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Sample records for allelic richness ar

  1. Ethnic variation in allele distribution of the androgen receptor (AR) (CAG)n repeat.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Christine M; Lowe, Lynn P; Lee, Hoon; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Dyer, Alan R; Metzger, Boyd E; Lowe, William L; Urbanek, Margrit

    2012-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is important in reproductive organ development, as well as tissue homeostasis of the pancreas, liver, and skeletal muscle in adulthood. The trinucleotide (CAG)(n) repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the AR gene is thought to regulate AR activity, with longer alleles conferring reduced receptor activity. Therefore, the evaluation of the allelic distribution of the AR (CAG)(n) repeat in various ethnic groups is crucial in understanding the interindividual variability in AR activity. We evaluated ethnic variation of this AR polymorphism by genotyping individuals from the multiethnic Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome study cohort. We genotyped 4421 Caucasian mothers and 3365 offspring of European ancestry; 1494 Thai mothers and 1742 offspring; 1119 Afro-Caribbean mothers and 1142 offspring; and 780 Hispanic mothers and 770 offspring of Mexican ancestry from Bellflower, California. The distributions of (CAG)(n) alleles among all 4 ethnic groups are significantly different (P < .0001). Pairwise tests confirmed significant differences between each pair of ethnicities tested (P < 10(-28)). The relative AR (CAG)(n) repeat length in the different groups was as follows: Afro-Caribbean (shortest repeat lengths and greatest predicted AR activity) < Caucasian < Hispanic < Thai (longest repeat length and lowest predicted AR activity). Significant interethnic differences in the allele frequencies of the AR exon 1 (CAG)(n) polymorphism exist. Our results suggest that there may be potential ethnic differences in androgenic pathway activity and androgen sensitivity. PMID:21597087

  2. Ar-40/Ar-39 Ages for Maskelynites and K-Rich Melt from Olivine-Rich Lithology in (Kanagawa) Zagami

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Nyquist, L. E.; Lindsay, F.; Turrin, B.; Swisher, C. C., III; Delaney, J. S.; Shih, C.-Y.; Niihara, T.; Misawa, K.

    2013-01-01

    We report Ar/Ar release patterns for small maskelynite grains and samples of a K-rich phase separated from the basaltic shergottite Zagami. The purpose of the work is to investigate the well-known discrepancy between published Ar/Ar ages of Zagami, >200 Ma, and its age of approx. 170 Ma as determined by other methods [1-6]. Niihara et al. [7] divide less abundant darker material present in Zagami into an olivine-rich lithology (ORL), from which most of our samples came, and a pyroxene-rich one (Dark Mottled-Lithology: DML) [8, 9]. ORL consists of vermicular fayalitic olivine, coarse-grained pyroxene, maskelynite, and a glassy phase exceptionally rich in K (up to 8.5 wt%), Al, and Si, but poor in Fe and Mg. The elemental composition suggests a late-stage melt, i.e., residual material that solidified late in a fractional crystallization sequence. Below we refer to it as "K-rich melt." The K-rich melt contains laths of captured olivine, Ca-rich pyroxene, plagioclase, and opaques. It seemed to offer an especially promising target for Ar-40/Ar-39 dating.

  3. 40Ar/39Ar and cosmic ray exposure ages of plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith, 78461

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, J. P.; Baldwin, S. L.; Delano, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Argon isotopic data is used to assess the potential of low-mass samples collected by sample return missions on planetary objects (e.g., Moon, Mars, asteroids), to reveal planetary surface processes. We report the first 40Ar/39Ar ages and 38Ar cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages, determined for eleven submillimeter-sized (ranging from 0.06 to 1.2 mg) plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith sample 78461 collected at the base of the Sculptured Hills. Total fusion analysis was used to outgas argon from the lithic fragments. Three different approaches were used to determine 40Ar/39Ar ages and illustrate the sensitivity of age determination to the choice of trapped (40Ar/36Ar)t. 40Ar/39Ar ages range from ~4.0 to 4.4 Ga with one exception (Plag#10). Surface CRE ages, based on 38Ar, range from ~1 to 24 Ma. The relatively young CRE ages suggest recent re-working of the upper few centimeters of the regolith. The CRE ages may result from the effect of downslope movement of materials to the base of the Sculptured Hills from higher elevations. The apparent 40Ar/39Ar age for Plag#10 is >5 Ga and yielded the oldest CRE age (i.e., ~24 Ma). We interpret this data to indicate the presence of parentless 40Ar in Plag#10, originating in the lunar atmosphere and implanted in lunar regolith by solar wind. Based on a chemical mixing model, plagioclase compositions, and 40Ar/39Ar ages, we conclude that lithic fragments originated from Mg-suite of highland rocks, and none were derived from the mare region.

  4. Mineralogy and Ar-Ar Age of the Tarahumara IIE Iron, with Reference to the Origin of Alkali-Rich Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Bogard, Donald D.; Otsuki, Mayumi; Ishii, Teruaki

    2003-01-01

    Silicate inclusions in nine known IIE irons show diversity in mineralogy, and Colomera, Kodaikanal, Elga and Miles contain alkali-rich silicate inclusions. Bogard et al. showed evidence of a complex parent body evolution for IIE irons based on Ar-39-Ar-40 ages. Colomera contained a sanidine-rich surface inclusion and the K-enrichment trends in the Na-rich inclusions are different from those of other IIEs. To elucidate the origin of K-rich materials, we studied the mineralogy and Ar-Ar age of silicate inclusions from the Tarahumara IIE iron meteorite.

  5. sup 40 Ar- sup 39 Ar and K-Ar dating of K-rich rocks from the Roccamonfina volcano, Roman Comagmatic Region, Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Di Brozolo, F.R.; Di Girolamo, P.; Turi, B.; Oddone, M. )

    1988-06-01

    Roccamonfina is the northernmost Volcano of the Campanian area of the K-rich Roman comagmatic Region of Italy. It erupted a huge amount of pyroclastics and lavas belonging to both the Leucite-Basanite and Leucitite Series (LBLS) and the Shoshonite Series (SS), spread over an area of about 300 km{sup 2}. The above series correspond to the High-K Series (HKS) and Low-K Series (LKS) of Appleton (1971), respectively. {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar and K-Ar dating of samples from both series gave ages ranging from 0.656 to 0.096 Ma for the SS and from 1.03( ) to 0.053 Ma for the LBLS. These results indicate that the products of the two series were outpoured together at least between 0.7 and 0.1 Ma age, i.e. during both the so-called pre-caldera phase and the post-caldera phase of activity. The latest products of the volcanism at Roccamonfina were erupted just before the deposition of the Grey Campanian Ignimbrite, which erupted from vents located about 50 km to the south in the Phlegrean Fields near Naples and has an age of about 33,000 years. Taking into account all the available all the available radiometric data the authors conclude that Roccamonfina was active between 1.5 and 0.05 Ma ago, in excellent agreement with the stratigraphic evidence. In this same time span is concentrated the activity of all the centers of the Roman Region north of Naples.

  6. Shape of Ar44: Onset of deformation in neutron-rich nuclei near Ca48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielińska, M.; Görgen, A.; Clément, E.; Delaroche, J.-P.; Girod, M.; Korten, W.; Bürger, A.; Catford, W.; Dossat, C.; Iwanicki, J.; Libert, J.; Ljungvall, J.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Obertelli, A.; Piętak, D.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Sletten, G.; Srebrny, J.; Theisen, Ch.; Wrzosek, K.

    2009-07-01

    The development of deformation and shape coexistence in the vicinity of doubly magic Ca48, related to the weakening of the N=28 shell closure, was addressed in a low-energy Coulomb excitation experiment using a radioactive Ar44 beam from the SPIRAL facility at GANIL. The 21+ and 22+ states in Ar44 were excited on Pb208 and Ag109 targets at two different beam energies. B(E2) values between all observed states and the spectroscopic quadrupole moment of the 21+ state were extracted from the differential Coulomb excitation cross sections, indicating a prolate shape of the Ar44 nucleus and giving evidence of an onset of deformation already two protons and two neutrons away from doubly magic Ca48. New Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov based configuration mixing calculations have been performed with the Gogny D1S interaction for Ar44 and neighboring nuclei using two different approaches: the angular momentum projected generator coordinate method considering axial quadrupole deformations and a five-dimensional approach including the triaxial degree of freedom. The experimental values and new calculations are furthermore compared to shell-model calculations and to relativistic mean-field calculations. The new results give insight into the weakening of the N=28 shell closure and the development of deformation in this neutron-rich region of the nuclear chart.

  7. POSTFLAME BEHAVIOR OF NITROGENOUS SPECIES IN THE PRESENCE OF FUEL SULFUR: I. RICH, MOIST, CO/AR/O2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of experimental measurements of NO, N2, and other nitrogenous species in the postflame games of rich (phi = 2.17) premixed laminar CO/Ar/O2 (trace H2) flames, with fuel nitrogen as NO, C2N2, and NH3 and fuel sulfur as SO2, which allowed the nitrogen balanc...

  8. AT-rich sequences from the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora rosea exhibit ARS function in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bergero, Roberta

    2006-05-01

    Autonomous replicating sequences are DNA elements that trigger DNA replication and are widely used in the development of episomal transformation vectors for fungi. In this paper, a genomic library from the mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora rosea was constructed in the integrative plasmid YIp5 and screened in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for sequences that act as ARS and trigger plasmid replication. Two genetic elements (GrARS2, GrARS6) promoted high-rates of yeast transformation. Sequence analysis of these elements shows them to be AT-rich (72-80%) and to contain multiple near-matches to the yeast autonomous consensus sequences ACS and EACS. GrARS2 contained a putative miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) delimited by 28-bp terminal inverted repeats (TIRs). Disruption of this element and removal of one TIR increased plasmid stability several fold. The potential for palindromes to affect DNA replication is discussed. PMID:16504551

  9. Meiotic recombination generates rich diversity in NK cell receptor genes, alleles, and haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Norman, Paul J; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Gendzekhadze, Ketevan; Hammond, John A; Moesta, Achim K; Sharma, Deepti; Graef, Thorsten; McQueen, Karina L; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Carrington, Christine V F; Chandanayingyong, Dasdayanee; Chang, Yih-Hsin; Crespí, Catalina; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Hameed, Kamran; Kamkamidze, Giorgi; Koram, Kwadwo A; Layrisse, Zulay; Matamoros, Nuria; Milà, Joan; Park, Myoung Hee; Pitchappan, Ramasamy M; Ramdath, D Dan; Shiau, Ming-Yuh; Stephens, Henry A F; Struik, Siske; Tyan, Dolly; Verity, David H; Vaughan, Robert W; Davis, Ronald W; Fraser, Patricia A; Riley, Eleanor M; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2009-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the essential functions of innate immunity and reproduction. Various genes encode NK cell receptors that recognize the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I molecules expressed by other cells. For primate NK cells, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are a variable and rapidly evolving family of MHC Class I receptors. Studied here is KIR3DL1/S1, which encodes receptors for highly polymorphic human HLA-A and -B and comprises three ancient allelic lineages that have been preserved by balancing selection throughout human evolution. While the 3DS1 lineage of activating receptors has been conserved, the two 3DL1 lineages of inhibitory receptors were diversified through inter-lineage recombination with each other and with 3DS1. Prominent targets for recombination were D0-domain polymorphisms, which modulate enhancer function, and dimorphism at position 283 in the D2 domain, which influences inhibitory function. In African populations, unequal crossing over between the 3DL1 and 3DL2 genes produced a deleted KIR haplotype in which the telomeric "half" was reduced to a single fusion gene with functional properties distinct from its 3DL1 and 3DL2 parents. Conversely, in Eurasian populations, duplication of the KIR3DL1/S1 locus by unequal crossing over has enabled individuals to carry and express alleles of all three KIR3DL1/S1 lineages. These results demonstrate how meiotic recombination combines with an ancient, preserved diversity to create new KIR phenotypes upon which natural selection acts. A consequence of such recombination is to blur the distinction between alleles and loci in the rapidly evolving human KIR gene family. PMID:19411600

  10. Meiotic recombination generates rich diversity in NK cell receptor genes, alleles, and haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Paul J.; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Gendzekhadze, Ketevan; Hammond, John A.; Moesta, Achim K.; Sharma, Deepti; Graef, Thorsten; McQueen, Karina L.; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Carrington, Christine V.F.; Chandanayingyong, Dasdayanee; Chang, Yih-Hsin; Crespí, Catalina; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Hameed, Kamran; Kamkamidze, Giorgi; Koram, Kwadwo A.; Layrisse, Zulay; Matamoros, Nuria; Milà, Joan; Park, Myoung Hee; Pitchappan, Ramasamy M.; Ramdath, D. Dan; Shiau, Ming-Yuh; Stephens, Henry A.F.; Struik, Siske; Tyan, Dolly; Verity, David H.; Vaughan, Robert W.; Davis, Ronald W.; Fraser, Patricia A.; Riley, Eleanor M.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the essential functions of innate immunity and reproduction. Various genes encode NK cell receptors that recognize the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I molecules expressed by other cells. For primate NK cells, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are a variable and rapidly evolving family of MHC Class I receptors. Studied here is KIR3DL1/S1, which encodes receptors for highly polymorphic human HLA-A and -B and comprises three ancient allelic lineages that have been preserved by balancing selection throughout human evolution. While the 3DS1 lineage of activating receptors has been conserved, the two 3DL1 lineages of inhibitory receptors were diversified through inter-lineage recombination with each other and with 3DS1. Prominent targets for recombination were D0-domain polymorphisms, which modulate enhancer function, and dimorphism at position 283 in the D2 domain, which influences inhibitory function. In African populations, unequal crossing over between the 3DL1 and 3DL2 genes produced a deleted KIR haplotype in which the telomeric “half” was reduced to a single fusion gene with functional properties distinct from its 3DL1 and 3DL2 parents. Conversely, in Eurasian populations, duplication of the KIR3DL1/S1 locus by unequal crossing over has enabled individuals to carry and express alleles of all three KIR3DL1/S1 lineages. These results demonstrate how meiotic recombination combines with an ancient, preserved diversity to create new KIR phenotypes upon which natural selection acts. A consequence of such recombination is to blur the distinction between alleles and loci in the rapidly evolving human KIR gene family. PMID:19411600

  11. A high-fat diet and the threonine-encoding allele (Thr54) polymorphism of fatty acid–binding protein 2 reduce plasma triglyceride–rich lipoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Thr54 allele of the fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2) DNA polymorphism is associated with increased triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and insulin resistance. We investigated whether the triglyceride-rich lipoprotein response to diets of varied fat content is affected by the fatty acid binding pr...

