residue. DRB1*0807 was identified in samples of Brazilian origin while *0811 was identified among samples from the Tlingit Native American population of Southeast Alaska. DRB1*0814, identified in a family of Chinese origin, differed from DRB1*08032 at codon 12 at both the nucleotide and the amino acid level. In addition, two alleles of DR11, DRB1*1113 and *1119, were each detected in Caucasian individuals. DRB1*1113 differs from other DR11 alleles at codons 37, 67, 70 and 74, while DRB1*1119 differs from *1101 by a single nucleotide substitution at codon 67. Finally, DRB1*1418 was detected in a sample from an Asian or Pacific Islander and shares sequences with several other DR52-associated DRB1 alleles. These six DRB1 alleles appear to have been generated by either gene conversion events, DRB1*1113 and *1418, or by point mutations, DRB1*0814, *0807, *0811 and *1119, although the single nucleotide substitutions found in the latter three alleles are also present in at least one other DRB1 allele and, therefore, could have been the product of gene conversions.

  15. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers defined by estrogen (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumour. Methods We used genotype data on up to 11,421 BRCA1 and 7,080 BRCA2 carriers, of whom 4,310 had been affected with breast cancer and had information on either ER or PR status of the tumour, to assess the associations of 12 loci with breast cancer tumour characteristics. Associations were evaluated using a retrospective cohort approach. Results The results suggested stronger associations with ER-positive breast cancer than ER-negative for 11 loci in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Among BRCA1 carriers, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2981582 (FGFR2) exhibited the biggest difference based on ER status (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) for ER-positive = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.17 to 1.56 vs HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.85 to 0.98 for ER-negative, P-heterogeneity = 6.5 × 10-6). In contrast, SNP rs2046210 at 6q25.1 near ESR1 was primarily associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In BRCA2 carriers, SNPs in FGFR2, TOX3, LSP1, SLC4A7/NEK10, 5p12, 2q35, and 1p11.2 were significantly associated with ER-positive but not ER-negative disease. Similar results were observed when differentiating breast cancer cases by PR status. Conclusions The associations of the 12 SNPs with risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers differ by ER-positive or ER-negative breast cancer status. The apparent differences in SNP associations between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, and non-carriers, may be explicable by differences in the prevalence of tumour subtypes. As more risk modifying variants are identified, incorporating these associations into breast cancer subtype-specific risk models

  16. Effects of Tooth Loss and the Apolipoprotein E ɛ4 Allele on Mild Memory Impairment in the Fujiwara-kyo Study of Japan: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Nozomi; Morikawa, Masayuki; Amano, Nobuko; Yanagi, Motokazu; Takasawa, Shin; Kurumatani, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies have suggested that periodontal disease can exacerbate the pro-inflammatory status of the brain. Tooth loss is one of the alternative evaluation indices of periodontal disease. There are few data on the relationship between tooth loss and memory impairment, depending on the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4 genotype. Objective: To determine if tooth loss is associated with mild memory impairment (MMI) and if this association is modified by the presence of the APOE ɛ4 allele. Methods: A nested case-control study was conducted from 2007 to 2012 in Japan. Five hundred and thirty-seven Japanese subjects aged 65 years and over who were cognitively intact at baseline were analyzed. MMI at follow-up was evaluated. Results: The median number of teeth at baseline was significantly lower in MMI participants (n = 179) than in controls (n = 358) (MMI: median 21.0, interquartile range 10.0–25.0 versus controls: 24.0, 14.0–27.0). After adjustment for demographics, vascular risk factors, and APOE ɛ4 allele, the multivariate adjusted odds ratio (OR) of ≤8 teeth was 1.97 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13–3.44) compared to 25–32 teeth. Participants with both the presence of at least 1 APOE ɛ4 allele and ≤8 teeth had a higher risk of MMI compared with those with neither (OR, 2.82; 95% CI, 1.15–6.91). Those with either risk factor alone did not have a higher risk of MMI. Conclusions: A lower number of teeth is related to risk of MMI. This may be primarily true for those individuals with an APOE ɛ4 allele. PMID:27716671

  17. HLA-DQ β1 alleles associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infectivity and EBV gp42 binding to cells

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Wei; Gabriel, Erin; Aguilar, Fiona; Hoshino, Yo; Miyadera, Hiroko; Hess, Christoph; Hornung, Ronald L.

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects B cells and ~95% of adults are infected. EBV glycoprotein gp42 is essential for entry of virus into B cells. EBV gp42 binds to the β1 chain of HLA-DQ, -DR, and -DP on B cells, and uses these molecules for infection. To investigate if certain HLA-DQ alleles are associated with EBV seronegativity, we recruited ~3,300 healthy adult blood donors, identified 106 EBV-seronegative individuals, and randomly selected a control group of EBV-seropositive donors from the donor pool. A larger than expected proportion of EBV-seronegative subjects were HLA-DQ β1 *04/*05 and *06/*06, and to a lesser extent, *02/*03, compared with the control group, while a larger than expected portion of EBV-seropositive persons were HLA-DQ β1 *02/*02. We examined the ability of EBV gp42 to bind to different HLA-DQ molecules using human and mouse cells stably expressing these alleles. EBV gp42 bound less effectively to cells expressing HLA-DQ β1 *04/*05, *06/*06, or *03/*03 than to cells expressing HLA-DQ β1 *02/*02. These data are consistent with our observations of increased EBV seronegativity with DQ β1 *04/*05 or *06/*06 alleles. These findings emphasize the importance of a single genetic locus (HLA-DQ β1) to influence infectivity with EBV. PMID:28239644

  18. Allelic loss of 10q23, the PTEN tumour suppressor gene locus, in Barrett's oesophagus-associated adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulke, M H; Odze, R D; Thakore, K S; Thomas, G; Wang, H; Loda, M; Eng, C

    2001-01-01

    PTEN is a putative tumour suppressor gene located on chromosome band 10q23. Mutations in PTEN have been identified in numerous human malignancies, including cancers of the brain, endometrium, ovary, and prostate. In this study, we screened 80 Barrett's oesophagus-associated adenocarcinomas (BOAd) for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 10q23, using the microsatellite markers D10S541, D10S219, and D10S551. Tumours demonstrating LOH were then screened for the presence or absence of PTEN mutations. LOH at one or more loci was identified in 17/80 (21%) cases. In none of these cases did we detect mutations in PTEN. The presence of LOH did not correlate with patient age, tumour stage, degree of differentiation, presence of perineural or vascular invasion, or overall survival. We conclude that LOH at chromosome 10q23 is uncommon in BOAd, is not associated with mutations in the PTEN tumour suppressor gene, and does not correlate with the clinical or pathologic features of these tumours. It is possible that PTEN is inactivated through other mechanisms in BOAd. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11259087

  19. Clozapine-induced agranulocytosis is associated with rare HLA-DQB1 and HLA-B alleles

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Jarskog, L Fredrik; Hilliard, Chris; Alfirevic, Ana; Duncan, Laramie; Fourches, Denis; Huang, Hailiang; Lek, Monkol; Neale, Benjamin M; Ripke, Stephan; Shianna, Kevin; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Tropsha, Alexander; van den Oord, Edwin JCG; Cascorbi, Ingolf; Dettling, Michael; Gazit, Ephraim; Goff, Donald C; Holden, Arthur L; Kelly, Deanna L; Malhotra, Anil K; Nielsen, Jimmi; Pirmohamed, Munir; Rujescu, Dan; Werge, Thomas; Levy, Deborah L; Josiassen, Richard C; Kennedy, James L; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Daly, Mark J; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2014-01-01

    Clozapine is a particularly effective antipsychotic medication but its use is curtailed by the risk of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis/granulocytopenia (CIAG), a severe adverse drug reaction occurring in up to 1% of treated individuals. Identifying genetic risk factors for CIAG could enable safer and more widespread use of clozapine. Here we perform the largest and most comprehensive genetic study of CIAG to date by interrogating 163 cases using genome-wide genotyping and whole-exome sequencing. We find that two loci in the major histocompatibility complex are independently associated with CIAG: a single amino acid in HLA-DQB1 (126Q) (P=4.7×10−14, odds ratio, OR=0.19, 95% CI 0.12–0.29) and an amino acid change in the extracellular binding pocket of HLA-B (158T) (P=6.4×10−10, OR=3.3, 95% CI 2.3–4.9). These associations dovetail with the roles of these genes in immunogenetic phenotypes and adverse drug responses for other medications, and provide insight into the pathophysiology of CIAG. PMID:25187353

  20. Maize ARGOS1 (ZAR1) transgenic alleles increase hybrid maize yield

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Crop improvement for yield and drought tolerance is challenging due to the complex genetic nature of these traits and environmental dependencies. This study reports that transgenic over-expression of Zea mays ARGOS1 (ZAR1) enhanced maize organ growth, grain yield, and drought-stress tolerance. The ZAR1 transgene exhibited environmental interactions, with yield increase under Temperate Dry and yield reduction under Temperate Humid or High Latitude environments. Native ZAR1 allele variation associated with drought-stress tolerance. Two founder alleles identified in the mid-maturity germplasm of North America now predominate in Pioneer’s modern breeding programme, and have distinct proteins, promoters and expression patterns. These two major alleles show heterotic group partitioning, with one predominant in Pioneer’s female and the other in the male heterotic groups, respectively. These two alleles also associate with favourable crop performance when heterozygous. Allele-specific transgene testing showed that, of the two alleles discussed here, each allele differed in their impact on yield and environmental interactions. Moreover, when transgenically stacked together the allelic pair showed yield and environmental performance advantages over either single allele, resembling heterosis effects. This work demonstrates differences in transgenic efficacy of native alleles and the differences reflect their association with hybrid breeding performance. PMID:24218327

  1. Maize ARGOS1 (ZAR1) transgenic alleles increase hybrid maize yield.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary A; Wei, Jun; Winkler, Chris; Goncalves-Butruille, Marymar; Weers, Ben P; Cerwick, Sharon F; Dieter, Jo Ann; Duncan, Keith E; Howard, Richard J; Hou, Zhenglin; Löffler, Carlos M; Cooper, Mark; Simmons, Carl R

    2014-01-01

    Crop improvement for yield and drought tolerance is challenging due to the complex genetic nature of these traits and environmental dependencies. This study reports that transgenic over-expression of Zea mays AR GOS1 (ZAR1) enhanced maize organ growth, grain yield, and drought-stress tolerance. The ZAR1 transgene exhibited environmental interactions, with yield increase under Temperate Dry and yield reduction under Temperate Humid or High Latitude environments. Native ZAR1 allele variation associated with drought-stress tolerance. Two founder alleles identified in the mid-maturity germplasm of North America now predominate in Pioneer's modern breeding programme, and have distinct proteins, promoters and expression patterns. These two major alleles show heterotic group partitioning, with one predominant in Pioneer's female and the other in the male heterotic groups, respectively. These two alleles also associate with favourable crop performance when heterozygous. Allele-specific transgene testing showed that, of the two alleles discussed here, each allele differed in their impact on yield and environmental interactions. Moreover, when transgenically stacked together the allelic pair showed yield and environmental performance advantages over either single allele, resembling heterosis effects. This work demonstrates differences in transgenic efficacy of native alleles and the differences reflect their association with hybrid breeding performance.

  2. Allele Copy Number and Underlying Pathology Are Associated with Subclinical Severity in Equine Type 1 Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy (PSSM1)

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Rosie J.; Livesey, Leanda; Schumacher, John; Henke, Nicole; Massey, Claire; Brock, Kenny V.; Fernandez-Fuente, Marta; Piercy, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1), a common glycogenosis associated with an R309H founder mutation in the glycogen synthase 1 gene (GYS1), shares pathological features with several human myopathies. In common with related human disorders, the pathogenesis remains unclear in particular, the marked phenotypic variability between affected animals. Given that affected animals accumulate glycogen and alpha-crystalline polysaccharide within their muscles, it is possible that physical disruption associated with the presence of this material could exacerbate the phenotype. The aim of this study was to compare the histopathological changes in horses with PSSM1, and specifically, to investigate the hypothesis that the severity of underlying pathology, (e.g. vacuolation and inclusion formation) would (1) be higher in homozygotes than heterozygotes and (2) correlate with clinical severity. Resting and post-exercise plasma creatine kinase (CK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) enzyme activity measurements and muscle pathology were assessed in matched cohorts of PSSM1 homozygotes, heterozygotes or control horses. Median (interquartile range (IR)) resting CK activities were 364 (332–764) U/L for homozygotes, 301 (222–377) U/L for heterozygotes and 260 (216–320) U/L for controls, and mean (+/− SD) AST activity for homozygotes were 502 (+/116) U/L, for heterozygotes, 357 (+/−92) U/L and for controls, 311 (+/−64) U/L and were significantly different between groups (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01 respectively). Resting plasma AST activity was significantly associated with the severity of subsarcolemmal vacuolation (rho = 0.816; P = 0.01) and cytoplasmic inclusions (rho = 0.766; P = 0.01). There were fewer type 2× and more type 2a muscle fibres in PSSM1-affected horses. Our results indicate that PSSM1 has incomplete dominance. Furthermore, the association between plasma muscle enzyme activity and severity of underlying pathology

  3. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing and Characterization of Powdery Mildew Disease-Associated Allelic Variation in Melon

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Kim, Hoy-Taek; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Veerappan, Karpagam; Park, Jong-In; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most common fungal diseases in the world. This disease frequently affects melon (Cucumis melo L.) and other Cucurbitaceous family crops in both open field and greenhouse cultivation. One of the goals of genomics is to identify the polymorphic loci responsible for variation in phenotypic traits. In this study, powdery mildew disease assessment scores were calculated for four melon accessions, ‘SCNU1154’, ‘Edisto47’, ‘MR-1’, and ‘PMR5’. To investigate the genetic variation of these accessions, whole genome re-sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. A total of 754,759,704 quality-filtered reads were generated, with an average of 82.64% coverage relative to the reference genome. Comparisons of the sequences for the melon accessions revealed around 7.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 1.9 million InDels, and 182,398 putative structural variations (SVs). Functional enrichment analysis of detected variations classified them into biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories. Further, a disease-associated QTL map was constructed for 390 SNPs and 45 InDels identified as related to defense-response genes. Among them 112 SNPs and 12 InDels were observed in powdery mildew responsive chromosomes. Accordingly, this whole genome re-sequencing study identified SNPs and InDels associated with defense genes that will serve as candidate polymorphisms in the search for sources of resistance against powdery mildew disease and could accelerate marker-assisted breeding in melon. PMID:27311063

  4. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing and Characterization of Powdery Mildew Disease-Associated Allelic Variation in Melon.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Kim, Hoy-Taek; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Veerappan, Karpagam; Park, Jong-In; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most common fungal diseases in the world. This disease frequently affects melon (Cucumis melo L.) and other Cucurbitaceous family crops in both open field and greenhouse cultivation. One of the goals of genomics is to identify the polymorphic loci responsible for variation in phenotypic traits. In this study, powdery mildew disease assessment scores were calculated for four melon accessions, 'SCNU1154', 'Edisto47', 'MR-1', and 'PMR5'. To investigate the genetic variation of these accessions, whole genome re-sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. A total of 754,759,704 quality-filtered reads were generated, with an average of 82.64% coverage relative to the reference genome. Comparisons of the sequences for the melon accessions revealed around 7.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 1.9 million InDels, and 182,398 putative structural variations (SVs). Functional enrichment analysis of detected variations classified them into biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories. Further, a disease-associated QTL map was constructed for 390 SNPs and 45 InDels identified as related to defense-response genes. Among them 112 SNPs and 12 InDels were observed in powdery mildew responsive chromosomes. Accordingly, this whole genome re-sequencing study identified SNPs and InDels associated with defense genes that will serve as candidate polymorphisms in the search for sources of resistance against powdery mildew disease and could accelerate marker-assisted breeding in melon.

  5. Alleles versus mutations: Understanding the evolution of genetic architecture requires a molecular perspective on allelic origins.

    PubMed

    Remington, David L

    2015-12-01

    Perspectives on the role of large-effect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the evolution of complex traits have shifted back and forth over the past few decades. Different sets of studies have produced contradictory insights on the evolution of genetic architecture. I argue that much of the confusion results from a failure to distinguish mutational and allelic effects, a limitation of using the Fisherian model of adaptive evolution as the lens through which the evolution of adaptive variation is examined. A molecular-based perspective reveals that allelic differences can involve the cumulative effects of many mutations plus intragenic recombination, a model that is supported by extensive empirical evidence. I discuss how different selection regimes could produce very different architectures of allelic effects under a molecular-based model, which may explain conflicting insights on genetic architecture from studies of variation within populations versus between divergently selected populations. I address shortcomings of genome-wide association study (GWAS) practices in light of more suitable models of allelic evolution, and suggest alternate GWAS strategies to generate more valid inferences about genetic architecture. Finally, I discuss how adopting more suitable models of allelic evolution could help redirect research on complex trait evolution toward addressing more meaningful questions in evolutionary biology.

  6. Alteration of Fecal Microbiota Profiles in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Associations with HLA-B27 Allele and Disease Status.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Monica; Cavalieri, Duccio; Albanese, Davide; Sordo, Maddalena; Pindo, Massimo; Donati, Claudio; Pagnini, Ilaria; Giani, Teresa; Simonini, Gabriele; Paladini, Alessia; Lionetti, Paolo; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cimaz, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    Alteration of gut microbiota is involved in several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, and gut microbial "pro-arthritogenic" profiles have been hypothesized. Intestinal inflammation may be involved in spondyloarthropathies and in a subset of patients affected by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), the most common chronic rheumatic disease of childhood. We compared the fecal microbiota composition of JIA patients with healthy subjects (HS), evaluating differences in microbial profiles between sub-categories of JIA, such as enthesitis-related arthritis (JIA-ERA), in which inflammation of entheses occurs, and polyarticular JIA, non-enthesitis related arthritis (JIA-nERA). Through taxon-level analysis, we discovered alteration of fecal microbiota components that could be involved in subclinical gut inflammation, and promotion of joint inflammation. We observed abundance in Ruminococcaceae in both JIA categories, reduction in Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae in JIA-ERA, and increase in Veillonellaceae in JIA-nERA, respectively, compared with HS. Among the more relevant genera, we found an increase in Clostridium cluster XIVb, involved in colitis and arthritis, in JIA-ERA patients compared with HS, and a trend of decrease in Faecalibacterium, known for anti-inflammatory properties, in JIA-nERA compared with JIA-ERA and HS. Differential abundant taxa identified JIA patients for the HLA-B27 allele, including Bilophila, Clostridium cluster XIVb, Oscillibacter, and Parvimonas. Prediction analysis of metabolic functions showed that JIA-ERA metagenome was differentially enriched in bacterial functions related to cell motility and chemotaxis, suggesting selection of potential virulence traits. We also discovered differential microbial profiles and intra-group variability among active disease and remission, suggesting instability of microbial ecosystem in autoimmune diseases with respect to healthy status. Similarly to other

  7. Alteration of Fecal Microbiota Profiles in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Associations with HLA-B27 Allele and Disease Status

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Monica; Cavalieri, Duccio; Albanese, Davide; Sordo, Maddalena; Pindo, Massimo; Donati, Claudio; Pagnini, Ilaria; Giani, Teresa; Simonini, Gabriele; Paladini, Alessia; Lionetti, Paolo; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cimaz, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    Alteration of gut microbiota is involved in several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, and gut microbial “pro-arthritogenic” profiles have been hypothesized. Intestinal inflammation may be involved in spondyloarthropathies and in a subset of patients affected by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), the most common chronic rheumatic disease of childhood. We compared the fecal microbiota composition of JIA patients with healthy subjects (HS), evaluating differences in microbial profiles between sub-categories of JIA, such as enthesitis-related arthritis (JIA-ERA), in which inflammation of entheses occurs, and polyarticular JIA, non-enthesitis related arthritis (JIA-nERA). Through taxon-level analysis, we discovered alteration of fecal microbiota components that could be involved in subclinical gut inflammation, and promotion of joint inflammation. We observed abundance in Ruminococcaceae in both JIA categories, reduction in Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae in JIA-ERA, and increase in Veillonellaceae in JIA-nERA, respectively, compared with HS. Among the more relevant genera, we found an increase in Clostridium cluster XIVb, involved in colitis and arthritis, in JIA-ERA patients compared with HS, and a trend of decrease in Faecalibacterium, known for anti-inflammatory properties, in JIA-nERA compared with JIA-ERA and HS. Differential abundant taxa identified JIA patients for the HLA-B27 allele, including Bilophila, Clostridium cluster XIVb, Oscillibacter, and Parvimonas. Prediction analysis of metabolic functions showed that JIA-ERA metagenome was differentially enriched in bacterial functions related to cell motility and chemotaxis, suggesting selection of potential virulence traits. We also discovered differential microbial profiles and intra-group variability among active disease and remission, suggesting instability of microbial ecosystem in autoimmune diseases with respect to healthy status. Similarly to

  8. T-cell receptor V sub. alpha. and C sub. alpha. alleles associated with multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Oksenberg, J.R.; Cavalli-Sforza, L.L.; Steinman, L. ); Sherritt, M.; Bernard, C.C. ); Begovich, A.B.; Erlich, H.A. )

    1989-02-01

    Polymorphic markers in genes encoding the {alpha} chain of the human T-cell receptor (TcR) have been detected by Southern blot analysis in Pss I digests. Polymorphic bands were observed at 6.3 and 2.0 kilobases (kb) with frequencies of 0.30 and 0.44, respectively, in the general population. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, the authors amplified selected sequences derived from the full-length TcR {alpha} cDNA probe. These PcR products were used as specific probes to demonstrate that the 6.3-kb polymorphic fragment hybridizes to the variable (V)-region probe and the 2.0-kb fragment hybridizes to the constant (C)-region probe. Segregation of the polymorphic bands was analyzed in family studies. To look for associations between these markers and autoimmune diseases, the authors have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism distribution of the Pss I markers in patients with multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and Graves disease. Significant differences in the frequency of the polymorphic V{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {alpha}} markers were identified between patients and healthy individuals.

