Science.gov

Sample records for allelic association studies

  1. Confounded by sequencing depth in association studies of rare alleles.

    PubMed

    Garner, Chad

    2011-05-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are facilitating large-scale association studies of rare genetic variants. The depth of the sequence read coverage is an important experimental variable in the next-generation technologies and it is a major determinant of the quality of genotype calls generated from sequence data. When case and control samples are sequenced separately or in different proportions across batches, they are unlikely to be matched on sequencing read depth and a differential misclassification of genotypes can result, causing confounding and an increased false-positive rate. Data from Pilot Study 3 of the 1000 Genomes project was used to demonstrate that a difference between the mean sequencing read depth of case and control samples can result in false-positive association for rare and uncommon variants, even when the mean coverage depth exceeds 30× in both groups. The degree of the confounding and inflation in the false-positive rate depended on the extent to which the mean depth was different in the case and control groups. A logistic regression model was used to test for association between case-control status and the cumulative number of alleles in a collapsed set of rare and uncommon variants. Including each individual's mean sequence read depth across the variant sites in the logistic regression model nearly eliminated the confounding effect and the inflated false-positive rate. Furthermore, accounting for the potential error by modeling the probability of the heterozygote genotype calls in the regression analysis had a relatively minor but beneficial effect on the statistical results. PMID:21328616

  2. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Alleles Associated with Hair Color and Skin Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiali; Kraft, Peter; Nan, Hongmei; Guo, Qun; Chen, Constance; Qureshi, Abrar; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hu, Frank B.; Duffy, David L.; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen; Hunter, David J.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of natural hair color in more than 10,000 men and women of European ancestry from the United States and Australia. An initial analysis of 528,173 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped on 2,287 women identified IRF4 and SLC24A4 as loci highly associated with hair color, along with three other regions encompassing known pigmentation genes. We confirmed these associations in 7,028 individuals from three additional studies. Across these four studies, SLC24A4 rs12896399 and IRF4 rs12203592 showed strong associations with hair color, with p = 6.0×10−62 and p = 7.46×10−127, respectively. The IRF4 SNP was also associated with skin color (p = 6.2×10−14), eye color (p = 6.1×10−13), and skin tanning response to sunlight (p = 3.9×10−89). A multivariable analysis pooling data from the initial GWAS and an additional 1,440 individuals suggested that the association between rs12203592 and hair color was independent of rs1540771, a SNP between the IRF4 and EXOC2 genes previously found to be associated with hair color. After adjustment for rs12203592, the association between rs1540771 and hair color was not significant (p = 0.52). One variant in the MATP gene was associated with hair color. A variant in the HERC2 gene upstream of the OCA2 gene showed the strongest and independent association with hair color compared with other SNPs in this region, including three previously reported SNPs. The signals detected in a region around the MC1R gene were explained by MC1R red hair color alleles. Our results suggest that the IRF4 and SLC24A4 loci are associated with human hair color and skin pigmentation. PMID:18483556

  3. Genome-wide association study identifies 14 novel risk alleles associated with basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Harvind S.; Wu, Wenting; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Yang, Lingyao; Hedlin, Haley; Desai, Manisha; Lin, Yuan; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Hinds, David A.; Tang, Jean Y.; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y.

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of 2.8 million cases in the United States alone. Previous studies have demonstrated an association between 21 distinct genetic loci and BCC risk. Here, we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of BCC, totalling 17,187 cases and 287,054 controls. We confirm 17 previously reported loci and identify 14 new susceptibility loci reaching genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8, logistic regression). These newly associated SNPs lie within predicted keratinocyte regulatory elements and in expression quantitative trait loci; furthermore, we identify candidate genes and non-coding RNAs involved in telomere maintenance, immune regulation and tumour progression, providing deeper insight into the pathogenesis of BCC. PMID:27539887

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies 14 novel risk alleles associated with basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Harvind S; Wu, Wenting; Ransohoff, Katherine J; Yang, Lingyao; Hedlin, Haley; Desai, Manisha; Lin, Yuan; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Hinds, David A; Tang, Jean Y; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of 2.8 million cases in the United States alone. Previous studies have demonstrated an association between 21 distinct genetic loci and BCC risk. Here, we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of BCC, totalling 17,187 cases and 287,054 controls. We confirm 17 previously reported loci and identify 14 new susceptibility loci reaching genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8), logistic regression). These newly associated SNPs lie within predicted keratinocyte regulatory elements and in expression quantitative trait loci; furthermore, we identify candidate genes and non-coding RNAs involved in telomere maintenance, immune regulation and tumour progression, providing deeper insight into the pathogenesis of BCC. PMID:27539887

  5. GACT: a Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool for SNP imputation and meta-analysis in genetic association studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified genes associated with complex human diseases. Although much of the heritability remains unexplained, combining single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes from multiple studies for meta-analysis will increase the statistical power to identify new disease-associated variants. Meta-analysis requires same allele definition (nomenclature) and genome build among individual studies. Similarly, imputation, commonly-used prior to meta-analysis, requires the same consistency. However, the genotypes from various GWAS are generated using different genotyping platforms, arrays or SNP-calling approaches, resulting in use of different genome builds and allele definitions. Incorrect assumptions of identical allele definition among combined GWAS lead to a large portion of discarded genotypes or incorrect association findings. There is no published tool that predicts and converts among all major allele definitions. Results In this study, we have developed a tool, GACT, which stands for Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool, that predicts and inter-converts between any of the common SNP allele definitions and between the major genome builds. In addition, we assessed several factors that may affect imputation quality, and our results indicated that inclusion of singletons in the reference had detrimental effects while ambiguous SNPs had no measurable effect. Unexpectedly, exclusion of genotypes with missing rate > 0.001 (40% of study SNPs) showed no significant decrease of imputation quality (even significantly higher when compared to the imputation with singletons in the reference), especially for rare SNPs. Conclusion GACT is a new, powerful, and user-friendly tool with both command-line and interactive online versions that can accurately predict, and convert between any of the common allele definitions and between genome builds for genome-wide meta-analysis and imputation of

  6. Association between HLA Class I and Class II Alleles and the Outcome of West Nile Virus Infection: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Lanteri, Marion C.; Kaidarova, Zhanna; Peterson, Trevor; Cate, Steven; Custer, Brian; Wu, Shiquan; Agapova, Maria; Law, Jacqueline P.; Bielawny, Thomas; Plummer, Frank; Tobler, Leslie H.; Loeb, Mark; Busch, Michael P.; Bramson, Jonathan; Luo, Ma; Norris, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background West Nile virus (WNV) infection is asymptomatic in most individuals, with a minority developing symptoms ranging from WNV fever to serious neuroinvasive disease. This study investigated the impact of host HLA on the outcome of WNV disease. Methods A cohort of 210 non-Hispanic mostly white WNV+ subjects from Canada and the U.S. were typed for HLA-A, B, C, DP, DQ, and DR. The study subjects were divided into three WNV infection outcome groups: asymptomatic (AS), symptomatic (S), and neuroinvasive disease (ND). Allele frequency distribution was compared pair-wise between the AS, S, and ND groups using χ2 and Fisher's exact tests and P values were corrected for multiple comparisons (Pc). Allele frequencies were compared between the groups and the North American population (NA) used as a control group. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the potential synergistic effect of age and HLA allele phenotype on disease outcome. Results The alleles HLA-A*68, C*08 and DQB*05 were more frequently associated with severe outcomes (ND vs. AS, PA*68 = 0.013/Pc = 0.26, PC*08 = 0.0075/Pc = 0.064, and PDQB1*05 = 0.029/Pc = 0.68), However the apparent DQB1*05 association was driven by age. The alleles HLA-B*40 and C*03 were more frequently associated with asymptomatic outcome (AS vs. S, PB*40 = 0.021/Pc = 0.58 and AS vs. ND PC*03 = 0.039/Pc = 0.64) and their frequencies were lower within WNV+ subjects with neuroinvasive disease than within the North American population (NA vs. S, PB*40 = 0.029 and NA vs. ND, PC*03 = 0.032). Conclusions Host HLA may be associated with the outcome of WNV disease; HLA-A*68 and C*08 might function as “susceptible” alleles, whereas HLA-B*40 and C*03 might function as “protective” alleles. PMID:21829673

  7. Genetic Association Studies in Uterine Fibroids: Risk Alleles Presage the Path to Personalized Therapies.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, C Scott; Morton, Cynthia C

    2016-07-01

    Uterine leiomyoma (UL) is the most common tumor of the female reproductive system. Epidemiological analyses, including familial aggregation, twin studies, and racial discrepancies in disease prevalence and morbidity, indicated genetic factors influence risk for developing UL. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) are a powerful method for identifying genetic variants that are associated with elevated risk for a common, complex disease. To date, three genome-wide scans for UL have been performed: a GWAS in Japanese women, a genome-wide linkage and association study in women of European decent, and an admixture-based analysis in African American women. Results from each of the three genome-wide scans performed have had varying success in identifying unique loci associated with predisposition to developing UL. Here, we address the evidence for a genetic basis for UL risk, discuss genetic association studies and their results, and identify challenges and future directions for UL GWAS analyses. PMID:27513025

  8. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favorova, Olga O; Favorov, Alexander V; Boiko, Alexey N; Andreewski, Timofey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Alekseenkov, Alexey D; Kulakova, Olga G; Gusev, Eugenyi I; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion) of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGFβ1, CCR5 and CTLA4 genes and TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. Each allele carriership in patients and controls was compared by Fisher's exact test, and disease-associated combinations of alleles in the data set were sought using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method recently developed by our group. Results We identified two previously unknown MS-associated tri-allelic combinations: -509TGFβ1*C, DRB1*18(3), CTLA4*G and -238TNF*B1,-308TNF*A2, CTLA4*G, which perfectly separate MS cases from controls, at least in the present sample. The previously described DRB1*15(2) allele, the microsatellite TNFa9 allele and the biallelic combination CCR5Δ32, DRB1*04 were also reidentified as MS-associated. Conclusion These results represent an independent validation of MS association with DRB1*15(2) and TNFa9 in Russians and are the first to find the interplay of three loci in conferring susceptibility to MS. They demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for the identification of complex-disease-associated combinations of alleles. PMID:16872485

  9. Genomewide Association Study of Tacrolimus Concentrations in African American Kidney Transplant Recipients Identifies Multiple CYP3A5 Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Oetting, W. S.; Schladt, D. P.; Guan, W.; Miller, M. B.; Remmel, R. P.; Dorr, C.; Sanghavi, K.; Mannon, R. B.; Herrera, B.; Matas, A. J.; Salomon, D. R.; Kwok, P.-Y.; Keating, B. J.; Israni, A. K.; Jacobson, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that tacrolimus (TAC) trough blood concentrations for African American (AA) kidney allograft recipients were lower than those observed in white patients. Subtherapeutic TAC troughs may be associated with acute rejection (AR) and AR-associated allograft failure. This variation in TAC troughs is due, in part, to differences in the frequency of the cytochrome P450 CYP3A5*3 allele (rs776746, expresses nonfunctional enzyme) between white and AA recipients; however, even after accounting for this variant, variability in AA-associated troughs is significant. We conducted a genomewide association study of TAC troughs in AA kidney allograft recipients to search for additional genetic variation. We identified two additional CYP3A5 variants in AA recipients independently associated with TAC troughs: CYP3A5*6 (rs10264272) and CYP3A5*7 (rs41303343). All three variants and clinical factors account for 53.9% of the observed variance in troughs, with 19.8% of the variance coming from demographic and clinical factors including recipient age, glomerular filtration rate, anti-cytomegalovirus drug use, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant and antibody induction. There was no evidence of common genetic variants in AA recipients significantly influencing TAC troughs aside from the CYP3A gene. These results reveal that additional and possibly rare functional variants exist that account for the additional variation. PMID:26485092

  10. A note on the use of the generalized odds ratio in meta-analysis of association studies involving bi- and tri-allelic polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The generalized odds ratio (GOR) was recently suggested as a genetic model-free measure for association studies. However, its properties were not extensively investigated. We used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate type-I error rates, power and bias in both effect size and between-study variance estimates of meta-analyses using the GOR as a summary effect, and compared these results to those obtained by usual approaches of model specification. We further applied the GOR in a real meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies in Alzheimer's disease. Findings For bi-allelic polymorphisms, the GOR performs virtually identical to a standard multiplicative model of analysis (e.g. per-allele odds ratio) for variants acting multiplicatively, but augments slightly the power to detect variants with a dominant mode of action, while reducing the probability to detect recessive variants. Although there were differences among the GOR and usual approaches in terms of bias and type-I error rates, both simulation- and real data-based results provided little indication that these differences will be substantial in practice for meta-analyses involving bi-allelic polymorphisms. However, the use of the GOR may be slightly more powerful for the synthesis of data from tri-allelic variants, particularly when susceptibility alleles are less common in the populations (≤10%). This gain in power may depend on knowledge of the direction of the effects. Conclusions For the synthesis of data from bi-allelic variants, the GOR may be regarded as a multiplicative-like model of analysis. The use of the GOR may be slightly more powerful in the tri-allelic case, particularly when susceptibility alleles are less common in the populations. PMID:21645382

  11. Birth Cohort, Age, and Sex Strongly Modulate Effects of Lipid Risk Alleles Identified in Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kulminski, Alexander M.; Culminskaya, Irina; Arbeev, Konstantin G.; Arbeeva, Liubov; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V.; Stallard, Eric; Wu, Deqing; Yashin, Anatoliy I.

    2015-01-01

    Insights into genetic origin of diseases and related traits could substantially impact strategies for improving human health. The results of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are often positioned as discoveries of unconditional risk alleles of complex health traits. We re-analyzed the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with total cholesterol (TC) in a large-scale GWAS meta-analysis. We focused on three generations of genotyped participants of the Framingham Heart Study (FHS). We show that the effects of all ten directly-genotyped SNPs were clustered in different FHS generations and/or birth cohorts in a sex-specific or sex-unspecific manner. The sample size and procedure-therapeutic issues play, at most, a minor role in this clustering. An important result was clustering of significant associations with the strongest effects in the youngest, or 3rd Generation, cohort. These results imply that an assumption of unconditional connections of these SNPs with TC is generally implausible and that a demographic perspective can substantially improve GWAS efficiency. The analyses of genetic effects in age-matched samples suggest a role of environmental and age-related mechanisms in the associations of different SNPs with TC. Analysis of the literature supports systemic roles for genes for these SNPs beyond those related to lipid metabolism. Our analyses reveal strong antagonistic effects of rs2479409 (the PCSK9 gene) that cautions strategies aimed at targeting this gene in the next generation of lipid drugs. Our results suggest that standard GWAS strategies need to be advanced in order to appropriately address the problem of genetic susceptibility to complex traits that is imperative for translation to health care. PMID:26295473

  12. Genome-wide Association Study of Subtype-Specific Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk Alleles Using Pooled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Madalene A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Swenerton, Kenneth D.; Chenevix–Trench, Georgia; Lu, Yi; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fasching, Peter A.; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Friel, Grace; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Lurie, Galina; Goodman, Marc T.; Carney, Michael E.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H.; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P.; Ness, Roberta B.; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Sellers, Thomas A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa C.; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Chandran, Urmila; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H.; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B.; Bjorge, Line; Halle, Mari K.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T.; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia–Closas, Montserrat; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian G.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Flanagan, James M.; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Phelan, Catherine M.; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Narod, Steven A.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Szafron, Lukasz M; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.; Brooks–Wilson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS (56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC), selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging 6 loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P<0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR=1.17, P=0.029, n=1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P=0.014, n=2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR=0.86, P=0.0043, n=892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR=0.84, P=0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P<0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes. PMID:24190013

  13. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies HLA 8.1 Ancestral Haplotype Alleles as Major Genetic Risk Factors for Myositis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Frederick W.; Chen, Wei; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Cooper, Robert G.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Rider, Lisa G.; Danko, Katalin; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Reed, Ann M.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Padyukov, Leonid; Selva-O’Callaghan, Albert; Radstake, Timothy R.; Isenberg, David A.; Chinoy, Hector; Ollier, William E.R.; Scheet, Paul; Peng, Bo; Lee, Annette; Byun, Jinyoung; Lamb, Janine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Amos, Christopher I.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune muscle diseases (myositis) comprise a group of complex phenotypes influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify genetic risk factors in patients of European ancestry, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the major myositis phenotypes in a total of 1710 cases, which included 705 adult dermatomyositis; 473 juvenile dermatomyositis; 532 polymyositis; and 202 adult dermatomyositis, juvenile dermatomyositis or polymyositis patients with anti-histidyl tRNA synthetase (anti-Jo-1) autoantibodies, and compared them with 4724 controls. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms showing strong associations (P < 5 × 10−8) in GWAS were identified in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region for all myositis phenotypes together, as well as for the four clinical and autoantibody phenotypes studied separately. Imputation and regression analyses found that alleles comprising the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH8.1) defined essentially all the genetic risk in the phenotypes studied. Although the HLA DRB1*03:01 allele showed slightly stronger associations with adult and juvenile dermatomyositis, and HLA B*08:01 with polymyositis and anti-Jo-1 autoantibody-positive myositis, multiple alleles of AH8.1 were required for the full risk effects. Our findings establish that alleles of the AH8.1haplotype comprise the primary genetic risk factors associated with the major myositis phenotypes in geographically diverse Caucasian populations. PMID:26291516

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies HLA 8.1 ancestral haplotype alleles as major genetic risk factors for myositis phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Miller, F W; Chen, W; O'Hanlon, T P; Cooper, R G; Vencovsky, J; Rider, L G; Danko, K; Wedderburn, L R; Lundberg, I E; Pachman, L M; Reed, A M; Ytterberg, S R; Padyukov, L; Selva-O'Callaghan, A; Radstake, T R; Isenberg, D A; Chinoy, H; Ollier, W E R; Scheet, P; Peng, B; Lee, A; Byun, J; Lamb, J A; Gregersen, P K; Amos, C I

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune muscle diseases (myositis) comprise a group of complex phenotypes influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify genetic risk factors in patients of European ancestry, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the major myositis phenotypes in a total of 1710 cases, which included 705 adult dermatomyositis, 473 juvenile dermatomyositis, 532 polymyositis and 202 adult dermatomyositis, juvenile dermatomyositis or polymyositis patients with anti-histidyl-tRNA synthetase (anti-Jo-1) autoantibodies, and compared them with 4724 controls. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms showing strong associations (P<5×10(-8)) in GWAS were identified in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region for all myositis phenotypes together, as well as for the four clinical and autoantibody phenotypes studied separately. Imputation and regression analyses found that alleles comprising the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH8.1) defined essentially all the genetic risk in the phenotypes studied. Although the HLA DRB1*03:01 allele showed slightly stronger associations with adult and juvenile dermatomyositis, and HLA B*08:01 with polymyositis and anti-Jo-1 autoantibody-positive myositis, multiple alleles of AH8.1 were required for the full risk effects. Our findings establish that alleles of the AH8.1 comprise the primary genetic risk factors associated with the major myositis phenotypes in geographically diverse Caucasian populations. PMID:26291516

  15. Association between rs2431697 T allele on 5q33.3 and systemic lupus erythematosus: case-control study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhao-Ming; Wang, Ping; Chang, Pan-Pan; Hasahya, Tony; Xing, Hui; Wang, Jin-Ping; Hu, Li-Hua

    2015-11-01

    rs2431697 is located on 5q33.3, between pituitary tumor-transforming gene 1 and miR-146a. Several studies have estimated the association between rs2431697 and systemic lupus erythematosus risk. However, the results were inconsistent. A case-control study was carried out to explore the association between rs2431697 and systemic lupus erythematosus risk in a central Chinese population. Meta-analyses combining present with previous studies were conducted to further explore the association. Our case-control study included 322 cases and 353 controls. rs2431697 T allele was associated with increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (odds ratios (ORs) = 1.461, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.091-1.957, P = 0.011). The association was stronger between T allele and the risk of anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)-positive systemic lupus erythematosus (OR = 2.510, 95% CI 1.545-4.077, P < 0.001). The meta-analyses included 8648 systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 10947 controls. rs2431697 T allele had an overall OR of 1.262 (95% CI 1.205-1.323, P < 0.001) under fixed-effects model. After stratified by ethnicity, I (2) reduced from 24.3 to 0 %. T allele had an OR of 1.213 (95% CI 1.145-1.284, P < 0.001) in European descendant and 1.365 (95% CI 1.259-1.480, P < 0.001) in Asian under fixed-effects model. Data on women were also extracted, and T allele had an OR of 1.337 (95% CI 1.162-1.539, P < 0.001) under random-effects model. The pooled ORs were not influenced by each study in sensitivity analyses. There were no publication biases observed in these analyses. The results from our case-control study and the meta-analyses indicate that rs2431697 T allele significantly associates with the increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:26251230

  16. Rare allelic forms of PRDM9 associated with childhood leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hussin, Julie; Sinnett, Daniel; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; de Malliard, Thibault; Busche, Stephan; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Gibson, Greg; Andersson, Anna; Holmfeldt, Linda; Ma, Jing; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jinghui; Andelfinger, Gregor; Downing, James R.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-01-01

    One of the most rapidly evolving genes in humans, PRDM9, is a key determinant of the distribution of meiotic recombination events. Mutations in this meiotic-specific gene have previously been associated with male infertility in humans and recent studies suggest that PRDM9 may be involved in pathological genomic rearrangements. In studying genomes from families with children affected by B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we characterized meiotic recombination patterns within a family with two siblings having hyperdiploid childhood B-ALL and observed unusual localization of maternal recombination events. The mother of the family carries a rare PRDM9 allele, potentially explaining the unusual patterns found. From exomes sequenced in 44 additional parents of children affected with B-ALL, we discovered a substantial and significant excess of rare allelic forms of PRDM9. The rare PRDM9 alleles are transmitted to the affected children in half the cases; nonetheless there remains a significant excess of rare alleles among patients relative to controls. We successfully replicated this latter observation in an independent cohort of 50 children with B-ALL, where we found an excess of rare PRDM9 alleles in aneuploid and infant B-ALL patients. PRDM9 variability in humans is thought to influence genomic instability, and these data support a potential role for PRDM9 variation in risk of acquiring aneuploidies or genomic rearrangements associated with childhood leukemogenesis. PMID:23222848

  17. Haplotype block structure study of the CFTR gene. Most variants are associated with the M470 allele in several European populations.

    PubMed

    Pompei, Fiorenza; Ciminelli, Bianca Maria; Bombieri, Cristina; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Koudova, Monika; Giorgi, Silvia; Belpinati, Francesca; Begnini, Angela; Cerny, Milos; Des Georges, Marie; Claustres, Mireille; Ferec, Claude; Macek, Milan; Modiano, Guido; Pignatti, Pier Franco

    2006-01-01

    An average of about 1700 CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) alleles from normal individuals from different European populations were extensively screened for DNA sequence variation. A total of 80 variants were observed: 61 coding SNSs (results already published), 13 noncoding SNSs, three STRs, two short deletions, and one nucleotide insertion. Eight DNA variants were classified as non-CF causing due to their high frequency of occurrence. Through this survey the CFTR has become the most exhaustively studied gene for its coding sequence variability and, though to a lesser extent, for its noncoding sequence variability as well. Interestingly, most variation was associated with the M470 allele, while the V470 allele showed an 'extended haplotype homozygosity' (EHH). These findings make us suggest a role for selection acting either on the M470V itself or through an hitchhiking mechanism involving a second site. The possible ancient origin of the V allele in an 'out of Africa' time frame is discussed. PMID:16251901

  18. Association and linkage studies of the TAQI A1 allele at the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in samples of female and male alcoholics

    SciTech Connect

    Neiswanger, K.; Hill, S.Y.; Kaplan, B.B.

    1995-08-14

    To address the controversy surrounding DRD2 and alcoholism, we performed linkage and association studies utilizing alcoholic men from high density families largely uncontaminated by other psychopathology and female alcoholics for whom secondary drug dependence (averaging 10 years later onset) was a prominent feature. The males and females were combined for a total of 52 alcoholics, and compared to 30 controls screened for the absence of alcoholism and other psychopathology, revealing a significant association between the frequency of the TaqI allele and alcoholism. However, linkage and family-based association study, placed in the context of the literature, suggest that minimizing psychopathology in control groups is probably a more important explanation for divergent results than either sampling error or population stratification. When combined with the complete lack of within-family evidence, we conclude that the association, while not specific to the alcoholism phenotype, per se. 37 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Allelic and genotypic associations of DRD2 TaqI A polymorphism with heroin dependence in Spanish subjects: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Perez de los Cobos, Jose; Baiget, Montserrat; Trujols, Joan; Sinol, Nuria; Volpini, Victor; Banuls, Enrique; Calafell, Francesc; Luquero, Elena; del Rio, Elisabeth; Alvarez, Enric

    2007-01-01

    Background Conflicting associations with heroin dependence have been found involving the A1 allele of dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2) TaqI A polymorphism. Methods We compared two samples of unrelated Spanish individuals, all of European origin: 281 methadone-maintained heroin-dependent patients (207 males and 74 females) who frequently used non-opioid substances, and 145 control subjects (98 males and 47 females). Results The A1-A1 genotype was detected in 7.1% of patients and 1.4% of controls (P = 0.011, odds ratio = 5.48, 95% CI 1.26–23.78). Although the A1 allele was not associated with heroin dependence in the entire sample, the frequency of A1 allele was higher in male patients than in male controls (24.4% vs. 16.3%, P = 0.024, odds ratio = 1.65, 95% CI 1.07–2.57). A logistic regression analysis showed an interaction between DRD2 alleles and gender (odds ratio = 1.77, 95% CI 1.15–2.70). Conclusion Our results indicate that, in Spanish individuals, genotypes of the DRD2 TaqI A polymorphism contribute to variations in the risk of heroin dependence, while single alleles contribute only in males. PMID:17543096

  20. APOL1 Risk Alleles Are Associated with Exaggerated Age-Related Changes in Glomerular Number and Volume in African-American Adults: An Autopsy Study.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Wendy E; Hughson, Michael D; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Mott, Susan A; Bertram, John F; Winkler, Cheryl A

    2015-12-01

    APOL1 genetic variants contribute to kidney disease in African Americans. We assessed correlations between APOL1 profiles and renal histological features in subjects without renal disease. Glomerular number (N glom) and mean glomerular volume (V glom) were measured by the dissector/fractionator method in kidneys of African-American and non-African-American adults without renal disease, undergoing autopsies in Jackson, Mississippi. APOL1 risk alleles were genotyped and the kidney findings were evaluated in the context of those profiles. The proportions of African Americans with none, one, and two APOL1 risk alleles were 38%, 43%, and 19%, respectively; 38% of African Americans had G1 allele variants and 31% of African Americans had G2 allele variants. Only APOL1-positive African Americans had significant reductions in N glom and increases in V glom with increasing age. Regression analysis predicted an annual average loss of 8834 (P=0.03, sex adjusted) glomeruli per single kidney over the first 38 years of adult life in African Americans with two risk alleles. Body mass index above the group medians, but below the obesity definition of ≥ 30 kg/m(2), enhanced the expression of age-related changes in N glom in African Americans with either one or two APOL1 risk alleles. These findings indicate that APOL1 risk alleles are associated with exaggerated age-related nephron loss, probably decaying from a larger pool of smaller glomeruli in early adult life, along with enlargement of the remaining glomeruli. These phenomena might mark mechanisms of accentuated susceptibility to kidney disease in APOL1-positive African Americans. PMID:26038529

  1. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  2. Significant Association of HLA-B Alleles and Genotypes in Thai Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Puangpetch, Apichaya; Suwannarat, Pongwut; Chamnanphol, Montri; Koomdee, Napatrupron; Ngamsamut, Nattawat; Limsila, Penkhae; Sukasem, Chonlaphat

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder. Many susceptible causative genes have been identified. Most of the previous reports showed the relationship between the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) gene and etiology of autism. In order to identify HLA-B alleles associated with autism in Thai population, we compared the frequency of HLA-B allele in 364 autistic subjects with 952 normal subjects by using a two-stage sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe system (PCR-SSOP) method based on flow-cytometry technology. HLA-B⁎13:02 (P = 0.019, OR = 2.229), HLA-B⁎38:02 (P = 0.049, OR = 1.628), HLA-B⁎44:03 (P = 0.016, OR = 1.645), and HLA-B⁎56:01 (P = 1.78 × 10−4, OR = 4.927) alleles were significantly increased in autistic subjects compared with normal subjects. Moreover, we found that the HLA-B⁎18:02 (P = 0.016, OR = 0.375) and HLA-B⁎46:12 (P = 0.008, OR = 0.147) alleles were negatively associated with autism when compared to normal controls. Both alleles might have a protective role in disease development. In addition, four HLA-B genotypes of autistic patients had statistically significant relationship with control groups, consisting of HLA-B⁎3905/⁎5801 (P = 0.032, OR = 24.697), HLA-B⁎2704/⁎5801 (P = 0.022, OR = 6.872), HLA-B⁎3501/⁎4403 (P = 0.021, OR = 30.269), and HLA-B⁎1801/⁎4402 (P = 0.017, OR = 13.757). This is the first report on HLA-B associated with Thai autism and may serve as a marker for genetic susceptibility to autism in Thai population. PMID:26819491

  3. Population based allele frequencies of disease associated polymorphisms in the Personalized Medicine Research Project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a lack of knowledge regarding the frequency of disease associated polymorphisms in populations and population attributable risk for many populations remains unknown. Factors that could affect the association of the allele with disease, either positively or negatively, such as race, ethnicity, and gender, may not be possible to determine without population based allele frequencies. Here we used a panel of 51 polymorphisms previously associated with at least one disease and determined the allele frequencies within the entire Personalized Medicine Research Project population based cohort. We compared these allele frequencies to those in dbSNP and other data sources stratified by race. Differences in allele frequencies between self reported race, region of origin, and sex were determined. Results There were 19544 individuals who self reported a single racial category, 19027 or (97.4%) self reported white Caucasian, and 11205 (57.3%) individuals were female. Of the 11,208 (57%) individuals with an identifiable region of origin 8337 or (74.4%) were German. 41 polymorphisms were significantly different between self reported race at the 0.05 level. Stratification of our Caucasian population by self reported region of origin revealed 19 polymorphisms that were significantly different (p = 0.05) between individuals of different origins. Further stratification of the population by gender revealed few significant differences in allele frequencies between the genders. Conclusions This represents one of the largest population based allele frequency studies to date. Stratification by self reported race and region of origin revealed wide differences in allele frequencies not only by race but also by region of origin within a single racial group. We report allele frequencies for our Asian/Hmong and American Indian populations; these two minority groups are not typically selected for population allele frequency detection. Population wide allele frequencies are

  4. Amyloid mediates the association of apolipoprotein E e4 allele to cognitive function in older people

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, D; Schneider, J; Wilson, R; Bienias, J; Berry-Kravis, E; Arnold, S

    2005-01-01

    Background: The neurobiological changes underlying the association of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 allele with level of cognition are poorly understood. Objective: To test the hypothesis that amyloid load can account for (mediate) the association of the APOE e4 allele with level of cognition assessed proximate to death. Methods: There were 44 subjects with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease and 50 without dementia, who had participated in the Religious Orders Study. They underwent determination of APOE allele status, had comprehensive cognitive testing in the last year of life, and brain autopsy at death. The percentage area of cortex occupied by amyloid beta and the density of tau positive neurofibrillary tangles were quantified from six brain regions and averaged to yield summary measures of amyloid load and neurofibrillary tangles. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine whether amyloid load could account for the effect of allele status on level of cognition, controlling for age, sex, and education. Results: Possession of at least one APOE e4 allele was associated with lower level of cognitive function proximate to death (p = 0.04). The effect of the e4 allele was reduced by nearly 60% and was no longer significant after controlling for the effect of amyloid load, whereas there was a robust inverse association between amyloid and cognition (p = 0.001). Because prior work had suggested that neurofibrillary tangles could account for the association of amyloid on cognition, we next examined whether amyloid could account for the effect of allele status on tangles. In a series of regression analyses, e4 was associated with density of tangles (p = 0.002), but the effect of the e4 allele was reduced by more than 50% and was no longer significant after controlling for the effect of amyloid load. Conclusion: These findings are consistent with a sequence of events whereby the e4 allele works through amyloid deposition and subsequent tangle formation to

  5. Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Is Associated With Allelic Variants of Stromelysin-1, Interleukin-6, and Hepatic Lipase Genes The Northern Manhattan Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rundek, Tanja; Elkind, Mitchell S.; Pittman, John; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Martin, Steve; Humphries, Steve E.; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Sacco, Ralph L.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Atherosclerosis is a complex disorder with hereditary and environmental causes. Carotid artery intima-media wall thickness (IMT) is a useful measure of atherosclerosis. The objective of this study was to determine the association between carotid IMT and functional promoter variants of stromelysin-1 (MMP3: −1612 5A>6A), interleukin-6 (IL6: −174G>C), and hepatic lipase (HL: −480C>T) genes. Methods B-mode carotid ultrasound was performed among 87 subjects (mean age, 70 ± 12 years; 55% women; 60% Caribbean-Hispanic, 25% black, and 13% white) from the Northern Manhattan Prospective Cohort Study. Carotid IMT was calculated as a composite measure (mean of the maximum IMT in the bifurcation, the common carotid artery, and the internal carotid artery). Results For all polymorphisms, genotype distribution was not significantly different from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The frequencies of the rare alleles were as follows: MMP3 −1612 5A>6A, 0.31 (95% CI, 0.25 to 0.39); IL6 −174 G>C, 0.20 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.25); and HL −480 C>T, 0.45 (95% CI, 0.35 to 0.50). Carotid IMT in the sample was 0.78±0.18 mm. Subjects with the MMP3 genotype 6A6A had 8% greater mean carotid IMT than the other MMP3 genotypes combined (0.95±0.17 versus 0.87±0.15 mm; P=0.04). Subjects with the IL6 genotype GG had 11% greater IMT (0.85±0.17 versus 0.76±0.16 mm; P=0.03), and those with the HL genotype CC had 13% greater IMT (0.87±20 versus 0.76±0.18 mm; P=0.02) than the other genotypes combined. Adjustment for other risk factors did not change these associations. Conclusions Carotid IMT is higher among subjects homozygous for functional variants in genes related to matrix deposition (MMP3 −16126A), inflammation (IL6 −174G), and lipid metabolism (HL −480C). These associations were independent of race-ethnicity and some environmental exposures. Further studies are needed to confirm these genotype-phenotype associations. PMID:11988625

  6. Association of the T allele of an intronic single nucleotide polymorphism in the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor with Crohn's disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Velandia, Adriana; Ng, San-San; Brennan, Rebecca F; Simonsen, Neal R; Gastanaduy, Mariella; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Lentz, Jennifer J; Craver, Randall D; Correa, Hernan; Delgado, Alberto; Pitts, Angela L; Himel, Jane R; Udall, John N; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Eberhard; Brown, Raynorda F; Athas, Grace B; Keats, Bronya B; Mannick, Elizabeth E

    2004-05-14

    BACKGROUND: Polymorphisms in several genes (NOD2, MDR1, SLC22A4) have been associated with susceptibility to Crohn's disease. Identification of the remaining Crohn's susceptibility genes is essential for the development of disease-specific targets for immunotherapy. Using gene expression analysis, we identified a differentially expressed gene on 5q33, the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) gene, and hypothesized that it is a Crohn's susceptibility gene. The CSF1R gene is involved in monocyte to macrophage differentiation and in innate immunity. METHODS: Patients provided informed consent prior to entry into the study as approved by the Institutional Review Board at LSU Health Sciences Center. We performed forward and reverse sequencing of genomic DNA from 111 unrelated patients with Crohn's disease and 108 controls. We also stained paraffin-embedded, ileal and colonic tissue sections from patients with Crohn's disease and controls with a polyclonal antibody raised against the human CSF1R protein. RESULTS: A single nucleotide polymorphism (A2033T) near a Runx1 binding site in the eleventh intron of the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor was identified. The T allele of this single nucleotide polymorphism occurred in 27% of patients with Crohn's disease but in only 13% of controls (X2 = 6.74, p < 0.01, odds ratio (O.R.) = 2.49, 1.23 < O.R. < 5.01). Using immunohistochemistry, positive staining with a polyclonal antibody to CSF1R was observed in the superficial epithelium of ileal and colonic tissue sections. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the colony stimulating factor receptor 1 gene may be a susceptibility gene for Crohn's disease. PMID:15144560

  7. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Noble, E P; Blum, K; Khalsa, M E; Ritchie, T; Montgomery, A; Wood, R C; Fitch, R J; Ozkaragoz, T; Sheridan, P J; Anglin, M D

    1993-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine allelic prevalence of the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) gene in male cocaine-dependent (CD) Caucasian (non-Hispanic) subjects and to determine the relationship of DRD2 alleles to family history and selected behavioral measures. The prevalence of the A1 allele in CD subjects (n = 53) was 50.9%. It was significantly higher than either the 16.0% prevalence (P < 10(-4)) in non-substance abusing controls (n = 100) or the 30.9% prevalence (P < 10(-2)) in population controls (n = 265) wherein substance abusers were not excluded. Similarly, a significantly higher prevalence (P < 10(-2)) of the B1 allele was found in CD subjects (n = 52) compared with non-substance abusing controls (n = 53); 38.5% vs. 13.2%. Logistic regression analysis of CD subjects identified potent routes of cocaine use and the interaction of early deviant behaviors and parental alcoholism as significant risk factors associated with the A1 allele. The cumulative number of these three risk factors in CD subjects was positively and significantly (P < 10(-3)) related to A1 allelic prevalence. The data showing a strong association of the minor alleles (A1 and B1) of the DRD2 with cocaine dependence suggest that a gene, located on the q22-q23 region of chromosome 11, confers susceptibility to this drug disorder. PMID:8261891

  8. Differential dopamine receptor D4 allele association with ADHD dependent of proband season of birth.

    PubMed

    Brookes, K J; Neale, B; Xu, X; Thapar, A; Gill, M; Langley, K; Hawi, Z; Mill, J; Taylor, E; Franke, B; Chen, W; Ebstein, R; Buitelaar, J; Banaschewski, T; Sonuga-Barke, E; Eisenberg, J; Manor, I; Miranda, A; Oades, R D; Roeyers, H; Rothenberger, A; Sergeant, J; Steinhausen, H C; Faraone, S V; Asherson, P

    2008-01-01

    Season of birth (SOB) has been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in two existing studies. One further study reported an interaction between SOB and genotypes of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene. It is important that these findings are further investigated to confirm or refute the findings. In this study, we investigated the SOB association with ADHD in four independent samples collected for molecular genetic studies of ADHD and found a small but significant increase in summer births compared to a large population control dataset. We also observed a significant association with the 7-repeat allele of the DRD4 gene variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in exon three with probands born in the winter season, with no significant differential transmission of this allele between summer and winter seasons. Preferential transmission of the 2-repeat allele to ADHD probands occurred in those who were born during the summer season, but did not surpass significance for association, even though the difference in transmission between the two seasons was nominally significant. However, following adjustment for multiple testing of alleles none of the SOB effects remained significant. We conclude that the DRD4 7-repeat allele is associated with ADHD but there is no association or interaction with SOB for increased risk for ADHD. Our findings suggest that we can refute a possible effect of SOB for ADHD. PMID:17525975

  9. Reintroduction of a Homocysteine Level-Associated Allele into East Asians by Neanderthal Introgression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ya; Ding, Qiliang; He, Yungang; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present an analysis of Neanderthal introgression at the dipeptidase 1 gene, DPEP1. A Neanderthal origin for the putative introgressive haplotypes was demonstrated using an established three-step approach. This introgression was under positive natural selection, reached a frequency of >50%, and introduced a homocysteine level- and pigmentation-associated allele (rs460879-T) into East Asians. However, the same allele was also found in non-East Asians, but not from Neanderthal introgression. It is likely that rs460879-T was lost in East Asians and was reintroduced subsequently through Neanderthal introgression. Our findings suggest that Neanderthal introgression could reintroduce an important previously existing allele into populations where the allele had been lost. This study sheds new light on understanding the contribution of Neanderthal introgression to the adaptation of non-Africans. PMID:26392408

  10. No Association Between CEL-HYB Hybrid Allele and Chronic Pancreatitis in Asian Populations.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen-Bin; Boulling, Arnaud; Masamune, Atsushi; Issarapu, Prachand; Masson, Emmanuelle; Wu, Hao; Sun, Xiao-Tian; Hu, Liang-Hao; Zhou, Dai-Zhan; He, Lin; Fichou, Yann; Nakano, Eriko; Hamada, Shin; Kakuta, Yoichi; Kume, Kiyoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Paliwal, Sumit; Mani, K Radha; Bhaskar, Seema; Cooper, David N; Férec, Claude; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Chandak, Giriraj R; Chen, Jian-Min; Li, Zhao-Shen; Liao, Zhuan

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid allele between the carboxyl ester lipase gene (CEL) and its pseudogene, CELP (called CEL-HYB), generated by nonallelic homologous recombination between CEL intron 10 and CELP intron 10', was found to increase susceptibility to chronic pancreatitis in a case-control study of patients of European ancestry. We attempted to replicate this finding in 3 independent cohorts from China, Japan, and India, but failed to detect the CEL-HYB allele in any of these populations. The CEL-HYB allele might therefore be an ethnic-specific risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. An alternative hybrid allele (CEL-HYB2) was identified in all 3 Asian populations (1.7% combined carrier frequency), but was not associated with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26946345

  11. Variation in lipoprotein(a) concentration associated with different apolipoprotein(a) alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Perombelon, Y F; Soutar, A K; Knight, B L

    1994-01-01

    Plasma lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) concentrations vary considerably between individuals. To examine the variation for products of the same and different apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) alleles, conditions were established whereby phenotyping immunoblots could be used to estimate the concentration of Lp(a) associated with the constituent apo(a) isoforms. In these studies 28 distinct isoforms were identified, each differing by a single kringle IV unit. Tracking the isoforms through 10 families showed that there could be up to 200-fold difference in the Lp(a) concentration associated with the same-sized isoform produced from different alleles. In contrast there was typically < 2.5-fold variation in the Lp(a) concentration associated with the same allele. However, there were four occasions where the concentration associated with a particular allele was reduced below the typical range from one generation to the next. A nonlinear, inverse trend with isoform size was apparently superimposed upon the other factors that determine Lp(a) concentration. Inheritance of familial hypercholesterolemia or familial-defective apoB100 had little consistent effect upon Lp(a) concentration. In both the families and in other unrelated individuals the distribution of isoforms and their associated concentrations provided evidence for the presence of at least two and possibly more subpopulations of apo(a) alleles with different sizes and expression. Images PMID:8163653

  12. Allelic analysis of sheath blight resistance with association mapping in rice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Limeng; Yan, Wengui; Zhu, Chengsong; Agrama, Hesham A; Jackson, Aaron; Yeater, Kathleen; Li, Xiaobai; Huang, Bihu; Hu, Biaolin; McClung, Anna; Wu, Dianxing

    2012-01-01

    Sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most devastating diseases in rice world-wide. Global attention has focused on examining individual mapping populations for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for ShB resistance, but to date no study has taken advantage of association mapping to examine hundreds of lines for potentially novel QTLs. Our objective was to identify ShB QTLs via association mapping in rice using 217 sub-core entries from the USDA rice core collection, which were phenotyped with a micro-chamber screening method and genotyped with 155 genome-wide markers. Structure analysis divided the mapping panel into five groups, and model comparison revealed that PCA5 with genomic control was the best model for association mapping of ShB. Ten marker loci on seven chromosomes were significantly associated with response to the ShB pathogen. Among multiple alleles in each identified loci, the allele contributing the greatest effect to ShB resistance was named the putative resistant allele. Among 217 entries, entry GSOR 310389 contained the most putative resistant alleles, eight out of ten. The number of putative resistant alleles presented in an entry was highly and significantly correlated with the decrease of ShB rating (r = -0.535) or the increase of ShB resistance. Majority of the resistant entries that contained a large number of the putative resistant alleles belonged to indica, which is consistent with a general observation that most ShB resistant accessions are of indica origin. These findings demonstrate the potential to improve breeding efficiency by using marker-assisted selection to pyramid putative resistant alleles from various loci in a cultivar for enhanced ShB resistance in rice. PMID:22427867

  13. Allelic Associations between 100 DNA Markers and High versus Low IQ.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; And Others

    1995-01-01

    For DNA markers in or near genes of neurological relevance, allelic frequencies were compared for groups of high- and low-IQ children (total sample of 86). This study adds 40 markers to the 60 already studied. Only one showed a significant association with IQ in original and replication samples. (SLD)

  14. Allelic Variation in a Willow Warbler Genomic Region Is Associated with Climate Clines

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Keith W.; Liedvogel, Miriam; Addison, BriAnne; Kleven, Oddmund; Laskemoen, Terje; Lifjeld, Jan T.; Lundberg, Max; Åkesson, Susanne; Bensch, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Local adaptation is an important process contributing to population differentiation which can occur in continuous or isolated populations connected by various amounts of gene flow. The willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus) is one of the most common songbirds in Fennoscandia. It has a continuous breeding distribution where it is found in all forested habitats from sea level to the tree line and therefore constitutes an ideal species for the study of locally adapted genes associated with environmental gradients. Previous studies in this species identified a genetic marker (AFLP-WW1) that showed a steep north-south cline in central Sweden with one allele associated with coastal lowland habitats and the other with mountainous habitats. It was further demonstrated that this marker is embedded in a highly differentiated chromosome region that spans several megabases. In the present study, we sampled 2,355 individuals at 128 sites across all of Fennoscandia to study the geographic and climatic variables associated with the allele frequency distributions of WW1. Our results demonstrate that 1) allele frequency patterns significantly differ between mountain and lowland populations, 2) these allele differences coincide with extreme temperature conditions and the short growing season in the mountains, and milder conditions in coastal areas, and 3) the northern-allele or “altitude variant” of WW1 occurs in willow warblers that occupy mountainous habitat regardless of subspecies. Finally these results suggest that climate may exert selection on the genomic region associated with these alleles and would allow us to develop testable predictions for the distribution of the genetic marker based on climate change scenarios. PMID:24788148

  15. The associations of HLA-A, -B, DRB1 alleles and haplotypes in Turkish lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Uçar, Fahri; Sönmez, Mehmet; Ermantaş, Nilay; Özbaş, Hasan Mücahit; Cansız, Abide; Balcı, Mustafa; Yılmazz, Mustafa

    2016-07-25

    A significant association between lymphomas and HLA alleles has been shown in previous studies. However, the frequency of HLA alleles and haplotypes has not been studied in Turkish lymphoma patients. We studied HLA-A, -B, -DRB1 alleles and haplotypes in 80 adult lymphomas and 360 unrelated normal subjects by PCR-SSOP method using Luminex technology. The allele frequencies of HLA-A*29, B*07, and DRB1*11 were higher in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) compared with the controls [OR; 5.65 (95%CI; 2.16-14.81), P=0.001], [OR; 3.00 (95%CI; 1.50-5.99), P=0.003)], and [OR; 1.80 (95%CI; 1.08-3.01), P=0.002); respectively]. In patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) HLA-B*51 and DRB1*04 allele frequencies were higher than controls [OR; 2.25 (95%CI; 1.27-4.00), P=0.007] and [OR; 2.14 (95%CI; 1.20-3.78), P=0.01]. The most frequently observed haplotypes were A*02 B*35 DRB1*11 (7.50% vs. 1.89%) in HL patients, A*02 B*51 DRB1*11 (5.00% vs. 1.96%) in NHL patients, and A*02 B*35 DRB1*13 (2.19%) in the controls. We detected four haplotypes specific to NHL, five haplotypes to HL patients. Seven haplotypes were unique to controls. Our findings suggest that in HL patients, HLA-A*29, B*07, and DRB1*11 alleles, and in NHL patients, HLA-B*51 and DRB1*04 alleles might be presumptive predisposing factors. PMID:27063556

  16. Susceptible and protective associations of HLA DRB1*/DQB1* alleles and haplotypes with ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Murali, V; Rathika, C; Ramgopal, S; Padma Malini, R; Arun Kumar, M J; Neethi Arasu, V; Jeyaram Illiayaraja, K; Balakrishnan, K

    2016-06-01

    Stroke has emerged as the second commonest cause of mortality worldwide and is a major public health problem. For the first time, we present here the association of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*/DQB1* alleles and haplotypes with ischaemic stroke in South Indian patients. Ischaemic stroke (IS) cases and controls were genotyped for HLA-DRB1*/DQB1* alleles by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) method. The frequencies of HLA class II alleles such as DRB1*04, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*12, DRB1*13, DQB1*02 and DQB1*07 were high in IS patients than in the age- and gender-matched controls, suggesting that the individuals with these alleles are susceptible to ischaemic stroke in South India. The frequencies of alleles such as DRB1*03, DRB1*10, DRB1*14, DQB1*04 and DQB1*05 were less in IS cases than in the controls, suggesting a protective association. Haplotypes DRB1*04-DQB1*0301, DRB1*07-DQB1*02, DRB1*07-DQB1*0301, DRB1*11-DQB1*0301 and DRB1*13-DQB1*06 were found to be high in IS patients conferring susceptibility. The frequency of haplotype DRB1*10-DQB1*05 was high in controls conferring protection. IS-LVD and gender-stratified analysis too confirmed these susceptible and protective associations. Thus, HLA-DRB1*/DQB1* alleles and haplotypes strongly predispose South Indian population to ischaemic stroke. Further studies in different populations with large sample size or the meta-analysis are needed to explain the exact mechanism of associations of HLA gene(s) with IS. PMID:27105925

  17. Short aggrecan gene repetitive alleles associated with lumbar degenerative disc disease in Turkish patients.

    PubMed

    Eser, O; Eser, B; Cosar, M; Erdogan, M O; Aslan, A; Yıldız, H; Solak, M; Haktanır, A

    2011-01-01

    We investigated a possible association between aggrecan gene polymorphism and lumbar degenerative disc disease in Turkish patients. One hundred 20-30-year-old patients with or without low back pain were selected for the study. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all patients. The patient group had low back pain clinically and degenerative disc disease radiographically. The control group included patients with and without low back pain: all were negative radiographically for degenerative disc disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from all participants. A PCR assay were used to evaluate variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism of aggrecan gene alleles to determine if there was any correlation with degenerative disc disease. Significant associations were found between short repeated alleles of the aggrecan gene and severe disc degeneration. A significant association was also found between short repeated alleles of the aggrecan gene and multilevel disc herniation as well as extrusion and sequestration types of disc herniation. In Turkish population, short repeated alleles of the aggrecan gene are associated with increased disc degeneration and disc herniation. PMID:21948754

  18. Apolipoprotein E ε4 Allele was Associated With Nonlesional Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Han Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhimei; Ding, Chengyun; Gong, Xiping; Wang, Xiaofei; Cui, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene has been implicated as one of the genes susceptible to temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but the association is inconsistent. We carried out a study to investigate the association of APOEε4 allele with a subtype of TLE-nonlesional mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (NLMTLE) in Han Chinese people. The study consisted of total 308 NLMTLE patients and 302 controls in Han Chinese. The APOE polymorphisms were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA sequencing. We compared the frequency of APOEε4 allele and carrying status between NLMTLE patients and control subjects to test for the association of APOEε4 allele with NLMTLE clinical status. Carrying status of APOEε4 allele was significantly associated with the risk of NLMTLE. No effect of APOEε4 allele was found on the age of onset, duration of epilepsy, or frequency of seizure. Moreover, there was no association between APOEε4 allele and hippocampal sclerosis (HS) or febrile convulsion (FC) history. Our study provided an evidence that APOEε4 allele was a possible risk factor for NLMTLE, and further study with a larger sample is needed to warrant this finding. PMID:26945380

  19. Microsatellite allele dose and configuration establishment (MADCE): an integrated approach for genetic studies in allopolyploids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic studies in allopolyploid plants are challenging because of the presence of similar sub-genomes, which leads to multiple alleles and complex segregation ratios. In this study, we describe a novel method for establishing the exact dose and configuration of microsatellite alleles for any accession of an allopolyploid plant species. The method, named Microsatellite Allele Dose and Configuration Establishment (MADCE), can be applied to mapping populations and pedigreed (breeding) germplasm in allopolyploids. Results Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the power and robustness of the MADCE method. In the mapping case, five microsatellites were analysed. These microsatellites amplified 35 different alleles based on size. Using MADCE, we uncovered 30 highly informative segregating alleles. A conventional approach would have yielded only 19 fully informative and six partially informative alleles. Of the ten alleles that were present in all progeny (and thereby ignored or considered homozygous when using conventional approaches), six were found to segregate by dosage when analysed with MADCE. Moreover, the full allelic configuration of the mapping parents could be established, including null alleles, homozygous loci, and alleles that were present on multiple homoeologues. In the second case, 21 pedigreed cultivars were analysed using MADCE, resulting in the establishment of the full allelic configuration for all 21 cultivars and a tracing of allele flow over multiple generations. Conclusions The procedure described in this study (MADCE) enhances the efficiency and information content of mapping studies in allopolyploids. More importantly, it is the first technique to allow the determination of the full allelic configuration in pedigreed breeding germplasm from allopolyploid plants. This enables pedigree-based marker-trait association studies the use of algorithms developed for diploid crops, and it may increase the effectiveness of LD

  20. Association of SORL1 alleles with late-onset Alzheimer's disease. findings from the GIGAS_LOAD study and mega-analysis.

    PubMed

    Olgiati, Paolo; Politis, Antonis; Albani, Diego; Rodilossi, Serena; Polito, Letizia; Ateri, Eleonora; Zisaki, Aikaterini; Piperi, Christina; Liappas, Ioannis; Stamouli, Evangelia; Mailis, Antonis; Atti, Anna R; Ferrari, Barbara; Morini, Valentina; Moretti, Francesca; Biella, Gloria; Forloni, Gianluigi; Papadimitriou, George N; Ronchi, Diana De; Kalofoutis, Anastasios; Serretti, Alessandro

    2012-05-01

    The pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is influenced by sorting-protein related receptor (sorLa) that is less expressed in AD patients. The gene encoding sorLa (SORL1) has been investigated as a susceptibility factor for late-onset AD (LOAD) with conflicting results. Our objectives were to confirm the association between SORL1 SNPs and LOAD in two independent South-European centers and to perform a mega-analysis of published samples. We analyzed three SORL1 SNPs (intron 6: rs668387; rs689021; rs641120) from the Greece-Italy Genetic Association Study on lateonset AD (GIGAS_LOAD). Greek sample included 96 patients with LOAD (DSM-IV) and 120 unrelated controls. In Italy, a community-based sample is ongoing. 47 LOAD patients and 165 controls were recruited until study endpoint. These samples and previously published ones (Alzgene) were pooled as in a single study. A test for trend was used to analyze genotype association. In the GIGAS_LOAD sample no association was detected between SORL1 genotypes and LOAD. Conversely all SNPs were associated with LOAD in mega-analysis based on ordinal classification of genotypes (Armitage's test: p < 0.001). Although our analysis of pooled samples has positive results for the association between SORL1 and AD, there is substantial heterogeneity across studies. Thus further examination into SORL1 SNPs and the population is necessary to determine the role of SORL1 in LOAD. PMID:22044026

  1. The Y-associated XY275 low allele is not restricted to indigenous African peoples.

    PubMed Central

    Spurdle, A; Ramsay, M; Jenkins, T

    1992-01-01

    The level of linkage disequilibrium between the XY275 MspI polymorphism and the X and Y boundaries was investigated in 21 different southern African populations. A full range of frequencies of the high allele was observed on the 1,013 X chromosomes studied, in keeping with published data. In previous studies fixation of the high allele on the Y chromosome was observed in all but two groups--a Pygmy and a Tsumkwe San population. However, in the present study of 673 Y chromosomes, the low allele was found to be associated with the Y chromosome in several different Bantu-speaking negroid groups, the Khoisan-speaking negroid Dama, the Khoisan, two groups of mixed ancestry, and the South African Asiatic-Indian population. The discovery of the low allele on Y chromosomes of caucasoid individuals suggests that more than one class of Y chromosome gave rise to the present-day non-African population. The data also fail to provide support for the theory that Africa is the site of origin of Homo sapiens, but they equally do not exclude it. Images Figure 2 PMID:1598910

  2. Association of apolipoprotein E allele {epsilon}4 with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; David, F.; Berriche, S.

    1994-09-15

    Apolipoprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE {epsilon}4), is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD) in French patients. The association is highly significant (0.45 AD versus 0.12 controls for {epsilon}4 allele frequencies). These data support the involvement of ApoE {epsilon}4 allele as a very important risk factor for the clinical expression of AD. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Effective marker alleles associated with type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight infection in fields

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Luo, Meng; Zhang, Dadong; Wu, Di; Li, Lei; Bai, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers associated with known quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in bi-parental mapping population usually have more than two alleles in breeding populations. Therefore, understanding the association of each allele with FHB response is particularly important to marker-assisted enhancement of FHB resistance. In this paper, we evaluated FHB severities of 192 wheat accessions including landraces and commercial varieties in three field growing seasons, and genotyped this panel with 364 genome-wide informative molecular markers. Among them, 11 markers showed reproducible marker-trait association (p < 0.05) in at least two experiments using a mixed model. More than two alleles were identified per significant marker locus. These alleles were classified into favorable, unfavorable and neutral alleles according to the normalized genotypic values. The distributions of effective alleles at these loci in each wheat accession were characterized. Mean FHB severities increased with decreased number of favorable alleles at the reproducible loci. Chinese wheat landraces and Japanese accessions have more favorable alleles at the majority of the reproducible marker loci. FHB resistance levels of varieties can be greatly improved by introduction of these favorable alleles and removal of unfavorable alleles simultaneously at these QTL-linked marker loci. PMID:27436944

  4. Lichen planopilaris is associated with HLA DRB1*11 and DQB1*03 alleles.

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky, Lev; Israeli, Moshe; Sagy, Eti; Berg, Amy L; David, Michael; Shemer, Avner; Klein, Tirza; Hodak, Emmilia

    2015-02-01

    There are no studies of the possible association of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system with lichen planopilaris (LPP). To determine whether the HLA system is associated with LPP, 40 consecutive Jewish Israeli patients with LPP (study group) and 252 volunteers (controls) were typed for DRB1*and DQB1* loci by molecular methods. Compared with controls, the study group had a significantly higher frequency of the DRB1*11 allele (62% vs. 21%, corrected p-value (pc) = 0.001) owing to increased frequencies of DRB1*11: 01 and DRB1*11: 04. The DQB1*03 allele was also expressed at a significantly higher frequency in the study group (70% vs. 33%, pc = 0.0005); specifically, the frequency of DQB1*03: 01 was increased. The majority (82.5%) of the patients were of non-Ashkenazi origin. We conclude that LPP appears to be over-represented in non-Ashkenazi Jewish patients and is associated with an increased frequency of HLA DRB1*11 and DQB1*03 alleles. These findings suggest that immunogenetic factors play a role in LPP. PMID:24806356

  5. No Evidence for Enrichment in Schizophrenia for Common Allelic Associations at Imprinted Loci

    PubMed Central

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Kirov, George; Rees, Elliott; Isles, Anthony R.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Most genetic studies assume that the function of a genetic variant is independent of the parent from which it is inherited, but this is not always true. The best known example of parent-of-origin effects arises with respect to alleles at imprinted loci. In classical imprinting, characteristically, either the maternal or paternal copy is expressed, but not both. Only alleles present in one of the parental copies of the gene, the expressed copy, is likely to contribute to disease. It has been postulated that imprinting is important in central nervous system development, and that consequently, imprinted loci may be involved in schizophrenia. If this is true, allowing for parent-of-origin effects might be important in genetic studies of schizophrenia. Here, we use genome-wide association data from one of the world’s largest samples (N = 695) of parent schizophrenia-offspring trios to test for parent-of-origin effects. To maximise power, we restricted our analyses to test two main hypotheses. If imprinting plays a disproportionate role in schizophrenia susceptibility, we postulated a) that alleles showing robust evidence for association to schizophrenia from previous genome-wide association studies should be enriched for parent-of-origin effects and b) that genes at loci imprinted in humans or mice should be enriched both for genome-wide significant associations, and in our sample, for parent-of-origin effects. Neither prediction was supported in the present study. We have shown, that it is unlikely that parent-of-origin effects or imprinting play particularly important roles in schizophrenia, although our findings do not exclude such effects at specific loci nor do they exclude such effects among rare alleles. PMID:26633303

  6. Genetic association mapping based on discordant sib pairs: the discordant-alleles test.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, M; Langefeld, C D

    1998-04-01

    Family-based tests of association provide the opportunity to test for an association between a disease and a genetic marker. Such tests avoid false-positive results produced by population stratification, so that evidence for association may be interpreted as evidence for linkage or causation. Several methods that use family-based controls have been proposed, including the haplotype relative risk, the transmission-disequilibrium test, and affected family-based controls. However, because these methods require genotypes on affected individuals and their parents, they are not ideally suited to the study of late-onset diseases. In this paper, we develop several family-based tests of association that use discordant sib pairs (DSPs) in which one sib is affected with a disease and the other sib is not. These tests are based on statistics that compare counts of alleles or genotypes or that test for symmetry in tables of alleles or genotypes. We describe the use of a permutation framework to assess the significance of these statistics. These DSP-based tests provide the same general advantages as parent-offspring trio-based tests, while being applicable to essentially any disease; they may also be tailored to particular hypotheses regarding the genetic model. We compare the statistical properties of our DSP-based tests by computer simulation and illustrate their use with an application to Alzheimer disease and the apolipoprotein E polymorphism. Our results suggest that the discordant-alleles test, which compares the numbers of nonmatching alleles in DSPs, is the most powerful of the tests we considered, for a wide class of disease models and marker types. Finally, we discuss advantages and disadvantages of the DSP design for genetic association mapping. PMID:9529345

  7. Molecular Analysis of Chloroquine and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine Resistance-Associated Alleles in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Sridaran, Sankar; Rodriguez, Betzabe; Mercedes Soto, Aida; Macedo De Oliveira, Alexandre; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2014-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is used as a first-line therapy for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Nicaragua. We investigated the prevalence of molecular markers associated with CQ and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance in P. falciparum isolates obtained from the North Atlantic Autonomous Region of Nicaragua. Blood spots for this study were made available from a CQ and SP drug efficacy trial conducted in 2005 and also from a surveillance study performed in 2011. Polymorphisms in P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter, dihydrofolate reductase, and dihydropteroate synthase gene loci that are associated with resistance to CQ, pyrimethamine, and sulfadoxine, respectively, were detected by DNA sequencing. In the 2005 dataset, only 2 of 53 isolates had a CQ resistance allele (CVIET), 2 of 52 had a pyrimethamine resistance allele, and 1 of 49 had a sulfadoxine resistance allele. In the 2011 dataset, none of 45 isolates analyzed had CQ or SP resistance alleles. PMID:24615126

  8. Association of low-activity MAOA allelic variants with violent crime in incarcerated offenders

    PubMed Central

    Stetler, Dean A.; Davis, Chad; Leavitt, Kathryn; Schriger, Ilana; Benson, Katie; Bhakta, Samir; Wang, Lam Chee; Oben, Cynthia; Watters, Matthew; Haghnegahdar, Tara; Bortolato, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The main enzyme for serotonin degradation, monoamine oxidase (MAO) A, has recently emerged as a key biological factor in the predisposition to impulsive aggression. Male carriers of low-activity variants of the main functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene (MAOA-uVNTR) have been shown to exhibit a greater proclivity to engage in violent acts. Thus, we hypothesized that low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles may be associated with a higher risk for criminal violence among male offenders. To test this possibility, we analyzed the MAOA-uVNTR variants of violent (n=49) and non-violent (n=40) male Caucasian and African-American convicts in a correctional facility. All participants were also tested with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) to assess their levels of childhood trauma exposure, impulsivity and aggression, respectively. Our results revealed a robust (P<0.0001) association between low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles and violent crime. This association was replicated in the group of Caucasian violent offenders (P<0.01), but reached only a marginal trend (P=0.08) in their African American counterparts. While violent crime charges were not associated with CTQ, BIS-11 and BPAQ scores, carriers of low-activity alleles exhibited a mild, yet significant (P<0.05) increase in BIS-11 total and attentional-impulsiveness scores. In summary, these findings support the role of MAOA gene as a prominent genetic determinant for criminal violence. Further studies are required to confirm these results in larger samples of inmates and evaluate potential interactions between MAOA alleles and environmental vulnerability factors. PMID:25082653

  9. Association of low-activity MAOA allelic variants with violent crime in incarcerated offenders.

    PubMed

    Stetler, Dean A; Davis, Chad; Leavitt, Kathryn; Schriger, Ilana; Benson, Katie; Bhakta, Samir; Wang, Lam Chee; Oben, Cynthia; Watters, Matthew; Haghnegahdar, Tara; Bortolato, Marco

    2014-11-01

    The main enzyme for serotonin degradation, monoamine oxidase (MAO) A, has recently emerged as a key biological factor in the predisposition to impulsive aggression. Male carriers of low-activity variants of the main functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene (MAOA-uVNTR) have been shown to exhibit a greater proclivity to engage in violent acts. Thus, we hypothesized that low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles may be associated with a higher risk for criminal violence among male offenders. To test this possibility, we analyzed the MAOA-uVNTR variants of violent (n = 49) and non-violent (n = 40) male Caucasian and African-American convicts in a correctional facility. All participants were also tested with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) to assess their levels of childhood trauma exposure, impulsivity and aggression, respectively. Our results revealed a robust (P < 0.0001) association between low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles and violent crime. This association was replicated in the group of Caucasian violent offenders (P < 0.01), but reached only a marginal trend (P = 0.08) in their African American counterparts. While violent crime charges were not associated with CTQ, BIS-11 and BPAQ scores, carriers of low-activity alleles exhibited a mild, yet significant (P < 0.05) increase in BIS-11 total and attentional-impulsiveness scores. In summary, these findings support the role of MAOA gene as a prominent genetic determinant for criminal violence. Further studies are required to confirm these results in larger samples of inmates and evaluate potential interactions between MAOA alleles and environmental vulnerability factors. PMID:25082653

  10. First example of an FY*01 allele associated with weakened expression of Fya on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Patricia A; Horn, Trina; Keller, Jessica A; Heri, Suzanne M; Keller, Margaret A

    2015-01-01

    Duffy antigens are important in immunohematology. the reference allele for the Duffy gene (FY) is FY*02, which encodes Fy(b). An A>G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at coding nucleotide (c.) 125 in exon 2 defines the FY*01 allele, which encodes the antithetical Fy(a). A C>T SNP at c.265 in the FY*02 allele is associated with weakening of Fy(b) expression on red blood cells (R BCs) (called Fy(x)). until recently, this latter change had not been described on a FY*01 background allele. Phenotype-matched units were desired for a multi-transfused Vietnamese fetus with α-thalassemia. Genotyping of the fetus using a microarray assay that interrogates three SNPs (c.1-67, c.125, and c.265) in FY yielded indeterminate results for the predicted Duffy phenotype. Genomic sequencing of FY exon 2 showed that the fetal sample had one wild-type FY*01 allele and one new FY*01 allele with the c.265C>T SNP, which until recently had only been found on the FY*02 allele. Genotyping performed on samples from the proband's parents indicated that the father had the same FY genotype as the fetus. Flow cytometry, which has been previously demonstrated as a useful method to study antigen strength on cells, was used to determine if this new FY*01 allele was associated with reduced Fy(a) expression on the father's RBCs. Median fluorescence intensity of the father's RBCs (after incubation with anti-FY(a) and fluorescein-labeled anti-IgG) was similar to known FY*01 heterozygotes. and significantly weaker than known FY*01 homozygotes. In conclusion, the fetus and father both had one normal FY*01 allele and one new FY*01W.01, is associated with weakened expression of Fy(a) on RBCs. PMID:26829175

  11. Lack of an independent association between the human leukocyte antigen allele DQA1*0501 and Graves` disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddihy, R.M.; Bahn, R.S.

    1996-02-01

    The association between the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) serotype DR3 and Graves` disease (GD) in Caucasian populations is well known. However, an even stronger association has been reported recently, especially in the male population, between the closely linked HLA allele DQA1*0501 and GD. We postulated that the reported association between DQA1*0501 and GD may be a result of the linkage of this allele with DR3 and may not represent an independent association. Accordingly, we screened a population of North American Caucasians (n=218), including patients with GD (n=101, 32 males, 69 females) and individuals with documented normal thyroid function (n=117, 51 males, 66 females), for the presence of the DQA1*0501 allele and those alleles corresponding to the DR3 serotype (DRB1*03). Screening was accomplished using sequence specific PCR. A significant association was documented in the total study population between DR3 positivity and GD (P=0.0002), but not between DQA1*0501 positivity and GD(P=0.06). After gender stratification, significant associations were found only in the female population (DR3, P=0.0004; DQA1*0501, P=0.012) and not in the male population (DR3, P=1.0;DQA1*0501,P=.0). Additionally, in those DR3 negative female subjects (n=100), there was no independent association between DQA1*0501 positivity (n=26) and GD (P=0.82). P-values were corrected, where appropriate, for gender stratification and/or the number of HLA alleles tested. In conclusion, our results demonstrated a lack of independent association between the presence of the HLA allele DAQ1*0501 and GD. We suggest that the apparent association between this allele and GD in the female population may be the result of its` close linkage to DR3. 21 refs., 7 tabs.

  12. Individual risk alleles of susceptibility to schizophrenia are associated with poor clinical and social outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shinji; Takaki, Manabu; Okahisa, Yuko; Mizuki, Yutaka; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Ujike, Hiroshi; Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu; Takao, Soshi; Ikeda, Masashi; Uchitomi, Yosuke; Iwata, Nakao; Yamada, Norihito

    2016-04-01

    Many patients with schizophrenia have poor clinical and social outcomes. Some risk alleles closely related to the onset of schizophrenia have been reported to be associated with their clinical phenotypes, but the direct relationship between genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia and clinical/social outcomes of schizophrenia, as evaluated by both practical clinical scales and 'real-world' function, has not been investigated. We evaluated the clinical and social outcomes of 455 Japanese patients with schizophrenia by severity of illness according to the Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) and social outcomes by social adjustment/maladjustment at 5 years after the first visit. We examined whether 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from a Japanese genome-wide association study of susceptibility to schizophrenia were associated with clinical and social outcomes. We also investigated the polygenic risk scores of 46 SNPs. Allele-wise association analysis detected three SNPs, including rs2623659 in the CUB and Sushi multiple domains-1 (CSMD1) gene, associated with severity of illness at end point. The severity of illness at end point was associated with treatment response, but not with the severity of illness at baseline. Three SNPs, including rs2294424 in the C6orf105 gene, were associated with social outcomes. Point estimates of odds ratios showed positive relationships between polygenic risk scores and clinical/social outcomes; however, the results were not statistically significant. Because these results are exploratory, we need to replicate them with a larger sample in a future study. PMID:26674612

  13. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; Chen, Jay; Ranjan, Priya; Slavov, Gancho; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Bryan, Anthony C.; Sykes, Robert; et al

    2015-01-23

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcriptionmore » factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.« less

  14. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; Chen, Jay; Ranjan, Priya; Slavov, Gancho; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Bryan, Anthony C.; Sykes, Robert; Ziebell, Angela L.; Klapste, Jaroslav; Porth, Ilga; Skyba, Oleksandr; Unda, Faride; El-Kassaby, Yousry; Douglas, Carl; Mansfield, Shawn; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Evans, Luke M.; Czarnecki, Olaf; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2015-01-23

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcription factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.