  12. Contribution of allelic variability in prostate specific antigen (PSA) & androgen receptor (AR) genes to serum PSA levels in men with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Sushant V.; Maitra, Anurupa; Roy, Nobhojit; Chavan, Padma R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Wide variability in serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels exists in malignant conditions of the prostate. PSA is expressed in normal range in 20 to 25 per cent of prostate cancer cases even in presence of high grade Gleason score. This study was aimed to assess the influence of genetic variants exhibited by PSA and androgen receptor (AR) genes towards the variable expression of PSA in prostate cancer. Methods: Pre-treatment serum PSA levels from 101 prostate cancer cases were retrieved from medical record. PSA genotype analysis in promoter region and AR gene microsatellite Cytosine/Adenine/Guanine (CAG) repeat analysis in exon 1 region was performed using DNA sequencing and fragment analysis techniques. Results: A total of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PSA promoter region were noted. Only two SNPs viz., 158G/A (P<0.001) in the proximal promoter region and -3845G/A (P<0.001) in enhancer region showed significant association with serum PSA levels. The carriers of homozygous GG genotype (P<0.001) at both of these polymorphic sites showed higher expression of PSA whereas homozygous AA genotype (P<0.001) carriers demonstrated lower PSA levels. The combination effect of PSA genotypes along with stratified AR CAG repeats lengths (long, intermediate and short) was also studied. The homozygous GG genotype along with AR long CAG repeats and homozygous AA genotype along with AR short CAG repeats at position -3845 and -158 showed strong interaction and thus influenced serum PSA levels. Interpretation & conclusions: The genetic variants exhibited by PSA gene at positions -3845G/A and -158G/A may be accountable towards wide variability of serum PSA levels in prostate cancer. Also the preferential binding of G and A alleles at these polymorphic sites along with AR long and short CAG repeats may contribute towards PSA expression. PMID:24820830

  13. The Alu-Rich Genomic Architecture of SPAST Predisposes to Diverse and Functionally Distinct Disease-Associated CNV Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Yuan, Bo; Campbell, Ian M.; Scull, Jennifer C.; Withers, Marjorie A.; Baggett, Brett C.; Beck, Christine R.; Shaw, Christine J.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Moretti, Paolo; Goodwin, Wendy E.; Hein, Nichole; Fink, John K.; Seong, Moon-Woo; Seo, Soo Hyun; Park, Sung Sup; Karbassi, Izabela D.; Batish, Sat Dev; Ordóñez-Ugalde, Andrés; Quintáns, Beatriz; Sobrido, María-Jesús; Stemmler, Susanne; Lupski, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Intragenic copy-number variants (CNVs) contribute to the allelic spectrum of both Mendelian and complex disorders. Although pathogenic deletions and duplications in SPAST (mutations in which cause autosomal-dominant spastic paraplegia 4 [SPG4]) have been described, their origins and molecular consequences remain obscure. We mapped breakpoint junctions of 54 SPAST CNVs at nucleotide resolution. Diverse combinations of exons are deleted or duplicated, highlighting the importance of particular exons for spastin function. Of the 54 CNVs, 38 (70%) appear to be mediated by an Alu-based mechanism, suggesting that the Alu-rich genomic architecture of SPAST renders this locus susceptible to various genome rearrangements. Analysis of breakpoint Alus further informs a model of Alu-mediated CNV formation characterized by small CNV size and potential involvement of mechanisms other than homologous recombination. Twelve deletions (22%) overlap part of SPAST and a portion of a nearby, directly oriented gene, predicting novel chimeric genes in these subjects’ genomes. cDNA from a subject with a SPAST final exon deletion contained multiple SPAST:SLC30A6 fusion transcripts, indicating that SPAST CNVs can have transcriptional effects beyond the gene itself. SLC30A6 has been implicated in Alzheimer disease, so these fusion gene data could explain a report of spastic paraplegia and dementia cosegregating in a family with deletion of the final exon of SPAST. Our findings provide evidence that the Alu genomic architecture of SPAST predisposes to diverse CNV alleles with distinct transcriptional—and possibly phenotypic—consequences. Moreover, we provide further mechanistic insights into Alu-mediated copy-number change that are extendable to other loci. PMID:25065914

  14. Development of β-Carotene Rich Maize Hybrids through Marker-Assisted Introgression of β-carotene hydroxylase Allele

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Vignesh; Hossain, Firoz; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Choudhary, Mukesh; Saha, Supradip; Bhat, Jayant S.; Prasanna, Boddupalli M.; Gupta, Hari S.

    2014-01-01

    Development of vitamin A-rich cereals can help in alleviating the widespread problem of vitamin A deficiency. We report here significant enhancement of kernel β-carotene in elite maize genotypes through accelerated marker-assisted backcross breeding. A favourable allele (543 bp) of the β-carotene hydroxylase (crtRB1) gene was introgressed in the seven elite inbred parents, which were low (1.4 µg/g) in kernel β-carotene, by using a crtRB1-specific DNA marker for foreground selection. About 90% of the recurrent parent genome was recovered in the selected progenies within two backcross generations. Concentration of β-carotene among the crtRB1-introgressed inbreds varied from 8.6 to 17.5 µg/g - a maximum increase up to 12.6-fold over recurrent parent. The reconstituted hybrids developed from improved parental inbreds also showed enhanced kernel β-carotene as high as 21.7 µg/g, compared to 2.6 µg/g in the original hybrid. The reconstituted hybrids evaluated at two locations possessed similar grain yield to that of original hybrids. These β-carotene enriched high yielding hybrids can be effectively utilized in the maize biofortification programs across the globe. PMID:25486271

  15. MHC class II variation in a rare and ecological specialist mouse lemur reveals lower allelic richness and contrasting selection patterns compared to a generalist and widespread sympatric congener.

    PubMed

    Pechouskova, Eva; Dammhahn, Melanie; Brameier, Markus; Fichtel, Claudia; Kappeler, Peter M; Huchard, Elise

    2015-04-01

    The polymorphism of immunogenes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is thought to influence the functional plasticity of immune responses and, consequently, the fitness of populations facing heterogeneous pathogenic pressures. Here, we evaluated MHC variation (allelic richness and divergence) and patterns of selection acting on the two highly polymorphic MHC class II loci (DRB and DQB) in the endangered primate Madame Berthe's mouse lemur (Microcebus berthae). Using 454 pyrosequencing, we examined MHC variation in a total of 100 individuals sampled over 9 years in Kirindy Forest, Western Madagascar, and compared our findings with data obtained previously for its sympatric congener, the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus). These species exhibit a contrasting ecology and demography that were expected to affect MHC variation and molecular signatures of selection. We found a lower allelic richness concordant with its low population density, but a similar level of allelic divergence and signals of historical selection in the rare feeding specialist M. berthae compared to the widespread generalist M. murinus. These findings suggest that demographic factors may exert a stronger influence than pathogen-driven selection on current levels of allelic richness in M. berthae. Despite a high sequence similarity between the two congeners, contrasting selection patterns detected at DQB suggest its potential functional divergence. This study represents a first step toward unravelling factors influencing the adaptive divergence of MHC genes between closely related but ecologically differentiated sympatric lemurs and opens new questions regarding potential functional discrepancy that would explain contrasting selection patterns detected at DQB. PMID:25687337

  16. Variant mapping of the Apo(B) AT rich minisatellite. Dependence on nucleotide sequence of the copy number variations. Instability of the non-canonical alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Desmarais, E; Vigneron, S; Buresi, C; Cambien, F; Cambou, J P; Roizes, G

    1993-01-01

    Because of its variations in length, the AT rich Hyper-Variable Region (HVR) of the 3' end of the Apolipoprotein B gene is used as a polymorphic maker in genetic studies. It contains a SspI site in its repeated motif and we used this feature to precisely analyse the internal structure of the different alleles found at this locus in a Caucasian population. We performed total digestion on 194 alleles as well as Minisatellite Variant Repeat mapping (MVR mapping: partial digestion) on 54. The results show that the level of length variability (in copy number) of the 5' end of this locus is at least two times higher than that of the 3' end. This could be correlated with the difference in nucleotide sequence between the two parts of the HVR and suggests the dependence on the primary structure of the mechanism that produces length variability. A molecular model is proposed to explain this result. Moreover, the sharp analysis of the minisatellite structure by the distribution of SspI sites reveals differences between long and short alleles, indicating that in most cases, no recombination occurs between alleles of different sizes. Finally the rare alleles exhibit a non-canonical structure. These important points could explain the bimodal distribution of the frequencies of the alleles in the population. Images PMID:8502559

  17. Mineralogy, Petrology, Chemistry, and Ar-39 - Ar-40 and Ages of the Caddo County IAB Iron: Evidence for Early Partial Melt Segregation of a Gabbro Area Rich in Plagioclase-Diopside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Bogard, Donald D.; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2000-01-01

    We found coarse-grained gabbroic material rich in plagioclase and diopside in the Caddo County IAB iron meteorite. The polished thin sections studied were made from areas rich in Al and Ca detected by a micro-focus X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping technique. The gabbro is not a clast within a breccia, but rather this area is located mainly at silicate-metal boundaries only a few cm away from an area with fine-grained, ultramafic silicate similar to winonaites. Medium-grained orthopyroxene and olivine are found in transitional areas showing no disturbance of their crystalline textures. A vein-like region, starting at the area rich in fine-grained mafic silicate, extends towards the gabbroic area with a gradual increase in abundance of plagioclase and diopside. This texture and our accumulated knowledge of the formation mechanism of IAB/winonaltes meteorites, suggest that the gabbroic materials were formed by inhomogeneous segregation of partial melts of chondritic source materials. Compositional data on two mineralogically distinct samples of the gabbro-rich portion of the inclusion were obtained by INAA. Compared to an average of LAB silicate inclusions or winonaites, the Caddo County gabbro is enriched in the incompatible lithophile elements Na, Ca, Sc, REE and Hf, which is consistent with a melt origin for the gabbro. The cosmogenic space exposure age of Caddo County (511 Ma) is significantly younger than exposure ages of some other IAB meteorites, An 39Ar-40Ar age determination of the gabbroic material indicates a series of upward steps in age from 4.516 Ga to 4.523 Ga, with a few high temperature ages up to 4.54 Ga. The older age could approximate the primary recrystallization age of silicates. The stepped Ar age spectrum may indicate differences in Ar closure temperatures during slow cooling of -2-20'C/Myr in the parent body. Alternatively, the younger Ar-Ar ages may date a shock event which occurred while Caddo County was hot and which also created textures

  18. Effects of sample size, number of markers, and allelic richness on the detection of spatial genetic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landguth, Erin L.; Gedy, Bradley C.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Garey, Andrew L.; Emel, Sarah L.; Mumma, Matthew; Wagner, Helene H.; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Cushman, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of study design on the ability to detect the effects of landscape pattern on gene flow is one of the most pressing methodological gaps in landscape genetic research. To investigate the effect of study design on landscape genetics inference, we used a spatially-explicit, individual-based program to simulate gene flow in a spatially continuous population inhabiting a landscape with gradual spatial changes in resistance to movement. We simulated a wide range of combinations of number of loci, number of alleles per locus and number of individuals sampled from the population. We assessed how these three aspects of study design influenced the statistical power to successfully identify the generating process among competing hypotheses of isolation-by-distance, isolation-by-barrier, and isolation-by-landscape resistance using a causal modelling approach with partial Mantel tests. We modelled the statistical power to identify the generating process as a response surface for equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions after introduction of isolation-by-landscape resistance. All three variables (loci, alleles and sampled individuals) affect the power of causal modelling, but to different degrees. Stronger partial Mantel r correlations between landscape distances and genetic distances were found when more loci were used and when loci were more variable, which makes comparisons of effect size between studies difficult. Number of individuals did not affect the accuracy through mean equilibrium partial Mantel r, but larger samples decreased the uncertainty (increasing the precision) of equilibrium partial Mantel r estimates. We conclude that amplifying more (and more variable) loci is likely to increase the power of landscape genetic inferences more than increasing number of individuals.

