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Sample records for allelic diversity ranged

  1. Patterns of selection and allele diversity of class I and class II major histocompatibility loci across the species range of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka).

    PubMed

    McClelland, Erin K; Ming, Tobi J; Tabata, Amy; Kaukinen, Karia H; Beacham, Terry D; Withler, Ruth E; Miller, Kristina M

    2013-09-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), an important component of the vertebrate immune system, provides an important suite of genes to examine the role of genetic diversity at non-neutral loci for population persistence. We contrasted patterns of diversity at the two classical MHC loci in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), MHC class I (UBA) and MHC class II (DAB), and neutral microsatellite loci across 70 populations spanning the species range from Washington State to Japan. There was no correlation in allelic richness or heterozygosity between MHC loci or between MHC loci and microsatellites. The two unlinked MHC loci may be responding to different selective pressures; the distribution of FST values for the two loci was uncorrelated, and evidence for both balancing and directional selection on alleles and lineages of DAB and UBA was observed in populations throughout the species range but rarely on both loci within a population. These results suggest that fluctuating selection has resulted in the divergence of MHC loci in contemporary populations. PMID:24033436

  2. Drift Rather than Selection Dominates MHC Class II Allelic Diversity Patterns at the Biogeographical Range Scale in Natterjack Toads Bufo calamita

    PubMed Central

    Zeisset, Inga; Beebee, Trevor J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci has gained great popularity in recent years, partly due to their function in protecting vertebrates from infections. This is of particular interest in amphibians on account of major threats many species face from emergent diseases such as chytridiomycosis. In this study we compare levels of diversity in an expressed MHC class II locus with neutral genetic diversity at microsatellite loci in natterjack toad (Bufo (Epidalea) calamita) populations across the whole of the species’ biogeographical range. Variation at both classes of loci was high in the glacial refugium areas (REF) and much lower in postglacial expansion areas (PGE), especially in range edge populations. Although there was clear evidence that the MHC locus was influenced by positive selection in the past, congruence with the neutral markers suggested that historical demographic events were the main force shaping MHC variation in the PGE area. Both neutral and adaptive genetic variation declined with distance from glacial refugia. Nevertheless, there were also some indications from differential isolation by distance and allele abundance patterns that weak effects of selection have been superimposed on the main drift effect in the PGE zone. PMID:24937211

  3. MHC class II DR allelic diversity in bighorn sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that decreased diversity and/or unique polymorphisms in MHC class II alleles of bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are responsible for lower titer of antibodies against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). To test this hypothesis, DRA...

  4. Geographical patterns of turnover and nestedness-resultant components of allelic diversity among populations.

    PubMed

    Diniz-Filho, Jose Alexandre Felizola; Collevatti, Rosane Garcia; Soares, Thannya Nascimento; Telles, Mariana Pires de Campos

    2012-06-01

    The analysis of geographical patterns in population divergence has always been a powerful way to infer microevolutionary processes involved in population differentiation, and several approaches have been used to investigate such patterns. Most frequently, multivariate spatial patterns of population differentiation are analyzed by computing pairwise genetic distances or F(ST) (or related statistics, such as ϕ(ST) from AMOVA), which are then correlated with geographical distances or landscape features. However, when calculating distances, especially based on presence-absence of alleles in local populations, there would be a confounding effect of allelic richness differences in the population differentiation. Moreover, the relative magnitude of these components and their spatial patterns can help identifying microevolutionary processes driving population differentiation. Here we show how recent methodological advances in ecological community analyses that allows partitioning dissimilarity into turnover (turnover) and richness differences, or nestedness-resultant dissimilarity, can be applied to allelic variation data, using an endemic Cerrado tree (Dipteryx alata) as a case study. Individuals from 15 local populations were genotyped for eight microsatellite loci, and pairwise dissimilarities were computed based on presence-absence of alleles. The turnover of alleles among populations represented 69 % of variation in dissimilarity, but only the richness difference component shows a clear spatial structure, appearing as a westward decrease of allelic richness. We show that decoupling richness difference and turnover components of allelic variation reveals more clearly how similarity among populations reflects geographical patterns in allelic diversity that can be interpreted in respect to historical range expansion in the species. PMID:22886007

  5. Puroindoline allelic diversity in Indian wheat germplasm and identification of new allelic variants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Arora, Shaweta; Singh, Kashmir; Garg, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Grain hardness is an important quality trait that influences product development in wheat. This trait is governed by variation in puroindoline proteins (PINA and PINB). Our study evaluated 551 Indian wheat germplasm lines for diversity in Pina and Pinb genes. Eighty-two lines were shortlisted for full length sequencing and grain hardness studies. Sequencing studies identified six unknown alleles: two for the Pina gene and four for the Pinb gene. Five of them were novel with non-synonymous changes in the corresponding amino acid sequences. Identified mutations in the deduced mature proteins and their pre- and pro-peptides influenced the hardness characteristics of the grain. We classified these 82 varieties into different hardness categories with reference to international and Indian systems of classification. The majority of Indian wheat varieties were categorized as hard. This study revealed that unexplored Indian wheat germplasm can be a good source of genetic variability for both Pina and Pinb genes, helping in marker-assisted breeding and in obtaining wheat with different textural properties. PMID:26366114

  6. DRD4 dopamine receptor allelic diversity in various primate species

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Higley, D.; O`Brien, S.

    1994-09-01

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is uniquely characterized by a 48 bp repeating segment within the coding region, located in exon III. Different DRD4 alleles are produced by the presence of additional 48 bp repeats, each of which adds 16 amino acids to the length of the 3rd intracytoplasmic loop of the receptor. The DRD4 receptor is therefore an intriguing candidate gene for behaviors which are influenced by dopamine function. In several human populations, DRD4 alleles with 2-8 and 10 repeats have previously been identified, and the 4 and 7 repeat alleles are the most abundant. We have determined DRD4 genotypes in the following nonhuman primate species: chimpanzee N=2, pygmy chimpanzee N=2, gorilla N=4, siamang N=2, Gelada baboon N=1, gibbon N=1, orangutan (Bornean and Sumatran) N=62, spider monkey N=4, owl monkey N=1, Colobus monkey N=1, Patas monkey N=1, ruffed lemur N=1, rhesus macaque N=8, and vervet monkey N=28. The degree of DRD4 polymorphism and which DRD4 alleles were present both showed considerable variation across primate species. In contrast to the human, rhesus macaque monkeys were monomorphic. The 4 and 7 repeat allels, highly abundant in the human, may not be present in certain other primates. For example, the four spider monkeys we studied showed the 7, 8 and 9 repeat length alleles and the only gibbon we analyzed was homozygous for the 9 repeat allele (thus far not observed in the human). Genotyping of other primate species and sequencing of the individual DRD4 repeat alleles in different species may help us determine the ancestral DRD4 repeat length and identify connections between DRD4 genotype and phenotype.

  7. Estimating allelic diversity generated by excision of different transposon types.

    PubMed

    Nordborg, M; Walbot, V

    1995-05-01

    Methods are presented for calculating the number and type of different DNA sequences generated by base excision and insertion events at a given site in a known DNA sequence. We calculate, for example, that excision of the Mu1 transposon from the bz1::Mu1 allele of maize should generate more than 500,000 unique alleles given the extent of base deletion (up to 34 bases removed) and base insertion (0-5 bases) observed thus far in sequenced excision alleles. Analysis of this universe of potential alleles can, for example, be used to predict the frequency of creation of stop codons or repair-generated duplications. In general, knowledge of the distribution of alleles can be used to evaluate models of both excision and repair by determining whether particular events occur more frequently than expected. Such quantitative analysis complements the qualitative description provided by the DNA sequence of individual events. Similar methods can be used to evaluate the outcome of other cases of DNA breakage and repair such as programmed V(D)J recombination in immunoglobin genes. PMID:24172918

  8. Allelic diversity at the DLA-88 locus in Golden Retriever and Boxer breeds is limited.

    PubMed

    Ross, P; Buntzman, A S; Vincent, B G; Grover, E N; Gojanovich, G S; Collins, E J; Frelinger, J A; Hess, P R

    2012-08-01

    In the dog, previous analyses of major histocompatibility complex class I genes suggest a single polymorphic locus, dog leukocyte antigen (DLA)-88. While 51 alleles have been reported, estimates of prevalence have not been made. We hypothesized that, within a breed, DLA-88 diversity would be restricted, and one or more dominant alleles could be identified. Accordingly, we determined allele usage in 47 Golden Retrievers and 39 Boxers. In each population, 10 alleles were found; 4 were shared. Seven novel alleles were identified. DLA-88*05101 and *50801 predominated in Golden Retrievers, while most Boxers carried *03401. In these breeds, DLA-88 polymorphisms are limited and largely non-overlapping. The finding of highly prevalent alleles fulfills an important prerequisite for studying canine CD8+ T-cell responses. PMID:22571293

  9. Allelic diversity at the DLA-88 locus in Golden Retriever and Boxer breeds is limited

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Peter; Buntzman, Adam S.; Vincent, Benjamin G.; Grover, Elise N.; Gojanovich, Gregory S.; Collins, Edward J.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.; Hess, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    In the dog, previous analyses of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes suggest a single polymorphic locus, Dog Leukocyte Antigen (DLA)-88. While 51 alleles have been reported, estimates of prevalence have not been made. We hypothesized that, within a breed, DLA-88 diversity would be restricted, and one or more dominant alleles could be identified. Accordingly, we determined allele usage in 47 Golden Retrievers and 39 Boxers. In each population, 10 alleles were found; 4 were shared. Seven novel alleles were identified. DLA-88*05101 and *50801 predominated in Golden Retrievers, while most Boxers carried *03401. In these breeds DLA-88 polymorphisms are limited and largely non-overlapping. The finding of highly prevalent alleles fulfills an important prerequisite for studying canine CD8+ T-cell responses. PMID:22571293

  10. Extensive Allelic Diversity of MHC Class I in Wild Mallard Ducks.

    PubMed

    Fleming-Canepa, Ximena; Jensen, Shawna M; Mesa, Christine M; Diaz-Satizabal, Laura; Roth, Alexa J; Parks-Dely, Julie A; Moon, Debra A; Wong, Janet P; Evseev, Danyel; Gossen, Desolie A; Tetrault, David G; Magor, Katharine E

    2016-08-01

    MHC class I is critically involved in defense against viruses, and diversity from polygeny and polymorphism contributes to the breadth of the immune response and health of the population. In this article, we examine MHC class I diversity in wild mallard ducks, the natural host and reservoir of influenza A viruses. We previously showed domestic ducks predominantly use UAA, one of five MHC class I genes, but whether biased expression is also true for wild mallards is unknown. Using RT-PCR from blood, we examined expressed MHC class I alleles from 38 wild mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and identified 61 unique alleles, typically 1 or 2 expressed alleles in each individual. To determine whether expressed alleles correspond to UAA adjacent to TAP2 as in domestic ducks, we cloned and sequenced genomic UAA-TAP2 fragments from all mallards, which matched transcripts recovered and allowed us to assign most alleles as UAA Allelic differences are primarily located in α1 and α2 domains in the residues known to interact with peptide in mammalian MHC class I, suggesting the diversity is functional. Most UAA alleles have unique residues in the cleft predicting distinct specificity; however, six alleles have an unusual conserved cleft with two cysteine residues. Residues that influence peptide-loading properties and tapasin involvement in chicken are fixed in duck alleles and suggest tapasin independence. Biased expression of one MHC class I gene may make viral escape within an individual easy, but high diversity in the population places continual pressure on the virus in the reservoir species. PMID:27342841

  11. Naturally occurring allele diversity allows potato cultivation in northern latitudes.

    PubMed

    Kloosterman, Bjorn; Abelenda, José A; Gomez, María del Mar Carretero; Oortwijn, Marian; de Boer, Jan M; Kowitwanich, Krissana; Horvath, Beatrix M; van Eck, Herman J; Smaczniak, Cezary; Prat, Salomé; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B

    2013-03-14

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) originates from the Andes and evolved short-day-dependent tuber formation as a vegetative propagation strategy. Here we describe the identification of a central regulator underlying a major-effect quantitative trait locus for plant maturity and initiation of tuber development. We show that this gene belongs to the family of DOF (DNA-binding with one finger) transcription factors and regulates tuberization and plant life cycle length, by acting as a mediator between the circadian clock and the StSP6A mobile tuberization signal. We also show that natural allelic variants evade post-translational light regulation, allowing cultivation outside the geographical centre of origin of potato. Potato is a member of the Solanaceae family and is one of the world's most important food crops. This annual plant originates from the Andean regions of South America. Potato develops tubers from underground stems called stolons. Its equatorial origin makes potato essentially short-day dependent for tuberization and potato will not make tubers in the long-day conditions of spring and summer in the northern latitudes. When introduced in temperate zones, wild material will form tubers in the course of the autumnal shortening of day-length. Thus, one of the first selected traits in potato leading to a European potato type is likely to have been long-day acclimation for tuberization. Potato breeders can exploit the naturally occurring variation in tuberization onset and life cycle length, allowing varietal breeding for different latitudes, harvest times and markets. PMID:23467094

  12. Genetic Diversity and Elite Allele Mining for Grain Traits in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) by Association Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Edzesi, Wisdom M.; Dang, Xiaojing; Liang, Lijun; Liu, Erbao; Zaid, Imdad U.; Hong, Delin

    2016-01-01

    Mining elite alleles for grain size and weight is of importance for the improvement of cultivated rice and selection for market demand. In this study, association mapping for grain traits was performed on a selected sample of 628 rice cultivars using 262 SSRs. Grain traits were evaluated by grain length (GL), grain width (GW), grain thickness (GT), grain length to width ratio (GL/GW), and 1000-grain weight (TGW) in 2013 and 2014. Our result showed abundant phenotypic and genetic diversities found in the studied population. In total, 2953 alleles were detected with an average of 11.3 alleles per locus. The population was divided into seven subpopulations and the levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) ranged from 34 to 84 cM. Genome-wide association mapping detected 10 marker trait association (MTAs) loci for GL, 1MTAs locus for GW, 7 MTAs loci for GT, 3 MTAs loci for GL/GW, and 1 MTAs locus for TGW. Twenty-nine, 2, 10, 5, and 3 elite alleles were found for the GL, GW, GT, GL/GW, and TGW, respectively. Optimal cross designs were predicted for improving the target traits. The accessions containing elite alleles for grain traits mined in this study could be used for breeding rice cultivars and cloning the candidate genes. PMID:27375646

  13. Allele diversity for abiotic stress responsive candidate genes in chickpea reference set using gene based SNP markers

    PubMed Central

    Roorkiwal, Manish; Nayak, Spurthi N.; Thudi, Mahendar; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Brunel, Dominique; Mournet, Pierre; This, Dominique; Sharma, Prakash C.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume crop for the semi-arid regions, however, its productivity is adversely affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of candidate genes associated with abiotic stress response will help breeding efforts aiming to enhance its productivity. With this objective, 10 abiotic stress responsive candidate genes were selected on the basis of prior knowledge of this complex trait. These 10 genes were subjected to allele specific sequencing across a chickpea reference set comprising 300 genotypes including 211 genotypes of chickpea mini core collection. A total of 1.3 Mbp sequence data were generated. Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) revealed 79 SNPs and 41 indels in nine genes while the CAP2 gene was found to be conserved across all the genotypes. Among 10 candidate genes, the maximum number of SNPs (34) was observed in abscisic acid stress and ripening (ASR) gene including 22 transitions, 11 transversions and one tri-allelic SNP. Nucleotide diversity varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 while polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.01 (AKIN gene) to 0.43 (CAP2 promoter). Haplotype analysis revealed that alleles were represented by more than two haplotype blocks, except alleles of the CAP2 and sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene, where only one haplotype was identified. These genes can be used for association analysis and if validated, may be useful for enhancing abiotic stress, including drought tolerance, through molecular breeding. PMID:24926299

  14. Diversity of lactase persistence alleles in Ethiopia: signature of a soft selective sweep.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryony L; Raga, Tamiru O; Liebert, Anke; Zmarz, Pawel; Bekele, Endashaw; Danielsen, E Thomas; Olsen, Anders Krüger; Bradman, Neil; Troelsen, Jesper T; Swallow, Dallas M

    2013-09-01

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (-13910(∗)T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene LCT is responsible for lactase persistence and appears to have been under strong directional selection in the last 5,000 years, evidenced by the widespread occurrence of this allele on an extended haplotype. In Africa and the Middle East, the situation is more complicated and at least three other alleles (-13907(∗)G, rs41525747; -13915(∗)G, rs41380347; -14010(∗)C, rs145946881) in the same LCT enhancer region can cause continued lactase expression. Here we examine the LCT enhancer sequence in a large lactose-tolerance-tested Ethiopian cohort of more than 350 individuals. We show that a further SNP, -14009T>G (ss 820486563), is significantly associated with lactose-digester status, and in vitro functional tests confirm that the -14009(∗)G allele also increases expression of an LCT promoter construct. The derived alleles in the LCT enhancer region are spread through several ethnic groups, and we report a greater genetic diversity in lactose digesters than in nondigesters. By examining flanking markers to control for the effects of mutation and demography, we further describe, from empirical evidence, the signature of a soft selective sweep. PMID:23993196

  15. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer–receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating—a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against “obligate cheaters” quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity. PMID:26787913

  16. High levels of MHC class II allelic diversity in lake trout from Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorschner, M.O.; Duris, T.; Bronte, C.R.; Burnham-Curtis, M. K.; Phillips, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Sequence variation in a 216 bp portion of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II B1 domain was examined in 74 individual lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from different locations in Lake Superior. Forty-three alleles were obtained which encoded 71-72 amino acids of the mature protein. These sequences were compared with previous data obtained from five Pacific salmon species and Atlantic salmon using the same primers. Although all of the lake trout alleles clustered together in the neighbor-joining analysis of amino acid sequences, one amino acid allelic lineage was shared with Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a species in another genus which probably diverged from Salvelinus more than 10-20 million years ago. As shown previously in other salmonids, the level of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution (d(N)) exceeded the level of synonymous substitution (d(S)). The level of nucleotide diversity at the MHC class II B1 locus was considerably higher in lake trout than in the Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that lake trout colonized Lake Superior from more than one refuge following the Wisconsin glaciation. Recent population bottlenecks may have reduced nucleotide diversity in Pacific salmon populations.

  17. Range-edge genetic diversity: locally poor extant southern patches maintain a regionally diverse hotspot in the seagrass Zostera marina.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Onno E; Serrão, Ester A

    2012-04-01

    Refugial populations at the rear edge are predicted to contain higher genetic diversity than those resulting from expansion, such as in post-glacial recolonizations. However, peripheral populations are also predicted to have decreased diversity compared to the centre of a species' distribution. We aim to test these predictions by comparing genetic diversity in populations at the limits of distribution of the seagrass Zostera marina, with populations in the species' previously described central diversity 'hotspot'. Zostera marina populations show decreased allelic richness, heterozygosity and genotypic richness in both the 'rear' edge and the 'leading' edge compared to the diversity 'hotspot' in the North Sea/Baltic region. However, when populations are pooled, genetic diversity at the southern range is as high as in the North Sea/Baltic region while the 'leading edge' remains low in genetic diversity. The decreased genetic diversity in these southern Iberian populations compared to more central populations is possibly the effect of drift because of small effective population size, as a result of reduced habitat, low sexual reproduction and low gene flow. However, when considering the whole southern edge of distribution rather than per population, diversity is as high as in the central 'hotspot' in the North Sea/Baltic region. We conclude that diversity patterns assessed per population can mask the real regional richness that is typical of rear edge populations, which have played a key role in the species biogeographical history and as marginal diversity hotspots have very high conservation value. PMID:22369278

  18. QTL mapping identifies candidate alleles involved in adaptive introgression and range expansion in a wild sunflower

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Kenneth D.; Broman, Karl W.; Kane, Nolan C.; Hovick, Stephen M.; Randell, Rebecca A.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2014-01-01

    The wild North American sunflowers Helianthus annuus and H. debilis are participants in one of the earliest identified examples of adaptive trait introgression, and the exchange is hypothesized to have triggered a range expansion in H. annuus. However, the genetic basis of the adaptive exchange has not been examined. Here, we combine quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with field measurements of fitness to identify candidate H. debilis QTL alleles likely to have introgressed into H. annuus to form the natural hybrid lineage H. a. texanus. Two 500-individual BC1 mapping populations were grown in central Texas, genotyped for 384 SNP markers, and then phenotyped in the field for two fitness and 22 herbivore resistance, ecophysiological, phenological, and architectural traits. We identified a total of 110 QTL, including at least one QTL for 22 of the 24 traits. Over 75% of traits exhibited at least one H. debilis QTL allele that would shift the trait in the direction of the wild hybrid H. a. texanus. We identified three chromosomal regions where H. debilis alleles increased both female and male components of fitness; these regions are expected to be strongly favored in the wild. QTL for a number of other ecophysiological, phenological, and architectural traits co-localized with these three regions and are candidates for the actual traits driving adaptive shifts. G × E interactions played a modest role, with 17% of the QTL showing potentially divergent phenotypic effects between the two field sites. The candidate adaptive chromosomal regions identified here serve as explicit hypotheses for how the genetic architecture of the hybrid lineage came into existence. PMID:25522096

  19. Cheetah paradigm revisited: MHC diversity in the world's largest free-ranging population.

    PubMed

    Castro-Prieto, Aines; Wachter, Bettina; Sommer, Simone

    2011-04-01

    For more than two decades, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been considered a paradigm of disease vulnerability associated with low genetic diversity, particularly at the immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Cheetahs have been used as a classic example in numerous conservation genetics textbooks as well as in many related scientific publications. However, earlier studies used methods with low resolution to quantify MHC diversity and/or small sample sizes. Furthermore, high disease susceptibility was reported only for captive cheetahs, whereas free-ranging cheetahs show no signs of infectious diseases and a good general health status. We examined whether the diversity at MHC class I and class II-DRB loci in 149 Namibian cheetahs was higher than previously reported using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, cloning, and sequencing. MHC genes were examined at the genomic and transcriptomic levels. We detected ten MHC class I and four class II-DRB alleles, of which nine MHC class I and all class II-DRB alleles were expressed. Phylogenetic analyses and individual genotypes suggested that the alleles belong to four MHC class I and three class II-DRB putative loci. Evidence of positive selection was detected in both MHC loci. Our study indicated that the low number of MHC class I alleles previously observed in cheetahs was due to a smaller sample size examined. On the other hand, the low number of MHC class II-DRB alleles previously observed in cheetahs was further confirmed. Compared with other mammalian species including felids, cheetahs showed low levels of MHC diversity, but this does not seem to influence the immunocompetence of free-ranging cheetahs in Namibia and contradicts the previous conclusion that the cheetah is a paradigm species of disease vulnerability. PMID:21183613

  20. Genome-wide assessment of worldwide chicken SNP genetic diversity indicates significant absence of rare alleles in commercial breeds

    PubMed Central

    Muir, William M.; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jun; Groenen, Martien A. M.; Crooijmans, Richard P. M. A.; Megens, Hendrik-Jan; Zhang, Huanmin; Okimoto, Ron; Vereijken, Addie; Jungerius, Annemieke; Albers, Gerard A. A.; Lawley, Cindy Taylor; Delany, Mary E.; MacEachern, Sean; Cheng, Hans H.

    2008-01-01

    Breed utilization, genetic improvement, and industry consolidation are predicted to have major impacts on the genetic composition of commercial chickens. Consequently, the question arises as to whether sufficient genetic diversity remains within industry stocks to address future needs. With the chicken genome sequence and more than 2.8 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it is now possible to address biodiversity using a previously unattainable metric: missing alleles. To achieve this assessment, 2551 informative SNPs were genotyped on 2580 individuals, including 1440 commercial birds. The proportion of alleles lacking in commercial populations was assessed by (1) estimating the global SNP allele frequency distribution from a hypothetical ancestral population as a reference, then determining the portion of the distribution lost, and then (2) determining the relationship between allele loss and the inbreeding coefficient. The results indicate that 50% or more of the genetic diversity in ancestral breeds is absent in commercial pure lines. The missing genetic diversity resulted from the limited number of incorporated breeds. As such, hypothetically combining stocks within a company could recover only preexisting within-breed variability, but not more rare ancestral alleles. We establish that SNP weights act as sentinels of biodiversity and provide an objective assessment of the strains that are most valuable for preserving genetic diversity. This is the first experimental analysis investigating the extant genetic diversity of virtually an entire agricultural commodity. The methods presented are the first to characterize biodiversity in terms of allelic diversity and to objectively link rate of allele loss with the inbreeding coefficient. PMID:18981413

  1. Meiotic recombination generates rich diversity in NK cell receptor genes, alleles, and haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Norman, Paul J; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Gendzekhadze, Ketevan; Hammond, John A; Moesta, Achim K; Sharma, Deepti; Graef, Thorsten; McQueen, Karina L; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Carrington, Christine V F; Chandanayingyong, Dasdayanee; Chang, Yih-Hsin; Crespí, Catalina; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Hameed, Kamran; Kamkamidze, Giorgi; Koram, Kwadwo A; Layrisse, Zulay; Matamoros, Nuria; Milà, Joan; Park, Myoung Hee; Pitchappan, Ramasamy M; Ramdath, D Dan; Shiau, Ming-Yuh; Stephens, Henry A F; Struik, Siske; Tyan, Dolly; Verity, David H; Vaughan, Robert W; Davis, Ronald W; Fraser, Patricia A; Riley, Eleanor M; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2009-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the essential functions of innate immunity and reproduction. Various genes encode NK cell receptors that recognize the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I molecules expressed by other cells. For primate NK cells, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are a variable and rapidly evolving family of MHC Class I receptors. Studied here is KIR3DL1/S1, which encodes receptors for highly polymorphic human HLA-A and -B and comprises three ancient allelic lineages that have been preserved by balancing selection throughout human evolution. While the 3DS1 lineage of activating receptors has been conserved, the two 3DL1 lineages of inhibitory receptors were diversified through inter-lineage recombination with each other and with 3DS1. Prominent targets for recombination were D0-domain polymorphisms, which modulate enhancer function, and dimorphism at position 283 in the D2 domain, which influences inhibitory function. In African populations, unequal crossing over between the 3DL1 and 3DL2 genes produced a deleted KIR haplotype in which the telomeric "half" was reduced to a single fusion gene with functional properties distinct from its 3DL1 and 3DL2 parents. Conversely, in Eurasian populations, duplication of the KIR3DL1/S1 locus by unequal crossing over has enabled individuals to carry and express alleles of all three KIR3DL1/S1 lineages. These results demonstrate how meiotic recombination combines with an ancient, preserved diversity to create new KIR phenotypes upon which natural selection acts. A consequence of such recombination is to blur the distinction between alleles and loci in the rapidly evolving human KIR gene family. PMID:19411600

  2. Meiotic recombination generates rich diversity in NK cell receptor genes, alleles, and haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Paul J.; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Gendzekhadze, Ketevan; Hammond, John A.; Moesta, Achim K.; Sharma, Deepti; Graef, Thorsten; McQueen, Karina L.; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Carrington, Christine V.F.; Chandanayingyong, Dasdayanee; Chang, Yih-Hsin; Crespí, Catalina; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Hameed, Kamran; Kamkamidze, Giorgi; Koram, Kwadwo A.; Layrisse, Zulay; Matamoros, Nuria; Milà, Joan; Park, Myoung Hee; Pitchappan, Ramasamy M.; Ramdath, D. Dan; Shiau, Ming-Yuh; Stephens, Henry A.F.; Struik, Siske; Tyan, Dolly; Verity, David H.; Vaughan, Robert W.; Davis, Ronald W.; Fraser, Patricia A.; Riley, Eleanor M.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the essential functions of innate immunity and reproduction. Various genes encode NK cell receptors that recognize the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I molecules expressed by other cells. For primate NK cells, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are a variable and rapidly evolving family of MHC Class I receptors. Studied here is KIR3DL1/S1, which encodes receptors for highly polymorphic human HLA-A and -B and comprises three ancient allelic lineages that have been preserved by balancing selection throughout human evolution. While the 3DS1 lineage of activating receptors has been conserved, the two 3DL1 lineages of inhibitory receptors were diversified through inter-lineage recombination with each other and with 3DS1. Prominent targets for recombination were D0-domain polymorphisms, which modulate enhancer function, and dimorphism at position 283 in the D2 domain, which influences inhibitory function. In African populations, unequal crossing over between the 3DL1 and 3DL2 genes produced a deleted KIR haplotype in which the telomeric “half” was reduced to a single fusion gene with functional properties distinct from its 3DL1 and 3DL2 parents. Conversely, in Eurasian populations, duplication of the KIR3DL1/S1 locus by unequal crossing over has enabled individuals to carry and express alleles of all three KIR3DL1/S1 lineages. These results demonstrate how meiotic recombination combines with an ancient, preserved diversity to create new KIR phenotypes upon which natural selection acts. A consequence of such recombination is to blur the distinction between alleles and loci in the rapidly evolving human KIR gene family. PMID:19411600

  3. Population genetic analysis of Helicobacter pylori by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis: extensive allelic diversity and recombinational population structure.

    PubMed Central

    Go, M F; Kapur, V; Graham, D Y; Musser, J M

    1996-01-01

    Genetic diversity and relationships in 74 Helicobacter pylori isolates recovered from patients assigned to distinct clinical categories were estimated by examination of allelic variation in six genes encoding metabolic housekeeping enzymes by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Seventy-three distinct allele profiles, representing multilocus chromosomal genotypes, were identified. All six loci were highly polymorphic, with an average of 11.2 alleles per locus. The mean genetic diversity in the sample was 0.735, a value that exceeds the level of diversity recorded in virtually all bacterial species studied by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. A high frequency of occurrence of null alleles (lack of enzyme activity) was identified and warrants further investigation at the molecular level. Lack of linkage disequilibrium (nonrandom association (of alleles over loci) indicates that horizontal transfer and recombination of metabolic enzyme genes have contributed to the generation of chromosomal diversity in H. pylori. In this sample of isolates, there was no statistically significant association of multilocus enzyme electrophoretic types or cluster of related chromosomal types and disease category. PMID:8682800

  4. Evolution of Functionally Diverse Alleles Associated with PTC Bitter Taste Sensitivity in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Michael C.; Ranciaro, Alessia; Froment, Alain; Hirbo, Jibril; Omar, Sabah; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Nyambo, Thomas; Lema, Godfrey; Zinshteyn, Daniel; Drayna, Dennis; Breslin, Paul A. S.; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    indicate that novel rare mutations contribute to the phenotypic variance of PTC sensitivity, illustrating the influence of rare variation on a common trait, as well as the relatively recent evolution of functionally diverse alleles at this locus. PMID:22130969

  5. Allelic diversity of a beer haze active protein gene in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and development of allelic specific markers.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingzhen; Dai, Fei; Qiu, Long; Sun, Dongfa; Zhang, Guoping

    2011-07-13

    The formation of haze is a serious quality problem in beer production. It has been shown that the use of silica elute (SE)-ve malt (absence of molecular weight (MW) ∼14000 Da) for brewing can improve haze stability in the resultant beer, and the protein was identified as a barley trypsin inhibitor of the chloroform/methanol type (BTI-CMe). The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and (2) allele-specific (AS) markers for screening SE protein type. A survey of 172 Tibetan annual wild barley accessions and 71 cultivated barley genotypes was conducted, and 104 wild accessions and 35 cultivated genotypes were identified as SE+ve and 68 wild accessions and 36 cultivated genotypes as SE-ve. The allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe was investigated by cloning, alignment, and association analysis. It was found that there were significant differences between the SE+ve and SE-ve types in single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 234 (SNP(234)), SNP(313), and SNP(385.) Furthermore, two sets of AS markers were developed to screen SE protein type based on SNP(313). AS-PCR had results very similar to those obtained by immunoblot method. Mapping analysis showed that the gene controlling the MW∼14 kDa band was located on the short arm of chromosome 3H, at the position of marker BPB-0527 (33.302 cM) in the Franklin/Yerong DH population. PMID:21608526

  6. Allelic Diversity and Geographical Distribution of the Gene Encoding Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein-3 in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Sawaswong, Vorthon; Simpalipan, Phumin; Siripoon, Napaporn; Harnyuttanakorn, Pongchai; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn

    2015-01-01

    Merozoite surface proteins (MSPs) of malaria parasites play critical roles during the erythrocyte invasion and so are potential candidates for malaria vaccine development. However, because MSPs are often under strong immune selection, they can exhibit extensive genetic diversity. The gene encoding the merozoite surface protein-3 (MSP-3) of Plasmodium falciparum displays 2 allelic types, K1 and 3D7. In Thailand, the allelic frequency of the P. falciparum msp-3 gene was evaluated in a single P. falciparum population in Tak at the Thailand and Myanmar border. However, no study has yet looked at the extent of genetic diversity of the msp-3 gene in P. falciparum populations in other localities. Here, we genotyped the msp-3 alleles of 63 P. falciparum samples collected from 5 geographical populations along the borders of Thailand with 3 neighboring countries (Myanmar, Laos, and Cambodia). Our study indicated that the K1 and 3D7 alleles coexisted, but at different proportions in different Thai P. falciparum populations. K1 was more prevalent in populations at the Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia borders, whilst 3D7 was more prevalent at the Thailand-Laos border. Global analysis of the msp-3 allele frequencies revealed that proportions of K1 and 3D7 alleles of msp-3 also varied in different continents, suggesting the divergence of malaria parasite populations. In conclusion, the variation in the msp-3 allelic patterns of P. falciparum in Thailand provides fundamental knowledge for inferring the P. falciparum population structure and for the best design of msp-3 based malaria vaccines. PMID:25925176

  7. Allelic Diversity and Population Structure in Oenococcus oeni as Determined from Sequence Analysis of Housekeeping Genes

    PubMed Central

    de las Rivas, Blanca; Marcobal, Ángela; Muñoz, Rosario

    2004-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is the organism of choice for promoting malolactic fermentation in wine. The population biology of O. oeni is poorly understood and remains unclear. For a better understanding of the mode of genetic variation within this species, we investigated by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) with the gyrB, pgm, ddl, recP, and mleA genes the genetic diversity and genetic relationships among 18 O. oeni strains isolated in various years from wines of the United States, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy. These strains have also been characterized by ribotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the PCR-amplified 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region (ISR). Ribotyping grouped the strains into two groups; however, the RFLP analysis of the ISRs showed no differences in the strains analyzed. In contrast, MLST in oenococci had a good discriminatory ability, and we have found a higher genetic diversity than indicated by ribotyping analysis. All sequence types were represented by a single strain, and all the strains could be distinguished from each other because they had unique combinations of alleles. Strains assumed to be identical showed the same sequence type. Phylogenetic analyses indicated a panmictic population structure in O. oeni. Sequences were analyzed for evidence of recombination by split decomposition analysis and analysis of clustered polymorphisms. All results indicated that recombination plays a major role in creating the genetic heterogeneity of O. oeni. A low standardized index of association value indicated that the O. oeni genes analyzed are close to linkage equilibrium. This study constitutes the first step in the development of an MLST method for O. oeni and the first example of the application of MLST to a nonpathogenic food production bacteria. PMID:15574919

  8. Analysis of the vomeronasal receptor repertoire, expression and allelic diversity in swine.

    PubMed

    Dinka, Hunduma; Le, Minh Thong; Ha, Heekyun; Cho, Hyesun; Choi, Min-Kyeung; Choi, Hojun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Soundarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Park, Jin-Ki; Park, Chankyu

    2016-05-01

    Here we report a comprehensive analysis of the vomeronasal receptor repertoire in pigs. We identified a total of 25 V1R sequences consisting of 10 functional genes, 3 pseudogenes, and 12 partial genes, while functional V2R and FPR genes were not present in the pig genome. Pig V1Rs were classified into three subfamilies, D, F, and J. Using direct high resolution sequencing-based typing of all functional V1Rs from 10 individuals of 5 different breeds, a total of 24 SNPs were identified, indicating that the allelic diversity of V1Rs is much lower than that of the olfactory receptors. A high expression level of V1Rs was detected in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and testes, while a low expression level of V1Rs was observed in all other tissues examined. Our results showed that pigs could serve as an interesting large animal model system to study pheromone-related neurobiology because of their genetic simplicity. PMID:26482471

  9. Rapid range expansion increases genetic differentiation while causing limited reduction in genetic diversity in a damselfly

    PubMed Central

    Swaegers, J; Mergeay, J; Therry, L; Larmuseau, M H D; Bonte, D; Stoks, R

    2013-01-01

    Many ectothermic species are currently expanding their geographic range due to global warming. This can modify the population genetic diversity and structure of these species because of genetic drift during the colonization of new areas. Although the genetic signatures of historical range expansions have been investigated in an array of species, the genetic consequences of natural, contemporary range expansions have received little attention, with the only studies available focusing on range expansions along a narrow front. We investigate the genetic consequences of a natural range expansion in the Mediterranean damselfly Coenagrion scitulum, which is currently rapidly expanding along a broad front in different directions. We assessed genetic diversity and genetic structure using 12 microsatellite markers in five centrally located populations and five recently established populations at the edge of the geographic distribution. Our results suggest that, although a marginal significant decrease in the allelic richness was found in the edge populations, genetic diversity has been preserved during the range expansion of this species. Nevertheless, edge populations were genetically more differentiated compared with core populations, suggesting genetic drift during the range expansion. The smaller effective population sizes of the edge populations compared with central populations also suggest a contribution of genetic drift after colonization. We argue and document that range expansion along multiple axes of a broad expansion front generates little reduction in genetic diversity, yet stronger differentiation of the edge populations. PMID:23820582

  10. Rapid range expansion increases genetic differentiation while causing limited reduction in genetic diversity in a damselfly.

    PubMed

    Swaegers, J; Mergeay, J; Therry, L; Larmuseau, M H D; Bonte, D; Stoks, R

    2013-11-01

    Many ectothermic species are currently expanding their geographic range due to global warming. This can modify the population genetic diversity and structure of these species because of genetic drift during the colonization of new areas. Although the genetic signatures of historical range expansions have been investigated in an array of species, the genetic consequences of natural, contemporary range expansions have received little attention, with the only studies available focusing on range expansions along a narrow front. We investigate the genetic consequences of a natural range expansion in the Mediterranean damselfly Coenagrion scitulum, which is currently rapidly expanding along a broad front in different directions. We assessed genetic diversity and genetic structure using 12 microsatellite markers in five centrally located populations and five recently established populations at the edge of the geographic distribution. Our results suggest that, although a marginal significant decrease in the allelic richness was found in the edge populations, genetic diversity has been preserved during the range expansion of this species. Nevertheless, edge populations were genetically more differentiated compared with core populations, suggesting genetic drift during the range expansion. The smaller effective population sizes of the edge populations compared with central populations also suggest a contribution of genetic drift after colonization. We argue and document that range expansion along multiple axes of a broad expansion front generates little reduction in genetic diversity, yet stronger differentiation of the edge populations. PMID:23820582

  11. Selection, diversity and evolutionary patterns of the MHC class II DAB in free-ranging Neotropical marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Lucht, Yvonne; Otten, Celine; Püttker, Thomas; Sommer, Simone

    2008-01-01

    Background Research on the genetic architecture and diversity of the MHC has focused mainly on eutherian mammals, birds and fish. So far, studies on model marsupials used in laboratory investigations indicated very little or even no variation in MHC class II genes. However, natural levels of diversity and selection are unknown in marsupials as studies on wild populations are virtually absent. We used two endemic South American mouse opossums, Gracilinanus microtarsus and Marmosops incanus, to investigate characteristic features of MHC selection. This study is the first investigation of MHC selection in free-ranging Neotropical marsupials. In addition, the evolutionary history of MHC lineages within the group of marsupials was examined. Results G. microtarsus showed extensive levels of MHC diversity within and among individuals as 47 MHC-DAB alleles and high levels of sequence divergence were detected at a minimum of four loci. Positively selected codon sites were identified, of which most were congruent with human antigen binding sites. The diversity in M. incanus was rather low with only eight observed alleles at presumably two loci. However, these alleles also revealed high sequence divergence. Again, positive selection was identified on specific codon sites, all congruent with human ABS and with positively selected sites observed in G. microtarsus. In a phylogenetic comparison alleles of M. incanus interspersed widely within alleles of G. microtarsus with four alleles being present in both species. Conclusion Our investigations revealed extensive MHC class II polymorphism in a natural marsupial population, contrary to previous assumptions. Furthermore, our study confirms for the first time in marsupials the presence of three characteristic features common at MHC loci of eutherian mammals, birds and fish: large allelic sequence divergence, positive selection on specific sites and trans-specific polymorphism. PMID:18534008

  12. Transposon-based high sequence diversity in Avr-Pita alleles increases the potential for pathogenicity of Magnaporthe oryzae populations.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Thakur, S; Rathour, R; Variar, M; Prashanthi, S K; Singh, A K; Singh, U D; Sharma, V; Singh, N K; Sharma, T R

    2014-06-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae causes rice blast that is one of the most devastating diseases of rice worldwide. Highly variable nature of this fungus has evolved itself against major resistance genes in newly released rice varieties. Understanding the population structure of this fungus is essential for proper utilization of the rice blast resistance genes in rice crop plants. In the present study, we analyzed 133 isolates of M. oryzae from ten countries to find the allelic variation of Avr-Pita gene that is triggering Pita-mediated resistance in rice plant. The diversity analysis of these alleles showed higher level of nucleotide variation in the coding regions than the noncoding regions. Evolutionary analysis of these alleles indicates that Avr-Pita gene is under purifying selection to favor its major alleles in 133 isolates analyzed in this study. We hypothesize that the selection of favorable Avr-Pita allele in these isolates may occur through a genetic mechanism known as recurrent selective sweeps. A total of 22 functional Avr-Pita protein variants were identified in this study. Insertion of Pot3 transposable element into the promoter of Avr-Pita gene was identified in virulent isolates and was suggested that mobility of repeat elements in avirulence genes of M. oryzae seems to help in emergence of new virulent types of the pathogen. Allele-specific markers developed in this study will be helpful to identify a particular type of Avr-Pita allele from M. oryzae population which can form the basis for the deployment of Pita gene in different epidemiological regions. PMID:24633351

  13. Power Laws for Heavy-Tailed Distributions: Modeling Allele and Haplotype Diversity for the National Marrow Donor Program

    PubMed Central

    Gragert, Loren; Maiers, Martin; Chatterjee, Ansu; Albrecht, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Measures of allele and haplotype diversity, which are fundamental properties in population genetics, often follow heavy tailed distributions. These measures are of particular interest in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Donor/Recipient suitability for HSCT is determined by Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) similarity. Match predictions rely upon a precise description of HLA diversity, yet classical estimates are inaccurate given the heavy-tailed nature of the distribution. This directly affects HSCT matching and diversity measures in broader fields such as species richness. We, therefore, have developed a power-law based estimator to measure allele and haplotype diversity that accommodates heavy tails using the concepts of regular variation and occupancy distributions. Application of our estimator to 6.59 million donors in the Be The Match Registry revealed that haplotypes follow a heavy tail distribution across all ethnicities: for example, 44.65% of the European American haplotypes are represented by only 1 individual. Indeed, our discovery rate of all U.S. European American haplotypes is estimated at 23.45% based upon sampling 3.97% of the population, leaving a large number of unobserved haplotypes. Population coverage, however, is much higher at 99.4% given that 90% of European Americans carry one of the 4.5% most frequent haplotypes. Alleles were found to be less diverse suggesting the current registry represents most alleles in the population. Thus, for HSCT registries, haplotype discovery will remain high with continued recruitment to a very deep level of sampling, but population coverage will not. Finally, we compared the convergence of our power-law versus classical diversity estimators such as Capture recapture, Chao, ACE and Jackknife methods. When fit to the haplotype data, our estimator displayed favorable properties in terms of convergence (with respect to sampling depth) and accuracy (with respect to diversity estimates). This

  14. Power laws for heavy-tailed distributions: modeling allele and haplotype diversity for the national marrow donor program.

    PubMed

    Slater, Noa; Louzoun, Yoram; Gragert, Loren; Maiers, Martin; Chatterjee, Ansu; Albrecht, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Measures of allele and haplotype diversity, which are fundamental properties in population genetics, often follow heavy tailed distributions. These measures are of particular interest in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Donor/Recipient suitability for HSCT is determined by Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) similarity. Match predictions rely upon a precise description of HLA diversity, yet classical estimates are inaccurate given the heavy-tailed nature of the distribution. This directly affects HSCT matching and diversity measures in broader fields such as species richness. We, therefore, have developed a power-law based estimator to measure allele and haplotype diversity that accommodates heavy tails using the concepts of regular variation and occupancy distributions. Application of our estimator to 6.59 million donors in the Be The Match Registry revealed that haplotypes follow a heavy tail distribution across all ethnicities: for example, 44.65% of the European American haplotypes are represented by only 1 individual. Indeed, our discovery rate of all U.S. European American haplotypes is estimated at 23.45% based upon sampling 3.97% of the population, leaving a large number of unobserved haplotypes. Population coverage, however, is much higher at 99.4% given that 90% of European Americans carry one of the 4.5% most frequent haplotypes. Alleles were found to be less diverse suggesting the current registry represents most alleles in the population. Thus, for HSCT registries, haplotype discovery will remain high with continued recruitment to a very deep level of sampling, but population coverage will not. Finally, we compared the convergence of our power-law versus classical diversity estimators such as Capture recapture, Chao, ACE and Jackknife methods. When fit to the haplotype data, our estimator displayed favorable properties in terms of convergence (with respect to sampling depth) and accuracy (with respect to diversity estimates). This

  15. Y chromosome STR allelic and haplotype diversity in a Rwanda population from East Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, Kuppareddi; Duncan, George

    2012-03-01

    We have analyzed 17 Y-chromosomal STR loci in a population sample of 69 unrelated male individuals of the Rwanda-Hutu population from East Central Africa using an AmpFlSTR® Yfiler™ PCR amplification kit. A total of 62 unique haplotypes were identified among the 69 individuals studied. The haplotype diversity was found to be 0.9970 for this population. The gene diversity ranged from 0.1130 (DYS392) to 0.7722 (DYS385). Comparison of populations in this study with twenty-five other national and global populations using Principal Co-ordinate Analysis (PCA) and phylogenetic molecular analysis using a genetic distance matrix indicates a delineation of all the African populations from other unrelated populations. The results of population pair-wise Fst p values indicate statistically significant differentiation of the Rwandan population when compared with 25 other global populations including four African populations (p=0.0000). Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) of the Rwanda population with four other African populations indicated a 93% variance within populations and 7% variance among the five populations. A data base search of the 62 haplotypes yielded only one non-African haplotype match, suggesting these haplotypes are unique to the African continent. PMID:22285642

  16. Global phylogeography of the avian malaria pathogen Plasmodium relictum based on MSP1 allelic diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hellgren, Olof; Atkinson, Carter T.; Bensch, Staffan; Albayrak, Tamer; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Ewen, John G.; Kim, Kyeong Soon; Lima, Marcos R.; Martin, Lynn; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Ricklefs, Robert; Sehgal, Ravinder N. M.; Gediminas, Valkiunas; Tsuda, Yoshio; Marzal, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Knowing the genetic variation that occurs in pathogen populations and how it is distributed across geographical areas is essential to understand parasite epidemiology, local patterns of virulence, and evolution of host-resistance. In addition, it is important to identify populations of pathogens that are evolutionarily independent and thus ‘free’ to adapt to hosts and environments. Here, we investigated genetic variation in the globally distributed, highly invasive avian malaria parasite Plasmodium relictum, which has several distinctive mitochondrial haplotyps (cyt b lineages, SGS1, GRW11 and GRW4). The phylogeography of P. relictum was accessed using the highly variable nuclear gene merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1), a gene linked to the invasion biology of the parasite. We show that the lineage GRW4 is evolutionarily independent of GRW11 and SGS1 whereas GRW11 and SGS1 share MSP1 alleles and thus suggesting the presence of two distinct species (GRW4 versus SGS1 and GRW11). Further, there were significant differences in the global distribution of MSP1 alleles with differences between GRW4 alleles in the New and the Old World. For SGS1, a lineage formerly believed to have both tropical and temperate transmission, there were clear differences in MSP1 alleles transmitted in tropical Africa compared to the temperate regions of Europe and Asia. Further, we highlight the occurrence of multiple MSP1 alleles in GRW4 isolates from the Hawaiian Islands, where the parasite has contributed to declines and extinctions of endemic forest birds since it was introduced. This study stresses the importance of multiple independent loci for understanding patterns of transmission and evolutionary independence across avian malaria parasites.

  17. The genetic signature of rapid range expansions: How dispersal, growth and invasion speed impact heterozygosity and allele surfing.

    PubMed

    Goodsman, Devin W; Cooke, Barry; Coltman, David W; Lewis, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    As researchers collect spatiotemporal population and genetic data in tandem, models that connect demography and dispersal to genetics are increasingly relevant. The dominant spatiotemporal model of invasion genetics is the stepping-stone model which represents a gradual range expansion in which individuals jump to uncolonized locations one step at a time. However, many range expansions occur quickly as individuals disperse far from currently colonized regions. For these types of expansion, stepping-stone models are inappropriate. To more accurately reflect wider dispersal in many organisms, we created kernel-based models of invasion genetics based on integrodifference equations. Classic theory relating to integrodifference equations suggests that the speed of range expansions is a function of population growth and dispersal. In our simulations, populations that expanded at the same speed but with spread rates driven by dispersal retained more heterozygosity along axes of expansion than range expansions with rates of spread that were driven primarily by population growth. To investigate surfing we introduced mutant alleles in wave fronts of simulated range expansions. In our models based on random mating, surfing alleles remained at relatively low frequencies and surfed less often compared to previous results based on stepping-stone simulations with asexual reproduction. PMID:25201435

  18. Employing genome-wide SNP discovery and genotyping strategy to extrapolate the natural allelic diversity and domestication patterns in chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Kujur, Alice; Bajaj, Deepak; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Das, Shouvik; Ranjan, Rajeev; Shree, Tanima; Saxena, Maneesha S.; Badoni, Saurabh; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C. L. L.; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    The genome-wide discovery and high-throughput genotyping of SNPs in chickpea natural germplasm lines is indispensable to extrapolate their natural allelic diversity, domestication, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns leading to the genetic enhancement of this vital legume crop. We discovered 44,844 high-quality SNPs by sequencing of 93 diverse cultivated desi, kabuli, and wild chickpea accessions using reference genome- and de novo-based GBS (genotyping-by-sequencing) assays that were physically mapped across eight chromosomes of desi and kabuli. Of these, 22,542 SNPs were structurally annotated in different coding and non-coding sequence components of genes. Genes with 3296 non-synonymous and 269 regulatory SNPs could functionally differentiate accessions based on their contrasting agronomic traits. A high experimental validation success rate (92%) and reproducibility (100%) along with strong sensitivity (93–96%) and specificity (99%) of GBS-based SNPs was observed. This infers the robustness of GBS as a high-throughput assay for rapid large-scale mining and genotyping of genome-wide SNPs in chickpea with sub-optimal use of resources. With 23,798 genome-wide SNPs, a relatively high intra-specific polymorphic potential (49.5%) and broader molecular diversity (13–89%)/functional allelic diversity (18–77%) was apparent among 93 chickpea accessions, suggesting their tremendous applicability in rapid selection of desirable diverse accessions/inter-specific hybrids in chickpea crossbred varietal improvement program. The genome-wide SNPs revealed complex admixed domestication pattern, extensive LD estimates (0.54–0.68) and extended LD decay (400–500 kb) in a structured population inclusive of 93 accessions. These findings reflect the utility of our identified SNPs for subsequent genome-wide association study (GWAS) and selective sweep-based domestication trait dissection analysis to identify potential genomic loci (gene-associated targets) specifically

  19. Quantitative trait locus mapping identifies candidate alleles involved in adaptive introgression and range expansion in a wild sunflower.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Kenneth D; Broman, Karl W; Kane, Nolan C; Hovick, Stephen M; Randell, Rebecca A; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2015-05-01

    The wild North American sunflowers Helianthus annuus and H. debilis are participants in one of the earliest identified examples of adaptive trait introgression, and the exchange is hypothesized to have triggered a range expansion in H. annuus. However, the genetic basis of the adaptive exchange has not been examined. Here, we combine quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with field measurements of fitness to identify candidate H. debilis QTL alleles likely to have introgressed into H. annuus to form the natural hybrid lineage H. a. texanus. Two 500-individual BC1 mapping populations were grown in central Texas, genotyped for 384 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and then phenotyped in the field for two fitness and 22 herbivore resistance, ecophysiological, phenological and architectural traits. We identified a total of 110 QTL, including at least one QTL for 22 of the 24 traits. Over 75% of traits exhibited at least one H. debilis QTL allele that would shift the trait in the direction of the wild hybrid H. a. texanus. We identified three chromosomal regions where H. debilis alleles increased both female and male components of fitness; these regions are expected to be strongly favoured in the wild. QTL for a number of other ecophysiological, phenological and architectural traits colocalized with these three regions and are candidates for the actual traits driving adaptive shifts. G × E interactions played a modest role, with 17% of the QTL showing potentially divergent phenotypic effects between the two field sites. The candidate adaptive chromosomal regions identified here serve as explicit hypotheses for how the genetic architecture of the hybrid lineage came into existence. PMID:25522096

  20. Allele and haplotype diversity of X-chromosomal STRs in Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Pasino, Serena; Caratti, Stefano; Del Pero, Massimiliano; Santovito, Alfredo; Torre, Carlo; Robino, Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Twenty-one X-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci, including the six clusters of linked markers DXS10148-DXS10135-DXS8378 (Xp22), DXS7132-DXS10079-DXS10074 (Xq12), DXS6801-DXS6809-DXS6789 (Xq21), DXS7424-DXS101 (Xq22), DXS10103-HPRTB-DXS10101 (Xq26), DXS8377-DXS10146-DXS10134-DXS7423 (Xq28) and the loci DXS6800, GATA172D05 and DXS10011 were typed in a population sample from Ivory Coast (n=125; 51 men and 74 women). Allele and haplotype frequencies as well as linkage disequilibrium data for kinship calculations are provided. On the whole, no significant differences in the genetic variability of X-STR markers were observed between Ivorians and other sub-Saharan African populations belonging to the Niger-Kordofanian linguistic group. PMID:21717153

  1. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in a Legacy Collection of Spring Barley Landraces Adapted to a Wide Range of Climates

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Alexander; Özkan, Hakan; Graner, Andreas; Kilian, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Global environmental change and increasing human population emphasize the urgent need for higher yielding and better adapted crop plants. One strategy to achieve this aim is to exploit the wealth of so called landraces of crop species, representing diverse traditional domesticated populations of locally adapted genotypes. In this study, we investigated a comprehensive set of 1485 spring barley landraces (Lrc1485) adapted to a wide range of climates, which were selected from one of the largest genebanks worldwide. The landraces originated from 5° to 62.5° N and 16° to 71° E. The whole collection was genotyped using 42 SSR markers to assess the genetic diversity and population structure. With an average allelic richness of 5.74 and 372 alleles, Lrc1485 harbours considerably more genetic diversity than the most polymorphic current GWAS panel for barley. Ten major clusters defined most of the population structure based on geographical origin, row type of the ear and caryopsis type – and were assigned to specific climate zones. The legacy core reference set Lrc648 established in this study will provide a long-lasting resource and a very valuable tool for the scientific community. Lrc648 is best suited for multi-environmental field testing to identify candidate genes underlying quantitative traits but also for allele mining approaches. PMID:25541702

  2. Inborn errors of human STAT1: allelic heterogeneity governs the diversity of immunological and infectious phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Okada, Satoshi; Cypowyj, Sophie; Puel, Anne; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The genetic dissection of various human infectious diseases has led to the definition of inborn errors of human STAT1 immunity of four types, including (i) autosomal recessive (AR) complete STAT1 deficiency, (ii) AR partial STAT1 deficiency, (iii) autosomal dominant (AD) STAT1 deficiency, and (iv) AD gain of STAT1 activity. The two types of AR STAT1 defect give rise to a broad infectious phenotype with susceptibility to intramacrophagic bacteria (mostly mycobacteria) and viruses (herpes viruses at least), due principally to the impairment of IFN-γ-mediated and IFN-α/β-mediated immunity, respectively. Clinical outcome depends on the extent to which the STAT1 defect decreases responsiveness to these cytokines. AD STAT1 deficiency selectively predisposes individuals to mycobacterial disease, owing to the impairment of IFN-γ-mediated immunity, as IFN-α/β-mediated immunity is maintained. Finally, AD gain of STAT1 activity is associated with autoimmunity, probably owing to an enhancement of IFN-α/β-mediated immunity. More surprisingly, it is also associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, through as yet undetermined mechanisms involving an inhibition of the development of IL-17-producing T cells. Thus, germline mutations in human STAT1 define four distinct clinical disorders. Various combinations of viral, mycobacterial and fungal infections are therefore allelic at the human STAT1 locus. These experiments of Nature neatly highlight the clinical and immunological impact of the human genetic dissection of infectious phenotypes. PMID:22651901

  3. The Alu-Rich Genomic Architecture of SPAST Predisposes to Diverse and Functionally Distinct Disease-Associated CNV Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Yuan, Bo; Campbell, Ian M.; Scull, Jennifer C.; Withers, Marjorie A.; Baggett, Brett C.; Beck, Christine R.; Shaw, Christine J.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Moretti, Paolo; Goodwin, Wendy E.; Hein, Nichole; Fink, John K.; Seong, Moon-Woo; Seo, Soo Hyun; Park, Sung Sup; Karbassi, Izabela D.; Batish, Sat Dev; Ordóñez-Ugalde, Andrés; Quintáns, Beatriz; Sobrido, María-Jesús; Stemmler, Susanne; Lupski, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Intragenic copy-number variants (CNVs) contribute to the allelic spectrum of both Mendelian and complex disorders. Although pathogenic deletions and duplications in SPAST (mutations in which cause autosomal-dominant spastic paraplegia 4 [SPG4]) have been described, their origins and molecular consequences remain obscure. We mapped breakpoint junctions of 54 SPAST CNVs at nucleotide resolution. Diverse combinations of exons are deleted or duplicated, highlighting the importance of particular exons for spastin function. Of the 54 CNVs, 38 (70%) appear to be mediated by an Alu-based mechanism, suggesting that the Alu-rich genomic architecture of SPAST renders this locus susceptible to various genome rearrangements. Analysis of breakpoint Alus further informs a model of Alu-mediated CNV formation characterized by small CNV size and potential involvement of mechanisms other than homologous recombination. Twelve deletions (22%) overlap part of SPAST and a portion of a nearby, directly oriented gene, predicting novel chimeric genes in these subjects’ genomes. cDNA from a subject with a SPAST final exon deletion contained multiple SPAST:SLC30A6 fusion transcripts, indicating that SPAST CNVs can have transcriptional effects beyond the gene itself. SLC30A6 has been implicated in Alzheimer disease, so these fusion gene data could explain a report of spastic paraplegia and dementia cosegregating in a family with deletion of the final exon of SPAST. Our findings provide evidence that the Alu genomic architecture of SPAST predisposes to diverse CNV alleles with distinct transcriptional—and possibly phenotypic—consequences. Moreover, we provide further mechanistic insights into Alu-mediated copy-number change that are extendable to other loci. PMID:25065914

  4. Host range, prevalence, and genetic diversity of adenoviruses in bats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Ge, Xingyi; Zhang, Huajun; Zhou, Peng; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yunzhi; Yuan, Junfa; Wang, Lin-Fa; Shi, Zhengli

    2010-04-01

    Bats are the second largest group of mammals on earth and act as reservoirs of many emerging viruses. In this study, a novel bat adenovirus (AdV) (BtAdV-TJM) was isolated from bat fecal samples by using a bat primary kidney cell line. Infection studies indicated that most animal and human cell lines are susceptible to BtAdV-TJM, suggesting a possible wide host range. Genome analysis revealed 30 putative genes encoding proteins homologous to their counterparts in most known AdVs. Phylogenetic analysis placed BtAdV-TJM within the genus Mastadenovirus, most closely related to tree shrew and canine AdVs. PCR analysis of 350 bat fecal samples, collected from 19 species in five Chinese provinces during 2007 and 2008, indicated that 28 (or 8%) samples were positive for AdVs. The samples were from five bat species, Hipposideros armiger, Myotis horsfieldii, M. ricketti, Myotis spp., and Scotophilus kuhlii. The prevalence ranged from 6.25% (H. armiger in 2007) to 40% (M. ricketti in 2007). Comparison studies based on available partial sequences of the pol gene demonstrated a great genetic diversity among bat AdVs infecting different bat species as well as those infecting the same bat species. This is the first report of a genetically diverse group of DNA viruses in bats. Our results support the notion, derived from previous studies based on RNA viruses (especially coronaviruses and astroviruses), that bats seem to have the unusual ability to harbor a large number of genetically diverse viruses within a geographic location and/or within a taxonomic group. PMID:20089640

  5. Allele- and Tir-Independent Functions of Intimin in Diverse Animal Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Emily M.; Brady, Michael J.; Luperchio, Steven A.; Vanguri, Vijay K.; Magoun, Loranne; Liu, Hui; Sheppard, Barbara J.; Mukherjee, Jean; Donohue-Rolfe, Art; Tzipori, Saul; Leong, John M.; Schauer, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Upon binding to intestinal epithelial cells, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and Citrobacter rodentium trigger formation of actin pedestals beneath bound bacteria. Pedestal formation has been associated with enhanced colonization, and requires intimin, an adhesin that binds to the bacterial effector translocated intimin receptor (Tir), which is translocated to the host cell membrane and promotes bacterial adherence and pedestal formation. Intimin has been suggested to also promote cell adhesion by binding one or more host receptors, and allelic differences in intimin have been associated with differences in tissue and host specificity. We assessed the function of EHEC, EPEC, or C. rodentium intimin, or a set of intimin derivatives with varying Tir-binding abilities in animal models of infection. We found that EPEC and EHEC intimin were functionally indistinguishable during infection of gnotobiotic piglets by EHEC, and that EPEC, EHEC, and C. rodentium intimin were functionally indistinguishable during infection of C57BL/6 mice by C. rodentium. A derivative of EHEC intimin that bound Tir but did not promote robust pedestal formation on cultured cells was unable to promote C. rodentium colonization of conventional mice, indicating that the ability to trigger actin assembly, not simply to bind Tir, is required for intimin-mediated intestinal colonization. Interestingly, streptomycin pre-treatment of mice eliminated the requirement for Tir but not intimin during colonization, and intimin derivatives that were defective in Tir-binding still promoted colonization of these mice. These results indicate that EPEC, EHEC, and C. rodentium intimin are functionally interchangeable during infection of gnotobiotic piglets or conventional C57BL/6 mice, and that whereas the ability to trigger Tir-mediated pedestal formation is essential for colonization of conventional mice, intimin provides a Tir-independent activity during colonization

  6. Compensatory Aspects of Allele Diversity at Immunoglobulin Loci: Gene Correlations in Rabbit Populations Devoid of Light Chain Diversity (Oryctolagus Cuniculus L.; Kerguelen Islands)

    PubMed Central

    van-der-Loo, W.; Bousses, P.; Arthur, C. P.; Chapuis, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    Is there a selective advantage of increased diversity at one immunoglobulin locus when diversity at another locus is low? A previous paper demonstrated excess heterozygosity at the rabbit light chain b locus when heterozygosity was low at the heavy chain constant region e locus. Here we consider the reverse situation by analyzing allele distributions at heavy chain loci in populations fixed for the light chain b locus. We analyzed the a locus that encodes the predominantly expressed heavy chain variable region, and the d and e loci that control different parts of the Ig gamma class constant region. While there was excess heterozygosity, genetic differentiation between localities was extensive and was most pronounced for females. This was in marked contrast with observations in areas where b-locus diversity was important and confirms a negative correlation between e- and b-locus heterozygosity. Trigenic disequilibria corresponded to a significant negative correlation between e- and a-locus heterozygosity due mainly to strong variation among localities within the context of pronounced (digenic) linkage disequilibria. Although substantial, the average increase in a/e-locus single heterozygosity implemented by higher order disequilibria within localities was not significant. PMID:8913759

  7. Copy number variation and genetic diversity of MHC Class IIb alleles in an alien population of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Mable, Barbara K; Kilbride, Elizabeth; Viney, Mark E; Tinsley, Richard C

    2015-10-01

    Xenopus laevis (the African clawed frog), which originated through hybridisation and whole genome duplication, has been used as a model for genetics and development for many years, but surprisingly little is known about immune gene variation in natural populations. The purpose of this study was to use an isolated population of X. laevis that was introduced to Wales, UK in the past 50 years to investigate how variation at the MHC compares to that at other loci, following a severe population bottleneck. Among 18 individuals, we found nine alleles based on exon 2 sequences of the Class IIb region (which includes the peptide binding region). Individuals carried from one to three of the loci identified from previous laboratory studies. Genetic variation was an order of magnitude higher at the MHC compared with three single-copy nuclear genes, but all loci showed high levels of heterozygosity and nucleotide diversity and there was not an excess of homozygosity or decrease in diversity over time that would suggest extensive inbreeding in the introduced population. Tajima's D was positive for all loci, which is consistent with a bottleneck. Moreover, comparison with published sequences identified the source of the introduced population as the Western Cape region of South Africa, where most commercial suppliers have obtained their stocks. These factors suggest that despite founding by potentially already inbred individuals, the alien population in Wales has maintained substantial genetic variation at both adaptively important and neutral genes. PMID:26329765

  8. Allelic and haplotypic diversity at the rp1 rust resistance locus of maize.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Shavannor M; Pryor, Anthony J; Hulbert, Scot H

    2004-01-01

    The maize Rp1 rust resistance locus is a complex consisting of a family of closely related resistance genes. The number of Rp1 paralogs in different maize lines (haplotypes) varied from a single gene in some stocks of the inbred A188 to >50 genes in haplotypes carrying the Rp1-A and Rp1-H specificities. The sequences of paralogs in unrelated haplotypes differ, indicating that the genetic diversity of Rp1-related genes is extremely broad in maize. Two unrelated haplotypes with five or nine paralogs had identical resistance phenotypes (Rp1-D) encoded in genes that differed by three nucleotides resulting in a single amino acid substitution. Genes in some haplotypes are more similar to each other than to any of the genes in other haplotypes indicating that they are evolving in a concerted fashion. PMID:15342531

  9. Allelic Diversity of the Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 Entails Variant-Specific Red Cell Surface Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Vigan-Womas, Inès; Guillotte, Micheline; Juillerat, Alexandre; Vallieres, Cindy; Lewit-Bentley, Anita; Tall, Adama; Baril, Laurence; Bentley, Graham A.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2011-01-01

    The clonally variant Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 adhesin is a virulence factor and a prime target of humoral immunity. It is encoded by a repertoire of functionally differentiated var genes, which display architectural diversity and allelic polymorphism. Their serological relationship is key to understanding the evolutionary constraints on this gene family and rational vaccine design. Here, we investigated the Palo Alto/VarO and IT4/R29 and 3D7/PF13_003 parasites lines. VarO and R29 form rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes, a phenotype associated with severe malaria. They express an allelic Cys2/group A NTS-DBL1α1 PfEMP1 domain implicated in rosetting, whose 3D7 ortholog is encoded by PF13_0003. Using these three recombinant NTS-DBL1α1 domains, we elicited antibodies in mice that were used to develop monovariant cultures by panning selection. The 3D7/PF13_0003 parasites formed rosettes, revealing a correlation between sequence identity and virulence phenotype. The antibodies cross-reacted with the allelic domains in ELISA but only minimally with the Cys4/group B/C PFL1955w NTS-DBL1α. By contrast, they were variant-specific in surface seroreactivity of the monovariant-infected red cells by FACS analysis and in rosette-disruption assays. Thus, while ELISA can differentiate serogroups, surface reactivity assays define the more restrictive serotypes. Irrespective of cumulated exposure to infection, antibodies acquired by humans living in a malaria-endemic area also displayed a variant-specific surface reactivity. Although seroprevalence exceeded 90% for each rosetting line, the kinetics of acquistion of surface-reactive antibodies differed in the younger age groups. These data indicate that humans acquire an antibody repertoire to non-overlapping serotypes within a serogroup, consistent with an antibody-driven diversification pressure at the population level. In addition, the data provide important information for vaccine design, as production of a vaccine

  10. Genetic differentiation and reduced genetic diversity at the northern range edge of two species with different dispersal modes.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Abigail E; Levinton, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Theory predicts that genetic variation should be reduced at range margins, but empirical support is equivocal. Here, we used genotyping-by-sequencing technology to investigate genetic variation in central and marginal populations of two species in the marine gastropod genus Crepidula. These two species have different development and dispersal types and might therefore show different spatial patterns of genetic variation. Both allelic richness and the proportion of private alleles were highest in the most central populations of both species, and lower at the margin. The species with low dispersal, Crepidula convexa, showed high degrees of structure throughout the range that conform to the pattern found in previous studies using other molecular markers. The northernmost populations of the high-dispersing species, Crepidula fornicata, are distinct from more central populations, although this species has been previously observed to have little genetic structure over much of its range. Although genetic diversity was significantly lower at the range margin, the absolute reduction in diversity observed with these genomewide markers was slight, and it is not yet known whether there are functional consequences for the marginal populations. PMID:26615052

  11. Genome-wide high-throughput SNP discovery and genotyping for understanding natural (functional) allelic diversity and domestication patterns in wild chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Deepak; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Mohar; Bansal, Kailash C.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    We identified 82489 high-quality genome-wide SNPs from 93 wild and cultivated Cicer accessions through integrated reference genome- and de novo-based GBS assays. High intra- and inter-specific polymorphic potential (66–85%) and broader natural allelic diversity (6–64%) detected by genome-wide SNPs among accessions signify their efficacy for monitoring introgression and transferring target trait-regulating genomic (gene) regions/allelic variants from wild to cultivated Cicer gene pools for genetic improvement. The population-specific assignment of wild Cicer accessions pertaining to the primary gene pool are more influenced by geographical origin/phenotypic characteristics than species/gene-pools of origination. The functional significance of allelic variants (non-synonymous and regulatory SNPs) scanned from transcription factors and stress-responsive genes in differentiating wild accessions (with potential known sources of yield-contributing and stress tolerance traits) from cultivated desi and kabuli accessions, fine-mapping/map-based cloning of QTLs and determination of LD patterns across wild and cultivated gene-pools are suitably elucidated. The correlation between phenotypic (agromorphological traits) and molecular diversity-based admixed domestication patterns within six structured populations of wild and cultivated accessions via genome-wide SNPs was apparent. This suggests utility of whole genome SNPs as a potential resource for identifying naturally selected trait-regulating genomic targets/functional allelic variants adaptive to diverse agroclimatic regions for genetic enhancement of cultivated gene-pools. PMID:26208313

  12. MAIZE ALLELIC DIVERSITY PROJECT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Of the estimated 250-300 races of maize, only 24 races are represented in materials utilized by the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) project, a collaborative effort between USDA-ARS and public and private sector research scientists. This is largely a result of poor performance of many races in ...