  15. Association of ABO Blood Group Phenotype and Allele Frequency with Chikungunya Fever

    PubMed Central

    Rujirojindakul, Pairaya; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Limprasert, Pornprot

    2015-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of the ABO blood group phenotype and allele frequency with CHIK fever. Methods. A rural community survey in Southern Thailand was conducted in August and September 2010. A total of 506 villagers were enrolled. Cases were defined as individuals having anti-CHIK IgG by hemagglutination ≥1 : 10. Results. There were 314 cases (62.1%) with CHIK seropositivity. Females were less likely to have positive anti-CHIK IgG with odds ratio (OR) (95% CI) of 0.63 (0.43, 0.93). All samples tested were Rh positive. Distribution of CHIK seropositivity versus seronegativity (P value) in A, B, AB, and O blood groups was 80 versus 46 (0.003), 80 versus 48 (0.005), 24 versus 20 (0.55), and 130 versus 78 (<0.001), respectively. However, chi-square test between ABO and CHIK infection showed no statistical significance (P = 0.76). Comparison of the ABO blood group allele frequency between CHIK seropositivity and seronegativity was not statistically significant. Conclusion. This finding demonstrated no association of the ABO blood group phenotypes and allele frequencies with CHIK infection. PMID:25977691

  16. Natalizumab-related anaphylactoid reactions in MS patients are associated with HLA class II alleles

    PubMed Central

    de la Hera, Belén; Urcelay, Elena; Brassat, David; Chan, Andrew; Vidal-Jordana, Angela; Salmen, Anke; Villar, Luisa Maria; Álvarez-Cermeño, José Carlos; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Fernández, Oscar; Oliver, Begoña; Saiz, Albert; Ara, Jose Ramón; Vigo, Ana G.; Arroyo, Rafael; Meca, Virginia; Malhotra, Sunny; Fissolo, Nicolás; Horga, Alejandro; Montalban, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to investigate potential associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II alleles and the development of anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with natalizumab. Methods: HLA class I and II genotyping was performed in patients with MS who experienced anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions and in patients who did not develop infusion-related allergic reactions following natalizumab administration. Results: A total of 119 patients with MS from 3 different cohorts were included in the study: 54 with natalizumab-related anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions and 65 without allergic reactions. HLA-DRB1*13 and HLA-DRB1*14 alleles were significantly increased in patients who developed anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions (pM-H = 3 × 10−7; odds ratio [OR]M-H = 8.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.40–23.64), with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 82%. In contrast, the HLA-DRB1*15 allele was significantly more represented in patients who did not develop anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions to natalizumab (pM-H = 6 × 10−4; ORM-H = 0.2, 95% CI = 0.08–0.50), with a PPV of 81%. Conclusions: HLA-DRB1 genotyping before natalizumab treatment may help neurologists to identify patients with MS at risk for developing serious systemic hypersensitivity reactions associated with natalizumab administration. PMID:25520955

  17. No Association Between Apoε4 Alleles, HIV Infection, Age, Neuropsychological Outcome or Death

    PubMed Central

    Becker, James T.; Martinson, Jeremy J.; Penugonda, Sudhir; Kingsley, Lawrence; Molsberry, Samantha; Wolinsky, Steven; Reynolds, Sandra; Aronow, Aaron; Goodkin, Karl; Levine, Andrew; Martin, Eileen; Miller, Eric N.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Ragin, Ann; Sacktor, Ned

    2014-01-01

    The ε4 allele of the ApoE gene may have important interactions with physical health and cognitive function among individuals with HIV disease. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between ε4, HIV disease, age, neuropsychological impairment and death in a large, well-characterized study sample. 2,846 men participating in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study had ApoE genotyping and neuropsychological test data available for analysis. We found a significant association between HIV infection and time to death (from any cause), as well as older age, race, and education. But, ApoE status was not significantly associated with time to death. Similarly, we found a significant association between HIV infection and time to incident cognitive impairment, as well as age, education, and HIV serostatus; Apoε4 status was not related to incident cognitive impairment. There were no significant interactions between ApoE, HIV infection, and age on cognitive impairment. These data replicate and strengthen prior findings of the lack of association between ApoE ε4 and cognitive outcomes in HIV disease. We conclude that within the specific constraints of an exclusively male study in which the majority of participants were less than 65 years of age (range: 22-87 years), it appears reasonable to conclude that the ε4 allele is not significantly interacting with HIV serostatus. PMID:25388225

  18. No association between Apoε4 alleles, HIV infection, age, neuropsychological outcome, or death.

    PubMed

    Becker, James T; Martinson, Jeremy J; Penugonda, Sudhir; Kingsley, Lawrence; Molsberry, Samantha; Reynolds, Sandra; Aronow, Aaron; Goodkin, Karl; Levine, Andrew; Martin, Eileen; Miller, Eric N; Munro, Cynthia A; Ragin, Ann; Sacktor, Ned

    2015-02-01

    The ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene may have important interactions with physical health and cognitive function among individuals with HIV disease. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between ε4, HIV disease, age, neuropsychological impairment, and death in a large, well-characterized study sample. A total of 2846 men participating in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study had ApoE genotyping and neuropsychological test data available for analysis. We found a significant association between HIV infection and time to death (from any cause), as well as older age, race, and education. But, ApoE status was not significantly associated with time to death. Similarly, we found a significant association between HIV infection and time to incident cognitive impairment, as well as age, education, and HIV serostatus; Apoε4 status was not related to incident cognitive impairment. There were no significant interactions between ApoE, HIV infection, and age on cognitive impairment. These data replicate and strengthen prior findings of the lack of association between ApoE ε4 and cognitive outcomes in HIV disease. We conclude that within the specific constraints of an exclusively male study in which the majority of participants were less than 65 years of age (range 22-87 years), it appears reasonable to conclude that the ε4 allele is not significantly interacting with HIV serostatus. PMID:25388225

  19. Major histocompatibility complex class II DAB alleles associated with intestinal parasite load in the vulnerable Chinese egret (Egretta eulophotes).

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Zhou, Xiaoping; Fang, Wenzhen; Lin, Qingxian; Chen, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    The maintenance of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism has been hypothesized to result from many mechanisms such as rare-allele advantage, heterozygote advantage, and allele counting. In the study reported herein, 224 vulnerable Chinese egrets (Egretta eulophotes) were used to examine these hypotheses as empirical results derived from bird studies are rare. Parasite survey showed that 147 (65.63%) individuals were infected with 1-3 helminths, and 82.31% of these infected individuals carried Ascaridia sp. Using asymmetric polymerase chain reaction technique, 10 DAB1, twelve DAB2, and three DAB3 exon 2 alleles were identified at each single locus. A significant association of the rare allele Egeu-DAB2*05 (allele frequency: 0.022) with helminth resistance was found for all helminths, as well as for the most abundant morphotype Ascaridia sp. in the separate analyses. Egeu-DAB2*05 occurred frequently in uninfected individuals, and individuals carrying Egeu-DAB2*05 had significantly lower helminth morphotypes per individual (HMI) (the number of HMI) and the fecal egg count values. Further, the parasite infection measurements were consistently lower in individuals with an intermediate number of different alleles in the duplicated DAB loci. Significantly, heterozygosity within each DAB locus was not correlated with any parasite infection measurements. These results indicate that the diversity in MHC Egeu-DAB gene is associated with intestinal parasite load and maintained by pathogen-driven selection that probably operate through both the rare-allele advantage and the allele counting strategy, and suggest that Egeu-DAB2*05 might be a valuable indicator of better resistance to helminth diseases in the vulnerable Chinese egret. PMID:27386085

  20. QTL Detection and Elite Alleles Mining for Stigma Traits in Oryza sativa by Association Mapping.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiaojing; Liu, Erbao; Liang, Yinfeng; Liu, Qiangming; Breria, Caleb M; Hong, Delin

    2016-01-01

    Stigma traits are very important for hybrid seed production in Oryza sativa, which is a self-pollinated crop; however, the genetic mechanism controlling the traits is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the phenotypic data of 227 accessions across 2 years and assessed their genotypic variation with 249 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. By combining phenotypic and genotypic data, a genome-wide association (GWA) map was generated. Large phenotypic variations in stigma length (STL), stigma brush-shaped part length (SBPL) and stigma non-brush-shaped part length (SNBPL) were found. Significant positive correlations were identified among stigma traits. In total, 2072 alleles were detected among 227 accessions, with an average of 8.3 alleles per SSR locus. GWA mapping detected 6 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the STL, 2 QTLs for the SBPL and 7 QTLs for the SNBPL. Eleven, 5, and 12 elite alleles were found for the STL, SBPL, and SNBPL, respectively. Optimal cross designs were predicted for improving the target traits. The detected genetic variation in stigma traits and QTLs provides helpful information for cloning candidate STL genes and breeding rice cultivars with longer STLs in the future. PMID:27555858

  1. QTL Detection and Elite Alleles Mining for Stigma Traits in Oryza sativa by Association Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Xiaojing; Liu, Erbao; Liang, Yinfeng; Liu, Qiangming; Breria, Caleb M.; Hong, Delin

    2016-01-01

    Stigma traits are very important for hybrid seed production in Oryza sativa, which is a self-pollinated crop; however, the genetic mechanism controlling the traits is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the phenotypic data of 227 accessions across 2 years and assessed their genotypic variation with 249 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. By combining phenotypic and genotypic data, a genome-wide association (GWA) map was generated. Large phenotypic variations in stigma length (STL), stigma brush-shaped part length (SBPL) and stigma non-brush-shaped part length (SNBPL) were found. Significant positive correlations were identified among stigma traits. In total, 2072 alleles were detected among 227 accessions, with an average of 8.3 alleles per SSR locus. GWA mapping detected 6 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the STL, 2 QTLs for the SBPL and 7 QTLs for the SNBPL. Eleven, 5, and 12 elite alleles were found for the STL, SBPL, and SNBPL, respectively. Optimal cross designs were predicted for improving the target traits. The detected genetic variation in stigma traits and QTLs provides helpful information for cloning candidate STL genes and breeding rice cultivars with longer STLs in the future. PMID:27555858

  2. Evidence for a genetic association between alleles of monoamine oxidase A gene and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L.C.C.; Sham, P.; Castle, D.

    1995-08-14

    We present evidence of a genetic association between bipolar disorder and alleles at 3 monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) markers, but not with alleles of a monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) polymorphism. The 3 MAOA markers, including one associated with low MAOA activity, show strong allelic association with each other but surprisingly not with MAOB. Our results are significantly only for females, though the number of males in our sample is too small to draw any definite conclusions. Our data is consistent with recent reports of reduced MAOA activity in patients with abnormal behavioral phenotypes. The strength of the association is weak, but significant, which suggests that alleles at the MAOA locus contribute to susceptibility to bipolar disorder rather than being a major determinant. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. No evidence for allelic association between bipolar disorder and monoamine oxidase A gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Craddock, N.; Daniels, J.; Roberts, E.

    1995-08-14

    We have tested the hypothesis that DNA markers in the MAOA gene show allelic association with bipolar affective disorder. Eighty-four unrelated Caucasian patients with DSM III-R bipolar disorder and 84 Caucasian controls were typed for three markers in MAOA: a dinucleotide repeat in intron 2, a VNTR in intron 1, and an Fnu4HI RFLP in exon 8. No evidence for allelic association was observed between any of the markers and bipolar disorder. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Genetic Diversity and Elite Allele Mining for Grain Traits in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) by Association Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Edzesi, Wisdom M.; Dang, Xiaojing; Liang, Lijun; Liu, Erbao; Zaid, Imdad U.; Hong, Delin

    2016-01-01

    Mining elite alleles for grain size and weight is of importance for the improvement of cultivated rice and selection for market demand. In this study, association mapping for grain traits was performed on a selected sample of 628 rice cultivars using 262 SSRs. Grain traits were evaluated by grain length (GL), grain width (GW), grain thickness (GT), grain length to width ratio (GL/GW), and 1000-grain weight (TGW) in 2013 and 2014. Our result showed abundant phenotypic and genetic diversities found in the studied population. In total, 2953 alleles were detected with an average of 11.3 alleles per locus. The population was divided into seven subpopulations and the levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) ranged from 34 to 84 cM. Genome-wide association mapping detected 10 marker trait association (MTAs) loci for GL, 1MTAs locus for GW, 7 MTAs loci for GT, 3 MTAs loci for GL/GW, and 1 MTAs locus for TGW. Twenty-nine, 2, 10, 5, and 3 elite alleles were found for the GL, GW, GT, GL/GW, and TGW, respectively. Optimal cross designs were predicted for improving the target traits. The accessions containing elite alleles for grain traits mined in this study could be used for breeding rice cultivars and cloning the candidate genes. PMID:27375646

  5. HLA Allele Frequencies in 5802 Koreans: Varied Allele Types Associated with SJS/TEN According to Culprit Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Jung; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Junho; Park, Kyung Hee; Park, Jung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are very serious forms of drug-induced cutaneous adverse reaction. SJS/TEN induced by certain drug is well known to be associated with some human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene type. We aimed to explore HLA allele frequencies and their association with SJS/TEN according to culprit drugs in Korea. Materials and Methods We enrolled 5802 subjects who had results of HLA typing test from August 2005 to July 2014. Total 28 SJS/TEN patients were categorized based on culprit drugs (allopurinol, lamotrigine, carbamazepine) and identified the presence of HLA-B*58:01, HLA-B*44:03, HLA-B*15:02, and HLA-A*31:01. Results HLA-A*24:02 (20.5%), HLA-B*44:03 (10.0%), and HLA-Cw*01:02 (17.1%) were the most frequent type in HLA-A, -B, and -C genes, respectively. Allele frequencies of HLA-B*58:01, HLA-B*44:03, HLA-A*31:01, and HLA-B*15:02 were 7.0%, 10.0%, 5.0%, and 0.3%, respectively. In 958 allopurinol users, 9 subjects (0.9%) were diagnosed with SJS/TEN. Among them, 8 subjects possessed HLA-B*58:01 allele. SJS/TEN induced by allopurinol was more frequently developed in subjects with HLA-B*58:01 than in subjects without it [odds ratio: 57.4; confidence interval (CI) 7.12-463.50; p<0.001]. Allopurinol treatment, based on screening by HLA-B*58:01 genotyping, could be more cost-effective than that not based on screening. HLA-B*44:03 may be associated with lamotrigine-induced SJS/TEN (odds ratio: 12.75; CI 1.03-157.14; p=0.053). Among carbamazepine users, only two patients experienced SJS/TEN and possessed neither HLA-B*15:02 nor HLA-A*31:03. Conclusion HLA gene frequencies varied in Korea. Screening of HLA-B*58:01 before the use of allopurinol might be needed to anticipate probability of SJS/TEN. PMID:26632391

  6. Polarisation of equine pregnancy outcome associated with a maternal MHC class I allele: Preliminary evidence.

    PubMed

    Kydd, J H; Case, R; Winton, C; MacRae, S; Sharp, E; Ricketts, S L; Rash, N; Newton, J R

    2016-05-30

    Identification of risk factors which are associated with severe clinical signs can assist in the management of disease outbreaks and indicate future research areas. Pregnancy loss during late gestation in the mare compromises welfare, reduces fecundity and has financial implications for horse owners. This retrospective study focussed on the identification of risk factors associated with pregnancy loss among 46 Thoroughbred mares on a single British stud farm, with some but not all losses involving equid herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) infection. In a sub-group of 30 mares, association between pregnancy loss and the presence of five common Thoroughbred horse haplotypes of the equine Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) was assessed. This involved development of sequence specific, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions and in several mares, measurement of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity. Of the 46 mares, 10 suffered late gestation pregnancy loss or neonatal foal death, five of which were EHV-1 positive. Maternal factors including age, parity, number of EHV-1 specific vaccinations and the number of days between final vaccination and foaling or abortion were not significantly associated with pregnancy loss. In contrast, a statistically significant association between the presence of the MHC class I B2 allele and pregnancy loss was identified, regardless of the fetus/foal's EHV-1 status (p=0.002). In conclusion, this study demonstrated a significantly positive association between pregnancy loss in Thoroughbred mares and a specific MHC class I allele in the mother. This association requires independent validation and further investigation of the mechanism by which the mare's genetic background contributes to pregnancy outcome. PMID:27139027

  7. Novel association of the obesity risk-allele near Fas Apoptotic Inhibitory Molecule 2 (FAIM2) gene with heart rate and study of its effects on myocardial infarction in diabetic participants of the PREDIMED trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Fas apoptotic pathway has been implicated in type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although a polymorphism (rs7138803; G > A) near the Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (FAIM2) locus has been related to obesity, its association with other cardiovascular risk factors and disease remains uncertain. Methods We analyzed the association between the FAIM2-rs7138803 polymorphism and obesity, blood pressure and heart rate in 7,161 participants (48.3% with type 2 diabetes) in the PREDIMED study at baseline. We also explored gene-diet interactions with adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) and examined the effects of the polymorphism on cardiovascular disease incidence per diabetes status after a median 4.8-year dietary intervention (MedDiet versus control group) follow-up. Results We replicated the association between the FAIM2-rs7138803 polymorphism and greater obesity risk (OR: 1.08; 95% CI: 1.01-1.16; P = 0.011; per-A allele). Moreover, we detected novel associations of this polymorphism with higher diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate at baseline (B = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.97-1.28 bmp in AA vs G-carriers for the whole population), that remained statistically significant even after adjustment for body mass index (P = 0.012) and correction for multiple comparisons. This association was greater and statistically significant in type-2 diabetic subjects (B = 1.44: 95% CI: 0.23-2.56 bmp; P = 0.010 for AA versus G-carriers). Likewise, these findings were also observed longitudinally over 5-year follow-up. Nevertheless, we found no statistically significant gene-diet interactions with MedDiet for this trait. On analyzing myocardial infarction risk, we detected a nominally significant (P = 0.041) association in type-2 diabetic subjects (HR: 1.86; 95% CI:1.03-3.37 for AA versus G-carriers), although this association did not remain statistically significant following correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions We

  8. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  9. Association of Pancreatic Polypeptide with Mild Cognitive Impairment Varies by APOE ε4 Allele

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosebud O.; Aakre, Jeremiah A.; Cha, Ruth H.; Kremers, Walter K.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Velgos, Stefanie N.; Geda, Yonas E.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a preliminary case–control investigation of the association of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in 202 MCI cases (mean age, 81.6 years) and 202 age- and sex-matched cognitively normal controls in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. Plasma PP was measured and examined as the natural logarithm (continuous) and dichotomized at the median. The OR (95% CI) of MCI increased with increasing PP [1.46 (1.04–2.05)]. There was a negative interaction of PP with apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele; compared to the reference group (no APOE ε4 allele and low PP), the OR (95% CI) for combinations of ε4 and PP were: 2.64 (1.39–5.04) for APOE ε4 plus low PP; 2.09 (1.27–3.45) for no APOE ε4 plus high PP; and 1.91 (1.04–3.53) for no APOE ε4 plus high PP (P for interaction = 0.017). There was also a trend toward a negative interaction with type 2 diabetes (P for interaction = 0.058). Compared to no diabetes and low PP, the OR (95% CI) was 3.02 (1.22–7.46) for low PP plus diabetes but 1.80 (1.01–3.22) for high PP plus diabetes. Participants with high PP had a greater mean (SD) weight loss (kilograms per decade) than persons with low PP [−2.27 (4.07) vs. −1.61 (5.24); P = 0.016]. MCI cases had a non-significantly greater weight loss per decade compared to controls. These findings suggest that high PP alone or jointly with APOE ε4 allele or type 2 diabetes is associated with MCI, and that high PP may mitigate some effects of APOE ε4 allele and type 2 diabetes on cognition. Potential mechanisms may involve PP-related weight loss and centrally mediated effects of PP on cognition. These findings remain to be validated in other studies. PMID:26441635

  10. Human Endogenous Retrovirus (HERVK9) Structural Polymorphism With Haplotypic HLA-A Allelic Associations

    PubMed Central

    Kulski, Jerzy K.; Shigenari, Atsuko; Shiina, Takashi; Ota, Masao; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; James, Ian; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2008-01-01

    The frequency and HLA-A allelic associations of a HERVK9 DNA structural polymorphism located in close proximity to the highly polymorphic HLA-A gene within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genomic region were determined in Japanese, African Americans, and Australian Caucasians to better understand its human population evolutionary history. The HERVK9 insertion or deletion was detected as a 3′ LTR or a solo LTR, respectively, by separate PCR assays. The average insertion frequency of the HERVK9.HG was significantly different (P < 1.083e−6) between the Japanese (0.59) and the African Americans (0.34) or Australian Caucasians (0.37). LD analysis predicted a highly significant (P < 1.0e−5) linkage between the HLA-A and HERVK9 alleles, probably as a result of hitchhiking (linkage). Evolutionary time estimates of the solo, 5′ and 3′ LTR nucleotide sequence divergences suggest that the HERVK9 was inserted 17.3 MYA with the first structural deletion occurring 15.1 MYA. The LTR/HLA-A haplotypes appear to have been formed mostly during the past 3.9 MY. The HERVK9 insertion and deletion, detected by a simple and economical PCR method, is an informative genetic and evolutionary marker for the study of HLA-A haplotype variations, human migration, the origins of contemporary populations, and the possibility of disease associations. PMID:18757922

  11. Association between suicide attempt and a tri-allelic functional polymorphism in serotonin transporter gene promoter in Chinese patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chi-Fa; Lung, For-Wey; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; O'Nions, Elizabeth; Hung, Tai-Hsin; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Wen, Jung-Kwang; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2011-10-31

    Mounting evidence supports the association between a polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene promoter region (5-HTTLPR) and suicidal behaviour. Recently, a novel variant of the 5-HTTLPR L allele was identified. The previously unknown L(G) allele produced similar levels of gene expression to the S allele and might have been misclassified as a "high-expression" allele in previous association studies. In this study, we aimed to compare the genotype distribution of the tri-allelic 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in 168 Chinese patients with schizophrenia, including 60 suicide attempters and 108 non-suicide attempters. In our analysis, which used the L(A) dominant model, it was found that the L(A) allele carriers were significantly more likely to have attempted suicide (p=0.035). Further analysis showed this association existed only in male patients (p=0.012). A similar association between the L(A) allele and violent suicide attempt was also found (p=0.028). In addition, logistic regression confirmed our findings that male L(A) allele carriers were at a higher risk of suicide, although the lack of a significant association in females may reflect insufficient power due to small sample size. However, no association was found when we examined the traditional bi-allelic 5-HTTLPR. These findings differ from those reported in Caucasian subjects, where no associations have been reported. Different genetic backgrounds may give rise to different allelic distribution, causing differential effects on the expression of endophenotypes of suicide behaviours. Although the potential influence of multiple comparisons might weaken our findings, our study provides preliminary evidence for a potentially gender-specific role of a "high-expression" 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in susceptibility to suicide in Chinese patients with schizophrenia. PMID:21964390

  12. APOL1 Risk Alleles are Associated with More Severe Arteriosclerosis in Renal Resistance Vessels with Aging and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hughson, Michael D; Hoy, Wendy E; Mott, Susan A; Puelles, Victor G; Bertram, John F; Winkler, Cheryl L; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2016-01-01

    The increased risk of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) among hypertensive African Americans is partly related to APOL1 allele variants. Hypertension-associated arterionephrosclerosis consists of arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and cortical fibrosis. The initial glomerulosclerosis, attributed to preglomerular arteriosclerosis and ischemia, consists of focal global glomerulosclerosis (FGGS), but in biopsy studies, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is found with progression to ESKD, particularly in African Americans. This is a study of arterionephrosclerosis in successfully APOL1 genotyped autopsy kidney tissue of 159 African Americans (61 no risk alleles, 68 one risk allele, 30 two risk alleles) and 135 whites aged 18–89 years from a general population with no clinical renal disease. Glomerulosclerosis was nearly exclusively FGGS with only three subjects having FSGS-like lesions that were unrelated to APOL1 risk status. For both races, in multivariable analysis, the dependent variables of arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and cortical fibrosis were all significantly related to the independent variables of older age (P < 0.001) and hypertension (P < 0.001). A relationship between APOL1 genotype and arteriosclerosis was apparent only after 35 years of age when, for any level of elevated blood pressure, more severe arteriosclerosis was found in the interlobular arteries of 14 subjects with two APOL1 risk alleles when compared to African Americans with none (n = 37, P = 0.02) or one risk alleles (n = 35, P = 0.02). With the limitation of the small number of subjects contributing to the positive results, the findings imply that APOL1 risk alleles recessively augment small vessel arteriosclerosis in conjunction with age and hypertension. FSGS was not a significant finding, indicating that in the early stages of arterionephrosclerosis, the primary pathologic influence of APOL1 genotype is vascular rather than glomerular.

  13. No association between an allele at the D sub 2 dopamine receptor gene (DRD2) and alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Gelernter, J.; Krystal, J.; Kennedy, J.L. West Haven Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, CT ); O'Malley, S.; Risch, N.; Merikangas, K.; Kidd, K.K. ); Kranzler, H.R. )

    1991-10-02

    The author attempted to replicate a positive allelic association between the A1 allele of DRD2 (the D{sub 2} dopamine receptor locus) and alcoholism that has been reported. They compared allele frequencies at the previously described Taq I restriction fragment length polymorphism system of DRD2 in alcoholics and random population controls.

  14. DRD2 Schizophrenia-Risk Allele Is Associated With Impaired Striatal Functioning in Unaffected Siblings of Schizophrenia Patients.

    PubMed

    Vink, Matthijs; de Leeuw, Max; Luykx, Jurjen J; van Eijk, Kristel R; van den Munkhof, Hanna E; van Buuren, Mariët; Kahn, René S

    2016-05-01

    A recent Genome-Wide Association Study showed that the rs2514218 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in close proximity to dopamine receptor D2 is strongly associated with schizophrenia. Further, an in silico experiment showed that rs2514218 has a cis expression quantitative trait locus effect in the basal ganglia. To date, however, the functional consequence of this SNP is unknown. Here, we used functional Magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the impact of this risk allele on striatal activation during proactive and reactive response inhibition in 45 unaffected siblings of schizophrenia patients. We included siblings to circumvent the illness specific confounds affecting striatal functioning independent from gene effects. Behavioral analyses revealed no differences between the carriers (n= 21) and noncarriers (n= 24). Risk allele carriers showed a diminished striatal response to increasing proactive inhibitory control demands, whereas overall level of striatal activation in carriers was elevated compared to noncarriers. Finally, risk allele carriers showed a blunted striatal response during successful reactive inhibition compared to the noncarriers. These data are consistent with earlier reports showing similar deficits in schizophrenia patients, and point to a failure to flexibly engage the striatum in response to contextual cues. This is the first study to demonstrate an association between impaired striatal functioning and the rs2514218 polymorphism. We take our findings to indicate that striatal functioning is impaired in carriers of the DRD2 risk allele, likely due to dopamine dysregulation at the DRD2 location. PMID:26598739

  15. The Association Between HLA Class II Alleles and the Occurrence of Factor VIII Inhibitor in Thai Patients with Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Nathalang, Oytip; Sriwanitchrak, Pramote; Sasanakul, Werasak; Chuansumrit, Ampaiwan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the association between HLA class II alleles and the occurrence of FVIIIinhibitor in Thai hemophilia A patients. Material and Methods: The distribution of HLA-DRB1 alleles and DQB1 alleles in 57 Thai hemophilia A patientsand 36 blood donors as controls was determined using the PCR sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) method, and theassociation between the occurrence of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitor and the presence of certain HLA class II alleles wasinvestigated. Results: The frequency of HLA-DRB1*15 was higher in the hemophilia A patients with and without FVIII inhibitor,whereas that of DRB1*14, DRB1*07, and DQB1*02 was lower in the hemophilia A patients with FVIII inhibitor, ascompared to controls. Interestingly, only the frequency of DRB1*15 was significantly higher in the patients with inhibitorthan in the controls (P = 0.021). Moreover, the frequency of DRB1*15 in the patients with inhibitor was higher than inthose without inhibitor (P = 0.198). Conclusion: The study’s findings show that the DRB1*15 allele might have contributed to the occurrence of inhibitorin the Thai hemophilia A patients; however, additional research using larger samples and high-resolution DRB1 typingis warranted. PMID:24744621

  16. APOL1 Kidney Risk Alleles: Population Genetics and Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Limou, Sophie; Nelson, George W.; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Winkler, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    APOL1 kidney disease is a unique case in the field of the genetics of common disease: 2 variants (termed G1 and G2) with high population frequency have been repeatedly associated with nondiabetic CKDs, with very strong effect size (odds ratios 3–29) in populations of sub-Saharan African descent. This review provides an update on the spectrum of APOL1 kidney disease and on the worldwide distribution of these kidney risk variants. We also summarize the proper way to run a recessive analysis on joint and independent effects of APOL1 G1 and G2 kidney risk variants. PMID:25168832

  17. Association of DLA-DQB1 alleles with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in Pembroke Welsh Corgis.

    PubMed

    Evans, J M; Tsai, K L; Starr-Moss, A N; Steiner, J M; Clark, L A

    2015-08-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is a digestive disorder resulting from the insufficient secretion of enzymes from the pancreas. In dogs, this condition is often attributed to pancreatic acinar atrophy, wherein the enzyme-producing acinar cells are believed to be destroyed through an autoimmune process. Although EPI affects many diverse breeds, to date, molecular studies have been limited to the German Shepherd dog. A recent study of major histocompatibility genes in diseased and healthy German Shepherd dogs identified both risk and protective haplotypes. Herein, we genotyped DLA-DQB1 in Pembroke Welsh Corgis to determine whether dog leukocyte antigen alleles contribute to the pathogenesis of EPI across dog breeds. We evaluated 14 affected and 43 control Pembroke Welsh Corgis, which were selected based on an age of onset similar to German Shepherd dogs. We identified one protective allele (odds ratio = 0.13, P-value = 0.044) and one risk allele (odds ratio = 3.8, P-value = 0.047). As in German Shepherd dogs, the risk allele is a duplication of DLA-DQB1 (alleles DQB1*013:03 and 017:01); however, Pembroke Welsh Corgis have acquired a single polymorphism on DQB1*017:01. Thus, the DLA-DQB1 duplication is a risk allele for EPI in at least two breeds. PMID:26095904

  18. Allelic associations of two polymorphic microsatellites in intron 40 of the human von Willebrand factor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, S.D.J.; De Souza, K.T. ); De Andrade, M.; Chakraborty, R. )

    1994-01-18

    At intron 40 of the von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene, two GATA-repeat polymorphic sites exist that are physically separated by 212 bp. At the first site (vWF1 locus), seven segregating repeat alleles were observed in a Brazilian Caucasian population, and at the second (vWF2 locus) there were eight alleles, detected through PCR amplifications of this DNA region. Haplotype analysis of individuals revealed 36 different haplotypes in a sample of 338 chromosomes examined. Allele frequencies between generations and gender at each locus were not significantly different, and the genotype frequencies were consistent with their Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Linkage disequilibrium between loci is highly significant with positive allele size association; that is, large alleles at the loci tend to occur together, and so do the same alleles. Variability at each locus appeared to have arisen in a stepwise fashion, suggesting replication slippage as a possible mechanism of production of new alleles. However, the authors observed an increased number of haplotypes, in contrast with the predictions of a stepwise production of variation in the entire region, suggesting some form of cooperative changes between loci that could be due to either gene conversion, or a common control mechanism of production of new variation at these repeat polymorphism sites. The high degree of polymorphism (gene diversity values of 72% and 78% at vWF1 and vWF2, respectively, and of 93% at the haplotype level) makes these markers informative for paternity testing, genetic counseling, and individual-identification purposes.

  19. Confirmation of association between the e4 allele of apolipoprotein E and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Liddell, M; Williams, J; Bayer, A; Kaiser, F; Owen, M

    1994-01-01

    The Apo E genotype of 86 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 77 age matched controls was determined by digestion of Apo E PCR products with the restriction enzyme CfoI. The frequency of the e4 allele was significantly increased in the patient group (0.33) as compared with controls (0.12). This effect was seen in patients with a family history and in sporadic cases. The odds ratio in homozygotes for the e4 allele was 11.24 (95% confidence interval 2.45-51.50). There was no relationship between age of onset and Apo E genotype. There was no linkage disequilibrium between the apolipoprotein E locus and a TaqI polymorphism at the Apo CII locus, and no allelic association between Apo CII and AD. Images PMID:8014966

  20. Allelic association at the D14S43 locus in early onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, A.; Tardieu, S.; Campion, D.; Martinez, M.

    1995-04-24

    The D14S43 marker is closely linked to the major gene for early onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer`s disease on chromosome 14. Allelic frequencies at the D14S43 locus were compared in 113 familial and isolated cases of early onset Alzheimer`s disease (<60 years of age at onset) (EOAD) and 109 unaffected individuals of the same geographic origin. Allele 7 was significantly (P = 0.033) more frequent in type 1 EOAD patients (13.2%), defined by the presence of at least another first degree relative with EOAD, than in controls (4.1%). Since an autosomal dominant gene is probably responsible for type 1 patients, allelic association may reflect linkage disequilibrium at the D14S43 locus. This would mean that some patients share a common ancestral mutation. However, since multiple tests were carried out, this result must be interpreted with caution, and needs confirmation in an independent sample. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Major histocompatibility complex alleles associated with parasite susceptibility in wild giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, Q; Hu, Y; Wu, H; Wei, F

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism is thought to be driven by antagonistic coevolution between pathogens and hosts, mediated through either overdominance or frequency-dependent selection. However, investigations under natural conditions are still rare for endangered mammals which often exhibit depleted variation, and the mechanism of selection underlying the maintenance of characteristics remains a considerable debate. In this study, 87 wild giant pandas were used to investigate MHC variation associated with parasite load. With the knowledge of the MHC profile provided by the genomic data of the giant panda, seven DRB1, seven DQA1 and eight DQA2 alleles were identified at each single locus. Positive selection evidenced by a significantly higher number of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous codon site relative to synonymous substitutions per synonymous codon site could only be detected at the DRB1 locus, which leads to the speculation that DRB1 may have a more important role in dealing with parasite infection for pandas. Coprological analyses revealed that 55.17% of individuals exhibited infection with 1-2 helminthes and 95.3% of infected pandas carried Baylisascaris shroederi. Using a generalized linear model, we found that Aime-DRB1*10 was significantly associated with parasite infection, but no resistant alleles could be detected. MHC heterozygosity of the pandas was found to be uncorrelated with the infection status or the infection intensity. These results suggested that the possible selection mechanisms in extant wild pandas may be frequency dependent rather than being determined by overdominance selection. Our findings could guide the candidate selection for the ongoing reintroduction or translocation of pandas. PMID:25248466

  2. Major histocompatibility complex alleles associated with parasite susceptibility in wild giant pandas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Wu, Q; Hu, Y; Wu, H; Wei, F

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism is thought to be driven by antagonistic coevolution between pathogens and hosts, mediated through either overdominance or frequency-dependent selection. However, investigations under natural conditions are still rare for endangered mammals which often exhibit depleted variation, and the mechanism of selection underlying the maintenance of characteristics remains a considerable debate. In this study, 87 wild giant pandas were used to investigate MHC variation associated with parasite load. With the knowledge of the MHC profile provided by the genomic data of the giant panda, seven DRB1, seven DQA1 and eight DQA2 alleles were identified at each single locus. Positive selection evidenced by a significantly higher number of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous codon site relative to synonymous substitutions per synonymous codon site could only be detected at the DRB1 locus, which leads to the speculation that DRB1 may have a more important role in dealing with parasite infection for pandas. Coprological analyses revealed that 55.17% of individuals exhibited infection with 1–2 helminthes and 95.3% of infected pandas carried Baylisascaris shroederi. Using a generalized linear model, we found that Aime-DRB1*10 was significantly associated with parasite infection, but no resistant alleles could be detected. MHC heterozygosity of the pandas was found to be uncorrelated with the infection status or the infection intensity. These results suggested that the possible selection mechanisms in extant wild pandas may be frequency dependent rather than being determined by overdominance selection. Our findings could guide the candidate selection for the ongoing reintroduction or translocation of pandas. PMID:25248466

  3. Allele-specific transcription factor binding to common and rare variants associated with disease and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Marco; Pan, Gang; Nord, Helena; Wallerman, Ola; Wallén Arzt, Emelie; Berggren, Olof; Elvers, Ingegerd; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Rönnblom, Lars; Lindblad Toh, Kerstin; Wadelius, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a large number of disease-associated SNPs, but in few cases the functional variant and the gene it controls have been identified. To systematically identify candidate regulatory variants, we sequenced ENCODE cell lines and used public ChIP-seq data to look for transcription factors binding preferentially to one allele. We found 9962 candidate regulatory SNPs, of which 16 % were rare and showed evidence of larger functional effect than common ones. Functionally rare variants may explain divergent GWAS results between populations and are candidates for a partial explanation of the missing heritability. The majority of allele-specific variants (96 %) were specific to a cell type. Furthermore, by examining GWAS loci we found >400 allele-specific candidate SNPs, 141 of which were highly relevant in our cell types. Functionally validated SNPs support identification of an SNP in SYNGR1 which may expose to the risk of rheumatoid arthritis and primary biliary cirrhosis, as well as an SNP in the last intron of COG6 exposing to the risk of psoriasis. We propose that by repeating the ChIP-seq experiments of 20 selected transcription factors in three to ten people, the most common polymorphisms can be interrogated for allele-specific binding. Our strategy may help to remove the current bottleneck in functional annotation of the genome. PMID:26993500

  4. Evolved tooth gain in sticklebacks is associated with a cis-regulatory allele of Bmp6

    PubMed Central

    Cleves, Phillip A.; Ellis, Nicholas A.; Jimenez, Monica T.; Nunez, Stephanie M.; Schluter, Dolph; Kingsley, David M.; Miller, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental genetic studies of evolved differences in morphology have led to the hypothesis that cis-regulatory changes often underlie morphological evolution. However, because most of these studies focus on evolved loss of traits, the genetic architecture and possible association with cis-regulatory changes of gain traits are less understood. Here we show that a derived benthic freshwater stickleback population has evolved an approximate twofold gain in ventral pharyngeal tooth number compared with their ancestral marine counterparts. Comparing laboratory-reared developmental time courses of a low-toothed marine population and this high-toothed benthic population reveals that increases in tooth number and tooth plate area and decreases in tooth spacing arise at late juvenile stages. Genome-wide linkage mapping identifies largely separate sets of quantitative trait loci affecting different aspects of dental patterning. One large-effect quantitative trait locus controlling tooth number fine-maps to a genomic region containing an excellent candidate gene, Bone morphogenetic protein 6 (Bmp6). Stickleback Bmp6 is expressed in developing teeth, and no coding changes are found between the high- and low-toothed populations. However, quantitative allele-specific expression assays of Bmp6 in developing teeth in F1 hybrids show that cis-regulatory changes have elevated the relative expression level of the freshwater benthic Bmp6 allele at late, but not early, stages of stickleback development. Collectively, our data support a model where a late-acting cis-regulatory up-regulation of Bmp6 expression underlies a significant increase in tooth number in derived benthic sticklebacks. PMID:25205810

  5. A loss-of-function allele of OsHMA3 associated with high cadmium accumulation in shoots and grain of Japonica rice cultivars.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiali; Wang, Peitong; Wang, Peng; Yang, Meng; Lian, Xingming; Tang, Zhong; Huang, Chao-Feng; Salt, David E; Zhao, Fang Jie

    2016-09-01

    Excessive cadmium (Cd) accumulation in rice poses a risk to food safety. OsHMA3 plays an important role in restricting Cd translocation from roots to shoots. A non-functional allele of OsHMA3 has been reported in some Indica rice cultivars with high Cd accumulation, but it is not known if OsHMA3 allelic variation is associated with Cd accumulation in Japonica cultivars. In this study, we identified a Japonica cultivar with consistently high Cd accumulation in shoots and grain in both field and greenhouse experiments. The cultivar possesses an OsHMA3 allele with a predicted amino acid mutation at the 380(th) position from Ser to Arg. The haplotype had no Cd transport activity when the gene was expressed in yeast, and the allele did not complement a known nonfunctional allele of OsHMA3 in F1 test. The allele is present only in temperate Japonica cultivars among diversity panels of 1483 rice cultivars. Different cultivars possessing this allele showed greatly increased root-to-shoot Cd translocation and a shift in root Cd speciation from Cd-S to Cd-O bonding determined by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study has identified a new loss-of-function allele of OsHMA3 in Japonica rice cultivars leading to high Cd accumulation in shoots and grain. PMID:27038090

  6. Breed Distribution of SOD1 Alleles Previously Associated with Canine Degenerative Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, R; Coates, JR; Johnson, GC; Hansen, L; Awano, T; Kolicheski, A; Ivansson, E; Perloski, M; Lindblad-Toh, K; O'Brien, DP; Guo, J; Katz, ML; Johnson, GS

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous reports associated 2 mutant SOD1 alleles (SOD1:c.118A and SOD1:c.52T) with degenerative myelopathy in 6 canine breeds. The distribution of these alleles in other breeds has not been reported. Objective To describe the distribution of SOD1:c.118A and SOD1:c.52T in 222 breeds. Animals DNA from 33,747 dogs was genotyped at SOD1:c.118, SOD1:c.52, or both. Spinal cord sections from 249 of these dogs were examined. Methods Retrospective analysis of 35,359 previously determined genotypes at SOD1:c.118G>A or SOD1:c.52A>T and prospective survey to update the clinical status of a subset of dogs from which samples were obtained with a relatively low ascertainment bias. Results The SOD1:c.118A allele was found in cross-bred dogs and in 124 different canine breeds whereas the SOD1:c.52T allele was only found in Bernese Mountain Dogs. Most of the dogs with histopathologically confirmed degenerative myelopathy were SOD1:c.118A homozygotes, but 8 dogs with histopathologically confirmed degenerative myelopathy were SOD1:c.118A/G heterozygotes and had no other sequence variants in their SOD1 amino acid coding regions. The updated clinical conditions of dogs from which samples were obtained with a relatively low ascertainment bias suggest that SOD1:c.118A homozygotes are at a much higher risk of developing degenerative myelopathy than are SOD1:c.118A/G heterozygotes. Conclusions and Clinical Importance We conclude that the SOD1:c.118A allele is widespread and common among privately owned dogs whereas the SOD1:c.52T allele is rare and appears to be limited to Bernese Mountain Dogs. We also conclude that breeding to avoid the production of SOD1:c.118A homozygotes is a rational strategy. PMID:24524809

  7. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.; Montgomery, A.; Sheridan, P.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The allelic association of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene with the binding characteristics of the D2 dopamine receptor was determined in 66 brains of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects. In a blinded experiment, DNA from the cerebral cortex was treated with the restriction endonuclease Taql and probed with a 1.5-kilobase (kb) digest of a clone (lambda hD2G1) of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene. The binding characteristics (Kd (binding affinity) and Bmax (number of binding sites)) of the D2 dopamine receptor were determined in the caudate nuclei of these brains using tritiated spiperone as the ligand. The adjusted Kd was significantly lower in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic subjects. In subjects with the A1 allele, in whom a high association with alcoholism was found, the Bmax was significantly reduced compared with the Bmax of subjects with the A2 allele. Moreover, a progressively reduced Bmax was found in subjects with A2/A2, A1/A2, and A1/A1 alleles, with subjects with A2/A2 having the highest mean values, and subjects with A1/A1, the lowest. The polymorphic pattern of the D2 dopamine receptor gene and its differential expression of receptors suggests the involvement of the dopaminergic system in conferring susceptibility to at least one subtype of severe alcoholism.

  8. Association between AgI-CA alleles and severity of autosomal recessive proximal spina lmuscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    DiDonato, C.J.; Carpten, J.D.; Fuerst, P.; Ingraham, S.E.; Mendell, J.R.; Burghes, A.H.M.; Morgan, K.; Prescott, G.; Simard, L.R.; McPherson, J.D.

    1994-12-01

    The gene for autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been mapped to an 850-kb interval on 5q11.2-q13.3, between the centromeric D5S823 and telomeric D5S557 markers. We report a new complex marker, Ag1-CA, that lies in this interval, whose primers produce one, two, or rarely three amplification-fragment-length variants (AFLVs) per allele. Class I chromosomes are those which amplify a single AFLV allele, and class II chromosomes are those which amplify an allele with two or three AFLVs. Ag1-CA shows highly significant allelic association with type I SMA in both the French Canadian (Hopital Sainte-Justine (HSJ)) and American (Ohio State University (OSU)) populations (P < .0001). Significant association between the Ag1-CA genotype and disease severity was also observed. Type I patients were predominantly homozygous for class I chromosomes (P = .0003 OSU; P = 0.0012 HSJ), whereas the majority of type II patients were heterozygous for class I and II chromosomes (P = .0014 OSU; P = .001 HSJ). There was no significant difference in Ag1-CA genotype frequencies between type III patients (P = .5 OSU; P = .25 HSJ) and the paired normal chromosomes from both carrier parents. Our results indicate that Ag1-CA is the most closely linked marker to SMA and defines the critical candidate-gene region. Finally, we have proposed a model that should be taken into consideration when screening candidates SMA genes.

  9. Allele-Specific Methylation Occurs at Genetic Variants Associated with Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, John N.; Raj, Towfique; Fagerness, Jes; Stahl, Eli; Viloria, Fernando T.; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Seddon, Johanna; Daly, Mark; Chess, Andrew; Plenge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesize that the phenomenon of allele-specific methylation (ASM) may underlie the phenotypic effects of multiple variants identified by Genome-Wide Association studies (GWAS). We evaluate ASM in a human population and document its genome-wide patterns in an initial screen at up to 380,678 sites within the genome, or up to 5% of the total genomic CpGs. We show that while substantial inter-individual variation exists, 5% of assessed sites show evidence of ASM in at least six samples; the majority of these events (81%) are under genetic influence. Many of these cis-regulated ASM variants are also eQTLs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes and/or in high linkage-disequilibrium with variants linked to complex disease. Finally, focusing on autoimmune phenotypes, we extend this initial screen to confirm the association of cis-regulated ASM with multiple complex disease-associated variants in an independent population using next-generation bisulfite sequencing. These four variants are implicated in complex phenotypes such as ulcerative colitis and AIDS progression disease (rs10491434), Celiac disease (rs2762051), Crohn's disease, IgA nephropathy and early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (rs713875) and height (rs6569648). Our results suggest cis-regulated ASM may provide a mechanistic link between the non-coding genetic changes and phenotypic variation observed in these diseases and further suggests a route to integrating DNA methylation status with GWAS results. PMID:24911414

  10. Stable association of a pigmentation allele with an oncogene: nonhybrid melanomas in Xiphophorus variatus.

    PubMed

    Kazianis, S; Borowsky, R

    1995-01-01

    Sex-linked genes in several species of the fish genus Xiphophorus cause macromelanophore pigmentation patterns on the flanks of the fish. Some, but not all, of these patterns can develop into melanomas. The tumorigenic alleles are tightly linked to a supernumerary oncogene sequence, Xmrk. The data show that the association of Xmrk with two of the tumorigenic alleles of X. variatus, P2 and Li, holds over a broad geographic area. From the distribution of the fish and the geology of the area, it is probable that this association is older than the late Tertiary. The persistence of this association suggests that Xmrk confers some benefit on P2-and Li-bearing individuals to offset the deleterious effect. The nature of this benefit remains unknown. PMID:7608512

  11. Effective marker alleles associated with type II resistance of wheat to Fusarium head blight infection in fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular markers associated with known quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in bi-parental mapping populations usually have more than two alleles in breeding populations. Therefore, understanding the association of each allele with FHB response is parti...

  12. PCSK9 polymorphism in a Tunisian cohort: identification of a new allele, L8, and association of allele L10 with reduced coronary heart disease risk.

    PubMed

    Slimani, Afef; Hrira, Mohamed Yahia; Najah, Mohamed; Jomaa, Walid; Maatouk, Faouzi; Hamda, Khaldoun Ben; Abifadel, Marianne; Rabès, Jean-Pierre; Boileau, Catherine; Rouis, Mustapha; Slimane, Mohamed Naceur; Varret, Mathilde

    2015-02-01

    The c.61_63dupCTG (L10) allele of rs72555377 polymorphism in PCSK9 has been reported to be associated with low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and with a decreased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). We investigated the effect of two known alleles for rs72555377, L10 and L11, on the risk of CAD in a Tunisian cohort (218 patients diagnosed by angiography and 125 control subjects). Two subgroups of patients were defined by their level of stenosis: ≥50% for CAD and <50% for no-CAD. The genotypes were obtained by the size measurement of fluorescent-labeled PCR products. We identified a novel allele for the rs72555377 polymorphism: an in-frame deletion, c.61_63delCTG (L8). The frequency of the L10 allele was significantly higher in the no-CAD subgroup than in the CAD subgroup (0.210 vs 0.114, p = 0.045), and than in the subgroup of CAD patients presenting a stenosis ≥50% in two or three major coronary arteries (0.210 vs 0.125, p = 0.028). Multiple regression analysis showed that the L10 allele was significantly associated with a reduced risk of CAD (p = 0.049, OR = 0.51[0.26-1.00]), and with its reduced severity (p = 0.045, OR = 0.44[0.20-0.98]). The L10 allele is associated with a reduced risk and severity of CAD, seemingly independently of its LDL-lowering effect, suggesting a direct effect of PCSK9 on atherogenesis. PMID:25239117

  13. Association of HLA-DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to mixed connective tissue disease in Polish patients.

    PubMed

    Paradowska-Gorycka, A; Stypińska, B; Olesińska, M; Felis-Giemza, A; Mańczak, M; Czuszynska, Z; Zdrojewski, Z; Wojciechowicz, J; Jurkowska, M

    2016-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease, originally defined as a connective tissue inflammatory syndrome with overlapping features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc), characterized by the presence of antibodies against components of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1snRNP). The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of (high-resolution-typed) DRB1 alleles in a cohort of Polish patients with MCTD (n = 103). Identification of the variants potentially associated with risk and protection was carried out by comparison with the DKMS Polish Bone Marrow Donor Registry (41306 alleles). DRB1*15:01 (odds ratio (OR): 6.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.55-8.06), DRB1*04 (OR: 3.69; 95% CI 2.69-5.01) and *09:01 (OR: 8.12; 95% CI 2.15-21.75) were identified as risk alleles for MCTD, while HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele was found to be protective (OR: 0.50; 95% CI 0.28-0.83). The carrier frequency of the DRB1*01 was higher in MCTD patients compared with controls, although the differences were not statistically significant. Our results confirm the modulating influence of HLA-DRB1 genotypes on development of connective tissue diseases such as MCTD. PMID:26818120

  14. Frequency of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 Alleles and Haplotype Association in Syrian Population.

    PubMed

    Jazairi, Batoul; Khansaa, Issam; Ikhtiar, Adnan; Murad, Hossam

    2016-02-01

    The study of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) system is very important in health and diseases. As the HLA loci are the most polymorphic in the human genome, it plays a very important role in the immune responses to self and nonself antigens. In the light of the growing importance of typing the HLA alleles in transplantation, autoimmune diseases, cancer, and many other diseases, we studied 225 unrelated healthy Syrian subjects for their HLA class II genotypes in an attempt to reveal the distribution of the HLA (DRB1-DQB1) alleles in the general Syrian population. Our results revealed that the most common alleles for the DRB1 locus were DRB1*11 (26.4%), DRB1*04 (14%), and DRB1*07 (12%). However, the most frequent alleles for the DQB1 locus were DQB1*03 (40.9%) and DQB1*05 (25.1%). The frequent of two-locus haplotypes carry the most frequent alleles at these loci. The most frequently detected class II ''haplotypes'' are DRB1*11-DQB1*03 (8.9%), DRB1*01-DQB1*05 (3.6%), and DRB1*04-DQB1*03 (2.7%). Compared with other populations, our result, deduced from the analysis of genetic distances and the construction of neighbor-joining (NJ) dendrogram, and principal component analysis (PCA) indicates that Syrians are related to Middle Eastern populations. Our data about the Syrian population will aid researchers in studying the relation of HLA class II with different diseases in a Syrian population and will add to the available international literature associated with these loci. PMID:26853713

  15. Association between prostate cancer in black Americans and an allele of the PADPRP pseudogene locus on chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, J.A.; Suarez, B.K.; Donis-Keller, H.

    1996-02-01

    Black American men have a higher incidence of cancer of the prostate (CAP), multiple myeloma, and lung cancer than do white American men. The basis for these differences no doubt includes environmental influences, because American blacks have also been found to have a higher incidence of CAP than do African blacks. However, genetic factors may play a role as well. For example, Lyn et al. reported an increase in the frequency of an allele of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) pseudogene locus on chromosome 13 in black Americans with CAP, suggesting the presence of a disease-susceptibility locus. Since only nine CAP patients were studied, proof of the significance of the finding for the general population of black Americans will rely on independent replication of the result and studies with larger sample sizes. We have doubled the number of black American CAP patients studied at the PADPRP pseudogene locus on chromosome 13 and compared them with white Americans with CAP, along with reference samples. In addition, we have determined allele frequencies by using a larger number of white individuals, from the CEPH reference pedigree resource, and a larger number of black Americans than previously reported, which may reflect more accurately the allele frequencies in these populations. We also find a statistically significant association between an allele at the PADPRP pseudogene locus and CAP in black Americans; however, it is not the same allele reported by Lyn et al. Furthermore, we tested CAP tumor DNA for chromosome 13 PADPRP pseudogene region deletions. In contrast to the report of Bhatia et al., we found no evidence for deletions that would suggest the presence of a tumor-suppressor gene in this region of chromosome 13. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. G Allele of the IGF2 ApaI Polymorphism Is Associated With Judo Status.

    PubMed

    Itaka, Toshio; Agemizu, Kenichiro; Aruga, Seiji; Machida, Shuichi

    2016-07-01

    Itaka, T, Agemizu, K, Aruga, S, and Machida, S. G allele of the IGF2 ApaI polymorphism is associated with judo status. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2043-2048, 2016-Previous studies have reported that the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) ApaI polymorphism is associated with body mass index, fat mass, and grip strength. Competitive judo requires high levels of strength and power. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the IGF2 ApaI and ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and judo status. The subjects were 156 male judo athletes from a top-level university in Japan. They were divided into 3 groups based on their competitive history: international-level athletes, national-level athletes, and others. Genomic DNA was extracted from the saliva of each athlete, and the maximal isometric strength of the trunk muscles and handgrip strength were measured. Genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to detect IGF2 (rs680) and α-actinin-3 (ACTN3) (rs1815739) gene polymorphisms. The genotype frequencies of the 2 gene polymorphisms were compared among the 3 groups of judo athletes and controls. International-level judo athletes showed a higher frequency of the GG + GA genotype of the IGF2 gene than that of the national-level athletes and others. There was an inverse linear correlation between the frequency of the IGF2 AA genotype and level of judo performance (p = 0.041). Back muscle strength relative to height and weight was higher in subjects with the GG + GA genotype than in those with the AA genotype. Conversely, the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism was not associated with judo status. Additionally, no differences were found in back muscle or handgrip strength among the ACTN3 genotypes. In conclusion, the results indicate that the IGF2 gene polymorphism may be associated with judo status. PMID:26677828

  17. Allelic frequencies and association with carcass traits of six genes in local subpopulations of Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, Takahiro; Ibi, Takayuki; Siqintuya; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Akiyama, Takayuki; Yoshida, Emi; Imai, Kazumi; Matsui, Mayu; Uemura, Keiichi; Eto, Hisayoshi; Watanabe, Naoto; Fujita, Tatsuo; Saito, Yosuke; Komatsu, Tomohiko; Hoshiba, Hiroshi; Mannen, Hideyuki; Sasazaki, Shinji; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Marker-assisted selection (MAS) is expected to accelerate the genetic improvement of Japanese Black cattle. However, verification of the effects of the genes for MAS in different subpopulations is required prior to the application of MAS. In this study, we investigated the allelic frequencies and genotypic effects for carcass traits of six genes, which can be used in MAS, in eight local subpopulations. These genes are SCD, FASN and SREBP1, which are associated with the fatty acid composition of meat, and NCAPG, MC1R and F11, which are associated with carcass weight, coat color and blood coagulation abnormality, respectively. The frequencies of desirable alleles of SCD and FASN were relatively high and that of NCAPG was relatively low, and NCAPG was significantly associated with several carcass traits, including carcass weight. The proportions of genotypic variance explained by NCAPG to phenotypic variance were 4.83 for carcass weight. We thus confirmed that NCAPG is a useful marker for selection of carcass traits in these subpopulations. In addition, we found that the desirable alleles of six genes showed no negative effects on carcass traits. Therefore, selection using these genes to improve target traits should not have negative impacts on carcass traits. PMID:26249527

  18. Relation of the Allelic Variants of Multidrug Resistance Gene to Agranulocytosis Associated With Clozapine.

    PubMed

    Anil Yağcioğlu, A Elif; Yoca, Gökhan; Ayhan, Yavuz; Karaca, R Özgür; Çevik, Lokman; Müderrisoğlu, Ahmet; Göktaş, Mustafa T; Eni, Nurhayat; Yazici, M Kâzim; Bozkurt, Atilla; Babaoğlu, Melih O

    2016-06-01

    Clozapine use is associated with leukopenia and more rarely agranulocytosis, which may be lethal. The drug and its metabolites are proposed to interact with the multidrug resistance transporter (ABCB1/MDR1) gene product, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Among various P-glycoprotein genetic polymorphisms, nucleotide changes in exons 26 (C3435T), 21 (G2677T), and 12 (C1236T) have been implicated for changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many substrate drugs. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between these specific ABCB1 polymorphisms and clozapine-associated agranulocytosis (CAA). Ten patients with a history of CAA and 91 control patients without a history of CAA, despite 10 years of continuous clozapine use, were included. Patient recruitment and blood sample collection were conducted at the Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, in collaboration with the members of the Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders Section of the Psychiatric Association of Turkey, working in various psychiatry clinics. After DNA extraction from peripheral blood lymphocytes, genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction and endonuclease digestion. Patients with CAA had shorter duration of clozapine use but did not show any significant difference in other clinical, sociodemographic characteristics and in genotypic or allelic distributions of ABCB1 variants and haplotypes compared with control patients. Among the 10 patients with CAA, none carried the ABCB1 all-variant haplotype (TT-TT-TT), whereas the frequency of this haplotype was approximately 12% among the controls. Larger sample size studies and thorough genetic analyses may reveal both genetic risk and protective factors for this serious adverse event. PMID:27043126

  19. Prematurity and Severity Are Associated With Toxoplasma gondii Alleles (NCCCTS, 1981–2009)

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Rima; Boyer, Kenneth M.; Lee, Daniel; Mui, Ernest; Wroblewski, Kristen; Karrison, Theodore; Noble, A. Gwendolyn; Withers, Shawn; Swisher, Charles N.; Heydemann, Peter T.; Sautter, Mari; Babiarz, Jane; Rabiah, Peter; Meier, Paul; Grigg, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Congenital toxoplasmosis is a severe, life-altering disease in the United States. A recently developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) distinguishes Toxoplasma gondii parasite types (II and not exclusively II [NE-II]) by detecting antibodies in human sera that recognize allelic peptide motifs of distinct parasite types. Methods. ELISA determined parasite serotype for 193 congenitally infected infants and their mothers in the National Collaborative Chicago-based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study (NCCCTS), 1981–2009. Associations of parasite serotype with demographics, manifestations at birth, and effects of treatment were determined. Results. Serotypes II and NE-II occurred in the United States with similar proportions during 3 decades. For persons diagnosed before or at birth and treated in infancy, and persons diagnosed after 1 year of age who missed treatment in infancy, proportions were similar (P = .91). NE-II serotype was more common in hot, humid regions (P = .02) but was also present in other regions. NE-II serotype was associated with rural residence (P < .01), lower socioeconomic status (P < .001), and Hispanic ethnicity (P < .001). Prematurity (P = .03) and severe disease at birth (P < .01) were associated with NE-II serotype. Treatment with lower and higher doses of pyrimethamine with sulfadizine improved outcomes relative to those outcomes of persons in the literature who did not receive such treatment. Conclusions. Type II and NE-II parasites cause congenital toxoplasmosis in North America. NE-II serotype was more prevalent in certain demographics and associated with prematurity and severe disease at birth. Both type II and NE-II infections improved with treatment. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00004317. PMID:22499837

  20. Lack of association between TaqI A1 Allele of dopamine D2 receptor gene and alcohol-use disorders in Atayal natives of Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chia-Hsiang Chen; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Hai-Gwo Hwu

    1996-09-20

    Association studies between the A1 allele of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene TaqI A polymorphism and alcoholism remain controversial. A recent study from Japan demonstrated that the A1 allele is associated with severe alcoholism in the Japanese population. We were interested in knowing if this association also exists in the Atayals of Taiwan, who were found to have a higher prevalence of alcohol-use disorders than the Han Chinese in Taiwan. Genotype and allele frequencies were determined in alcohol-abusing, alcohol-dependent, and nonalcoholic control Atayal natives in Taiwan. A1 allele frequencies in alcohol-dependent, alcohol-abusing, and normal control Atayals were 0.39, 0.42, and 0.39, respectively. No difference in A1 allele frequency was found among these three groups. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the A1 allele of the TaqI A polymorphism of the DRD2 gene increases susceptibility to alcohol-use disorders in the Atayals of Taiwan. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Allelic Imbalance of mRNA Associated with α2-HS Glycoprotein (Fetuin-A) Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Inaoka, Yoshihiko; Osawa, Motoki; Mukasa, Nahoko; Miyashita, Keiko; Satoh, Fumiko; Kakimoto, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Alpha 2-HS glycoprotein (AHSG), also designated as fetuin-A, exhibits polymorphism in population genetics consisting of two major alleles of AHSG(∗) 1 and AHSG(∗) 2. The serum level in the AHSG(∗) 1 homozygote is significantly higher than that of the AHSG(∗) 2 homozygote. This study examined the molecular mechanism for the cis-regulatory expression. To quantitate allele-specific mRNA in intra-assays of the heterozygote, RT-PCR method employing primers that were incorporated to the two closely located SNPs was developed. The respective magnitudes of AHSG(∗) 1 to AHSG(∗) 2 in the liver tissues and hepatic culture cells of PLC/PRF/5 were determined quantitatively as 2.5-fold and 6.2-fold. The mRNA expressional difference of two major alleles was observed, which is consistent with that in the serum level. The culture cells carried heterozygous genotypes in rs4917 and rs4918, but homozygous one in rs2248690. It was unlikely that the imbalance was derived from the SNP located in the promotor site. Furthermore, to investigate the effect of mRNA degradation, RNA synthesis in the cell culture was inhibited potently by the addition of actinomycin-D. No marked change was apparent between the two alleles. The results indicated that the cis-regulatory expressional difference is expected to occur at the level of transcription or splicing of mRNA. PMID:26549924

  2. Allelic association of human dopamine D sub 2 receptor gene in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, K.; Sheridan, P.J.; Montgomery, A.; Jagadeeswaran, P.; Nogami, H.; Briggs, A.H. ); Noble, E.P.; Ritchie, T.; Cohn, J.B. )

    1990-04-18

    In a blinded experiment, the authors report the first allelic association of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in alcoholism. From 70 brain samples of alcoholics and nonalcoholics, DNA was digested with restriction endonucleases and probed with a clone that contained the entire 3{prime} coding exon, the polyadenylation signal, and approximately 16.4 kilobases of noncoding 3{prime} sequence of the human dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene ({lambda}hD2G1). In the present samples, the presence of A1 allele of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene correctly classified 77% of alcoholics, and its absence classified 72% of nonalcoholics. The polymorphic pattern of this receptor gene suggests that a gene that confers susceptibility to at least one form of alcoholism is located on the q22-q23 region of chromosome 11.

  3. Allele variants of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin are globally transmitted and associated with colonization factors.

    PubMed

    Joffré, Enrique; von Mentzer, Astrid; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Oezguen, Numan; Savidge, Tor; Dougan, Gordon; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Sjöling, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. ETEC-mediated diarrhea is orchestrated by heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxins (STp and STh), acting in concert with a repertoire of more than 25 colonization factors (CFs). LT, the major virulence factor, induces fluid secretion after delivery of a monomeric ADP-ribosylase (LTA) and its pentameric carrier B subunit (LTB). A study of ETEC isolates from humans in Brazil reported the existence of natural LT variants. In the present study, analysis of predicted amino acid sequences showed that the LT amino acid polymorphisms are associated with a geographically and temporally diverse set of 192 clinical ETEC strains and identified 12 novel LT variants. Twenty distinct LT amino acid variants were observed in the globally distributed strains, and phylogenetic analysis showed these to be associated with different CF profiles. Notably, the most prevalent LT1 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS1 + CS3 or CS2 + CS3, and the most prevalent LT2 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS5 + CS6 or CFA/I. LTB allele variants generally exhibited more-stringent amino acid sequence conservation (2 substitutions identified) than LTA allele variants (22 substitutions identified). The functional impact of LT1 and LT2 polymorphisms on virulence was investigated by measuring total-toxin production, secretion, and stability using GM1-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (GM1-ELISA) and in silico protein modeling. Our data show that LT2 strains produce 5-fold more toxin than LT1 strains (P < 0.001), which may suggest greater virulence potential for this genetic variant. Our data suggest that functionally distinct LT-CF variants with increased fitness have persisted during the evolution of ETEC and have spread globally. PMID:25404692

  4. FMR1 Gray Zone Alleles: Association with Parkinson Disease in Women?

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Deborah A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Zhang, Wenting; Tassone, Flora; Spector, Elaine; Zerbe, Gary; Hagerman, Paul J; Ouyang, Bichun; Leehey, Maureen A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Carriers of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) repeat expansions in the premutation range (55–200 CGG repeats), especially males, often develop tremor, ataxia, and parkinsonism.1–2 These neurological signs are believed to be due to elevated levels of expanded CGG repeat FMR1 mRNA. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of FMR1 repeat expansions in a movement disorder population, comprised of all types of tremor, ataxia or parkinsonism subjects. Methods We screened 335 consecutive movement disorders patients with tremor, ataxia, or parkinsonism and 273 controls confirmed to have no movement disorders. Results There was no difference in FMR1 premutation size expansions in the cases compared to controls. Eleven percent of the women with Parkinson disease (PD) had FMR1 gray zone expansions compared to 4.4% of female controls, odds ratio of 3.2 (95% CI 1.2–8.7). Gray zone expansions in patients with other phenotypes were not overrepresented in comparison with controls. Conclusions FMR1 premutation range expansions are not more common in a mixed movement disorder population compared to controls. Our results, however, suggest that FMR1 gray zone alleles may be associated with PD in women. PMID:21567456

  5. Allelic heterogeneity in NCF2 associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility across four ethnic populations

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Howard, Xana; Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E.; Maiti, Amit K.; Chandru, Hema; Adler, Adam; Wiley, Graham B.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kottyan, Leah; Guthridge, Joel M.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Kelly, Jennifer; Sánchez, Elena; Raj, Prithvi; Li, Quan-Zhen; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Han, Bok-Ghee; Olsen, Nancy J.; Karp, David R.; Moser, Kathy; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; James, Judith A.; Harley, John B.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Looger, Loren L.; Nath, Swapan K.; Acevedo, Eduardo; Acevedo, Eduardo; La Torre, Ignacio García-De; Maradiaga-Ceceña, Marco A.; Cardiel, Mario H.; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A.; Rodriguez-Amado, Jacqueline; Moctezuma, José Francisco; Miranda, Pedro; Perandones, Carlos; Aires, Buenos; Castel, Cecilia; Laborde, Hugo A.; Alba, Paula; Musuruana, Jorge; Goecke, Annelise; Foster, Carola; Orozco, Lorena; Baca, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have associated NCF2, encoding a core component of the multi-protein NADPH oxidase (NADPHO), with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility in individuals of European ancestry. To identify ethnicity-specific and -robust variants within NCF2, we assessed 145 SNPs in and around the NCF2 gene in 5325 cases and 21 866 controls of European-American (EA), African-American (AA), Hispanic (HS) and Korean (KR) ancestry. Subsequent imputation, conditional, haplotype and bioinformatic analyses identified seven potentially functional SLE-predisposing variants. Association with non-synonymous rs17849502, previously reported in EA, was detected in EA, HS and AA (PEA = 1.01 × 10−54, PHS = 3.68 × 10−10, PAA = 0.03); synonymous rs17849501 was similarly significant. These SNPs were monomorphic in KR. Novel associations were detected with coding variants at rs35937854 in AA (PAA = 1.49 × 10−9), and rs13306575 in HS and KR (PHS = 7.04 × 10−7, PKR = 3.30 × 10−3). In KR, a 3-SNP haplotype was significantly associated (P = 4.20 × 10−7), implying that SLE predisposing variants were tagged. Significant SNP–SNP interaction (P = 0.02) was detected between rs13306575 and rs17849502 in HS, and a dramatically increased risk (OR = 6.55) with a risk allele at each locus. Molecular modeling predicts that these non-synonymous mutations could disrupt NADPHO complex assembly. The risk allele of rs17849501, located in a conserved transcriptional regulatory region, increased reporter gene activity, suggesting in vivo enhancer function. Our results not only establish allelic heterogeneity within NCF2 associated with SLE, but also emphasize the utility of multi-ethnic cohorts to identify predisposing variants explaining additional phenotypic variance (‘missing heritability’) of complex diseases like SLE. PMID:24163247

  6. Allelic heterogeneity in NCF2 associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility across four ethnic populations.