  9. Novel loci associated with usual sleep duration: the CHARGE Consortium Genome-Wide Association Study.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, D J; Hek, K; Chen, T-H; Watson, N F; Eiriksdottir, G; Byrne, E M; Cornelis, M; Warby, S C; Bandinelli, S; Cherkas, L; Evans, D S; Grabe, H J; Lahti, J; Li, M; Lehtimäki, T; Lumley, T; Marciante, K D; Pérusse, L; Psaty, B M; Robbins, J; Tranah, G J; Vink, J M; Wilk, J B; Stafford, J M; Bellis, C; Biffar, R; Bouchard, C; Cade, B; Curhan, G C; Eriksson, J G; Ewert, R; Ferrucci, L; Fülöp, T; Gehrman, P R; Goodloe, R; Harris, T B; Heath, A C; Hernandez, D; Hofman, A; Hottenga, J-J; Hunter, D J; Jensen, M K; Johnson, A D; Kähönen, M; Kao, L; Kraft, P; Larkin, E K; Lauderdale, D S; Luik, A I; Medici, M; Montgomery, G W; Palotie, A; Patel, S R; Pistis, G; Porcu, E; Quaye, L; Raitakari, O; Redline, S; Rimm, E B; Rotter, J I; Smith, A V; Spector, T D; Teumer, A; Uitterlinden, A G; Vohl, M-C; Widen, E; Willemsen, G; Young, T; Zhang, X; Liu, Y; Blangero, J; Boomsma, D I; Gudnason, V; Hu, F; Mangino, M; Martin, N G; O'Connor, G T; Stone, K L; Tanaka, T; Viikari, J; Gharib, S A; Punjabi, N M; Räikkönen, K; Völzke, H; Mignot, E; Tiemeier, H

    2015-10-01

    Usual sleep duration is a heritable trait correlated with psychiatric morbidity, cardiometabolic disease and mortality, although little is known about the genetic variants influencing this trait. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of usual sleep duration was conducted using 18 population-based cohorts totaling 47 180 individuals of European ancestry. Genome-wide significant association was identified at two loci. The strongest is located on chromosome 2, in an intergenic region 35- to 80-kb upstream from the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 (lowest P=1.1 × 10(-9)). This finding was replicated in an African-American sample of 4771 individuals (lowest P=9.3 × 10(-4)). The strongest combined association was at rs1823125 (P=1.5 × 10(-10), minor allele frequency 0.26 in the discovery sample, 0.12 in the replication sample), with each copy of the minor allele associated with a sleep duration 3.1 min longer per night. The alleles associated with longer sleep duration were associated in previous GWAS with a more favorable metabolic profile and a lower risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these associations may help elucidate biological mechanisms influencing sleep duration and its association with psychiatric, metabolic and cardiovascular disease.

  10. Association of the bovine leukocyte antigen major histocompatibility complex class II DRB3*4401 allele with host resistance to the Lone Star tick, Amblyomma americanum.

    PubMed

    Untalan, Pia M; Pruett, John H; Steelman, C Dayton

    2007-04-10

    The MHC of cattle, known as the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) complex, plays an integral role in disease and parasite susceptibility, and immune responsiveness of the host. While susceptibility to tick infestation in cattle is believed to be heritable, genes that may be responsible for the manifestation of this phenotype remain elusive. In an effort to analyze the role that genes within the BoLA complex may play in host resistance to ticks, we have evaluated components of this system within a herd of cattle established at our laboratory that has been phenotyped for ectoparasite susceptibility. Of three microsatellite loci within the BoLA complex analyzed, alleles of two microsatellite loci within the BoLA class IIa cluster (DRB1-118 and DRB3-174) associated with the tick-resistant phenotype, prompting further investigation of gene sequences within the DRB3 region. DRB3 is a class IIa gene, the second exon of which is highly polymorphic since it encodes the antigen recognition site of the DR class II molecule. Analysis of the second exon of the DRB3 gene from the phenotyped calves in our herd revealed a significant association between the DRB3*4401 allele and the tick-resistant phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a putative association between a class IIa DRB3 sequence and host resistance to the Lone Star tick. Elucidation of the mechanism involved in tick resistance will contribute to improving breeding schemes for parasite resistance, which will be beneficial to the cattle industry.

  11. Inferring microevolutionary patterns from allele-size frequency distributions of minisatellite loci: a worldwide study of the APOB 3' hypervariable region polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Destro-Bisol, G; Capelli, C; Belledi, M

    2000-10-01

    The availability of numerous population and molecular data makes the apolipoprotein B 3' hypervariable region (APOB 3' HVR) polymorphism ideal for a pilot study of the relationships between the allele-size frequency distributions (referred to as allele-size distributions) of minisatellite loci and the microevolutionary processes underlying their present-day polymorphism in human populations. In this paper, we present a worldwide APOB 3' HVR study, based on published and unpublished data, which refers to 36 populations. We systematically compare APOB 3' HVR within-group diversity (in terms of heterozygosity, number of alleles, and allele-size variance) in numerous human populations, including African, European, Asian, Amerindian, Australomelanesian, and Polynesian groups. Overall, our analyses indicate a greater APOB 3' HVR diversity in Africans than non-Africans. Then, we compare APOB 3' HVR allele-size distributions. The APOB 3' HVR allele-size distribution is found to be quasi-unimodal in Africans and bimodal or nonunimodal in non-African populations. The analysis of the distribution of pairwise comparisons suggests that Africans expanded earlier and/or that their ancestral population was larger than other continental groups. As a final step, we examine APOB 3' HVR interpopulational relationships by using three genetic distances. The F(ST) genetic distance, which assumes genetic drift as being the agent that differentiates populations, provides results that are more congruent with established anthropological knowledge than mutation-based distances (D(SW) and R(ST)). We hypothesize that the ancestral population was characterized by a high heterozygosity, an extended range of allele size, and a quasi-unimodal allele-size distribution centered on allele *37, features persisting in examined African populations. Sampling processes during "out-of-Africa" migrations would be responsible for the decrease in APOB 3' HVR gene diversity and the nonunimodal allele

  12. Genome Wide Association Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastiani, Paola; Solovieff, Nadia

    The availability of high throughput technology for parallel genotyping has opened the field of genetics to genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These studies generate massive amount of genetic data that challenge investigators with issues related to data management, statistical analysis of large data sets, visualization, and annotation of results. We will review the common approach to analysis of GWAS data and then discuss options to learn more from these data.

  13. Prevalence of Deafness-Associated Connexin-26 (GJB2) and Connexin-30 (GJB6) Pathogenic Alleles in a Large Patient Cohort from Eastern Sicily.

    PubMed

    Amorini, Maria; Romeo, Petronilla; Bruno, Rocco; Galletti, Francesco; Di Bella, Chiara; Longo, Patrizia; Briuglia, Silvana; Salpietro, Carmelo; Rigoli, Luciana

    2015-06-19

    Mutations in the gene encoding the gap junction protein connexin 26 (GJB2) and connexin 30 (GJB6) have been shown to be a major contributor to prelingual, sensorineural, nonsyndromic deafness. The aim of this study was to characterize and establish the prevalence of GJB2 and GJB6 gene alterations in 196 patients affected by sensorineural, nonsyndromic hearing loss, from Eastern Sicily. We performed sequence analysis of GJB2 and identified sequence variants in 68 out of 196 patients (34.7%); (28 homozygous for c.35delG, 22 compound heterozygous and 11 with only one variant allele). We found 12 different allelic variants, the most prevalent being c.35delG, which was found on 89 chromosomes (65.5%), followed by other alleles with different frequencies (p.E47X, c.-23+1G>A, p.L90P, p.R184W, p.M34T, c.167delT, p.R127H, p.M163V, p.V153I, p.W24X, and p.T8M). Importantly, for the first time we present the frequency and spectrum of GJB2 mutations in NSHL patients from Eastern Sicily. No alterations were found in the GJB6 gene, confirming that alterations in this gene are uncommon in our geographic area. Note that 65.3% and 23.5% of our patients, respectively were found to be negative or carriers by GJB2 molecular screening. This emphasizes the need to broaden the genetic analysis to other genes involved in hearing loss.

  14. Homozygosity for the HLA-DRB1 allele selects for extraarticular manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, C M; Xie, C; Goronzy, J J

    1992-01-01

    Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis is genetically linked to a group of HLA-DRB1 alleles sharing a sequence motif within the third hypervariable region. Controversy exists over the role of the distinct allelic variants in affecting not only the risk to develop disease, but also in modifying the expression of the disease. We have stratified 81 patients according to their patterns of disease manifestations and identified the HLA-DRB1 alleles by polymerase chain reaction amplification and subsequent oligonucleotide hybridization. To identify precisely the allelic combinations at the HLA-DRB1 locus, homozygosity was confirmed by locus-specific cDNA amplification and subsequent sequencing. Our study demonstrated a high correlation of allelic combinations of disease-associated HLA-DRB1 alleles with the clinical manifestations. Characteristic genotypes were identified for patients who had progressed toward nodular disease and patients who had developed major organ involvement. Rheumatoid nodules were highly associated with a heterozygosity for two disease associated HLA-DRB1 alleles. Homozygosity for the HLA-DRB1*0401 allele was a characteristic finding for RA patients with major organ involvement. Our data suggest a role of the disease-associated sequence motif in determining severity of the disease. The finding of a codominant function of HLA-DRB1 alleles suggests that the biological function of HLA-DR molecules in thymic selection might be important in the pathogenesis of RA. Images PMID:1602009

  15. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 allelic frequencies and identification of two new alleles in Iranian buffalo breed.

    PubMed

    Mosafer, J; Heydarpour, M; Manshad, E; Russell, G; Sulimova, G E

    2012-01-01

    The role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the immune response makes it an attractive candidate gene for associations with disease resistance and susceptibility. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian buffaloes. Heminested PCR-RFLP method was used to identify the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the study herd (12 alleles). Almost 63.50% of the alleles were accounted for by four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2 ∗48, ∗20, ∗21, and obe) in Iranian buffalo. The DRB3.2 ∗48 allele frequency (24.20%) was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2 ∗20 and DRB3.2 ∗21 are 14.52 and 14.00, respectively, and obe and gbb have a new pattern. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian buffalo and other cattle breed studied. In the Iranian buffaloes studied alleles associated with resistance to various diseases are found.

  16. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 Allelic Frequencies and Identification of Two New Alleles in Iranian Buffalo Breed

    PubMed Central

    Mosafer, J.; Heydarpour, M.; Manshad, E.; Russell, G.; Sulimova, G. E.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the immune response makes it an attractive candidate gene for associations with disease resistance and susceptibility. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian buffaloes. Heminested PCR-RFLP method was used to identify the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the study herd (12 alleles). Almost 63.50% of the alleles were accounted for by four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2 ∗48, ∗20, ∗21, and obe) in Iranian buffalo. The DRB3.2 ∗48 allele frequency (24.20%) was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2 ∗20 and DRB3.2 ∗21 are 14.52 and 14.00, respectively, and obe and gbb have a new pattern. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian buffalo and other cattle breed studied. In the Iranian buffaloes studied alleles associated with resistance to various diseases are found. PMID:22454612

  17. CFH haplotypes and ARMS2, C2, C3, and CFB alleles show association with susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration in Mexicans

    PubMed Central

    Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Fernández-López, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez-Corona, Ulises; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés; Sebastian, Leticia; Morales, Fabiola; Ochoa-Contreras, Daniel; Carnevale, Alessandra; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the contribution of genetic variants of complement factor H (CFH), complement component 2 and 3 (C2 and C3), complement factor B (CFB), and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2) to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk in the Mexican Mestizo population. Methods Analysis included 282 unrelated Mexican patients with advanced AMD, 205 healthy controls, and 280 population controls. Stereoscopic fundus images were graded on the Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy System (CARMS). We designed a resequencing strategy using primers with M13 adaptor for the 23 exons of the CFH gene in a subgroup of 96 individuals clinically evaluated: 48 AMD cases and 48 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in C3 (Arg80Gly and Pro292Leu), C2 (rs547154), CFB (Leu9His), and ARMS2 (Ala69Ser) were genotyped in all patients, healthy and population controls using TaqMan assay. Results All evaluated individuals were Mexican Mestizos, and their genetic ancestry was validated using 224 ancestry informative markers and calculating Fst values. The CFH resequencing revealed 19 SNPs and a common variant in the intron 2 splice acceptor site; three CFH haplotypes inferred from individual genotypes, showed significant differences between cases and controls. The risk alleles in C3 (rs1047286, odds ratio [OR]=2.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.64–3.75, p=1.59E-05; rs2230199, OR=2.15, 95% CI=1.48–3.13, p=6.28E-05) and in ARMS2 (rs10490924, OR=3.09, 95% CI=2.48–3.86, p=5.42E-23) were strongly associated with risk of AMD. The protective effect of alleles in C2 (rs547154) and CFB (rs4151667) showed a trend but was not significantly associated after correction for multiple testing. Conclusions Our results show that ARMS2 and C3 are major contributors to advanced AMD in Mexican patients, while the contributions of CFH, C2, and CFB are minor to those of other populations, reveling significant ethnic differences in minor allele

  18. Prevalence of the Rhizobium etli-Like Allele in Genes Coding for 16S rRNA among the Indigenous Rhizobial Populations Found Associated with Wild Beans from the Southern Andes in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, O. Mario; López, María Verónica; Riccillo, Pablo M.; González, Ramón A.; Pagano, Marcela; Grasso, Daniel H.; Pühler, Alfred; Favelukes, Gabriel

    1998-01-01

    A collection of rhizobial isolates from nodules of wild beans, Phaseolus vulgaris var. aborigineus, found growing in virgin lands in 17 geographically separate sites in northwest Argentina was characterized on the basis of host range, growth, hybridization to a nifH probe, analysis of genes coding for 16S rRNA (16S rDNA), DNA fingerprinting, and plasmid profiles. Nodules in field-collected wild bean plants were largely dominated by rhizobia carrying the 16S rDNA allele of Rhizobium etli. A similar prevalence of the R. etli allele was observed among rhizobia trapped from nearby soil. Intragroup diversity of wild bean isolates with either R. etli-like or Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli-like alleles was generally found across northwest Argentina. The predominance of the R. etli allele suggests that in this center of origin of P. vulgaris the coevolution of Rhizobium spp. and primitive beans has resulted in this preferential symbiotic association. PMID:9726909

  19. An evaluation of potential allelic association between the STRs vWA and D12S391: implications in criminal casework and applications to short pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Gill, Peter; Phillips, Chris; McGovern, Catherine; Bright, Jo-Anne; Buckleton, John

    2012-07-01

    An evaluation was carried out to determine the effect on routine forensic calculations when incorporating STRs D12S391 and vWA. These loci are co-located on the same arm of chromosome 12. It has been suggested that allelic association could result in over-estimates of strength-of-evidence calculations. In the first place, we argue that is very unlikely that genotypes collected from typical cosmopolitan forensic databases can provide meaningful information about effects attributable to physical linkage. Since admixture is the most likely cause of allelic association in modern populations we specifically evaluate this effect. We use computer simulation as the preferred approach to generate populations with disequilibrium and observe the effect on match probability. Although we have specifically evaluated the linkage between D12S391 and vWA, the methods described in this paper can be extended and generalized to evaluate linkage effects between any pair of loci where the recombination rate is known. Many jurisdictions apply a subpopulation correction following the standard method of Balding and Nichols. Such corrections would appear to be more than adequate to compensate for any increase in match probability that we were able to create by this admixture. Linkage is likely to have an appreciable effect on relatedness calculations in short pedigrees in some but not all instances. We examined those circumstances where an effect is likely and give formulae for some common situations. The complexity of these calculations is a cause for concern in some laboratories. We discuss possible strategies that might be employed and plausible effects.

  20. Allelic Spectra of Risk SNPs Are Different for Environment/Lifestyle Dependent versus Independent Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gorlov, Ivan P; Gorlova, Olga Y; Amos, Christopher I

    2015-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated sufficient data to assess the role of selection in shaping allelic diversity of disease-associated SNPs. Negative selection against disease risk variants is expected to reduce their frequencies making them overrepresented in the group of minor (<50%) alleles. Indeed, we found that the overall proportion of risk alleles was higher among alleles with frequency <50% (minor alleles) compared to that in the group of major alleles. We hypothesized that negative selection may have different effects on environment (or lifestyle)-dependent versus environment (or lifestyle)-independent diseases. We used an environment/lifestyle index (ELI) to assess influence of environmental/lifestyle factors on disease etiology. ELI was defined as the number of publications mentioning "environment" or "lifestyle" AND disease per 1,000 disease-mentioning publications. We found that the frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with strong environmental/lifestyle components follow the distribution expected under a selectively neutral model, while frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with weak environmental/lifestyle influences is shifted to the lower values indicating effects of negative selection. We hypothesized that previously selectively neutral variants become risk alleles when environment changes. The hypothesis of ancestrally neutral, currently disadvantageous risk-associated alleles predicts that the distribution of risk alleles for the environment/lifestyle dependent diseases will follow a neutral model since natural selection has not had enough time to influence allele frequencies. The results of our analysis suggest that prediction of SNP functionality based on the level of evolutionary conservation may not be useful for SNPs associated with environment/lifestyle dependent diseases.