  13. Genetic Adaptation to Climate in White Spruce Involves Small to Moderate Allele Frequency Shifts in Functionally Diverse Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hornoy, Benjamin; Pavy, Nathalie; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to climate is of paramount importance for preserving and managing genetic diversity in plants in a context of climate change. Yet, this objective has been addressed mainly in short-lived model species. Thus, expanding knowledge to nonmodel species with contrasting life histories, such as forest trees, appears necessary. To uncover the genetic basis of adaptation to climate in the widely distributed boreal conifer white spruce (Picea glauca), an environmental association study was conducted using 11,085 single nucleotide polymorphisms representing 7,819 genes, that is, approximately a quarter of the transcriptome. Linear and quadratic regressions controlling for isolation-by-distance, and the Random Forest algorithm, identified several dozen genes putatively under selection, among which 43 showed strongest signals along temperature and precipitation gradients. Most of them were related to temperature. Small to moderate shifts in allele frequencies were observed. Genes involved encompassed a wide variety of functions and processes, some of them being likely important for plant survival under biotic and abiotic environmental stresses according to expression data. Literature mining and sequence comparison also highlighted conserved sequences and functions with angiosperm homologs. Our results are consistent with theoretical predictions that local adaptation involves genes with small frequency shifts when selection is recent and gene flow among populations is high. Accordingly, genetic adaptation to climate in P. glauca appears to be complex, involving many independent and interacting gene functions, biochemical pathways, and processes. From an applied perspective, these results shall lead to specific functional/association studies in conifers and to the development of markers useful for the conservation of genetic resources. PMID:26560341

  14. Status of allele frequency and diversity of Plasmodium falciparum msp1, msp2 and glurp before implementation of an artemisinin-based combined therapy in Northwestern Colombia.

    PubMed Central

    Arango, Eliana; Carmona-Fonseca, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The status of msp1, msp2 and glurp allele frequency and the diversity of Plasmodium falciparum in Northwestern Colombia before the implementation of an artemisinin-combined therapy have been explored only by a few authors and in a relatively small number of samples from this highly endemic region. Objective: To evaluate the frequency of msp1, msp2, and glurp alleles and the diversity of P. falciparum in two Colombian regions before the use of an artemisinin-combined therapy. Methods: This study was part of a major anti-malarial efficacy trial designed as a random, clinically-controlled study for which 224 subjects were recruited. Region 2 of msp1 and msp2 (central region) were amplified by a nested PCR; glurp (region R2) was amplified by a semi-nested PCR. Results: For msp1, five genotypes were observed, representing the K1, MAD20, and RO33 allelic families. All samples corresponded to a MAD20 150 bp allele. For msp2 (IC family), two alleles were detected and for glurp, eight were observed. A total 33 haplotypes were detected. Conclusions: Analysis of glurpcan be used to successfully genotype parasite populations in the new studies in Colombia aimed at exploring Plasmodium spp population dynamics. In addition, analysis of msp1 and msp2 can also be of value for comparisons with past studies, but not when the objective is to study parasites obtained from the same patient in a reduced period of time; for instance, during treatment efficacy studies. PMID:24892236

  15. Geographical Structuring of Genetic Diversity Across the Whole Distribution Range of Narcissus longispathus, a Habitat-specialist, Mediterranean Narrow Endemic

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, Mónica; Herrera, Carlos M.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims High mountain ranges of the Mediterranean Basin harbour a large number of narrowly endemic plants. In this study an investigation is made of the levels and partitioning of genetic diversity in Narcissus longispathus, a narrow endemic of south-eastern Spanish mountains characterized by a naturally fragmented distribution due to extreme specialization on a rare habitat type. By using dense sampling of populations across the species' whole geographical range, genetic structuring at different geographical scales is also examined. Methods Using horizontal starch-gel electrophoresis, allozyme variability was screened at 19 loci for a total of 858 individuals from 27 populations. The data were analysed by means of standard statistical approaches in order to estimate gene diversity and the genetic structure of the populations. Key Results Narcissus longispathus displayed high levels of genetic diversity and extensive diversification among populations. At the species level, the percentage of polymorphic loci was 68 %, with average values of 2·1, 0·11 and 0·14 for the number of alleles per locus, observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity, respectively. Southern and more isolated populations tended to have less genetic variability than northern and less-isolated populations. A strong spatial patterning of genetic diversity was found at the various spatial scales. Gene flow/drift equilibrium occurred over distances <4 km. Beyond that distance divergence was relatively more influenced by drift. The populations studied seem to derive from three panmictic units or ‘gene pools’, with levels of admixture being greatest in the central and south-eastern portions of the species' range. Conclusions In addition to documenting a case of high genetic diversity in a narrow endemic plant with naturally fragmented populations, the results emphasize the need for dense population sampling and examination of different geographical scales for understanding

  16. High genetic diversity and distribution of Bubu-DQA alleles in swamp buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis carabanesis): identification of new Bubu-DQA loci and haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, S K; Niranjan, S K; Banerjee, B; Dubey, P K; Gonge, D S; Mishra, B P; Kataria, R S

    2016-07-01

    In this study, genetic diversity analysis of MHC class II-DQA locus helped in identification of 25 new Bubu-DQA nucleotide sequences in swamp buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis carabanesis, Bubu). Phylogenetic analysis revealed the distribution of the buffalo DQA sequences in two major clusters of DQA1 and DQA2 genes, sharing common lineages with corresponding cattle alleles, possibly due to trans-species evolution. However, a highly divergent sequence, Bubu-DQA*2501, homologous to cattle (BoLA) DQA3 allele, was identified, indicating the existence of an additional locus; putative DQA3 in buffalo. PCR-RFLP analysis revealed extensive duplication of DQA locus in swamp buffaloes, sharing DQA1, DQA2, and DQA3 alleles in different combinations in duplicated haplotypes. Higher dN than dS values and Wu-Kabat variability at peptide-binding regions in Bubu-DQA indicated high polymorphism with balancing selection. Levels of genetic diversity within DQA sequences and duplication in a small population of swamp buffalo indicate the genetic richness of the species, important for fitness. PMID:27177904

  17. Haplotype diversity of 13 RM Y-STRs in Chinese Han population and an update on the allele designation of DYF403S1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqiong; Xiao, Chao; Wei, Tian; Pan, Chao; Yi, Shaohua; Huang, Daixin

    2016-07-01

    Rapidly mutating Y-STRs (RM Y-STRs) have been paid much attention in recent years. The 13 RM Y-STRs have been proved to have substantially higher haplotype diversity and discrimination capacity than conventionally used Y-STRs, indicating the considerable power in paternal lineage differentiation. To investigate the haplotype diversity in Chinese Han population, we collected 252 unrelated male samples and tested the genotype of the 13 RM Y-STRs. Among 252 male individuals, a total of 250 haplotypes were observed in which only 2 haplotypes were shared by 2 males respectively. The haplotype diversity reached 0.999937 and the discrimination capacity was 99.21%, showing a great discrimination power in Chinese Han population. In addition, an update on the allele designation of DYF403S1 was proposed. PMID:27217255

  18. Cytochrome P450 2C8*2 allele in Botswana: Human genetic diversity and public health implications.

    PubMed

    Motshoge, Thato; Tawe, Leabaneng; Muthoga, Charles Waithaka; Allotey, Joel; Romano, Rita; Quaye, Isaac; Paganotti, Giacomo Maria

    2016-05-01

    Human cytochrome P450 2C8 is a highly polymorphic gene and shows variation according to ethnicity. The CYP2C8*2 is a slow drug metabolism allele and shows 10-24% frequency in Black populations. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of CYP2C8*2 allele in Botswana among the San (or Bushmen) and the Bantu ethnic groups. For that purpose we recruited 544 children of the two ethnicities in three districts of Botswana from primary schools, collected blood samples, extracted DNA and genotyped them through PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The results demonstrated that in the San the prevalence of the CYP2C8*2 allele is significantly higher than among the Bantu-related ethnic groups (17.5% and 8.5% for San and Bantu, respectively; P=0.00002). These findings support the evidence of a different genetic background of the San with respect to Bantu-related populations, and highlight a possible higher risk of longer drug clearance or poor level of activation of pro-drugs among the San group. PMID:26836270

  19. Several different lactase persistence associated alleles and high diversity of the lactase gene in the admixed Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Santos, Sidney E B; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea K C; Hutz, Mara H

    2012-01-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a common phenotype caused by the lactase enzyme deficiency. The -13910 C>T polymorphism, located 14 Kb upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) in the MCM6 gene was associated with lactase persistence (LP) in Europeans. This polymorphism is rare in Africa but several other variants associated with lactase persistence were observed in Africans. The aims of this study were to identify polymorphisms in the MCM6 region associated with the lactase persistence phenotype and to determine the distribution of LCT gene haplotypes in 981 individuals from North, Northeast and South Brazil. These polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR based methods and sequencing. The -13779*C,-13910*T, -13937*A, -14010*C, -14011*T LP alleles previously described in the MCM6 gene region that acts as an enhancer for the LCT gene were identified in Brazilians. The most common LP allele was -13910*T. Its frequency was highly correlated with European ancestry in the Brazilian populations investigated. The -13910*T was higher (0.295) in southern Brazilians of European ancestry and lower (0.175) in the Northern admixed population. LCT haplotypes were derived from the 10 LCT SNPs genotyped. Overall twenty six haplotypes previously described were identified in the four Brazilian populations studied. The Multidimensional Scaling analysis showed that Belém, in the north, was closer to Amerindians. Northeastern and southern Afro-descendants were more related with Bantu-speaking South Africans whereas the Southern population with European ancestry grouped with Southern and Northern Europeans. This study shows a high variability considering the number of LCT haplotypes observed. Due to the highly admixed nature of the Brazilian populations, the diagnosis of hypolactasia in Brazil, based only in the investigation of the -13910*T allele is an oversimplification. PMID:23029545

  20. Historical data refute recent range contraction as cause of low genetic diversity in isolated frog populations.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Eric A; Blouin, Michael S

    2004-02-01

    This study tested whether low genetic diversity in remnant populations of a declining amphibian is best explained by recent bottlenecks or by a history of being peripheral. We compared diversity from eight microsatellite loci in historical and extant populations from the interior and former periphery of the species' range. We found that historic peripheral populations already had reduced levels of genetic variation before the range contraction. Therefore, low diversity in remnants could not be ascribed to recent range contractions. This study shows that a common conservation strategy for rescuing genetically depauperate populations, artificial gene flow, may often be unwarranted and detrimental to evolutionarily important peripheral populations. PMID:14717886

  1. The induction of nitric oxide response of carp macrophages by transferrin is influenced by the allelic diversity of the molecule.

    PubMed

    Jurecka, Patrycja; Irnazarow, Ilgiz; Stafford, James L; Ruszczyk, Aleksandra; Taverne, Nico; Belosevic, Miodrag; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Wiegertjes, Geert F

    2009-04-01

    The central role of transferrin (Tf) as an iron transporting protein has been extended by observations that modified versions of Tf also participate in the regulation of innate immunity. We report on the isolation of two carp Tf proteins (alleles D and G) to purity using rivanol precipitation and ion-exchange chromatography, and describe the activation of head kidney-derived carp macrophages by cleaved Tf. We demonstrate the superiority of the D-type over the G-type Tf in inducing nitric oxide (NO) and confirm previous observations that full-length Tf cannot induce NO in fish macrophages. We believe that cleaved Tf fragments should be considered to be "alarmins". We discuss the possibility that parasites such as Trypanoplasma borreli cleave Tf and use Tf fragments to their advantage by modulating the NO induction in carp macrophages. PMID:18996204

  2. Genome-wide assessment of worldwide chicken SNP genetic diversity indicates significant absence of rare alleles in commercial breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breed utilization, genetic improvement, and industry consolidation are predicted to have major impacts on the genetic composition of commercial chickens. Consequently, the question arises as to whether sufficient genetic diversity remains within industry stocks to address future needs. With the ch...

  3. Natural selection on marine carnivores elaborated a diverse family of classical MHC class I genes exhibiting haplotypic gene content variation and allelic polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Hammond, John A; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Norman, Paul J; Parham, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Pinnipeds, marine carnivores, diverged from terrestrial carnivores ~45 million years ago, before their adaptation to marine environments. This lifestyle change exposed pinnipeds to different microbiota and pathogens, with probable impact on their MHC class I genes. Investigating this question, genomic sequences were determined for 71 MHC class I variants: 27 from harbor seal and 44 from gray seal. These variants form three MHC class I gene lineages, one comprising a pseudogene. The second, a candidate nonclassical MHC class I gene, comprises a nonpolymorphic transcribed gene related to dog DLA-79 and giant panda Aime-1906. The third is the diversity lineage, which includes 62 of the 71 seal MHC class I variants. All are transcribed, and they minimally represent six harbor and 12 gray seal MHC class I genes. Besides species-specific differences in gene number, seal MHC class I haplotypes exhibit gene content variation and allelic polymorphism. Patterns of sequence variation, and of positions for positively selected sites, indicate the diversity lineage genes are the seals' classical MHC class I genes. Evidence that expansion of diversity lineage genes began before gray and harbor seals diverged is the presence in both species of two distinctive sublineages of diversity lineage genes. Pointing to further expansion following the divergence are the presence of species-specific genes and greater MHC class I diversity in gray seals than harbor seals. The elaboration of a complex variable family of classical MHC class I genes in pinnipeds contrasts with the single, highly polymorphic classical MHC class I gene of dog and giant panda, terrestrial carnivores. PMID:23001684

  4. Natural selection on marine carnivores elaborated a diverse family of classical MHC class I genes exhibiting haplotypic gene content variation and allelic polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Paul J.; Parham, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Pinnipeds, marine carnivores, diverged from terrestrial carnivores ~45 million years ago, before their adaptation to marine environments. This lifestyle change exposed pinnipeds to different microbiota and pathogens, with probable impact on their MHC class I genes. Investigating this question, genomic sequences were determined for 71 MHC class I variants: 27 from harbor seal and 44 from gray seal. These variants form three MHC class I gene lineages, one comprising a pseudogene. The second, a candidate nonclassical MHC class I gene, comprises a nonpolymorphic transcribed gene related to dog DLA-79 and giant panda Aime-1906. The third is the diversity lineage, which includes 62 of the 71 seal MHC class I variants. All are transcribed, and they minimally represent six harbor and 12 gray seal MHC class I genes. Besides species-specific differences in gene number, seal MHC class I haplotypes exhibit gene content variation and allelic polymorphism. Patterns of sequence variation, and of positions for positively selected sites, indicate the diversity lineage genes are the seals’ classical MHC class I genes. Evidence that expansion of diversity lineage genes began before gray and harbor seals diverged is the presence in both species of two distinctive sublineages of diversity lineage genes. Pointing to further expansion following the divergence are the presence of species-specific genes and greater MHC class I diversity in gray seals than harbor seals. The elaboration of a complex variable family of classical MHC class I genes in pinnipeds contrasts with the single, highly polymorphic classical MHC class I gene of dog and giant panda, terrestrial carnivores. PMID:23001684

  5. HLA-B allele and haplotype diversity among Thai patients identified by PCR-SSOP: evidence for high risk of drug-induced hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Puangpetch, Apichaya; Koomdee, Napatrupron; Chamnanphol, Montri; Jantararoungtong, Thawinee; Santon, Siwalee; Prommas, Santirhat; Hongkaew, Yaowaluck; Sukasem, Chonlaphat

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are 3 classes of HLA molecules; HLA class I, II and III, of which different classes have different functions. HLA-B gene which belongs to HLA class I play an important role predicting drug hypersensitivity. Materials and Methods: Nine hundred and eighty-six Thai subjects who registered at a pharmacogenomics laboratory were determined for HLA-B genotype using a two-stage sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe system (PCR-SSOP). Results: In this study, HLA-B alleles did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.05). The most common HLA-B alleles observed in this population were HLA-B*46:01 (11.51%), HLA-B*58:01 (8.62%), HLA-B*40:01 (8.22%), HLA-B*15:02 (8.16%) and HLA-B*13:01 (6.95%). This finding revealed that HLA-B allele frequency in the Thai population was consistent with the Chinese population (p > 0.05), however, differed from the Malaysian population (p < 0.05). The top five HLA-B genotypes were HLA-B*40:01/46:01 (2.13%), HLA-B*46:01/46:01 (2.03%), HLA-B*40:01/58:01 (2.03%), HLA-B*46:01/58:01 (1.93%) and HLA-B*15:02/46:01 (1.83%). This study found that 15.92% of Thai subjects carry HLA-B*15:02, which has been associated with carbamazepine-induced severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs). Moreover, 16.33% of Thai subjects carry the HLA-B*58:01 allele, which has been associated with allopurinol-induced SCARs. Conclusion: This study demonstrates a high diversity of HLA-B polymorphisms in this Thai population. The high frequency of HLA-B pharmacogenomic markers in the population emphasizes the importance of such screening to predict/avoid drug hypersensitivity. PMID:25657656

  6. Functionally Divergent Alleles and Duplicated Loci Encoding an Acyltransferase Contribute to Acylsugar Metabolite Diversity in Solanum Trichomes[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schilmiller, Anthony L.; Moghe, Gaurav D.; Fan, Pengxiang; Ghosh, Banibrata; Ning, Jing; Jones, A. Daniel; Last, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Glandular trichomes from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and other species in the Solanaceae produce and secrete a mixture of O-acylsugars (aliphatic esters of sucrose and glucose) that contribute to insect defense. Despite their phylogenetic distribution and diversity, relatively little is known about how these specialized metabolites are synthesized. Mass spectrometric profiling of acylsugars in the S. lycopersicum x Solanum pennellii introgression lines identified a chromosome 11 locus containing a cluster of BAHD acyltransferases with one gene (named Sl-ASAT3) expressed in tip cells of type I trichomes where acylsugars are made. Sl-ASAT3 was shown to encode an acyl-CoA-dependent acyltransferase that catalyzes the transfer of short (four to five carbons) branched acyl chains to the furanose ring of di-acylsucrose acceptors to produce tri-acylsucroses, which can be further acetylated by Sl-ASAT4 (previously Sl-AT2). Among the wild tomatoes, diversity in furanose ring acyl chains on acylsucroses was most striking in Solanum habrochaites. S. habrochaites accessions from Ecuador and northern Peru produced acylsucroses with short (≤C5) or no acyl chains on the furanose ring. Accessions from central and southern Peru had the ability to add short or long (up to C12) acyl chains to the furanose ring. Multiple ASAT3-like sequences were found in most accessions, and their in vitro activities correlated with observed geographical diversity in acylsugar profiles. PMID:25862303

  7. High and Distinct Range-Edge Genetic Diversity despite Local Bottlenecks

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Jorge; Castilho Coelho, Nelson; Alberto, Filipe; Valero, Myriam; Raimondi, Pete; Reed, Dan; Alvares Serrão, Ester

    2013-01-01

    The genetic consequences of living on the edge of distributional ranges have been the subject of a largely unresolved debate. Populations occurring along persistent low latitude ranges (rear-edge) are expected to retain high and unique genetic diversity. In contrast, currently less favourable environmental conditions limiting population size at such range-edges may have caused genetic erosion that prevails over past historical effects, with potential consequences on reducing future adaptive capacity. The present study provides an empirical test of whether population declines towards a peripheral range might be reflected on decreasing diversity and increasing population isolation and differentiation. We compare population genetic differentiation and diversity with trends in abundance along a latitudinal gradient towards the peripheral distribution range of Saccorhizapolyschides, a large brown seaweed that is the main structural species of kelp forests in SW Europe. Signatures of recent bottleneck events were also evaluated to determine whether the recently recorded distributional shifts had a negative influence on effective population size. Our findings show decreasing population density and increasing spatial fragmentation and local extinctions towards the southern edge. Genetic data revealed two well supported groups with a central contact zone. As predicted, higher differentiation and signs of bottlenecks were found at the southern edge region. However, a decrease in genetic diversity associated with this pattern was not verified. Surprisingly, genetic diversity increased towards the edge despite bottlenecks and much lower densities, suggesting that extinctions and recolonizations have not strongly reduced diversity or that diversity might have been even higher there in the past, a process of shifting genetic baselines. PMID:23967038

  8. High and distinct range-edge genetic diversity despite local bottlenecks.

    PubMed

    Assis, Jorge; Castilho Coelho, Nelson; Alberto, Filipe; Valero, Myriam; Raimondi, Pete; Reed, Dan; Serrão, Ester Alvares

    2013-01-01

    The genetic consequences of living on the edge of distributional ranges have been the subject of a largely unresolved debate. Populations occurring along persistent low latitude ranges (rear-edge) are expected to retain high and unique genetic diversity. In contrast, currently less favourable environmental conditions limiting population size at such range-edges may have caused genetic erosion that prevails over past historical effects, with potential consequences on reducing future adaptive capacity. The present study provides an empirical test of whether population declines towards a peripheral range might be reflected on decreasing diversity and increasing population isolation and differentiation. We compare population genetic differentiation and diversity with trends in abundance along a latitudinal gradient towards the peripheral distribution range of Saccorhiza polyschides, a large brown seaweed that is the main structural species of kelp forests in SW Europe. Signatures of recent bottleneck events were also evaluated to determine whether the recently recorded distributional shifts had a negative influence on effective population size. Our findings show decreasing population density and increasing spatial fragmentation and local extinctions towards the southern edge. Genetic data revealed two well supported groups with a central contact zone. As predicted, higher differentiation and signs of bottlenecks were found at the southern edge region. However, a decrease in genetic diversity associated with this pattern was not verified. Surprisingly, genetic diversity increased towards the edge despite bottlenecks and much lower densities, suggesting that extinctions and recolonizations have not strongly reduced diversity or that diversity might have been even higher there in the past, a process of shifting genetic baselines. PMID:23967038

  9. Ongoing Horizontal and Vertical Transmission of Virulence Genes and papA Alleles among Escherichia coli Blood Isolates from Patients with Diverse-Source Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.; O'Bryan, Timothy T.; Kuskowski, Michael; Maslow, Joel N.

    2001-01-01

    The phylogenetic distributions of multiple putative virulence factors (VFs) and papA (P fimbrial structural subunit) alleles among 182 Escherichia coli blood isolates from patients with diverse-source bacteremia were defined. Phylogenetic correspondence among these strains, the E. coli Reference (ECOR) collection, and other collections of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) was assessed. Although among the 182 bacteremia isolates phylogenetic group B2 predominated, exhibited the greatest concentration of individual VFs, and contained the largest number of familiar virulent clones, other phylogenetic groups exhibited greater concentrations of certain VFs than did group B2 and included several additional virulent clones. Certain of the newly detected VF genes, e.g., fyuA (yersiniabactin; 76%) and focG (F1C fimbriae; 25%), were as prevalent or more prevalent than their more familiar traditional counterparts, e.g., iut (aerobactin; 57%) and sfaS (S fimbriae; 14%), thus possibly offering additional useful targets for preventive interventions. Considerable diversity of VF profiles was observed at every level within the phylogenetic tree, including even within individual lineages. This suggested that many different pathways can lead to extraintestinal virulence in E. coli and that the evolution of ExPEC, which involves extensive horizontal transmission of VFs and continuous remodeling of pathogenicity-associated islands, is a highly active, ongoing process. PMID:11500406

  10. Diversity of Bacillus cereus group strains is reflected in their broad range of pathogenicity and diverse ecological lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Ceuppens, Siele; Boon, Nico; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2013-06-01

    Bacillus cereus comprises a highly versatile group of bacteria, which are of particular interest because of their capacity to cause disease. Emetic food poisoning is caused by the toxin cereulide produced during the growth of emetic B. cereus in food, while diarrhoeal food poisoning is the result of enterotoxin production by viable vegetative B. cereus cells in the small intestine, probably in the mucus layer and/or attached to the host's intestinal epithelium. The numbers of B. cereus causing disease are highly variable, depending on diverse factors linked to the host (age, diet, physiology and immunology), bacteria (cellular form, toxin genes and expression) and food (nutritional composition and meal characteristics). Bacillus cereus group strains show impressive ecological diversity, ranging from their saprophytic life cycle in soil to symbiotic (commensal and mutualistic) lifestyles near plant roots and in guts of insects and mammals to various pathogenic ones in diverse insect and mammalian hosts. During all these different ecological lifestyles, their toxins play important roles ranging from providing competitive advantages within microbial communities to inhibition of specific pathogenic organisms for their host and accomplishment of infections by damaging their host's tissues. PMID:23488744

  11. Natural Selection Constrains Neutral Diversity across A Wide Range of Species

    PubMed Central

    Corbett-Detig, Russell B.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Sackton, Timothy B.

    2015-01-01

    The neutral theory of molecular evolution predicts that the amount of neutral polymorphisms within a species will increase proportionally with the census population size (Nc). However, this prediction has not been borne out in practice: while the range of Nc spans many orders of magnitude, levels of genetic diversity within species fall in a comparatively narrow range. Although theoretical arguments have invoked the increased efficacy of natural selection in larger populations to explain this discrepancy, few direct empirical tests of this hypothesis have been conducted. In this work, we provide a direct test of this hypothesis using population genomic data from a wide range of taxonomically diverse species. To do this, we relied on the fact that the impact of natural selection on linked neutral diversity depends on the local recombinational environment. In regions of relatively low recombination, selected variants affect more neutral sites through linkage, and the resulting correlation between recombination and polymorphism allows a quantitative assessment of the magnitude of the impact of selection on linked neutral diversity. By comparing whole genome polymorphism data and genetic maps using a coalescent modeling framework, we estimate the degree to which natural selection reduces linked neutral diversity for 40 species of obligately sexual eukaryotes. We then show that the magnitude of the impact of natural selection is positively correlated with Nc, based on body size and species range as proxies for census population size. These results demonstrate that natural selection removes more variation at linked neutral sites in species with large Nc than those with small Nc and provides direct empirical evidence that natural selection constrains levels of neutral genetic diversity across many species. This implies that natural selection may provide an explanation for this longstanding paradox of population genetics. PMID:25859758

  12. Allelic Variation in the Perennial Ryegrass FLOWERING LOCUS T Gene Is Associated with Changes in Flowering Time across a Range of Populations1[W

    PubMed Central

    Skøt, Leif; Sanderson, Ruth; Thomas, Ann; Skøt, Kirsten; Thorogood, Danny; Latypova, Galina; Asp, Torben; Armstead, Ian

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene and its orthologs in other plant species (e.g. rice [Oryza sativa] OsFTL2/Hd3a) have an established role in the photoperiodic induction of flowering response. The genomic and phenotypic variations associated with the perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) ortholog of FT, designated LpFT3, was assessed in a diverse collection of nine European germplasm populations, which together constituted an association panel of 864 plants. Sequencing and genotyping of a series of amplicons derived from the nine populations, containing the complete exon and intron sequences as well as 5′ and 3′ noncoding sequences of LpFT3, identified a total of seven haplotypes. Genotyping assays designed to detect the genomic variation showed that three haplotypes were present in approximately equal proportions and represented 84% of the total, with a fourth representing a further 11%. Of the three major haplotypes, two were predicted to code for identical protein products and the third contained two amino acid substitutions. Association analysis using either a mixed model with a relationship matrix to correct for population structure and relatedness or structured association with further correction using genomic control indicated significant associations between LpFT3 and variation in flowering time. These associations were corroborated in a validation population segregating for the same major alleles. The most “diagnostic” region of genomic variation was situated 5′ of the coding sequence. Analysis of this region identified that the interhaplotype variation was closely associated with sequence motifs that were apparently conserved in the 5′ region of orthologs of LpFT3 from other plant species. These may represent cis-regulatory elements involved in influencing the expression of this gene. PMID:21115808

  13. An invasive non-native mammal population conserves genetic diversity lost from its native range.

    PubMed

    Veale, A J; Holland, O J; McDonald, R A; Clout, M N; Gleeson, D M

    2015-05-01

    Invasive, non-native species are one of the major causes of global biodiversity loss. Although they are, by definition, successful in their non-native range, their populations generally show major reductions in their genetic diversity during the demographic bottleneck they experience during colonization. By investigating the mitochondrial genetic diversity of an invasive non-native species, the stoat Mustela erminea, in New Zealand and comparing it to diversity in the species' native range in Great Britain, we reveal the opposite effect. We demonstrate that the New Zealand stoat population contains four mitochondrial haplotypes that have not been found in the native range. Stoats in Britain rely heavily on introduced rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus as their primary prey and were introduced to New Zealand in a misguided attempt at biological control of rabbits, which had also been introduced there. While invasive stoats have since decimated the New Zealand avifauna, native stoat populations were themselves decimated by the introduction to Britain of Myxoma virus as a control measure for rabbits. We highlight the irony that while introduced species (rabbits) and subsequent biocontrol (myxomatosis) have caused population crashes of native stoats, invasive stoats in New Zealand, which were also introduced for biological control, now contain more genetic haplotypes than their most likely native source. PMID:25655531

  14. The serodominant secreted effector protein of Salmonella, SseB, is a strong CD4 antigen containing an immunodominant epitope presented by diverse HLA class II alleles

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Catherine J; Jones, Claire; Blohmke, Christoph J; Darton, Thomas C; Goudet, Amelie; Sergeant, Ruhena; Maillere, Bernard; Pollard, Andrew J; Altmann, Daniel M; Boyton, Rosemary J

    2014-01-01

    Detailed characterization of the protective T-cell response in salmonellosis is a pressing unmet need in light of the global burden of human Salmonella infections and the likely contribution of CD4 T cells to immunity against this intracellular infection. In previous studies screening patient sera against antigen arrays, SseB was noteworthy as a serodominant target of adaptive immunity, inducing significantly raised antibody responses in HIV-seronegative compared with seropositive patients. SseB is a secreted protein, part of the Espa superfamily, localized to the bacterial surface and forming part of the translocon of the type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island 2. We demonstrate here that SseB is also a target of CD4 T-cell immunity, generating a substantial response after experimental infection in human volunteers, with around 0·1% of the peripheral repertoire responding to it. HLA-DR/peptide binding studies indicate that this protein encompasses a number of peptides with ability to bind to several different HLA-DR alleles. Of these, peptide 11 (p11) was shown in priming of both HLA-DR1 and HLA-DR4 transgenic mice to contain an immunodominant CD4 epitope. Analysis of responses in human donors showed immunity focused on p11 and another epitope in peptide 2. The high frequency of SseB-reactive CD4 T cells and the broad applicability to diverse HLA genotypes coupled with previous observations of serodominance and protective vaccination in mouse challenge experiments, make SseB a plausible candidate for next-generation Salmonella vaccines. PMID:24891088

  15. Cultivable bacterial diversity along the altitudinal zonation and vegetation range of tropical Eastern Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Lyngwi, Nathaniel A; Koijam, Khedarani; Sharma, D; Joshi, S R

    2013-03-01

    The Northeastern part of India sprawls over an area of 262 379km2 in the Eastern Himalayan range. This constitutes a biodiversity hotspot with high levels of biodiversity and endemism; unfortunately, is also a poorly known area, especially on its microbial diversity. In this study, we assessed cultivable soil bacterial diversity and distribution from lowlands to highlands (34 to 3 990m.a.s.l.). Soil physico-chemical parameters and forest types across the different altitudes were characterized and correlated with bacterial distribution and diversity. Microbes from the soil samples were grown in Nutrient, Muller Hinton and Luria-Bertani agar plates and were initially characterized using biochemical methods. Parameters like dehydrogenase and urease activities, temperature, moisture content, pH, carbon content, bulk density of the sampled soil were measured for each site. Representative isolates were also subjected to 16S rDNA sequence analysis. A total of 155 cultivable bacterial isolates were characterized which were analyzed for richness, evenness and diversity indices. The tropical and sub-tropical forests supported higher bacterial diversity compared to temperate pine, temperate conifer, and sub-alpine rhododendron forests. The 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis revealed that Firmicutes was the most common group followed by Proteobacreria and Bacteroidetes. Species belonging to the genera Bacillus and Pseudomonas were the most abundant. Bacterial CFU showed positive but insignificant correlation with soil parameters like pH (r=0.208), soil temperature (r=0.303), ambient temperature (r=0.443), soil carbon content (r=0.525), soil bulk density (r=0.268), soil urease (r=0.549) and soil dehydrogenase (r=0.492). Altitude (r=-0.561) and soil moisture content (r=-0.051) showed negative correlation. Altitudinal gradient along with the vegetation and soil physico-chemical parameters were found to influence bacterial diversity and distribution. This study points out that this is

  16. Bryophyte diversity and range size distribution along two altitudinal gradients: Continent vs. island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ah-Peng, Claudine; Wilding, Nicholas; Kluge, Juergen; Descamps-Julien, Blandine; Bardat, Jacques; Chuah-Petiot, Min; Strasberg, Dominique; Hedderson, Terry A. J.

    2012-07-01

    We compare patterns of bryophyte diversity and variation in species altitudinal ranges between a continental and an island altitudinal gradient. We use our ecological data set along the highest summit (Piton des Neiges, 3069 m) of Réunion Island (Mascarene archipelago) and compare it to available published data of another high volcanic massif in Colombia (Nevado del Ruiz, 5321 m). The distribution of narrow-ranged and large-ranged species was investigated. We tested the effect of geometric constraints on species distribution along the two gradients by comparing empirical to predicted data using the Mid-Domain Null Programme (McCain, 2004). Species richness was comparable between the island and continental gradient for epiphytic bryophytes, 265 and 295 species respectively. The comparison between the two tropical high mountains demonstrates important differences in the distribution of range sizes with altitude and a dominance of species with small range sizes on the Réunion gradient. For the island gradient, mean altitudinal range increases with altitude whilst concurrently species richness decreases revealing a Rapoport effect in altitudinal distribution of bryophyte communities. Geometric constraints did not explain much of the species richness pattern for the island. Conversely, for the continental gradient, dominated by large-ranged species, geometric constraints could not be ruled out as a primary structuring feature for the species richness pattern. This study also highlights that the island's cloud forest hosts not only high species richness but also high number of rare species, which is of prime interest for conservation planners.

  17. Maritime climate influence on chaparral composition and diversity in the coast range of central California

    PubMed Central

    Vasey, Michael C; Parker, V Thomas; Holl, Karen D; Loik, Michael E; Hiatt, Seth

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that maritime climatic factors associated with summer fog and low cloud stratus (summer marine layer) help explain the compositional diversity of chaparral in the coast range of central California. We randomly sampled chaparral species composition in 0.1-hectare plots along a coast-to-interior gradient. For each plot, climatic variables were estimated and soil samples were analyzed. We used Cluster Analysis and Principle Components Analysis to objectively categorize plots into climate zone groups. Climate variables, vegetation composition and various diversity measures were compared across climate zone groups using ANOVA and nonmetric multidimensional scaling. Differences in climatic variables that relate to summer moisture availability and winter freeze events explained the majority of variance in measured conditions and coincided with three chaparral assemblages: maritime (lowland coast where the summer marine layer was strongest), transition (upland coast with mild summer marine layer influence and greater winter precipitation), and interior sites that generally lacked late summer water availability from either source. Species turnover (β-diversity) was higher among maritime and transition sites than interior sites. Coastal chaparral differs from interior chaparral in having a higher obligate seeder to facultative seeder (resprouter) ratio and by being dominated by various Arctostaphylos species as opposed to the interior dominant, Adenostoma fasciculatum. The maritime climate influence along the California central coast is associated with patterns of woody plant composition and β-diversity among sites. Summer fog in coastal lowlands and higher winter precipitation in coastal uplands combine to lower late dry season water deficit in coastal chaparral and contribute to longer fire return intervals that are associated with obligate seeders and more local endemism. Soil nutrients are comparatively less important in explaining plant

  18. Entomofaunal diversity of tree hole mosquitoes in Western and Eastern Ghats hill ranges of Tamilnadu, India.

    PubMed

    Senthamarai Selvan, P; Jebanesan, A; Reetha, D

    2016-07-01

    The distribution and abundance of various mosquito vectors is important in the determination of disease prevalence in disease endemic areas. The aim of the present study was to conduct regular entomological surveillance and to determine the relative abundance of tree hole mosquito species in Tamilnadu, India. In addition to this, the impact of weather-conditions on tree hole mosquito population were evaluated between June, 2014 and May, 2015. Six hills ranges viz., Anaimalai hills, Kodaikanal hills, Sitheri hills, Kolli hills, Yercaud hills, and Megamalai were selected, the immatures collected from tree holes by the help of suction tube. Collections were made at dusk and dawn at randomly selected 15 different tree species. The collected samples were stored and morphologically identified to species level in the laboratory. Mosquito diversity was calculated by Simpson's and Shannon-Weiner diversity indicies with spatial and temporal aspects. Over 2642 mosquitoes comprising the primary vectors of dengue, chickungunya, malaria, filariasis were identified. Other species collected from the fifteen sites in each hill during the study included Christophersiomyia annularis, Christophersiomyia thomsoni, Downsiomyia albolateralis, Downsiomyia nivea and Toxorhynchites splendens, etc. Study revealed high species diversity and relative density associated with different study sites. Based on the Shannon diversity index high number of species was recorded with Aedes pseudoalbopicta (0.0829) followed by Ae. aegypti (0.0805) and least species was recorded as Anopheles elegans (0.0059). The distribution of the primary vectors of DF along the high occurrence was evident with most study sites representing proportions of this vector population. This showed the high risk level associated with the livestock movement in amplification and circulation of the virus during the outbreaks. The findings of this study, therefore, demonstrated the potential vulnerability of nomadic communities to

  19. Maritime climate influence on chaparral composition and diversity in the coast range of central California.

    PubMed

    Vasey, Michael C; Parker, V Thomas; Holl, Karen D; Loik, Michael E; Hiatt, Seth

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that maritime climatic factors associated with summer fog and low cloud stratus (summer marine layer) help explain the compositional diversity of chaparral in the coast range of central California. We randomly sampled chaparral species composition in 0.1-hectare plots along a coast-to-interior gradient. For each plot, climatic variables were estimated and soil samples were analyzed. We used Cluster Analysis and Principle Components Analysis to objectively categorize plots into climate zone groups. Climate variables, vegetation composition and various diversity measures were compared across climate zone groups using ANOVA and nonmetric multidimensional scaling. Differences in climatic variables that relate to summer moisture availability and winter freeze events explained the majority of variance in measured conditions and coincided with three chaparral assemblages: maritime (lowland coast where the summer marine layer was strongest), transition (upland coast with mild summer marine layer influence and greater winter precipitation), and interior sites that generally lacked late summer water availability from either source. Species turnover (β-diversity) was higher among maritime and transition sites than interior sites. Coastal chaparral differs from interior chaparral in having a higher obligate seeder to facultative seeder (resprouter) ratio and by being dominated by various Arctostaphylos species as opposed to the interior dominant, Adenostoma fasciculatum. The maritime climate influence along the California central coast is associated with patterns of woody plant composition and β-diversity among sites. Summer fog in coastal lowlands and higher winter precipitation in coastal uplands combine to lower late dry season water deficit in coastal chaparral and contribute to longer fire return intervals that are associated with obligate seeders and more local endemism. Soil nutrients are comparatively less important in explaining plant

  20. Assessment of Immune Interference, Antagonism and Diversion following Human Immunization with Bi-Allelic Blood-Stage Malaria Viral Vectored Vaccines and Controlled Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Sean C.; Collins, Katharine A.; Halstead, Fenella D.; Choudhary, Prateek; Bliss, Carly M.; Ewer, Katie J.; Sheehy, Susanne H.; Duncan, Christopher J. A.; Biswas, Sumi; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    Overcoming antigenic variation is one of the major challenges in the development of an effective vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of human malaria. Inclusion of multiple antigen variants in subunit vaccine candidates is one strategy that has aimed to overcome this problem for the leading blood-stage malaria vaccine targets, merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) and apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1). However previous studies, utilizing malaria antigens, have concluded that inclusion of multiple allelic variants, encoding altered peptide ligands (APL), in such a vaccine may be detrimental to both the priming and in vivo re-stimulation of antigen-experienced T cells. Here we analyze the T cell responses to two alleles of MSP1 and AMA1 induced by vaccination of malaria-naïve adult volunteers with bi-valent viral vectored vaccine candidates. We show a significant bias to the 3D7/MAD20 allele compared to the Wellcome allele for the 33kDa region of MSP1, but not for the 19kDa fragment or the AMA1 antigen. Whilst this bias could be caused by ‘immune interference’ at priming, the data don’t support a significant role for ‘immune antagonism’ during memory T cell re-stimulation, despite observation of the latter at a minimal epitope level in vitro. A lack of class I HLA epitopes in the Wellcome allele that are recognized by vaccinated volunteers may in fact contribute to the observed bias. We also show that controlled infection with 3D7 strain P. falciparum parasites neither boosts existing 3D7-specific T cell responses nor appears to ‘immune divert’ cellular responses towards the Wellcome allele. PMID:23293353

  1. Metabolomic unveiling of a diverse range of green tea (Camellia sinensis) metabolites dependent on geography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang-Eun; Lee, Bum-Jin; Chung, Jin-Oh; Kim, Hak-Nam; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jung, Sungheuk; Lee, Hyosang; Lee, Sang-Jun; Hong, Young-Shick

    2015-05-01

    Numerous factors such as geographical origin, cultivar, climate, cultural practices, and manufacturing processes influence the chemical compositions of tea, in the same way as growing conditions and grape variety affect wine quality. However, the relationships between these factors and tea chemical compositions are not well understood. In this study, a new approach for non-targeted or global analysis, i.e., metabolomics, which is highly reproducible and statistically effective in analysing a diverse range of compounds, was used to better understand the metabolome of Camellia sinensis and determine the influence of environmental factors, including geography, climate, and cultural practices, on tea-making. We found a strong correlation between environmental factors and the metabolome of green, white, and oolong teas from China, Japan, and South Korea. In particular, multivariate statistical analysis revealed strong inter-country and inter-city relationships in the levels of theanine and catechin derivatives found in green and white teas. This information might be useful for assessing tea quality or producing distinct tea products across different locations, and highlights simultaneous identification of diverse tea metabolites through an NMR-based metabolomics approach. PMID:25529705

  2. A DNA Metabarcoding Study of a Primate Dietary Diversity and Plasticity across Its Entire Fragmented Range

    PubMed Central

    Quéméré, Erwan; Hibert, Fabrice; Miquel, Christian; Lhuillier, Emeline; Rasolondraibe, Emmanuel; Champeau, Julie; Rabarivola, Clément; Nusbaumer, Louis; Chatelain, Cyrille; Gautier, Laurent; Ranirison, Patrick; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Taberlet, Pierre; Chikhi, Lounès

    2013-01-01

    In tropical regions, most primary ecosystems have been replaced by mosaic landscapes in which species must cope with a large shift in the distribution of their habitat and associated food resources. Primates are particularly vulnerable to habitat modifications. Most species persist in small fragments surrounded by complex human-mediated matrices whose structure and connectivity may strongly influence their dispersal and feeding behavior. Behavioral plasticity appears to be a crucial parameter governing the ability of organisms to exploit the resources offered by new matrix habitats and thus to persist in fragmented habitats. In this study, we were interested in the dietary plasticity of the golden-crowned sifaka (Propithecus tattersalli), an endangered species of lemur, found only in the Daraina region in north-eastern Madagascar. We used a DNA-based approach combining the barcoding concept and Illumina next-generation sequencing to (i) describe the species diet across its entire range and (ii) evaluate the influence of landscape heterogeneity on diet diversity and composition. Faeces from 96 individuals were sampled across the entire species range and their contents were analyzed using the trnL metabarcoding approach. In parallel, we built a large DNA reference database based on a checklist of the plant species of the Daraina region. Our results suggest that golden-crowned sifakas exhibit remarkable dietary diversity with at least 130 plant species belonging to 80 genera and 49 different families. We highlighted an influence of both habitat type and openness on diet composition suggesting a high flexibility of foraging strategies. Moreover, we observed the presence of numerous cultivated and naturalized plants in the faeces of groups living in forest edge areas. Overall, our findings support our initial expectation that P. tattersalli is able to cope with the current level of alteration of the landscape and confirm our previous results on the distribution and the

  3. Effects of Glutenin Loci Allelic Diversity and Rye Translocations on Dough Properties Within U.S. Hard Winter Wheat Breeding Programs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Allelic variation at the Glu-1 and Glu-3 loci is known to contribute to end-use qualities in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The Glu-1 loci, which encodes high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS), and the Glu-3 loci, which encodes low molecular weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS), are polymorph...

  4. Increased species diversity and extended habitat range of sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira spp.

    PubMed Central

    Brinkhoff, T; Muyzer, G

    1997-01-01

    We combined traditional cultivation methods and new molecular techniques to study the diversity and habitat range of bacteria of the genus Thiomicrospira. Specific primers were designed and used in the PCR to amplify the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of Thiomicrospira spp. and thus detect the presence of these bacteria in environmental samples and enrichment cultures. By using this genus-specific PCR, we were able to amplify 722-bp-long 16S rDNA fragments from different saltwater habitats as well as from a freshwater ecosystem. Furthermore, we were able to isolate most of these bacteria in pure culture by using enrichment cultures for chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. With denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments followed by hybridization analysis with one of the primers as a genus-specific probe, it was possible to monitor the success of isolation. The combined approach resulted in the isolation of several chemolithoautotrophic bacteria from different habitats: e.g., a coastal sediment along the coast of Chile, a microbial mat of the hypersaline pond Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt), and the saline spring Artern (Thuringia, Germany). In addition, four different isolates were obtained from sediment and water samples taken at Jadebusen, which is part of the German Waddensea. Comparative analysis of the nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences of these isolates indicated several new species, all grouping with the Thiomicrospira species of the gamma subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. A freshwater Thiomicrospira species could not be isolated, but sequence analysis of the PCR product obtained after amplification of the environmental DNA with the Thiomicrospira-specific primers revealed its phylogenetic affiliation. The study indicates an increased species diversity of Thiomicrospira and the ubiquity of this sulfur-oxidizing bacterium in habitats with reduced sulfur compounds. PMID:9327542

  5. Genetic diversity and differentiation of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) population in western Sichuan, China, based on the second exon of the major histocompatibility complex class II DQB (MhcMamu-DQB1) alleles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstracts Background Rhesus macaques living in western Sichuan, China, have been separated into several isolated populations due to habitat fragmentation. Previous studies based on the neutral or nearly neutral markers (mitochondrial DNA or microsatellites) showed high levels of genetic diversity and moderate genetic differentiation in the Sichuan rhesus macaques. Variation at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci is widely accepted as being maintained by balancing selection, even with a low level of neutral variability in some species. However, in small and isolated or bottlenecked populations, balancing selection may be overwhelmed by genetic drift. To estimate microevolutionary forces acting on the isolated rhesus macaque populations, we examined genetic variation at Mhc-DQB1 loci in 119 wild rhesus macaques from five geographically isolated populations in western Sichuan, China, and compared the levels of MHC variation and differentiation among populations with that previously observed at neutral microsatellite markers. Results 23 Mamu-DQB1 alleles were identified in 119 rhesus macaques in western Sichuan, China. These macaques exhibited relatively high levels of genetic diversity at Mamu-DQB1. The Hanyuan population presented the highest genetic variation, whereas the Heishui population was the lowest. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and pairwise FST values showed moderate genetic differentiation occurring among the five populations at the Mhc-DQB1 locus. Non-synonymous substitutions occurred at a higher frequency than synonymous substitutions in the peptide binding region. Levels of MHC variation within rhesus macaque populations are concordant with microsatellite variation. On the phylogenetic tree for the rhesus and crab-eating macaques, extensive allele or allelic lineage sharing is observed betweenthe two species. Conclusions Phylogenetic analyses confirm the apparent trans-species model of evolution of the Mhc-DQB1 genes in these

  6. Mitochondrial DNA genetic diversity and LCT-13910 and deltaF508 CFTR alleles typing in the medieval sample from Poland.

    PubMed

    Płoszaj, T; Jerszyńska, B; Jędrychowska-Dańska, K; Lewandowska, M; Kubiak, D; Grzywnowicz, K; Masłowska, A; Witas, H W

    2015-06-01

    We attempted to confirm the resemblance of a local medieval population and to reconstruct their contribution to the formation of the modern Polish population at the DNA level. The HVR I mtDNA sequence and two nuclear alleles, LCT-13910C/T SNP and deltaF508 CFTR, were chosen as markers since the distribution of selected nuclear alleles varies among ethnic groups. A total of 47 specimens were selected from a medieval cemetery in Cedynia (located in the western Polish lowland). Regarding the HVR I profile, the analyzed population differed from the present-day population (P = 0.045, F(st) = 0.0103), in contrast to lactase persistence (LP) based on the LCT-13910T allele, thus indicating the lack of notable frequency changes of this allele during the last millennium (P = 0.141). The sequence of the HVR I mtDNA fragment allowed to identify six major haplogroups including H, U5, T, K, and HV0 within the medieval population of Cedynia which are common in today's central Europe. An analysis of haplogroup frequency and its comparison with modern European populations shows that the studied medieval population is more closely related to Finno-Ugric populations than to the present Polish population. Identification of less common haplogroups, i.e., Z and U2, both atypical of the modern Polish population and of Asian origin, provides evidence for some kind of connections between the studied and foreign populations. Furthermore, a comparison of the available aDNA sequences from medieval Europe suggests that populations differed from one another and a number of data from other locations are required to find out more about the features of the medieval gene pool profile. PMID:25896719

  7. High genetic diversity declines towards the geographic range periphery of Adonis vernalis, a Eurasian dry grassland plant.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, H; Wagner, V; Danihelka, J; Ruprecht, E; Sánchez-Gómez, P; Seifert, M; Hensen, I

    2015-11-01

    Genetic diversity is important for species' fitness and evolutionary processes but our knowledge on how it varies across a species' distribution range is limited. The abundant centre hypothesis (ACH) predicts that populations become smaller and more isolated towards the geographic range periphery - a pattern that in turn should be associated with decreasing genetic diversity and increasing genetic differentiation. We tested this hypothesis in Adonis vernalis, a dry grassland plant with an extensive Eurasian distribution. Its life-history traits and distribution characteristics suggest a low genetic diversity that decreases and a high genetic differentiation that increases towards the range edge. We analysed AFLP fingerprints in 28 populations along a 4698-km transect from the geographic range core in Russia to the western range periphery in Central and Western Europe. Contrary to our expectation, our analysis revealed high genetic diversity (range of proportion of polymorphic bands = 56-81%, He = 0.168-0.238) and low genetic differentiation across populations (Φ(ST) = 0.18). However, in congruence with the genetic predictions of the ACH, genetic diversity decreased and genetic differentiation increased towards the range periphery. Spanish populations were genetically distinct, suggesting a divergent post-glacial history in this region. The high genetic diversity and low genetic differentiation in the remaining A. vernalis populations is surprising given the species' life-history traits and points to the possibility that the species has been widely distributed in the studied region or that it has migrated from a diverse source in an East-West direction, in the past. PMID:26122089

  8. Cross-Scale Analysis of the Region Effect on Vascular Plant Species Diversity in Southern and Northern European Mountain Ranges

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Jonathan; Gégout, Jean-Claude; Guisan, Antoine; Vittoz, Pascal; Wohlgemuth, Thomas; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Dullinger, Stefan; Pauli, Harald; Willner, Wolfgang; Grytnes, John-Arvid; Virtanen, Risto; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2010-01-01

    Background The divergent glacial histories of southern and northern Europe affect present-day species diversity at coarse-grained scales in these two regions, but do these effects also penetrate to the more fine-grained scales of local communities? Methodology/Principal Findings We carried out a cross-scale analysis to address this question for vascular plants in two mountain regions, the Alps in southern Europe and the Scandes in northern Europe, using environmentally paired vegetation plots in the two regions (n = 403 in each region) to quantify four diversity components: (i) total number of species occurring in a region (total γ-diversity), (ii) number of species that could occur in a target plot after environmental filtering (habitat-specific γ-diversity), (iii) pair-wise species compositional turnover between plots (plot-to-plot β-diversity) and (iv) number of species present per plot (plot α-diversity). We found strong region effects on total γ-diversity, habitat-specific γ-diversity and plot-to-plot β-diversity, with a greater diversity in the Alps even towards distances smaller than 50 m between plots. In contrast, there was a slightly greater plot α-diversity in the Scandes, but with a tendency towards contrasting region effects on high and low soil-acidity plots. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that there are strong regional differences between coarse-grained (landscape- to regional-scale) diversity components of the flora in the Alps and the Scandes mountain ranges, but that these differences do not necessarily penetrate to the finest-grained (plot-scale) diversity component, at least not on acidic soils. Our findings are consistent with the contrasting regional Quaternary histories, but we also consider alternative explanatory models. Notably, ecological sorting and habitat connectivity may play a role in the unexpected limited or reversed region effect on plot α-diversity, and may also affect the larger-scale diversity components. For

  9. Range-wide distribution of genetic diversity in the North American tree Juglans cinerea: a product of range shifts, not ecological marginality or recent population decline.

    PubMed

    Hoban, Sean M; Borkowski, Daniel S; Brosi, Sunshine L; McCleary, Tim S; Thompson, Laura M; McLachlan, Jason S; Pereira, Marie A; Schlarbaum, Scott E; Romero-Severson, Jeanne

    2010-11-01

    The spatial distribution of genetic diversity is a product of recent and historical ecological processes, as well as anthropogenic activities. A current challenge in population and conservation genetics is to disentangle the relative effects of these processes, as a first step in predicting population response to future environmental change. In this investigation, we compare the influence of contemporary population decline, contemporary ecological marginality and postglacial range shifts. Using classical model comparison procedures and Bayesian methods, we have identified postglacial range shift as the clear determinant of genetic diversity, differentiation and bottlenecks in 29 populations of butternut, Juglans cinerea L., a North American outcrossing forest tree. Although butternut has experienced dramatic 20th century decline because of an introduced fungal pathogen, our analysis indicates that recent population decline has had less genetic impact than postglacial recolonization history. Location within the range edge vs. the range core also failed to account for the observed patterns of diversity and differentiation. Our results suggest that the genetic impact of large-scale recent population losses in forest trees should be considered in the light of Pleistocene-era large-scale range shifts that may have had long-term genetic consequences. The data also suggest that the population dynamics and life history of wind-pollinated forest trees may provide a buffer against steep population declines of short duration, a result having important implications for habitat management efforts, ex situ conservation sampling and population viability analysis. PMID:21040046

  10. Genetic diversity and host range studies of turnip curly top virus.

    PubMed

    Razavinejad, Sara; Heydarnejad, Jahangir; Kamali, Mehdi; Massumi, Hossain; Kraberger, Simona; Varsani, Arvind

    2013-04-01

    Turnip curly top virus (TCTV) is a unique geminivirus that has recently been characterised as infecting turnips in Iran. The genome of TCTV shares <68 % pairwise identity with other geminiviruses and has a genome organisation similar to that of curtoviruses and topocuvirus. The replication-associated protein (Rep) bears the highest similarity to curtovirus Reps (48.5-69.0 %); however, in the case of the capsid protein (CP), the extent of similarity is only 39.5-44.5 %. We constructed an agroinfectious clone of TCTV and undertook host range studies on ten plant species; in three species (turnip, sugar beet and cowpea), we detected infection which presents curly top symptoms in turnip and sugar beet. The efficiency of TCTV infection in agroinoculated turnip plants was 71.7 %, and the infection was successfully transmitted to 80 % of the healthy turnip plants used in the insect transmission studies by Circulifer haematoceps under greenhouse conditions. We also determined the genome sequence of 14 new TCTV isolates from southern Iran isolated from turnips. We observed ~13 % diversity amongst all the TCTV isolates and found evidence of recombination in the CP- and Rep-coding regions of the genomes. PMID:23225113

  11. Genetic diversity, host range, and distribution of tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, M; Mozafari, J; Rakhshandehroo, F; Shams-Bakhsh, M

    2014-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is considered one of the most important tomato pathogens in tropical and subtropical regions including Iran. During the years 2007 to 2009, a total number of 510 symptomatic and asymptomatic vegetable, ornamental and weed samples were collected from fields and greenhouses in ten provinces of Iran. Symptoms included stunting, yellowing, leaf curl and flower senescence. PCR with specific primers showed TYLCV infection in 184 samples (36%) such as cucumber, pepper, tomato and several weeds from seven provinces. Based on the geographical origin, host range and symptoms, twenty three representative isolates were selected for phylogenetic analysis. An amplicon with a size about 608 base pair (bp) comprising partial sequence of the coat (CP) and movement protein (MP) coding regions of the viral genome was sequenced and compared with the corresponding selected sequences available in GenBank for Iran and worldwide. Phylogenetic analyses on the basis of the nucleotide sequences indicated two geographically separated clades. Isolates collected from Hormozgan, Khuzestan and Kerman provinces were grouped together with other Iranian isolates including TYLCV-Ir2, TYLCV-Kahnooj, and an isolate from Oman. It was also revealed that isolates collected from Boushehr, Fars, Tehran, and Isfahan placed close to the Iranian isolate TYLCV-Abadeh and isolates from Israel and Egypt. No correlation was found between the genetic variation and the host species, but selected Iranian isolates were grouped on the basis of the geographical origins. Results of this study indicated a high genetic diversity among Iranian TYLCV isolates. PMID:24957717

  12. Diverse wild bird host range of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, André A; DeCoste, Jonathan C; Ley, David H; Hochachka, Wesley M

    2014-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases often result from pathogens jumping to novel hosts. Identifying possibilities and constraints on host transfer is therefore an important facet of research in disease ecology. Host transfers can be studied for the bacterium Mycoplasma gallisepticum, predominantly a pathogen of poultry until its 1994 appearance and subsequent epidemic spread in a wild songbird, the house finch Haemorhous mexicanus and some other wild birds. We screened a broad range of potential host species for evidence of infection by M. gallisepticum in order to answer 3 questions: (1) is there a host phylogenetic constraint on the likelihood of host infection (house finches compared to other bird species); (2) does opportunity for close proximity (visiting bird feeders) increase the likelihood of a potential host being infected; and (3) is there seasonal variation in opportunity for host jumping (winter resident versus summer resident species). We tested for pathogen exposure both by using PCR to test for the presence of M. gallisepticum DNA and by rapid plate agglutination to test for the presence of antibodies. We examined 1,941 individual birds of 53 species from 19 avian families. In 27 species (15 families) there was evidence for exposure with M. gallisepticum although conjunctivitis was very rare in non-finches. There was no difference in detection rate between summer and winter residents, nor between feeder birds and species that do not come to feeders. Evidence of M. gallisepticum infection was found in all species for which at least 20 individuals had been sampled. Combining the present results with those of previous studies shows that a diverse range of wild bird species may carry or have been exposed to M. gallisepticum in the USA as well as in Europe and Asia. PMID:25061684

  13. Unravelling the effects of contemporary and historical range expansion on the distribution of genetic diversity in the damselfly Coenagrion scitulum.

    PubMed

    Swaegers, J; Mergeay, J; Therry, L; Bonte, D; Larmuseau, M H D; Stoks, R

    2014-04-01

    Although genetic diversity provides the basic substrate for evolution, there are a limited number of studies that assess the impact of recent climate change on intraspecific genetic variation. This study aims to unravel the degree to which historical and contemporary factors shape genetic diversity and structure across a large part of the range of the range-expanding damselfly Coenagrion scitulum (Rambur, 1842). A total of 525 individuals from 31 populations were genotyped at nine microsatellites, and a subset was sequenced at two mitochondrial genes. We inferred the importance of geography, environmental factors, and recent range expansion on genetic diversity and structure. Genetic diversity decreased going westwards, suggesting a signature of historical post-glacial expansion from east to west and the presence of eastern refugia. Although genetic differentiation decreased going northwards, it increased in the northern edge populations, suggesting a role of contemporary range expansion on the genetic make-up of populations. The phylogeographical context was proven to be essential in understanding and identifying the genetic signatures of local contemporary processes. Within this framework, our results highlight that recent range expansion of a good disperser can decrease genetic diversity and increase genetic differentiation which should be considered when devising suitable conservation strategies. PMID:24581303

  14. High prevalence and diversity of pre-CTXΦ alleles in the environmental Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 strains in the Zhujiang River estuary.

    PubMed

    Wang, Duochun; Wang, Xiaomei; Li, Baisheng; Deng, Xiaoling; Tan, Hailing; Diao, Baowei; Chen, Jingdiao; Ke, Bixia; Zhong, Haojie; Zhou, Haijian; Ke, Changwen; Kan, Biao

    2014-06-01

    Toxigenic conversion of environmental Vibrio cholerae strains through lysogenic infection by the phage CTXΦ is an important step in the emergence of new pathogenic clones. The precursor form of the CTXΦ phage, pre-CTXΦ, does not carry the cholera toxin gene. During our investigation, we frequently found pre-CTXΦ prophages in non-toxigenic isolates in the serogroups of O1 and O139 strains in the Zhujiang estuary. We observed high amounts of sequence variation of rstR and gIII(CTX) in the pre-CTXΦ alleles as well as in the tcpA sequences within the strains. In addition, a new pre-CTXΦ allele, with a novel rstR sequence type and hybrid RS2, was identified. Our findings show that active, complicated gene recombination and horizontal transfer of pre-CTXΦs occurs within V. cholerae environmental strains, which creates a complex intermediate pool for the generation of toxigenic clones in the estuarine environment. PMID:24983529

  15. Patterns of bacterial diversity across a range of Antarctic terrestrial habitats.

    PubMed

    Yergeau, Etienne; Newsham, Kevin K; Pearce, David A; Kowalchuk, George A

    2007-11-01

    Although soil-borne bacteria represent the world's greatest source of biological diversity, it is not well understood whether extreme environmental conditions, such as those found in Antarctic habitats, result in reduced soil-borne microbial diversity. To address this issue, patterns of bacterial diversity were studied in soils sampled along a > 3200 km southern polar transect spanning a gradient of increased climate severity over 27 degrees of latitude. Vegetated and fell-field plots were sampled at the Falkland (51 degrees S), South Georgia (54 degrees S), Signy (60 degrees S) and Anchorage Islands (67 degrees S), while bare frost-sorted soil polygons were examined at Fossil Bluff (71 degrees S), Mars Oasis (72 degrees S), Coal Nunatak (72 degrees S) and the Ellsworth Mountains (78 degrees S). Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences were recovered subsequent to direct DNA extraction from soil, polymerase chain reaction amplification and cloning. Although bacterial diversity was observed to decline with increased latitude, habitat-specific patterns appeared to also be important. Namely, a negative relationship was found between bacterial diversity and latitude for fell-field soils, but no such pattern was observed for vegetated sites. The Mars Oasis site, previously identified as a biodiversity hotspot within this region, proved exceptional within the study transect, with unusually high bacterial diversity. In independent analyses, geographical distance and vegetation cover were found to significantly influence bacterial community composition. These results provide insight into the factors shaping the composition of bacterial communities in Antarctic terrestrial habitats and support the notion that bacterial diversity declines with increased climatic severity. PMID:17922752

  16. MHC class II diversity of koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) populations across their range.

    PubMed

    Lau, Q; Jaratlerdsiri, W; Griffith, J E; Gongora, J; Higgins, D P

    2014-10-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) genes code for proteins that bind and present antigenic peptides and trigger the adaptive immune response. We present a broad geographical study of MHCII DA β1 (DAB) and DB β1 (DBB) variants of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus; n=191) from 12 populations across eastern Australia, with a total of 13 DAB and 7 DBB variants found. We identified greater MHCII variation and, possibly, additional gene copies in koala populations in the north (Queensland and New South Wales) relative to the south (Victoria), confirmed by STRUCTURE analyses and genetic differentiation using analysis of molecular variance. The higher MHCII diversity in the north relative to south could potentially be attributed to (i) significant founder effect in Victorian populations linked to historical translocation of bottlenecked koala populations and (ii) increased pathogen-driven balancing selection and/or local genetic drift in the north. Low MHCII genetic diversity in koalas from the south could reduce their potential response to disease, although the three DAB variants found in the south had substantial sequence divergence between variants. This study assessing MHCII diversity in the koala with historical translocations in some populations contributes to understanding the effects of population translocations on functional genetic diversity. PMID:24690756

  17. Silage Collected from Dairy Farms Harbors an Abundance of Listeriaphages with Considerable Host Range and Genome Size Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Switt, Andrea Moreno; den Bakker, Henk C.; Fortes, Esther D.

    2012-01-01

    Since the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is common in dairy farm environments, it is likely that phages infecting this bacterium (“listeriaphages”) are abundant on dairy farms. To better understand the ecology and diversity of listeriaphages on dairy farms and to develop a diverse phage collection for further studies, silage samples collected on two dairy farms were screened for L. monocytogenes and listeriaphages. While only 4.5% of silage samples tested positive for L. monocytogenes, 47.8% of samples were positive for listeriaphages, containing up to >1.5 × 104 PFU/g. Host range characterization of the 114 phage isolates obtained, with a reference set of 13 L. monocytogenes strains representing the nine major serotypes and four lineages, revealed considerable host range diversity; phage isolates were classified into nine lysis groups. While one serotype 3c strain was not lysed by any phage isolates, serotype 4 strains were highly susceptible to phages and were lysed by 63.2 to 88.6% of phages tested. Overall, 12.3% of phage isolates showed a narrow host range (lysing 1 to 5 strains), while 28.9% of phages represented broad host range (lysing ≥11 strains). Genome sizes of the phage isolates were estimated to range from approximately 26 to 140 kb. The extensive host range and genomic diversity of phages observed here suggest an important role of phages in the ecology of L. monocytogenes on dairy farms. In addition, the phage collection developed here has the potential to facilitate further development of phage-based biocontrol strategies (e.g., in silage) and other phage-based tools. PMID:23042180

  18. High genetic diversity at the extreme range edge: nucleotide variation at nuclear loci in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Wachowiak, W; Salmela, M J; Ennos, R A; Iason, G; Cavers, S

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide polymorphism at 12 nuclear loci was studied in Scots pine populations across an environmental gradient in Scotland, to evaluate the impacts of demographic history and selection on genetic diversity. At eight loci, diversity patterns were compared between Scottish and continental European populations. At these loci, a similar level of diversity (θsil=∼0.01) was found in Scottish vs mainland European populations, contrary to expectations for recent colonization, however, less rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium was observed in the former (ρ=0.0086±0.0009, ρ=0.0245±0.0022, respectively). Scottish populations also showed a deficit of rare nucleotide variants (multi-locus Tajima's D=0.316 vs D=−0.379) and differed significantly from mainland populations in allelic frequency and/or haplotype structure at several loci. Within Scotland, western populations showed slightly reduced nucleotide diversity (πtot=0.0068) compared with those from the south and east (0.0079 and 0.0083, respectively) and about three times higher recombination to diversity ratio (ρ/θ=0.71 vs 0.15 and 0.18, respectively). By comparison with results from coalescent simulations, the observed allelic frequency spectrum in the western populations was compatible with a relatively recent bottleneck (0.00175 × 4Ne generations) that reduced the population to about 2% of the present size. However, heterogeneity in the allelic frequency distribution among geographical regions in Scotland suggests that subsequent admixture of populations with different demographic histories may also have played a role. PMID:20823905

  19. Cryptic diversity among Western Palearctic tree frogs: postglacial range expansion, range limits, and secondary contacts of three European tree frog lineages (Hyla arborea group).