    PubMed

    Kim-Howard, Xana; Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E; Maiti, Amit K; Chandru, Hema; Adler, Adam; Wiley, Graham B; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kottyan, Leah; Guthridge, Joel M; Rasmussen, Astrid; Kelly, Jennifer; Sánchez, Elena; Raj, Prithvi; Li, Quan-Zhen; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Han, Bok-Ghee; Olsen, Nancy J; Karp, David R; Moser, Kathy; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Wakeland, Edward K; James, Judith A; Harley, John B; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Gaffney, Patrick M; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Looger, Loren L; Nath, Swapan K

    2014-03-15

    Recent reports have associated NCF2, encoding a core component of the multi-protein NADPH oxidase (NADPHO), with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility in individuals of European ancestry. To identify ethnicity-specific and -robust variants within NCF2, we assessed 145 SNPs in and around the NCF2 gene in 5325 cases and 21 866 controls of European-American (EA), African-American (AA), Hispanic (HS) and Korean (KR) ancestry. Subsequent imputation, conditional, haplotype and bioinformatic analyses identified seven potentially functional SLE-predisposing variants. Association with non-synonymous rs17849502, previously reported in EA, was detected in EA, HS and AA (P(EA) = 1.01 × 10(-54), PHS = 3.68 × 10(-10), P(AA) = 0.03); synonymous rs17849501 was similarly significant. These SNPs were monomorphic in KR. Novel associations were detected with coding variants at rs35937854 in AA (PAA = 1.49 × 10(-9)), and rs13306575 in HS and KR (P(HS) = 7.04 × 10(-7), P(KR) = 3.30 × 10(-3)). In KR, a 3-SNP haplotype was significantly associated (P = 4.20 × 10(-7)), implying that SLE predisposing variants were tagged. Significant SNP-SNP interaction (P = 0.02) was detected between rs13306575 and rs17849502 in HS, and a dramatically increased risk (OR = 6.55) with a risk allele at each locus. Molecular modeling predicts that these non-synonymous mutations could disrupt NADPHO complex assembly. The risk allele of rs17849501, located in a conserved transcriptional regulatory region, increased reporter gene activity, suggesting in vivo enhancer function. Our results not only establish allelic heterogeneity within NCF2 associated with SLE, but also emphasize the utility of multi-ethnic cohorts to identify predisposing variants explaining additional phenotypic variance ('missing heritability') of complex diseases like SLE. PMID:24163247

  7. The CFTR Met 470 Allele Is Associated with Lower Birth Rates in Fertile Men from a Population Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Kosova, Gülüm; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Kelley, Joanna L.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Abney, Mark; Ober, Carole

    2010-01-01

    Although little is known about the role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene in reproductive physiology, numerous variants in this gene have been implicated in etiology of male infertility due to congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD). Here, we studied the fertility effects of three CBAVD–associated CFTR polymorphisms, the (TG)m and polyT repeat polymorphisms in intron 8 and Met470Val in exon 10, in healthy men of European descent. Homozygosity for the Met470 allele was associated with lower birth rates, defined as the number of births per year of marriage (P = 0.0029). The Met470Val locus explained 4.36% of the phenotypic variance in birth rate, and men homozygous for the Met470 allele had 0.56 fewer children on average compared to Val470 carrier men. The derived Val470 allele occurs at high frequencies in non-African populations (allele frequency  = 0.51 in HapMap CEU), whereas it is very rare in African population (Fst  = 0.43 between HapMap CEU and YRI). In addition, haplotypes bearing Val470 show a lack of genetic diversity and are thus longer than haplotypes bearing Met470 (measured by an integrated haplotype score [iHS] of −1.93 in HapMap CEU). The fraction of SNPs in the HapMap Phase2 data set with more extreme Fst and iHS measures is 0.003, consistent with a selective sweep outside of Africa. The fertility advantage conferred by Val470 relative to Met470 may provide a selective mechanism for these population genetic observations. PMID:20532200

  8. EcoTILLING-Based Association Mapping Efficiently Delineates Functionally Relevant Natural Allelic Variants of Candidate Genes Governing Agronomic Traits in Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Deepak; Srivastava, Rishi; Nath, Manoj; Tripathi, Shailesh; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2016-01-01

    The large-scale mining and high-throughput genotyping of novel gene-based allelic variants in natural mapping population are essential for association mapping to identify functionally relevant molecular tags governing useful agronomic traits in chickpea. The present study employs an alternative time-saving, non-laborious and economical pool-based EcoTILLING approach coupled with agarose gel detection assay to discover 1133 novel SNP allelic variants from diverse coding and regulatory sequence components of 1133 transcription factor (TF) genes by genotyping in 192 diverse desi and kabuli chickpea accessions constituting a seed weight association panel. Integrating these SNP genotyping data with seed weight field phenotypic information of 192 structured association panel identified eight SNP alleles in the eight TF genes regulating seed weight of chickpea. The associated individual and combination of all SNPs explained 10–15 and 31% phenotypic variation for seed weight, respectively. The EcoTILLING-based large-scale allele mining and genotyping strategy implemented for association mapping is found much effective for a diploid genome crop species like chickpea with narrow genetic base and low genetic polymorphism. This optimized approach thus can be deployed for various genomics-assisted breeding applications with optimal expense of resources in domesticated chickpea. The seed weight-associated natural allelic variants and candidate TF genes delineated have potential to accelerate marker-assisted genetic improvement of chickpea. PMID:27148286

  9. EcoTILLING-Based Association Mapping Efficiently Delineates Functionally Relevant Natural Allelic Variants of Candidate Genes Governing Agronomic Traits in Chickpea.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Deepak; Srivastava, Rishi; Nath, Manoj; Tripathi, Shailesh; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-01-01

    The large-scale mining and high-throughput genotyping of novel gene-based allelic variants in natural mapping population are essential for association mapping to identify functionally relevant molecular tags governing useful agronomic traits in chickpea. The present study employs an alternative time-saving, non-laborious and economical pool-based EcoTILLING approach coupled with agarose gel detection assay to discover 1133 novel SNP allelic variants from diverse coding and regulatory sequence components of 1133 transcription factor (TF) genes by genotyping in 192 diverse desi and kabuli chickpea accessions constituting a seed weight association panel. Integrating these SNP genotyping data with seed weight field phenotypic information of 192 structured association panel identified eight SNP alleles in the eight TF genes regulating seed weight of chickpea. The associated individual and combination of all SNPs explained 10-15 and 31% phenotypic variation for seed weight, respectively. The EcoTILLING-based large-scale allele mining and genotyping strategy implemented for association mapping is found much effective for a diploid genome crop species like chickpea with narrow genetic base and low genetic polymorphism. This optimized approach thus can be deployed for various genomics-assisted breeding applications with optimal expense of resources in domesticated chickpea. The seed weight-associated natural allelic variants and candidate TF genes delineated have potential to accelerate marker-assisted genetic improvement of chickpea. PMID:27148286

  10. Association of smoking behavior with an odorant receptor allele telomeric to the human major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Santos, Pablo Sandro Carvalho; Füst, George; Prohászka, Zoltán; Volz, Armin; Horton, Roger; Miretti, Marcos; Yu, Chack-Yung; Beck, Stephan; Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    Smoking behavior has been associated in two independent European cohorts with the most common Caucasian human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype (A1-B8-DR3). We aimed to test whether polymorphic members of the two odorant receptor (OR) clusters within the extended HLA complex might be responsible for the observed association, by genotyping a cohort of Hungarian women in which the mentioned association had been found. One hundred and eighty HLA haplotypes from Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain families were analyzed in silico to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within OR genes that are in linkage disequilibrium with the A1-B8-DR3 haplotype, as well as with two other haplotypes indirectly linked to smoking behavior. A nonsynonymous SNP within the OR12D3 gene (rs3749971(T)) was found to be linked to the A1-B8-DR3 haplotype. This polymorphism leads to a (97)Thr --> Ile exchange that affects a putative ligand binding region of the OR12D3 protein. Smoking was found to be associated in the Hungarian cohort with the rs3749971(T) allele (p = 1.05 x 10(-2)), with higher significance than with A1-B8-DR3 (p = 2.38 x 10(-2)). Our results link smoking to a distinct OR allele, and demonstrate that the rs3749971(T) polymorphism is associated with the HLA haplotype-dependent differential recognition of cigarette smoke components, at least among Caucasian women. PMID:18939942

  11. Effect of HLA Class I and Class II Alleles on Progression From Autoantibody Positivity to Overt Type 1 Diabetes in Children With Risk-Associated Class II Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lipponen, Kati; Gombos, Zsofia; Kiviniemi, Minna; Siljander, Heli; Lempainen, Johanna; Hermann, Robert; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Knip, Mikael; Ilonen, Jorma

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Class II alleles define the main HLA effect on type 1 diabetes, but there is an independent effect of certain class I alleles. Class II and class I molecules are differently involved in the initiation and effector phases of the immune response, suggesting that class I alleles would be important determinants in the rate of β-cell destruction. To test this hypothesis we analyzed the role of HLA class I and class II gene polymorphisms in the progression from diabetes-associated autoimmunity to clinical disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The effect of HLA-DR-DQ haplotypes and a panel of class I HLA-A and -B alleles on the progression from autoantibody seroconversion to clinical diabetes was studied in 249 children persistently positive for at least one biochemical diabetes-associated autoantibody in addition to islet cell autoantibody. RESULTS The progression to clinical disease was separately analyzed after the appearance of the first and the second persistent biochemical autoantibody using Cox regression. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant protective effect of the A*03 allele (odds ratio [OR] 0.61, P = 0.042 after the first and OR 0.55, P = 0.027 after the second autoantibody), whereas the B*39 allele had a promoting effect after seroconversion for the second autoantibody (OR 2.4, P = 0.014). When children with the DR3/DR4 genotype were separately analyzed, HLA-B*39 had a strong effect (OR 6.6, P = 0.004 and OR 7.5, P = 0.007, after the appearance of the first and the second autoantibody, respectively). The protective effect of A*03 was seen only among children without the DR3/DR4 combination. CONCLUSIONS These results confirm that class I alleles affect the progression of diabetes-associated autoimmunity and demonstrate interactions between class I and class II alleles. PMID:20739684

  12. Cellular Adhesion Gene SELP Is Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Displays Differential Allelic Expression

    PubMed Central

    Petit-Teixeira, Elisabeth; Hugo Teixeira, Vitor; Steiner, Anke; Quente, Elfi; Wolfram, Grit; Scholz, Markus; Pierlot, Céline; Migliorini, Paola; Bombardieri, Stefano; Balsa, Alejandro; Westhovens, René; Barrera, Pilar; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Alves, Helena; Bardin, Thomas; Prum, Bernard; Emmrich, Frank; Cornelis, François

    2014-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a key event is infiltration of inflammatory immune cells into the synovial lining, possibly aggravated by dysregulation of cellular adhesion molecules. Therefore, single nucleotide polymorphisms of 14 genes involved in cellular adhesion processes (CAST, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB2, PECAM1, PTEN, PTPN11, PTPRC, PXN, SELE, SELP, SRC, TYK2, and VCAM1) were analyzed for association with RA. Association analysis was performed consecutively in three European RA family sample groups (Nfamilies = 407). Additionally, we investigated differential allelic expression, a possible functional consequence of genetic variants. SELP (selectin P, CD62P) SNP-allele rs6136-T was associated with risk for RA in two RA family sample groups as well as in global analysis of all three groups (ptotal = 0.003). This allele was also expressed preferentially (p<10−6) with a two- fold average increase in regulated samples. Differential expression is supported by data from Genevar MuTHER (p1 = 0.004; p2 = 0.0177). Evidence for influence of rs6136 on transcription factor binding was also found in silico and in public datasets reporting in vitro data. In summary, we found SELP rs6136-T to be associated with RA and with increased expression of SELP mRNA. SELP is located on the surface of endothelial cells and crucial for recruitment, adhesion, and migration of inflammatory cells into the joint. Genetically determined increased SELP expression levels might thus be a novel additional risk factor for RA. PMID:25147926

  13. The human leucocyte antigen DQB1*0602 allele is associated with electroencephelograph differences in individuals with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Manzotte, Thais; Guindalini, Camila; Mazzotti, Diego R; Palombini, Luciana; de Souza, Altay L; Poyares, Dalva; Bittencourt, Lia R A; Tufik, Sergio

    2013-04-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) DQB1*0602 allele, a well-known genetic risk factor for narcolepsy, has been associated with sleep parameters in healthy subjects. We aimed to assess the association of this allele with daytime sleepiness and altered sleep electroencephalogram characteristics in the general population and in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). Eight hundred and ninety-four individuals from the Epidemiologic Study of Sleep were genotyped for the HLA DQB1*0602 allele. Full-night polysomnography was performed, and daytime sleepiness was analysed according to the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. HLA-DQB1*0602 allele-positive and -negative subjects in the general population, as well as in patients with OSAS, exhibited similar sleep parameters and levels of daytime sleepiness. However, spectral analysis showed that allele-positive individuals with OSAS exhibited higher theta power during sleep Stage 1 (P < 0.05) in occipital derivations, and lower delta power during sleep Stages 1 and 2 (P < 0.01) compared with individuals negative for the allele, even after correction for potential confounders as age, sex, body mass index and European ancestry. No significant differences in the electroencephalogram variables were found in individuals without OSAS. The data highlight the HLA-DQB1*0602 as a potential genetic factor influencing sleep physiology in individuals diagnosed with OSAS. PMID:23136848

  14. High Resolution Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Allele Frequencies and HIV-1 Infection Associations in Chinese Han and Uyghur Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanhou; Zhao, Zhongfang; Li, Tianyi; Liao, Qi; Kushner, Nicholas; Touzjian, Neal Y.; Shao, Yiming; Sun, Yongtao; Strong, Amie J.; Lu, Yichen

    2012-01-01

    Background Host immunogenetic factors such as HLA class I polymorphism are important to HIV-1 infection risk and AIDS progression. Previous studies using high-resolution HLA class I profile data of Chinese populations appeared insufficient to provide information for HIV-1 vaccine development and clinical trial design. Here we reported HLA class I association with HIV-1 susceptibility in a Chinese Han and a Chinese Uyghur cohort. Methodology/Principal Findings Our cohort included 327 Han and 161 Uyghur ethnic individuals. Each cohort included HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative subjects. Four-digit HLA class I typing was performed by sequencing-based typing and high-resolution PCR-sequence specific primer. We compared the HLA class I allele and inferred haplotype frequencies between HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative groups. A neighbor-joining tree between our cohorts and other populations was constructed based on allele frequencies of HLA-A and HLA-B loci. We identified 58 HLA-A, 75 HLA-B, and 32 HLA-Cw distinct alleles from our cohort and no novel alleles. The frequency of HLA-B*5201 and A*0301 was significantly higher in the Han HIV-1 negative group. The frequency of HLA-B*5101 was significantly higher in the Uyghur HIV-1 negative group. We observed statistically significant increases in expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm predicted haplotype frequencies of HLA-A*0201-B*5101 in the Uyghur HIV-1 negative group, and of Cw*0304-B*4001 in the Han HIV-1 negative group. The B62s supertype frequency was found to be significantly higher in the Han HIV-1 negative group than in the Han HIV-1 positive group. Conclusions At the four-digit level, several HLA class I alleles and haplotypes were associated with lower HIV-1 susceptibility. Homogeneity of HLA class I and Bw4/Bw6 heterozygosity were not associated with HIV-1 susceptibility in our cohort. These observations contribute to the Chinese HLA database and could prove useful in the development of HIV-1 vaccine

  15. Associations of high-grade glioma with glioma risk alleles and histories of allergy and smoking.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Daniel H; Yang, Ping; Johnson, Derek R; Decker, Paul A; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; McCoy, Lucie S; Rice, Terri; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Ali-Osman, Francis; Wang, Frances; Stoddard, Shawn M; Sprau, Debra J; Kosel, Matthew L; Wiencke, John K; Wiemels, Joseph L; Patoka, Joseph S; Davis, Faith; McCarthy, Bridget; Rynearson, Amanda L; Worra, Joel B; Fridley, Brooke L; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Buckner, Jan C; Il'yasova, Dora; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2011-09-01

    Glioma risk has consistently been inversely associated with allergy history but not with smoking history despite putative biologic plausibility. Data from 855 high-grade glioma cases and 1,160 controls from 4 geographic regions of the United States during 1997-2008 were analyzed for interactions between allergy and smoking histories and inherited variants in 5 established glioma risk regions: 5p15.3 (TERT), 8q24.21 (CCDC26/MLZE), 9p21.3 (CDKN2B), 11q23.3 (PHLDB1/DDX6), and 20q13.3 (RTEL1). The inverse relation between allergy and glioma was stronger among those who did not (odds ratio(allergy-glioma) = 0.40, 95% confidence interval: 0.28, 0.58) versus those who did (odds ratio(allergy-glioma) = 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.97; P(interaction) = 0.02) carry the 9p21.3 risk allele. However, the inverse association with allergy was stronger among those who carried (odds ratio(allergy-glioma) = 0.44, 95% confidence interval: 0.29, 0.68) versus those who did not carry (odds ratio(allergy-glioma) = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.54, 0.86) the 20q13.3 glioma risk allele, but this interaction was not statistically significant (P = 0.14). No relation was observed between glioma risk and smoking (odds ratio = 0.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.77, 1.10; P = 0.37), and there were no interactions for glioma risk of smoking history with any of the risk alleles. The authors' observations are consistent with a recent report that the inherited glioma risk variants in chromosome regions 9p21.3 and 20q13.3 may modify the inverse association of allergy and glioma. PMID:21742680

  16. Associations of High-Grade Glioma With Glioma Risk Alleles and Histories of Allergy and Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Daniel H.; Yang, Ping; Johnson, Derek R.; Decker, Paul A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Rice, Terri; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Ali-Osman, Francis; Wang, Frances; Stoddard, Shawn M.; Sprau, Debra J.; Kosel, Matthew L.; Wiencke, John K.; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Patoka, Joseph S.; Davis, Faith; McCarthy, Bridget; Rynearson, Amanda L.; Worra, Joel B.; Fridley, Brooke L.; O’Neill, Brian Patrick; Buckner, Jan C.; Il’yasova, Dora; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2011-01-01

    Glioma risk has consistently been inversely associated with allergy history but not with smoking history despite putative biologic plausibility. Data from 855 high-grade glioma cases and 1,160 controls from 4 geographic regions of the United States during 1997–2008 were analyzed for interactions between allergy and smoking histories and inherited variants in 5 established glioma risk regions: 5p15.3 (TERT), 8q24.21 (CCDC26/MLZE), 9p21.3 (CDKN2B), 11q23.3 (PHLDB1/DDX6), and 20q13.3 (RTEL1). The inverse relation between allergy and glioma was stronger among those who did not (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.40, 95% confidence interval: 0.28, 0.58) versus those who did (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.97; Pinteraction = 0.02) carry the 9p21.3 risk allele. However, the inverse association with allergy was stronger among those who carried (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.44, 95% confidence interval: 0.29, 0.68) versus those who did not carry (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.54, 0.86) the 20q13.3 glioma risk allele, but this interaction was not statistically significant (P = 0.14). No relation was observed between glioma risk and smoking (odds ratio = 0.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.77, 1.10; P = 0.37), and there were no interactions for glioma risk of smoking history with any of the risk alleles. The authors’ observations are consistent with a recent report that the inherited glioma risk variants in chromosome regions 9p21.3 and 20q13.3 may modify the inverse association of allergy and glioma. PMID:21742680

  17. Several different lactase persistence associated alleles and high diversity of the lactase gene in the admixed Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Santos, Sidney E B; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea K C; Hutz, Mara H

    2012-01-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a common phenotype caused by the lactase enzyme deficiency. The -13910 C>T polymorphism, located 14 Kb upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) in the MCM6 gene was associated with lactase persistence (LP) in Europeans. This polymorphism is rare in Africa but several other variants associated with lactase persistence were observed in Africans. The aims of this study were to identify polymorphisms in the MCM6 region associated with the lactase persistence phenotype and to determine the distribution of LCT gene haplotypes in 981 individuals from North, Northeast and South Brazil. These polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR based methods and sequencing. The -13779*C,-13910*T, -13937*A, -14010*C, -14011*T LP alleles previously described in the MCM6 gene region that acts as an enhancer for the LCT gene were identified in Brazilians. The most common LP allele was -13910*T. Its frequency was highly correlated with European ancestry in the Brazilian populations investigated. The -13910*T was higher (0.295) in southern Brazilians of European ancestry and lower (0.175) in the Northern admixed population. LCT haplotypes were derived from the 10 LCT SNPs genotyped. Overall twenty six haplotypes previously described were identified in the four Brazilian populations studied. The Multidimensional Scaling analysis showed that Belém, in the north, was closer to Amerindians. Northeastern and southern Afro-descendants were more related with Bantu-speaking South Africans whereas the Southern population with European ancestry grouped with Southern and Northern Europeans. This study shows a high variability considering the number of LCT haplotypes observed. Due to the highly admixed nature of the Brazilian populations, the diagnosis of hypolactasia in Brazil, based only in the investigation of the -13910*T allele is an oversimplification. PMID:23029545

  18. Complex allele [-102T>A+S549R(T>G)] is associated with milder forms of cystic fibrosis than allele S549R(T>G) alone.

    PubMed

    Romey, M C; Guittard, C; Chazalette, J P; Frossard, P; Dawson, K P; Patton, M A; Casals, T; Bazarbachi, T; Girodon, E; Rault, G; Bozon, D; Seguret, F; Demaille, J; Claustres, M

    1999-01-01

    We recently reported a novel complex allele in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene, combining a sequence change in the minimal CFTR promoter (-102T>A) and a missense mutation in exon 11 [S549R(T>G)]. Here we compare the main clinical features of six patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) carrying the complex allele [-102T>A+S549R(T>G)] with those of 16 CF patients homozygous for mutation S549R(T>G) alone. Age at diagnosis was higher, and current age was significantly higher (P=0.0032) in the group with the complex allele, compared with the S549R/S549R group. Although the proportion of patients with lung colonization was similar in both groups, the age at onset was significantly higher in the group with the complex allele (P=0.0022). Patients with the complex allele also had significantly lower sweat test chloride values (P=0.0028) and better overall clinical scores (P=0.004). None of the 22 patients reported in this study had meconium ileus. All 16 patients homozygous for S549R(T>G), however, were pancreatic insufficient, as compared with 50% of patients carrying the complex allele (P=0.013). Moreover, the unique patient homozygous for [-102T>A+S549R(T>G)] presented with a mild disease at 34 years of age. These observations strongly suggest that the sequence change (-102T>A) in the CFTR minimal promoter could attenuate the severe clinical phenotype associated with mutation S549R(T>G). PMID:10480369

  19. Peptide binding motifs associated with MHC molecules common in Chinese rhesus macaques are analogous to those of human HLA supertypes, and include HLA-B27-like alleles

    PubMed Central

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Southwood, Scott; Sidney, John; English, A. Michelle; Wriston, Amanda; Hoof, Ilka; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Chinese rhesus macaques are of particular interest in SIV/HIV research as these animals have prolonged kinetics of disease progression to AIDS, compared to their Indian counterparts, suggesting that they may be a better model for HIV. Nevertheless, the specific mechanism(s) accounting for these kinetics remains unclear. The study of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecules, including their MHC:peptide binding motifs, provides valuable information for measuring cellular immune responses and deciphering outcomes of infection and vaccine efficacy. In this study, we have provided detailed characterization of six prevalent Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I alleles, yielding a combined phenotypic frequency of 29%. The peptide binding specificity of two of these alleles, Mamu-A2*01:02 and -B*010:01, as well as the previously characterized allele Mamu-B*003:01 (and Indian rhesus Mamu-B*003:01), was found to be analogous to that of alleles in the HLA-B27 supertype family. Specific alleles in the HLA-B27 supertype family, including HLA-B*27:05, have been associated with long-term non-progression to AIDS in humans. All six alleles characterized in the present study were found to have specificities analogous to HLA-supertype alleles. These data contribute to the concept that Chinese rhesus macaque MHC immunogenetics is more similar to HLA than their Indian rhesus macaque counterparts, and thereby warrant further studies to decipher the role of these alleles in the context of SIV infection. PMID:23417323

  20. Associations of the lactase persistence allele and lactose intake with body composition among multiethnic children.

    PubMed

    Malek, Adil J; Klimentidis, Yann C; Kell, Kenneth P; Fernández, José R

    2013-09-01

    Childhood obesity is a worldwide health concern with a multifaceted and sometimes confounding etiology. Dairy products have been implicated as both pro- and anti-obesogenic, perhaps due to the confounding relationship between dairy, lactose consumption, and potential genetic predisposition. We aimed to understand how lactase persistence influenced obesity-related traits by observing the relationships among lactose consumption, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) near the lactase (LCT) gene and body composition parameters in a sample of multiethnic children (n = 296, 7-12 years old). We hypothesized that individuals with the lactase persistence (LP) allele of the LCT SNP (rs4988235) would exhibit a greater degree of adiposity and that this relationship would be mediated by lactose consumption. Body composition variables were measured using dual X-ray absorptiometry and a registered dietitian assessed dietary intake of lactose. Statistical models were adjusted for sex, age, pubertal stage, ethnic group, genetic admixture, socio-economic status, and total energy intake. Our findings indicate a positive, significant association between the LP allele and body mass index (p = 0.034), fat mass index (FMI) (p = 0.043), and waist circumference (p = 0.008), with associations being stronger in males than in females. Our results also reveal that lactose consumption is positively and nearly significantly associated with FMI. PMID:23479116

  1. A Complex Deoxyribonucleic Acid Looping Configuration Associated with the Silencing of the Maternal Igf2 Allele

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xinwen; Vu, Thanh H.; Lu, Qiucheng; Ling, Jian Qun; Li, Tao; Hou, Aiju; Wang, Shu Kui; Chen, Hui Ling; Hu, Ji Fan; Hoffman, Andrew R.

    2008-01-01

    Alternate interactions between the H19 imprinting control region (ICR) and one of the two Igf2 differentially methylated regions has been proposed as a model regulating the reciprocal imprinting of Igf2 and H19. To study the conformation of this imprint switch, we performed a systematic structural analysis across the 140 kb of the mouse Igf2-H19 region, which includes enhancers located both between the two genes as well as downstream of H19, by using a scanning chromosome conformation capture (3C) technique. Our results suggest that on the active paternal Igf2 allele, the various enhancers have direct access to the Igf2 promoters, whereas the imprinted silent maternal Igf2 allele assumes a complex three-dimensional knotted loop that keeps the enhancers away from the Igf2 promoters and allows them to interact with the H19 promoter. This complex DNA looping of the maternal allele is formed by interactions involving differentially methylated region 1, the ICR, and enhancers. Binding of CTC-binding factor to the maternal, unmethylated ICR in conjunction with the presence of multicomplex components including interchromosomal interactions, create a barrier blocking the access of all enhancers to Igf2, thereby silencing the maternal Igf2. This silencing configuration exists in newborn liver, mouse embryonic fibroblast, and embryonic stem cells and persists during mitosis, conferring a mechanism for epigenetic memory. PMID:18356289

  2. A Computer Simulation Study of Vntr Population Genetics: Constrained Recombination Rules Out the Infinite Alleles Model

    PubMed Central

    Harding, R. M.; Boyce, A. J.; Martinson, J. J.; Flint, J.; Clegg, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Extensive allelic diversity in variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTRs) has been discovered in the human genome. For population genetic studies of VNTRs, such as forensic applications, it is important to know whether a neutral mutation-drift balance of VNTR polymorphism can be represented by the infinite alleles model. The assumption of the infinite alleles model that each new mutant is unique is very likely to be violated by unequal sister chromatid exchange (USCE), the primary process believed to generate VNTR mutants. We show that increasing both mutation rates and misalignment constraint for intrachromosomal recombination in a computer simulation model reduces simulated VNTR diversity below the expectations of the infinite alleles model. Maximal constraint, represented as slippage of single repeats, reduces simulated VNTR diversity to levels expected from the stepwise mutation model. Although misalignment rule is the more important variable, mutation rate also has an effect. At moderate rates of USCE, simulated VNTR diversity fluctuates around infinite alleles expectation. However, if rates of USCE are high, as for hypervariable VNTRs, simulated VNTR diversity is consistently lower than predicted by the infinite alleles model. This has been observed for many VNTRs and accounted for by technical problems in distinguishing alleles of neighboring size classes. We use sampling theory to confirm the intrinsically poor fit to the infinite alleles model of both simulated VNTR diversity and observed VNTR polymorphisms sampled from two Papua New Guinean populations. PMID:8293988

  3. Strong allelic association between Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome and D17S805

    SciTech Connect

    Pigg, M.; Jagell, S.; Sillen, A.

    1994-09-01

    Sjoegren-Larsson Syndrom (SLS) is characterized by congenital ichthyosis, spastic di- or tetraplegia and mental retardation. It is an autosomal recessive trait that has been described in many populations, but is particularly frequent in the northern part of Sweden. A defect in the enzyme fatty alcohol: NAD+ oxidoreductase (FAD) has been suggested, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Based on linkage analysis and allelic association, the disorder has now been mapped to chromosome 17. Meiotic recombinations suggests that the gene is flanked by D17S805 on the centromeric and D17S783 and D17S925 on the telomeric side. These three markers map to the same location in reference pedigrees. Strong allelic association (chi-square 60.28, p<0.0003) to D17S805 suggests that the mutation is located at a limited distance on the telomeric side of this marker. It is possible that the gene can be identified by functional complementation of SLS cells using YACs from this region. Alternatively, positional cloning should be possible in this presumable small area. The markers identified are close and informative enough to allow accurate genetic diagnosis.

  4. Radiosensitivity of Human Fibroblasts is Associated With Amino Acid Substitution Variants in Susceptible Genes And Correlates With The Number of Risk Alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Alsbeih, Ghazi . E-mail: galsbeih@kfshrc.edu.sa; El-Sebaie, Medhat; Al-Harbi, Najla; Al-Buhairi, Muneera; Al-Hadyan, Khaled; Al-Rajhi, Nasser

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: Genetic predictive markers of radiosensitivity are being sought for stratifying radiotherapy for cancer patients and risk assessment of radiation exposure. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in susceptible genes are associated with, and the number of risk alleles has incremental effect on, individual radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: Six amino acid substitution variants (ATM 1853 Asp/Asn G>A, p53 72 Arg/Pro G>C, p21 31 Ser/Arg C>A, XRCC1 399 Arg/Gln G>A, XRCC3 241 Thr/Met C>T, and TGF{beta}1 10 Leu/Pro T>C) were genotyped by direct sequencing in 54 fibroblast strains of different radiosensitivity. Results: The clonogenic survival fraction at 2 Gy range was 0.15-0.50 (mean, 0.34, standard deviation, 0.08). The mean survival fraction at 2 Gy divided the cell strains into radiosensitive (26 cases) and normal (28 controls). A significant association was observed between the survival fraction at 2 Gy and ATM 1853 Asn, XRCC3 241 Met, and TGF{beta}1 10 Leu alleles (p = 0.05, p = 0.02, and p = 0.02, respectively). The p53 72 Arg allele showed a borderline association (p = 0.07). The number of risk alleles increased with increasing radiosensitivity, and the group comparison showed a statistically significant difference between the radiosensitive and control groups (p {<=}0.001). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms in susceptible genes influence cellular radiation response and that the number of risk alleles has a combined effect on radiosensitivity. Individuals with multiple risk alleles could be more susceptible to radiation effects than those with fewer risk alleles. These results may have implications in predicting normal tissue reactions to radiotherapy and risk assessment of radiation exposure.

  5. Molecular analysis of HLA-DQ A alleles in coeliac disease lack of a unique disease-associated sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Mantovani, V; Corazza, G R; Angelini, G; Delfino, L; Frisoni, M; Mirri, P; Valentini, R A; Barboni, P; Gasbarrini, G; Ferrara, G B

    1991-01-01

    Susceptibility to coeliac disease is strongly associated with some HLA class II antigens, encoded by the HLA-D region. Since the HLA-DQ locus seems to be primarily involved, we have analysed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization the most polymorphic region of the HLA-DQ A1 gene. No difference was observed between the 20 coeliac patients and 20 HLA-D-matched healthy controls who took part in the study. Furthermore, in patients and controls, the restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the HLA-DQ A gene using the restriction enzyme BglII did not disclose any specific disease-associated fragment. Our results are not consistent with a unique DQ A coeliac disease-associated sequence, but rather with the hypothesis that some polymorphic residues or allelic hypervariable regions, although found also in the normal population, can predispose to coeliac disease due to their higher frequency in this condition. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:1671007

  6. African Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Alleles Associated with Protection from Severe Malaria in Heterozygous Females in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Manjurano, Alphaxard; Sepulveda, Nuno; Nadjm, Behzad; Mtove, George; Wangai, Hannah; Maxwell, Caroline; Olomi, Raimos; Reyburn, Hugh; Riley, Eleanor M.; Drakeley, Christopher J.; Clark, Taane G.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) A- deficiency is prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa populations, and has been associated with protection from severe malaria. Whether females and/or males are protected by G6PD deficiency is uncertain, due in part to G6PD and malaria phenotypic complexity and misclassification. Almost all large association studies have genotyped a limited number of G6PD SNPs (e.g. G6PD202 / G6PD376), and this approach has been too blunt to capture the complete epidemiological picture. Here we have identified 68 G6PD polymorphisms and analysed 29 of these (i.e. those with a minor allele frequency greater than 1%) in 983 severe malaria cases and controls in Tanzania. We establish, across a number of SNPs including G6PD376, that only female heterozygotes are protected from severe malaria. Haplotype analysis reveals the G6PD locus to be under balancing selection, suggesting a mechanism of protection relying on alleles at modest frequency and avoiding fixation, where protection provided by G6PD deficiency against severe malaria is offset by increased risk of life-threatening complications. Our study also demonstrates that the much-needed large-scale studies of severe malaria and G6PD enzymatic function across African populations require the identification and analysis of the full repertoire of G6PD genetic markers. PMID:25671784

  7. Association between alleles of the transforming growth factor alpha locus and cleft lip and palate in the Chilean population

    SciTech Connect

    Jara, L.; Blanco, R.; Chiffelle, I.

    1995-07-17

    Two RFLPs at the TGFA locus were studied in 39 unrelated Chilean (Caucasoid-Mongoloid) patients with non-syndromic cleft lip/palate [CL(P)] and 51 control individuals. A highly significant association between BamHI A2 allele and CL(P) was detected ({chi}{sub 2} = 6.00; P = 0.014), while no association was found between TaqI RFLPs and clefting. No significant differences were found when comparing genotypes by type of cleft and a positive or negative family history of clefting. Our results seem to support rather definitively the association between TGFA and clefting but not support the hypothesis that TGFA is a major causal gene of CL(P). 29 refs., 5 tabs.

  8. Association of the apolipoprotein E {epsilon}4 allele with clinical subtypes of autopsy-confirmed Alzheimer`s Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zubenko, G.S.; Stiffler, S.; Kopp, U.

    1994-09-15

    Consistent with previous reports, we observed a significant association of the APOE {epsilon}4 allele with Alzheimer`s Disease (AD) in a series of 91 autopsy-confirmed cases. The {epsilon}4 allele frequency was higher in cases with a family history of AD-like dementia (0.54 {+-} 0.07), although the {epsilon}4 allele frequency in the AD cases with a negative family history (0.38 {+-} 0.05) remained significantly greater than that for the non-AD control group (0.13 {+-} 0.03). A similar increase in {epsilon}4 allele frequency (0.54 {+-} 0.07) was observed in the AD cases with amyloid angiopathy, compared to those who did not have amyloid angiopathy (0.35 {+-} 0.04). Contrary to previous reports, no effect of the dosage of the {epsilon}4 allele was found on the age of onset of dementia among the AD cases and, contrary to reports suggesting an association of {epsilon}4 and atherosclerosis, the {epsilon}4 allele frequency was similar in cases with or without concurrent brain infarcts. Modest but consistent correlations were observed between the dosage of {epsilon}4 alleles and the cortical density of senile plaques, but not neurofibrillary tangles. The last finding suggests that the pathogenic events mediated by the {epsilon}4 allele may be more directly involved in the formation of senile plaques, the identifying lesions in AD, than neurofibrillary tangles. A robust association of both the presence of an {epsilon}4 allele and a family history of AD-like dementia with concurrent amyloid angiopathy occurred within our sample of AD cases. This association arose from an interaction of the {epsilon}4 allele with a separate familial factor for which a family history of dementia served as a surrogate. These results suggest that amyloid angiopathy may be a common or central feature of a form of familial AD that is associated with the transmission of the APOE {epsilon}4 allele. 22 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. [The association of the severe clinical course of respiratory papillomatosis with certain HLA-DQ alleles].

    PubMed

    Kolesnikova, O M

    2016-01-01

    We undertook the analysis of genetic polymorphism of the HLADQA1 and DQB1 genes in the patients presenting with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (n=21) with the use of the multiprimer polymerase chain reaction. The results of the study give evidence that the identification of DQ 2.5 and DQ 7.5 haplotypes encoded by the DQA1 *0501, DQB1 *0201, DQA1 *0505, and DQB1 *0301 alleles as well as the carriage of type 16 human papilloma virus (HPV) in combination with these haplotypes in the patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis can be used for the prognostication of the severity of this disease. PMID:27500575

  10. p53 mutations are associated with 17p allelic loss in grade II and grade III astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    von Deimling, A; Eibl, R H; Ohgaki, H; Louis, D N; von Ammon, K; Petersen, I; Kleihues, P; Chung, R Y; Wiestler, O D; Seizinger, B R

    1992-05-15

    Loss of genetic material on the short arm of chromosome 17 is observed in approximately 40% of human astrocytomas (WHO grades II and III) and in approximately 30% of cases of glioblastoma multiforme (WHO grade IV). Previous studies of glioblastoma multiforme have shown that the p53 gene, located on the short arm of chromosome 17, is frequently mutated in these glioblastomas. To explore whether lower-grade astrocytomas are also associated with corresponding mutations of the p53 gene, we have investigated a series of 22 human astrocytomas of WHO grades II and III both for loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 17p and for p53 mutations. Mutations in the conserved regions of the p53 gene were identified by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of exons 5, 6, 7, and 8 and were verified by direct DNA sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction products. p53 mutations were observed in 3 of 8 grade II astrocytomas and 4 of 14 grade II astrocytomas. In all 22 tumors, allelic loss of the short arm of chromosome 17 was investigated by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. One-half of the grade II astrocytomas (4 of 8) and grade III astrocytomas (7 of 14) exhibited allelic loss on chromosome 17p. Mutations in the p53 gene were exclusively observed in tumors with allelic loss on 17p. Our results show that p53 mutations are not restricted to glioblastoma multiforme and may be important in the tumorigenesis of lower-grade astrocytomas and that p53 mutations in lower-grade astrocytomas are associated with loss of chromosome 17p. These findings are consistent with a recessive mechanism of action of p53 in WHO grade II and III astrocytoma tumorigenesis. PMID:1349850

  11. DLA Class II Alleles Are Associated with Risk for Canine Symmetrical Lupoid Onychodystropy (SLO)

    PubMed Central

    Wilbe, Maria; Ziener, Martine Lund; Aronsson, Anita; Harlos, Charlotte; Sundberg, Katarina; Norberg, Elin; Andersson, Lisa; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Hedhammar, Åke; Andersson, Göran; Lingaas, Frode

    2010-01-01

    Symmetrical lupoid onychodystrophy (SLO) is an immune-mediated disease in dogs affecting the claws with a suggested autoimmune aethiology. Sequence-based genotyping of the polymorphic exon 2 from DLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 class II loci were performed in a total of 98 SLO Gordon setter cases and 98 healthy controls. A risk haplotype (DRB1*01801/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00802) was present in 53% of cases and 34% of controls and conferred an elevated risk of developing SLO with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.1. When dogs homozygous for the risk haplotype were compared to all dogs not carrying the haplotype the OR was 5.4. However, a stronger protective haplotype (DRB1*02001/DQA1*00401/DQB1*01303, OR = 0.03, 1/OR = 33) was present in 16.8% of controls, but only in a single case (0.5%). The effect of the protective haplotype was clearly stronger than the risk haplotype, since 11.2% of the controls were heterozygous for the risk and protective haplotypes, whereas this combination was absent from cases. When the dogs with the protective haplotype were excluded, an OR of 2.5 was obtained when dogs homozygous for the risk haplotype were compared to those heterozygous for the risk haplotype, suggesting a co-dominant effect of the risk haplotype. In smaller sample sizes of the bearded collie and giant schnauzer breeds we found the same or similar haplotypes, sharing the same DQA1 allele, over-represented among the cases suggesting that the risk is associated primarily with DLA-DQ. We obtained conclusive results that DLA class II is significantly associated with risk of developing SLO in Gordon setters, thus supporting that SLO is an immune-mediated disease. Further studies of SLO in dogs may provide important insight into immune privilege of the nail apparatus and also knowledge about a number of inflammatory disorders of the nail apparatus like lichen planus, psoriasis, alopecia areata and onycholysis. PMID:20808798

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Allele PTPRC Is Also Associated With Response to Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor α Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jing; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Thomson, Brian; Padyukov, Leonid; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; Nititham, Joanne; Hughes, Laura B.; de Vries, Niek; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Alfredsson, Lars; Askling, Johan; Wedrén, Sara; Ding, Bo; Guiducci, Candace; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Crusius, J. Bart A.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; Herenius, Marieke; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Worthington, Jane; Batliwalla, Franak; Kern, Marlena; Morgan, Ann W.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Isaacs, John D.; Hyrich, Kimme; Seldin, Michael F.; Moreland, Larry W.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Tak, Paul P.; Bridges, S. Louis; Toes, Rene E. M.; Barton, Anne; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anti–tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNF) therapy is a mainstay of treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to test established RA genetic risk factors to determine whether the same alleles also influence the response to anti-TNF therapy. Methods A total of 1,283 RA patients receiving etanercept, infliximab, or adalimumab therapy were studied from among an international collaborative consortium of 9 different RA cohorts. The primary end point compared RA patients with a good treatment response according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria (n = 505) with RA patients considered to be nonresponders (n = 316). The secondary end point was the change from baseline in the level of disease activity according to the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (ΔDAS28). Clinical factors such as age, sex, and concomitant medications were tested as possible correlates of treatment response. Thirty-one single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of RA were genotyped and tested for any association with treatment response, using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Results Of the 31 RA-associated risk alleles, a SNP at the PTPRC (also known as CD45) gene locus (rs10919563) was associated with the primary end point, a EULAR good response versus no response (odds ratio [OR] 0.55, P = 0.0001 in the multivariate model). Similar results were obtained using the secondary end point, the ΔDAS28 (P = 0.0002). There was suggestive evidence of a stronger association in autoantibody-positive patients with RA (OR 0.55, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.39–0.76) as compared with autoantibody-negative patients (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.41–1.99). Conclusion Statistically significant associations were observed between the response to anti-TNF therapy and an RA risk allele at the PTPRC gene locus. Additional studies will be required to replicate this finding in additional patient collections

  13. Mechanisms and Disease Associations of Haplotype-Dependent Allele-Specific DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Do, Catherine; Lang, Charles F; Lin, John; Darbary, Huferesh; Krupska, Izabela; Gaba, Aulona; Petukhova, Lynn; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Gallagher, Mary P; Goland, Robin S; Clynes, Raphael A; Dwork, Andrew; Kral, John G; Monk, Catherine; Christiano, Angela M; Tycko, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    Haplotype-dependent allele-specific methylation (hap-ASM) can impact disease susceptibility, but maps of this phenomenon using stringent criteria in disease-relevant tissues remain sparse. Here we apply array-based and Methyl-Seq approaches to multiple human tissues and cell types, including brain, purified neurons and glia, T lymphocytes, and placenta, and identify 795 hap-ASM differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and 3,082 strong methylation quantitative trait loci (mQTLs), most not previously reported. More than half of these DMRs have cell type-restricted ASM, and among them are 188 hap-ASM DMRs and 933 mQTLs located near GWAS signals for immune and neurological disorders. Targeted bis-seq confirmed hap-ASM in 12/13 loci tested, including CCDC155, CD69, FRMD1, IRF1, KBTBD11, and S100A(∗)-ILF2, associated with immune phenotypes, MYT1L, PTPRN2, CMTM8 and CELF2, associated with neurological disorders, NGFR and HLA-DRB6, associated with both immunological and brain disorders, and ZFP57, a trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting. Polymorphic CTCF and transcription factor (TF) binding sites were over-represented among hap-ASM DMRs and mQTLs, and analysis of the human data, supplemented by cross-species comparisons to macaques, indicated that CTCF and TF binding likelihood predicts the strength and direction of the allelic methylation asymmetry. These results show that hap-ASM is highly tissue specific; an important trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting is regulated by this phenomenon; and variation in CTCF and TF binding sites is an underlying mechanism, and maps of hap-ASM and mQTLs reveal regulatory sequences underlying supra- and sub-threshold GWAS peaks in immunological and neurological disorders. PMID:27153397

  14. Case-control study of allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat loci in males with impulsive violent behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; Ba, Huajie; Gao, Zhiqin; Zhao, Hanqing; Yu, Haiying; Guo, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Analysis of genetic polymorphisms in short tandem repeats (STRs) is an accepted method for detecting associations between genotype and phenotype but it has not previously been used in the study of the genetics of impulsive violent behavior. Objective Compare the prevalence of different polymorphisms in 15 STR loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA) between men with a history of impulsive violence and male control subjects without a history of impulsive violence. Methods The distributions of the alleles of the 15 STR loci were compared between 407 cases with impulsive violent behavior and 415 controls using AmpFlSTR® Identifiler™ kits. Results Compared to controls, the average frequencies of the following alleles were significantly lower in individuals with a history of violent behavior: allele 10 of TH01 (OR=0.29, 95%CI=0.16-0.52, p<0.0001,), allele 8 of TPOX (OR=0.71, 95%CI=0.58-0.86, p=0.0005), allele 9 of TPOX (OR=0.65, 95%CI=0.47-0.89, p=0.0072) and allele 14 of CSF1PO (OR=0.27, 95%CI=0.11-0.68, p=0.0035). One allele was significantly higher in cases than controls: allele 11 of TPOX (OR=1.79, 95%CI=1.45-2.22, p<0.0001). Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first behavioral genetic study that clearly demonstrates a close relationship between specific genetic markers and impulsive aggression in non-psychiatric offenders. Further prospective work will be needed to determine whether or not the alleles identified can be considered risk factors for impulsive aggression and, if so, the underlying mechanisms that result in this relationship. PMID:24991178

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Reveals the Selective Binding of Human Leukocyte Antigen Alleles Associated with Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kongkaew, Sirilak; Yotmanee, Pathumwadee; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Kaiyawet, Nopporn; Meeprasert, Arthitaya; Kaburaki, Toshikatsu; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Fujio; Kungwan, Nawee; Hannongbua, Supot

    2015-01-01

    Behçet’s disease (BD), a multi-organ inflammatory disorder, is associated with the presence of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) HLA-B*51 allele in many ethnic groups. The possible antigen involvement of the major histocompatibility complex class I chain related gene A transmembrane (MICA-TM) nonapeptide (AAAAAIFVI) has been reported in BD symptomatic patients. This peptide has also been detected in HLA-A*26:01 positive patients. To investigate the link of BD with these two specific HLA alleles, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were applied on the MICA-TM nonapeptide binding to the two BD-associated HLA alleles in comparison with the two non-BD-associated HLA alleles (B*35:01 and A*11:01). The MD simulations were applied on the four HLA/MICA-TM peptide complexes in aqueous solution. As a result, stabilization for the incoming MICA-TM was found to be predominantly contributed from van der Waals interactions. The P2/P3 residue close to the N-terminal and the P9 residue at the C-terminal of the MICA-TM nonapeptide served as the anchor for the peptide accommodated at the binding groove of the BD associated HLAs. The MM/PBSA free energy calculation predicted a stronger binding of the HLA/peptide complexes for the BD-associated HLA alleles than for the non-BD-associated ones, with a ranked binding strength of B*51:01 > B*35:01 and A*26:01 > A*11:01. Thus, the HLAs associated with BD pathogenesis expose the binding efficiency with the MICA-TM nonapeptide tighter than the non-associated HLA alleles. In addition, the residues 70, 73, 99, 146, 147 and 159 of the two BD-associated HLAs provided the conserved interaction for the MICA-TM peptide binding. PMID:26331842

  16. Association between ACE polymorphism, cognitive phenotype and APOE E4 allele in a Tunisian population with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Achouri-Rassas, Afef; Ali, Nadia Ben; Cherif, Aroua; Fray, Saloua; Siala, Hajer; Zakraoui, Nouria Oudiaa; Hadj-Fredj, Sondes; Kechaou, Mariem; Anane, Nadia; Echebi, Slim; Messaoud, Taieb; Belal, Samir

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has shown altered activity in patients with neurological diseases. An insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene encoding angiotensin-converting enzyme has been reported to be associated with the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and is generally considered to be a disorder primarily affecting memory. We conducted a case-control study in a sample composed of 85 sporadic AD patients and 90 age- and sex-matched controls to investigate the possible effect of the polymorphism and cognitive profile. Our data revealed an association between the ACE polymorphism and AD risk. There was a significant difference in the ACE allele or genotype frequencies between cases and controls. The D/D genotype showed an increased risk for AD and in the amnestic group and the effect was independent on ApoE genotypes. PMID:26456241

  17. No allelic association between Parkinson`s disease and dopamine D2, D3, and D4 receptor gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nanko, S.; Hattori, M.; Dai, X.Y.

    1994-12-15

    Parkinson`s disease is thought to be caused by a combination of unknown environmental, genetic, and degenerative factors. Evidence from necropsy brain samples and pharmacokinetics suggests involvement of dopamine receptors in the pathogenesis or pathophysiology of Parkinson`s disease. Genetic association studies between Parkinson`s disease and dopamine D2, D3 and D4 receptor gene polymorphisms were conducted. The polymorphism was examined in 71 patients with Parkinson`s disease and 90 controls. There were no significant differences between two groups in allele frequencies at the D2, D3, and D4 dopamine receptor loci. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that susceptibility to Parkinson`s disease is associated with the dopamine receptor polymorphisms examined. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Association of the C47T Polymorphism in SOD2 with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease in Carriers of the APOEε4 Allele

    PubMed Central

    Gamarra, David; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Fernández-Martínez, Manuel; de Pancorbo, Marian M.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important part in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), the prodromal phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidence shows that polymorphisms in the SOD2 gene affect the elimination of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in mitochondria. The aim of this study was to determine whether the functional rs4880 SNP in the SOD2 gene is a risk factor associated with aMCI and sporadic AD. 216 subjects with aMCI, 355 with AD, and 245 controls have been studied. The SNP rs4880 of the SOD2 gene was genotyped by RT-PCR and the APOE genotype was determined by PCR and RFLPs. Different multinomial logistic regression models were used to determine the risk levels for aMCI and AD. Although the T allele of the SOD2 rs4880 SNP gene (rs4880-T) is not an independent risk for aMCI or AD, this allele increases the risk to aMCI patients carrying at least one APOEε4 allele. Moreover, rs4880-T allele and APOEε4 allele combination has been found to produce an increased risk for AD compared to aMCI reference patients. These results suggest that APOEε4 and rs4880-T genotype may be a risk for aMCI and a predictor of progression from aMCI to AD. PMID:26696693

  19. Whole-exome imputation of sequence variants identified two novel alleles associated with adult body height in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Du, Mengmeng; Auer, Paul L.; Jiao, Shuo; Haessler, Jeffrey; Altshuler, David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Carlson, Christopher S.; Carty, Cara L.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Curtis, Keith; Franceschini, Nora; Hsu, Li; Jackson, Rebecca; Lange, Leslie A.; Lettre, Guillaume; Monda, Keri L.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Reiner, Alex P.; Rich, Stephen S.; Rosse, Stephanie A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Willer, Cristen J.; Wilson, James G.; North, Kari; Kooperberg, Charles; Heard-Costa, Nancy; Peters, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Adult body height is a quantitative trait for which genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous loci, primarily in European populations. These loci, comprising common variants, explain <10% of the phenotypic variance in height. We searched for novel associations between height and common (minor allele frequency, MAF ≥5%) or infrequent (0.5% < MAF < 5%) variants across the exome in African Americans. Using a reference panel of 1692 African Americans and 471 Europeans from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) Exome Sequencing Project (ESP), we imputed whole-exome sequence data into 13 719 African Americans with existing array-based GWAS data (discovery). Variants achieving a height-association threshold of P < 5E−06 in the imputed dataset were followed up in an independent sample of 1989 African Americans with whole-exome sequence data (replication). We used P < 2.5E−07 (=0.05/196 779 variants) to define statistically significant associations in meta-analyses combining the discovery and replication sets (N = 15 708). We discovered and replicated three independent loci for association: 5p13.3/C5orf22/rs17410035 (MAF = 0.10, β = 0.64 cm, P = 8.3E−08), 13q14.2/SPRYD7/rs114089985 (MAF = 0.03, β = 1.46 cm, P = 4.8E−10) and 17q23.3/GH2/rs2006123 (MAF = 0.30; β = 0.47 cm; P = 4.7E−09). Conditional analyses suggested 5p13.3 (C5orf22/rs17410035) and 13q14.2 (SPRYD7/rs114089985) may harbor novel height alleles independent of previous GWAS-identified variants (r2 with GWAS loci <0.01); whereas 17q23.3/GH2/rs2006123 was correlated with GWAS-identified variants in European and African populations. Notably, 13q14.2/rs114089985 is infrequent in African Americans (MAF = 3%), extremely rare in European Americans (MAF = 0.03%), and monomorphic in Asian populations, suggesting it may be an African-American-specific height allele. Our findings demonstrate that whole-exome imputation of sequence variants can identify low

  20. Allele-specific chromatin remodeling in the ZPBP2/GSDMB/ORMDL3 locus associated with the risk of asthma and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Verlaan, Dominique J; Berlivet, Soizik; Hunninghake, Gary M; Madore, Anne-Marie; Larivière, Mathieu; Moussette, Sanny; Grundberg, Elin; Kwan, Tony; Ouimet, Manon; Ge, Bing; Hoberman, Rose; Swiatek, Marcin; Dias, Joana; Lam, Kevin C L; Koka, Vonda; Harmsen, Eef; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Avila, Lydiana; Celedón, Juan C; Weiss, Scott T; Dewar, Ken; Sinnett, Daniel; Laprise, Catherine; Raby, Benjamin A; Pastinen, Tomi; Naumova, Anna K

    2009-09-01

    Common SNPs in the chromosome 17q12-q21 region alter the risk for asthma, type 1 diabetes, primary biliary cirrhosis, and Crohn disease. Previous reports by us and others have linked the disease-associated genetic variants with changes in expression of GSDMB and ORMDL3 transcripts in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). The variants also alter regulation of other transcripts, and this domain-wide cis-regulatory effect suggests a mechanism involving long-range chromatin interactions. Here, we further dissect the disease-linked haplotype and identify putative causal DNA variants via a combination of genetic and functional analyses. First, high-throughput resequencing of the region and genotyping of potential candidate variants were performed. Next, additional mapping of allelic expression differences in Yoruba HapMap LCLs allowed us to fine-map the basis of the cis-regulatory differences to a handful of candidate functional variants. Functional assays identified allele-specific differences in nucleosome distribution, an allele-specific association with the insulator protein CTCF, as well as a weak promoter activity for rs12936231. Overall, this study shows a common disease allele linked to changes in CTCF binding and nucleosome occupancy leading to altered domain-wide cis-regulation. Finally, a strong association between asthma and cis-regulatory haplotypes was observed in three independent family-based cohorts (p = 1.78 x 10(-8)). This study demonstrates the requirement of multiple parallel allele-specific tools for the investigation of noncoding disease variants and functional fine-mapping of human disease-associated haplotypes. PMID:19732864

  1. The CD45 77C/G allele is not associated with myasthenia gravis - a reassessment of the potential role of CD45 in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The G allele of the CD45 77C/G SNP (rs17612648), which has previously been suggested to be associated with autoimmune disorders, was genotyped in 446 Swedish myasthenia gravis (MG) patients and 2303 matched controls. Results There was no association between the polymorphism and patient group as a whole (p = 0.199), nor with clinical subgroups. Our results add to a growing number of studies unable to find association between the 77C/G polymorphism and autoimmune disorders. One control sample, from an adult blood donor, was homozygous for the G allele, yet negative for a panel of auto-antibodies, representing the first homozygous individual studied in this respect. Conclusions The 77C/G mutation does not predispose to MG, and its role in autoimmunity may have to be re-evaluated. PMID:21067564

  2. Allelic association and extended haplotype analysis of the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) candidate region in the French Candadian population

    SciTech Connect

    Simard, L.R.; Prescott, G.; Rochette, C. |

    1994-09-01

    SMA is a common lower motor neuron disease characterized by progressive proximal limb and trunk muscle weakness. Despite the wide range in phenotypic severity, all three clinical types of childhood SMAs map to chromosome 5q11.2-5q13.3. The proximal (D5S557) flanking markers span about 1 Mb. We have previously demonstrated significant linkage disequilibrium between D5S125, D5S435, D5S351, JK53CA1/2 and SMA in the French Canadian population. We now present data for three new DNA markers mapping between D5S435 and D5S557 kindly provided to us by Drs. B. Wirth (A31), A. Burghes (Ag1) and A. MacKenzie (CATT-40G1). We identified 10 different A31 Alleles whose frequencies were similar for both normal and SMA chromosomes. Ag1 is a complex multi-allelic marker and specific primers amplified 1 (Class I), 2 or rarely 3 (Class II) alleles per chromosome. We observed significant association between Ag1 and SMA. For example, the 100 bp Ag1 fragment was typed on 20 of 73 SMA chromosomes and 0 of 74 normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). We also observed significant association between Ag1 Class genotypes and phenotypic severity. Class I chromosomes predominated in Type I SMA (p=.001) while Type II SMA individuals were generally heterozygous Class I/Class II (p=.001). Finally, we provide evidence for allelic association between Type I SMA and CATT-40G1, a tri-allelic sublocus of CATT-1. All of our Type I SMA chromosomes (n=20) carried a null allele compared to 40% of normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). Extended haplotype analyses indicated that > 19% of French Canadian SMA chromosomes appear to be ancestrally related to two unique haplotypes indicating their utility for linkage disequilibrium mapping.

  3. The Dopaminergic Reward System and Leisure Time Exercise Behavior: A Candidate Allele Study

    PubMed Central

    Huppertz, Charlotte; Bartels, Meike; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M.; Dolan, Conor V.; de Moor, Marleen H. M.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E. M.; Ehli, Erik A.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Xiao, Xiangjun; Scheet, Paul; Davies, Gareth E.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Hudziak, James J.; de Geus, Eco J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Twin studies provide evidence that genetic influences contribute strongly to individual differences in exercise behavior. We hypothesize that part of this heritability is explained by genetic variation in the dopaminergic reward system. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in DRD1: rs265981, DRD2: rs6275, rs1800497, DRD3: rs6280, DRD4: rs1800955, DBH: rs1611115, rs2519152, and in COMT: rs4680) and three variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs in DRD4, upstream of DRD5, and in DAT1) were investigated for an association with regular leisure time exercise behavior. Materials and Methods. Data on exercise activities and at least one SNP/VNTR were available for 8,768 individuals aged 7 to 50 years old that were part of the Netherlands Twin Register. Exercise behavior was quantified as weekly metabolic equivalents of task (MET) spent on exercise activities. Mixed models were fitted in SPSS with genetic relatedness as a random effect. Results. None of the genetic variants were associated with exercise behavior (P > .02), despite sufficient power to detect small effects. Discussion and Conclusions. We did not confirm that allelic variants involved in dopaminergic function play a role in creating individual differences in exercise behavior. A plea is made for large genome-wide association studies to unravel the genetic pathways that affect this health-enhancing behavior. PMID:24734235

  4. A novel CHST3 allele associated with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and hearing loss in Pakistani kindred.

    PubMed

    Waryah, A M; Shahzad, M; Shaikh, H; Sheikh, S A; Channa, N A; Hufnagel, R B; Makhdoom, A; Riazuddin, S; Ahmed, Z M

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal dysplasias (SDs) are highly heterogeneous disorders composed of 40 clinical sub-types that are part of 456 well-delineated syndromes in humans. Here, we enrolled consanguineous kindred from a remote area of Sindh province of Pakistan, with 14 affected individuals suffering with short stature, kyphoscoliosis, joint dislocations, clubfoot, heart valve anomalies and progressive bilateral mixed hearing loss. To identify pathogenic variants in this family, whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed in one affected and one normal individual, which revealed a novel transversion mutation (c.802G>T; p.Glu268*) in CHST3 associated with the phenotype. CHST3 encodes a chondroitin 6-O-sulfotransferase-1 (C6ST-1) enzyme that is essential for the sulfation of proteoglycans found in cartilages. Previously, mutations in CHST3 have largely been reported in sporadic cases of SD, primarily with severe spinal abnormalities, joint dislocations, joint contractures, and clubfoot. Clinical and radiological examination of the affected individuals in this family provides new insights into phenotypic spectrum of CHST3 alleles and disease progression with age. PMID:26572954

  5. Beneficial role of D allele in controlling ACE levels: a study among Brahmins of north India.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Shobha; Sharma, Nidhi; Thakur, Sunil; Mondal, Prakash R; Saraswathy, Kallur N

    2016-06-01

    India being a country with vast diversity is expected to have different dietary and life style patterns which in turn may lead to population-specific environmental risk factors. Further, the interaction of these risk factors with the genetic makeup of population makes it either susceptible or resistant to cardiovascular disease. One such candidate gene is angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) for various cardiovascular mechanisms. ACE is the key enzyme of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system pathway which maintains homeostasis blood pressure in the body and any variation in the levels is reported to be associated with various complex diseases. The DD genotype is found to increase ACE levels, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases and decrease in ACE levels are associated with kidney diseases. The aim of this study was to understand the distribution of ACE I/D polymorphism and ACE levels among Brahmins of National Capital Region (NCR) north India, with respect to age and sex ratio distribution. In this study, 136 subjects of which 50 males and 86 females, who were unrelated up to first cousin, aged 25 to70 years were studied. ACE gene was found to be polymorphic with high frequency of heterozygote (ID) followed by II and DD genotypes. The studied population was found to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with respect to ACE I/D polymorphism (P = 0.55). I allele frequency was found to be higher (0.560) than the D allele (0.44). The median level of ACE was found to be 65.96 ng/mL (48.12-86.24) which is towards lower side of the normal range. ACE levels were found to be increased among individual having either of the homozygotes that is II or DD and higher frequency of heterozygote (ID) is indicative of advantage in the population by maintaining lower ACE levels. The limitation of the present study is low sample size, however, the merit is that the subjects belonged to a Mendalian population with a common gene pool. PMID:27350671

  6. Alleles of HLA-DRB1*04 Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Amazon Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Porto dos Santos, Maisa; de Melo Silva, Cláudia Maria; Alves de Almeida, Vanessa; Assumpção Antunes, Irineide

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenetic host factors are associated with susceptibility or protection to tuberculosis (TB). Strong associations of HLA class II genes with TB are reported. We analyzed the HLA-DRB1*04 alleles to identify subtypes associated with pulmonary TB and their interaction with risk factors such as alcohol, smoking, and gender in 316 pulmonary TB patients and 306 healthy individuals from the Brazilian Amazon. The HLA-DRB1*04 was prevalent in patients with pulmonary TB (p<0.0001; OR = 2.94; 95% CI = 2.12 to 4.08). Direct nucleotide sequencing of DRB1 exon 2 identified nine subtypes of HLA-DRB1*04. The subtype HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 (p = 0.0019; OR = 2.23; 95% CI = 1.34 to 3.70) was associated with susceptibility to pulmonary TB while DRB1*04:07:01 (p<0.0001; OR = 0.02; 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.33) to protection. Notably, the interaction between alcohol and HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 increased the risk for developing pulmonary TB (p = 0.0001; OR = 51.3; 95% CI = 6.81 to 386). Multibacillary pulmonary TB, the clinical presentation of disease transmission, was strongly associated with interaction to alcohol (p = 0.0026; OR = 11.1; 95% CI = 3.99 to 30.9), HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 (p = 0.0442; OR = 2.01; 95% CI = 1.03 to 3.93) and DRB1*04:92 (p = 0.0112; OR = 8.62; 95% CI = 1.63 to 45.5). These results show that HLA-DRB1*04 are associated with pulmonary TB. Interestingly, three subtypes, DRB1*04:07:01, DRB1*04:11:01 and DRB1*04:92 of the HLA-DRB1*04 could be potential immunogenetic markers that may help to explain mechanisms involved in disease development. PMID:26901036

  7. Vitamin D Responsive Elements within the HLA-DRB1 Promoter Region in Sardinian Multiple Sclerosis Associated Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Murru, Maria Rita; Corongiu, Daniela; Tranquilli, Stefania; Fadda, Elisabetta; Murru, Raffaele; Schirru, Lucia; Secci, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Gianna; Asunis, Isadora; Cuccu, Stefania; Fenu, Giuseppe; Lorefice, Lorena; Carboni, Nicola; Mura, Gioia; Rosatelli, Maria Cristina; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D response elements (VDREs) have been found in the promoter region of the MS-associated allele HLA-DRB1*15∶01, suggesting that with low vitamin D availability VDREs are incapable of inducing *15∶01 expression allowing in early life autoreactive T-cells to escape central thymic deletion. The Italian island of Sardinia exhibits a very high frequency of MS and high solar radiation exposure. We test the contribution of VDREs analysing the promoter region of the MS-associated DRB1 *04∶05, *03∶01, *13∶01 and *15∶01 and non-MS-associated *16∶01, *01, *11, *07∶01 alleles in a cohort of Sardinians (44 MS patients and 112 healthy subjects). Sequencing of the DRB1 promoter region revealed a homozygous canonical VDRE in all *15∶01, *16∶01, *11 and in 45/73 *03∶01 and in heterozygous state in 28/73 *03∶01 and all *01 alleles. A new mutated homozygous VDRE was found in all *13∶03, *04∶05 and *07∶01 alleles. Functionality of mutated and canonical VDREs was assessed for its potential to modulate levels of DRB1 gene expression using an in vitro transactivation assay after stimulation with active vitamin D metabolite. Vitamin D failed to increase promoter activity of the *04∶05 and *03∶01 alleles carrying the new mutated VDRE, while the *16∶01 and *03∶01 alleles carrying the canonical VDRE sequence showed significantly increased transcriptional activity. The ability of VDR to bind the mutant VDRE in the DRB1 promoter was evaluated by EMSA. Efficient binding of VDR to the VDRE sequence found in the *16∶01 and in the *15∶01 allele reduced electrophoretic mobility when either an anti-VDR or an anti-RXR monoclonal antibody was added. Conversely, the Sardinian mutated VDRE sample showed very low affinity for the RXR/VDR heterodimer. These data seem to exclude a role of VDREs in the promoter region of the DRB1 gene in susceptibility to MS carried by DRB1* alleles in Sardinian patients. PMID:22848563

  8. MicroRNA-3148 modulates allelic expression of toll-like receptor 7 variant associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun; Zhao, Jian; Sakurai, Daisuke; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Jacob, Chaim O; Scofield, R Hal; Langefeld, Carl D; Kelly, Jennifer A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Alarcón, Graciela S; Vyse, Timothy J; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Freedman, Barry I; Gaffney, Patrick M; Sivils, Kathy Moser; James, Judith A; Gregersen, Peter K; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Niewold, Timothy B; Merrill, Joan T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Stevens, Anne M; Boackle, Susan A; Cantor, Rita M; Chen, Weiling; Grossman, Jeniffer M; Hahn, Bevra H; Harley, John B; Alarcόn-Riquelme, Marta E; Brown, Elizabeth E; Tsao, Betty P

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the G allele of rs3853839 at 3'untranslated region (UTR) of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) was associated with elevated transcript expression and increased risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 9,274 Eastern Asians [P = 6.5×10(-10), odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.27 (1.17-1.36)]. Here, we conducted trans-ancestral fine-mapping in 13,339 subjects including European Americans, African Americans, and Amerindian/Hispanics and confirmed rs3853839 as the only variant within the TLR7-TLR8 region exhibiting consistent and independent association with SLE (Pmeta = 7.5×10(-11), OR = 1.24 [1.18-1.34]). The risk G allele was associated with significantly increased levels of TLR7 mRNA and protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and elevated luciferase activity of reporter gene in transfected cells. TLR7 3'UTR sequence bearing the non-risk C allele of rs3853839 matches a predicted binding site of microRNA-3148 (miR-3148), suggesting that this microRNA may regulate TLR7 expression. Indeed, miR-3148 levels were inversely correlated with TLR7 transcript levels in PBMCs from SLE patients and controls (R(2) = 0.255, P = 0.001). Overexpression of miR-3148 in HEK-293 cells led to significant dose-dependent decrease in luciferase activity for construct driven by TLR7 3'UTR segment bearing the C allele (P = 0.0003). Compared with the G-allele construct, the C-allele construct showed greater than two-fold reduction of luciferase activity in the presence of miR-3148. Reduced modulation by miR-3148 conferred slower degradation of the risk G-allele containing TLR7 transcripts, resulting in elevated levels of gene products. These data establish rs3853839 of TLR7 as a shared risk variant of SLE in 22,613 subjects of Asian, EA, AA, and Amerindian/Hispanic ancestries (Pmeta  = 2.0×10(-19), OR = 1.25 [1.20-1.32]), which confers allelic effect on transcript turnover via differential binding to the epigenetic factor

  9. MicroRNA-3148 Modulates Allelic Expression of Toll-Like Receptor 7 Variant Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Daisuke; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Scofield, R. Hal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Freedman, Barry I.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Sivils, Kathy Moser; James, Judith A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Niewold, Timothy B.; Merrill, Joan T.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Stevens, Anne M.; Boackle, Susan A.; Cantor, Rita M.; Chen, Weiling; Grossman, Jeniffer M.; Hahn, Bevra H.; Harley, John B.; Alarcόn-Riquelme, Marta E.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Tsao, Betty P.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the G allele of rs3853839 at 3′untranslated region (UTR) of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) was associated with elevated transcript expression and increased risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 9,274 Eastern Asians [P = 6.5×10−10, odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.27 (1.17–1.36)]. Here, we conducted trans-ancestral fine-mapping in 13,339 subjects including European Americans, African Americans, and Amerindian/Hispanics and confirmed rs3853839 as the only variant within the TLR7-TLR8 region exhibiting consistent and independent association with SLE (Pmeta = 7.5×10−11, OR = 1.24 [1.18–1.34]). The risk G allele was associated with significantly increased levels of TLR7 mRNA and protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and elevated luciferase activity of reporter gene in transfected cells. TLR7 3′UTR sequence bearing the non-risk C allele of rs3853839 matches a predicted binding site of microRNA-3148 (miR-3148), suggesting that this microRNA may regulate TLR7 expression. Indeed, miR-3148 levels were inversely correlated with TLR7 transcript levels in PBMCs from SLE patients and controls (R2 = 0.255, P = 0.001). Overexpression of miR-3148 in HEK-293 cells led to significant dose-dependent decrease in luciferase activity for construct driven by TLR7 3′UTR segment bearing the C allele (P = 0.0003). Compared with the G-allele construct, the C-allele construct showed greater than two-fold reduction of luciferase activity in the presence of miR-3148. Reduced modulation by miR-3148 conferred slower degradation of the risk G-allele containing TLR7 transcripts, resulting in elevated levels of gene products. These data establish rs3853839 of TLR7 as a shared risk variant of SLE in 22,613 subjects of Asian, EA, AA, and Amerindian/Hispanic ancestries (Pmeta = 2.0×10−19, OR = 1.25 [1.20–1.32]), which confers allelic effect on transcript turnover via differential binding to the

  10. A Fasting Insulin–Raising Allele at IGF1 Locus Is Associated with Circulating Levels of IGF-1 and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Greco, Annalisa; De Lorenzo, Carlo; Andreozzi, Francesco; Marini, Maria A.; Perticone, Francesco; Sesti, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Background A meta-analysis of genome-wide data reported the discovery of the rs35767 polymorphism near IGF1 with genome-wide significant association with fasting insulin levels. However, it is unclear whether the effects of this polymorphism on fasting insulin are mediated by a reduced insulin sensitivity or impaired insulin clearance. We investigated the effects of the rs35767 polymorphism on circulating IGF-1 levels, insulin sensitivity, and insulin clearance. Methodology/Principal Findings Two samples of adult nondiabetic white Europeans were studied. In sample 1 (n=569), IGF-1 levels were lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (190±77 vs. 218±97 ng/ml, respectively; P=0.007 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). Insulin sensitivity assessed by euglycaemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp was lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (8.9±4.1 vs. 10.1±5.1 mg x Kg-1 free fat mass x min-1, respectively; P=0.03 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). The rs35767 polymorphism did not show significant association with insulin clearance. In sample 2 (n=859), IGF-1 levels were lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (155±60 vs. 164±63 ng/ml, respectively; P=0.02 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). Insulin sensitivity, as estimated by the HOMA index, was lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (2.8±2.2 vs. 2.5±1.3, respectively; P=0.03 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). Conclusion/Significance The rs35767 polymorphism near IGF1 was associated with circulating IGF-1 levels, and insulin sensitivity with carriers of the GG genotype exhibiting lower IGF-1 concentrations and insulin sensitivity as compared with subjects carrying the A allele. PMID:24392014

  11. Evolution of Functionally Diverse Alleles Associated with PTC Bitter Taste Sensitivity in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Michael C.; Ranciaro, Alessia; Froment, Alain; Hirbo, Jibril; Omar, Sabah; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Nyambo, Thomas; Lema, Godfrey; Zinshteyn, Daniel; Drayna, Dennis; Breslin, Paul A. S.; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    Although human bitter taste perception is hypothesized to be a dietary adaptation, little is known about genetic signatures of selection and patterns of bitter taste perception variability in ethnically diverse populations with different diets, particularly from Africa. To better understand the genetic basis and evolutionary history of bitter taste sensitivity, we sequenced a 2,975 bp region encompassing TAS2R38, a bitter taste receptor gene, in 611 Africans from 57 populations in West Central and East Africa with diverse subsistence patterns, as well as in a comparative sample of 132 non-Africans. We also examined the association between genetic variability at this locus and threshold levels of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) bitterness in 463 Africans from the above populations to determine how variation influences bitter taste perception. Here, we report striking patterns of variation at TAS2R38, including a significant excess of novel rare nonsynonymous polymorphisms that recently arose only in Africa, high frequencies of haplotypes in Africa associated with intermediate bitter taste sensitivity, a remarkably similar frequency of common haplotypes across genetically and culturally distinct Africans, and an ancient coalescence time of common variation in global populations. Additionally, several of the rare nonsynonymous substitutions significantly modified levels of PTC bitter taste sensitivity in diverse Africans. While ancient balancing selection likely maintained common haplotype variation across global populations, we suggest that recent selection pressures may have also resulted in the unusually high level of rare nonsynonymous variants in Africa, implying a complex model of selection at the TAS2R38 locus in African populations. Furthermore, the distribution of common haplotypes in Africa is not correlated with diet, raising the possibility that common variation may be under selection due to their role in nondietary biological processes. In addition, our data

  12. Allelic association but only weak evidence for linkage to the apolipoprotein E locus in late-onset Swedish Alzheimer families

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Forsell, C.; Lilius, L.