  1. Allelic Spectra of Risk SNPs Are Different for Environment/Lifestyle Dependent versus Independent Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated sufficient data to assess the role of selection in shaping allelic diversity of disease-associated SNPs. Negative selection against disease risk variants is expected to reduce their frequencies making them overrepresented in the group of minor (<50%) alleles. Indeed, we found that the overall proportion of risk alleles was higher among alleles with frequency <50% (minor alleles) compared to that in the group of major alleles. We hypothesized that negative selection may have different effects on environment (or lifestyle)-dependent versus environment (or lifestyle)-independent diseases. We used an environment/lifestyle index (ELI) to assess influence of environmental/lifestyle factors on disease etiology. ELI was defined as the number of publications mentioning “environment” or “lifestyle” AND disease per 1,000 disease-mentioning publications. We found that the frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with strong environmental/lifestyle components follow the distribution expected under a selectively neutral model, while frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with weak environmental/lifestyle influences is shifted to the lower values indicating effects of negative selection. We hypothesized that previously selectively neutral variants become risk alleles when environment changes. The hypothesis of ancestrally neutral, currently disadvantageous risk-associated alleles predicts that the distribution of risk alleles for the environment/lifestyle dependent diseases will follow a neutral model since natural selection has not had enough time to influence allele frequencies. The results of our analysis suggest that prediction of SNP functionality based on the level of evolutionary conservation may not be useful for SNPs associated with environment/lifestyle dependent diseases. PMID:26201053

  2. Apolipoprotein E4 allele is associated with substantial changes in the plasma lipids and hyaluronic acid content in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Stachowska, E; Maciejewska, D; Ossowski, P; Drozd, A; Ryterska, K; Banaszczak, M; Milkiewicz, M; Raszeja-Wyszomirska, J; Slebioda, M; Milkiewicz, P; Jelen, H

    2013-12-01

    Fat may affect progression of liver damage in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In this study we characterize the state of lipid metabolism in 22 patients with NAFLD and different Apo-E variants. Total concentration of plasma total fatty acids was quantified by gas chromatography, while their derivatives by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC ESI MS/MS). The ratio of plasma saturated fatty acid to monounsaturated fatty acid increased, whereas the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids was reduced in Apo-E4 carriers. Simultaneously, the levels of individual plasma linoleic, arachidonic, and alpha linolenic acids significantly increased in subjects with the Apo-E4 allele. The 15-lipoxygenase metabolite, 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, was significantly higher in Apo-E3 carriers (p<0.006). 5-oxo-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid was significantly elevated in Apo-E4 carriers (p<0.009). A significant difference in hyaluronic acid concentration (p<0.0016) as well as predicted advanced fibrosis (using the BARD scoring system) was found in Apo-E4 carriers (p<0.01). We suggest that a distinct mechanism of fibrosis between Apo E alleles. In Apo-E4 carriers, an elevation in 5-oxo-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid synthesis and fatty acid dysfunction may induce fibrosis, while an inflammatory process may be the main cause of fibrosis in Apo-E3 carriers.

  3. Human Leukocyte Antigen-E Alleles are Associated with Hepatitis C Virus, Torque Teno Virus, and Toxoplasma Co-infections but are not Associated with Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis D Virus, and GB Virus C Co-infections in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Dharmawan, Ruben; Raharjo, Irvan; Hudiyono

    2016-01-01

    Context: Data regarding the distribution of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E alleles and their association with blood-borne pathogen infections/co-infections are limited for many populations, including Indonesia. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze the association between HLA-E allelic variants and infection with blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV), torque teno virus (TTV), GB virus C (GBV-C), and Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) in Indonesian Javanese human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. Settings and Design: A total of 320 anti-HIV-positive blood samples were analyzed for HBV, HCV, HDV, TTV, GBV-C, and T. gondii infection status and its association with HLA-E allelic variants. Materials and Methods: Nucleic acid was extracted from plasma samples and used for the molecular detection of HBV DNA, HCV RNA, HDV RNA, TTV DNA, and GBV-C RNA, whereas hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV, immunoglobulin M and G (IgM and IgG) anti-T. gondii were detected through serological testing. The blood samples were genotyped for HLA-E loci using a sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction. Statistical Analysis Used: Either the Chi-square or Fisher's exact test was performed to analyze the frequency of HLA-E alleles and blood-borne pathogen infections in the population. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to measure the association between the antibodies found and the participants’ possible risk behaviors. A logistic regression analysis was used to assess the associations. Results: HLA-E*101/0101 was associated with HCV/TTV co-infection (adjusted OR [aOR]: 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.156-10.734; P = 0.027) and IgM/IgG anti-Toxo positivity (aOR: 27.0; 95% CI: 3.626-200.472; P = 0.001). HLA-E*103/0103 was associated with TTV co-infection (aOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.509-4.796; P = 0.001). Conclusions: HLA-E alleles in Indonesian Javanese HIV patients were found to be associated with HCV, TTV, and

  4. Bipolar disorder and the pseudoautosomal region: An association study

    SciTech Connect

    Parsian, A.; Todd, R.D.

    1994-03-15

    From family, adoption, and twin studies it is clear that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of bipolar disorder (McGuffin and Katz: The Biology of Depression, Gaskell, London, 1986). Recently Yoneda et al. reported an association between an allele (A4) of a VNTR marker (DXYS20) for the pseudoautosomal region and bipolar disorder in a Japanese population. In order to test for this association in a Caucasian population, we have typed a sample of 52 subjects with bipolar disorder and 61 normal controls. The bipolar subjects are probands of multiple incidence families. The normal controls are an epidemiologically ascertained sample of middle-aged, unrelated individuals. The two groups were matched for sex and ethnic background. There were no significant differences in the allele or genotype frequencies of DXYS20 between the two groups. In particular, there was no significant difference in the frequency of the A4 allele in normal controls and bipolar patients (0.377 vs. 0.317, respectively). The prevalence of the A4 allele in bipolar patients and normal controls was 0.567 and 0.622, respectively. We were not able to replicate the results of the 1992 Yoneda et al. study. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Large-scale profiling and identification of potential regulatory mechanisms for allelic gene expression in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robin Dong-Woo; Song, Min-Young; Lee, Jong-Keuk

    2013-01-01

    Allelic variation in gene expression is common in humans and this variation is associated with phenotypic variation. In this study, we employed high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips containing 13,900 exonic SNPs to identify genes with allelic gene expression in cells from colorectal cancer cell lines. We found 2 monoallelically expressed genes (ERAP2 and MYLK4), 32 genes with an allelic imbalance in their expression, and 13 genes showing allele substitution by RNA editing. Among a total of 34 allelically expressed genes in colorectal cancer cells, 15 genes (44.1%) were associated with cis-acting eQTL, indicating that large portions of allelically expressed genes are regulated by cis-acting mechanisms of gene expression. In addition, potential regulatory variants present in the proximal promoter regions of genes showing either monoallelic expression or allelic imbalance were not tightly linked with coding SNPs, which were detected with allelic gene expression. These results suggest that multiple rare variants could be involved in the cis-acting regulatory mechanism of allelic gene expression. In the comparison with allelic gene expression data from Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) family B cells, 12 genes showed B-cell specific allelic imbalance and 1 noncoding SNP showed colorectal cancer cell-specific allelic imbalance. In addition, different patterns of allele substitution were observed between B cells and colorectal cancer cells. Overall, our study not only indicates that allelic gene expression is common in colorectal cancer cells, but our study also provides a better understanding of allele-specific gene expression in colorectal cancer cells.

  6. A new approach to study dispersal: immigration of novel alleles reveals female-biased dispersal in great reed warblers.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Bengt; Bensch, Staffan; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2003-03-01

    We use the assignment technique and a new approach, the 'novel allele technique', to detect sex-biased dispersal in great reed warblers Acrocephalus arundinaceus. The data set consisted of immigrants and philopatric birds in a semi-isolated population in Sweden scored at 21 microsatellite loci. Fourteen cohorts were represented of which the four earliest were used to define a reference population. Female immigrants had lower assignment probability than males (i.e. were less likely to have been sampled in the reference population), and carried the majority of 'novel alleles' (i.e. alleles observed in the population for the first time). The difference in number of novel alleles between sexes was caused by a strong over-representation of females among the few individuals that carried several novel alleles, and there was a tendency for a corresponding female bias among individuals with low assignment probabilities. Immigrant males had similar or lower reproductive success than females. These results lead us to conclude that important interregional gene flow in great reed warblers depends on relatively few dispersing females, and that the novel allele technique may be a useful complement to the assignment technique when evaluating dispersal patterns from temporally structured data.

  7. Family-based association study of DRD4 gene in methylphenidate-responded Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Leung, Patrick Wing-Leung; Chan, Janice Ka Yan; Chen, Lu Hua; Lee, Chi Chiu; Hung, Se Fong; Ho, Ting Pong; Tang, Chun Pan; Moyzis, Robert K; Swanson, James M

    2017-01-01

    The 48-basepair (48-bp) variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in exon 3 of the dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4) is implicated in the etiology of attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In particular, ADHD in European-ancestry population is associated with an increased prevalence of the 7-repeat (7R) allele of the exon 3 VNTR. However, it is intriguing to note that the 7R allele has been found to be of very low prevalence in the Chinese general population. In a previous case-control study, our research team had found that the 7R allele was similarly absent in Chinese ADHD children in Hong Kong. Instead, there was an increased prevalence of the 2R allele in Chinese ADHD children. Interestingly, in Asian samples, the 2R allele had been found to be an evolutionary derivative of the 7R allele with equivalent biochemical functionality. So, the finding of an association between ADHD and 2R allele in Chinese population does not exactly contradict the original 7R allele finding in European-ancestry population. However, given the potential pitfall of population stratification in the previous case-control design, this current study tested the 2R allele and ADHD association using a methodologically more rigorous family-based approach on 33 Chinese ADHD probands who had favorable clinical responses to stimulant medication (methylphenidate). Haplotype Relative Risk (HRR) analysis and Transmission Disequilibrium Test (TDT) both showed a significant preferential transmission of the 2R allele from the biological parents to ADHD probands (pone-tailed = 0.038, OR = 2.04; pone-tailed = 0.048, OR = 2.29, respectively). A second hypothesis speculates that it is the deviation, including 7R and 2R alleles, from the conserved ancestral 4R allele which confers risk to ADHD. Thus, a preferential transmission of non-4R alleles, against the 4R allele, from biological parents to their ADHD probands is predicted. Both HRR analysis and TDT confirmed such prediction (pone

  8. Family-based association study of DRD4 gene in methylphenidate-responded Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Patrick Wing-leung; Chan, Janice Ka Yan; Chen, Lu Hua; Lee, Chi Chiu; Hung, Se Fong; Ho, Ting Pong; Tang, Chun Pan; Moyzis, Robert K.; Swanson, James M.

    2017-01-01

    The 48-basepair (48-bp) variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in exon 3 of the dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4) is implicated in the etiology of attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In particular, ADHD in European-ancestry population is associated with an increased prevalence of the 7-repeat (7R) allele of the exon 3 VNTR. However, it is intriguing to note that the 7R allele has been found to be of very low prevalence in the Chinese general population. In a previous case-control study, our research team had found that the 7R allele was similarly absent in Chinese ADHD children in Hong Kong. Instead, there was an increased prevalence of the 2R allele in Chinese ADHD children. Interestingly, in Asian samples, the 2R allele had been found to be an evolutionary derivative of the 7R allele with equivalent biochemical functionality. So, the finding of an association between ADHD and 2R allele in Chinese population does not exactly contradict the original 7R allele finding in European-ancestry population. However, given the potential pitfall of population stratification in the previous case-control design, this current study tested the 2R allele and ADHD association using a methodologically more rigorous family-based approach on 33 Chinese ADHD probands who had favorable clinical responses to stimulant medication (methylphenidate). Haplotype Relative Risk (HRR) analysis and Transmission Disequilibrium Test (TDT) both showed a significant preferential transmission of the 2R allele from the biological parents to ADHD probands (pone-tailed = 0.038, OR = 2.04; pone-tailed = 0.048, OR = 2.29, respectively). A second hypothesis speculates that it is the deviation, including 7R and 2R alleles, from the conserved ancestral 4R allele which confers risk to ADHD. Thus, a preferential transmission of non-4R alleles, against the 4R allele, from biological parents to their ADHD probands is predicted. Both HRR analysis and TDT confirmed such prediction (pone

  9. Microarrays for high-throughput genotyping of MICA alleles using allele-specific primer extension.

    PubMed

    Baek, I C; Jang, J-P; Choi, H-B; Choi, E-J; Ko, W-Y; Kim, T-G

    2013-10-01

    The role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene A (MICA), a ligand of NKG2D, has been defined in human diseases by its allele associations with various autoimmune diseases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and cancer. This study describes a practical system to develop MICA genotyping by allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) on microarrays. From the results of 20 control primers, strict and reliable cut-off values of more than 30,000 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) as positive and less than 3000 MFI as negative, were applied to select high-quality specific extension primers. Among 55 allele-specific primers, 44 primers could be initially selected as optimal primer. Through adjusting the length, six primers were improved. The other failed five primers were corrected by refractory modification. MICA genotypes by ASPE on microarrays showed the same results as those by nucleotide sequencing. On the basis of these results, ASPE on microarrays may provide high-throughput genotyping for MICA alleles for population studies, disease-gene associations and HSCT.

  10. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chaoyong; Odeberg, Jacob; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per . E-mail: Per.Eriksson@ki.se

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  11. Deciphering Natural Allelic Variation in Switchgrass for Biomass Yield and Quality Using a Nested Association Mapping Population

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Malay C.; Brummer, E. Charles; Kaeppler, Shawn; Bhandari, Hem S.

    2016-10-28

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a C4 grass with high biomass yield potential and a model species for bioenergy feedstock development. Understanding the genetic basis of quantitative traits is essential to facilitate genome-enabled breeding programs. The nested association mapping (NAM) analysis combines the best features of both bi-parental and association analyses and can provide high power and high resolution in QTL detection and will ensure significant improvements in biomass yield and quality. To develop a NAM population of switchgrass, 15 highly diverse genotypes with specific characteristics were selected from a diversity panel and crossed to a recurrent parent, AP13, a genotype selected for whole genome sequencing and parent of a mapping population. Ten genotypes from each of the 15 F1 families were then chain crossed. Progenies form each family were randomly selected to develop the NAM population. The switchgrass NAM population consists of a total of 2000 genotypes from 15 families. All the progenies, founder parents, F1 parents (n=2350) were evaluated in replicated field trials at Ardmore, OK and Knoxville, TN. Phenotypic data on plant height, tillering ability, regrowth, flowering time, and biomass yield were collected. Dried biomass samples were also analyzed using prediction equations of NIRS at the Noble Foundation and for lignin content, S/G ratio, and sugar release characteristics at the NREL. Genomic shotgun sequencing of 15 switchgrass NAM founder parental genomes at JGI produced 28-66 Gb high-quality sequence data. Alignment of these sequences with the reference genome, AP13 (v3.0), revealed that up to 99% of the genomic sequences mapped to the reference genome. A total of 2,149 individuals from NAM populations were sequenced by exome capture and two sets of 15 SNP matrices (one for each family) were generated. QTL associated with important traits have been identified and verified in breeding populations. The QTL detected and their associated

  12. The severe clinical phenotype for a heterozygous Fabry female patient correlates to the methylation of non-mutated allele associated with chromosome 10q26 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Arif; Yanagisawa, Hiroko; Miyajima, Takashi; Wu, Chen; Takamura, Ayumi; Akiyama, Keiko; Itagaki, Rina; Eto, Kaoru; Iwamoto, Takeo; Yokoi, Takayuki; Kurosawa, Kenji; Numabe, Hironao; Eto, Yoshikatsu

    2017-03-01

    Heterozygous Fabry females usually have an attenuated form of Fabry disease, causing them to be symptomatic; however, in rare cases, they can present with a severe phenotype. In this study, we report on a 37-year-old woman with acroparesthesia, a dysmorphic face, left ventricular hypertrophy, and intellectual disability. Her father had Fabry disease and died due to chronic renal and congestive cardiac failure. Her paternal uncle had chronic renal failure and intellectual disability, and her paternal aunt was affected with congestive cardiac failure. The patient has two sisters with no significant medical illness. However, her nephew has acroparesthesia, anhidrosis, and school phobia, and her niece shows mild phenotypes. The patient's enzyme analysis showed very low α-galactosidase A (α-gal A) activity in dried blood spot (DBS), lymphocytes, and skin fibroblasts with massive excretion of Gb3 and Gb2 in urine and lyso-Gb3 in DBS and plasma. Electron microscopic examination showed a large accumulation of sphingolipids in vascular endothelial cells and keratinocytes. Chromosomal analysis and comparative genomic hybridization microarray showed 10q26 terminal deletion. Molecular data showed a novel heterozygous stop codon mutation in exon 1 of the GLA gene in her sisters and niece, and a hemizygous state in her nephew. When we checked the methylation status, we found her non-mutated allele in the GLA gene was methylated. However, the non-mutated alleles of her sisters were non-methylated, and those of her niece were partially methylated. The chromosomal and methylation study may speculate the severity of her clinical phenotypes.

  13. Allelic loss on distal chromosome 17p is associated with poor prognosis in a group of Brazilian breast cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, M. A.; Pacheco, M. M.; Brentani, M. M.; Marques, L. A.; Brentani, R. R.; Ponder, B. A.; Mulligan, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    We examined loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for two loci on chromosome 17p (D17S5 and TP53), and erbB-2 gene amplification, in primary breast cancers from 67 Brazilian patients. We identified two distinct regions of LOH on chromosome 17p, one spanning TP53 and the other a more telomeric region (D17S5). Based on a short-term follow-up, Kaplan-Meier analyses of patients' disease-free survival showed that patients with LOH for D17S5, but retaining heterozygosity for TP53, were at higher risk of recurrence (P = 0.007) than those who retained heterozygosity for D17S5. Bivariate analyses indicated that patients with LOH for D17S5 alone had an increased risk of recurrence (hazard ratio = 7.2) over patients with erbB-2 amplification (hazard ratio = 3.7), when compared with patients with neither alteration (hazard ratio = 1.0). Further, lymph node-positive patients whose tumours had both LOH for D17S5 and erbB-2 gene amplification had a higher risk of recurrence than patients whose tumours had neither of these genetic alterations. Our data confirm previous reports of a putative tumour-suppressor gene, distinct from TP53, on distal chromosome 17p which is associated with breast cancer. They further suggest that LOH for loci in this region may provide an independent indicator to identify patients with poor prognosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7908218

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wei; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2006-12-01

    Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth Disease. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of a group of enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of aminoacyl-tRNAs for translation. Mutations of human and mouse GlyRSs are causally associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, the most common genetic disorder of the peripheral nervous system. As the first step towards a structure–function analysis of this disease, native human GlyRS was expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystal belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or its enantiomorphic space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 91.74, c = 247.18 Å, and diffracted X-rays to 3.0 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained one GlyRS molecule and had a solvent content of 69%.

  15. Genome-wide detection of allelic gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells using a human exome SNP chip.

    PubMed

    Park, Yon Mi; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Lee, Jong-Keuk

    2014-11-10

    Allelic variations in gene expression influence many biological responses and cause phenotypic variations in humans. In this study, Illumina Human Exome BeadChips containing more than 240,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to identify changes in allelic gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. We found 17 monoallelically expressed genes, 58 allelic imbalanced genes, and 7 genes showing allele substitution. In addition, we also detected 33 differentially expressed genes following LPS treatment in vitro using these human exome SNP chips. However, alterations in allelic gene expression following LPS treatment were detected in only three genes (MLXIPL, TNC, and MX2), which were observed in one cell line sample only, indicating that changes in allelic gene expression following LPS stimulation of liver cells are rare events. Among a total of 75 genes showing allelic expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells, either monoallelic or imbalanced, 43 genes (57.33%) had expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data, indicating that high-density exome SNP chips are useful and reliable for studying allelic gene expression. Furthermore, most genes showing allelic expression were regulated by cis-acting mechanisms and were also significantly associated with several human diseases. Overall, our study provides a better understanding of allele-specific gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with and without LPS stimulation and potential clues for the cause of human disease due to alterations in allelic gene expression.

  16. [Study on identification of cistanche hebra and its adulterants by PCR amplification of specific alleles based on ITS sequences].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Hua; Long, Ping; Zou, De-Zhi; Li, Yue; Cui, Zhan-Hu; Li, Min-Hui

    2014-10-01

    To explore the new method of discriminating Cistanche deserticola, Cynomorium songaricum and Orobanche pycnostachya by using PCR amplification of specific alleles. 30 samples of the different C. deserticola, 21 samples of C. songaricum and O. pycnostachya were collected. The total DNA of the samples were extracted, the ITS sequences from C. deserticola, C. songaricum and O. pycnostachya were amplified by PCR and sequenced unidirectionally. These sequences were aligned by using ClustulW. Specific primer was designed according to the ITS sequences of specific alleles, and PCR reaction system was optimized. Additionally, compare with the identification of specific PCR method and DNA sequence analysis method. The result showed that the 331 bp identification band for C. deserticola and the adulterants not amplified bands by a single PCR reaction, which showed good identification ability to the three species. PCR amplification of specific alleles can be used to identify C. deserticola, C. songaricum and O. pycnostachya successfully.