    PubMed

    Stöck, Matthias; Dufresnes, Christophe; Litvinchuk, Spartak N; Lymberakis, Petros; Biollay, Sébastien; Berroneau, Matthieu; Borzée, Amaël; Ghali, Karim; Ogielska, Maria; Perrin, Nicolas

    2012-10-01

    We characterize divergence times, intraspecific diversity and distributions for recently recognized lineages within the Hyla arborea species group, based on mitochondrial and nuclear sequences from 160 localities spanning its whole distribution. Lineages of H. arborea, H. orientalis, H. molleri have at least Pliocene age, supporting species level divergence. The genetically uniform Iberian H. molleri, although largely isolated by the Pyrenees, is parapatric to H. arborea, with evidence for successful hybridization in a small Aquitanian corridor (southwestern France), where the distribution also overlaps with H. meridionalis. The genetically uniform H. arborea, spread from Crete to Brittany, exhibits molecular signatures of a postglacial range expansion. It meets different mtDNA clades of H. orientalis in NE-Greece, along the Carpathians, and in Poland along the Vistula River (there including hybridization). The East-European H. orientalis is strongly structured genetically. Five geographic mitochondrial clades are recognized, with a molecular signature of postglacial range expansions for the clade that reached the most northern latitudes. Hybridization with H. savignyi is suggested in southwestern Turkey. Thus, cryptic diversity in these Pliocene Hyla lineages covers three extremes: a genetically poor, quasi-Iberian endemic (H. molleri), a more uniform species distributed from the Balkans to Western Europe (H. arborea), and a well-structured Asia Minor-Eastern European species (H. orientalis). PMID:22652054

  20. The effect of range changes on the functional turnover, structure and diversity of bird assemblages under future climate scenarios.

    PubMed

    Barbet-Massin, Morgane; Jetz, Walter

    2015-08-01

    Animal assemblages fulfill a critical set of ecological functions for ecosystems that may be altered substantially as climate change-induced distribution changes lead to community disaggregation and reassembly. We combine species and community perspectives to assess the consequences of projected geographic range changes for the diverse functional attributes of avian assemblages worldwide. Assemblage functional structure is projected to change highly unevenly across space. These differences arise from both changes in the number of species and changes in species' relative local functional redundancy or distinctness. They sometimes result in substantial losses of functional diversity that could have severe consequences for ecosystem health. Range expansions may counter functional losses in high-latitude regions, but offer little compensation in many tropical and subtropical biomes. Future management of local community function and ecosystem services thus relies on understanding the global dynamics of species distributions and multiscale approaches that include the biogeographic context of species traits. PMID:25931153

  1. Allele mining across DREB1A and DREB1B in diverse rice genotypes suggest a highly conserved pathway inducible by low temperature.

    PubMed

    Challam, Clarissa; Ghosh, Tapu; Rai, Mayank; Tyagi, Wricha

    2015-06-01

    Low temperature stress is one of the major limiting factors affecting rice productivity in higher altitudes. DREB1A and DREB1B, are two transcription factors that have been reported to play key regulatory role in low temperature tolerance. In order to understand whether natural genetic variation in these two loci leads to cold tolerance or susceptibility, OsDREB1A and OsDREB1B were targeted across several rice genotypes showing differential response to low temperature. Expression data suggests induction of gene expression in shoots in response to low temperature in both tolerant and susceptible genotypes. Upon sequence analysis of 20 rice genotypes, eight nucleotide changes were identified including two in the coding region and six in the 5'UTR. None of the discovered novel variations lie in the conserved region of the genes under study, thereby causing little or no changes in putative function of the corresponding proteins. In silico analysis using a diverse set of 400 O. sativa revealed much lower nucleotide diversity estimates across two DREB loci and one other gene (MYB2) involved in DREB pathway than those observed for other rice genes. None of the changes showed association with seedling stage cold tolerance, suggesting that nucleotide changes in DREB loci are unlikely to contribute to low temperature tolerance. So far, data concerning the physiological role and regulation of DREB1 in different genetic background are very limited; it is to be expected that they will be studied extensively in the near future. PMID:26174670

  2. Adenovirus and herpesvirus diversity in free-ranging great apes in the Sangha region of the Republic Of Congo.

    PubMed

    Seimon, Tracie A; Olson, Sarah H; Lee, Kerry Jo; Rosen, Gail; Ondzie, Alain; Cameron, Kenneth; Reed, Patricia; Anthony, Simon J; Joly, Damien O; Karesh, William B; McAloose, Denise; Lipkin, W Ian

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases have caused die-offs in both free-ranging gorillas and chimpanzees. Understanding pathogen diversity and disease ecology is therefore critical for conserving these endangered animals. To determine viral diversity in free-ranging, non-habituated gorillas and chimpanzees in the Republic of Congo, genetic testing was performed on great-ape fecal samples collected near Odzala-Kokoua National Park. Samples were analyzed to determine ape species, identify individuals in the population, and to test for the presence of herpesviruses, adenoviruses, poxviruses, bocaviruses, flaviviruses, paramyxoviruses, coronaviruses, filoviruses, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We identified 19 DNA viruses representing two viral families, Herpesviridae and Adenoviridae, of which three herpesviruses had not been previously described. Co-detections of multiple herpesviruses and/or adenoviruses were present in both gorillas and chimpanzees. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and lymphocryptovirus (LCV) were found primarily in the context of co-association with each other and adenoviruses. Using viral discovery curves for herpesviruses and adenoviruses, the total viral richness in the sample population of gorillas and chimpanzees was estimated to be a minimum of 23 viruses, corresponding to a detection rate of 83%. These findings represent the first description of DNA viral diversity in feces from free-ranging gorillas and chimpanzees in or near the Odzala-Kokoua National Park and form a basis for understanding the types of viruses circulating among great apes in this region. PMID:25781992

  3. Adenovirus and Herpesvirus Diversity in Free-Ranging Great Apes in the Sangha Region of the Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Seimon, Tracie A.; Olson, Sarah H.; Lee, Kerry Jo; Rosen, Gail; Ondzie, Alain; Cameron, Kenneth; Reed, Patricia; Anthony, Simon J.; Joly, Damien O.; McAloose, Denise; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases have caused die-offs in both free-ranging gorillas and chimpanzees. Understanding pathogen diversity and disease ecology is therefore critical for conserving these endangered animals. To determine viral diversity in free-ranging, non-habituated gorillas and chimpanzees in the Republic of Congo, genetic testing was performed on great-ape fecal samples collected near Odzala-Kokoua National Park. Samples were analyzed to determine ape species, identify individuals in the population, and to test for the presence of herpesviruses, adenoviruses, poxviruses, bocaviruses, flaviviruses, paramyxoviruses, coronaviruses, filoviruses, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We identified 19 DNA viruses representing two viral families, Herpesviridae and Adenoviridae, of which three herpesviruses had not been previously described. Co-detections of multiple herpesviruses and/or adenoviruses were present in both gorillas and chimpanzees. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and lymphocryptovirus (LCV) were found primarily in the context of co-association with each other and adenoviruses. Using viral discovery curves for herpesviruses and adenoviruses, the total viral richness in the sample population of gorillas and chimpanzees was estimated to be a minimum of 23 viruses, corresponding to a detection rate of 83%. These findings represent the first description of DNA viral diversity in feces from free-ranging gorillas and chimpanzees in or near the Odzala-Kokoua National Park and form a basis for understanding the types of viruses circulating among great apes in this region. PMID:25781992

  4. Complete Haplotype Sequence of the Human Immunoglobulin Heavy-Chain Variable, Diversity, and Joining Genes and Characterization of Allelic and Copy-Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Corey T.; Steinberg, Karyn M.; Huddleston, John; Warren, Rene L.; Malig, Maika; Schein, Jacqueline; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Joy, Jeffrey B.; Scott, Jamie K.; Graves, Tina A.; Wilson, Richard K.; Holt, Robert A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Breden, Felix

    2013-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus (IGH) encodes variable (IGHV), diversity (IGHD), joining (IGHJ), and constant (IGHC) genes and is responsible for antibody heavy-chain biosynthesis, which is vital to the adaptive immune response. Programmed V-(D)-J somatic rearrangement and the complex duplicated nature of the locus have impeded attempts to reconcile its genomic organization based on traditional B-lymphocyte derived genetic material. As a result, sequence descriptions of germline variation within IGHV are lacking, haplotype inference using traditional linkage disequilibrium methods has been difficult, and the human genome reference assembly is missing several expressed IGHV genes. By using a hydatidiform mole BAC clone resource, we present the most complete haplotype of IGHV, IGHD, and IGHJ gene regions derived from a single chromosome, representing an alternate assembly of ∼1 Mbp of high-quality finished sequence. From this we add 101 kbp of previously uncharacterized sequence, including functional IGHV genes, and characterize four large germline copy-number variants (CNVs). In addition to this germline reference, we identify and characterize eight CNV-containing haplotypes from a panel of nine diploid genomes of diverse ethnic origin, discovering previously unmapped IGHV genes and an additional 121 kbp of insertion sequence. We genotype four of these CNVs by using PCR in 425 individuals from nine human populations. We find that all four are highly polymorphic and show considerable evidence of stratification (Fst = 0.3–0.5), with the greatest differences observed between African and Asian populations. These CNVs exhibit weak linkage disequilibrium with SNPs from two commercial arrays in most of the populations tested. PMID:23541343

  5. Conyza canadensis suppresses plant diversity in its nonnative ranges but not at home: a transcontinental comparison.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manzoor A; Callaway, Ragan M; Shah, Tabasum; Houseman, Gregory R; Pal, Robert W; Xiao, Sa; Luo, Wenbo; Rosche, Christoph; Reshi, Zafar A; Khasa, Damase P; Chen, Shuyan

    2014-06-01

    The impact of invasive species across their native and nonnative ranges is poorly quantified and this impedes a complete understanding of biological invasions. We compared the impact of the native North American plant, Conyza canadensis, which is invasive to Eurasia, on species richness at home and in a number of introduced regions through well replicated transcontinental field studies, glasshouse experiments and individual-based models. Our results demonstrated mostly negative relationships between C. canadensis abundance and native species richness in nonnative ranges, but either positive or no relationships in its native North American range. In glasshouse experiments, the total biomass of Conyza was suppressed more by species from its native range than by species from regions where it is nonnative, but the effects of Conyza on other species did not show a consistent biogeographical pattern. Finally, individual-based models led to the exclusion of Conyza from North American scenarios but to high abundances in scenarios with species from the nonnative ranges of Conyza. We illustrate biogeographical differences in the impact of an invader across regional scales and suggest that inherent differences in one specific aspect of competitive ability, tolerance to the effects of other species, may play some role in these differences. PMID:24548283

  6. Long-range high-speed visible light communication system over 100-m outdoor transmission utilizing receiver diversity technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiguang; Huang, Xingxing; Shi, Jianyang; Wang, Yuan-quan; Chi, Nan

    2016-05-01

    Visible light communication (VLC) has no doubt become a promising candidate for future wireless communications due to the increasing trends in the usage of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). In addition to indoor high-speed wireless access and positioning applications, VLC usage in outdoor scenarios, such as vehicle networks and intelligent transportation systems, are also attracting significant interest. However, the complex outdoor environment and ambient noise are the key challenges for long-range high-speed VLC outdoor applications. To improve system performance and transmission distance, we propose to use receiver diversity technology in an outdoor VLC system. Maximal ratio combining-based receiver diversity technology is utilized in two receivers to achieve the maximal signal-to-noise ratio. A 400-Mb/s VLC transmission using a phosphor-based white LED and a 1-Gb/s wavelength division multiplexing VLC transmission using a red-green-blue LED are both successfully achieved over a 100-m outdoor distance with the bit error rate below the 7% forward error correction limit of 3.8×10-3. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest data rate at 100-m outdoor VLC transmission ever achieved. The experimental results clearly prove the benefit and feasibility of receiver diversity technology for long-range high-speed outdoor VLC systems.

  7. Extremely long range chromatin loops link topological domains to facilitate a diverse antibody repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Montefiori, Lindsey; Wuerffel, Robert; Roqueiro, Damian; Lajoie, Bryan; Guo, Changying; Gerasimova, Tatiana; De, Supriyo; Wood, William; Becker, Kevin G.; Dekker, Job; Liang, Jie; Sen, Ranjan; Kenter, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Early B cell development is characterized by large scale Igh locus contraction prior to V(D)J recombination to facilitate a highly diverse Ig repertoire. However, an understanding of the molecular architecture that mediates locus contraction remains unclear. We have combined high resolution chromosome conformation capture (3C) techniques with 3D DNA FISH to identify three conserved topological sub-domains. Each of these topological folds encompasses a major VH gene family that become juxtaposed in pro-B cells via Mb-scale chromatin looping. The transcription factor Pax5 organizes the sub-domain that spans the VHJ558 gene family. In its absence the J558 VH genes fail to associate with the proximal VH genes, thereby providing a plausible explanation for reduced VHJ558 gene rearrangements in Pax5-deficient pro-B cells. We propose that Igh locus contraction is the cumulative effect of several independently controlled chromatin sub-domains that provide the structural infrastructure to coordinate optimal antigen receptor assembly. PMID:26804913

  8. Allele and haplotype diversity of new multiplex of 19 ChrX-STR loci in Han population from Guanzhong region (China).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Dang; Shen, Chun-Mei; Meng, Hao-Tian; Guo, Yu-Xin; Dong, Qian; Yang, Guang; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Liu, Yao-Shun; Mei, Ting; Huang, Rui-Zhe; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2016-07-01

    X-chromosomal short tandem repeats (X-STRs) have been proved to be useful for some deficiency paternity cases in recent years. Here, we studied the genetic polymorphisms of 19 X-STR loci (DXS10148-DXS10135-DXS8378, DXS10159-DXS10162-DXS10164, DXS7132-DXS10079-DXS10074-DXS10075, DXS6809-DXS6789, DXS7424-DXS101, DXS10103-HPRTB-DXS10101 and DXS7423-DXS10134) in 252 male and 222 female individuals from Guanzhong Han population, China. No deviation for all 19 loci was observed from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The polymorphism information content values of the panel of 19 loci were more than 0.5 with the exception of the locus DXS7423. The combined power of discrimination were 0.9999999999999999999994340 in females and 0.9999999999997662 in males, respectively; and the combined mean exclusion chances were 0.999999993764 in duos and 0.999999999997444 in trios, respectively. The haplotype diversities for all the seven clusters of linked loci were more than 0.9. The results showed that the panel of 19 X-STR loci were powerful for forensic applications in Guanzhong Han population. Locus by locus population comparisons showed significant differences at more than seven loci between Guanzhong Han population and the groups from North America, Europe and Africa. PMID:27063464

  9. Methicillin resistance gene diversity in staphylococci isolated from captive and free-ranging wallabies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michelle M. S.; Boardman, Wayne S. J.; Brown, Melissa H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Infection with methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) can be life-threatening in humans and its presence in animals is a cause for public health concern. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of MRS in captive and free-ranging wallabies over a 16-month period in South Australia, Australia. Materials and methods Eighty-nine purified staphylococcal isolates recovered from 98 captive and free-ranging wallabies' anterior nasal swabs were used in this study. All isolates were tested for the presence of the mecA, mecA1, and mecC genes. Multiplex PCR-directed SCCmec-typing, ccrB-typing, and determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration of oxacillin were performed on mec-positive isolates. Results and discussion In total, 11 non-Staphylococcus aureus MRS were isolated from 7 out of 98 animals, corresponding to a 7.1% carriage rate. The SCCmec types I, III, and V were identified by multiplex PCR and sequencing of the ccrB gene. This is the first report of MRS carriage in both captive and free-ranging wallabies in Australia. These data demonstrate a low prevalence of MRS and no association between wallaby captivity status and MRS carriage could be assigned. These animals may act as a reservoir for the exchange of genetic elements between staphylococci. Furthermore, the mecA genes of animal isolates were identical to that found in human MRS strains and thus the possibility of zoonotic transfer must be considered. PMID:27193419

  10. Extensive genetic diversity and endemism across the global range of the oceanic copepod Pleuromamma abdominalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Junya; Tsuda, Atsushi; Goetze, Erica

    2015-11-01

    Many oceanic zooplankton species have been described as cosmopolitan in distribution; however, recent molecular work has detected species complexity with highly divergent genetic lineages within several of these taxa. To further resolve the species complexity within these ecologically-important and widespread species, we performed both molecular and morphological analyses of the oceanic copepod Pleuromamma abdominalis using a comprehensive collection of material from 944 individuals collected at 46 sites across the global ocean. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) sequences detected eighteen divergent evolutionary lineages within P. abdominalis, with an additional four singleton specimens that were also genetically divergent. Two phylogenetically distinct groups, PLAB1 and PLAB2, were supported by concordant sequence variation in the nuclear large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (nLSU). Within PLAB1, two mtCOI clades, 1a-1 and 1b-1 were observed, and each clade contained geographically distinct sub-clades 1a-2 and 1b-2. PLAB2 was composed of sixteen well-supported mtCOI clades (2a-2p) as well as four singletons. High genetic divergence among the mtCOI lineages within both PLAB1 and PLAB2, ranging between 9.2-11.2% and 4.3-18.9% K2P distances respectively, suggests the presence of additional species within these groups. Significant differences were observed in the presence and shape of antennule spines of adult females between sympatric clades with genetic distances greater than 5.7-7.0% (K2P). The biogeographic distributions of mtCOI clades indicated greater specialization to particular oceanographic provinces than observed in the nominal species P. abdominalis, with mtCOI clades ranging from antitropical in subtropical waters of all three ocean basins (Atlantic, Pacific and Indian; clade 1b-1 and 2a) to taxa that are endemic to a particular ocean region, for example restricted to equatorial waters of the Atlantic Ocean (clade 1b

  11. European Invasion of North American Pinus strobus at Large and Fine Scales: High Genetic Diversity and Fine-Scale Genetic Clustering over Time in the Adventive Range

    PubMed Central

    Mandák, Bohumil; Hadincová, Věroslava; Mahelka, Václav; Wildová, Radka

    2013-01-01

    Background North American Pinus strobus is a highly invasive tree species in Central Europe. Using ten polymorphic microsatellite loci we compared various aspects of the large-scale genetic diversity of individuals from 30 sites in the native distribution range with those from 30 sites in the European adventive distribution range. To investigate the ascertained pattern of genetic diversity of this intercontinental comparison further, we surveyed fine-scale genetic diversity patterns and changes over time within four highly invasive populations in the adventive range. Results Our data show that at the large scale the genetic diversity found within the relatively small adventive range in Central Europe, surprisingly, equals the diversity found within the sampled area in the native range, which is about thirty times larger. Bayesian assignment grouped individuals into two genetic clusters separating North American native populations from the European, non-native populations, without any strong genetic structure shown over either range. In the case of the fine scale, our comparison of genetic diversity parameters among the localities and age classes yielded no evidence of genetic diversity increase over time. We found that SGS differed across age classes within the populations under study. Old trees in general completely lacked any SGS, which increased over time and reached its maximum in the sapling stage. Conclusions Based on (1) the absence of difference in genetic diversity between the native and adventive ranges, together with the lack of structure in the native range, and (2) the lack of any evidence of any temporal increase in genetic diversity at four highly invasive populations in the adventive range, we conclude that population amalgamation probably first happened in the native range, prior to introduction. In such case, there would have been no need for multiple introductions from previously isolated populations, but only several introductions from

  12. Evidence of rapid change in genetic structure and diversity during range expansion in a recovering large terrestrial carnivore.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Snorre B; Kopatz, Alexander; Aspi, Jouni; Kojola, Ilpo; Eiken, Hans Geir

    2015-05-22

    Recovery of natural populations occurs often with simultaneous or subsequent range expansions. According to population genetic theory, genetic structuring emerges at the expansion front together with decreasing genetic diversity, owing to multiple founder events. Thereupon, as the expansion proceeds and connectivity among populations is established, homogenization and a resurgence of genetic diversity are to be expected. Few studies have used a fine temporal scale combined with genetic sampling to track range expansions as they proceed in wild animal populations. As a natural experiment, the historical eradication of large terrestrial carnivores followed by their recovery and recolonization may facilitate empirical tests of these ideas. Here, using brown bear (Ursus arctos) as model species, we tested predictions from genetic theory of range expansion. Individuals from all over Finland were genotyped for every year between 1996 and 2010 using 12 validated autosomal microsatellite markers. A latitudinal shift of about 110 km was observed in the distribution and delineation of genetic clusters during this period. As the range expansion proceeded, we found, as theory predicts, that the degree of genetic structure decreased, and that both genetic variation and admixture increased. The genetic consequences of range expansions may first be detected after multiple generations, but we found major changes in genetic composition after just 1.5 generations, accompanied by population growth and increased migration. These rapid genetic changes suggest an ongoing concerted action of geographical and demographic expansion combined with substantial immigration of bears from Russia during the recovery of brown bears within the large ecosystem of northern Europe. PMID:25904665

  13. Evidence of rapid change in genetic structure and diversity during range expansion in a recovering large terrestrial carnivore

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Snorre B.; Kopatz, Alexander; Aspi, Jouni; Kojola, Ilpo; Eiken, Hans Geir

    2015-01-01

    Recovery of natural populations occurs often with simultaneous or subsequent range expansions. According to population genetic theory, genetic structuring emerges at the expansion front together with decreasing genetic diversity, owing to multiple founder events. Thereupon, as the expansion proceeds and connectivity among populations is established, homogenization and a resurgence of genetic diversity are to be expected. Few studies have used a fine temporal scale combined with genetic sampling to track range expansions as they proceed in wild animal populations. As a natural experiment, the historical eradication of large terrestrial carnivores followed by their recovery and recolonization may facilitate empirical tests of these ideas. Here, using brown bear (Ursus arctos) as model species, we tested predictions from genetic theory of range expansion. Individuals from all over Finland were genotyped for every year between 1996 and 2010 using 12 validated autosomal microsatellite markers. A latitudinal shift of about 110 km was observed in the distribution and delineation of genetic clusters during this period. As the range expansion proceeded, we found, as theory predicts, that the degree of genetic structure decreased, and that both genetic variation and admixture increased. The genetic consequences of range expansions may first be detected after multiple generations, but we found major changes in genetic composition after just 1.5 generations, accompanied by population growth and increased migration. These rapid genetic changes suggest an ongoing concerted action of geographical and demographic expansion combined with substantial immigration of bears from Russia during the recovery of brown bears within the large ecosystem of northern Europe. PMID:25904665

  14. Diversity and gradients in cedar forests on Taurus mountain range (Turkey).

    PubMed

    Kavgai, Ali; Earni, Andra

    2012-09-01

    Cedrus libani forests have been under anthropogenic pressure for thousands of years. The unattainable topography of the Taurus mountain range (Southern Anatolia) has prevented cedar in this region from being extirpated, in contrast to its other distribution areas in Syria and Lebanon. Numerical analyses of relevés confirmed the individuality of associations, as well as the division of C. libani forests into two ecological and floristically different groups/alliances (Abieti-Cedrion and Lonicero-Cedrion). Abieti-Cedrion is distributed in the middle and eastern Taurus whereas Lonicero-Cedrion appears in the Western Taurus. The main gradients of C. libani forests were detected. It was noticed that the distribution and floristic composition of C. libani forests is strongly affected by the geographical factors. Topographical factors are also influential on their distribution. C. libani forests are fundemantal components of the Mediterranean phytogeographical region and floral elements, but under more continental conditions, where the influence of the Mediterranean climate decreased, the proportion of Iran-Turanian and Euro-Siberian floral elements increase, especially towards the east and north, as well at higher altitudes and on steeper sites. PMID:23734468

  15. Diverse sources for igneous blocks in Franciscan melanges, California Coast Ranges

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, G.J. ); Phipps, S.P. ); Grossman, J.N. )

    1990-11-01

    Igneous blocks in Franciscan melanges are of three chemical-petrologic types: (1) tholeiitic basalts of both arc and spreading center origin, with depletions in light relative to heavy rare-earth elements, 3% > TiO{sub 2} > 1%, high Y/Zr and Y/Ti ratios, and relict augites that generally have low Al and Ti and well-defined iron-enrichment trends; (2) basalts of probable seamount origin with marked enrichments in light relative to heavy rare-earth elements, 5% > TiO{sub 2} > 1%, lower Y/Zr and Y/Ti than (1), and Ti-Al-rich augites showing little if any iron-enrichment trends; and (3) hypabyssal intrusives having SiO{sub 2} > 52%, TiO{sub 2} < 1%, flat or only slightly fractionated rare-earth-abundance patterns, and diopsidic augites that are very low in Ti and Al and show no iron-enrichment trends. All of the blocks are metamorphosed; most are undeformed pumpellyite-bearing greenstones, and a few contain sodic amphibole {plus minus} lawsonite {plus minus} sodic pyroxene. The melanges are probably olistostromal in origin, deriving their igneous block detritus both from the downgoing Pacific plate (ocean floor basalts and seamounts) and from the hanging wall of the Franciscan trench (basalts and arc-related silic intrusive rocks). The silicic intrusive rocks and some of the basalts are eroded fragments of the fore-arc crust that ultimately become the Coast Range Ophiolite. These fragments were incorporated into the Franciscan trench fill and subducted. Results suggest that the igneous blocks in ophiolitic melanges provide important information about melange formation and about the tectonics and paleogeography of the regions in which the melanges are found.

  16. Molecular phylogeny reveals high diversity, geographic structure and limited ranges in neotenic net-winged beetles platerodrilus (coleoptera: lycidae).

    PubMed

    Masek, Michal; Palata, Vaclav; Bray, Timothy C; Bocak, Ladislav

    2014-01-01

    The neotenic Platerodrilus net-winged beetles have strongly modified development where females do not pupate and retain larval morphology when sexually mature. As a result, dispersal propensity of females is extremely low and the lineage can be used for reconstruction of ancient dispersal and vicariance patterns and identification of centres of diversity. We identified three deep lineages in Platerodrilus occurring predominantly in (1) Borneo and the Philippines, (2) continental Asia, and (3) Sumatra, the Malay Peninsula and Java. We document limited ranges of all species of Platerodrilus and complete species level turnover between the Sunda Islands and even between individual mountain regions in Sumatra. Few dispersal events were recovered among the major geographical regions despite long evolutionary history of occurrence; all of them were dated at the early phase of Platerodrilus diversification up to the end of Miocene and no exchange of island faunas was identified during the Pliocene and Pleistocene despite the frequently exposed Sunda Shelf as sea levels fluctuated with each glacial cycle. We observed high diversity in the regions with persisting humid tropical forests during cool periods. The origins of multiple species were inferred in Sumatra soon after the island emerged and the mountain range uplifted 15 million years ago with the speciation rate lower since then. We suppose that the extremely low dispersal propensity makes Platerodrilus a valuable indicator of uninterrupted persistence of rainforests over a long time span. Additionally, if the diversity of these neotenic lineages is to be protected, a high dense system of protected areas would be necessary. PMID:25919357

  17. Ecology and genetic diversity of the dense-flowered orchid, Neotinea maculata, at the centre and edge of its range

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Karl J.; Scopece, Giovanni; Cozzolino, Salvatore; Fay, Michael F.; Smith, Rhian J.; Stout, Jane C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Species may occur over a wide geographical range within which populations can display large variation in reproductive success and genetic diversity. Neotinea maculata is a rare orchid of conservation concern at the edge of its range in Ireland, where it occurs in small populations. However, it is relatively common throughout the Mediterranean region. Here, factors that affect rarity of N. maculata in Ireland are investigated by comparing Irish populations with those found in Italy, where it is more common. Methods Vegetation communities, breeding system and genetic diversity were compared using three amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) primer pairs in populations in Ireland and Italy. Vegetation was quantified using quadrats taken along transects in study populations, and hand pollination experiments were performed to assess reliance of N. maculata on pollinators in both Irish and Italian populations. Key Results Neotinea maculata occupies different vegetation communities in Italian and Irish populations. Breeding system experiments show that N. maculata is 100 % autogamous, and there are no differences in fruit and seed production in selfed, outcrossed and unmanipulated plants. AFLP markers revealed that Irish and Italian populations have similar genetic diversity and are distinct from each other. Conclusions Neotinea maculata does not suffer any negative effects of autogamous reproduction; it self-pollinates and sets seed readily in the absence of pollinators. It occupies a variety of habitats in both Ireland and Italy; however, Irish populations are small and rare and should be conserved. This could be due to climatic factors and the absence of suitable soil mycorrhizas to allow recruitment from seed. PMID:18940852

  18. Microstrip Antennas with Polarization Diversity across a Wide Frequency Range and Phased Array Antennas for Radar and Satellite Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kevin Ming-Jiang

    The thesis comprises of 3 projects; an L-band microstrip antenna with frequency agility and polarization diversity, X-band phased array antennas incorporating commercially packaged RFIC phased array chips, and studies for Ku/Ka-band shared aperture antenna array. The first project features the use of commercially packaged RF-MEMS SPDT switches, that boasts of high reliability, high linearity, low losses, hermetically packaged and fully compatible for SMTA processes for mass-assembly and production. Using the switches in a novel manner for the feed network, microstrip antennas with polarization diversity are presented. Frequency agility is achieved with the use of tuning diodes to provide capacitive loading to the antenna element. Additional inductance effects from surface-mounted capacitors, and its impact, is introduced. Theoretical cross-polarization of probe-fed antenna elements is presented for both linear and circular polarized microstrip antennas. Designs and measurements are presented, for microstrip antennas with polarization diversity, wide frequency tuning range, and both features. Replacement of the tuning diodes with commercially-packaged high Q RF MEMS tunable capacitors will allow for significant improvements to the radiation efficiency. In another project, multi-channel CMOS RFIC phased-array receiver chips are assembled in QFN packages and directly integrated on the same multi-layered PCB stack-up with the antenna arrays. Problems of isolation from the PCB-QFN interface, and potential performance degradation on antenna array from the use of commercial-grade laminates for assembly requirements, namely potential scan blindness and radiation efficiency, are presented. Causes for apparent drift of dielectric constant for microstrip circuits, and high conductor losses observed in measurements, are introduced. Finally, studies are performed for the design of a Ku/Ka-Band shared aperture array. Different approaches for developing dual-band shared apertures

  19. The Role of the Jasmonate Response in Plant Susceptibility to Diverse Pathogens with a Range of Lifestyles1[w

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Jennifer S.; Owen, Blythe; Higgins, Verna J.

    2004-01-01

    Plants defend themselves against attack from insects and pathogens with various resistance strategies. The jasmonate and salicylate signaling pathways are two induced responses that protect plants against these attackers. Knowledge of the range of organisms that are affected by each response is important for understanding how plants coordinate their defenses against multiple attackers and the generality of effect of different resistance mechanisms. The jasmonate response is known to protect plants against a wide range of insect herbivores; in this study, we examined the role of the jasmonate response in susceptibility to eight pathogens with diverse lifestyles in the laboratory and field. Recent biochemical models suggest that the lifestyle of the pathogen (necrotroph versus biotroph) should predict whether the jasmonate response will be involved in resistance. We tested this by examining the susceptibility of wild-type (cv Castlemart with no known genes for resistance to the pathogens used) and jasmonate-deficient mutant tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants (def1) and by employing rescue treatments of the mutant. Plant susceptibility to five of the eight pathogens we examined was reduced by the jasmonate response, including two bacteria (Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas campestris), two fungi (Verticillium dahliae and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici), and an oomycete (Phytophthora infestans). Susceptibility to three fungi was unaffected (Cladosporium fulvum, Oidium neolycopersici, and Septoria lycopersici). Our results indicate that the jasmonate response reduces damage by a wide range of pathogens from different lifestyles, a result that contrasts with the emerging picture of diseases on Arabidopsis. Thus, the generality of jasmonate-based resistance of tomato challenges the view that ecologically distinct plant parasites are resisted via different mechanisms. PMID:15133157

  20. The role of the jasmonate response in plant susceptibility to diverse pathogens with a range of lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Jennifer S; Owen, Blythe; Higgins, Verna J

    2004-05-01

    Plants defend themselves against attack from insects and pathogens with various resistance strategies. The jasmonate and salicylate signaling pathways are two induced responses that protect plants against these attackers. Knowledge of the range of organisms that are affected by each response is important for understanding how plants coordinate their defenses against multiple attackers and the generality of effect of different resistance mechanisms. The jasmonate response is known to protect plants against a wide range of insect herbivores; in this study, we examined the role of the jasmonate response in susceptibility to eight pathogens with diverse lifestyles in the laboratory and field. Recent biochemical models suggest that the lifestyle of the pathogen (necrotroph versus biotroph) should predict whether the jasmonate response will be involved in resistance. We tested this by examining the susceptibility of wild-type (cv Castlemart with no known genes for resistance to the pathogens used) and jasmonate-deficient mutant tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants (def1) and by employing rescue treatments of the mutant. Plant susceptibility to five of the eight pathogens we examined was reduced by the jasmonate response, including two bacteria (Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas campestris), two fungi (Verticillium dahliae and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici), and an oomycete (Phytophthora infestans). Susceptibility to three fungi was unaffected (Cladosporium fulvum, Oidium neolycopersici, and Septoria lycopersici). Our results indicate that the jasmonate response reduces damage by a wide range of pathogens from different lifestyles, a result that contrasts with the emerging picture of diseases on Arabidopsis. Thus, the generality of jasmonate-based resistance of tomato challenges the view that ecologically distinct plant parasites are resisted via different mechanisms. PMID:15133157

  1. Firing range soils yield a diverse array of fungal isolates capable of organic acid production and Pb mineral solubilization.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Tarah S; Gottel, Neil R; Basta, Nicholas; Jardine, Philip M; Schadt, Christopher W

    2012-09-01

    Anthropogenic sources of lead contamination in soils include mining and smelting activities, effluents and wastes, agricultural pesticides, domestic garbage dumps, and shooting ranges. While Pb is typically considered relatively insoluble in the soil environment, some fungi may potentially contribute to mobilization of heavy metal cations by means of secretion of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs). We sought to better understand the potential for metal mobilization within an indigenous fungal community at an abandoned shooting range in Oak Ridge, TN, where soil Pb contamination levels ranged from 24 to >2,700 mg Pb kg dry soil(-1). We utilized culture-based assays to determine organic acid secretion and Pb-carbonate dissolution of a diverse collection of soil fungal isolates derived from the site and verified isolate distribution patterns within the community by 28S rRNA gene analysis of whole soils. The fungal isolates examined included both ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that excreted high levels (up to 27 mM) of a mixture of LMWOAs, including oxalic and citric acids, and several isolates demonstrated a marked ability to dissolve Pb-carbonate at high concentrations up to 10.5 g liter(-1) (18.5 mM) in laboratory assays. Fungi within the indigenous community of these highly Pb-contaminated soils are capable of LMWOA secretion at levels greater than those of well-studied model organisms, such as Aspergillus niger. Additionally, these organisms were found in high relative abundance (>1%) in some of the most heavily contaminated soils. Our data highlight the need to understand more about autochthonous fungal communities at Pb-contaminated sites and how they may impact Pb biogeochemistry, solubility, and bioavailability, thus consequently potentially impacting human and ecosystem health. PMID:22729539

  2. Firing Range Soils Yield a Diverse Array of Fungal Isolates Capable of Organic Acid Production and Pb Mineral Solubilization

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Tarah S.; Gottel, Neil R.; Basta, Nicholas; Jardine, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic sources of lead contamination in soils include mining and smelting activities, effluents and wastes, agricultural pesticides, domestic garbage dumps, and shooting ranges. While Pb is typically considered relatively insoluble in the soil environment, some fungi may potentially contribute to mobilization of heavy metal cations by means of secretion of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs). We sought to better understand the potential for metal mobilization within an indigenous fungal community at an abandoned shooting range in Oak Ridge, TN, where soil Pb contamination levels ranged from 24 to >2,700 mg Pb kg dry soil−1. We utilized culture-based assays to determine organic acid secretion and Pb-carbonate dissolution of a diverse collection of soil fungal isolates derived from the site and verified isolate distribution patterns within the community by 28S rRNA gene analysis of whole soils. The fungal isolates examined included both ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that excreted high levels (up to 27 mM) of a mixture of LMWOAs, including oxalic and citric acids, and several isolates demonstrated a marked ability to dissolve Pb-carbonate at high concentrations up to 10.5 g liter−1 (18.5 mM) in laboratory assays. Fungi within the indigenous community of these highly Pb-contaminated soils are capable of LMWOA secretion at levels greater than those of well-studied model organisms, such as Aspergillus niger. Additionally, these organisms were found in high relative abundance (>1%) in some of the most heavily contaminated soils. Our data highlight the need to understand more about autochthonous fungal communities at Pb-contaminated sites and how they may impact Pb biogeochemistry, solubility, and bioavailability, thus consequently potentially impacting human and ecosystem health. PMID:22729539

  3. Negative Selection on BRCA1 Susceptibility Alleles Sheds Light on the Population Genetics of Late-Onset Diseases and Aging Theory

    PubMed Central

    Pavard, Samuel; Metcalf, C. Jessica E.

    2007-01-01

    The magnitude of negative selection on alleles involved in age-specific mortality decreases with age. This is the foundation of the evolutionary theory of senescence. Because of this decrease in negative selection with age, and because of the absence of reproduction after menopause, alleles involved in women's late-onset diseases are generally considered evolutionarily neutral. Recently, genetic and epidemiological data on alleles involved in late onset-diseases have become available. It is therefore timely to estimate selection on these alleles. Here, we estimate selection on BRCA1 alleles leading to susceptibility to late-onset breast and ovarian cancer. For this, we integrate estimates of the risk of developing a cancer for BRCA1-carriers into population genetics frameworks, and calculate selection coefficients on BRCA1 alleles for different demographic scenarios varying across the extent of human demography. We then explore the magnitude of negative selection on alleles leading to a diverse range of risk patterns, to capture a variety of late-onset diseases. We show that BRCA1 alleles may have been under significant negative selection during human history. Although the mean age of onset of the disease is long after menopause, variance in age of onset means that there are always enough cases occurring before the end of reproductive life to compromise the selective value of women carrying a susceptibility allele in BRCA1. This seems to be the case for an extended range of risk of onset functions varying both in mean and variance. This finding may explain the distribution of BRCA1 alleles' frequency, and also why alleles for many late-onset diseases, like certain familial forms of cancer, coronary artery diseases and Alzheimer dementia, are typically recent and rare. Finally, we discuss why the two most popular evolutionary theories of aging, mutation accumulation and antagonistic pleiotropy, may underestimate the effect of selection on survival at old ages. PMID

  4. Species History Masks the Effects of Human-Induced Range Loss – Unexpected Genetic Diversity in the Endangered Giant Mayfly Palingenia longicauda

    PubMed Central

    Bálint, Miklós; Málnás, Kristóf; Nowak, Carsten; Geismar, Jutta; Váncsa, Éva; Polyák, László; Lengyel, Szabolcs; Haase, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater biodiversity has declined dramatically in Europe in recent decades. Because of massive habitat pollution and morphological degradation of water bodies, many once widespread species persist in small fractions of their original range. These range contractions are generally believed to be accompanied by loss of intraspecific genetic diversity, due to the reduction of effective population sizes and the extinction of regional genetic lineages. We aimed to assess the loss of genetic diversity and its significance for future potential reintroduction of the long-tailed mayfly Palingenia longicauda (Olivier), which experienced approximately 98% range loss during the past century. Analysis of 936 bp of mitochondrial DNA of 245 extant specimens across the current range revealed a surprisingly large number of haplotypes (87), and a high level of haplotype diversity (). In contrast, historic specimens (6) from the lost range (Rhine catchment) were not differentiated from the extant Rába population (, ), despite considerable geographic distance separating the two rivers. These observations can be explained by an overlap of the current with the historic (Pleistocene) refugia of the species. Most likely, the massive recent range loss mainly affected the range which was occupied by rapid post-glacial dispersal. We conclude that massive range losses do not necessarily coincide with genetic impoverishment and that a species' history must be considered when estimating loss of genetic diversity. The assessment of spatial genetic structures and prior phylogeographic information seems essential to conserve once widespread species. PMID:22412844

  5. Assessing potential modifications to the activated sludge process to improve simultaneous removal of a diverse range of micropollutants.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Bruce; McAdam, Ewan J; Lester, John N; Cartmell, Elise

    2014-10-01

    It is proposed that wastewater treatment facilities meet legislated discharge limits for a range of micropollutants. However, the heterogeneity of these micropollutants in wastewaters make removal difficult to predict since their chemistry is so diverse. In this study, a range of organic and inorganic micropollutants known to be preferentially removed via different mechanisms were selected to challenge the activated sludge process (ASP) and determine its potential to achieve simultaneous micropollutant removal. At a fixed hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 8 h, the influence of an increase in solids retention time (SRT) on removal was evaluated. Maximum achievable micropollutant removal was recorded for all chemicals (estrogens, nonylphenolics and metals) at the highest SRT studied (27 days). Also, optimisation of HRT by extension to 24 h further augmented organic biodegradation. Most notable was the enhancement in removal of the considerably recalcitrant synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol which increased to 65 ± 19%. Regression analysis indicates that this enhanced micropollutant behaviour is ostensibly related to the concomitant reduction in food: microorganism ratio. Interestingly, extended HRT also initiated nonylphenol biodegradation which has not been consistently observed previously in real wastewaters. However, extending HRT increased the solubilisation of particulate bound metals, increasing effluent aqueous metals concentrations (i.e., 0.45 μm filtered) by >100%. This is significant as only the aqueous metal phase is to be considered for environmental compliance. Consequently, identification of an optimum process condition for generic micropollutant removal is expected to favour a more integrated approach where upstream process unit optimisation (i.e., primary sedimentation) is demanded to reduce loading of the particle bound metal phase onto the ASP, thereby enabling longer HRT in the ASP to be considered for optimum removal of organic

  6. Effects of historical climate change, habitat connectivity, and vicariance on genetic structure and diversity across the range of the Red Tree Vole (Phenacomys longicaudus) in the Pacific Northwest United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mark P.; Bellinger, R.M.; Forsman, E.D.; Haig, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    Phylogeographical analyses conducted in the Pacific Northwestern United States have often revealed concordant patterns of genetic diversity among taxa. These studies demonstrate distinct North/South genetic discontinuities that have been attributed to Pleistocene glaciation. We examined phylogeographical patterns of red tree voles (Phenacomys longicaudus) in western Oregon by analysing mitochondrial control region sequences for 169 individuals from 18 areas across the species' range. Cytochrome b sequences were also analysed from a subset of our samples to confirm the presence of major haplotype groups. Phylogenetic network analyses suggested the presence of two haplotype groups corresponding to northern and southern regions of P. longicaudus' range. Spatial genetic analyses (samova and Genetic Landscape Shapes) of control region sequences demonstrated a primary genetic discontinuity separating northern and southern sampling areas, while a secondary discontinuity separated northern sampling areas into eastern and western groups divided by the Willamette Valley. The North/South discontinuity likely corresponds to a region of secondary contact between lineages rather than an overt barrier. Although the Cordilleran ice sheet (maximum a??12 000 years ago) did not move southward to directly affect the region occupied by P. longicaudus, climate change during glaciation fragmented the forest landscape that it inhabits. Signatures of historical fragmentation were reflected by positive associations between latitude and variables such as Tajima's D and patterns associated with location-specific alleles. Genetic distances between southern sampling areas were smaller, suggesting that forest fragmentation was reduced in southern vs. northern regions.

  7. Petrogenesis of Triassic granites from the Nanling Range in South China: Implications for geochemical diversity in granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Zhao, Zi-Fu; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2014-12-01

    A combined study of whole-rock major-trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes, zircon U-Pb ages, Hf and O isotopes as well as biotite geochemistry was carried out for Triassic granite intrusions from the Nanling Range in South China. The results provide insights into the effects of source composition and melting conditions on the geochemical diversity of granites. The granites of interest are peraluminous, and contain primary muscovite and tourmaline. They are characterized by high zircon δ18O values of > 9.0‰, high initial 87Sr/86Sr values of ~ 0.7200, and homogeneous εNd(t) values of - 11.3 to - 9.8, as well as variable zircon εHf(t) values of - 12.2 to - 5.8. Biotite geochemistry is similar to that of common peraluminous granites. An integrated interpretation of these petrological, mineralogical and geochemical data indicates that these granites were derived from partial melting of metasedimentary rocks under variable physicochemical conditions. The differences in whole-rock and biotite geochemistry between the intrusions are ascribed to the variable effects of source heterogeneity and melting temperature. The Luxi intrusion exhibits higher contents of MgO, FeOT, TiO2 and CaO than common melts derived from metasedimentary rocks, tight variations in major-trace elements and homogeneous Sr-Nd isotopic compositions, and homogeneous biotite composition with high Mg# [= Mg / (Mg + Fe) in molar] and lower whole-rock A/CNK values [= Al2O3 / (CaO + Na2O + K2O) in molar]. These can be explained by originating from a relatively mafic metasedimentary source. On the other hand, the geochemical diversity of granites can be caused by the difference in melting temperature in addition to the source heterogeneity. This is suggested by the Xiazhuang and Fucheng intrusions which exhibit similar range of SiO2. Nevertheless, the Fucheng intrusion is ferroan, and high in TiO2, (Na2O + K2O)/CaO, TiO2/MgO, Ga/Al and Zr + Nb + Ce + Y, but low in CaO, MgO and Mg#. Most of its major

  8. High Cryptic Diversity across the Global Range of the Migratory Planktonic Copepods Pleuromamma piseki and P. gracilis

    PubMed Central

    Halbert, Kristin M. K.; Goetze, Erica; Carlon, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Although holoplankton are ocean drifters and exhibit high dispersal potential, a number of studies on single species are finding highly divergent genetic clades. These cryptic species complexes are important to discover and describe, as identification of common marine species is fundamental to understanding ecosystem dynamics. Here we investigate the global diversity within Pleuromamma piseki and P. gracilis, two dominant members of the migratory zooplankton assemblage in subtropical and tropical waters worldwide. Using DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (mtCOII) from 522 specimens collected across the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans, we discover twelve well-resolved genetically distinct clades in this species complex (Bayesian posterior probabilities >0.7; 6.3–17% genetic divergence between clades). The morphologically described species P. piseki and P. gracilis did not form monophyletic groups, rather they were distributed throughout the phylogeny and sometimes co-occurred within well-resolved clades: this result suggests that morphological characters currently used for taxonomic identification of P. gracilis and P. piseki may be inaccurate as indicators of species’ boundaries. Cryptic clades within the species complex ranged from being common to rare, and from cosmopolitan to highly restricted in distribution across the global ocean. These novel lineages appear to be ecologically divergent, with distinct biogeographic distributions across varied pelagic habitats. We hypothesize that these mtDNA lineages are distinct species and suggest that resolving their systematic status is important, given the ecological significance of the genus Pleuromamma in subtropical-tropical waters worldwide. PMID:24167556

  9. The utility of ancient human DNA for improving allele age estimates, with implications for demographic models and tests of natural selection

    PubMed Central

    Sams, Aaron J.; Hawks, John; Keinan, Alon

    2015-01-01

    The age of polymorphic alleles in humans is often estimated from population genetic patterns in extant human populations, such as allele frequencies, linkage disequilibrium, and rate of mutations. Ancient DNA can improve the accuracy of such estimates, as well as facilitate testing the validity of demographic models underlying many population genetic methods. Specifically, the presence of an allele in a genome derived from an ancient sample testifies that the allele is at least as old as that sample. In this study, we consider a common method for estimating allele age based on allele frequency as applied to variants from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Exome Sequencing Project. We view these estimates in the context of the presence or absence of each allele in the genomes of the 5300 year old Tyrolean Iceman, Ötzi, and of the 50,000 year old Altai Neandertal. Our results illuminate the accuracy of these estimates and their sensitivity to demographic events that were not included in the model underlying age estimation. Specifically, allele presence in the Iceman genome provides a good fit of allele age estimates to the expectation based on the age of that specimen. The equivalent based on the Neandertal genome leads to a poorer fit. This is likely due in part to the older age of the Neandertal and the older time of the split between modern humans and Neandertals, but also due to gene flow from Neandertals to modern humans not being considered in the underlying demographic model. Thus, the incorporation of ancient DNA can improve allele age estimation, demographic modeling, and tests of natural selection. Our results also point to the importance of considering a more diverse set of ancient samples for understanding the geographic and temporal range of individual alleles. PMID:25467111

  10. The utility of ancient human DNA for improving allele age estimates, with implications for demographic models and tests of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Sams, Aaron J; Hawks, John; Keinan, Alon

    2015-02-01

    The age of polymorphic alleles in humans is often estimated from population genetic patterns in extant human populations, such as allele frequencies, linkage disequilibrium, and rate of mutations. Ancient DNA can improve the accuracy of such estimates, as well as facilitate testing the validity of demographic models underlying many population genetic methods. Specifically, the presence of an allele in a genome derived from an ancient sample testifies that the allele is at least as old as that sample. In this study, we consider a common method for estimating allele age based on allele frequency as applied to variants from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Exome Sequencing Project. We view these estimates in the context of the presence or absence of each allele in the genomes of the 5300 year old Tyrolean Iceman, Ötzi, and of the 50,000 year old Altai Neandertal. Our results illuminate the accuracy of these estimates and their sensitivity to demographic events that were not included in the model underlying age estimation. Specifically, allele presence in the Iceman genome provides a good fit of allele age estimates to the expectation based on the age of that specimen. The equivalent based on the Neandertal genome leads to a poorer fit. This is likely due in part to the older age of the Neandertal and the older time of the split between modern humans and Neandertals, but also due to gene flow from Neandertals to modern humans not being considered in the underlying demographic model. Thus, the incorporation of ancient DNA can improve allele age estimation, demographic modeling, and tests of natural selection. Our results also point to the importance of considering a more diverse set of ancient samples for understanding the geographic and temporal range of individual alleles. PMID:25467111

  11. Interpreting sperm DNA damage in a diverse range of mammalian sperm by means of the two-tailed comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; López-Fernández, Carmen; Fernández, José Luis; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Johnston, Stephen D.; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    allow for the simultaneous evaluation of DSBs and SSBs in mammalian spermatozoa. Here we have compiled a retrospective overview of how the TT-comet assay has been used to investigate the structure and function of sperm DNA across a diverse range of mammalian species (eutheria, metatheria, and prototheria). When conducted as part of the TT-comet assay, we illustrate (a) how the alkaline comet single assay has been used to help understand the constitutive and transient changes in DNA structure associated with chromatin packing, (b) the capacity of the TT-comet to differentiate between the presence of SSBs and DSBs (c) and the possible implications of SSBs or DSBs for the assessment of infertility. PMID:25505901

  12. Functional Significance of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Lactase Gene in Diverse United States Subjects and Evidence for a Novel Lactase Persistence Allele at -13909 in Those of European Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Baffour-Awuah, Nana Yaa; Fleet, Sarah; Baker, Susan S.; Butler, Johannah L.; Campbell, Catarina; Tischfield, Samuel; Mitchell, Paul D.; Moon, Jennifer E.; Allende-Richter, Sophie; Fishman, Laurie; Bousvaros, Athos; Fox, Victor; Kuokkanen, Mikko; Montgomery, Robert K.; Grand, Richard J.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recent data from mainly homogeneous European and African populations implicate a 140 bp region 5′ to the transcriptional start site of LCT (the lactase gene) as a regulatory site for lactase persistence and non-persistence. As there are no studies of United States non-homogeneous populations, we performed genotype/phenotype analysis of the -13910 and -22018 LCT SNPs in New England children, mostly of European ancestry. Methods Duodenal biopsies were processed for disaccharidase activities, RNA quantification by RT-PCR, allelic expression ratios by PCR, and genotyping and SNP analysis. Results were compared to clinical information. Results Lactase activity and mRNA levels, as well as sucrase-to-lactase ratios of enzyme activity and mRNA, showed robust correlations with genotype. None of the other LCT SNPs showed as strong a correlation with enzyme or mRNA activities as did -13910. Data were consistent with the -13910 being the causal sequence variant rather than -22018. Four individuals heterozygous for -13910T/C had allelic expression patterns similar to individuals with -13910C/C genotypes; of these, 2 showed equal LCT expression from the 2 alleles and a novel variant (-13909C>A) associated with lactase persistence. Conclusion The identification of -13910C/C genotype is very likely to predict lactase non-persistence, consistent with prior published studies. A -13910T/T genotype will frequently, but not perfectly, predict lactase persistence in this mixed European-ancestry population; a -13910T/C genotype will not predict the phenotype. A long, rare haplotype in 2 individuals with -13910T/C genotype but equal allele-specific expression contains a novel lactase persistence allele present at -13909. PMID:25625576

  13. A limit to the divergent allele advantage model supported by variable pathogen recognition across HLA-DRB1 allele lineages.

    PubMed

    Lau, Q; Yasukochi, Y; Satta, Y

    2015-11-01

    Genetic diversity in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules is thought to have arisen from the co-evolution between host and pathogen and maintained by balancing selection. Heterozygote advantage is a common proposed scenario for maintaining high levels of diversity in HLA genes, and extending from this, the divergent allele advantage (DAA) model suggests that individuals with more divergent HLA alleles bind and recognize a wider array of antigens. While the DAA model seems biologically suitable for driving HLA diversity, there is likely an upper threshold to the amount of sequence divergence. We used peptide-binding and pathogen-recognition capacity of DRB1 alleles as a model to further explore the DAA model; within the DRB1 locus, we examined binding predictions based on two distinct phylogenetic groups (denoted group A and B) previously identified based on non-peptide-binding region (PBR) nucleotide sequences. Predictions in this study support that group A allele and group B allele lineages have contrasting binding/recognition capacity, with only the latter supporting the DAA model. Furthermore, computer simulations revealed an inconsistency in the DAA model alone with observed extent of polymorphisms, supporting that the DAA model could only work effectively in combination with other mechanisms. Overall, we support that the mechanisms driving HLA diversity are non-exclusive. By investigating the relationships among HLA alleles, and pathogens recognized, we can provide further insights into the mechanisms on how humans have adapted to infectious diseases over time. PMID:26392055

  14. Retention of agronomically important variation in germplasm core collections: implications for allele mining

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary targets of allele mining efforts are loci of agronomic importance. Agronomic loci typically exhibit patterns of allelic diversity consistent with a history of natural or artificial selection. Natural or artificial selection causes the distribution of genetic diversity at such loci to d...

  15. Molecular diversity of the microsporidium Kneallhazzia solenopsae reveals an expanded host range among fire ants in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kneallhazia solenopsae is a pathogenic microsporidium of the fire ants Solenopsis invicta and Solenopis richteri in South America and the USA. In this study we analyzed the presence and molecular diversity of K. solenopsae in fire ants from North and South America. We reported the first empirical ev...

  16. Belowground carabid beetle diversity in the western Palaearctic – effects of history and climate on range-restricted taxa (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

    PubMed Central

    Schuldt, Andreas; Assmann, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Broad-scale patterns of subterranean diversity are a fascinating but neglected part of biodiversity research. Carabid beetles adapted to belowground habitats form a particularly species-rich part of the subterranean fauna. We studied large-scale diversity patterns of these belowground carabids across the western Palaearctic and evaluated potential impacts of historical and contemporary environmental conditions on the distribution of these taxa, using available species richness and environmental data at country level. Regression modelling and variation partitioning showed a strong relationship between species richness and range in elevation. Potential effects of climatic variables, mainly those related to ambient energy input, were much weaker. We discuss the implications of this combination of effects, which suggests, concordant with the absence of subterranean carabids in northern and highest richness in southern Europe, a strong prevailing influence of historical processes on current richness distributions of these taxa. Previous studies did not provide clear indications for such an influence. In contrast to more mobile and widespread carabid beetles, dispersal limitation due to high adaptation of belowground carabids to subterranean habitats has probably hindered their re-colonization of former permafrost and glaciated regions. Hotspots of highest belowground diversity are located in regions with an assumed long-term stability of environmental conditions, correlating with patterns of other dispersal-limited taxa such as many endemic plants. Our study provides important new information in the discussion of potential determinants of the distinct geographic patterns of belowground diversity. Moreover, it contributes to a better understanding of range size related differences previously found in the distribution of diversity and environmental dependencies of widespread and range-restricted species within the highly diverse carabid beetles. PMID:21738427

  17. Evidence for selection maintaining MHC diversity in a rodent species despite strong density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Andrea C; Herde, Antje; Mazzoni, Camila J; Eccard, Jana A; Sommer, Simone

    2016-07-01

    Strong spatiotemporal variation in population size often leads to reduced genetic diversity limiting the adaptive potential of individual populations. Key genes of adaptive variation are encoded by the immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) playing an essential role in parasite resistance. How MHC variation persists in rodent populations that regularly experience population bottlenecks remains an important topic in evolutionary genetics. We analysed the consequences of strong population fluctuations on MHC class II DRB exon 2 diversity in two distant common vole (Microtus arvalis) populations in three consecutive years using a high-throughput sequencing approach. In 143 individuals, we detected 25 nucleotide alleles translating into 14 unique amino acid MHC alleles belonging to at least three loci. Thus, the overall allelic diversity and amino acid distance among the remaining MHC alleles, used as a surrogate for the range of pathogenic antigens that can be presented to T-cells, are still remarkably high. Both study populations did not show significant population differentiation between years, but significant differences were found between sites. We concluded that selection processes seem to be strong enough to maintain moderate levels of MHC diversity in our study populations outcompeting genetic drift, as the same MHC alleles were conserved between years. Differences in allele frequencies between populations might be the outcome of different local parasite pressures and/or genetic drift. Further understanding of how pathogens vary across space and time will be crucial to further elucidate the mechanisms maintaining MHC diversity in cyclic populations. PMID:27225422

  18. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.

  19. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; et al

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population andmore » functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.« less

  20. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  1. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; De Masi, Leon; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S; Fraser, George P; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W Florian; Edwards, Robert A; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R; Rankin, Shelley C; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  2. Multilocus sequence typing approach for a broader range of species of Leishmania genus: describing parasite diversity in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Marco, Jorge D; Barroso, Paola A; Locatelli, Fabricio M; Cajal, S Pamela; Hoyos, Carlos L; Nevot, M Cecilia; Lauthier, Juan J; Tomasini, Nicolás; Juarez, Marisa; Estévez, J Octavio; Korenaga, Masataka; Nasser, Julio R; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa; Ruybal, Paula

    2015-03-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne protozoan infection affecting over 350 million people around the world. In Argentina cutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic in nine provinces and visceral leishmaniasis is spreading from autochthonous transmission foci in seven provinces. However, there is limited information about the diversity of the parasite in this country. Implementation of molecular strategies for parasite typing, particularly multilocus sequence typing (MLST), represents an improved approach for genetic variability and population dynamics analyses. We selected six loci as candidates implemented in reference strains and Argentinean isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed high correlation with taxonomic classification of the parasite. Autochthonous Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis showed higher genetic diversity than L. (Leishmania) infantum but low support was obtained for intra-L. braziliensis complex variants suggesting the need of new loci that contribute to phylogenetic resolution for an improved MLST or nested-MLST scheme. This study represents the first characterization of genetic variability of Leishmania spp. in Argentina. PMID:25558029

  3. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  4. Inferring the age of a fixed beneficial allele.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Louise; Foll, Matthieu; Ewing, Gregory B; Pfeifer, Susanne P; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the age and strength of beneficial alleles is central to understanding how adaptation proceeds in response to changing environmental conditions. Several haplotype-based estimators exist for inferring the age of segregating beneficial mutations. Here, we develop an approximate Bayesian-based approach that rather estimates these parameters for fixed beneficial mutations in single populations. We integrate a range of existing diversity, site frequency spectrum, haplotype- and linkage disequilibrium-based summary statistics. We show that for strong selective sweeps on de novo mutations the method can estimate allele age and selection strength even in nonequilibrium demographic scenarios. We extend our approach to models of selection on standing variation, and co-infer the frequency at which selection began to act upon the mutation. Finally, we apply our method to estimate the age and selection strength of a previously identified mutation underpinning cryptic colour adaptation in a wild deer mouse population, and compare our findings with previously published estimates as well as with geological data pertaining to the presumed shift in selective pressure. PMID:26576754

  5. Prevalence, Genetic Characterization, and 18S Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Diversity of Trypanosoma rangeli in Triatomine and Mammal Hosts in Endemic Areas for Chagas Disease in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofia; Aguirre-Villacis, Fernanda; Pinto, C Miguel; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli is a nonpathogenic parasite for humans; however, its medical importance relies in its similarity and overlapping distribution with Trypanosoma cruzi, causal agent of Chagas disease in the Americas. The genetic diversity of T. rangeli and its association with host species (triatomines and mammals) has been identified along Central and the South America; however, it has not included data of isolates from Ecuador. This study reports infection with T. rangeli in 18 genera of mammal hosts and five species of triatomines in three environments (domestic, peridomestic, and sylvatic). Higher infection rates were found in the sylvatic environment, in close association with Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. The results of this study extend the range of hosts infected with this parasite and the geographic range of the T. rangeli genotype KP1(-)/lineage C in South America. It was not possible to detect variation on T. rangeli from the central coastal region and southern Ecuador with the analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene, even though these areas are ecologically different and a phenotypic subdivision of R. ecuadoriensis has been found. R. ecuadoriensis is considered one of the most important vectors for Chagas disease transmission in Ecuador due to its wide distribution and adaptability to diverse environments. An extensive knowledge of the trypanosomes circulating in this species of triatomine, and associated mammal hosts, is important for delineating transmission dynamics and preventive measures in the endemic areas of Ecuador and Northern Peru. PMID:26645579

  6. Analysis of the distribution of HLA-A alleles in populations from five continents.

    PubMed

    Middleton, D; Williams, F; Meenagh, A; Daar, A S; Gorodezky, C; Hammond, M; Nascimento, E; Briceno, I; Perez, M P

    2000-10-01

    The variation and frequency of HLA-A genotypes were established by PCR-SSOP typing in diverse geographically distributed populations: Brazilian, Colombian Kogui, Cuban, Mexican, Omani, Singapore Chinese, and South African Zulu. HLA-A allelic families with only one allele were identified for HLA-A*01, -A*23, -A*25, -A*31, -A*32, -A*36, -A*43, -A*69, -A*80; and with two alleles for HLA-A*03, -A*11, -A*26, -A*29, -A*33, -A*34, and -A*66. Greater variation was detected for HLA-A*02, -A*24, and -A*68 allele families. Colombian Kogui and Mexican Seris showed the least diversity with respect to HLA-A alleles, albeit with small numbers tested, with only four and five HLA-A alleles identified, respectively. It would appear by their presence in all populations studied, either rural or indigenous, that certain alleles are very important in pathogen peptide presentation. PMID:11082518

  7. Bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere of cucumbers grown in soils covering a wide range of cucumber cropping histories and environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongqiang; Gao, Lihong

    2014-11-01

    Rhizosphere microorganisms in soils are important for plant growth. However, the importance of rhizosphere microorganisms is still underestimated since many microorganisms associated with plant roots cannot be cultured and since the microbial diversity in the rhizosphere can be influenced by several factors, such as the cropping history, biogeography, and agricultural practice. Here, we characterized the rhizosphere bacterial diversity of cucumber plants grown in soils covering a wide range of cucumber cropping histories and environmental conditions by using pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We also tested the effects of compost addition and/or bacterial inoculation on the bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere. We identified an average of approximately 8,883 reads per sample, corresponding to around 4,993 molecular operational taxonomic units per sample. The Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in almost all soils. The abundances of the phyla Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia varied among the samples, and together with Proteobacteria, these phyla were the six most abundant phyla in almost all analyzed samples. Analyzing all the sample libraries together, the predominant genera found were Flavobacterium, Ohtaekwangia, Opitutus, Gp6, Steroidobacter, and Acidovorax. Overall, compost and microbial amendments increased shoot biomass when compared to untreated soils. However, compost addition decreased the bacterial α-diversity in most soils (but for three soils compost increased diversity), and no statistical effect of microbial amendment on the bacterial α-diversity was found. Moreover, soil amendments did not significantly influence the bacterial β-diversity. Soil organic content appeared more important than compost and microbial amendments in shaping the structure of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of cucumber. PMID:25027276

  8. Comparison of genetic diversity of the invasive weed Rubus alceifolius poir. (Rosaceae) in its native range and in areas of introduction, using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers.

    PubMed

    Amsellem, L; Noyer, J L; Le Bourgeois, T; Hossaert-McKey, M

    2000-04-01

    Theory predicts that colonization of new areas will be associated with population bottlenecks that reduce within-population genetic diversity and increase genetic differentiation among populations. This should be especially true for weedy plant species, which are often characterized by self-compatible breeding systems and vegetative propagation. To test this prediction, and to evaluate alternative scenarios for the history of introduction, the genetic diversity of Rubus alceifolius was studied with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers in its native range in southeast Asia and in several areas where this plant has been introduced and is now a serious weed (Indian Ocean islands, Australia). In its native range, R. alceifolius showed great genetic variability within populations and among geographically close populations (populations sampled ranging from northern Vietnam to Java). In Madagascar, genetic variability was somewhat lower than in its native range, but still considerable. Each population sampled in the other Indian Ocean islands (Mayotte, La Réunion, Mauritius) was characterized by a single different genotype of R. alceifolius for the markers studied, and closely related to individuals from Madagascar. Queensland populations also included only a single genotype, identical to that found in Mauritius. These results suggest that R. alceifolius was first introduced into Madagascar, perhaps on multiple occasions, and that Madagascan individuals were the immediate source of plants that colonized other areas of introduction. Successive nested founder events appear to have resulted in cumulative reduction in genetic diversity. Possible explanations for the monoclonality of R. alceifolius in many areas of introduction are discussed. PMID:10736047

  9. Genetic Diversity and Ecological Niche Modelling of Wild Barley: Refugia, Large-Scale Post-LGM Range Expansion and Limited Mid-Future Climate Threats?

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Joanne; van Zonneveld, Maarten; Dawson, Ian K.; Booth, Allan; Waugh, Robbie; Steffenson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Describing genetic diversity in wild barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum) in geographic and environmental space in the context of current, past and potential future climates is important for conservation and for breeding the domesticated crop (Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare). Spatial genetic diversity in wild barley was revealed by both nuclear- (2,505 SNP, 24 nSSR) and chloroplast-derived (5 cpSSR) markers in 256 widely-sampled geo-referenced accessions. Results were compared with MaxEnt-modelled geographic distributions under current, past (Last Glacial Maximum, LGM) and mid-term future (anthropogenic scenario A2, the 2080s) climates. Comparisons suggest large-scale post-LGM range expansion in Central Asia and relatively small, but statistically significant, reductions in range-wide genetic diversity under future climate. Our analyses support the utility of ecological niche modelling for locating genetic diversity hotspots and determine priority geographic areas for wild barley conservation under anthropogenic climate change. Similar research on other cereal crop progenitors could play an important role in tailoring conservation and crop improvement strategies to support future human food security. PMID:24505252

  10. Metabolic profiling of a range of peach fruit varieties reveals high metabolic diversity and commonalities and differences during ripening.