  19. Effects of sample size, number of markers, and allelic richness on the detection of spatial genetic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landguth, E.L.; Fedy, B.C.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.; Garey, A.L.; Emel, S.L.; Mumma, M.; Wagner, H.H.; Fortin, M.-J.; Cushman, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of study design on the ability to detect the effects of landscape pattern on gene flow is one of the most pressing methodological gaps in landscape genetic research. To investigate the effect of study design on landscape genetics inference, we used a spatially-explicit, individual-based program to simulate gene flow in a spatially continuous population inhabiting a landscape with gradual spatial changes in resistance to movement. We simulated a wide range of combinations of number of loci, number of alleles per locus and number of individuals sampled from the population. We assessed how these three aspects of study design influenced the statistical power to successfully identify the generating process among competing hypotheses of isolation-by-distance, isolation-by-barrier, and isolation-by-landscape resistance using a causal modelling approach with partial Mantel tests. We modelled the statistical power to identify the generating process as a response surface for equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions after introduction of isolation-by-landscape resistance. All three variables (loci, alleles and sampled individuals) affect the power of causal modelling, but to different degrees. Stronger partial Mantel r correlations between landscape distances and genetic distances were found when more loci were used and when loci were more variable, which makes comparisons of effect size between studies difficult. Number of individuals did not affect the accuracy through mean equilibrium partial Mantel r, but larger samples decreased the uncertainty (increasing the precision) of equilibrium partial Mantel r estimates. We conclude that amplifying more (and more variable) loci is likely to increase the power of landscape genetic inferences more than increasing number of individuals. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Denitrification in nitrate-rich streams: Application of N2:Ar and 15N-tracer methods in intact cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, L.K.; Voytek, M.A.; Böhlke, J.K.; Harvey, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Rates of benthic denitrification were measured using two techniques, membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), applied to sediment cores from two NO3--rich streams draining agricultural land in the upper Mississippi River Basin. Denitrification was estimated simultaneously from measurements of N 2:Ar (MIMS) and 15N[N2] (IRMS) after the addition of low-level 15NO3- tracer ( 15N:N = 0.03-0.08) in stream water overlying intact sediment cores. Denitrification rates ranged from about 0 to 4400 lmol N??m -2??h-1 in Sugar Creek and from 0 to 1300 ??mol N??m-2??h-1 in Iroquois River, the latter of which possesses greater streamflow discharge and a more homogeneous streambed and water column. Within the uncertainties of the two techniques, there is good agreement between the MIMS and IRMS results, which indicates that the production of N2 by the coupled process of nitrification/denitrification was relatively unimportant and surface-water NO3- was the dominant source of NO3- for benthic denitrification in these streams. Variation in stream NO3- concentration (from about 20 ??mol/L during low discharge to 1000 ??mol/L during high discharge) was a significant control of benthic denitrification rates, judging from the more abundant MIMS data. The interpretation that NO3- concentration directly affects denitrification rate was corroborated by increased rates of denitrification in cores amended with NO 3-. Denitrification in Sugar Creek removed ???11% per day of the instream NO3- in late spring and removed roughly 15-20% in late summer. The fraction of NO3- removed in Iroquois River was less than that of Sugar Creek. Although benthic denitrification rates were relatively high during periods of high stream flow, when NO3 concentrations were also high, the increase in benthic denitrification could not compensate for the much larger increase in stream NO3- fluxes during high flow. Consequently, fractional NO3- losses were relatively low

  1. Argon, oxygen, and boron isotopic evidence documenting 40ArE accumulation in phengite during water-rich high-pressure subduction metasomatism of continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menold, Carrie A.; Grove, Marty; Sievers, Natalie E.; Manning, Craig E.; Yin, An; Young, Edward D.; Ziegler, Karen

    2016-07-01

    The Luliang Shan area of the North Qaidam high pressure (HP) to ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic terrane in northwestern China features thick, garnet- and phengite-rich metasomatic selvages that formed around gneiss-hosted mafic eclogite blocks during HP conditions. Here we present new 40Ar/39Ar, δ18 O, and δ11 B results from a previously studied 30 m, 18 sample traverse that extends from the host gneiss into a representative eclogite block. Previous thermobarometry and new mica-quartz oxygen isotope thermometry from the traverse reveal that the phengite-rich selvage formed at temperatures similar to those recorded by the eclogites at peak pressure. Quartz and white mica δ18 O data from the selvage cannot be explained by simple mixing of gneiss and eclogite, and indicate a fluid/rock ratio >1 during regional-scale infiltration of high δ18 O (ca. 14‰) fluids. Heavy δ18 O overgrowths of metamorphic zircon over lighter δ18 O detrital grains indicate that the gneiss was similarly affected. Starkly contrasting boron content and δ11 B compositions for the host gneiss and the selvage also cannot be explained by local-scale devolatilization of the gneiss to form the selvage. Instead, the boron systematics are best attributed to two distinct phases of fluid infiltration: (1) low-boron selvage phengite with δ11 B from -10 to -30‰ grew under HP conditions; and (2) tourmaline and boron-rich muscovite with generally positive δ11 B crystallized in the host gneiss under subsequent lower pressure epidote-amphibolite facies conditions as the Luliang Shan gneiss terrane was exhumed past shallower portions of the subduction channel. Consistent with observations made worldwide, we were able to identify uptake of excess argon (40ArE) in phengite as a high pressure phenomenon. Phengite 40Ar/39Ar ages from massive eclogite exceed the ca. 490 Ma zircon U-Pb age of eclogite metamorphism by a factor of 1.5. However, phengite ages from the more permeable schistose selvage

  2. Compositional, structural and optical properties of Si-rich a-SiC:H thin films deposited by ArF-LCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, E.; Chiussi, S.; Kosch, U.; González, P.; Serra, J.; Serra, C.; León, B.

    2005-07-01

    Silicon-rich amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbon (a-SiC:H) films with C content up to 23% have been grown on Si and Corning glass substrates using ArF laser induced chemical vapor deposition (ArF-LCVD). This technique allows tailoring film composition by controlling deposition parameters such as precursor gas mixture (disilane and ethylene diluted in helium) and substrate temperature (180-400 °C). The influence of both parameters on composition and bonding were studied by Fourier transform infrarred (FTIR) and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The optical gap of these semiconductors deposited at 250 °C varied from 1.6 to 2.4 eV and was determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. An additional analysis by profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been done for determining the deposition rate and the roughness (rms < 6 nm) of the films as well as their surface morphology.

  3. The Laramide Caborca orogenic gold belt of northwestern Sonora, Mexico; white mica 40Ar/39Ar geochronology from gold-rich quartz veins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izaguirre, Aldo; Kunk, Michael J.; Iriondo, Alexander; McAleer, Ryan; Caballero-Martinez, Juan Antonio; Espinosa-Arámburu, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The COGB is approximately 600 kilometers long and 60 to 80 km wide, trends northwest, and extends from west-central Sonora to southern Arizona and California. The COGB contains mineralized gold-rich quartz veins that contain free gold associated with white mica (sericite), carbonate minerals (calcite and ankerite), and sulfides such as pyrite and galena. Limited geochronologic studies exist for parts of the COGB, and previous work was concentrated in mining districts. These previous studies recorded mineralization ages of approximately 70 to 40 Ma. Therefore, some workers proposed that the orogenic gold mineralization in the region occurred during a single pulse that was associated with the Laramide Orogeny that took place during the Cretaceous to early Eocene in the western margin of North America. However, the geochronologic dataset was quite limited, making any regional interpretations tenuous. Accordingly, one of the objectives of this geochronology study was to get a better representative sampling of the COGB in order to obtain a more complete record of the mineralization history. The 63 samples presented in this work are broadly distributed throughout the area of the COGB and allow us to better test the hypothesis that mineralization occurred in a single pulse.

  4. Effect of thermal maturation on the K-Ar, Rb-Sr and REE systematics of an organic-rich New Albany Shale as determined by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clauer, Norbert; Chaudhuri, Sambhudas; Lewan, M.D.; Toulkeridis, T.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrous-pyrolysis experiments were conducted on an organic-rich Devonian-Mississippian shale, which was also leached by dilute HCl before and after pyrolysis, to identify and quantify the induced chemical and isotopic changes in the rock. The experiments significantly affect the organic-mineral organization, which plays an important role in natural interactions during diagenetic hydrocarbon maturation in source rocks. They produce 10.5% of volatiles and the amount of HCl leachables almost doubles from about 6% to 11%. The Rb-Sr and K-Ar data are significantly modified, but not just by removal of radiogenic 40Ar and 87Sr, as described in many studies of natural samples at similar thermal and hydrous conditions. The determining reactions relate to alteration of the organic matter marked by a significant change in the heavy REEs in the HCl leachate after pyrolysis, underlining the potential effects of acidic fluids in natural environments. Pyrolysis induces also release from organics of some Sr with a very low 87Sr/86Sr ratio, as well as part of U. Both seem to have been volatilised during the experiment, whereas other metals such as Pb, Th and part of U appear to have been transferred from soluble phases into stable (silicate?) components. Increase of the K2O and radiogenic 40Ar contents of the silicate minerals after pyrolysis is explained by removal of other elements that could only be volatilised, as the system remains strictly closed during the experiment. The observed increase in radiogenic 40Ar implies that it was not preferentially released as a volatile gas phase when escaping the altered mineral phases. It had to be re-incorporated into newly-formed soluble phases, which is opposite to the general knowledge about the behavior of Ar in supergene natural environments. Because of the strictly closed-system conditions, hydrous-pyrolysis experiments allow to better identify and even quantify the geochemical aspects of organic-inorganic interactions, such as

  5. Diverged Alleles of the Anopheles gambiae Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene APL1A Display Distinct Protective Profiles against Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Mitri, Christian; Riehle, Michelle M.; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Brito-Fravallo, Emma; Takashima, Eizo; Thiery, Isabelle; Zettor, Agnes; Petres, Stephane; Bourgouin, Catherine; Vernick, Kenneth D.; Eiglmeier, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Functional studies have demonstrated a role for the Anopheles gambiae APL1A gene in resistance against the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Here, we exhaustively characterize the structure of the APL1 locus and show that three structurally different APL1A alleles segregate in the Ngousso colony. Genetic association combined with RNAi-mediated gene silencing revealed that APL1A alleles display distinct protective profiles against P. falciparum. One APL1A allele is sufficient to explain the protective phenotype of APL1A observed in silencing experiments. Epitope-tagged APL1A isoforms expressed in an in vitro hemocyte-like cell system showed that under assay conditions, the most protective APL1A isoform (APL1A2) localizes within large cytoplasmic vesicles, is not constitutively secreted, and forms only one protein complex, while a less protective isoform (APL1A1) is constitutively secreted in at least two protein complexes. The tested alleles are identical to natural variants in the wild A. gambiae population, suggesting that APL1A genetic variation could be a factor underlying natural heterogeneity of vector susceptibility to P. falciparum. PMID:23285147

  6. Autotetraploids of Vicia cracca show a higher allelic richness in natural populations and a higher seed set after artificial selfing than diploids

    PubMed Central

    Eliášová, Anežka; Trávníček, Pavel; Mandák, Bohumil; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite the great importance of autopolyploidy in the evolution of angiosperms, relatively little attention has been devoted to autopolyploids in natural polyploid systems. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain why autopolyploids are so common and successful, for example increased genetic diversity and heterozygosity and the transition towards selfing. However, case studies on patterns of genetic diversity and on mating systems in autopolyploids are scarce. In this study allozymes were employed to investigate the origin, population genetic diversity and mating system in the contact zone between diploid and assumed autotetraploid cytotypes of Vicia cracca in Central Europe. Methods Four enzyme systems resolved in six putative loci were investigated in ten diploid, ten tetraploid and five mixed-ploidy populations. Genetic diversity and heterozygosity, partitioning of genetic diversity among populations and cytotypes, spatial genetic structure and fixed heterozygosity were analysed. These studies were supplemented by a pollination experiment and meiotic chromosome observation. Key Results and Conclusions Weak evidence of fixed heterozygosity, a low proportion of unique alleles and genetic variation between cytotypes similar to the variation among populations within cytotypes supported the autopolyploid origin of tetraploids, although no multivalent formation was observed. Tetraploids possessed more alleles than diploids and showed higher observed zygotic heterozygosity than diploids, but the observed gametic heterozygosity was similar to the value observed in diploids and smaller than expected under panmixis. Values of the inbreeding coefficient and differentiation among populations (ρST) suggested that the breeding system in both cytotypes of V. cracca is mixed mating with prevailing outcrossing. The reduction in seed production of tetraploids after selfing was less than that in diploids. An absence of correlation between genetic and

  7. Increased J774 macrophage cytotoxicity of late postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from normolipidemic young men expressing an apolipoprotein epsilon 4 allele.

    PubMed

    Ragogna, F; Angeli, A; Corazza, S; Tettamanti, C; Faggiotto, A; Grassi, A; Ruotolo, G

    1997-07-25

    It has been demonstrated that normolipidemic young men with apolipoprotein E4/3 phenotype have a prolonged postprandial clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins following a high-fat diet. In the present study, we isolated fasting and postprandial (3 and 8 h) lipoprotein fraction from normolipidemic young men with E3/3 and E4/3 phenotypes and examined the in vitro cytotoxicity of these lipoproteins towards J774 macrophages. 8 h E4/3 very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) were significantly more cytotoxic than either 8 h E3/3 VLDL or fasting and 3 h E4/3 VLDL (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released: 161 +/- 21, 107 +/- 9, 88 +/- 16 and 101 +/- 12 I.U./l, respectively). Fasting E4/3 intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL) were also significantly more cytotoxic than either fasting E3/3 IDL or 3 h and 8 h E4/3 IDL (LDH released: 105 +/- 23, 60 +/- 9, 37 +/- 5 and 53 +/- 16 I.U./l, respectively), whereas either fasting or postprandial low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) samples did not show any difference in cytotoxicity between the two groups studied. 8 h E4/3 VLDL samples incubated with J774 macrophages had a lower esterified cholesterol (40 +/- 3 versus 52 +/- 3 micrograms), and higher triglyceride (783 +/- 133 versus 418 +/- 64 micrograms) and free fatty acid (FFA) (2.0 +/- 0.4 versus 0.9 +/- 0.1 microgram) content than fasting E4/3 VLDL. The increased macrophage cytotoxicity of late postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins seems to be related to the FFA content of E4/3 VLDL. PMID:9242961

  8. The kinetics of autoignition of rich N{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixtures at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, I.N.; Starikovskaia, S.M.; Starikovskii, A.Yu.

    2007-10-15

    The kinetics of chemical transformation in N{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixtures has been studied in the temperature range from 1000 to 2700 K and at pressures from 0.1 to 10 atm. A shock-tube experiment has been used to obtain data on the times of ignition delay in mixtures weakly diluted with inert gas (50 to 90% Ar). Based on the results, a mechanism to describe the kinetics in the system under study has been suggested. The values of rate constants of some chemical reactions involving N{sub 2}O, NO, and OH have been specified. (author)

  9. Two-cell detonation: losses effects on cellular structure and propagation in rich H2-NO2/N2O4-Ar mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virot, F.; Khasainov, B.; Desbordes, D.; Presles, H.-N.