  17. Intragenic suppression of a constitutively active allele of Gsα associated with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tobar-Rubin, Raquel; Sultan, Dahlia; Janevska, Daniela; Turcic, Kyle; Carroll, Julie; Ooms, Laura; Pals-Rylaarsdam, Robin

    2013-04-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a human genetic disorder caused by a mutation that constitutively activates the G(s)α subunit by abolishing GTP hydrolysis. MAS patients suffer from a range of endocrinopathies as well as polyostotic fibrous dysplasia of bone. We previously identified an intragenic suppressor of the MAS mutation in a yeast system, which substituted two residues in the GTP-binding site of Gpa1: L318P and D319V to suppress the constitutive activity of an R297H mutation, corresponding to the human F222P, D223V, and R201H mutations respectively. To extend these studies, the human GNAS gene was subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. Constructs expressing the MAS mutation (R201H), the MAS mutation plus the mutations homologous to the yeast suppressors (R201H, F222P/D223V), or the yeast suppressor mutation alone (F222P/D223V) were transfected into HEK293 cells, and basal and receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were measured. Expression of R201H increased the basal cAMP levels and decreased the EC(50) for hormone-stimulated cAMP production. These effects were dependent on the amount of R201H protein expressed. R201H, F222P/D223V abolished the constitutive activity of the MAS mutation and caused responses to hormone that were not different from those measured in cells expressing WT G(s)α. Interestingly, F222P/D223V behaved similar to R201H in causing increases in basal cAMP production, thus demonstrating constitutive activity. Substitution of another acidic (E) or polar (N, T, and G) amino acid at position 223 caused no suppression of R201H activity, while substitution of a second nonpolar amino acid (A) at this position partially suppressed, and the larger polar I residue completely suppressed the effects of R201H.

  18. An entropy-based statistic for genomewide association studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinying; Boerwinkle, Eric; Xiong, Momiao

    2005-07-01

    Efficient genotyping methods and the availability of a large collection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms provide valuable tools for genetic studies of human disease. The standard chi2 statistic for case-control studies, which uses a linear function of allele frequencies, has limited power when the number of marker loci is large. We introduce a novel test statistic for genetic association studies that uses Shannon entropy and a nonlinear function of allele frequencies to amplify the differences in allele and haplotype frequencies to maintain statistical power with large numbers of marker loci. We investigate the relationship between the entropy-based test statistic and the standard chi2 statistic and show that, in most cases, the power of the entropy-based statistic is greater than that of the standard chi2 statistic. The distribution of the entropy-based statistic and the type I error rates are validated using simulation studies. Finally, we apply the new entropy-based test statistic to two real data sets, one for the COMT gene and schizophrenia and one for the MMP-2 gene and esophageal carcinoma, to evaluate the performance of the new method for genetic association studies. The results show that the entropy-based statistic obtained smaller P values than did the standard chi2 statistic.

  19. Does 5HTTLPR long allele prevent hospitalization? Test of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Gen; Kung, Simon; Mrazek, David A

    2014-02-01

    Many studies suggest an association of the serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5HTTLPR) long allele with better antidepressant treatment response than the short allele. However, there is controversy over these findings. We hypothesized that if the long allele is associated with a better outcome, we would find fewer inpatients with the long allele compared with the short allele. Chart review identified 925 depressed inpatients and 201 outpatients genotyped for 5HTTLPR. The sample was primarily White (>90%). We tested potential departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for each sample. We analyzed three independent sets of inpatient samples separately and combined, a White subgroup of 791 patients of the total 925 inpatients, and 201 outpatients. There was no departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with any of these samples. We also compared 5HTTLPR genotype prevalence between 925 inpatients and 201 outpatients, which showed no statistically significant difference.

  20. Disease-Concordant Twins Empower Genetic Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qihua; Li, Weilong; Vandin, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies with moderate sample sizes are underpowered, especially when testing SNP alleles with low allele counts, a situation that may lead to high frequency of false-positive results and lack of replication in independent studies. Related individuals, such as twin pairs concordant for a disease, should confer increased power in genetic association analysis because of their genetic relatedness. We conducted a computer simulation study to explore the power advantage of the disease-concordant twin design, which uses singletons from disease-concordant twin pairs as cases and ordinary healthy samples as controls. We examined the power gain of the twin-based design for various scenarios (i.e., cases from monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs concordant for a disease) and compared the power with the ordinary case-control design with cases collected from the unrelated patient population. Simulation was done by assigning various allele frequencies and allelic relative risks for different mode of genetic inheritance. In general, for achieving a power estimate of 80%, the sample sizes needed for dizygotic and monozygotic twin cases were one half and one fourth of the sample size of an ordinary case-control design, with variations depending on genetic mode. Importantly, the enriched power for dizygotic twins also applies to disease-concordant sibling pairs, which largely extends the application of the concordant twin design. Overall, our simulation revealed a high value of disease-concordant twins in genetic association studies and encourages the use of genetically related individuals for highly efficiently identifying both common and rare genetic variants underlying human complex diseases without increasing laboratory cost.

  1. End-use quality and agronomic characteristics associated with the Glu-B1al high-molecular-weight glutenin allele in U.S. hard winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) conferred by alleles at the Glu-B1 and Glu-D1 loci confer unique end-use quality properties for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The Glu-B1al allele at the Glu-B1 locus has not been widely used for cultivar development in the U.S. hard winter wheat regio...

  2. Studies on human eRF3-PABP interaction reveal the influence of eRF3a N-terminal glycin repeat on eRF3-PABP binding affinity and the lower affinity of eRF3a 12-GGC allele involved in cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Jerbi, Soumaya; Jolles, Béatrice; Bouceba, Tahar; Jean-Jean, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3) has been involved in the control of mRNA degradation through its association with the cytoplasmic Poly(A) Binding Protein, PABP. In mammals, eRF3 N-terminal domain contains two overlapping PAM2 motifs which specifically recognize the MLLE domain of PABP. In humans, eRF3a/GSPT1 gene contains a stable GGC repeat encoding a repeat of glycine residues in eRF3a N-terminus. There are five known eRF3a/GSPT1 alleles in the human population, encoding 7, 9, 10, 11 and 12 glycines. Several studies have reported that the presence of eRF3a 12-GGC allele is correlated with an increased risk of cancer development. Using surface plasmon resonance, we have studied the interaction of the various allelic forms of eRF3a with PABP alone or poly(A)-bound PABP. We found that the N-terminal glycine repeat of eRF3a influences eRF3a-PABP interaction and that eRF3a 12-GGC allele has a decreased binding affinity for PABP. Our comparative analysis on eRF3a alleles suggests that the presence of eRF3a 12-GGC allele could modify the coupling between translation termination and mRNA deadenylation. PMID:26818177

  3. Four p67 alleles identified in South African Theileria parva field samples.

    PubMed

    Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Geysen, Dirk; Oosthuizen, Marinda C; Matthee, Conrad A; Troskie, Milana; Potgieter, Frederick T; Coetzer, Jacobus A W; Collins, Nicola E

    2010-02-10

    Previous studies characterizing the Theileria parva p67 gene in East Africa revealed two alleles. Cattle-derived isolates associated with East Coast fever (ECF) have a 129bp deletion in the central region of the p67 gene (allele 1), compared to buffalo-derived isolates with no deletion (allele 2). In South Africa, Corridor disease outbreaks occur if there is contact between infected buffalo and susceptible cattle in the presence of vector ticks. Although ECF was introduced into South Africa in the early 20th century, it has been eradicated and it is thought that there has been no cattle to cattle transmission of T. parva since. The variable region of the p67 gene was amplified and the gene sequences analyzed to characterize South African T. parva parasites that occur in buffalo, in cattle from farms where Corridor disease outbreaks were diagnosed and in experimentally infected cattle. Four p67 alleles were identified, including alleles 1 and 2 previously detected in East African cattle and buffalo, respectively, as well as two novel alleles, one with a different 174bp deletion (allele 3), the other with a similar sequence to allele 3 but with no deletion (allele 4). Sequence variants of allele 1 were obtained from field samples originating from both cattle and buffalo. Allele 1 was also obtained from a bovine that tested T. parva positive from a farm near Ladysmith in the KwaZulu-Natal Province. East Coast fever was not diagnosed on this farm, but the p67 sequence was identical to that of T. parva Muguga, an isolate that causes ECF in Kenya. Variants of allele 2 were obtained from all T. parva samples from both buffalo and cattle, except Lad 10 and Zam 5. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that alleles 3 and 4 are monophyletic and diverged early from the other alleles. These novel alleles were not identified from South African field samples collected from cattle; however allele 3, with a p67 sequence identical to those obtained in South African field samples from

  4. Replication of association between ELAVL4 and Parkinson disease: the GenePD study

    PubMed Central

    DeStefano, Anita L.; Latourelle, Jeanne; Lew, Mark F.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Klein, Christine; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Mark, Margery H.; Growdon, John H.; Wooten, G. Fredrick; Watts, Ray; Guttman, Mark; Racette, Brad A.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Marlor, Lynn; Shill, Holly A.; Singer, Carlos; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pezzoli, Gianni; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Hendricks, Audrey E.; Gower, Adam; Williamson, Sally; Nagle, Michael W.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Massood, Tiffany; Huskey, Karen W.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Itin, Ilia; Litvan, Irene; Nicholson, Garth; Corbett, Alastair; Nance, Martha; Drasby, Edward; Isaacson, Stuart; Burn, David J.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Al-hinti, Jomana; Moller, Anette T.; Ostergaard, Karen; Sherman, Scott J.; Roxburgh, Richard; Snow, Barry; Slevin, John T.; Cambi, Franca; Gusella, James F.; Myers, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic variants in embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, Drosophila-like 4 (ELAVL4) have been reported to be associated with onset age of Parkinson disease (PD) or risk for PD affection in Caucasian populations. In the current study we genotyped three single nucleotide polymorphisms in ELAVL4 in a Caucasian study sample consisting of 712 PD patients and 312 unrelated controls from the GenePD study. The minor allele of rs967582 was associated with increased risk of PD (odds ratio = 1.46, nominal P value = 0.011) in the GenePD population. The minor allele of rs967582 was also the risk allele for PD affection or earlier onset age in the previously studied populations. This replication of association with rs967582 in a third cohort further implicates ELAVL4 as a PD susceptibility gene. PMID:18587682

  5. Apolipoprotein E alleles in Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s patients

    SciTech Connect

    Poduslo, S.E.; Schwankhaus, J.D.

    1994-09-01

    A number of investigators have found an association between the apolipoprotein E4 allele and Alzheimer`s disease. The E4 allele appears at a higher frequency in late onset familial Alzheimer`s patients. In our studies we obtained blood samples from early and late onset familial and sporadic Alzheimer`s patients and spouses, as well as from Parkinson`s patients. The patients were diagnosed as probable Alzheimer`s patients after a neurological examination, extensive blood work, and a CAT scan. The diagnosis was made according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. The apolipoprotein E4 polymorphism was detected after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, restriction enzyme digestion with Hhal, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Ethidium bromide-stained bands at 91 bp were designated as allele 3, at 83 bp as allele 2, and at 72 bp as allele 4. Of the 84 probable Alzheimer`s patients (all of whom were Caucasian), 47 were heterozygous and 13 were homozygous for the E4 allele. There were 26 early onset patients; 13 were heterozygous and 7 homozygous for the E4 allele. The frequencies for the E4 allele for late onset familial patients was 0.45 and for sporadic patients was 0.37. We analyzed 77 spouses with an average age of 71.9 {plus_minus} 7.4 years as controls, and 15 were heterozygous for the E4 allele for an E4 frequency of 0.097. Of the 53 Parkinson`s patients, 11 had the E4 allele for a frequency of 0.113. Thus our findings support the association of the ApoE4 allele with Alzheimer`s disease.

  6. 5' and 3' untranslated regions contribute to the differential expression of specific HLA-A alleles.

    PubMed

    René, Céline; Lozano, Claire; Villalba, Martin; Eliaou, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), when no HLA full-matched donor is available, alternative donors could include one HLA-mismatched donor. Recently, the low expressed HLA-C alleles have been identified as permissive mismatches for the best donor choice. Concerning HLA-A, the degree of variability of expression is poorly understood. Here, we evaluated HLA-A expression in healthy individuals carrying HLA-A*02 allele in different genotypes using flow cytometry and allele-specific quantitative RT-PCR. While an interindividual variability of HLA-A*02 cell surface expression, not due to the allele associated, was observed, no difference of the mRNA expression level was shown, suggesting the involvement of the posttranscriptional regulation. The results of qRT-PCR analyses exhibit a differential expression of HLA-A alleles with HLA-A*02 as the strongest expressed allele independently of the second allele. The associated non-HLA-A*02 alleles were differentially expressed, particularly the HLA-A*31 and HLA-A*33 alleles (strong expression) and the HLA-A*29 (low expression). The presence of specific polymorphisms in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the HLA-A*31 and HLA-A*33 alleles could contribute to this high level of expression. As previously described for HLA-C, low-expressed HLA-A alleles, such as HLA-A*29, could be considered as a permissive mismatch, although this needs to be confirmed by clinical studies.

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies four SNPs associated with response to platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiong; Huang, Kecheng; Zhang, Qinghua; Zhou, Jin; Sun, Haiying; Tang, Fangxu; Zhou, Hang; Hu, Ting; Wang, Shaoshuai; Jia, Yao; Yang, Ru; Chen, Yile; Cheng, Xiaodong; Lv, Weiguo; Wu, Li; Xing, Hui; Wang, Lin; Zhou, Shasha; Yao, Yuan; Wang, Xiaoli; Suolang, Quzhen; Shen, Jian; Xi, Ling; Hu, Junbo; Wang, Hui; Chen, Gang; Gao, Qinglei; Xie, Xing; Wang, Shixuan; Li, Shuang; Ma, Ding

    2017-01-01

    To identify genomic markers associated with the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in patients with cervical cancer, we performed a three-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) in the Han Chinese population. A total of 596 patients with stage IA2-IIIB cervical cancer were enrolled in this study. One single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs6812281, per allele OR = 2.37, P = 9.0 × 10−9) located at 4q34.3 reached GWAS significance (P < 5.0 × 10−8). Another three SNPs, rs4590782 (10q26.2, P = 1.59 × 10−5, per allele OR = 0.48), rs1742101 (14q32.11, P = 7.11 × 10−6, per allele OR = 0.52), and rs1364121 (16q23.3, P = 3.15 × 10−6, per allele OR = 1.98), exhibited strong evidence of associations with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with a C allele (CT + CC) of rs4590782 had better 5-year overall survival rates (82.9% vs. 75.8%, P = 0.083) and 5-year disease-free survival rate (80.8% vs. 72.7%, P = 0.021) than those without a C allele. Our findings help to characterize the genetic etiology of the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. PMID:28120872

  8. Association of human leukocyte antigen-DRB1 alleles with chronic hepatitis B virus infection in the Han Chinese of Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu; Jiang, Zhen-Yu; Jiao, Li-Xin; Yao, Cheng; Lin, Qian-Fei; Ma, Ning; Ju, Rui-Qing; Yang, Fan; Yu, Jiang-Hong; Chen, Lin

    2012-05-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecule is an integral component of the immune response on which the majority of host genetic studies have concentrated. Many different HLA-II alleles have been demonstrated to play roles in HBV infection. PCR-SSOP methods were applied to determine the HLA-DRB1 genotypes of 769 unrelated healthy individuals from Han Chinese of Northeast China. The frequencies of HLA-DRB1*09 in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected subjects were higher compared to those in the control group. Frequencies of HLA-DRB1*04 and *13 in the HBV-infected group were significantly lower compared to those in the healthy control group. Frequencies of HLA-DRB1*12 in the cirrhosis and liver cancer groups were significantly higher than those in the chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. The frequency of LA-DRB1*03 in the CHB patient group was significantly higher compared to that in the asymptomatic hepatitis B carrier patients. The above results suggest that the host HLA-II gene is an important factor in the determination of the outcome of HBV infection.

  9. High prevalence of CYP2C19*2 allele in Roma samples: study on Roma and Hungarian population samples with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sipeky, Csilla; Weber, Agnes; Szabo, Melinda; Melegh, Bela I; Janicsek, Ingrid; Tarlos, Greta; Szabo, Istvan; Sumegi, Katalin; Melegh, Bela

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to characterise the CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3 alleles in healthy Roma and Hungarian populations. DNA of 500 Roma and 370 Hungarian subjects were genotyped for CYP2C19*2 (G681A, rs4244285) and CYP2C19*3 (G636A, rs4986893) by PCR-RFLP assay and direct sequencing. Significant differences were found comparing the Roma and Hungarian populations in CYP2C19 681 GG (63.6 vs. 75.9%), GA (31.8 vs. 23.0%), AA (4.6 vs. 1.1%), GA+AA (36.4 vs. 24.1%) and A allele frequencies (0.205 vs. 0.125) (p<0.004). Striking differences were found between Roma and Hungarian samples in CYP2C19*1 (79.5 vs. 87.4%) and CYP2C19*2 (20.5 vs. 12.6%) alleles, respectively (p<0.001). None of the subjects was found to carry the CYP2C19*3 allele. Frequencies of the intermedier metabolizer phenotype defined by the *1/*2 genotype (0.318 vs. 0.230, p<0.005) and poor metabolizer predicted by the *2/*2 genotype (0.046 vs. 0.011, p<0.005) was significantly higher in Roma than in Hungarians, respectively. Genotype distribution of the Roma population was similar to those of the population of North India, however, a major difference was found in the frequency of the CYP2C19*2 allele, which is likely a result of admixture with European lineages. In conclusion, the frequencies of the CYP2C19 alleles, genotypes and corresponding extensive, intermediate and poor metabolizer phenotypes studied here in the Hungarian population are similar to those of other European Caucasian populations, but display clear differences when compared to the Roma population.

  10. Allelic variation at the VRN-1 promoter region in polyploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Yan, L; Helguera, M; Kato, K; Fukuyama, S; Sherman, J; Dubcovsky, J

    2004-11-01

    Vernalization, the requirement of a long exposure to low temperatures to induce flowering, is an essential adaptation of plants to cold winters. We have shown recently that the vernalization gene VRN-1 from diploid wheat Triticum monococcum is the meristem identity gene APETALA1, and that deletions in its promoter were associated with spring growth habit. In this study, we characterized the allelic variation at the VRN-1 promoter region in polyploid wheat. The Vrn-A1a allele has a duplication including the promoter region. Each copy has similar foldback elements inserted at the same location and is flanked by identical host direct duplications (HDD). This allele was found in more than half of the hexaploid varieties but not among the tetraploid lines analyzed here. The Vrn-A1b allele has two mutations in the HDD region and a 20-bp deletion in the 5' UTR compared with the winter allele. The Vrn-A1b allele was found in both tetraploid and hexaploid accessions but at a relatively low frequency. Among the tetraploid wheat accessions, we found two additional alleles with 32 bp and 54 bp deletions that included the HDD region. We found no size polymorphisms in the promoter region among the winter wheat varieties. The dominant Vrn-A1 allele from two spring varieties from Afghanistan and Egypt ( Vrn-A1c allele) and all the dominant Vrn-B1 and Vrn-D1 alleles included in this study showed no differences from their respective recessive alleles in promoter sequences. Based on these results, we concluded that the VRN-1 genes should have additional regulatory sites outside the promoter region studied here.