    PubMed

    Monti, Laura L; Bustamante, Claudia A; Osorio, Sonia; Gabilondo, Julieta; Borsani, Julia; Lauxmann, Martin A; Maulión, Evangelina; Valentini, Gabriel; Budde, Claudio O; Fernie, Alisdair R; Lara, María V; Drincovich, María F

    2016-01-01

    Peach (Prunus persica) fruits from different varieties display differential organoleptic and nutritional properties, characteristics related to their chemical composition. Here, chemical biodiversity of peach fruits from fifteen varieties, at harvest and after post-harvest ripening, was explored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Metabolic profiling revealed that metabolites involved in organoleptic properties (sugars, organic and amino acids), stress tolerance (raffinose, galactinol, maltitol), and with nutritional properties (amino, caffeoylquinic and dehydroascorbic acids) displayed variety-dependent levels. Peach varieties clustered into four groups: two groups of early-harvest varieties with higher amino acid levels; two groups of mid- and late-harvest varieties with higher maltose levels. Further separation was mostly dependent on organic acids/raffinose levels. Variety-dependent and independent metabolic changes associated with ripening were detected; which contribute to chemical diversity or can be used as ripening markers, respectively. The great variety-dependent diversity in the content of metabolites that define fruit quality reinforces metabolomics usage as a tool to assist fruit quality improvement in peach. PMID:26213052

  11. Phylogeography of postglacial range expansion in Juglans mandshurica (Juglandaceae) reveals no evidence of bottleneck, loss of genetic diversity, or isolation by distance in the leading-edge populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Ting; Xu, Bing; Zhang, Da-Yong; Bai, Wei-Ning

    2016-09-01

    The past studies of postglacial recolonization patterns in high latitude regions have revealed a significant role of dispersal capacity in shaping the genetic diversity and population structure of temperate trees. However, most of these studies have focused on species with long-distance dispersal followed by exponential population growth and were therefore unable to reveal the patterns in the case of a gradual expansion. Here we studied the impacts of postglacial range expansions on the distribution of genetic diversity in the Manchurian walnut (Juglans mandshurica), a common tree of East Asian cool-temperate deciduous forests that apparently lacks long-distance seed dispersal ability. The genetic diversity and structure of 19 natural walnut populations in Northeast China and the Korean Peninsula were examined using 17 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci. Potential habitats under current and past climatic conditions were predicted using the ecological niche modelling (ENM) method. Bayesian clustering analysis revealed three groups, which were inferred to have diverged through multiple glacial-interglacial cycles in multiple refugia during the Quaternary Period. ENM estimated a southward range shift at the LGM, but high suitability scores still occurred in the western parts of the Changbai Mountains (Northeast China), the Korean peninsula and the exposed seafloor of the Yellow Sea. In contrast to most other cool-temperate trees co-occurring in the same region, the Manchurian walnut did not show any evidence of a population bottleneck, loss of genetic diversity or isolation by distance during the postglacial expansion. Our study clearly indicates that current northern populations originated from one glacial lineage and recolonization via a gradually advancing front due to the lack of a long-distance seed dispersal mechanism led to no latitudinal decrease in genetic diversity. PMID:27346642

  12. A Computer Simulation Study of Vntr Population Genetics: Constrained Recombination Rules Out the Infinite Alleles Model

    PubMed Central

    Harding, R. M.; Boyce, A. J.; Martinson, J. J.; Flint, J.; Clegg, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Extensive allelic diversity in variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTRs) has been discovered in the human genome. For population genetic studies of VNTRs, such as forensic applications, it is important to know whether a neutral mutation-drift balance of VNTR polymorphism can be represented by the infinite alleles model. The assumption of the infinite alleles model that each new mutant is unique is very likely to be violated by unequal sister chromatid exchange (USCE), the primary process believed to generate VNTR mutants. We show that increasing both mutation rates and misalignment constraint for intrachromosomal recombination in a computer simulation model reduces simulated VNTR diversity below the expectations of the infinite alleles model. Maximal constraint, represented as slippage of single repeats, reduces simulated VNTR diversity to levels expected from the stepwise mutation model. Although misalignment rule is the more important variable, mutation rate also has an effect. At moderate rates of USCE, simulated VNTR diversity fluctuates around infinite alleles expectation. However, if rates of USCE are high, as for hypervariable VNTRs, simulated VNTR diversity is consistently lower than predicted by the infinite alleles model. This has been observed for many VNTRs and accounted for by technical problems in distinguishing alleles of neighboring size classes. We use sampling theory to confirm the intrinsically poor fit to the infinite alleles model of both simulated VNTR diversity and observed VNTR polymorphisms sampled from two Papua New Guinean populations. PMID:8293988

  13. The making of a rapid plant invader: genetic diversity and differentiation in the native and invaded range of Senecio inaequidens.

    PubMed

    Lachmuth, Susanne; Durka, Walter; Schurr, Frank M

    2010-09-01

    To become invasive, exotic species have to succeed in the consecutive phases of introduction, naturalization, and invasion. Each of these phases leaves traces in genetic structure, which may affect the species' success in subsequent phases. We examined this interplay of genetic structure and invasion dynamics in the South African Ragwort (Senecio inaequidens), one of Europe's fastest plant invaders. We used AFLP and microsatellite markers to analyze 19 native African and 32 invasive European populations. In combination with historic data, we distinguished invasion routes and traced them back to the native source areas. This revealed that different introduction sites had markedly different success in the three invasion phases. Notably, an observed lag-phase in Northern Germany was evidently not terminated by factors increasing the invasiveness of the resident population but by invasive spread from another introduction centre. The lineage invading Central Europe was introduced to sites in which winters are more benign than in the native source region. Subsequently, this lineage spread into areas in which winter temperatures match the native climate more closely. Genetic diversity clearly increases with population age in Europe and less clearly decreases with spread rate up to population establishment. This indicates that gene flow along well-connected invasion routes counteracted losses of genetic diversity during rapid spread. In summary, this study suggests that multiple introductions, environmental preadaptation and high gene flow along invasion routes contributed to the success of this rapid invader. More generally, it demonstrates the benefit of combining genetic, historical, and climatic data for understanding biological invasions. PMID:20854275

  14. Genetic diversity and expanding nonindigenous range of the rhizocephalan Loxothylacus panopaei parasitizing mud crabs in the western north Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Inken; Hare, Matthew P

    2007-06-01

    Nonindigenous parasite introductions and range expansions have become a major concern because of their potential to restructure communities and impact fisheries. Molecular markers provide an important tool for reconstructing the pattern of introduction. The parasitic castrator Loxothylacus panopaei, a rhizocephalan barnacle, infects estuarine mud crabs in the Gulf of Mexico and southeastern Florida. A similar parasite introduced into Chesapeake Bay before 1964, presumably via infected crabs associated with oysters from the Gulf of Mexico, was identified as L. panopaei. Our samples of this species during 2004 and 2005 show that the introduced range has expanded as far south as Edgewater, Florida, just north of the northern endemic range limit. The nonindigenous range expanded southward at a rate of up to 165 km/yr with relatively high prevalence, ranging from 30 to 93%. Mitochondrial DNA sequences from the cytochrome oxidase I gene showed that these nonindigenous L. panopaei are genetically distinct from the endemic parasites in southeastern Florida and the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The genetic difference was also associated with distinct host spectra. These results are incompatible with an eastern Gulf source population, but suggest that unrecognized genetic and phenotypic population structure may occur among Gulf of Mexico populations of Loxothvlacus. PMID:17626349

  15. Do-or-die life cycles and diverse post-infection resistance mechanisms limit the evolution of parasite host ranges.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Michael; Gudelj, Ivana

    2014-04-01

    In light of the dynamic nature of parasite host ranges and documented potential for rapid host shifts, the observed high host specificity of most parasites remains an ecological paradox. Different variants of host-use trade-offs have become a mainstay of theoretical explanations of the prevalence of host specialism, but empirical evidence for such trade-offs is rare. We propose an alternative theory based on basic features of the parasite life cycle: host selection and subsequent intrahost replication. We introduce a new concept of effective burst size that accounts for the fact that successful host selection does not guarantee intrahost replication. Our theory makes a general prediction that a parasite will expand its host range if its effective burst size is positive. An in silico model of bacteria-phage coevolution verifies our predictions and demonstrates that the tendency for relatively narrow host ranges in parasites can be explained even in the absence of trade-offs. PMID:24495077

  16. Allele-specific expression assays using Solexa

    PubMed Central

    Main, Bradley J; Bickel, Ryan D; McIntyre, Lauren M; Graze, Rita M; Calabrese, Peter P; Nuzhdin, Sergey V

    2009-01-01

    Background Allele-specific expression (ASE) assays can be used to identify cis, trans, and cis-by-trans regulatory variation. Understanding the source of expression variation has important implications for disease susceptibility, phenotypic diversity, and adaptation. While ASE is commonly measured via relative fluorescence at a SNP, next generation sequencing provides an opportunity to measure ASE in an accurate and high-throughput manner using read counts. Results We introduce a Solexa-based method to perform large numbers of ASE assays using only a single lane of a Solexa flowcell. In brief, transcripts of interest, which contain a known SNP, are PCR enriched and barcoded to enable multiplexing. Then high-throughput sequencing is used to estimate allele-specific expression using sequencing counts. To validate this method, we measured the allelic bias in a dilution series and found high correlations between measured and expected values (r>0.9, p < 0.001). We applied this method to a set of 5 genes in a Drosophila simulans parental mix, F1 and introgression and found that for these genes the majority of expression divergence can be explained by cis-regulatory variation. Conclusion We present a new method with the capacity to measure ASE for large numbers of assays using as little as one lane of a Solexa flowcell. This will be a valuable technique for molecular and population genetic studies, as well as for verification of genome-wide data sets. PMID:19740431

  17. Restoration of genetic diversity in the dry forest tree Swietenia macrophylla (Meliaceae) after pasture abandonment in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, M; Gutierrez, M V; Holbrook, N M; J Rocha, O

    2003-12-01

    We studied the levels of genetic diversity of Swietenia macrophylla (big leaf mahogany) in five successional plots in the Santa Rosa National Park, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. We selected sites with different lengths of time since the last major disturbance (typically fire): 6, 9, 15 and 20 years. In addition, we also included a patch of mature forest that had experienced selective logging and other human activity in the past 100 years. Genetic diversity was assessed using five polymorphic DNA microsatellite loci. We found a total of 21 alleles in the five loci examined, in which the number of alleles present varied among the five sites studied. Allelic diversity varied between sites ranging from 20 to 14 alleles, and our data revealed that earlier successional sites have more alleles than older sites. There was significant heterogeneity in allele frequencies between sites; however, genetic differentiation between populations was low (FST = 0.063) indicating that most of the variation was found within sites and extensive gene flow between sites. In addition, our analysis also showed that genetic diversity of adult trees does not solely determine the diversity of seedlings and saplings found around them, also supporting the existence of extensive gene flow. The impact of these findings for the design of conservation strategies for tropical dry forests trees is discussed. PMID:14629338

  18. Distinct and diverse: range-wide phylogeography reveals ancient lineages and high genetic variation in the endangered okapi (Okapia johnstoni).

    PubMed

    Stanton, David W G; Hart, John; Galbusera, Peter; Helsen, Philippe; Shephard, Jill; Kümpel, Noëlle F; Wang, Jinliang; Ewen, John G; Bruford, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    The okapi is an endangered, evolutionarily distinctive even-toed ungulate classified within the giraffidae family that is endemic to the Democratic Republic of Congo. The okapi is currently under major anthropogenic threat, yet to date nothing is known about its genetic structure and evolutionary history, information important for conservation management given the species' current plight. The distribution of the okapi, being confined to the Congo Basin and yet spanning the Congo River, also makes it an important species for testing general biogeographic hypotheses for Congo Basin fauna, a currently understudied area of research. Here we describe the evolutionary history and genetic structure of okapi, in the context of other African ungulates including the giraffe, and use this information to shed light on the biogeographic history of Congo Basin fauna in general. Using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis of mainly non-invasively collected samples, we show that the okapi is both highly genetically distinct and highly genetically diverse, an unusual combination of genetic traits for an endangered species, and feature a complex evolutionary history. Genetic data are consistent with repeated climatic cycles leading to multiple Plio-Pleistocene refugia in isolated forests in the Congo catchment but also imply historic gene flow across the Congo River. PMID:25007188

  19. Distinct and Diverse: Range-Wide Phylogeography Reveals Ancient Lineages and High Genetic Variation in the Endangered Okapi (Okapia johnstoni)

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, David W. G.; Hart, John; Galbusera, Peter; Helsen, Philippe; Shephard, Jill; Kümpel, Noëlle F.; Wang, Jinliang; Ewen, John G.; Bruford, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The okapi is an endangered, evolutionarily distinctive even-toed ungulate classified within the giraffidae family that is endemic to the Democratic Republic of Congo. The okapi is currently under major anthropogenic threat, yet to date nothing is known about its genetic structure and evolutionary history, information important for conservation management given the species' current plight. The distribution of the okapi, being confined to the Congo Basin and yet spanning the Congo River, also makes it an important species for testing general biogeographic hypotheses for Congo Basin fauna, a currently understudied area of research. Here we describe the evolutionary history and genetic structure of okapi, in the context of other African ungulates including the giraffe, and use this information to shed light on the biogeographic history of Congo Basin fauna in general. Using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis of mainly non-invasively collected samples, we show that the okapi is both highly genetically distinct and highly genetically diverse, an unusual combination of genetic traits for an endangered species, and feature a complex evolutionary history. Genetic data are consistent with repeated climatic cycles leading to multiple Plio-Pleistocene refugia in isolated forests in the Congo catchment but also imply historic gene flow across the Congo River. PMID:25007188

  20. Wheat gene bank accessions as a source of new alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3: a large scale allele mining project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the last hundred years, the development of improved wheat cultivars has led to the replacement of landraces and traditional varieties by modern cultivars. This has resulted in a decline in the genetic diversity of agriculturally used wheat. However, the diversity lost in the elite material is somewhat preserved in crop gene banks. Therefore, the gene bank accessions provide the basis for genetic improvement of crops for specific traits and and represent rich sources of novel allelic variation. Results We have undertaken large scale molecular allele mining to isolate new alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3 from wheat gene bank accessions. The search for new Pm3 alleles was carried out on a geographically diverse set of 733 wheat accessions originating from 20 countries. Pm3 specific molecular tools as well as classical pathogenicity tests were used to characterize the accessions. Two new functional Pm3 alleles were identified out of the eight newly cloned Pm3 sequences. These new resistance alleles were isolated from accessions from China and Nepal. Thus, the repertoire of functional Pm3 alleles now includes 17 genes, making it one of the largest allelic series of plant resistance genes. The combined information on resistant and susceptible Pm3 sequences will allow to study molecular function and specificity of functional Pm3 alleles. Conclusions This study demonstrates that molecular allele mining on geographically defined accessions is a useful strategy to rapidly characterize the diversity of gene bank accessions at a specific genetic locus of agronomical importance. The identified wheat accessions with new resistance specificities can be used for marker-assisted transfer of the Pm3 alleles to modern wheat lines. PMID:20470444

  1. A general approach for combining diverse rare variant association tests provides improved robustness across a wider range of genetic architectures.

    PubMed

    Greco, Brian; Hainline, Allison; Arbet, Jaron; Grinde, Kelsey; Benitez, Alejandra; Tintle, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    The widespread availability of genome sequencing data made possible by way of next-generation technologies has yielded a flood of different gene-based rare variant association tests. Most of these tests have been published because they have superior power for particular genetic architectures. However, for applied researchers it is challenging to know which test to choose in practice when little is known a priori about genetic architecture. Recently, tests have been proposed which combine two particular individual tests (one burden and one variance components) to minimize power loss while improving robustness to a wider range of genetic architectures. In our analysis we propose an expansion of these approaches, yielding a general method that works for combining any number of individual tests. We demonstrate that running multiple different tests on the same data set and using a Bonferroni correction for multiple testing is never better than combining tests using our general method. We also find that using a test statistic that is highly robust to the inclusion of non-causal variants (joint-infinity) together with a previously published combined test (sequence kernel adaptive test-optimal) provides improved robustness to a wide range of genetic architectures and should be considered for use in practice. Software for this approach is supplied. We support the increased use of combined tests in practice - as well as further exploration of novel combined testing approaches using the general framework provided here - to maximize robustness of rare variant testing strategies against a wide range of genetic architectures. PMID:26508571

  2. Divergent pattern of nuclear genetic diversity across the range of the Afromontane Prunus africana mirrors variable climate of African highlands

    PubMed Central

    Kadu, Caroline A. C.; Konrad, Heino; Schueler, Silvio; Muluvi, Geoffrey M.; Eyog-Matig, Oscar; Muchugi, Alice; Williams, Vivienne L.; Ramamonjisoa, Lolona; Kapinga, Consolatha; Foahom, Bernard; Katsvanga, Cuthbert; Hafashimana, David; Obama, Crisantos; Geburek, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Afromontane forest ecosystems share a high similarity of plant and animal biodiversity, although they occur mainly on isolated mountain massifs throughout the continent. This resemblance has long provoked questions on former wider distribution of Afromontane forests. In this study Prunus africana (one of the character trees of Afromontane forests) is used as a model for understanding the biogeography of this vegetation zone. Methods Thirty natural populations from nine African countries covering a large part of Afromontane regions were analysed using six nuclear microsatellites. Standard population genetic analysis as well as Bayesian and maximum likelihood models were used to infer genetic diversity, population differentiation, barriers to gene flow, and recent and all migration among populations. Key Results Prunus africana exhibits strong divergence among five main Afromontane regions: West Africa, East Africa west of the Eastern Rift Valley (ERV), East Africa east of the ERV, southern Africa and Madagascar. The strongest divergence was evident between Madagascar and continental Africa. Populations from West Africa showed high similarity with East African populations west of the ERV, whereas populations east of the ERV are closely related to populations of southern Africa, respectively. Conclusions The observed patterns indicate divergent population history across the continent most likely associated to Pleistocene changes in climatic conditions. The high genetic similarity between populations of West Africa with population of East Africa west of the ERV is in agreement with faunistic and floristic patterns and provides further evidence for a historical migration route. Contrasting estimates of recent and historical gene flow indicate a shift of the main barrier to gene flow from the Lake Victoria basin to the ERV, highlighting the dynamic environmental and evolutionary history of the region. PMID:23250908

  3. Parallel Adaptation: One or Many Waves of Advance of an Advantageous Allele?

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Peter; Coop, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Models for detecting the effect of adaptation on population genomic diversity are often predicated on a single newly arisen mutation sweeping rapidly to fixation. However, a population can also adapt to a new environment by multiple mutations of similar phenotypic effect that arise in parallel, at the same locus or different loci. These mutations can each quickly reach intermediate frequency, preventing any single one from rapidly sweeping to fixation globally, leading to a “soft” sweep in the population. Here we study various models of parallel mutation in a continuous, geographically spread population adapting to a global selection pressure. The slow geographic spread of a selected allele due to limited dispersal can allow other selected alleles to arise and start to spread elsewhere in the species range. When these different selected alleles meet, their spread can slow dramatically and so initially form a geographic patchwork, a random tessellation, which could be mistaken for a signal of local adaptation. This spatial tessellation will dissipate over time due to mixing by migration, leaving a set of partial sweeps within the global population. We show that the spatial tessellation initially formed by mutational types is closely connected to Poisson process models of crystallization, which we extend. We find that the probability of parallel mutation and the spatial scale on which parallel mutation occurs are captured by a single compound parameter, a characteristic length, which reflects the expected distance a spreading allele travels before it encounters a different spreading allele. This characteristic length depends on the mutation rate, the dispersal parameter, the effective local density of individuals, and to a much lesser extent the strength of selection. While our knowledge of these parameters is poor, we argue that even in widely dispersing species, such parallel geographic sweeps may be surprisingly common. Thus, we predict that as more data

  4. Diversity and evolution of avian influenza viruses in live poultry markets, free-range poultry and wild wetland birds in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang-Jun; Lin, Xian-Dan; Guo, Wen-Ping; Tian, Jun-Hua; Wang, Wen; Ying, Xu-Hua; Wang, Miao-Ruo; Yu, Bin; Yang, Zhan-Qiu; Shi, Mang; Holmes, Edward C; Zhang, Yong-Zhen

    2016-04-01

    The wide circulation of novel avian influenza viruses (AIVs) highlights the risk of pandemic influenza emergence in China. To investigate the prevalence and genetic diversity of AIVs in different ecological contexts, we surveyed AIVs in live poultry markets (LPMs), free-range poultry and the wetland habitats of wild birds in Zhejiang and Hubei provinces. Notably, LPMs contained the highest frequency of AIV infection, and the greatest number of subtypes (n = 9) and subtype co-infections (n = 14), as well as frequent reassortment, suggesting that they play an active role in fuelling AIV transmission. AIV-positive samples were also identified in wild birds in both provinces and free-range poultry in one sampling site close to a wetland region in Hubei. H9N2, H7N9 and H5N1 were the most commonly sampled subtypes in the LPMs from Zhejiang, whilst H5N6 and H9N2 were the dominant subtypes in the LPMs from Hubei. Phylogenetic analyses of the whole-genome sequences of 43 AIVs revealed that three reassortant H5 subtypes were circulating in LMPs in both geographical regions. Notably, the viruses sampled from the wetland regions and free-range poultry contained complex reassortants, for which the origins of some segments were unclear. Overall, our study highlights the extent of AIV genetic diversity in two highly populated parts of central and south-eastern China, particularly in LPMs, and emphasizes the need for continual surveillance. PMID:26758561

  5. Deciphering diversity in populations of various linguistic and ethnic affiliations of different geographical regions of India: analysis based on 15 microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, V K; Ashma, Richa; Gaikwad, Sonali; Sarkar, B N; Trivedi, R

    2004-04-01

    The extent of genetic polymorphism at fifteen autosomal microsatellite markers in 54 ethnically, linguistically and geographically diverse human populations of India was studied to decipher intrapopulation diversity. The parameters used to quantify intrapopulation diversity were average allele diversity, average heterozygosity, allele range (base pairs), and number of alleles. Multilocus genotype frequencies calculated for selected populations were utilized for testing conformity with the assumption of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The exact test values, after Bonferroni correction, showed significant deviation amongst Gowda (vWA, Penta E); Dhangar, Satnami and Gounder (D8S1179); Hmar (FGA); Kuki and Balti (vWA) groups. Relatively low number of alleles and allelic diversity (base-pairs size) had been observed in populations of central India as compared with southern and northern regions of the country. The communities of Indo-Caucasoid ethnic origin and Indo-European linguistic family (Kshatriya of Uttar Pradesh) showed highest allelic diversity, as well as rare alleles, not reported in any other Indian populations. Analysis based on average heterozygosity was also found to be lowest among the populations of central India (0.729) and highest among the populations from north (0.777) and west (0.784) regions of the country, having Indo-Caucasoid ethnic origin and Austro-Asiatic linguistic affiliation. The maximum power of discrimination (85%-89%) had been observed at loci FGA, Penta E, D18S51 and D21S11, suggested high intrapopulation diversity in India. Genetic diversity revealed by STR markers was consistent with the known demographic histories of populations. Thus, the present study clearly demonstrated that the intrapopulation diversity is not only present at the national level, but also within smaller geographical regions of the country. This is the first attempt to understand the extent of diversity within populations of India at such a large scale at genomic

  6. RECOVERY OF EXOTIC ALLELES IN ENHANCED TROPICAL YELLOW GERMPLASM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhancement of overall diversity levels and the incorporation of new favorable traits are major benefits of using exotic germplasm in elite breeding programs. Agronomic deficiencies and poor adaptation often limits use of exotic germplasm in plant breeding programs. To introgress exotic alleles into...

  7. Recovery of Exotic Alleles in Enhanced Tropical Yellow Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhancement of overall diversity levels and the incorporation of new favorable traits are major benefits of using exotic germplasm in elite breeding programs. Agronomic deficiencies and poor adaptation often limits use of exotic germplasm in plant breeding programs. To introgress exotic alleles into...

  8. Geographic range and structure of cryptic genetic diversity among Pacific North American populations of the non-native amphipod Grandidierella japonica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilgrim, Erik M.; Blum, Michael J.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Lee, Henry, II; Darling, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructing the invasion history of aquatic invasive species can enhance understanding of invasion risks by recognizing areas most susceptible to invasion and forecasting future spread based on past patterns of population expansion. Here we reconstruct the invasion history of the Japanese amphipod Grandidierella japonica Stephensen 1938 combining information from historical collection data with molecular genetic data to better understand post-invasion range expansion and anthropogenic connectivity across the Pacific coast of North America. Compilation of collection data from bays and estuaries of the Pacific North American coast show many new localities have been colonized in the last two decades, moving outward from harbors and bays with high commercial traffic into smaller coastal locations dominated by local recreational traffic. DNA barcode sequence data for G. japonica reveals two distinct clades: one found in San Francisco Bay and sites to the north, and one also found in San Francisco Bay and sites to the south. The two clades differ by an average 7.28 % genetic distance, large enough to consider these invasive amphipods two separate species. Both northern and southern clades exhibit low levels of genetic diversity, suggesting a single introduction event for each. The presence of cryptic diversity within this invasive amphipod highlights the need for more extensive study of the invasive and native populations of aquatic invasive invertebrates to address questions of taxonomy, diversity, and invasion history.

  9. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  10. Diversity of proteobacterial endosymbionts in hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) from its native and introduced range.

    PubMed

    von Dohlen, Carol D; Spaulding, Usha; Shields, Kathleen; Havill, Nathan P; Rosa, Cristina; Hoover, Kelli

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of intraspecific variation in symbioses may aid in understanding the ecology of widespread insects in different parts of their range. We investigated bacterial symbionts of Adelges tsugae, a pest of hemlocks in eastern North America introduced from Asia. Amplification, cloning, and sequencing of bacterial 16S rDNA, in situ hybridizations, and electron microscopy revealed that A. tsugae harbours up to five bacterial phylotypes, according to population. Three Gammaproteobacteria species are maternally transmitted. The first, designated 'Ca. Pseudomonas adelgestsugas' resides in the haemocoel, and was detected in all populations except Taiwan. The second phylotype, 'Ca. Serratia symbiotica', resides in bacteriocytes of populations on Tsuga sieboldii in Japan and in E. North America. The third phylotype, designated 'Ca. Annandia adelgestsuga', clustered within a lineage of several insect endosymbionts that included Buchnera aphidicola. It was detected in bacteriocytes in all populations, and in salivary glands of first instars. Two Betaproteobacteria phylotypes were detected in some Japanese T. sieboldii and eastern North America populations, and were observed only in salivary glands with no evidence of maternal transmission. Our results support the ideas that symbiont gain and loss has been volatile in adelgids, and that symbionts may help to trace the source of invasive species. PMID:23452267

  11. Rapidly expanding genetic diversity and host range of the Circoviridae viral family and other Rep encoding small circular ssDNA genomes.

    PubMed

    Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin

    2012-03-01

    The genomes of numerous circoviruses and distantly related circular ssDNA viruses encoding a rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep) have been characterized from the tissues of mammals, fish, insects, plants (geminivirus and nanovirus), in human and animal feces, in an algae cell, and in diverse environmental samples. We review the genome organization, phylogenetic relationships and initial prevalence studies of cycloviruses, a proposed new genus in the Circoviridae family. Viral fossil rep sequences were also recently identified integrated on the chromosomes of mammals, frogs, lancelets, crustaceans, mites, gastropods, roundworms, placozoans, hydrozoans, protozoans, land plants, fungi, algae, and phytoplasma bacterias and their plasmids, reflecting the very wide past host range of rep bearing viruses. An ancient origin for viruses with Rep-encoding small circular ssDNA genomes, predating the diversification of eukaryotes, is discussed. The cellular hosts and pathogenicity of many recently described rep-containing circular ssDNA genomes remain to be determined. Future studies of the virome of single cell and multi-cellular eukaryotes are likely to further extend the known diversity and host-range of small rep-containing circular ssDNA viral genomes. PMID:22155583

  12. Rapidly expanding genetic diversity and host range of the Circoviridae viral family and other Rep encoding small circular ssDNA genomes

    PubMed Central

    Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin

    2011-01-01

    The genomes of numerous circoviruses and distantly related circular DNA viruses encoding a rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep) have been characterized from the tissues of mammals, fish, insects, and plants (geminivirus and nanovirus), human and animal feces, in an algae cell, and in diverse environmental samples. We review the genome organization, phylogenetic relationships and initial prevalence studies of cycloviruses, a proposed new genus in the Circoviridae family. Viral fossil rep sequences were also identified integrated on the chromosomes of mammals, frogs, lancelets, crustaceans, mites, gastropods, roundworms, placozoans, hydrozoans, protozoans, land plants, fungi, algae, and phytoplasma bacterias and their plasmids, reflecting their past host range. An ancient origin for viruses with rep-encoding single stranded small circular genomes, predating the diversification of eukaryotes, is discussed. The cellular hosts and pathogenicity of many recently described rep-containing circular genomes remain to be determined. Future studies of the virome of single cell and multi-cellular eukaryotes are likely to further extend the known diversity and host-range of small rep-containing circular viral genomes. PMID:22155583

  13. Population structure and genetic diversity of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in fragmented landscapes at the northern edge of their range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bush, K.L.; Dyte, C.K.; Moynahan, B.J.; Aldridge, C.L.; Sauls, H.S.; Battazzo, A.M.; Walker, B.L.; Doherty, K.E.; Tack, J.; Carlson, J.; Eslinger, D.; Nicholson, J.; Boyce, M.S.; Naugle, D.E.; Paszkowski, C.A.; Coltman, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Range-edge dynamics and anthropogenic fragmentation are expected to impact patterns of genetic diversity, and understanding the influence of both factors is important for effective conservation of threatened wildlife species. To examine these factors, we sampled greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) from a declining, fragmented region at the northern periphery of the species' range and from a stable, contiguous core region. We genotyped 2,519 individuals at 13 microsatellite loci from 104 leks in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Montana, and Wyoming. Birds from northern Montana, Alberta, and Saskatchewan were identified as a single population that exhibited significant isolation by distance, with the Milk River demarcating two subpopulations. Both subpopulations exhibited high genetic diversity with no evidence that peripheral regions were genetically depauperate or highly structured. However, river valleys and a large agricultural region were significant barriers to dispersal. Leks were also composed primarily of non-kin, rejecting the idea that leks form because of male kin association. Northern Montana sage-grouse are maintaining genetic connectivity in fragmented and northern peripheral habitats via dispersal through and around various forms of fragmentation. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  14. Elucidating the native sources of an invasive tree species, Acacia pycnantha, reveals unexpected native range diversity and structure

    PubMed Central

    Ndlovu, Joice; Richardson, David M.; Wilson, John R. U.; O'Leary, Martin; Le Roux, Johannes J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Understanding the introduction history of invasive plant species is important for their management and identifying effective host-specific biological control agents. However, uncertain taxonomy, intra- and interspecific hybridization, and cryptic speciation may obscure introduction histories, making it difficult to identify native regions to explore for host-specific agents. The overall aim of this study was to identify the native source populations of Acacia pycnantha, a tree native to south-eastern Australia and invasive in South Africa, Western Australia and Portugal. Using a phylogeographical approach also allowed an exploration of the historical processes that have shaped the genetic structure of A. pycnantha in its native range. Methods Nuclear (nDNA) and plastid DNA sequence data were used in network and tree-building analyses to reconstruct phylogeographical relationships between native and invasive A. pycnantha populations. In addition, mismatch distributions, relative rates and Bayesian analyses were used to infer recent demographic processes and timing of events in Australia that led to population structure and diversification. Key Results The plastid network indicated that Australian populations of A. pycnantha are geographically structured into two informally recognized lineages, the wetland and dryland forms, whereas the nuclear phylogeny showed little geographical structure between these two forms. Moreover, the dryland form of A. pycnantha showed close genetic similarity to the wetland form based on nDNA sequence data. Hybrid zones may explain these findings, supported here by incongruent phylogenetic placement of some of these taxa between nuclear and plastid genealogies. Conclusions It is hypothesized that habitat fragmentation due to cycles of aridity inter-dispersed with periods of abundant rainfall during the Pleistocene (approx. 100 kya) probably gave rise to native dryland and wetland forms of A. pycnantha. Although the

  15. The Length Distribution of Class I-Restricted T Cell Epitopes Is Determined by Both Peptide Supply and MHC Allele-Specific Binding Preference.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Thomas; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Sidney, John; Bardet, Wilfried; Osborn, Sean C; Kaever, Thomas; Sette, Alessandro; Hildebrand, William H; Nielsen, Morten; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-02-15

    HLA class I-binding predictions are widely used to identify candidate peptide targets of human CD8(+) T cell responses. Many such approaches focus exclusively on a limited range of peptide lengths, typically 9 aa and sometimes 9-10 aa, despite multiple examples of dominant epitopes of other lengths. In this study, we examined whether epitope predictions can be improved by incorporating the natural length distribution of HLA class I ligands. We found that, although different HLA alleles have diverse length-binding preferences, the length profiles of ligands that are naturally presented by these alleles are much more homogeneous. We hypothesized that this is due to a defined length profile of peptides available for HLA binding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Based on this, we created a model of HLA allele-specific ligand length profiles and demonstrate how this model, in combination with HLA-binding predictions, greatly improves comprehensive identification of CD8(+) T cell epitopes. PMID:26783342

  16. Assessment of genetic diversity by simple sequence repeat markers among forty elite varieties in the germplasm for malting barley breeding*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-mei; Yang, Jian-ming; Zhu, Jing-huan; Jia, Qiao-jun; Tao, Yue-zhi

    2010-01-01

    The genetic diversity and relationship among 40 elite barley varieties were analyzed based on simple sequence repeat (SSR) genotyping data. The amplified fragments from SSR primers were highly polymorphic in the barley accessions investigated. A total of 85 alleles were detected at 35 SSR loci, and allelic variations existed at 29 SSR loci. The allele number per locus ranged from 1 to 5 with an average of 2.4 alleles per locus detected from the 40 barley accessions. A cluster analysis based on the genetic similarity coefficients was conducted and the 40 varieties were classified into two groups. Seven malting barley varieties from China fell into the same subgroup. It was found that the genetic diversity within the Chinese malting barley varieties was narrower than that in other barley germplasm sources, suggesting the importance and feasibility of introducing elite genotypes from different origins for malting barley breeding in China. PMID:20872987

  17. Genetic Diversity and Host Range of Rhizobia Nodulating Lotus tenuis in Typical Soils of the Salado River Basin (Argentina)▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, María Julia; Muñoz, Socorro; Soto, María José; Ruiz, Oscar; Sanjuán, Juan

    2009-01-01

    A total of 103 root nodule isolates were used to estimate the diversity of bacteria nodulating Lotus tenuis in typical soils of the Salado River Basin. A high level of genetic diversity was revealed by repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR, and 77 isolates with unique genomic fingerprints were further differentiated into two clusters, clusters A and B, after 16S rRNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Cluster A strains appeared to be related to the genus Mesorhizobium, whereas cluster B was related to the genus Rhizobium. 16S rRNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis further supported the distribution of most of the symbiotic isolates in either Rhizobium or Mesorhizobium: the only exception was isolate BA135, whose 16S rRNA gene was closely related to the 16S rRNA gene of the genus Aminobacter. Most Mesorhizobium-like isolates were closely related to Mesorhizobium amorphae, Mesorhizobium mediterraneum, Mesorhizobium tianshanense, or the broad-host-range strain NZP2037, but surprisingly few isolates grouped with Mesorhizobium loti type strain NZP2213. Rhizobium-like strains were related to Rhizobium gallicum, Rhizobium etli, or Rhizobium tropici, for which Phaseolus vulgaris is a common host. However, no nodC or nifH genes could be amplified from the L. tenuis isolates, suggesting that they have rather divergent symbiosis genes. In contrast, nodC genes from the Mesorhizobium and Aminobacter strains were closely related to nodC genes from narrow-host-range M. loti strains. Likewise, nifH gene sequences were very highly conserved among the Argentinian isolates and reference Lotus rhizobia. The high levels of conservation of the nodC and nifH genes suggest that there was a common origin of the symbiosis genes in narrow-host-range Lotus symbionts, supporting the hypothesis that both intrageneric horizontal gene transfer and intergeneric horizontal gene transfer are important mechanisms for the spread of symbiotic capacity in the Salado River Basin. PMID

  18. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients. Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3′-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5′-UTR polymorphisms). For neither the 3′- nor the 5′-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance. The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold

  19. Common alleles contribute to schizophrenia in CNV carriers

    PubMed Central

    Tansey, K E; Rees, E; Linden, D E; Ripke, S; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; McCarroll, S A; Holmans, P; Kirov, G; Walters, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of schizophrenia is complex, involving risk alleles ranging from common alleles of weak effect to rare alleles of large effect, the best exemplar of the latter being large copy number variants (CNVs). It is currently unknown whether pathophysiology in those with defined rare mutations overlaps with that in other individuals with the disorder who do not share the same rare mutation. Under an extreme heterogeneity model, carriers of specific high-penetrance mutations form distinct subgroups. In contrast, under a polygenic threshold model, high-penetrance rare allele carriers possess many risk factors, of which the rare allele is the only one, albeit an important, factor. Under the latter model, cases with rare mutations can be expected to share some common risk alleles, and therefore pathophysiological mechanisms, with cases without the same mutation. Here we show that, compared with controls, individuals with schizophrenia who have known pathogenic CNVs carry an excess burden of common risk alleles (P=2.25 × 10−17) defined from a genome-wide association study largely based on individuals without known CNVs. Our finding is not consistent with an extreme heterogeneity model for CNV carriers, but does offer support for the polygenic threshold model of schizophrenia. That this is so provides support for the notion that studies aiming to model the effects of rare variation may uncover pathophysiological mechanisms of relevance to those with the disorder more widely. PMID:26390827

  20. Common alleles contribute to schizophrenia in CNV carriers.

    PubMed

    Tansey, K E; Rees, E; Linden, D E; Ripke, S; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; McCarroll, S A; Holmans, P; Kirov, G; Walters, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-08-01

    The genetic architecture of schizophrenia is complex, involving risk alleles ranging from common alleles of weak effect to rare alleles of large effect, the best exemplar of the latter being large copy number variants (CNVs). It is currently unknown whether pathophysiology in those with defined rare mutations overlaps with that in other individuals with the disorder who do not share the same rare mutation. Under an extreme heterogeneity model, carriers of specific high-penetrance mutations form distinct subgroups. In contrast, under a polygenic threshold model, high-penetrance rare allele carriers possess many risk factors, of which the rare allele is the only one, albeit an important, factor. Under the latter model, cases with rare mutations can be expected to share some common risk alleles, and therefore pathophysiological mechanisms, with cases without the same mutation. Here we show that, compared with controls, individuals with schizophrenia who have known pathogenic CNVs carry an excess burden of common risk alleles (P=2.25 × 10(-17)) defined from a genome-wide association study largely based on individuals without known CNVs. Our finding is not consistent with an extreme heterogeneity model for CNV carriers, but does offer support for the polygenic threshold model of schizophrenia. That this is so provides support for the notion that studies aiming to model the effects of rare variation may uncover pathophysiological mechanisms of relevance to those with the disorder more widely. PMID:26390827

  1. Differential and limited expression of mutant alleles in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Naim U.; Sperling, Adam S.; Bolli, Niccolo; Wedge, David C.; Van Loo, Peter; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Shammas, Masood A.; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Samur, Mehmet K.; Richardson, Paul G.; Magrangeas, Florence; Minvielle, Stephane; Futreal, P. Andrew; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Parmigiani, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has delineated mutational profiles in multiple myeloma and reported a median of 52 mutations per patient, as well as a set of commonly mutated genes across multiple patients. In this study, we have used deep sequencing of RNA from a subset of these patients to evaluate the proportion of expressed mutations. We find that the majority of previously identified mutations occur within genes with very low or no detectable expression. On average, 27% (range, 11% to 47%) of mutated alleles are found to be expressed, and among mutated genes that are expressed, there often is allele-specific expression where either the mutant or wild-type allele is suppressed. Even in the absence of an overall change in gene expression, the presence of differential allelic expression within malignant cells highlights the important contribution of RNA-sequencing in identifying clinically significant mutational changes relevant to our understanding of myeloma biology and also for therapeutic applications. PMID:25237203

  2. Differential and limited expression of mutant alleles in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Naim U; Sperling, Adam S; Bolli, Niccolo; Wedge, David C; Van Loo, Peter; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Shammas, Masood A; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Samur, Mehmet K; Richardson, Paul G; Magrangeas, Florence; Minvielle, Stephane; Futreal, P Andrew; Anderson, Kenneth C; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Campbell, Peter J; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2014-11-13

    Recent work has delineated mutational profiles in multiple myeloma and reported a median of 52 mutations per patient, as well as a set of commonly mutated genes across multiple patients. In this study, we have used deep sequencing of RNA from a subset of these patients to evaluate the proportion of expressed mutations. We find that the majority of previously identified mutations occur within genes with very low or no detectable expression. On average, 27% (range, 11% to 47%) of mutated alleles are found to be expressed, and among mutated genes that are expressed, there often is allele-specific expression where either the mutant or wild-type allele is suppressed. Even in the absence of an overall change in gene expression, the presence of differential allelic expression within malignant cells highlights the important contribution of RNA-sequencing in identifying clinically significant mutational changes relevant to our understanding of myeloma biology and also for therapeutic applications. PMID:25237203

  3. Population genetic structure of Oryza sativa in East and Southeast Asia and the discovery of elite alleles for grain traits

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Xiaojing; Giang Tran Thi, Thu; Mawuli Edzesi, Wisdom; Liang, Lijun; Liu, Qiangming; Liu, Erbao; Wang, Yang; Qiang, Sheng; Liu, Linglong; Hong, Delin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) genotypes of 532 rice (Oryza sativa L.) accessions collected from East and Southeast Asia and detected abundant genetic diversity within the population. We identified 6 subpopulations and found a tendency towards directional evolution in O. sativa from low to high latitudes, with levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the 6 subpopulations ranging from 10 to 30 cM. We then investigated the phenotypic data for grain length, grain width, grain thickness and 1,000-grain weight over 4 years. Using a genome-wide association analysis, we identified 17 marker-trait associations involving 14 SSR markers on 12 chromosome arms, and 8 of the 17 associations were novel. The elite alleles were mined based on the phenotypic effects of the detected quantitative trait loci (QTLs). These elite alleles could be used to improve target traits through optimal cross designs, with the expected results obtained by pyramiding or substituting the elite alleles per QTL (independent of possible epistatic effects). Together, these results provide an in-depth understanding of the genetic diversity pattern among rice-grain traits across a broad geographic scale, which has potential use in future research work, including studies related to germplasm conservation and molecular breeding by design. PMID:26059752

  4. Out of the tropics, but how? Fossils, bridge species, and thermal ranges in the dynamics of the marine latitudinal diversity gradient

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, David; Belanger, Christina L.; Berke, Sarah K.; Huang, Shan; Krug, Andrew Z.; Roy, Kaustuv; Tomasovych, Adam; Valentine, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Latitudinal diversity gradients are underlain by complex combinations of origination, extinction, and shifts in geographic distribution and therefore are best analyzed by integrating paleontological and neontological data. The fossil record of marine bivalves shows, in three successive late Cenozoic time slices, that most clades (operationally here, genera) tend to originate in the tropics and then expand out of the tropics (OTT) to higher latitudes while retaining their tropical presence. This OTT pattern is robust both to assumptions on the preservation potential of taxa and to taxonomic revisions of extant and fossil species. Range expansion of clades may occur via “bridge species,” which violate climate-niche conservatism to bridge the tropical-temperate boundary in most OTT genera. Substantial time lags (∼5 Myr) between the origins of tropical clades and their entry into the temperate zone suggest that OTT events are rare on a per-clade basis. Clades with higher diversification rates within the tropics are the most likely to expand OTT and the most likely to produce multiple bridge species, suggesting that high speciation rates promote the OTT dynamic. Although expansion of thermal tolerances is key to the OTT dynamic, most latitudinally widespread species instead achieve their broad ranges by tracking widespread, spatially-uniform temperatures within the tropics (yielding, via the nonlinear relation between temperature and latitude, a pattern opposite to Rapoport’s rule). This decoupling of range size and temperature tolerance may also explain the differing roles of species and clade ranges in buffering species from background and mass extinctions. PMID:23759748

  5. Diversity of bees and their floral resources at altitudinal areas in the Southern Espinhaço Range, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Vinícius A; Antonini, Yasmine; Araújo, Ana P A

    2006-01-01

    The Southern Espinhaço Range consists of large areas covered by quartzitic or metaliferous tropical altitudinal fields. The Espinhaço Range ecosystems are endangered by anthropic high impacts, particularly due to mining and urbanization. We conducted a one-year inventory of the bee flora and fauna at the quartzitic Ouro Branco Mountains and a two-year survey of the metaliferous Ouro Preto fields. The samples were collected twice a month, from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. The bees (677) belonged to 91 species, five families. The family Apidae was the richest and most abundant, followed by the Halictidae and Megachilidae. The bees visited 46 flowering plant species; the most visited plants were the Asteraceae (n = 220), the Malpighiaceae (n = 95), the Melastomataceae (n = 94), the Fabaceae (n = 78), and the Solanaceae (n = 63). Diversity was higher in Ouro Branco (H = 1.47) than in Ouro Preto (H = 1.17). The low richness and abundance of bees in our research site when compared to other Brazilian "Cerrado" areas can be due to the high altitude, low temperature, and low availability of flowers we found. "Canga" and rupestrian areas house fauna and flora species that are rare and threatened by extinction. The southern Espinhaço areas can, therefore, be given the status of permanent biodiversity preservation area. PMID:17352066

  6. Allele surfing promotes microbial adaptation from standing variation.

    PubMed

    Gralka, Matti; Stiewe, Fabian; Farrell, Fred; Möbius, Wolfram; Waclaw, Bartlomiej; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2016-08-01

    The coupling of ecology and evolution during range expansions enables mutations to establish at expanding range margins and reach high frequencies. This phenomenon, called allele surfing, is thought to have caused revolutions in the gene pool of many species, most evidently in microbial communities. It has remained unclear, however, under which conditions allele surfing promotes or hinders adaptation. Here, using microbial experiments and simulations, we show that, starting with standing adaptive variation, range expansions generate a larger increase in mean fitness than spatially uniform population expansions. The adaptation gain results from 'soft' selective sweeps emerging from surfing beneficial mutations. The rate of these surfing events is shown to sensitively depend on the strength of genetic drift, which varies among strains and environmental conditions. More generally, allele surfing promotes the rate of adaptation per biomass produced, which could help developing biofilms and other resource-limited populations to cope with environmental challenges. PMID:27307400

  7. Diversity and geographical distribution of Flavobacterium psychrophilum isolates and their phages: patterns of susceptibility to phage infection and phage host range.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Espejo, Romilio; Middelboe, Mathias

    2014-05-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is an important fish pathogen worldwide that causes cold water disease (CWD) or rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS). Phage therapy has been suggested as an alternative method for the control of this pathogen in aquaculture. However, effective use of bacteriophages in disease control requires detailed knowledge about the diversity and dynamics of host susceptibility to phage infection. For this reason, we examined the genetic diversity of 49 F. psychrophilum strains isolated in three different areas (Chile, Denmark, and USA) through direct genome restriction enzyme analysis (DGREA) and their susceptibility to 33 bacteriophages isolated in Chile and Denmark, thus covering large geographical (>12,000 km) and temporal (>60 years) scales of isolation. An additional 40 phage-resistant isolates obtained from culture experiments after exposure to specific phages were examined for changes in phage susceptibility against the 33 phages. The F. psychrophilum and phage populations isolated from Chile and Denmark clustered into geographically distinct groups with respect to DGREA profile and host range, respectively. However, cross infection between Chilean phage isolates and Danish host isolates and vice versa was observed. Development of resistance to certain bacteriophages led to susceptibility to other phages suggesting that "enhanced infection" is potentially an important cost of resistance in F. psychrophilum, possibly contributing to the observed co-existence of phage-sensitive F. psychrophilum strains and lytic phages across local and global scales. Overall, our results showed that despite the identification of local communities of phages and hosts, some key properties determining phage infection patterns seem to be globally distributed. PMID:24557506

  8. Discovery of Novel dsRNA Viral Sequences by In Silico Cloning and Implications for Viral Diversity, Host Range and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiquan; Fu, Yanping; Xie, Jiatao; Cheng, Jiasen; Ghabrial, Said A.; Li, Guoqing; Yi, Xianhong; Jiang, Daohong

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequence of viruses can contribute greatly to the study of viral evolution, diversity and the interaction between viruses and hosts. Traditional molecular cloning methods for obtaining RNA viral genomes are time-consuming and often difficult because many viruses occur in extremely low titers. DsRNA viruses in the families, Partitiviridae, Totiviridae, Endornaviridae, Chrysoviridae, and other related unclassified dsRNA viruses are generally associated with symptomless or persistent infections of their hosts. These characteristics indicate that samples or materials derived from eukaryotic organisms used to construct cDNA libraries and EST sequencing might carry these viruses, which were not easily detected by the researchers. Therefore, the EST databases may include numerous unknown viral sequences. In this study, we performed in silico cloning, a procedure for obtaining full or partial cDNA sequence of a gene by bioinformatics analysis, using known dsRNA viral sequences as queries to search against NCBI Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) database. From this analysis, we obtained 119 novel virus-like sequences related to members of the families, Endornaviridae, Chrysoviridae, Partitiviridae, and Totiviridae. Many of them were identified in cDNA libraries of eukaryotic lineages, which were not known to be hosts for these viruses. Furthermore, comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of these newly discovered virus-like sequences with known dsRNA viruses revealed that these dsRNA viruses may have co-evolved with respective host supergroups over a long evolutionary time while potential horizontal transmissions of viruses between different host supergroups also is possible. We also found that some of the plant partitiviruses may have originated from fungal viruses by horizontal transmissions. These findings extend our knowledge of the diversity and possible host range of dsRNA viruses and offer insight into the origin and evolution of relevant viruses with their hosts. PMID

  9. Culturable and culture-independent bacterial diversity and the prevalence of cold-adapted enzymes from the Himalayan mountain ranges of India and Nepal.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Siddarthan; Gowdaman, Vasudevan; Prabagaran, Solai Ramatchandirane

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial diversity of soil samples collected from different geographical regions of Himalayan mountains was studied through culturable (13 samples) and culture-independent approaches (5 samples based on abundance of diversity indices in each ecological niche). Shannon-Wiener diversity index and total bacterial count ranged from 1.50 ± 0.1 to 2.57 ± 0.15 and 7.8 ± 1.6 × 10(5) to 30.9 ± 1.7 × 10(5) cfu ml(-1) of soil, respectively. Based on morphology and pigmentation, 406 isolates were selected by culturing in different cultivable media at various strengths and concentrations. All the strains were subjected to amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and the representative isolates from each cluster were chosen for 16S rRNA gene sequence-based identification. Soil habitat in Himalayan foot hills was dominated by the genera Arthrobacter, Exiguobacterium, Bacillus, Cedecea, Erwinia, and Pseudomonas. Five 16S rRNA gene libraries from the selected five samples yielded 268 clones and were grouped into 53 phylotypes covering 25 genera including the genus of Ferribacterium, Rothia, and Wautersiella, which were reported for the first time in Himalayan tracks. Principal coordinates analysis indicates that all the clone libraries were clearly separated and found to be significantly different from each other. Further, extracellular investigation of cold-active enzymes showed activity of cellulase (23.71%), pectinase (20.24%), amylase (17.32%), phytase (13.87%), protease (12.72%), and lipase (23.71%) among the isolates. Four isolates namely Exiguobacterium mexicanum (BSa14), Exiguobacterium sibiricum (BZa11), Micrococcus antarcticus (BSb10), and Bacillus simplex (BZb3) showed multiple enzyme activity for five different types of enzymes. In addition, various genera like Exiguobacterium, Erwinia, Mycetecola, Cedecea, Pantoea, and Trichococcus have also shown novel hydrolytic enzyme activity in the Himalayan foothills. PMID:25204748

  10. Allele mining and enhanced genetic recombination for rice breeding.

    PubMed

    Leung, Hei; Raghavan, Chitra; Zhou, Bo; Oliva, Ricardo; Choi, Il Ryong; Lacorte, Vanica; Jubay, Mona Liza; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Gregorio, Glenn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ulat, Victor Jun; Borja, Frances Nikki; Mauleon, Ramil; Alexandrov, Nickolai N; McNally, Kenneth L; Sackville Hamilton, Ruaraidh

    2015-12-01

    Traditional rice varieties harbour a large store of genetic diversity with potential to accelerate rice improvement. For a long time, this diversity maintained in the International Rice Genebank has not been fully used because of a lack of genome information. The publication of the first reference genome of Nipponbare by the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP) marked the beginning of a systematic exploration and use of rice diversity for genetic research and breeding. Since then, the Nipponbare genome has served as the reference for the assembly of many additional genomes. The recently completed 3000 Rice Genomes Project together with the public database (SNP-Seek) provides a new genomic and data resource that enables the identification of useful accessions for breeding. Using disease resistance traits as case studies, we demonstrated the power of allele mining in the 3,000 genomes for extracting accessions from the GeneBank for targeted phenotyping. Although potentially useful landraces can now be identified, their use in breeding is often hindered by unfavourable linkages. Efficient breeding designs are much needed to transfer the useful diversity to breeding. Multi-parent Advanced Generation InterCross (MAGIC) is a breeding design to produce highly recombined populations. The MAGIC approach can be used to generate pre-breeding populations with increased genotypic diversity and reduced linkage drag. Allele mining combined with a multi-parent breeding design can help convert useful diversity into breeding-ready genetic resources. PMID:26606925

  11. Analysis of the genetic diversity of the nematode parasite Baylisascaris schroederi from wild giant pandas in different mountain ranges in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Baylisascaris schroederi is one of the most common nematodes of the giant panda, and can cause severe baylisascarosis in both wild and captive giant pandas. Previous studies of the giant pandas indicated that this population is genetically distinct, implying the presence of a new subspecies. Based on the co-evolution between the parasite and the host, the aim of this study was to investigate the genetic differentiation in the B. schroederi population collected from giant pandas inhabiting different mountain ranges, and further to identify whether the evolution of this parasite correlates with the evolution of giant pandas. Methods In this study, 48 B. schroederi were collected from 28 wild giant pandas inhabiting the Qinling, Minshan and Qionglai mountain ranges in China. The complete sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b (mtCytb) gene was amplified by PCR, and the corresponding population genetic diversity of the three mountain populations was determined. In addition, we discussed the evolutionary relationship between B. schroederi and its host giant panda. Results For the DNA dataset, insignificant Fst values and a significant, high level of gene flow were detected among the three mountain populations of B. schroederi, and high genetic variation within populations and a low genetic distance were observed. Both phylogenetic analyses and network mapping of the 16 haplotypes revealed a dispersed pattern and an absence of branches strictly corresponding to the three mountain range sampling sites. Neutrality tests and mismatch analysis indicated that B. schroederi experienced a population expansion in the past. Conclusions Taken together, the dispersed haplotype map, extremely high gene flow among the three populations of B. schroederi, low genetic structure and rapid evolutionary rate suggest that the B. schroederi populations did not follow a pattern of isolation by distance, indicating the existence of physical connections before these populations

  12. Glacial refugia and modern genetic diversity of 22 western North American tree species.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David R; Hamann, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    North American tree species, subspecies and genetic varieties have primarily evolved in a landscape of extensive continental ice and restricted temperate climate environments. Here, we reconstruct the refugial history of western North American trees since the last glacial maximum using species distribution models, validated against 3571 palaeoecological records. We investigate how modern subspecies structure and genetic diversity corresponds to modelled glacial refugia, based on a meta-analysis of allelic richness and expected heterozygosity for 473 populations of 22 tree species. We find that species with strong genetic differentiation into subspecies had widespread and large glacial refugia, whereas species with restricted refugia show no differentiation among populations and little genetic diversity, despite being common over a wide range of environments today. In addition, a strong relationship between allelic richness and the size of modelled glacial refugia (r(2) = 0.55) suggest that population bottlenecks during glacial periods had a pronounced effect on the presence of rare alleles. PMID:25761711

  13. Glacial refugia and modern genetic diversity of 22 western North American tree species

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, David R.; Hamann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    North American tree species, subspecies and genetic varieties have primarily evolved in a landscape of extensive continental ice and restricted temperate climate environments. Here, we reconstruct the refugial history of western North American trees since the last glacial maximum using species distribution models, validated against 3571 palaeoecological records. We investigate how modern subspecies structure and genetic diversity corresponds to modelled glacial refugia, based on a meta-analysis of allelic richness and expected heterozygosity for 473 populations of 22 tree species. We find that species with strong genetic differentiation into subspecies had widespread and large glacial refugia, whereas species with restricted refugia show no differentiation among populations and little genetic diversity, despite being common over a wide range of environments today. In addition, a strong relationship between allelic richness and the size of modelled glacial refugia (r2 = 0.55) suggest that population bottlenecks during glacial periods had a pronounced effect on the presence of rare alleles. PMID:25761711

  14. Microsatellite marker diversity in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Blair, M W; Giraldo, M C; Buendía, H F; Tovar, E; Duque, M C; Beebe, S E

    2006-06-01

    A diversity survey was used to estimate allelic diversity and heterozygosity of 129 microsatellite markers in a panel of 44 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes that have been used as parents of mapping populations. Two types of microsatellites were evaluated, based respectively on gene coding and genomic sequences. Genetic diversity was evaluated by estimating the polymorphism information content (PIC), as well as the distribution and range of alleles sizes. Gene-based microsatellites proved to be less polymorphic than genomic microsatellites in terms of both number of alleles (6.0 vs. 9.2) and PIC values (0.446 vs. 0.594) while greater size differences between the largest and the smallest allele were observed for the genomic microsatellites than for the gene-based microsatellites (31.4 vs. 19.1 bp). Markers that showed a high number of alleles were identified with a maximum of 28 alleles for the marker BMd1. The microsatellites were useful for distinguishing Andean and Mesoamerican genotypes, for uncovering the races within each genepool and for separating wild accessions from cultivars. Greater polymorphism and race structure was found within the Andean gene pool than within the Mesoamerican gene pool and polymorphism rate between genotypes was consistent with genepool and race identity. Comparisons between Andean genotypes had higher polymorphism (53.0%) on average than comparisons among Mesoamerican genotypes (33.4%). Within the Mesoamerican parental combinations, the intra-racial combinations between Mesoamerica and Durango or Jalisco race genotypes showed higher average rates of polymorphism (37.5%) than the within-race combinations between Mesoamerica race genotypes (31.7%). In multiple correspondance analysis we found two principal clusters of genotypes corresponding to the Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools and subgroups representing specific races especially for the Nueva Granada and Peru races of the Andean gene pool. Intra population diversity

  15. Pinworm diversity in free-ranging howler monkeys (Alouatta spp.) in Mexico: Morphological and molecular evidence for two new Trypanoxyuris species (Nematoda: Oxyuridae).

    PubMed

    Solórzano-García, Brenda; Nadler, Steven A; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2016-10-01

    Two new species of Trypanoxyuris are described from the intestine of free-ranging howler monkeys in Mexico, Trypanoxyuris multilabiatus n. sp. from the mantled howler Alouatta palliata, and Trypanoxyuris pigrae n. sp. from the black howler Alouatta pigra. An integrative taxonomic approach is followed, where conspicuous morphological traits and phylogenetic trees based on DNA sequences are used to test the validity of the two new species. The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 gene, and the nuclear ribosomal 18S and 28S rRNA genes were used for evolutionary analyses, with the concatenated dataset of all three genes used for maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. The two new species of pinworms from howler monkeys were morphologically distinct and formed reciprocally monophyletic lineages in molecular phylogenetic trees. The three species from howler monkeys, T. multilabiatus n. sp., T. pigrae n. sp., and Trypanoxyuris minutus, formed a monophyletic group with high bootstrap and posterior probability support values. Phylogenetic patterns inferred from sequence data support the hypothesis of a close evolutionary association between these primate hosts and their pinworm parasites. The results suggest that the diversity of pinworm parasites from Neotropical primates might be underestimated. PMID:27262522

  16. Diversity in short-to-intermediate range order in pure forms of amorphous silicon generated by a variety of experimental and modeling techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Holmstrom, Eero; Haberl, Bianca; Pakarinen, Olli H; Nordlund, Kai; Djurabekova, Flyura; Arenal, Raul; Williams, James S.; Bradby, Jodie E.; Petersen, Timothy C.; Liu, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Variability in the short-to-intermediate range order of pure amorphous silicon prepared by different experimental and computational techniques is probed by measuring mass density, atomic coordination, bond-angle deviation, and dihedral angle deviation. It is found that there is significant variability in order parameters at these length scales in this archetypal covalently bonded, monoatomic system. This diversity strongly reflects preparation technique and thermal history in both experimental and simulated systems. Experiment and simulation do not fully quantitatively agree, partly due to differences in the way parameters are accessed. However, qualitative agreement in the trends is identified. Relaxed forms of amorphous silicon closelymore » resemble continuous random networks generated by a hybrid method of bond-switching Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation. As-prepared ion implanted amorphous silicon can be adequately modeled using a structure generated from amorphization via ion bombardement using energetic recoils. Preparation methods which narrowly avoid crystallization such as experimental pressure-induced amorphization or simulated melt-quenching result in inhomogeneous structures that contain regions with significant variations in atomic ordering. Ad hoc simulated structures containing small (1 nm) diamond cubic crystal inclusions were found to possess relatively high bond-angle deviations and low dihedral angle deviations, a trend that could not be reconciled with any experimental material.« less

  17. Diversity in short-to-intermediate range order in pure forms of amorphous silicon generated by a variety of experimental and modeling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Holmstrom, Eero; Haberl, Bianca; Pakarinen, Olli H; Nordlund, Kai; Djurabekova, Flyura; Arenal, Raul; Williams, James S.; Bradby, Jodie E.; Petersen, Timothy C.; Liu, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Variability in the short-to-intermediate range order of pure amorphous silicon prepared by different experimental and computational techniques is probed by measuring mass density, atomic coordination, bond-angle deviation, and dihedral angle deviation. It is found that there is significant variability in order parameters at these length scales in this archetypal covalently bonded, monoatomic system. This diversity strongly reflects preparation technique and thermal history in both experimental and simulated systems. Experiment and simulation do not fully quantitatively agree, partly due to differences in the way parameters are accessed. However, qualitative agreement in the trends is identified. Relaxed forms of amorphous silicon closely resemble continuous random networks generated by a hybrid method of bond-switching Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation. As-prepared ion implanted amorphous silicon can be adequately modeled using a structure generated from amorphization via ion bombardement using energetic recoils. Preparation methods which narrowly avoid crystallization such as experimental pressure-induced amorphization or simulated melt-quenching result in inhomogeneous structures that contain regions with significant variations in atomic ordering. Ad hoc simulated structures containing small (1 nm) diamond cubic crystal inclusions were found to possess relatively high bond-angle deviations and low dihedral angle deviations, a trend that could not be reconciled with any experimental material.

  18. EcM fungal community structure, but not diversity, altered in a Pb-contaminated shooting range in a boreal coniferous forest site in Southern Finland.

    PubMed

    Hui, Nan; Jumpponen, Ari; Niskanen, Tuula; Liimatainen, Kare; Jones, Kenneth L; Koivula, Teija; Romantschuk, Martin; Strömmer, Rauni

    2011-04-01

    Boreal forests contain diverse fungal communities that form essential ectomycorrhizal symbioses with trees. To determine the effects of lead (Pb) contamination on ectomycorrhizal fungal communities associated with the dominant pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), we surveyed sporocarps for 3 years, analyzed morphotyped ectomycorrhizal root tips by direct sequencing, and 454-sequenced fungal communities that grew into in-growth bags during a 2-year incubation at a shooting range where sectors vary in the Pb load. We recorded a total of 32 ectomycorrhizal fungi that formed conspicuous sporocarps, 27 ectomycorrhizal fungal phylotypes from 294 root tips, and 116 ectomycorrhizal fungal operation taxonomic unit (OTUs) from a total of 8194 internal transcribed spacer-2 454 sequences. Our ordination analyses by nonparametric multidimensional scaling (NMS) indicated that the Pb enrichment induced a shift in the ectomycorrhizal community composition. This was visible as indicative trends in the sporocarp and root tip data sets, but was explicitly clear in the communities observed in the in-growth bags. The compositional shift in the ectomycorrhizal community was mainly attributable to an increase in the frequencies of OTUs assigned to genus Thelephora and to a decrease in the OTUs assigned to Pseudotomentella, Suillus, and Tylospora in Pb-contaminated areas when compared with the control. While the compositional shifts are clear, their functional consequences for the dominant trees or soil ecosystem function remain undetermined. PMID:21223331

  19. The effects of organic matter-mineral interactions and organic matter chemistry on diuron sorption across a diverse range of soils.

    PubMed

    Smernik, Ronald J; Kookana, Rai S

    2015-01-01

    Sorption of non-ionic organic compounds to soil is usually expressed as the carbon-normalized partition coefficient (KOC), because it is assumed that the main factor that influences the amount sorbed is the organic carbon content of the soil. However, KOC can vary by a factor of at least ten across a range of soils. We investigated two potential causes of variation in diuron KOC - organic matter-mineral interactions and organic matter chemistry - for a diverse set of 34 soils from Sri Lanka, representing a wide range of soil types. Treatment with hydrofluoric acid (HF-treatment) was used to concentrate soil organic matter. HF-treatment increased KOC for the majority of soils (average factor 2.4). We attribute this increase to the blocking of organic matter sorption sites in the whole soils by minerals. There was no significant correlation between KOC for the whole soils and KOC for the HF-treated soils, indicating that the importance of organic matter-mineral interactions varied greatly amongst these soils. There was as much variation in KOC across the HF-treated soils as there was across the whole soils, indicating that the nature of soil organic matter is also an important contributor to KOC variability. Organic matter chemistry, determined by solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was correlated with KOC for the HF-treated soils. In particular, KOC increased with the aromatic C content (R=0.64, p=1×10(-6)), and decreased with O-alkyl C (R=-0.32, p=0.03) and alkyl C (R=-0.41, p=0.004) content. PMID:24972176

  20. Invasive Allele Spread under Preemptive Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasi, J. A.; Korniss, G.; Caraco, T.

    We study a discrete spatial model for invasive allele spread in which two alleles compete preemptively, initially only the "residents" (weaker competitors) being present. We find that the spread of the advantageous mutation is well described by homogeneous nucleation; in particular, in large systems the time-dependent global density of the resident allele is well approximated by Avrami's law.

  1. A Polarization-Diversity Homodyne Image-Reject Optical Tranceiver Architecture for Improved Range and Signal Detection in Coherent Doppler Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abari, C. F.; Chu, X.; Mann, J.

    2014-12-01

    Doppler light detection and ranging (lidar) has been used for a few decades for the characterization of wind fields and turbulence structures in the atmosphere. More recently, due to the advances in fiber optic communications, all-fiber coherent Doppler lidars (CDL) have been developed and widely used as a primary instrument for probing the atmospheric boundary layer wind fields. Due to a variety of reasons, all-fiber CDLs have gradually replaced their counterparts benefiting from technologies other than fiber optics. Most CDLs suffer from a number of drawbacks inherent to their principle of operation. For instance, one of the main challenges in CDLs is extracting the signal information from noisy observations, which is common to most opto-electronic systems. Moreover, it is sometimes challenging to extract the sign of the measured radial velocity. Conventionally, CDLs have benefitted from an intermediate frequency (IF) heterodyne receiver architecture for the determination of the radial velocity. In such systems, either the transmitted or the local oscillator (LO) signal is shifted in frequency. Such architectures may suffer from increased noise and spurious effects due to the employment of additional active components, e.g., acousto-optic modulator (AOM), limited measurement bandwidth (BW), and a more sophisticated electronic front-end for signal detection. On the other hand, one of the main challenges in long-range (pulsed) CDLs is the limitations imposed on the pulse repetition rate (PRR) as well as the available transmit power. These restrictions are more significant in all-fiber pulsed CDLs in which Erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA) are employed for the amplification of the optical pulses. In this study, we propose an alternative reconfigurable opto-electronic front-end transceiver architecture in all-fiber CDLs where there is no compromise in the detection BW. Additionally, by benefiting from a polarization diversity architecture we show that both the PRR

  2. Genetic comparison of lake sturgeon populations: Differentiation based on allelic frequencies at seven microsatellite loci

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McQuown, E.; Krueger, C.C.; Kincaid, H.L.; Gall, G.A.E.; May, B.

    2003-01-01

    The lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) has recently become a high priority for restoration management because of the near extinction of the species from many areas of North America. The identification of the level of population differentiation that naturally exists among lake sturgeon populations will be useful in the development of management plans to conserve and restore diversity, and in the choice of donor populations to use for re-introduction. Genetic variation among and within 210 lake sturgeon collected from seven locations (St. Lawrence River, Des Prairies River (tributary to the St. Lawrence River), Mattagami River (Hudson Bay drainage), Menominee River (Lake Michigan drainage), Wolf River (Lake Michigan drainage), Niagara River, and Lake Erie) was examined based on allelic variation at seven microsatellite loci (four disomic and three putative tetrasomic). High levels of variability were detected at these loci. Analyses revealed an average of 8.6 alleles per locus (range 5 to 12 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity values at the four disomic loci ranging from 0.46 to 0.66. Multivariate factor analysis of Nei's genetic distance values produced three distinct population groups that were organized by geography: 1) Mattagami (northern Quebec), 2) Menominee/ Wolf (Lake Michigan - Wisconsin), and 3) St. Lawrence/ Des Prairies/ Niagara/ Erie (lower Great Lakes). Differences based on G-tests summed over all loci occurred between all possible paired comparisons of the collections (P < 0.01). These analyses indicated that lake sturgeon populations are differentiated within the Great Lakes basin. Managers of this species will need to identify individual populations in their jurisdictions and provide separate consideration for their conservation and rehabilitation.