    2010-12-01

    Detonation experiments in H2-NO2/N2O4-Ar mixtures (Equivalence ratio 1.2 and initial pressure lower than 0.1 MPa) confined in a tube of internal diameter 52 mm reveal two propagation regimes depending on initial pressure: (1) a quasi-CJ regime is observed along with a double cellular structure at high pressures; (2) at lower pressures, a low velocity detonation regime is observed with a single structure. Transition between this two regimes happens when the spinning detonation of the larger cell vanishes. Each detonation regime is characterized by velocity and pressure measurements and cellular structure records. Coherence between all experimental data for each experiment leads in assumption that losses are responsible for the transition between one regime to another. In a second part, we study such behaviour for a two-step mixture through numerical simulations using a global two-step chemical kinetics and a simple losses model. Numerical simulations qualitatively agree with experiments. Both detonation regimes with their own cellular structures are reproduced.

  10. Neutron-hole states in 45Ar from 1H(46Ar, d) 45Ar reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, F.; Lee, Jenny; Tsang, M. B.; Bazin, D.; Coupland, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M.; Lynch, W. G.; Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Sun, Z. Y.; Youngs, M.; Charity, R. J.; Sobotka, L. G.; Famiano, M.; Hudan, S.; Horoi, M.; Ye, Y. L.

    2013-07-01

    To improve the effective interactions in the pf shell, it is important to measure the single-particle and single-hole states near the N = 28 shell gap. In this paper, the neutron spectroscopic factors of hole states from the unstable neutron-rich 45Ar (Z = 18,N = 27) nucleus have been studied using the 1H(46Ar,d) 45Ar transfer reaction in inverse kinematics. Comparison of our results with the particle states of 45Ar produced in 2H(44Ar, p) 45Ar reaction shows that the two reactions populate states with different angular momenta. Using the angular distributions, we are able to confirm the spin assignments of four low-lying states of 45Ar. These are the ground state (f7/2), the first-excited state (p3/2), and the s1/2 and d3/2 states. While large basis shell-model predictions describe spectroscopic properties of the ground and p3/2 states very well, they fail to describe the s1/2 and d3/2 hole states.

  11. Topography evolution of 500 keV Ar(4+) ion beam irradiated InP(100) surfaces - formation of self-organized In-rich nano-dots and scaling laws.

    PubMed

    Sulania, Indra; Agarwal, Dinesh C; Kumar, Manish; Kumar, Sunil; Kumar, Pravin

    2016-07-27

    We report the formation of self-organized nano-dots on the surface of InP(100) upon irradiating it with a 500 keV Ar(4+) ion beam. The irradiation was carried out at an angle of 25° with respect to the normal at the surface with 5 different fluences ranging from 1.0 × 10(15) to 1.0 × 10(17) ions per cm(2). The morphology of the ion-irradiated surfaces was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the formation of the nano-dots on the irradiated surfaces was confirmed. The average size of the nano-dots varied from 44 ± 14 nm to 94 ± 26 nm with increasing ion fluence. As a function of the ion fluence, the variation in the average size of the nano-dots has a great correlation with the surface roughness, which changes drastically up to the ion fluence of 1.0 × 10(16) ions per cm(2) and attains almost a saturation level for further irradiation. The roughness and the growth exponent values deduced from the scaling laws suggest that the kinetic sputtering and the large surface diffusion steps of the atoms are the primary reasons for the formation of the self-organized nanodots on the surface. X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) studies show that the surface stoichiometry changes with the ion fluence. With irradiation, the surface becomes more indium (In)-rich owing to the preferential sputtering of the phosphorus atoms (P) and the pure metallic In nano-dots evolve at the highest ion fluence. The cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the sample irradiated with the highest fluence showed the absence of the nanostructuring beneath the surface. The surface morphological changes at this medium energy ion irradiation are discussed in correlation with the low and high energy experiments to shed more light on the mechanism of the well separated nano-dot formation. PMID:27400760

  12. Ar-Ar_Redux: rigorous error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rigorous data reduction and error propagation algorithms are needed to realise Earthtime's objective to improve the interlaboratory accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating to better than 1% and thereby facilitate the comparison and combination of the K-Ar and U-Pb chronometers. Ar-Ar_Redux is a new data reduction protocol and software program for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology which takes into account two previously underappreciated aspects of the method: 1. 40Ar/39Ar measurements are compositional dataIn its simplest form, the 40Ar/39Ar age equation can be written as: t = log(1+J [40Ar/39Ar-298.5636Ar/39Ar])/λ = log(1 + JR)/λ Where λ is the 40K decay constant and J is the irradiation parameter. The age t does not depend on the absolute abundances of the three argon isotopes but only on their relative ratios. Thus, the 36Ar, 39Ar and 40Ar abundances can be normalised to unity and plotted on a ternary diagram or 'simplex'. Argon isotopic data are therefore subject to the peculiar mathematics of 'compositional data', sensu Aitchison (1986, The Statistical Analysis of Compositional Data, Chapman & Hall). 2. Correlated errors are pervasive throughout the 40Ar/39Ar methodCurrent data reduction protocols for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology propagate the age uncertainty as follows: σ2(t) = [J2 σ2(R) + R2 σ2(J)] / [λ2 (1 + R J)], which implies zero covariance between R and J. In reality, however, significant error correlations are found in every step of the 40Ar/39Ar data acquisition and processing, in both single and multi collector instruments, during blank, interference and decay corrections, age calculation etc. Ar-Ar_Redux revisits every aspect of the 40Ar/39Ar method by casting the raw mass spectrometer data into a contingency table of logratios, which automatically keeps track of all covariances in a compositional context. Application of the method to real data reveals strong correlations (r2 of up to 0.9) between age measurements within a single irradiation batch. Propertly taking

  13. Ar-40/Ar-39 laser-probe dating of diamond inclusions from the Premier kimberlite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, D.; Onstott, T. C.; Harris, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The results of Ar-40/Ar-39 laser-probe analyses of individual eclogitic clinopyroxene inclusions from Premier diamonds are reported which yield a mean age of 1198 + or - 14 Myr. This age agrees well with Sm-Nd and Ar-40/Ar-39 analyses on similar Premier inclusions and is indistinguishable from the inferred time of emplacement of the host kimberlite, which implies that diamond formation was essentially synchronous with kimberlite generation. The extrapolated nonradiogenic Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio of 334 + or - 102 is similar to the present-day atmospheric composition. This value is inconsistent with Sr and Nd isotopic signatures from Premier eclogite inclusions, which suggest a depleted mantle source. Preentrapment equilibration of the inclusions with an Ar-36-rich fluid is the most probable explanation for the low nonradiogenic composition.

  14. MAIZE ALLELIC DIVERSITY PROJECT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Of the estimated 250-300 races of maize, only 24 races are represented in materials utilized by the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) project, a collaborative effort between USDA-ARS and public and private sector research scientists. This is largely a result of poor performance of many races in ...

  15. Neutron spectroscopic factors of Ar34 and Ar46 from (p,d) transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jenny; Tsang, M. B.; Bazin, D.; Coupland, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M.; Lynch, W. G.; Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Sun, Z. Y.; Youngs, M.; Charity, R. J.; Sobotka, L. G.; Famiano, M.; Hudan, S.; Shapira, D.; O'Malley, P.; Peters, W. A.; Chae, K. Y.; Schmitt, K.

    2011-01-01

    Single-neutron-transfer measurements using (p,d) reactions have been performed at 33 MeV per nucleon with proton-rich Ar34 and neutron-rich Ar46 beams in inverse kinematics. The extracted spectroscopic factors are compared to the large-basis shell-model calculations. Relatively weak quenching of the spectroscopic factors is observed between Ar34 and Ar46. The experimental results suggest that neutron correlations have a weak dependence on the asymmetry of the nucleus over this isotopic region. The present results are consistent with the systematics established from extensive studies of spectroscopic factors and dispersive optical-model analyses of Ca40-49 isotopes. They are, however, inconsistent with the trends obtained in knockout-reaction measurements.

  16. OCCURRENCE OF THE WAXY ALLELES WXA AND WXB IN WAXY SORGHUM PLANT INTRODUCTIONS AND THEIR EFFECT ON GRAIN THERMAL PROPERTIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The existence of two waxy alleles, wxa associated with no detectable Granule Bound Starch Synthase (GBSS), and wxb associated with apparently inactive GBSS was recently reported in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench). In this paper, the occurrence of the wxa and wxb alleles in the USDA-ARS photoperi...

  17. Ar-Ar ages and trapped Ar components in Martian shergottites RBT 04262 and LAR 06319

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jisun; Bogard, Donald D.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Garrison, Daniel H.; Mikouchi, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    We made 39Ar-40Ar (Ar-Ar) analyses of whole rock (WR) and mineral samples of two Martian shergottites, RBT 04262 (RBT) and LAR 06319 (LAR), in order to determine their Ar-Ar ages and the 40Ar/36Ar ratios of the trapped Martian Ar they contain. All samples released trapped (excess) 40Ar and 36Ar and suggested Ar-Ar ages older than their formation ages. Because trapped Ar components having different 40Ar/36Ar were released at different extraction temperatures, we utilized only a portion of the data to derive preferred Ar-Ar ages. We obtain Ar-Ar ages of 171 ± 8 Ma for RBT plagioclase and 163 ± 13 Ma for LAR whole rock. We identify two trapped Ar components. At low temperatures, particularly for plagioclase, Trapped-A with 40Ar/36Ar 285 ± 3 was released, and we believe this is most likely absorbed terrestrial air. At high extraction temperatures, particularly for pyroxene, Trapped-B with 40Ar/36Ar 1813 ± 127 was released. The poikilitic/non-poikilitic texture of RBT and the presence of large pyroxene oikocrysts allowed a clear definition of Trapped-B. This Ar component is Martian, and its isotopic similarity to the Martian atmospheric composition suggests that it may represent Martian atmospheric Ar incorporated into the shergottite melt via crustal rocks. Trapped-B partitioned into pyroxene at a constant molar ratio of K/36ArTr = 33.2 ± 9.5 × 106 for RBT 04262, and 80 ± 21 × 106 for LAR 06319. Trapped-A mixed in different proportions with Trapped-B could give apparently intermediate trapped 40Ar/36Ar compositions commonly observed in shergottites.

  18. 40Ar/39Ar systematics and argon diffusion in amber: implications for ancient earth atmospheres

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, G.P.; Snee, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    Argon isotope data indicate retained argon in bulk amber (matrix gas) is radiogenic [40Ar/39Ar ???32o] than the much more abundant surface absorbed argon [40Ar/39Ar ???295.5]. Neutron-induced 39Ar is retained in amber during heating experiments to 150?? -250??C, with no evidence of recoiled 39Ar found after irradiation. A maximum permissible volume diffusion coefficient of argon in amber (at ambient temperature) D???1.5 x 10-17 cm2S-1 is calculated from 39Ar retention. 40Ar/39Ar age calculations indicate Dominican Republic amber is ??? 45 Ma and North Dakota amber is ??? 89 Ma, both at least reasonable ages for the amber based upon stratigraphic and paleontological constraints and upon the small amount of radiogenic 40Ar. To date, over 300 gas analyses of ambers and resins of Cretaceous to Recent age that are geographically distributed among fifteen noted world locations identify mixtures of gases in different sites within amber (Berner and Landis, 1988). The presence of multiple mixing trends between compositionally distinct end-members gases within the same sample and evidence for retained radiogenic argon within the amber argue persuasivley against rapid exchange by diffusion of amber-contained gases with moder air. Only gas in primary bubbles entrapped between successive flows of tree resin has been interpreted as original "ancient air", which is an O2-rich end-member gas with air-like N2/Ar ratios. Gas analyses of these primary bubbles indicate atmospheric O2 levels in the Late Cretaceous of ??? 35%, and that atmospheric O2 dropped by early Tertiary time to near a present atmospheric level of 21% O2. A very low argon diffusion coefficient in amber persuasively argues for a gas in primary bubbles trapped in amber being ancient air (possibly modified only by O2 reaction with amber). ?? 1991.

  19. Plasma AR and abiraterone-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Romanel, Alessandro; Gasi Tandefelt, Delila; Conteduca, Vincenza; Jayaram, Anuradha; Casiraghi, Nicola; Wetterskog, Daniel; Salvi, Samanta; Amadori, Dino; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Rescigno, Pasquale; Bianchini, Diletta; Gurioli, Giorgia; Casadio, Valentina; Carreira, Suzanne; Goodall, Jane; Wingate, Anna; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Tunariu, Nina; Flohr, Penny; De Giorgi, Ugo; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene aberrations are rare in prostate cancer before primary hormone treatment but emerge with castration resistance. To determine AR gene status using a minimally invasive assay that could have broad clinical utility, we developed a targeted next-generation sequencing approach amenable to plasma DNA, covering all AR coding bases and genomic regions that are highly informative in prostate cancer. We sequenced 274 plasma samples from 97 castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone at two institutions. We controlled for normal DNA in patients' circulation and detected a sufficiently high tumor DNA fraction to quantify AR copy number state in 217 samples (80 patients). Detection of AR copy number gain and point mutations in plasma were inversely correlated, supported further by the enrichment of nonsynonymous versus synonymous mutations in AR copy number normal as opposed to AR gain samples. Whereas AR copy number was unchanged from before treatment to progression and no mutant AR alleles showed signal for acquired gain, we observed emergence of T878A or L702H AR amino acid changes in 13% of tumors at progression on abiraterone. Patients with AR gain or T878A or L702H before abiraterone (45%) were 4.9 and 7.8 times less likely to have a ≥50 or ≥90% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), respectively, and had a significantly worse overall [hazard ratio (HR), 7.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.51 to 15.34; P = 1.3 × 10(-9)) and progression-free (HR, 3.73; 95% CI, 2.17 to 6.41; P = 5.6 × 10(-7)) survival. Evaluation of plasma AR by next-generation sequencing could identify cancers with primary resistance to abiraterone. PMID:26537258

  20. Neutron-Proton Asymmetry Dependence of Spectroscopic Factors in Ar Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jenny; Tsang, M. B.; Bazin, D.; Coupland, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M.; Lynch, W. G.; Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Signoracci, A.; Sun, Z. Y.; Youngs, M.; Chae, K. Y.; Charity, R. J.; Cheung, H. K.; Famiano, M.; Hudan, S.; O'Malley, P.; Peters, W. A.; Schmitt, K.; Shapira, D.; Sobotka, L. G.