    1996-05-31

    An association between the {epsilon}4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) and late-onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) was recently demonstrated. In order to confirm the association and to gauge the ability of standard genetic linkage methods to identify susceptibility genes, we investigated 15 Swedish late-onset AD families. We found an association of familial AD to the APOE {epsilon}4 allele (P = 0.01) but no indication of linkage to the APOE region using 2-point linkage analysis, and only weak evidence using the affected pedigree-member (APM) method. Our results confirm an APOE {epsilon}4 association with late-onset familial AD and indicate that susceptibility genes can easily be missed when using standard lod score and APM genetic linkage analysis. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Associations of Human Leukocyte Antigen-DRB1 Alleles with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma and Its Clinical Significance in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiao-Tao; Hu, Yun-Hui; Dong, Tao; Wang, Ruo-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Genetic susceptibility is one of the major etiological factors for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Among the genetic predisposing factors, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes have been reported to be associated with NPC. This study aimed to investigate the associations of HLA-DRB1 alleles with NPC and the clinical significance of HLA-DRB1 alleles in NPC. Methods: From January 2009 to December 2013, 140 NPC patients (118 Han patients and 22 Uyghur patients) and 158 healthy controls (81 Han individuals and 77 Uyghur individuals) from Xinjiang Province were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 using the polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer technique. Chi-square analysis was used when comparing allele frequencies between groups. The clinical outcomes were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression model. Results: Compared with healthy controls, the allele frequency of HLA-DRB1*0701 was increased in the Uyghur patients (P = 0.008) but not in the Han patients (P = 0.869). HLA-DRB1*0101 allele was presented with higher frequency in clinical Stage I + II group compared with clinical Stage III + IV group in the Han patients (P = 0.015) but not in the Uyghur patients (P = 1.000). Higher frequency of HLA-DRB1*1501 allele was observed in patients aged <45 years compared with those in patients aged ≥45 years (P = 0.002). Neither HLA-DRB1*0701 nor HLA-DRB1*0101 had a statistically significant association with 3-year survival. Conclusions: This study found HLA-DRB1*0701 in Uyghur population was associated with an increased risk of developing NPC. In Han population, we found HLA-DRB1*0101 was associated with protection from disease progression, and HLA-DRB1*1501 was associated with early age of onset. HLA-DRB1 could not be identified as a prognostic indicator for NPC in either Han or Uyghur patients. PMID:27231174

  14. Dynamic characterization of HLA-B*44 Alleles: A comparative molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Pemra

    2016-06-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) are highly polymorphic proteins that play a key role in the immune system. HLA molecule is present on the cell membrane of antigen-presenting cells of the immune system and presents short peptides, originating from the proteins of invading pathogens or self-proteins, to the T-cell Receptor (TCR) molecule of the T-cells. In this study, peptide-binding characteristics of HLA-B*44:02, 44:03, 44:05 alleles bound to three nonameric peptides were studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Polymorphisms among these alleles (Asp116Tyr and Asp156Leu) result in major differences in the allele characteristics. While HLA-B*44:02 (Asp116, Asp156) and HLA-B*44:03 (Asp116, Leu156) depend on tapasin for efficient peptide loading, HLA-B*44:05 (Tyr116, Asp156) is tapasin independent. On the other hand, HLA-B*44:02 and HLA-B*44:03 mismatch is closely related to transplant rejection and acute-graft-versus-host disease. In order to understand the dynamic characteristics, the simulation trajectories were analyzed by applying Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) and Root Mean Square Fluctuation (RMSF) calculations and hydrogen bonding analysis. Binding dynamics of the three HLA-B*44 alleles and peptide sequences are comparatively discussed. In general, peptide binding stability is found to depend on the peptide rather than the allele type for HLA-B*44 alleles. PMID:27016630

  15. Allelic variation at 5-HTTLPR is associated with brain morphology in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiewei; Mo, Yin; Ge, Tian; Wang, Yi; Luo, Xiong-jian; Feng, Jianfeng; Li, Ming; Su, Bing

    2015-03-30

    Previous studies have reported significant associations of 5-HTTLPR with brain structures mainly in Europeans, but the situations in other ethnic groups remain largely unknown. Here we examined the association of 5-HTTLPR with regional gray matter volume in Han Chinese, and observed significant association in the postcentral gyrus and precuneus cortex. PMID:25677398

  16. Association of allelic losses on human chromosomal arms 11Q and 16Q in sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schmutzler, R K; Fimmers, R; Bierhoff, E; Lohmar, B; Homann, A; Speiser, P; Kubista, E; Jaeger, K; Krebs, D; Zeillinger, R; Wiestler, O D; Von Deimling, A

    1996-08-22

    Breast-carcinoma development presumably results from multiple mutational events in tumor-associated genes. Certain results indicate that some tumor-suppressor genes may combine their pathogenetic potential to synergistically promote tumor growth. In an effort to identify such mechanisms in breast tumors, a series of 77 (group I) paired blood tumor samples from patients with sporadic mammary carcinomas was analyzed for loss of heterozygosity with 15 polymorphic markers on the chromosomal arms 7q, 11q, 13q, 16q, 17p and 17q. A significant association was observed for the combination of allelic losses on chromosomes 11q and 16q. In order to confirm these findings, we studied a second independent series of 189 breast-tumor patients (group 2) with comparable histopathological tumor stages. Group 2 was examined for the same genetic alterations using the identical set of polymorphic markers. The data from this group confirmed the detected association of loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 11q and 16q and indicate the cooperation of putative tumor-suppressor genes on the chromosomal arms 11q and 16q in a sub-set of breast carcinomas. The regions involved harbor the candidate genes ATM (mutated in ataxiatelangiectasia) on chromosome 11q23 and UVO (uvomorulin, cadherin E) and BBCI (breast basic conserved I) on chromosome 16q22-q24. PMID:8797873

  17. Uncommon HLA alleles identified by hemizygous ultra-high Sanger sequencing: haplotype associations and reconsideration of their assignment in the Common and Well-Documented catalogue.

    PubMed

    Voorter, Christina E M; Groeneweg, Mathijs; Groeneveld, Lisette; Tilanus, Marcel G J

    2016-02-01

    Although the number of HLA alleles still increases, many of them have been reported being uncommon. This is partly due to lack of full length gene sequencing, especially for those alleles belonging to an allele ambiguity in which the first discovered allele has been assigned as the most frequent one. As members of the working group on Common and Well Documented (CWD) alleles and since we implemented full length group-specific sequencing as standard method routinely, we have investigated the presence of presumably rare alleles in our collection of HLA typing data. We identified 50 alleles, that were not previously encountered as Common or Well Documented. Sixteen of them should be added to the CWD catalogue, since we encountered them in 5 or more unrelated individuals. Another 11 could be added, based upon our results and the data present in the IMGT database and the rare allele section of the allele frequencies database. Furthermore, tight associations were observed between several different alleles even at the level of synonymous and non-coding sequences. In addition, in several cases the uncommon allele was found to be more frequent than its common counterpart. PMID:26610902

  18. Favorable alleles for stem water-soluble carbohydrates identified by association analysis contribute to grain weight under drought stress conditions in wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyu; Zhang, Bin; Li, Runzhi; Chang, Xiaoping; Jing, Ruilian

    2015-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental constraint to crop distribution and productivity. Stem water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) buffer wheat grain yield against conditions unfavorable for photosynthesis during the grain filling stage. In this study, 262 winter wheat accessions and 209 genome-wide SSR markers were collected and used to undertake association analysis based on a mixed linear model (MLM). The WSC in different internodes at three growth stages and 1000-grain weight (TGW) were investigated under four environmental regimes (well-watered, drought stress during the whole growth period, and two levels of terminal drought stress imposed by chemical desiccation under the well-watered and drought stress during the whole growth period conditions). Under diverse drought stress conditions, WSC in lower internodes showed significant positive correlations with TGW, especially at the flowering stage under well-watered conditions and at grain filling under drought stress. Sixteen novel WSC-favorable alleles were identified, and five of them contributed to significantly higher TGW. In addition, pyramiding WSC favorable alleles was not only effective for obtaining accessions with higher WSC, but also for enhancing TGW under different water regimes. During the past fifty years of wheat breeding, WSC was selected incidentally. The average number of favorable WSC alleles increased from 1.13 in the pre-1960 period to 4.41 in the post-2000 period. The results indicate a high potential for using marker-assisted selection to pyramid WSC favorable alleles in improving WSC and TGW in wheat. PMID:25768726

  19. Cytochrome P450 Allele CYP3A7*1C Associates with Adverse Outcomes in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Breast, and Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nichola; De Ieso, Paolo; Migliorini, Gabriele; Orr, Nick; Broderick, Peter; Catovsky, Daniel; Matakidou, Athena; Eisen, Timothy; Goldsmith, Christy; Dudbridge, Frank; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Ashworth, Alan; Ross, Gillian; Houlston, Richard S; Fletcher, Olivia

    2016-03-15

    CYP3A enzymes metabolize endogenous hormones and chemotherapeutic agents used to treat cancer, thereby potentially affecting drug effectiveness. Here, we refined the genetic basis underlying the functional effects of a CYP3A haplotype on urinary estrone glucuronide (E1G) levels and tested for an association between CYP3A genotype and outcome in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), breast, or lung cancers. The most significantly associated SNP was rs45446698, an SNP that tags the CYP3A7*1C allele; this SNP was associated with a 54% decrease in urinary E1G levels. Genotyping this SNP in 1,008 breast cancer, 1,128 lung cancer, and 347 CLL patients, we found that rs45446698 was associated with breast cancer mortality (HR, 1.74; P = 0.03), all-cause mortality in lung cancer patients (HR, 1.43; P = 0.009), and CLL progression (HR, 1.62; P = 0.03). We also found borderline evidence of a statistical interaction between the CYP3A7*1C allele, treatment of patients with a cytotoxic agent that is a CYP3A substrate, and clinical outcome (Pinteraction = 0.06). The CYP3A7*1C allele, which results in adult expression of the fetal CYP3A7 gene, is likely to be the functional allele influencing levels of circulating endogenous sex hormones and outcome in these various malignancies. Further studies confirming these associations and determining the mechanism by which CYP3A7*1C influences outcome are required. One possibility is that standard chemotherapy regimens that include CYP3A substrates may not be optimal for the approximately 8% of cancer patients who are CYP3A7*1C carriers. PMID:26964624

  20. The minor C-allele of rs2014355 in ACADS is associated with reduced insulin release following an oral glucose load

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A genome-wide association study (GWAS) using metabolite concentrations as proxies for enzymatic activity, suggested that two variants: rs2014355 in the gene encoding short-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (ACADS) and rs11161510 in the gene encoding medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (ACADM) impair fatty acid β-oxidation. Chronic exposure to fatty acids due to an impaired β-oxidation may down-regulate the glucose-stimulated insulin release and result in an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We aimed to investigate whether the two variants associate with altered insulin release following an oral glucose load or with T2D. Methods The variants were genotyped using KASPar® PCR SNP genotyping system and investigated for associations with estimates of insulin release and insulin sensitivity following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a random sample of middle-aged Danish individuals (n ACADS = 4,324; n ACADM = 4,337). The T2D-case-control study involved a total of ~8,300 Danish individuals (n ACADS = 8,313; n ACADM = 8,344). Results In glucose-tolerant individuals the minor C-allele of rs2014355 of ACADS associated with reduced measures of serum insulin at 30 min following an oral glucose load (per allele effect (β) = -3.8% (-6.3%;-1.3%), P = 0.003), reduced incremental area under the insulin curve (β = -3.6% (-6.3%;-0.9%), P = 0.009), reduced acute insulin response (β = -2.2% (-4.2%;0.2%), P = 0.03), and with increased insulin sensitivity ISIMatsuda (β = 2.9% (0.5%;5.2%), P = 0.02). The C-allele did not associate with two other measures of insulin sensitivity or with a derived disposition index. The C-allele was not associated with T2D in the case-control analysis (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.96-1.18, P = 0.21). rs11161510 of ACADM did not associate with any indices of glucose-stimulated insulin release or with T2D. Conclusions In glucose-tolerant individuals the minor C-allele of rs2014355 of ACADS was associated with reduced measures of

  1. Novel association of the obesity risk-allele near Fas Apoptotic Inhibitory molecule 2 (FAIM2) gene with heart rate and study of its effects on myocardial infarction in diabetic participants of the PREDIMED trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Fas apoptotic pathway has been implicated in type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although a polymorphism (rs7138803; G'>'A) near the Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (FAIM2) locus has been related to obesity, its association with other cardiovascular risk factors and disease remains u...

  2. Molecular lesions associated with alleles of decapentaplegic identify residues necessary for TGF/{beta}/BMP cell signaling in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, K.; Ray, R.P.; Gelbart, W.M.

    1996-02-01

    We have identified the molecular lesions associated with six point mutations in the Drosophila TGF-{beta} homologue decapentaplegic (dpp). The sites of these mutations define residues within both the pro and ligand regions that are essential for dpp function in vivo. While all of these mutations affect residues that are highly conserved among TGF-{beta} superfamily members, the phenotypic consequences of the different alleles are quite distinct. Through an analysis of these mutant phenotypes, both in cuticle preparations and with molecular probes, we have assessed the functional significance of specific residues that are conserved among the different members of the superfamily. In addition, we have tested for conditional genetic interactions between the different alleles. We show that two of the alleles are temperature sensitive for the embryonic functions of dpp, such that these alleles are not only embryonic viable as homozygotes but also partially complement other dpp hypomorphs at low temperatures. Our results are discussed with regard to in vitro mutagenesis data on other TGF-{beta}-like molecules, as well as with regard to the regulation of dpp cell signaling in Drosophila. 57 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Association of human leukocyte antigen class II alleles with severe Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Hajeer, Ali H.; Balkhy, Hanan; Johani, Sameera; Yousef, Mohammed Z.; Arabi, Yaseen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a disease of the lower respiratory tract and is characterized by high mortality. It is caused by a beta coronavirus (CoV) referred to as MERS-CoV. Majority of MERS-CoV cases have been reported from Saudi Arabia. AIM: We investigated the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) Class II alleles in patients with severe MERS who were admitted in our Intensive Care Unit. METHODS: A total of 23 Saudi patients with severe MERS-CoV infection were typed for HLA class II, results were compared with those of 161 healthy controls. RESULTS: Two HLA class II alleles were associated with the disease; HLA-DRB1*11:01 and DQB1*02:02, but not with the disease outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the HLA-DRB1*11:01 and DQB1*02:02 may be associated with susceptibility to MERS. PMID:27512511

  4. Characterization and allelic variation of the transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) genes in the domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris).

    PubMed

    Gojanovich, Gregory S; Ross, Peter; Holmer, Savannah G; Holmes, Jennifer C; Hess, Paul R

    2013-12-01

    The function of the transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) complex is to shuttle antigenic peptides from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum to load MHC class I molecules for CD8(+) T-cell immunosurveillance. Here we report the promoter and coding regions of the canine TAP1 and TAP2 genes, which encode the homologous subunits forming the TAP heterodimer. By sampling genetically divergent breeds, polymorphisms in both genes were identified, although there were few amino acid differences between alleles. Splice variants were also found. When aligned to TAP genes of other species, functional regions appeared conserved, and upon phylogenetic analysis, canine sequences segregated appropriately with their orthologs. Transfer of the canine TAP2 gene into a murine TAP2-defective cell line rescued surface MHC class I expression, confirming exporter function. This data should prove useful in investigating the association of specific TAP defects or alleles with immunity to intracellular pathogens and cancer in dogs. PMID:23892057

  5. Characterization and allelic variation of the transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) genes in the domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris)

    PubMed Central

    Gojanovich, Gregory S.; Ross, Peter; Holmer, Savannah R.; Holmes, Jennifer C.; Hess, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    The function of the transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) complex is to shuttle antigenic peptides from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum to load MHC class I molecules for CD8+ T-cell immunosurveillance. Here we report the promoter and coding regions of the canine TAP1 and TAP2 genes, which encode the homologous subunits forming the TAP heterodimer. By sampling genetically divergent breeds, polymorphisms in both genes were identified, although there were few amino acid differences between alleles. Splice variants were also found. When aligned to TAP genes of other species, functional regions appeared conserved, and upon phylogenetic analysis, canine sequences segregated appropriately with their orthologs. Transfer of the canine TAP2 gene into a murine TAP2-defective cell line rescued surface MHC class I expression, confirming exporter function. This data should prove useful in investigating the association of specific TAP defects or alleles with immunity to intracellular pathogens and cancer in dogs. PMID:23892057

  6. Association of Allelic Variants of Thyroid-Binding Globulin With Puberty in Boars and Responses to Hemicastration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hemicastration of males increases weight of remaining testis when conducted before terminal differentiation of Sertoli cells. The current studies re-examined responses to hemicastration in one-quarter Meishan crossbred boars that differed for 2 alleles of thyroid-binding globulin (TBG). In the first...

  7. DNA-PKcs mutations in dogs and horses: allele frequency and association with neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qi; Bramble, Lori; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Vilma; Bell, Thomas; Meek, Katheryn

    2002-01-23

    Previously, spontaneous genetic immunodeficiencies in mice, Arabian foals, and recently in Jack Russell terriers have been ascribed to defects in DNA-PKcs (catalytic subunit of the DNA dependent protein kinase) expression. In severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) foals, a 5 bp deletion at codon 9480 results in a frameshift and a 967 amino acid deletion from the C terminus (including the entire PI3 kinase domain) and an unstable mutant protein. In SCID mice, a single base pair mutation results in a premature stop codon and deletion of 83 amino acids; as in SCID foals, the mutant protein is unstable. Here, we define the mutation within the canine DNA-PKcs gene that results in SCID. In this case, a point mutation results in a stop codon at nucleotide 10,828 and premature termination at a position 517 amino acids before the normal C terminus resulting in a functionally null allele. Thus, this is the third documentation of a spontaneous germline mutation in the C terminus of DNA-PKcs. Emerging data implicate DNA repair factors as potential tumor suppressors. Here, we have ascertained the carrier frequency of the defective DNA-PKcs genes in Arabian horses and in Jack Russell terriers. Our data indicate (in good agreement with a previous report) that the carrier frequency of the equine SCID allele is approximately 8%; in contrast, the carrier frequency of the canine SCID allele is less than 1.1%. We also assessed the frequency of the equine SCID allele in a series of 295 tumors from Arabian horses. We find a statistically significant correlation between the development of a virally induced tumor (sarcoid) and heterozygosity for the equine SCID allele. These data provide further support for an emerging consensus: that DNA-PK may normally act as a tumor suppressor through its caretaker role in maintaining chromosomal stability. PMID:11867233

  8. [Genetic study of the Penta E locus and identification of rare alleles].

    PubMed

    Lai, Li; Shen, Xiaoli; Han, Lili; Chen, Dian; Hu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the genetic polymorphisms of Penta E locus in Fujian Han population. METHODS Polymorphisms of the Penta E locus in 851 unrelated individuals were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction-short tandem repeat (PCR-STR). The mutation rate of rare alleles was analyzed in 494 paternity identification cases (in a total of 674 meiosis). RESULTS Twenty-six alleles were identified for the Penta E locus, with their frequencies ranging from 0.0006 to 0.1528. There were 7 rare alleles, among which Penta E-28.4 ([AAAGA]29) was identified for the first time. Genetic parameters of the Penta E locus in Fujian Han population were obtained, including PIC= 0.91, PE= 0.817, PD= 0.986, and mutation rate= 0.0015. CONCLUSION The Penta E locus is highly polymorphic and has a low mutation rate in Fujian Han population. It also has a good prospect in genetics applications. DNA sequencing is a good method for identifying rare alleles. PMID:26418985

  9. "Gene-swap knock-in" cassette in mice to study allelic differences in human genes.

    PubMed

    Nebert, D W; Dalton, T P; Stuart, G W; Carvan, M J

    2000-01-01

    Genetic differences in environmental toxicity and cancer susceptibility among individuals in a human population often reflect polymorphisms in the genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), drug transporters, and receptors that control DME levels. This field of study is called "ecogenetics", and a subset of this field--concerning genetic variability in response to drugs--is termed "pharmacogenetics". Although human-mouse differences might be 3- to perhaps 10-fold, human interindividual differences can be as great as 20-fold or more than 40-fold. It would be helpful, therefore, to study toxicokinetics/pharmacokinetics of particular environmental agents and drugs in mice containing these "high-" and "low-extreme" human alleles. We hope to use transgenic "knock-in" technology in order to insert human alleles in place of the orthologous mouse gene. However, the knock-in of each gene has normally been a separate event requiring the following: (a) construction of the targeting vector, (b) transfection into embryonic stem (ES) cells, (c) generation of a targeted mouse having germline transmission of the construct, and (d) backcross breeding of the knock-in mouse (at least 6-8 times) to produce a suitable genetically homogeneous background (i.e., to decrease "experimental noise"). These experiments require 1 1/2 to 2 years to complete, making this very powerful technology inefficient for routine applications. If, on the other hand, the initial knock-in targeting vector might include sequences that would allow the knocked-in gene to be exchanged (quickly and repeatedly) for one new allele after another, then testing distinctly different human polymorphic alleles in transgenic mice could be accomplished in a few months instead of several years. This "gene-swapping" technique will soon be done by zygotic injection of a "human allele cassette" into the sperm or fertilized ovum of the parental knock-in mouse inbred strain or by the cloning of whole mice from cumulus

  10. Allelic imbalance study of 16q in human primary breast carcinomas using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Dorion-Bonnet, F; Mautalen, S; Hostein, I; Longy, M

    1995-11-01

    The high incidence of allelic imbalance on the long arm of chromosome 16 in breast cancer suggests its involvement in the development and progression of the tumor. Several loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies have led to the assignment of commonly deleted regions on 16q where tumor suppressor genes may be located. The most recurrent LOH regions have been 16q22.1 and 16q22.4-qter. The aim of this study was to gain further insight into the occurrence of one or multiple "smallest regions of overlap" on 16q in a new series of breast carcinomas. Hence, a detailed allelic imbalance map was constructed for 46 sporadic breast carcinomas, using 11 polymorphic microsatellite markers located on chromosome 16. Allelic imbalance of one or more markers on 16q was shown by 30 of the 46 tumors (65%). Among these 30 carcinomas, LOH on the long arm of chromosome 16 was detected at all informative loci in 19 (41%); 13 of them showed allelic imbalance on the long but not on the short arm, with the occurrence of variable "breakpoints" in the pericentromeric region. The partial allelic imbalance in 11 tumors involved either the 16q22.1-qter LOH region or interstitial LOH regions. A commonly deleted region was found between D16S421 and D16S289 on 16q22.1 in 29 of the 30 tumors. The present data argue in favor of an important involvement of a tumor suppressor gene mapping to 16q22.1 in the genesis or progression of breast cancer. PMID:8589033

  11. Association between the seven-repeat allele of the dopamine-4 receptor gene (DRD4) and spontaneous food intake in pre-school children

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Patrícia Pelufo; Portella, André Krumel; Kennedy, James L.; Gaudreau, Hélène; Davis, Caroline; Steiner, Meir; Soares, Claudio N.; Matthews, Stephen G.; Sokolowski, Marla B.; Dubé, Laurette; Loucks, Eric B.; Hamilton, Jill; Meaney, Michael J.; Levitan, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies in adults show associations between the hypofunctional seven-repeat allele (7R) of the dopamine-4 receptor gene (DRD4), increased eating behaviour and/or obesity, particularly in females. We examined whether 7R is associated with total caloric intake and/or food choices in pre-schoolers. Methods 150 four-year-old children taking part in a birth cohort study in Canada were administered a snack test meal in a laboratory setting. Mothers also filled out a food frequency questionnaire to address childrens’ habitual food consumption. Total caloric and individual macronutrient intakes during the snack meal and specific types of foods as reported in the food diaries were compared across 7R allele carriers vs. non-carriers, using current BMI as a co-variate. Results We found significant sex by genotype interactions for fat and protein intake during the snack test. Post-hoc testing revealed that in girls, but not boys, 7R carriers ate more fat and protein than did non-carriers. Based on the food diaries, across both sexes, 7R carriers consumed more portions of ice cream and less vegetables, eggs, nuts and whole bread, suggesting a less healthy pattern of habitual food consumption. Conclusion The 7R allele of DRD4 influences macronutrient intakes and specific food choices as early as four years of age. The specific pattern of results further suggests that prior associations between the 7R allele and adult overeating/obesity may originate in food choices observable in the preschool years. Longitudinal follow-up of these children will help establish the relevance of these findings for obesity risk and prevention. PMID:24153108

  12. Association of HLA class II alleles with hepatitis C virus clearance and persistence in thalassemia patients from Iran.

    PubMed

    Samimi-Rad, Katayoun; Sadeghi, Farzin; Amirzargar, Aliakbar; Eshraghian, Mohamad Reza; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed; Rahimnia, Ramin

    2015-09-01

    There is no published data on association of HLA class II alleles with clearance or persistence after acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients from Iran. HLA DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 alleles were determined using polymerase chain reaction amplification with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) on a total of 117 thalassemia patients (63 with chronic infection, and 54 with viral clearance) and 120 healthy controls. HLA-DRB1*0301 and DQA1*0501 alleles were found significantly present in patients with HCV clearance compared to those with chronic infection (P = 0.03 and P = 0.0007, respectively). By contrast, DRB1*0701, DQA1*0201, and DQB1*0602 alleles occurred significantly in those with chronic infection compared to those with viral clearance (P = 0.004, P = 0.007, and P = 0.02, respectively). As compared to the controls, DRB1*0301, DRB1*11, DQA1*0501, and DQB1*0301 alleles showed a significant decrease in chronic patients (P = 0.002, P = 0.001, P = 0.0001, and P = 0.0004, respectively). Furthermore, the haplotype frequencies of DRB1*0301, DQA1*0501, DQB1*0201, and DRB1*1101, DQA1*0501, DQB1*0301 were found significantly higher (P = 0.004 and P = 0.04, respectively) in patients with HCV clearance than those with chronic infection. By contrast, the haplotype DRB1*0701, DQA1*0201, DQB1*0201 occurred more frequently (P = 0.02) in those with chronic infection compared with those with viral clearance. These findings suggest that particular HLA alleles and related haplotypes may have an influence on the outcome of HCV infection among the Iranian patients. Some of the HLA alleles found in the Iranian patients are different from those reported elsewhere, suggesting that the immunogenetic makeup for HCV clearance or persistence may vary based on the ethnicity. PMID:25970464

  13. The Relationship of HLA Class I and II Alleles and Haplotypes with Autism: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakbany, Manan; Awadallah, Sitalbanat

    2014-01-01

    Earlier reports showed the relationship between autism and immune genes located in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA). In this current study, we compared the HLA class I and class II alleles and haplotypes in 35 autistic children with 100 control subjects from Saudi Arabia, using PCR-SSP method and Luminex technology. In class I the HLA-A*01 (P = 0.03, OR 2.68), A*02 (P = 0.001, OR 3.02) and HLA-B*07 (P = 0.01, OR 3.27), were significantly associated with autism. Also, the haplotype A*02-B*07 was significantly higher in autistic patients than in controls (P = 0.007, OR 5.83). In class II, DRB1*1104 was significantly higher in patients than in controls (P = 0.001, OR 8.75). The DQB1*0202 (P = 0.001, OR 0.24), DQB1*0302 (P = 0.001, OR 0.14), and DQB1*0501 (P = 0.012, OR 0.25), were negatively associated with disease. While the four-loci genotype study showed that A*01-B*07-DRB1*0701-DQB1*0602 (P = 0.001, OR 41.9) and the A*31-B*51-DRB1*0103-DQB1*0302 (P = 0.012, OR 4.8) are positively associated with autism among Saudi patients. This is the first report on a foreseeable risk of association of HLA-B*07 allele with autism. Thus, HLA-B*07 allele and the closely linked haplotype A*01 B*07 DRB1*0701 DQB1*0602 may serve as a marker for genetic susceptibility to autism in Saudis. PMID:24672722

  14. Association of mitochondrial allele 4216C with increased risk for sepsis-related organ dysfunction and shock after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Huebinger, Ryan M; Gomez, Ruben; McGee, Daphne; Chang, Ling-Yu; Bender, Jessica E; O'Keeffe, Terence; Burris, Agnes M; Friese, Susan M; Purdue, Gary F; Hunt, John L; Arnoldo, Brett D; Horton, Jureta W; Barber, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    Impaired mitochondrial activity has been linked to increased risk for clinical complications after injury. Furthermore, variant mitochondrial alleles have been identified and are thought to result in decreased mitochondrial activity. These include a nonsynonymous mitochondrial polymorphism (T4216C) in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase 1 gene (ND1), encoding a key member of complex I within the electron transport chain, which is found almost exclusively among Caucasians. We hypothesized that burn patients carrying ND1 4216C are less able to generate the cellular energy necessary for an effective immune response and are at increased risk for infectious complications. The association between 4216C and outcome after burn injury was evaluated in a cohort of 175 Caucasian patients admitted to the Parkland Hospital with burns covering greater than or equal to 15% of their total body surface area or greater than or equal to 5% full-thickness burns under an institutional review board-approved protocol. To remove confounding unrelated to burn injury, individuals were excluded if they presented with significant non-burn-related trauma (Injury Severity Score > or =16), traumatic or anoxic brain injury, spinal cord injury, were HIV/AIDS positive, had active malignancy, or survived less than 48 h postadmission. Within this cohort of patients, carriage of the 4216C allele was significantly associated by unadjusted analysis with increased risk for sepsis-related organ dysfunction or septic shock (P = 0.011). After adjustment for full-thickness burn size, inhalation injury, age, and sex, carriage of the 4216C allele was associated with complicated sepsis (adjusted odds ratio = 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-9.1; P = 0.005), relative to carriers of the T allele. PMID:19487983

  15. Effect of schizophrenia risk-associated alleles in SREB2 (GPR85) on functional MRI phenotypes in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Eugenia; Sambataro, Fabio; Mattay, Venkata S; Callicott, Joseph H; Straub, Richard E; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki; Weinberger, Daniel R; Marenco, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variants in GPR85 (SREB2: rs56080411 and rs56039557) have been associated with risk for schizophrenia. Here, we test the hypothesis that these variants impact on brain function in normal subjects, measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigms that target regions with greatest SREB2 expression (hippocampal formation and amygdaloid complex). During a facial emotion recognition paradigm, a significant interaction of rs56080411 genotype by sex was found in the left amygdaloid complex (male risk allele carriers showed less activation than male homozygotes for the non-risk allele, while females showed the opposite pattern). During aversive encoding of an emotional memory paradigm, we found that risk allele carriers for rs56080411 had greater activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus. Trends in the same direction were present for rs56039557 in the right occipital cortex and right fusiform gyrus. During a working memory paradigm, a significant sex-by-genotype interaction was found with male risk allele carriers of rs56080411 having inefficient activation within the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), compared with same sex non-risk carriers, while females revealed an opposite pattern, despite similar levels of performance. These data suggest that risk-associated variants in SREB2 are associated with phenotypes similar to those found in patients with schizophrenia in the DLPFC and the amygdala of males, while the pattern is opposite in females. The findings in females and during the emotional memory paradigm are consistent with modulation by SREB2 of brain circuitries implicated in mood regulation and may be relevant to neuropsychiatric conditions other than schizophrenia. PMID:22968816

  16. Reduced severity of posttraumatic stress disorder associated with Val allele of Val66Met polymorphism at brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene among Chinese adolescents after Wenchuan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong Hui; Fan, Mei; Hu, Min Shan; Ran, Mao Sheng; Fang, Ding Zhi

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to longitudinally investigate the association of BDNF Val66Met with PTSD symptoms in Chinese Han adolescents who experienced the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Variants of BDNF Val66Met were identified by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses and verified by DNA sequencing. PTSD symptoms were assessed by the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C) among high school students at 6, 12, and 18 months after the earthquake. No differences of PTSD prevalence and PCL-C scores were found between the Val/Val homozygotes and the Met allele carriers at 6, 12, and 18 months after the earthquake regardless of gender. Decreased PTSD prevalence was observed at 12 and 18 months when compared with that at 6 months after the earthquake regardless of gender and the genotype. Meanwhile, PCL-C scores were decreased consecutively in the female subjects regardless of the genotypes. However, the scores at 18 months were lower when compared with those at 12 months in the male Val/Val homozygotes, but not in the male Met allele carriers. In addition, differences were found for the predictors of PCL-C scores and PTSD prevalence between the Val/Val homozygotes and the Met allele carriers during follow-up. These findings suggest that the association of BDNF Val66Met with PTSD is longitudinally different in Chinese Han adolescents after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. The Val allele may be associated with reduced PTSD severity in male adolescents in the later stage of PTSD rehabilitation during follow-up. PMID:26751724

  17. The HLA-DRA*0102 allele: correct nucleotide sequence and associated HLA haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Kralovicova, J; Marsh, S G E; Waller, M J; Hammarstrom, L; Vorechovsky, I

    2002-09-01

    Here we correct the nucleotide sequence of a single known variant of the HLA-DRA gene. We show that the coding regions of the HLA-DRA*0101 and HLA-DRA*0102 alleles do not differ at two codons as reported previously, but only in codon 217. Using nucleotide sequencing and DNA samples from individuals homozygous in the major histocompatibility complex, we found that the variant, leucine 217-encoding HLA-DRA*0102 allele was present on the haplotypes HLA-B*0801, DRB1*03011, DQB1*0201 (ancestral haplotype AH8.1), HLA-B*07021, DRB1*15011, DQB1*0602 (AH7.1), HLA-B*1501, DRB1*15011, DQB1*0602, HLA-B*1501, DRB1*1402, DQB1*03011 and HLA-A3, B*07021, DRB1*1301, DQB1*0603. The HLA-DRA*0101 allele coding for valine 217 was observed on the haplotypes HLA-B*5701, DRB1*0701, DQB1*03032 (AH57.1), HLA-DRB1*04011, DQB1*0302, HLA-DRB1*0701, DQB1*0202, and HLA-DRB1*0101, DQB1*05011. PMID:12445311

  18. Allelic variations in the vitamin D receptor gene, insulin secretion and parents' heights are independently associated with height in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ferrarezi, Daniela A F; Bellili-Muñoz, Naïma; Nicolau, Christiane; Cheurfa, Nadir; Guazzelli, Isabel C; Frazzatto, Eliana; Velho, Gilberto; Villares, Sandra M

    2012-10-01

    Polymorphisms in the VDR gene were reported to be associated with variations in intrauterine and postnatal growth and with adult height, but also with other traits that are strongly correlated such as the BMI, insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion and hyperglycemia. Here, we assessed the impact of VDR polymorphisms on body height and its interactions with obesity- and glucose tolerance-related traits in obese children and adolescents. We studied 173 prepubertal (Tanner's stage 1) and 146 pubertal (Tanner's stages 2-5) obese children who were referred for a weight-loss program. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped: rs1544410 (BsmI), rs7975232 (ApaI) and rs731236 (TaqI). BsmI and TaqI genotypes were significantly associated with height in pubertal children, but the associations did not reach statistical significance in prepubertal children. In stepwise regression analyses, the lean body mass, insulin secretion, BsmI or TaqI genotypes and the father's and the mother's height were independently and positively associated with height in pubertal children. These covariables accounted for 46% of the trait variance. The height of homozygous carriers of the minor allele of BsmI was 0.65 z-scores (4cm) higher than the height of homozygous carriers of the major allele (P=.0006). Haplotype analyses confirmed the associations of the minor alleles of BsmI and TaqI with increased height. In conclusion, VDR genotypes were significantly associated with height in pubertal obese children. The associations were independent from the effects of confounding traits, such as the body fat mass, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. PMID:22551951

  19. JAK2V617F allele burden is associated with thrombotic mechanisms activation in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia patients.

    PubMed

    Coucelo, Margarida; Caetano, Gonçalo; Sevivas, Teresa; Almeida Santos, Susana; Fidalgo, Teresa; Bento, Celeste; Fortuna, Manuela; Duarte, Marta; Menezes, Cristina; Ribeiro, M Letícia

    2014-01-01

    The clinical courses of polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) are characterized by thrombohemorrhagic diathesis. Several groups have suggested an association between JAK2V617F mutation and thrombosis. We hypothesized a relationship between JAK2V617F allele burden, cellular activation parameters, and thrombosis. We evaluated a group of PV and ET patients using flow cytometry: platelet CD62P, CD63, and dense granules, platelet-leukocyte aggregates (PLA), leukocyte CD11b and monocyte tissue factor (TF) expression. All patients had increased baseline platelet CD62P and CD63 expression (p < 0.05); 71 % of PV and 47 % of ET presented with a storage pool disease. Leukocyte CD11b, TF, and PLA were elevated in all patients. TF was higher in PV compared to ET (p < 0.05) and platelet-neutrophil [polymorphonuclear (PMN)] aggregates were increased in ET versus PV (p < 0.05). In ET, PLA were correlated with platelet numbers (p < 0.05). In all patients, JAK2V617F allele burden was directly correlated with monocyte CD11b. Patients with JAK2V617F allele burden >50 % presented higher levels of leukocyte activation. In ET, thrombosis was associated with JAK2V617F mutation (p < 0.05, χ (2) = 5.2), increased monocyte CD11b (p < 0.05) and with platelet-PMN aggregates (p < 0.05). In ET patients, hydroxyurea does not significantly reduce the activation parameters. Our data demonstrate that JAK2V617F allele burden is directly correlated with activation parameters that drive mechanisms that favor thrombosis. PMID:24277659

  20. WHOLE GENOME ASSOCIATION ANALYSIS IDENTIFIES SUSCEPTIBILITY ALLELES FOR PARASITIC INFECTION IN BOS TAURUS CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA markers associated with parasite indicator traits are ideal targets for study of marker assisted selection aimed at controlling infections that reduced herd use of anthelminthics. For this study, we collected fecal egg count (FEC) data from post-weaning animals of an Angus resource population c...

  1. Triglyceride-increasing alleles associated with protection against type-2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) levels are an established risk factor for type-2 diabetes (T2D). However, recent studies have hinted at the possibility that genetic risk for TG may paradoxically protect against T2D. In this study, we examined the association of genetic risk for TG with incident T2...

  2. Different patterns of allelic imbalance in sporadic tumors and tumors associated with long-term exposure to gamma-radiation.

    PubMed

    Litviakov, Nikolai V; Freidin, Maxim B; Sazonov, Aleksey E; Khalyuzova, Maria V; Buldakov, Mikhail A; Karbyshev, Mikhail S; Albakh, Еlena N; Isubakova, Daria S; Gagarin, Аleksey A; Nekrasov, Gennadiy B; Mironova, Elena B; Izosimov, Аndrey S; Takhauov, Ravil M; Karpov, Аndrei B

    2015-12-01

    The study aimed to reveal cancer related mutations in DNA repair and cell cycle genes associated with chronic occupational exposure to gamma-radiation in personnel of the Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises (SGCE). Mutations were analyzed by comparing genotypes of malignant tumors and matched normal tissues of 255 cancer patients including 98 exposed to external gamma-radiation (mean dose 128.1±150.5mSv). Also a genetic association analysis was carried out in a sample of 149 cancer patients and 908 healthy controls occupationally exposed to gamma-radiation (153.2±204.6mSv and 150.5±211.2mSv, respectively). Eight SNPs of genes of DNA excision repair were genotyped (rs13181, rs1052133, rs1042522, rs2305427, rs4244285, rs1045642, rs1805419 and rs1801133). The mutation profiles in heterozygous loci for selected SNP were different between sporadic tumors and tumors in patients exposed to radiation. In sporadic tumors, heterozygous genotype Arg/Pro of the rs1042522 SNP mutated into Arg/0 in 15 cases (9.6%) and 0/Pro in 14 cases (8.9%). The genotype Lys/Gln of the rs13181 SNP mutated into Lys/0 and 0/Gln in 9 and 4 cases, respectively. In tumors of patients exposed to low-level radiation, the rs1042522 Arg/0 mutated genotype was found in 12 cases (12.1%), while in 2 cases (2%) 0/Pro mutation was observed. Finally, the rs13181 0/Gln mutated genotype was observed in 15 cases (16,5%) . Thus, our study showed the difference in patterns of allelic imbalance in tumors appeared under low-level radiation exposure and spontaneous tumors for selected SNPs. This suggests different mechanisms of inactivation of heterozygous genotypes in sporadic and radiation-induced tumors. PMID:26653978

  3. Quinine Bitterness and Grapefruit Liking Associate with Allelic Variants in TAS2R31.

    PubMed

    Hayes, John E; Feeney, Emma L; Nolden, Alissa A; McGeary, John E

    2015-07-01

    Multiple psychophysical gene-association studies suggest a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the bitter receptor gene TAS2R19 on chromosome 12 may be functional. Previously, the Arg299Cys SNP (rs10772420) has been associated with differential bitterness of quinine and differential liking for grapefruit juice. However, quinine does not activate TAS2R19 in vitro; likewise, limonin and naringin, bitter compounds in grapefruit, do not activate TAS2R19 in vitro. Here, we examined quinine bitterness (whole-mouth swish-and-spit stimuli and regionally delivered quinine across 4 loci) and remembered liking for grapefruit juice to test whether they associate with SNPs in another nearby gene, TASR2R31. We observed SNP-phenotype associations between whole-mouth quinine bitterness and self-reported liking for grapefruit juice with SNPs in TAS2R31, and regional quinine bitterness followed a similar trend, but did not reach significance. Present data provide independent replication of prior associations reported for TAS2R19. However, we also observed strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between TAS2R19 and TAS2R31 SNPs. When present data are considered in light of existing functional expression data, this suggests phenotypic associations reported previously for rs10772420 may potentially be due to LD between this SNP and polymorphism(s) in, or closer to, TAS2R31. If confirmed, this would reduce the number of TAS2Rs with putatively functional polymorphisms to 5. PMID:26024668

  4. Quinine Bitterness and Grapefruit Liking Associate with Allelic Variants in TAS2R31

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Emma L.; Nolden, Alissa A.; McGeary, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple psychophysical gene-association studies suggest a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the bitter receptor gene TAS2R19 on chromosome 12 may be functional. Previously, the Arg299Cys SNP (rs10772420) has been associated with differential bitterness of quinine and differential liking for grapefruit juice. However, quinine does not activate TAS2R19 in vitro; likewise, limonin and naringin, bitter compounds in grapefruit, do not activate TAS2R19 in vitro. Here, we examined quinine bitterness (whole-mouth swish-and-spit stimuli and regionally delivered quinine across 4 loci) and remembered liking for grapefruit juice to test whether they associate with SNPs in another nearby gene, TASR2R31. We observed SNP–phenotype associations between whole-mouth quinine bitterness and self-reported liking for grapefruit juice with SNPs in TAS2R31, and regional quinine bitterness followed a similar trend, but did not reach significance. Present data provide independent replication of prior associations reported for TAS2R19. However, we also observed strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between TAS2R19 and TAS2R31 SNPs. When present data are considered in light of existing functional expression data, this suggests phenotypic associations reported previously for rs10772420 may potentially be due to LD between this SNP and polymorphism(s) in, or closer to, TAS2R31. If confirmed, this would reduce the number of TAS2Rs with putatively functional polymorphisms to 5. PMID:26024668

  5. Triglyceride-Increasing Alleles Associated with Protection against Type-2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Klimentidis, Yann C.; Chougule, Akshay; Arora, Amit; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) levels are an established risk factor for type-2 diabetes (T2D). However, recent studies have hinted at the possibility that genetic risk for TG may paradoxically protect against T2D. In this study, we examined the association of genetic risk for TG with incident T2D, and the interaction of baseline TG with TG genetic risk on incident T2D in 13,247 European-Americans (EA) and 3,238 African-Americans (AA) from three prospective cohort studies. A TG genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated based on 31 validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We considered several baseline covariates, including body- mass index (BMI) and lipid traits. Among EA and AA, we find, as expected, that baseline levels of TG are strongly positively associated with incident T2D (p<2 x 10-10). However, the TG GRS is negatively associated with T2D (p=0.013), upon adjusting for only race, in the full dataset. Upon additionally adjusting for age, sex, BMI, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and TG, the TG GRS is significantly and negatively associated with T2D incidence (p=7.0 x 10-8), with similar trends among both EA and AA. No single SNP appears to be driving this association. We also find a significant statistical interaction of the TG GRS with TG (pinteraction=3.3 x 10-4), whereby the association of TG with incident T2D is strongest among those with low genetic risk for TG. Further research is needed to understand the likely pleiotropic mechanisms underlying these findings, and to clarify the causal relationship between T2D and TG. PMID:26020539

  6. Albinism and disease causing pathogens in Tanzania: are alleles that are associated with OCA2 being maintained by balancing selection?

    PubMed

    Tuli, Abbas M; Valenzuela, Robert K; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Brilliant, Murray H

    2012-12-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) is present at significantly higher frequencies in sub-Saharan African populations compared to populations in other regions of the world. In Tanzania and other sub-Saharan countries, most OCA2 is associated with a common 2.7kb deletion allele. Leprosy is also in high prevalence in sub-Saharan African populations. The infectious agent of leprosy, Mycobacterium leprae, contains a gene, 38L, that is similar to OCA2. Hypopigmented patches of skin are early symptoms that present with infection of leprosy. In consideration of both the genetic similarity of OCA2 and the 38L gene of M. leprae and the involvement of pigmentation in both disorders, we hypothesized that the high rates of OCA2 may be due to heterozygote advantage. Hence, we hypothesized that carriers of the 2.7kb deletion allele of OCA2 may provide a protective advantage from infection with leprosy. We tested this hypothesis by determining the carrier frequency of the 2.7kb deletion allele from a sample of 240 individuals with leprosy from Tanzania. The results were inconclusive due to the small sample size; however, they enabled us to rule out a large protective effect, but perhaps not a small advantage. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is another infectious organism prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa that contains a gene, arsenic-transport integral membrane protein that is also similar to OCA2. Interestingly, chromosomal region 15q11-13, which also contains OCA2, was reported to be linked to tuberculosis susceptibility. Although variants within OCA2 were tested for association, the 2.7kb deletion allele of OCA2 was not tested. This led us to hypothesize that the deletion allele may confer resistance to susceptibility. Confirmation of our hypothesis would enable development of novel pharmocogenetic therapies for the treatment of tuberculosis, which in turn, may enable development of drugs that target other pathogens that utilize a similar infection mechanism as M. tuberculosis

  7. The MS Risk Allele of CD40 Is Associated with Reduced Cell-Membrane Bound Expression in Antigen Presenting Cells: Implications for Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Field, Judith; Shahijanian, Fernando; Schibeci, Stephen; Johnson, Laura; Gresle, Melissa; Laverick, Louise; Parnell, Grant; Stewart, Graeme; McKay, Fiona; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Butzkueven, Helmut; Booth, David

    2015-01-01

    Human genetic and animal studies have implicated the costimulatory molecule CD40 in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the cell specific gene and protein expression variation controlled by the CD40 genetic variant(s) associated with MS, i.e. the T-allele at rs1883832. Previously we had shown that the risk allele is expressed at a lower level in whole blood, especially in people with MS. Here, we have defined the immune cell subsets responsible for genotype and disease effects on CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein level. In cell subsets in which CD40 is most highly expressed, B lymphocytes and dendritic cells, the MS-associated risk variant is associated with reduced CD40 cell-surface protein expression. In monocytes and dendritic cells, the risk allele additionally reduces the ratio of expression of full-length versus truncated CD40 mRNA, the latter encoding secreted CD40. We additionally show that MS patients, regardless of genotype, express significantly lower levels of CD40 cell-surface protein compared to unaffected controls in B lymphocytes. Thus, both genotype-dependent and independent down-regulation of cell-surface CD40 is a feature of MS. Lower expression of a co-stimulator of T cell activation, CD40, is therefore associated with increased MS risk despite the same CD40 variant being associated with reduced risk of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Our results highlight the complexity and likely individuality of autoimmune pathogenesis, and could be consistent with antiviral and/or immunoregulatory functions of CD40 playing an important role in protection from MS. PMID:26068105

  8. Association of Allelic Variation in PtoXET16A with Growth and Wood Properties in Populus tomentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bowen; Zhang, Deqiang

    2014-01-01

    Xyloglucan endo-transglycosylases (XETs) modify the xyloglucan-cellulose framework of plant cell walls and, thus, affect cell wall expansion and strength. Dissecting the mechanism by which natural variation in XETs affects wood properties can inform breeding efforts to improve wood quality and yield traits. To this end, we isolated a full-length PtoXET16A cDNA clone from Populus tomentosa. Real-time PCR analysis showed that PtoXET16A was maximally expressed in the root, followed by phloem, cambium, and developing xylem, suggesting that PtoXET16A plays important roles in the development of vascular tissues. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium analysis revealed that PtoXET16A has high single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity (π = 0.01266 and θw = 0.01392) and low linkage disequilibrium (r2 ≥ 0.1, within 900 bp). SNP- and haplotype-based association analyses of 426 individuals from a natural population indicated that nine SNPs (including two non-synonymous markers and one splicing variant) (p ≤ 0.05, false discovery rate Q ≤ 0.01), and nine haplotypes (p ≤ 0.05) were significantly associated with growth and wood properties, each explaining from 3.40%–10.95% of phenotypic variance. This work shows that examination of allelic variation and linkage disequilibrium by a candidate-gene-based approach can help to decipher the genetic basis of wood formation. Moreover, the SNP markers identified in this study can potentially be applied for marker-assisted selection to improve growth and wood-property traits in Populus. PMID:25250912

  9. The Minor Allele of rs7574865 in the STAT4 Gene Is Associated with Increased mRNA and Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lamana, Amalia; López-Santalla, Mercedes; Castillo-González, Raquel; Ortiz, Ana María; Martín, Javier; García-Vicuña, Rosario; González-Álvaro, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 confers risk of developing autoimmune disorders. However, its functional significance remains unclear. Here we analyze how rs7574865 affects the transcription of STAT4 and its protein expression. Methods We studied 201 patients (80% female; median age, 54 years; median disease duration, 5.4 months) from PEARL study. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic data were collected at each visit. IL-6 serum levels were measured by enzyme immune assay. The rs7574865 was genotyped using TaqMan probes. The expression levels of STAT4 mRNA were determined at 182 visits from 69 patients using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. STAT4 protein was assessed by western blot in 62 samples from 34 patients. To determine the effect of different variables on the expression of STAT4 mRNA and protein, we performed multivariate longitudinal analyses using generalized linear models. Results After adjustment for age, disease activity and glucocorticoid dose as confounders, the presence of at least one copy of the T allele of rs7574865 was significantly associated with higher levels of STAT4 mRNA. Similarly, TT patients showed significantly higher levels of STAT4 protein than GG patients. IL-6 induced STAT4 and STAT5 phosphorylation in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Patients carrying at least one T allele of rs7574865 displayed lower levels of serum IL-6 compared to GG homozygous; by contrast the production of C-reactive protein was similar in both populations. Conclusion Our data suggest that the presence of the rs7574865 T allele enhances STAT4 mRNA transcription and protein expression. It may enhance the signaling of molecules depending on the STAT4 pathway. PMID:26569609

  10. Methotrexate-induced mucositis in acute leukemia patients is not associated with the MTHFR 677T allele in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J; Coconi-Linares, Lucia Nancy; Garcés-Eisele, Javier; Reyes-Núñez, Virginia

    2007-10-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) has two common variants with reduced activity due to polymorphisms at nucleotides 677 and 1298. Both affect folate metabolism and thus remethylation of homocysteine, but are also thought to affect nucleotide synthesis and DNA methylation. Methotrexate (MTX), which interrupts folate metabolism, is used in the treatment of a variety of diseases including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but exerts in some patients toxic effects on fast dividing tissues such as mucosal epithelia. The enhanced toxicity may be due to cooperative effects between MTX and MTHFR variants. Accordingly, it has been reported that carrying the 677T allele of the MTHFR is a risk factor for MTX-associated mucositis. As in the Mexican population, which is characterized by a high prevalence of the 677T MTHFR variant, several of its commonly associated defects have not been observed, we investigated the relationship between MTX toxicity and the 677T allele. Out of 28 patients with ALL (CC: 2, CT: 10, TT: 16), 16 had episodes of MTX-associated mucositis (CC: 0, CT: 6, TT: 10). Neither at the gene level nor at the genotype level was a significant association with mucositis found. It may be postulated that the risk of higher MTX toxicity in patients with decreased MTHFR activity could be neutralized by the normally folate rich diet in Mexico. PMID:17891601

  11. A single nomenclature and associated database for alleles at the MHC class II DRB1 locus of sheep: IPD-MHC-OLA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of standardised nomenclatures with associated databases containing reference sequences for alleles at polymorphic loci within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) has been facilitated by the development of the Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD-MHC). Recently, included within I...

  12. Parent-of-origin specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zhao, Jing Hua; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J. Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coveillo, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D’adamo, Adamo Pio; Smith, George Davey; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco EJ; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul DP; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth JF; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild IA; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F

    2014-01-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality1. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation2,3, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P<5×10−8) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1/WDR25, MKRN3/MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signaling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition. PMID:25231870

  13. Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche.

    PubMed

    Perry, John R B; Day, Felix; Elks, Cathy E; Sulem, Patrick; Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Hua Zhao, Jing; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Davey Smith, George; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco E J; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth J F; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F; Stefansson, Kari; Murabito, Joanne M; Ong, Ken K

    2014-10-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1-WDR25, MKRN3-MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signalling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition. PMID:25231870

  14. A Common Cancer Risk-Associated Allele in the hTERT Locus Encodes a Dominant Negative Inhibitor of Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Killedar, Anagha; Stutz, Michael D.; Sobinoff, Alexander P.; Tomlinson, Christopher G.; Bryan, Tracy M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Reddel, Roger R.; Pickett, Hilda A.

    2015-01-01

    The TERT-CLPTM1L region of chromosome 5p15.33 is a multi-cancer susceptibility locus that encodes the reverse transcriptase subunit, hTERT, of the telomerase enzyme. Numerous cancer-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including rs10069690, have been identified within the hTERT gene. The minor allele (A) at rs10069690 creates an additional splice donor site in intron 4 of hTERT, and is associated with an elevated risk of multiple cancers including breast and ovarian carcinomas. We previously demonstrated that the presence of this allele resulted in co-production of full length (FL)-hTERT and an alternatively spliced, INS1b, transcript. INS1b does not encode the reverse transcriptase domain required for telomerase enzyme activity, but we show here that INS1b protein retains its ability to bind to the telomerase RNA subunit, hTR. We also show that INS1b expression results in decreased telomerase activity, telomere shortening, and an increased telomere-specific DNA damage response (DDR). We employed antisense oligonucleotides to manipulate endogenous transcript expression in favor of INS1b, which resulted in a decrease in telomerase activity. These data provide the first detailed mechanistic insights into a cancer risk-associated SNP in the hTERT locus, which causes cell type-specific expression of INS1b transcript from the presence of an additional alternative splice site created in intron 4 by the risk allele. We predict that INS1b expression levels cause subtle inadequacies in telomerase-mediated telomere maintenance, resulting in an increased risk of genetic instability and therefore of tumorigenesis. PMID:26053551

  15. IL-18, TNF, and IFN-γ alleles and genotypes are associated with susceptibility to chronic hepatitis B infection and severity of liver injury.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Sandro da Costa; Chachá, Silvana Gama Florêncio; Souza, Fernanda Fernandes; Teixeira, Andreza Corrêa; Santana, Rodrigo de Carvalho; Deghaide, Neifi Hassan Saloun; Rodrigues, Sandra; Marano, Leonardo Arduíno; Mendes-Junior, Celso Teixeira; Zucoloto, Sérgio; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Martinelli, Ana de Lourdes Candolo

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the association of polymorphisms in the IL-18 (-607C/A and -137C/G), IFNγ (+874 A/T), and TNF (-238 A/G and -308 A/G) genes with susceptibility to HBV infection and severity of liver injury. A total of 259 chronic HBV-infected patients followed at the University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil, and 202 healthy individuals were studied. Four Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) were amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Liver biopsy was performed in 212 HBV-infected patients and classified according to severity of liver fibrosis (scores 0-4) and necroinflammatory activity (HAI scores 0-18). TNF-308*A allele (P < 0.001; OR = 2.16) and TNF -308 AA genotype (P = 0.026; OR = 5.43) were associated with susceptibility to HBV infection. An association was found between severe liver fibrosis when compared to mild fibrosis and the following polymorphisms: Alleles IL-18 -137*G (P = 0.004; OR = 3.45), TNF -308*A (P < 0.001; OR = 3.39), and IFNγ +874*T (P = 0.029; OR = 1.85) and IL-18 -137 GG genotype (P = 0.009; OR = 3.70). No significant association was found between IL-18 (-607 A/C) polymorphism and severity of liver fibrosis. Alleles IL-18 -137*G (P = 0.028; OR = 2.64) and TNF-308*A (P = 0.002; OR = 3.06) and IL-18 -137 GG genotype (P = 0.011; OR = 4.20) were associated with severe necroinflammatory activity (HAI>12) when compared to mild necroinflammatory activity (HAI 1-8). The results suggest that IL-18 -137C/G, TNF-308 G/A and IFNγ +874 A/T SNPs were associated to more severe liver injury in chronic HBV infection. TNF -308*A allele and TNF -308 AA genotype could play a role in the susceptibility to HBV infection. PMID:25952099

  16. Utilizing Murine Inducible Telomerase Alleles in the Studies of Tissue Degeneration/Regeneration and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shingu, Takashi; Jaskelioff, Mariela; Yuan, Liang; Ding, Zhihu; Protopopov, Alexei; Kost-Alimova, Maria; Hu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction-induced loss of genome integrity and its associated DNA damage signaling and checkpoint responses are well-established drivers that cause tissue degeneration during ageing. Cancer, with incidence rates greatly increasing with age, is characterized by short telomere lengths and high telomerase activity. To study the roles of telomere dysfunction and telomerase reactivation in ageing and cancer, the protocol shows how to generate two murine inducible telomerase knock-in alleles 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT)-inducible TERT-Estrogen Receptor (mTERT-ER) and Lox-Stopper-LoxTERT (LSL-mTERT). The protocol describes the procedures to induce telomere dysfunction and reactivate telomerase activity in mTERT-ER and LSL-mTERT mice in vivo. The representative data show that reactivation of telomerase activity can ameliorate the tissue degenerative phenotypes induced by telomere dysfunction. In order to determine the impact of telomerase reactivation on tumorigenesis, we generated prostate tumor model G4 PB-Cre4 PtenL/L p53L/L LSL-mTERTL/L and thymic T-cell lymphoma model G4 Atm-/- mTERTER/ER. The representative data show that telomerase reactivation in the backdrop of genomic instability induced by telomere dysfunction can greatly enhance tumorigenesis. The protocol also describes the procedures used to isolate neural stem cells (NSCs) from mTERT-ER and LSL-mTERT mice and reactivate telomerase activity in NSCs in vitro. The representative data show that reactivation of telomerase can enhance the self-renewal capability and neurogenesis in vitro. Finally, the protocol describes the procedures for performing telomere FISH (Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization) on both mouse FFPE (Formalin Fixed and Paraffin Embedded) brain tissues and metaphase chromosomes of cultured cells. PMID:25938254

  17. The ADA*2 allele of the adenosine deaminase gene (20q13.11) and recurrent spontaneous abortions: an age-dependent association

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Daniela Prudente Teixeira; Spegiorin, Lígia Cosentino Junqueira Franco; de Mattos, Cinara Cássia Brandão; Oliani, Antonio Helio; Vaz-Oliani, Denise Cristina Mós; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adenosine deaminase acts on adenosine and deoxyadenosine metabolism and modulates the immune response. The adenosine deaminase G22A polymorphism (20q.11.33) influences the level of adenosine deaminase enzyme expression, which seems to play a key role in maintaining pregnancy. The adenosine deaminase 2 phenotype has been associated with a protective effect against recurrent spontaneous abortions in European Caucasian women. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the G22A polymorphism of the adenosine deaminase gene is associated with recurrent spontaneous abortions in Brazilian women. METHODS: A total of 311 women were recruited to form two groups: G1, with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortions (N = 129), and G2, without a history of abortions (N = 182). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood with a commercial kit and PCR-RFLP analysis was used to identify the G22A genetic polymorphism. Fisher's exact test and odds ratio values were used to compare the proportions of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between women with and without a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion (p<0.05). The differences between mean values for categorical data were calculated using unpaired t tests. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was assessed with a chi-square test. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were identified for the frequencies of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between the G1 and G2 groups when adjusted for maternal age. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the adenosine deaminase *2 allele is associated with a low risk for recurrent spontaneous abortions, but this association is dependent on older age. PMID:22086524

  18. Transcriptome and Allele Specificity Associated with a 3BL Locus for Fusarium Crown Rot Resistance in Bread Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Stiller, Jiri; Zhao, Qiang; Feng, Qi; Cavanagh, Colin; Wang, Penghao; Gardiner, Donald; Choulet, Frédéric; Feuillet, Catherine; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yuming; Yan, Guijun; Han, Bin; Manners, John M.; Liu, Chunji

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium pathogens cause two major diseases in cereals, Fusarium crown rot (FCR) and head blight (FHB). A large-effect locus conferring resistance to FCR disease was previously located to chromosome arm 3BL (designated as Qcrs-3B) and several independent sets of near isogenic lines (NILs) have been developed for this locus. In this study, five sets of the NILs were used to examine transcriptional changes associated with the Qcrs-3B locus and to identify genes linked to the resistance locus as a step towards the isolation of the causative gene(s). Of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) detected between the NILs, 12.7% was located on the single chromosome 3B. Of the expressed genes containing SNP (SNP-EGs) detected, 23.5% was mapped to this chromosome. Several of the DEGs and SNP-EGs are known to be involved in host-pathogen interactions, and a large number of the DEGs were among those detected for FHB in previous studies. Of the DEGs detected, 22 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and they included eight which were detected in the resistant isolines only. The enrichment of DEG, and not necessarily those containing SNPs between the resistant and susceptible isolines, around the Qcrs-3B locus is suggestive of local regulation of this region by the resistance allele. Functions for 13 of these DEGs are known. Of the SNP-EGs, 28 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and biological functions for 16 of them are known. These results provide insights into responses regulated by the 3BL locus and identify a tractable number of target genes for fine mapping and functional testing to identify the causative gene(s) at this QTL. PMID:25405461

  19. Transcriptome and allele specificity associated with a 3BL locus for Fusarium crown rot resistance in bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Stiller, Jiri; Zhao, Qiang; Feng, Qi; Cavanagh, Colin; Wang, Penghao; Gardiner, Donald; Choulet, Frédéric; Feuillet, Catherine; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yuming; Yan, Guijun; Han, Bin; Manners, John M; Liu, Chunji

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium pathogens cause two major diseases in cereals, Fusarium crown rot (FCR) and head blight (FHB). A large-effect locus conferring resistance to FCR disease was previously located to chromosome arm 3BL (designated as Qcrs-3B) and several independent sets of near isogenic lines (NILs) have been developed for this locus. In this study, five sets of the NILs were used to examine transcriptional changes associated with the Qcrs-3B locus and to identify genes linked to the resistance locus as a step towards the isolation of the causative gene(s). Of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) detected between the NILs, 12.7% was located on the single chromosome 3B. Of the expressed genes containing SNP (SNP-EGs) detected, 23.5% was mapped to this chromosome. Several of the DEGs and SNP-EGs are known to be involved in host-pathogen interactions, and a large number of the DEGs were among those detected for FHB in previous studies. Of the DEGs detected, 22 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and they included eight which were detected in the resistant isolines only. The enrichment of DEG, and not necessarily those containing SNPs between the resistant and susceptible isolines, around the Qcrs-3B locus is suggestive of local regulation of this region by the resistance allele. Functions for 13 of these DEGs are known. Of the SNP-EGs, 28 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and biological functions for 16 of them are known. These results provide insights into responses regulated by the 3BL locus and identify a tractable number of target genes for fine mapping and functional testing to identify the causative gene(s) at this QTL. PMID:25405461

  20. Preferential Binding to Elk-1 by SLE-Associated IL10 Risk Allele Upregulates IL10 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Jennifer A.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Harley, John B.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Alarcόn-Riquelme, Marta E.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Sivils, Kathy Moser; James, Judith A.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Merrill, Joan T.; Scofield, R. Hal; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Stevens, Anne M.; Boackle, Susan A.; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jiyoung; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Freedman, Barry I.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Martin, Javier; Yu, C. Yung; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Langefeld, Carl D.; Chen, Weiling; Grossman, Jennifer M.; Cantor, Rita M.; Hahn, Bevra H.; Tsao, Betty P.

    2013-01-01

    Immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) is elevated in sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlating with disease activity. The established association of IL10 with SLE and other autoimmune diseases led us to fine map causal variant(s) and to explore underlying mechanisms. We assessed 19 tag SNPs, covering the IL10 gene cluster including IL19, IL20 and IL24, for association with SLE in 15,533 case and control subjects from four ancestries. The previously reported IL10 variant, rs3024505 located at 1 kb downstream of IL10, exhibited the strongest association signal and was confirmed for association with SLE in European American (EA) (P = 2.7×10−8, OR = 1.30), but not in non-EA ancestries. SNP imputation conducted in EA dataset identified three additional SLE-associated SNPs tagged by rs3024505 (rs3122605, rs3024493 and rs3024495 located at 9.2 kb upstream, intron 3 and 4 of IL10, respectively), and SLE-risk alleles of these SNPs were dose-dependently associated with elevated levels of IL10 mRNA in PBMCs and circulating IL-10 protein in SLE patients and controls. Using nuclear extracts of peripheral blood cells from SLE patients for electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified specific binding of transcription factor Elk-1 to oligodeoxynucleotides containing the risk (G) allele of rs3122605, suggesting rs3122605 as the most likely causal variant regulating IL10 expression. Elk-1 is known to be activated by phosphorylation and nuclear localization to induce transcription. Of interest, phosphorylated Elk-1 (p-Elk-1) detected only in nuclear extracts of SLE PBMCs appeared to increase with disease activity. Co-expression levels of p-Elk-1 and IL-10 were elevated in SLE T, B cells and monocytes, associated with increased disease activity in SLE B cells, and were best downregulated by ERK inhibitor. Taken together, our data suggest that preferential binding of activated Elk-1 to the IL10 rs3122605-G allele upregulates IL

  1. Major histocompatibility complex class II alleles and haplotypes associated with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in greyhounds.