  11. Effect of HLA-DPA1 alleles on chronic hepatitis B prognosis and treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Katrinli, Seyma; Enc, Feruze Yilmaz; Ozdil, Kamil; Ozturk, Oguzhan; Tuncer, Ilyas; Doganay, Gizem Dinler; Doganay, Levent

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is a major health problem. The outcome of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is associated with variations in HLA-DPA1 alleles. The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations of HLA-DPA1 alleles with treatment response and with hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion. METHODS: Eight different HLA-DPA1 alleles from 246 CHB patients were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers at high resolution to investigate the association of HLA-DPA1 alleles with treatment response, development of cirrhosis, HBeAg seroconversion, and disease reoccurrence upon HBeAg loss. RESULTS: There was no significant association between HLA-DPA1 alleles and treatment response, development of cirrhosis, or HBeAg seroconversion. However, HLA-DPA1*04:01 allele was significantly more frequently found in patients who redeveloped disease upon HBeAg seroconversion (100% vs 36.8%: p=0.037; Fisher’s exact test). CONCLUSION: HLA-DPA1*04:01 allele may be a risk factor for reoccurrence of CHB after HBeAg seroconversion. PMID:28275747

  12. Kinetics of HIV-1 CTL epitopes recognized by HLA I alleles in HIV-infected individuals at times near primary infection: the Provir/Latitude45 study.

    PubMed

    Papuchon, Jennifer; Pinson, Patricia; Guidicelli, Gwenda-Line; Bellecave, Pantxika; Thomas, Réjean; LeBlanc, Roger; Reigadas, Sandrine; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Baril, Jean Guy; Routy, Jean Pierre; Wainberg, Mark; Fleury, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    In patients responding successfully to ART, the next therapeutic step is viral cure. An interesting strategy is antiviral vaccination, particularly involving CD8 T cell epitopes. However, attempts at vaccination are dependent on the immunogenetic background of individuals. The Provir/Latitude 45 project aims to investigate which CTL epitopes in proviral HIV-1 will be recognized by the immune system when HLA alleles are taken into consideration. A prior study (Papuchon et al, PLoS ONE 2013) showed that chronically-infected patients under successful ART exhibited variations of proviral CTL epitopes compared to a reference viral strain (HXB2) and that a generic vaccine may not be efficient. Here, we investigated viral and/or proviral CTL epitopes at different time points in recently infected individuals of the Canadian primary HIV infection cohort and assessed the affinity of these epitopes for HLA alleles during the study period. An analysis of the results confirms that it is not possible to fully predict which epitopes will be recognized by the HLA alleles of the patients if the reference sequences and epitopes are taken as the basis of simulation. Epitopes may be seen to vary in circulating RNA and proviral DNA. Despite this confirmation, the overall variability of the epitopes was low in these patients who are temporally close to primary infection.

  13. Semiparametric Allelic Tests for Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression and Mahalanobis Distance.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2015-12-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors and genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g., MultiPhen (O'Reilly et al. []), have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. In this article, we explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (Binomial regression-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [BAMP]), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a single-nucleotide polymorphism (Distance-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [DAMP]). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association is compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen's. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found to be substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two different real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. We propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) is violated and BAMP otherwise, because the allelic approaches assume HWE.

  14. Alarmingly High Segregation Frequencies of Quinolone Resistance Alleles within Human and Animal Microbiomes Are Not Explained by Direct Clinical Antibiotic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Field, Wesley; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance poses a major threat to human health. It is therefore important to characterize the frequency of resistance within natural bacterial environments. Many studies have focused on characterizing the frequencies with which horizontally acquired resistance genes segregate within natural bacterial populations. Yet, very little is currently understood regarding the frequency of segregation of resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics. We surveyed a large number of metagenomic datasets extracted from a large variety of host-associated and non host-associated environments for such alleles conferring resistance to three groups of broad spectrum antibiotics: streptomycin, rifamycins, and quinolones. We find notable segregation frequencies of resistance alleles occurring within the target genes of each of the three antibiotics, with quinolone resistance alleles being the most frequent and rifamycin resistance alleles being the least frequent. Resistance allele frequencies varied greatly between different phyla and as a function of environment. The frequency of quinolone resistance alleles was especially high within host-associated environments, where it averaged an alarming ∼40%. Within host-associated environments, resistance to quinolones was most often conferred by a specific resistance allele. High frequencies of quinolone resistance alleles were also found within hosts that were not directly treated with antibiotics. Therefore, the high segregation frequency of quinolone resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics in host-associated environments does not seem to be the sole result of clinical antibiotic usage. PMID:26019163

  15. Alarmingly High Segregation Frequencies of Quinolone Resistance Alleles within Human and Animal Microbiomes Are Not Explained by Direct Clinical Antibiotic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Field, Wesley; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-05-26

    Antibiotic resistance poses a major threat to human health. It is therefore important to characterize the frequency of resistance within natural bacterial environments. Many studies have focused on characterizing the frequencies with which horizontally acquired resistance genes segregate within natural bacterial populations. Yet, very little is currently understood regarding the frequency of segregation of resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics. We surveyed a large number of metagenomic datasets extracted from a large variety of host-associated and non host-associated environments for such alleles conferring resistance to three groups of broad spectrum antibiotics: streptomycin, rifamycins, and quinolones. We find notable segregation frequencies of resistance alleles occurring within the target genes of each of the three antibiotics, with quinolone resistance alleles being the most frequent and rifamycin resistance alleles being the least frequent. Resistance allele frequencies varied greatly between different phyla and as a function of environment. The frequency of quinolone resistance alleles was especially high within host-associated environments, where it averaged an alarming ∼ 40%. Within host-associated environments, resistance to quinolones was most often conferred by a specific resistance allele. High frequencies of quinolone resistance alleles were also found within hosts that were not directly treated with antibiotics. Therefore, the high segregation frequency of quinolone resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics in host-associated environments does not seem to be the sole result of clinical antibiotic usage.

  16. Replication of genetic association studies in aortic stenosis in adults.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathalie; Ducharme, Valérie; Lamontagne, Maxime; Guauque-Olarte, Sandra; Mathieu, Patrick; Pibarot, Philippe; Bossé, Yohan

    2011-11-01

    Only a handful of studies have attempted to unravel the genetic architecture of calcific aortic valve stenosis (AS). The goal of this study was to validate genes previously associated with AS. Seven genes were assessed: APOB, APOE, CTGF, IL10, PTH, TGFB1, and VDR. Each gene was tested for a comprehensive set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). SNPs were genotyped in 457 patients who underwent surgical aortic valve replacement, and allele frequencies were compared to 3,294 controls. A missense mutation in the APOB gene was significantly associated with AS (rs1042031, E4181K, p = 0.00001). A second SNP located 5.6 kilobases downstream of the APOB stop codon was also associated with the disease (rs6725189, p = 0.000013). Six SNPs surrounding the IL10 locus were strongly associated with AS (0.02 > p > 6.2 × 10⁻¹¹). The most compelling association for IL10 was found with a promoter polymorphism (rs1800872) well known to regulate the production of the encoded anti-inflammatory cytokine. The frequency of the low-producing allele was greater in cases compared to controls (30% vs 20%, p = 6.2 × 10⁻¹¹). SNPs in PTH, TGFB1, and VDR had nominal p values <0.05 but did not resist Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, this study suggests that subjects carrying specific polymorphisms in the IL10 and APOB genes are at higher risk for developing AS.

  17. Applicability of major histocompatibility complex DRB1 alleles as markers to detect vertebrate hybridization: a case study from Iberian ibex × domestic goat in southern Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hybridization between closely related wild and domestic species is of great concern because it can alter the evolutionary integrity of the affected populations. The high allelic variability of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) loci usually excludes them from being used in studies to detect hybridization events. However, if a) the parental species don’t share alleles, and b) one of the parental species possesses an exceptionally low number of alleles (to facilitate analysis), then even MHC loci have the potential to detect hybrids. Results By genotyping the exon2 of the MHC class II DRB1 locus, we were able to detect hybridization between domestic goats (Capra hircus) and free-ranging Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica) by molecular means. Conclusions This is the first documentation of a Capra pyrenaica × Capra hircus hybridization, which presented us the opportunity to test the applicability of MHC loci as new, simple, cost-effective, and time-saving approach to detect hybridization between wild species and their domesticated relatives, thus adding value to MHC genes role in animal conservation and management. PMID:23006678

  18. Identification and characterization of variant alleles at CODIS STR loci.

    PubMed

    Allor, Catherine; Einum, David D; Scarpetta, Marco

    2005-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from 32,671 individuals generated by the ABI Profiler Plus and Cofiler systems were screened for variant alleles not represented within manufacturer-provided allelic ladders. A total of 85 distinct variants were identified at 12 of the 13 CODIS loci, most of which involve a truncated tetranucleotide repeat unit. Twelve novel alleles, identified at D3S1358, FGA, D18S51, D5S818, D7S820 and TPOX, were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis and include both insertions and deletions involving the repeat units themselves as well as DNA flanking the repeat regions. Population genetic data were collected for all variants and frequencies range from 0.0003 (many single observations) to 0.0042 (D7S820 '10.3' in North American Hispanics). In total, the variant alleles identified in this study are carried by 1.6% of the estimated 1 million individuals tested annually in the U.S. for the purposes of parentage resolution. A paternity case involving a recombination event of paternal origin is presented and demonstrates how variant alleles can significantly strengthen the genetic evidence in troublesome cases. In such instances, increased costs and turnaround time associated with additional testing may be eliminated.

  19. Bayesian graphical models for genomewide association studies.

    PubMed

    Verzilli, Claudio J; Stallard, Nigel; Whittaker, John C

    2006-07-01

    As the extent of human genetic variation becomes more fully characterized, the research community is faced with the challenging task of using this information to dissect the heritable components of complex traits. Genomewide association studies offer great promise in this respect, but their analysis poses formidable difficulties. In this article, we describe a computationally efficient approach to mining genotype-phenotype associations that scales to the size of the data sets currently being collected in such studies. We use discrete graphical models as a data-mining tool, searching for single- or multilocus patterns of association around a causative site. The approach is fully Bayesian, allowing us to incorporate prior knowledge on the spatial dependencies around each marker due to linkage disequilibrium, which reduces considerably the number of possible graphical structures. A Markov chain-Monte Carlo scheme is developed that yields samples from the posterior distribution of graphs conditional on the data from which probabilistic statements about the strength of any genotype-phenotype association can be made. Using data simulated under scenarios that vary in marker density, genotype relative risk of a causative allele, and mode of inheritance, we show that the proposed approach has better localization properties and leads to lower false-positive rates than do single-locus analyses. Finally, we present an application of our method to a quasi-synthetic data set in which data from the CYP2D6 region are embedded within simulated data on 100K single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Analysis is quick (<5 min), and we are able to localize the causative site to a very short interval.

  20. Complex and multi-allelic copy number variation in human disease.

    PubMed

    Usher, Christina L; McCarroll, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    Hundreds of copy number variants are complex and multi-allelic, in that they have many structural alleles and have rearranged multiple times in the ancestors who contributed chromosomes to current humans. Not only are the relationships of these multi-allelic CNVs (mCNVs) to phenotypes generally unknown, but many mCNVs have not yet been described at the basic levels-alleles, allele frequencies, structural features-that support genetic investigation. To date, most reported disease associations to these variants have been ascertained through candidate gene studies. However, only a few associations have reached the level of acceptance defined by durable replications in many cohorts. This likely stems from longstanding challenges in making precise molecular measurements of the alleles individuals have at these loci. However, approaches for mCNV analysis are improving quickly, and some of the unique characteristics of mCNVs may assist future association studies. Their various structural alleles are likely to have different magnitudes of effect, creating a natural allelic series of growing phenotypic impact and giving investigators a set of natural predictions and testable hypotheses about the extent to which each allele of an mCNV predisposes to a phenotype. Also, mCNVs' low-to-modest correlation to individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may make it easier to distinguish between mCNVs and nearby SNPs as the drivers of an association signal, and perhaps, make it possible to preliminarily screen candidate loci, or the entire genome, for the many mCNV-disease relationships that remain to be discovered.

  1. Complex and multi-allelic copy number variation in human disease

    PubMed Central

    McCarroll, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of copy number variants are complex and multi-allelic, in that they have many structural alleles and have rearranged multiple times in the ancestors who contributed chromosomes to current humans. Not only are the relationships of these multi-allelic CNVs (mCNVs) to phenotypes generally unknown, but many mCNVs have not yet been described at the basic levels—alleles, allele frequencies, structural features—that support genetic investigation. To date, most reported disease associations to these variants have been ascertained through candidate gene studies. However, only a few associations have reached the level of acceptance defined by durable replications in many cohorts. This likely stems from longstanding challenges in making precise molecular measurements of the alleles individuals have at these loci. However, approaches for mCNV analysis are improving quickly, and some of the unique characteristics of mCNVs may assist future association studies. Their various structural alleles are likely to have different magnitudes of effect, creating a natural allelic series of growing phenotypic impact and giving investigators a set of natural predictions and testable hypotheses about the extent to which each allele of an mCNV predisposes to a phenotype. Also, mCNVs’ low-to-modest correlation to individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may make it easier to distinguish between mCNVs and nearby SNPs as the drivers of an association signal, and perhaps, make it possible to preliminarily screen candidate loci, or the entire genome, for the many mCNV–disease relationships that remain to be discovered. PMID:26163405

  2. Two amino acid substitutions in apolipoprotein B are in complete allelic association with the antigen group (x/y) polymorphism: Evidence for little recombination in the 3' end of the human gene

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Alison M.; Renges, Helmut-H.; Xu, Chun-Fang; Peacock, Rachel; Brasseur, Robert; Laxer, Gerald; Tikkanen, Matti J.; Bütler, Réné; Saha, N.; Hamsten, Anders; Rosseneu, Maryvonne; Talmud, Philippa; Humphries, Steve E.

    1992-01-01

    We report the identification of an A-to-G base change, in exon 29 of the apolipoprotein B (apo B) gene, that results in the substitution of serine for asparagine at residue 4311 of mature apo B100. In a recent publication, Huang et al. have reported a C-to-T base change in exon 26 that causes the substitution of leucine for proline at residue 2712 of apo B. We have found complete linkage disequilibrium between the alleles at both these sites and an immunochemical polymorphism of LDL designated antigen group (x/y) (Ag(x/y)) in a sample of 118 Finnish individuals. This implies that either one of these substitutions–or both of them combined–could be the molecular basis of the Ag(x/y) antigenic determinants, with the allele encoding serine4311 plus leucine2712 representing the Ag(x) epitope, and that encoding asparagine4311 plus proline2712 the Ag(y) epitope. In a sample of 90 healthy Swedish individuals the Leu2712/Ser4311 allele is associated both with reduced serum levels of LDL-cholesterol and apo B and with raised levels of HDL. However, these differences are of smaller effect than those associated with the XbaI RFLP of the apo B gene in this sample. We have also genotyped 523 individuals from European, Asian, Chinese, and Afro-Caribbean populations and have found complete association between the sites encoding residues 2712 and 4311 in all of these samples, although there are large allele frequency differences between these populations. In addition, there is strong linkage disequilibrium with allelic association between the alleles of these sites and those of the XbaI RFLP in all the populations examined. Taken together, these data suggest that, since the divergence of the major ethnic groups, there has been little or no recombination in the 3' end of the human apo B gene. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:1370364

  3. Genotype-phenotype correlations of TGFBI p.Leu509Pro, p.Leu509Arg, p.Val613Gly, and the allelic association of p.Met502Val-p.Arg555Gln mutations

    PubMed Central

    Niel-Butschi, Florence; Kantelip, Bernadette; Iwaszkiewicz, Justyna; Zoete, Vincent; Boimard, Mathieu; Delpech, Marc; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Renard, Gilles; D’Hermies, François; Pisella, Pierre-Jean; Hamel, Christian; Delbosc, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Investigate the genotype-phenotype correlations for five TGFBI (transforming growth factor, beta-induced) mutations including one novel pathogenic variant and one complex allele affecting the fourth FAS1 domain of keratoepithelin, and their potential effects on the protein’s structure. Methods Three unrelated families were clinically diagnosed with lattice corneal dystrophy (CD) and one with an unclassified CD of Bowman’s layer. Mutations in the TGFBI gene were detected by direct sequencing, and the functional impact of each variant was predicted using in silico algorithms. Corneal phenotypes, including histological examinations, were compared with the literature data. Furthermore, molecular modeling studies of these mutations were performed. Results Two distinct missense mutations affecting the same residue at position 509 of keratoepithelin: p.Leu509Pro (c.1526T>C) and p.Leu509Arg (c.1526T>G) were found to be associated with a lattice-type CD. The novel p.Val613Gly (c.1828T>G) TGFBI mutation was found in a sporadic case of an Algerian individual affected by lattice CD. Finally, the Bowman’s layer CD was linked to the association in cis of the p.Met502Val and p.Arg555Gln variants, leading to the reclassification of this CD as atypical Thiel-Behnke CD. Structural modeling of these TGFBI mutations argues in favor of these mutations being responsible for instability and/or incorrect folding of keratoepithelin, predictions that are compatible with the clinical diagnoses. Conclusions Description of a novel TGFBI mutation and a complex TGFBI allele further extends the mutational spectrum of TGFBI. Moreover, we show convincing evidence that TGFBI mutations affecting Leu509 are linked to the lattice phenotype in two unrelated French families, contrasting with findings previously reported. The p.Leu509Pro was reported to be associated with both amyloid and non-amyloid aggregates, whereas p.Leu509Arg has been described as being responsible for Epithelial

  4. A Candidate Gene Association Study of Bone Mineral Density in an Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Dastgheib, Seyed Alireza; Gartland, Alison; Tabei, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Omrani, Gholamhossein Ranjbar; Teare, Marion Dawn

    2016-01-01

    The genetic epidemiology of variation in bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis is not well studied in Iranian populations and needs more research. We report a candidate gene association study of BMD variation in a healthy cross-sectional study of 501 males and females sampled from the Iranian Multi-Centre Osteoporosis Study, Shiraz, Iran. We selected to study the association with 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the 7 candidate genes LRP5, RANK, RANKL, OPG, P2RX7, VDR, and ESR1. BMD was measured at the three sites L2–L4, neck of femur, and total hip. Association between BMD and each SNP was assessed using multiple linear regression assuming an allele dose (additive effect) on BMD (adjusted for age and sex). Statistically significant (at the unadjusted 5% level) associations were seen with seven SNPs in five of the candidate genes. Two SNPs showed statistically significant association with more than one BMD site. Significant association was seen between BMD at all the three sites with the VDR SNP rs731246 (L2–L4 p = 0.038; neck of femur p = 0.001; and total hip p < 0.001). The T allele was consistently associated with lower BMD than the C allele. Significant association was also seen for the P2RX7 SNP rs3751143, where the G allele was consistently associated with lower BMD than the T allele (L2–L4 p = 0.069; neck of femur p = 0.024; and total hip p = 0.045). PMID:27833587

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies loci on 12q24 and 13q32 associated with Tetralogy of Fallot

    PubMed Central

    Cordell, Heather J.; Töpf, Ana; Mamasoula, Chrysovalanto; Postma, Alex V.; Bentham, Jamie; Zelenika, Diana; Heath, Simon; Blue, Gillian; Cosgrove, Catherine; Granados Riveron, Javier; Darlay, Rebecca; Soemedi, Rachel; Wilson, Ian J.; Ayers, Kristin L.; Rahman, Thahira J.; Hall, Darroch; Mulder, Barbara J.M.; Zwinderman, Aelko H.; van Engelen, Klaartje; Brook, J. David; Setchfield, Kerry; Bu'Lock, Frances A.; Thornborough, Chris; O'Sullivan, John; Stuart, A. Graham; Parsons, Jonathan; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Winlaw, David; Mital, Seema; Gewillig, Marc; Breckpot, Jeroen; Devriendt, Koen; Moorman, Antoon F.M.; Rauch, Anita; Lathrop, G. Mark; Keavney, Bernard D.; Goodship, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study to search for risk alleles associated with Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), using a northern European discovery set of 835 cases and 5159 controls. A region on chromosome 12q24 was associated (P = 1.4 × 10−7) and replicated convincingly (P = 3.9 × 10−5) in 798 cases and 2931 controls [per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.27 in replication cohort, P = 7.7 × 10−11 in combined populations]. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the glypican 5 gene on chromosome 13q32 were also associated (P = 1.7 × 10−7) and replicated convincingly (P = 1.2 × 10−5) in 789 cases and 2927 controls (per allele OR = 1.31 in replication cohort, P = 3.03 × 10−11 in combined populations). Four additional regions on chromosomes 10, 15 and 16 showed suggestive association accompanied by nominal replication. This study, the first genome-wide association study of a congenital heart malformation phenotype, provides evidence that common genetic variation influences the risk of TOF. PMID:23297363

  6. Association studies in late onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goate, A.M.; Lendon, C.; Talbot, C.