    2010-03-01

    Spectroscopic factors have been extracted for proton-rich Ar34 and neutron-rich Ar46 using the (p, d) neutron transfer reaction. The experimental results show little reduction of the ground state neutron spectroscopic factor of the proton-rich nucleus Ar34 compared to that of Ar46. The results suggest that correlations, which generally reduce such spectroscopic factors, do not depend strongly on the neutron-proton asymmetry of the nucleus in this isotopic region as was reported in knockout reactions. The present results are consistent with results from systematic studies of transfer reactions but inconsistent with the trends observed in knockout reaction measurements.

  1. Neutron-Proton Asymmetry Dependence of Spectroscopic Factors in Ar Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jenny; Tsang, Betty; Shapira, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic factors have been extracted for proton-rich 34Ar and neutron-rich 46Ar using the (p, d) neutron transfer reaction. The experimental results show little reduction of the ground state neutron spectroscopic factor of the proton-rich nucleus 34Ar compared to that of 46Ar. The results suggest that correlations, which generally reduce such spectroscopic factors, do not depend strongly on the neutron-proton asymmetry of the nucleus in this isotopic region as was reported in knockout reactions. The present results are consistent with results from systematic studies of transfer reactions but inconsistent with the trends observed in knockout reaction measurements.

  2. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  3. Identification of excess 40Ar by the 40Ar 39Ar, age spectrum technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1976-01-01

    40Ar 39Ar incremental heating experiments on igneous plagioclase, biotite, and pyroxene that contain known amounts of excess 40Ar indicate that saddle-shaped age spectra are diagnostic of excess 40Ar in igneous minerals as well as in igneous rocks. The minima in the age spectra approach but do not reach the crystallization age. Neither the age spectrum diagram nor the 40Ar 36Ar versus 39Ar 36Ar isochron diagram reliably reveal the crystallization age in such samples. ?? 1976.

  4. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients. Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3′-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5′-UTR polymorphisms). For neither the 3′- nor the 5′-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance. The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold

  5. NOTICE OF RELEASE OF HARD KERNEL PUROINDOLINE ALLELE NEAR-ISOGENIC LINE HEXAPLOID WHEAT GENETIC STOCKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture announces the release of seven hard kernel puroindoline allele near-isogenic line (NIL) hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genetic stocks (PI xxxxxx – PI xxxxxx) developed by Dr. Craig F. Morris at the USDA-ARS Western Wheat Quali...

  6. Registration of hard kernel puroindoline allele nearisogenic line hexaploid wheat genetic stocks.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven puroindoline allele near-isogenic line (NIL) hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genetic stocks (GS-xxxx – GS-xxxx; PI 644080 – PI 644086) were developed by Dr. Craig F. Morris at the USDA-ARS Western Wheat Quality Laboratory, Pullman, Washington. As they incorporate the first seven known ...

  7. Superdeformation of Ar hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaka, Masahiro; Kimura, Masaaki; Hiyama, Emiko; Sagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the differences in the Λ separation energies (S_Λ ) of the ground and superdeformed (SD) states in {}^{37}_Λ Ar, ^{39}_Λ Ar, and ^{41}_Λ Ar within the framework of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). In this study, we find that the calculated S_Λ values in the SD states are much smaller than those in the ground states, unlike the result using the relativistic mean-field (RMF) calculation [B.-N. Lu et al., Phys. Rev. C, 89, 044307 (2014)]. One of the reasons for this difference between the present work and the RMF calculation is the difference in the density profile of the SD states in the core nuclei. We also find that the property of the Λ N odd-parity interaction affects the S_Λ trend between the ground and SD states.

  8. ARS Biodiesel Research Initiatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel activities within ARS are concerned with the production, quality, and properties of this alternative fuel from agriculturally derived fats and oils. Currently, in the absence of tax incentives, biodiesel production when using refined fats and oils and conventional alkali transesterificati...

  9. ARS Culture Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The internationally recognized Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Culture Collection will be described to include the microorganisms maintained by the collection, preservation methods and worldwide distribution of cultures. The impact of the germplasm will be described to include discovery of the f...

  10. STEREO Observing AR903

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    A close up of loops in a magnetic active region. These loops, observed by STEREO's SECCHI/EUVI telescope, are at a million degrees K. This powerful active region, AR903, observed here on Dec. 4, 2006, produced a series of intense flares, particle storms, and coronal mass ejections over the next few days.

  11. Geographical patterns of turnover and nestedness-resultant components of allelic diversity among populations.

    PubMed

    Diniz-Filho, Jose Alexandre Felizola; Collevatti, Rosane Garcia; Soares, Thannya Nascimento; Telles, Mariana Pires de Campos

    2012-06-01

    The analysis of geographical patterns in population divergence has always been a powerful way to infer microevolutionary processes involved in population differentiation, and several approaches have been used to investigate such patterns. Most frequently, multivariate spatial patterns of population differentiation are analyzed by computing pairwise genetic distances or F(ST) (or related statistics, such as ϕ(ST) from AMOVA), which are then correlated with geographical distances or landscape features. However, when calculating distances, especially based on presence-absence of alleles in local populations, there would be a confounding effect of allelic richness differences in the population differentiation. Moreover, the relative magnitude of these components and their spatial patterns can help identifying microevolutionary processes driving population differentiation. Here we show how recent methodological advances in ecological community analyses that allows partitioning dissimilarity into turnover (turnover) and richness differences, or nestedness-resultant dissimilarity, can be applied to allelic variation data, using an endemic Cerrado tree (Dipteryx alata) as a case study. Individuals from 15 local populations were genotyped for eight microsatellite loci, and pairwise dissimilarities were computed based on presence-absence of alleles. The turnover of alleles among populations represented 69 % of variation in dissimilarity, but only the richness difference component shows a clear spatial structure, appearing as a westward decrease of allelic richness. We show that decoupling richness difference and turnover components of allelic variation reveals more clearly how similarity among populations reflects geographical patterns in allelic diversity that can be interpreted in respect to historical range expansion in the species. PMID:22886007

  12. Earth-atmosphere evolution based on new determination of Devonian atmosphere Ar isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Finlay M.; Mark, Darren F.; Gandanger, Pierre; McConville, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The isotopic composition of the noble gases, in particular Ar, in samples of ancient atmosphere trapped in rocks and minerals provides the strongest constraints on the timing and rate of Earth atmosphere formation by degassing of the Earth's interior. We have re-measured the isotopic composition of argon in the Rhynie chert from northeast Scotland using a high precision mass spectrometer in an effort to provide constraints on the composition of Devonian atmosphere. Irradiated chert samples yield 40Ar/36Ar ratios that are often below the modern atmosphere value. The data define a 40Ar/36Ar value of 289.5 ± 0.4 at K/36Ar = 0. Similarly low 40Ar/36Ar are measured in un-irradiated chert samples. The simplest explanation for the low 40Ar/36Ar is the preservation of Devonian atmosphere-derived Ar in the chert, with the intercept value in 40Ar-39Ar-36Ar space representing an upper limit. In this case the Earth's atmosphere has accumulated only 3% (5.1 ± 0.4 ×1016 mol) of the total 40Ar inventory since the Devonian. The average accumulation rate of 1.27 ± 0.09 ×108 mol40Ar/yr overlaps the rate over the last 800 kyr. This implies that there has been no resolvable temporal change in the outgassing rate of the Earth since the mid-Palaeozoic despite the likely episodicity of Ar degassing from the continental crust. Incorporating the new Devonian atmosphere 40Ar/36Ar into the Earth degassing model of Pujol et al. (2013) provides the most precise constraints on atmosphere formation so far. The atmosphere formed in the first ∼100 Ma after initial accretion during a catastrophic degassing episode. A significant volume of 40Ar did not start to accumulate in the atmosphere until after 4 Ga which implies that stable K-rich continental crust did not develop until this time.

  13. Structure of the N=27 isotones derived from the {sup 44}Ar(d,p){sup 45}Ar reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudefroy, L.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Fortier, S.; Franchoo, S.; Hammache, F.; Roussel, P.; Stanoiu, M.; Tryggestad, E.; Dombradi, Z.; Sohler, D.; Grevy, S.; St Laurent, M. G.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Kratz, K. L.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.-E.

    2008-09-15

    The {sup 44}Ar(d,p){sup 45}Ar neutron transfer reaction was performed at 10A MeV. Measured excitation energies, deduced angular momenta, and spectroscopic factors of the states populated in {sup 45}Ar are reported. A satisfactory description of these properties is achieved in the shell model framework using a new sdpf interaction. The model analysis is extended to more exotic even-Z nuclei down to {sub 14}{sup 41}Si{sub 27} to study how collectivity impacts the low-lying structure of N=27 neutron-rich nuclei.

  14. Wheat gene bank accessions as a source of new alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3: a large scale allele mining project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the last hundred years, the development of improved wheat cultivars has led to the replacement of landraces and traditional varieties by modern cultivars. This has resulted in a decline in the genetic diversity of agriculturally used wheat. However, the diversity lost in the elite material is somewhat preserved in crop gene banks. Therefore, the gene bank accessions provide the basis for genetic improvement of crops for specific traits and and represent rich sources of novel allelic variation. Results We have undertaken large scale molecular allele mining to isolate new alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3 from wheat gene bank accessions. The search for new Pm3 alleles was carried out on a geographically diverse set of 733 wheat accessions originating from 20 countries. Pm3 specific molecular tools as well as classical pathogenicity tests were used to characterize the accessions. Two new functional Pm3 alleles were identified out of the eight newly cloned Pm3 sequences. These new resistance alleles were isolated from accessions from China and Nepal. Thus, the repertoire of functional Pm3 alleles now includes 17 genes, making it one of the largest allelic series of plant resistance genes. The combined information on resistant and susceptible Pm3 sequences will allow to study molecular function and specificity of functional Pm3 alleles. Conclusions This study demonstrates that molecular allele mining on geographically defined accessions is a useful strategy to rapidly characterize the diversity of gene bank accessions at a specific genetic locus of agronomical importance. The identified wheat accessions with new resistance specificities can be used for marker-assisted transfer of the Pm3 alleles to modern wheat lines. PMID:20470444

  15. Ar-Ar ages and thermal histories of enstatite meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Dixon, Eleanor T.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2010-05-01

    Compared with ordinary chondrites, there is a relative paucity of chronological and other data to define the early thermal histories of enstatite parent bodies. In this study, we report 39Ar-40Ar dating results for five EL chondrites: Khairpur, Pillistfer, Hvittis, Blithfield, and Forrest; five EH chondrites: Parsa, Saint Marks, Indarch, Bethune, and Reckling Peak 80259; three igneous-textured enstatite meteorites that represent impact melts on enstatite chondrite parent bodies: Zaklodzie, Queen Alexandra Range 97348, and Queen Alexandra Range 97289; and three aubrites, Norton County, Bishopville, and Cumberland Falls Several Ar-Ar age spectra show unusual 39Ar recoil effects, possibly the result of some of the K residing in unusual sulfide minerals, such as djerfisherite and rodderite, and other age spectra show 40Ar diffusion loss. Few additional Ar-Ar ages for enstatite meteorites are available in the literature. When all available Ar-Ar data on enstatite meteorites are considered, preferred ages of nine chondrites and one aubrite show a range of 4.50-4.54Ga, whereas five other meteorites show only lower age limits over 4.35-4.46Ga. Ar-Ar ages of several enstatite chondrites are as old or older as the oldest Ar-Ar ages of ordinary chondrites, which suggests that enstatite chondrites may have derived from somewhat smaller parent bodies, or were metamorphosed to lower temperatures compared to other chondrite types. Many enstatite meteorites are brecciated and/or shocked, and some of the younger Ar-Ar ages may record these impact events. Although impact heating of ordinary chondrites within the last 1Ga is relatively common for ordinary chondrites, only Bethune gives any significant evidence for such a young event.

  16. 40Ar/36Ar analyses of historic lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.

    1969-01-01

    The ratio 40Ar/36Ar was measured for 26 subaerial historic lava flows. Approximately one-third of the samples had 40Ar/36Ar ratios either higher or lower than the atmospheric value of 295.5 at the 95% confidence level. Excess radiogenic 40Ar in five flows ranged from about 1 ?? 10-13 to 1.5 ?? 10-12 mol/g. Possible excess 36Ar in three flows was on the order of 10-16 to 10-15 mol/g. Upper 95% confidence limits for excess 40Ar in samples with normal 40Ar/36Ar ratios are generally less than 3 ?? 10-13 mol/g. The origin of the excess 36Ar is unknown but it may be due either to the incorporation of primitive argon that has been stored in the mantle in very low potassium environments or to enrichment in 36Ar as atmospheric argon diffuses into the rocks after they cool. ?? 1969.