    PubMed

    Shiel, R E; Kennedy, L J; Nolan, C M; Mooney, C T; Callanan, J J

    2014-09-01

    Non-suppurative meningoencephalitis is a breed-restricted canine neuroinflammatory disorder affecting young greyhounds in Ireland. A genetic risk factor is suspected because of the development of disease in multiple siblings and an inability to identify a causative infectious agent. The aim of this study was to examine potential associations between dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II haplotype and the presence of the disease. DLA three locus haplotypes were determined in 31 dogs with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis and in 115 healthy control dogs using sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. All dogs were unrelated at the parental level. Two haplotypes (DRB1*01802/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00802 and DRB1*01501/DQA1*00601/DQB1*02201) were significantly (P = 0.0099 and 0.037) associated with the presence of meningoencephalitis, with odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of 5.531 (1.168-26.19) and 3.736 (1.446-9.652), respectively. These results confirm that there is an association between DLA class II haplotype and greyhound meningoencephalitis, suggesting an immunogenetic risk factor for the development of the disease. Greyhound meningoencephalitis may be a suitable model for human neuroinflammatory diseases with an immunogenetic component. PMID:24851745

  2. Characterization of Sucrose transporter alleles and their association with seed yield-related traits in Brassica napus L

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sucrose is the primary photosynthesis product and the principal translocating form within higher plants. Sucrose transporters (SUC/SUT) play a critical role in phloem loading and unloading. Photoassimilate transport is a major limiting factor for seed yield. Our previous research demonstrated that SUT co-localizes with yield-related quantitative trait loci. This paper reports the isolation of BnA7.SUT1 alleles and their promoters and their association with yield-related traits. Results Two novel BnA7.SUT1 genes were isolated from B. napus lines 'Eagle' and 'S-1300' and designated as BnA7.SUT1.a and BnA7.SUT1.b, respectively. The BnA7.SUT1 protein exhibited typical SUT features and showed high amino acid homology with related species. Promoters of BnA7.SUT1.a and BnA7.SUT1.b were also isolated and classified as pBnA7.SUT1.a and pBnA7.SUT1.b, respectively. Four dominant sequence-characterized amplified region markers were developed to distinguish BnA7.SUT1.a and BnA7.SUT1.b. The two genes were estimated as alleles with two segregating populations (F2 and BC1) obtained by crossing '3715'×'3769'. BnA7.SUT1 was mapped to the A7 linkage group of the TN doubled haploid population. In silico analysis of 55 segmental BnA7.SUT1 alleles resulted three BnA7.SUT1 clusters: pBnA7.SUT1.a- BnA7.SUT1.a (type I), pBnA7.SUT1.b- BnA7.SUT1.a (type II), and pBnA7.SUT1.b- BnA7.SUT1.b (type III). Association analysis with a diverse panel of 55 rapeseed lines identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in promoter and coding domain sequences of BnA7.SUT1 that were significantly associated with one of three yield-related traits: number of effective first branches (EFB), siliques per plant (SP), and seed weight (n = 1000) (TSW) across all four environments examined. SNPs at other BnA7.SUT1 sites were also significantly associated with at least one of six yield-related traits: EFB, SP, number of seeds per silique, seed yield per plant, block yield, and TSW. Expression levels

  3. Hypomorphic variant of the slow allele of C3 associated with hypocomplementemia and hematuria.

    PubMed

    McLean, R H; Bryan, R K; Winkelstein, J

    1985-05-01

    This report describes the first instance of a hypomorphic variant (C3*s) of the most common C3 allele, C3 Slow, which was detected in a four-year-old Caucasian boy with hematuria. Analysis of C3 phenotypes, as determined by agarose electrophoresis, showed a hypomorphic C3 Slow in the patient and a maternal aunt. Serum C3 concentration was significantly reduced in the patient and his mother (610 and 750 micrograms/ml; normal +/- 1 SD = 1,240 +/- 240 micrograms/ml) and was at the lower limits of normal in the affected aunt (770 micrograms/ml). The mother's phenotype was C3 S (? Ss) and she was the presumed carrier, since the father (C3 FS) had neither an abnormal C3 S band nor a low C3 concentration (980 micrograms/ml). Total hemolytic complement was significantly reduced only in the patient (19 units/ml; normal = 38 +/- 16). Hypomorphic C3 variants should be considered in the evaluation of decreased serum C3 levels. PMID:3993666

  4. A leucine-to-proline substitution causes a defective [alpha]-antichymotrypsin allele associated with familial obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Poller, W.; Scholz, S.; Fischer, M. ); Faber, J.P.; Tief, K.; Olek, K.; Kirchgesser, M. ); Weidinger, S. ); Heidtmann, H.H. )

    1993-09-01

    Using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and direct sequencing of amplified genomic DNA, the authors have identified two defective mutants of the human [alpha][sub 1]-antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A leucine 55-to-proline substitution causing a defective ACT allele (Bochum-1) was observed in a family with COPD in three subsequent generations. Another mutation, proline 229-to-alanine (Bonn-1), was associated with ACT serum deficiency in four patients with a positive family history. These mutations were not detected among 100 healthy control subjects, suggesting a possible pathogenetic role of ACT gene defects in a subset of patients with COPD. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. A viable Arabidopsis pex13 missense allele confers severe peroxisomal defects and decreases PEX5 association with peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Andrew W.; Fleming, Wendell A.; Burkhart, Sarah E.; Ratzel, Sarah E.; Bjornson, Marta; Bartel, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes are organelles that catabolize fatty acids and compartmentalize other oxidative metabolic processes in eukaryotes. Using a forward-genetic screen designed to recover severe peroxisome-defective mutants, we isolated a viable allele of the peroxisome biogenesis gene PEX13 with striking peroxisomal defects. The pex13-4 mutant requires an exogenous source of fixed carbon for pre-photosynthetic development and is resistant to the protoauxin indole-3-butyric acid. Delivery of peroxisome-targeted matrix proteins depends on the PEX5 receptor docking with PEX13 at the peroxisomal membrane, and we found severely reduced import of matrix proteins and less organelle-associated PEX5 in pex13-4 seedlings. Moreover, pex13-4 physiological and molecular defects were partially ameliorated when PEX5 was overexpressed, suggesting that PEX5 docking is partially compromised in this mutant and can be improved by increasing PEX5 levels. Because previously described Arabidopsis pex13 alleles either are lethal or confer only subtle defects, the pex13-4 mutant provides valuable insight into plant peroxisome receptor docking and matrix protein import. PMID:25008153

  6. Allele-specific PCR for detecting the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Liu, Qi; Li, Mei-Ya; Huang, Shui-Xian; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2016-10-10

    Mutations in mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1) are the important causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Of these mutations, the homoplasmic m.1555A>G or m.1494C>T mutation in the highly conserved A-site of MT-RNR1 gene has been found to be associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss in many families worldwide. Since the m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations are sensitive to ototoxic drugs, therefore, screening for the presence of these mutations is important for early diagnosis and prevention of deafness. For this purpose, we recently developed a novel allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) which is able to simultaneously detect these mutations. To assess its accuracy, in this study, we employed this method to screen the frequency of m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations in 200 deafness patients and 120 healthy subjects. Consequently, four m.1555A>G and four m.1494C>T mutations were identified; among these, only one patient with the m.1494C>T mutation had an obvious family history of hearing loss. Strikingly, clinical evaluation showed that this family exhibited a high penetrance of hearing loss. In particular, the penetrances of hearing loss were 80% with the aminoglycoside included and 20% when excluded. PCR-Sanger sequencing of the mitochondrial genomes confirmed the presence of the m.1494C>T mutation and identified a set of polymorphisms belonging to mitochondrial haplogroup A. However, the lack of functional variants in mitochondrial and nuclear modified genes (GJB2 and TRMU) in this family indicated that mitochondrial haplogroup and nuclear genes may not play important roles in the phenotypic expression of the m.1494C>T mutation. Thus, other modification factors, such as environmental factor, aminoglycosides or epigenetic modification may have contributed to the high penetrance of hearing loss in this family. Taken together, our data showed that this assay is an effective approach that could be used for detection the deafness-associated MT-RNR1

  7. Allelic Variations at Four Major Maturity E Genes and Transcriptional Abundance of the E1 Gene Are Associated with Flowering Time and Maturity of Soybean Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yueqiang; Chen, Xin; Ren, Haixiang; Yang, Jiayin; Cheng, Wen; Zong, Chunmei; Gu, Heping; Qiu, Hongmei; Wu, Hongyan; Zhang, Xingzheng; Cui, Tingting; Xia, Zhengjun

    2014-01-01

    The time to flowering and maturity are ecologically and agronomically important traits for soybean landrace and cultivar adaptation. As a typical short-day crop, long day conditions in the high-latitude regions require soybean cultivars with photoperiod insensitivity that can mature before frost. Although the molecular basis of four major E loci (E1 to E4) have been deciphered, it is not quite clear whether, or to what degree, genetic variation and the expression level of the four E genes are associated with the time to flowering and maturity of soybean cultivars. In this study, we genotyped 180 cultivars at E1 to E4 genes, meanwhile, the time to flowering and maturity of those cultivars were investigated at six geographic locations in China from 2011 to 2012 and further confirmed in 2013. The percentages of recessive alleles at E1, E2, E3 and E4 loci were 38.34%, 84.45%, 36.33%, and 7.20%, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that allelic variations at each of four loci had a significant effect on flowering time as well as maturity. We classified the 180 cultivars into eight genotypic groups based on allelic variations of the four major E loci. The genetic group of e1-nf representing dysfunctional alleles at the E1 locus flowered earliest in all the geographic locations. In contrast, cultivars in the E1E2E3E4 group originated from the southern areas flowered very late or did not flower before frost at high latitude locations. The transcriptional abundance of functional E1 gene was significantly associated with flowering time. However, the ranges of time to flowering and maturity were quite large within some genotypic groups, implying the presence of some other unknown genetic factors that are involved in control of flowering time or maturity. Known genes (e.g. E3 and E4) and other unknown factors may function, at least partially, through regulation of the expression of the E1 gene. PMID:24830458

  8. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients. Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3′-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5′-UTR polymorphisms). For neither the 3′- nor the 5′-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance. The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold

  9. A study of allelic polymorphism of four short tandem repeats in the population of northwestern Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Aseev, M.V.; Skakun, V.N.; Baranov, V.S.

    1995-06-01

    Characteristics of the allelic polymorphisms of the trimeric AGC repeat of the androgen receptor gene (Xq11-12), exon 1 (AR); the tetrameric ATCT repeat of the von Willebrand factor gene (12p12), intron 40 (vWF); the AGAT repeat of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (Xq26) (HPRT); and the AGAT repeat of anonymous DNA sequences of the short arm of chromosome X (STRX1) were studied in 160 DNA samples from unrelated inhabitants of northwestern Russia using the method of polymerase chain reaction. Seventeen, ten, eight, and nine alleles were revealed electrophoretically for short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The heterozygosity indices for these repeats were 0.80, 0.70, 0.54, and 0.58, respectively. The values for AR and vWF correlated with those expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, whereas the values for HPRT and STRX1 differed significantly from those theoretically expected. The individualization potentials were 0.045, 0.135, 0.095, and 0.061 for the short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The distribution of genotypes for the set of these four loci in the population studied was determined. The possibilities of using the studied polymorphic marker systems in molecular diagnosis of the corresponding monogenic diseases - spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (AR), Lesch-Nyhan disease (HPRT), and von Willebrand disease (vWF) - as well as in population human genetics, testing of personal identity, and molecular approaches to the estimation of mutagenic activity are discussed. 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. A commonly carried allele of the obesity-related FTO gene is associated with reduced brain volume in the healthy elderly

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jason L.; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek P.; Leow, Alex D.; Dinov, Ivo D.; Toga, Arthur W.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Gerber, Jill D.; Allen, April N.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Stephan, Dietrich A.; DeCarli, Charles S.; DeChairo, Bryan M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Raji, Cyrus A.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Becker, James T.; Carmichael, Owen T.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Thal, Leon; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Gamst, Anthony; Potter, William Z.; Montine, Tom; Anders, Dale; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Trojanowki, John; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Kornak, John; Kachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Vorobik, Remi; Quinn, Joseph; Schneider, Lon; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan; Fleisher, Adam S.; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Badger, Beverly; Grossman, Hillel; Tang, Cheuk; Stern, Jessica; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Bach, Julie; Duara, Ranjan; Isaacson, Richard; Strauman, Silvia; Albert, Marilyn S.; Pedroso, Julia; Toroney, Jaimie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; De Santi, Susan M; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Aiello, Marilyn; Clark, Christopher M.; Pham, Cassie; Nunez, Jessica; Smith, Charles D.; Given II, Curtis A.; Hardy, Peter; DeKosky, Steven T.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Porsteinsson, Anton; McCallum, Colleen; Cramer, Steven C.; Mulnard, Ruth A.; McAdams-Ortiz, Catherine; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Laubinger, Mary M.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Fletcher, Rita; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin; Herring, Scott; Hake, Ann M.; van Dyck, Christopher H.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Bifano, Laurel A.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Graham, Simon; Caldwell, Curtis; Feldman, Howard; Assaly, Michele; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R.; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Gitelman, Darren; Johnson, Nancy; Mesulam, Marsel; Sadowsky, Carl; Villena, Teresa; Mesner, Scott; Aisen, Paul S.; Johnson, Kathleen B.; Behan, Kelly E.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Ashford, Wes; Sabbagh, Marwan; Connor, Donald; Obradov, Sanja; Killiany, Ron; Norbash, Alex; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; Wang, Paul; Auchus, Alexander P.; Huang, Juebin; Friedland, Robert P.; DeCarli, Charles; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Kittur, Smita; Mirje, Seema; Johnson, Sterling C.; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Highum, Diane; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre N.; Hendin, Barry A.; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Beversdorf, David Q.; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Gandy, Sam; Marenberg, Marjorie E.; Rovner, Barry W.; Pearlson, Godfrey; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Pare, Nadia; Williamson, Jeff D.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Potter, Huntington; Ashok Raj, B.; Giordano, Amy; Ott, Brian R.; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Cohen, Ronald; Wilks, Kerri L.

    2010-01-01

    A recently identified variant within the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is carried by 46% of Western Europeans and is associated with an ~1.2 kg higher weight, on average, in adults and an ~1 cm greater waist circumference. With >1 billion overweight and 300 million obese persons worldwide, it is crucial to understand the implications of carrying this very common allele for the health of our aging population. FTO is highly expressed in the brain and elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with brain atrophy, but it is unknown how the obesity-associated risk allele affects human brain structure. We therefore generated 3D maps of regional brain volume differences in 206 healthy elderly subjects scanned with MRI and genotyped as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We found a pattern of systematic brain volume deficits in carriers of the obesity-associated risk allele versus noncarriers. Relative to structure volumes in the mean template, FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers had an average brain volume difference of ~8% in the frontal lobes and 12% in the occipital lobes—these regions also showed significant volume deficits in subjects with higher BMI. These brain differences were not attributable to differences in cholesterol levels, hypertension, or the volume of white matter hyperintensities; which were not detectably higher in FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers. These brain maps reveal that a commonly carried susceptibility allele for obesity is associated with structural brain atrophy, with implications for the health of the elderly. PMID:20404173

  11. A commonly carried allele of the obesity-related FTO gene is associated with reduced brain volume in the healthy elderly.

    PubMed

    Ho, April J; Stein, Jason L; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek P; Leow, Alex D; Dinov, Ivo D; Toga, Arthur W; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Gerber, Jill D; Allen, April N; Corneveaux, Jason J; Stephan, Dietrich A; DeCarli, Charles S; DeChairo, Bryan M; Potkin, Steven G; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Raji, Cyrus A; Lopez, Oscar L; Becker, James T; Carmichael, Owen T; Thompson, Paul M

    2010-05-01

    A recently identified variant within the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is carried by 46% of Western Europeans and is associated with an approximately 1.2 kg higher weight, on average, in adults and an approximately 1 cm greater waist circumference. With >1 billion overweight and 300 million obese persons worldwide, it is crucial to understand the implications of carrying this very common allele for the health of our aging population. FTO is highly expressed in the brain and elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with brain atrophy, but it is unknown how the obesity-associated risk allele affects human brain structure. We therefore generated 3D maps of regional brain volume differences in 206 healthy elderly subjects scanned with MRI and genotyped as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We found a pattern of systematic brain volume deficits in carriers of the obesity-associated risk allele versus noncarriers. Relative to structure volumes in the mean template, FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers had an average brain volume difference of approximately 8% in the frontal lobes and 12% in the occipital lobes-these regions also showed significant volume deficits in subjects with higher BMI. These brain differences were not attributable to differences in cholesterol levels, hypertension, or the volume of white matter hyperintensities; which were not detectably higher in FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers. These brain maps reveal that a commonly carried susceptibility allele for obesity is associated with structural brain atrophy, with implications for the health of the elderly. PMID:20404173

  12. Reduced 3-O-methyl-dopa levels in OCD patients and their unaffected parents is associated with the low activity M158 COMT allele

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Richard; Betancur, Catalina; Chaste, Pauline; Kernéis, Solen; Stopin, Astrid; Mouren, Marie-Christine; Collet, Corinne; Bourgeron, Thomas; Leboyer, Marion; Launay, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Background The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene is considered as a candidate gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Specifically, the COMT low-activity M158 allele has been suggested to be associated with OCD. However, there is no study reporting that COMT activity is decreased in OCD patients and that the decrease is mediated by the V158M polymorphism. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to assess COMT activity in OCD by measuring plasma levels of 3-O-methyl-dopa (3-OMD), which result from the methylation of levodopa by COMT, and to investigate the relationship between 3-OMD levels and the V158M polymorphism. We also examined whether 3-OMD levels represented an endophenotype, associated with the genetic liability to OCD, by assessing unaffected relatives of OCD patients. Method We assessed plasma 3-OMD levels in a sample of drug-free OCD probands (n = 34) and their unaffected parents (n = 63), and compared them with controls (n = 85). The COMT V158M polymorphism was genotyped in all participants. Results Lower plasma 3-OMD levels were found in OCD probands and their unaffected parents compared to controls. The COMT M158 allele was associated with reduced plasma 3-OMD levels in a co-dominant manner, both in OCD probands and their relatives, but not in controls. Conclusion Our results suggest that COMT activity could act as a limiting factor for the production of 3-OMD in OCD patients and in their relatives. These findings further support a role of COMT in the susceptibility to OCD and provide evidence that 3-OMD levels could represent an endophenotype in OCD. PMID:19676096

  13. The genetic association of RUNX3 with ankylosing spondylitis can be explained by allele-specific effects on IRF4 recruitment that alter gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Vecellio, Matteo; Roberts, Amity R; Cohen, Carla J; Cortes, Adrian; Knight, Julian C; Bowness, Paul; Wordsworth, B Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify the functional basis for the genetic association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), upstream of the RUNX3 promoter, with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods We performed conditional analysis of genetic association data and used ENCODE data on chromatin remodelling and transcription factor (TF) binding sites to identify the primary AS-associated regulatory SNP in the RUNX3 region. The functional effects of this SNP were tested in luciferase reporter assays. Its effects on TF binding were investigated by electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. RUNX3 mRNA levels were compared in primary CD8+ T cells of AS risk and protective genotypes by real-time PCR. Results The association of the RUNX3 SNP rs4648889 with AS (p<7.6×10−14) was robust to conditioning on all other SNPs in this region. We identified a 2 kb putative regulatory element, upstream of RUNX3, containing rs4648889. In reporter gene constructs, the protective rs4648889 ‘G’ allele increased luciferase activity ninefold but significantly less activity (4.3-fold) was seen with the AS risk ‘A’ allele (p≤0.01). The binding of Jurkat or CD8+ T-cell nuclear extracts to the risk allele was decreased and IRF4 recruitment was reduced. The AS-risk allele also affected H3K4Me1 histone methylation and associated with an allele-specific reduction in RUNX3 mRNA (p<0.05). Conclusion We identified a regulatory region upstream of RUNX3 that is modulated by rs4648889. The risk allele decreases TF binding (including IRF4) and reduces reporter activity and RUNX3 expression. These findings may have important implications for understanding the role of T cells and other immune cells in AS. PMID:26452539

  14. Comparison of genetic association strategies in the presence of rare alleles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the quest for the missing heritability of most complex diseases, rare variants have received increased attention. Advances in large-scale sequencing have led to a shift from the common disease/common variant hypothesis to the common disease/rare variant hypothesis or have at least reopened the debate about the relevance and importance of rare variants for gene discoveries. The investigation of modeling and testing approaches to identify significant disease/rare variant associations is in full motion. New methods to better deal with parameter estimation instabilities, convergence problems, or multiple testing corrections in the presence of rare variants or effect modifiers of rare variants are in their infancy. Using a recently developed semiparametric strategy to detect causal variants, we investigate the performance of the model-based multifactor dimensionality reduction (MB-MDR) technique in terms of power and family-wise error rate (FWER) control in the presence of rare variants, using population-based and family-based data (FAM-MDR). We compare family-based results obtained from MB-MDR analyses to screening findings from a quantitative trait Pedigree-based association test (PBAT). Population-based data were further examined using penalized regression models. We restrict attention to all available single-nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 4 and consider Q1 as the outcome of interest. The considered family-based methods identified marker C4S4935 in the VEGFC gene with estimated power not exceeding 0.35 (FAM-MDR), when FWER was kept under control. The considered population-based methods gave rise to highly inflated FWERs (up to 90% for PBAT screening). PMID:22373505

  15. Comparison of genetic association strategies in the presence of rare alleles.

    PubMed

    Mahachie John, Jestinah M; Cattaert, Tom; De Lobel, Lizzy; Van Lishout, François; Empain, Alain; Van Steen, Kristel

    2011-01-01

    In the quest for the missing heritability of most complex diseases, rare variants have received increased attention. Advances in large-scale sequencing have led to a shift from the common disease/common variant hypothesis to the common disease/rare variant hypothesis or have at least reopened the debate about the relevance and importance of rare variants for gene discoveries. The investigation of modeling and testing approaches to identify significant disease/rare variant associations is in full motion. New methods to better deal with parameter estimation instabilities, convergence problems, or multiple testing corrections in the presence of rare variants or effect modifiers of rare variants are in their infancy. Using a recently developed semiparametric strategy to detect causal variants, we investigate the performance of the model-based multifactor dimensionality reduction (MB-MDR) technique in terms of power and family-wise error rate (FWER) control in the presence of rare variants, using population-based and family-based data (FAM-MDR). We compare family-based results obtained from MB-MDR analyses to screening findings from a quantitative trait Pedigree-based association test (PBAT). Population-based data were further examined using penalized regression models. We restrict attention to all available single-nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 4 and consider Q1 as the outcome of interest. The considered family-based methods identified marker C4S4935 in the VEGFC gene with estimated power not exceeding 0.35 (FAM-MDR), when FWER was kept under control. The considered population-based methods gave rise to highly inflated FWERs (up to 90% for PBAT screening). PMID:22373505

  16. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav) Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Sayono, Sayono; Hidayati, Anggie Puspa Nur; Fahri, Sukmal; Sumanto, Didik; Dharmana, Edi; Hadisaputro, Suharyo; Asih, Puji Budi Setia; Syafruddin, Din

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNaV gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide susceptibility tests demonstrated Ae, aegypti resistance to the pyrethroids, with mortality rates ranging from 1.6%-15.2%. Three non-synonymous polymorphisms (S989P, V1016G and F1534C) and one synonymous polymorphism (codon 982) were detected in the AaNaV gene. Eight AaNaV alleles were observed in specimens from Central Java. Allele 3 (SGF) and allele 7 (PGF) represent the most common alleles found and demonstrated strong associations with resistance to pyrethroids (OR = 2.75, CI: 0.97-7.8 and OR = 7.37, CI: 2.4-22.5, respectively). This is the first report of 8 Ae. aegypti AaNaV alleles, and it indicates the development of resistance in Ae. aegypti in response to pyrethroid insecticide-based selective pressure. These findings strongly suggest the need for an appropriate integrated use of insecticides in the region. The 989P, 1016G and 1534C polymorphisms in the AaNaV gene are potentially valuable molecular markers for pyrethroid insecticide resistance monitoring. PMID:26939002

  17. WHOLE GENOME-WIDE SNP ASSOCIATION: IDENTIFICATION OF SUSCEPTIBILITY ALLELES FOR PARASITIC INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    QTL for parasite indicator traits in cattle are ideal targets for study of marker assisted selection; however the phenotypic data and available resource populations were not optimal for reliable QTL identification. Fecal egg count (FEC) values, which are used to measure resistance to nematodes, are ...

  18. HLA Allele E*01:01 Is Associated with a Reduced Risk of EBV-Related Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Independently of HLA-A*01/*02

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Paloma; Krsnik, Isabel; Navarro, Belen; Provencio, Mariano; García, Juan F.; Bellas, Carmen; Vilches, Carlos; Gomez-Lozano, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Background An inefficient immune response against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is related to the pathogenesis of a subgroup of classical Hodgkin lymphomas (cHL). Some EBV immune-evasion mechanisms target HLA presentation, including the non-classical HLA-E molecule. HLA-E can be recognized by T cells via the TCR, and it also regulates natural killer (NK) cell signaling through the inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor. Some evidences indicate that EBV-infected B-cells promote the proliferation of NK subsets bearing CD94/NKG2A, suggesting a relevant function of these cells in EBV control. Variations in CD94/NKG2A-HLA-E interactions could affect NK cell-mediated immunity and, consequently, play a role in EBV-driven transformation and lymphomagenesis. The two most common HLA-E alleles, E*01:01 and E*01:03, differ by a single amino acid change that modifies the molecule function. We hypothesized that the functional differences in these variants might participate in the pathogenicity of EBV. Aim We studied two series of cHL patients, both with EBV-positive and-negative cases, and a cohort of unrelated controls, to assess the impact of HLA-E variants on EBV-related cHL susceptibility. Results We found that the genotypes with at least one copy of E*01:01 (i.e., E*01:01 homozygous and heterozygous) were underrepresented among cHL patients from both series compared to controls (72.6% and 71.6% vs 83%, p = 0.001). After stratification by EBV status, we found low rates of E*01:01-carriers mainly among EBV-positive cases (67.6%). These reduced frequencies are seen independently of other factors such as age, gender, HLA-A*01 and HLA-A*02, HLA alleles positively and negatively associated with the disease (adjusted OR = 0.4, p = 0.001). Furthermore, alleles from both HLA loci exert a cumulative effect on EBV-associated cHL susceptibility. Conclusions These results indicate that E*01:01 is a novel protective genetic factor in EBV-associated cHL and support a role for HLA

  19. DLA Class II Alleles and Haplotypes Are Associated with Risk for and Protection from Chronic Hepatitis in the English Springer Spaniel

    PubMed Central

    Bexfield, Nicholas H.; Watson, Penny J.; Aguirre-Hernandez, Jesús; Sargan, David R.; Tiley, Laurence; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Kennedy, Lorna J.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis (CH) is common in dogs in the United Kingdom. An increased prevalence of the disease is seen in the English Springer spaniel (ESS), and this breed suffer from a severe form with young to middle aged female dogs being predisposed. The disease shares histological features with those of human viral hepatitis, although the specific aetiological agent has not yet been identified. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II alleles and haplotypes are associated with susceptibility/resistance to CH in the ESS. Sequence-based genotyping of the polymorphic exon 2 from DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 class II loci were performed in 66 ESSs with CH and 84 healthy controls. There was a significant difference in the distribution of the protective alleles DRB1*00501 (3.0% vs. 12.0%, odds ratio [OR] = 0.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.06–0.74) and DQB1*00501 (3.8% vs. 12.0%, OR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.09–0.85) between cases and controls. The haplotype DLA-DRB1*00501/DQA1*00301/DQB1*00501 was present in 11.9% of controls and 3.0% of cases and was significantly associated with protection against disease development (OR = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.08–0.80). There was a significant difference in the distribution of the risk alleles DRB1*00601 (14.4% vs. 6.5%, OR = 2.40, 95% CI = 1.10–5.63) and DQB1*00701 (14.4% vs. 6.5%, OR = 2.40, 95% CI = 1.10–5.63) between cases and controls. A risk haplotype (DLA-DRB1*00601/DQA1*005011/DQB1*00701) was present in 14.4% of cases and 6.5% of controls and conferred an elevated risk of developing CH with an OR of 3.13 (95% CI = 1.20–8.26). These results demonstrate that DLA class II is significantly associated with risk and protection from developing CH in ESSs. PMID:22870335

  20. Identification and Molecular Analysis of Four New Alleles at the W1 Locus Associated with Flower Color in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramoorthy, Jagadeesh; Park, Gyu Tae; Chang, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Kim, Jeong Hoe; Seo, Hak Soo; Chung, Gyuhwa; Song, Jong Tae

    2016-01-01

    In soybean, flavonoid 3′5′-hydroxylase (F3′5′H) and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) play a crucial role in the production of anthocyanin pigments. Loss-of-function of the W1 locus, which encodes the former, or W3 and W4, which encode the latter, always produces white flowers. In this study, we searched for new genetic components responsible for the production of white flowers in soybean and isolated four white-flowered mutant lines, i.e., two Glycine soja accessions (CW12700 and CW13381) and two EMS-induced mutants of Glycine max (PE1837 and PE636). F3′5′H expression in CW12700, PE1837, and PE636 was normal, whereas that in CW13381 was aberrant and missing the third exon. Sequence analysis of F3′5′H of CW13381 revealed the presence of an indel (~90-bp AT-repeat) in the second intron. In addition, the F3′5′H of CW12700, PE1837, and PE636 harbored unique single-nucleotide substitutions. The single nucleotide polymorphisms resulted in substitutions of amino acid residues located in or near the SRS4 domain of F3′5′H, which is essential for substrate recognition. 3D structure modeling of F3′5′H indicated that the substitutions could interfere with an interaction between the substrate and heme group and compromise the conformation of the active site of F3′5′H. Recombination analysis revealed a tight correlation between all of the mutant alleles at the W1 locus and white flower color. On the basis of the characterization of the new mutant alleles, we discussed the biological implications of F3′5′H and DFR in the determination of flower colors in soybean. PMID:27442124

  1. Association of H2A{sup b} with resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in H2-recombinant mouse strains: An allele associated with reduction of several apparently unrelated responses

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, N.A.; Brunner, M.C.

    1995-02-01

    HLA class II alleles can protect against immunological diseases. Seeking an animal model for a naturally occurring protective allele, we screened a panel of H2-congenic and recombinant mouse strains for ability to protect against collagen-induced arthritis. The strains were crossed with the susceptible strain DBA/1, and the F{sub 1} hybrids immunized with cattle and chicken type II collagen. Hybrids having the H2A{sup b} allele displayed a reduced incidence and duration of the disease. They also had a reduced level of pre-disease inflammation, but not of anti-collagen antibodies. The allele is already known to be associated with reduction of other apparently unrelated immune responses, suggesting that some form of functional differentiation may operate that is not exclusively related to epitope-binding. It is suggested that this may reflect allelic variation in the class II major histocompatibility complex promoter region. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Distribution of the lactase persistence-associated variant alleles -13910* T and -13915* G among the people of Oman and Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Abri, Abdul Rahim; Al-Rawas, Omar; Al-Yahyaee, Saeed; Al-Habori, Molham; Al-Zubairi, Adel Sharaf; Bayoumi, Riad

    2012-06-01

    The high prevalence of lactase persistence (LP) among the people of Saudi Arabia is associated with the -13915(*)G variant allele upstream of the lactase gene (LCT). We, therefore, examined the frequency of the commonly known LP associated SNPs among randomly collected samples from Omani and Yemeni adult populations and obtained further data on the distribution of the two most common LP-associated variants, -13910(*)T and -13915T(*)G, in the Arabian Peninsula. The DNA fragment containing all the reported LP- associated SNPs was amplified and genotyped. The frequency of the -13915(*)G allele was highest among Dhofari Arabs of southern Oman (0.72) followed by Yemeni Arabs (0.54) and Arabs of northern Oman (0.14). It was not detected in Omanis of Asian origin. The frequency of the -13910(*)T allele was extremely low in Arabs of northern and southern Oman (0.00-0.01) and Yemenis (0.002). However, it had a frequency of 0.160 among Omanis of Asian origin. Results show that the highest frequency of the LCT -13915(*)G variant allele appears to be in the south of the Arabian Peninsula with clinal decrease within the Peninsula and further out in surrounding countries. PMID:23256641

  3. Allelic Variation in TAS2R Bitter Receptor Genes Associates with Variation in Sensations from and Ingestive Behaviors toward Common Bitter Beverages in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, John E.; Wallace, Margaret R.; Knopik, Valerie S.; Herbstman, Deborah M.; Bartoshuk, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    The 25 human bitter receptors and their respective genes (TAS2Rs) contain unusually high levels of allelic variation, which may influence response to bitter compounds in the food supply. Phenotypes based on the perceived bitterness of single bitter compounds were first linked to food preference over 50 years ago. The most studied phenotype is propylthiouracil bitterness, which is mediated primarily by the TAS2R38 gene and possibly others. In a laboratory-based study, we tested for associations between TAS2R variants and sensations, liking, or intake of bitter beverages among healthy adults who were primarily of European ancestry. A haploblock across TAS2R3, TAS2R4, and TAS2R5 explained some variability in the bitterness of espresso coffee. For grapefruit juice, variation at a TAS2R19 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was associated with increased bitterness and decreased liking. An association between a TAS2R16 SNP and alcohol intake was identified, and the putative TAS2R38–alcohol relationship was confirmed, although these polymorphisms did not explain sensory or hedonic responses to sampled scotch whisky. In summary, TAS2R polymorphisms appear to influence the sensations, liking, or intake of common and nutritionally significant beverages. Studying perceptual and behavioral differences in vivo using real foods and beverages may potentially identify polymorphisms related to dietary behavior even in the absence of known ligands. PMID:21163912

  4. HLA DRB1/DQB1 alleles and DRB1-DQB1 haplotypes and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis in Tunisians: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lagha, A; Messadi, A; Boussaidi, S; Kochbati, S; Tazeghdenti, A; Ghazouani, E; Almawi, W Y; Yacoubi-Loueslati, B

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease, which affects synovial joints, and is influenced by environmental and genetic factors, in particular the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) system. In our study, we investigated the association of HLA class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles and DRB1-DQB1 haplotypes with RA susceptibility in Tunisian subjects. Therefore, HLA class II low-resolution genotyping was done in 110 RA patients and 116 controls, with a HLA-DRB1*04 high-resolution typing. Our results showed a strong association between HLA-DRB1*04/DRB1*04:05 alleles and RA presence, which persisted after correcting for multiple comparisons (Pc < 10-3, Pc = 0.020, respectively), in contrast to the protective effect of HLA-DRB1*04:03 allele (Pc = 15.2 × 10-4). However, increased frequency of DQB1*05 (Pc = 0.020) and decreased frequency of DRB1*04:03 subtype (Pc = 0.032) were seen in RF+ patients than controls. Moreover, when RA patients were compared to controls, DRB1*04-DQB1*03 haplotype was associated with RA susceptibility in Tunisians (Pc = 16.8 × 10-5), independently of RF status. Conversely, DRB1*01 allele and DRB1*01-DQB1*05 haplotype was highly present in RF+ vs RF- groups (Pc < 10-3, Pc = 5.6 × 10-3, respectively) and seems to be linked to seropositivity. Investigation of HLA class II alleles and haplotypes association with RA susceptibility with secondary Sjögren's syndrome (sSS) showed a predisposing effect of DRB1*04 (Pc < 10-3) and DRB1*04-DQB1*03 haplotype when RA with sSS/without sSS groups were compared to healthy controls. Our results confirms the association of HLA-DRB1*04, specifically HLA-DRB1*04:05 subtype, and DRB1*04-DQB1*03 haplotype with RA susceptibility in Tunisians, independently of seropositivity or the sSS presence. PMID:27580864

  5. Association of HLA-A, B, DRB1* and DQB1* alleles and haplotypes in south Indian T2DM patients.

    PubMed

    Chinniah, Rathika; Vijayan, Murali; Sivanadham, Ramgopal; Ravi, Padma Malini; Panneerselvam, Dharmarajan; Karuppiah, Balakrishnan

    2016-10-30

    The genes of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) system are implicated in the susceptibility of several diseases including Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of HLA alleles with T2DM in south India. A total of 344 patients (195 males; 149 females) and 309 controls (186 males; 123 females) were genotyped for HLA-DR/-DQ alleles. Based on predominant DR/DQ haplotypes, 222 patients and 222 age/sex matched controls were HLA-A/-B genotyped. HLA alleles were typed by PCR-SSP methods. Susceptible association was observed for the alleles A*33 (OR=13.8), A*01 (OR=3.69), A*02 (OR=2.91), B*07 (OR=4.12), DRB1*11 (OR=2.23), DRB1*04 (OR=1.51), DRB1*03 (OR=1.90) and DQB1*02 (OR=1.49). Protective association was observed for the alleles A*11 (OR=0.59), A*68 (OR=0.68), B*40 (OR=0.50), B*54 (OR=0.42), B*57 (OR=0.31), B*51 (OR=0.29) and DRB1*10 (OR=0.45). Gender stratified analysis too confirmed many of these associations. Predominant susceptible haplotypes were A*33-B*40 (OR=10.27), A*01-B*07 (OR=4.97), A*02-B*07 (OR=6.50), DRB1*03-DQB1*05 (OR=1.88), DRB1*03-DQB1*06 (OR=3.01), DRB1*04-DQB1*05 (2.63), A*01-B*07-DRB1*10 (OR=8.26) and A*11-B*35-DRB1*07 (OR=9.338). Haplotypes A*03-B*07 (OR=0.57; p<0.034) and DRB1*10-DQB1*05 (OR=0.57; p<0.033) were protectively associated. Further, a very strong susceptible association was documented for four-locus haplotypes such as A*11-B*40-DRB1*15-DQB1*06 (n=15; OR=16.01; p<0.001); A*01-B*07-DRB1*10-DQB1*05 (n=8; OR=8.26; p<0.043) and A*11-B*07-DRB1*07-DQB1*05 (n=8; OR=8.26; p<0.043). Thus, a number of HLA alleles and haplotypes showed susceptible and protective association(s) in T2DM patients from south India. PMID:27496342

  6. The KMO allele encoding Arg452 is associated with psychotic features in bipolar disorder type 1, and with increased CSF KYNA level and reduced KMO expression.

    PubMed

    Lavebratt, C; Olsson, S; Backlund, L; Frisén, L; Sellgren, C; Priebe, L; Nikamo, P; Träskman-Bendz, L; Cichon, S; Vawter, M P; Osby, U; Engberg, G; Landén, M; Erhardt, S; Schalling, M

    2014-03-01

    The kynurenine pathway metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA), modulating glutamatergic and cholinergic neurotransmission, is increased in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder type 1 with psychotic features. KYNA production is critically dependent on kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO). KMO mRNA levels and activity in prefrontal cortex (PFC) are reduced in schizophrenia. We hypothesized that KMO expression in PFC would be reduced in bipolar disorder with psychotic features and that a functional genetic variant of KMO would associate with this disease, CSF KYNA level and KMO expression. KMO mRNA levels were reduced in PFC of bipolar disorder patients with lifetime psychotic features (P=0.005, n=19) or schizophrenia (P=0.02, n=36) compared with nonpsychotic patients and controls. KMO genetic association to psychotic features in bipolar disorder type 1 was studied in 493 patients and 1044 controls from Sweden. The KMO Arg(452) allele was associated with psychotic features during manic episodes (P=0.003). KMO Arg(452) was studied for association to CSF KYNA levels in an independent sample of 55 Swedish patients, and to KMO expression in 717 lymphoblastoid cell lines and 138 hippocampal biopsies. KMO Arg(452) associated with increased levels of CSF KYNA (P=0.03) and reduced lymphoblastoid and hippocampal KMO expression (P≤0.05). Thus, findings from five independent cohorts suggest that genetic variation in KMO influences the risk for psychotic features in mania of bipolar disorder patients. This provides a possible mechanism for the previous findings of elevated CSF KYNA levels in those bipolar patients with lifetime psychotic features and positive association between KYNA levels and number of manic episodes. PMID:23459468

  7. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Allele UBE2E2 Is Associated With Decreased Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Release in Elderly Chinese Han Individuals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kuanfeng; Jiang, Lin; Zhang, Mei; Zheng, Xuqin; Gu, Yong; Wang, Zhixiao; Cai, Yun; Dai, Hao; Shi, Yun; Zheng, Shuai; Chen, Yang; Ji, Li; Xu, Xinyu; Chen, Heng; Sun, Min; Yang, Tao

    2016-05-01

    Recently, rs163182 in KCNQ1, rs7612463 in UBE2E2, rs7119 in HMG20A, and rs6815464 in MAEA were discovered as type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci unique to Asians, and rs13342692 in SLC16A11 were newly reported as T2D loci in multiethnicities by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. The aim of the present study is to ascertain the potential associations between these variants and T2D risk in the Chinese population, and characterize diabetic-related quantitative traits underlying these variants.A total of 4268 Chinese Han individuals (1754 patients with T2D and 2514 glucose-tolerant health subjects, age ≥40 years) were genotyped for these 5 variants. All the health individuals underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and measures of insulin release and sensitivity were estimated from insulinogenic, BIGTT, Matsuda, and disposition indices. The associations were determined by using logistic regression analysis.After adjustment for age, sex, and BMI, rs163182 in KCNQ1 (P = 0.002) and rs7612463 in UBE2E2 (P = 0.024) were found to be associated with T2D risk in Chinese Han population. The risk C allele of rs7612463 in UBE2E2 is associated with decreased IGI (P = 0.001), BIGTT-AIR (P = 0.002), CIR (P = 0.002), and DI (P = 0.006). The other 4 variants did not associate with insulin release or sensitivity.UBE2E2 rs7612463 may mediate its diabetogenic impact on insulin response, which highly depends on the impairment of β-cell function. PMID:27175665

  8. A FDG-PET Study of Metabolic Networks in Apolipoprotein E ε4 Allele Carriers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhijun; Hu, Bin; Zheng, Jiaxiang; Zheng, Weihao; Chen, Xuejiao; Gao, Xiang; Xie, Yuanwei; Fang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Recently, some studies have applied the graph theory in brain network analysis in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). However, relatively little research has specifically explored the properties of the metabolic network in apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele carriers. In our study, all the subjects, including ADs, MCIs and NCs (normal controls) were divided into 165 APOE ε4 carriers and 165 APOE ε4 noncarriers. To establish the metabolic network for all brain regions except the cerebellum, cerebral glucose metabolism data obtained from FDG-PET (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) were segmented into 90 areas with automated anatomical labeling (AAL) template. Then, the properties of the networks were computed to explore the between-group differences. Our results suggested that both APOE ε4 carriers and noncarriers showed the small-world properties. Besides, compared with APOE ε4 noncarriers, the carriers showed a lower clustering coefficient. In addition, significant changes in 6 hub brain regions were found in between-group nodal centrality. Namely, compared with APOE ε4 noncarriers, significant decreases of the nodal centrality were found in left insula, right insula, right anterior cingulate, right paracingulate gyri, left cuneus, as well as significant increases in left paracentral lobule and left heschl gyrus in APOE ε4 carriers. Increased local short distance interregional correlations and disrupted long distance interregional correlations were found, which may support the point that the APOE ε4 carriers were more similar with AD or MCI in FDG uptake. In summary, the organization of metabolic network in APOE ε4 carriers indicated a less optimal pattern and APOE ε4 might be a risk factor for AD. PMID:26161964

  9. A FDG-PET Study of Metabolic Networks in Apolipoprotein E ε4 Allele Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhijun; Hu, Bin; Zheng, Jiaxiang; Zheng, Weihao; Chen, Xuejiao; Gao, Xiang; Xie, Yuanwei; Fang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Recently, some studies have applied the graph theory in brain network analysis in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). However, relatively little research has specifically explored the properties of the metabolic network in apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele carriers. In our study, all the subjects, including ADs, MCIs and NCs (normal controls) were divided into 165 APOE ε4 carriers and 165 APOE ε4 noncarriers. To establish the metabolic network for all brain regions except the cerebellum, cerebral glucose metabolism data obtained from FDG-PET (18F-fluorodeoxyglu-cose positron emission tomography) were segmented into 90 areas with automated anatomical labeling (AAL) template. Then, the properties of the networks were computed to explore the between-group differences. Our results suggested that both APOE ε4 carriers and noncarriers showed the small-world properties. Besides, compared with APOE ε4 noncarriers, the carriers showed a lower clustering coefficient. In addition, significant changes in 6 hub brain regions were found in between-group nodal centrality. Namely, compared with APOE ε4 noncarriers, significant decreases of the nodal centrality were found in left insula, right insula, right anterior cingulate, right paracingulate gyri, left cuneus, as well as significant increases in left paracentral lobule and left heschl gyrus in APOE ε4 carriers. Increased local short distance interregional correlations and disrupted long distance interregional correlations were found, which may support the point that the APOE ε4 carriers were more similar with AD or MCI in FDG uptake. In summary, the organization of metabolic network in APOE ε4 carriers indicated a less optimal pattern and APOE ε4 might be a risk factor for AD. PMID:26161964

  10. A novel allele of L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase is associated with enhanced drought tolerance through affecting stomatal aperture in common wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juncheng; Li, Bin; Yang, Yanping; Mu, Peiyuan; Qian, Weiqiang; Dong, Lingli; Zhang, Kunpu; Liu, Xin; Qin, Huanju; Ling, Hongqing; Wang, Daowen

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) plays important roles in ascorbic acid (AsA) biosynthesis and assembly of respiration complex I. Here we report three homoeologous genes (TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1) encoding common wheat GLDH isozymes and a unique allelic variant (TaGLDH-A1b) associated with enhanced drought tolerance. TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1 were located on chromosomes 5A, 5B and 5D, respectively, and their transcripts were found in multiple organs. The three homoeologs each conferred increased GLDH activity when ectopically expressed in tobacco. Decreasing TaGLDH expression in wheat significantly reduced GLDH activity and AsA content. TaGLDH-A1b differed from wild type allele TaGLDH-A1a by an in-frame deletion of three nucleotides. TaGLDH-A1b was biochemically less active than TaGLDH-A1a, and the total GLDH activity levels were generally lower in the cultivars carrying TaGLDH-A1b relative to those with TaGLDH-A1a. Interestingly, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars showed stronger water deficiency tolerance than TaGLDH-A1a cultivars, and TaGLDH-A1b co-segregated with decreased leaf water loss in a F2 population. Finally, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars generally exhibited smaller leaf stomatal aperture than TaGLDH-A1a varieties in control or water deficiency environments. Our work provides new information on GLDH genes and function in higher plants. TaGLDH-A1b is likely useful for further studying and improving wheat tolerance to drought stress. PMID:27443220

  11. Diurnal Expression Pattern, Allelic Variation, and Association Analysis Reveal Functional Features of the E1 Gene in Control of Photoperiodic Flowering in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongyan; Zhang, Yupeng; Zhang, Xingzheng; Yang, Jiayin; Wang, Yaying; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Hongmei; Cui, Tingting; Xia, Zhengjun

    2015-01-01

    Although four maturity genes, E1 to E4, in soybean have been successfully cloned, their functional mechanisms and the regulatory network of photoperiodic flowering remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated how the diurnal expression pattern of the E1 gene is related to photoperiodic length; and to what extent allelic variation in the B3-like domain of the E1 gene is associated with flowering time phenotype. The bimodal expression of the E1 gene peaked first at around 2 hours after dawn in long-day condition. The basal expression level of E1 was enhanced by the long light phase, and decreased by duration of dark. We identified a 5bp (3 SNP and 2-bp deletion) mutation, referred to an e1-b3a, which occurs in the middle of B3 domain of the E1 gene in the early flowering cultivar Yanhuang 3. Subcellular localization analysis showed that the putative truncated e1-b3a protein was predominately distributed in nuclei, indicating the distribution pattern of e1-b3a was similar to that of E1, but not to that of e1-as. Furthermore, genetic analysis demonstrated allelic variations at the E1 locus significantly underlay flowering time in three F2 populations. Taken together, we can conclude the legume specific E1 gene confers some special features in photoperiodic control of flowering in soybean. Further characterization of the E1 gene will extend our understanding of the soybean flowering pathway in soybean. PMID:26275311

  12. A novel allele of L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase is associated with enhanced drought tolerance through affecting stomatal aperture in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juncheng; Li, Bin; Yang, Yanping; Mu, Peiyuan; Qian, Weiqiang; Dong, Lingli; Zhang, Kunpu; Liu, Xin; Qin, Huanju; Ling, Hongqing; Wang, Daowen

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) plays important roles in ascorbic acid (AsA) biosynthesis and assembly of respiration complex I. Here we report three homoeologous genes (TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1) encoding common wheat GLDH isozymes and a unique allelic variant (TaGLDH-A1b) associated with enhanced drought tolerance. TaGLDH-A1, -B1 and -D1 were located on chromosomes 5A, 5B and 5D, respectively, and their transcripts were found in multiple organs. The three homoeologs each conferred increased GLDH activity when ectopically expressed in tobacco. Decreasing TaGLDH expression in wheat significantly reduced GLDH activity and AsA content. TaGLDH-A1b differed from wild type allele TaGLDH-A1a by an in-frame deletion of three nucleotides. TaGLDH-A1b was biochemically less active than TaGLDH-A1a, and the total GLDH activity levels were generally lower in the cultivars carrying TaGLDH-A1b relative to those with TaGLDH-A1a. Interestingly, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars showed stronger water deficiency tolerance than TaGLDH-A1a cultivars, and TaGLDH-A1b co-segregated with decreased leaf water loss in a F2 population. Finally, TaGLDH-A1b cultivars generally exhibited smaller leaf stomatal aperture than TaGLDH-A1a varieties in control or water deficiency environments. Our work provides new information on GLDH genes and function in higher plants. TaGLDH-A1b is likely useful for further studying and improving wheat tolerance to drought stress. PMID:27443220

  13. Searching for missing heritability: designing rare variant association studies.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Or; Schaffner, Stephen F; Samocha, Kaitlin; Do, Ron; Hechter, Eliana; Kathiresan, Sekar; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Lander, Eric S

    2014-01-28

    Genetic studies have revealed thousands of loci predisposing to hundreds of human diseases and traits, revealing important biological pathways and defining novel therapeutic hypotheses. However, the genes discovered to date typically explain less than half of the apparent heritability. Because efforts have largely focused on common genetic variants, one hypothesis is that much of the missing heritability is due to rare genetic variants. Studies of common variants are typically referred to as genomewide association studies, whereas studies of rare variants are often simply called sequencing studies. Because they are actually closely related, we use the terms common variant association study (CVAS) and rare variant association study (RVAS). In this paper, we outline the similarities and differences between RVAS and CVAS and describe a conceptual framework for the design of RVAS. We apply the framework to address key questions about the sample sizes needed to detect association, the relative merits of testing disruptive alleles vs. missense alleles, frequency thresholds for filtering alleles, the value of predictors of the functional impact of missense alleles, the potential utility of isolated populations, the value of gene-set analysis, and the utility of de novo mutations. The optimal design depends critically on the selection coefficient against deleterious alleles and thus varies across genes. The analysis shows that common variant and rare variant studies require similarly large sample collections. In particular, a well-powered RVAS should involve discovery sets with at least 25,000 cases, together with a substantial replication set. PMID:24443550

  14. Searching for missing heritability: Designing rare variant association studies

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Or; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Samocha, Kaitlin; Do, Ron; Hechter, Eliana; Kathiresan, Sekar; Daly, Mark J.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Lander, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies have revealed thousands of loci predisposing to hundreds of human diseases and traits, revealing important biological pathways and defining novel therapeutic hypotheses. However, the genes discovered to date typically explain less than half of the apparent heritability. Because efforts have largely focused on common genetic variants, one hypothesis is that much of the missing heritability is due to rare genetic variants. Studies of common variants are typically referred to as genomewide association studies, whereas studies of rare variants are often simply called sequencing studies. Because they are actually closely related, we use the terms common variant association study (CVAS) and rare variant association study (RVAS). In this paper, we outline the similarities and differences between RVAS and CVAS and describe a conceptual framework for the design of RVAS. We apply the framework to address key questions about the sample sizes needed to detect association, the relative merits of testing disruptive alleles vs. missense alleles, frequency thresholds for filtering alleles, the value of predictors of the functional impact of missense alleles, the potential utility of isolated populations, the value of gene-set analysis, and the utility of de novo mutations. The optimal design depends critically on the selection coefficient against deleterious alleles and thus varies across genes. The analysis shows that common variant and rare variant studies require similarly large sample collections. In particular, a well-powered RVAS should involve discovery sets with at least 25,000 cases, together with a substantial replication set. PMID:24443550

  15. AB-QTL analysis reveals new alleles associated to proline accumulation and leaf wilting under drought stress conditions in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Land plants have evolved several measures to maintain their life against abiotic stresses. The accumulation of proline is the most generalized response of plants under drought, heat or salt stress conditions. It is known as an osmoprotectant which also acts as an instant source of energy during drought recovery process. But, both its role and genetic inheritance are poorly understood in agriculture crops. In the present work, advanced backcross quantitative trait locus (AB-QTL) analysis was performed to elucidate genetic mechanisms controlling proline accumulation and leaf wilting in barley under drought stress conditions. Results The analysis revealed eight QTL associated to proline content (PC) and leaf wilting (WS). QTL for PC were localized on chromosome 3H, 4H, 5H and 6H. The strongest QTL effect QPC.S42.5H was detected on chromosome 5H where drought inducible exotic allele was associated to increase PC by 54%. QTL effects QPC.S42.3H, QPC.S42.4H and QPC.S42.6H were responsible to heighten PC due to the preeminence of elite alleles over the exotic alleles which ranged from 26% to 43%. For WS, QTL have been localized on chromosome 1H, 2H, 3H and 4H. Among these, QWS.S42.1H and QWS.S42.4H were associated to decrease in WS due to the introgression of exotic alleles. In addition, two digenic epistatic interaction effects were detected for WS where the additive effect of exotic alleles imparted a favorable increase in the trait value. Conclusions The present data represents a first report on whole-genome mapping of proline accumulation and leaf wilting in barley. The detected QTL are linked to new alleles from both cultivated and wild accessions which bring out an initial insight on the genetic inheritance of PC and WS. These QTL alleles are fixed in the isogenic background of Scarlett, which will allow for positional cloning of underlying genes and to develop drought resilient barley cultivars. PMID:22817330

  16. Leukemia-associated NOTCH1 alleles are weak tumor initiators but accelerate K-ras–initiated leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Mark Y.; Xu, Lanwei; Shestova, Olga; Histen, Gavin; L’Heureux, Sarah; Romany, Candice; Childs, M. Eden; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Aster, Jon C.; Pear, Warren S.

    2008-01-01

    Gain-of-function NOTCH1 mutations are found in 50%–70% of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL) cases. Gain-of-function NOTCH1 alleles that initiate strong downstream signals induce leukemia in mice, but it is unknown whether the gain-of-function NOTCH1 mutations most commonly found in individuals with T-ALL generate downstream signals of sufficient strength to induce leukemia. We addressed this question by expressing human gain-of-function NOTCH1 alleles of varying strength in mouse hematopoietic precursors. Uncommon gain-of-function NOTCH1 alleles that initiated strong downstream signals drove ectopic T cell development and induced leukemia efficiently. In contrast, although gain-of-function alleles that initiated only weak downstream signals also induced ectopic T cell development, these more common alleles failed to efficiently initiate leukemia development. However, weak gain-of-function NOTCH1 alleles accelerated the onset of leukemia initiated by constitutively active K-ras and gave rise to tumors that were sensitive to Notch signaling pathway inhibition. These data show that induction of leukemia requires doses of Notch1 greater than those needed for T cell development and that most NOTCH1 mutations found in T-ALL cells do not generate signals of sufficient strength to initiate leukemia development. Furthermore, low, nonleukemogenic levels of Notch1 can complement other leukemogenic events, such as activation of K-ras. Even when Notch1 participates secondarily, the resulting tumors show “addiction” to Notch, providing a further rationale for evaluating Notch signaling pathway inhibitors in leukemia. PMID:18677410

  17. Ancestry of the Timorese: age-related macular degeneration associated genotype and allele sharing among human populations from throughout the world.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Margaux A; Magalhaes, Tiago R; Ramke, Jacqueline; Smith, Silvia E; Ennis, Sean; Simpson, Claire L; Portas, Laura; Murgia, Federico; Ahn, Jeeyun; Dardenne, Caitlin; Mayne, Katie; Robinson, Rosann; Morgan, Denise J; Brian, Garry; Lee, Lucy; Woo, Se J; Zacharaki, Fani; Tsironi, Evangelia E; Miller, Joan W; Kim, Ivana K; Park, Kyu H; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Farrer, Lindsay A; Stambolian, Dwight; DeAngelis, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    We observed that the third leading cause of blindness in the world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), occurs at a very low documented frequency in a population-based cohort from Timor-Leste. Thus, we determined a complete catalog of the ancestry of the Timorese by analysis of whole exome chip data and haplogroup analysis of SNP genotypes determined by sequencing the Hypervariable I and II regions of the mitochondrial genome and 17 genotyped YSTR markers obtained from 535 individuals. We genotyped 20 previously reported AMD-associated SNPs in the Timorese to examine their allele frequencies compared to and between previously documented AMD cohorts of varying ethnicities. For those without AMD (average age > 55 years), genotype and allele frequencies were similar for most SNPs with a few exceptions. The major risk allele of HTRA1 rs11200638 (10q26) was at a significantly higher frequency in the Timorese, as well as 3 of the 5 protective CFH (1q32) SNPs (rs800292, rs2284664, and rs12066959). Additionally, the most commonly associated AMD-risk SNP, CFH rs1061170 (Y402H), was also seen at a much lower frequency in the Korean and Timorese populations than in the assessed Caucasian populations (C ~7 vs. ~40%, respectively). The difference in allele frequencies between the Timorese population and the other genotyped populations, along with the haplogroup analysis, also highlight the genetic diversity of the Timorese. Specifically, the most common ancestry groupings were Oceanic (Melanesian and Papuan) and Eastern Asian (specifically Han Chinese). The low prevalence of AMD in the Timorese population (2 of 535 randomly selected participants) may be due to the enrichment of protective alleles in this population at the 1q32 locus. PMID:26217379

  18. Association between Anti-Ganglionic Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (gAChR) Antibodies and HLA-DRB1 Alleles in the Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Yasuhiro; Migita, Kiyoshi; Higuchi, Osamu; Mukaino, Akihiro; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Komori, Atsumasa; Nakamura, Minoru; Hashimoto, Satoru; Nagaoka, Shinya; Abiru, Seigo; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Hidenori; Kawakami, Atsushi; Yasunami, Michio; Nakane, Shunya

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Anti-ganglionic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (gAChR) antibodies are observed in autoimmune diseases, as well as in patients with autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. However, the genetic background of anti-gAChR antibodies is unclear. Here, we investigated HLA alleles in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) patients with or without anti-gAChR antibodies. Methodology/Principal Findings Genomic DNA from 260 patients with type-1 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) were genotyped for HLA-A, B, DRB1, and DQB1 loci. Anti-gAChR antibodies in the sera form AIH patients were measured using the luciferase immunoprecipitation system, and examined allelic association in patients with or without anti-gAChR antibodies. Methodology/ Methods We detected anti-α3 or -β4 gAChR antibodies in 11.5% (30/260) of patients with AIH. Among AIH patients there was no significant association between HLA-A, B DQB1 alleles and the positivity for anti-gAChR antibodies. Whereas the HLA-DRB1*0403 allele showed a significantly increased frequency in AIH patients with anti-gAChR antibodies compared with those without anti-gAChR antibodies. Conclusions/Significance The frequency of the HLA-DRB1*0403 allele differed among Japanese patients with AIH according to the presence or absence of anti-gAChR antibodies. Our findings suggest that particular HLA class II molecules might control the development of anti-gAChR antibodies in the autoimmune response to gAChR. PMID:26807576

  19. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav) Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Sayono, Sayono; Hidayati, Anggie Puspa Nur; Fahri, Sukmal; Sumanto, Didik; Dharmana, Edi; Hadisaputro, Suharyo; Asih, Puji Budi Setia; Syafruddin, Din

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNaV gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide susceptibility tests demonstrated Ae, aegypti resistance to the pyrethroids, with mortality rates ranging from 1.6%–15.2%. Three non-synonymous polymorphisms (S989P, V1016G and F1534C) and one synonymous polymorphism (codon 982) were detected in the AaNaV gene. Eight AaNaV alleles were observed in specimens from Central Java. Allele 3 (SGF) and allele 7 (PGF) represent the most common alleles found and demonstrated strong associations with resistance to pyrethroids (OR = 2.75, CI: 0.97–7.8 and OR = 7.37, CI: 2.4–22.5, respectively). This is the first report of 8 Ae. aegypti AaNaV alleles, and it indicates the development of resistance in Ae. aegypti in response to pyrethroid insecticide-based selective pressure. These findings strongly suggest the need for an appropriate integrated use of insecticides in the region. The 989P, 1016G and 1534C polymorphisms in the AaNaV gene are potentially valuable molecular markers for pyrethroid insecticide resistance monitoring. PMID:26939002

  20. Ancestry of the Timorese: age-related macular degeneration associated genotype and allele sharing among human populations from throughout the world

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Margaux A.; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Ramke, Jacqueline; Smith, Silvia E.; Ennis, Sean; Simpson, Claire L.; Portas, Laura; Murgia, Federico; Ahn, Jeeyun; Dardenne, Caitlin; Mayne, Katie; Robinson, Rosann; Morgan, Denise J.; Brian, Garry; Lee, Lucy; Woo, Se J.; Zacharaki, Fani; Tsironi, Evangelia E.; Miller, Joan W.; Kim, Ivana K.; Park, Kyu H.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Stambolian, Dwight; DeAngelis, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    We observed that the third leading cause of blindness in the world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), occurs at a very low documented frequency in a population-based cohort from Timor-Leste. Thus, we determined a complete catalog of the ancestry of the Timorese by analysis of whole exome chip data and haplogroup analysis of SNP genotypes determined by sequencing the Hypervariable I and II regions of the mitochondrial genome and 17 genotyped YSTR markers obtained from 535 individuals. We genotyped 20 previously reported AMD-associated SNPs in the Timorese to examine their allele frequencies compared to and between previously documented AMD cohorts of varying ethnicities. For those without AMD (average age > 55 years), genotype and allele frequencies were similar for most SNPs with a few exceptions. The major risk allele of HTRA1 rs11200638 (10q26) was at a significantly higher frequency in the Timorese, as well as 3 of the 5 protective CFH (1q32) SNPs (rs800292, rs2284664, and rs12066959). Additionally, the most commonly associated AMD-risk SNP, CFH rs1061170 (Y402H), was also seen at a much lower frequency in the Korean and Timorese populations than in the assessed Caucasian populations (C ~7 vs. ~40%, respectively). The difference in allele frequencies between the Timorese population and the other genotyped populations, along with the haplogroup analysis, also highlight the genetic diversity of the Timorese. Specifically, the most common ancestry groupings were Oceanic (Melanesian and Papuan) and Eastern Asian (specifically Han Chinese). The low prevalence of AMD in the Timorese population (2 of 535 randomly selected participants) may be due to the enrichment of protective alleles in this population at the 1q32 locus. PMID:26217379

  1. High-resolution HLA-DRB1 genotyping in an Australian inclusion body myositis (s-IBM) cohort: an analysis of disease-associated alleles and diplotypes.

    PubMed

    Rojana-udomsart, Arada; James, Ian; Castley, Alison; Needham, Merrilee; Scott, Adrian; Day, Timothy; Kiers, Lynette; Corbett, Alastair; Sue, Carolyn; Witt, Campbell; Martinez, Patricia; Christiansen, Frank; Mastaglia, Frank

    2012-09-15

    We performed high-resolution (4-digit) HLA-DRB1 genotyping in an Australian cohort of 105s-IBM patients and 189 controls. Our findings showed that whilst the strongest association was with the HLA-DRB1*03:01 allele and the HLA-DRB1*03:01/*01:01 diplotype, HLA-DRB1*01:01 and HLA-DRB1*13:01 are also risk alleles. A number of other alleles, HLA-DRB1*04:01, *04:04, *07:01, *09:01, *11:01 and *15:01, as well as the HLA-DRB1*03:01/*04:01 and HLA-DRB1*03:01/*07:01 diplotypes were reduced in s-IBM cases and may be protective. The HLA-DRB1*03:01 and HLA-DRB1*13:01 alleles also appear to have an influence on the age at onset of the disease and severity of muscle weakness. Our findings indicate that the influence of HLA-DRB1 in s-IBM is complex and that epistatic interactions at the HLA-DRB1 locus contribute both to disease susceptibility and to the clinical phenotype. PMID:22633068

  2. Reduced Hippocampal Insulin-Degrading Enzyme in Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Is Associated with the Apolipoprotein E-ε4 Allele

    PubMed Central

    Cook, David G.; Leverenz, James B.; McMillan, Pamela J.; Kulstad, J. Jacob; Ericksen, Sasha; Roth, Richard A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Jin, Lee-Way; Kovacina, Kristina S.; Craft, Suzanne

    2003-01-01

    Aβ is the major component of amyloid plaques characterizing Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Aβ accumulation can be affected by numerous factors including increased rates of production and/or impaired clearance. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) has been implicated as a candidate enzyme responsible for the degradation and clearance of Aβ in the brain. We have previously shown that AD patients exhibit abnormalities in insulin metabolism that are associated with apoliprotein E (APOE) status. The possible association of IDE with AD, as well as the link between APOE status and insulin metabolism, led us to examine the expression of IDE in AD. We report that hippocampal IDE protein is reduced by approximately 50% in ε4+ AD patients compared to ε4− patients and controls. The allele-specific decrease of IDE in ε4+ AD patients is not associated with neuronal loss since neuron-specific enolase levels were comparable between the AD groups, regardless of APOE status. Hippocampal IDE mRNA levels were also reduced in AD patients with the ε4 allele compared to AD and normal subjects without the ε4 allele. These findings show that reduced IDE expression is associated with a significant risk factor for AD and suggest that IDE may interact with APOE status to affect Aβ metabolism. PMID:12507914

  3. Presence of specific MHC Class II expressed alleles associates with clinical disease in ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) infected sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic tool hypothesized to predict which OPPV infected sheep will progress to debilitating clinical disease is MHC Class II Ovis aries (Ovar)-DRB1. Previously, fifteen Ovar-DRB1 beta 1 expressed alleles were identified in a ewe-lamb flock of 32 originating from an Idaho flock using RT-PCR, clon...

  4. Association of XRCC1 Trp194 allele with risk of breast cancer, and Ki67 protein status in breast tumor tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Chiya; Ghaderi, Bayazid; Amini, Sabrieh; Abdi, Mohammad; Roshani, Daem

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of this polymorphism as a risk factor for breast cancer in Kurdish patients and to investigate the possible association between Arg194Trp x-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene polymorphisms with clinical and histopathological outcomes of patients with breast cancer. Methods: A total of 100 breast cancer patients and 200 cancer-free controls in Kurdish population of Kurdistan state admitted to Tohid Hospital, Sanandaj, Kurdistan, Iran between January 2012 and May 2015 were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Tissue expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesteron receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2/neu), and Ki67 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The Arg194Trp genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Results: Our data showed that the risk for breast cancer increased significantly among the Trp variant of XRCC1. Statistically significant association was found between codon 194 polymorphisms and tissue expression of Ki67. Conclusion: The Trp allele of codon 194 XRCC1 is a potential risk factor for breast cancer in Kurdish ethnicity. Furthermore, effect of this polymorphism on clinical and histological features of breast cancer was significant. PMID:27279507

  5. Distinct Transcript Isoforms of the Atypical Chemokine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) / Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) Gene Are Expressed in Lymphoblasts and Altered Isoform Levels Are Associated with Genetic Ancestry and the Duffy-Null Allele

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melissa B.; Walens, Andrea; Hire, Rupali; Mumin, Kauthar; Brown, Andrea M.; Ford, DeJuana; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Monteil, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atypical ChemoKine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) gene, better known as Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC or Duffy), is responsible for the Duffy Blood Group and plays a major role in regulating the circulating homeostatic levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines. Previous studies have shown that one common variant, the Duffy Null (Fy-) allele that is specific to African Ancestry groups, completely removes expression of the gene on erythrocytes; however, these individuals retain endothelial expression. Additional alleles are associated with a myriad of clinical outcomes related to immune responses and inflammation. In addition to allele variants, there are two distinct transcript isoforms of DARC which are expressed from separate promoters, and very little is known about the distinct transcriptional regulation or the distinct functionality of these protein isoforms. Our objective was to determine if the African specific Fy- allele alters the expression pattern of DARC isoforms and therefore could potentially result in a unique signature of the gene products, commonly referred to as antigens. Our work is the first to establish that there is expression of DARC on lymphoblasts. Our data indicates that people of African ancestry have distinct relative levels of DARC isoforms expressed in these cells. We conclude that the expression of both isoforms in combination with alternate alleles yields multiple Duffy antigens in ancestry groups, depending upon the haplotypes across the gene. Importantly, we hypothesize that DARC isoform expression patterns will translate into ancestry-specific inflammatory responses that are correlated with the axis of pro-inflammatory chemokine levels and distinct isoform-specific interactions with these chemokines. Ultimately, this work will increase knowledge of biological mechanisms underlying disparate clinical outcomes of inflammatory-related diseases among ethnic and geographic ancestry groups. PMID:26473357

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 alleles associated with increased risk of Ankylosing Spondylitis reduce HLA-B27 mediated presentation of multiple antigens

    PubMed Central

    Seregin, Sergey S.; Rastall, David P.W.; Evnouchidou, Irini; Aylsworth, Charles F.; Quiroga, Dionisia; Kamal, Ram P.; Godbehere-Roosa, Sarah; Blum, Christopher F.; York, Ian A.; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic arthritic disease that leads to significant disability and loss of quality of life in the ~0.5% of the worldwide human population it affects. There is currently no cure for AS and mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis remain unclear. AS is highly genetic, with over 70% of the genetic risk being associated with the presence of HLA-B27 and endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 (ERAP1) alleles. Furthermore, gene-gene interactions between HLA-B27 and ERAP1 AS risk alleles have recently been confirmed. Here, we demonstrate that various ERAP1 alleles can differentially mediate surface expression of antigens presented by HLA-B27 on human cells. Specifically, for all peptides tested, we found that an ERAP1 variant containing high AS risk SNPs reduced the amount of the peptide presented by HLA-B27, relative to low AS risk ERAP1 variants. These results were further validated using peptide catalysis assays in vitro, suggesting that high AS risk alleles have an enhanced catalytic activity that more rapidly destroys many HLA-B27-destined peptides, a result that correlated with decreased HLA-B27 presentation of the same peptides. These findings suggest that one mechanism underlying AS pathogenesis may involve an altered ability for AS patients harboring both HLA-B27 and high AS risk ERAP1 alleles to correctly display a variety of peptides to the adaptive arm of the immune system, potentially exposing such individuals to higher AS risk due to abnormal display of pathogen or self derived peptides by the adaptive immune system. PMID:24028501

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 alleles associated with increased risk of ankylosing spondylitis reduce HLA-B27 mediated presentation of multiple antigens.