    1994-09-01

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is characterized by an adult onset progressive dementia and the presence of numerous plaques and tangles within the brain at autopsy. The senile plaques are composed of a proteinaceous core surrounded by dystrophic neurites. The major protein component of the core is {beta}-amyloid but antibodies to many other proteins bind to senile plaques, e.g., antibodies to apolioprotein E (ApoE) and to {alpha}1-antichymotrypsin (AACT). Genetic studies have implicated mutations within the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene as the cause of AD in a small number of early onset AD families. More recently, assocition studies in late onset AD have demonstrated a positive association between ApoE-{epsilon}4 and AD. We report evidence for a negative association between ApoE-{epsilon}2 and AD in a large sample of sporadic late onset AD cases and matched controls supporting the role of ApoE in the etiology of AD. Ninety-three patients with sporadic AD (average age = 75 years, s.d. 8 yrs.) and 67 normal controls from the same ethnic background (age = 77 yrs., s.d. 10 yrs.) were recruited through the patient registry of the Washington University Alzheimer`s Disease Research Center. We found a statistically significant increase in ApoE-{epsilon}4 allele frequency in patients compared with controls ({chi}{sup 2}=7.75, 1 d.f., one tailed p=0.0027) and a significant decrease in {epsilon}2 allele frequency (Fisher`s exact test, one tailed p=0.0048), whereas the decreased frequency of {epsilon}3 in the patient groups was not statistically significant. Allele {epsilon}2 conferred a strong protective effect in our sample, with the odds ratio for AD for subjects possessing this allele being 0.08 (85% confidence interval 0.01-0.69). Similar studies using a polymorphism within the AACT gene showed no association with alleles at this locus in the entire AD sample or in AD cases homozygous for ApoE-{epsilon}3.

  7. Detection of bovine leukocyte antigen DRB3 alleles as candidate markers for clinical mastitis resistance in Holstein x Zebu.

    PubMed

    Duangjinda, M; Buayai, D; Pattarajinda, V; Phasuk, Y; Katawatin, S; Vongpralub, T; Chaiyotvittayakul, A

    2009-02-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigen DRB3 alleles from Holstein x Zebu crossbred dairy cows (n = 409) were analyzed using the PCR-RFLP technique. Exon II of DRB3 was amplified using locus-specific primers (HLO30/HLO32), followed by digestion with 3 restriction enzymes (RsaI, BstyI, and HaeIII). Forty alleles were found with frequency ranging from 0.005 to 0.139. The most frequently detected alleles of Holstein x Zebu were DRB3*16, *51, *23, *11, *8, and *1, accounting for 61.12% of the alleles in the population. Detection of candidate alleles for clinical mastitis occurrence was performed by logistic regression. It was found that percentage of Holstein fraction in crossbred cows had a nonsignificant effect (P > 0.05). However, parity had a significant effect on mastitis occurrence. In addition, DRB3*1 and *52 were the most associated with the occurrence of clinical mastitis, whereas *15, *51, and *22 were associated with resistance in crossbred populations. This is the first report of association of DRB3*15 and *51 with mastitis resistance. The association was validated by examining the candidate alleles in another commercial population. Highly susceptible (n = 43) and resistant (n = 42) groups of Holstein x Zebu cows were investigated. The result confirmed that DRB3*1 and *52 could be considered as susceptibility alleles, whereas *15, *51, and *22 could be considered as resistant alleles in Holstein x Zebu raised under tropical conditions. In addition, allele effects on 305-d milk production were estimated by BLUP. It was shown that most alleles associated with high clinical mastitis occurrence were related to increased milk yield. This study revealed that allele DRB3*10 had the greatest effect on increasing milk yield with moderate resistance to clinical mastitis, which could be used as a potential marker for selection in dairy genetic evaluation.

  8. Nucleotide variation and identification of novel blast resistance alleles of Pib by allele mining strategy.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, G; Madhav, M S; Devi, S J S Rama; Prasad, M S; Babu, V Ravindra

    2015-04-01

    Pib is one of significant rice blast resistant genes, which provides resistance to wide range of isolates of rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. Identification and isolation of novel and beneficial alleles help in crop enhancement. Allele mining is one of the best strategies for dissecting the allelic variations at candidate gene and identification of novel alleles. Hence, in the present study, Pib was analyzed by allele mining strategy, and coding and non-coding (upstream and intron) regions were examined to identify novel Pib alleles. Allelic sequences comparison revealed that nucleotide polymorphisms at coding regions affected the amino acid sequences, while the polymorphism at upstream (non-coding) region affected the motifs arrangements. Pib alleles from resistant landraces, Sercher and Krengosa showed better resistance than Pib donor variety, might be due to acquired mutations, especially at LRR region. The evolutionary distance, Ka/Ks and phylogenetic analyzes also supported these results. Transcription factor binding motif analysis revealed that Pib (Sr) had a unique motif (DPBFCOREDCDC3), while five different motifs differentiated the resistance and susceptible Pib alleles. As the Pib is an inducible gene, the identified differential motifs helps to understand the Pib expression mechanism. The identified novel Pib resistant alleles, which showed high resistance to the rice blast, can be used directly in blast resistance breeding program as alternative Pib resistant sources.

  9. HLA DRB1 alleles and hepatitis C virus infection in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Noha Mohamed Hosni; Soliman, Amin Roshdy; El-Khashab, Sahier Omar; Hanna, Mariam Onsy Farag

    2013-01-01

    T cell responses against HCV are regulated by the host's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, which thus are ideal candidate genes to investigate for associations with HCV susceptibility. We aimed to identify associations of HLA DRB1* alleles with HCV infection in a high risk of exposure population, chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients on dialysis, and to study any possible relationships with allele zygosity. The study population comprised 110 HCV infected and 143 HCV uninfected CKD patients undergoing regular hemodialysis. HLA DRB1* alleles were determined using polymerase chain reaction followed by hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. We found a significant negative association between HLA DRB1*03 and HCV infection, but the association did not retain significance after adjustment for multiple comparisons. HLA DRB1*03 was found at reduced frequency in HCV antibody positive compared to HCV antibody negative CKD patients on regular dialysis (corrected p was not significant). No significant association between HCV infection and HLA DRB1* zygosity was observed. Our results suggest that there is minimal evidence for a significant role of a particular HLA DRB1* allele or allele zygosity in the susceptibility or protection to HCV in high-risk hemodialysis patients with similar exposure to infection.

  10. Gene-based rare allele analysis identified a risk gene of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hun; Song, Pamela; Lim, Hyunsun; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Jun Hong; Park, Sun Ah

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has a strong propensity to run in families. However, the known risk genes excluding APOE are not clinically useful. In various complex diseases, gene studies have targeted rare alleles for unsolved heritability. Our study aims to elucidate previously unknown risk genes for AD by targeting rare alleles. We used data from five publicly available genetic studies from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). A total of 4,171 cases and 9,358 controls were included. The genotype information of rare alleles was imputed using 1,000 genomes. We performed gene-based analysis of rare alleles (minor allele frequency≤3%). The genome-wide significance level was defined as meta P<1.8×10(-6) (0.05/number of genes in human genome = 0.05/28,517). ZNF628, which is located at chromosome 19q13.42, showed a genome-wide significant association with AD. The association of ZNF628 with AD was not dependent on APOE ε4. APOE and TREM2 were also significantly associated with AD, although not at genome-wide significance levels. Other genes identified by targeting common alleles could not be replicated in our gene-based rare allele analysis. We identified that rare variants in ZNF628 are associated with AD. The protein encoded by ZNF628 is known as a transcription factor. Furthermore, the associations of APOE and TREM2 with AD were highly significant, even in gene-based rare allele analysis, which implies that further deep sequencing of these genes is required in AD heritability studies.

  11. Allelic selection of human IL-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Matesanz, F; Delgado, C; Fresno, M; Alcina, A

    2000-12-01

    The allelic expression of mouse IL-2 cannot be definitely extrapolated to what might happen in humans. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of allelic expression of the IL-2 gene in non-genetically manipulated human T lymphocytes by following natural allelic polymorphisms. We found a phenotypically silent punctual change in the human IL-2 at position 114 after the first nucleotide of the initiation codon, which represents a dimorphic polymorphism at the first exon of the IL-2 gene. This allowed the study by single-cell PCR of the regulation of the human IL-2 allelic expression in heterozygous CD4(+) T cells, which was found to be tightly controlled monoallelically. These findings may be used as a suitable marker for monitoring the IL-2 allelic contribution to effector activities and in immune responses against different infections or in pathological situations.

  12. [Studies of the allelic diversity in micro-satellite locus D16S539, F13B, FESFPS, TH01, and TROX in European population of Russia Ural region using capillary electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Pushkarev, V P; Rakhmanina, L V; Novikov, P I; Ivanov, P L

    2004-01-01

    Allelic frequencies of chromosome micro-satellite locuses D16S539, F13B, FESFPS, TH01 and TPOX were determined, within the case study, in a sampling of Europeoidal individuals residing in Russia's Ural Region. The allelic variants were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis after the enzyme amplification in polymerase chain reaction with fluorescent primers. The genotypic frequencies of the studied locuses were shown not to divert with statistical reliability from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The estimated aggregate discriminative potential for a panel of 5 studied locuses made 0.99995. No nonequilibrium was found by linkage between alleles of all lucuses examined within the present case study or between their alleles and the alleles of previously investigated locuses D7S820 and D13S317. The implemented testing of the population homogeneity of allelic frequencies of investigated locuses for 3 samplings of Europeoids showed a deviation for locus FESFPS versus the Ural and Polish samplings and for locus F13B in the Ural and North America samplings. The distribution of allelic frequencies of other locuses was homogenous in the compared samplings.

  13. Association in alcoholic patients between psychopathic traits and the additive effect of allelic forms of the CNR1 and FAAH endocannabinoid genes, and the 3' region of the DRD2 gene.

    PubMed

    Hoenicka, Janet; Ponce, Guillermo; Jiménez-Arriero, Miguel A; Ampuero, Israel; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Roberto; Rubio, Gabriel; Aragüés, Maria; Ramos, Jose A; Palomo, Tomás

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic factors that underlie the comorbidity between alcohol use disorder and antisocial personality disorder. Previous studies have associated both, dopaminergic and endocannabinoid systems to severe alcoholism with non-adaptive disrupted behaviours. In this work we have examined some gene variants involved in such systems in a sample of alcoholic patients to test whether there is a relationship with antisocial traits. The genetic analysis involved the genotyping of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) TaqIA located nearby the DRD2 gene, the 10-repeat allele of a variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) of the SLC6A3 gene, the C385A FAAH SNP and the 3'-UTR microsatellite of CNR1 gene. The clinical study was performed in 137 Spanish alcohol dependent males. Antisocial Personality Disorder (DSM-IV) diagnosis was made by applying the International Personality Disorder Examination, and psychopathic traits were evaluated by the Hare's Psychopathy Checklist revised (PCL-R). The genotype distribution indicates there is a relationship between the TaqIA SNP, CNR1 and FAAH genes and PCL-R's Factor 1 in alcoholic patients. This relationship seems to be additive and independent and might be responsible for 11.4% of the variance in this PCL-R subscale. Our results suggest the implication of the dopaminergic and endocannabinoid systems in those processes leading to the comorbidity of alcoholism and antisocial behaviour.

  14. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E(35) alleles are functionally stronger than -Q(35) alleles.

    PubMed

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-03-31

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E(35)) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q(35)). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E(35) could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q(35) alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3(+) NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  15. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-03-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  16. Influence of HLA DRB1 alleles in the susceptibility of rheumatoid arthritis and the regulation of antibodies against citrullinated proteins and rheumatoid factor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between HLA-DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and production of antibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPA) and rheumatoid factor (RF). Methods We studied 408 patients (235 with RA, 173 non-RA) and 269 controls. ACPA, RF and HLA-DR typing were determined. Results We found an increased frequency of HLA DRB1 alleles with the shared epitope (SE) in ACPA-positive RA. Inversely, HLA DRB1 alleles encoding DERAA sequences were more frequent in controls than in ACPA-positive RA, and a similar trend was found for HLA DR3. However, these results could not be confirmed after stratification for the presence of the SE, probably due to the relatively low number of patients. These data may suggest that the presence of these alleles may confer a protective role for ACPA-positive RA. In RA patients we observed association between SE alleles and ACPA titers in a dose-dependent effect. The presence of HLA DR3 or DERAA-encoding alleles was associated with markedly reduced ACPA levels. No association between RF titers and HLA DR3 or DERAA-encoding alleles was found. Conclusions HLA DRB1 alleles with the SE are associated with production of ACPA. DERAA-encoding HLA-DR alleles and HLA DR3 may be protective for ACPA-positive RA. PMID:20370905

  17. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  18. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. A combination of alleles 2 of interleukin (IL)-1A(-889) and IL-1B(+3954) is associated with lower gingival bleeding tendency in plaque-induced gingivitis in young adults of Arabic heritage.

    PubMed

    Müller, H P; Barrieshi-Nusair, K M

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association of a distinct combination of polymorphisms in the interleukin (IL)-1 gene cluster on gingival bleeding tendency in young adult Arabs with plaque-induced gingivitis. Fifty otherwise healthy, nonsmoking volunteers, 19-28 years of age, participated. Clinical examinations included periodontal probing depth, bleeding on probing, and plaque index. Probing was done with a pressure-controlled probe at about 1.27 MPa. Examinations were repeated after 2 and 4 weeks. Polymorphisms in the IL-1 gene cluster were assessed using a reverse hybridization assay. A subject carrying alleles 2 at IL-1A ( -889 ) and IL-1B ( +3954 ) was designated genotype-positive. Twenty-six subjects were genotype-positive (52%). A repeated measures two-level (occasion, subject) model of the proportion of sites bleeding on probing, which was adjusted for gender, average plaque index, probing depth, and calculus, revealed a significantly lower proportion of bleeding sites in genotype-positive subjects (estimate -0.050, standard error 0.025, p < 0.05). Biserial correlations of bleeding proportions were high (0.71-0.78), confirming the steady-state plaque environment. It was concluded that inflammatory responses to dental plaque were considerably dampened in genotype-positive, nonsmoking young adults of Arabic heritage.

  20. Tissue-specific patterns of allelically-skewed DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Sarah J; Meaburn, Emma L; Dempster, Emma L; Lunnon, Katie; Paya-Cano, Jose L; Smith, Rebecca G; Volta, Manuela; Troakes, Claire; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Mill, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    While DNA methylation is usually thought to be symmetrical across both alleles, there are some notable exceptions. Genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation are two well-studied sources of allele-specific methylation (ASM), but recent research has indicated a more complex pattern in which genotypic variation can be associated with allelically-skewed DNA methylation in cis. Given the known heterogeneity of DNA methylation across tissues and cell types we explored inter- and intra-individual variation in ASM across several regions of the human brain and whole blood from multiple individuals. Consistent with previous studies, we find widespread ASM with > 4% of the ∼220,000 loci interrogated showing evidence of allelically-skewed DNA methylation. We identify ASM flanking known imprinted regions, and show that ASM sites are enriched in DNase I hypersensitivity sites and often located in an extended genomic context of intermediate DNA methylation. We also detect examples of genotype-driven ASM, some of which are tissue-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the nature of differential DNA methylation across tissues and have important implications for genetic studies of complex disease. As a resource to the community, ASM patterns across each of the tissues studied are available in a searchable online database: http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/ASMBrainBlood.

  1. Tissue-specific patterns of allelically-skewed DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marzi, Sarah J.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Dempster, Emma L.; Lunnon, Katie; Paya-Cano, Jose L.; Smith, Rebecca G.; Volta, Manuela; Troakes, Claire; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Mill, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While DNA methylation is usually thought to be symmetrical across both alleles, there are some notable exceptions. Genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation are two well-studied sources of allele-specific methylation (ASM), but recent research has indicated a more complex pattern in which genotypic variation can be associated with allelically-skewed DNA methylation in cis. Given the known heterogeneity of DNA methylation across tissues and cell types we explored inter- and intra-individual variation in ASM across several regions of the human brain and whole blood from multiple individuals. Consistent with previous studies, we find widespread ASM with > 4% of the ∼220,000 loci interrogated showing evidence of allelically-skewed DNA methylation. We identify ASM flanking known imprinted regions, and show that ASM sites are enriched in DNase I hypersensitivity sites and often located in an extended genomic context of intermediate DNA methylation. We also detect examples of genotype-driven ASM, some of which are tissue-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the nature of differential DNA methylation across tissues and have important implications for genetic studies of complex disease. As a resource to the community, ASM patterns across each of the tissues studied are available in a searchable online database: http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/ASMBrainBlood. PMID:26786711

  2. Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA: comparison of three PCR-based methods.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, Stefan; Hemminki, Kari; Thirumaran, Ranjit Kumar; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Bonn, Stefan; Försti, Asta; Kumar, Rajiv

    2005-12-01

    Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA samples is a powerful and efficient tool for large-scale association studies. In this study, we tested and compared three PCR-based methods for accuracy, reproducibility, cost, and convenience. The methods compared were: (i) real-time PCR with allele-specific primers, (ii) real-time PCR with allele-specific TaqMan probes, and (iii) quantitative sequencing. Allele frequencies of three single nucleotide polymorphisms in three different genes were estimated from pooled DNA. The pools were made of genomic DNA samples from 96 cases with basal cell carcinoma of the skin and 96 healthy controls with known genotypes. In this study, the allele frequency estimation made by real-time PCR with allele-specific primers had the smallest median deviation (MD) from the real allele frequency with 1.12% (absolute percentage points) and was also the cheapest method. However; this method required the most time for optimization and showed the highest variation between replicates (SD = 6.47%). Quantitative sequencing, the simplest method, was found to have intermediate accuracies (MD = 1.44%, SD = 4.2%). Real-time PCR with TaqMan probes, a convenient but very expensive method, had an MD of 1.47% and the lowest variation between replicates (SD = 3.18%).