  17. A natural laboratory for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology: ICDP cores from Lake Van, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Jonathan; Sudo, Masafumi; Oberhänsli, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Pore water samples from ICDP Paleovan cores indicate a limited pore water exchange within Quaternary lake sediments. The core's volcaniclastic sections bear unaltered K-rich ternary feldspar and fresh to altered glass shards of predominantly rhyolitic composition. Whereas applying the 40Ar/39Ar method on feldspars resulted in ages timing a late-stage crystallization, glass shards had the potential to date the eruption. Volcanic glass is prone to modifications such as hydrous alteration (palagonitization) and devitrification (Cerling et al., 1985). These modifications affect the glass' chemistry and challenge the application of the 40Ar/39Ar method. Gaining precise radiometric ages from two phases has the potential to strengthen a climate-stratigraphic age-model (Stockhecke et al., 2014), and to significantly increase the temporal resolution on the deposition of the lake sediments. Vice versa the core's previous age model has the ability to question the reliability of 40Ar/39Ar eruption ages derived from ternary feldspars and glass shards. Multi- and single-grain total fusion on alkali feldspars from six volcaniclastic deposits resulted in Pleistocene ages that are in good agreement with the predicted age model. Feldspar phenocrysts from three ashes in the core's youngest section yielded consistent isochron ages that are significantly older than the model's prediction. Several distinct stratigraphic and paleomagnetic time markers of similar stratigraphic positions contradict to the older radiometric dates (Stockhecke et al., 2014). Partial resorption features of inherited feldspar domains and the involvement of excess 40Ar indicate incomplete degassing of older domains. To evaluate the magmatic history of the different domains EMPA mappings of trace elements that could be interpreted as Ar diffusion couples are currently conducted. Geochronology on Paleovan cores offers unique opportunities to monitor the effect of alteration on the Ar-systematics of volcanic glass

  18. Invasive Allele Spread under Preemptive Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasi, J. A.; Korniss, G.; Caraco, T.

    We study a discrete spatial model for invasive allele spread in which two alleles compete preemptively, initially only the "residents" (weaker competitors) being present. We find that the spread of the advantageous mutation is well described by homogeneous nucleation; in particular, in large systems the time-dependent global density of the resident allele is well approximated by Avrami's law.

  19. USDA-ARS support of the USDA small watershed program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS Hydraulic Engineering Research Unit (HERU) has had a rich history supporting the USDA Small Watershed Program. The Small Watershed Program was established by the passage of legislation that allowed the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service to provide financial and technical suppo...

  20. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2015-10-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs.

  1. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2015-01-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs. PMID:26498172

  2. Ar Ar dating of authigenic K-feldspar: Quantitative modelling of radiogenic argon-loss through subgrain boundary networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, D. F.; Kelley, S. P.; Lee, M. R.; Parnell, J.; Sherlock, S. C.; Brown, D. J.

    2008-06-01

    We have analysed two distinct generations of authigenic K-feldspar in Fucoid Bed sandstones from An-t-Sron and Skiag Bridge, NW Highlands, Scotland, which have experienced post-growth heating to levels in excess of the predicted Ar-closure temperature. Authigenic K-feldspars show microtextural similarities to patch perthites; that is subgrains separated by dislocation-rich boundary networks that potentially act as fast diffusion pathways for radiogenic argon. The two generations of authigenic K-feldspar in the Fucoid Bed sandstones can be distinguished by different microtextural zones, bulk mineral compositions, fluid-inclusion populations, and inferred temperatures and chemistries of parent fluids. Ar-Ar age data obtained using high-resolution ultraviolet laser ablation, show that the first cementing generation is Ordovician and the second cementing generation is Silurian. Modelling of Ar diffusion using subgrain size as the effective diffusion dimension and a simplified tectono-thermal thrust model assuming transient heating of the Fucoid Beds is inconsistent with observed data. Removal of heat from the thrust zone through rapid flushing of heated fluids rather than transient heating can be invoked to explain the observed Ar-Ar ages for both generations of cement. Alternatively, Ar-diffusion modelling using overgrowth thickness as the effective diffusion dimension instead of subgrain size also yields models that are consistent with both the Fucoid Bed palaeothermal maxima and determined Ar-Ar age ages for the two generations of K-feldspar cement. Based on this alternate explanation, we propose a theoretical microtextural model that highlights fundamental differences between the microtextures of deuterically formed patch perthites and authigenic K-feldspars, explaining the apparent robustness of authigenic K-feldspar with respect to Ar-retention.

  3. 40Ar retention in the terrestrial planets.

    PubMed

    Watson, E Bruce; Thomas, Jay B; Cherniak, Daniele J

    2007-09-20

    The solid Earth is widely believed to have lost its original gases through a combination of early catastrophic release and regulated output over geologic time. In principle, the abundance of 40Ar in the atmosphere represents the time-integrated loss of gases from the interior, thought to occur through partial melting in the mantle followed by melt ascent to the surface and gas exsolution. Here we present data that reveal two major difficulties with this simple magmatic degassing scenario--argon seems to be compatible in the major phases of the terrestrial planets, and argon diffusion in these phases is slow at upper-mantle conditions. These results challenge the common belief that the upper mantle is nearly degassed of 40Ar, and they call into question the suitability of 40Ar as a monitor of planetary degassing. An alternative to magmatism is needed to release argon to the atmosphere, with one possibility being hydration of oceanic lithosphere consisting of relatively argon-rich olivine and orthopyroxene. PMID:17882213

  4. Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of four ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    Ureilites Novo Urei, Havero, and Kenna show strong evidence of one or more Ar-40 degassing events in the time period of 3.3-4.1 Ga ago. These ages may be compared to current interpretations of ureilite chronology. These include the suggestion of metasomatic activity on the parent body 3.7 Ga ago that reset some Sm-Nd ages and the suggestion that ureilites have experienced terrestrial contamination of several trace elements (including Pb and LREE), which makes suspect ages younger than approximately 4.5 Ga. Because the K-Ar chronometer can be sensitive to metamorphic events, we made Ar-39-Ar-40 determinations on bulk samples (0.12-0.14 g each) of four ureilites. The Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectra and K/Ca ratios as a function of cumulative Ar release from stepwise temperature extractions for the four ureilites analyzed are shown. Because Ar-39-Ar-40 ages shown by low and high temperature extractions may be suspect, we examined the intermediate temperature extractions. Although interpretation of these spectra is obviously uncertain, we believe that the most recent times of Ar degassing can be roughly inferred. These times are approximately 3.3 Ga for Havero, 3.3-3.7 Ga for Novo Urei, and approximately 4.1 Ga for Kenna, for which Ar degassing may not have been complete. The indication of Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing ages of 3.3-4.1 Ga for three ureilites that also contain an enhanced LREE component and (excepting Havero) produce a 3.74 Ga Sm-Nd age, suggests that both chronometers may have responded to the same parent body event. On the other hand, it is also possible that the Ar data reflect one or more separate events that did not strongly affect the Sm-Nd system, a situation that commonly occurs in eucrites. Thus the existence of reset Ar ages does not require similarly reset Sm-Nd ages.

  5. AR-39-AR-40 "Age" of Basaltic Shergottite NWA-3171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2007-01-01

    North-West-Africa 3171 is a 506 g, relatively fresh appearing, basaltic shergottite with similarities to Zagami and Shergotty, but not obviously paired with any of the other known African basaltic shergottites. Its exposure age has the range of 2.5-3.1 Myr , similar to those of Zagami and Shergotty. We made AR-39-AR-40 analyses of a "plagioclase" (now shock-converted to maskelynite) separate and of a glass hand-picked from a vein connected to shock melt pockets.. Plagioclase was separated using its low magnetic susceptibility and then heavy liquid with density of <2.85 g/cm(exp 3). The AR-39-AR-40 age spectrum of NWA-317 1 plag displays a rise in age over 20-100% of the 39Ar release, from 0.24 Gyr to 0.27 Gy.

  6. A metrological approach to measuring 40Ar* concentrations in K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Leah E.; Postma, Onno; Kuiper, Klaudia F.; Mark, Darren F.; van der Plas, Wim; Davidson, Stuart; Perkin, Michael; Villa, Igor M.; Wijbrans, Jan R.

    2011-10-01

    In geochronology, isotopic ages are determined from the ratio of parent and daughter nuclide concentrations in minerals. For dating of geological material using the K-Ar system, the simultaneous determination of 40Ar and 40K concentrations on the same aliquot is not possible. Therefore, a widely used variant, the 40Ar/39Ar technique, involves the production of 39Ar from 39K by neutron bombardment and the reliance on indirect natural calibrators of the neutron flux, referred to as "mineral standards." Many mineral standards still in use rely on decades-old determinations of 40Ar concentrations; resulting uncertainties, both systematic and analytical, impede the determination of higher accuracy ages using the K-Ar decay system. We discuss the theoretical approach and technical design of a gas delivery system which emits metrologically traceable amounts of 40Ar and will allow for the sensitivity calibration of noble gas mass spectrometers. The design of this system is based on a rigorous assessment of the uncertainty budget and detailed tests of a prototype system. A number of obstacles and proposed resolutions are discussed along with the selection of components and their integration into a pipette system.

  7. Comparison of conventional K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating of young mafic volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages have been measured on nine mafic volcanic rocks younger than 1 myr from the Snake River Plain (Idaho), Mount Adams (Washington), and Crater Lake (Oregon). The K-Ar ages were calculated from Ar measurements made by isotope dilution and K2O measurements by flame photometry. The 40Ar/39Ar ages are incremental-heating experiments using a low-blank resistance-heated furnace. The results indicate that high-quality ages can be measured on young, mafic volcanic rocks using either the K-Ar or the 40Ar/39Ar technique. The precision of an 40Ar/39Ar plateau age generally is better than the precision of a K-Ar age because the plateau age is calculated by pooling the ages of several gas increments. The precision of a plateau age generally is better than the precision of an isotope correlation (isochron) age for the same sample. For one sample the intercept of the isochron yielded an 40Ar/36Ar value significantly different from the atmospheric value of 295.5. Recalculation of increment ages using the isochron intercept for the composition of nonradiogenic Ar in the sample resulted in much better agreement of ages for this sample. The results of this study also indicate that, given suitable material and modern equipment, precise K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages can be measured on volcanic rocks as young as the latest Pleistocene, and perhaps even the Holocene.

  8. Photosynthetic and antioxidant responses of Liquidambar formosana and Schima superba seedlings to sulfuric-rich and nitric-rich simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Liu, Ting-Wu; Wu, Fei-Hua; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-03-01

    To study whether differential responses occur in photosynthesis and antioxidant system for seedlings of Liquidambar formosana, an acid rain (AR)-sensitive tree species and Schima superba, an AR-tolerant tree species treated with three types of pH 3.0 simulated AR (SiAR) including sulfuric-rich (S-SiAR), nitric-rich (N-SiAR), sulfate and nitrate mixed (SN-SiAR), we investigated the changes of leaf necrosis, chlorophyll content, soluble protein and proline content, photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics, reactive oxygen species production, membrane lipid peroxidation, small molecular antioxidant content, antioxidant enzyme activities and related protein expressions. Our results showed that SiAR significantly caused leaf necrosis, inhibited photosynthesis, induced superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide generation, aggravated membrane lipid peroxidation, changed antioxidant enzyme activities, modified related protein expressions such as Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), l-ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1. 11. 1. 11), glutathione S transferase (GST, EC 2. 5. 1. 18) and Rubisco large subunit (RuBISCO LSU), altered non-protein thiols (NPT) and glutathione (GSH) content in leaves of L. formosana and S. superba. Taken together, we concluded that the damages caused by SiAR in L. formosana were more severe and suffered from more negative impacts than in S. superba. S-SiAR induced more serious damages for the plants than did SN-SiAR and N-SiAR. PMID:23353765

  9. Pulsed discharge production Ar* metastables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiande; Heaven, Michael C.; Emmons, Daniel; Perram, Glen P.; Weeks, David E.; Bailey, William F.

    2016-03-01

    The production of relatively high densities of Ar* metastables (>1012 cm-3) in Ar/He mixtures, at total pressures close to 1 atm, is essential for the efficient operation of an optically pumped Ar* laser. We have used emission spectroscopy and diode laser absorption spectroscopy measurements to observe the production and decay of Ar* in a parallel plate pulsed discharge. With discharge pulses of 1 μs duration we find that metastable production is dominated by processes occurring within the first 100 ns of the gas break-down. Application of multiple, closely spaced discharge pulses yields insights concerning conditions that favor metastable production. This information has been combined with time-resolved measurements of voltage and current. The experimental results and preliminary modeling of the discharge kinetics are presented.

  10. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  11. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. First ^4^0Ar/^3^9Ar geochronology of lateritic manganiferous pisolites: Implications for the Palaeogene history of a West African landscape [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, F.; Beauvais, A.; Ruffet, G.; Hénocque, O.

    2005-09-01

    A pisolitic superficial formation deriving from the geochemical degradation of a previous massive manganiferous crust has been investigated in West Africa using 40Ar/ 39Ar laser probe analysis on different generations of cryptomelane from Fe-Mn pisolites and their embedding lateritic matrices. Prior to the 40Ar- 39Ar geochronological analysis, a detailed petrographical study has allowed the identification of successive assemblages from Mn-pisolites to (Fe,Mn)-pisolites embedded in Mn-rich and Fe-rich matrices, respectively. The age spectra obtained for pisolites, including cores, cortices and matrices enables the definition of three age clusters around 56-59, 44-47, and 24-27 Ma. The first two age clusters with the petrographical and geochemical results obtained on the different assemblages indicate that the development of the pisolitic crust first induced Mn-leaching and Fe-Al accumulations due to warmer and wetter climatic conditions in the age interval 56-47 Ma that characterizes the Tertiary greenhouse effect period propitious to bauxite formation in West Africa. The absence of 40Ar/ 39Ar ages between 44 and 27 Ma only means that geochemical conditions for cryptomelane crystallisation were not fulfilled, but could still be favourable to Fe- and/or Al-oxy-hydroxides formation, before drier climatic conditions became rather effective at the Oligocene period to sustain mechanical erosion rather than chemical weathering processes. The age cluster 24-27 Ma indicates however a reactivation of the manganiferous lateritic weathering late Oligocene. The 40Ar/ 39Ar dating results are discussed in terms of climatic condition changes during the Palaeogene that were favourable to the genesis of either Al- and Fe- or Mn-oxy-hydroxides in the course of development and evolution of the pisolitic formation. The 40Ar/ 39Ar dating also provides a new highlight to large-scale geomorphological patterns of West Africa.