  3. Allelic Spectra of Risk SNPs Are Different for Environment/Lifestyle Dependent versus Independent Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated sufficient data to assess the role of selection in shaping allelic diversity of disease-associated SNPs. Negative selection against disease risk variants is expected to reduce their frequencies making them overrepresented in the group of minor (<50%) alleles. Indeed, we found that the overall proportion of risk alleles was higher among alleles with frequency <50% (minor alleles) compared to that in the group of major alleles. We hypothesized that negative selection may have different effects on environment (or lifestyle)-dependent versus environment (or lifestyle)-independent diseases. We used an environment/lifestyle index (ELI) to assess influence of environmental/lifestyle factors on disease etiology. ELI was defined as the number of publications mentioning “environment” or “lifestyle” AND disease per 1,000 disease-mentioning publications. We found that the frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with strong environmental/lifestyle components follow the distribution expected under a selectively neutral model, while frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with weak environmental/lifestyle influences is shifted to the lower values indicating effects of negative selection. We hypothesized that previously selectively neutral variants become risk alleles when environment changes. The hypothesis of ancestrally neutral, currently disadvantageous risk-associated alleles predicts that the distribution of risk alleles for the environment/lifestyle dependent diseases will follow a neutral model since natural selection has not had enough time to influence allele frequencies. The results of our analysis suggest that prediction of SNP functionality based on the level of evolutionary conservation may not be useful for SNPs associated with environment/lifestyle dependent diseases. PMID:26201053

  4. Identification of alleles of carotenoid pathway genes important for zeaxanthin accumulation in potato tubers

    PubMed Central

    Uitdewilligen, Jan G. A. M. L.; Kloosterman, Bjorn A.; Hutten, Ronald C. B.; Visser, Richard G. F.; van Eck, Herman J.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the genetics and molecular biology of orange flesh colour in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). To this end the natural diversity in three genes of the carotenoid pathway was assessed by SNP analyses. Association analysis was performed between SNP haplotypes and flesh colour phenotypes in diploid and tetraploid potato genotypes. We observed that among eleven beta-carotene hydroxylase 2 (Chy2) alleles only one dominant allele has a major effect, changing white into yellow flesh colour. In contrast, none of the lycopene epsilon cyclase (Lcye) alleles seemed to have a large effect on flesh colour. Analysis of zeaxanthin epoxidase (Zep) alleles showed that all (diploid) genotypes with orange tuber flesh were homozygous for one specific Zep allele. This Zep allele showed a reduced level of expression. The complete genomic sequence of the recessive Zep allele, including the promoter, was determined, and compared with the sequence of other Zep alleles. The most striking difference was the presence of a non-LTR retrotransposon sequence in intron 1 of the recessive Zep allele, which was absent in all other Zep alleles investigated. We hypothesise that the presence of this large sequence in intron 1 caused the lower expression level, resulting in reduced Zep activity and accumulation of zeaxanthin. Only genotypes combining presence of the dominant Chy2 allele with homozygosity for the recessive Zep allele produced orange-fleshed tubers that accumulated large amounts of zeaxanthin. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11103-010-9647-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20490894

  5. Adapting populations in space: clonal interference and genetic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Daniel; Barton, Nick

    Most species inhabit ranges much larger than the scales over which individuals interact. How does this spatial structure interact with adaptive evolution? We consider a simple model of a spatially-extended, adapting population and show that, while clonal interference severely limits the adaptation of purely asexual populations, even rare recombination is enough to allow adaptation at rates approaching those of well-mixed populations. We also find that the genetic hitchhiking produced by the adaptive alleles sweeping through the population has strange effects on the patterns of genetic diversity. In large spatial ranges, even low rates of adaptation cause all individuals in the population to rapidly trace their ancestry back to individuals living in a small region in the center of the range. The probability of fixation of an allele is thus strongly dependent on the allele's spatial location, with alleles from the center favored. Surprisingly, these effects are seen genome-wide (instead of being localized to the regions of the genome undergoing the sweeps). The spatial concentration of ancestry produces a power-law dependence of relatedness on distance, so that even individuals sampled far apart are likely to be fairly closely related, masking the underlying spatial structure.

  6. Null allele, allelic dropouts or rare sex detection in clonal organisms: simulations and application to real data sets of pathogenic microbes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pathogens and their vectors are organisms whose ecology is often only accessible through population genetics tools based on spatio-temporal variability of molecular markers. However, molecular tools may present technical difficulties due to the masking of some alleles (allelic dropouts and/or null alleles), which tends to bias the estimation of heterozygosity and thus the inferences concerning the breeding system of the organism under study. This is especially critical in clonal organisms in which deviation from panmixia, as measured by Wright’s FIS, can, in principle, be used to infer both the extent of clonality and structure in a given population. In particular, null alleles and allelic dropouts are locus specific and likely produce high variance of Wright’s FIS across loci, as rare sex is expected to do. In this paper we propose a tool enabling to discriminate between consequences of these technical problems and those of rare sex. Methods We have performed various simulations of clonal and partially clonal populations. We introduce allelic dropouts and null alleles in clonal data sets and compare the results with those that exhibit increasing rates of sexual recombination. We use the narrow relationship that links Wright’s FIS to genetic diversity in purely clonal populations as assessment criterion, since this relationship disappears faster with sexual recombination than with amplification problems of certain alleles. Results We show that the relevance of our criterion for detecting poorly amplified alleles depends partly on the population structure, the level of homoplasy and/or mutation rate. However, the interpretation of data becomes difficult when the number of poorly amplified alleles is above 50%. The application of this method to reinterpret published data sets of pathogenic clonal microbes (yeast and trypanosomes) confirms its usefulness and allows refining previous estimates concerning important pathogenic agents. Conclusion Our

  7. The Chief Diversity Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Damon; Wade-Golden, Katrina

    2007-01-01

    Numerous institutions are moving toward the chief diversity officer model of leading and managing diversity in higher education. These officers carry formal administrative titles and ranks that range from vice president for institutional diversity to associate vice chancellor for diversity and climate and dean of diversity and academic engagement.…

  8. Characterization of alleles in a diversity panel of tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Approximately 6,000 accessions of domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), including open-pollinated populations and inbred lines, are conserved at the USDA, ARS Plant Genetic Resources Unit (PGRU). This collection provides a publicly available resource for breeding and experimentation to end-...

  9. Germplasm Enhancement of Maize: Allelic Diversity and Double Haploid Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) Project is a collaborative effort of public and private sector researchers to broaden and enhance the germplasm base. To date, 235 germplasm lines have been released to cooperators representing approximately 25 races. These lines were selected based on yiel...

  10. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-03-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  11. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-01-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27030405

  12. The Diversity Outbred mouse population.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Gary A; Gatti, Daniel M; Munger, Steven C; Svenson, Karen L

    2012-10-01

    The Diversity Outbred (DO) population is a heterogeneous stock derived from the same eight founder strains as the Collaborative Cross (CC) inbred strains. Genetically heterogeneous DO mice display a broad range of phenotypes. Natural levels of heterozygosity provide genetic buffering and, as a result, DO mice are robust and breed well. Genetic mapping analysis in the DO presents new challenges and opportunities. Specialized algorithms are required to reconstruct haplotypes from high-density SNP array data. The eight founder haplotypes can be combined into 36 possible diplotypes, which must be accommodated in QTL mapping analysis. Population structure of the DO must be taken into account here. Estimated allele effects of eight founder haplotypes provide information that is not available in two-parent crosses and can dramatically reduce the number of candidate loci. Allele effects can also distinguish chance colocation of QTL from pleiotropy, which provides a basis for establishing causality in expression QTL studies. We recommended sample sizes of 200-800 mice for QTL mapping studies, larger than for traditional crosses. The CC inbred strains provide a resource for independent validation of DO mapping results. Genetic heterogeneity of the DO can provide a powerful advantage in our ability to generalize conclusions to other genetically diverse populations. Genetic diversity can also help to avoid the pitfall of identifying an idiosyncratic reaction that occurs only in a limited genetic context. Informatics tools and data resources associated with the CC, the DO, and their founder strains are developing rapidly. We anticipate a flood of new results to follow as our community begins to adopt and utilize these new genetic resource populations. PMID:22892839

  13. Distribution of a pseudodeficiency allele among Tay-Sachs carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tomczak, J.; Grebner, E.E. ); Boogen, C. )

    1993-08-01

    Recently Triggs-Raine et al. (1992) identified a new mutation in the gene coding for the [alpha]-subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (hex A), the enzyme whose deficiency causes Tay-Sachs disease. This mutation, a C[sub 739]-to-T transition in exon 7, results in an altered enzyme that is active (albeit at reduced levels) in cells but that has essentially no activity in serum. This so-called pseudodeficient allele was first detected in compound heterozygotes who also carried a Tay-Sachs disease allele and therefore had no detectable hex A in their serum but who were in good health. Carriers of this apparently benign mutation are generally indistinguishable from carriers of a lethal mutation by means of routine enzyme-based screening tests, because the product of the pseudodeficient allele is not detectable in serum and has decreased activity in cells. This suggests that some individuals who have been classified as Tay-Sachs carriers are actually carriers of the pseudodeficient allele and are not at risk to have a child affected with Tay-Sachs disease. The pseudodeficient allele may also be responsible for some inconclusive diagnoses, where leukocyte values fall below the normal range but are still above the carrier range. The fact that there are now two mutant alleles (the psuedodeficient and the adult) that are indistinguishable from the lethal infantile mutations by means of enzyme assay yet that are phenotypically very different and that together may account for as much as 12% of enzyme-defined carriers on the basis of the data here suggests that DNA analysis should be part of a comprehensive screening program. It will be particularly useful to identify the mutations in couples at risk, before they undergo prenatal diagnosis. DNA analysis will also resolve some inconclusive diagnoses.

  14. Origin of the diversity in DNA recognition domains in phasevarion associated modA genes of pathogenic Neisseria and Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Gawthorne, Jayde A; Beatson, Scott A; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Fox, Kate L; Jennings, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Phase variable restriction-modification (R-M) systems have been identified in a range of pathogenic bacteria. In some it has been demonstrated that the random switching of the mod (DNA methyltransferase) gene mediates the coordinated expression of multiple genes and constitutes a phasevarion (phase variable regulon). ModA of Neisseria and Haemophilus influenzae contain a highly variable, DNA recognition domain (DRD) that defines the target sequence that is modified by methylation and is used to define modA alleles. 18 distinct modA alleles have been identified in H. influenzae and the pathogenic Neisseria. To determine the origin of DRD variability, the 18 modA DRDs were used to search the available databases for similar sequences. Significant matches were identified between several modA alleles and mod gene from distinct bacterial species, indicating one source of the DRD variability was via horizontal gene transfer. Comparison of DRD sequences revealed significant mosaicism, indicating exchange between the Neisseria and H. influenzae modA alleles. Regions of high inter- and intra-allele similarity indicate that some modA alleles had undergone recombination more frequently than others, generating further diversity. Furthermore, the DRD from some modA alleles, such as modA12, have been transferred en bloc to replace the DRD from different modA alleles. PMID:22457715

  15. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2015-10-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs.

  16. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2015-01-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs. PMID:26498172

  17. Surfing in tortoises? Empirical signs of genetic structuring owing to range expansion

    PubMed Central

    Graciá, Eva; Botella, Francisco; Anadón, José Daniel; Edelaar, Pim; Harris, D. James; Giménez, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Much of our current knowledge about the genetic dynamics in range expansions originates from models, simulations and microcosm experiments that need to be corroborated by field data. Here, we report a neutral genetic pattern that matches the predictions of the genetic surfing theory. Genetic surfing occurs when repeated founding events and genetic drift act on the wave of advance of an expanding population, promoting strong spatial structure. In the range expansion of the tortoise Testudo graeca from North Africa to southeastern Spain, we found several genetic signatures consistent with surfing: a decrease of genetic diversity with distance from the initial founder area, clinal patterns in allele frequencies, rare African alleles which have become common at distal sites in the Spanish range, and stronger spatial differentiation in the expanded range than in the original one. Our results provide support for the theory that genetic drift can be an important force in shaping the genetic structure of expanding populations. PMID:23554278

  18. Diversity of potato genetic resources

    PubMed Central

    Machida-Hirano, Ryoko

    2015-01-01

    A considerable number of highly diverse species exist in genus Solanum. Because they can adapt to a broad range of habitats, potato wild relatives are promising sources of desirable agricultural traits. Potato taxonomy is quite complex because of introgression, interspecific hybridization, auto- and allopolyploidy, sexual compatibility among many species, a mixture of sexual and asexual reproduction, possible recent species divergence, phenotypic plasticity, and the consequent high morphological similarity among species. Recent researchers using molecular tools have contributed to the identification of genes controlling several types of resistance as well as to the revision of taxonomical relationships among potato species. Historically, primitive forms of cultivated potato and its wild relatives have been used in breeding programs and there is still an enormous and unimaginable potential for discovering desirable characteristics, particularly in wild species Different methods have been developed to incorporate useful alleles from these wild species into the improved cultivars. Potato germplasm comprising of useful alleles for different breeding objectives is preserved in various gene banks worldwide. These materials, with their invaluable information, are accessible for research and breeding purposes. Precise identification of species base on the new taxonomy is essential for effective use of the germplasm collection. PMID:25931978

  19. Global distribution of allele frequencies at the human dopamine D4 receptor locus

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.M.; Kidd, J.R.; Livak, K.J.

    1994-09-01

    The dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) is a candidate gene for schizophrenia because the dopaminergic system has been implicated in this neuropsychiatric disorder. Several research groups have reported an association between allelic variants at DRD4 and schizophrenia, while others have been unable to replicate that finding. Knowledge of the appropriate gene frequencies in the underlying populations may resolve these inconsistencies. We have determined the frequencies of 8 different alleles of the 48 bp imperfect tandem repeat of exon 3 at the DRD4 locus in samples from 33 populations around the world. The frequencies vary considerably in the different populations with the most common allele ranging from 16% to 95%. Frequencies and Fst values will be presented for the 3 most common alleles (4-, 7-, and 2- repeat) by continental groupings, but the individual populations vary significantly around the averages. The populations averaged 4.3 alleles (range 2 to 7).

  20. Distribution of forensic marker allelic frequencies in Pernambuco, Northestern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Rabelo, K C N; Souza, P R E; Moura, R R; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S

    2015-01-01

    Pernambuco is one of the 27 federal units of Brazil, ranking seventh in the number of inhabitants. We examined the allele frequencies of 13 short tandem repeat loci (CFS1PO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, FGA, TH01, vWA, and TPOX), the minimum recommended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and commonly used in forensic genetics laboratories in Brazil, in a sample of 609 unrelated individuals from all geographic regions of Pernambuco. The allele frequencies ranged from 5 to 47.2%. No significant differences for any loci analyzed were observed compared with other publications in other various regions of Brazil. Most of the markers observed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The occurrence of the allele 47.2 (locus FGA) and alleles 35.1 and 39 (locus D21S11), also described in a single study of the Brazilian population, was observed. The other forensic parameters analyzed (matching probability, power of discrimination, polymorphic information content, paternity exclusion, complement factor I, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity) indicated that the studied markers are very informative for human forensic identification purposes in the Pernambuco population. PMID:25966202

  1. Genetic Diversity of the Two Commercial Tetraploid Cotton Species in the Gossypium Diversity Reference Set.

    PubMed

    Hinze, Lori L; Gazave, Elodie; Gore, Michael A; Fang, David D; Scheffler, Brian E; Yu, John Z; Jones, Don C; Frelichowski, James; Percy, Richard G

    2016-05-01

    A diversity reference set has been constructed for the Gossypium accessions in the US National Cotton Germplasm Collection to facilitate more extensive evaluation and utilization of accessions held in the Collection. A set of 105 mapped simple sequence repeat markers was used to study the allelic diversity of 1933 tetraploid Gossypium accessions representative of the range of diversity of the improved and wild accessions of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense. The reference set contained 410 G. barbadense accessions and 1523 G. hirsutum accessions. Observed numbers of polymorphic and private bands indicated a greater diversity in G. hirsutum as compared to G. barbadense as well as in wild-type accessions as compared to improved accessions in both species. The markers clearly differentiated the 2 species. Patterns of diversity within species were observed but not clearly delineated, with much overlap occurring between races and regions of origin for wild accessions and between historical and geographic breeding pools for cultivated accessions. Although the percentage of accessions showing introgression was higher among wild accessions than cultivars in both species, the average level of introgression within individual accessions, as indicated by species-specific bands, was much higher in wild accessions of G. hirsutum than in wild accessions of G. barbadense. The average level of introgression within individual accessions was higher in improved G. barbadense cultivars than in G. hirsutum cultivars. This molecular characterization reveals the levels and distributions of genetic diversity that will allow for better exploration and utilization of cotton genetic resources. PMID:26774060

  2. Inactive alleles of cytochrome P450 2C19 may be positively selected in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 CYP2C19 metabolizes a wide range of pharmacologically active substances and a relatively small number of naturally occurring environmental toxins. Poor activity alleles of CYP2C19 are very frequent worldwide, particularly in Asia, raising the possibility that reduced metabolism could be advantageous in some circumstances. The evolutionary selective forces acting on this gene have not previously been investigated. We analyzed CYP2C19 genetic markers from 127 Gambians and on 120 chromosomes from Yoruba, Europeans and Asians (Japanese + Han Chinese) in the Hapmap database. Haplotype breakdown was explored using bifurcation plots and relative extended haplotype homozygosity (REHH). Allele frequency differentiation across populations was estimated using the fixation index (FST) and haplotype diversity with coalescent models. Results Bifurcation plots suggested conservation of alleles conferring slow metabolism (CYP2C19*2 and *3). REHH was high around CYP2C19*2 in Yoruba (REHH 8.3, at 133.3 kb from the core) and to a lesser extent in Europeans (3.5, at 37.7 kb) and Asians (2.8, at −29.7 kb). FST at the CYP2C19 locus was low overall (0.098). CYP2C19*3 was an FST outlier in Asians (0.293), CYP2C19 haplotype diversity < = 0.037, p <0.001. Conclusions We found some evidence that the slow metabolizing allele CYP2C19*2 is subject to positive selective forces worldwide. Similar evidence was also found for CYP2C19*3 which is frequent only in Asia. FST is low at the CYP2C19 locus, suggesting balancing selection overall. The biological factors responsible for these selective pressures are currently unknown. One possible explanation is that early humans were exposed to a ubiquitous novel toxin activated by CYP2C19. The genetic adaptation took place within the last 10,000 years which coincides with the development of systematic agricultural practices. PMID:24690327

  3. Diploid male dynamics under different numbers of sexual alleles and male dispersal abilities.

    PubMed

    Faria, Luiz R R; Soares, Elaine Della Giustina; Carmo, Eduardo do; Oliveira, Paulo Murilo Castro de

    2016-09-01

    Insects in the order Hymenoptera (bees, wasps and ants) present an haplodiploid system of sexual determination in which fertilized eggs become females and unfertilized eggs males. Under single locus complementary sex-determination (sl-CSD) system, the sex of a specimen depends on the alleles at a single locus: when diploid, an individual will be a female if heterozygous and male if homozygous. Significant diploid male (DM) production may drive a population to an extinction scenario called "diploid male vortex". We aimed at studying the dynamics of populations of a sl-CSD organism under several combinations of two parameters: male flight abilities and number of sexual alleles. In these simulations, we evaluated the frequency of DM and a genetic diversity measure over 10,000 generations. The number of sexual alleles varied from 10 to 100 and, at each generation, a male offspring might fly to another random site within a varying radius R. Two main results emerge from our simulations: (i) the number of DM depends more on male flight radius than on the number of alleles; (ii) in large geographic regions, the effect of males flight radius on the allelic diversity turns out much less pronounced than in small regions. In other words, small regions where inbreeding normally appears recover genetic diversity due to large flight radii. These results may be particularly relevant when considering the population dynamics of species with increasingly limited dispersal ability (e.g., forest-dependent species of euglossine bees in fragmented landscapes). PMID:27067711

  4. Genetic diversity of microsatellite loci in Leopardus pardalis, Leopardus wiedii and Leopardus tigrinus.

    PubMed

    Grisolia, A B; Moreno, V R; Campagnari, F; Milazzotto, M P; Garcia, J F; Adania, C H; Souza, E B

    2007-01-01

    The microsatellite loci FCA045, FCA077, FCA008, and FCA096 are highly variable molecular markers which were used to determine the genetic diversity in 148 captive Leopardus sp. The PCR-amplified products of microsatellite loci were characterized in ABI Prism 310 Genetic Analyzer. Allele numbers, heterozygosity, polymorphism information content, exclusive allele number, and shared alleles were calculated. Sixty-five alleles were found and their sizes ranged from 116 to 216 bp in four microsatellite loci. The heterozygosity ranged from 0.36 to 0.81 in Leopardus pardalis, 0.57 to 0.67 in L. tigrinus and 0.80 to 0.92 in L. wiedii. The polymorphism information content was from 0.80 to 0.88 in L. pardalis, 0.76 to 0.88 in L. tigrinus and 0.77 to 0.90 in L. wiedii. The margay (L. wiedii) showed the highest index of polymorphism among the three species in this study. These results imply that microsatellite DNA markers can help in the study of the genetic diversity of Leopardus specimens. PMID:17624861

  5. Shared genetic diversity across the global invasive range of the monk parakeet suggests a common restricted geographic origin and the possibility of convergent selection.

    PubMed

    Edelaar, Pim; Roques, Severine; Hobson, Elizabeth A; Gonçalves da Silva, Anders; Avery, Michael L; Russello, Michael A; Senar, Juan C; Wright, Timothy F; Carrete, Martina; Tella, José L

    2015-05-01

    While genetic diversity is hypothesized to be an important factor explaining invasion success, there is no consensus yet on how variation in source populations or demographic processes affects invasiveness. We used mitochondrial DNA haplotypic and microsatellite genotypic data to investigate levels of genetic variation and reconstruct the history of replicate invasions on three continents in a globally invasive bird, the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus). We evaluated whether genetic diversity at invasive sites could be explained by (i) the native source populations from which they were derived and (ii) demographic bottlenecks during introduction. Genetic data indicated a localized source area for most sampled invasive populations, with limited evidence for admixing of native source populations. This pattern largely coincides with historical data on pet trade exports. However, the invasive populations are genetically more similar than predicted from the export data alone. The extent of bottleneck effects varied among invasive populations. The observed low genetic diversity, evidence of demographic contraction and restricted source area do not support the hypothesis that invasion is favoured by the mixing and recombining of genetic variation from multiple source populations. Instead, they suggest that reduced genetic variation through random processes may not inhibit successful establishment and invasion in this species. However, convergent selection across invasive sites could also explain the observed patterns of reduction and similarity in genetic variation and/or the restricted source area. In general, the alternative explanation of intraspecific variation in invasive potential among genotypes or geographic areas is neglected, but warrants more attention as it could inform comparative studies and management of biological invaders. PMID:25873354

  6. Geographically Distinct and Domain-Specific Sequence Variations in the Alleles of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pib

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M.; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, which is the most destructive fungal pathogen affecting rice growing regions worldwide. The rice blast resistance gene Pib confers broad-spectrum resistance against Southeast Asian M. oryzae races. We investigated the allelic diversity of Pib in rice germplasm originating from 12 major rice growing countries. Twenty-five new Pib alleles were identified that have unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions and/or deletions, in addition to the polymorphic nucleotides that are shared between the different alleles. These partially or completely shared polymorphic nucleotides indicate frequent sequence exchange events between the Pib alleles. In some of the new Pib alleles, nucleotide diversity is high in the LRR domain, whereas, in others it is distributed among the NB-ARC and LRR domains. Most of the polymorphic amino acids in LRR and NB-ARC2 domains are predicted as solvent-exposed. Several of the alleles and the unique SNPs are country specific, suggesting a diversifying selection of alleles in various geographical locations in response to the locally prevalent M. oryzae population. Together, the new Pib alleles are an important genetic resource for rice blast resistance breeding programs and provide new information on rice-M. oryzae interactions at the molecular level. PMID:27446145

  7. Localization and diversity of 185/333 proteins from the purple sea urchin--unexpected protein-size range and protein expression in a new coelomocyte type.

    PubMed

    Brockton, Virginia; Henson, John H; Raftos, David A; Majeske, Audrey J; Kim, Young-Ok; Smith, L Courtney

    2008-02-01

    The current paradigm proposes that the innate immune systems of invertebrates are much more complex than previously thought. The highly diverse 185/333 gene family in the purple sea urchin encodes a family of closely related proteins of varying length and sequence composition. Subsets of small phagocytes and polygonal cells express 185/333 proteins with localization on the surface of the small phagocytes and within perinuclear vesicles in both cell types. In short-term cultures, coelomocytes form small aggregates that progress to syncytia that are thought to be equivalent to encapsulation in vivo. These aggregates were found to be enriched for 185/333-positive (185/333(+)) small phagocytes. In response to lipopolysaccharide challenge, coelomocytes transiently increased, including frequencies of both 185/333(+) and 185/333-negative (185/333(-)) small phagocytes and 185/333(+) polygonal cells. The 185/333 proteins were present in a broad array of sizes, most of which were larger than that predicted from the cDNAs. Recombinant 185/333 proteins expressed in bacteria and insect cells were also larger than expected, suggesting that the proteins dimerize and multimerize. The diversity of the 185/333 proteins, their expression in response to immune challenge, and their cellular localization suggests this protein family and the small phagocytes have an important immunological role in the sea urchin. PMID:18198192

  8. [Genetic diversity of microsatellite loci in captive Amur tigers].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Gaung; Li, Di-Qiang; Xiao, Qi-Ming; Rao, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Wen

    2004-09-01

    The tiger is one of the most threatened wildlife species since the abundance and distribution of tiger have decreased dramatically in the last century. The wild Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) only distributed in northeast China, the far east area of Russia and the north Korea and its size of wild population is about 450 in the world and 20 in China. Several hundred captive populations of Amur tigers are the main source to protect gene library of tiger and the source of recovering the wild populations. The Breeding Center for Felidae at Hengdaohezi and Haoerbin Tiger Park in Heilongjiang Province is the biggest captive breeding base in China. How to make clear the genetic pedigree and establish reasonable breeding system is the urgent issues. So we use the microsatellite DNA markers and non-invasive technology to research on the genetic diversity of captive Amur tiger in this study. Ten microsatellite loci (Fca005, Fca075, Fca094, Fca152, Fca161, Fca294, Pti002, Pti003, Pti007 and Pti010), highly variable nuclear markers, were studied their genetic diversity in 113 captive Amur tigers. The PCR amplified products of microsatellite loci were detected by non-denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Allele numbers, allelic frequency, gene heterozygosity(H(e)), polymorphism information content(PIC) and effective number of allele(N(e)) were calculated. 41 alleles were found and their size were ranged from 110bp to 250bp in ten microsatellite loci, Fca152 had 6 alleles, Fca075, Fca094 and Fca294 had 5 alleles, Fca005 and Pti002 had 4 alleles and the others had 3 alleles in all tiger samples, respectively. The allelic frequencies were from 0.009 to 0.767; The He ranged from 0.385 to 0.707, and Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; the PIC were from 0.353 to 0.658, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; and N(e) were from 1.626 to 3.409, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value, which showed the ten

  9. Functional screening of willow alleles in Arabidopsis combined with QTL mapping in willow (Salix) identifies SxMAX4 as a coppicing response gene

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Jemma; Ward, Sally P; Hanley, Steven J; Leyser, Ottoline; Karp, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) are important biomass crops due to their ability to grow rapidly with low fertilizer inputs and ease of cultivation in short-rotation coppice cycles. They are relatively undomesticated and highly diverse, but functional testing to identify useful allelic variation is time-consuming in trees and transformation is not yet possible in willow. Arabidopsis is heralded as a model plant from which knowledge can be transferred to advance the improvement of less tractable species. Here, knowledge and methodologies from Arabidopsis were successfully used to identify a gene influencing stem number in coppiced willows, a complex trait of key biological and industrial relevance. The strigolactone-related More AXillary growth (MAX) genes were considered candidates due to their role in shoot branching. We previously demonstrated that willow and Arabidopsis show similar response to strigolactone and that transformation rescue of Arabidopsis max mutants with willow genes could be used to detect allelic differences. Here, this approach was used to screen 45 SxMAX1, SxMAX2, SxMAX3 and SxMAX4 alleles cloned from 15 parents of 11 mapping populations varying in shoot-branching traits. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies were locus dependent, ranging from 29.2 to 74.3 polymorphic sites per kb. SxMAX alleles were 98%–99% conserved at the amino acid level, but different protein products varying in their ability to rescue Arabidopsis max mutants were identified. One poor rescuing allele, SxMAX4D, segregated in a willow mapping population where its presence was associated with increased shoot resprouting after coppicing and colocated with a QTL for this trait. PMID:24393130

  10. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  11. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Investigation of the genetic diversity of an invasive whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in China using both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Chu, D; Gao, C S; De Barro, P; Wan, F H; Zhang, Y J

    2011-08-01

    It is often considered that reduced genetic variation due to bottlenecks and founder effects limits the capacity for species to establish in new environments and subsequently spread. The recent invasion (during the past five years) of an alien whitefly, one member of Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex, referred to as Mediterranean (herein referred to as Q-type) in Shandong Province, China, provides an ideal opportunity to study the changes in genetic variation between its home range in the Mediterranean region and its invasion range. Using both the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) and nuclear (microsatellite) DNA, we show that Q in Shandong likely originated in the western Mediterranean. We also found that the haplotype diversity was low compared with its presumed geographic origin, whereas microsatellite allele diversity showed no such decline. A key factor in invasions is the establishment of females and so bottleneck and founder events can lead to a very rapid and considerable loss of mitochondrial diversity. The lack of haplotype diversity in Shandong supports the interpretation that, at one or more points between the western Mediterranean and China, the invading Q lost haplotype diversity, most probably through the serial process of establishment and redistribution through trade in ornamental plants. However, the loss in haplotype diversity does not necessarily mean that nuclear allelic diversity should also decline. Provided females can mate freely with whichever males are available, allelic diversity can be maintained or even increased relative to the origin of the invader. Our findings may offer some explanation to the apparent paradox between the concept of reduced genetic variation limiting adaptation to new environments and the observed low diversity in successful invaders. PMID:21320364

  13. Always look on both sides: Phylogenetic information conveyed by simple sequence repeat allele sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily,...

  14. Alleles conferring improved fiber quality from EMS mutagenesis of elite cotton genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The elite gene pool of cotton (Gossypium spp.) has less diversity than those of most other major crops, making identification of novel alleles important to ongoing crop improvement. A total of 3,164 M5 lines resulting from ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of two G. hirsutum breeding lines, TAM 94L...

  15. High genetic diversity in gametophyte clones of Undaria pinnatifida from Vladivostok, Dalian and Qingdao revealed using microsatellite analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Tifeng; Pang, Shaojun; Liu, Feng; Xu, Na; Zhao, Xiaobo; Gao, Suqin

    2012-03-01

    Breeding practice for Undaria pinnatifida (Harvey) Suringar requires the screening of a large number of offspring from gametophyte crossings to obtain an elite variety for large-scale cultivation. To better understand the genetic relationships of different gametophyte cultures isolated from different sources, 20 microsatellite loci were screened and 53 gametophyte clone cultures analyzed for U. pinnatifida isolated from wild sporophytes in Vladivostok, Russia and from cultivated sporophytes from Dalian and Qingdao, China. One locus was abandoned because of poor amplification. At the sex-linked locus of Up-AC-2A8, 3 alleles were detected in 25 female gametophyte clones, with sizes ranging from 307 to 316 bp. At other loci, 3 to 7 alleles were detected with an average of 4.5 alleles per locus. The average number of alleles at each locus was 1.3 and 3.7 for Russian and Chinese gametophyte clones, respectively. The average gene diversity for Russian, Chinese, and for the combined total of gametophyte clones was 0.1, 0.4, and 0.5, respectively. Russian gametophyte clones had unique alleles at 7 out of the 19 loci. In cluster analysis, Russian and Chinese gametophyte clones were separated into two different groups according to genetic distance. Overall, high genetic diversity was detected in gametophyte clones isolated from the two countries. These gametophyte cultures were believed to be appropriate parental materials for conducting breeding programs in the future.

  16. Bacterial diversity of soil in the vicinity of Pindari glacier, Himalayan mountain ranges, India, using culturable bacteria and soil 16S rRNA gene clones.

    PubMed

    Shivaji, S; Pratibha, M S; Sailaja, B; Hara Kishore, K; Singh, Ashish K; Begum, Z; Anarasi, Uttam; Prabagaran, S R; Reddy, G S N; Srinivas, T N R

    2011-01-01

    Three 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (P1L, P4L and P8L) were constructed using three soil samples (P1S, P4S and P8S) collected near Pindari glacier, Himalayas. The three libraries yielded a total of 703 clones. Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were common to the three libraries. In addition to the above P1L and P8L shared the phyla Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes and Planctomycetes. Phyla Chlamydiae, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Dictyoglomi, Fibrobacteres, Nitrospirae, Verrucomicrobia, candidate division SPAM and candidate TM7s TM7a phylum were present only in P1L. Rarefaction analysis indicated that the bacterial diversity in P4S and P8S soil samples was representative of the sample. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that P1S and P8S were different from P4S soil sample. PCA also indicated that arsenic content, pH, Cr and altitude influence the observed differences in the percentage of specific OTUs in the three 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. The observed bacterial diversity was similar to that observed for other Himalayan and non-polar cold habitats. A total of 40 strains of bacteria were isolated from the above three soil samples and based on the morphology 20 bacterial strains were selected for further characterization. The 20 bacteria belonged to 12 different genera. All the isolates were psychro-, halo- and alkalitolerant. Amylase and urease activities were detected in majority of the strains but lipase and protease activities were not detected. Long chain, saturated, unsaturated and branched fatty acids were predominant in the psychrotolerant bacteria. PMID:21061031

  17. Pyrosequencing for Accurate Imprinted Allele Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bing; Damaschke, Nathan; Yao, Tianyu; McCormick, Johnathon; Wagner, Jennifer; Jarrard, David

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that restricts gene expression to one inherited allele. Improper maintenance of imprinting has been implicated in a number of human diseases and developmental syndromes. Assays are needed that can quantify the contribution of each paternal allele to a gene expression profile. We have developed a rapid, sensitive quantitative assay for the measurement of individual allelic ratios termed Pyrosequencing for Imprinted Expression (PIE). Advantages of PIE over other approaches include shorter experimental time, decreased labor, avoiding the need for restriction endonuclease enzymes at polymorphic sites, and prevent heteroduplex formation which is problematic in quantitative PCR-based methods. We demonstrate the improved sensitivity of PIE including the ability to detect differences in allelic expression down to 1%. The assay is capable of measuring genomic heterozygosity as well as imprinting in a single run. PIE is applied to determine the status of Insulin-like Growth Factor-2 (IGF2) imprinting in human and mouse tissues. PMID:25581900

  18. Genetic diversity of Swiss sheep breeds in the focus of conservation research.

    PubMed

    Glowatzki-Mullis, M-L; Muntwyler, J; Bäumle, E; Gaillard, C

    2009-04-01

    There is constant pressure to improve evaluation of animal genetic resources in order to prevent their erosion. Maintaining the integrity of livestock species as well as their genetic diversity is of paramount interest for long-term agricultural policies. One major use of DNA techniques in conservation is to reveal genetic diversity within and between populations. Forty-one microsatellites were analysed to assess genetic diversity in nine Swiss sheep breeds and to measure the loss of the overall diversity when one breed would become extinct. The expected heterozygosities varied from 0.65 to 0.74 and 10.8% of the total genetic diversity can be explained by the variation among breeds. Based on the proportion of shared alleles, each of the nine breeds were clearly defined in their own cluster in the neighbour-joining tree describing the relationships among the breeds. Bayesian clustering methods assign individuals to groups based on their genetic similarity and infer the number of populations. In STRUCTURE, this approach pooled the Valais Blacknose and the Valais Red. With BAPS method the two Valais sheep breeds could be separated. Caballero & Toro approach (2002) was used to calculate the loss or gain of genetic diversity when each of the breeds would be removed from the set. The changes in diversity based on between-breed variation ranged from -12.2% (Valais Blacknose) to 0% (Swiss Black Brown Mountain and Mirror Sheep); based on within-breed diversity the removal of a breed could also produce an increase in diversity (-0.6% to + 0.6%). Allelic richness ranged from 4.9 (Valais Red) to 6.7 (Brown Headed Meat sheep and Red Engadine Sheep). Breed conservation decisions cannot be limited to genetic diversity alone. In Switzerland, conservation goals are embedded in the desire to carry the cultural legacy over to future generations. PMID:19320774

  19. Allelic variation in the squirrel monkey x-linked color vision gene: biogeographical and behavioral correlates.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Susan; Boinski, Sue; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2002-06-01

    Most Neotropical primate species possess a polymorphic X-linked and a monomorphic autosomal color vision gene. Consequently, populations are composed of both dichromatics and trichromatics. Most theories on the maintenance of this genetic system revolve around possible advantages for foraging ecology. To examine the issue from a different angle, we compared the numbers and relative frequencies of alleles at the X-linked locus among three species of Saimiri representing a wide range of geographical and behavioral variation in the genus. Exons 3, 4, and 5 of the X-linked opsin gene were sequenced for a large number of X chromosomes for all three species. Several synonymous mutations were detected in exons 4 and 5 for the originally reported alleles but only a single nonsynonymous change was detected. Two alleles were found that appeared to be the result of recombination events. The low occurrence of recombinant alleles and absence of mutations in the amino acids critical for spectral tuning indicates that stabilizing selection acts to maintain the combinations of critical sites specific to each allele. Allele frequencies were approximately the same for all Saimiri species, with a slight but significant difference between S. boliviensis and S. oerstedii. No apparent correlation exists between allele frequencies and behavioral or biogeographical differences between species, casting doubt on the speculation that the spectral sensitivities of the alleles have been maintained because they are specifically well-tuned to Saimiri visual ecology. Rather, the spectral tuning peaks might have been maintained because they are as widely spaced as possible within the limited range of middlewave to longwave spectra useful to all primates. This arrangement creates a balance between maximizing the distance between spectral tuning peaks (allowing the color opponency of the visual system to distinguish between peaks) and maximizing the number of alleles within a limited range (yielding

  20. Analysis of genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei using microsatellite markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Weiji; Li, Weiya; Zhang, Quanqi; Kong, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Seven microsatellite markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei, which were introduced from Central and South America to China. All seven microsatellite loci were polymorphic, with polymorphism information content ( PIC) values ranging from 0.593 to 0.952. Totally 92 alleles were identified, and the number of alleles ( Na) and effective alleles ( Ne) varied between 4 and 21 and 2.7 and 14.6, respectively. Observed heterozygosity ( H o) values were lower than the expected heterozygosity ( H e) values (0.526-0.754), which indicated that the seven stocks possessed a rich genetic diversity. Thirty-seven tests were detected for reasonable significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. F is values were positive at five loci, suggesting that there was a relatively high degree of inbreeding within stocks. Pairwise F st values ranged from 0.0225 to 0.151, and most of the stock pairs were moderately differentiated. Genetic distance and cluster analysis using UPGMA revealed a close genetic relationship of L. vannamei between Pop2 and Pop3. AMOVA indicated that the genetic variation among stocks (11.3%) was much lower than that within stocks (88.7%). Although the seven stocks had a certain degree of genetic differentiation and a rich genetic diversity, there is an increasing risk of decreased performance due to inbreeding in subsequent generations.

  1. Suppression of Seedling Damping-Off Caused by Pythium ultimum, P. irregulare, and Rhizoctonia solani in Container Media Amended with a Diverse Range of Pacific Northwest Compost Sources.

    PubMed

    Scheuerell, Steven J; Sullivan, Dan M; Mahaffee, Walter F

    2005-03-01

    ABSTRACT Suppression of seedling damping-off disease caused by Pythium spp. and Rhizoctonia solani is a potential benefit of formulating soilless container media with compost. Thirty-six compost samples from Pacific Northwest commercial composting facilities were analyzed for a number of physical, chemical, and biological properties, including suppression of damping-off caused by Pythium ultimum, P. irregulare, and R. solani. The samples were produced from diverse feedstocks and composting technol ogies; this was reflected in a large degree of variability in the measured properties. When mixed with sphagnum peat moss and inorganic aggregates, 67% of the compost samples significantly suppressed P. irregulare damping-off of cucumber, 64% suppressed P. ultimum damping-off of cucumber, and 17% suppressed damping-off of cabbage caused by R. solani. Suppression of Pythium damping-off was related to the potential of compost to support microbial activity and a qualitative index of ammonia volatilization. Suppression of Rhizoctonia damping-off was not related to any one compost factor. Currently available compost products potentially could provide commercially acceptable control of damping-off caused by Pythium spp., but it is necessary to fortify composts with microbial antagonists for the control of R. solani. PMID:18943125

  2. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  3. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  4. Distribution of repeat unit differences between alleles at tandem repeat microsatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L. |; Zhong, Y.; Chakraborty, R.

    1994-09-01

    PCR-based assays of tandemly repeated microsatellite loci detect genetic variation from which alleles may be scored by their repeat unit lengths. Comparison of allele sizes from such data yields a probability distribution (P{sub k}) of repeat unit differences (k) between alleles segregating in a population. We show that this distribution (P{sub k}; k = 0, 1,2,...) provides insight regarding the mechanism of production of new alleles at such loci and the demographic history of populations, far better than that obtained from other summary measures (e.g., heterozygosity, number of alleles, and the range of allele sizes). The distributions of P{sub k} under multi-step stepwise models of mutation are analytically derived, which show that when a population is at equilibrium under the mutation-drift balance, the distribution of repeat unit differences between alleles is positively skewed with a mode larger than zero. However, when the heterozygosity at a locus is low (say, less than 40%), P{sub k} is a monotonically decreasing function of k. Applications of this theory to data on repeat unit sizes at over 1,240 microsatellite loci from the Caucasians, categorized by the average heterozygosity of loci, indicate that at most microsatellite loci new alleles are produced by stepwise mutations, and this is consistent with the replication slippage mechanism of mutations. The repeat size changes of mutants are probably within one or two units of alleles from which the mutants arise. Distributions of P{sub k} at microsatellite loci located within genes show evidence of allele size constraints. No significant evidence of recent expansion of population sizes in the Caucasians is detected by the distribution of P{sub k}.

  5. Female sticklebacks count alleles in a strategy of sexual selection explaining MHC polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Reusch, T B; Häberli, M A; Aeschlimann, P B; Milinski, M

    2001-11-15

    The origin and maintenance of polymorphism in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in natural populations is still unresolved. Sexual selection, frequency-dependent selection by parasites and pathogens, and heterozygote advantage have been suggested to explain the maintenance of high allele diversity at MHC genes. Here we argue that there are two (non-exclusive) strategies for MHC-related sexual selection, representing solutions to two different problems: inbreeding avoidance and parasite resistance. In species prone to inadvertent inbreeding, partners should prefer dissimilar MHC genotypes to similar ones. But if the goal is to maximize the resistance of offspring towards potential infections, the choosing sex should prefer mates with a higher diversity of MHC alleles. This latter strategy should apply when there are several MHC loci, as is the case in most vertebrates. We tested the relative importance of an 'allele counting' strategy compared to a disassortative mating strategy using wild-caught three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from an interconnected system of lakes. Here we show that gravid female fish preferred the odour of males with a large number of MHC class-IIB alleles to that of males with fewer alleles. Females did not prefer male genotypes dissimilar to their own. PMID:11713527

  6. Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jason A; Pickrell, Joseph K; Pearson, Laurel N; Quillen, Ellen E; Prista, António; Rocha, Jorge; Soodyall, Himla; Shriver, Mark D; Perry, George H

    2014-08-22

    While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the Duffy-null allele in the Malagasy, a recently admixed population with major ancestry components from both East Asia and mainland sub-Saharan Africa. We used genome-wide genetic data and extensive computer simulations to show that the high frequency of the Duffy-null allele in Madagascar can only be explained in the absence of positive natural selection under extreme demographic scenarios involving high genetic drift. However, the observed genomic single nucleotide polymorphism diversity in the Malagasy is incompatible with such extreme demographic scenarios, indicating that positive selection for the Duffy-null allele best explains the high frequency of the allele in Madagascar. We estimate the selection coefficient to be 0.066. Because vivax malaria is endemic to Madagascar, this result supports the hypothesis that malaria resistance drove fixation of the Duffy-null allele in mainland sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24990677

  7. Association of DLA-DQB1 alleles with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in Pembroke Welsh Corgis.

    PubMed

    Evans, J M; Tsai, K L; Starr-Moss, A N; Steiner, J M; Clark, L A

    2015-08-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is a digestive disorder resulting from the insufficient secretion of enzymes from the pancreas. In dogs, this condition is often attributed to pancreatic acinar atrophy, wherein the enzyme-producing acinar cells are believed to be destroyed through an autoimmune process. Although EPI affects many diverse breeds, to date, molecular studies have been limited to the German Shepherd dog. A recent study of major histocompatibility genes in diseased and healthy German Shepherd dogs identified both risk and protective haplotypes. Herein, we genotyped DLA-DQB1 in Pembroke Welsh Corgis to determine whether dog leukocyte antigen alleles contribute to the pathogenesis of EPI across dog breeds. We evaluated 14 affected and 43 control Pembroke Welsh Corgis, which were selected based on an age of onset similar to German Shepherd dogs. We identified one protective allele (odds ratio = 0.13, P-value = 0.044) and one risk allele (odds ratio = 3.8, P-value = 0.047). As in German Shepherd dogs, the risk allele is a duplication of DLA-DQB1 (alleles DQB1*013:03 and 017:01); however, Pembroke Welsh Corgis have acquired a single polymorphism on DQB1*017:01. Thus, the DLA-DQB1 duplication is a risk allele for EPI in at least two breeds. PMID:26095904

  8. Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Jason A.; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Pearson, Laurel N.; Quillen, Ellen E.; Prista, António; Rocha, Jorge; Soodyall, Himla; Shriver, Mark D.; Perry, George H.

    2014-01-01

    While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the Duffy-null allele in the Malagasy, a recently admixed population with major ancestry components from both East Asia and mainland sub-Saharan Africa. We used genome-wide genetic data and extensive computer simulations to show that the high frequency of the Duffy-null allele in Madagascar can only be explained in the absence of positive natural selection under extreme demographic scenarios involving high genetic drift. However, the observed genomic single nucleotide polymorphism diversity in the Malagasy is incompatible with such extreme demographic scenarios, indicating that positive selection for the Duffy-null allele best explains the high frequency of the allele in Madagascar. We estimate the selection coefficient to be 0.066. Because vivax malaria is endemic to Madagascar, this result supports the hypothesis that malaria resistance drove fixation of the Duffy-null allele in mainland sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24990677

  9. Multiple and independent origins of short seeded alleles of GS3 in rice

    PubMed Central

    Takano-Kai, Noriko; Jiang, Hui; Powell, Adrian; McCouch, Susan; Takamure, Itsuro; Furuya, Naruto; Doi, Kazuyuki; Yoshimura, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    GRAIN SIZE 3 (GS3) is a cloned gene that is related to seed length. Here we report the discovery of new deletion alleles at the GS3 locus, each of which confer short seed. We selected ten short seeded cultivars from a collection of 282 diverse cultivars. Sequence analysis across the GS3 gene in these ten cultivars identified three novel alleles and a known allele that contain several independent deletion(s) in the fifth exon of GS. These independent deletion variants each resulted in a frameshift mutation that caused a premature stop codon, and they were functionally similar to one another. Each coded for a truncated gene product that behaved as an incomplete dominant allele and conferred a short seeded phenotype. Haplotype analysis of these sequence variants indicated that two of the variants were of japonica origin, and two were from indica. Transformation experiments demonstrated that one of the deletion alleles of GS3 decrease the cell number in the upper epidermis of the glume, resulting in a significant reduction in seed length. The multiple and independent origins of these short seeded alleles indicate that farmers and early breeders imposed artificial selection favoring short seeds. PMID:23641184

  10. Rapid Microarray-Based Identification of Different mecA Alleles in Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Elke; Schwarz, Stefan; Hotzel, Helmut; Ehricht, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    To screen isolates and to identify mecA alleles, published mecA sequences were analyzed, and a microarray for the rapid discrimination of mecA alleles was designed. A GenBank analysis yielded 135 full-length gene sequences annotated as mecA. These sequences clustered into 32 different alleles corresponding to 28 unique amino acid sequences and to 15 distinct hybridization patterns on this microarray. A collection of 78 clinical and veterinary isolates of Staphylococcus spp. was characterized using this assay. Nine of the 15 expected patterns, as well as one as-yet-unknown pattern, were identified. These patterns were detected in various epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, in S. pseudintermedius, and in coagulase-negative species such as S. epidermidis, S. fleurettii, or S. haemolyticus. There was no correlation between the different mecA hybridization patterns and the SCCmec type. Determination of MICs showed that mecA alleles corresponding to only four of these nine patterns were associated with β-lactam resistance. The mecA alleles that did not confer β-lactam resistance were largely restricted to coagulase-negative staphylococci of animal origin, such as S. sciuri and S. vitulinus. Because of the diversity of sequences and the different impact on β-lactam susceptibility, the existence of different mecA alleles needs to be taken into account when designing diagnostic assays for the detection of mecA. PMID:22890767

  11. Do island plant populations really have lower genetic variation than mainland populations? Effects of selection and distribution range on genetic diversity estimates.

    PubMed

    García-Verdugo, C; Sajeva, M; La Mantia, T; Harrouni, C; Msanda, F; Caujapé-Castells, J

    2015-02-01

    Ecological and evolutionary studies largely assume that island populations display low levels of neutral genetic variation. However, this notion has only been formally tested in a few cases involving plant taxa, and the confounding effect of selection on genetic diversity (GD) estimates based on putatively neutral markers has typically been overlooked. Here, we generated nuclear microsatellite and plastid DNA sequence data in Periploca laevigata, a plant taxon with an island-mainland distribution area, to (i) investigate whether selection affects GD estimates of populations across contrasting habitats; and (ii) test the long-standing idea that island populations have lower GD than their mainland counterparts. Plastid data showed that colonization of the Canary Islands promoted strong lineage divergence within P. laevigata, which was accompanied by selective sweeps at several nuclear microsatellite loci. Inclusion of loci affected by strong divergent selection produced a significant downward bias in the GD estimates of the mainland lineage, but such underestimates were substantial (>14%) only when more than one loci under selection were included in the computations. When loci affected by selection were removed, we did not find evidence that insular Periploca populations have less GD than their mainland counterparts. The analysis of data obtained from a comprehensive literature survey reinforced this result, as overall comparisons of GD estimates between island and mainland populations were not significant across plant taxa (N = 66), with the only exception of island endemics with narrow distributions. This study suggests that identification and removal of markers potentially affected by selection should be routinely implemented in estimates of GD, particularly if different lineages are compared. Furthermore, it provides compelling evidence that the expectation of low GD cannot be generalized to island plant populations. PMID:25580539

  12. Comparative genotyping of Campylobacter jejuni by amplified fragment length polymorphism, multilocus sequence typing, and short repeat sequencing: strain diversity, host range, and recombination.

    PubMed

    Schouls, Leo M; Reulen, Sanne; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Willems, Rob J L; Dingle, Kate E; Colles, Frances M; Van Embden, Jan D A

    2003-01-01

    Three molecular typing methods were used to study the relationships among 184 Campylobacter strains isolated from humans, cattle, and chickens. All strains were genotyped by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and sequence analysis of a genomic region with short tandem repeats designated clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). MLST and AFLP analysis yielded more than 100 different profiles and patterns, respectively. These multiple-locus typing methods resulted in similar genetic clustering, indicating that both are useful in disclosing genetic relationships between Campylobacter jejuni isolates. Group separation analysis of the AFLP analysis and MLST data revealed an unexpected association between cattle and human strains, suggesting a common source of infection. Analysis of the polymorphic CRISPR region carrying short repeats allowed about two-thirds of the typeable strains to be distinguished, similar to AFLP analysis and MLST. The three methods proved to be equally powerful in identifying strains from outbreaks of human campylobacteriosis. Analysis of the MLST data showed that intra- and interspecies recombination occurs frequently and that the role of recombination in sequence variation is 50 times greater than that of mutation. Examination of strains cultured from cecum swabs revealed that individual chickens harbored multiple Campylobacter strain types and that some genotypes were found in more than one chicken. We conclude that typing of Campylobacter strains is useful for identification of outbreaks but is probably not useful for source tracing and global epidemiology because of carriage of strains of multiple types and an extremely high diversity of strains in animals. PMID:12517820

  13. The T-box transcription factor 3 is a promising biomarker and a key regulator of the oncogenic phenotype of a diverse range of sarcoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Willmer, T; Cooper, A; Sims, D; Govender, D; Prince, S

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomas represent a complex group of malignant neoplasms of mesenchymal origin and their heterogeneity poses a serious diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. There is therefore a need to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underpinning the pathogenesis of the more than 70 distinguishable sarcoma subtypes. The transcription factor TBX3, a critical developmental regulator, is overexpressed in several cancers of epithelial origin where it contributes to tumorigenesis by different molecular mechanisms. However, the status and role of TBX3 in sarcomas have not been reported. Here we show that a diverse subset of soft tissue and bone sarcoma cell lines and patient-derived sarcoma tissues express high levels of TBX3. We further explore the significance of this overexpression using a small interferring RNA approach and demonstrate that TBX3 promotes the migratory ability of chondrosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and liposarcoma cells but inhibits fibrosarcoma cell migration. This suggested that TBX3 may play a key role in the development of different sarcoma subtypes by functioning as either an oncoprotein or as a brake to prevent tumour progression. To further explore this, TBX3 knockdown and overexpression cell culture models were established using chondrosarcoma and fibrosarcoma cells as representatives of each scenario, and the resulting cells were characterized with regard to key features of tumorigenesis. Results from in vitro and in vivo assays reveal that, while TBX3 promotes substrate-dependent and -independent cell proliferation, migration and tumour formation in chondrosarcoma cells, it discourages fibrosarcoma formation. Our findings provide novel evidence linking TBX3 to cancers of mesenchymal origin. Furthermore, we show that TBX3 may be a biomarker for the diagnosis of histologically dynamic sarcoma subtypes and that it impacts directly on their oncogenic phenotype. Indeed, we reveal that TBX3 may exhibit oncogene or tumour suppressor activity in sarcomas, which

  14. Evolution in karst massifs: Cryptic diversity among bent-toed geckos along the Truong Son Range with descriptions of three new species and one new country record from Laos.

    PubMed

    Luu, Vinh Quang; Bonkowski, Michael; Nguyen, Truong Quang; Le, Minh Duc; Schneider, Nicole; Ngo, Hanh Thi; Ziegler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Species designated as 'cryptic' share a similar morphotype, and are often only clearly separable by molecular data. Cyrtodactylus, the most diverse gecko genus of the family Gekkonidae, is a prime example, because many morphologically similar taxa have only recently been identified as new species as a result of available genetic evidence. However, while cryptic diversity of Cyrtodactylus is already well documented on the Vietnamese side of the Truong Son range, only scarce data is available from central Laos. In this study, we address this issue by means of an integrative approach, which employs morphological, molecular, and ecological data to distinguish cryptic species of the Cyrtodacylus phongnhakebangensis species group primarily distributed along the northern Truong Son Range. Our analyses based on 12 selected morphological characters, a partial mitochondrial gene (COI), and five ecological parameters revealed three undescribed cryptic Cyrtodactylus species from Hin Nam No National Protected Area, which are described as Cyrtodactylus calamei sp. nov., Cyrtodactylus hinnamnoensis sp. nov., and Cyrtodactylus sommerladi sp. nov. A fourth discovered Cyrtodactylus population in Hin Nam No proved to be the first country record of C. cryptus for Laos. Our results highlight the importance of applying an integrative approach to resolving the taxonomy of complex and cryptic species groups, and the role of the Truong Son Range in maintaining the high level of biodiversity over time. PMID:27394811

  15. Sphaeromyxids form part of a diverse group of myxosporeans infecting the hepatic biliary systems of a wide range of host organisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Approximately 40 species of Sphaeromyxa have been described, all of which are coelozoic parasites from gall bladders of marine fish. They are unique amongst the myxosporeans as they have polar filaments that are flat and folded instead of being tubular and spirally wound. This unusual feature was used as a subordinal character to erect the suborder Sphaeromyxina, which contains one family, the Sphaeromyxidae, and a single genus Sphaeromyxa. Methods In the present study, we examine eelpout from the genus Lycodes from Iceland for the presence of myxosporean parasites in the gall bladder and perform morphological and DNA studies. Results A novel myxosporean, Sphaeromyxa lycodi n. sp., was identified in the gall bladders of five of the six species of Lycodes examined, with a prevalence ranging from 29 - 100%. The coelozoic plasmodia are large, polysporous and contain disporic pansporoblasts and mature spores which are arcuate. The pyriform polar capsules encase long and irregularly folded ribbon-like polar filaments. Each spore valve has two distinct ends and an almost 180° twist along the relatively indistinct suture line. The single sporoplasm is granular with two nuclei. Sphaeromyxa lycodi is phylogenetically related to other arcuate sphaeromyxids and is reproducibly placed with all known sphaeromyxids and forms part of a robustly supported clade of numerous myxosporean genera which infect the hepatic biliary systems of a wide range of hosts. Conclusions Sphaeromyxa lycodi is a common gall bladder myxosporean in eelpout of the genus Lycodes from Northern Iceland. It has characteristics typical of the genus and develops arcuate spores. Molecular phylogenetic analyses confirm that sphaeromyxids form a monophyletic group, subdivided into straight and arcuate spore forms, within the hepatic biliary clade that infect a wide range of freshwater associated animals. The ancestral spore form for the hepatic biliary clade was probably a Chloromyxum morphotype

  16. Characterization of the genetic diversity, structure and admixture of British chicken breeds.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S; Wiener, P; Teverson, D; Haley, C S; Hocking, P M

    2012-10-01

    The characterization of livestock genetic diversity can inform breed conservation initiatives. The genetic diversity and genetic structure were assessed in 685 individual genotypes sampled from 24 British chicken breeds. A total of 239 alleles were found across 30 microsatellite loci with a mean number of 7.97 alleles per locus. The breeds were highly differentiated, with an average F(ST) of 0.25, similar to that of European chicken breeds. The genetic diversity in British chicken breeds was comparable to that found in European chicken breeds, with an average number of alleles per locus of 3.59, ranging from 2.00 in Spanish to 4.40 in Maran, and an average expected heterozygosity of 0.49, ranging from 0.20 in Spanish to 0.62 in Araucana. However, the majority of breeds were not in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium, as indicated by heterozygote deficiency in the majority of breeds (average F(IS) of 0.20), with an average observed heterozygote frequency of 0.39, ranging from 0.15 in Spanish to 0.49 in Cochin. Individual-based clustering analyses revealed that most individuals clustered to breed origin. However, genetic subdivisions occurred in several breeds, and this was predominantly associated with flock supplier and occasionally by morphological type. The deficit of heterozygotes was likely owing to a Wahlund effect caused by sampling from different flocks, implying structure within breeds. It is proposed that gene flow amongst flocks within breeds should be enhanced to maintain the current levels of genetic diversity. Additionally, certain breeds had low levels of both genetic diversity and uniqueness. Consideration is required for the conservation and preservation of these potentially vulnerable breeds. PMID:22497565

  17. Diverse Thinking about Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra N.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the concept of diversity in educational decision making. It is noted that the differences that distinguish the needs, interests and abilities are identified by educators. It lists misconceptions resulting from not attending to within-group diversity, and states that a "loss of self" for individual members of…

  18. Patterns of species range evolution in Indo-Pacific reef assemblages reveal the Coral Triangle as a net source of transoceanic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Sean M.; McKenna, Caroline; Simpson, Stephen D.; Tournois, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The Coral Triangle in the Indo-Pacific is a region renowned for exceptional marine biodiversity. The area could have acted as a ‘centre of origin’ where speciation has been prolific or a ‘centre of survival’ by providing refuge during major environmental shifts such as sea-level changes. The region could also have acted as a ‘centre of accumulation’ for species with origins outside of the Coral Triangle, owing to it being at a central position between the Indian and Pacific oceans. Here, we investigated support for these hypotheses using population-level DNA sequence-based reconstructions of the range evolution of 45 species (314 populations) of Indo-Pacific reef-associated organisms. Our results show that populations undergoing the most ancient establishment were significantly more likely to be closer to the centre of the Coral Triangle than to peripheral locations. The data are consistent with the Coral Triangle being a net source of coral-reef biodiversity for the Indo-Pacific region, suggesting that the region has acted primarily as a centre of survival, a centre of origin or both. These results provide evidence of how a key location can influence the large-scale distributions of biodiversity over evolutionary timescales. PMID:27330168

  19. Revealing the diversity of Cloeodes Traver, 1938 (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae) in the Neotropics: description of eleven new species from Brazilian mountain ranges.