  3. Association of the 5HTR2A gene with suicidal behavior: CASE-control study and updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The polymorphism rs6313 (T102C) has been associated with suicidal behavior in case–control and meta-analysis studies, but results and conclusions remain controversial. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between T102C with suicidal behavior in a case–control study and, to assess the combined evidence – this case–control study and available data from other related studies – we carried out a meta-analysis. Methods We conducted a case–control study that included 161 patients with suicide attempts and 244 controls; we then performed a meta-analysis. The following models were evaluated in the meta-analysis: A) C allele vs T allele; B) T allele vs C allele; C) Caucasian population, D) Asian population, and E) suicide attempters with schizophrenia. Results We found an association between attempted suicide and control participants for genotype (χ2=6.28, p=0.04, df=2) and allele (χ2=6.17, p=0.01, df=1, OR 1.48 95% IC: 1.08-2.03) frequencies in the case–control study. The meta-analysis, comprising 23 association studies (including the present one), showed that the rs6313 polymorphism is not associated with suicidal behavior for the following comparisons:T allele vs C allele (OR: 1.03; 95% CI 0.93-1.13; p(Z)=0.44); C allele vs T allele: (OR:0.99; 95% CI: 0.90-1.08; p(Z)=0.22); Caucasians (OR:1.09; 95% CI: 0.96-1.23), and Asians (OR:0.96; 95% CI: 0.84-1.09). Conclusion Our results showed association between the rs6313 (T102C) polymorphism and suicidal behavior in the case–control study. However, the meta-analysis showed no evidence of association. Therefore, more studies are necessary to determine conclusively an association between T102C and suicidal behavior. PMID:23311440

  4. CYP2C9*2 allele increases risk for hypoglycemia in POR*1/*1 type 2 diabetic patients treated with sulfonylureas.

    PubMed

    Ragia, G; Tavridou, A; Elens, L; Van Schaik, R H N; Manolopoulos, V G

    2014-01-01

    It is previously shown that carriers of the defective allele CYP2C9*3 that leads to impaired sulfonylurea metabolism are at increased sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia risk due to diminished drug metabolism, whereas no effect of CYP2C9*2 allele was found. Recently, a polymorphism in P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene, assigned as POR*28 allele, was associated with increased CYP2C9 activity. The aim of this study was to assess i) the effect of POR*28 allele on sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia risk and ii) the association of CYP2C9*2 allele with hypoglycemia risk in non-carriers of POR*28 allele. The study group consisted of 176 patients with diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with sulfonylureas, of whom 92 patients had experienced at least one drug-associated hypoglycemic event (cases), while 84 had never experienced a hypoglycemic event (controls). POR*28 allele was detected by use of real-time TaqMan PCR. POR*28 allele was not associated with sulfonyl-urea-induced hypoglycemia. In POR*1/*1 patients, CYP2C9*1/*2 genotype was more common in cases than in controls (32.7 vs. 14.3%, p=0.041). In a model adjusted for age, BMI, duration of T2DM and renal function, and POR*1/*1 entered as a selection variable, CYP2C9*2 allele increased the hypoglycemia risk in response to sulfonylurea (odds ratio: 3.218, p=0.031). In conclusion, our results suggest that POR*28 allele is masking the association of CYP2C9*2 allele with sulfonyl-urea-induced hypoglycemia. Therefore, POR*28 allele is an important source of CYP2C9 activity variability and combined with CYP2C9 gene poly-morphisms may explain individual variability in the effect of sulfonylureas.

  5. Recovering frequencies of known haplotype blocks from single-nucleotide polymorphism allele frequencies.

    PubMed Central

    Pe'er, Itsik; Beckmann, Jacques S

    2004-01-01

    Prospects for large-scale association studies rely on economical methods and powerful analysis. Representing available SNPs by small subsets and measuring allele frequencies on pooled DNA samples each improve genotyping cost effectiveness, while haplotype analysis may highlight associations in otherwise underpowered studies. This manuscript provides the mathematical framework to integrate these methodologies. PMID:15126415

  6. Association study of dopamine D3 receptor gene and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.L.; Billett, E.A.; Macciardi, F.M.

    1995-12-18

    Several groups have reported an association between schizophrenia and the MscI polymorphism in the first exon of the dopamine D3 receptor gene (DRD3). We studied this polymorphism using a North American sample (117 patients plus 188 controls) and an Italian sample (97 patients plus 64 controls). In the first part of the study, we compared allele frequencies of schizophrenia patients and unmatched controls and observed a significant difference in the total sample (P = 0.01). The second part of the study involved a case control approach in which each schizophrenia patient was matched to a control of the same sex, and of similar age and ethnic background. The DRD3 allele frequencies of patients and controls revealed no significant difference between the two groups in the Italian (N = 53) or the North American (N = 54) matched populations; however, when these two matched samples were combined, a significant difference was observed (P = 0.026). Our results suggest that the MscI polymorphism may be associated with schizophrenia in the populations studied. 32 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Association between germline homeobox B13 (HOXB13) G84E allele and prostate cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Aiming; Zhao, Kai; Liang, Chao; Miao, Chenkui; Zhu, Jundong; Chen, Wei; Hua, Yibo; Liu, Yiyang; Zhang, Chao; Yu, Yajie; Su, Shifeng; Wang, Zengjun

    2016-01-01

    Germline HOXB13 G84E mutation (rs138213197) has been described associated with prostate cancer (PCa) susceptibility but results of different studies are inconsistent. We conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the specific role of this mutation. Relevant available studies were identified by searching the databases Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to measure the strength of the association. Subgroup analysis were performed to evaluate the specific role of rs138213197 in disease aggressiveness, diagnostic age and family history. Furthermore, trial sequential analysis (TSA) was conducted for the first time to estimate whether the evidence of the results is sufficient. Our results indicated that significant increased PCa susceptibility was associated with rs138213197 compared with non-carriers (OR = 3.38, 95% CI: 2.45–4.66). Besides, in subgroup analysis, HOXB13 G84E variant was obviously associated with early onset (OR = 2.90, 95% CI: 2.24–3.75), affected relatives (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 2.19–3.10) and highly aggressive disease (OR = 2.38, 95% CI 1.84–3.08). By TSA, the findings in the current study were based on sufficient evidence. Therefore, our results indicated that the G84E mutation in HOXB13 gene might increase susceptibility to PCa. PMID:27626483

  8. Genome-wide association study SNPs in the human genome diversity project populations: does selection affect unlinked SNPs with shared trait associations?

    PubMed

    Casto, Amanda M; Feldman, Marcus W

    2011-01-06

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 2,000 trait-SNP associations, and the number continues to increase. GWAS have focused on traits with potential consequences for human fitness, including many immunological, metabolic, cardiovascular, and behavioral phenotypes. Given the polygenic nature of complex traits, selection may exert its influence on them by altering allele frequencies at many associated loci, a possibility which has yet to be explored empirically. Here we use 38 different measures of allele frequency variation and 8 iHS scores to characterize over 1,300 GWAS SNPs in 53 globally distributed human populations. We apply these same techniques to evaluate SNPs grouped by trait association. We find that groups of SNPs associated with pigmentation, blood pressure, infectious disease, and autoimmune disease traits exhibit unusual allele frequency patterns and elevated iHS scores in certain geographical locations. We also find that GWAS SNPs have generally elevated scores for measures of allele frequency variation and for iHS in Eurasia and East Asia. Overall, we believe that our results provide evidence for selection on several complex traits that has caused changes in allele frequencies and/or elevated iHS scores at a number of associated loci. Since GWAS SNPs collectively exhibit elevated allele frequency measures and iHS scores, selection on complex traits may be quite widespread. Our findings are most consistent with this selection being either positive or negative, although the relative contributions of the two are difficult to discern. Our results also suggest that trait-SNP associations identified in Eurasian samples may not be present in Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, possibly due to differences in linkage disequilibrium patterns. This observation suggests that non-Eurasian and non-East Asian sample populations should be included in future GWAS.

  9. The higher exercise intensity and the presence of allele I of ACE gene elicit a higher post-exercise blood pressure reduction and nitric oxide release in elderly women: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The absence of the I allele of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been associated with higher levels of circulating ACE, lower nitric oxide (NO) release and hypertension. The purposes of this study were to analyze the post-exercise salivary nitrite (NO2-) and blood pressure (BP) responses to different exercise intensities in elderly women divided according to their ACE genotype. Methods Participants (n = 30; II/ID = 20 and DD = 10) underwent three experimental sessions: incremental test - IT (15 watts workload increase/3 min) until exhaustion; 20 min exercise 90% anaerobic threshold (90% AT); and 20 min control session without exercise. Volunteers had their BP and NO2- measured before and after experimental sessions. Results Despite both intensities showed protective effect on preventing the increase of BP during post-exercise recovery compared to control, post-exercise hypotension and increased NO2- release was observed only for carriers of the I allele (p < 0.05). Conclusion Genotypes of the ACE gene may exert a role in post-exercise NO release and BP response. PMID:22136292

  10. Rare alleles within the CYP2E1 (MEOS system) could be associated with better short-term health outcome after acute methanol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Pelclova, Daniela; Seidl, Zdenek; Vaneckova, Manuela; Klempir, Jiri; Ruzicka, Evzen; Ridzon, Petr; Urban, Pavel; Fenclova, Zdenka; Petrik, Vit; Diblik, Pavel; Kuthan, Pavel; Miovsky, Michal; Janikova, Barbara; Adamkova, Vera; Zakharov, Sergey

    2015-02-01

    Genetic polymorphisms influence the metabolism of ethanol and methanol, but the potential effects of genetic predisposition on the clinical course, outcome and short-term health sequelae of acute methanol poisoning are unknown. To evaluate the role of the MEOS system in methanol poisoning, we analysed the effect of three polymorphisms (RsaI - rs2031920; PstI - rs3813867; insertion/deletion I/D) within the CYP2E1 enzyme (MEOS system) in 50 adult survivors of methanol poisoning and compared their genotype frequencies with 460 controls. The minor allele frequencies of all three polymorphisms were below 5% in both groups. We did not detect significant differences in the genotype frequencies between survivors of methanol poisoning and controls (p = 0.34 for the RsaI variant; p = 0.59 for the PstI variant and p = 0.21 for the I/D polymorphism). The carriers of at least one minor allele in the CYP2E1 gene had less severe clinical symptoms and better short-term outcome after acute poisoning. Variants within the CYP2E1 gene are likely not significant genetic determinants of acute methanol poisoning (if survivors are analysed), but they may influence the severity of methanol poisoning and its visual/central nervous system (CNS) outcome.

  11. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 allelic frequencies and identification of a new allele in the iranian cattle breed sistani (Bos indicus).

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Nassiry, M R; Mosafer, J; Mohammadabadi, M R; Sulimova, G E

    2009-02-01

    The distribution of the frequencies of BoLA-DRB3 gene alleles in the Iranian cattle breed Sistani was studied by the PCR-RFLP ("hemi-nested") assay using restriction endonucleases RsaI, HaeIII and BstYI. In the examined cattle breed (65 animals) 32 alleles have been identified one of which being described for the first time (6.15% frequency). The nucleotide sequence of the polymorphic region of exon 2 of this allele has been determined and submitted in the GeneBank database under accession number DQ486519. The submitted sequence has maximum homology (92%) with the previously described sequence DRB3-mRNA from Bos indicus (AccN X79346) and differs from it by 24 nucleotide substitutions which result in 16 amino acid substitutions. The peptide (on the basis of the reconstructed amino acid sequence) has 89% identity to the sequence encoded by the BIDRBF 188 locus (Bos indicus). The results obtained permit the sequence described by us to be considered as a new allele of the BoLA-DRB3 gene (DRB3.2**X). The total frequency of the main six alleles (DRB3.2*X, *10, *11, *20, *34 and *X) occurring with a frequency of over 5% is about 60% in Iranian Sistani cattle. Fifteen alleles have <1% frequency. The highest frequency was observed for DRB3.2*8 allele (21.54%) like in other previously described breeds of Bos indicus (up to 23.07%). The Iranian breed Sistani has a high level of similarity by the spectrum of BoLA-DRB3 alleles and their frequencies to other Bos indicus breeds and significantly differs by these criteria from the Bos taurus breeds. The Iranian Sistani herd under study includes alleles associated with to resistance to leukemia (DRB3.2*ll and *23) and to different forms of mastitis (DRB3.2*2, *7, *11, *23 and *24) although their frequencies are low (from 0.77 to 5.37%). On the whole, a high level of diversity of BoLA-DRB3 gene alleles and the availability of alleles associated with resistance to different diseases makes this breed of interest for breeding practice.

  12. Weighted SNP set analysis in genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hui; Zhao, Yang; Qian, Cheng; Cai, Min; Zhang, Ruyang; Chu, Minjie; Dai, Juncheng; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are popular for identifying genetic variants which are associated with disease risk. Many approaches have been proposed to test multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a region simultaneously which considering disadvantages of methods in single locus association analysis. Kernel machine based SNP set analysis is more powerful than single locus analysis, which borrows information from SNPs correlated with causal or tag SNPs. Four types of kernel machine functions and principal component based approach (PCA) were also compared. However, given the loss of power caused by low minor allele frequencies (MAF), we conducted an extension work on PCA and used a new method called weighted PCA (wPCA). Comparative analysis was performed for weighted principal component analysis (wPCA), logistic kernel machine based test (LKM) and principal component analysis (PCA) based on SNP set in the case of different minor allele frequencies (MAF) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structures. We also applied the three methods to analyze two SNP sets extracted from a real GWAS dataset of non-small cell lung cancer in Han Chinese population. Simulation results show that when the MAF of the causal SNP is low, weighted principal component and weighted IBS are more powerful than PCA and other kernel machine functions at different LD structures and different numbers of causal SNPs. Application of the three methods to a real GWAS dataset indicates that wPCA and wIBS have better performance than the linear kernel, IBS kernel and PCA.

  13. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Laura Putignano, Anna; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andrés, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Nelen, Marcel R.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A.M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Gareth Evans, D.; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; John Kennedy, M.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frénay, Marc; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Catharina Dressler, Anne; Hansen, Thomas v.O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Bjork Barkardottir, Rosa; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Sluiter, Michelle D.; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Chun Ding, Yuan; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r2 = 0.14) were independently associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.23, P-trend = 4.5 × 10−9 for rs2046210; HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18–1.40, P-trend = 1.3 × 10−8 for rs9397435], but only rs9397435 was associated with the risk for BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01–1.28, P-trend = 0.031). SNP rs11249433 (1p11.2) was associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02–1.17, P-trend = 0.015), but was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92–1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women. PMID:21593217

  14. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Putignano, Anna Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G; Caligo, Maria A; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andrés, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B; Rookus, Matti A; Hooning, Maartje J; Nelen, Marcel R; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Os, Theo A M; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; Kennedy, M John; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frénay, Marc; Hopper, John L; Daly, Mary B; Terry, Mary B; John, Esther M; Buys, Saundra S; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Hansen, Thomas v O; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine S; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L; Beattie, Mary S; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Sluiter, Michelle D; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Chun Ding, Yuan; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2011-08-15

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r(2) = 0.14) were independently associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.23, P-trend = 4.5 × 10(-9) for rs2046210; HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18-1.40, P-trend = 1.3 × 10(-8) for rs9397435], but only rs9397435 was associated with the risk for BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01-1.28, P-trend = 0.031). SNP rs11249433 (1p11.2) was associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02-1.17, P-trend = 0.015), but was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92-1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women.

  15. Kruppel-like factor4 regulates PRDM1 expression through binding to an autoimmune risk allele

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Helen; Gregersen, Peter K.; Diamond, Betty

    2017-01-01

    A SNP identified as rs548234, which is found in PRDM1, the gene that encodes BLIMP1, is a risk allele associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). BLIMP1 expression was reported to be decreased in women with the PRDM1 rs548234 risk allele compared with women with the nonrisk allele in monocyte-derived DCs (MO-DCs). In this study, we demonstrate that BLIMP1 expression is regulated by the binding of Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) to the risk SNP. KLF4 is highly expressed in MO-DCs but undetectable in B cells, consistent with the lack of altered expression of BLIMP1 in B cells from risk SNP carriers. Female rs548234 risk allele carriers, but not nonrisk allele carriers, exhibited decreased levels of BLIMP1 in MO-DCs, showing that the regulatory function of KLF4 is influenced by the risk allele. In addition, KLF4 directly recruits histone deacetylases (HDAC4, HDAC6, and HDAC7), established negative regulators of gene expression. Finally, the knock down of KLF4 expression reversed the inhibitory effects of the risk SNP on promoter activity and BLIMP1 expression. Therefore, the binding of KLF4 and the subsequent recruitment of HDACs represent a mechanism for reduced BLIMP1 expression in MO-DCs bearing the SLE risk allele rs548234. PMID:28097234

  16. Identification of β-globin haplotypes linked to sickle hemoglobin (Hb S) alleles in Mazandaran province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Aghajani, Faeghe; Mahdavi, Mohammad Reza; Kosaryan, Mehrnoush; Mahdavi, Mehrad; Hamidi, Mohaddese; Jalali, Hossein

    2016-12-21

    Carrier frequency of the β(S) allele has been reported to be 0.19% in Mazandaran province, northern Iran. Haplotype analysis of the β(S) allele helps trace the origin of its encoded hemoglobin (Hb) variant, Hb S, in a region. The aim of this study was to investigate the haplotypes associated with β(S) alleles in Mazandaran province. Capillary electrophoresis was carried out to detect individuals suspected to have a βS allele(s). DNA analysis (PCR-RFLP) was used for final confirmation. To identify 5\\' to 3\\' β-globin gene cluster haplotypes associated with β(S) alleles, family linkage analysis was applied. Six polymorphic sites (HincII 5' to ε, XmnI 5' to (G)γ, HindIII in (G)γ, HindIII in (A)γ, HincII 3' to ψβ and AvaII in β) were investigated using the PCR-RFLP method. Five different haplotypes were linked to β(S) alleles, while β(A) alleles were associated with nine haplotypes. Among the β(S) alleles, 53.9% were associated with the Benin (----++) haplotype, and the Arab-Indian (+++-++) haplotype had the second-highest frequency (23%). Unlike southern provinces, where the Arab-Indian haplotype is prominent, the Benin haplotype is the most frequent haplotype in northern Iran, and this may represent a founder effect. Since the Benin haplotype does not carry the XmnI polymorphism 5' to the (G)γ gene, which is responsible for high expression of Hb F, a severe form of sickle cell disease can be anticipated in patients that are homozygous for the β(S) allele in the northern region.

  17. Predictive long-range allele-specific mapping of regulatory variants and target transcripts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kibaick; Lee, Seulkee; Bang, Hyoeun; Choi, Jung Kyoon

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified a large number of noncoding associations, calling for systematic mapping to causal regulatory variants and their distal target genes. A widely used method, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for chromatin or expression traits, suffers from sample-to-sample experimental variation and trans-acting or environmental effects. Instead, alleles at heterozygous loci can be compared within a sample, thereby controlling for those confounding factors. Here we introduce a method for chromatin structure-based allele-specific pairing of regulatory variants and target transcripts. With phased genotypes, much of allele-specific expression could be explained by paired allelic cis-regulation across a long range. This approach showed approximately two times greater sensitivity than QTL mapping. There are cases in which allele imbalance cannot be tested because heterozygotes are not available among reference samples. Therefore, we employed a machine learning method to predict missing positive cases based on various features shared by observed allele-specific pairs. We showed that only 10 reference samples are sufficient to achieve high prediction accuracy with a low sampling variation. In conclusion, our method enables highly sensitive fine mapping and target identification for trait-associated variants based on a small number of reference samples.

  18. 'Smoking genes': a genetic association study.

    PubMed

    Verde, Zoraida; Santiago, Catalina; Rodríguez González-Moro, José Miguel; de Lucas Ramos, Pilar; López Martín, Soledad; Bandrés, Fernando; Lucia, Alejandro; Gómez-Gallego, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Some controversy exists on the specific genetic variants that are associated with nicotine dependence and smoking-related phenotypes. The purpose of this study was to analyse the association of smoking status and smoking-related phenotypes (included nicotine dependence) with 17 candidate genetic variants: CYP2A6*1×2, CYP2A6*2 (1799T>A) [rs1801272], CYP2A6*9 (-48T>G) [rs28399433], CYP2A6*12, CYP2A13*2 (3375C>T) [rs8192789], CYP2A13*3 (7520C>G), CYP2A13*4 (579G>A), CYP2A13*7 (578C>T) [rs72552266], CYP2B6*4 (785A>G), CYP2B6*9 (516G>T), CHRNA3 546C>T [rs578776], CHRNA5 1192G>A [rs16969968], CNR1 3764C>G [rs6928499], DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A) [rs1800497], 5HTT LPR, HTR2A -1438A>G [rs6311] and OPRM1 118A>G [rs1799971]. We studied the genotypes of the aforementioned polymorphisms in a cohort of Spanish smokers (cases, N = 126) and ethnically matched never smokers (controls, N = 80). The results showed significant between-group differences for CYP2A6*2 and CYP2A6*12 (both P<0.001). Compared with carriers of variant alleles, the odds ratio (OR) for being a non-smoker in individuals with the wild-type genotype of CYP2A6*12 and DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A) polymorphisms was 3.60 (95%CI: 1.75, 7.44) and 2.63 (95%CI: 1.41, 4.89) respectively. Compared with the wild-type genotype, the OR for being a non-smoker in carriers of the minor CYP2A6*2 allele was 1.80 (95%CI: 1.24, 2.65). We found a significant genotype effect (all P≤0.017) for the following smoking-related phenotypes: (i) cigarettes smoked per day and CYP2A13*3; (ii) pack years smoked and CYP2A6*2, CYP2A6*1×2, CYP2A13*7, CYP2B6*4 and DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A); (iii) nicotine dependence (assessed with the Fagestrom test) and CYP2A6*9. Overall, our results suggest that genetic variants potentially involved in nicotine metabolization (mainly, CYP2A6 polymorphisms) are those showing the strongest association with smoking-related phenotypes, as opposed to genetic variants influencing the brain effects of nicotine, e

  19. AlleleSeq: analysis of allele-specific expression and binding in a network framework.

    PubMed

    Rozowsky, Joel; Abyzov, Alexej; Wang, Jing; Alves, Pedro; Raha, Debasish; Harmanci, Arif; Leng, Jing; Bjornson, Robert; Kong, Yong; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Rubin, Mark; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark

    2011-08-02

    To study allele-specific expression (ASE) and binding (ASB), that is, differences between the maternally and paternally derived alleles, we have developed a computational pipeline (AlleleSeq). Our pipeline initially constructs a diploid personal genome sequence (and corresponding personalized gene annotation) using genomic sequence variants (SNPs, indels, and structural variants), and then identifies allele-specific events with significant differences in the number of mapped reads between maternal and paternal alleles. There are many technical challenges in the construction and alignment of reads to a personal diploid genome sequence that we address, for example, bias of reads mapping to the reference allele. We have applied AlleleSeq to variation data for NA12878 from the 1000 Genomes Project as well as matched, deeply sequenced RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq data sets generated for this purpose. In addition to observing fairly widespread allele-specific behavior within individual functional genomic data sets (including results consistent with X-chromosome inactivation), we can study the interaction between ASE and ASB. Furthermore, we investigate the coordination between ASE and ASB from multiple transcription factors events using a regulatory network framework. Correlation analyses and network motifs show mostly coordinated ASB and ASE.