  13. Ar-39-Ar-40 Ages of Two Nakhlites, MIL03346 and Y000593: A Detailed Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel; Bogard, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Radiometric dating of martian nakhlites by several techniques have given similar ages of approx.1.2-1.4 Ga [e.g. 1, 2]. Unlike the case with shergottites, where the presence of martian atmosphere and inherited radiogenic Ar-40 produce apparent Ar-39-Ar-40 ages older than other radiometric ages, Ar-Ar ages of nakhlites are similar to ages derived by other techniques. However, even in some nakhlites the presence of trapped martian Ar produces some uncertainty in the Ar-Ar age. We present here an analysis of such Ar-Ar ages from the MIL03346 and Y000593 nakhlites.

  14. Unmixing 40Ar/39Ar Muscovite Ages Using Powder X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAleer, R. J.; Kunk, M. J.; Valley, P. M.; Walsh, G. J.; Bish, D. L.; Wintsch, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Whole rock powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments from eight samples collected across a retrograde ductile shear zone in the Devonian Littleton Formation near Claremont, NH, exhibit broad and asymmetric to bimodal muscovite 00l reflections. These composite 00l reflections exhibit a systematic change in shape with increasing retrograde strain. Microtextural relationships, electron microprobe quantitative analyses, and element mapping indicate that the change in peak shape reflects progressive dissolution of metastable Na-rich muscovite and the precipitation of stable Na-poor muscovite. 40Ar/39Ar step heating experiments on muscovite concentrates from these samples show a decrease in total gas age from 274 to 258 Ma as the highest strain zone is approached, and steps within individual spectra range in age by ~20 m.y. The correlation between age and 00l peak shape suggests that the argon isotopic system also tracks the dissolution-precipitation process. Furthermore, the variation in age during step heating indicates that these populations exhibit different in-vacuo degassing behavior. Comparison of whole rock and muscovite concentrate XRD patterns from the same samples shows that the mineral separation process can fractionate these muscovite populations. With this knowledge, four muscovite concentrates were prepared from a single hand sample, analyzed by XRD, and dated. Combining modal estimates from XRD experiments with total gas ages, the four splits narrowly define a mixing line that resolves end-member ages of 250 and 300 Ma for the neocrystallized and earlier high grade populations of muscovite, respectively. These ages are consistent with age data from all other samples. The results show that, in some settings, powder XRD provides a powerful and time effective method to both identify the existence of and establish the proportions of multiple compositional populations of muscovite prior to 40Ar/39Ar analysis. This approach will be especially useful in

  15. Low-Lying Structure of 50Ar and the N =32 Subshell Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steppenbeck, D.; Takeuchi, S.; Aoi, N.; Doornenbal, P.; Matsushita, M.; Wang, H.; Utsuno, Y.; Baba, H.; Go, S.; Lee, J.; Matsui, K.; Michimasa, S.; Motobayashi, T.; Nishimura, D.; Otsuka, T.; Sakurai, H.; Shiga, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Taniuchi, R.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Yoneda, K.

    2015-06-01

    The low-lying structure of the neutron-rich nucleus 50Ar has been investigated at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory using in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy with 9Be (54Ca, 50Ar +γ )X , 9Be (55Sc, 50Ar +γ )X , and 9Be (56Ti, 50Ar +γ )X multinucleon removal reactions at ˜220 MeV /u . A γ -ray peak at 1178(18) keV is reported and assigned as the transition from the first 2+ state to the 0+ ground state. A weaker, tentative line at 1582(38) keV is suggested as the 41+→21+ transition. The experimental results are compared to large-scale shell-model calculations performed in the s d p f model space using the SDPF-MU effective interaction with modifications based on recent experimental data for exotic calcium and potassium isotopes. The modified Hamiltonian provides a satisfactory description of the new experimental results for 50Ar and, more generally, reproduces the energy systematics of low-lying states in neutron-rich Ar isotopes rather well. The shell-model calculations indicate that the N =32 subshell gap in 50Ar is similar in magnitude to those in 52Ca and 54Ti and, notably, predict an N =34 subshell closure in 52Ar that is larger than the one recently reported in 54Ca.

  16. Ar-Ar Age of Shergottite Dhofar 378: Formation or Early Shock Event?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Bogard, Don D.

    2006-01-01

    The Ar-39-Ar40 data for 16 stepwise temperature extractions of mixed mesostasis plus plagioclase show the following major characteristics. Changes in the K/Ca ratio and in the differential rate of Ar-39 release with extraction temperature suggest three distinct, but overlapping Ar diffusion domains: <13%, 13-45%, and >45% cumulative Ar-39 release:. The youngest Ar-Ar age, approx.162-165 Myr is observed at approx.28-40% Ar-39 release, which we attribute primarily to the mesostasis. Extractions releasing >45% Ar-39, probably from plagioclase, suggest older Ar-Ar ages and indicate release of trapped martian Ar-40. An isochron plot for 8 extractions, releasing 3-45% of the Ar-39 and corrected for 36Arcos using directly measured 36Arcos, gives an Ar-Ar age of 143+/-4 Myr (where the +/- ignores the uncertainty in applying a correction for Ar-36cos). Applying a correction assuming only one-half of the measured Ar-36cos gives an age of 159+/-2 Myr. Correcting for cos-Ar-36 using the minimum measured Ar-36/Ar-37 ratio gives a minimum possible age of 138+/-5 Myr. All of these ages are within combined uncertainties of the Sm-Nd age of 157+/-24 Myr [4]. The trapped Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio obtained from the isochron is largely defined by the highest [K] data.

  17. Pyrosequencing for Accurate Imprinted Allele Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bing; Damaschke, Nathan; Yao, Tianyu; McCormick, Johnathon; Wagner, Jennifer; Jarrard, David

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that restricts gene expression to one inherited allele. Improper maintenance of imprinting has been implicated in a number of human diseases and developmental syndromes. Assays are needed that can quantify the contribution of each paternal allele to a gene expression profile. We have developed a rapid, sensitive quantitative assay for the measurement of individual allelic ratios termed Pyrosequencing for Imprinted Expression (PIE). Advantages of PIE over other approaches include shorter experimental time, decreased labor, avoiding the need for restriction endonuclease enzymes at polymorphic sites, and prevent heteroduplex formation which is problematic in quantitative PCR-based methods. We demonstrate the improved sensitivity of PIE including the ability to detect differences in allelic expression down to 1%. The assay is capable of measuring genomic heterozygosity as well as imprinting in a single run. PIE is applied to determine the status of Insulin-like Growth Factor-2 (IGF2) imprinting in human and mouse tissues. PMID:25581900

  18. NeAr Dating: New Dimensions for Ar-Ar Dating Using Nucleogenic Neon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    The neutron reactions that produce 37Ar from Ca, 38Ar from Cl and 39Ar from K form the very heart of the 40Ar/39Ar dating system. Not only can ages be derived, but much can be deduced from the effective mineral separation performed by step-heating analysis. However, the normal suite of elements detected using Ar isotopes cannot determine the presence of some minerals. Specifically, the absence of Na means that it is not possible in principle to uniquely determine the compositions of degassing feldpsars and the inability to measure Mg limits the discrimination of some mafic phases. Mineral and glass samples of known composition have been irradiated to determine the important nucleogenic Ne isotopes produced from F, Na and Mg. Mg produces two isotopes from the reactions 24Mg(n,α)21Ne and 25Mg(n,α)22Ne, with a production ratio for (22Ne/21Ne)Mg of about 0.25. For Na, the important reactions are 23Na(n,α)20F(β-)20Ne with a production ratio for (20Ne/22Ne)Na of about 5.3. The thermal neutron reaction for F is 19F(n,γ)20F(β-)20Ne with (20Ne)F/(39Ar)K equal to about 1.1. Because there are only 3 isotopes and 4 end member isotopic compositions, it is not possible to uniquely deconvolve the above nucleogenic sources along with atmospheric Ne. Fortunately, most unirradiated minerals analyzed have had extremely low levels of atmospheric Ne. A maximal correction for atmospheric Ne can be done assuming an atmospheric 20Ne/36Ar ratio. Measuring Ne isotopes along with Ar isotopes is challenging, requiring extra time and cryo-separation of the two species. In addition, there are unresolved issues dealing with the relative rates of Ne and Ar diffusion and Ne recoil effects. However, there is promise for the method for all whole-rock samples, amphiboles, feldspars and any mineral with expected complex exsolution textures. Examples of a variety of Ne-enhanced argon age spectra will be shown.

  19. Ar-Ar Analysis of Chelyabinsk: Evidence for a Recent Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, S. P.; Kring, D. A.; Isachsen, C. E.; Lapen, T. J.; Zolensky, M. E.; Swindle, T. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite is an LL5 ordinary chondrite that fell as a spectacular fireball on February 15th, 2013, over the Ural region in Russia. The meteoroid exploded at an altitude of 25-30 km, producing shockwaves that broke windowpanes in Chelyabinsk and surrounding areas, injuring some 1500 people. Analyses of the samples show that the meteorite underwent moderate shock metamorphism (stage S4; 25-35 GPa) [1]. Most of the samples have a fusion crust ranging from 0.1-1mm thick, and roughly a third of the samples were composed of a dark fine-grained impact melt with chondrule fragments which were targeted for chronometry. A Pb-Pb age obtained by [2] of a shock-darkened and potentially melted sample of Chelyabinsk is reported as 4538.3 +/- 2.1 Ma, while a U-Pb study [3] gave an upper concordia intercept of 4454 +/- 67 Ma and a lower intercept of 585 +/- 390. Galimov et al. 2013 [1] suggest the Sm-Nd system records a recent impact event [290 Ma] that may represent separation from the parent body, while the Rb-Sr isotopic system is disturbed and does not give any definitive isochron. In order to better understand its history, we have performed 40Ar-39Ar analysis on multiple splits of two Chelyabinsk samples; clast- rich MB020f,2 and melt-rich MB020f,5. The term "clast-rich" lithology is meant to indicate a mechanical mixture of highly shock-darkened and less shocked components, both with some shock melt veining.

  20. REGISTRATION OF BIRDSFOOT TREFOIL GERMPLASM ARS-2622

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ARS-2622 broadleafed birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.) germplasm was released by the USDA-ARS in cooperation with the Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station in August 2002. The merit of ARS-2622 is that it is a rhizome producing population with a broad genetic base. ARS-2622 was developed ...

  1. A study of allelic polymorphism of four short tandem repeats in the population of northwestern Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Aseev, M.V.; Skakun, V.N.; Baranov, V.S.

    1995-06-01

    Characteristics of the allelic polymorphisms of the trimeric AGC repeat of the androgen receptor gene (Xq11-12), exon 1 (AR); the tetrameric ATCT repeat of the von Willebrand factor gene (12p12), intron 40 (vWF); the AGAT repeat of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (Xq26) (HPRT); and the AGAT repeat of anonymous DNA sequences of the short arm of chromosome X (STRX1) were studied in 160 DNA samples from unrelated inhabitants of northwestern Russia using the method of polymerase chain reaction. Seventeen, ten, eight, and nine alleles were revealed electrophoretically for short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The heterozygosity indices for these repeats were 0.80, 0.70, 0.54, and 0.58, respectively. The values for AR and vWF correlated with those expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, whereas the values for HPRT and STRX1 differed significantly from those theoretically expected. The individualization potentials were 0.045, 0.135, 0.095, and 0.061 for the short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The distribution of genotypes for the set of these four loci in the population studied was determined. The possibilities of using the studied polymorphic marker systems in molecular diagnosis of the corresponding monogenic diseases - spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (AR), Lesch-Nyhan disease (HPRT), and von Willebrand disease (vWF) - as well as in population human genetics, testing of personal identity, and molecular approaches to the estimation of mutagenic activity are discussed. 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  3. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  4. ARS Grape Quality Research Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In ARS much of the research on grape quality is overseen by National Program 306, entitled Quality Preservation, Characterization and Enhancement and New Processes, New Uses and Value-Added Foods. The mission of the Processed Foods Research Unit at the Western Regional Research Center in Albany, CA...

  5. USDA-ARS Quartlerly News

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This quarterly article is an update of research going on at The USDA-ARS Thad Cochran Southern Horticultural Laboratory in Poplarville, MS to be published in the Louisiana Nursery and Landscape Associations (LANLA) quarterly newsletter. This is one of three publications that I am sending out to the ...