    PubMed

    Seregin, Sergey S; Rastall, David P W; Evnouchidou, Irini; Aylsworth, Charles F; Quiroga, Dionisia; Kamal, Ram P; Godbehere-Roosa, Sarah; Blum, Christopher F; York, Ian A; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic arthritic disease that leads to significant disability and loss of quality of life in the ∼0.5% of the worldwide human population it affects. There is currently no cure for AS and mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis remain unclear. AS is highly genetic, with over 70% of the genetic risk being associated with the presence of HLA-B27 and endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 (ERAP1) alleles. Furthermore, gene-gene interactions between HLA-B27 and ERAP1 AS risk alleles have recently been confirmed. Here, we demonstrate that various ERAP1 alleles can differentially mediate surface expression of antigens presented by HLA-B27 on human cells. Specifically, for all peptides tested, we found that an ERAP1 variant containing high AS risk SNPs reduced the amount of the peptide presented by HLA-B27, relative to low AS risk ERAP1 variants. These results were further validated using peptide catalysis assays in vitro, suggesting that high AS risk alleles have an enhanced catalytic activity that more rapidly destroys many HLA-B27-destined peptides, a result that correlated with decreased HLA-B27 presentation of the same peptides. These findings suggest that one mechanism underlying AS pathogenesis may involve an altered ability for AS patients harboring both HLA-B27 and high AS risk ERAP1 alleles to correctly display a variety of peptides to the adaptive arm of the immune system, potentially exposing such individuals to higher AS risk due to abnormal display of pathogen or self-derived peptides by the adaptive immune system. PMID:24028501

  8. HLA-DRB1*01 allele and low plasma immunoglobulin G1 concentration may predispose to herpes-associated recurrent lymphocytic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kallio-Laine, Katariina; Seppänen, Mikko; Aittoniemi, Janne; Kautiainen, Hannu; Seppälä, Ilkka; Valtonen, Ville; Färkkilä, Markus; Kalso, Eija; Lokki, Marja-Liisa

    2010-02-01

    Recurrent lymphocytic meningitis (RLM) is a rare illness caused mostly by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Predisposing factors are not known. Deficiencies in immunoglobulin (Ig) G subclasses 1 (IgG1) and 3 (IgG3) and complement protein C4 are associated with susceptibility to and persistence of bacterial and viral infections. Selected HLA and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) alleles have previously been associated with recurrent genital herpes or herpetic meningitis. We assessed the frequencies of low IgG1 and IgG3, their allotypes (Gm), and HLA-A*, -B*, -DRB1*, and MBL2 alleles, as well as deficiencies in C4A and C4B genes, as potential predisposing factors for HSV-2-associated RLM. The level of IgG1 was lower (p = 0.009) and the frequency of low IgG1 was higher (p < 0.001) in patients than in controls. Furthermore, the risk for a new meningitis episode was increased in patients with low IgG1 (incident ratio 2.05). HLA-DRB1*01 (p = 0.009) and -B*27 (p = 0.050) were more common among patients than controls. We conclude that HLA-DRB1*01 and -B*27 alleles and low plasma IgG1 levels may be significant risk factors for RLM. PMID:19879913

  9. CYP2C19 loss-of-function alleles are not associated with clinical outcome of clopidogrel therapy in patients treated with newer-generation drug-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ik Jun; Koh, Yoon-Seok; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung Ho; Choi, Yun-Seok; Park, Chul-Soo; Park, Hun-Jun; Kim, Pum-Joon; Chung, Wook-Sung; Kim, Ho-Sook; Shin, Jae-Gook; Seung, Ki-Bae; Chang, Kiyuk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract CYP2C19 loss-of-function (LOF) alleles adversely affect clinical outcome of clopidogrel therapy. Recent introduction of a newer-generation drug-eluting stent (DES) has significantly reduced the occurrence of stent thrombosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of CYP2C19 LOF alleles on clinical outcome in patients treated with the newer-generation DES. The effects of CYP2C19 genotypes were evaluated on clinical outcome of clopidogrel therapy in 2062 patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention using either first-generation DES (sirolimus- and paclitaxel-eluting stent, n = 1349) or newer-generation DES (everolimus- and zotarolimus-eluting stent, n = 713). The primary clinical outcome was major cardiac and cerebrovascular event (MACCE) including cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, and stent thrombosis during 1 year of follow-up. CYP2C19 LOF alleles were significantly associated with a higher risk of MACCE in patients treated with first-generation DES (hazard ratio [HR] 2.599, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.047–6.453; P = 0.034). In contrast, CYP2C19 LOF alleles were not associated with primary outcome in newer-generation DES (HR 0.716, 95% CI 0.316–1.622; P = 0.522). In the further multivariate analysis, CYP2C19 LOF alleles were not associated with MACCE in patients receiving newer-generation DES (adjusted HR 0.540, 95% CI 0.226–1.291; P = 0.166), whereas they were demonstrated to be an independent risk factor for MACCE in those implanted with first-generation DES (adjusted HR 3.501, 95% CI 1.194–10.262; P = 0.022). In contradiction to their clinical impact in first-generation DES era, CYP2C19 LOF alleles may not affect clinical outcome of clopidogrel therapy in patients treated with newer-generation DES. PMID:27368038

  10. Allelic Variation of BnaC.TT2.a and Its Association with Seed Coat Color and Fatty Acids in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Nazim; Li, Zhilan; Wu, Dezhi; Jiang, Lixi

    2016-01-01

    Efficient molecular markers for the selection of rapeseed genetic materials with high seed oil content and ideal fatty acid (FA) composition are preferred by rapeseed breeders. Recently, we reported the molecular mechanism of TRANSPARENT TESTA 2 (TT2) in inhibiting seed FA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. However, evidence showing the association of rapeseed TT2 homologs and seed FA production are still insufficient. In this study, we collected 83 rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) landraces from different geographical backgrounds to conduct association mapping of BnaC.TT2.a in relation to seed coat color and FA biosynthesis. Population background was corrected by 84 pairs of SSR markers that were uniformly distributed among the linkage groups of the Tapidor-Ningyou-7 DH population. A single copy of BnaC.TT2.a for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay was cloned by a pair of previously reported specific primers. From the analysis of BnaC.TT2.a allelic variations using GLM+Q model, four SNPs on intron 1 of BnaC.TT2.a that were associated with seed FA were discovered. Moreover, an InDel at position 738 on exon 3 of BnaC.TT2.a indicated a change of protein function that was significantly associated with seed coat color, linoleic acid (C18:2), and total FA content. These findings revealed the role of BnaC.TT2.a in regulating the seed color formation and seed FA biosynthesis in rapeseed, thereby suggesting effective molecular markers for rapeseed breeding. PMID:26752200

  11. The A Allele of the rs1990760 Polymorphism in the IFIH1 Gene Is Associated with Protection for Arterial Hypertension in Type 1 Diabetic Patients and with Expression of This Gene in Human Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bouças, Ana P.; Brondani, Letícia A.; Souza, Bianca M.; Lemos, Natália E.; de Oliveira, Fernanda S.; Canani, Luis H.; Crispim, Daisy

    2013-01-01

    Background The rs1990760 polymorphism of interferon induced with helicase C domain 1 (IFIH1) has been associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Here, we investigated whether this polymorphism is associated with T1DM or its clinical characteristics in a Brazilian population, and if IFIH1 gene expression in mononuclear cells from T1DM patients differs according to the genotypes of this polymorphism. A meta-analysis was also conducted to evaluate if the rs1990760 polymorphism is associated with T1DM. Methods Frequencies of the rs1990760 polymorphism were analyzed in 527 T1DM patients and in 517 healthy subjects. IFIH1 gene expressions according to genotypes were measured in a sub-sample of 26 T1DM patients by quantitative real-time PCR. Results Our data show the association of the A allele with risk to T1DM under a dominant model of inheritance [odds ratio (OR) = 1.421, P = 0.037], adjusting for ethnicity. The meta-analysis revealed significant association between the rs199760A allele and risk for T1DM for all analyzed inheritance models. Surprisingly, T1DM patients carrying the A allele showed lower levels of systolic (P = 0.001) and diastolic (P = 1×10−10) blood pressures as compared to G/G carriers. Furthermore, the A/A genotype seems to be associated with protection to arterial hypertension (AH) after adjustment for covariates (OR = 0.339, P = 0.019). IFIH1 gene expression in mononuclear cells from 26 T1DM patients did not differ among genotypes (P = 0.274). Nevertheless, IFIH1 gene expression was increased in mononuclear cells from T1DM patients with AH as compared with T1DM patients without AH [6.7 (1.7–2.0) vs. 1.8 (1.3–7.1) arbitrary units; P = 0.036]. The association with blood pressures and AH was not observed in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Conclusions Our results indicate that the rs1990760 polymorphism is associated with T1DM. Interestingly, the rs1990760 A allele seems to be associated with

  12. A study of HLA class I and class II 4-digit allele level in Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cristallo, A F; Schroeder, J; Citterio, A; Santori, G; Ferrioli, G M; Rossi, U; Bertani, G; Cassano, S; Gottardi, P; Ceschini, N; Barocci, F; Ribizzi, G; Cutrupi, V; Cairoli, R; Rapisarda, V; Pastorello, E A; Barocci, S

    2011-08-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are represented by rare but life-threatening cutaneous adverse reactions to different drugs. Previous studies have found that in a Han Chinese population from Taiwan and other Asian Countries, a strong genetic association between HLA-class I alleles (B*15:02, B*58:01) and SJS and TEN was induced by carbamazepine and allopurinol, respectively. To identify genetic markers that covered the MHC region, we carried out a case-control association enrolling 20 Caucasian patients with SJS/TEN. Our patient series included 10 cases related to paracetamol, 7 to allopurinol and 3 to different drugs (plaquenil, itraconazol, nabumetone). Healthy controls were represented by 115 Caucasian bone marrow or stem cell donors. The HLA-A*, B*, C*, DRB1*, DQB1*, DQA1* and DPB1* genotyping were determined. The frequencies of HLA-A*33:03 as well as C*03:02 and C*08:01 were significantly higher in SJS/TEN patient subgroup showing allopurinol drug-induced severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) as compared to controls (28.6% vs 0%, P=0.00002, Pc=0.0011; 28.6% vs 0%, P=0.00002, Pc=0.001; 28.6% vs 0%, P=0.00002, Pc=0.001, respectively). In the same subgroup the frequencies of B*58:01, DRB1*15:02 and DRB1*13:02 alleles, although considerably higher than in control group (42.8% vs 5.2%, P=0.003; 28.6% vs 1.7%, P=0.005; 28.6% vs 3.5%, P=0.037, respectively), appeared no more statistically different after P correction (Pc=0.248; Pc=0.29; Pc=1.00, respectively). In addition, in 10 of the 20 SJS/TEN patient subgroup with paracetamol-induced SCAR no statistically significant association with HLA alleles could be found. However, in the same SJS/TEN patient subgroup showing allopurinol drug-induced SCAR, haplotype analysis indicated that B*58:01, DRB1*13:02 and DRB1*15:02 alleles, that in a single allele analysis lost statistical significance after P correction, may still confer susceptibility, because the B*58:01-DRB1*13:02 and DRB1

  13. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Genes Associated with Fusarium Ear Rot Resistance in a Maize Core Diversity Panel

    PubMed Central

    Zila, Charles T.; Samayoa, L. Fernando; Santiago, Rogelio; Butrón, Ana; Holland, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium ear rot is a common disease of maize that affects food and feed quality globally. Resistance to the disease is highly quantitative, and maize breeders have difficulty incorporating polygenic resistance alleles from unadapted donor sources into elite breeding populations without having a negative impact on agronomic performance. Identification of specific allele variants contributing to improved resistance may be useful to breeders by allowing selection of resistance alleles in coupling phase linkage with favorable agronomic characteristics. We report the results of a genome-wide association study to detect allele variants associated with increased resistance to Fusarium ear rot in a maize core diversity panel of 267 inbred lines evaluated in two sets of environments. We performed association tests with 47,445 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) while controlling for background genomic relationships with a mixed model and identified three marker loci significantly associated with disease resistance in at least one subset of environments. Each associated SNP locus had relatively small additive effects on disease resistance (±1.1% on a 0–100% scale), but nevertheless were associated with 3 to 12% of the genotypic variation within or across environment subsets. Two of three identified SNPs colocalized with genes that have been implicated with programmed cell death. An analysis of associated allele frequencies within the major maize subpopulations revealed enrichment for resistance alleles in the tropical/subtropical and popcorn subpopulations compared with other temperate breeding pools. PMID:24048647

  14. A genome-wide association study reveals genes associated with fusarium ear rot resistance in a maize core diversity panel.

    PubMed

    Zila, Charles T; Samayoa, L Fernando; Santiago, Rogelio; Butrón, Ana; Holland, James B

    2013-11-01

    Fusarium ear rot is a common disease of maize that affects food and feed quality globally. Resistance to the disease is highly quantitative, and maize breeders have difficulty incorporating polygenic resistance alleles from unadapted donor sources into elite breeding populations without having a negative impact on agronomic performance. Identification of specific allele variants contributing to improved resistance may be useful to breeders by allowing selection of resistance alleles in coupling phase linkage with favorable agronomic characteristics. We report the results of a genome-wide association study to detect allele variants associated with increased resistance to Fusarium ear rot in a maize core diversity panel of 267 inbred lines evaluated in two sets of environments. We performed association tests with 47,445 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) while controlling for background genomic relationships with a mixed model and identified three marker loci significantly associated with disease resistance in at least one subset of environments. Each associated SNP locus had relatively small additive effects on disease resistance (±1.1% on a 0-100% scale), but nevertheless were associated with 3 to 12% of the genotypic variation within or across environment subsets. Two of three identified SNPs colocalized with genes that have been implicated with programmed cell death. An analysis of associated allele frequencies within the major maize subpopulations revealed enrichment for resistance alleles in the tropical/subtropical and popcorn subpopulations compared with other temperate breeding pools. PMID:24048647

  15. Inosine triphosphatase allele frequency and association with ribavirin-induced anaemia in Brazilian patients receiving antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Delvaux, Nathália; da Costa, Vanessa Duarte; da Costa, Maristella Matos; Villar, Livia Melo; Coelho, Henrique Sérgio Moraes; Esberard, Eliane Bordalo Cathalá; Flores, Priscila Pollo; Brandão-Mello, Carlos Eduardo; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane Alves; de Almeida, Adilson José; Lampe, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are strongly associated with protection against ribavirin (RBV)-induced anaemia in European, American and Asian patients; however, there is a paucity of data for Brazilian patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ITPA SNP (rs7270101/rs1127354) frequency in healthy and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients from Brazil and the association with the development of severe anaemia during antiviral therapy. ITPA SNPs were determined in 200 HCV infected patients and 100 healthy individuals by sequencing. Biochemical parameters and haemoglobin (Hb) levels were analysed in 97 patients who underwent antiviral therapy. A combination of AArs7270101+CCrs1127354 (100% ITPase activity) was observed in 236/300 individuals. Anaemia was observed in 87.5% and 86.2% of treated patients with AA (rs7270101) and CC genotypes (rs1127354), respectively. Men with AA (rs7270101) showed a considerable reduction in Hb at week 12 compared to those with AC/CC (p = 0.1475). In women, there was no influence of genotype (p = 0.5295). For rs1127354, men with the CC genotype also showed a sudden reduction in Hb compared to those with AC. Allelic distribution of rs7270101 and rs1127354 shows high rates of the genotypes AA and CC, respectively, suggesting that the study population had a great propensity for developing RBV-induced anaemia. A progressive Hb reduction during treatment was observed; however, this reduction was greater in men at week 12 than in women. PMID:26154744

  16. Vestibular function is associated with residual low-frequency hearing loss in patients with bi-allelic mutations in the SLC26A4 gene.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinsei; Seo, Young Wook; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Sung Huhn

    2016-05-01

    DFNB4 is non-syndromic, autosomal recessive type of hearing loss with an enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) caused by mutations in SLC26A4/pendrin. Although the characteristics of hearing loss are well known in DFNB4, vestibular function remains inconclusive. We evaluated the vestibular function of 31 patients with bi-allelic mutations in SLC26A4/pendrin and analyzed genetic, radiological, and audiological correlations with vestibular function. In a caloric test, unilateral and bilateral vestibulopathies were detected in 45.2% and 6.4% of patients, respectively; however, only 22.6% had subjective vertigo symptoms. While vestibular phenotype was not significantly associated with specific mutations in genetic alleles or the sizes of the endolymphatic sac and vestibular aqueduct, a residual hearing threshold at a low frequency (500 Hz) was definitely correlated with vestibular function in DFNB4 (p = 0.005). These findings may indicate that vestibular function in DFNB4 deteriorates unilaterally in ears when hearing loss occurs. In conclusion, DFNB4 shows vestibular dysfunction, which is strongly linked to hearing loss at low frequencies without any allelic or anatomical predisposing factor. PMID:26900070

  17. Allele-specific recognition by LILRB3 and LILRA6 of a cytokeratin 8 - associated ligand on necrotic glandular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    López-Álvarez, María R.; Jahnke, Martin; Russell, Alasdair I.; Radjabova, Valeria; Trowsdale, Alice R.Z.; Trowsdale, John

    2016-01-01

    The LILRs are a family of receptors that regulate the activities of myelomonocytic cells. We found that specific allelic variants of two related members of the LILR family, LILRB3 and LILRA6, interact with a ligand exposed on necrotic glandular epithelial cells. The extracellular domains of LILRB3 and LILRA6 are very similar and their genes are highly polymorphic. A commonly occurring allele, LILRB3*12, displayed particularly strong binding of these necrotic cells and further screening of the products of LILRB3 alleles identified motifs that correlated with binding. Immunoprecipitation of the ligand from epithelial cell lysates using recombinant LILRB3*12, identified cytokeratins 8, 18 and 19. Purified proteins obtained from epithelial cell lysates, using anti-cytokeratin 8 antibodies, were able to activate LILRB3*12 reporter cells. Knock-down of cytokeratin 8 in epithelial cells abrogated expression of the LILRB3 ligand, while staining with recombinant LILRB3*12 showed co-localisation with cytokeratin 8 and 18 in permeabilised breast cancer cells. Necrosis is a common feature of tumours. The finding of a necrosis-associated ligand for these two receptors raises the possibility of a novel interaction that alters immune responses within the tumour microenvironment. Since LILRB3 and LILRA6 genes are highly polymorphic the interaction may influence an individual's immune response to tumours. PMID:26769854

  18. Increased risk of severe fluoropyrimidine-associated toxicity in patients carrying a G to C substitution in the first 28-bp tandem repeat of the thymidylate synthase 2R allele.

    PubMed

    Meulendijks, Didier; Jacobs, Bart A W; Aliev, Abidin; Pluim, Dick; van Werkhoven, Erik; Deenen, Maarten J; Beijnen, Jos H; Cats, Annemieke; Schellens, Jan H M

    2016-01-01

    The fluoropyrimidines act by inhibiting thymidylate synthase (TS). Recent studies have shown that patients' risk of severe fluoropyrimidine-associated toxicity is affected by polymorphisms in the 5'-untranslated region of TYMS, the gene encoding TS. A G>C substitution in the promoter enhancer region of TYMS, rs183205964 (known as the 2RC allele), markedly reduces TS activity in vitro, but its clinical relevance is unknown. We determined rs183205964 in 1605 patients previously enrolled in a prospective multicenter study. Associations between putative low TS expression genotypes (3RC/2RC, 2RG/2RC, and 2RC/2RC) and severe toxicity were investigated using univariable and multivariable logistic regression. Activity of TS and TYMS gene expression were determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of a patient carrying genotype 2RC/2RC and of a control group of healthy individuals. Among 1,605 patients, 28 patients (1.7%) carried the 2RC allele. Twenty patients (1.2%) carried a risk-associated genotype (2RG/2RC, n=13; 3RC/2RC, n=6; and 2RC/2RC, n=1), the eight remaining patients had genotype 3RG/2RC. Early severe toxicity and toxicity-related hospitalization were significantly more frequent in risk-associated genotype carriers (OR 3.0, 95%CI 1.04-8.93, p=0.043 and OR 3.8, 95%CI 1.19-11.9, p=0.024, respectively, in multivariable analysis). The patient with genotype 2RC/2RC was hospitalized twice and had severe febrile neutropenia, diarrhea, and hand-foot syndrome. Baseline TS activity and gene expression in PBMCs of this patient, and a healthy individual with the 2RC allele, were found to be within the normal range. Our study suggests that patients carrying rs183205964 are at strongly increased risk of severe, potentially life-threatening, toxicity when treated with fluoropyrimidines. PMID:26189437

  19. The Alu-Rich Genomic Architecture of SPAST Predisposes to Diverse and Functionally Distinct Disease-Associated CNV Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Yuan, Bo; Campbell, Ian M.; Scull, Jennifer C.; Withers, Marjorie A.; Baggett, Brett C.; Beck, Christine R.; Shaw, Christine J.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Moretti, Paolo; Goodwin, Wendy E.; Hein, Nichole; Fink, John K.; Seong, Moon-Woo; Seo, Soo Hyun; Park, Sung Sup; Karbassi, Izabela D.; Batish, Sat Dev; Ordóñez-Ugalde, Andrés; Quintáns, Beatriz; Sobrido, María-Jesús; Stemmler, Susanne; Lupski, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Intragenic copy-number variants (CNVs) contribute to the allelic spectrum of both Mendelian and complex disorders. Although pathogenic deletions and duplications in SPAST (mutations in which cause autosomal-dominant spastic paraplegia 4 [SPG4]) have been described, their origins and molecular consequences remain obscure. We mapped breakpoint junctions of 54 SPAST CNVs at nucleotide resolution. Diverse combinations of exons are deleted or duplicated, highlighting the importance of particular exons for spastin function. Of the 54 CNVs, 38 (70%) appear to be mediated by an Alu-based mechanism, suggesting that the Alu-rich genomic architecture of SPAST renders this locus susceptible to various genome rearrangements. Analysis of breakpoint Alus further informs a model of Alu-mediated CNV formation characterized by small CNV size and potential involvement of mechanisms other than homologous recombination. Twelve deletions (22%) overlap part of SPAST and a portion of a nearby, directly oriented gene, predicting novel chimeric genes in these subjects’ genomes. cDNA from a subject with a SPAST final exon deletion contained multiple SPAST:SLC30A6 fusion transcripts, indicating that SPAST CNVs can have transcriptional effects beyond the gene itself. SLC30A6 has been implicated in Alzheimer disease, so these fusion gene data could explain a report of spastic paraplegia and dementia cosegregating in a family with deletion of the final exon of SPAST. Our findings provide evidence that the Alu genomic architecture of SPAST predisposes to diverse CNV alleles with distinct transcriptional—and possibly phenotypic—consequences. Moreover, we provide further mechanistic insights into Alu-mediated copy-number change that are extendable to other loci. PMID:25065914

  20. Genetic variation in brain-derived neurotrophic factor val66met allele is associated with altered serotonin-1A receptor binding in human brain.

    PubMed

    Lan, Martin J; Ogden, R Todd; Huang, Yung-yu; Oquendo, Maria A; Sullivan, Gregory M; Miller, Jeffrey; Milak, Matthew; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2014-07-01

    Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) regulates brain synaptic plasticity. BDNF affects serotonin signaling, increases serotonin levels in brain tissue and prevents degeneration of serotonin neurons. These effects have hardly been studied in human brain. We examined the relationship of the functional val66met polymorphism of the BDNF gene to serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor binding in vivo. 50 healthy volunteers (HV) and 50 acutely depressed, unmedicated patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) underwent PET scanning with the 5-HT(1A) receptor ligand, [(11)C]WAY-100635 and a metabolite corrected arterial input function. A linear mixed effects model compared 5-HT(1A) receptor binding potential (BP(F), proportional to the number of available receptors) in 13 brain regions of interest between met allele carriers (met/met and val/met) and noncarriers (val/val) using sex and C-1019G genotype of the 5-HT(1A) receptor promoter functional polymorphism as covariates. There was an interaction between diagnosis and allele (F=4.23, df=1, 94, p=0.042), such that met allele carriers had 17.4% lower BP(F) than non-met carriers in the HV group (t=2.6, df=96, p=0.010), but not in the MDD group (t=-0.4, df=96, p=0.58). These data are consistent with a model where the met allele of the val66met polymorphism causes less proliferation of serotonin synapses, and consequently fewer 5-HT(1A) receptors. In MDD, however, the effect of the val66met polymorphism is not detectable, possibly due to a ceiling effect of over-expression of 5-HT(1A) receptors in mood disorders. PMID:24607934

  1. Identification of a Novel Allele of TaCKX6a02 Associated with Grain Size, Filling Rate and Weight of Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Wang, Sheng-Xing; Sun, Genlou; Xiao, Shi-He; Ma, Chuan-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinin oxidase (CKX) plays a crucial role in plant growth and development by reversibly inactivating cytokinin (CTK). Twenty-four primer pairs, designed from ESTs of the TaCKX genes family of common wheat, were used to identify their allelic variations associated with grain size, weight, and filling rate in 169 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from Jing 411 × Hongmangchun 21. TaCKX6a02, a member of TaCKX gene family, amplified by primer pair T31–32, showed a close association with grain traits in this RIL population. Statistical analysis indicated that allelic variation of TaCKX6a02 had significant correlation with grain size, weight, and filling rate (GFR; P < 0.001) under varied environments. The TaCKX6a02-D1a allele from Jing411 significantly increased grain size, weight and grain filling rate, compared with TaCKX6a02-D1b from Hongmangchun 21. TaCKX6a02 was located on chromosome 3DS in the interval of Xbarc1119 and Xbarc1162, with a genetic distance of 1.4 cM. The location was further confirmed using Chinese Spring nulli–tetrasomic lines. A major QTL (quantitative trait locus) tightly linked to TaCKX6a02 was detected in the RIL population, explaining 17.1~38.2% of phenotype variations for grain size, weight, GFRmax and GFRmean in different environments. In addition, significant effects of variations of TaCKX6a02 on grain weight and GFR were further validated by association analysis among 102 wheat varieties in two cropping seasons. 12.8~35.1% of phenotypic variations were estimated for these genotypes. A novel 29-bp InDel behind the stop codon was detected by DNA sequence analysis between the two alleles of TaCKX6a02-D1. The gene-specific marker, TKX3D, was designed according to the novel variation, and can be used in marker-assisted selection (MAS) for grain size, weight, and GFR in common wheat. PMID:26657796

  2. Newborn screening strategy for cystic fibrosis: a field study in an area with high allelic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Castellani, C; Bonizzato, A; Cabrini, G; Mastella, G

    1997-05-01

    To verify to what extent mutation analysis on blood spot could improve cystic fibrosis neonatal screening in an area with high allelic heterogeneity, we designed a special protocol. Spot trypsin estimation at birth, trypsin re-testing after 1 month, meconium lactase testing and mutation analysis of delta F508, R1162X and N1303K, were retrospectively clustered according to different patterns (trypsin/lactase/mutation; trypsin/lactase/re-testing; trypsin/mutation) and compared. The programme, which lasted 2 years (1993-94) and covered most of North-eastern Italy, included 95,553 screened newborns. Thirty-four affected babies were detected by screening and one by meconium ileus (incidence 1/2730). The combined use of trypsin, lactase and mutation analysis in cystic fibrosis neonatal screening permits a better sensitivity compared to the two other combinations (34 diagnoses vs 32 in both cases). Moreover, the higher specificity of the former method (false positives 42 vs 148) allows a reduction of recalls, which cause considerable anxiety. We confirm in trypsin-positive newborns an increased frequency of cystic fibrosis heterozygotes (1/17). PMID:9183489

  3. An association between human leucocyte antigen alleles and acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Remberger, Mats; Persson, Ulla; Hauzenberger, Dan; Ringdén, Olle

    2002-12-01

    The association between various human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and the occurrence of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was evaluated in 493 haematopoietic stem-cell transplant (HSCT) patients with HLA identical sibling donors. There were 307 men and 186 women with a median age of 30 years (0.2-77). Most of the patients had a haematological malignancy and received total body irradiation or busulphan combined with cyclophosphamide as conditioning before transplantation. GVHD prophylaxis consisted of monotherapy with methotrexate (MTX) or cyclosporin (CsA) in 118 patients, MTX + CsA in 323, T-cell depletion in 28 and other combinations in 24. In total, 84 patients (17%) received a peripheral blood stem-cell graft, whereas the rest received bone marrow. The cumulative incidence of acute GVHD grades II-IV was 20%, and chronic GVHD 46%. In the multivariate analysis, HLA-A10 (OR 2.14, CI 1.04-4.41, P = 0.03) and HLA-B7 (OR 1.80, CI 1.04-3.12, P = 0.03) correlated with an increased risk of acute GVHD grades II-IV. We also found an association between HLA-B27 (RR 0.60, CI 0.37-0.95, P = 0.04) and a lower incidence of chronic GVHD. These HLA alleles were independent of other known risk factors for acute or chronic GVHD, as shown by multivariate analysis. These results show that major histocompatibility comlex (MHC) alleles may influence the incidence of GVHD in HSCT with HLA identical sibling donors. PMID:12437654

  4. Schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for alleles that affect gene expression in adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Alexander L; Jones, Lesley; Moskvina, Valentina; Kirov, George; Gejman, Pablo V; Levinson, Douglas F; Sanders, Alan R; Purcell, Shaun; Visscher, Peter M; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J; Holmans, Peter; O’Donovan, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    It is widely thought that alleles that influence susceptibility to common diseases, including schizophrenia, will frequently do so through effects on gene expression. Since only a small proportion of the genetic variance for schizophrenia has been attributed to specific loci, this remains an unproven hypothesis. The International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC) recently reported a substantial polygenic contribution to that disorder, and that schizophrenia risk alleles are enriched among SNPs selected for marginal evidence for association (p<0.5) from genome wide association studies (GWAS). It follows that if schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for those that affect gene expression, those marginally associated SNPs which are also eQTLs should carry more true association signals compared with SNPs which are not. To test this, we identified marginally associated (p<0.5) SNPs from two of the largest available schizophrenia GWAS datasets. We assigned eQTL status to those SNPs based upon an eQTL dataset derived from adult human brain. Using the polygenic score method of analysis reported by the ISC, we observed and replicated the observation that higher probability cis-eQTLs predicted schizophrenia better than those with a lower probability for being a cis-eQTL. Our data support the hypothesis that alleles conferring risk of schizophrenia are enriched among those that affect gene expression. Moreover, our data show that notwithstanding the likely developmental origin of schizophrenia, studies of adult brain tissue can in principle allow relevant susceptibility eQTLs to be identified. PMID:21339752

  5. Pomology observations, morphometric analysis, ultrastructural study and allelic profiles of "olivastra Seggianese" endocarps from ancient olive trees (Olea europaea L.).

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Claudio; Sorbi, Andrea; Paolucci, Elisa; Antonucci, Francesca; Menesatti, Paolo; Costa, Corrado; Pallottino, Federico; Vignani, Rita; Cimato, Antonio; Ciacci, Andrea; Cresti, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary studies of historical sources and remote sensing were used to identify ancient olive trees near archaeological sites and heritage buildings in the Orcia Valley (Siena, Italy). Distinctive characters were assessed by traditional pomological observation. Trees with similar characters were selected on the basis of the features of endocarps, the only structure that survives aerobic deterioration and conserves useful botanical information for centuries. Non-invasive morphometric analysis of endocarp size and shape established morphological variations in individuals of different populations. Plastid organization in the endocarp and location of DNA in the endocarp tegument were detected by morphological and ultrastructural observations using light and electron microscopy. Cytoplasmic markers with high polymorphism were used to test similarity of endocarp and leaf DNA within individuals and to confirm low variability and minimal divergence between individuals. The ancient trees studied showed the same allelic profiles and therefore belonged to a distinct cultivar. The traditional pomological descriptions of the trees, leaves and fruits, morphometric analysis of size, and shape elliptic Fourier analysis of endocarp outline, ultrastructural observations and allelic profiles of endocarp tegument delineated the general species-specific qualities of the cultivar "olivastra Seggianese" of the Orcia Valley. PMID:21262485

  6. [Study of the HLA-DQ system by the complement fixation test on lymphocytes stimulated by phytohemagglutinin. Existence of HLA-DQX allele(s)].

    PubMed

    Chidiac, A; Colombani, M; Lepage, V; Raffoux, C; Sansonetti, N; Colombani, J

    1986-04-01

    The complement fixation microtechnique against PHA blasts has been used to study HLA-DQw1, 2, 3 specificities with sera from multiple transfused patients and/or from multiparous women. Several sera (6 or 7) have been used to define each DQ specificity. The sera have been chosen because of their reactivity with cells from HLA-DR 1, 2 or w6 donors (for DQw1), DR3 or 7 donors (for DQw2,) DR4 or 5 donors (for DQw3). Correlation coefficients between DQ and DR specificities were from 0.56 to 0.91. Correlation coefficients between sera were from 0.51 to 0.92 in each cluster of sera. The segregation of DQw1, 2, 3 specificities has been studied in 46 families with 234 children. This study showed haplotypes lacking DQw1, 2, 3 specificities. The segregation of such 11 DQX haplotypes has been observed in 38 children from 8 families; 5 children were DQX/DQX homozygotes. Up to now, no serological reagent defining the specificity (or specificities) corresponding to DQX has been found. No preferential association was observed between DQX and DR specificities. The gene frequencies observed in 170 haplotypes in these 46 families were as follows: DQw1: 0.400; DQw2: 0.252; DQw3: 0.282; DQX: 0.065. Detecting DQ specificities seems easier by CF on PHA blasts than by lymphocytotoxicity microtechnique against B lymphocytes and monocytes from pheripheral blood. This suggests that PHA blasts express larger quantities of DQ molecules than B lymphocytes and monocytes. The results confirm that complement fixation microtechnique against PHA blasts is efficient for HLA-DQw typing. PMID:3092321

  7. Analysis of case-parent trios at a locus with a deletion allele: association of GSTM1 with autism

    PubMed Central

    Buyske, Steven; Williams, Tanishia A; Mars, Audrey E; Stenroos, Edward S; Ming, Sue X; Wang, Rong; Sreenath, Madhura; Factura, Marivic F; Reddy, Chitra; Lambert, George H; Johnson, William G

    2006-01-01

    Background Certain loci on the human genome, such as glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), do not permit heterozygotes to be reliably determined by commonly used methods. Association of such a locus with a disease is therefore generally tested with a case-control design. When subjects have already been ascertained in a case-parent design however, the question arises as to whether the data can still be used to test disease association at such a locus. Results A likelihood ratio test was constructed that can be used with a case-parents design but has somewhat less power than a Pearson's chi-squared test that uses a case-control design. The test is illustrated on a novel dataset showing a genotype relative risk near 2 for the homozygous GSTM1 deletion genotype and autism. Conclusion Although the case-control design will remain the mainstay for a locus with a deletion, the likelihood ratio test will be useful for such a locus analyzed as part of a larger case-parent study design. The likelihood ratio test has the advantage that it can incorporate complete and incomplete case-parent trios as well as independent cases and controls. Both analyses support (p = 0.046 for the proposed test, p = 0.028 for the case-control analysis) an association of the homozygous GSTM1 deletion genotype with autism. PMID:16472391

  8. Novel Loci Associated with Usual Sleep Duration: The CHARGE Consortium Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Hek, Karin; Chen, Ting-hsu; Watson, Nathaniel F.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Byrne, Enda M.; Cornelis, Marilyn; Warby, Simon C.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Cherkas, Lynn; Evans, Daniel S.; Grabe, Hans J.; Lahti, Jari; Li, Man; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lumley, Thomas; Marciante, Kristin D.; Pérusse, Louis; Psaty, Bruce M.; Robbins, John; Tranah, Gregory J.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Bellis, Claire; Biffar, Reiner; Bouchard, Claude; Cade, Brian; Curhan, Gary C.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ewert, Ralf; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fülöp, Tibor; Gehrman, Philip R.; Goodloe, Robert; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hernandez, Dena; Hofman, Albert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hunter, David J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Kähönen, Mika; Kao, Linda; Kraft, Peter; Larkin, Emma K.; Lauderdale, Diane S.; Luik, Annemarie I.; Medici, Marco; Montgomery, Grant W.; Palotie, Aarno; Patel, Sanjay R.; Pistis, Giorgio; Porcu, Eleonora; Quaye, Lydia; Raitakari, Olli; Redline, Susan; Rimm, Eric B.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Smith, Albert V.; Spector, Tim D.; Teumer, Alexander; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Young, Terry; Zhang, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hu, Frank; Mangino, Massimo; Martin, Nicholas G.; O’Connor, George T.; Stone, Katie L.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Viikari, Jorma; Gharib, Sina A.; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Räikkönen, Katri; Völzke, Henry; Mignot, Emmanuel; Tiemeier, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Usual sleep duration is a heritable trait correlated with psychiatric morbidity, cardiometabolic disease and mortality, although little is known about the genetic variants influencing this trait. A genome-wide association study of usual sleep duration was conducted using 18 population-based cohorts totaling 47,180 individuals of European ancestry. Genome-wide significant association was identified at two loci. The strongest is located on chromosome 2, in an intergenic region 35–80 kb upstream from the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 (lowest p=1.1 ×10−9). This finding was replicated in an African-American sample of 4771 individuals (lowest p=9.3 × 10−4). The strongest combined association was at rs1823125 (p=1.5 × 10−10, minor allele frequency 0.26 in the discovery sample, 0.12 in the replication sample), with each copy of the minor allele associated with a sleep duration 3.1 minutes longer per night. The alleles associated with longer sleep duration were associated in previous genome-wide association studies with a more favorable metabolic profile and a lower risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these associations may help elucidate biological mechanisms influencing sleep duration and its association with psychiatric, metabolic and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25469926

  9. An obesity-associated risk allele within the FTO gene affects human brain activity for areas important for emotion, impulse control and reward in response to food images.

    PubMed

    Wiemerslage, Lyle; Nilsson, Emil K; Solstrand Dahlberg, Linda; Ence-Eriksson, Fia; Castillo, Sandra; Larsen, Anna L; Bylund, Simon B A; Hogenkamp, Pleunie S; Olivo, Gaia; Bandstein, Marcus; Titova, Olga E; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Benedict, Christian; Brooks, Samantha J; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-05-01

    Understanding how genetics influences obesity, brain activity and eating behaviour will add important insight for developing strategies for weight-loss treatment, as obesity may stem from different causes and as individual feeding behaviour may depend on genetic differences. To this end, we examined how an obesity risk allele for the FTO gene affects brain activity in response to food images of different caloric content via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thirty participants homozygous for the rs9939609 single nucleotide polymorphism were shown images of low- or high-calorie food while brain activity was measured via fMRI. In a whole-brain analysis, we found that people with the FTO risk allele genotype (AA) had increased activity compared with the non-risk (TT) genotype in the posterior cingulate, cuneus, precuneus and putamen. Moreover, higher body mass index in the AA genotype was associated with reduced activity to food images in areas important for emotion (cingulate cortex), but also in areas important for impulse control (frontal gyri and lentiform nucleus). Lastly, we corroborate our findings with behavioural scales for the behavioural inhibition and activation systems. Our results suggest that the two genotypes are associated with differential neural processing of food images, which may influence weight status through diminished impulse control and reward processing. PMID:26797854

  10. [Study on identification of "Digeda" raw materials in Mongolian patent medicine by PCR amplification of specific alleles].

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhan-hu; Huang, Xian-zhang; Long, Ping; Zhang, Le; Zhao, Dong-dong; Wang, Ying-li; Li, Min-hui

    2015-03-01

    To explore a new method for identification of Mongolian patent medicine (MPM) by PCR amplification of specific alleles. Eight kinds of MPM were used to study the identification of "Digeda" raw materials. The total DNA of Lomatogonium rotatum and Corydalis bungeana samples were extracted through modified CTAB method, psbA-trnH sequence was amplified by PCR and sequenced directionally. Specific primer was designed. The DNA of 8 kinds of MPM also was extracted and purified by the commercial DNA purification kits. The rbcL and two pair of specific primers sequences were amplified. The specific amplified products were sequenced in forward directions. All specific sequences were aligned and were analyzed. The results indicated that L rotatum can be identified by specific primers from Digeda-4 Tang, Digeda-8 San, Digeda-4 San, and C. bungeana medicinal materials can be identified by specific primers from Li Dan Ba Wei San, Yi He Ha Ri-12 and A Ga Ri-35. PCR amplification of specific alleles can stably and accurately distinguish raw medicinal materials in MPM. PMID:26087535

  11. Disparities in allele frequencies and population differentiation for 101 disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms between Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic whites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Variations in gene allele frequencies can contribute to differences in the prevalence of some common complex diseases among populations. Natural selection modulates the balance in allele frequencies across populations. Population differentiation (FST) can evidence environmental selection...

  12. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers defined by estrogen (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumour. Methods We used genotype data on up to 11,421 BRCA1 and 7,080 BRCA2 carriers, of whom 4,310 had been affected with breast cancer and had information on either ER or PR status of the tumour, to assess the associations of 12 loci with breast cancer tumour characteristics. Associations were evaluated using a retrospective cohort approach. Results The results suggested stronger associations with ER-positive breast cancer than ER-negative for 11 loci in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Among BRCA1 carriers, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2981582 (FGFR2) exhibited the biggest difference based on ER status (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) for ER-positive = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.17 to 1.56 vs HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.85 to 0.98 for ER-negative, P-heterogeneity = 6.5 × 10-6). In contrast, SNP rs2046210 at 6q25.1 near ESR1 was primarily associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In BRCA2 carriers, SNPs in FGFR2, TOX3, LSP1, SLC4A7/NEK10, 5p12, 2q35, and 1p11.2 were significantly associated with ER-positive but not ER-negative disease. Similar results were observed when differentiating breast cancer cases by PR status. Conclusions The associations of the 12 SNPs with risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers differ by ER-positive or ER-negative breast cancer status. The apparent differences in SNP associations between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, and non-carriers, may be explicable by differences in the prevalence of tumour subtypes. As more risk modifying variants are identified, incorporating these associations into breast cancer subtype-specific risk models

  13. Human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DQA1*0501 allele associated with genetic susceptibility of Graves disease in a Caucasian population

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsuo, Yanagawa; Ampica, Mangklakruks; Youn-Bok Chang; Yasuyuki, Okamoto; Fisfalen, M.E.; Curran, P.G.; Degroot, L.J. )

    1993-06-01

    Graves disease (GB) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland. Genes of, or closely associated to, the HLA complex are assumed to contribute to the genetic predisposition to GD. The authors have previously reported an increased frequency of HLA-DR3/DQ3 in Caucasian patients with GD, and recently the importance of Dw24 encoded by DRB3 gene has been suggested. To further investigate the associations of GD and these genes, 94 unrelated patients with GD and 75 control subjects were typed for HLA-DRB3, -DRB1, and -DQA1, and -DQB1, using sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes to analyze polymerase chain reaction amplified DNA (PCR-SSO). Three findings emerged from these studies. (1) The frequency of subjects positive for DQA1*0501 (GD, 73.4% vs. control 42.7%, P = 0.0001, RR = 3.71) was significantly increased among patients. The frequency of DR3 (GD, 34.0% vs. control 17.3%, P = 0.0146, RR = 2.46), which is in tight linkage disequilibrium with DQA1*0501, was also increased; however, it was not significant when the P value was corrected for the number of antigens tested. Neither DQB1 nor DRB3 alleles were significantly increased in frequency. (2) After exclusion of DR3-positive subjects, DQA1*0501 was still significantly increased (GD, 59.7% vs. control 30.6%, P = 0.0012, Pc < 0.01, RR = 3.35) among patients. (3) The distributions of Dw24 and Dw25,26 (Dw25 or Dw26) did not differ between patients and controls on either DR3 positive or negative groups. These findings suggest the DQA1*0501, or a closely associated unknown gene, confers susceptibility to GD, while Dw24 is not directly involved. The importance of DR3, however, remains to be elucidated, because of the fixed linkage with DQA1*0501. 34 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  14. Escherichia coli mrsC Is an Allele of hflB, Encoding a Membrane-Associated ATPase and Protease That Is Required for mRNA Decay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong-fu; O’Hara, Eileen B.; Aldea, Marti; Bargmann, Cornelia I.; Gromley, Heather; Kushner, Sidney R.

    1998-01-01

    The mrsC gene of Escherichia coli is required for mRNA turnover and cell growth, and strains containing the temperature-sensitive mrsC505 allele have longer half-lives than wild-type controls for total pulse-labeled and individual mRNAs (L. L. Granger et al., J. Bacteriol. 180:1920–1928, 1998). The cloned mrsC gene contains a long open reading frame beginning at an initiator UUG codon, confirmed by N-terminal amino acid sequencing, encoding a 70,996-Da protein with a consensus ATP-binding domain. mrsC is identical to the independently identified ftsH gene except for three additional amino acids at the N terminus (T. Tomoyasu et al., J. Bacteriol. 175:1344–1351, 1993). The purified protein had a Km of 28 μM for ATP and a Vmax of 21.2 nmol/μg/min. An amino-terminal glutathione S-transferase–MrsC fusion protein retained ATPase activity but was not biologically active. A glutamic acid replacement of the highly conserved lysine within the ATP-binding motif (mrsC201) abolished the complementation of the mrsC505 mutation, confirming that the ATPase activity is required for MrsC function in vivo. In addition, the mrsC505 allele conferred a temperature-sensitive HflB phenotype, while the hflB29 mutation promoted mRNA stability at both 30 and 44°C, suggesting that the inviability associated with the mrsC505 allele is not related to the defect in mRNA decay. The data presented provide the first direct evidence for the involvement of a membrane-bound protein in mRNA decay in E. coli. PMID:9537394

  15. A Hypomorphic PALB2 Allele Gives Rise to an Unusual Form of FA-N Associated with Lymphoid Tumour Development

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Philip J.; Stewart, Grant. S.; Smith, Anna; Eaton, Charlotte; Taylor, Alexander J.; Guy, Chloe; Eringyte, Ieva; Fooks, Peggy; Last, James I.; Horsley, Robert; Oliver, Antony W.; Janic, Dragana; Dokmanovic, Lidija; Stankovic, Tatjana; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with biallelic truncating mutations in PALB2 have a severe form of Fanconi anaemia (FA-N), with a predisposition for developing embryonal-type tumours in infancy. Here we describe two unusual patients from a single family, carrying biallelic PALB2 mutations, one truncating, c.1676_1677delAAinsG;(p.Gln559ArgfsTer2), and the second, c.2586+1G>A; p.Thr839_Lys862del resulting in an in frame skip of exon 6 (24 amino acids). Strikingly, the affected individuals did not exhibit the severe developmental defects typical of FA-N patients and initially presented with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The expressed p.Thr839_Lys862del mutant PALB2 protein retained the ability to interact with BRCA2, previously unreported in FA-N patients. There was also a large increased chromosomal radiosensitivity following irradiation in G2 and increased sensitivity to mitomycin C. Although patient cells were unable to form Rad51 foci following exposure to either DNA damaging agent, U2OS cells, in which the mutant PALB2 with in frame skip of exon 6 was induced, did show recruitment of Rad51 to foci following damage. We conclude that a very mild form of FA-N exists arising from a hypomorphic PALB2 allele. PMID:26990772

  16. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity) and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. Methods We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP) of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. Results HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031). HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 – 294.670). DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027–0.223, p = 0.00001). Conclusion Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the first study in Mexican

  17. Invasive Allele Spread under Preemptive Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasi, J. A.; Korniss, G.; Caraco, T.

    We study a discrete spatial model for invasive allele spread in which two alleles compete preemptively, initially only the "residents" (weaker competitors) being present. We find that the spread of the advantageous mutation is well described by homogeneous nucleation; in particular, in large systems the time-dependent global density of the resident allele is well approximated by Avrami's law.

  18. Common alleles contribute to schizophrenia in CNV carriers

    PubMed Central

    Tansey, K E; Rees, E; Linden, D E; Ripke, S; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; McCarroll, S A; Holmans, P; Kirov, G; Walters, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of schizophrenia is complex, involving risk alleles ranging from common alleles of weak effect to rare alleles of large effect, the best exemplar of the latter being large copy number variants (CNVs). It is currently unknown whether pathophysiology in those with defined rare mutations overlaps with that in other individuals with the disorder who do not share the same rare mutation. Under an extreme heterogeneity model, carriers of specific high-penetrance mutations form distinct subgroups. In contrast, under a polygenic threshold model, high-penetrance rare allele carriers possess many risk factors, of which the rare allele is the only one, albeit an important, factor. Under the latter model, cases with rare mutations can be expected to share some common risk alleles, and therefore pathophysiological mechanisms, with cases without the same mutation. Here we show that, compared with controls, individuals with schizophrenia who have known pathogenic CNVs carry an excess burden of common risk alleles (P=2.25 × 10−17) defined from a genome-wide association study largely based on individuals without known CNVs. Our finding is not consistent with an extreme heterogeneity model for CNV carriers, but does offer support for the polygenic threshold model of schizophrenia. That this is so provides support for the notion that studies aiming to model the effects of rare variation may uncover pathophysiological mechanisms of relevance to those with the disorder more widely. PMID:26390827

  19. Common alleles contribute to schizophrenia in CNV carriers.

    PubMed

    Tansey, K E; Rees, E; Linden, D E; Ripke, S; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; McCarroll, S A; Holmans, P; Kirov, G; Walters, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-08-01

    The genetic architecture of schizophrenia is complex, involving risk alleles ranging from common alleles of weak effect to rare alleles of large effect, the best exemplar of the latter being large copy number variants (CNVs). It is currently unknown whether pathophysiology in those with defined rare mutations overlaps with that in other individuals with the disorder who do not share the same rare mutation. Under an extreme heterogeneity model, carriers of specific high-penetrance mutations form distinct subgroups. In contrast, under a polygenic threshold model, high-penetrance rare allele carriers possess many risk factors, of which the rare allele is the only one, albeit an important, factor. Under the latter model, cases with rare mutations can be expected to share some common risk alleles, and therefore pathophysiological mechanisms, with cases without the same mutation. Here we show that, compared with controls, individuals with schizophrenia who have known pathogenic CNVs carry an excess burden of common risk alleles (P=2.25 × 10(-17)) defined from a genome-wide association study largely based on individuals without known CNVs. Our finding is not consistent with an extreme heterogeneity model for CNV carriers, but does offer support for the polygenic threshold model of schizophrenia. That this is so provides support for the notion that studies aiming to model the effects of rare variation may uncover pathophysiological mechanisms of relevance to those with the disorder more widely. PMID:26390827

  20. Clozapine-induced agranulocytosis is associated with rare HLA-DQB1 and HLA-B alleles

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Jarskog, L Fredrik; Hilliard, Chris; Alfirevic, Ana; Duncan, Laramie; Fourches, Denis; Huang, Hailiang; Lek, Monkol; Neale, Benjamin M; Ripke, Stephan; Shianna, Kevin; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Tropsha, Alexander; van den Oord, Edwin JCG; Cascorbi, Ingolf; Dettling, Michael; Gazit, Ephraim; Goff, Donald C; Holden, Arthur L; Kelly, Deanna L; Malhotra, Anil K; Nielsen, Jimmi; Pirmohamed, Munir; Rujescu, Dan; Werge, Thomas; Levy, Deborah L; Josiassen, Richard C; Kennedy, James L; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Daly, Mark J; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2014-01-01

    Clozapine is a particularly effective antipsychotic medication but its use is curtailed by the risk of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis/granulocytopenia (CIAG), a severe adverse drug reaction occurring in up to 1% of treated individuals. Identifying genetic risk factors for CIAG could enable safer and more widespread use of clozapine. Here we perform the largest and most comprehensive genetic study of CIAG to date by interrogating 163 cases using genome-wide genotyping and whole-exome sequencing. We find that two loci in the major histocompatibility complex are independently associated with CIAG: a single amino acid in HLA-DQB1 (126Q) (P=4.7×10−14, odds ratio, OR=0.19, 95% CI 0.12–0.29) and an amino acid change in the extracellular binding pocket of HLA-B (158T) (P=6.4×10−10, OR=3.3, 95% CI 2.3–4.9). These associations dovetail with the roles of these genes in immunogenetic phenotypes and adverse drug responses for other medications, and provide insight into the pathophysiology of CIAG. PMID:25187353

  1. Clozapine-induced agranulocytosis is associated with rare HLA-DQB1 and HLA-B alleles.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Jarskog, L Fredrik; Hilliard, Chris; Alfirevic, Ana; Duncan, Laramie; Fourches, Denis; Huang, Hailiang; Lek, Monkol; Neale, Benjamin M; Ripke, Stephan; Shianna, Kevin; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Tropsha, Alexander; van den Oord, Edwin J C G; Cascorbi, Ingolf; Dettling, Michael; Gazit, Ephraim; Goff, Donald C; Holden, Arthur L; Kelly, Deanna L; Malhotra, Anil K; Nielsen, Jimmi; Pirmohamed, Munir; Rujescu, Dan; Werge, Thomas; Levy, Deborah L; Josiassen, Richard C; Kennedy, James L; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Daly, Mark J; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2014-01-01

    Clozapine is a particularly effective antipsychotic medication but its use is curtailed by the risk of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis/granulocytopenia (CIAG), a severe adverse drug reaction occurring in up to 1% of treated individuals. Identifying genetic risk factors for CIAG could enable safer and more widespread use of clozapine. Here we perform the largest and most comprehensive genetic study of CIAG to date by interrogating 163 cases using genome-wide genotyping and whole-exome sequencing. We find that two loci in the major histocompatibility complex are independently associated with CIAG: a single amino acid in HLA-DQB1 (126Q) (P=4.7 × 10(-14), odds ratio (OR)=0.19, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.12-0.29) and an amino acid change in the extracellular binding pocket of HLA-B (158T) (P=6.4 × 10(-10), OR=3.3, 95% CI=2.3-4.9). These associations dovetail with the roles of these genes in immunogenetic phenotypes and adverse drug responses for other medications, and provide insight into the pathophysiology of CIAG. PMID:25187353

  2. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing and Characterization of Powdery Mildew Disease-Associated Allelic Variation in Melon

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Kim, Hoy-Taek; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Veerappan, Karpagam; Park, Jong-In; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most common fungal diseases in the world. This disease frequently affects melon (Cucumis melo L.) and other Cucurbitaceous family crops in both open field and greenhouse cultivation. One of the goals of genomics is to identify the polymorphic loci responsible for variation in phenotypic traits. In this study, powdery mildew disease assessment scores were calculated for four melon accessions, ‘SCNU1154’, ‘Edisto47’, ‘MR-1’, and ‘PMR5’. To investigate the genetic variation of these accessions, whole genome re-sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. A total of 754,759,704 quality-filtered reads were generated, with an average of 82.64% coverage relative to the reference genome. Comparisons of the sequences for the melon accessions revealed around 7.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 1.9 million InDels, and 182,398 putative structural variations (SVs). Functional enrichment analysis of detected variations classified them into biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories. Further, a disease-associated QTL map was constructed for 390 SNPs and 45 InDels identified as related to defense-response genes. Among them 112 SNPs and 12 InDels were observed in powdery mildew responsive chromosomes. Accordingly, this whole genome re-sequencing study identified SNPs and InDels associated with defense genes that will serve as candidate polymorphisms in the search for sources of resistance against powdery mildew disease and could accelerate marker-assisted breeding in melon. PMID:27311063

  3. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing and Characterization of Powdery Mildew Disease-Associated Allelic Variation in Melon.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Kim, Hoy-Taek; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Veerappan, Karpagam; Park, Jong-In; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most common fungal diseases in the world. This disease frequently affects melon (Cucumis melo L.) and other Cucurbitaceous family crops in both open field and greenhouse cultivation. One of the goals of genomics is to identify the polymorphic loci responsible for variation in phenotypic traits. In this study, powdery mildew disease assessment scores were calculated for four melon accessions, 'SCNU1154', 'Edisto47', 'MR-1', and 'PMR5'. To investigate the genetic variation of these accessions, whole genome re-sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. A total of 754,759,704 quality-filtered reads were generated, with an average of 82.64% coverage relative to the reference genome. Comparisons of the sequences for the melon accessions revealed around 7.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 1.9 million InDels, and 182,398 putative structural variations (SVs). Functional enrichment analysis of detected variations classified them into biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories. Further, a disease-associated QTL map was constructed for 390 SNPs and 45 InDels identified as related to defense-response genes. Among them 112 SNPs and 12 InDels were observed in powdery mildew responsive chromosomes. Accordingly, this whole genome re-sequencing study identified SNPs and InDels associated with defense genes that will serve as candidate polymorphisms in the search for sources of resistance against powdery mildew disease and could accelerate marker-assisted breeding in melon. PMID:27311063

  4. SIRT6 Minor Allele Genotype Is Associated with >5-Year Decrease in Lifespan in an Aged Cohort

    PubMed Central

    TenNapel, Mindi J.; Lynch, Charles F.; Burns, Trudy L.; Wallace, Robert; Smith, Brian J.; Button, Anna; Domann, Frederick E.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a natural process involving complex interplay between environment, metabolism, and genes. Sirtuin genes and their downstream targets have been associated with lifespan in numerous organisms from nematodes to humans. Several target proteins of the sirtuin genes are key sensors and/or effectors of oxidative stress pathways including FOXO3, SOD3, and AKT1. To examine the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at candidate genes in these pathways and human lifespan, we performed a molecular epidemiologic study of an elderly cohort (≥65 years old.). Using age at death as a continuous outcome variable and assuming a co-dominant genetic model within the framework of multi-variable linear regression analysis, the genotype-specific adjusted mean age at death was estimated for individual SNP genotypes while controlling for age-related risk factors including smoking, body mass index, alcohol consumption and co-morbidity. Significant associations were detected between human lifespan and SNPs in genes SIRT3, SIRT5, SIRT6, FOXO3 and SOD3. Individuals with either the CC or CT genotype at rs107251 within SIRT6 displayed >5-year mean survival advantages compared to the TT genotype (5.5 and 5.9 years, respectively; q-value  = 0.012). Other SNPs revealed genotype-specific mean survival advantages ranging from 0.5 to 1.6 years. Gender also modified the effect of SNPs in SIRT3, SIRT5 and AKT1 on lifespan. Our novel findings highlight the impact of sirtuins and sirtuin-related genotypes on lifespan, the importance of evaluating gender and the advantage of using age as a continuous variable in analyses to report mean age at death. PMID:25541994

  5. Allelic loss at chromosome 13q12-q13 is associated with poor prognosis in familial and sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, J.; Johannsson, O.; Håkansson, S.; Olsson, H.; Borg, A.

    1996-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was analysed in 84 primary tumours from sporadic, familial and hereditary breast cancer using five microsatellite markers spanning the chromosomal region 13q12-q13 which harbours the BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility gene, and using one other marker located within the RBI tumour-suppressor gene at 13q14. LOH at the BRCA2 region was found in 34% and at RBI in 27% of the tumours. Selective LOH at BRCA2 occurred in 7% of the tumours, whereas selective LOH at RBI was observed in another 7%. Moreover, a few tumours demonstrated a restricted deletion pattern, suggesting the presence of additional tumour-suppressor genes both proximal and distal of BRCA2. LOH at BRCA2 was significantly correlated to high S-phase values, low oestrogen and progesterone receptor content and DNA non-diploidy. LOH at BRCA2 was also associated, albeit non-significantly, with large tumour size and the ductal and medullar histological types. No correlation was found with lymph node status, patient age or a family history of breast cancer. A highly significant and independent correlation existed between LOH at BRCA2 and early recurrence and death. LOH at RBI was not associated with the above mentioned factors or prognosis. The present study does not provide conclusive evidence that BRCA2 is the sole target for deletions at 13q12-q13 in breast tumours. However, the results suggest that inactivation of one or several tumour-suppressor genes in the 13q12-q13 region confer a strong tumour growth potential and poor prognosis in both familial and sporadic breast cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8932343

  6. T-cell receptor V sub. alpha. and C sub. alpha. alleles associated with multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Oksenberg, J.R.; Cavalli-Sforza, L.L.; Steinman, L. ); Sherritt, M.; Bernard, C.C. ); Begovich, A.B.; Erlich, H.A. )

    1989-02-01

    Polymorphic markers in genes encoding the {alpha} chain of the human T-cell receptor (TcR) have been detected by Southern blot analysis in Pss I digests. Polymorphic bands were observed at 6.3 and 2.0 kilobases (kb) with frequencies of 0.30 and 0.44, respectively, in the general population. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, the authors amplified selected sequences derived from the full-length TcR {alpha} cDNA probe. These PcR products were used as specific probes to demonstrate that the 6.3-kb polymorphic fragment hybridizes to the variable (V)-region probe and the 2.0-kb fragment hybridizes to the constant (C)-region probe. Segregation of the polymorphic bands was analyzed in family studies. To look for associations between these markers and autoimmune diseases, the authors have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism distribution of the Pss I markers in patients with multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and Graves disease. Significant differences in the frequency of the polymorphic V{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {alpha}} markers were identified between patients and healthy individuals.

  7. Novel loci associated with usual sleep duration: the CHARGE Consortium Genome-Wide Association Study.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, D J; Hek, K; Chen, T-H; Watson, N F; Eiriksdottir, G; Byrne, E M; Cornelis, M; Warby, S C; Bandinelli, S; Cherkas, L; Evans, D S; Grabe, H J; Lahti, J; Li, M; Lehtimäki, T; Lumley, T; Marciante, K D; Pérusse, L; Psaty, B M; Robbins, J; Tranah, G J; Vink, J M; Wilk, J B; Stafford, J M; Bellis, C; Biffar, R; Bouchard, C; Cade, B; Curhan, G C; Eriksson, J G; Ewert, R; Ferrucci, L; Fülöp, T; Gehrman, P R; Goodloe, R; Harris, T B; Heath, A C; Hernandez, D; Hofman, A; Hottenga, J-J; Hunter, D J; Jensen, M K; Johnson, A D; Kähönen, M; Kao, L; Kraft, P; Larkin, E K; Lauderdale, D S; Luik, A I; Medici, M; Montgomery, G W; Palotie, A; Patel, S R; Pistis, G; Porcu, E; Quaye, L; Raitakari, O; Redline, S; Rimm, E B; Rotter, J I; Smith, A V; Spector, T D; Teumer, A; Uitterlinden, A G; Vohl, M-C; Widen, E; Willemsen, G; Young, T; Zhang, X; Liu, Y; Blangero, J; Boomsma, D I; Gudnason, V; Hu, F; Mangino, M; Martin, N G; O'Connor, G T; Stone, K L; Tanaka, T; Viikari, J; Gharib, S A; Punjabi, N M; Räikkönen, K; Völzke, H; Mignot, E; Tiemeier, H

    2015-10-01

    Usual sleep duration is a heritable trait correlated with psychiatric morbidity, cardiometabolic disease and mortality, although little is known about the genetic variants influencing this trait. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of usual sleep duration was conducted using 18 population-based cohorts totaling 47 180 individuals of European ancestry. Genome-wide significant association was identified at two loci. The strongest is located on chromosome 2, in an intergenic region 35- to 80-kb upstream from the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 (lowest P=1.1 × 10(-9)). This finding was replicated in an African-American sample of 4771 individuals (lowest P=9.3 × 10(-4)). The strongest combined association was at rs1823125 (P=1.5 × 10(-10), minor allele frequency 0.26 in the discovery sample, 0.12 in the replication sample), with each copy of the minor allele associated with a sleep duration 3.1 min longer per night. The alleles associated with longer sleep duration were associated in previous GWAS with a more favorable metabolic profile and a lower risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these associations may help elucidate biological mechanisms influencing sleep duration and its association with psychiatric, metabolic and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25469926

  8. Bi-allelic Mutations in KLHL7 Cause a Crisponi/CISS1-like Phenotype Associated with Early-Onset Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Angius, Andrea; Uva, Paolo; Buers, Insa; Oppo, Manuela; Puddu, Alessandro; Onano, Stefano; Persico, Ivana; Loi, Angela; Marcia, Loredana; Höhne, Wolfgang; Cuccuru, Gianmauro; Fotia, Giorgio; Deiana, Manila; Marongiu, Mara; Atalay, Hatice Tuba; Inan, Sibel; El Assy, Osama; Smit, Leo M E; Okur, Ilyas; Boduroglu, Koray; Utine, Gülen Eda; Kılıç, Esra; Zampino, Giuseppe; Crisponi, Giangiorgio; Crisponi, Laura; Rutsch, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Crisponi syndrome (CS)/cold-induced sweating syndrome type 1 (CISS1) is a very rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a complex phenotype with high neonatal lethality, associated with the following main clinical features: hyperthermia and feeding difficulties in the neonatal period, scoliosis, and paradoxical sweating induced by cold since early childhood. CS/CISS1 can be caused by mutations in cytokine receptor-like factor 1 (CRLF1). However, the physiopathological role of CRLF1 is still poorly understood. A subset of CS/CISS1 cases remain yet genetically unexplained after CRLF1 sequencing. In five of them, exome sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing identified four homozygous disease-causing mutations in kelch-like family member 7 (KLHL7), affecting the Kelch domains of the protein. KLHL7 encodes a BTB-Kelch-related protein involved in the ubiquitination of target proteins for proteasome-mediated degradation. Mono-allelic substitutions in other domains of KLHL7 have been reported in three families affected by a late-onset form of autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Retinitis pigmentosa was also present in two surviving children reported here carrying bi-allelic KLHL7 mutations. KLHL7 mutations are thus associated with a more severe phenotype in recessive than in dominant cases. Although these data further support the pathogenic role of KLHL7 mutations in a CS/CISS1-like phenotype, they do not explain all their clinical manifestations and highlight the high phenotypic heterogeneity associated with mutations in KLHL7. PMID:27392078

  9. Allelic Spectra of Risk SNPs Are Different for Environment/Lifestyle Dependent versus Independent Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated sufficient data to assess the role of selection in shaping allelic diversity of disease-associated SNPs. Negative selection against disease risk variants is expected to reduce their frequencies making them overrepresented in the group of minor (<50%) alleles. Indeed, we found that the overall proportion of risk alleles was higher among alleles with frequency <50% (minor alleles) compared to that in the group of major alleles. We hypothesized that negative selection may have different effects on environment (or lifestyle)-dependent versus environment (or lifestyle)-independent diseases. We used an environment/lifestyle index (ELI) to assess influence of environmental/lifestyle factors on disease etiology. ELI was defined as the number of publications mentioning “environment” or “lifestyle” AND disease per 1,000 disease-mentioning publications. We found that the frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with strong environmental/lifestyle components follow the distribution expected under a selectively neutral model, while frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with weak environmental/lifestyle influences is shifted to the lower values indicating effects of negative selection. We hypothesized that previously selectively neutral variants become risk alleles when environment changes. The hypothesis of ancestrally neutral, currently disadvantageous risk-associated alleles predicts that the distribution of risk alleles for the environment/lifestyle dependent diseases will follow a neutral model since natural selection has not had enough time to influence allele frequencies. The results of our analysis suggest that prediction of SNP functionality based on the level of evolutionary conservation may not be useful for SNPs associated with environment/lifestyle dependent diseases. PMID:26201053

  10. Reduced Methylprednisolone Clearance Causing Prolonged Pharmacodynamics in a Healthy Subject Was Not Associated With CYP3A5*3 Allele or a Change in Diet Composition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su-Jun; Jusko, William J.; Salaita, Christine G.; Calis, Karim A.; Jann, Michael W.; Spratlin, Vicky E.; Goldstein, Joyce A.; Hon, Yuen Yi

    2014-01-01

    The influence of diet and genetics was investigated in a healthy white person who had distinctly low methylprednisolone clearance. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameter values were similar on 2 occasions during the consumption of a low-carbohydrate diet and a Weight Watchers diet, indicating that the decreased clearance was unlikely attributable to a change in diet composition. Although the subject was found to be homozygous for CYP3A5*3, genetic findings were not significant for a number of other CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 allelic variants. Because of the high prevalence of CYP3A5*3/*3 in whites and because 5 of 7 white control subjects are also homozygous for CYP3A5*3, this genotype cannot fully explain the reduced metabolism of the drug. Other genetic or contributing factors might have been involved. New polymerase chain reaction–based genotyping methods for functionally defective CYP3A5*6, *8, *9, and *10 alleles were developed in this study. These assays will be useful for CYP3A5 genotype analysis in future clinical studies. PMID:16638735

  11. Human Leukocyte Antigen-E Alleles are Associated with Hepatitis C Virus, Torque Teno Virus, and Toxoplasma Co-infections but are not Associated with Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis D Virus, and GB Virus C Co-infections in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Dharmawan, Ruben; Raharjo, Irvan; Hudiyono

    2016-01-01

    Context: Data regarding the distribution of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E alleles and their association with blood-borne pathogen infections/co-infections are limited for many populations, including Indonesia. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze the association between HLA-E allelic variants and infection with blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV), torque teno virus (TTV), GB virus C (GBV-C), and Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) in Indonesian Javanese human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. Settings and Design: A total of 320 anti-HIV-positive blood samples were analyzed for HBV, HCV, HDV, TTV, GBV-C, and T. gondii infection status and its association with HLA-E allelic variants. Materials and Methods: Nucleic acid was extracted from plasma samples and used for the molecular detection of HBV DNA, HCV RNA, HDV RNA, TTV DNA, and GBV-C RNA, whereas hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV, immunoglobulin M and G (IgM and IgG) anti-T. gondii were detected through serological testing. The blood samples were genotyped for HLA-E loci using a sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction. Statistical Analysis Used: Either the Chi-square or Fisher's exact test was performed to analyze the frequency of HLA-E alleles and blood-borne pathogen infections in the population. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to measure the association between the antibodies found and the participants’ possible risk behaviors. A logistic regression analysis was used to assess the associations. Results: HLA-E*101/0101 was associated with HCV/TTV co-infection (adjusted OR [aOR]: 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.156-10.734; P = 0.027) and IgM/IgG anti-Toxo positivity (aOR: 27.0; 95% CI: 3.626-200.472; P = 0.001). HLA-E*103/0103 was associated with TTV co-infection (aOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.509-4.796; P = 0.001). Conclusions: HLA-E alleles in Indonesian Javanese HIV patients were found to be associated with HCV, TTV, and

  12. A functional polymorphism in the Eta-1 promoter is associated with allele specific binding to the transcription factor Sp1 and elevated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hummelshoj, Tina; Ryder, Lars P; Madsen, Hans O; Odum, Niels; Svejgaard, Arne

    2006-03-01

    Early T lymphocyte activator 1 (Eta-1), also known as Osteopontin, is a cytokine produced by macrophages and T lymphocytes. It is involved in the regulation of IL-12 and IL-10 expression in macrophages and stimulates the polarization of T cells to the Th1 subset. Three promoter polymorphisms of the human Eta-1 gene, -443T/C, -156delG/G, -66T/G, were investigated for possible influence on gene expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) with nuclear extract from the human myeloid leukaemia premonocyte cell line, THP-1, revealed sequence specific binding of the transcription factor Sp1 to the -66T allele but not the -66G allele, and haplotype -443C/-156G/-66T showed a marked increase in promoter activity of a luciferase reporter gene. Thus, a substitution of the T-base with G at position -66 in the Eta-1 promoter modulates the promoter activity of the Eta-1 gene, which might influence the Th1 versus Th2 balance. These observations are discussed in relation to a recently reported related observation on the same gene, and it is argued that discrepancies between reporter gene assays in the two studies may be due to the use of different cell lines and may reflect requirements for different transcription factors in cells involved in immune responses compared with other cells. PMID:16009426

  13. Fine-Mapping the HOXB Region Detects Common Variants Tagging a Rare Coding Allele: Evidence for Synthetic Association in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Edward J.; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Wiklund, Fredrik; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Xu, Jianfeng; Mikropoulos, Christos; Goh, Chee; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Sawyer, Emma J.; Morgan, Angela; Easton, Douglas F.; Muir, Ken; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2014-01-01

    The HOXB13 gene has been implicated in prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility. We performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association between common genetic variation across the HOXB genetic locus at 17q21 and PrCa risk. This involved genotyping 700 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (iCOGS) followed by imputation of 3195 SNPs in 20,440 PrCa cases and 21,469 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. We identified a cluster of highly correlated common variants situated within or closely upstream of HOXB13 that were significantly associated with PrCa risk, described by rs117576373 (OR 1.30, P = 2.62×10−14). Additional genotyping, conditional regression and haplotype analyses indicated that the newly identified common variants tag a rare, partially correlated coding variant in the HOXB13 gene (G84E, rs138213197), which has been identified recently as a moderate penetrance PrCa susceptibility allele. The potential for GWAS associations detected through common SNPs to be driven by rare causal variants with higher relative risks has long been proposed; however, to our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence for this phenomenon of synthetic association contributing to cancer susceptibility. PMID:24550738

  14. Fine-mapping the HOXB region detects common variants tagging a rare coding allele: evidence for synthetic association in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Edward J; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Wiklund, Fredrik; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Gronberg, Henrik; Aly, Markus; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan; Chanock, Stephen; Berndt, Sonja I; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald; Schleutker, Johanna; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Canzian, Federico; Campa, Daniele; Riboli, Elio; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Hayes, Richard B; Pharoah, Paul; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Ostrander, Elaine A; Signorello, Lisa B; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Schaid, Daniel; Maier, Christiane; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong Y; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A; Teixeira, Manuel R; Xu, Jianfeng; Mikropoulos, Christos; Goh, Chee; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma J; Morgan, Angela; Easton, Douglas F; Muir, Ken; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2014-02-01

    The HOXB13 gene has been implicated in prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility. We performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association between common genetic variation across the HOXB genetic locus at 17q21 and PrCa risk. This involved genotyping 700 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (iCOGS) followed by imputation of 3195 SNPs in 20,440 PrCa cases and 21,469 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. We identified a cluster of highly correlated common variants situated within or closely upstream of HOXB13 that were significantly associated with PrCa risk, described by rs117576373 (OR 1.30, P = 2.62×10(-14)). Additional genotyping, conditional regression and haplotype analyses indicated that the newly identified common variants tag a rare, partially correlated coding variant in the HOXB13 gene (G84E, rs138213197), which has been identified recently as a moderate penetrance PrCa susceptibility allele. The potential for GWAS associations detected through common SNPs to be driven by rare causal variants with higher relative risks has long been proposed; however, to our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence for this phenomenon of synthetic association contributing to cancer susceptibility. PMID:24550738

  15. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chaoyong; Odeberg, Jacob; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per . E-mail: Per.Eriksson@ki.se

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  16. Bipolar disorder and the pseudoautosomal region: An association study

    SciTech Connect

    Parsian, A.; Todd, R.D.