    PubMed

    Salles, F F; Massariol, F C; Angeli, K B; Lima, M M; Gattolliat, J-L; Sartori, M

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, based on material from distinct mountain ranges in Brazil, 11 new species of Cloeodes with hind wings or hind wing pads are described, illustrated and discussed. Among the new species, in C. aiuruoca, C. amantykyra, C. atlanticus, C. boldrinii and C. ioachimi, the apex of the fore femora in the nymphs is extremely projected (a characteristic previously found only in two species of the genus). Cloeodes guara and C. tracheatus share the presence of unusual large and dark gills. Cloeodes melanotarsus is readily distinguished by conspicuous blackish tarsi, C. lucifer by the bright yellow coloration of tergum I, and C. xyrognathos by blade-like incisors. Cloeodes magnus, besides being the largest species of the genus, with a body size reaching 12 mm, possess short maxillary palp. Comments on the presence of C. irvingi and C. opacus in Brazil are also provided. An interactive online key is provided for the nymphs of all the species of Cloeodes in which hind wing pads are present. PMID:26624088

  20. Patterns of species range evolution in Indo-Pacific reef assemblages reveal the Coral Triangle as a net source of transoceanic diversity.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sean M; McKenna, Caroline; Simpson, Stephen D; Tournois, Jennifer; Genner, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    The Coral Triangle in the Indo-Pacific is a region renowned for exceptional marine biodiversity. The area could have acted as a 'centre of origin' where speciation has been prolific or a 'centre of survival' by providing refuge during major environmental shifts such as sea-level changes. The region could also have acted as a 'centre of accumulation' for species with origins outside of the Coral Triangle, owing to it being at a central position between the Indian and Pacific oceans. Here, we investigated support for these hypotheses using population-level DNA sequence-based reconstructions of the range evolution of 45 species (314 populations) of Indo-Pacific reef-associated organisms. Our results show that populations undergoing the most ancient establishment were significantly more likely to be closer to the centre of the Coral Triangle than to peripheral locations. The data are consistent with the Coral Triangle being a net source of coral-reef biodiversity for the Indo-Pacific region, suggesting that the region has acted primarily as a centre of survival, a centre of origin or both. These results provide evidence of how a key location can influence the large-scale distributions of biodiversity over evolutionary timescales. PMID:27330168

  1. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favorova, Olga O; Favorov, Alexander V; Boiko, Alexey N; Andreewski, Timofey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Alekseenkov, Alexey D; Kulakova, Olga G; Gusev, Eugenyi I; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion) of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGFβ1, CCR5 and CTLA4 genes and TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. Each allele carriership in patients and controls was compared by Fisher's exact test, and disease-associated combinations of alleles in the data set were sought using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method recently developed by our group. Results We identified two previously unknown MS-associated tri-allelic combinations: -509TGFβ1*C, DRB1*18(3), CTLA4*G and -238TNF*B1,-308TNF*A2, CTLA4*G, which perfectly separate MS cases from controls, at least in the present sample. The previously described DRB1*15(2) allele, the microsatellite TNFa9 allele and the biallelic combination CCR5Δ32, DRB1*04 were also reidentified as MS-associated. Conclusion These results represent an independent validation of MS association with DRB1*15(2) and TNFa9 in Russians and are the first to find the interplay of three loci in conferring susceptibility to MS. They demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for the identification of complex-disease-associated combinations of alleles. PMID:16872485

  2. Unlocking wheat genetic resources for the molecular identification of previously undescribed functional alleles at the Pm3 resistance locus

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Navreet K.; Street, Kenneth; Mackay, Michael; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Keller, Beat

    2009-01-01

    The continuous improvement of crop plants is essential for agriculture in the coming decades and relies on the use of genetic variability through breeding. However, domestication and modern breeding have reduced diversity in the crop germplasm. Global gene banks conserve diversity, but these resources remain underexplored owing to a lack of efficient strategies to isolate important alleles. Here we describe a large-scale allele-mining project at the molecular level. We first selected a set of 1,320 bread wheat landraces from a database of 16,089 accessions, using the focused identification of germplasm strategy. On the basis of a hierarchical selection procedure on this set, we then isolated 7 resistance alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3, doubling the known functional allelic diversity at this locus. This targeted approach for molecular utilization of gene bank accessions reveals landraces as a rich resource of new functional alleles. This strategy can be implemented for other studies on the molecular diversity of agriculturally important genes, as well as for molecular breeding. PMID:19470492

  3. Unlocking wheat genetic resources for the molecular identification of previously undescribed functional alleles at the Pm3 resistance locus.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Navreet K; Street, Kenneth; Mackay, Michael; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Keller, Beat

    2009-06-01

    The continuous improvement of crop plants is essential for agriculture in the coming decades and relies on the use of genetic variability through breeding. However, domestication and modern breeding have reduced diversity in the crop germplasm. Global gene banks conserve diversity, but these resources remain underexplored owing to a lack of efficient strategies to isolate important alleles. Here we describe a large-scale allele-mining project at the molecular level. We first selected a set of 1,320 bread wheat landraces from a database of 16,089 accessions, using the focused identification of germplasm strategy. On the basis of a hierarchical selection procedure on this set, we then isolated 7 resistance alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3, doubling the known functional allelic diversity at this locus. This targeted approach for molecular utilization of gene bank accessions reveals landraces as a rich resource of new functional alleles. This strategy can be implemented for other studies on the molecular diversity of agriculturally important genes, as well as for molecular breeding. PMID:19470492

  4. Cytochrome allelic variants and clopidogrel metabolism in cardiovascular diseases therapy.

    PubMed

    Jarrar, Mohammed; Behl, Shalini; Manyam, Ganiraju; Ganah, Hany; Nazir, Mohammed; Nasab, Reem; Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-06-01

    Clopidogrel and aspirin are among the most prescribed dual antiplatelet therapies to treat the acute coronary syndrome and heart attacks. However, their potential clinical impacts are a subject of intense debates. The therapeutic efficiency of clopidogrel is controlled by the actions of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYPs) enzymes and impacted by individual genetic variations. Inter-individual polymorphisms in CYPs enzymes affect the metabolism of clopidogrel into its active metabolites and, therefore, modify its turnover and clinical outcome. So far, clinical trials fail to confirm higher or lower adverse cardiovascular effects in patients treated with combinations of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors, compared with clopidogrel alone. Such inconclusive findings may be due to genetic variations in the cytochromes CYP2C19 and CYP3A4/5. To investigate potential interactions/effects of these cytochromes and their allele variants on the treatment of acute coronary syndrome with clopidogrel alone or in combination with proton pump inhibitors, we analyze recent literature and discuss the potential impact of the cytochrome allelic variants on cardiovascular events and stent thrombosis treated with clopidogrel. The diversity of CYP2C19 polymorphisms and prevalence span within various ethnic groups, subpopulations and demographic areas are also debated. PMID:27072373

  5. Strong Genetic Differentiation of Submerged Plant Populations across Mountain Ranges: Evidence from Potamogeton pectinatus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Shabnam; Afsharzadeh, Saeed; Saeidi, Hojjatollah; Triest, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Biogeographic barriers for freshwater biota can be effective at various spatial scales. At the largest spatial scale, freshwater organisms can become genetically isolated by their high mountain ranges, vast deserts, and inability to cross oceans. Isolation by distance of aquatic plants is expected to be stronger across than alongside mountain ridges whereas the heterogeneity of habitats among populations and temporary droughts may influence connectivity and hamper dispersal. Suitable aquatic plant habitats became reduced, even for the widespread submerged Potamogeton pectinatus L. (also named Stuckenia pectinata) giving structure to various aquatic habitats. We compared the level of genetic diversity in a heterogeneous series of aquatic habitats across Iran and tested their differentiation over distances and across mountain ranges (Alborz and Zagros) and desert zones (Kavir), with values obtained from temperate region populations. The diversity of aquatic ecosystems across and along large geographic barriers provided a unique ecological situation within Iran. P. pectinatus were considered from thirty-six sites across Iran at direct flight distances ranging from 20 to 1,200 km. Nine microsatellite loci revealed a very high number of alleles over all sites. A PCoA, NJT clustering and STRUCTURE analysis revealed a separate grouping of individuals of southeastern Iranian sites and was confirmed by their different nuclear ITS and cpDNA haplotypes thereby indicating an evolutionary significant unit (ESU). At the level of populations, a positive correlation between allelic differentiation Dest with geographic distance was found. Individual-based STRUCTURE analysis over 36 sites showed 7 genetic clusters. FST and RST values for ten populations reached 0.343 and 0.521, respectively thereby indicating that allele length differences are more important and contain evolutionary information. Overall, higher levels of diversity and a stronger differentiation was revealed among

  6. Strong Genetic Differentiation of Submerged Plant Populations across Mountain Ranges: Evidence from Potamogeton pectinatus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Shabnam; Afsharzadeh, Saeed; Saeidi, Hojjatollah; Triest, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Biogeographic barriers for freshwater biota can be effective at various spatial scales. At the largest spatial scale, freshwater organisms can become genetically isolated by their high mountain ranges, vast deserts, and inability to cross oceans. Isolation by distance of aquatic plants is expected to be stronger across than alongside mountain ridges whereas the heterogeneity of habitats among populations and temporary droughts may influence connectivity and hamper dispersal. Suitable aquatic plant habitats became reduced, even for the widespread submerged Potamogeton pectinatus L. (also named Stuckenia pectinata) giving structure to various aquatic habitats. We compared the level of genetic diversity in a heterogeneous series of aquatic habitats across Iran and tested their differentiation over distances and across mountain ranges (Alborz and Zagros) and desert zones (Kavir), with values obtained from temperate region populations. The diversity of aquatic ecosystems across and along large geographic barriers provided a unique ecological situation within Iran. P. pectinatus were considered from thirty-six sites across Iran at direct flight distances ranging from 20 to 1,200 km. Nine microsatellite loci revealed a very high number of alleles over all sites. A PCoA, NJT clustering and STRUCTURE analysis revealed a separate grouping of individuals of southeastern Iranian sites and was confirmed by their different nuclear ITS and cpDNA haplotypes thereby indicating an evolutionary significant unit (ESU). At the level of populations, a positive correlation between allelic differentiation Dest with geographic distance was found. Individual-based STRUCTURE analysis over 36 sites showed 7 genetic clusters. FST and RST values for ten populations reached 0.343 and 0.521, respectively thereby indicating that allele length differences are more important and contain evolutionary information. Overall, higher levels of diversity and a stronger differentiation was revealed among

  7. Molecular and morphological diversity in locally grown non-commercial (heirloom) mango varieties of North India.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Anju; Muthukumar, M; Ahmad, Israr; Ravishankar, K V; Parthasarthy, V A; Sthapit, Bhuwon; Rao, Ramanatha; Verma, J P; Rajan, S

    2016-03-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) has been cultivated and conserved in different agro-ecologies including Malihabad region in northern part of India, that is well known for housing diverse types (heirloom and commercial varieties). In the present study, 37 mango types comprising of 27 heirloom varieties from Malihabad region and 10 commercial varieties grown in North and Eastern India were assessed for morphological attributes and molecular diversity. The employed SSR markers amplified 2-13 alleles individually, cumulatively amplifying 124 alleles. These were studied for allelic diversity and genetic dissimilarity ranged from 0.035 to 0.892 arranging the varieties in three major clusters. The results revealed that majority of unique heirloom mangoes from Malihabad were different from the eastern part of the country. It is interesting to note Dashehari, a commercial variety from Malihabad was not aligned with heirloom varieties. Commercial varieties like Gulabkhas and Langra were placed in a separate group including Bombay Green, Himsagar, Dashehari, etc., indicating their dissimilarity with heirloom varieties at molecular level and thus, indicating importance for later from conservation point of view. Furthermore, the hierarchical clustering of varieties based on fruit morphology, assembled these into four groups largely influenced by fruit size. The maximum agreement subtree indicated seemingly good fit as thirteen varieties were arrayed in common grouping pattern. Appreciable dissimilarity among the heirloom varieties demonstrated by molecular analysis, underlines the importance for their on-farm conservation. PMID:27097441

  8. Tracking human migrations by the analysis of the distribution of HLA alleles, lineages and haplotypes in closed and open populations

    PubMed Central

    Vina, Marcelo A. Fernandez; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Lyke, Kirsten E.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Maiers, Martin; Klitz, William; Cano, Pedro; Mack, Steven; Single, Richard; Brautbar, Chaim; Israel, Shosahna; Raimondi, Eduardo; Khoriaty, Evelyne; Inati, Adlette; Andreani, Marco; Testi, Manuela; Moraes, Maria Elisa; Thomson, Glenys; Stastny, Peter; Cao, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) system shows extensive variation in the number and function of loci and the number of alleles present at any one locus. Allele distribution has been analysed in many populations through the course of several decades, and the implementation of molecular typing has significantly increased the level of diversity revealing that many serotypes have multiple functional variants. While the degree of diversity in many populations is equivalent and may result from functional polymorphism(s) in peptide presentation, homogeneous and heterogeneous populations present contrasting numbers of alleles and lineages at the loci with high-density expression products. In spite of these differences, the homozygosity levels are comparable in almost all of them. The balanced distribution of HLA alleles is consistent with overdominant selection. The genetic distances between outbred populations correlate with their geographical locations; the formal genetic distance measurements are larger than expected between inbred populations in the same region. The latter present many unique alleles grouped in a few lineages consistent with limited founder polymorphism in which any novel allele may have been positively selected to enlarge the communal peptide-binding repertoire of a given population. On the other hand, it has been observed that some alleles are found in multiple populations with distinctive haplotypic associations suggesting that convergent evolution events may have taken place as well. It appears that the HLA system has been under strong selection, probably owing to its fundamental role in varying immune responses. Therefore, allelic diversity in HLA should be analysed in conjunction with other genetic markers to accurately track the migrations of modern humans. PMID:22312049

  9. Impact of alternative regeneration methods on genetic diversity in coastal Douglas-fir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, W.T.; Zuo, J.; Shimizu, J.Y.; Tappeiner, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Genetic implications of natural and artificial regeneration following three regeneration methods (group selection, shelterwood, and clearcut) were investigated in coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) using genetic markers (17 allozyme loci). In general, harvesting followed by either natural or artificial regeneration resulted in offspring populations little altered from those in the previous generation. Cutting the smallest trees to form shelterwoods, however, resulted in the removal of rare, presumably deleterious, alleles, such that slightly fewer alleles per locus were observed among residual trees (2.76) and natural regeneration (2.75) than found in uncut (control) stands (2.86). Thus, although the shelterwood regime appears quite compatible with gene conservation, it would be best to leave parent trees of a range of sizes in shelterwoods designated as gene conservation reserves, in order to maximize the number of alleles (regardless of current adaptive value) in naturally regenerated offspring. Seedling stocks used for artificial regeneration in clearcut, shelterwood, and group selection stands (7 total) had significantly greater levels of genetic diversity, on average, than found in natural regeneration. This is probably because the seeds used in artificial seedling stocks came from many wild stands and thus, sampled more diversity than found in single populations.Genetic implications of natural and artificial regeneration following three regeneration methods (group selection, shelterwood, and clearcut) were investigated in coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) using genetic markers (17 allozyme loci). In general, harvesting followed by either natural or artificial regeneration resulted in offspring populations little altered from those in the previous generation. Cutting the smallest trees to form shelterwoods, however, resulted in the removal of rare, presumably deleterious, alleles

  10. Growth behavior of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2013-01-01

    The probability of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele for growing to a size NC for a range of population sizes N, sequence lengths L, selective advantages s, and measuring parameters C was calculated for a haploid, asexual population in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape with a positive selective advantage of the reversal allele over the optimal allele. The growing probability in the stochastic region was inversely proportional to the measuring parameter when C < 1 /Ns, bent when C ≈ 1/ Ns and saturated when C > 1/ Ns. The crossing time and the time dependence of the increase in relative density of the reversal allele in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was approximated using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model with the same selective advantage and corresponding effective mutation rate. The growth behavior of additional offspring with the reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was controlled by the selective advantage of the reversal allele compared to the optimal allele and could be described by using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model, in spite of there being many other alleles with lower fitness, and in spite of there being two alleles, the optimal and reversal allele, separated by a low-fitness valley with a tunable depth and width.

  11. Population genetic diversity and fitness in multiple environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    When a large number of alleles are lost from a population, increases in homozygosity may reduce individual fitness through inbreeding depression. Modest losses of allelic diversity may also negatively impact long-term population viability by reducing the capacity of populations t...

  12. Population Genetic Diversity and Fitness in Multiple Environments(BMCEB)

    EPA Science Inventory

    When a large number of alleles are lost from a population, increases in individual homozygosity may reduce individual fitness through inbreeding depression. Modest losses of allelic diversity may also negatively impact long-term population viability by reducing the capacity of p...

  13. Allelic background of LEPRE1 mutations that cause recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta in different populations

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Melanie G; Schwarze, Ulrike; Singh, Virendra; Romana, Marc; Jones-LeCointe, Altheia; Byers, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Biallelic mutations in LEPRE1 result in recessively inherited forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that are often lethal in the perinatal period. A mutation (c.1080+1G>T, IVS5+1G>T) in African Americans has a carrier frequency of about 1/240. The mutant allele originated in West Africa in tribes of Ghana and Nigeria where the carrier frequencies are 2% and 5%. By examining 200 samples from an African-derived population in Tobago and reviewing hospital neonatal death records, we determined that the carrier frequency of c.1080+1G>T was about one in 200 and did not contribute to the neonatal deaths recorded over a 3-year period of time in Trinidad. In the course of sequence analysis, we found surprisingly high LEPRE1 allelic diversity in the Tobago DNA samples in which there were 11 alleles distinguished by a single basepair variant in or near exon 5. All the alleles found in the Tobago population that were within the sequence analysis region were found in the African American population in the Exome Variant Project. This diversity appeared to reflect the geographic origin of the original population in Tobago. In 44 individuals with biallelic LEPRE1 mutations identified by clinical diagnostic testing, we found the sequence alterations occurred on seven of the 11 variant alleles. All but one of the mutations identified resulted in mRNA or protein instability for the majority of the transcripts from the altered allele. These findings suggest that the milder end of the clinical spectrum could be due to as yet unidentified missense mutations in LEPRE1. PMID:24498616

  14. Tetrasomic Segregation for Multiple Alleles in Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Quiros, Carlos F.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence of tetrasomic inheritance in alfalfa, Medicago sativa L. and M. falcata L., for multiple codominant alleles at three isozymic loci is reported in this study. The locus Prx-1 governing anodal peroxidase and the loci Lap-1 and Lap-2 governing anodal leucine-aminopeptidase were studied by starch gel electrophoresis in seedling root tissue or seeds. The progenies from several di-, tri- or tetra-allelic plants belong to the species M. sativa and M. falcata and their hybrids were studied for the segregation of the three genes. In all cases, tetrasomic inheritance of chromosomal-type segregation was observed. In another progeny resulting from the crossing of two plants involving four different alleles at locus Lap-2, tetrasomic segregation with the possible occurrence of double reduction was observed. This study presents direct evidence of autotetraploidy and the existence of tetra-allelic loci in alfalfa. It also supports the concept that the species M. sativa and M. falcata are genetically close enough to be considered biotypes of a common species. PMID:17246077

  15. Capturing the Diversity in Lexical Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The range, variety, or diversity of words found in learners' language use is believed to reflect the complexity of their vocabulary knowledge as well as the level of their language proficiency. Many indices of lexical diversity have been proposed, most of which involve statistical relationships between types and tokens, and which ultimately…

  16. Allelic associations of two polymorphic microsatellites in intron 40 of the human von Willebrand factor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, S.D.J.; De Souza, K.T. ); De Andrade, M.; Chakraborty, R. )

    1994-01-18

    At intron 40 of the von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene, two GATA-repeat polymorphic sites exist that are physically separated by 212 bp. At the first site (vWF1 locus), seven segregating repeat alleles were observed in a Brazilian Caucasian population, and at the second (vWF2 locus) there were eight alleles, detected through PCR amplifications of this DNA region. Haplotype analysis of individuals revealed 36 different haplotypes in a sample of 338 chromosomes examined. Allele frequencies between generations and gender at each locus were not significantly different, and the genotype frequencies were consistent with their Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Linkage disequilibrium between loci is highly significant with positive allele size association; that is, large alleles at the loci tend to occur together, and so do the same alleles. Variability at each locus appeared to have arisen in a stepwise fashion, suggesting replication slippage as a possible mechanism of production of new alleles. However, the authors observed an increased number of haplotypes, in contrast with the predictions of a stepwise production of variation in the entire region, suggesting some form of cooperative changes between loci that could be due to either gene conversion, or a common control mechanism of production of new variation at these repeat polymorphism sites. The high degree of polymorphism (gene diversity values of 72% and 78% at vWF1 and vWF2, respectively, and of 93% at the haplotype level) makes these markers informative for paternity testing, genetic counseling, and individual-identification purposes.

  17. Genome Destabilizing Mutator Alleles Drive Specific Mutational Trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, Peter C.; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J. M.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13–Stn1–Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes. PMID:24336748

  18. ADZE: a rarefaction approach for counting alleles private to combinations of populations

    PubMed Central

    Szpiech, Zachary A.; Jakobsson, Mattias; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Analysis of the distribution of alleles across populations is a useful tool for examining population diversity and relationships. However, sample sizes often differ across populations, sometimes making it difficult to assess allelic distributions across groups. Results: We introduce a generalized rarefaction approach for counting alleles private to combinations of populations. Our method evaluates the number of alleles found in each of a set of populations but absent in all remaining populations, considering equal-sized subsamples from each population. Applying this method to a worldwide human microsatellite dataset, we observe a high number of alleles private to the combination of African and Oceanian populations. This result supports the possibility of a migration out of Africa into Oceania separate from the migrations responsible for the majority of the ancestry of the modern populations of Asia, and it highlights the utility of our approach to sample size correction in evaluating hypotheses about population history. Availability: We have implemented our method in the computer pro-gram ADZE, which is available for download at http://rosenberglab.bioinformatics.med.umich.edu/adze.html. Contact: szpiechz@umich.edu PMID:18779233

  19. Nonfunctional alleles of long-day suppressor genes independently regulate flowering time.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Ming; Feng, Li; Wang, Junrui; Qiao, Weihua; Zhang, Lifang; Cheng, Yunlian; Yang, Qingwen

    2016-06-01

    Due to the remarkable adaptability to various environments, rice varieties with diverse flowering times have been domesticated or improved from Oryza rufipogon. Detailed knowledge of the genetic factors controlling flowering time will facilitate understanding the adaptation mechanism in cultivated rice and enable breeders to design appropriate genotypes for distinct preferences. In this study, four genes (Hd1, DTH8, Ghd7 and OsPRR37) in a rice long-day suppression pathway were collected and sequenced in 154, 74, 69 and 62 varieties of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) respectively. Under long-day conditions, varieties with nonfunctional alleles flowered significantly earlier than those with functional alleles. However, the four genes have different genetic effects in the regulation of flowering time: Hd1 and OsPRR37 are major genes that generally regulate rice flowering time for all varieties, while DTH8 and Ghd7 only regulate regional rice varieties. Geographic analysis and network studies suggested that the nonfunctional alleles of these suppression loci with regional adaptability were derived recently and independently. Alleles with regional adaptability should be taken into consideration for genetic improvement. The rich genetic variations in these four genes, which adapt rice to different environments, provide the flexibility needed for breeding rice varieties with diverse flowering times. PMID:26220807

  20. Distribution of CGG repeats and FRAXAC1/DXS548 alleles in South American populations.

    PubMed

    Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia; Angeli, Claudia B; Auricchio, Maria Teresa B M; Leal-Mesquita, Emygdia R; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea K C; Ferrari, Iris; Hutz, Mara H; Salzano, Francisco M; Hill, Kim; Hurtado, A Magdalena; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M

    2002-08-15

    In order to assess the molecular variability related to fragile X (FMR1 locus), we investigated the distribution of CGG repeats and DXS548/FRAXAC1 haplotypes in normal South American populations of different ethnic backgrounds. Special attention was given to Amerindian Wai-Wai (Northern Brazil) and Ache (Paraguay), as well as to Brazilian isolated communities of African ancestry, the remnants of quilombos. Comparison of samples from quilombos, Amerindians, and the ethnically mixed, but mainly European-derived population of São Paulo revealed that the 30-copy allele of the fragile X gene is the most frequent in all groups. A second peak at 20 repeats was present in the population of São Paulo only, confirming this as a European peculiarity. The distribution of DXS548 and FRAXAC1 alleles led to a high expected heterozygosity in African Brazilians, followed by that observed in the population of São Paulo. Amerindians showed the lowest diversity in CGG repeats and DXS548/FRAXAC1 haplotypes. Some rare alleles, for example, the 148-bp (FRAXAC1) or 200-bp (DXS548) variants, which seem to be almost absent in Europe, occurred in higher frequencies among African Brazilians. This suggests a general trend for higher genetic diversity among Africans; these rarer alleles could be African in origin and would have been lost or possibly were not present in the groups that gave rise to the Europeans. PMID:12210320

  1. Microsatellite-based genetic diversity patterns in disjunct populations of a rare orchid.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Madhav; Richards, Matt; Sharma, Jyotsna

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the patterns of genetic diversity and structure in seven disjunct populations of a rare North American orchid, Cypripedium kentuckiense by including populations that represented the periphery and the center of the its range. Eight nuclear and two chloroplast microsatellites were used. Genetic diversity was low across the sampled populations of C. kentuckiense based on both nuclear (average An = 4.0, Ho = 0.436, He = 0.448) and cpDNA microsatellites (average An = 1.57, Nh = 1.57 and H = 0.133). The number of private alleles ranged from one to four per population with a total of 17 private alleles detected at five nuclear microsatellites. One private allele at one cpDNA microsatellite was also observed. Although the absolute values for nuclear microsatellite based population differentiation were low (Fst = 0.075; ϕPT = 0.24), they were statistically significant. Pairwise Fst values ranged from 0.038 to 0.123 and each comparison was significant. We also detected isolation by distance with nDNA microsatellites based on the Mantel test (r(2) = 0.209, P = 0.05). STRUCTURE analysis and the neighbor joining trees grouped the populations similarly whereby the geographically proximal populations were genetically similar. Our data indicate that the species is genetically depauperate but the diversity is distributed more or less equally across its range. Population differentiation and isolation by distance were detectable, which indicates that genetic isolation is beginning to manifest itself across the range in this rare species. PMID:26481007

  2. Diversity in a Variable-Number Tandem Repeat from Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Adair, D. M.; Worsham, P. L.; Hill, K. K.; Klevytska, A. M.; Jackson, P. J.; Friedlander, A. M.; Keim, P.

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a tetranucleotide repeat sequence, (CAAA)N, in the genome of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. This variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) region has nine alleles and great diversity (calculated as 1 minus the sum of the squared allele frequencies) (diversity value, 0.82) within a set of 35 diverse Y. pestis strains. In contrast, the nucleotide sequence of the lcrV (low-calcium-response) gene differed only slightly among these strains, having a haplotype diversity value of 0.17. Replicated cultures, phenotypic variants of particular strains, and extensively cultured replicates within strains did not differ in VNTR allele type. Thus, while a high mutation rate must contribute to the great diversity of this locus, alleles appear stable under routine laboratory culture conditions. The classic three plague biovars did not have single identifying alleles, although there were allelic biases within biovar categories. The antiqua biovar was the most diverse, with four alleles observed in 5 strains, while the orientalis and mediaevalis biovars exhibited five alleles in 21 strains and three alleles in 8 strains, respectively. The CAAA VNTR is located immediately adjacent to the transcriptional promoters for flanking open reading frames and may affect their activity. This VNTR marker may provide a high-resolution tool for epidemiological analyses of plague. PMID:10747136

  3. Allele-Specific Deletions in Mouse Tumors Identify Fbxw7 as Germline Modifier of Tumor Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Losada, Jesus; Wu, Di; DelRosario, Reyno; Balmain, Allan; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in finding associations between specific genetic variants and cancer susceptibility in human populations. These studies have identified a range of highly statistically significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and susceptibility to development of a range of human tumors. However, the effect of each SNP in isolation is very small, and all of the SNPs combined only account for a relatively minor proportion of the total genetic risk (5–10%). There is therefore a major requirement for alternative routes to the discovery of genetic risk factors for cancer. We have previously shown using mouse models that chromosomal regions harboring susceptibility genes identified by linkage analysis frequently exhibit allele-specific genetic alterations in tumors. We demonstrate here that the Fbxw7 gene, a commonly mutated gene in a wide range of mouse and human cancers, shows allele-specific deletions in mouse lymphomas and skin tumors. Lymphomas from three different F1 hybrids show 100% allele-specificity in the patterns of allelic loss. Parental alleles from 129/Sv or Spretus/Gla mice are lost in tumors from F1 hybrids with C57BL/6 animals, due to the presence of a specific non-synonymous coding sequence polymorphism at the N-terminal portion of the gene. A specific genetic test of association between this SNP and lymphoma susceptibility in interspecific backcross mice showed a significant linkage (p = 0.001), but only in animals with a functional p53 gene. These data therefore identify Fbxw7 as a p53-dependent tumor susceptibility gene. Increased p53-dependent tumor susceptibility and allele-specific losses were also seen in a mouse skin model of skin tumor development. We propose that analysis of preferential allelic imbalances in tumors may provide an efficient means of uncovering genetic variants that affect mouse and human tumor susceptibility. PMID:22348067

  4. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: New B39 and B15 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, T.L.; Butler, L.M.; Watkins, D.I.

    1995-05-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles. 70 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Population Bottlenecks and Nonequilibrium Models in Population Genetics. I. Allele Numbers When Populations Evolve from Zero Variability

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Takeo; Fuerst, Paul A.

    1984-01-01

    A simple numerical method was developed for the mean number and average age of alleles in a population that was initiated with no genetic variation following a sudden population expansion. The methods are used to examine the question of whether allele numbers are elevated compared with values seen in equilibrium populations having equivalent gene diversity. Excess allele numbers in expanding populations were found to be the rule. This was true whether the population began with zero variation or with low levels of variation in either of two initial distributions (initially an equilibrium allele frequency distribution or initially with loci occurring in only two classes of variation). Although the increase of alleles may persist for only a short time, when compared with the time which is required for approach to final equilibrium, the increase may be long when measured in absolute generation numbers. The pattern of increase in very rare alleles (those present only once in a sample) and the persistence of the original allele were also investigated. PMID:6500263

  6. Carriage of One or Two FMR1 Premutation Alleles Seems to Have No Effect on Illness Severity in a FXTAS Female with an Autozygous FMR1 Premutation Allele.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Revenga, Laia; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; López-Mourelo, Olga; Izquierdo, Silvia; Alvarez-Mora, Maria Isabel; Granell, Esther; Madrigal, Irene; Milà, Montserrat

    2016-10-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that occurs in FMR1 premutation carriers. The prevalence of FMR1 premutation carriers in the general population is relatively high, and although rare, a premutation in both X chromosomes may occur in females inheriting a premutation allele from each of both parent carriers. Here, we report the first female with an autozygous (homozygous by descendent) FMR1 premutation allele, who fulfills neurological and radiological FXTAS findings/criteria. Molecular characterization included CGG repeat length, AGG interruption pattern, FMR1 messenger RNA (mRNA), fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) level quantification, and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray. Neuroradiological assessment of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and neurological and cognitive/neuropsychological evaluations were performed. Neurological and neuroradiological examination of the female with the same FMR1 allele in the premutation range (77 CGGs) demonstrated FXTAS features. Further familial evaluation showed a similar neuropsychiatric profile, with impairments in cognitive flexibility and visuospatial function, mainly. A unique family with an autozygous FMR1 premutation female is presented. Neurological/cognitive and neuroradiological examinations revealed FXTAS-specific findings in the female with the autozygous FMR1 premutation allele. The consistent molecular and cognitive/psychiatric phenotype in family members suggests that carrying one or two FMR1 premutation alleles has no effect on illness severity. PMID:27315125

  7. Functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles reveals distinct carrier phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Rory L.; Cidado, Justin; Kim, Minsoo; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Wong, Hong Yuen; Beaver, Julia A.; Cravero, Karen; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Meeker, Alan K.; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 is commonly performed to identify specific individuals at risk for breast and ovarian cancers who may benefit from prophylactic therapeutic interventions. Unfortunately, it is evident that deleterious BRCA1 alleles demonstrate variable penetrance and that many BRCA1 variants of unknown significance (VUS) exist. In order to further refine hereditary risks that may be associated with specific BRCA1 alleles, we performed gene targeting to establish an isogenic panel of immortalized human breast epithelial cells harboring eight clinically relevant BRCA1 alleles. Interestingly, BRCA1 mutations and VUS had distinct, quantifiable phenotypes relative to isogenic parental BRCA1 wild type cells and controls. Heterozygous cells with known deleterious BRCA1 mutations (185delAG, C61G and R71G) demonstrated consistent phenotypes in radiation sensitivity and genomic instability assays, but showed variability in other assays. Heterozygous BRCA1 VUS cells also demonstrated assay variability, with some VUS demonstrating phenotypes more consistent with deleterious alleles. Taken together, our data suggest that BRCA1 deleterious mutations and VUS can differ in their range of tested phenotypes, suggesting they might impart varying degrees of risk. These results demonstrate that functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles could aid in classifying BRCA1 mutations and VUS, and determining BRCA allele cancer risk. PMID:26246475

  8. Functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles reveals distinct carrier phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Rory L; Cidado, Justin; Kim, Minsoo; Zabransky, Daniel J; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Wong, Hong Yuen; Beaver, Julia A; Cravero, Karen; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather; Heaphy, Christopher M; Meeker, Alan K; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-09-22

    Clinical genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 is commonly performed to identify specific individuals at risk for breast and ovarian cancers who may benefit from prophylactic therapeutic interventions. Unfortunately, it is evident that deleterious BRCA1 alleles demonstrate variable penetrance and that many BRCA1 variants of unknown significance (VUS) exist. In order to further refine hereditary risks that may be associated with specific BRCA1 alleles, we performed gene targeting to establish an isogenic panel of immortalized human breast epithelial cells harboring eight clinically relevant BRCA1 alleles. Interestingly, BRCA1 mutations and VUS had distinct, quantifiable phenotypes relative to isogenic parental BRCA1 wild type cells and controls. Heterozygous cells with known deleterious BRCA1 mutations (185delAG, C61G and R71G) demonstrated consistent phenotypes in radiation sensitivity and genomic instability assays, but showed variability in other assays. Heterozygous BRCA1 VUS cells also demonstrated assay variability, with some VUS demonstrating phenotypes more consistent with deleterious alleles. Taken together, our data suggest that BRCA1 deleterious mutations and VUS can differ in their range of tested phenotypes, suggesting they might impart varying degrees of risk. These results demonstrate that functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles could aid in classifying BRCA1 mutations and VUS, and determining BRCA allele cancer risk. PMID:26246475

  9. Microsatellite allele frequencies in humans and chimpanzees, with implications for constraints on allele size.

    PubMed

    Garza, J C; Slatkin, M; Freimer, N B

    1995-07-01

    The distributions of allele sizes at eight simple-sequence repeat (SSR) or microsatellite loci in chimpanzees are found and compared with the distributions previously obtained from several human populations. At several loci, the differences in average allele size between chimpanzees and humans are sufficiently small that there might be a constraint on the evolution of average allele size. Furthermore, a model that allows for a bias in the mutation process shows that for some loci a weak bias can account for the observations. Several alleles at one of the loci (Mfd 59) were sequenced. Differences between alleles of different lengths were found to be more complex than previously assumed. An 8-base-pair deletion was present in the nonvariable region of the chimpanzee locus. This locus contains a previously unrecognized repeated region, which is imperfect in humans and perfect in chimpanzees. The apparently greater opportunity for mutation conferred by the two perfect repeat regions in chimpanzees is reflected in the higher variance in repeat number at Mfd 59 in chimpanzees than in humans. These data indicate that interspecific differences in allele length are not always attributable to simple changes in the number of repeats. PMID:7659015

  10. Multiple crm- mutations in familial hypercholesterolemia. Evidence for 13 alleles, including four deletions.

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, H H; Leitersdorf, E; Goldstein, J L; Brown, M S; Russell, D W

    1988-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in fibroblasts from 132 subjects with the clinical syndrome of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia were analyzed by immunoprecipitation with an anti-LDL receptor monoclonal antibody. 16 of the 132 cell strains (12%) synthesized no immunodetectable LDL receptor protein, indicating the presence of two mutant genes that failed to produce cross-reacting material (crm- mutations). DNA and mRNA from 15 of the 16 crm- patients, representing 30 crm- genes, were available for further study. Haplotype analysis based on 10 restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) suggested that the 30 crm- genes represent 13 mutant alleles. Four of the alleles produced no mRNA. Three of these four mRNA- alleles had large deletions ranging from 6 to 20 kb that eliminated the promoter region of the gene. The fourth mRNA- allele did not contain any deletion or alteration in the promoter sequence; the reason for the mRNA- phenotype was not apparent. Nine alleles were positive for mRNAs, of which three encoded mRNAs of abnormal size. One of the abnormal mRNAs was produced by a gene harboring a deletion, and another was produced by a gene with a complex rearrangement. The third abnormal-sized mRNA (3.1 kb larger than normal) was produced by an allele that had no detectable alterations as judged by Southern blotting. The other six mRNA+ alleles appeared normal by Southern blotting and produced normal-sized mRNA but no receptor protein. The current studies demonstrate that mRNA analysis coupled with haplotype determination by Southern blot analysis can be used to classify crm- mutations at a genetic locus where multiple alleles exist. Images PMID:3343347

  11. Genetic diversity and species diversity of stream fishes covary across a land-use gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blum, M.J.; Bagley, M.J.; Walters, D.M.; Jackson, S.A.; Daniel, F.B.; Chaloud, D.J.; Cade, B.S.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity and species diversity are expected to covary according to area and isolation, but may not always covary with environmental heterogeneity. In this study, we examined how patterns of genetic and species diversity in stream fishes correspond to local and regional environmental conditions. To do so, we compared population size, genetic diversity and divergence in central stonerollers (Campostoma anomalum) to measures of species diversity and turnover in stream fish assemblages among similarly sized watersheds across an agriculture-forest land-use gradient in the Little Miami River basin (Ohio, USA). Significant correlations were found in many, but not all, pair-wise comparisons. Allelic richness and species richness were strongly correlated, for example, but diversity measures based on allele frequencies and assemblage structure were not. In-stream conditions related to agricultural land use were identified as significant predictors of genetic diversity and species diversity. Comparisons to population size indicate, however, that genetic diversity and species diversity are not necessarily independent and that variation also corresponds to watershed location and glaciation history in the drainage basin. Our findings demonstrate that genetic diversity and species diversity can covary in stream fish assemblages, and illustrate the potential importance of scaling observations to capture responses to hierarchical environmental variation. More comparisons according to life history variation could further improve understanding of conditions that give rise to parallel variation in genetic diversity and species diversity, which in turn could improve diagnosis of anthropogenic influences on aquatic ecosystems. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Genetic Diversity in Nothofagus alessandrii (Fagaceae), an Endangered Endemic Tree Species of the Coastal Maulino Forest of Central Chile

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Díaz, Cristian; Ruiz, Eduardo; González, Fidelina; Fuentes, Glenda; Cavieres, Lohengrin A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The endemic tree Nothofagus alessandrii (Fagaceae) has been historically restricted to the coastal range of Region VII of central Chile, and its forests have been increasingly destroyed and fragmented since the end of the 19th century. In this study, the patterns of within- and among-population genetic diversity in seven fragments of this endangered narrowly endemic tree were examined. Methods Allozyme electrophoresis of seven loci of N. alessandrii was used to estimate genetic diversity, genetic structure and gene flow. Key Results High levels of genetic diversity were found as shown by mean expected heterozygosity (He = 0·182 ± 0·034), percentage of polymorphic loci (Pp = 61·2 %), mean number of alleles per locus (A = 1·8) and mean number of alleles per polymorphic locus (Ap = 2·3). Genetic differentiation was also high (GST = 0·257 and Nm = 0·7). These values are high compared with more widespread congeneric species. Conclusions Despite its endemic status and restricted geographical range N. alessandrii showed high levels of genetic diversity. The observed patterns of diversity are explained in part by historical processes and more recent human fragmentation. PMID:17513870

  13. Microsatellite DNA marker analysis of genetic diversity in wild common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) populations.

    PubMed

    Li, Dayu; Kang, Dahai; Yin, Qianqian; Sun, Xiaowen; Liang, Liqun

    2007-11-01

    Thirty microsatellite loci were used for analyzing six wild populations of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.). Observed (H(o)) and expected (H(e)) heterozygosity values, polymorphic information content (PIC), and number of effective alleles (A(e)) were all detected. Genetic similarity index and genetic distance were computed based on the allele frequency. The Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium was checked according to the test of chi2. Genetic differentiation and hierarchical partition of genetic diversity were evaluated by F(ST) and N(m). A clustering dendrogram was made based on the results of UPGMA methods using the PHYLIP software package (version 3.63). There were totally 8,136 fragments ranging from 125 bp to 414 bp in length. Three to thirteen alleles were amplified in 30 loci and 210 alleles in all six populations. The average number of alleles in each locus was seven. The result showed that 1) the level of genetic variability was moderate in the six populations. Polymorphic information contents of the six wild common carp populations were 0.44, 0.52, 0.53, 0.57, 0.63, and 0.64 respectively. Effective alleles were from 1.04 to 4.72, the average numbers in each population were 2.19, 2.60, 2.42, 2.43, 2.45, and 2.33. The average expected heterozygosity values were 0.50, 0.59, 0.56, 0.56, 0.57, and 0.54 respectively; 2) the highest genetic similarity index that came from the populations of BR and ZL was 0.8511 and the lowest index was 0.6688, and it came from the populations of BR and HN. There was a correlation between the clustering result and the geographical distribution. PMID:18037135

  14. Do Heliconius butterfly species exchange mimicry alleles?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joel; Kronforst, Marcus R.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization has the potential to transfer beneficial alleles across species boundaries, and there are a growing number of examples in which this has apparently occurred. Recent studies suggest that Heliconius butterflies have transferred wing pattern mimicry alleles between species via hybridization, but ancestral polymorphism could also produce a signature of shared ancestry around mimicry genes. To distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we measured DNA sequence divergence around putatively introgressed mimicry loci and compared this with the rest of the genome. Our results reveal that putatively introgressed regions show strongly reduced sequence divergence between co-mimetic species, suggesting that their divergence times are younger than the rest of the genome. This is consistent with introgression and not ancestral variation. We further show that this signature of introgression occurs at sites throughout the genome, not just around mimicry genes. PMID:23864282

  15. Reconstructing the prior probabilities of allelic phylogenies.

    PubMed Central

    Golding, G Brian

    2002-01-01

    In general when a phylogeny is reconstructed from DNA or protein sequence data, it makes use only of the probabilities of obtaining some phylogeny given a collection of data. It is also possible to determine the prior probabilities of different phylogenies. This information can be of use in analyzing the biological causes for the observed divergence of sampled taxa. Unusually "rare" topologies for a given data set may be indicative of different biological forces acting. A recursive algorithm is presented that calculates the prior probabilities of a phylogeny for different allelic samples and for different phylogenies. This method is a straightforward extension of Ewens' sample distribution. The probability of obtaining each possible sample according to Ewens' distribution is further subdivided into each of the possible phylogenetic topologies. These probabilities depend not only on the identity of the alleles and on 4N(mu) (four times the effective population size times the neutral mutation rate) but also on the phylogenetic relationships among the alleles. Illustrations of the algorithm are given to demonstrate how different phylogenies are favored under different conditions. PMID:12072482

  16. Patterns of microsatellite polymorphism in the range-restricted bonobo (Pan paniscus): considerations for interspecific comparison with chimpanzees (P. troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Reinartz, G E; Karron, J D; Phillips, R B; Weber, J L

    2000-03-01

    The endangered great ape, Pan paniscus (bonobo) has the smallest range of the African apes. Virtually nothing is known about the genetic diversity or genetic structure of this species, while substantial amounts of polymorphism have been reported for the bonobo's widespread congener, the chimpanzee (P. troglodytes). Given its restricted range, what is the extent of genetic variation in the bonobo relative to the chimpanzee, and is the bonobo genetically depauperate? To investigate patterns of genetic polymorphism, bonobos of wild origin were genotyped for 28 microsatellite loci. The mean number of alleles per locus (5.2) and the mean observed heterozygosity (0.52) in bonobos were similar to variation observed in a wild chimpanzee community (P. t. schweinfurthii). The rarer bonobo is not genetically depauperate and may have genetic diversity comparable to the eastern chimpanzee subspecies. Bonobos have approximately 55% of the allelic diversity and 66% of the observed heterozygosity exhibited by all three chimpanzee subspecies sampled across equatorial Africa. Resampling techniques were used to quantify the effects of sample size differences and number and choice of loci between bonobos and chimpanzees. The examination of these variables underscores their importance in accurately interpreting interspecific comparisons of diversity estimates. PMID:10736029

  17. Allozyme gene diversities in some leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Krafsur, E S

    1999-08-01

    Gene diversity at allozyme loci was investigated in the bean leaf beetle, Ceratoma trifurcata Forster; the elm leaf beetle, Xanthogaleruca luteola (Muller); the cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta Fabricus; the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte; the southern corn rootworm, also called the spotted cucumber beetle, D. undecimpunctata howardi Baker; the northern corn rootworm, D. barberi Smith and Lawrence; and the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say). Six of these species are economically important pests of crops and display adaptive traits that may correlate with genetic diversity. Gene diversity H(E) in bean leaf beetles was 17.7 +/- 4.0% among 32 loci. In western corn rootworms, H(E) = 4.8 +/- 2.0% among 36 loci, and in spotted cucumber beetles, H(E) = 11.9 +/- 2.7% among 39 loci. Diversity among 27 loci was 10.5 +/- 4.3% in the Colorado potato beetle. The data were compared with gene diversity estimates from other leaf beetle species in which heterozygosities varied from 0.3 to 21% and no correlation was detected among heterozygosities, geographic ranges, or population densities. Distributions of single-locus heterozygosities were consistent with selective neutrality of alleles. PMID:10624512

  18. Genetic diversity in walnut (Juglans regia) from the caucasus nation of Azerbaijan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of genetic structure and differentiation using 12 microsatellite loci of six walnut populations, three each from the Greater Caucasus and the Talysh, revealed a moderate range of variation. The observed number of alleles ranged from 2 to 11 alleles with a mean of 5.6 alleles per locus. The ...

  19. Natural variation in non-coding regions underlying phenotypic diversity in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Francisco; de Boer, Carl G.; Abarca, Valentina; García, Verónica; Cuevas, Mara; Araos, Sebastian; Larrondo, Luis F.; Martínez, Claudio; Cubillos, Francisco A.

    2016-01-01

    Linkage mapping studies in model organisms have typically focused their efforts in polymorphisms within coding regions, ignoring those within regulatory regions that may contribute to gene expression variation. In this context, differences in transcript abundance are frequently proposed as a source of phenotypic diversity between individuals, however, until now, little molecular evidence has been provided. Here, we examined Allele Specific Expression (ASE) in six F1 hybrids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae derived from crosses between representative strains of the four main lineages described in yeast. ASE varied between crosses with levels ranging between 28% and 60%. Part of the variation in expression levels could be explained by differences in transcription factors binding to polymorphic cis-regulations and to differences in trans-activation depending on the allelic form of the TF. Analysis on highly expressed alleles on each background suggested ASN1 as a candidate transcript underlying nitrogen consumption differences between two strains. Further promoter allele swap analysis under fermentation conditions confirmed that coding and non-coding regions explained aspartic and glutamic acid consumption differences, likely due to a polymorphism affecting Uga3 binding. Together, we provide a new catalogue of variants to bridge the gap between genotype and phenotype. PMID:26898953

  20. Natural variation in non-coding regions underlying phenotypic diversity in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Francisco; de Boer, Carl G; Abarca, Valentina; García, Verónica; Cuevas, Mara; Araos, Sebastian; Larrondo, Luis F; Martínez, Claudio; Cubillos, Francisco A

    2016-01-01

    Linkage mapping studies in model organisms have typically focused their efforts in polymorphisms within coding regions, ignoring those within regulatory regions that may contribute to gene expression variation. In this context, differences in transcript abundance are frequently proposed as a source of phenotypic diversity between individuals, however, until now, little molecular evidence has been provided. Here, we examined Allele Specific Expression (ASE) in six F1 hybrids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae derived from crosses between representative strains of the four main lineages described in yeast. ASE varied between crosses with levels ranging between 28% and 60%. Part of the variation in expression levels could be explained by differences in transcription factors binding to polymorphic cis-regulations and to differences in trans-activation depending on the allelic form of the TF. Analysis on highly expressed alleles on each background suggested ASN1 as a candidate transcript underlying nitrogen consumption differences between two strains. Further promoter allele swap analysis under fermentation conditions confirmed that coding and non-coding regions explained aspartic and glutamic acid consumption differences, likely due to a polymorphism affecting Uga3 binding. Together, we provide a new catalogue of variants to bridge the gap between genotype and phenotype. PMID:26898953

  1. Genetic diversity of Ovis aries populations near domestication centers and in the New World.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, H D; Toishibekov, Y; Toishibekov, M; Welsh, C S; Spiller, S F; Brown, M; Paiva, S R

    2011-09-01

    Domestic sheep in Kazakhstan may provide an interesting source of genetic variability due to their proximity to the center of domestication and the Silk Route. Additionally, those breeds have never been compared to New World sheep populations. This report compares genetic diversity among five Kazakhstan (KZ) and 13 United States (US) sheep breeds (N = 442) using 25 microsatellite markers from the FAO panel. The KZ breeds had observed and expected measures of heterozygosity greater than 0.60 and an average number of alleles per locus of 7.8. In contrast, US sheep breeds had observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.37 to 0.62 and had an average number of alleles of 5.7. A Bayesian analysis indicated there were two primary populations (K = 2). Surprisingly, the US breeds were near evenly split between the two clusters, while all of the KZ breeds were placed in one of the two clusters. Pooling breeds within country of sample origin showed KZ and US populations to have similar levels of expected heterozygosity and the average number of alleles per locus. The results of breeds pooled within country suggest that there was no difference between countries for these diversity measures using this set of neutral markers. This finding suggests that populations' geographically isolated from centers of domestication can be more diverse than previously thought, and as a result, conservation strategies can be adjusted accordingly. Furthermore, these results suggest there may be limited need for countries to alter the protocols for trade and exchange of animal genetic resources that are in place today, since no one population has a unique set of private alleles. PMID:22105875

  2. Natural variation in maize architecture is mediated by allelic differences at the PINOID co-ortholog barren inflorescence2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We characterized allelic variation at barren inflorescence2 (bif2), a maize co-ortholog of the Arabidopsis PINOID protein kinase (PID), and tested for trait associations with bif2 in both an association mapping population of 277 diverse maize inbreds and in the inter-mated B73-Mo17 (IBM) linkage pop...

  3. Allelic Expression Imbalance of JAK2 V617F Mutation in BCR-ABL Negative Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of a single point mutation in the JAK2 gene in patients with BCR/ABL-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) has not only brought new insights and pathogenesis, but also has made the diagnosis of MPNs much easier. Although, to date, several mechanisms for the contribution of single JAK2V617F point mutation to phenotypic diversity of MPNs have been suggested in multiple studies, but it is not clear how a unique mutation can cause the phenotypic diversity of MPNs. In this study, our results show that allelic expression imbalance of JAK2 V617F mutant frequently occurs and contributes to phenotypic diversity of BCR-ABL-negative MPNs. The proportion of JAK2 V617F mutant allele was significantly augmented in RNA levels as compared with genomic DNA differently by distinct MPNs subtypes. In detail, preferential expression of JAK2 mutant allele showed threefold increase from the cDNA compared with the genomic DNA from patients with essential thrombocythemia and twofold increase in polycythemia vera. In conclusion, allelic expression imbalance of JAK2 V617F mutant proposes another plausible mechanism for the contribution of single JAK2 point mutation to phenotypic diversity of MPNs. PMID:23349688

  4. Increasing long term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  5. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  6. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  7. Patterns of Neutral Diversity Under General Models of Selective Sweeps

    PubMed Central

    Coop, Graham; Ralph, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Two major sources of stochasticity in the dynamics of neutral alleles result from resampling of finite populations (genetic drift) and the random genetic background of nearby selected alleles on which the neutral alleles are found (linked selection). There is now good evidence that linked selection plays an important role in shaping polymorphism levels in a number of species. One of the best-investigated models of linked selection is the recurrent full-sweep model, in which newly arisen selected alleles fix rapidly. However, the bulk of selected alleles that sweep into the population may not be destined for rapid fixation. Here we develop a general model of recurrent selective sweeps in a coalescent framework, one that generalizes the recurrent full-sweep model to the case where selected alleles do not sweep to fixation. We show that in a large population, only the initial rapid increase of a selected allele affects the genealogy at partially linked sites, which under fairly general assumptions are unaffected by the subsequent fate of the selected allele. We also apply the theory to a simple model to investigate the impact of recurrent partial sweeps on levels of neutral diversity and find that for a given reduction in diversity, the impact of recurrent partial sweeps on the frequency spectrum at neutral sites is determined primarily by the frequencies rapidly achieved by the selected alleles. Consequently, recurrent sweeps of selected alleles to low frequencies can have a profound effect on levels of diversity but can leave the frequency spectrum relatively unperturbed. In fact, the limiting coalescent model under a high rate of sweeps to low frequency is identical to the standard neutral model. The general model of selective sweeps we describe goes some way toward providing a more flexible framework to describe genomic patterns of diversity than is currently available. PMID:22714413

  8. Always Look on Both Sides: Phylogenetic Information Conveyed by Simple Sequence Repeat Allele Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Barthe, Stéphanie; Gugerli, Felix; Barkley, Noelle A.; Maggia, Laurent; Cardi, Céline; Scotti, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily, mutations in the target sequences follow the stepwise mutation model (SMM). Generally speaking, PCR amplicon sizes are used as direct indicators of the number of SSR repeats composing an allele with the data analysis either ignoring the extent of allele size differences or assuming that there is a direct correlation between differences in amplicon size and evolutionary distance. However, without precisely knowing the kind and distribution of polymorphism within an allele (SSR and the associated flanking region (FR) sequences), it is hard to say what kind of evolutionary message is conveyed by such a synthetic descriptor of polymorphism as DNA amplicon size. In this study, we sequenced several SSR alleles in multiple populations of three divergent tree genera and disentangled the types of polymorphisms contained in each portion of the DNA amplicon containing an SSR. The patterns of diversity provided by amplicon size variation, SSR variation itself, insertions/deletions (indels), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) observed in the FRs were compared. Amplicon size variation largely reflected SSR repeat number. The amount of variation was as large in FRs as in the SSR itself. The former contributed significantly to the phylogenetic information and sometimes was the main source of differentiation among individuals and populations contained by FR and SSR regions of SSR markers. The presence of mutations occurring at different rates within a marker’s sequence offers the opportunity to analyse evolutionary events occurring on various timescales, but at the same time calls for caution in the interpretation of SSR marker data when the distribution of within

  9. Catalogue of alleles of gliadin-coding loci in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    PubMed

    Melnikova, N V; Kudryavtseva, A V; Kudryavtsev, A M

    2012-02-01

    Gliadins are seed storage proteins which are characterized by high intervarietal polymorphism and can be used as genetic markers. As a result of our work, a considerably extended catalogue of allelic variants of gliadin component blocks was compiled for durum wheat; 74 allelic variants for four gliadin-coding loci were identified for the first time. The extended catalogue includes a total of 131 allelic variants: 16 for locus Gli-A1(d), 19 for locus Gli-B1(d), 41 for locus Gli-A2(d), and 55 for locus Gli-B2(d). The electrophoretic pattern of the standard cultivar and a diagram are provided for every block identified. The number of alleles per family is quite small for loci Gli-A1(d) and Gli-B1(d) of durum wheat, as contrasted to loci Gli-A2(d) and Gli-B2(d) that are characterized by large families including many alleles. The presence of large block families determines a higher diversity of durum wheat for loci Gli-A2(d) and Gli-B2(d) as compared to Gli-A1(d) and Gli-B1(d). The catalogue of allelic variants of gliadin component blocks can be used by seed farmers to identify durum wheat cultivars and evaluate their purity; by breeders, to obtain homogenous cultivars and control the initial stages of selection; by gene bank experts, to preserve native varieties and the original biotypic composition of cultivars. PMID:21946233

  10. The importance of HLA DRB1 gene allele to clinical features and disability in patients with multiple sclerosis in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of HLA DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) has been consistently reported although its effect on the clinical features and disability is still unclear probably due to diversity in ethnicity and geographic location of the studied populations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of HLA DRB1 alleles on the clinical features and disability of the patients with MS in Lithuania. Methods This was a prospective study of 120 patients with MS. HLA DRB1 alleles were genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction. Results The first symptoms of MS in patients with HLA DRB1*15 allele manifested at younger age than in those without this allele (28.32 +/− 5.49 yrs vs. 30.94 +/− 8.43 yrs, respectively, p = 0.043). HLA DRB1*08 allele was more prevalent among relapsing-remitting (RR) MS patients than among patients with progressive course of MS (25.0% vs. 8.3%, respectively, chi^2 = 6.000, p = 0.05). MS patients with this allele had lower relapse rate than those without this allele (1.00 +/− 0.97 and 1.44 +/− 0.85, respectively, p = 0.043). Degree of disability during the last visit was lower among the patients with HLA DRB1*08 allele (EDSS score 3.15 +/− 1.95 vs. 4.49 +/− 1.96, p = 0.006), and higher among those with HLA DRB1*15 allele (EDSS score 4.60 +/− 2.10 vs.4.05 +/− 1.94, p = 0.047) compared to patients without these alleles but there were no significant associations between these alleles and the duration of the disease to disability. HLA DRB1*08 allele (OR = 0.18, 95% CI 0,039-0,8, p = 0.029) was demonstradet to be independent factor to take a longer time to reach an EDSS of 6, while HLA DRB1*01 allele (OR = 5.92, 95% CI 1,30-26,8, p = 0.021) was related in a shorter time to reach and EDSS of 6. Patients with HLA DRB1*08 allele had lower IgG index compared to patients without this allele (0.58 +/− 0.17 and 0.73 +/− 0.31, respectively, p

  11. Promoting Utilization of Saccharum spp. Genetic Resources through Genetic Diversity Analysis and Core Collection Construction

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C.; Kuhn, David N.; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A.; Comstock, Jack C.; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance. PMID:25333358

  12. Promoting utilization of Saccharum spp. genetic resources through genetic diversity analysis and core collection construction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Spurthi N; Song, Jian; Villa, Andrea; Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C; Kuhn, David N; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A; Comstock, Jack C; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance. PMID:25333358

  13. Microsatellite Analysis of the Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Dairy Goats in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Seilsuth, Somkiat; Seo, Joo Hee; Kong, Hong Sik; Jeon, Gwang Joo

    2016-01-01

    The genetic relationships between different populations and breeds of exotic dairy goats in Thailand were studied using 12 microsatellite markers. Blood samples were obtained from 211 goats from Department of Livestock Development breeding and research farms: 29 Anglonubian (AN), 21 Alpine (AP), 23 Jamunapari (JAM), 50 Saanen (SN), and 88 Toggenburg (TG). Five of the 12 microsatellite markers were found to be polymorphic. A mean of 7.40 alleles per locus was found, with a range from 5 (SPS115 and ETH225) to 11 (TGLA122). We found 24, 27, 19, 32, and 24 alleles in the AN, AP, JAM, SN, and TG breeds, respectively; 37 alleles were present in all breeds. The mean number of alleles in each population ranged from 3.2 (ETH225 locus) to 7.6 (TGLA122 locus). Genetic variability within the breeds was moderate as evidenced by the mean expected heterozygosity of 0.539. The average observed heterozygosity across the 5 markers in all breeds was 0.529 with the maximum observed at the BM1818 locus (0.772) and the minimum at the ETH225 locus (0.248). The observed and expected heterozygosity for all breeds for the 5 microsatellite markers ranged from 0.419 to 0.772 and 0.227 to 0.792, respectively. On the basis of their means, the TGLA122 and BM1818 loci were the most suitable markers for distinguishing genetic diversity among the goats. The estimated average Fis value for the breeds ranged from −0.044 (ETH225) to 0.180 (SPS115), while the estimated average Fst value ranged from 0.021 (SPS115) to 0.104 (ETH10). These results indicated that TGLA122 and BM1818 markers are suitable to be used for aiding conservation and breeding improvement strategies of dairy. PMID:26950862

  14. Fixation probability with multiple alleles and projected average allelic effect on selection.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Sabin; Lahaie, Philippe

    2009-06-01

    The first-order effect of selection on the probability of fixation of an allele, with respect to an intensity of selection s>0 in a diploid population of fixed finite size N, undergoing discrete, non-overlapping generations, is shown to be given by the sum of the average effects of that allele on the coefficient of selection in the current generation and all future generations, given the population state in the current generation. This projected average allelic effect is a weighted sum of average allelic effects in allozygous and autozygous offspring in the initial generation, with weights given in terms of expected coalescence times, under neutrality, for the lineages of two or three gametes chosen at random in the same generation. This is shown in the framework of multiple alleles at one locus, with genotypic values determining either viability or fertility differences, and with either multinomial or exchangeable reproduction schemes. In the limit of weak selection in a large population such that Ns tends to zero, the initial average allelic effects in allozygous offspring and autozygous offspring have the same weight on the fixation probability only in the domain of application of the Kingman coalescent. With frequency-dependent selection in a linear-game-theoretic context with two phenotypes determined by additive gene action, the first-order effect on the fixation probability is a combination of two effects of frequency-independent selection, one in a haploid population, the other in a diploid population. In the domain of application of the Kingman coalescent as the population size goes to infinity and Ns to zero, the first effect is three times more important than the second effect. This explains the one-third law of evolutionary dynamics in this domain, and shows how this law can be extended beyond this domain. PMID:19249322

  15. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Brian J; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Weisman, Caroline M; Hollister, Jesse D; Salt, David E; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-07-19

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  16. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Brian J.; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M.; Weisman, Caroline M.; Hollister, Jesse D.; Salt, David E.; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-01-01

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata. In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata. This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  17. Genetics of unstable alleles of the X chromosome genes isolated from natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster during the outburst of mutation yellow in 1982 to 1991 in Uman`

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, I.K.; Skibitskii, E.E.

    1995-08-01

    In 1982, a local increase of frequency of mutation yellow-2, which lasted for a decade, occurred in a population of Drosophila melanogaster from Uman` (Ukraine). Genetic properties (phenotypic difference, mutability, and pecularities of complementation) of alleles yellow-2, isolated from the population during the mutation outburst, and of their revertants, were studied. Allelic diversity, which reflected molecular differences in allele structure, was shown to appear. In addition to mutation yellow, isolated in 1990 from the Uman` population, mutational properties of other sex-linked genes (dusky, miniature, rudimentary, singed, and vermilion) isolated from natural populations in 1986 to 1990, were analyzed. Based on these data, the conclusion was drawn that the presence of unstable alleles in populations is not a sufficient condition for mutation outbursts. Comparative analysis of properties of yellow alleles obtained in different periods of the outburst continues. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Allelic genealogies in sporophytic self-incompatibility systems in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Christiansen, F B

    1998-01-01

    Expectations for the time scale and structure of allelic genealogies in finite populations are formed under three models of sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance interactions among the alleles that determine the self-incompatibility phenotype: In the SSIcod model, alleles act codominantly in both pollen and style, in the SSIdom model, alleles form a dominance hierarchy, and in SSIdomcod, alleles are codominant in the style and show a dominance hierarchy in the pollen. Coalescence times of alleles rarely differ more than threefold from those under gametophytic self-incompatibility, and transspecific polymorphism is therefore expected to be equally common. The previously reported directional turnover process of alleles in the SSIdomcod model results in coalescence times lower and substitution rates higher than those in the other models. The SSIdom model assumes strong asymmetries in allelic action, and the most recessive extant allele is likely to be the most recent common ancestor. Despite these asymmetries, the expected shape of the allele genealogies does not deviate markedly from the shape of a neutral gene genealogy. The application of the results to sequence surveys of alleles, including interspecific comparisons, is discussed. PMID:9799270

  19. Evaluation of Genetic Diversity and Development of a Core Collection of Wild Rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) Populations in China

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lin; Lu, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yuhong; Jiang, Lan; Diao, Mengyang; Liu, Xiangdong; Lu, Yonggen

    2015-01-01

    Common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.), the progenitor of Asian cultivated rice (O. sativa L.), is endangered due to habitat loss. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the genetic diversity of wild rice species in isolated populations and to develop a core collection of representative genotypes for ex situ conservation. We collected 885 wild rice accessions from eight geographically distinct regions and transplanted these accessions in a protected conservation garden over a period of almost two decades. We evaluated these accessions for 13 morphological or phenological traits and genotyped them for 36 DNA markers evenly distributed on the 12 chromosomes. The coefficient of variation of quantitative traits was 0.56 and ranged from 0.37 to 1.06. SSR markers detected 206 different alleles with an average of 6 alleles per locus. The mean polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.64 in all populations, indicating that the marker loci have a high level of polymorphism and genetic diversity in all populations. Phylogenetic analyses based on morphological and molecular data revealed remarkable differences in the genetic diversity of common wild rice populations. The results showed that the Zengcheng, Gaozhou, and Suixi populations possess higher levels of genetic diversity, whereas the Huilai and Boluo populations have lower levels of genetic diversity than do the other populations. Based on their genetic distance, 130 accessions were selected as a core collection that retained over 90% of the alleles at the 36 marker loci. This genetically diverse core collection will be a useful resource for genomic studies of rice and for initiatives aimed at developing rice with improved agronomic traits. PMID:26720755

  20. Evaluation of Genetic Diversity and Development of a Core Collection of Wild Rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) Populations in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Shahid, Muhammad Qasim; Bai, Lin; Lu, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yuhong; Jiang, Lan; Diao, Mengyang; Liu, Xiangdong; Lu, Yonggen

    2015-01-01

    Common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.), the progenitor of Asian cultivated rice (O. sativa L.), is endangered due to habitat loss. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the genetic diversity of wild rice species in isolated populations and to develop a core collection of representative genotypes for ex situ conservation. We collected 885 wild rice accessions from eight geographically distinct regions and transplanted these accessions in a protected conservation garden over a period of almost two decades. We evaluated these accessions for 13 morphological or phenological traits and genotyped them for 36 DNA markers evenly distributed on the 12 chromosomes. The coefficient of variation of quantitative traits was 0.56 and ranged from 0.37 to 1.06. SSR markers detected 206 different alleles with an average of 6 alleles per locus. The mean polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.64 in all populations, indicating that the marker loci have a high level of polymorphism and genetic diversity in all populations. Phylogenetic analyses based on morphological and molecular data revealed remarkable differences in the genetic diversity of common wild rice populations. The results showed that the Zengcheng, Gaozhou, and Suixi populations possess higher levels of genetic diversity, whereas the Huilai and Boluo populations have lower levels of genetic diversity than do the other populations. Based on their genetic distance, 130 accessions were selected as a core collection that retained over 90% of the alleles at the 36 marker loci. This genetically diverse core collection will be a useful resource for genomic studies of rice and for initiatives aimed at developing rice with improved agronomic traits. PMID:26720755

  1. Dissecting Diversity Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article presents "Dissecting Diversity, Part II," the conclusion of a wide-ranging two-part roundtable discussion on diversity in higher education. The participants were as follows: Lezli Baskerville, J.D., President and CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO); Dr. Gerald E. Gipp, Executive Director of the American…

  2. Managing diversity.

    PubMed

    Epting, L A; Glover, S H; Boyd, S D

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. work force is becoming increasingly diverse as the 20th century approaches. Statistics prove that most organizations are experiencing gender, culture, and age diversity within their labor forces. All managers and leaders must accept this diversity and work to handle it effectively. This article examines the current literature concerning management of diversity and its implications for the health care profession. Gender, culture, and age diversity and the potential problems that may arise with each are also addressed. Reasons to manage diversity are offered, as well as methods of managing diversity for both the manager and the chief executive officer. PMID:10134144

  3. Roles of conserved and allelic regions of the major merozoite surface protein (gp195) in immunity against Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Hui, G S; Hashimoto, A; Chang, S P

    1992-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum major merozoite surface protein gp195 is a candidate antigen for a vaccine against human malaria. The significance of allelism and polymorphism in vaccine-induced immunity to gp195 was investigated in this study. Rabbits were immunized with each of two allelic forms of gp195 that were affinity purified from the FUP and FVO parasite isolates. gp195-specific antibodies raised against one allelic form of gp195 cross-reacted extensively with the gp195 of the heterologous allele in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and immunofluorescence assays. Competitive binding ELISAs with homologous and heterologous gp195s confirmed that a majority of the anti-gp195 antibodies produced against either allelic protein were cross-reactive. Moreover, the biological activities of the gp195 antibody responses were also highly cross-reactive, since anti-gp195 sera inhibited the in vitro growth of the homologous and heterologous parasites with equal efficiency. The degree of cross-reactivity with strain-specific and allele-specific determinants of gp195 in the ELISA was low. These results suggest that the immunological cross-reactivity between the two gp195 proteins is due to recognition of conserved determinants. They also suggest that a gp195-based vaccine may be effective against blood-stage infection with a diverse array of parasite isolates. Images PMID:1548068

  4. Development of SSR Markers and Genetic Diversity in White Birch (Betula platyphylla)

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wei; Wang, Shengji; Liu, Huajing; Zhou, Boru; Wang, Xinwang; Jiang, Tingbo

    2015-01-01

    In order to study genetic diversity of white birch (Betula platyphylla), 544 primer pairs were designed based on the genome-wide Solexa sequences. Among them, 215 primer pairs showed polymorphism between five genotypes and 111 primer pairs that presented clear visible bands in genotyping 41 white birch plants that were collected from 6 different geographical regions. A total of 717 alleles were obtained at 111 loci with a range of 2 to 12 alleles per locus. The results of statistic analysis showed that polymorphic frequency of the alleles ranged from 17% to 100% with a mean of 55.85%; polymorphism information content (PIC) of the loci was from 0.09 to 0.58 with a mean of 0.30; and gene diversity between the tested genotypes was from 0.01 to 0.66 with a mean of 0.36. The results also indicated that major allele frequency ranged from 0.39 to 1.00 with an mean of 0.75; expected heterozygosity from 0.22 to 0.54 with a mean of 0.46; observed heterozygosity from 0.02 to 0.95 with a mean of 0.26; Nei's index from 0.21 to 0.54 with a mean of 0.46; and Shannon's Information from 0.26 to 0.87 with a mean of 0.66. The 41 white birch genotypes at the 111 selected SSR loci showed low to moderate similarity (0.025-0.610), indicating complicated genetic diversity among the white birch collections. The UPGMA-based clustering analysis of the allelic constitution of 41 white birch genotypes at 111 SSR loci suggested that the six different geographical regions can be further separated into four clusters at a similarity coefficient of 0.22. Genotypes from Huanren and Liangshui provenances were grouped into Cluster I, genotypes from Xiaobeihu and Qingyuan provenances into Cluster II, genotypes from Finland provenance into Cluster III, and genotypes from Maoershan into Cluster IV. The information provided in this study could help for genetic improvement and germplasm conservation, evaluation and utilization in white birch tree breeding program. PMID:25923698

  5. Development of SSR Markers and Genetic Diversity in White Birch (Betula platyphylla).

    PubMed

    Hao, Wei; Wang, Shengji; Liu, Huajing; Zhou, Boru; Wang, Xinwang; Jiang, Tingbo

    2015-01-01

    In order to study genetic diversity of white birch (Betula platyphylla), 544 primer pairs were designed based on the genome-wide Solexa sequences. Among them, 215 primer pairs showed polymorphism between five genotypes and 111 primer pairs that presented clear visible bands in genotyping 41 white birch plants that were collected from 6 different geographical regions. A total of 717 alleles were obtained at 111 loci with a range of 2 to 12 alleles per locus. The results of statistic analysis showed that polymorphic frequency of the alleles ranged from 17% to 100% with a mean of 55.85%; polymorphism information content (PIC) of the loci was from 0.09 to 0.58 with a mean of 0.30; and gene diversity between the tested genotypes was from 0.01 to 0.66 with a mean of 0.36. The results also indicated that major allele frequency ranged from 0.39 to 1.00 with an mean of 0.75; expected heterozygosity from 0.22 to 0.54 with a mean of 0.46; observed heterozygosity from 0.02 to 0.95 with a mean of 0.26; Nei's index from 0.21 to 0.54 with a mean of 0.46; and Shannon's Information from 0.26 to 0.87 with a mean of 0.66. The 41 white birch genotypes at the 111 selected SSR loci showed low to moderate similarity (0.025-0.610), indicating complicated genetic diversity among the white birch collections. The UPGMA-based clustering analysis of the allelic constitution of 41 white birch genotypes at 111 SSR loci suggested that the six different geographical regions can be further separated into four clusters at a similarity coefficient of 0.22. Genotypes from Huanren and Liangshui provenances were grouped into Cluster I, genotypes from Xiaobeihu and Qingyuan provenances into Cluster II, genotypes from Finland provenance into Cluster III, and genotypes from Maoershan into Cluster IV. The information provided in this study could help for genetic improvement and germplasm conservation, evaluation and utilization in white birch tree breeding program. PMID:25923698

  6. GST M1-T1 null Allele Frequency Patterns in Geographically Assorted Human Populations: A Phylogenetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Thirumurugan; Ayyavoo, Jayachitra

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME). Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST) gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs). Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs). The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions) and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs. PMID:25867025

  7. GST M1-T1 null allele frequency patterns in geographically assorted human populations: a phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Kasthurinaidu, Senthilkumar Pitchalu; Ramasamy, Thirumurugan; Ayyavoo, Jayachitra; Dave, Dhvani Kirtikumar; Adroja, Divya Anantray

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME). Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST) gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs). Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs). The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions) and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs. PMID:25867025

  8. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Broomcorn Millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) Cultivars and Landraces in China Based on Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minxuan; Xu, Yue; He, Jihong; Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Yinyue; Lu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum L.), one of the first domesticated crops, has been grown in Northern China for at least 10,000 years. The species is presently a minor crop, and evaluation of its genetic diversity has been very limited. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of 88 accessions of broomcorn millet collected from various provinces of China. Amplification with 67 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers revealed moderate levels of diversity in the investigated accessions. A total of 179 alleles were detected, with an average of 2.7 alleles per locus. Polymorphism information content and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.043 to 0.729 (mean = 0.376) and 0.045 to 0.771 (mean = 0.445), respectively. Cluster analysis based on the unweighted pair group method of mathematical averages separated the 88 accessions into four groups at a genetic similarity level of 0.633. A genetic structure assay indicated a close correlation between geographical regions and genetic diversity. The uncovered information will be valuable for defining gene pools and developing breeding programs for broomcorn millet. Furthermore, the millet-specific SSR markers developed in this study should serve as useful tools for assessment of genetic diversity and elucidation of population structure in broomcorn millet. PMID:26985894

  9. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Broomcorn Millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) Cultivars and Landraces in China Based on Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minxuan; Xu, Yue; He, Jihong; Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Yinyue; Lu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum L.), one of the first domesticated crops, has been grown in Northern China for at least 10,000 years. The species is presently a minor crop, and evaluation of its genetic diversity has been very limited. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of 88 accessions of broomcorn millet collected from various provinces of China. Amplification with 67 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers revealed moderate levels of diversity in the investigated accessions. A total of 179 alleles were detected, with an average of 2.7 alleles per locus. Polymorphism information content and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.043 to 0.729 (mean = 0.376) and 0.045 to 0.771 (mean = 0.445), respectively. Cluster analysis based on the unweighted pair group method of mathematical averages separated the 88 accessions into four groups at a genetic similarity level of 0.633. A genetic structure assay indicated a close correlation between geographical regions and genetic diversity. The uncovered information will be valuable for defining gene pools and developing breeding programs for broomcorn millet. Furthermore, the millet-specific SSR markers developed in this study should serve as useful tools for assessment of genetic diversity and elucidation of population structure in broomcorn millet. PMID:26985894

  10. Beneficial role of D allele in controlling ACE levels: a study among Brahmins of north India.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Shobha; Sharma, Nidhi; Thakur, Sunil; Mondal, Prakash R; Saraswathy, Kallur N

    2016-06-01

    India being a country with vast diversity is expected to have different dietary and life style patterns which in turn may lead to population-specific environmental risk factors. Further, the interaction of these risk factors with the genetic makeup of population makes it either susceptible or resistant to cardiovascular disease. One such candidate gene is angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) for various cardiovascular mechanisms. ACE is the key enzyme of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system pathway which maintains homeostasis blood pressure in the body and any variation in the levels is reported to be associated with various complex diseases. The DD genotype is found to increase ACE levels, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases and decrease in ACE levels are associated with kidney diseases. The aim of this study was to understand the distribution of ACE I/D polymorphism and ACE levels among Brahmins of National Capital Region (NCR) north India, with respect to age and sex ratio distribution. In this study, 136 subjects of which 50 males and 86 females, who were unrelated up to first cousin, aged 25 to70 years were studied. ACE gene was found to be polymorphic with high frequency of heterozygote (ID) followed by II and DD genotypes. The studied population was found to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with respect to ACE I/D polymorphism (P = 0.55). I allele frequency was found to be higher (0.560) than the D allele (0.44). The median level of ACE was found to be 65.96 ng/mL (48.12-86.24) which is towards lower side of the normal range. ACE levels were found to be increased among individual having either of the homozygotes that is II or DD and higher frequency of heterozygote (ID) is indicative of advantage in the population by maintaining lower ACE levels. The limitation of the present study is low sample size, however, the merit is that the subjects belonged to a Mendalian population with a common gene pool. PMID:27350671

  11. Exquisite allele discrimination by toehold hairpin primers

    PubMed Central

    Byrom, Michelle; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to detect and monitor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biological samples is an enabling research and clinical tool. We have developed a surprising, inexpensive primer design method that provides exquisite discrimination between SNPs. The field of DNA computation is largely reliant on using so-called toeholds to initiate strand displacement reactions, leading to the execution of kinetically trapped circuits. We have now similarly found that the short toehold sequence to a target of interest can initiate both strand displacement within the hairpin and extension of the primer by a polymerase, both of which will further stabilize the primer:template complex. However, if the short toehold does not bind, neither of these events can readily occur and thus amplification should not occur. Toehold hairpin primers were used to detect drug resistance alleles in two genes, rpoB and katG, in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, and ten alleles in the Escherichia coli genome. During real-time PCR, the primers discriminate between mismatched templates with Cq delays that are frequently so large that the presence or absence of mismatches is essentially a ‘yes/no’ answer. PMID:24990378

  12. Differential effects of the APOE e4 allele on different domains of cognitive ability across the life-course.

    PubMed

    Marioni, Riccardo E; Campbell, Archie; Scotland, Generation; Hayward, Caroline; Porteous, David J; Deary, Ian J

    2016-06-01

    The association between APOE genotype and cognitive function suggests a positive role for the e2 allele and a negative role for the e4 allele. Both alleles have relatively low frequencies in the general population; hence, meta-analyses have been based on many small, heterogeneous studies. Here, we report the APOE-cognition associations in the largest single analysis to date. APOE status and cognitive ability were measured in 18 337 participants from the Generation Scotland study between 2006 and 2011. The age range was 18-94 years with a mean of 47 (SD 15). Four cognitive domains were assessed: verbal declarative memory (paragraph recall), processing speed (digit symbol substitution), verbal fluency (phonemic verbal fluency), and vocabulary (Mill Hill synonyms). Linear regression was used to assess the associations between APOE genetic status and cognition. Possession of the e4 allele was associated with lower scores on the measures of memory and processing speed in subjects aged >60. Across all age ranges, the e4 allele was linked to better verbal fluency scores. In younger subjects (≤60 years) the e4 allele was linked to higher vocabulary scores. There were no associations between the e2 allele and cognitive ability. As seen in previous meta-analyses, the APOE e4 allele is linked to poorer cognitive performance in the domains of memory and processing speed. By contrast, positive associations were seen between the e4 allele and measures of verbal fluency and vocabulary. All associations were relatively small and, in many cases, nominally significant despite the very large sample size. PMID:26395552

  13. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules.