  20. Power comparison of admixture mapping and direct association analysis in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Qin, Huaizhen; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2012-04-01

    When dense markers are available, one can interrogate almost every common variant across the genome via imputation and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) test, which has become a routine in current genome-wide association studies (GWASs). As a complement, admixture mapping exploits the long-range linkage disequilibrium (LD) generated by admixture between genetically distinct ancestral populations. It is then questionable whether admixture mapping analysis is still necessary in detecting the disease associated variants in admixed populations. We argue that admixture mapping is able to reduce the burden of massive comparisons in GWASs; it therefore can be a powerful tool to locate the disease variants with substantial allele frequency differences between ancestral populations. In this report we studied a two-stage approach, where candidate regions are defined by conducting admixture mapping at stage 1, and single SNP association tests are followed at stage 2 within the candidate regions defined at stage 1. We first established the genome-wide significance levels corresponding to the criteria to define the candidate regions at stage 1 by simulations. We next compared the power of the two-stage approach with direct association analysis. Our simulations suggest that the two-stage approach can be more powerful than the standard genome-wide association analysis when the allele frequency difference of a causal variant in ancestral populations, is larger than 0.4. Our conclusion is consistent with a theoretical prediction by Risch and Tang ([2006] Am J Hum Genet 79:S254). Surprisingly, our study also suggests that power can be improved when we use less strict criteria to define the candidate regions at stage 1.

  1. Partial Revertants of the Transposable Element-Associated Suppressible Allele White-Apricot in Drosophila Melanogaster: Structures and Responsiveness to Genetic Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Mount, S. M.; Green, M. M.; Rubin, G. M.

    1988-01-01

    The eye color phenotype of white-apricot (w(a)), a mutant allele of the white locus caused by the insertion of the transposable element copia into a small intron, is suppressed by the extragenic suppressor suppressor-of-white-apricot (su(w(a))) and enhanced by the extragenic enhancers suppressor-of-forked su(f)) and Enhancer-of-white-apricot (E(w(a))). Derivatives of w(a) have been analyzed molecularly and genetically in order to correlate the structure of these derivatives with their response to modifiers. Derivatives in which the copia element is replaced precisely by a solo long terminal repeat (sLTR) were generated in vitro and returned to the germline by P-element mediated transformation; flies carrying this allele within a P transposon show a nearly wild-type phenotype and no response to either su(f) or su(w(a)). In addition, eleven partial phenotypic revertants of w(a) were analyzed. Of these, one appears to be a duplication of a large region which includes w(a), three are new alleles of su(w(a)), two are sLTR derivatives whose properties confirm results obtained using transformation, and five are secondary insertions into the copia element within w(a). One of these, w(aR84h), differs from w(a) by the insertion of the most 3' 83 nucleotides of the I factor. The five insertion derivatives show a variety of phenotypes and modes of interaction with su((f) and su(w(a)). The eye pigmentation of w(aR84h) is affected by su(f) and E(w(a)), but not su(w(a)). These results demonstrate that copia (as opposed to the interruption of white sequences) is essential for the w(a) phenotype and its response to genetic modifiers, and that there are multiple mechanisms for the alteration of the w(a) phenotype by modifiers. PMID:2834265

  2. Genetically Determined Amerindian Ancestry Correlates with Increased Frequency of Risk Alleles for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, E; Webb, R; Rasmussen, A.; Kelly, J.A; Riba, L.; Kaufman, K.M.; Garcia-de la Torre, I.; Moctezuma, J.F.; Maradiaga-Ceceña, M.A.; Cardiel, M.; Acevedo, E.; Cucho-Venegas, M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gamron, S.; Pons-Estel, B.A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Martin, J.; Tusié-Luna, T.; Harley, J.B.; Richardson, B.; Sawalha, A.H.; Alarcón-Riquelme, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To analyze if genetically determined Amerindian ancestry predicts the increased presence of risk alleles of known susceptibility genes for systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms within 16 confirmed genetic susceptibility loci for SLE were genotyped in a set of 804 Mestizo lupus patients and 667 Mestizo normal healthy controls. In addition, 347 admixture informative markers were genotyped. Individual ancestry proportions were determined using STRUCTURE. Association analysis was performed using PLINK, and correlation of the presence of risk alleles with ancestry was done using linear regression. Results A meta-analysis of the genetic association of the 16 SNPs across populations showed that TNFSF4, STAT4, PDCD1, ITGAM, and IRF5 were associated with lupus in a Hispanic-Mestizo cohort enriched for European and Amerindian ancestry. In addition, two SNPs within the MHC region, previously associated in a genome-wide association study in Europeans, were also associated in Mestizos. Using linear regression we predict an average increase of 2.34 risk alleles when comparing a lupus patient with 100% Amerindian ancestry to an SLE patient with 0% American Indian Ancestry (p<0.0001). SLE patients with 43% more Amerindian ancestry are predicted to carry one additional risk allele. Conclusion Amerindian ancestry increased the number of risk alleles for lupus. PMID:20848568

  3. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections.

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies common variants associated with pharmacokinetics of psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Athanasiu, Lavinia; Smorr, Lisa-Lena H; Tesli, Martin; Røssberg, Jan I; Sønderby, Ida E; Spigset, Olav; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A

    2015-08-01

    Individual variation in pharmacokinetics of psychotropic drugs, particularly metabolism, is an important factor to consider in pharmacological treatment in psychiatry. A large proportion of this variance is still not accounted for, but evidence so far suggests the involvement of genetic factors. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with concentration dose ratio (CDR) as sub-phenotype to assess metabolism rate of psychotropic drugs in a homogenous Norwegian sample of 1334 individuals diagnosed with a severe mental disorder. The GWAS revealed one genome-wide significant marker (rs16935279, p-value=3.95×10(-10), pperm=7.5×10(-4)) located in an intronic region of the lncRNA LOC100505718. Carriers of the minor allele have a lower metabolism rate of antiepileptic drugs compared to major allele carriers. In addition, several nominally significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and CDR for antipsychotic, antidepressant and antiepileptic drugs were disclosed. We consider standardised CDR to be a useful measure of the metabolism rate of a drug. The present findings indicate that common gene variants could affect the metabolism of psychotropic drugs. This warrants further investigations into the functional mechanisms involved as it may lead to identification of predictive markers as well as novel drug targets.

  5. Polymorphism of the HLA-B*15 group of alleles is generated following 5 lineages of evolution.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Laso, Jorge; Herraiz, Miguel Angel; Vidart, Jose Antonio; Peñaloza, Jorge; Barbolla, Maria Luz; Jurado, Maria Luisa; Cervera, Isabel

    2011-05-01

    Generation of the HLA-B*15 group of alleles has been analyzed using exon 1, intron 1, exon 2, intron 2, and exon 3 sequences from human and nonhuman primates. Results indicated that the 230 alleles analyzed could be grouped into 5 different lineages of evolution coming from nonhuman primate MHC-B* alleles sharing characteristic nucleotide sequences. The major evolutionary mechanism of evolution in this group of alleles is the gene conversion event with the exchange of genomic sequences present in other HLA-B*alleles. This evolutionary event reflects the importance of the exchanges between different genomic regions of distinct HLA-A*, -B*, or -C* alleles and only 1 group of HLA-B* alleles (B*15 in the present paper). These data also correlated with the geographic distribution of the lineages postulated and with the corresponding serologic specificities (B62, -63, -71, -72, -75, -76, and -77). In conclusion, the high degree of polymorphism of 1 group of alleles has a specific and simple pathway of evolution, which could result in new insight into the study of immune system functionality, disease association studies, and anthropological studies.

  6. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    PubMed

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API).

  7. Evidence for schizophrenia susceptibility alleles in the Indian population: An association of neurodevelopmental genes in case-control and familial samples.

    PubMed

    Jajodia, Ajay; Kaur, Harpreet; Kumari, Kalpana; Gupta, Meenal; Baghel, Ruchi; Srivastava, Ankit; Sood, Mamta; Chadda, Rakesh Kumar; Jain, Sanjeev; Kukreti, Ritushree

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder with lifetime prevalence of ~1% worldwide. A genotyping study was conducted using a custom panel of Illumina 1536 SNPs in 840 schizophrenia cases and 876 controls (351 patients and 385 controls from North India; and 436 patients, 401 controls and 143 familial samples with 53 probands containing 37 complete and 16 incomplete trios from South India). Meta-analysis of this population of Indo-European and Dravidian ancestry identified three strongly associated variants with schizophrenia: STT3A (rs548181, p=1.47×10(-5)), NRG1 (rs17603876, p=8.66×10(-5)) and GRM7 (rs3864075, p=4.06×10(-3)). Finally, a meta-analysis was conducted comparing our data with data from the Schizophrenia Psychiatric Genome-Wide Association Study Consortium (PGC-SCZ) that supported rs548181 (p=1.39×10(-7)). In addition, combined analysis of sporadic case-control association and a transmission disequilibrium test in familial samples from South Indian population identified three associations: rs1062613 (p=3.12×10(-3)), a functional promoter variant of HTR3A; rs6710782 (p=3.50×10(-3)), an intronic variant of ERBB4; and rs891903 (p=1.05×10(-2)), an intronic variant of EBF1. The results support the risk variants observed in the earlier published work and suggest a potential role of neurodevelopmental genes in the schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  8. High-Throughput SNP Allele-Frequency Determination in Pooled DNA Samples by Kinetic PCR

    PubMed Central

    Germer, Søren; Holland, Michael J.; Higuchi, Russell

    2000-01-01

    We have developed an accurate, yet inexpensive and high-throughput, method for determining the allele frequency of biallelic polymorphisms in pools of DNA samples. The assay combines kinetic (real-time quantitative) PCR with allele-specific amplification and requires no post-PCR processing. The relative amounts of each allele in a sample are quantified. This is performed by dividing equal aliquots of the pooled DNA between two separate PCR reactions, each of which contains a primer pair specific to one or the other allelic SNP variant. For pools with equal amounts of the two alleles, the two amplifications should reach a detectable level of fluorescence at the same cycle number. For pools that contain unequal ratios of the two alleles, the difference in cycle number between the two amplification reactions can be used to calculate the relative allele amounts. We demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of the assay on samples with known predetermined SNP allele frequencies from 5% to 95%, including pools of both human and mouse DNAs using eight different SNPs altogether. The accuracy of measuring known allele frequencies is very high, with the strength of correlation between measured and known frequencies having an r2 = 0.997. The loss of sensitivity as a result of measurement error is typically minimal, compared with that due to sampling error alone, for population samples up to 1000. We believe that by providing a means for SNP genotyping up to thousands of samples simultaneously, inexpensively, and reproducibly, this method is a powerful strategy for detecting meaningful polymorphic differences in candidate gene association studies and genome-wide linkage disequilibrium scans. PMID:10673283

  9. Bovine leukocyte antigen major histocompatibility complex class II DRB3*2703 and DRB3*1501 alleles are associated with variation in levels of protection against Theileria parva challenge following immunization with the sporozoite p67 antigen.

    PubMed

    Ballingall, Keith T; Luyai, Anthony; Rowlands, G John; Sales, Jill; Musoke, Anthony J; Morzaria, Subash P; McKeever, Declan J

    2004-05-01

    Initial laboratory trials of an experimental subunit vaccine against Theileria parva based on the 67-kDa major sporozoite surface antigen revealed a range of responses to challenge. We have analyzed convergence in seven sets of monozygotic twins which suggests that genetic factors may have an influence in determining the degree of protection provided by p67 immunization. In addition, we have examined whether allelic diversity at major histocompatibility complex class II loci influences protection. Analysis of bovine leukocyte antigen DRB3 diversity in 201 animals identified significant associations with vaccine success (DRB3*2703; P = 0.027) and vaccine failure (DRB3*1501; P = 0.013). Furthermore, DRB3*2703 was associated with the likelihood of immunized animals showing little to no clinical signs of disease following challenge. We discuss the acquired and innate immune mechanisms that may be behind the associations described here.

  10. GLRB allelic variation associated with agoraphobic cognitions, increased startle response and fear network activation: a potential neurogenetic pathway to panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Deckert, J; Weber, H; Villmann, C; Lonsdorf, T B; Richter, J; Andreatta, M; Arias-Vasquez, A; Hommers, L; Kent, L; Schartner, C; Cichon, S; Wolf, C; Schaefer, N; von Collenberg, C R; Wachter, B; Blum, R; Schümann, D; Scharfenort, R; Schumacher, J; Forstner, A J; Baumann, C; Schiele, M A; Notzon, S; Zwanzger, P; Janzing, J G E; Galesloot, T; Kiemeney, L A; Gajewska, A; Glotzbach-Schoon, E; Mühlberger, A; Alpers, G; Fydrich, T; Fehm, L; Gerlach, A L; Kircher, T; Lang, T; Ströhle, A; Arolt, V; Wittchen, H-U; Kalisch, R; Büchel, C; Hamm, A; Nöthen, M M; Romanos, M; Domschke, K; Pauli, P; Reif, A

    2017-02-07

    The molecular genetics of panic disorder (PD) with and without agoraphobia (AG) are still largely unknown and progress is hampered by small sample sizes. We therefore performed a genome-wide association study with a dimensional, PD/AG-related anxiety phenotype based on the Agoraphobia Cognition Questionnaire (ACQ) in a sample of 1370 healthy German volunteers of the CRC TRR58 MEGA study wave 1. A genome-wide significant association was found between ACQ and single non-coding nucleotide variants of the GLRB gene (rs78726293, P=3.3 × 10(-8); rs191260602, P=3.9 × 10(-8)). We followed up on this finding in a larger dimensional ACQ sample (N=2547) and in independent samples with a dichotomous AG phenotype based on the Symptoms Checklist (SCL-90; N=3845) and a case-control sample with the categorical phenotype PD/AG (Ncombined =1012) obtaining highly significant P-values also for GLRB single-nucleotide variants rs17035816 (P=3.8 × 10(-4)) and rs7688285 (P=7.6 × 10(-5)). GLRB gene expression was found to be modulated by rs7688285 in brain tissue, as well as cell culture. Analyses of intermediate PD/AG phenotypes demonstrated increased startle reflex and increased fear network, as well as general sensory activation by GLRB risk gene variants rs78726293, rs191260602, rs17035816 and rs7688285. Partial Glrb knockout mice demonstrated an agoraphobic phenotype. In conjunction with the clinical observation that rare coding GLRB gene mutations are associated with the neurological disorder hyperekplexia characterized by a generalized startle reaction and agoraphobic behavior, our data provide evidence that non-coding, although functional GLRB gene polymorphisms may predispose to PD by increasing startle response and agoraphobic cognitions.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 7 February 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.2.

  11. Deleterious alleles in the human genome are on average younger than neutral alleles of the same frequency.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, Adam; Pulit, Sara L; Francioli, Laurent C; van Dijk, Freerk; Swertz, Morris; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Slagboom, P Eline; van Ommen, G J B; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I W; Sunyaev, Shamil R

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale population sequencing studies provide a complete picture of human genetic variation within the studied populations. A key challenge is to identify, among the myriad alleles, those variants that have an effect on molecular function, phenotypes, and reproductive fitness. Most non-neutral variation consists of deleterious alleles segregating at low population frequency due to incessant mutation. To date, studies characterizing selection against deleterious alleles have been based on allele frequency (testing for a relative excess of rare alleles) or ratio of polymorphism to divergence (testing for a relative increase in the number of polymorphic alleles). Here, starting from Maruyama's theoretical prediction (Maruyama T (1974), Am J Hum Genet USA 6:669-673) that a (slightly) deleterious allele is, on average, younger than a neutral allele segregating at the same frequency, we devised an approach to characterize selection based on allelic age. Unlike existing methods, it compares sets of neutral and deleterious sequence variants at the same allele frequency. When applied to human sequence data from the Genome of the Netherlands Project, our approach distinguishes low-frequency coding non-synonymous variants from synonymous and non-coding variants at the same allele frequency and discriminates between sets of variants independently predicted to be benign or damaging for protein structure and function. The results confirm the abundance of slightly deleterious coding variation in humans.

  12. Replication of association between schizophrenia and ZNF804A in the Irish Case Control Study of Schizophrenia (ICCSS) sample

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Brien; Thiselton, Dawn; Maher, Brion S.; Bigdeli, Tim; Wormley, Brandon; McMichael, G. Omari; Fanous, Ayman H.; Vladimirov, Vladimir; O’Neill, F. Anthony; Walsh, Dermot; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    A recent genomewide association study reported association between schizophrenia and the ZNF804A gene on chromosome 2q32.1. We attempted to replicate these findings in our Irish Case-Control Study of Schizophrenia (ICCSS) sample (N=1021 cases, 626 controls). Following consultation with the original investigators we genotyped 3 of the most promising SNPs from the Cardiff study. We replicate association with rs1344706 (trend test one tailed p=0.0113 with the previously associated A allele) in ZNF804A. We detect no evidence of association with rs6490121 in NOS1 (one tailed p=0.21), and only a trend with rs9922369 in RGRIP1L (one tailed p=0.0515). Based on these results, we completed genotyping of 11 additional LD-tagging SNPs in ZNF804A. Of 12 SNPs genotyped, 11 pass QC criteria and 4 are nominally associated, with our most significant evidence of association at rs7597593 (p=0.0013) followed by rs1344706. We observe no evidence of differential association in ZNF804A based on family history or sex of case. The associated SNP rs1344706 lies in ~30 bp of conserved mammalian sequence and the associated A allele is predicted to maintain binding sites for the brain-expressed transcription factors MYT1L and POU3F1/OCT-6. In controls, expression is significantly increased from the A allele of rs1344706 compared to the C allele. Expression is increased in schizophrenic cases compared to controls, but this difference does not achieve statistical significance. This study replicates the original reported association of ZNF804A with schizophrenia and suggests that there is a consistent link between the the A allele of rs1344706, increased expression of ZNF804A and risk for schizophrenia. PMID:19844207

  13. Update on allele nomenclature for human cytochromes P450 and the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Database.

    PubMed

    Sim, Sarah C; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in xenobiotic metabolism and drug response is extensive and genetic factors play an important role in this variation. A majority of clinically used drugs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system and interindividual variability in expression and function of these enzymes is a major factor for explaining individual susceptibility for adverse drug reactions and drug res