    1994-03-15

    From family, adoption, and twin studies it is clear that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of bipolar disorder (McGuffin and Katz: The Biology of Depression, Gaskell, London, 1986). Recently Yoneda et al. reported an association between an allele (A4) of a VNTR marker (DXYS20) for the pseudoautosomal region and bipolar disorder in a Japanese population. In order to test for this association in a Caucasian population, we have typed a sample of 52 subjects with bipolar disorder and 61 normal controls. The bipolar subjects are probands of multiple incidence families. The normal controls are an epidemiologically ascertained sample of middle-aged, unrelated individuals. The two groups were matched for sex and ethnic background. There were no significant differences in the allele or genotype frequencies of DXYS20 between the two groups. In particular, there was no significant difference in the frequency of the A4 allele in normal controls and bipolar patients (0.377 vs. 0.317, respectively). The prevalence of the A4 allele in bipolar patients and normal controls was 0.567 and 0.622, respectively. We were not able to replicate the results of the 1992 Yoneda et al. study. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Association study of IGF1 polymorphisms with susceptibility to high myopia in a Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Masao; Meguro, Akira; Yoshino, Atsushi; Nomura, Naoko; Okada, Eiichi; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Polymorphisms in the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) gene were previously associated with high or extreme myopia in Caucasian and Chinese populations. In the present study, we investigated whether IGF1 polymorphisms are associated with high myopia in a Japanese population. Methods A total of 446 Japanese patients with high myopia (≤−9.00 diopters) and 481 Japanese healthy controls (+1.50 diopters to −1.50 diopters) were recruited. We genotyped seven tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in IGF1 and assessed allelic and haplotypic diversity in cases and controls. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the allele frequencies of IGF1 SNPs and genotypes between cases and controls (P>0.05). However, the A allele of rs5742629 and the G allele of rs12423791 were associated with a moderately increased risk of high myopia (odds ratio [OR] =1.20 and OR =1.21, respectively) with borderline statistical significance (P=0.0502, corrected P (Pc) =0.21 and P=0.064, Pc=0.29, respectively). The haplotype consisting of the A allele of rs5742629 and the G allele of rs12423791 was marginally associated with the risk of high myopia (P=0.041; OR =1.21); this association was not significant after correction (Pc=0.19). Conclusion We found that the IGF1 SNPs are not significantly associated with high myopia in our Japanese population. Our results are in contrast to a previous study in which extreme myopia cases had significantly higher frequencies of the G allele of rs5742629 and the C allele of rs12423791 than controls. Therefore, the IGF1 SNPs may not be important factors for susceptibility to high myopia in all populations. Further genetic studies are needed to elucidate the possible contributions of the IGF1 region to the development of high myopia. PMID:24204106

  18. Allelic Variation in the Perennial Ryegrass FLOWERING LOCUS T Gene Is Associated with Changes in Flowering Time across a Range of Populations1[W

    PubMed Central

    Skøt, Leif; Sanderson, Ruth; Thomas, Ann; Skøt, Kirsten; Thorogood, Danny; Latypova, Galina; Asp, Torben; Armstead, Ian

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene and its orthologs in other plant species (e.g. rice [Oryza sativa] OsFTL2/Hd3a) have an established role in the photoperiodic induction of flowering response. The genomic and phenotypic variations associated with the perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) ortholog of FT, designated LpFT3, was assessed in a diverse collection of nine European germplasm populations, which together constituted an association panel of 864 plants. Sequencing and genotyping of a series of amplicons derived from the nine populations, containing the complete exon and intron sequences as well as 5′ and 3′ noncoding sequences of LpFT3, identified a total of seven haplotypes. Genotyping assays designed to detect the genomic variation showed that three haplotypes were present in approximately equal proportions and represented 84% of the total, with a fourth representing a further 11%. Of the three major haplotypes, two were predicted to code for identical protein products and the third contained two amino acid substitutions. Association analysis using either a mixed model with a relationship matrix to correct for population structure and relatedness or structured association with further correction using genomic control indicated significant associations between LpFT3 and variation in flowering time. These associations were corroborated in a validation population segregating for the same major alleles. The most “diagnostic” region of genomic variation was situated 5′ of the coding sequence. Analysis of this region identified that the interhaplotype variation was closely associated with sequence motifs that were apparently conserved in the 5′ region of orthologs of LpFT3 from other plant species. These may represent cis-regulatory elements involved in influencing the expression of this gene. PMID:21115808

  19. Allelic Variation in a Cellulose Synthase Gene (PtoCesA4) Associated with Growth and Wood Properties in Populus tomentosa

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qingzhang; Xu, Baohua; Pan, Wei; Gong, Chenrui; Wang, Qingshi; Tian, Jiaxing; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2013-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass from trees provides a renewable feedstock for biofuels, lumber, pulp, paper, and other uses. Dissecting the mechanism underlying natural variation of the complex traits controlling growth and lignocellulose biosynthesis in trees can enable marker-assisted breeding to improve wood quality and yield. Here, we combined linkage disequilibrium (LD)-based association analysis with traditional linkage analysis to detect the genetic effect of a Populus tomentosa cellulose synthase gene, PtoCesA4. PtoCesA4 is strongly expressed in developing xylem and leaves. Nucleotide diversity and LD in PtoCesA4, sampled from the P. tomentosa natural distribution, revealed that PtoCesA4 harbors high single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity (πT = 0.0080 and θw = 0.0098) and low LD (r2 ≥ 0.1, within 1400 bp), demonstrating that the potential of a candidate-gene-based LD approach in understanding the molecular basis underlying quantitative variation in this species. By combining single SNP, multi-SNP, and haplotype-based associations in an association population of 460 individuals with single SNP linkage analysis in a family-based linkage populations (1200 individuals), we identified three strong associations (false discovery rate Q < 0.05) in both populations. These include two nonsynonymous markers (SNP49 associated with α-cellulose content and SNP59 associated with fiber width) and a noncoding marker (SNP18 associated with α-cellulose content). Variation in RNA transcript abundance among genotypic classes of SNP49 was confirmed in these two populations. Therefore, combining different methods allowed us to examine functional PtoCesA4 allelic variation underlying natural variation in complex quantitative traits related to growth and lignocellulosic biosynthesis. PMID:24048648

  20. Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Stricto ospC Alleles Associated with Human Lyme Borreliosis Worldwide in Non-Human-Biting Tick Ixodes affinis and Rodent Hosts in Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Golovchenko, Maryna; Hönig, Václav; Mallátová, Nadja; Krbková, Lenka; Mikulášek, Peter; Fedorova, Natalia; Belfiore, Natalia M.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Lane, Robert S.; Oliver, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Comparative analysis of ospC genes from 127 Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strains collected in European and North American regions where Lyme disease is endemic and where it is not endemic revealed a close relatedness of geographically distinct populations. ospC alleles A, B, and L were detected on both continents in vectors and hosts, including humans. Six ospC alleles, A, B, L, Q, R, and V, were prevalent in Europe; 4 of them were detected in samples of human origin. Ten ospC alleles, A, B, D, E3, F, G, H, H3, I3, and M, were identified in the far-western United States. Four ospC alleles, B, G, H, and L, were abundant in the southeastern United States. Here we present the first expanded analysis of ospC alleles of B. burgdorferi strains from the southeastern United States with respect to their relatedness to strains from other North American and European localities. We demonstrate that ospC genotypes commonly associated with human Lyme disease in European and North American regions where the disease is endemic were detected in B. burgdorferi strains isolated from the non-human-biting tick Ixodes affinis and rodent hosts in the southeastern United States. We discovered that some ospC alleles previously known only from Europe are widely distributed in the southeastern United States, a finding that confirms the hypothesis of transoceanic migration of Borrelia species. PMID:23263953

  1. A genome-wide association study identifies a functional ERAP2 haplotype associated with birdshot chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Jonas J W; Van Setten, Jessica; Ripke, Stephan; Van 'T Slot, Ruben; Mulder, Flip; Missotten, Tom; Baarsma, G Seerp; Francioli, Laurent C; Pulit, Sara L; De Kovel, Carolien G F; Ten Dam-Van Loon, Ninette; Den Hollander, Anneke I; Huis in het Veld, Paulien; Hoyng, Carel B; Cordero-Coma, Miguel; Martín, Javier; Llorenç, Victor; Arya, Bharti; Thomas, Dhanes; Bakker, Steven C; Ophoff, Roel A; Rothova, Aniki; De Bakker, Paul I W; Mutis, Tuna; Koeleman, Bobby P C

    2014-11-15

    Birdshot chorioretinopathy (BSCR) is a rare form of autoimmune uveitis that can lead to severe visual impairment. Intriguingly, >95% of cases carry the HLA-A29 allele, which defines the strongest documented HLA association for a human disease. We have conducted a genome-wide association study in 96 Dutch and 27 Spanish cases, and 398 unrelated Dutch and 380 Spanish controls. Fine-mapping the primary MHC association through high-resolution imputation at classical HLA loci, identified HLA-A*29:02 as the principal MHC association (odds ratio (OR) = 157.5, 95% CI 91.6-272.6, P = 6.6 × 10(-74)). We also identified two novel susceptibility loci at 5q15 near ERAP2 (rs7705093; OR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.7-3.1, for the T allele, P = 8.6 × 10(-8)) and at 14q32.31 in the TECPR2 gene (rs150571175; OR = 6.1, 95% CI 3.2-11.7, for the A allele, P = 3.2 × 10(-8)). The association near ERAP2 was confirmed in an independent British case-control samples (combined meta-analysis P = 1.7 × 10(-9)). Functional analyses revealed that the risk allele of the polymorphism near ERAP2 is strongly associated with high mRNA and protein expression of ERAP2 in B cells. This study further defined an extremely strong MHC risk component in BSCR, and detected evidence for a novel disease mechanism that affects peptide processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:24957906

  2. A genome-wide association study identifies a functional ERAP2 haplotype associated with birdshot chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Jonas J.W.; Van Setten, Jessica; Ripke, Stephan; Van ‘T Slot, Ruben; Mulder, Flip; Missotten, Tom; Baarsma, G. Seerp; Francioli, Laurent C.; Pulit, Sara L.; De Kovel, Carolien G.F.; Ten Dam-Van Loon, Ninette; Den Hollander, Anneke I.; Huis in het Veld, Paulien; Hoyng, Carel B.; Cordero-Coma, Miguel; Martín, Javier; Llorenç, Victor; Arya, Bharti; Thomas, Dhanes; Bakker, Steven C.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Rothova, Aniki; De Bakker, Paul I.W.; Mutis, Tuna; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Birdshot chorioretinopathy (BSCR) is a rare form of autoimmune uveitis that can lead to severe visual impairment. Intriguingly, >95% of cases carry the HLA-A29 allele, which defines the strongest documented HLA association for a human disease. We have conducted a genome-wide association study in 96 Dutch and 27 Spanish cases, and 398 unrelated Dutch and 380 Spanish controls. Fine-mapping the primary MHC association through high-resolution imputation at classical HLA loci, identified HLA-A*29:02 as the principal MHC association (odds ratio (OR) = 157.5, 95% CI 91.6–272.6, P = 6.6 × 10−74). We also identified two novel susceptibility loci at 5q15 near ERAP2 (rs7705093; OR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.7–3.1, for the T allele, P = 8.6 × 10−8) and at 14q32.31 in the TECPR2 gene (rs150571175; OR = 6.1, 95% CI 3.2–11.7, for the A allele, P = 3.2 × 10−8). The association near ERAP2 was confirmed in an independent British case–control samples (combined meta-analysis P = 1.7 × 10−9). Functional analyses revealed that the risk allele of the polymorphism near ERAP2 is strongly associated with high mRNA and protein expression of ERAP2 in B cells. This study further defined an extremely strong MHC risk component in BSCR, and detected evidence for a novel disease mechanism that affects peptide processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:24957906

  3. Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis using fetal DNA in maternal plasma: a preliminary study for identification of paternally-inherited alleles using single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J J; Tan, J A M A; Chua, K H; Tan, P C; George, E

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) with a mutation can be used to identify the presence of the paternally-inherited wild-type or mutant allele as result of the inheritance of either allele in the fetus and allows the prediction of the fetal genotype. This study aims to identify paternal SNPs located at the flanking regions upstream or downstream from the β-globin gene mutations at CD41/42 (HBB:c.127_130delCTTT), IVS1-5 (HBB:c.92+5G>C) and IVS2-654 (HBB:c.316-197C>T) using free-circulating fetal DNA. Setting Haematology Lab, Department of Biomedical Science, University of Malaya. Participants Eight couples characterised as β-thalassaemia carriers where both partners posed the same β-globin gene mutations at CD41/42, IVS1-5 and IVS2-654, were recruited in this study. Outcome measures Genotyping was performed by allele specific-PCR and the locations of SNPs were identified after sequencing alignment. Results Genotype analysis revealed that at least one paternal SNP was present for each of the couples. Amplification on free-circulating DNA revealed that the paternal mutant allele of SNP was present in three fcDNA. Thus, the fetuses may be β-thalassaemia carriers or β-thalassaemia major. Paternal wild-type alleles of SNP were present in the remaining five fcDNA samples, thus indicating that the fetal genotypes would not be homozygous mutants. Conclusions This preliminary research demonstrates that paternal allele of SNP can be used as a non-invasive prenatal diagnosis approach for at-risk couples to determine the β-thalassaemia status of the fetus. PMID:26201722

  4. Multiple post-domestication origins of kabuli chickpea through allelic variation in a diversification-associated transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Varma Penmetsa, R; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Bergmann, Emily M; Vance, Lisa; Castro, Brenna; Kassa, Mulualem T; Sarma, Birinchi K; Datta, Subhojit; Farmer, Andrew D; Baek, Jong-Min; Coyne, Clarice J; Varshney, Rajeev K; von Wettberg, Eric J B; Cook, Douglas R

    2016-09-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) is among the founder crops domesticated in the Fertile Crescent. One of two major forms of chickpea, the so-called kabuli type, has white flowers and light-colored seed coats, properties not known to exist in the wild progenitor. The origin of the kabuli form has been enigmatic. We genotyped a collection of wild and cultivated chickpea genotypes with 538 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and examined patterns of molecular diversity relative to geographical sources and market types. In addition, we examined sequence and expression variation in candidate anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway genes. A reduction in genetic diversity and extensive genetic admixture distinguish cultivated chickpea from its wild progenitor species. Among germplasm, the kabuli form is polyphyletic. We identified a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor at chickpea's B locus that conditions flower and seed colors, orthologous to Mendel's A gene of garden pea, whose loss of function is associated invariantly with the kabuli type of chickpea. From the polyphyletic distribution of the kabuli form in germplasm, an absence of nested variation within the bHLH gene and invariant association of loss of function of bHLH among the kabuli type, we conclude that the kabuli form arose multiple times during the phase of phenotypic diversification after initial domestication of cultivated chickpea. PMID:27193699

  5. A new method for studying population genetics of cyst nematodes based on Pool-Seq and genomewide allele frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Mimee, Benjamin; Duceppe, Marc-Olivier; Véronneau, Pierre-Yves; Lafond-Lapalme, Joël; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François; Bélair, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Cyst nematodes are important agricultural pests responsible for billions of dollars of losses each year. Plant resistance is the most effective management tool, but it requires a close monitoring of population genetics. Current technologies for pathotyping and genotyping cyst nematodes are time-consuming, expensive and imprecise. In this study, we capitalized on the reproduction mode of cyst nematodes to develop a simple population genetic analysis pipeline based on genotyping-by-sequencing and Pool-Seq. This method yielded thousands of SNPs and allowed us to study the relationships between populations of different origins or pathotypes. Validation of the method on well-characterized populations also demonstrated that it was a powerful and accurate tool for population genetics. The genomewide allele frequencies of 23 populations of golden nematode, from nine countries and representing the five known pathotypes, were compared. A clear separation of the pathotypes and fine genetic relationships between and among global populations were obtained using this method. In addition to being powerful, this tool has proven to be very time- and cost-efficient and could be applied to other cyst nematode species. PMID:25846829

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wei; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2006-12-01

    Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth Disease. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of a group of enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of aminoacyl-tRNAs for translation. Mutations of human and mouse GlyRSs are causally associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, the most common genetic disorder of the peripheral nervous system. As the first step towards a structure–function analysis of this disease, native human GlyRS was expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystal belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or its enantiomorphic space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 91.74, c = 247.18 Å, and diffracted X-rays to 3.0 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained one GlyRS molecule and had a solvent content of 69%.

  7. Cerebellum volume in high-risk offspring from multiplex alcohol dependence families: association with allelic variation in GABRA2 and BDNF.

    PubMed

    Hill, Shirley Y; Wang, Shuhui; Carter, Howard; Tessner, Kevin; Holmes, Brian; McDermott, Michael; Zezza, Nicholas; Stiffler, Scott

    2011-12-30

    Offspring from families with multiple cases of alcohol dependence have a greater likelihood of developing alcohol dependence (AD) and related substance use disorders. Greater susceptibility for developing these disorders may be related to structural differences in brain circuits that influence the salience of rewards or modify the efficiency of information processing and AD susceptibility. We examined the cerebellum of 71 adolescent/young adult high-risk (HR) offspring from families with multiple cases of alcohol dependence (multiplex families), and 60 low-risk (LR) controls with no family history of alcohol or drug dependence who were matched for age, gender, socioeconomic status and IQ, with attention given to possible effects of personal use of substances and maternal use during pregnancy. Magnetic resonance images were acquired on a General Electric 1.5-Tesla scanner and manually traced (BRAINS2) blind to clinical information. GABRA2 and BDNF variation were tested for their association with cerebellar volumes. High-risk offspring from multiplex AD families showed greater total volume of the cerebellum and total gray matter (GM), in comparison with LR controls. An interaction between allelic variation in GABRA2 and BDNF genes was associated with GM volumes, suggesting that inherited variation in these genes may promote early developmental differences in neuronal proliferation of the cerebellum. PMID:22047728

  8. Cerebellum volume in high-risk offspring from multiplex alcohol dependence families: Association with allelic variation in GABRA2 and BDNF

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Shirley Y.; Wang, Shuhui; Carter, Howard; Tessner, Kevin; Holmes, Brian; McDermott, Michael; Zezza, Nicholas; Stiffler, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Offspring from families with multiple cases of alcohol dependence have a greater likelihood of developing alcohol dependence (AD) and related substance use disorders. Greater susceptibility for developing these disorders may be related to structural differences in brain circuits that influence the salience of rewards or modify the efficiency of information processing and AD susceptibility. We examined the cerebellum of 71 adolescent/young adult high-risk (HR) offspring from families with multiple cases of alcohol dependence (multiplex families), and 60 low-risk (LR) controls with no family history of alcohol or drug dependence who were matched for age, gender, socioeconomic status and IQ, with attention given to possible effects of personal use of substances and maternal use during pregnancy. Magnetic resonance images were acquired on a General Electric 1.5-Tesla scanner and manually traced (BRAINS2) blind to clinical information. GABRA2 and BDNF variation were tested for their association with cerebellar volumes. High-risk offspring from multiplex AD families showed greater total volume of the cerebellum and total gray matter (GM), in comparison with LR controls. An interaction between allelic variation in GABRA2 and BDNF genes was associated with GM volumes, suggesting that inherited variation in these genes may promote early developmental differences in neuronal proliferation of the cerebellum. PMID:22047728

  9. Evaluation of DNA pooling for the estimation of microsatellite allele frequencies: a case study using striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Skalski, Garrick T; Couch, Charlene R; Garber, Amber F; Weir, Bruce S; Sullivan, Craig V

    2006-06-01

    Using striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and six multiplexed microsatellite markers, we evaluated procedures for estimating allele frequencies by pooling DNA from multiple individuals, a method suggested as cost-effective relative to individual genotyping. Using moment-based estimators, we estimated allele frequencies in experimental DNA pools and found that the three primary laboratory steps, DNA quantitation and pooling, PCR amplification, and electrophoresis, accounted for 23, 48, and 29%, respectively, of the technical variance of estimates in pools containing DNA from 2-24 individuals. Exact allele-frequency estimates could be made for pools of sizes 2-8, depending on the locus, by using an integer-valued estimator. Larger pools of size 12 and 24 tended to yield biased estimates; however, replicates of these estimates detected allele frequency differences among pools with different allelic compositions. We also derive an unbiased estimator of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium coefficients that uses multiple DNA pools and analyze the cost-efficiency of DNA pooling. DNA pooling yields the most potential cost savings when a large number of loci are employed using a large number of individuals, a situation becoming increasingly common as microsatellite loci are developed in increasing numbers of taxa. PMID:16582444

  10. [Study on identification of cistanche hebra and its adulterants by PCR amplification of specific alleles based on ITS sequences].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Hua; Long, Ping; Zou, De-Zhi; Li, Yue; Cui, Zhan-Hu; Li, Min-Hui

    2014-10-01

    To explore the new method of discriminating Cistanche deserticola, Cynomorium songaricum and Orobanche pycnostachya by using PCR amplification of specific alleles. 30 samples of the different C. deserticola, 21 samples of C. songaricum and O. pycnostachya were collected. The total DNA of the samples were extracted, the ITS sequences from C. deserticola, C. songaricum and O. pycnostachya were amplified by PCR and sequenced unidirectionally. These sequences were aligned by using ClustulW. Specific primer was designed according to the ITS sequences of specific alleles, and PCR reaction system was optimized. Additionally, compare with the identification of specific PCR method and DNA sequence analysis method. The result showed that the 331 bp identification band for C. deserticola and the adulterants not amplified bands by a single PCR reaction, which showed good identification ability to the three species. PCR amplification of specific alleles can be used to identify C. deserticola, C. songaricum and O. pycnostachya successfully. PMID:25612421

  11. lon incompatibility associated with mutations causing SOS induction: null uvrD alleles induce an SOS response in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    SaiSree, L; Reddy, M; Gowrishankar, J

    2000-06-01

    The uvrD gene in Escherichia coli encodes a 720-amino-acid 3'-5' DNA helicase which, although nonessential for viability, is required for methyl-directed mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair and furthermore is believed to participate in recombination and DNA replication. We have shown in this study that null mutations in uvrD are incompatible with lon, the incompatibility being a consequence of the chronic induction of SOS in uvrD strains and the resultant accumulation of the cell septation inhibitor SulA (which is a normal target for degradation by Lon protease). uvrD-lon incompatibility was suppressed by sulA, lexA3(Ind(-)), or recA (Def) mutations. Other mutations, such as priA, dam, polA, and dnaQ (mutD) mutations, which lead to persistent SOS induction, were also lon incompatible. SOS induction was not observed in uvrC and mutH (or mutS) mutants defective, respectively, in excision repair and mismatch repair. Nor was uvrD-mediated SOS induction abolished by mutations in genes that affect mismatch repair (mutH), excision repair (uvrC), or recombination (recB and recF). These data suggest that SOS induction in uvrD mutants is not a consequence of defects in these three pathways. We propose that the UvrD helicase participates in DNA replication to unwind secondary structures on the lagging strand immediately behind the progressing replication fork, and that it is the absence of this function which contributes to SOS induction in uvrD strains. PMID:10809694

  12. The functional importance of sequence versus expression variability of MHC alleles in parasite resistance.

    PubMed

    Axtner, Jan; Sommer, Simone

    2012-12-01

    Understanding selection processes driving the pronounced allelic polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes and its functional associations to parasite load have been the focus of many recent wildlife studies. Two main selection scenarios are currently debated which explain the susceptibility or resistance to parasite infections either by the effects of (1) specific MHC alleles which are selected frequency-dependent in space and time or (2) a heterozygote or divergent allele advantage. So far, most studies have focused only on structural variance in co-evolutionary processes although this might not be the only trait subject to natural selection. In the present study, we analysed structural variance stretching from exon1 through exon3 of MHC class II DRB genes as well as genotypic expression variance in relation to the gastrointestinal helminth prevalence and infection intensity in wild yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis). We found support for the functional importance of specific alleles both on the sequence and expression level. By resampling a previously investigated study population we identified specific MHC alleles affected by temporal shifts in parasite pressure and recorded associated changes in allele frequencies. The allele Apfl-DRB*23 was associated with resistance to infections by the oxyurid nematode Syphacia stroma and at the same time with susceptibility to cestode infection intensity. In line with our expectation, MHC mRNA transcript levels tended to be higher in cestode-infected animals carrying the allele Apfl-DRB*23. However, no support for a heterozygote or divergent allele advantage on the sequence or expression level was detected. The individual amino acid distance of genotypes did not explain individual differences in parasite loads and the genetic distance had no effect on MHC genotype expression. For ongoing studies on the functional importance of expression variance in parasite resistance, allele

  13. Genetic mapping of the Batten disease locus (CLN3) to the interval D16S288-D16S383 by analysis of haplotypes and allelic association

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, H.M.; O`Rawe, A.M.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1994-07-15

    CLN3, the gene for juvenile-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) or Batten disease, has been localized by genetic linkage analysis to chromosome 16p between loci D16S297 and D16S57. The authors have now further refined the localization of CLN3 by haplotype analysis using two new microsatellite markers from loci D16S383 and SPN in the D16S297-D16S57 interval on a larger collaborative family resource consisting of 142 JNCL pedigrees. Crossover events in 3 maternal meioses define new flanking markers for CLN3 and localize the gene to the interval at 16p12.1-11.2 between D16S288 and D16S383, which corresponds to a genetic distance of 2.1 cM. Within this interval 4 microsatellite loci are in strong linkage disequilibrium with CLN3, and extended haplotype analysis of the associated alleles indicates that CLN3 is in closest proximity to loci D16S299 and D16S298. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Two novel tumor suppressor gene loci on chromosome 6q and 15q in human osteosarcoma identified through comparative study of allelic imbalances in mouse and man.

    PubMed

    Nathrath, Michaela H; Kuosaite, Virginija; Rosemann, Michael; Kremer, Marcus; Poremba, Christopher; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yanagi, Masayuki; Nathrath, Walter B J; Höfler, Heinz; Imai, Kenji; Atkinson, Michael J

    2002-08-29

    We have performed a comparative study of allelic imbalances in human and murine osteosarcomas to identify genetic changes critical for osteosarcomagenesis. Two adjacent but discrete loci on mouse chromosome 9 were found to show high levels of allelic imbalance in radiation-induced osteosarcomas arising in (BALB/cxCBA/CA) F1 hybrid mice. The syntenic human chromosomal regions were investigated in 42 sporadic human osteosarcomas. For the distal locus (OSS1) on mouse chromosome 9 the syntenic human locus was identified on chromosome 6q14 and showed allelic imbalance in 77% of the cases. Comparison between the human and mouse syntenic regions narrowed the locus down to a 4 Mbp fragment flanked by the marker genes ME1 and SCL35A1. For the proximal locus (OSS2) on mouse chromosome 9, a candidate human locus was mapped to chromosome 15q21 in a region showing allelic imbalance in 58% of human osteosarcomas. We have used a combination of synteny and microsatellite mapping to identify two potential osteosarcoma suppressor gene loci. This strategy represents a powerful tool for the identification of new genes important for the formation of human tumors. PMID:12185601

  15. Studies on human eRF3-PABP interaction reveal the influence of eRF3a N-terminal glycin repeat on eRF3-PABP binding affinity and the lower affinity of eRF3a 12-GGC allele involved in cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Jerbi, Soumaya; Jolles, Béatrice; Bouceba, Tahar; Jean-Jean, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3) has been involved in the control of mRNA degradation through its association with the cytoplasmic Poly(A) Binding Protein, PABP. In mammals, eRF3 N-terminal domain contains two overlapping PAM2 motifs which specifically recognize the MLLE domain of PABP. In humans, eRF3a/GSPT1 gene contains a stable GGC repeat encoding a repeat of glycine residues in eRF3a N-terminus. There are five known eRF3a/GSPT1 alleles in the human population, encoding 7, 9, 10, 11 and 12 glycines. Several studies have reported that the presence of eRF3a 12-GGC allele is correlated with an increased risk of cancer development. Using surface plasmon resonance, we have studied the interaction of the various allelic forms of eRF3a with PABP alone or poly(A)-bound PABP. We found that the N-terminal glycine repeat of eRF3a influences eRF3a-PABP interaction and that eRF3a 12-GGC allele has a decreased binding affinity for PABP. Our comparative analysis on eRF3a alleles suggests that the presence of eRF3a 12-GGC allele could modify the coupling between translation termination and mRNA deadenylation. PMID:26818177

  16. Studies on human eRF3-PABP interaction reveal the influence of eRF3a N-terminal glycin repeat on eRF3-PABP binding affinity and the lower affinity of eRF3a 12-GGC allele involved in cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Jerbi, Soumaya; Jolles, Béatrice; Bouceba, Tahar; Jean-Jean, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3) has been involved in the control of mRNA degradation through its association with the cytoplasmic Poly(A) Binding Protein, PABP. In mammals, eRF3 N-terminal domain contains two overlapping PAM2 motifs which specifically recognize the MLLE domain of PABP. In humans, eRF3a/GSPT1 gene contains a stable GGC repeat encoding a repeat of glycine residues in eRF3a N-terminus. There are five known eRF3a/GSPT1 alleles in the human population, encoding 7, 9, 10, 11 and 12 glycines. Several studies have reported that the presence of eRF3a 12-GGC allele is correlated with an increased risk of cancer development. Using surface plasmon resonance, we have studied the interaction of the various allelic forms of eRF3a with PABP alone or poly(A)-bound PABP. We found that the N-terminal glycine repeat of eRF3a influences eRF3a-PABP interaction and that eRF3a 12-GGC allele has a decreased binding affinity for PABP. Our comparative analysis on eRF3a alleles suggests that the presence of eRF3a 12-GGC allele could modify the coupling between translation termination and mRNA deadenylation. PMID:26818177

  17. Type 2 diabetes risk alleles demonstrate extreme directional differentiation among human populations, compared to other diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Corona, Erik; Sikora, Martin; Dudley, Joel T; Morgan, Alex A; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Nilsen, Geoffrey B; Ruau, David; Lincoln, Stephen E; Bustamante, Carlos D; Butte, Atul J

    2012-01-01

    Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may contribute to the observed

  18. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alleles Demonstrate Extreme Directional Differentiation among Human Populations, Compared to Other Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Corona, Erik; Sikora, Martin; Dudley, Joel T.; Morgan, Alex A.; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Nilsen, Geoffrey B.; Ruau, David; Lincoln, Stephen E.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Butte, Atul J.

    2012-01-01

    Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may contribute to the observed

  19. Significance of the Amyloidogenic Transthyretin Val 122 Ile allele in African-Americans in the Arteriosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) and Cardiovascular Health (CHS) Studies

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, Joel; Alexander, Alice; Koziol, James; Tagoe, Clement; Fox, Ervin; Kitzman, Dalane

    2010-01-01

    Many African-Americans carry an amyloidogenic transthyretin mutation (TTR V122I), with a high risk for cardiac TTR amyloid deposition after age 65. We wished to determine the allele frequency and its clinical penetrance in community-dwelling African-Americans. Study subjects 5000 consenting African-Americans, ages 41 to 93, in two community studies of cardiovascular risk (CHS and ARIC). Methods genotyping of banked DNA for TTR V122I allele status; review of cardiovascular and demographic parameters in CHS and ARIC databases with statistical comparisons of the frequency of congestive heart failure, survival and occurrence of features of cardiac amyloidosis, in carriers of the amyloidogenic allele and controls. Results 119 (3.23%) of 3712 ARIC and 17 (2.12%) of 805 CHS African-Americans carried TTR V122I. After age 65 (CHS) the frequency of congestive heart failure (38% vs 15%, RR 2.62, p = 0.04) and mortality (76% vs 53 %, RR 1.46, p =0.08) were higher in V122I allele carriers than in age, gender and ethnically matched controls. In ARIC (all subjects younger than 65) there were no differences between carriers and non-carriers in mortality, frequency of congestive heart failure or findings consistent with cardiac amyloidosis. Conclusions Heterozygosity for the amyloidogenic TTR V122I mutation is relatively common in community dwelling African-Americans. Before 65 the allele has no discernible impact on cardiac function or mortality. After age 70carriers show a higher frequency of congestive failure and greater mortality with more echocardiographic evidence suggestive of cardiac amyloidosis, findings consistent with age dependent clinical penetrance of this autosomal dominant gene. PMID:20435197

  20. End-use quality and agronomic characteristics associated with the Glu-B1al high-molecular-weight glutenin allele in U.S. hard winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) conferred by alleles at the Glu-B1 and Glu-D1 loci confer unique end-use quality properties for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The Glu-B1al allele at the Glu-B1 locus has not been widely used for cultivar development in the U.S. hard winter wheat regio...

  1. Apolipoprotein E alleles in Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s patients

    SciTech Connect

    Poduslo, S.E.; Schwankhaus, J.D.

    1994-09-01

    A number of investigators have found an association between the apolipoprotein E4 allele and Alzheimer`s disease. The E4 allele appears at a higher frequency in late onset familial Alzheimer`s patients. In our studies we obtained blood samples from early and late onset familial and sporadic Alzheimer`s patients and spouses, as well as from Parkinson`s patients. The patients were diagnosed as probable Alzheimer`s patients after a neurological examination, extensive blood work, and a CAT scan. The diagnosis was made according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. The apolipoprotein E4 polymorphism was detected after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, restriction enzyme digestion with Hhal, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Ethidium bromide-stained bands at 91 bp were designated as allele 3, at 83 bp as allele 2, and at 72 bp as allele 4. Of the 84 probable Alzheimer`s patients (all of whom were Caucasian), 47 were heterozygous and 13 were homozygous for the E4 allele. There were 26 early onset patients; 13 were heterozygous and 7 homozygous for the E4 allele. The frequencies for the E4 allele for late onset familial patients was 0.45 and for sporadic patients was 0.37. We analyzed 77 spouses with an average age of 71.9 {plus_minus} 7.4 years as controls, and 15 were heterozygous for the E4 allele for an E4 frequency of 0.097. Of the 53 Parkinson`s patients, 11 had the E4 allele for a frequency of 0.113. Thus our findings support the association of the ApoE4 allele with Alzheimer`s disease.

  2. [Absence of an association of the D allele of the ACE gene with arterial pressure in mild-moderate essential arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Celentano, A; Mancini, F P; Crivaro, M; Palmieri, V; Tammaro, P; De Stefano, V; Oliviero, M; Di Palma Esposito, N; Pietropaolo, I; Tufano, A; Di Minno, G; de Divitiis, O

    1996-10-01

    To assess the relationship between the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene I/D polymorphism, blood pressure (BP) and family history of hypertension, 133 hypertensive subjects (mean age 50 +/- 9 years, 78 males, 55 females) were selected according to both casual supine BP > 140/90 mmHg and ambulatory BP > 134/88 mmHg. Drug treatment was discontinued 2 weeks before entering the study. Subjects with myocardial ischemia, as well as those with "white coat" hypertension, were excluded. The study population was subclassified according to age < or = 50 years. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene, and the DD genotype was analysed twice. The frequencies of the I and D allele were 42 and 58%, and the distribution of the ID+ II and DD genotypes were 69 and 31% respectively. No significant relation was found among ACE genotypes (DD vs ID+ II) and casual systolic or diastolic BP as well as ambulatory BP, both in the whole study population and in the subpopulation < 50 years old. No difference was found also in the distribution of dippers and no dippers, as well as in the distribution of subjects with a positive family history in the whole sample and hypertensives < 50 years old. PMID:8983828

  3. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    PubMed Central

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; M. Maloney, Cliona; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; Boer, Anthonius de; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshall, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; J. Meyer, Nuala; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondahl, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; D. Christie, Jason; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; März, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10−6), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10−8). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10−11). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait. PMID:21194676

  4. A Refined Study of FCRL Genes from a Genome-Wide Association Study for Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Shao-Ying; Xue, Li-Qiong; Pan, Chun-Ming; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Liu, Bing-Li; Wang, Hai-Ning; Liang, Liming; Liang, Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Yuan, Guo-Yue; Li, Chang-Gui; Chen, Ming-Dao; Chen, Jia-Lun; Gao, Guan-Qi; Song, Huai-Dong

    2013-01-01

    To pinpoint the exact location of the etiological variant/s present at 1q21.1 harboring FCRL1-5 and CD5L genes, we carried out a refined association study in the entire FCRL region in 1,536 patients with Graves’ disease (GD) and 1,516 sex-matched controls by imputation analysis, logistic regression, and cis-eQTL analysis. Among 516 SNPs with P<0.05 in the initial GWAS scan, the strongest signals associated with GD and correlated to FCRL3 expression were located at a cluster of SNPs including rs7528684 and rs3761959. And the allele-specific effects for rs3761959 and rs7528684 on FCRL3 expression level revealed that the risk alleles A of rs3761959 and C of rs7528684 were correlated with the elevated expression level of FCRL3 whether in PBMCs or its subsets, especially in CD19+ B cells and CD8+ T subsets. Next, the combined analysis with 5,300 GD cases and 4,916 control individuals confirmed FCRL3 was a susceptibility gene of GD in Chinese Han populations, and rs3761959 and rs7528684 met the genome-wide association significance level (Pcombined = 2.27×10−12 and 7.11×10−13, respectively). Moreover, the haplotypes with the risk allele A of rs3761959 and risk allele C of rs7528684 were associated with GD risk. Finally, our epigenetic analysis suggested the disease-associated C allele of rs7528684 increased affinity for NF-KB transcription factor. Above data indicated that FCRL3 gene and its proxy SNP rs7528684 may be involved in the pathogenesis of GD by excessive inhibiting B cell receptor signaling and the impairment of suppressing function of Tregs. PMID:23505439

  5. Generation of Mice with a Conditional Allele for Ift172

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Paul W.; Howard, Tiffani L.; Maurer, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Ift172 encodes a gene product that is part of a complex that mediates intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process necessary for the genesis and maintenance of cilia. Genetic studies in mice have offered evidence that Ift172 also plays a role in hedgehog signaling. Disruption of Ift172 in mice is associated with lethality at about embryonic day 11, limiting studies to understand the role for Ift172 in later development and the adult. To further our understanding of the later roles of Ift172, we have generated mice with a conditional allele for Ift172. We have confirmed the phenotype of the disrupted allele by using CRE expression directed by the prx1 enhancer to disrupt the conditional Ift172 allele in the developing limb. PMID:19521792

  6. Effects of sequence variation on differential allelic transcription factor occupancy and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Timothy E; Gertz, Jason; Pauli, Florencia; Kucera, Katerina S; Varley, Katherine E; Newberry, Kimberly M; Marinov, Georgi K; Mortazavi, Ali; Williams, Brian A; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Wold, Barbara; Willard, Huntington F; Myers, Richard M

    2012-05-01

    A complex interplay between transcription factors (TFs) and the genome regulates transcription. However, connecting variation in genome sequence with variation in TF binding and gene expression is challenging due to environmental differences between individuals and cell types. To address this problem, we measured genome-wide differential allelic occupancy of 24 TFs and EP300 in a human lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. Overall, 5% of human TF binding sites have an allelic imbalance in occupancy. At many sites, TFs clustered in TF-binding hubs on the same homolog in especially open chromatin. While genetic variation in core TF binding motifs generally resulted in large allelic differences in TF occupancy, most allelic differences in occupancy were subtle and associated with disruption of weak or noncanonical motifs. We also measured genome-wide differential allelic expression of genes with and without heterozygous exonic variants in the same cells. We found that genes with differential allelic expression were overall less expressed both in GM12878 cells and in unrelated human cell lines. Comparing TF occupancy with expression, we found strong association between allelic occupancy and expression within 100 bp of transcription start sites (TSSs), and weak association up to 100 kb from TSSs. Sites of differential allelic occupancy were significantly enriched for variants associated with disease, particularly autoimmune disease, suggesting that allelic differences in TF occupancy give functional insights into intergenic variants associated with disease. Our results have the potential to increase the power and interpretability of association studies by targeting functional intergenic variants in addition to protein coding sequences. PMID:22300769

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies variants in TMPRSS6 associated with hemoglobin levels.

    PubMed

    Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Yun; Sehmi, Joban; Wass, Mark N; Zabaneh, Delilah; Hoggart, Clive; Bayele, Henry; McCarthy, Mark I; Peltonen, Leena; Freimer, Nelson B; Srai, Surjit K; Maxwell, Patrick H; Sternberg, Michael J E; Ruokonen, Aimo; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Scott, James; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S

    2009-11-01

    We carried out a genome-wide association study of hemoglobin levels in 16,001 individuals of European and Indian Asian ancestry. The most closely associated SNP (rs855791) results in nonsynonymous (V736A) change in the serine protease domain of TMPRSS6 and a blood hemoglobin concentration 0.13 (95% CI 0.09-0.17) g/dl lower per copy of allele A (P = 1.6 x 10(-13)). Our findings suggest that TMPRSS6, a regulator of hepcidin synthesis and iron handling, is crucial in hemoglobin level maintenance. PMID:19820698

  8. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel genetic markers associated with elite endurance performance.

    PubMed

    Ahmetov, Ii; Kulemin, Na; Popov, Dv; Naumov, Va; Akimov, Eb; Bravy, Yr; Egorova, Es; Galeeva, Aa; Generozov, Ev; Kostryukova, Es; Larin, Ak; Mustafina, Lj; Ospanova, Ea; Pavlenko, Av; Starnes, Lm; Żmijewski, P; Alexeev, Dg; Vinogradova, Ol; Govorun, Vm

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the association between multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), aerobic performance and elite endurance athlete status in Russians. By using GWAS approach, we examined the association between 1,140,419 SNPs and relative maximal oxygen consumption rate ([Formula: see text]O2max) in 80 international-level Russian endurance athletes (46 males and 34 females). To validate obtained results, we further performed case-control studies by comparing the frequencies of the most significant SNPs (with P < 10(-5)-10(-8)) between 218 endurance athletes and opposite cohorts (192 Russian controls, 1367 European controls, and 230 Russian power athletes). Initially, six 'endurance alleles' were identified showing discrete associations with [Formula: see text]O2max both in males and females. Next, case-control studies resulted in remaining three SNPs (NFIA-AS2 rs1572312, TSHR rs7144481, RBFOX1 rs7191721) associated with endurance athlete status. The C allele of the most significant SNP, rs1572312, was associated with high values of [Formula: see text]O2max (males: P = 0.0051; females: P = 0.0005). Furthermore, the frequency of the rs1572312 C allele was significantly higher in elite endurance athletes (95.5%) in comparison with non-elite endurance athletes (89.8%, P = 0.0257), Russian (88.8%, P = 0.007) and European (90.6%, P = 0.0197) controls and power athletes (86.2%, P = 0.0005). The rs1572312 SNP is located on the nuclear factor I A antisense RNA 2 (NFIA-AS2) gene which is supposed to regulate the expression of the NFIA gene (encodes transcription factor involved in activation of erythropoiesis and repression of the granulopoiesis). Our data show that the NFIA-AS2 rs1572312, TSHR rs7144481 and RBFOX1 rs7191721 polymorphisms are associated with aerobic performance and elite endurance athlete status. PMID:25729143

  9. Alarmingly High Segregation Frequencies of Quinolone Resistance Alleles within Human and Animal Microbiomes Are Not Explained by Direct Clinical Antibiotic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Field, Wesley; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance poses a major threat to human health. It is therefore important to characterize the frequency of resistance within natural bacterial environments. Many studies have focused on characterizing the frequencies with which horizontally acquired resistance genes segregate within natural bacterial populations. Yet, very little is currently understood regarding the frequency of segregation of resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics. We surveyed a large number of metagenomic datasets extracted from a large variety of host-associated and non host-associated environments for such alleles conferring resistance to three groups of broad spectrum antibiotics: streptomycin, rifamycins, and quinolones. We find notable segregation frequencies of resistance alleles occurring within the target genes of each of the three antibiotics, with quinolone resistance alleles being the most frequent and rifamycin resistance alleles being the least frequent. Resistance allele frequencies varied greatly between different phyla and as a function of environment. The frequency of quinolone resistance alleles was especially high within host-associated environments, where it averaged an alarming ∼40%. Within host-associated environments, resistance to quinolones was most often conferred by a specific resistance allele. High frequencies of quinolone resistance alleles were also found within hosts that were not directly treated with antibiotics. Therefore, the high segregation frequency of quinolone resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics in host-associated environments does not seem to be the sole result of clinical antibiotic usage. PMID:26019163

  10. Semiparametric Allelic Tests for Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression and Mahalanobis Distance.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2015-12-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors and genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g., MultiPhen (O'Reilly et al. []), have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. In this article, we explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (Binomial regression-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [BAMP]), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a single-nucleotide polymorphism (Distance-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [DAMP]). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association is compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen's. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found to be substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two different real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. We propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) is violated and BAMP otherwise, because the allelic approaches assume HWE

  11. Complex and multi-allelic copy number variation in human disease

    PubMed Central

    McCarroll, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of copy number variants are complex and multi-allelic, in that they have many structural alleles and have rearranged multiple times in the ancestors who contributed chromosomes to current humans. Not only are the relationships of these multi-allelic CNVs (mCNVs) to phenotypes generally unknown, but many mCNVs have not yet been described at the basic levels—alleles, allele frequencies, structural features—that support genetic investigation. To date, most reported disease associations to these variants have been ascertained through candidate gene studies. However, only a few associations have reached the level of acceptance defined by durable replications in many cohorts. This likely stems from longstanding challenges in making precise molecular measurements of the alleles individuals have at these loci. However, approaches for mCNV analysis are improving quickly, and some of the unique characteristics of mCNVs may assist future association studies. Their various structural alleles are likely to have different magnitudes of effect, creating a natural allelic series of growing phenotypic impact and giving investigators a set of natural predictions and testable hypotheses about the extent to which each allele of an mCNV predisposes to a phenotype. Also, mCNVs’ low-to-modest correlation to individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may make it easier to distinguish between mCNVs and nearby SNPs as the drivers of an association signal, and perhaps, make it possible to preliminarily screen candidate loci, or the entire genome, for the many mCNV–disease relationships that remain to be discovered. PMID:26163405

  12. Applicability of major histocompatibility complex DRB1 alleles as markers to detect vertebrate hybridization: a case study from Iberian ibex × domestic goat in southern Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hybridization between closely related wild and domestic species is of great concern because it can alter the evolutionary integrity of the affected populations. The high allelic variability of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) loci usually excludes them from being used in studies to detect hybridization events. However, if a) the parental species don’t share alleles, and b) one of the parental species possesses an exceptionally low number of alleles (to facilitate analysis), then even MHC loci have the potential to detect hybrids. Results By genotyping the exon2 of the MHC class II DRB1 locus, we were able to detect hybridization between domestic goats (Capra hircus) and free-ranging Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica) by molecular means. Conclusions This is the first documentation of a Capra pyrenaica × Capra hircus hybridization, which presented us the opportunity to test the applicability of MHC loci as new, simple, cost-effective, and time-saving approach to detect hybridization between wild species and their domesticated relatives, thus adding value to MHC genes role in animal conservation and management. PMID:23006678

  13. Two amino acid substitutions in apolipoprotein B are in complete allelic association with the antigen group (x/y) polymorphism: Evidence for little recombination in the 3' end of the human gene

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Alison M.; Renges, Helmut-H.; Xu, Chun-Fang; Peacock, Rachel; Brasseur, Robert; Laxer, Gerald; Tikkanen, Matti J.; Bütler, Réné; Saha, N.; Hamsten, Anders; Rosseneu, Maryvonne; Talmud, Philippa; Humphries, Steve E.

    1992-01-01

    We report the identification of an A-to-G base change, in exon 29 of the apolipoprotein B (apo B) gene, that results in the substitution of serine for asparagine at residue 4311 of mature apo B100. In a recent publication, Huang et al. have reported a C-to-T base change in exon 26 that causes the substitution of leucine for proline at residue 2712 of apo B. We have found complete linkage disequilibrium between the alleles at both these sites and an immunochemical polymorphism of LDL designated antigen group (x/y) (Ag(x/y)) in a sample of 118 Finnish individuals. This implies that either one of these substitutions–or both of them combined–could be the molecular basis of the Ag(x/y) antigenic determinants, with the allele encoding serine4311 plus leucine2712 representing the Ag(x) epitope, and that encoding asparagine4311 plus proline2712 the Ag(y) epitope. In a sample of 90 healthy Swedish individuals the Leu2712/Ser4311 allele is associated both with reduced serum levels of LDL-cholesterol and apo B and with raised levels of HDL. However, these differences are of smaller effect than those associated with the XbaI RFLP of the apo B gene in this sample. We have also genotyped 523 individuals from European, Asian, Chinese, and Afro-Caribbean populations and have found complete association between the sites encoding residues 2712 and 4311 in all of these samples, although there are large allele frequency differences between these populations. In addition, there is strong linkage disequilibrium with allelic association between the alleles of these sites and those of the XbaI RFLP in all the populations examined. Taken together, these data suggest that, since the divergence of the major ethnic groups, there has been little or no recombination in the 3' end of the human apo B gene. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:1370364

  14. Association studies in late onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goate, A.M.; Lendon, C.; Talbot, C.

    1994-09-01

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is characterized by an adult onset progressive dementia and the presence of numerous plaques and tangles within the brain at autopsy. The senile plaques are composed of a proteinaceous core surrounded by dystrophic neurites. The major protein component of the core is {beta}-amyloid but antibodies to many other proteins bind to senile plaques, e.g., antibodies to apolioprotein E (ApoE) and to {alpha}1-antichymotrypsin (AACT). Genetic studies have implicated mutations within the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene as the cause of AD in a small number of early onset AD families. More recently, assocition studies in late onset AD have demonstrated a positive association between ApoE-{epsilon}4 and AD. We report evidence for a negative association between ApoE-{epsilon}2 and AD in a large sample of sporadic late onset AD cases and matched controls supporting the role of ApoE in the etiology of AD. Ninety-three patients with sporadic AD (average age = 75 years, s.d. 8 yrs.) and 67 normal controls from the same ethnic background (age = 77 yrs., s.d. 10 yrs.) were recruited through the patient registry of the Washington University Alzheimer`s Disease Research Center. We found a statistically significant increase in ApoE-{epsilon}4 allele frequency in patients compared with controls ({chi}{sup 2}=7.75, 1 d.f., one tailed p=0.0027) and a significant decrease in {epsilon}2 allele frequency (Fisher`s exact test, one tailed p=0.0048), whereas the decreased frequency of {epsilon}3 in the patient groups was not statistically significant. Allele {epsilon}2 conferred a strong protective effect in our sample, with the odds ratio for AD for subjects possessing this allele being 0.08 (85% confidence interval 0.01-0.69). Similar studies using a polymorphism within the AACT gene showed no association with alleles at this locus in the entire AD sample or in AD cases homozygous for ApoE-{epsilon}3.

  15. Semi-parametric Allelic Tests For Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression And Mahalanobis Distance

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S.; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors. Genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g. MultiPhen [O'Reilly et al., 2012], have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. We explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (BAMP), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a SNP (DAMP). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association are compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. Since the allelic approaches assume Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE), we propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when HWE is violated and BAMP otherwise. PMID:26493781

  16. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-03-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  17. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-01-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27030405

  18. MICB Allele Genotyping on Microarrays by Improving the Specificity of Extension Primers

    PubMed Central

    Baek, In-Cheol; Jang, Jung-Pil; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene B (MICB) encodes a ligand for activating NKG2D that expressed in natural killer cells, γδ T cells, and αβ CD8+ T cells, which is associated with autoimmune diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases. Here, we have established a system for genotyping MICB alleles using allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) on microarrays. Thirty-six high quality, allele-specific extension primers were evaluated using strict and reliable cut-off values using mean fluorescence intensity (MFI), whereby an MFI >30,000 represented a positive signal and an MFI <10,000 represented a negative signal. Eight allele-specific extension primers were found to be false positives, five of which were improved by adjusting their length, and three of which were optimized by refractory modification. The MICB alleles (*002:01, *003, *005:02/*010, *005:03, *008, *009N, *018, and *024) present in the quality control panel could be exactly defined by 22 allele-specific extension primers. MICB genotypes that were identified by ASPE on microarrays were in full concordance with those identified by PCR-sequence-based typing. In conclusion, we have developed a method for genotyping MICB alleles using ASPE on microarrays; which can be applicable for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism typing studies of population and disease associations. PMID:26569110

  19. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  20. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  1. Allele-specific DNA methylation reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Izzi, Benedetta; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Cludts, Katrien; Akkor, Pinar; Lambrechts, Diether; Verfaillie, Catherine; Verhamme, Peter; Freson, Kathleen; Hoylaerts, Marc F

    2016-08-18

    Genetic variation in the PEAR1 locus is linked to platelet reactivity and cardiovascular disease. The major G allele of rs12041331, an intronic cytosine guanine dinucleotide-single-nucleotide polymorphism (CpG-SNP), is associated with higher PEAR1 expression in platelets and endothelial cells than the minor A allele. The molecular mechanism underlying this difference remains elusive. We have characterized the histone modification profiles of the intronic region surrounding rs12041331 and identified H3K4Me1 enhancer-specific enrichment for the region that covers the CpG-SNP. Interestingly, methylation studies revealed that the CpG site is fully methylated in leukocytes of GG carriers. Nuclear protein extracts from megakaryocytes, endothelial cells, vs control HEK-293 cells show a 3-fold higher affinity for the methylated G allele compared with nonmethylated G or A alleles in a gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. To understand the positive relationship between methylation and gene expression, we studied DNA methylation at 4 different loci of PEAR1 during in vitro megakaryopoiesis. During differentiation, the CpG-SNP remained fully methylated, while we observed rapid methylation increases at the CpG-island overlapping the first 5'-untranslated region exon, paralleling the increased PEAR1 expression. In the same region, A-allele carriers of rs12041331 showed significantly lower DNA methylation at CGI1 compared with GG homozygote. This CpG-island contains binding sites for the methylation-sensitive transcription factor CTCF, whose binding is known to play a role in enhancer activation and/or repression. In conclusion, we report the molecular characterization of the first platelet function-related CpG-SNP, a genetic predisposition that reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity through allele-specific DNA methylation. PMID:27313330

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies four loci associated with eruption of permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Geller, Frank; Feenstra, Bjarke; Zhang, Hao; Shaffer, John R; Hansen, Thomas; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Boyd, Heather A; Nohr, Ellen A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Paternoster, Lavinia; Evans, David M; Weyant, Robert J; Levy, Steven M; Lathrop, Mark; Smith, George Davey; Murray, Jeffrey C; Olesen, Jes; Werge, Thomas; Marazita, Mary L; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Melbye, Mads

    2011-09-01

    The sequence and timing of permanent tooth eruption is thought to be highly heritable and can have important implications for the risk of malocclusion, crowding, and periodontal disease. We conducted a genome-wide association study of number of permanent teeth erupted between age 6 and 14 years, analyzed as age-adjusted standard deviation score averaged over multiple time points, based on childhood records for 5,104 women from the Danish National Birth Cohort. Four loci showed association at P<5×10(-8) and were replicated in four independent study groups from the United States and Denmark with a total of 3,762 individuals; all combined P-values were below 10(-11). Two loci agreed with previous findings in primary tooth eruption and were also known to influence height and breast cancer, respectively. The two other loci pointed to genomic regions without any previous significant genome-wide association study results. The intronic SNP rs7924176 in ADK could be linked to gene expression in monocytes. The combined effect of the four genetic variants was most pronounced between age 10 and 12 years, where children with 6 to 8 delayed tooth eruption alleles had on average 3.5 (95% confidence interval: 2.9-4.1) fewer permanent teeth than children with 0 or 1 of these alleles. PMID:21931568

  3. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Association of Functional Kallikrein-1 Promoter Polymorphisms and Acute Kidney Injury: A Case-Control and Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Susantitaphong, Paweena; Perianayagam, Mary C.; Kang, Sun Woo; Zhang, Wenyi; Rao, Fangwen; O’Connor, Daniel T.; Jaber, Bertrand L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Kallikrein-1 (KLK1) is a highly conserved serine protease that is expressed in the kidney and involved in blood pressure regulation. The activity of this enzyme is diminished in acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods We first evaluated the potential role of functional multiallelic KLK1 promoter gene polymorphisms in a case-control study of 481 subjects (214 hospitalized patients with AKI of mixed causes and 267 healthy subjects). The complex, multiallelic G/C-rich repeat region of the proximal KLK1 promoter was determined by direct Sanger/capillary resequencing. Results 16 alleles were identified in a complex, polymorphic G/C-rich region of the KLK1 proximal promoter; 5 of these alleles (F, G, H, I, and K) were associated with development of AKI. Alleles I and G were classified as risk-alleles (unadjusted OR 1.86; 95% CI 1.23, 2.81; p = 0.003), whereas alleles F, H, and K were classified as protective-alleles (unadjusted OR 0.32; 95% CI 0.22, 0.46; p < 0.001) according to their directional association with development of AKI. After adjustment for sex, race, preexisting chronic kidney disease and APACHE II score, the KLK1 risk-allele (I or G) carrier state was associated with the composite of ≥ 2-fold increase in serum creatinine, oliguria, or dialysis requirement (adjusted OR 2.71; 95% CI 1.14, 6.44; p = 0.02). The KLK1 risk-allele carrier state was also marginally associated with the composite of ≥2-fold increase in serum creatinine, oliguria, dialysis requirement, or in-hospital death (adjusted OR 2.33; 95% CI 0.98, 5.52; p = 0.06). Conclusions KLK1 promoter polymorphisms are associated with development of AKI and adverse outcomes. Further studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:23635481

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies variants at 16p13 associated with survival in multiple myeloma patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Donglei; Martino, Alessandro; Serie, Daniel; Curtin, Karen; Campa, Daniele; Aftab, Blake; Bracci, Paige; Buda, Gabriele; Zhao, Yi; Caswell-Jin, Jennifer; Diasio, Robert; Dumontet, Charles; Dudziński, Marek; Fejerman, Laura; Greenberg, Alexandra; Huntsman, Scott; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Kumar, Shaji; Atanackovic, Djordje; Glenn, Martha; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.; Jones, Brandt; Lee, Adam; Marques, Herlander; Martin, Thomas; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Rajkumar, Vincent; Sainz, Juan; Vangsted, Annette Juul; Wątek, Marzena; Wolf, Jeffrey; Slager, Susan; Camp, Nicola J; Canzian, Federico; Vachon, Celine

    2015-01-01

    Here we perform the first genome wide association study (GWAS) of multiple myeloma (MM) survival. In a meta-analysis of 306 MM patients treated at UCSF and 239 patients treated at the Mayo clinic, we find a significant association between SNPs near the gene FOPNL on chromosome 16p13 and survival (rs72773978; p=6 × 10−10). Patients with the minor allele are at increased risk for mortality (HR 2.65; 95% CI: 1.94 – 3.58) relative to patients homozygous for the major allele. We replicate the association in the IMMEnSE cohort including 772 patients, and a University of Utah cohort including 318 patients (rs72773978 p=0.044). Using publically available data, we find that the minor allele was associated with increased expression of FOPNL and increased expression of FOPNL was associated with higher expression of centrosomal genes and with shorter survival.. Polymorphisms at the FOPNL locus are associated with survival among MM patients. PMID:26198393

  6. Tissue-specific patterns of allelically-skewed DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marzi, Sarah J.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Dempster, Emma L.; Lunnon, Katie; Paya-Cano, Jose L.; Smith, Rebecca G.; Volta, Manuela; Troakes, Claire; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Mill, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While DNA methylation is usually thought to be symmetrical across both alleles, there are some notable exceptions. Genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation are two well-studied sources of allele-specific methylation (ASM), but recent research has indicated a more complex pattern in which genotypic variation can be associated with allelically-skewed DNA methylation in cis. Given the known heterogeneity of DNA methylation across tissues and cell types we explored inter- and intra-individual variation in ASM across several regions of the human brain and whole blood from multiple individuals. Consistent with previous studies, we find widespread ASM with > 4% of the ∼220,000 loci interrogated showing evidence of allelically-skewed DNA methylation. We identify ASM flanking known imprinted regions, and show that ASM sites are enriched in DNase I hypersensitivity sites and often located in an extended genomic context of intermediate DNA methylation. We also detect examples of genotype-driven ASM, some of which are tissue-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the nature of differential DNA methylation across tissues and have important implications for genetic studies of complex disease. As a resource to the community, ASM patterns across each of the tissues studied are available in a searchable online database: http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/ASMBrainBlood. PMID:26786711

  7. Insights into kidney diseases from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have considerably improved our understanding of the genetic basis of kidney function and disease. Population-based studies, used to investigate traits that define chronic kidney disease (CKD), have identified >50 genomic regions in which common genetic variants associate with estimated glomerular filtration rate or urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Case-control studies, used to study specific CKD aetiologies, have yielded risk loci for specific kidney diseases such as IgA nephropathy and membranous nephropathy. In this Review, we summarize important findings from GWAS and clinical and experimental follow-up studies. We also compare risk allele frequency, effect sizes, and specificity in GWAS of CKD-defining traits and GWAS of specific CKD aetiologies and the implications for study design. Genomic regions identified in GWAS of CKD-defining traits can contain causal genes for monogenic kidney diseases. Population-based research on kidney function traits can therefore generate insights into more severe forms of kidney diseases. Experimental follow-up studies have begun to identify causal genes and variants, which are potential therapeutic targets, and suggest mechanisms underlying the high allele frequency of causal variants. GWAS are thus a useful approach to advance knowledge in nephrology. PMID:27477491

  8. Two amino acid substitutions in apolipoprotein B are in complete allelic association with the antigen group (x/y) polymorphism: Evidence for little recombination in the 3 prime end of the human gene

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, A.M.; Renges, H.H.; Xu, Chunfang; Peacock, R.; Humphries, S.E.; Talmud, P.; Laxer, G. ); Brasseur, R. ); Tikkanen, M.J. ); Buetler, R. ); Saha, N. ); Hamsten, A. ); Rosseneu, M. )

    1992-01-01

    The authors report the identification of an A-to-G base change, in exon 29 of the apolipoprotein B (apo B) gene, that results in the substitution of serine for asparagine at residue 4,311 of mature apo B100. In a recent publication, Huang et al. have reported a C-to-T base change in exon 26 that causes the substitution of leucine for proline at residue 2712 of apo B. The authors have found complete linkage disequilibrium between the alleles at both these sites and an immunochemical polymorphism of LDL designated antigen group (x/y) (Ag(x/y)) in a sample of 118 Finnish individuals. This implies that either one of these substitutions - or both of them combined - could be the molecular basis of the Ag(x/y) antigenic determinants, with the allele encoding serine{sub 4311} plus leucine{sub 2,712} representing the Ag(x) epitope, and that encoding asparagine{sub 4,311} plus proline{sub 2,712} the Ag(y) epitope. In a sample of 90 healthy Swedish individuals the Leu{sub 2,712}/Ser{sub 4,311} allele is associated both with reduced serum levels of LDL cholesterol and apo B and with raised levels of HDL. They have also genotyped 523 individuals from European, Asian, Chinese, and Afro-Caribbean populations and have found complete association between the sites encoding residues 2,712 and 4,311 in all of these samples, although there are large allele frequency differences between these populations. Taken together, these data suggest that, since the divergence of the major ethnic groups, there has been little or no recombination in the 3' end of the human apo B gene.

  9. Cognitive and neural correlates of the 5-repeat allele of the dopamine D4 receptor gene in a population lacking the 7-repeat allele.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Tomita, Hiroaki; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshie; Ono, Chiaki; Yu, Zhiqian; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-04-15

    The 5-repeat allele of a common length polymorphism in the gene that encodes the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) is robustly associated with the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and substantially exists in Asian populations, which have a lower ADHD prevalence. In this study, we investigated the effect of this allele on microstructural properties of the brain and on its functional activity during externally directed attention-demanding tasks and creative performance in the 765 Asian subjects. For this purpose, we employed diffusion tensor imaging, N-back functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigms, and a test to measure creativity by divergent thinking. The 5-repeat allele was significantly associated with increased originality in the creative performance, increased mean diffusivity (the measure of how the tissue includes water molecules instead of neural and vessel components) in the widespread gray and white matter areas of extensive areas, particularly those where DRD4 is expressed, and reduced task-induced deactivation in the areas that are deactivated during the tasks in the course of both the attention-demanding working memory task and simple sensorimotor task. The observed neural characteristics of 5-repeat allele carriers may lead to an increased risk of ADHD and behavioral deficits. Furthermore, the increased originality of creative thinking observed in the 5-repeat allele carriers may support the notion of the side of adaptivity of the widespread risk allele of psychiatric diseases. PMID:25659462

  10. M-protein gene-type distribution and hyaluronic acid capsule in group A Streptococcus clinical isolates in Chile: association of emm gene markers with csrR alleles.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, A; Rojas, P; Rodríguez, C; Undabarrena, A; Garate, C; Riedel, I; Román, J C; Kalergis, A M; García, P

    2012-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes a variety of infections because of virulence factors such as capsular hyaluronic acid and M protein. The aim of this study was to determine emm types and capsule phenotype in 110 isolates of S. pyogenes from patients with invasive (sterile sites) and non-invasive (mainly pharyngitis) infections in Chile, and the relationship between both virulence factors. The most abundant types found were emm12, emm1, emm4 and emm28 and their distribution was similar to that seen in Latin America and developed countries, but very different from that in Asia and Pacific Island countries. Ten of 16 emm types identified in pharyngeal isolates were found in sterile-site isolates, and three of nine emm types of sterile-site isolates occurred in pharyngeal isolates; three emm subtypes were novel. The amount of hyaluronic acid was significantly higher in sterile-site isolates but did not differ substantially among emm types. Only three isolates were markedly capsulate and two of them had mutations in the csrR gene that codes for a repressor of capsule synthesis genes. We found a non-random association between emm types and csrR gene alleles suggesting that horizontal gene transfer is not freely occurring in the population. PMID:21906413

  11. Known unknowns for allele-specific expression and genomic imprinting effects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for non-canonical imprinting effects that are associated with allele-specific expression biases at the tissue level in mice. These imprinting effects have features that are distinct from canonical imprinting effects that involve allele silencing. Here, I discuss some of the evidence for non-canonical imprinting effects in the context of random X-inactivation and epigenetic allele-specific expression effects on the autosomes. I propose several mechanisms that may underlie non-canonical imprinting effects and outline future directions and approaches to study these effects at the cellular level in vivo. The growing evidence for complex allele-specific expression effects that are cell- and developmental stage-specific has opened a new frontier for study. Currently, the function of these effects and the underlying regulatory mechanisms are largely unknown. PMID:25343032

  12. Differential effects of the APOE e4 allele on different domains of cognitive ability across the life-course.

    PubMed

    Marioni, Riccardo E; Campbell, Archie; Scotland, Generation; Hayward, Caroline; Porteous, David J; Deary, Ian J

    2016-06-01

    The association between APOE genotype and cognitive function suggests a positive role for the e2 allele and a negative role for the e4 allele. Both alleles have relatively low frequencies in the general population; hence, meta-analyses have been based on many small, heterogeneous studies. Here, we report the APOE-cognition associations in the largest single analysis to date. APOE status and cognitive ability were measured in 18 337 participants from the Generation Scotland study between 2006 and 2011. The age range was 18-94 years with a mean of 47 (SD 15). Four cognitive domains were assessed: verbal declarative memory (paragraph recall), processing speed (digit symbol substitution), verbal fluency (phonemic verbal fluency), and vocabulary (Mill Hill synonyms). Linear regression was used to assess the associations between APOE genetic status and cognition. Possession of the e4 allele was associated with lower scores on the measures of memory and processing speed in subjects aged >60. Across all age ranges, the e4 allele was linked to better verbal fluency scores. In younger subjects (≤60 years) the e4 allele was linked to higher vocabulary scores. There were no associations between the e2 allele and cognitive ability. As seen in previous meta-analyses, the APOE e4 allele is linked to poorer cognitive performance in the domains of memory and processing speed. By contrast, positive associations were seen between the e4 allele and measures of verbal fluency and vocabulary. All associations were relatively small and, in many cases, nominally significant despite the very large sample size. PMID:26395552

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study of Plasma Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the InCHIANTI Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshiko; Shen, Jian; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Kisialiou, Aliaksei; Ordovas, Jose M.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Singleton, Andrew; Bandinelli, Stefania; Cherubini, Antonio; Arnett, Donna; Tsai, Michael Y.; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have a role in many physiological processes, including energy production, modulation of inflammation, and maintenance of cell membrane integrity. High plasma PUFA concentrations have been shown to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease and mortality. To identify genetic contributors of plasma PUFA concentrations, we conducted a genome-wide association study of plasma levels of six omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in 1,075 participants in the InCHIANTI study on aging. The strongest evidence for association was observed in a region of chromosome 11 that encodes three fatty acid desaturases (FADS1, FADS2, FADS3). The SNP with the most significant association was rs174537 near FADS1 in the analysis of arachidonic acid (AA; p = 5.95×10−46). Minor allele homozygotes had lower AA compared to the major allele homozygotes and rs174537 accounted for 18.6% of the additive variance in AA concentrations. This SNP was also associated with levels of eicosadienoic acid (EDA; p = 6.78×10−9) and eicosapentanoic acid (EPA; p = 1.07×10−14). Participants carrying the allele associated with higher AA, EDA, and EPA also had higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) and total cholesterol levels. Outside the FADS gene cluster, the strongest region of association mapped to chromosome 6 in the region encoding an elongase of very long fatty acids 2 (ELOVL2). In this region, association was observed with EPA (rs953413; p = 1.1×10−6). The effects of rs174537 were confirmed in an independent sample of 1,076 subjects participating in the GOLDN study. The ELOVL2 SNP was associated with docosapentanoic and DHA but not with EPA in GOLDN. These findings show that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes in the metabolism of PUFA contribute to plasma concentrations of fatty acids. PMID:19148276

  14. Evolutionary triangulation: informing genetic association studies with evolutionary evidence.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minjun; Graham, Britney E; Zhang, Ge; Harder, Reed; Kodaman, Nuri; Moore, Jason H; Muglia, Louis; Williams, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies of human diseases have identified many variants associated with pathogenesis and severity. However, most studies have used only statistical association to assess putative relationships to disease, and ignored other factors for evaluation. For example, evolution is a factor that has shaped disease risk, changing allele frequencies as human populations migrated into and inhabited new environments. Since many common variants differ among populations in frequency, as does disease prevalence, we hypothesized that patterns of disease and population structure, taken together, will inform association studies. Thus, the population distributions of allelic risk variants should reflect the distributions of their associated diseases. Evolutionary Triangulation (ET) exploits this evolutionary differentiation by comparing population structure among three populations with variable patterns of disease prevalence. By selecting populations based on patterns where two have similar rates of disease that differ substantially from a third, we performed a proof of principle analysis for this method. We examined three disease phenotypes, lactase persistence, melanoma, and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. We show that for lactase persistence, a phenotype with a simple genetic architecture, ET identifies the key gene, lactase. For melanoma, ET identifies several genes associated with this disease and/or phenotypes related to it, such as skin color genes. ET was less obviously successful for Type 2 diabetes mellitus, perhaps because of the small effect sizes in known risk loci and recent environmental changes that have altered disease risk. Alternatively, ET may have revealed new genes involved in conferring disease risk for diabetes that did not meet nominal GWAS significance thresholds. We also compared ET to another method used to filter for phenotype associated genes, population branch statistic (PBS), and show that ET performs better in identifying genes known to associate with

  15. Genetic variants associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis susceptibility and mortality: a genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Carlos; Barber, Mathew; Huang, Yong; Broderick, Steven M; Wade, Michael S; Hysi, Pirro; Scuirba, Joseph; Richards, Thomas J; Juan-Guardela, Brenda M; Vij, Rekha; Han, MeiLan K; Martinez, Fernando J; Kossen, Karl; Seiwert, Scott D; Christie, Jason D

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating disease that probably involves several genetic loci. Several rare genetic variants and one common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of MUC5B have been associated with the disease. Our aim was to identify additional common variants associated with susceptibility and ultimately mortality in IPF. Methods First, we did a three-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS): stage one was a discovery GWAS; and stages two and three were independent case-control studies. DNA samples from European-American patients with IPF meeting standard criteria were obtained from several US centres for each stage. Data for European-American control individuals for stage one were gathered from the database of genotypes and phenotypes; additional control individuals were recruited at the University of Pittsburgh to increase the number. For controls in stages two and three, we gathered data for additional sex-matched European-American control individuals who had been recruited in another study. DNA samples from patients and from control individuals were genotyped to identify SNPs associated with IPF. SNPs identified in stage one were carried forward to stage two, and those that achieved genome-wide significance (p<5 × 10−8) in a meta-analysis were carried forward to stage three. Three case series with follow-up data were selected from stages one and two of the GWAS using samples with follow-up data. Mortality analyses were done in these case series to assess the SNPs associated with IPF that had achieved genome-wide significance in the meta-analysis of stages one and two. Finally, we obtained gene-expression profiling data for lungs of patients with IPF from the Lung Genomics Research Consortium and analysed correlation with SNP genotypes. Findings In stage one of the GWAS (542 patients with IPF, 542 control individuals matched one-by-one to cases by genetic ancestry estimates), we identified 20 loci. Six SNPs

  16. APOL1 Null Alleles from a Rural Village in India Do Not Correlate with Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Duncan B.; Shegokar, Vijay; Nihalani, Deepak; Rathore, Yogendra Singh; Mallik, Leena; Ashish; Zare, Vasant; Ikizler, H. Omer; Powar, Rajaram; Holzman, Lawrence B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Among African-Americans, genome wide association revealed a strong correlation between the G1 and G2 alleles of APOL1 (apolipoproteinL1, also called trypanolytic factor) and kidney diseases including focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis, HIV-associated nephropathy and hypertensive nephrosclerosis. In the prevailing hypothesis, heterozygous APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles increase resistance against Trypanosoma that cause African sleeping sickness, resulting in positive selection of these alleles, but when homozygous the G1 and G2 alleles predispose to glomerulosclerosis. While efforts are underway to screen patients for G1 and G2 alleles and to better understand “APOL1 glomerulopathy,” no data prove that these APOL1 sequence variants cause glomerulosclerosis. G1 and G2 correlate best with glomerulosclerosis as recessive alleles, which suggests a loss of function mutation for which proof of causality is commonly tested with homozygous null alleles. This test cannot be performed in rodents as the APOL gene cluster evolved only in primates. However, there is a homozygous APOL1 null human being who lives in a village in rural India. This individual and his family offer a unique opportunity to test causality between APOL1 null alleles and glomerulosclerosis. Methods and Findings We obtained clinical data, blood and urine from this APOL1 null patient and 50 related villagers. Based on measurements of blood pressure, BUN, creatinine, albuminuria, genotyping and immunoblotting, this APOL1 null individual does not have glomerulosclerosis, nor do his relatives who carry APOL1 null alleles. Conclusions This small study cannot provide definitive conclusions but the absence of glomerulosclerosis in this unique population is consistent with the possibility that African-American glomerulosclerosis is caused, not by loss of APOL1 function, but by other mechanisms including a subtle gain of function or by the “genetic hitchhiking” of deleterious mutations in a gene

  17. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer in Hispanics.