    PubMed

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S; Gaston, J S Hill; Deery, Michael J; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  14. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M. Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M.; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Deery, Michael J.; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  15. Variation in lipoprotein(a) concentration associated with different apolipoprotein(a) alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Perombelon, Y F; Soutar, A K; Knight, B L

    1994-01-01

    Plasma lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) concentrations vary considerably between individuals. To examine the variation for products of the same and different apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) alleles, conditions were established whereby phenotyping immunoblots could be used to estimate the concentration of Lp(a) associated with the constituent apo(a) isoforms. In these studies 28 distinct isoforms were identified, each differing by a single kringle IV unit. Tracking the isoforms through 10 families showed that there could be up to 200-fold difference in the Lp(a) concentration associated with the same-sized isoform produced from different alleles. In contrast there was typically < 2.5-fold variation in the Lp(a) concentration associated with the same allele. However, there were four occasions where the concentration associated with a particular allele was reduced below the typical range from one generation to the next. A nonlinear, inverse trend with isoform size was apparently superimposed upon the other factors that determine Lp(a) concentration. Inheritance of familial hypercholesterolemia or familial-defective apoB100 had little consistent effect upon Lp(a) concentration. In both the families and in other unrelated individuals the distribution of isoforms and their associated concentrations provided evidence for the presence of at least two and possibly more subpopulations of apo(a) alleles with different sizes and expression. Images PMID:8163653

  16. Development of Microsatellite Markers and Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides from Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Moges, Asmare D; Admassu, Belayneh; Belew, Derbew; Yesuf, Mohammed; Njuguna, Joyce; Kyalo, Martina; Ghimire, Sita R

    2016-01-01

    Twenty three polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for citrus plant pathogenic fungus, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and were used to analyze genetic diversity and population structure of 163 isolates from four different geographical regions of Ethiopia. These loci produced a total of 118 alleles with an average of 5.13 alleles per microsatellite marker. The polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.104 to 0.597 with an average of 0.371. The average observed heterozygosity across all loci varied from 0.046 to 0.058. The gene diversity among the loci ranged from 0.106 to 0.664. Unweighted Neighbor-joining and population structure analysis grouped these 163 isolates into three major groups. The clusters were not according to the geographic origin of the isolates. Analysis of molecular variance showed 85% of the total variation within populations and only 5% among populations. There was low genetic differentiation in the total populations (FST = 0.049) as evidenced by high level of gene flow estimate (Nm = 4.8 per generation) among populations. The results show that Ethiopian C. gloeosporioides populations are generally characterized by a low level of genetic diversity. The newly developed microsatellite markers were useful in analyzing the genetic diversity and population structure of the C. gloeosporioides populations. Information obtained from this study could be useful as a base to design strategies for better management of leaf and fruit spot disease of citrus in Ethiopia. PMID:26978654

  17. Development of Microsatellite Markers and Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Moges, Asmare D.; Admassu, Belayneh; Belew, Derbew; Yesuf, Mohammed; Njuguna, Joyce; Kyalo, Martina; Ghimire, Sita R.

    2016-01-01

    Twenty three polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for citrus plant pathogenic fungus, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and were used to analyze genetic diversity and population structure of 163 isolates from four different geographical regions of Ethiopia. These loci produced a total of 118 alleles with an average of 5.13 alleles per microsatellite marker. The polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.104 to 0.597 with an average of 0.371. The average observed heterozygosity across all loci varied from 0.046 to 0.058. The gene diversity among the loci ranged from 0.106 to 0.664. Unweighted Neighbor-joining and population structure analysis grouped these 163 isolates into three major groups. The clusters were not according to the geographic origin of the isolates. Analysis of molecular variance showed 85% of the total variation within populations and only 5% among populations. There was low genetic differentiation in the total populations (FST = 0.049) as evidenced by high level of gene flow estimate (Nm = 4.8 per generation) among populations. The results show that Ethiopian C. gloeosporioides populations are generally characterized by a low level of genetic diversity. The newly developed microsatellite markers were useful in analyzing the genetic diversity and population structure of the C. gloeosporioides populations. Information obtained from this study could be useful as a base to design strategies for better management of leaf and fruit spot disease of citrus in Ethiopia. PMID:26978654

  18. Isoelectric focusing of superoxide dismutase: report of the unique SOD A*2 allele in a US white population.

    PubMed

    DeCroo, S; Kamboh, M I; Leppert, M; Ferrell, R E

    1988-01-01

    An isoelectric focusing procedure in an ultranarrow pH range (5.0-5.5) polyacrylamide gel is described for the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) phenotypes. The occurrence of the rare SOD A*2 allele in the Caucasian population of Utah is also reported at a polymorphic frequency (0.011). The presence of the SOD A 2 unique allele in the Mormons of Utah is compatible with their historical affinity with Scandinavians. PMID:3350528

  19. Wide-range analysis of genetic structure of Betula maximowicziana, a long-lived pioneer tree species and noble hardwood in the cool temperate zone of Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Y; Ide, Y

    2005-11-01

    Betula maximowicziana is a long-lived pioneer tree species in Japanese cool temperate forests that plays an important role in maintenance of the forest ecosystem and has high economic value. Here we assess the wide-range genetic structure of 23 natural populations of B. maximowicziana using 11 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci. Genetic diversity within populations was relatively low in all populations (mean H(E), 0.361; mean allelic richness, 2.80; mean rare allelic richness, 1.02). The population differentiation was also relatively low (F(ST), 0.062). Genetic distance-based and Bayesian clustering analysis revealed that the populations examined here could be divided into a southern group and a northern group. Analysis of rare allelic richness and Bayesian clustering revealed evidence for both southern and northern refugia during the last glacial period. Furthermore, a comparison of regional genetic diversity revealed significant clines in allelic richness. In spatial genetic structure evaluation, significant isolation by distance (IBD) was detected among the 23 populations, but not within regions. Moreover, significant population bottlenecks were found in all populations under infinite allele model (IAM) assumptions. These unusual, significant bottlenecks might be because of the processes of postglacial colonization and the species' characters and/or life history as a long-lived pioneer tree species. The wide-range, regional genetic structure found in this study provides an important baseline for conservation and forest management, including the identification of evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) and/or management units (MUs) of B. maximowicziana. PMID:16262849

  20. Genetic Variability and Distribution of Mating Type Alleles in Field Populations of Leptosphaeria maculans from France

    PubMed Central

    Gout, Lilian; Eckert, Maria; Rouxel, Thierry; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène

    2006-01-01

    Leptosphaeria maculans is the most ubiquitous fungal pathogen of Brassica crops and causes the devastating stem canker disease of oilseed rape worldwide. We used minisatellite markers to determine the genetic structure of L. maculans in four field populations from France. Isolates were collected at three different spatial scales (leaf, 2-m2 field plot, and field) enabling the evaluation of spatial distribution of the mating type alleles and of genetic variability within and among field populations. Within each field population, no gametic disequilibrium between the minisatellite loci was detected and the mating type alleles were present at equal frequencies. Both sexual and asexual reproduction occur in the field, but the genetic structure of these populations is consistent with annual cycles of randomly mating sexual reproduction. All L. maculans field populations had a high level of gene diversity (H = 0.68 to 0.75) and genotypic diversity. Within each field population, the number of genotypes often was very close to the number of isolates. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that >99.5% of the total genetic variability was distributed at a small spatial scale, i.e., within 2-m2 field plots. Population differentiation among the four field populations was low (GST < 0.02), suggesting a high degree of gene exchange between these populations. The high gene flow evidenced here in French populations of L. maculans suggests a rapid countrywide diffusion of novel virulence alleles whenever novel resistance sources are used. PMID:16391041

  1. The Equilibrium Allele Frequency Distribution for a Population with Reproductive Skew

    PubMed Central

    Der, Ricky; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2014-01-01

    We study the population genetics of two neutral alleles under reversible mutation in a model that features a skewed offspring distribution, called the Λ-Fleming–Viot process. We describe the shape of the equilibrium allele frequency distribution as a function of the model parameters. We show that the mutation rates can be uniquely identified from this equilibrium distribution, but the form of the offspring distribution cannot itself always be so identified. We introduce an estimator for the mutation rate that is consistent, independent of the form of reproductive skew. We also introduce a two-allele infinite-sites version of the Λ-Fleming–Viot process, and we use it to study how reproductive skew influences standing genetic diversity in a population. We derive asymptotic formulas for the expected number of segregating sites as a function of sample size and offspring distribution. We find that the Wright–Fisher model minimizes the equilibrium genetic diversity, for a given mutation rate and variance effective population size, compared to all other Λ-processes. PMID:24473932

  2. Genetic variability and distribution of mating type alleles in field populations of Leptosphaeria maculans from France.

    PubMed

    Gout, Lilian; Eckert, Maria; Rouxel, Thierry; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène

    2006-01-01

    Leptosphaeria maculans is the most ubiquitous fungal pathogen of Brassica crops and causes the devastating stem canker disease of oilseed rape worldwide. We used minisatellite markers to determine the genetic structure of L. maculans in four field populations from France. Isolates were collected at three different spatial scales (leaf, 2-m2 field plot, and field) enabling the evaluation of spatial distribution of the mating type alleles and of genetic variability within and among field populations. Within each field population, no gametic disequilibrium between the minisatellite loci was detected and the mating type alleles were present at equal frequencies. Both sexual and asexual reproduction occur in the field, but the genetic structure of these populations is consistent with annual cycles of randomly mating sexual reproduction. All L. maculans field populations had a high level of gene diversity (H = 0.68 to 0.75) and genotypic diversity. Within each field population, the number of genotypes often was very close to the number of isolates. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that >99.5% of the total genetic variability was distributed at a small spatial scale, i.e., within 2-m2 field plots. Population differentiation among the four field populations was low (GST < 0.02), suggesting a high degree of gene exchange between these populations. The high gene flow evidenced here in French populations of L. maculans suggests a rapid countrywide diffusion of novel virulence alleles whenever novel resistance sources are used. PMID:16391041

  3. Allelic disequilibrium and allele frequency distribution as a function of social and demographic history.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, E A; Neel, J V

    1997-01-01

    Allelic disequilibrium between closely linked genes is a common observation in human populations and often gives rise to speculation concerning the role of selective forces. In a previous treatment, we have developed a population model of the expected distribution of rare variants (including private polymorphisms) in Amerindians and have argued that, because of the great expansion of Amerindian numbers with the advent of agriculture, most of these rare variants are of relatively recent origin. Many other populations have similar histories of striking recent expansions. In this treatment, we demonstrate that, in consequence of this fact, a high degree of linkage disequilibrium between two nonhomologous alleles <0.5 cM apart is the "normal" expectation, even in the absence of selection. This expectation is enhanced by the previous subdivision of human populations into relatively isolated tribes characterized by a high level of endogamy and inbreeding. We also demonstrate that the alleles associated with a recessive disease phenotype are expected to exist in a population in very variable frequencies: there is no need to postulate positive selection with respect to the more common disease-associated alleles for such entities as phenylketonuria or cystic fibrosis. PMID:8981963

  4. Schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for alleles that affect gene expression in adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Alexander L; Jones, Lesley; Moskvina, Valentina; Kirov, George; Gejman, Pablo V; Levinson, Douglas F; Sanders, Alan R; Purcell, Shaun; Visscher, Peter M; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J; Holmans, Peter; O’Donovan, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    It is widely thought that alleles that influence susceptibility to common diseases, including schizophrenia, will frequently do so through effects on gene expression. Since only a small proportion of the genetic variance for schizophrenia has been attributed to specific loci, this remains an unproven hypothesis. The International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC) recently reported a substantial polygenic contribution to that disorder, and that schizophrenia risk alleles are enriched among SNPs selected for marginal evidence for association (p<0.5) from genome wide association studies (GWAS). It follows that if schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for those that affect gene expression, those marginally associated SNPs which are also eQTLs should carry more true association signals compared with SNPs which are not. To test this, we identified marginally associated (p<0.5) SNPs from two of the largest available schizophrenia GWAS datasets. We assigned eQTL status to those SNPs based upon an eQTL dataset derived from adult human brain. Using the polygenic score method of analysis reported by the ISC, we observed and replicated the observation that higher probability cis-eQTLs predicted schizophrenia better than those with a lower probability for being a cis-eQTL. Our data support the hypothesis that alleles conferring risk of schizophrenia are enriched among those that affect gene expression. Moreover, our data show that notwithstanding the likely developmental origin of schizophrenia, studies of adult brain tissue can in principle allow relevant susceptibility eQTLs to be identified. PMID:21339752

  5. Allelic Interactions Heritably Alter the Activity of a Metastable Maize Pl Allele

    PubMed Central

    Hollick, J. B.; Patterson, G. I.; Coe-Jr., E. H.; Cone, K. C.; Chandler, V. L.

    1995-01-01

    The maize pl locus encodes a transcriptional activator of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes. The Pl-Rhoades (Pl-Rh) allele confers robust purple anthocyanin pigment in several tissues. Spontaneous derivatives of Pl-Rh, termed Pl'-mahogany (Pl'-mah), arise that confer reduced pigment and are meiotically heritable. These derivatives influence other Pl-Rh alleles such that only Pl'-mah alleles are transmitted from a Pl-Rh/Pl'-mah heterozygote. Genetic crosses establish that chromosomal segregation distortion does not explain this exclusive transmission and suggest that Pl-Rh invariably changes to Pl'-mah when exposed to Pl'-mah. Such behavior is a hallmark of paramutation. Cosegregation experiments demonstrate that this paramutagenic activity is genetically linked to the pl locus. By visually quantifying pl action through successive crosses, we find that phenotypic expression is inversely related to paramutagenic strength. In addition, the paramutagenic state is metastable; reversion to a nonparamutagenic Pl-Rh state can occur. The behavior of Pl-Rh is unique, yet it shares characteristics with paramutation at two other maize loci, b and r. Previous analysis of b and r paramutation revealed extensive differences and led to suggestions of distinct molecular mechanisms. Consideration of the common features of all three systems reinvigorates the interpretation that the mechanistic processes of these three allelic interactions are similar. PMID:8647404

  6. Major histocompatibility complex class II DAB alleles associated with intestinal parasite load in the vulnerable Chinese egret (Egretta eulophotes).

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Zhou, Xiaoping; Fang, Wenzhen; Lin, Qingxian; Chen, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    The maintenance of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism has been hypothesized to result from many mechanisms such as rare-allele advantage, heterozygote advantage, and allele counting. In the study reported herein, 224 vulnerable Chinese egrets (Egretta eulophotes) were used to examine these hypotheses as empirical results derived from bird studies are rare. Parasite survey showed that 147 (65.63%) individuals were infected with 1-3 helminths, and 82.31% of these infected individuals carried Ascaridia sp. Using asymmetric polymerase chain reaction technique, 10 DAB1, twelve DAB2, and three DAB3 exon 2 alleles were identified at each single locus. A significant association of the rare allele Egeu-DAB2*05 (allele frequency: 0.022) with helminth resistance was found for all helminths, as well as for the most abundant morphotype Ascaridia sp. in the separate analyses. Egeu-DAB2*05 occurred frequently in uninfected individuals, and individuals carrying Egeu-DAB2*05 had significantly lower helminth morphotypes per individual (HMI) (the number of HMI) and the fecal egg count values. Further, the parasite infection measurements were consistently lower in individuals with an intermediate number of different alleles in the duplicated DAB loci. Significantly, heterozygosity within each DAB locus was not correlated with any parasite infection measurements. These results indicate that the diversity in MHC Egeu-DAB gene is associated with intestinal parasite load and maintained by pathogen-driven selection that probably operate through both the rare-allele advantage and the allele counting strategy, and suggest that Egeu-DAB2*05 might be a valuable indicator of better resistance to helminth diseases in the vulnerable Chinese egret. PMID:27386085

  7. Nucleotide Diversity Analysis of Three Major Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Bimolata, Waikhom; Kumar, Anirudh; M, Sai Kiran Reddy; Sundaram, Raman Meenakshi; Laha, Gouri Sankar; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Ghazi, Irfan Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence polymorphisms among R gene alleles influence the process of co-evolutionary interaction between host and pathogen by shaping the response of host plants towards invading pathogens. Here, we present the DNA sequence polymorphisms and diversities present among natural alleles of three rice bacterial blight resistance genes, Xa21, Xa26 and xa5. The diversity was examined across different wild relatives and cultivars of Oryza species. Functional significance of selected alleles was evaluated through semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and real time PCR. The greatest nucleotide diversity and singleton variable sites (SVS) were present in Xa26 (π = 0.01958; SVS = 182) followed by xa5 and Xa21 alleles. The highest frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in Xa21 alleles and least in xa5. Transition bias was observed in all the genes and ‘G’ to ‘A’ transitions were more favored than other form of transitions. Neutrality tests failed to show the presence of selection at these loci, though negative Tajima’s D values indicate the presence of a rare form of polymorphisms. At the interspecies level, O. nivara exhibited more diversity than O. sativa. We have also identified two nearly identical resistant alleles of xa5 and two sequentially identical alleles of Xa21. The alleles of xa5 showed basal levels of expression while Xa21 alleles were functionally not expressed. PMID:25807168

  8. Chromosome inversions, adaptive cassettes and the evolution of species' ranges.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Mark; Barrett, Brian

    2015-05-01

    A chromosome inversion can spread when it captures locally adapted alleles or when it is introduced into a species by hybridization with adapted alleles that were previously absent. We present a model that shows how both processes can cause a species range to expand. Introgression of an inversion that carries novel, locally adapted alleles is a particularly powerful mechanism for range expansion. The model supports the earlier proposal that introgression of an inversion triggered a large range expansion of a malaria mosquito. These results suggest a role for inversions as cassettes of genes that can accelerate adaptation by crossing species boundaries, rather than protecting genomes from introgression. PMID:25583098

  9. Asymmetric dispersal allows an upstream region to control population structure throughout a species' range.

    PubMed

    Pringle, James M; Blakeslee, April M H; Byers, James E; Roman, Joe

    2011-09-13

    In a single well-mixed population, equally abundant neutral alleles are equally likely to persist. However, in spatially complex populations structured by an asymmetric dispersal mechanism, such as a coastal population where larvae are predominantly moved downstream by currents, the eventual frequency of neutral haplotypes will depend on their initial spatial location. In our study of the progression of two spatially separate, genetically distinct introductions of the European green crab (Carcinus maenas) along the coast of eastern North America, we captured this process in action. We documented the shift of the genetic cline in this species over 8 y, and here we detail how the upstream haplotypes are beginning to dominate the system. This quantification of an evolving genetic boundary in a coastal system demonstrates that novel genetic alleles or haplotypes that arise or are introduced into upstream retention zones (regions whose export of larvae is not balanced by import from elsewhere) will increase in frequency in the entire system. This phenomenon should be widespread when there is asymmetrical dispersal, in the oceans or on land, suggesting that the upstream edge of a species' range can influence genetic diversity throughout its distribution. Efforts to protect the upstream edge of an asymmetrically dispersing species' range are vital to conserving genetic diversity in the species. PMID:21876126

  10. Investigation of MGMT and DAPK1 methylation patterns in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using allelic MSP-pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Asmar, Fazila; Girkov, Mia Seremet; Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; Kjeldsen, Tina Ellegaard; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor genes MGMT and DAPK1 become methylated in several cancers including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, allelic methylation patterns have not been investigated in DLBCL. We developed a fast and cost-efficient method for the analysis of allelic methylation based on pyrosequencing of methylation specific PCR (MSP) products including a SNP. Allelic methylation patterns were reliably analyzed in standards of known allelic methylation status even when diluted in unmethylated DNA to below 1% methylation. When studying 148 DLBCL patients MGMT and DAPK1 methylation was observed in 19% and 89%, respectively, and among methylated and heterozygous patients 29% and 55%, respectively, were biallelically methylated. An association between the T-allele of the rs16906252 SNP and MGMT methylation was observed (p-value = 0.04), and DAPK1 methylation of the A-allele was associated with shorter overall survival (p-value = 0.006). In future cancer research allelic MSP-pyrosequencing may be used to study a wide range of other loci. PMID:24071855

  11. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes. PMID:27465215

  12. A loss-of-function allele of OsHMA3 associated with high cadmium accumulation in shoots and grain of Japonica rice cultivars.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiali; Wang, Peitong; Wang, Peng; Yang, Meng; Lian, Xingming; Tang, Zhong; Huang, Chao-Feng; Salt, David E; Zhao, Fang Jie

    2016-09-01

    Excessive cadmium (Cd) accumulation in rice poses a risk to food safety. OsHMA3 plays an important role in restricting Cd translocation from roots to shoots. A non-functional allele of OsHMA3 has been reported in some Indica rice cultivars with high Cd accumulation, but it is not known if OsHMA3 allelic variation is associated with Cd accumulation in Japonica cultivars. In this study, we identified a Japonica cultivar with consistently high Cd accumulation in shoots and grain in both field and greenhouse experiments. The cultivar possesses an OsHMA3 allele with a predicted amino acid mutation at the 380(th) position from Ser to Arg. The haplotype had no Cd transport activity when the gene was expressed in yeast, and the allele did not complement a known nonfunctional allele of OsHMA3 in F1 test. The allele is present only in temperate Japonica cultivars among diversity panels of 1483 rice cultivars. Different cultivars possessing this allele showed greatly increased root-to-shoot Cd translocation and a shift in root Cd speciation from Cd-S to Cd-O bonding determined by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study has identified a new loss-of-function allele of OsHMA3 in Japonica rice cultivars leading to high Cd accumulation in shoots and grain. PMID:27038090

  13. Allele-specific disparity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a cancer cell the number of copies of a locus may vary due to amplification and deletion and these variations are denoted as copy number alterations (CNAs). We focus on the disparity of CNAs in tumour samples, which were compared to those in blood in order to identify the directional loss of heterozygosity. Methods We propose a numerical algorithm and apply it to data from the Illumina 109K-SNP array on 112 samples from breast cancer patients. B-allele frequency (BAF) and log R ratio (LRR) of Illumina were used to estimate Euclidian distances. For each locus, we compared genotypes in blood and tumour for subset of samples being heterozygous in blood. We identified loci showing preferential disparity from heterozygous toward either the A/B-allele homozygous (allelic disparity). The chi-squared and Cochran-Armitage trend tests were used to examine whether there is an association between high levels of disparity in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and molecular, clinical and tumour-related parameters. To identify pathways and network functions over-represented within the resulting gene sets, we used Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results To identify loci with a high level of disparity, we selected SNPs 1) with a substantial degree of disparity and 2) with substantial frequency (at least 50% of the samples heterozygous for the respective locus). We report the overall difference in disparity in high-grade tumours compared to low-grade tumours (p-value < 0.001) and significant associations between disparity in multiple single loci and clinical parameters. The most significantly associated network functions within the genes represented in the loci of disparity were identified, including lipid metabolism, small-molecule biochemistry, and nervous system development and function. No evidence for over-representation of directional disparity in a list of stem cell genes was obtained, however genes appeared to be more often altered by deletion than by

  14. Genetic Diversity in Gorkhas: an Autosomal STR Study.

    PubMed

    Preet, Kiran; Malhotra, Seema; Shrivastava, Pankaj; Jain, Toshi; Rawat, Shweta; Varte, L Robert; Singh, Sayar; Singh, Inderjeet; Sarkar, Soma

    2016-01-01

    Genotyping of highly polymorphic autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) markers is a potent tool for elucidating genetic diversity. In the present study, fifteen autosomal STR markers were analyzed in unrelated healthy male Gorkha individuals (n = 98) serving in the Indian Army by using AmpFlSTR Identifiler Plus PCR Amplification Kit. In total, 138 alleles were observed with corresponding allele frequencies ranging from 0.005 to 0.469. The studied loci were in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE). Heterozygosity ranged from 0.602 to 0.867. The most polymorphic locus was Fibrinogen Alpha (FGA) chain which was also the most discriminating locus as expected. Neighbor Joining (NJ) tree and principal component analysis (PCA) plot clustered the Gorkhas with those of Nepal and other Tibeto-Burman population while lowlander Indian population formed separate cluster substantiating the closeness of the Gorkhas with the Tibeto-Burman linguistic phyla. Furthermore, the dataset of STR markers obtained in the study presents a valuable information source of STR DNA profiles from personnel for usage in disaster victim identification in military exigencies and adds to the Indian database of military soldiers and military hospital repository. PMID:27580933

  15. Genetic Diversity in Gorkhas: an Autosomal STR Study

    PubMed Central

    Preet, Kiran; Malhotra, Seema; Shrivastava, Pankaj; Jain, Toshi; Rawat, Shweta; Varte, L. Robert; Singh, Sayar; Singh, Inderjeet; Sarkar, Soma

    2016-01-01

    Genotyping of highly polymorphic autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) markers is a potent tool for elucidating genetic diversity. In the present study, fifteen autosomal STR markers were analyzed in unrelated healthy male Gorkha individuals (n = 98) serving in the Indian Army by using AmpFlSTR Identifiler Plus PCR Amplification Kit. In total, 138 alleles were observed with corresponding allele frequencies ranging from 0.005 to 0.469. The studied loci were in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE). Heterozygosity ranged from 0.602 to 0.867. The most polymorphic locus was Fibrinogen Alpha (FGA) chain which was also the most discriminating locus as expected. Neighbor Joining (NJ) tree and principal component analysis (PCA) plot clustered the Gorkhas with those of Nepal and other Tibeto-Burman population while lowlander Indian population formed separate cluster substantiating the closeness of the Gorkhas with the Tibeto-Burman linguistic phyla. Furthermore, the dataset of STR markers obtained in the study presents a valuable information source of STR DNA profiles from personnel for usage in disaster victim identification in military exigencies and adds to the Indian database of military soldiers and military hospital repository. PMID:27580933

  16. Recombinase-based conditional and reversible gene regulation via XTR alleles

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Oteiza, Camila; Taylor, Sarah; Yates, Travis; Cicchini, Michelle; Lauderback, Brian; Cashman, Christopher R.; Burds, Aurora A.; Winslow, Monte M.; Jacks, Tyler; Feldser, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biological tools that enable precise regulation of gene function within in vivo systems have enormous potential to discern gene function in diverse physiological settings. Here we report the development and characterization of a synthetic gene switch that, when targeted in the mouse germline, enables conditional inactivation, reports gene expression and allows inducible restoration of the targeted gene. Gene inactivation and reporter expression is achieved through Cre-mediated stable inversion of an integrated gene-trap reporter, whereas inducible gene restoration is afforded by Flp-dependent deletion of the inverted gene trap. We validate our approach by targeting the p53 and Rb genes and establishing cell line and in vivo cancer model systems, to study the impact of p53 or Rb inactivation and restoration. We term this allele system XTR, to denote each of the allelic states and the associated expression patterns of the targeted gene: eXpressed (XTR), Trapped (TR) and Restored (R). PMID:26537451

  17. High-Efficiency Genome Editing and Allele Replacement in Prototrophic and Wild Strains of Saccharomyces

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, William G.; Doering, Drew T.; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2014-01-01

    Current genome editing techniques available for Saccharomyces yeast species rely on auxotrophic markers, limiting their use in wild and industrial strains and species. Taking advantage of the ancient loss of thymidine kinase in the fungal kingdom, we have developed the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene as a selectable and counterselectable marker that forms the core of novel genome engineering tools called the Haploid Engineering and Replacement Protocol (HERP) cassettes. Here we show that these cassettes allow a researcher to rapidly generate heterogeneous populations of cells with thousands of independent chromosomal allele replacements using mixed PCR products. We further show that the high efficiency of this approach enables the simultaneous replacement of both alleles in diploid cells. Using these new techniques, many of the most powerful yeast genetic manipulation strategies are now available in wild, industrial, and other prototrophic strains from across the diverse Saccharomyces genus. PMID:25209147

  18. Recombinase-based conditional and reversible gene regulation via XTR alleles.

    PubMed

    Robles-Oteiza, Camila; Taylor, Sarah; Yates, Travis; Cicchini, Michelle; Lauderback, Brian; Cashman, Christopher R; Burds, Aurora A; Winslow, Monte M; Jacks, Tyler; Feldser, David M

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biological tools that enable precise regulation of gene function within in vivo systems have enormous potential to discern gene function in diverse physiological settings. Here we report the development and characterization of a synthetic gene switch that, when targeted in the mouse germline, enables conditional inactivation, reports gene expression and allows inducible restoration of the targeted gene. Gene inactivation and reporter expression is achieved through Cre-mediated stable inversion of an integrated gene-trap reporter, whereas inducible gene restoration is afforded by Flp-dependent deletion of the inverted gene trap. We validate our approach by targeting the p53 and Rb genes and establishing cell line and in vivo cancer model systems, to study the impact of p53 or Rb inactivation and restoration. We term this allele system XTR, to denote each of the allelic states and the associated expression patterns of the targeted gene: eXpressed (XTR), Trapped (TR) and Restored (R). PMID:26537451

  19. Allele Specific p53 Mutant Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Vazquez, Alexei; Levine, Arnold J.; Carpizo, Darren R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Rescuing the function of mutant p53 protein is an attractive cancer therapeutic strategy. Using the NCI anticancer drug screen data, we identified two compounds from the thiosemicarbazone family that manifest increased growth inhibitory activity in mutant p53 cells, particularly for the p53R175 mutant. Mechanistic studies reveal that NSC319726 restores WT structure and function to the p53R175 mutant. This compound kills p53R172H knock-in mice with extensive apoptosis and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in a 175-allele specific mutant p53 dependent manner. This activity depends upon the zinc ion chelating properties of the compound as well as redox changes. These data identify NSC319726 as a p53R175 mutant reactivator and as a lead compound for p53 targeted drug development. PMID:22624712

  20. Microsatellite variation and rare alleles in a bottlenecked Hawaiian Islands endemic: implications for reintroductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Pearce, John M.; Lavretsky, Philip; Seixas, Pedro P.; Courtot, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Conservation of genetic biodiversity in endangered wildlife populations is an important challenge to address since the loss of alleles and genetic drift may influence future adaptability. Reintroduction aims to re-establish species to restored or protected ecosystems; however, moving a subset of individuals may result in loss of gene variants during the management-induced bottleneck (i.e. translocation). The endangered Laysan teal Anas laysanensis was once widespread across the Hawaiian archipelago, but became isolated on Laysan Island (415 ha) from the mid-1800s until 2004 when a translocation to Midway Atoll (596 ha) was undertaken to reduce extinction risks. We compared genetic diversity and quantified variation at microsatellite loci sampled from 230 individuals from the wild populations at Laysan (1999 to 2009) and Midway (2007 to 2010; n = 133 Laysan, n = 96 Midway birds). We identified polymorphic markers by screening nuclear microsatellites (N = 83). Low nuclear variation was detected, consistent with the species’ insular isolation and historical bottleneck. Six of 83 microsatellites were polymorphic. We found limited but similar estimates of allelic richness (2.58 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity within populations. However, 2 rare alleles found in the Laysan source population were not present in Midway’s reintroduced population, and a unique allele was discovered in an individual on Midway. Differentiation between island populations was low (FST = 0.6%), but statistically significant. Our results indicate that genetic drift had little effect on offspring generations 3 to 6 yr post-release and demonstrate the utility of using known founder events to help quantify genetic capture during translocations and to inform management decisions.

  1. [Distribution of the genetic diversity of the Siberian stone pine, Pinus sibirica Du Tour, along the latitudinal and longitudinal profiles].

    PubMed

    Petrova, E A; Goroshkevich, S N; Belokon', M M; Belokon', Iu S; Politov, D V

    2014-05-01

    The Siberian stone pine (Pinus sibirica Du Tour) is one of the main forest-forming coniferous species of the boreal ecosystems of Western Siberia. We used the isozyme method to analyze 11 ecotypes representing the latitudinal and longitudinal profiles within the species range, including samples from the geographic boundaries of the distribution. The genetic structure of the ecotypes is described on the basis of the variability for 26 isozyme loci encoding for 16 enzyme systems. The greatest genetic diversity was observed in the taiga ecotypes in the central part of the studied area, while the ecotypes along the species range boundaries were shown to be genetically depauperized. Approximately 8.1% of the observed genetic diversity is attributed to differences between the studied ecotypes. We detected high levels of genetic diversity for the Fest_2, Pgm_1, Sod_4, and a few otherloci, as well as a correlation between allele frequencies and geographical locations of the populations. The results of multivariate analysis of allelic frequencies as well as cluster analysis allowed us to discriminate three major groups of ecotypes: north-eastern, central and south-western. In view of our results, we compare two hypotheses: one which attributes the spatial distribution of genetic variations to the selectivity for some of the polymorphic allozyme loci, and the other based in the history of the formation of the range of the Siberian stone pine. PMID:25715470

  2. Evolution of HLA class II molecules: Allelic and amino acid site variability across populations.

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, H; Klitz, W; Easteal, S; Gao, X; Erlich, H A; Fernandez-Viña, M; Trachtenberg, E A; McWeeney, S K; Nelson, M P; Thomson, G

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the highly polymorphic beta1 domains of the HLA class II molecules encoded by the DRB1, DQB1, and DPB1 loci reveals contrasting levels of diversity at the allele and amino acid site levels. Statistics of allele frequency distributions, based on Watterson's homozygosity statistic F, reveal distinct evolutionary patterns for these loci in ethnically diverse samples (26 populations for DQB1 and DRB1 and 14 for DPB1). When examined over all populations, the DQB1 locus allelic variation exhibits striking balanced polymorphism (P < 10(-4)), DRB1 shows some evidence of balancing selection (P < 0.06), and while there is overall very little evidence for selection of DPB1 allele frequencies, there is a trend in the direction of balancing selection (P < 0.08). In contrast, at the amino acid level all three loci show strong evidence of balancing selection at some sites. Averaged over polymorphic amino acid sites, DQB1 and DPB1 show similar deviation from neutrality expectations, and both exhibit more balanced polymorphic amino acid sites than DRB1. Across ethnic groups, polymorphisms at many codons show evidence for balancing selection, yet data consistent with directional selection were observed at other codons. Both antigen-binding pocket- and non-pocket-forming amino acid sites show overall deviation from neutrality for all three loci. Only in the case of DRB1 was there a significant difference between pocket- and non-pocket-forming amino acid sites. Our findings indicate that balancing selection at the MHC occurs at the level of polymorphic amino acid residues, and that in many cases this selection is consistent across populations. PMID:10224269

  3. Genetic diversity of locally adapted sheep from Pantanal region of Mato Grosso do Sul.

    PubMed

    Crispim, B A; Grisolia, A B; Seno, L O; Egito, A A; Vargas Junior, F M; Souza, M R

    2013-01-01

    Sheep of the Pantaneiro breed and seven other breeds, raised in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, were genotyped using eight microsatellite loci. The aim of the present study was to determine the genetic variability, phylogenetic relationship, and patterns of gene introgression and miscegenation among the animals surveyed, to obtain information about the genetic structure of locally adapted sheep in Mato Grosso do Sul. A total of 195 animals were used for genetic analysis. The Pantaneiro breed had the largest average number of alleles/locus (9.25), and higher allelic richness (6.95), while the Dorper population had the lowest values for these parameters (4.88 and 3.86, respectively). Analysis of genetic distance values and genetic structure between populations made it possible to characterize these animals with regard to distinct genetic groups. Average expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.72 (Pantaneiro) to 0.55 (Dorper), while average observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.63 (White Dorper) to 0.54 (Dorper). On the basis of the statistical parameters evaluated, it was possible to demonstrate that when compared to other populations, the Pantaneiro breed represented a reservoir of genetic diversity with rare and useful alleles for genetic improvement, emphasizing the importance of preserving the breed. PMID:24301918

  4. Instructional Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samples, Bob

    2000-01-01

    Explains how learning occurs in the brain, specifically in the limbic system. Compares traditional teaching methods and diverse learning modes. Describes the characteristics of diverse instructional approaches. First published in 1994. (YDS)

  5. Genetic diversity of donkey populations from the putative centers of domestication.

    PubMed

    Rosenbom, S; Costa, V; Al-Araimi, N; Kefena, E; Abdel-Moneim, A S; Abdalla, M A; Bakhiet, A; Beja-Pereira, A

    2015-02-01

    Donkey domestication drastically changed ancient transport systems in Africa and Asia, enabling overland circulation of people and goods and influencing the organization of early cities and pastoral societies. Genetic studies based on mtDNA have pointed to the African wild ass as the most probable ancestor of the domestic donkey, but questions regarding its center of origin remain unanswered. Endeavoring to pinpoint the geographical origin of domestic donkey, we assessed levels and patterns of genetic diversity at 15 microsatellite loci from eight populations, representing its three hypothesized centers of origin: northeast Africa, the Near East and the Arabian Peninsula. Additionally, we compared the donkey genotypes with those from their wild relative, the African wild ass (Equus africanus somaliensis) to visualize patterns of differentiation among wild and domestic individuals. Obtained results revealed limited variation in levels of unbiased expected heterozygosity across populations in studied geographic regions (ranging from 0.637 in northeast Africa to 0.679 in the Near East). Both allelic richness (Ar) and private allelic richness presented considerably higher values in northeast Africa and in the Arabian Peninsula. By looking at variation at the country level, for each region, we were able to identify Sudan and Yemen as the countries possessing higher allelic richness and, cumulatively, Yemen also presented higher values for private allelic richness. Our results support previously proposed northeast Africa as a putative center of origin, but the high levels of unique diversity in Yemen opens the possibility of considering this region as yet another center of origin for this species. PMID:25516010

  6. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Theileria annulata in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamidhi, Salama; H. Tageldin, Mohammed.; Weir, William; Al-Fahdi, Amira; Johnson, Eugene H.; Bobade, Patrick; Alqamashoui, Badar; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Thompson, Joanne; Kinnaird, Jane; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Babiker, Hamza

    2015-01-01

    Background Theileriosis, caused by a number of species within the genus Theileria, is a common disease of livestock in Oman. It is a major constraint to the development of the livestock industry due to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in both cattle and sheep. Since little is currently known about the genetic diversity of the parasites causing theileriosis in Oman, the present study was designed to address this issue with specific regard to T. annulata in cattle. Methods Blood samples were collected from cattle from four geographically distinct regions in Oman for genetic analysis of the Theileria annulata population. Ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites) representing all four chromosomes of T. annulata were applied to these samples using a combination of PCR amplification and fragment analysis. The resultant genetic data was analysed to provide a first insight into the structure of the T. annulata population in Oman. Results We applied ten micro- and mini-satellite markers to a total of 310 samples obtained from different regions (174 [56%] from Dhofar, 68 [22%] from Dhira, 44 [14.5%] from Batinah and 24 [8%] from Sharqia). A high degree of allelic diversity was observed among the four parasite populations. Expected heterozygosity for each site ranged from 0.816 to 0.854. A high multiplicity of infection was observed in individual hosts, with an average of 3.3 to 3.4 alleles per locus, in samples derived from Batinah, Dhofar and Sharqia regions. In samples from Dhira region, an average of 2.9 alleles per locus was observed. Mild but statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between pairs of markers was observed in populations from three of the four regions. In contrast, when the analysis was performed at farm level, no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed. Finally, no significant genetic differentiation was seen between the four populations, with most pair-wise FST values being less than 0.03. Slightly higher FST values (GST

  7. Peach genetic resources: diversity, population structure and linkage disequilibrium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) is one of the most important model fruits in the Rosaceae family. Native to the west of China, where peach has been domesticated for more than 4,000 years, its cultivation spread from China to Persia, Mediterranean countries and to America. Chinese peach has had a major impact on international peach breeding programs due to its high genetic diversity. In this research, we used 48 highly polymorphic SSRs, distributed over the peach genome, to investigate the difference in genetic diversity, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) among Chinese cultivars, and North American and European cultivars, and the evolution of current peach cultivars. Results In total, 588 alleles were obtained with 48 SSRs on 653 peach accessions, giving an average of 12.25 alleles per locus. In general, the average value of observed heterozygosity (0.47) was lower than the expected heterozygosity (0.60). The separate analysis of groups of accessions according to their origin or reproductive strategies showed greater variability in Oriental cultivars, mainly due to the high level of heterozygosity in Chinese landraces. Genetic distance analysis clustered the cultivars into two main groups: one included four wild related Prunus, and the other included most of the Oriental and Occidental landraces and breeding cultivars. STRUCTURE analysis assigned 469 accessions to three subpopulations: Oriental (234), Occidental (174), and Landraces (61). Nested STRUCTURE analysis divided the Oriental subpopulation into two different subpopulations: ‘Yu Lu’ and ‘Hakuho’. The Occidental breeding subpopulation was also subdivided into nectarine and peach subpopulations. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis in each of these subpopulations showed that the percentage of linked (r2 > 0.1) intra-chromosome comparisons ranged between 14% and 47%. LD decayed faster in Oriental (1,196 Kbp) than in Occidental (2,687 Kbp) samples. In the ‘Yu Lu’ subpopulation there

  8. RHCE variant allele: RHCE*ce254G,733G.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jessica A; Horn, Trina; Chiappa, Colleen; Melland, Camilla; Vietz, Christine; Castilho, Lilian; Keller, Margaret A

    2014-01-01

    A novel RHCE allele was identified in a 53-year-old African American female blood donor with an Rh phenotype of D+ CE-c+ e+ and a negative antibody screen. The donor's cells typed e+ with all antisera tested. By gel-based genotyping and Edna analysis, the two RHCE alleles in this donor were characterized.One allele was found to be the known allele RHCE*Ol.20.01(RHCE*ce733G) and the second was novel: RHCE*Ol.06.02(RHCE*ce254G,733G). PMID:25695437

  9. Nomenclature for human CYP2D6 alleles.

    PubMed

    Daly, A K; Brockmöller, J; Broly, F; Eichelbaum, M; Evans, W E; Gonzalez, F J; Huang, J D; Idle, J R; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Ishizaki, T; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Meyer, U A; Nebert, D W; Steen, V M; Wolf, C R; Zanger, U M

    1996-06-01

    To standardize CYP2D6 allele nomenclature, and to conform with international human gene nomenclature guidelines, an alternative to the current arbitrary system is described. Based on recommendations for human genome nomenclature, we propose that alleles be designated by CYP2D6 followed by an asterisk and a combination of roman letters and arabic numerals distinct for each allele with the number specifying the key mutation and, where appropriate, a letter specifying additional mutations. Criteria for classification as a separate allele and protein nomenclature are also presented. PMID:8807658

  10. The effect of deleterious alleles on adaptation in asexual populations.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Toby; Barton, Nick H

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the fixation probability of a beneficial allele that arises as the result of a unique mutation in an asexual population that is subject to recurrent deleterious mutation at rate U. Our analysis is an extension of previous works, which make a biologically restrictive assumption that selection against deleterious alleles is stronger than that on the beneficial allele of interest. We show that when selection against deleterious alleles is weak, beneficial alleles that confer a selective advantage that is small relative to U have greatly reduced probabilities of fixation. We discuss the consequences of this effect for the distribution of effects of alleles fixed during adaptation. We show that a selective sweep will increase the fixation probabilities of other beneficial mutations arising during some short interval afterward. We use the calculated fixation probabilities to estimate the expected rate of fitness improvement in an asexual population when beneficial alleles arise continually at some low rate proportional to U. We estimate the rate of mutation that is optimal in the sense that it maximizes this rate of fitness improvement. Again, this analysis relaxes the assumption made previously that selection against deleterious alleles is stronger than on beneficial alleles. PMID:12242249

  11. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency

    PubMed Central

    Castle, John C.; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D.; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency. PMID:24752137

  12. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency. PMID:24752137

  13. Rethinking Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Jack

    1992-01-01

    Managing diversity is about coping with unassimilated differences, about building systems and a culture that unite different people in a common pursuit without undermining their diversity. The goal of diversity training is a high performance organization rather than a climate in which no one's feathers are ruffled. (SK)

  14. In and out of refugia: historical patterns of diversity and demography in the North American Caesar's mushroom species complex.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ramírez, Santiago; Tulloss, Rodham E; Guzmán-Dávalos, Laura; Cifuentes-Blanco, Joaquín; Valenzuela, Ricardo; Estrada-Torres, Arturo; Ruán-Soto, Felipe; Díaz-Moreno, Raúl; Hernández-Rico, Nallely; Torres-Gómez, Mariano; León, Hugo; Moncalvo, Jean-Marc

    2015-12-01

    Some of the effects of past climate dynamics on plant and animal diversity make-up have been relatively well studied, but to less extent in fungi. Pleistocene refugia are thought to harbour high biological diversity (i.e. phylogenetic lineages and genetic diversity), mainly as a product of increased reproductive isolation and allele conservation. In addition, high extinction rates and genetic erosion are expected in previously glaciated regions. Some of the consequences of past climate dynamics might involve changes in range and population size that can result in divergence and incipient or cryptic speciation. Many of these dynamic processes and patterns can be inferred through phylogenetic and coalescent methods. In this study, we first delimit species within a group of closely related edible ectomycorrhizal Amanita from North America (the American Caesar's mushrooms species complex) using multilocus coalescent-based approaches; and then address questions related to effects of Pleistocene climate change on the diversity and genetics of the group. Our study includes extensive geographical sampling throughout the distribution range, and DNA sequences from three nuclear protein-coding genes. Results reveal cryptic diversity and high speciation rates in refugia. Population sizes and expansions seem to be larger at midrange latitudes (Mexican highlands and SE USA). Range shifts are proportional to population size expansions, which were overall more common during the Pleistocene. This study documents responses to past climate change in fungi and also highlights the applicability of the multispecies coalescent in comparative phylogeographical analyses and diversity assessments that include ancestral species. PMID:26465233

  15. Study of Genetic Diversity among Simmental Cross Cattle in West Sumatra Based on Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Agung, Paskah Partogi; Saputra, Ferdy; Septian, Wike Andre; Lusiana; Zein, Moch. Syamsul Arifin; Sulandari, Sri; Anwar, Saiful; Wulandari, Ari Sulistyo; Said, Syahruddin; Tappa, Baharuddin

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity among Simmental Cross cattle in West Sumatra using microsatellite DNA markers. A total of 176 individual cattle blood samples was used for obtaining DNA samples. Twelve primers of microsatellite loci as recommended by FAO were used to identify the genetic diversity of the Simmental Cross cattle population. Multiplex DNA fragment analysis method was used for allele identification. All the microsatellite loci in this study were highly polymorphic and all of the identified alleles were able to classify the cattle population into several groups based on their genetic distance. The heterozygosity values of microsatellite loci in this study ranged from 0.556 to 0.782. The polymorphism information content (PIC) value of the 12 observed loci is high (PIC>0.5). The highest PIC value in the Simmental cattle population was 0.893 (locus TGLA53), while the lowest value was 0.529 (locus BM1818). Based on the genetic distance value, the subpopulation of the Simmental Cross-Agam and the Simmental Cross-Limapuluh Kota was exceptionally close to the Simmental Purebred thus indicating that a grading-up process has taken place with the Simmental Purebred. In view of the advantages possessed by the Simmental Cross cattle and the evaluation of the genetic diversity results, a number of subpopulations in this study can be considered as the initial (base) population for the Simmental Cross cattle breeding programs in West Sumatra, Indonesia. PMID:26732442

  16. Study of Genetic Diversity among Simmental Cross Cattle in West Sumatra Based on Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Agung, Paskah Partogi; Saputra, Ferdy; Septian, Wike Andre; Lusiana; Zein, Moch Syamsul Arifin; Sulandari, Sri; Anwar, Saiful; Wulandari, Ari Sulistyo; Said, Syahruddin; Tappa, Baharuddin

    2016-02-01

    A study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity among Simmental Cross cattle in West Sumatra using microsatellite DNA markers. A total of 176 individual cattle blood samples was used for obtaining DNA samples. Twelve primers of microsatellite loci as recommended by FAO were used to identify the genetic diversity of the Simmental Cross cattle population. Multiplex DNA fragment analysis method was used for allele identification. All the microsatellite loci in this study were highly polymorphic and all of the identified alleles were able to classify the cattle population into several groups based on their genetic distance. The heterozygosity values of microsatellite loci in this study ranged from 0.556 to 0.782. The polymorphism information content (PIC) value of the 12 observed loci is high (PIC>0.5). The highest PIC value in the Simmental cattle population was 0.893 (locus TGLA53), while the lowest value was 0.529 (locus BM1818). Based on the genetic distance value, the subpopulation of the Simmental Cross-Agam and the Simmental Cross-Limapuluh Kota was exceptionally close to the Simmental Purebred thus indicating that a grading-up process has taken place with the Simmental Purebred. In view of the advantages possessed by the Simmental Cross cattle and the evaluation of the genetic diversity results, a number of subpopulations in this study can be considered as the initial (base) population for the Simmental Cross cattle breeding programs in West Sumatra, Indonesia. PMID:26732442

  17. Are ‘Endurance’ Alleles ‘Survival’ Alleles? Insights from the ACTN3 R577X Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Ruiz, Jonatan R.; Rodríguez-Romo, Gabriel; Santiago, Catalina; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; Yvert, Thomas; Cano-Nieto, Amalia; Garatachea, Nuria

    2011-01-01

    Exercise phenotypes have played a key role for ensuring survival over human evolution. We speculated that some genetic variants that influence exercise phenotypes could be associated with exceptional survival (i.e. reaching ≥100years of age). Owing to its effects on muscle structure/function, a potential candidate is the Arg(R)577Ter(X) polymorphism (rs1815739) in ACTN3, the structural gene encoding the skeletal muscle protein α-actinin-3. We compared the ACTN3 R577X genotype/allele frequencies between the following groups of ethnically-matched (Spanish) individuals: centenarians (cases, n = 64; 57 female; age range: 100–108 years), young healthy controls (n = 283, 67 females, 216 males; 21±2 years), and humans who are at the two end-points of exercise capacity phenotypes, i.e. muscle endurance (50 male professional road cyclists) and muscle power (63 male jumpers/sprinters). Although there were no differences in genotype/allele frequencies between centenarians (RR:28.8%; RX:47.5%; XX:23.7%), and controls (RR:31.8%; RX:49.8%; XX:18.4%) or endurance athletes (RR:28.0%; RX:46%; XX:26.0%), we observed a significantly higher frequency of the X allele (P = 0.019) and XX genotype (P = 0.011) in centenarians compared with power athletes (RR:47.6%; RX:36.5%;XX:15.9%). Notably, the frequency of the null XX (α-actinin-3 deficient) genotype in centenarians was the highest ever reported in non-athletic Caucasian populations. In conclusion, despite there were no significant differences with the younger, control population, overall the ACTN3 genotype of centenarians resembles that of world-class elite endurance athletes and differs from that of elite power athletes. Our preliminary data would suggest a certain ‘survival’ advantage brought about by α-actinin-3 deficiency and the ‘endurance’/oxidative muscle phenotype that is commonly associated with this condition. PMID:21407828

  18. Detecting range expansions from genetic data

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Benjamin M; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method that uses genetic data to test for the occurrence of a recent range expansion and to infer the location of the origin of the expansion. We introduce a statistic ψ (the directionality index) that detects asymmetries in the two-dimensional allele frequency spectrum of pairs of population. These asymmetries are caused by the series of founder events that happen during an expansion and they arise because low frequency alleles tend to be lost during founder events, thus creating clines in the frequencies of surviving low-frequency alleles. Using simulations, we show that ψ is more powerful for detecting range expansions than both FST and clines in heterozygosity. We also show how we can adapt our approach to more complicated scenarios such as expansions with multiple origins or barriers to migration and we illustrate the utility of ψ by applying it to a data set from modern humans. PMID:24152007

  19. Understanding Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of a Poa pratensis Worldwide Collection through Morphological, Nuclear and Chloroplast Diversity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Russi, Luigi; Marconi, Gianpiero; Sharbel, Timothy F.; Veronesi, Fabio; Albertini, Emidio

    2015-01-01

    Poa pratensis L. is a forage and turf grass species well adapted to a wide range of mesic to moist habitats. Due to its genome complexity little is known regarding evolution, genome composition and intraspecific phylogenetic relationships of this species. In the present study we investigated the morphological and genetic diversity of 33 P. pratensis accessions from 23 different countries using both nuclear and chloroplast molecular markers as well as flow cytometry of somatic tissues. This with the aim of shedding light on the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of the collection that includes both cultivated and wild materials. Morphological characterization showed that the most relevant traits able to distinguish cultivated from wild forms were spring growth habit and leaf colour. The genome size analysis revealed high variability both within and between accessions in both wild and cultivated materials. The sequence analysis of the trnL-F chloroplast region revealed a low polymorphism level that could be the result of the complex mode of reproduction of this species. In addition, a strong reduction of chloroplast SSR variability was detected in cultivated materials, where only two alleles were conserved out of the four present in wild accessions. Contrarily, at nuclear level, high variability exist in the collection where the analysis of 11 SSR loci allowed the detection of a total of 91 different alleles. A Bayesian analysis performed on nuclear SSR data revealed that studied materials belong to two main clusters. While wild materials are equally represented in both clusters, the domesticated forms are mostly belonging to cluster P2 which is characterized by lower genetic diversity compared to the cluster P1. In the Neighbour Joining tree no clear distinction was found between accessions with the exception of those from China and Mongolia that were clearly separated from all the others. PMID:25893249

  20. Understanding Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of a Poa pratensis Worldwide Collection through Morphological, Nuclear and Chloroplast Diversity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Lorenzo; Bitocchi, Elena; Russi, Luigi; Marconi, Gianpiero; Sharbel, Timothy F; Veronesi, Fabio; Albertini, Emidio

    2015-01-01

    Poa pratensis L. is a forage and turf grass species well adapted to a wide range of mesic to moist habitats. Due to its genome complexity little is known regarding evolution, genome composition and intraspecific phylogenetic relationships of this species. In the present study we investigated the morphological and genetic diversity of 33 P. pratensis accessions from 23 different countries using both nuclear and chloroplast molecular markers as well as flow cytometry of somatic tissues. This with the aim of shedding light on the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of the collection that includes both cultivated and wild materials. Morphological characterization showed that the most relevant traits able to distinguish cultivated from wild forms were spring growth habit and leaf colour. The genome size analysis revealed high variability both within and between accessions in both wild and cultivated materials. The sequence analysis of the trnL-F chloroplast region revealed a low polymorphism level that could be the result of the complex mode of reproduction of this species. In addition, a strong reduction of chloroplast SSR variability was detected in cultivated materials, where only two alleles were conserved out of the four present in wild accessions. Contrarily, at nuclear level, high variability exist in the collection where the analysis of 11 SSR loci allowed the detection of a total of 91 different alleles. A Bayesian analysis performed on nuclear SSR data revealed that studied materials belong to two main clusters. While wild materials are equally represented in both clusters, the domesticated forms are mostly belonging to cluster P2 which is characterized by lower genetic diversity compared to the cluster P1. In the Neighbour Joining tree no clear distinction was found between accessions with the exception of those from China and Mongolia that were clearly separated from all the others. PMID:25893249

  1. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications. PMID:25549886

  2. Mechanisms for dominance: Adh heterodimer formation in heterozygotes between ENU or x-ray induced null alleles and normal alleles in drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.C.; Lee, W.R.; Chang, S.H.; Silverman, H. )

    1992-01-01

    To study mechanisms for dominance of phenotype, eight ENU- and four x-ray-induced mutations at the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus were analyzed for partial dominance in their interaction with normal alleles. All ENU and one of the x-ray mutations were single base substitutions; the other three x-ray mutations were 9-21 base deletions. All but one of the 12 mutant alleles were selected for this study because they produced detectable mutant polypeptides, but seven of the 11 producing a peptide could not form dimers with the normal peptide and the enzyme activity of heterozygotes was about half that of normal homozygotes. Four mutations formed dimers with a decreased catalytic efficiency and two of these were near the limit of detectability; these two also inhibited the formation of normal homodimers. The mutant alleles therefore show multiple mechanisms leading to partial enzyme expression in heterozygotes and a wide range of dominance ranging from almost complete recessive to nearly dominant. All amino acid changes in mutant peptides that form dimers are located between amino acids 182 and 194, so this region is not critical for dimerization. It may, however, be an important surface domain for catalyzation. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Geographical Gradient of the eIF4E Alleles Conferring Resistance to Potyviruses in Pea (Pisum) Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Konečná, Eva; Šafářová, Dana; Navrátil, Milan; Hanáček, Pavel; Coyne, Clarice; Flavell, Andrew; Vishnyakova, Margarita; Ambrose, Mike; Redden, Robert; Smýkal, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Background The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E was shown to be involved in resistance against several potyviruses in plants, including pea. We combined our knowledge of pea germplasm diversity with that of the eIF4E gene to identify novel genetic diversity. Methodology/Principal findings Germplasm of 2803 pea accessions was screened for eIF4E intron 3 length polymorphism, resulting in the detection of four eIF4EA-B-C-S variants, whose distribution was geographically structured. The eIF4EA variant conferring resistance to the P1 PSbMV pathotype was found in 53 accessions (1.9%), of which 15 were landraces from India, Afghanistan, Nepal, and 7 were from Ethiopia. A newly discovered variant, eIF4EB, was present in 328 accessions (11.7%) from Ethiopia (29%), Afghanistan (23%), India (20%), Israel (25%) and China (39%). The eIF4EC variant was detected in 91 accessions (3.2% of total) from India (20%), Afghanistan (33%), the Iberian Peninsula (22%) and the Balkans (9.3%). The eIF4ES variant for susceptibility predominated as the wild type. Sequencing of 73 samples, identified 34 alleles at the whole gene, 26 at cDNA and 19 protein variants, respectively. Fifteen alleles were virologically tested and 9 alleles (eIF4EA-1-2-3-4-5-6-7, eIF4EB-1, eIF4EC-2) conferred resistance to the P1 PSbMV pathotype. Conclusions/Significance This work identified novel eIF4E alleles within geographically structured pea germplasm and indicated their independent evolution from the susceptible eIF4ES1 allele. Despite high variation present in wild Pisum accessions, none of them possessed resistance alleles, supporting a hypothesis of distinct mode of evolution of resistance in wild as opposed to crop species. The Highlands of Central Asia, the northern regions of the Indian subcontinent, Eastern Africa and China were identified as important centers of pea diversity that correspond with the diversity of the pathogen. The series of alleles identified in this study provides the basis

  4. Genetic diversity in mazandaranian native cattle: a comparison with Holstein cattle, using ISSR marker.

    PubMed

    Pashaei, S; Azari, M A; Hasani, S; Khanahmadi, A; Rostamzadeh, J

    2009-05-01

    This study was carried out to investigate genetic diversity in Mazandaranian native cattle population comparised to the Holstein breed, using Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR) marker. A total of 175 animals, including 71 native and 104 cattle of Holstein breed were screened. The extraction of DNA samples were carried out, using modified salting out method. A 19-mer oligonucleotide, (GA)9C, was used as primer in PCR reactions. The PCR products showed 15 different fragments with length ranged from 120 to 1600 bp in the two breeds.. Genetic variation indexes, including effective number of alleles, Shannon index, Nei's gene diversity and standard genetic distance were estimated, using POPGene software. Generally, the estimated genetic variation indexes showed low levels of diversity in the two breeds. However, Nei's gene diversity and Shannon index estimation was observed almost two folds in native cattle compared to Holstein breed. Less levels of diversity in Holstein cattle may be because of applying intensive selection programs. Conversely, native cattle have been less affected by selection. Therefore, it seems that Mazandaranian native cattle probably are better for breeding programs than Holstein cattle. Results showed that ISSR Markers are reliable and can be used in genetic diversity investigations. PMID:19634477

  5. Diversity at the major histocompatibility complex Class II in the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Lillie, Mette; Woodward, Rachael E; Sanderson, Claire E; Eldridge, Mark D B; Belov, Katherine

    2012-07-01

    The platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is the sole survivor of a previously widely distributed and diverse lineage of ornithorhynchid monotremes. Its dependence on healthy water systems imposes an inherent sensitivity to habitat degradation and climate change. Here, we compare genetic diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II-DZB gene and 3 MHC-associated microsatellite markers with diversity at 6 neutral microsatellite markers in 70 platypuses from across their range, including the mainland of Australia and the isolated populations of Tasmania, King Island, and Kangaroo Island. Overall, high DZB diversity was observed in the platypus, with 57 DZB β1 alleles characterized. Significant positive selection was detected within the DZB peptide-binding region, promoting variation in this domain. Low levels of genetic diversity were detected at all markers in the 2 island populations, King Island (endemic) and Kangaroo Island (introduced), with the King Island platypuses monomorphic at the DZB locus. Loss of MHC diversity on King Island is of concern, as the population may have compromised immunological fitness and reduced ability to resist changing environmental conditions. PMID:22563128

  6. Elucidating the temporal and spatial dynamics of Biomphalaria glabrata genetic diversity in three Brazilian villages

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Elizabeth A.; Corrêa-Oliveira, Guilherme; Gazzinelli, Andrea; Minchella, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata is the principal intermediate host for the parasite Schistosoma mansoni within Brazil. We assessed the potential effects of snail population dynamics on parasite transmission dynamics via population genetics. Methods We sampled snail populations located within the confines of three schistosome-endemic villages in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Snails were collected from individual microhabitats following seasonal periods of flood and drought over the span of one year. Snail spatio-temporal genetic diversity and population differentiation of 598 snails from 12 sites were assessed at 7 microsatellite loci. Results Average genetic diversity was relatively low, ranging from 4.29 to 9.43 alleles per locus and, overall, subpopulations tended to exhibit heterozygote deficits. Genetic diversity was highly spatially partitioned among subpopulations, while virtually no partitioning was observed across temporal sampling. Comparison with previously published parasite genetic diversity data indicated that S. mansoni populations are significantly more variable and less subdivided than those of the B. glabrata intermediate hosts. Discussion Within individual Brazilian villages, observed distributions of snail genetic diversity indicate temporal stability and very restricted gene flow. This is contrary to observations of schistosome genetic diversity over the same spatial scale, corroborating the expectation that parasite gene flow at the level of individual villages is likely driven by vertebrate host movement. PMID:23911082

  7. Pistil-function breakdown in a new S-allele of European pear, S21*, confers self-compatibility.

    PubMed

    Sanzol, Javier

    2009-03-01

    European pear exhibits RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility controlled by the polymorphic S-locus. S-allele diversity of cultivars has been extensively investigated; however, no mutant alleles conferring self-compatibility have been reported. In this study, two European pear cultivars, 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño', were classified as self-compatible after fruit/seed setting and pollen tube growth examination. S-genotyping through S-PCR and sequencing identified a new S-RNase allele in the two cultivars, with identical deduced amino acid sequence as S(21), but differing at the nucleotide level. Test-pollinations and analysis of descendants suggested that the new allele is a self-compatible pistil-mutated variant of S(21), so it was named S(21)*. S-genotypes assigned to 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño' were S(10)S(21)* and S(21)*S(25) respectively, of which S(25) is a new functional S-allele of European pear. Reciprocal crosses between cultivars bearing S(21) and S(21)* indicated that both alleles exhibit the same pollen function; however, cultivars bearing S(21)* had impaired pistil-S function as they failed to reject either S(21) or S (21)* pollen. RT-PCR analysis showed absence of S(21)* -RNase gene expression in styles of 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño', suggesting a possible origin for S(21)* pistil dysfunction. Two polymorphisms found within the S-RNase genomic region (a retrotransposon insertion within the intron of S(21)* and indels at the 3'UTR) might explain the different pattern of expression between S(21) and S(21)*. Evaluation of cultivars with unknown S-genotype identified another cultivar 'Azucar Verde' bearing S(21)*, and pollen tube growth examination confirmed self-compatibility for this cultivar as well. This is the first report of a mutated S-allele conferring self-compatibility in European pear. PMID:19096853

  8. Detection of new HLA-DPB1 alleles generated by interallelic gene conversion using PCR amplification of DPB1 second exon sequences from sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, H.; Zangenberg, G.; Bugawan, T.