    PubMed

    Schmit, Stephanie L; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Edlund, Christopher K; Conti, David V; Ihenacho, Ugonna; Wan, Peggy; Van Den Berg, David; Casey, Graham; Fortini, Barbara K; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Ordóñez-Sánchez, María Luisa; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; Cruz-Bautista, Ivette; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Muñóz-Hernández, Linda Liliana; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Gómez, Donají; Alvirde, Ulices; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; González-Villalpando, María Elena; Le Marchand, Loic; Haiman, Christopher A; Figueiredo, Jane C

    2016-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 58 susceptibility alleles across 37 regions associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) with P < 5×10(-8) Most studies have been conducted in non-Hispanic whites and East Asians; however, the generalizability of these findings and the potential for ethnic-specific risk variation in Hispanic and Latino (HL) individuals have been largely understudied. We describe the first GWAS of common genetic variation contributing to CRC risk in HL (1611 CRC cases and 4330 controls). We also examine known susceptibility alleles and implement imputation-based fine-mapping to identify potential ethnicity-specific association signals in known risk regions. We discovered 17 variants across 4 independent regions that merit further investigation due to suggestive CRC associations (P < 1×10(-6)) at 1p34.3 (rs7528276; Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.86 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.47-2.36); P = 2.5×10(-7)], 2q23.3 (rs1367374; OR = 1.37 (95% CI: 1.21-1.55); P = 4.0×10(-7)), 14q24.2 (rs143046984; OR = 1.65 (95% CI: 1.36-2.01); P = 4.1×10(-7)) and 16q12.2 [rs142319636; OR = 1.69 (95% CI: 1.37-2.08); P=7.8×10(-7)]. Among the 57 previously published CRC susceptibility alleles with minor allele frequency ≥1%, 76.5% of SNPs had a consistent direction of effect and 19 (33.3%) were nominally statistically significant (P < 0.05). Further, rs185423955 and rs60892987 were identified as novel secondary susceptibility variants at 3q26.2 (P = 5.3×10(-5)) and 11q12.2 (P = 6.8×10(-5)), respectively. Our findings demonstrate the importance of fine mapping in HL. These results are informative for variant prioritization in functional studies and future risk prediction modeling in minority populations. PMID:27207650

  18. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer in Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Schmit, Stephanie L.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Conti, David V.; Ihenacho, Ugonna; Wan, Peggy; Van Den Berg, David; Casey, Graham; Fortini, Barbara K.; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Ordóñez-Sánchez, María Luisa; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; Cruz-Bautista, Ivette; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Muñóz-Hernández, Linda Liliana; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Gómez, Donají; Alvirde, Ulices; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; González-Villalpando, María Elena; Le Marchand, Loic; Haiman, Christopher A.; Figueiredo, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 58 susceptibility alleles across 37 regions associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) with P < 5×10−8. Most studies have been conducted in non-Hispanic whites and East Asians; however, the generalizability of these findings and the potential for ethnic-specific risk variation in Hispanic and Latino (HL) individuals have been largely understudied. We describe the first GWAS of common genetic variation contributing to CRC risk in HL (1611 CRC cases and 4330 controls). We also examine known susceptibility alleles and implement imputation-based fine-mapping to identify potential ethnicity-specific association signals in known risk regions. We discovered 17 variants across 4 independent regions that merit further investigation due to suggestive CRC associations (P < 1×10−6) at 1p34.3 (rs7528276; Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.86 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.47–2.36); P = 2.5×10−7], 2q23.3 (rs1367374; OR = 1.37 (95% CI: 1.21–1.55); P = 4.0×10−7), 14q24.2 (rs143046984; OR = 1.65 (95% CI: 1.36–2.01); P = 4.1×10−7) and 16q12.2 [rs142319636; OR = 1.69 (95% CI: 1.37–2.08); P=7.8×10−7]. Among the 57 previously published CRC susceptibility alleles with minor allele frequency ≥1%, 76.5% of SNPs had a consistent direction of effect and 19 (33.3%) were nominally statistically significant (P < 0.05). Further, rs185423955 and rs60892987 were identified as novel secondary susceptibility variants at 3q26.2 (P = 5.3×10–5) and 11q12.2 (P = 6.8×10−5), respectively. Our findings demonstrate the importance of fine mapping in HL. These results are informative for variant prioritization in functional studies and future risk prediction modeling in minority populations. PMID:27207650

  19. A rare allele combination of the interleukin-1 gene complex is associated with high interleukin-1 beta plasma levels in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Hulkkonen, J; Laippala, P; Hurme, M

    2000-06-01

    Increases in the plasma levels of the inflammatory cytokines can be detected in various infectious and inflammatory diseases, but in healthy individuals these levels are in most cases low or undetectable. There is now increasing evidence that genes of the inflammatory cytokines are polymorphic and the various alleles may differ in their capability to produce the cytokine. We have measured the plasma levels IL-1 beta of 400 healthy blood donors and correlated these to the genotype (biallelelic base exchanges at the position - 889 of the IL-1 alpha gene, and at the position - 511 of the IL-1 beta gene and the pentaallelic VNTR in the second intron of the IL-1Ra gene). The median concentration of IL-1 beta was 5.8 pg/ml (upper and lower quartiles 2.2-13.6). The polymorphisms of the IL-1 beta and IL-1 Ra genes did not have any significant influence on the IL-1 beta levels, but the IL-1 alpha 2.2 homozygotes (32/400 blood donors) had significantly elevated levels (median 7.0 pg/ml, quartiles 2.2-22.4, one-way ANOVA p < 0.008 as compared to the IL-1 alpha 1.1 homozygotes and p < 0.02 as compared to the IL-1 alpha 1.2 heterozygotes). This effect of IL-1 alpha 2.2 homozygosity was more pronounced in donors, who also were carriers of the IL-1 beta allele 2. Thus these data suggest that this allele combination has a regulatory effect on basal IL-1 beta production. PMID:10903804

  20. Prospects and pitfalls in whole genome association studies

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Robert W; Evans, David M; Cardon, Lon R

    2005-01-01

    Recent large-scale studies of common genetic variation throughout the human genome are making it feasible to conduct whole genome studies of genotype–phenotype associations. Such studies have the potential to uncover novel contributors to common complex traits and thus lead to insights into the aetiology of multifactorial phenotypes. Despite this promise, it is important to recognize that the availability of genetic markers and the ability to assay them at realistic cost does not guarantee success of this approach. There are a number of practical issues that require close attention, some forms of allelic architecture are not readily amenable to the association approach with even the most rigorous design, and doubtless new hurdles will emerge as the studies begin. Here we discuss the promise and current challenges of the whole genome approach, and raise some issues to consider in interpreting the results of the first whole genome studies. PMID:16096108

  1. HLA-B27 allele frequency in Sri Lankan patients with spondyloarthritides.

    PubMed

    Kidnapillai, S; Sirisena, N D; Dissanayake, V H

    2016-06-01

    This preliminary study aims to describe the HLA-B27 allele frequency in Sri Lankan patients with spondyloarthritides (SA). An anonymised database of 373 Sri Lankan patients with SA referred for HLA-B27 testing was retrospectively analysed. Eighty five (22.8%) patients were positive for the HLA-B27 allele. A male preponderance was observed among the positives. The HLA-B27 allele frequency in this sample of patients with SA was relatively low compared to published studies in other populations. Further research is needed to identify the predominant subtypes of the allele to determine which subtypes are the most prevalent in a larger sample of Sri Lankan patients with SA, and to define their association with the specific types of SA. PMID:27423748

  2. Dynamic variation in allele-specific gene expression of Paraoxonase-1 in murine and human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Parker-Katiraee, Layla; Bousiaki, Eleni; Monk, David; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    Differential allelic expression has been shown to be common in mice, humans and maize, and variability in the expression of polymorphic alleles has been associated with human disease. Here, we describe the differential expression pattern of Paraoxonase-1, a gene involved in lipid metabolism and implicated in the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. We measured the expression of the murine Paraoxonase-1 gene (Pon1) in livers at different stages of embryonic development using F1 hybrid crosses and quantified the transcriptional level of both parental alleles. Using human foetal tissues, we analysed the expression of the human orthologue (PON1) and found monoallelic or preferential allelic expression in 6/7 and 4/4 samples from liver and pancreas, respectively. We observed that Pon1 does not show a parent-of-origin preference in its allelic expression, but has dramatic variations in allele-specific expression occurring throughout development. This study has important repercussions in the analysis of haplotypes at disease loci, since it implies that the expression of polymorphic alleles can be unequal and dynamic. PMID:18678600

  3. Association study of dopamine D3 receptor gene and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.L.; Billett, E.A.; Macciardi, F.M.

    1995-12-18

    Several groups have reported an association between schizophrenia and the MscI polymorphism in the first exon of the dopamine D3 receptor gene (DRD3). We studied this polymorphism using a North American sample (117 patients plus 188 controls) and an Italian sample (97 patients plus 64 controls). In the first part of the study, we compared allele frequencies of schizophrenia patients and unmatched controls and observed a significant difference in the total sample (P = 0.01). The second part of the study involved a case control approach in which each schizophrenia patient was matched to a control of the same sex, and of similar age and ethnic background. The DRD3 allele frequencies of patients and controls revealed no significant difference between the two groups in the Italian (N = 53) or the North American (N = 54) matched populations; however, when these two matched samples were combined, a significant difference was observed (P = 0.026). Our results suggest that the MscI polymorphism may be associated with schizophrenia in the populations studied. 32 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. The higher exercise intensity and the presence of allele I of ACE gene elicit a higher post-exercise blood pressure reduction and nitric oxide release in elderly women: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The absence of the I allele of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been associated with higher levels of circulating ACE, lower nitric oxide (NO) release and hypertension. The purposes of this study were to analyze the post-exercise salivary nitrite (NO2-) and blood pressure (BP) responses to different exercise intensities in elderly women divided according to their ACE genotype. Methods Participants (n = 30; II/ID = 20 and DD = 10) underwent three experimental sessions: incremental test - IT (15 watts workload increase/3 min) until exhaustion; 20 min exercise 90% anaerobic threshold (90% AT); and 20 min control session without exercise. Volunteers had their BP and NO2- measured before and after experimental sessions. Results Despite both intensities showed protective effect on preventing the increase of BP during post-exercise recovery compared to control, post-exercise hypotension and increased NO2- release was observed only for carriers of the I allele (p < 0.05). Conclusion Genotypes of the ACE gene may exert a role in post-exercise NO release and BP response. PMID:22136292

  5. Association of Valine and Leucine at HLA–DRB1 Position 11 With Radiographic Progression in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Independent of the Shared Epitope Alleles but Not Independent of Anti–Citrullinated Protein Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    van Steenbergen, H. W.; Raychaudhuri, S.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, L.; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S.; Berglin, E.; Toes, R. E. M.; Huizinga, T. W. J.; Fernández-Gutiérrez, B.; Gregersen, P. K.; van der Helm-van Mil, A. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective For decades it has been known that the HLA–DRB1 shared epitope (SE) alleles are associated with an increased risk of development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recently, the following variations in the peptide-binding grooves of HLA molecules that predispose to RA development have been identified: Val and Leu at HLA–DRB1 position 11, Asp at HLA–B position 9, and Phe at HLA–DPB1 position 9. This study was undertaken to investigate whether these variants are also associated with radiographic progression in RA, independent of SE and anti–citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) status. Methods A total of 4,911 radiograph sets from 1,878 RA patients included in the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic (The Netherlands), Umeå (Sweden), Hospital Clinico San Carlos–Rheumatoid Arthritis (Spain), and National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases (US) cohorts were studied. HLA was imputed using single-nucleotide polymorphism data from an Immunochip, and the amino acids listed above were tested in relation to radiographic progression per cohort using an additive model. Results from the 4 cohorts were combined in inverse-variance weighted meta-analyses using a fixed-effects model. Analyses were conditioned on SE and ACPA status. Results Val and Leu at HLA–DRB1 position 11 were associated with more radiographic progression (meta-analysis P = 5.11 × 10−7); this effect was independent of SE status (meta-analysis P = 0.022) but not independent of ACPA status. Phe at HLA–DPB1 position 9 was associated with more severe radiographic progression (meta-analysis P = 0.024), though not independent of SE status. Asp at HLA–B position 9 was not associated with radiographic progression. Conclusion Val and Leu at HLA–DRB1 position 11 conferred a risk of a higher rate of radiographic progression independent of SE status but not independent of ACPA status. These findings support the relevance of these amino acids at position 11. PMID:25580908

  6. The A Allele at rs13419896 of EPAS1 Is Associated with Enhanced Expression and Poor Prognosis for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kian Leong; Yamane, Yuko; Gustine, Ewita; Isobe, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Masahiko; Hiyama, Keiko; Poellinger, Lorenz; Tanimoto, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α, or EPAS1) is important for cancer progression, and is a putative biomarker for poor prognosis for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, molecular mechanisms underlying the EPAS1 overexpression are not still fully understood. We explored a role of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs13419896 located within intron 1 of the EPAS1 gene in regulation of its expression. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that a region including the rs13419896 SNP plays a role in regulation of the EPAS1 gene expression and the SNP alters the binding activity of transcription factors. In vitro analyses demonstrated that a fragment containing the SNP locus function as a regulatory region and that a fragment with A allele showed higher transactivation activity than one with G, especially in the presence of overexpressed c-Fos or c-Jun. Moreover, NSCLC patients with the A allele showed poorer prognosis than those with G at the SNP even after adjustment with various variables. In conclusion, the genetic polymorphism of the EPAS1 gene may lead to variation of its gene expression levels to drive progression of the cancer and serve as a prognostic marker for NSCLC. PMID:26263511

  7. A multi-stage genome-wide association in breast cancer identifies two novel risk alleles at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1)

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Gilles; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Kraft, Peter; Yeager, Meredith; Wacholder, Sholom; Cox, David G.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Zhaoming; Yu, Kai; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Orr, Nick; Willett, Walter C.; Colditz, Graham A.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Berg, Christine D.; Buys, Saundra S.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Calle, Eugenia E.; Thun, Michael J.; Diver, Ryan; Prentice, Ross; Jackson, Rebecca; Kooperberg, Charles; Chlebowski, Rowan; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Brinton, Louise A.; Sigurdson, Alice; Doody, Michele; Bhatti, Parveen; Alexander, Bruce H.; Buring, Julie; Lee, I-Min; Vatten, Lars J; Hveem, Kristian; Kumle, Merethe; Hayes, Richard B.; Tucker, Margaret; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J; Hunter, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative has conducted a three-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of breast cancer in 9,770 cases and 10,799 controls. In Stage 1, we genotyped 528,173 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1,145 cases of invasive breast cancer among postmenopausal white women, and 1,142 controls; in Stage 2, 24,909 SNPs with low p values observed in Stage 1 were analyzed in 4,547 cases and 4,434 controls. In Stage 3 we investigated 21 loci in 4,078 cases and 5,223 controls with low p values from Stage 1 and 2 combined. Two novel loci achieved genome-wide significance. A pericentromeric SNP on chromosome 1p11.2, rs11249433, (p=6.74 × 10-10 adjusted genotype test with 2 degrees of freedom) resides in a large block of linkage disequilibrium neighboring NOTCH2 and FCGR1B and is predominantly associated with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. A second SNP, rs999737 on chromosome 14q24.1 (p=1.74 × 10−7), localizes to RAD51L1, a gene in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway, a prior candidate pathway for breast cancer susceptibility. We confirmed previously reported markers on chromosome 2q35, 5q11.2, 5p12, 8q24, 10q26, and 16q12.1. Our results underscore the importance of large-scale replication in the identification of low penetrance breast cancer alleles. PMID:19330030

  8. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections. PMID:26407876

  9. Genetically Determined Amerindian Ancestry Correlates with Increased Frequency of Risk Alleles for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, E; Webb, R; Rasmussen, A.; Kelly, J.A; Riba, L.; Kaufman, K.M.; Garcia-de la Torre, I.; Moctezuma, J.F.; Maradiaga-Ceceña, M.A.; Cardiel, M.; Acevedo, E.; Cucho-Venegas, M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gamron, S.; Pons-Estel, B.A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Martin, J.; Tusié-Luna, T.; Harley, J.B.; Richardson, B.; Sawalha, A.H.; Alarcón-Riquelme, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To analyze if genetically determined Amerindian ancestry predicts the increased presence of risk alleles of known susceptibility genes for systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms within 16 confirmed genetic susceptibility loci for SLE were genotyped in a set of 804 Mestizo lupus patients and 667 Mestizo normal healthy controls. In addition, 347 admixture informative markers were genotyped. Individual ancestry proportions were determined using STRUCTURE. Association analysis was performed using PLINK, and correlation of the presence of risk alleles with ancestry was done using linear regression. Results A meta-analysis of the genetic association of the 16 SNPs across populations showed that TNFSF4, STAT4, PDCD1, ITGAM, and IRF5 were associated with lupus in a Hispanic-Mestizo cohort enriched for European and Amerindian ancestry. In addition, two SNPs within the MHC region, previously associated in a genome-wide association study in Europeans, were also associated in Mestizos. Using linear regression we predict an average increase of 2.34 risk alleles when comparing a lupus patient with 100% Amerindian ancestry to an SLE patient with 0% American Indian Ancestry (p<0.0001). SLE patients with 43% more Amerindian ancestry are predicted to carry one additional risk allele. Conclusion Amerindian ancestry increased the number of risk alleles for lupus. PMID:20848568

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel genetic markers associated with elite endurance performance

    PubMed Central

    Kulemin, NA; Popov, DV; Naumov, VA; Akimov, EB; Bravy, YR; Egorova, ES; Galeeva, AA; Generozov, EV; Kostryukova, ES; Larin, AK; Mustafina, LJ; Ospanova, EA; Pavlenko, AV; Starnes, LM; Żmijewski, P; Alexeev, DG; Vinogradova, OL; Govorun, VM

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the association between multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), aerobic performance and elite endurance athlete status in Russians. By using GWAS approach, we examined the association between 1,140,419 SNPs and relative maximal oxygen consumption rate (V.O2max) in 80 international-level Russian endurance athletes (46 males and 34 females). To validate obtained results, we further performed case-control studies by comparing the frequencies of the most significant SNPs (with P < 10−5-10−8) between 218 endurance athletes and opposite cohorts (192 Russian controls, 1367 European controls, and 230 Russian power athletes). Initially, six ‘endurance alleles’ were identified showing discrete associations with V.O2max both in males and females. Next, case-control studies resulted in remaining three SNPs (NFIA-AS2 rs1572312, TSHR rs7144481, RBFOX1 rs7191721) associated with endurance athlete status. The C allele of the most significant SNP, rs1572312, was associated with high values of V.O2max (males: P = 0.0051; females: P = 0.0005). Furthermore, the frequency of the rs1572312 C allele was significantly higher in elite endurance athletes (95.5%) in comparison with non-elite endurance athletes (89.8%, P = 0.0257), Russian (88.8%, P = 0.007) and European (90.6%, P = 0.0197) controls and power athletes (86.2%, P = 0.0005). The rs1572312 SNP is located on the nuclear factor I A antisense RNA 2 (NFIA-AS2) gene which is supposed to regulate the expression of the NFIA gene (encodes transcription factor involved in activation of erythropoiesis and repression of the granulopoiesis). Our data show that the NFIA-AS2 rs1572312, TSHR rs7144481 and RBFOX1 rs7191721 polymorphisms are associated with aerobic performance and elite endurance athlete status. PMID:25729143

  11. Polymorphism of the HLA-B*15 group of alleles is generated following 5 lineages of evolution.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Laso, Jorge; Herraiz, Miguel Angel; Vidart, Jose Antonio; Peñaloza, Jorge; Barbolla, Maria Luz; Jurado, Maria Luisa; Cervera, Isabel

    2011-05-01

    Generation of the HLA-B*15 group of alleles has been analyzed using exon 1, intron 1, exon 2, intron 2, and exon 3 sequences from human and nonhuman primates. Results indicated that the 230 alleles analyzed could be grouped into 5 different lineages of evolution coming from nonhuman primate MHC-B* alleles sharing characteristic nucleotide sequences. The major evolutionary mechanism of evolution in this group of alleles is the gene conversion event with the exchange of genomic sequences present in other HLA-B*alleles. This evolutionary event reflects the importance of the exchanges between different genomic regions of distinct HLA-A*, -B*, or -C* alleles and only 1 group of HLA-B* alleles (B*15 in the present paper). These data also correlated with the geographic distribution of the lineages postulated and with the corresponding serologic specificities (B62, -63, -71, -72, -75, -76, and -77). In conclusion, the high degree of polymorphism of 1 group of alleles has a specific and simple pathway of evolution, which could result in new insight into the study of immune system functionality, disease association studies, and anthropological studies. PMID:21376098

  12. Increase in NRAS mutant allele percentage during metastatic melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Funck-Brentano, Elisa; Hélias-Rodzewicz, Zofia; Longvert, Christine; Mokhtari, Karima; Saiag, Philippe; Emile, Jean-François

    2016-06-01

    One-fifth of cutaneous melanomas have dominant gain-of-function mutations of the NRAS oncogene. We report the first two cases of increasing NRAS mutant allele frequency in melanoma metastases and show that the chromosomal mechanism of this homozygosity is an increased polysomy of chromosome 1. We observed an increase in NRAS mutant allele percentage (NRAS-MA%) in the metastatic melanoma progression from 2 patients with melanomas harbouring a NRAS mutation (p.Q61K in case 1 and p.Q61R in case 2). In case 1, we observed a NRAS-MA% increase from 18% within the first metastatic node to 81%, 92% and 85% respectively in the three subsequent metastases: lymph node, brain and subcutaneous metastases biopsied 1, 6 and 17 months, respectively, after the initial lymph node biopsy. In case 2, we observed an increase in NRAS-MA% from 40% within the primary melanoma to 63% within the metastatic lymph node. FISH analysis showed the same results in both cases: a frequent polysomy of chromosome 1 in metastasis samples with NRAS mutant allele percentage >60%, while most cells were disomic in the samples with well-balanced heterozygous mutations. The percentage of NRAS mutant allele may increase during metastatic progression and may be associated with chromosomal instability. Further studies are needed to evaluate the prognostic impact of the NRAS homozygous status and/or polyploidy in metastatic cutaneous melanomas. PMID:26990546

  13. A Unified Framework Integrating Parent-of-Origin Effects for Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Feifei; Ma, Jianzhong; Amos, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic imprinting is the most well-known cause for parent-of-origin effect (POE) whereby a gene is differentially expressed depending on the parental origin of the same alleles. Genetic imprinting is related to several human disorders, including diabetes, breast cancer, alcoholism, and obesity. This phenomenon has been shown to be important for normal embryonic development in mammals. Traditional association approaches ignore this important genetic phenomenon. In this study, we generalize the natural and orthogonal interactions (NOIA) framework to allow for estimation of both main allelic effects and POEs. We develop a statistical (Stat-POE) model that has the orthogonal estimates of parameters including the POEs. We conducted simulation studies for both quantitative and qualitative traits to evaluate the performance of the statistical and functional models with different levels of POEs. Our results showed that the newly proposed Stat-POE model, which ensures orthogonality of variance components if Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) or equal minor and major allele frequencies is satisfied, had greater power for detecting the main allelic additive effect than a Func-POE model, which codes according to allelic substitutions, for both quantitative and qualitative traits. The power for detecting the POE was the same for the Stat-POE and Func-POE models under HWE for quantitative traits. PMID:23991061

  14. A unified framework integrating parent-of-origin effects for association study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feifei; Ma, Jianzhong; Amos, Christopher I

    2013-01-01

    Genetic imprinting is the most well-known cause for parent-of-origin effect (POE) whereby a gene is differentially expressed depending on the parental origin of the same alleles. Genetic imprinting is related to several human disorders, including diabetes, breast cancer, alcoholism, and obesity. This phenomenon has been shown to be important for normal embryonic development in mammals. Traditional association approaches ignore this important genetic phenomenon. In this study, we generalize the natural and orthogonal interactions (NOIA) framework to allow for estimation of both main allelic effects and POEs. We develop a statistical (Stat-POE) model that has the orthogonal estimates of parameters including the POEs. We conducted simulation studies for both quantitative and qualitative traits to evaluate the performance of the statistical and functional models with different levels of POEs. Our results showed that the newly proposed Stat-POE model, which ensures orthogonality of variance components if Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) or equal minor and major allele frequencies is satisfied, had greater power for detecting the main allelic additive effect than a Func-POE model, which codes according to allelic substitutions, for both quantitative and qualitative traits. The power for detecting the POE was the same for the Stat-POE and Func-POE models under HWE for quantitative traits. PMID:23991061

  15. Genetic variation in the functional ENG allele inherited from the non-affected parent associates with presence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia 1 (HHT1) and may influence expression of PTPN14

    PubMed Central

    Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Benzinou, Michael; Merrick, Christopher B.; Quigley, David A.; Zhau, Kechen; Kim, Il-Jin; To, Minh D.; Jablons, David M.; van Amstel, Johannes K. P.; Westermann, Cornelius J. J.; Giraud, Sophie; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Lesca, Gaetan; Berg, Jonathan H.; Balmain, Allan; Akhurst, Rosemary J.

    2015-01-01

    HHT shows clinical variability within and between families. Organ site and prevalence of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) depend on the HHT causative gene and on environmental and genetic modifiers. We tested whether variation in the functional ENG allele, inherited from the unaffected parent, alters risk for pulmonary AVM in HHT1 mutation carriers who are ENG haploinsufficient. Genetic association was found between rs10987746 of the wild type ENG allele and presence of pulmonary AVM [relative risk = 1.3 (1.0018–1.7424)]. The rs10987746-C at-risk allele associated with lower expression of ENG RNA in a panel of human lymphoblastoid cell lines (P = 0.004). Moreover, in angiogenically active human lung adenocarcinoma tissue, but not in uninvolved quiescent lung, rs10987746-C was correlated with expression of PTPN14 (P = 0.004), another modifier of HHT. Quantitative TAQMAN expression analysis in a panel of normal lung tissues from 69 genetically heterogeneous inter-specific backcross mice, demonstrated strong correlation between expression levels of Eng, Acvrl1, and Ptpn14 (r2 = 0.75–0.9, P < 1 × 10−12), further suggesting a direct or indirect interaction between these three genes in lung in vivo. Our data indicate that genetic variation within the single functional ENG gene influences quantitative and/or qualitative differences in ENG expression that contribute to risk of pulmonary AVM in HHT1, and provide correlative support for PTPN14 involvement in endoglin/ALK1 lung biology in vivo. PTPN14 has been shown to be a negative regulator of Yap/Taz signaling, which is implicated in mechanotransduction, providing a possible molecular link between endoglin/ALK1 signaling and mechanical stress. EMILIN2, which showed suggestive genetic association with pulmonary AVM, is also reported to interact with Taz in angiogenesis. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms regulating these interactions in endothelial cells may ultimately provide more rational choices for HHT

  16. Attenuated APC alleles produce functional protein from internal translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Heppner Goss, Kathleen; Trzepacz, Chris; Tuohy, Thérèse M. F.; Groden, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    Some truncating mutations of the APC tumor suppressor gene are associated with an attenuated phenotype of familial adenomatous polyposis coli (AAPC). This work demonstrates that APC alleles with 5′ mutations produce APC protein that down-regulates β-catenin, inhibits β-catenin/T cell factor-mediated transactivation, and induces cell-cycle arrest. Transfection studies demonstrate that cap-independent translation is initiated internally at an AUG at codon 184 of APC. Furthermore, APC coding sequence between AAPC mutations and AUG 184 permits internal ribosome entry in a bicistronic vector. These data suggest that AAPC alleles in vivo may produce functional APC by internal initiation and establish a functional correlation between 5′ APC mutations and their associated clinical phenotype. PMID:12034871

  17. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Laura Putignano, Anna; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andrés, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Nelen, Marcel R.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A.M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Gareth Evans, D.; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; John Kennedy, M.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frénay, Marc; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Catharina Dressler, Anne; Hansen, Thomas v.O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Bjork Barkardottir, Rosa; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Sluiter, Michelle D.; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Chun Ding, Yuan; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r2 = 0.14) were independently associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.23, P-trend = 4.5 × 10−9 for rs2046210; HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18–1.40, P-trend = 1.3 × 10−8 for rs9397435], but only rs9397435 was associated with the risk for BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01–1.28, P-trend = 0.031). SNP rs11249433 (1p11.2) was associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02–1.17, P-trend = 0.015), but was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92–1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women. PMID:21593217

  18. Dissecting ancestry genomic background in substance dependence genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Polimanti, Renato; Yang, Can; Zhao, Hongyu; Gelernter, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Aims To understand the role of ancestral genomic background in substance dependence (SD) genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we analyzed population diversity at genetic loci associated with SD traits and evaluated its effect on GWAS outcomes. Materials & methods We investigated 24 genes with variants associated with SD by GWAS; and 82 loci with putative subordinate roles with respect to SD-associated genes. Results We observed high ancestry-related frequency differences in common functional alleles in GWAS relevant genes and their interactive partners. Common functional alleles with high frequency differences demonstrated significant effects on the GWAS outcomes. Conclusion Population differences in SD GWAS outcomes seem not to be influenced by general variation across the genome, but by ancestry-related local haplotype structures at SD-associated loci. PMID:26267224

  19. The A allele of cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) SNP 1761667 associates with decreased lipid taste perception in obese Tunisian women.

    PubMed

    Mrizak, Ines; Šerý, Omar; Plesnik, Jiří; Arfa, Amel; Fekih, Mariem; Bouslema, Ali; Zaouali, Monia; Tabka, Zouhair; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2015-04-28

    Recent studies have suggested that excessive intake of dietary fat is associated with obesity. Some obese subjects have been reported to exhibit high thresholds for the gustatory detection of lipids via lipid receptors, such as cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). We studied lingual detection thresholds for emulsions containing oleic acid in obese Tunisian women (n 203) using a three-alternative forced choice (3-AFC) method. Genotyping of the TNF-α (rs1800629), IL-6 (rs1800795) and CD36 (rs1761667) genes was performed to associate with lipid taste perception thresholds. The CD36 genotype distribution was as follows: GG (n 42), AG (n 102) and AA (n 59). Women with the CD36 GG genotype exhibited oral detection thresholds for oleic acid that were more than three times lower than those with the CD36 AA genotype. The present study confirms a high threshold of gustatory fat detection in obese women with the CD36 AA genotype, but there is no significant association with the IL-6 and TNF-α gene polymorphisms. PMID:25822988

  20. Lack of evidence for association of primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis with risk alleles for Crohn's disease in Polish patients

    PubMed Central

    Gaj, Pawel; Habior, Andrzej; Mikula, Michal; Ostrowski, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Background Numerous papers have addressed the association of mutations and polymorphisms of susceptibility genes with autoimmune inflammatory disorders. We investigated whether polymorphisms that confer susceptibility to Crohn's disease could be classified also as predisposing factors for the development of primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis in Polish patients. Methods The study included 60 patients with CD, 77 patients with PSC, of which 61 exhibited IBD (40 UC, 8 CD, and 13 indeterminate colitis), and 144 patients with PBC. All the patients were screened against Crohn's disease associating genetic polymorphisms. The polymorphisms were chosen according to previously confirmed evidence for association with Crohn's disease, including Pro268Ser, Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg and 1007fs in NOD2/CARD15, Leu503Phe/-207G>C in SLC22A4/OCTN1/SLC22A5/OCTN2, Arg30Gln in DLG5, Thr300Ala in ATG16L1, and Arg381Gln, His3Gln and exon-3'UTR in IL23R. Genotyping was carried out using TaqMan SNP genotyping assays. Results We confirmed a strong association between three NOD2/CARD15 gene variants (Pro268Ser, OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.34 – 4.75); (Arg702Trp, OR = 6.65, 95% CI = 1.99 – 22.17); (1007fs, OR = 9.59, 95% CI = 3.94 – 23.29), and a weak association between both the protective OCTN1/OCTN2 CC haplotype (OR = 0.28, 95% CI = 0.08 – 0.94), and a variant of ATG16L1 gene (Thr300Ala, OR = 0.468, 95% CI = 0.24 – 0.90) with Crohn's disease. In contrast, none of the polymorphisms exhibited association with susceptibility to primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis, including a group of primary sclerosing cholangitis patients with concurrent IBD. Conclusion Although the clinical data indicate non-random co-occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis, consistently with the previously published studies, no genetic association was found between the genetic variants predisposing to Crohn's disease and hepatobiliary

  1. Fine genetic mapping of the Batten disease locus (CLN3) by haplotype analysis and demonstration of allelic association with chromosome 16p microsatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, H.M.; McKay, T.R.; Thompson, A.D.; Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.M.; Richards, R.I.; Callen, D.F.; Stallings, R.L.; Doggett, N.A.; Attwood, J.

    1993-05-01

    Batten disease, juvenile onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment in neurons and other cell types. The disease locus (CLN3) has previously been assigned to chromosome 16p. The genetic localization of CLN3 has been refined by analyzing 70 families using a high-resolution map of 15 marker loci encompassing the CLN3 region on 16p. Crossovers in three maternal meioses allowed localization of CLN3 to the interval between D16S297 and D16S57. Within that interval alleles at three highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat loci (D16S288, D16S298, D16S299) were found to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with CLN3. Analysis of haplotypes suggests that a majority of CLN3 chromosomes have arisen from a single founder mutation. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. A Genome-Wide Association Study Uncovers a Genetic Locus Associated with Thoracic-to-Hip Ratio in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Seongwon; Park, Ah Yeon; Kang, Changsoo

    2015-01-01

    The thoracic-to-hip circumference ratio (THR) is an anthropometric marker recently described as a predictor of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) followed by confirmatory analyses to identify genetic markers associated with THR. A total of 7,240 Korean subjects (4,988 for the discovery stage and 2,252 for the confirmatory analyses) were recruited for this study, and genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping of the initial 4,988 individuals was performed using Affymetrix Human SNP array 5.0. Linear regression analysis was then performed to adjust for the effects of age, sex, and current diabetes medication status on the THR of the study subjects. In the initial discovery stage, there was a statistically nominal association between minor alleles of SNP markers on chromosomes 4, 8, 10, and 12, and THR changes (p < 5.0 × 10−6). The subsequent confirmatory analyses of these markers, however, only detected a significant association between two SNPs in the HECTD4 gene and decreased THRs. Notably, this association was detected in male (rs11066280: p = 1.14 × 10−2; rs2074356: p = 1.10 × 10−2), but not in female subjects. Meanwhile, the combined results from the two analyses (initial and confirmatory) indicated that minor alleles of these two intronic variants exhibited a significant genome-wide association with decreased THR in the male subjects (n = 3,155; rs11066280: effect size = −0.008624, p = 6.19 × 10−9; rs2074356: effect size = −0.008762, p = 1.89 × 10−8). Furthermore, minor alleles of these two SNPs exhibited protective effects on patients’ risks for developing type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, we have identified two genetic variations in HECTD4 that are associated with THR, particularly in men. PMID:26675016

  3. Evidence for schizophrenia susceptibility alleles in the Indian population: An association of neurodevelopmental genes in case-control and familial samples.

    PubMed

    Jajodia, Ajay; Kaur, Harpreet; Kumari, Kalpana; Gupta, Meenal; Baghel, Ruchi; Srivastava, Ankit; Sood, Mamta; Chadda, Rakesh Kumar; Jain, Sanjeev; Kukreti, Ritushree

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder with lifetime prevalence of ~1% worldwide. A genotyping study was conducted using a custom panel of Illumina 1536 SNPs in 840 schizophrenia cases and 876 controls (351 patients and 385 controls from North India; and 436 patients, 401 controls and 143 familial samples with 53 probands containing 37 complete and 16 incomplete trios from South India). Meta-analysis of this population of Indo-European and Dravidian ancestry identified three strongly associated variants with schizophrenia: STT3A (rs548181, p=1.47×10(-5)), NRG1 (rs17603876, p=8.66×10(-5)) and GRM7 (rs3864075, p=4.06×10(-3)). Finally, a meta-analysis was conducted comparing our data with data from the Schizophrenia Psychiatric Genome-Wide Association Study Consortium (PGC-SCZ) that supported rs548181 (p=1.39×10(-7)). In addition, combined analysis of sporadic case-control association and a transmission disequilibrium test in familial samples from South Indian population identified three associations: rs1062613 (p=3.12×10(-3)), a functional promoter variant of HTR3A; rs6710782 (p=3.50×10(-3)), an intronic variant of ERBB4; and rs891903 (p=1.05×10(-2)), an intronic variant of EBF1. The results support the risk variants observed in the earlier published work and suggest a potential role of neurodevelopmental genes in the schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:25579050

  4. Allele-Specific Deletions in Mouse Tumors Identify Fbxw7 as Germline Modifier of Tumor Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Losada, Jesus; Wu, Di; DelRosario, Reyno; Balmain, Allan; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in finding associations between specific genetic variants and cancer susceptibility in human populations. These studies have identified a range of highly statistically significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and susceptibility to development of a range of human tumors. However, the effect of each SNP in isolation is very small, and all of the SNPs combined only account for a relatively minor proportion of the total genetic risk (5–10%). There is therefore a major requirement for alternative routes to the discovery of genetic risk factors for cancer. We have previously shown using mouse models that chromosomal regions harboring susceptibility genes identified by linkage analysis frequently exhibit allele-specific genetic alterations in tumors. We demonstrate here that the Fbxw7 gene, a commonly mutated gene in a wide range of mouse and human cancers, shows allele-specific deletions in mouse lymphomas and skin tumors. Lymphomas from three different F1 hybrids show 100% allele-specificity in the patterns of allelic loss. Parental alleles from 129/Sv or Spretus/Gla mice are lost in tumors from F1 hybrids with C57BL/6 animals, due to the presence of a specific non-synonymous coding sequence polymorphism at the N-terminal portion of the gene. A specific genetic test of association between this SNP and lymphoma susceptibility in interspecific backcross mice showed a significant linkage (p = 0.001), but only in animals with a functional p53 gene. These data therefore identify Fbxw7 as a p53-dependent tumor susceptibility gene. Increased p53-dependent tumor susceptibility and allele-specific losses were also seen in a mouse skin model of skin tumor development. We propose that analysis of preferential allelic imbalances in tumors may provide an efficient means of uncovering genetic variants that affect mouse and human tumor susceptibility. PMID:22348067

  5. High throughput automated allele frequency estimation by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Doostzadeh, Julie; Shokralla, Shadi; Absalan, Farnaz; Jalili, Roxana; Mohandessi, Sharareh; Langston, James W; Davis, Ronald W; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Gharizadeh, Baback

    2008-01-01

    Pyrosequencing is a DNA sequencing method based on the principle of sequencing-by-synthesis and pyrophosphate detection through a series of enzymatic reactions. This bioluminometric, real-time DNA sequencing technique offers unique applications that are cost-effective and user-friendly. In this study, we have combined a number of methods to develop an accurate, robust and cost efficient method to determine allele frequencies in large populations for association studies. The assay offers the advantage of minimal systemic sampling errors, uses a general biotin amplification approach, and replaces dTTP for dATP-apha-thio to avoid non-uniform higher peaks in order to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that this newly developed assay is a robust, cost-effective, accurate and reproducible approach for large-scale genotyping of DNA pools. We also discuss potential improvements of the software for more accurate allele frequency analysis. PMID:18628978

  6. High Throughput Automated Allele Frequency Estimation by Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Absalan, Farnaz; Jalili, Roxana; Mohandessi, Sharareh; Langston, James W.; Davis, Ronald W.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Gharizadeh, Baback

    2008-01-01

    Pyrosequencing is a DNA sequencing method based on the principle of sequencing-by-synthesis and pyrophosphate detection through a series of enzymatic reactions. This bioluminometric, real-time DNA sequencing technique offers unique applications that are cost-effective and user-friendly. In this study, we have combined a number of methods to develop an accurate, robust and cost efficient method to determine allele frequencies in large populations for association studies. The assay offers the advantage of minimal systemic sampling errors, uses a general biotin amplification approach, and replaces dTTP for dATP-apha-thio to avoid non-uniform higher peaks in order to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that this newly developed assay is a robust, cost-effective, accurate and reproducible approach for large-scale genotyping of DNA pools. We also discuss potential improvements of the software for more accurate allele frequency analysis. PMID:18628978

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies a potent locus associated with human opioid sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, D; Fukuda, K; Kasai, S; Hasegawa, J; Aoki, Y; Nishi, A; Saita, N; Koukita, Y; Nagashima, M; Katoh, R; Satoh, Y; Tagami, M; Higuchi, S; Ujike, H; Ozaki, N; Inada, T; Iwata, N; Sora, I; Iyo, M; Kondo, N; Won, M-J; Naruse, N; Uehara-Aoyama, K; Itokawa, M; Koga, M; Arinami, T; Kaneko, Y; Hayashida, M; Ikeda, K

    2014-01-01

    Opioids, such as morphine and fentanyl, are widely used as effective analgesics for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. In addition, the opioid system has a key role in the rewarding effects of morphine, ethanol, cocaine and various other drugs. Although opioid sensitivity is well known to vary widely among individual subjects, several candidate genetic polymorphisms reported so far are not sufficient for fully understanding the wide range of interindividual differences in human opioid sensitivity. By conducting a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS) in healthy subjects, we found that genetic polymorphisms within a linkage disequilibrium block that spans 2q33.3–2q34 were strongly associated with the requirements for postoperative opioid analgesics after painful cosmetic surgery. The C allele of the best candidate single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2952768, was associated with more analgesic requirements, and consistent results were obtained in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. In addition, carriers of the C allele in this SNP exhibited less vulnerability to severe drug dependence in patients with methamphetamine dependence, alcohol dependence, and eating disorders and a lower ‘Reward Dependence' score on a personality questionnaire in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the C/C genotype of this SNP was significantly associated with the elevated expression of a neighboring gene, CREB1. These results show that SNPs in this locus are the most potent genetic factors associated with human opioid sensitivity known to date, affecting both the efficacy of opioid analgesics and liability to severe substance dependence. Our findings provide valuable information for the personalized treatment of pain and drug dependence. PMID:23183491

  8. Genome-wide association study identifies a potent locus associated with human opioid sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, D; Fukuda, K; Kasai, S; Hasegawa, J; Aoki, Y; Nishi, A; Saita, N; Koukita, Y; Nagashima, M; Katoh, R; Satoh, Y; Tagami, M; Higuchi, S; Ujike, H; Ozaki, N; Inada, T; Iwata, N; Sora, I; Iyo, M; Kondo, N; Won, M-J; Naruse, N; Uehara-Aoyama, K; Itokawa, M; Koga, M; Arinami, T; Kaneko, Y; Hayashida, M; Ikeda, K

    2014-01-01

    Opioids, such as morphine and fentanyl, are widely used as effective analgesics for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. In addition, the opioid system has a key role in the rewarding effects of morphine, ethanol, cocaine and various other drugs. Although opioid sensitivity is well known to vary widely among individual subjects, several candidate genetic polymorphisms reported so far are not sufficient for fully understanding the wide range of interindividual differences in human opioid sensitivity. By conducting a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS) in healthy subjects, we found that genetic polymorphisms within a linkage disequilibrium block that spans 2q33.3-2q34 were strongly associated with the requirements for postoperative opioid analgesics after painful cosmetic surgery. The C allele of the best candidate single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2952768, was associated with more analgesic requirements, and consistent results were obtained in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. In addition, carriers of the C allele in this SNP exhibited less vulnerability to severe drug dependence in patients with methamphetamine dependence, alcohol dependence, and eating disorders and a lower 'Reward Dependence' score on a personality questionnaire in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the C/C genotype of this SNP was significantly associated with the elevated expression of a neighboring gene, CREB1. These results show that SNPs in this locus are the most potent genetic factors associated with human opioid sensitivity known to date, affecting both the efficacy of opioid analgesics and liability to severe substance dependence. Our findings provide valuable information for the personalized treatment of pain and drug dependence. PMID:23183491

  9. Investigation of MGMT and DAPK1 methylation patterns in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using allelic MSP-pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Asmar, Fazila; Girkov, Mia Seremet; Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; Kjeldsen, Tina Ellegaard; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor genes MGMT and DAPK1 become methylated in several cancers including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, allelic methylation patterns have not been investigated in DLBCL. We developed a fast and cost-efficient method for the analysis of allelic methylation based on pyrosequencing of methylation specific PCR (MSP) products including a SNP. Allelic methylation patterns were reliably analyzed in standards of known allelic methylation status even when diluted in unmethylated DNA to below 1% methylation. When studying 148 DLBCL patients MGMT and DAPK1 methylation was observed in 19% and 89%, respectively, and among methylated and heterozygous patients 29% and 55%, respectively, were biallelically methylated. An association between the T-allele of the rs16906252 SNP and MGMT methylation was observed (p-value = 0.04), and DAPK1 methylation of the A-allele was associated with shorter overall survival (p-value = 0.006). In future cancer research allelic MSP-pyrosequencing may be used to study a wide range of other loci. PMID:24071855

  10. Joint Analysis of Multiple Traits in Rare Variant Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenchuan; Wang, Xuexia; Sha, Qiuying; Zhang, Shuanglin

    2016-05-01

    The joint analysis of multiple traits has recently become popular since it can increase statistical power to detect genetic variants and there is increasing evidence showing that pleiotropy is a widespread phenomenon in complex diseases. Currently, the majority of existing methods for the joint analysis of multiple traits test association between one common variant and multiple traits. However, the variant-by-variant methods for common variant association studies may not be optimal for rare variant association studies due to the allelic heterogeneity as well as the extreme rarity of individual variants. Current statistical methods for rare variant association studies are for one single trait only. In this paper, we propose an adaptive weighting reverse regression (AWRR) method to test association between multiple traits and rare variants in a genomic region. AWRR is robust to the directions of effects of causal variants and is also robust to the directions of association of traits. Using extensive simulation studies, we compare the performance of AWRR with canonical correlation analysis (CCA), Single-TOW, and the weighted sum reverse regression (WSRR). Our results show that, in all of the simulation scenarios, AWRR is consistently more powerful than CCA. In most scenarios, AWRR is more powerful than Single-TOW and WSRR. PMID:26990300

  11. Tracing pastoralist migrations to southern Africa with lactase persistence alleles.

    PubMed

    Macholdt, Enrico; Lede, Vera; Barbieri, Chiara; Mpoloka, Sununguko W; Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-04-14

    Although southern African Khoisan populations are often assumed to have remained largely isolated during prehistory, there is growing evidence for a migration of pastoralists from eastern Africa some 2,000 years ago, prior to the arrival of Bantu-speaking populations in southern Africa. Eastern Africa harbors distinctive lactase persistence (LP) alleles, and therefore LP alleles in southern African populations may be derived from this eastern African pastoralist migration. We sequenced the lactase enhancer region in 457 individuals from 18 Khoisan and seven Bantu-speaking groups from Botswana, Namibia, and Zambia and additionally genotyped four short tandem repeat (STR) loci that flank the lactase enhancer region. We found nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms, of which the most frequent is -14010(∗)C, which was previously found to be associated with LP in Kenya and Tanzania and to exhibit a strong signal of positive selection. This allele occurs in significantly higher frequency in pastoralist groups and in Khoe-speaking groups in our study, supporting the hypothesis of a migration of eastern African pastoralists that was primarily associated with Khoe speakers. Moreover, we find a signal of ongoing positive selection in all three pastoralist groups in our study, as well as (surprisingly) in two foraging groups. PMID:24704073

  12. Identification of anticitrullinated protein antibody reactivities in a subset of anti-CCP-negative rheumatoid arthritis: association with cigarette smoking and HLA-DRB1 ‘shared epitope’ alleles

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Catriona A; Sokolove, Jeremy; Lahey, Lauren J; Bengtsson, Camilla; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Alfredsson, Lars; Delanoy, Michelle; Lindstrom, Tamsin M; Walker, Roger P; Bromberg, Reuven; Chandra, Piyanka E; Binder, Steven R; Klareskog, Lars; Robinson, William H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the development of autoantibodies targeting proteins that contain citrulline. Anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) are currently detected by the commercial cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) assay, which uses a mix of cyclised citrullinated peptides as an artificial mimic of the true antigen(s). To increase the sensitivity of ACPA detection and dissect ACPA specificities, we developed a multiplex assay that profiles ACPAs by measuring their reactivity to the citrullinated peptides and proteins derived from RA joint tissue. Methods We created a bead-based, citrullinated antigen array to profile ACPAs. This custom array contains 16 citrullinated peptides and proteins detected in RA synovial tissues. We used the array to profile ACPAs in sera from a cohort of patients with RA and other non-inflammatory arthritides, as well as sera from an independent cohort of RA patients for whom data were available on carriage of HLA-DRB1 ‘shared epitope’ (SE) alleles and history of cigarette smoking. Results Our multiplex assay showed that at least 10% of RA patients who tested negative in the commercial CCP assay possessed ACPAs. Carriage of HLA-DRB1 SE alleles and a history of cigarette smoking were associated with an increase in ACPA reactivity—in anti-CCP+ RA and in a subset of anti-CCP− RA. Conclusions Our multiplex assay can identify ACPA-positive RA patients missed by the commercial CCP assay, thus enabling greater diagnostic sensitivity. Further, our findings suggest that cigarette smoking and possession of HLA-DRB1 SE alleles contribute to the development of ACPAs in anti-CCP− RA. PMID:24297382

  13. Identification of a cys-ser substitution in the 5-HT{sub 2C} (HTR2C) receptor gene and allelic association to violent behavior and alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Lappalainen, J.; Ozaki, N.; Goldman, D.

    1994-09-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that brain serotonergic functions, including behavioral and neurochemical responses to 5-HT{sub 2C} agonist, are abnormal in some individuals with alcoholism and aggressive behaviors. The aim of the present study was to identify coding sequence variants in the human 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor gene which may cause abnormal or variant function of this receptor. Using SSCP analysis, a non-conservative cys-ser substitution was found in the 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor (designated 5-HT{sub 2Ccys} and 5-HT{sub 2Cser}). The polymorphism was typed in CEPH families to genetically map the gene. To test for association of the variant to alcoholism, violent behavior and serotonin function, the 5-HT{sub 2C} genotypes of 151 non-related Finnish male alcoholic violent offenders and impulsive fire setters and 127 Finnish psychiatrically interviewed healthy male volunteers were determined. CSF 5-HIAA concentrations were available for 74 alcoholic violent offenders and 25 healthy volunteers. Linkage analysis placed the 5-HT{sub 2C} gene on Xq21, a region that has been previously shown to contain genes for several mental retardation syndromes. The 5-HT{sub 2Ccys}/5-HT{sub 2Cser} genotype frequencies in alcoholic violent offenders and controls differed significantly (0.90/0.10 and 0.82/0.18, respectively, P=0.048). The association was found to be strongest in the violent offenders who did not fulfill the criteria for antisocial personality disorder (5-HT{sub 2Ccys}/5-HT{sub 2Cser} 0.93/0.07, p=0.021). No association was found between CSF 5-HIAA concentrations and 5-HT{sub 2C} genotype. These results implicate a 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor amino acid substitution in predisposition to alcohol abuse and violent behavior in a subgroup of alcoholics.

  14. HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles as putative susceptibility markers in congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Paulo Tadashi; Targa, Lília Spaleta; Yamamoto, Lidia; Rodrigues, Jonatas Cristian; Kanunfre, Kelly Aparecida; Okay, Thelma Suely

    2016-05-18

    Host and parasite genotypes are among the factors associated with congenital toxoplasmosis pathogenesis. As HLA class II molecules play a key role in the immune system regulation, the aim of this study was to investigate whether HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles are associated with susceptibility or protection to congenital toxoplasmosis. One hundred and twenty-two fetuses with and 103 without toxoplasmosis were studied. The two study groups were comparable according to a number of socio-demographic and genetic variables. HLA alleles were typed by PCR-SSP. In the HLA-DQA1 region, the allele frequencies showed that *01:03 and *03:02 alleles could confer susceptibility (OR= 3.06, p = 0.0002 and OR= 9.60, p= 0.0001, respectively) as they were more frequent among infected fetuses. Regarding the HLA-DQB1 region, the *05:04 allele could confer susceptibility (OR = 6.95, p < 0.0001). Of the 122 infected fetuses, 10 presented susceptibility haplotypes contrasting with only one in the non-infected group. This difference was not statistically significant after correction for multiple comparison (OR = 9.37, p=0.011). In the casuistic, there were two severely damaged fetuses with high parasite loads determined in amniotic fluid samples and HLA-DQA1 susceptibility alleles. In the present study, a discriminatory potential of HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles to identify susceptibility to congenital toxoplasmosis and the most severe cases has been shown. PMID:26856406

  15. The Burden of JAK2V617F Mutated Allele in Turkish Patients With Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yonal-Hindilerden, Ipek; Daglar-Aday, Aynur; Akadam-Teker, Basak; Yilmaz, Ceylan; Nalcaci, Meliha; Yavuz, Akif Selim; Sargin, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies regarding the impact of JAK2V617F allele burden on phenotypic properties and clinical course in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPNs) have reported variable results. We aimed to analyze the association of mutated JAK2V617F allele burden with laboratory characteristics and clinical phenotype in Turkish patients (107 essential thrombocythemia (ET) and 77 primary myelofibrosis (PMF)). Methods Peripheral blood samples of 184 patients with Ph-negative MPNs were analyzed for JAK2V617F allele status and burden. JAK2 MutaScreen assay (Ipsogen, Luminy Biotech, Marseille, France) was used to detect the JAK2V617F status and quantitative JAK2V617F allele burdens in genomic DNA using TaqMan allelic discrimination. Results Frequency of JAK2V617F-positive patients with high mutation load (allele burden > 50%) was higher in PMF compared to ET (23.4% and 4.7%, respectively; P = 0.001). We found significant association between ET patients with high JAK2V617F allele burden and lower hemoglobin (Hgb) and hematocrit (Hct), higher LDH levels and more prevalent massive splenomegaly (P = 0.001, P = 0.001, P = 0.012 and P = 0.015, respectively). ET patients with high mutation load displayed higher prevalence of bleeding compared to low mutation load and wild-type mutational status (P = 0.003). Rate of DVT was significantly higher in ET patients with mutant allele burden in upper half compared to lower half and wild-type (P = 0.029). We observed significant association between PMF patients with high JAK2V617F allele burden and higher Hgb, Hct levels and leukocyte counts (P = 0.003, P = 0.021 and P = 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Our study demonstrated JAK2V617F allele burden correlates with clinical features in ET and PMF. We conclude quantification of JAK2V617F mutation contributes to the workup of Ph-negative MPNs. PMID:25584101

  16. C-reactive protein gene variants associated with recurrent pregnancy loss independent of CRP serum levels: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salma K; Mahmood, Naeema; Malalla, Zainab H; Alsobyani, Fanar M; Al-Kiyumi, Israa S; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2015-09-10

    The aim of this study is to investigate the association of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) with altered C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels, and genetic variation in CRP gene. This was a retrospective case-control study, involving 275 women with three or more consecutive pregnancy losses, and 290 age-matched control women, who were recruited from outpatient obstetrics/gynecology clinics. CRP serum levels (hs-CRP) were determined by latex-enhanced nephelometry, and CRP genotyping was done by allelic discrimination. Mean serum CRP levels were higher in RPL cases than in control women, and carriage of the (minor) T allele of rs2794520 was associated with significant increase in CRP levels (P=0.017). Minor allele frequency (MAF) of rs7553007 was significantly different between RPL cases and control women, and was associated with reduced risk of RPL after adjusting for BMI and menarche. There was a significant enrichment of minor allele-carrying genotypes of rs1130864 and rs1417938 SNPs, and reduced frequency of minor allele-carrying genotypes of rs876537, rs2794520, and rs7553007 in RPL cases, thus assigning RPL-susceptible and -protective nature to these genotypes, respectively. Carriage of (minor) T allele of only rs2794520 was associated with significant increase in CRP levels. CRP variants that influenced circulating CRP levels in chronic inflammatory conditions are also associated with RPL, pointing to CRP as RPL candidate gene. PMID:26013044

  17. The importance of HLA DRB1 gene allele to clinical features and disability in patients with multiple sclerosis in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of HLA DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) has been consistently reported although its effect on the clinical features and disability is still unclear probably due to diversity in ethnicity and geographic location of the studied populations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of HLA DRB1 alleles on the clinical features and disability of the patients with MS in Lithuania. Methods This was a prospective study of 120 patients with MS. HLA DRB1 alleles were genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction. Results The first symptoms of MS in patients with HLA DRB1*15 allele manifested at younger age than in those without this allele (28.32 +/− 5.49 yrs vs. 30.94 +/− 8.43 yrs, respectively, p = 0.043). HLA DRB1*08 allele was more prevalent among relapsing-remitting (RR) MS patients than among patients with progressive course of MS (25.0% vs. 8.3%, respectively, chi^2 = 6.000, p = 0.05). MS patients with this allele had lower relapse rate than those without this allele (1.00 +/− 0.97 and 1.44 +/− 0.85, respectively, p = 0.043). Degree of disability during the last visit was lower among the patients with HLA DRB1*08 allele (EDSS score 3.15 +/− 1.95 vs. 4.49 +/− 1.96, p = 0.006), and higher among those with HLA DRB1*15 allele (EDSS score 4.60 +/− 2.10 vs.4.05 +/− 1.94, p = 0.047) compared to patients without these alleles but there were no significant associations between these alleles and the duration of the disease to disability. HLA DRB1*08 allele (OR = 0.18, 95% CI 0,039-0,8, p = 0.029) was demonstradet to be independent factor to take a longer time to reach an EDSS of 6, while HLA DRB1*01 allele (OR = 5.92, 95% CI 1,30-26,8, p = 0.021) was related in a shorter time to reach and EDSS of 6. Patients with HLA DRB1*08 allele had lower IgG index compared to patients without this allele (0.58 +/− 0.17 and 0.73 +/− 0.31, respectively, p

  18. Microarray-based estimation of SNP allele-frequency in pooled DNA using the Langmuir kinetic model

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Bin-Cheng; Li, Honghua; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2008-01-01

    Background High throughput genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for genome-wide association requires technologies for generating millions of genotypes with relative ease but also at a reasonable cost and with high accuracy. In this work, we have developed a theoretical approach to estimate allele frequency in pooled DNA samples, based on the physical principles of DNA immobilization and hybridization on solid surface using the Langmuir kinetic model and quantitative analysis of the allelic signals. Results This method can successfully distinguish allele frequencies differing by 0.01 in the actual pool of clinical samples, and detect alleles with a frequency as low as 2%. The accuracy of measuring known allele frequencies is very high, with the strength of correlation between measured and actual frequencies having an r2 = 0.9992. These results demonstrated that this method could allow the accurate estimation of absolute allele frequencies in pooled samples of DNA in a feasible and inexpensive way. Conclusion We conclude that this novel strategy for quantitative analysis of the ratio of SNP allelic sequences in DNA pools is an inexpensive and feasible alternative for detecting polymorphic differences in candidate gene association studies and genome-wide linkage disequilibrium scans. PMID:19087310

  19. DPA1*02012: A DPA1*0201-related Mhc class II allele in West Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, C.G.; May, J.; Spauke, D.; Schnittger, L.

    1994-12-31

    DNA techniques such as sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe (SSOP) hybridizations, restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses, and DNA sequencing have greatly supported the characterization of Mhc class II allelic polymorphism. Here the authors describe a DPA 1 allele which has been identified in two male individuals from Liberia and Benin, West Africa, during a survey study on Mhc class II associations with the different manifestations after infection with Onchocerca volvulus. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  20. A new DRB1*1202 allele (DRB1*12022) found in association with DQA1*0102 and DQB1*0602 in two Black narcoleptic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Behar, E.; Grumet, F.C.; Lin, X.; Mignot, E.

    1995-01-01

    DQB1*0602 is a better genetic marker than DR2 for narcolepsy susceptibility across all ethnic groups; for instance, only 75% of African American narcoleptics are DR2+ compared with 96% DQB1*0602+. We studied DRB1 genes of DR2- but DQB1*0602+ African American patients with cataplexy and observed two with an unusual DR12, DQA1*0102, DQB1*0602 haplotype; a new allelic variant of DRB1*1202 has been designated DRB*12022. 8 refs.

  1. Co-selection and replacement of resistance alleles to Lysinibacillus sphaericus in a Culex quinquefasciatus colony.

    PubMed

    Chalegre, Karlos Diogo de Melo; Tavares, Daniella A; Romão, Tatiany P; de Menezes, Heverly Suzany G; Nascimento, Nathaly A; de Oliveira, Cláudia Maria F; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo P; Silva-Filha, Maria Helena N L

    2015-09-01

    The Cqm1 α-glucosidase, expressed within the midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito larvae, is the receptor for the Binary toxin (Bin) from the entomopathogen Lysinibacillus sphaericus. Mutations of the Cqm1 α-glucosidase gene cause high resistance levels to this bacterium in both field and laboratory populations, and a previously described allele, cqm1REC, was found to be associated with a laboratory-resistant colony (R2362). This study described the identification of a novel resistance allele, cqm1REC-2, that was co-selected with cqm1REC within the R2362 colony. The two alleles display distinct mutations but both generate premature stop codons that prevent the expression of midgut-bound Cqm1 proteins. Using a PCR-based assay to monitor the frequency of each allele during long-term maintenance of the resistant colony, cqm1REC was found to predominate early on but later was replaced by cqm1REC-2 as the most abundant resistance allele. Homozygous larvae for each allele were then generated that displayed similar high-resistance phenotypes with equivalent low levels of transcript and lack of protein expression for both cqm1REC and cqm1REC-2. In progeny from a cross of homozygous individuals for each allele at a 1 : 1 ratio, analyzed for ten subsequent generations, cqm1REC showed a higher frequency than cqm1REC-2. The replacement of cqm1REC by cqm1REC -2 observed in the R2362 colony, kept for 210 generations, indicates changes in fitness related to traits that are unknown but linked to these two alleles, and constitutes a unique example of evolution of resistance within a controlled laboratory environment. PMID:26131741

  2. ACE-II genotype and I allele predicts ischemic stroke among males in south India

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Murali; Chinniah, Rathika; Ravi, Padma Malini; Mosses Joseph, Arun Kumar; Vellaiappan, Neethi Arasu; Krishnan, Jeyaram Illiayaraja; Karuppiah, Balakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Two hundred ischemic stroke patients and 193 age and sex matched healthy controls were studied for the presence of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion (ACE I/D) gene polymorphism. The PCR studies revealed that ACE ‘II’ (OR = 2.055; p = 0.004) genotype and ‘I’ (OR = 1.411; p = 0.018) alleles were significantly associated with IS patients. Gender specific analysis revealed a strong association of ‘II’ (OR = 2.044; p = 0.014) genotype and ‘I’ (OR = 1.531; p = 0.011) allele with male sex. Classification of patients based on TOAST criteria, revealed a significant association for ‘II’ genotype (OR = 1.713; p = 0.043) and ‘I’ (OR = 1.382; p = 0.039) allele in LVD patients only. When the data was stratified based on age and sex, a statistically significant association was observed for ACE ‘II’ genotype (OR = 2.288; p = 0.006) and ‘I’ allele (OR = 1.395; p = 0.054) in IS male patients of > 50 years of age. The ACE ‘D’ allele was found to be increased in controls (OR = 0.709; p = 0.018) than IS patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that smoking and diabetes were the most powerful independent risk factor in LVD type of stroke. Thus, we presented here an evidence for a strong association of ACE ‘II’ genotype and ‘I’ allele compounded by factors such as smoking and diabetes among south Indian IS patients. PMID:25606450

  3. Allelic variation within the S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase gene family is associated with wood properties in Chinese white poplar (Populus tomentosa)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) is the only eukaryotic enzyme capable of S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (SAH) catabolism for the maintenance of cellular transmethylation potential. Recently, biochemical and genetic studies in herbaceous species have obtained important discoveries in the function of SAHH, and an extensive characterization of SAHH family in even one tree species is essential, but currently lacking. Results Here, we first identified the SAHH family from Populus tomentosa using molecular cloning method. Phylogenetic analyses of 28 SAHH proteins from dicotyledons, monocotyledons, and lower plants revealed that the sequences formed two monophyletic groups: the PtrSAHHA with PtoSAHHA and PtrSAHHB with PtoSAHHB. Examination of tissue-specific expression profiles of the PtoSAHH family revealed similar expression patterns; high levels of expression in xylem were found. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the PtoSAHH family, sampled from P. tomentosa natural distribution, revealed that PtoSAHH harbors high single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity (π=0.01059±0.00122 and 0.00930±0.00079,respectively) and low LD (r2 > 0.1, within 800 bp and 2,200 bp, respectively). Using an LD-linkage analysis approach, two noncoding SNPs (PtoSAHHB_1065 and PtoSAHHA_2203) and the corresponding haplotypes were found to significantly associate with α-cellulose content, and a nonsynonymous SNP (PtoSAHHB_410) within the SAHH signature motifs showed significant association with fiber length, with an average of 3.14% of the phenotypic variance explained. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that PtoSAHHs were split off prior to the divergence of interspecies in Populus, and SAHHs may play a key role promoting transmethylation reactions in the secondary cell walls biosynthesis in trees. Hence, our findings provide insights into SAHH function and evolution in woody species and also offer a theoretical basis for marker

  4. Study of the tetraspanin 18 association with schizophrenia in a Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin; Chen, Fengping; Wei, Jun; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2016-07-30

    A genome-wide association study of Han Chinese samples identified three single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the tetraspanin 18 (TSPAN18) gene to be associated with schizophrenia. However, the replication of the TSPAN18 association was inconsistent across studies. To explore the possible reason for poor replication, we conducted a case-control study to validate the TSPAN18 finding in an independent Chinese sample. The frequency of rs11038167 minor allele (A) was significantly higher only in female patients with thought disorder. Our result suggested that the TSPAN18 gene may be involved in the development of psychotic symptoms and contribute to clinical heterogeneity of schizophrenia. PMID:27208512

  5. The population genetics of sporophytic self-incompatibility in Senecio squalidus L. (Asteraceae): avoidance of mating constraints imposed by low S-allele number.

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Adrian C; Harris, Stephen A; Hiscock, Simon J

    2003-01-01

    Senecio squalidus L. (Asteraceae) has been the subject of several ecological and population genetic studies due to its well-documented history of introduction, establishment and spread throughout Britain in the past 300 years. Our recent studies have focused on identifying and quantifying factors associated with the sporophytic self-incompatibility (SSI) system of S. squalidus that may have contributed to its success as a colonist. These findings are of general biological interest because they provide important insights into the short-term evolutionary dynamics of a plant mating system. The number of S-alleles in populations and their dominance interactions were investigated in eight wild British populations using cross-diallel studies. The numbers of S-alleles in British S. squalidus populations are typically low (average of 5.3 S-alleles) and the entire British population is estimated to possess no more than 7-11 S-alleles. Such low numbers of S-alleles are most probably a consequence of population bottlenecks associated with introduction and colonization. Potential evolutionary impacts on SSI caused by a paucity of S-alleles, such as restricted mate availability, are discussed, and we suggest that increased dominance interactions between S-alleles may be an important short-term means of increasing mate availability when S-allele numbers are low. PMID:12831471

  6. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: New B39 and B15 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, T.L.; Butler, L.M.; Watkins, D.I.

    1995-05-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles. 70 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Cost-effective genome-wide estimation of allele frequencies from pooled DNA in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New sequencing technologies have tremendously increased the number of known molecular markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) in a variety of species. Concurrently, improvements to genotyping technology have now made it possible to efficiently genotype large numbers of genome-wide distributed SNPs enabling genome wide association studies (GWAS). However, genotyping significant numbers of individuals with large number of SNPs remains prohibitively expensive for many research groups. A possible solution to this problem is to determine allele frequencies from pooled DNA samples, such ‘allelotyping’ has been presented as a cost-effective alternative to individual genotyping and has become popular in human GWAS. In this article we have tested the effectiveness of DNA pooling to obtain accurate allele frequency estimates for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) populations using an Illumina SNP-chip. Results In total, 56 Atlantic salmon DNA pools from 14 populations were analyzed on an Atlantic salmon SNP-chip containing probes for 5568 SNP markers, 3928 of which were bi-allelic. We developed an efficient quality control filter which enables exclusion of loci showing high error rate and minor allele frequency (MAF) close to zero. After applying multiple quality control filters we obtained allele frequency estimates for 3631 bi-allelic loci. We observed high concordance (r > 0.99) between allele frequency estimates derived from individual genotyping and DNA pools. Our results also indicate that even relatively small DNA pools (35 individuals) can provide accurate allele frequency estimates for a given sample. Conclusions Despite of higher level of variation associated with array replicates compared to pool construction, we suggest that both sources of variation should be taken into account. This study demonstrates that DNA pooling allows fast and high-throughput determination of allele frequencies in Atlantic salmon enabling cost

  8. Altered Ca2+ Kinetics Associated with α-Actinin-3 Deficiency May Explain Positive Selection for ACTN3 Null Allele in Human Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Houweling, Peter J.; Quinlan, Kate G. R.; Murphy, Robyn; Wagner, Sören; Friedrich, Oliver; North, Kathryn N.

    2015-01-01

    Over 1.5 billion people lack the skeletal muscle fast-twitch fibre protein α-actinin-3 due to homozygosity for a common null polymorphism (R577X) in the ACTN3 gene. α-Actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint performance in elite athletes and beneficial to endurance activities. In the human genome, it is very difficult to find single-gene loss-of-function variants that bear signatures of positive selection, yet intriguingly, the ACTN3 null variant has undergone strong positive selection during recent evolution, appearing to provide a survival advantage where food resources are scarce and climate is cold. We have previously demonstrated that α-actinin-3 deficiency in the Actn3 KO mouse results in a shift in fast-twitch fibres towards oxidative metabolism, which would be more “energy efficient” in famine, and beneficial to endurance performance. Prolonged exposure to cold can also induce changes in skeletal muscle similar to those observed with endurance training, and changes in Ca2+ handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) are a key factor underlying these adaptations. On this basis, we explored the effects of α-actinin-3 deficiency on Ca2+ kinetics in single flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibres from Actn3 KO mice, using the Ca2+-sensitive dye fura-2. Compared to wild-type, fibres of Actn3 KO mice showed: (i) an increased rate of decay of the twitch transient; (ii) a fourfold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ leak; (iii) a threefold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ pumping; and (iv) enhanced maintenance of tetanic Ca2+ during fatigue. The SR Ca2+ pump, SERCA1, and the Ca2+-binding proteins, calsequestrin and sarcalumenin, showed markedly increased expression in muscles of KO mice. Together, these changes in Ca2+ handling in the absence of α-actinin-3 are consistent with cold acclimatisation and thermogenesis, and offer an additional explanation for the positive selection of the ACTN3 577X null allele in populations living in cold environments during

  9. Altered Ca2+ kinetics associated with α-actinin-3 deficiency may explain positive selection for ACTN3 null allele in human evolution.

    PubMed

    Head, Stewart I; Chan, Stephen; Houweling, Peter J; Quinlan, Kate G R; Murphy, Robyn; Wagner, Sören; Friedrich, Oliver; North, Kathryn N

    2015-01-01

    Over 1.5 billion people lack the skeletal muscle fast-twitch fibre protein α-actinin-3 due to homozygosity for a common null polymorphism (R577X) in the ACTN3 gene. α-Actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint performance in elite athletes and beneficial to endurance activities. In the human genome, it is very difficult to find single-gene loss-of-function variants that bear signatures of positive selection, yet intriguingly, the ACTN3