    1994-09-01

    The rate at which allelic diversity at the HLA class I and class II loci evolves has been the subject of considerable controversy as have the mechanisms which generate new alleles. The patchwork pattern of polymorphism, particularly within the second exon of the HLA-DPB1 locus where the polymorphic sequence motifs are localized to 6 discrete regions, is consistent with the hypothesis that much of the allelic sequence variation may have been generated by segmental exchange (gene conversion). To measure the rate of new DPB1 variant generation, we have developed a strategy in which DPB1 second exon sequences are amplified from pools of FACS-sorted sperm (n=50) from a heterozygous sperm donor. Pools of sperm from these heterozygous individuals are amplified with an allele-specific primer for one allele and analyzed with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP) complementary to the other allele. This screening procedure, which is capable of detecting a single variant molecule in a pool of parental alleles, allows the identification of new variants that have been generated by recombination and/or gene conversion between the two parental alleles. To control for potential PCR artifacts, the same screening procedure was carried out with mixtures of sperm from DPB1 *0301/*0301 and DPB1 *0401/ 0401 individuals. Pools containing putative new variants DPB1 alleles were analyzed further by cloning into M13 and sequencing the M13 clones. Our current estimate is that about 1/10,000 sperm from these heterozygous individuals represents a new DPB1 allele generated by micro-gene conversion within the second exon.

  9. Nonsyntenic Genes Drive Tissue-Specific Dynamics of Differential, Nonadditive, and Allelic Expression Patterns in Maize Hybrids1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Distantly related maize (Zea mays) inbred lines display an exceptional degree of genomic diversity. F1 progeny of such inbred lines are often more vigorous than their parents, a phenomenon known as heterosis. In this study, we investigated how the genetic divergence of the maize inbred lines B73 and Mo17 and their F1 hybrid progeny is reflected in differential, nonadditive, and allelic expression patterns in primary root tissues. In pairwise comparisons of the four genotypes, the number of differentially expressed genes between the two parental inbred lines significantly exceeded those of parent versus hybrid comparisons in all four tissues under analysis. No differentially expressed genes were detected between reciprocal hybrids, which share the same nuclear genome. Moreover, hundreds of nonadditive and allelic expression ratios that were different from the expression ratios of the parents were observed in the reciprocal hybrids. The overlap of both nonadditive and allelic expression patterns in the reciprocal hybrids significantly exceeded the expected values. For all studied types of expression - differential, nonadditive, and allelic - substantial tissue-specific plasticity was observed. Significantly, nonsyntenic genes that evolved after the last whole genome duplication of a maize progenitor from genes with synteny to sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) were highly overrepresented among differential, nonadditive, and allelic expression patterns compared with the fraction of these genes among all expressed genes. This observation underscores the role of nonsyntenic genes in shaping the transcriptomic landscape of maize hybrids during the early developmental manifestation of heterosis in root tissues of maize hybrids. PMID:27208302

  10. Paternal-specific S-allele transmission in sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.): the potential for sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Hedhly, A; Wünsch, A; Kartal, Ö; Herrero, M; Hormaza, J I

    2016-03-01

    Homomorphic self-incompatibility is a well-studied example of a physiological process that is thought to increase population diversity and reduce the expression of inbreeding depression. Whereas theoretical models predict the presence of a large number of S-haplotypes with equal frequencies at equilibrium, unequal allele frequencies have been repeatedly reported and attributed to sampling effects, population structure, demographic perturbation, sheltered deleterious mutations or selection pressure on linked genes. However, it is unclear to what extent unequal segregations are the results of gametophytic or sexual selection. Although these two forces are difficult to disentangle, testing S-alleles in the offspring of controlled crosses provides an opportunity to separate these two phenomena. In this work, segregation and transmission of S-alleles have been characterized in progenies of mixed donors and fully compatible pollinations under field conditions in Prunus avium. Seed set patterns and pollen performance have also been characterized. The results reveal paternal-specific distorted transmission of S-alleles in most of the crosses. Interestingly, S-allele segregation within any given paternal or maternal S-locus was random. Observations on pollen germination, pollen tube growth rate, pollen tube cohort size, seed set dynamics and transmission patterns strongly suggest post-pollination, prezygotic sexual selection, with male-male competition as the most likely mechanism. According to these results, post-pollination sexual selection takes precedence over frequency-dependent selection in explaining unequal S-haplotype frequencies. PMID:26559165

  11. Nonsyntenic Genes Drive Tissue-Specific Dynamics of Differential, Nonadditive, and Allelic Expression Patterns in Maize Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Baldauf, Jutta A; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Distantly related maize (Zea mays) inbred lines display an exceptional degree of genomic diversity. F1 progeny of such inbred lines are often more vigorous than their parents, a phenomenon known as heterosis. In this study, we investigated how the genetic divergence of the maize inbred lines B73 and Mo17 and their F1 hybrid progeny is reflected in differential, nonadditive, and allelic expression patterns in primary root tissues. In pairwise comparisons of the four genotypes, the number of differentially expressed genes between the two parental inbred lines significantly exceeded those of parent versus hybrid comparisons in all four tissues under analysis. No differentially expressed genes were detected between reciprocal hybrids, which share the same nuclear genome. Moreover, hundreds of nonadditive and allelic expression ratios that were different from the expression ratios of the parents were observed in the reciprocal hybrids. The overlap of both nonadditive and allelic expression patterns in the reciprocal hybrids significantly exceeded the expected values. For all studied types of expression - differential, nonadditive, and allelic - substantial tissue-specific plasticity was observed. Significantly, nonsyntenic genes that evolved after the last whole genome duplication of a maize progenitor from genes with synteny to sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) were highly overrepresented among differential, nonadditive, and allelic expression patterns compared with the fraction of these genes among all expressed genes. This observation underscores the role of nonsyntenic genes in shaping the transcriptomic landscape of maize hybrids during the early developmental manifestation of heterosis in root tissues of maize hybrids. PMID:27208302

  12. Molecular Evolution of Typical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: Clonal Analysis by Multilocus Sequence Typing and Virulence Gene Allelic Profiling▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lacher, David W.; Steinsland, Hans; Blank, T. Eric; Donnenberg, Michael S.; Whittam, Thomas S.

    2007-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infections are a leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing nations. Typical EPEC isolates are differentiated from other types of pathogenic E. coli by two distinctive phenotypes, attaching effacement and localized adherence. The genes specifying these phenotypes are found on the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) and the EPEC adherence factor (EAF) plasmid. To describe how typical EPEC has evolved, we characterized a diverse collection of strains by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and performed restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of three virulence genes (eae, bfpA, and perA) to assess allelic variation. Among 129 strains representing 20 O-serogroups, 21 clonal genotypes were identified using MLST. RFLP analysis resolved nine eae, nine bfpA, and four perA alleles. Each bfpA allele was associated with only one perA allele class, suggesting that recombination has not played a large role in shuffling the bfpA and perA loci between separate EAF plasmids. The distribution of eae alleles among typical EPEC strains is more concordant with the clonal relationships than the distribution of the EAF plasmid types. These results provide further support for the hypothesis that the EPEC pathotype has evolved multiple times within E. coli through separate acquisitions of the LEE island and EAF plasmid. PMID:17098897

  13. Determinants of genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Ellegren, Hans; Galtier, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Genetic polymorphism varies among species and within genomes, and has important implications for the evolution and conservation of species. The determinants of this variation have been poorly understood, but population genomic data from a wide range of organisms now make it possible to delineate the underlying evolutionary processes, notably how variation in the effective population size (Ne) governs genetic diversity. Comparative population genomics is on its way to providing a solution to 'Lewontin's paradox' - the discrepancy between the many orders of magnitude of variation in population size and the much narrower distribution of diversity levels. It seems that linked selection plays an important part both in the overall genetic diversity of a species and in the variation in diversity within the genome. Genetic diversity also seems to be predictable from the life history of a species. PMID:27265362

  14. Biased Allelic Expression in Human Primary Fibroblast Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santoni, Federico; Delaneau, Olivier; Fort, Alexandre; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Guipponi, Michel; Padioleau, Ismael; Carninci, Piero; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of gene expression in mammalian single cells via genomic technologies now provides the possibility to investigate the patterns of allelic gene expression. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to detect the allele-specific mRNA level in 203 single human primary fibroblasts over 133,633 unique heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (hetSNVs). We observed that at the snapshot of analyses, each cell contained mostly transcripts from one allele from the majority of genes; indeed, 76.4% of the hetSNVs displayed stochastic monoallelic expression in single cells. Remarkably, adjacent hetSNVs exhibited a haplotype-consistent allelic ratio; in contrast, distant sites located in two different genes were independent of the haplotype structure. Moreover, the allele-specific expression in single cells correlated with the abundance of the cellular transcript. We observed that genes expressing both alleles in the majority of the single cells at a given time point were rare and enriched with highly expressed genes. The relative abundance of each allele in a cell was controlled by some regulatory mechanisms given that we observed related single-cell allelic profiles according to genes. Overall, these results have direct implications in cellular phenotypic variability. PMID:25557783

  15. Genetic diversity in native and commercial breeds of pigs in Portugal assessed by microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Vicente, A A; Carolino, M I; Sousa, M C O; Ginja, C; Silva, F S; Martinez, A M; Vega-Pla, J L; Carolino, N; Gama, L T

    2008-10-01

    Population structure and genetic diversity in the Portuguese native breeds of pigs Alentejano (AL), Bísaro (BI), and Malhado de Alcobaça (MA) and the exotic breeds Duroc (DU), Landrace (LR), Large White (LW), and Pietrain were analyzed by typing 22 microsatellite markers in 249 individuals. In general, the markers used were greatly polymorphic, with mean total and effective number of alleles per locus of 10.68 and 4.33, respectively, and an expected heterozygosity of 0.667 across loci. The effective number of alleles per locus and expected heterozygosity were greatest in BI, LR, and AL, and least in DU. Private alleles were found in 9 of the 22 markers analyzed, mostly in AL, but also in the other breeds, with the exception of LW. The proportion of loci not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in each breed analyzed ranged between 0.23 (AL) and 0.41 (BI, LW, and Pietrain), mostly because of a less than expected number of heterozygotes in those loci. With the exception of MA, all breeds showed a significant deficit in heterozygosity (F(IS); P < 0.05), which was more pronounced in BI (F(IS) = 0.175) and AL (F(IS) = 0.139), suggesting that inbreeding is a major concern, especially in these breeds that have gone through a genetic bottleneck in the recent past. The analysis of relationships among breeds, assessed by different methods, indicates that DU and AL are the more distanced breeds relative to the others, with the closest relationship being observed between LR and MA. The degree of differentiation between subpopulations (F(ST)) indicates that 0.184 of the total genetic variability can be attributed to differences among breeds. The analysis of individual distances based on allele sharing indicates that animals of the same breed generally cluster together, but subdivision is observed in the BI and LR breeds. Furthermore, the analysis of population structure indicates there is very little admixture among breeds, with each one being identified with a single ancestral

  16. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences. PMID:26416087

  17. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania. PMID:26711124

  18. Allelic Variation in Cell Wall Candidate Genes Affecting Solid Wood Properties in Natural Populations and Land Races of Pinus radiata

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, S. K.; Nolan, M.; Li, W.; Bell, C.; Wu, H. X.; Southerton, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    Forest trees are ideally suited to association mapping due to their high levels of diversity and low genomic linkage disequilibrium. Using an association mapping approach, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers influencing quantitative variation in wood quality were identified in a natural population of Pinus radiata. Of 149 sites examined, 10 demonstrated significant associations (P < 0.05, q < 0.1) with one or more traits after accounting for population structure and experimentwise error. Without accounting for marker interactions, phenotypic variation attributed to individual SNPs ranged from 2 to 6.5%. Undesirable negative correlations between wood quality and growth were not observed, indicating potential to break negative correlations by selecting for individual SNPs in breeding programs. Markers that yielded significant associations were reexamined in an Australian land race. SNPs from three genes (PAL1, PCBER, and SUSY) yielded significant associations. Importantly, associations with two of these genes validated associations with density previously observed in the discovery population. In both cases, decreased wood density was associated with the minor allele, suggesting that these SNPs may be under weak negative purifying selection for density in the natural populations. These results demonstrate the utility of LD mapping to detect associations, even when the power to detect SNPs with small effect is anticipated to be low. PMID:20498299

  19. HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies of 10 918 Koreans from bone marrow donor registry in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, H; Lee, Y-J; Song, E Y; Park, M H

    2016-10-01

    The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) system is the most polymorphic genetic system in humans, and HLA matching is crucial in organ transplantation, especially in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We investigated HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies at allelic level in 10 918 Koreans from bone marrow donor registry in Korea. Intermediate resolution HLA typing was performed using Luminex technology (Wakunaga, Japan), and additional allelic level typing was performed using PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism method and/or sequence-based typing (Abbott Molecular, USA). Allele and haplotype frequencies were calculated by direct counting and maximum likelihood methods, respectively. A total of 39 HLA-A, 66 HLA-B and 47 HLA-DRB1 alleles were identified. High-frequency alleles found at a frequency of ≥5% were 6 HLA-A (A*02:01, *02:06, *11:01, *24:02, *31:01 and *33:03), 6 HLA-B (B*15:01, *35:01, *44:03, *51:01, 54:01 and *58:01) and 8 HLA-DRB1 (DRB1*01:01, *04:05, *04:06, *07:01, *08:03, *09:01, *13:02 and *15:01) alleles. At each locus, A*02, B*15 and DRB1*14 generic groups were most diverse at allelic level, consisting of 9, 12 and 11 different alleles, respectively. A total of 366, 197 and 21 different HLA-A-B-DRB1 haplotypes were estimated with frequencies of ≥0.05%, ≥0.1% and ≥0.5%, respectively. The five most common haplotypes with frequencies of ≥2.0% were A*33:03-B*44:03-DRB1*13:02 (4.97%), A*33:03-B*58:01-DRB1*13:02, A*33:03-B*44:03-DRB1*07:01, A*24:02-B*07:02-DRB1*01:01 and A*24:02-B*52:01-DRB1*15:02. Among 34 serologic HLA-A-B-DR haplotypes with frequencies of ≥0.5%, 17 haplotypes revealed allele-level diversity and majority of the allelic variation was arising from A2, A26, B61, B62, DR4 and DR14 specificities. Haplotype diversity obtained in this study is the most comprehensive data thus far reported in Koreans, and the information will be useful for unrelated stem cell transplantation as well as for disease

  20. Mapping Genetic Diversity of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.): Application of Spatial Analysis for Conservation and Use of Plant Genetic Resources

    PubMed Central

    van Zonneveld, Maarten; Scheldeman, Xavier; Escribano, Pilar; Viruel, María A.; Van Damme, Patrick; Garcia, Willman; Tapia, César; Romero, José; Sigueñas, Manuel; Hormaza, José I.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing call for inventories that evaluate geographic patterns in diversity of plant genetic resources maintained on farm and in species' natural populations in order to enhance their use and conservation. Such evaluations are relevant for useful tropical and subtropical tree species, as many of these species are still undomesticated, or in incipient stages of domestication and local populations can offer yet-unknown traits of high value to further domestication. For many outcrossing species, such as most trees, inbreeding depression can be an issue, and genetic diversity is important to sustain local production. Diversity is also crucial for species to adapt to environmental changes. This paper explores the possibilities of incorporating molecular marker data into Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to allow visualization and better understanding of spatial patterns of genetic diversity as a key input to optimize conservation and use of plant genetic resources, based on a case study of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.), a Neotropical fruit tree species. We present spatial analyses to (1) improve the understanding of spatial distribution of genetic diversity of cherimoya natural stands and cultivated trees in Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru based on microsatellite molecular markers (SSRs); and (2) formulate optimal conservation strategies by revealing priority areas for in situ conservation, and identifying existing diversity gaps in ex situ collections. We found high levels of allelic richness, locally common alleles and expected heterozygosity in cherimoya's putative centre of origin, southern Ecuador and northern Peru, whereas levels of diversity in southern Peru and especially in Bolivia were significantly lower. The application of GIS on a large microsatellite dataset allows a more detailed prioritization of areas for in situ conservation and targeted collection across the Andean distribution range of cherimoya than previous studies could do, i.e. at

  1. Mapping genetic diversity of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.): application of spatial analysis for conservation and use of plant genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Zonneveld, Maarten van; Scheldeman, Xavier; Escribano, Pilar; Viruel, María A; Van Damme, Patrick; Garcia, Willman; Tapia, César; Romero, José; Sigueñas, Manuel; Hormaza, José I

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing call for inventories that evaluate geographic patterns in diversity of plant genetic resources maintained on farm and in species' natural populations in order to enhance their use and conservation. Such evaluations are relevant for useful tropical and subtropical tree species, as many of these species are still undomesticated, or in incipient stages of domestication and local populations can offer yet-unknown traits of high value to further domestication. For many outcrossing species, such as most trees, inbreeding depression can be an issue, and genetic diversity is important to sustain local production. Diversity is also crucial for species to adapt to environmental changes. This paper explores the possibilities of incorporating molecular marker data into Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to allow visualization and better understanding of spatial patterns of genetic diversity as a key input to optimize conservation and use of plant genetic resources, based on a case study of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.), a Neotropical fruit tree species. We present spatial analyses to (1) improve the understanding of spatial distribution of genetic diversity of cherimoya natural stands and cultivated trees in Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru based on microsatellite molecular markers (SSRs); and (2) formulate optimal conservation strategies by revealing priority areas for in situ conservation, and identifying existing diversity gaps in ex situ collections. We found high levels of allelic richness, locally common alleles and expected heterozygosity in cherimoya's putative centre of origin, southern Ecuador and northern Peru, whereas levels of diversity in southern Peru and especially in Bolivia were significantly lower. The application of GIS on a large microsatellite dataset allows a more detailed prioritization of areas for in situ conservation and targeted collection across the Andean distribution range of cherimoya than previous studies could do, i.e. at

  2. The Y-associated XY275 low allele is not restricted to indigenous African peoples.

    PubMed Central

    Spurdle, A; Ramsay, M; Jenkins, T

    1992-01-01

    The level of linkage disequilibrium between the XY275 MspI polymorphism and the X and Y boundaries was investigated in 21 different southern African populations. A full range of frequencies of the high allele was observed on the 1,013 X chromosomes studied, in keeping with published data. In previous studies fixation of the high allele on the Y chromosome was observed in all but two groups--a Pygmy and a Tsumkwe San population. However, in the present study of 673 Y chromosomes, the low allele was found to be associated with the Y chromosome in several different Bantu-speaking negroid groups, the Khoisan-speaking negroid Dama, the Khoisan, two groups of mixed ancestry, and the South African Asiatic-Indian population. The discovery of the low allele on Y chromosomes of caucasoid individuals suggests that more than one class of Y chromosome gave rise to the present-day non-African population. The data also fail to provide support for the theory that Africa is the site of origin of Homo sapiens, but they equally do not exclude it. Images Figure 2 PMID:1598910

  3. Phenotypic analysis of separation-of-function alleles of MEI-41, Drosophila ATM/ATR.

    PubMed Central

    Laurençon, Anne; Purdy, Amanda; Sekelsky, Jeff; Hawley, R Scott; Su, Tin Tin

    2003-01-01

    ATM/ATR kinases act as signal transducers in eukaryotic DNA damage and replication checkpoints. Mutations in ATM/ATR homologs have pleiotropic effects that range from sterility to increased killing by genotoxins in humans, mice, and Drosophila. Here we report the generation of a null allele of mei-41, Drosophila ATM/ATR homolog, and the use of it to document a semidominant effect on a larval mitotic checkpoint and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) sensitivity. We also tested the role of mei-41 in a recently characterized checkpoint that delays metaphase/anaphase transition after DNA damage in cellular embryos. We then compare five existing mei-41 alleles to the null with respect to known phenotypes (female sterility, cell cycle checkpoints, and MMS resistance). We find that not all phenotypes are affected equally by each allele, i.e., the functions of MEI-41 in ensuring fertility, cell cycle regulation, and resistance to genotoxins are genetically separable. We propose that MEI-41 acts not in a single rigid signal transduction pathway, but in multiple molecular contexts to carry out its many functions. Sequence analysis identified mutations, which, for most alleles, fall in the poorly characterized region outside the kinase domain; this allowed us to tentatively identify additional functional domains of MEI-41 that could be subjected to future structure-function studies of this key molecule. PMID:12807779

  4. Distribution of HLA class I alleles differs in celiac disease patients according to age of onset.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, Harald; Panzer, Simon; Mayr, Wolfgang R; Granditsch, Gerhard; Fischer, Gottfried F

    2003-03-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten-sensitive enteropathy is strongly associated with HLA-DQ alleles; more than 95% of patients are DQB1*02. However, the uniform association with HLA-DQ alleles does not explain the clinical heterogeneity, especially the wide range in the age of onset of CD. We asked whether the age of onset of CD is also influenced by class I genes of the human MHC. We performed HLA typing in three groups of patients suffering from CD. The age of onset in the first group (N = 200) was before 15 years of age, in the second group (N = 62) between 15 and 40 years, in the third group (N = 59) after 40 years. We observed a statistically significant increase in the frequencies of HLA-B8 and Cw7 with increasing age of onset. In conclusion, we conclude that distinct alleles from the class I region of the human MHC might lead to late onset of CD. In particular, relatives of CD patients with the disease-prone HLA class I alleles HLA-B8 and Cw7 should be followed up carefully for late onset of CD. PMID:12757179

  5. Naturally occurring ERAP1 haplotypes encode functionally distinct alleles with fine substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Emma; Edwards, Christopher J; Elliott, Tim; James, Edward

    2013-07-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) trims peptides for MHC class I presentation, influencing the degree and specificity of CD8(+) T cell responses. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the exons encoding ERAP1 are associated with autoimmune diseases and cervical carcinoma, but it is not known whether they act independently or as disease-associated haplotypes. We sequenced ERAP1 from 20 individuals and show that single-nucleotide polymorphisms occur as distinct haplotypes in the human population and that these haplotypes encode functionally distinct ERAP1 alleles. Using a wide range of substrates, we are able to demonstrate that for any given substrate distinct ERAP1 alleles can be "normal," "hypofunctional," or "hyperfunctional" and that each allele has a trend bias toward one of these three activities. Thus, the repertoire of peptides presented at the cell surface for recognition by CTL is likely to depend on the precise combination of both MHC class I and ERAP1 alleles expressed within an individual, and has important implications for predisposition to disease. PMID:23733883

  6. Somatic mosaicism and allele complexity induced by CRISPR/Cas9 RNA injections in mouse zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Shuo-Ting; Zhang, Min; Deng, Jian Min; Usman, Shireen J.; Smith, Chad N.; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Swinton, Paul G.; Martin, James F.; Behringer, Richard R.

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosinase is the rate-limiting enzyme for the production of melanin pigmentation. In the mouse and other animals, homozygous null mutations in the Tyrosinase gene (Tyr) result in the absence of pigmentation, i.e. albinism. Here we used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate mono- and bi-allelic null mutations in the Tyr locus by zygote injection of two single-guide and Cas9 RNAs. Injection into C57BL/6N wild-type embryos resulted in one completely albino founder carrying two different Tyr mutations. In addition, three pigmentation mosaics and fully pigmented littermates were obtained that transmitted new mutant Tyr alleles to progeny in test crosses with albinos. Injection into Tyr heterozygous (B6CBAF1/J × FVB/NJ) zygotes resulted in the generation of numerous albinos and also mice with a graded range of albino mosaicism. Deep sequencing revealed that the majority of the albinos and the mosaics had more than two new mutant alleles. These visual phenotypes and molecular genotypes highlight the somatic mosaicism and allele complexity in founders that occurs for targeted genes during CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis by zygote injection in mice. PMID:24984260

  7. [Genetic study of the Penta E locus and identification of rare alleles].

    PubMed

    Lai, Li; Shen, Xiaoli; Han, Lili; Chen, Dian; Hu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the genetic polymorphisms of Penta E locus in Fujian Han population. METHODS Polymorphisms of the Penta E locus in 851 unrelated individuals were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction-short tandem repeat (PCR-STR). The mutation rate of rare alleles was analyzed in 494 paternity identification cases (in a total of 674 meiosis). RESULTS Twenty-six alleles were identified for the Penta E locus, with their frequencies ranging from 0.0006 to 0.1528. There were 7 rare alleles, among which Penta E-28.4 ([AAAGA]29) was identified for the first time. Genetic parameters of the Penta E locus in Fujian Han population were obtained, including PIC= 0.91, PE= 0.817, PD= 0.986, and mutation rate= 0.0015. CONCLUSION The Penta E locus is highly polymorphic and has a low mutation rate in Fujian Han population. It also has a good prospect in genetics applications. DNA sequencing is a good method for identifying rare alleles. PMID:26418985

  8. Seed fates in crop–wild hybrid sunflower: crop allele and maternal effects

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Brian A; Alexander, Helen M; Emry, Jason D; Mercer, Kristin L

    2015-01-01

    Domestication has resulted in selection upon seed traits found in wild populations, yet crop-wild hybrids retain some aspects of both parental phenotypes. Seed fates of germination, dormancy, and mortality can influence the success of crop allele introgression in crop-wild hybrid zones, especially if crop alleles or crop-imparted seed coverings result in out-of-season germination. We performed a seed burial experiment using crop, wild, and diverse hybrid sunflower (Helianthus annuus) cross types to test how a cross type's maternal parent and nuclear genetic composition might affect its fate under field conditions. We observed higher maladaptive fall germination in the crop- and F1- produced seeds than wild-produced seeds and, due to an interaction with percent crop alleles, fall germination was higher for cross types with more crop-like nuclear genetics. By spring, crop-produced cross types had the highest overwintering mortality, primarily due to higher fall germination. Early spring germination was identical across maternal types, but germination continued for F1-produced seeds. In conclusion, the more wild-like the maternal parent or the less proportion of the cross type's genome contributed by the crop, the greater likelihood a seed will remain ungerminated than die. Wild-like dormancy may facilitate introgression through future recruitment from the soil seed bank. PMID:25685189

  9. Seed fates in crop-wild hybrid sunflower: crop allele and maternal effects.

    PubMed

    Pace, Brian A; Alexander, Helen M; Emry, Jason D; Mercer, Kristin L

    2015-02-01

    Domestication has resulted in selection upon seed traits found in wild populations, yet crop-wild hybrids retain some aspects of both parental phenotypes. Seed fates of germination, dormancy, and mortality can influence the success of crop allele introgression in crop-wild hybrid zones, especially if crop alleles or crop-imparted seed coverings result in out-of-season germination. We performed a seed burial experiment using crop, wild, and diverse hybrid sunflower (Helianthus annuus) cross types to test how a cross type's maternal parent and nuclear genetic composition might affect its fate under field conditions. We observed higher maladaptive fall germination in the crop- and F1- produced seeds than wild-produced seeds and, due to an interaction with percent crop alleles, fall germination was higher for cross types with more crop-like nuclear genetics. By spring, crop-produced cross types had the highest overwintering mortality, primarily due to higher fall germination. Early spring germination was identical across maternal types, but germination continued for F1-produced seeds. In conclusion, the more wild-like the maternal parent or the less proportion of the cross type's genome contributed by the crop, the greater likelihood a seed will remain ungerminated than die. Wild-like dormancy may facilitate introgression through future recruitment from the soil seed bank. PMID:25685189

  10. Cytological Characterization and Allelism Testing of Anther Developmental Mutants Identified in a Screen of Maize Male Sterile Lines

    PubMed Central

    Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Skibbe, David S.; Lee, Sidae; Golubovskaya, Inna; Wang, Rachel; Harper, Lisa; Walbot, Virginia; Cande, William Zacheus

    2013-01-01

    Proper regulation of anther differentiation is crucial for producing functional pollen, and defects in or absence of any anther cell type result in male sterility. To deepen understanding of processes required to establish premeiotic cell fate and differentiation of somatic support cell layers a cytological screen of maize male-sterile mutants has been conducted which yielded 42 new mutants including 22 mutants with premeiotic cytological defects (increasing this class fivefold), 7 mutants with postmeiotic defects, and 13 mutants with irregular meiosis. Allelism tests with known and new mutants confirmed new alleles of four premeiotic developmental mutants, including two novel alleles of msca1 and single new alleles of ms32, ms8, and ocl4, and two alleles of the postmeiotic ms45. An allelic pair of newly described mutants was found. Premeiotic mutants are now classified into four categories: anther identity defects, abnormal anther structure, locular wall defects and premature degradation of cell layers, and/or microsporocyte collapse. The range of mutant phenotypic classes is discussed in comparison with developmental genetic investigation of anther development in rice and Arabidopsis to highlight similarities and differences between grasses and eudicots and within the grasses. PMID:23390600

  11. Synchronous waves of failed soft sweeps in the laboratory: remarkably rampant clonal interference of alleles at a single locus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Chun; Marx, Christopher J

    2013-03-01

    It has increasingly been recognized that adapting populations of microbes contain not one, but many lineages continually arising and competing at once. This process, termed "clonal interference," alters the rate and dynamics of adaptation and biases winning mutations toward those with the largest selective effect. Here we uncovered a dramatic example of clonal interference between multiple similar mutations occurring at the same locus within replicate populations of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1. Because these mutational events involved the transposition of an insertion sequence into a narrow window of a single gene, they were both readily detectable at low frequencies and could be distinguished due to differences in insertion sites. This allowed us to detect up to 17 beneficial alleles of this type coexisting in a single population. Despite conferring a large selective benefit, the majority of these alleles rose and then fell in frequency due to other lineages emerging that were more fit. By comparing allele-frequency dynamics to the trajectories of fitness gains by these populations, we estimated the fitness values of the genotypes that contained these mutations. Collectively across all populations, these alleles arose upon backgrounds with a wide range of fitness values. Within any single population, however, multiple alleles tended to rise and fall synchronously during a single wave of multiple genotypes with nearly identical fitness values. These results suggest that alleles of large benefit arose repeatedly in failed "soft sweeps" during narrow windows of adaptation due to the combined effects of epistasis and clonal interference. PMID:23307898

  12. Allele and genotype frequencies of metabolic genes in Native Americans from Argentina and Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Bailliet, G; Santos, M R; Alfaro, E L; Dipierri, J E; Demarchi, D A; Carnese, F R; Bianchi, N O

    2007-03-01

    Interethnic differences in the allele frequencies of CYP2D6, NAT2, GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions have been documented for Caucasians, Asians, and Africans population. On the other hand, data on Amerindians are scanty and limited to a few populations from southern areas of South America. In this report we analyze the frequencies of 11 allele variants of CYP2D6 and 4 allele variants of NAT2 genes, and the frequency of GSTM1 and GSTT1 homozygous deleted genotypes in a sample of 90 donors representing 8 Native American populations from Argentina and Paraguay, identified as Amerindians on the basis of their geographic location, genealogical data, mitochondrial- and Y-chromosome DNA markers. For CYP2D6, 88.6% of the total allele frequency corresponded to *1, *2, *4 and *10 variants. Average frequencies for NAT2 *4, *5, *6 and *7 alleles were 51.2%, 25%, 6.1%, and 20.1%, respectively. GSTM1 deletion ranged from 20% to 66%, while GSTT1 deletion was present in four populations in less than 50%. We assume that CYP2D6 *2, *4, *10, *14; NAT2 *5, *7 alleles and GSTM1 and GSTT1 *0/*0 genotypes are founder variants brought to America by the first Asian settlers. PMID:17194620

  13. Population Dynamics of Sex-Determining Alleles in Honey Bees and Self-Incompatibility Alleles in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Nei, Masatoshi

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical theories of the population dynamics of sex-determining alleles in honey bees are developed. It is shown that in an infinitely large population the equilibrium frequency of a sex allele is 1/n, where n is the number of alleles in the population, and the asymptotic rate of approach to this equilibrium is 2/(3n) per generation. Formulae for the distribution of allele frequencies and the effective and actual numbers of alleles that can be maintained in a finite population are derived by taking into account the population size and mutation rate. It is shown that the allele frequencies in a finite population may deviate considerably from 1/n. Using these results, available data on the number of sex alleles in honey bee populations are discussed. It is also shown that the number of self-incompatibility alleles in plants can be studied in a much simpler way by the method used in this paper. A brief discussion about general overdominant selection is presented. PMID:17248901

  14. Genetic diversity, structure and differentiation within and between cultivated (Vitis vinifera L. ssp. sativa) and wild (Vitis vinifera L. ssp. sylvestris) grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic characterization of 502 diverse grape accessions including 342 cultivated (V. vinifera ssp. sativa) and 160 wild (V. vinifera ssp. sylvestris) grapes showed considerable genetic diversity among accessions. A total of 117 alleles were detected with the average of 14 alleles per locus. The tot...

  15. Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Simon; Henn, Brenna M; Gutenkunst, Ryan N; Indap, Amit R; Marth, Gabor T; Clark, Andrew G; Yu, Fuli; Gibbs, Richard A; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2011-07-19

    High-throughput sequencing technology enables population-level surveys of human genomic variation. Here, we examine the joint allele frequency distributions across continental human populations and present an approach for combining complementary aspects of whole-genome, low-coverage data and targeted high-coverage data. We apply this approach to data generated by the pilot phase of the Thousand Genomes Project, including whole-genome 2-4× coverage data for 179 samples from HapMap European, Asian, and African panels as well as high-coverage target sequencing of the exons of 800 genes from 697 individuals in seven populations. We use the site frequency spectra obtained from these data to infer demographic parameters for an Out-of-Africa model for populations of African, European, and Asian descent and to predict, by a jackknife-based approach, the amount of genetic diversity that will be discovered as sample sizes are increased. We predict that the number of discovered nonsynonymous coding variants will reach 100,000 in each population after ∼1,000 sequenced chromosomes per population, whereas ∼2,500 chromosomes will be needed for the same number of synonymous variants. Beyond this point, the number of segregating sites in the European and Asian panel populations is expected to overcome that of the African panel because of faster recent population growth. Overall, we find that the majority of human genomic variable sites are rare and exhibit little sharing among diverged populations. Our results emphasize that replication of disease association for specific rare genetic variants across diverged populations must overcome both reduced statistical power because of rarity and higher population divergence. PMID:21730125

  16. Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations

    PubMed Central

    Gravel, Simon; Henn, Brenna M.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Indap, Amit R.; Marth, Gabor T.; Clark, Andrew G.; Yu, Fuli; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Altshuler, David L.; Durbin, Richard M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bentley, David R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clark, Andrew G.; Collins, Francis S.; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Donnelly, Peter; Egholm, Michael; Flicek, Paul; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Lander, Eric S.; Lehrach, Hans; Mardis, Elaine R.; McVean, Gil A.; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Peltonen, Leena; Schafer, Alan J.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Wang, Jun; Wilson, Richard K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Deiros, David; Metzker, Mike; Muzny, Donna; Reid, Jeff; Wheeler, David; Wang, Jun; Li, Jingxiang; Jian, Min; Li, Guoqing; Li, Ruiqiang; Liang, Huiqing; Tian, Geng; Wang, Bo; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Yang, Huanming; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zheng, Huisong; Lander, Eric S.; Altshuler, David L.; Ambrogio, Lauren; Bloom, Toby; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Jaffe, David B.; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Bentley, David R.; Gormley, Niall; Humphray, Sean; Kingsbury, Zoya; Koko-Gonzales, Paula; Stone, Jennifer; McKernan, Kevin J.; Costa, Gina L.; Ichikawa, Jeffry K.; Lee, Clarence C.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Borodina, Tatiana A.; Dahl, Andreas; Davydov, Alexey N.; Marquardt, Peter; Mertes, Florian; Nietfeld, Wilfiried; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schreiber, Stefan; Soldatov, Aleksey V.; Timmermann, Bernd; Tolzmann, Marius; Egholm, Michael; Affourtit, Jason; Ashworth, Dana; Attiya, Said; Bachorski, Melissa; Buglione, Eli; Burke, Adam; Caprio, Amanda; Celone, Christopher; Clark, Shauna; Conners, David; Desany, Brian; Gu, Lisa; Guccione, Lorri; Kao, Kalvin; Kebbel, Andrew; Knowlton, Jennifer; Labrecque, Matthew; McDade, Louise; Mealmaker, Craig; Minderman, Melissa; Nawrocki, Anne; Niazi, Faheem; Pareja, Kristen; Ramenani, Ravi; Riches, David; Song, Wanmin; Turcotte, Cynthia; Wang, Shally; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Weinstock, George; Durbin, Richard M.; Burton, John; Carter, David M.; Churcher, Carol; Coffey, Alison; Cox, Anthony; Palotie, Aarno; Quail, Michael; Skelly, Tom; Stalker, James; Swerdlow, Harold P.; Turner, Daniel; De Witte, Anniek; Giles, Shane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wheeler, David; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Wang, Jun; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Xiaosen; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Tai, Shuaishuai; Wu, Honglong; Zheng, Hancheng; Zheng, Xiaole; Zhou, Yan; Li, Guoqing; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Huang, Weichun; Indap, Amit; Kural, Deniz; Lee, Wan-Ping; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; Daly, Mark J.; DePristo, Mark A.; Altshuler, David L.; Ball, Aaron D.; Banks, Eric; Bloom, Toby; Browning, Brian L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Grossman, Sharon R.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hanna, Matt; Hartl, Chris; Jaffe, David B.; Kernytsky, Andrew M.; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Maguire, Jared R.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McKenna, Aaron; Nemesh, James C.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Poplin, Ryan E.; Price, Alkes; Rivas, Manuel A.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Shefler, Erica; Shlyakhter, Ilya A.; Cooper, David N.; Ball, Edward V.; Mort, Matthew; Phillips, Andrew D.; Stenson, Peter D.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Clark, Andrew G.; Boyko, Adam; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Gravel, Simon; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Kaganovich, Mark; Keinan, Alon; Lacroute, Phil; Ma, Xin; Reynolds, Andy; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Cunningham, Fiona; Herrero, Javier; Keenen, Stephen; Kulesha, Eugene; Leinonen, Rasko; McLaren, William M.; Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Smith, Richard E.; Zalunin, Vadim; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Stütz, Adrian M.; Humphray, Sean; Bauer, Markus; Cheetham, R. Keira; Cox, Tony; Eberle, Michael; James, Terena; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Hyland, Fiona C. L.; Manning, Jonathan M.; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Peckham, Heather E.; Sakarya, Onur; Sun, Yongming A.; Tsung, Eric F.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Albrecht, Marcus W.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav S.; Herwig, Ralf; Parkhomchuk, Dimitri V.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Agarwala, Richa; Khouri, Hoda M.; Morgulis, Aleksandr O.; Paschall, Justin E.; Phan, Lon D.; Rotmistrovsky, Kirill E.; Sanders, Robert D.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Auton, Adam; Iqbal, Zamin; Lunter, Gerton; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myers, Simon; Tumian, Afidalina; Desany, Brian; Knight, James; Winer, Roger; Craig, David W.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Steve M.; Christoforides, Alexis; Kurdoglu, Ahmet A.; Pearson, John V.; Sinari, Shripad A.; Tembe, Waibhav D.; Haussler, David; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Katzman, Sol J.; Kern, Andrew; Kuhn, Robert M.; Przeworski, Molly; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Howie, Bryan; Kelley, Joanna L.; Melton, S. Cord; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Li, Yun; Anderson, Paul; Blackwell, Tom; Chen, Wei; Cookson, William O.; Ding, Jun; Kang, Hyun Min; Lathrop, Mark; Liang, Liming; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Scheet, Paul; Sidore, Carlo; Snyder, Matthew; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zöllner, Sebastian; Awadalla, Philip; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Keebler, John; Stone, Eric A.; Zilversmit, Martine; Jorde, Lynn; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Sudmant, Peter H.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; Koboldt, Daniel C.; McLellan, Mike D.; Dooling, David; Weinstock, George; Wallis, John W.; Wendl, Michael C.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Durbin, Richard M.; Albers, Cornelis A.; Ayub, Qasim; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Carter, David M.; Chen, Yuan; Conrad, Donald F.; Danecek, Petr; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Hu, Min; Huang, Ni; Hurles, Matt E.; Jin, Hanjun; Jostins, Luke; Keane, Thomas M.; Le, Si Quang; Lindsay, Sarah; Long, Quan; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Parts, Leopold; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Bjornson, Robert; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Habegger, Lukas; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Kural, Deniz; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; McCarroll, Steven A.; Banks, Eric; DePristo, Mark A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hartl, Chris; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Nemesh, James C.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Kaganovich, Mark; Clarke, Laura; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Humphray, Sean; Cheetham, R. Keira; Eberle, Michael; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Peckham, Heather E.; Sun, Yongming A.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Xiao, Chunlin; Iqbal, Zamin; Desany, Brian; Blackwell, Tom; Snyder, Matthew; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; McLellan, Mike D.; Wallis, John W.; Hurles, Matt E.; Conrad, Donald F.; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Coafra, Cristian; Dinh, Huyen; Kovar, Christie; Lee, Sandy; Muzny, Donna; Nazareth, Lynne; Reid, Jeff; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Indap, Amit; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Hartl, Chris; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Wilkinson, Jane; Clark, Andrew G.; Gravel, Simon; Grubert, Fabian; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Sherry, Stephen T.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Paschall, Justin E.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Katzman, Sol J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Blackwell, Tom; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Durbin, Richard M.; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Coffey, Allison; Keane, Thomas M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Palotie, Aarno; Scott, Carol; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Gerstein, Mark B.; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Gharani, Neda; Gibbs, Richard A.; Jorde, Lynn; Kaye, Jane S.; Kent, Alastair; Li, Taosha; McGuire, Amy L.; McVean, Gil A.; Ossorio, Pilar N.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Su, Yeyang; Toji, Lorraine H.; TylerSmith, Chris; Brooks, Lisa D.; Felsenfeld, Adam L.; McEwen, Jean E.; Abdallah, Assya; Juenger, Christopher R.; Clemm, Nicholas C.; Collins, Francis S.; Duncanson, Audrey; Green, Eric D.; Guyer, Mark S.; Peterson, Jane L.; Schafer, Alan J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Altshuler, David L.; Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D.; Durbin, Richard M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Hurles, Matt E.; McVean, Gil A.

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology enables population-level surveys of human genomic variation. Here, we examine the joint allele frequency distributions across continental human populations and present an approach for combining complementary aspects of whole-genome, low-coverage data and targeted high-coverage data. We apply this approach to data generated by the pilot phase of the Thousand Genomes Project, including whole-genome 2–4× coverage data for 179 samples from HapMap European, Asian, and African panels as well as high-coverage target sequencing of the exons of 800 genes from 697 individuals in seven populations. We use the site frequency spectra obtained from these data to infer demographic parameters for an Out-of-Africa model for populations of African, European, and Asian descent and to predict, by a jackknife-based approach, the amount of genetic diversity that will be discovered as sample sizes are increased. We predict that the number of discovered nonsynonymous coding variants will reach 100,000 in each population after ∼1,000 sequenced chromosomes per population, whereas ∼2,500 chromosomes will be needed for the same number of synonymous variants. Beyond this point, the number of segregating sites in the European and Asian panel populations is expected to overcome that of the African panel because of faster recent population growth. Overall, we find that the majority of human genomic variable sites are rare and exhibit little sharing among diverged populations. Our results emphasize that replication of disease association for specific rare genetic variants across diverged populations must overcome both reduced statistical power because of rarity and higher population divergence. PMID:21730125

  17. Performance of Molecular Inversion Probes (MIP) in Allele CopyNumber Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuker; Moorhead, Martin; Karlin-Neumann, George; Wang,Nicolas J.; Ireland, James; Lin, Steven; Chen, Chunnuan; Heiser, LauraM.; Chin, Koei; Esserman, Laura; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Faham,Malek

    2007-05-14

    We have developed a new protocol for using MolecularInversion Probes (MIP) to accurately and specifically measure allele copynumber (ACN). The new protocol provides for significant improvementsincluding the reduction of input DNA (from 2?g) by more than 25 fold (to75ng total genomic DNA), higher overall precision resulting in one orderof magnitude lower false positive rate, and greater dynamic range withaccurate absolute copy number up to 60 copies.

  18. Genetic diversity estimates point to immediate efforts for conserving the endangered Tibetan sheep of India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rekha; Kumar, Brijesh; Arora, Reena; Ahlawat, Sonika; Mishra, A.K.; Tantia, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan is a valuable Himalayan sheep breed classified as endangered. Knowledge of the level and distribution of genetic diversity in Tibetan sheep is important for designing conservation strategies for their sustainable survival and to preserve their evolutionary potential. Thus, for the first time, genetic variability in the Tibetan population was accessed with twenty five inter-simple sequence repeat markers. All the microsatellites were polymorphic and a total of 148 alleles were detected across these loci. The observed number of alleles across all the loci was more than the effective number of alleles and ranged from 3 (BM6506) to 11 (BM6526) with 5.920 ± 0.387 mean number of alleles per locus. The average observed heterozygosity was less than the expected heterozygosity. The observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.150 (BM1314) to 0.9 (OarCP20) with an overall mean of 0.473 ± 0.044 and from 0.329 (BM8125) to 0.885 (BM6526) with an overall mean 0.672 ± 0.030, respectively. The lower heterozygosity pointed towards diminished genetic diversity in the population. Thirteen microsatellite loci exhibited significant (P < 0.05) departures from the Hardy–Weinberg proportions in the population. The estimate of heterozygote deficiency varied from − 0.443 (OarCP20) to 0.668 (OarFCB128) with a mean positive value of 0.302 ± 0.057. A normal ‘L’ shaped distribution of mode-shift test and non-significant heterozygote excess on the basis of different models suggested absence of recent bottleneck in the existing Tibetan population. In view of the declining population of Tibetan sheep (less than 250) in the breeding tract, need of the hour is immediate scientific management of the population so as to increase the population hand in hand with retaining the founder alleles to the maximum possible extent. PMID:27014586

  19. Genetic diversity estimates point to immediate efforts for conserving the endangered Tibetan sheep of India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rekha; Kumar, Brijesh; Arora, Reena; Ahlawat, Sonika; Mishra, A K; Tantia, M S

    2016-06-01

    Tibetan is a valuable Himalayan sheep breed classified as endangered. Knowledge of the level and distribution of genetic diversity in Tibetan sheep is important for designing conservation strategies for their sustainable survival and to preserve their evolutionary potential. Thus, for the first time, genetic variability in the Tibetan population was accessed with twenty five inter-simple sequence repeat markers. All the microsatellites were polymorphic and a total of 148 alleles were detected across these loci. The observed number of alleles across all the loci was more than the effective number of alleles and ranged from 3 (BM6506) to 11 (BM6526) with 5.920 ± 0.387 mean number of alleles per locus. The average observed heterozygosity was less than the expected heterozygosity. The observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.150 (BM1314) to 0.9 (OarCP20) with an overall mean of 0.473 ± 0.044 and from 0.329 (BM8125) to 0.885 (BM6526) with an overall mean 0.672 ± 0.030, respectively. The lower heterozygosity pointed towards diminished genetic diversity in the population. Thirteen microsatellite loci exhibited significant (P < 0.05) departures from the Hardy-Weinberg proportions in the population. The estimate of heterozygote deficiency varied from - 0.443 (OarCP20) to 0.668 (OarFCB128) with a mean positive value of 0.302 ± 0.057. A normal 'L' shaped distribution of mode-shift test and non-significant heterozygote excess on the basis of different models suggested absence of recent bottleneck in the existing Tibetan population. In view of the declining population of Tibetan sheep (less than 250) in the breeding tract, need of the hour is immediate scientific management of the population so as to increase the population hand in hand with retaining the founder alleles to the maximum possible extent. PMID:27014586

  20. Embracing Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeck, Kathryn T.

    2009-01-01

    The high school art unit "Embracing Diversity" was the author's principal work towards the completion of a Masters thesis. The objective was to learn whether or not teaching an art unit that focused on sexual diversity could have a positive impact on the current culture one finds in high schools. The unit was found to have a positive impact on…

  1. Allele frequencies at microsatellite loci: The stepwise mutation model revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, A.M.; Slatkin, M. ); Freimer, N.B. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors summarize available data on the frequencies of alleles at microsatellite loci in human populations and compare observed distributions of allele frequencies to those generated by a simulation of the stepwise mutation model. They show that observed frequency distributions at 108 loci are consistent with the results of the model under the assumption that mutations cause an increase or decrease in repeat number by one and under the condition that the product Nu, where N is the effective population size and u is the mutation rate, is larger than one. It is also shown that the variance of the distribution of allele sizes is a useful estimator of Nu and performs much better than previously suggested estimators for the stepwise mutation model. In the data, there is no correlation between the mean and variance in allele size at a locus or between the number of alleles and mean allele size, which suggests that the mutation rate at these loci is independent of allele size. 39 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Bayesian Inference of Natural Selection from Allele Frequency Time Series.

    PubMed

    Schraiber, Joshua G; Evans, Steven N; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2016-05-01

    The advent of accessible ancient DNA technology now allows the direct ascertainment of allele frequencies in ancestral populations, thereby enabling the use of allele frequency time series to detect and estimate natural selection. Such direct observations of allele frequency dynamics are expected to be more powerful than inferences made using patterns of linked neutral variation obtained from modern individuals. We developed a Bayesian method to make use of allele frequency time series data and infer the parameters of general diploid selection, along with allele age, in nonequilibrium populations. We introduce a novel path augmentation approach, in which we use Markov chain Monte Carlo to integrate over the space of allele frequency trajectories consistent with the observed data. Using simulations, we show that this approach has good power to estimate selection coefficients and allele age. Moreover, when applying our approach to data on horse coat color, we find that ignoring a relevant demographic history can significantly bias the results of inference. Our approach is made available in a C++ software package. PMID:27010022

  3. Microsatellite allele sizes alone are insufficient to delineate species boundaries in Symbiodinium.

    PubMed

    Howells, E J; Willis, B L; Bay, L K; van Oppen, M J H

    2016-06-01

    Symbiodinium are a diverse group of unicellular dinoflagellates that are important nutritional symbionts of reef-building corals. Symbiodinium putative species ('types') are commonly identified with genetic markers, mostly nuclear and chloroplast encoded ribosomal DNA regions. Population genetic analyses using microsatellite loci have provided insights into Symbiodinium biogeography, connectivity and phenotypic plasticity, but are complicated by: (i) a lack of consensus criteria used to delineate inter- vs. intragenomic variation within species; and (ii) the high density of Symbiodinium in host tissues, which results in single samples comprising thousands of individuals. To address this problem, Wham & LaJeunesse (2016) present a method for identifying cryptic Symbiodinium species from microsatellite data based on correlations between allele size distributions and nongeographic genetic structure. Multilocus genotypes that potentially do not recombine in sympatry are interpreted as secondary 'species' to be discarded from downstream population genetic analyses. However, Symbiodinium species delineations should ideally incorporate multiple physiological, ecological and molecular criteria. This is because recombination tests may be a poor indicator of species boundaries in Symbiodinium due to their predominantly asexual mode of reproduction. Furthermore, discontinuous microsatellite allele sizes in sympatry may be explained by secondary contact between previously isolated populations and by mutations that occur in a nonstepwise manner. Limitations of using microsatellites alone to delineate species are highlighted in earlier studies that demonstrate occasional bimodal distributions of allele sizes within Symbiodinium species and considerable allele size sharing among Symbiodinium species. We outline these issues and discuss the validity of reinterpretations of our previously published microsatellite data from Symbiodinium populations on the Great Barrier Reef

  4. Predictable allele frequency changes due to habitat fragmentation in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Toby; Nieminen, Marko; Sirén, Jukka; Wong, Swee Chong; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-03-01

    Describing the evolutionary dynamics of now extinct populations is challenging, as their genetic composition before extinction is generally unknown. The Glanville fritillary butterfly has a large extant metapopulation in the Åland Islands in Finland, but declined to extinction in the nearby fragmented southwestern (SW) Finnish archipelago in the 20th century. We genotyped museum samples for 222 SNPs across the genome, including SNPs from candidate genes and neutral regions. SW Finnish populations had significantly reduced genetic diversity before extinction, and their allele frequencies gradually diverged from those in contemporary Åland populations over 80 y. We identified 15 outlier loci among candidate SNPs, mostly related to flight, in which allele frequencies have changed more than the neutral expectation. At outlier loci, allele frequencies in SW Finland shifted in the same direction as newly established populations deviated from old local populations in contemporary Åland. Moreover, outlier allele frequencies in SW Finland resemble those in fragmented landscapes as opposed to continuous landscapes in the Baltic region. These results indicate selection for genotypes associated with good colonization capacity in the highly fragmented landscape before the extinction of the populations. Evolutionary response to habitat fragmentation may have enhanced the viability of the populations, but it did not save the species from regional extinction in the face of severe habitat loss and fragmentation. These results highlight a potentially common situation in changing environments: evolutionary changes are not strong enough to fully compensate for the direct adverse effects of environmental change and thereby rescue populations from extinction. PMID:26903642

  5. Predictable allele frequency changes due to habitat fragmentation in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Toby; Nieminen, Marko; Sirén, Jukka; Wong, Swee Chong; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-01-01

    Describing the evolutionary dynamics of now extinct populations is challenging, as their genetic composition before extinction is generally unknown. The Glanville fritillary butterfly has a large extant metapopulation in the Åland Islands in Finland, but declined to extinction in the nearby fragmented southwestern (SW) Finnish archipelago in the 20th century. We genotyped museum samples for 222 SNPs across the genome, including SNPs from candidate genes and neutral regions. SW Finnish populations had significantly reduced genetic diversity before extinction, and their allele frequencies gradually diverged from those in contemporary Åland populations over 80 y. We identified 15 outlier loci among candidate SNPs, mostly related to flight, in which allele frequencies have changed more than the neutral expectation. At outlier loci, allele frequencies in SW Finland shifted in the same direction as newly established populations deviated from old local populations in contemporary Åland. Moreover, outlier allele frequencies in SW Finland resemble those in fragmented landscapes as opposed to continuous landscapes in the Baltic region. These results indicate selection for genotypes associated with good colonization capacity in the highly fragmented landscape before the extinction of the populations. Evolutionary response to habitat fragmentation may have enhanced the viability of the populations, but it did not save the species from regional extinction in the face of severe habitat loss and fragmentation. These results highlight a potentially common situation in changing environments: evolutionary changes are not strong enough to fully compensate for the direct adverse effects of environmental change and thereby rescue populations from extinction. PMID:26903642

  6. Versatile Dual-Technology System for Markerless Allele Replacement in Burkholderia pseudomallei▿ †

    PubMed Central

    López, Carolina M.; Rholl, Drew A.; Trunck, Lily A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2009-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiologic agent of melioidosis, a rare but serious tropical disease. In the United States, genetic research with this select agent bacterium is strictly regulated. Although several select agent compliant methods have been developed for allelic replacement, all of them suffer from some drawbacks, such as a need for specific host backgrounds or use of minimal media. Here we describe a versatile select agent compliant allele replacement system for B. pseudomallei based on a mobilizable vector, pEXKm5, which contains (i) a multiple cloning site within a lacZα gene for facile cloning of recombinant DNA fragments, (ii) a constitutively expressed gusA indicator gene for visual detection of merodiploid formation and resolution, and (iii) elements required for resolution of merodiploids using either I-SceI homing endonuclease-stimulated recombination or sacB-based counterselection. The homing endonuclease-based allele replacement system is completed by pBADSce, which contains an araC-PBAD-I-sceI expression cassette for arabinose-inducible I-SceI expression and a temperature-sensitive pRO1600 replicon for facile plasmid curing. Complementing these systems is the improved Δasd Escherichia coli mobilizer strain RHO3. This strain is susceptible to commonly used antibiotics and allows nutritional counterselection on rich media because of its diaminopimelic acid auxotrophy. The versatility of the I-SceI- and sacB-based methods afforded by pEXKm5 in conjunction with E. coli RHO3 was demonstrated by isolation of diverse deletion mutants in several clinical, environmental, and laboratory B. pseudomallei strains. Finally, sacB-based counterselection was employed to isolate a defined chromosomal fabD(Ts) allele that causes synthesis of a temperature-sensitive FabD, an essential fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme. PMID:19700544

  7. High Risks of Losing Genetic Diversity in an Endemic Mauritian Gecko: Implications for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Buckland, Steeves; Cole, Nik C.; Groombridge, Jim J.; Küpper, Clemens; Burke, Terry; Dawson, Deborah A.; Gallagher, Laura E.; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Genetic structure can be a consequence of recent population fragmentation and isolation, or a remnant of historical localised adaptation. This poses a challenge for conservationists since misinterpreting patterns of genetic structure may lead to inappropriate management. Of 17 species of reptile originally found in Mauritius, only five survive on the main island. One of these, Phelsuma guimbeaui (lowland forest day gecko), is now restricted to 30 small isolated subpopulations following severe forest fragmentation and isolation due to human colonisation. We used 20 microsatellites in ten subpopulations and two mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers in 13 subpopulations to: (i) assess genetic diversity, population structure and genetic differentiation of subpopulations; (ii) estimate effective population sizes and migration rates of subpopulations; and (iii) examine the phylogenetic relationships of haplotypes found in different subpopulations. Microsatellite data revealed significant population structure with high levels of genetic diversity and isolation by distance, substantial genetic differentiation and no migration between most subpopulations. MtDNA, however, showed no evidence of population structure, indicating that there was once a genetically panmictic population. Effective population sizes of ten subpopulations, based on microsatellite markers, were small, ranging from 44 to 167. Simulations suggested that the chance of survival and allelic diversity of some subpopulations will decrease dramatically over the next 50 years if no migration occurs. Our DNA-based evidence reveals an urgent need for a management plan for the conservation of P. guimbeaui. We identified 18 threatened and 12 viable subpopulations and discuss a range of management options that include translocation of threatened subpopulations to retain maximum allelic diversity, and habitat restoration and assisted migration to decrease genetic erosion and inbreeding for the viable subpopulations. PMID

  8. Bacterial diversity in faeces from polar bear (Ursus maritimus) in Arctic Svalbard

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are major predators in the Arctic marine ecosystem, feeding mainly on seals, and living closely associated with sea ice. Little is known of their gut microbial ecology and the main purpose of this study was to investigate the microbial diversity in faeces of polar bears in Svalbard, Norway (74-81°N, 10-33°E). In addition the level of blaTEM alleles, encoding ampicillin resistance (ampr) were determined. In total, ten samples were collected from ten individual bears, rectum swabs from five individuals in 2004 and faeces samples from five individuals in 2006. Results A 16S rRNA gene clone library was constructed, and all sequences obtained from 161 clones showed affiliation with the phylum Firmicutes, with 160 sequences identified as Clostridiales and one sequence identified as unclassified Firmicutes. The majority of the sequences (70%) were affiliated with the genus Clostridium. Aerobic heterotrophic cell counts on chocolate agar ranged between 5.0 × 104 to 1.6 × 106 colony forming units (cfu)/ml for the rectum swabs and 4.0 × 103 to 1.0 × 105 cfu/g for the faeces samples. The proportion of ampr bacteria ranged from 0% to 44%. All of 144 randomly selected ampr isolates tested positive for enzymatic β-lactamase activity. Three % of the ampr isolates from the rectal samples yielded positive results when screened for the presence of blaTEM genes by PCR. BlaTEM alleles were also detected by PCR in two out of three total faecal DNA samples from polar bears. Conclusion The bacterial diversity in faeces from polar bears in their natural environment in Svalbard is low compared to other animal species, with all obtained clones affiliating to Firmicutes. Furthermore, only low levels of blaTEM alleles were detected in contrast to their increasing prevalence in some clinical and commensal bacterial populations. PMID:20074323

  9. The evolution of hyperactivity, impulsivity and cognitive diversity

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jonathan; Taylor, Eric

    2005-01-01

    The evolutionary status of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is central to assessments of whether modern society has created it, either physically or socially; and is potentially useful in understanding its neurobiological basis and treatment. The high prevalence of ADHD (5–10%) and its association with the seven-repeat allele of DRD4, which is positively selected in evolution, raise the possibility that ADHD increases the reproductive fitness of the individual, and/or the group. However, previous suggestions of evolutionary roles for ADHD have not accounted for its confinement to a substantial minority. Because one of the key features of ADHD is its diversity, and many benefits of population diversity are well recognized (as in immunity), we study the impact of groups' behavioural diversity on their fitness. Diversity occurs along many dimensions, and for simplicity we choose unpredictability (or variability), excess of which is a well-established characteristic of ADHD. Simulations of the Changing Food group task show that unpredictable behaviour by a minority optimizes results for the group. Characteristics of such group exploration tasks are risk-taking, in which costs are borne mainly by the individual; and information-sharing, in which benefits accrue to the entire group. Hence, this work is closely linked to previous studies of evolved altruism. We conclude that even individually impairing combinations of genes, such as ADHD, can carry specific benefits for society, which can be selected for at that level, rather than being merely genetic coincidences with effects confined to the individual. The social benefits conferred by diversity occur both inside and outside the ‘normal’ range, and these may be distinct. This view has the additional merit of offering explanations for the prevalence, sex and age distribution, severity distribution and heterogeneity of ADHD. PMID:16849269

  10. Distribution of CYP2D6 alleles and phenotypes in the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Genro, Júlia P; Sortica, Vinicius A; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; de Moraes, Maria Elizabete; Pena, Sergio D J; dos Santos, Andrea K Ribeiro; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Hutz, Mara H

    2014-01-01

    The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil) to 10.2% (Northern Brazil). The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%). Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions. PMID:25329392

  11. Distribution of CYP2D6 Alleles and Phenotypes in the Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Sortica, Vinicius A.; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; de Moraes, Maria Elizabete; Pena, Sergio D. J.; dos Santos, Ândrea K. Ribeiro; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Hutz, Mara H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil) to 10.2% (Northern Brazil). The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%). Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions. PMID:25329392

  12. Range Ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After more than two hundred years, grazing remains California’s most extensive land use. The ‘Range Ecosystems’ chapter in the ‘Ecosystems of California’ sourcebook provides an integrated picture of the biophysical, social, and economic aspects of lands grazed by livestock in the state. Grazing mana...

  13. Geostatistical analysis of allele presence patterns among American black bears in eastern North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, L.M.; Van Manen, F.T.; King, T.L.

    2005-01-01

    Highways are one of the leading causes of wildlife habitat fragmentation and may particularly affect wide-ranging species, such as American black bears (Ursus americanus). We initiated a research project in 2000 to determine potential effects of a 4-lane highway on black bear ecology in Washington County, North Carolina. The research design included a treatment area (highway construction) and a control area and a pre- and post-construction phase. We used data from the pre-construction phase to determine whether we could detect scale dependency or directionality among allele occurrence patterns using geostatistics. Detection of such patterns could provide a powerful tool to measure the effects of landscape fragmentation on gene flow. We sampled DNA from roots of black bear hair at 70 hair-sampling sites on each study area for 7 weeks during fall of 2000. We used microsatellite analysis based on 10 loci to determine unique multi-locus genotypes. We examined all alleles sampled at ???25 sites on each study area and mapped their presence or absence at each hair-sample site. We calculated semivariograms, which measure the strength of statistical correlation as a function of distance, and adjusted them for anisotropy to determine the maximum direction of spatial continuity. We then calculated the mean direction of spatial continuity for all examined alleles. The mean direction of allele frequency variation was 118.3?? (SE = 8.5) on the treatment area and 172.3?? (SE = 6.0) on the control area. Rayleigh's tests showed that these directions differed from random distributions (P = 0.028 and P < 0.001, respectively), indicating consistent directional patterns for the alleles we examined in each area. Despite the small spatial scale of our study (approximately 11,000 ha for each study area), we observed distinct and consistent patterns of allele occurrence, suggesting different directions of gene flow between the study areas. These directions seemed to coincide with the

  14. JAK2V617F allele burden in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Alshemmari, Salem H; Rajaan, Reshmi; Ameen, Reem; Al-Drees, Mohammad A; Almosailleakh, Marwa R

    2014-05-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal malignant diseases that represent a group of conditions including polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and myelofibrosis (MF). The JAK2-V617F mutation is prevalent in almost all patients with MPNs and has become a valuable biomarker for diagnosis of MPNs. A different allele burden in these entities has long been noticed. The aim of our study was to assess the JAK2 allele burden in our JAK2V617F positive cases and its association with phenotype if any and to select a simple, sensitive assay for use in our clinical molecular diagnostic laboratory. Methodologies reported in this literature include amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR). We analyzed 174 cases by RQ-PCR for the quantification of JAK2V617F were initially screened by ARMS-PCR. We found that V617F allele burden in the entire population of patients was 73 % ranging from 0.97 to 95 %. The median V617F allele burden in PV patients was 40 %, MF was 95 %, and ET was 25 %. ARMS-PCR and RQ-PCR were proven to be sensitive since ARMS-PCR is a qualitative method; it can be used to screen JAK2V617F mutation and RQ-PCR was used to quantify the V617F cells. Our study suggests that JAK2V617F positivity is associated with MPNs, and its allele burden is an excellent diagnostic marker for disease subtypes, prognosis, disease phenotype and complication, and evolution. The data indicates that ARMS-PCR is simple and can be easily performed for the primary screening of JAK2V617F mutation, and RQ-PCR is sensitive enough to detect low mutant allele levels (>10 %), specific enough not to produce false positive results, and can be performed for the JAK2V617F allele burden quantification. PMID:24362471

  15. Analysis of HLA class II haplotypes in the Cayapa indians of ecuador: A novel DRBI allele reveals evidence for convergent evolution and balancing selection at position 86

    SciTech Connect

    Titus-Trachtenberg, E.A.; Erlich, H. ); Rickards, O.; De Stefano, G.F. )

    1994-07-01

    PCR amplification, oligonucleotide probe typing, and sequencing were used to analyze the HLA class II loci (DRB1, DQA1, DAB1, and DPB1) of an isolated South Amerindian tribe. Here the authors report HLA class II variation, including the identification of a new DRB1 allele, several novel DR/DQ haplotypes, and an unusual distribution of DPB1 alleles, among the Cayapa Indians (N=100) of Ecuador. A general reduction of HLA class II allelic variation in the Cayapa is consistent with a population bottleneck during the colonization of the Americas. The new Cayapa DRB1 allele, DRB1[sup *]08042, which arose by a G[yields]T point mutation in the parental DRB1[sup *]0802, contains a novel Val codon (GTT) at position 86. The generation of DRB1[sup *]08042 (Val-86) from DRB1[sup *]0802 (Gly-86) in the Cayapa, by a different mechanism than the (GT[yields]TG) change in the creation of DRB1[sub *]08041 (Val-86) from DRB1[sup *]0802 in Africa, implicates selection in the convergent evolution of position 86 DR[beta] variants. The DRB1[sup *]08042 allele has not been found in >1,800 Amerindian haplotypes and thus presumably arose after the Cayapa separated from other South American Amerindians. Selection pressure for increased haplotype diversity can be inferred in the generation and maintenance of three new DRB1[sup *]08042 haplotypes and several novel DR/DQ haplotypes in this population. The DPB1 allelic distribution in the Cayapa is also extraordinary, with two alleles, DPB1[sup *]1401, a very rare allele in North American Amerindian populations, and DPB1[sup *]0402, the most common Amerindian DPB1 allele, constituting 89% of the Cayapa DPB1. These data are consistent with the postulated rapid rate of evolution as noted for the class I HLA-B locus of other South American Indians. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Allele-Specific Behavior of Molecular Networks: Understanding Small-Molecule Drug Response in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunquan; Hao, Dapeng; Zhang, Shaojun; Zhou, Meng; Su, Fei; Chen, Xi; Zhi, Hui; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    The study of systems genetics is changing the way the genetic and molecular basis of phenotypic variation, such as disease susceptibility and drug response, is being analyzed. Moreover, systems genetics aids in the translation of insights from systems biology into genetics. The use of systems genetics enables greater attention to be focused on the potential impact of genetic perturbations on the molecular states of networks that in turn affects complex traits. In this study, we developed models to detect allele-specific perturbations on interactions, in which a genetic locus with alternative alleles exerted a differing influence on an interaction. We utilized the models to investigate the dynamic behavior of an integrated molecular network undergoing genetic perturbations in yeast. Our results revealed the complexity of regulatory relationships between genetic loci and networks, in which different genetic loci perturb specific network modules. In addition, significant within-module functional coherence was found. We then used the network perturbation model to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of individual differences in response to 100 diverse small molecule drugs. As a result, we identified sub-networks in the integrated network that responded to variations in DNA associated with response to diverse compounds and were significantly enriched for known drug targets. Literature mining results provided strong independent evidence for the effectiveness of these genetic perturbing networks in the elucidation of small-molecule responses in yeast. PMID:23308257

  17. Chromosome substitution lines (CS-B) revealed the presence of cryptic beneficial alleles in G. barbadense with potential to increase lint and seedcotton yield in Upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most promising opportunities to improve the genetic diversity of Upland cotton is from interspecific germplasm introgression from the other tetraploid species. The untapped potential of the beneficial alleles of the wild unadapted species has not been well utilized because of the paucit...

  18. Gm and Km alleles in two Spanish Pyrenean populations (Andorra and Pallars Sobirà): a review of Gm variation in the Western Mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, M P; Esteban, E; Aluja, M P; Nogués, R M; Backés-Duró, C; Dug