  6. Ar-Ar chronology of the Martian meteorite ALH84001: evidence for the timing of the early bombardment of Mars.

    PubMed

    Turner, G; Knott, S F; Ash, R D; Gilmour, J D

    1997-09-01

    ALH84001, a cataclastic cumulate orthopyroxenite meteorite from Mars, has been dated by Ar-Ar stepped heating and laser probe methods. Both methods give ages close to 3,900 Ma. The age calculated is dependent on assumptions made about 39Ar recoil effects and on whether significant quantities of 40Ar from the Martian atmosphere are trapped in the meteorite. If, as suggested by xenon and nitrogen isotope studies, Martian atmospheric argon is present, then it must reside predominantly in the K-rich phase maskelynite. Independently determined 129Xe abundances in the maskelynite can be used to place limits on the concentration of the atmospheric 40Ar. These indicate a reduction of around 80 Ma to ages calculated on the assumption that no Martian atmosphere is present. After this correction, the nominal ages obtained are: 3940 +/- 50, 3870 +/- 80, and 3970 +/- 100 Ma. by stepped heating, and 3900 +/- 90 Ma by laser probe (1 sigma statistical errors), giving a weighted mean value of 3,920 Ma. Ambiguities in the interpretation of 39Ar recoil effects and in the contribution of Martian atmospheric 40Ar lead to uncertainties in the Ar-Ar age which are difficult to quantify, but we suggest that the true value lies somewhere between 4,050 and 3,800 Ma. This age probably dates a period of annealing of the meteorite subsequent to the shock event which gave it its cataclastic texture. The experiments provide the first evidence of an event occurring on Mars coincident with the time of the late heavy bombardment of the Moon and may reflect a similar period of bombardment in the Southern Highlands of Mars. Whether the age determined bears any relationship to the time of carbonate deposition in ALH84001 is not known. Such a link depends on whether the temperature associated with the metasomatic activity was sufficient to cause argon loss from the maskelynite and/or whether the metasomatism and metamorphism were linked in time through a common heat source. PMID:11541217

  7. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favorova, Olga O; Favorov, Alexander V; Boiko, Alexey N; Andreewski, Timofey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Alekseenkov, Alexey D; Kulakova, Olga G; Gusev, Eugenyi I; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion) of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGFβ1, CCR5 and CTLA4 genes and TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. Each allele carriership in patients and controls was compared by Fisher's exact test, and disease-associated combinations of alleles in the data set were sought using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method recently developed by our group. Results We identified two previously unknown MS-associated tri-allelic combinations: -509TGFβ1*C, DRB1*18(3), CTLA4*G and -238TNF*B1,-308TNF*A2, CTLA4*G, which perfectly separate MS cases from controls, at least in the present sample. The previously described DRB1*15(2) allele, the microsatellite TNFa9 allele and the biallelic combination CCR5Δ32, DRB1*04 were also reidentified as MS-associated. Conclusion These results represent an independent validation of MS association with DRB1*15(2) and TNFa9 in Russians and are the first to find the interplay of three loci in conferring susceptibility to MS. They demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for the identification of complex-disease-associated combinations of alleles. PMID:16872485

  8. Oldest human footprints dated by Ar/Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaillet, Stéphane; Vita-Scaillet, Grazia; Guillou, Hervé

    2008-11-01

    Fossilized human trackways are extremely rare in the geologic record. These bear indirect but invaluable testimony of human/hominid locomotion in open air settings and can provide critical information on biomechanical changes relating to bipedalism evolution throughout the primitive human lineage. Among these, the "Devil's footsteps" represent one of the best preserved human footprints suite recovered so far in a Pleistocene volcanic ash of the Roccamonfina volcano (southern Italy). Until recently, the age of these footprints remained speculative and indirectly correlated with a loosely dated caldera-forming eruption that produced the Brown Leucitic Tuff. Despite extensive hydrothermal alteration of the pyroclastic deposit and variable contamination with excess 40Ar, detailed and selective 40Ar/ 39Ar laser probe analysis of single leucite crystals recovered from the ash deposit shows that the pyroclastic layer and the footprints are 345 ± 6 kyr old (1 σ), confirming for the first time that these are the oldest human trackways ever dated, and that they were presumably left by the modern human predecessor, Homo heidelbergensis, close to Climatic Termination IV.

  9. Mineralogy and Ar-39 - Ar-40 of an old pristine basalt: Thermal history of the HED parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, H.; Mori, H.; Bogard, D. D.

    1994-03-01

    Previous investigations of mineral chemistry and Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages indicated that clast,84 from eucrite Yamato 75011 had preserved the pristine nature of its initial crystallization during an early stage of the HED parent body. Microscale mineralogy and Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of this clast, however, revealed local disturbance of microtextures and partially reset ages. This evidence suggests that, in addition to initial crystallization and rapid cooling, the Y75011,84 clast experienced shock deformation, reheating of short duration at higher temperature, and brecciation. These characteristics suggest two or more impact events. Fe-rich olivine filling fractures in pyroxene may have been introduced during the accompanying shock fracturing. The inferred Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing ages for Y75011 matrix and clast, 84 are 3.94 +/- 0.04 Ga and 3.98 +/- 0.03 Ga, respectively. The suggested degassing age for a clast from Y790020, believed to be paired with Y75011, is approximately 4.03 Ga, but could be younger. We consider it likely that all three samples experienced a common degassing event 3.95 +/- 0.05 Ga ago, but we cannot rule out two or more events spaced over a approximately 0.1 Ga interval. Higher temperature extractions of the two clast samples show significantly older apparent ages up to approximately 4.5 Ga and suggest that the time/temperature regime of this event was not sufficient to degas Ar totally. Most likely, the K-Ar ages were reset by thermal metamorphism associated with one or more impact events associated with shock fracturing, formation of Fe-rich olivine veins, and/or meteorite brecciation. The pyroxene annealing that commonly occurs in many eucrites is likely to be a much earlier process than the impact-produced textural changes and reset K-Ar ages observed in these meteorites. The existence of mineralogical and chronological evidence for metamorphism in an otherwise pristine eucrite suggests that the HED parent body experienced an extensive degree of

  10. Mineralogy and Ar-39 - Ar-40 of an old pristine basalt: Thermal history of the HED parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Mori, Hiroshi; Bogard, Donald D.

    1994-01-01

    Previous investigations of mineral chemistry and Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages indicated that clast,84 from eucrite Yamato 75011 had preserved the pristine nature of its initial crystallization during an early stage of the HED parent body. Microscale mineralogy and Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of this clast, however, revealed local disturbance of microtextures and partially reset ages. This evidence suggests that, in addition to initial crystallization and rapid cooling, the Y75011,84 clast experienced shock deformation, reheating of short duration at higher temperature, and brecciation. These characteristics suggest two or more impact events. Fe-rich olivine filling fractures in pyroxene may have been introduced during the accompanying shock fracturing. The inferred Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing ages for Y75011 matrix and clast, 84 are 3.94 +/- 0.04 Ga and 3.98 +/- 0.03 Ga, respectively. The suggested degassing age for a clast from Y790020, believed to be paired with Y75011, is approximately 4.03 Ga, but could be younger. We consider it likely that all three samples experienced a common degassing event 3.95 +/- 0.05 Ga ago, but we cannot rule out two or more events spaced over a approximately 0.1 Ga interval. Higher temperature extractions of the two clast samples show significantly older apparent ages up to approximately 4.5 Ga and suggest that the time/temperature regime of this event was not sufficient to degas Ar totally. Most likely, the K-Ar ages were reset by thermal metamorphism associated with one or more impact events associated with shock fracturing, formation of Fe-rich olivine veins, and/or meteorite brecciation. The pyroxene annealing that commonly occurs in many eucrites is likely to be a much earlier process than the impact-produced textural changes and reset K-Ar ages observed in these meteorites. The existence of mineralogical and chronological evidence for metamorphism in an otherwise pristine eucrite suggests that the HED parent body experienced an extensive degree of

  11. Resolvable miscalibration of the 40Ar/39Ar geochronometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundil, R.; Renne, P. R.; Min, K. K.; Ludwig, K. R.

    2006-12-01

    U/Pb and 40Ar/39Ar isotopic dating techniques are the most widely applied geochronometers, both capable of 0.1% internal precision. A robust intercalibration between the two isotopic systems is fundamental for reconstructing short term processes and events in geologic time. However, whereas the U decay constants are known precisely (to ca 0.1%), the currently used 40K decay constant (5.543×10^{-10}/yr, (1)) is associated with an unstated uncertainty that is about an order of magnitude larger than the former, making high-resolution comparisons of ages from the two isotopic systems impossible. We present an indirect calibration by comparing radio-isotopic ages derived from both isotopic systems of rapidly cooled volcanic rocks in order to minimize effects from protracted cooling history. Eleven data pairs of 206Pb/238U and conventional 40Ar/39Ar ages exhibit a bias between the two isotopic systems ranging from >-1.5% for young rocks to ca -0.5% for rocks as old as 2 Ga (possibly even smaller for rocks >2 Ga), with the 40Ar/39Ar ages being consistently younger. All Mesozoic and Paleozoic samples display a bias of about -1%. Most of this bias is probably the result of miscalibration of the electron capture decay constant of 404→ 40Ar (λ40Kec) by ca -1%, in combination with a miscalibration of smaller magnitude and opposite sense of the β- decay constant (λ40Kβ-) of 40K→ 40Ca. Bias greater than 1% for younger Cenozoic samples probably reflects pre-eruptive zircon saturation (magma residence time) whose effects become proportionately negligible beyond ca. 200 Ma. Whereas the currently used decay constant for 40K (see above) is based on an arguably arbitrary selection from counting experiments associated with large and sometimes incomprehensible uncertainties (mostly from experiments conducted in the 1940s to 1960s) two recent recalibrations of λ40Ktotal using liquid scintillation counting techniques suggest precise and mutually consistent values of 5.553 ± 0

  12. CEAP ARS watershed assessment study - overview

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The symposium “Conservation Effects Assessment Project: Accomplishments from USDA-ARS Benchmark Watersheds” will illustrate the opportunities for ARS research accomplishments to support conservation policy. Specifically, their long-term databases provide scientific bases for regional assessment outc...

  13. Tetrasomic Segregation for Multiple Alleles in Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Quiros, Carlos F.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence of tetrasomic inheritance in alfalfa, Medicago sativa L. and M. falcata L., for multiple codominant alleles at three isozymic loci is reported in this study. The locus Prx-1 governing anodal peroxidase and the loci Lap-1 and Lap-2 governing anodal leucine-aminopeptidase were studied by starch gel electrophoresis in seedling root tissue or seeds. The progenies from several di-, tri- or tetra-allelic plants belong to the species M. sativa and M. falcata and their hybrids were studied for the segregation of the three genes. In all cases, tetrasomic inheritance of chromosomal-type segregation was observed. In another progeny resulting from the crossing of two plants involving four different alleles at locus Lap-2, tetrasomic segregation with the possible occurrence of double reduction was observed. This study presents direct evidence of autotetraploidy and the existence of tetra-allelic loci in alfalfa. It also supports the concept that the species M. sativa and M. falcata are genetically close enough to be considered biotypes of a common species. PMID:17246077

  14. arXiv.org and Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramlo, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The website arXiv.org (pronounced "archive") is a free online resource for full-text articles in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science, nonlinear science, and quantitative biology that has existed for about 15 years. Available directly at http://www.arXiv.org, this e-print archive is searchable. As of Jan. 3, 2007, arXiv had open…

  15. Ar-40/Ar-39 age determinations for the Rotoiti eruption, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, S.; Storey, M.

    2013-12-01

    The contemporaneous Rotoiti and Earthquake Flat ignimbrites, erupted from the Taupo Volcanic zone, New Zealand, form a distinctive tephrostratigraphic horizon in the Southern Pacific. Radioisotopic dating results for these eruptions remain controversial, with published ages ranging from 35.1 × 2.8 ka [1] to 71 × 6 ka [2], with 61.0 × 1.5 ka [3] often being cited as the most widely accepted age. These eruptions are difficult to date as their age is near the limit for various radiometric dating techniques, which are complicated by a large proportion of inherited material (xenocrysts) and a lack of phases suitable for dating. Glass-bearing plutonic blocks erupted with the Rotoiti and Earthquake Flat ignimbrites have previously been interpreted as deriving from a slowly cooled and incompletely solidified magma body that was sampled by the eruptions. They contain large vugs lined with euhedral quartz, sanidine and biotite crystals, indicating that these crystals grew in a gas or aqueous fluid rich environment and are interpreted to have formed shortly before or during eruption. Here we will present Ar-40/Ar-39 ages for sanidines and biotites extracted from vugs in lithic blocks erupted as part of the Earthquake Flat ignimbrite. We show that, even for vug-lining material, inherited ages remain a problem and are the likely source of the wide variation in published radiometric ages. Nevertheless, many of the Ar-40/Ar-39 ages are much younger than the 61 ka age [3] and are more consistent with the recent stratigraphic, C-14 and U-238/Th-230+(U-Th)/He ages that have been suggested (e.g. [4,5]). 1. Whitehead, N. & Ditchburn, R. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics 37, 381-383 (1994). 2. Ota, Y., Omura, A. & Iwata, H. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics 32, 327-331 (1989). 3. Wilson, C. J. N. et al. Quaternary Science Reviews 26, 1861-1870 (2007). 4. Molloy, C., Shane, P. & Augustinus, P. Geological Society of America Bulletin 121, 1666-1677 (2009). 5

  16. 40Ar-39Ar Analyses of Antarctic Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, S. F.; Turner, G.; Maurette, M.

    1993-07-01

    Eleven particles from the 100-400-micrometer-sized fraction of a sample of dust (vial G1-35) retrieved from Antarctica early in 1991 [1] have been analyzed using high-sensitivity noble gas mass spectrometry and, where possible, SEM/EDX techniques. The bulk sample was possibly heavily contaminated with terrestrial material but an attempt was made to preselect angular unmelted grains of extraterrestrial origin. Particles were examined optically and then split, where possible, into three parts to provide samples for 40Ar-39Ar, SEM, and He isotope analysis. Samples for 40Ar-39Ar studies were irradiated in the University of Michigan reactor, where they received a fast neutron fluence of approximately 10^18 cm^-2 (J = 0.0097, beta = 3.16). SEM analyses indicated that three particles (SK64, SK69, and SK72) have chondritic compositions, while a fourth (SK71) was thought to be extraterrestrial on the basis of its morphology. Two particles (SK65 and SK73) appeared to be terrestrial based on their location on an Mg-Fe-Si plot [2]. No SEM analyses are available for five of the samples (SK63, SK66, SK67, SK70, and SK71), and their origins are unknown. Gas was extracted from the samples for the argon analyses using a pulsed Nd laser. Step-heating was performed on each particle by defocusing the laser beam to reduce the heating effect. The laser delivered about 200 mJ per pulse; the initial heating was done with the beam covering approximately 150 micrometers. A broad overview of the data from nine particles analyzed in a seven-day sequence is shown in Fig. 1. Gas release, in units of 10^-12 ccSTP, is plotted as a function of run number with sample analyses interspersed with system blanks. Only two terrestrial particles, with well-defined ages of 200 Ma and 1000 Ma, released large amounts of gas and are omitted from the plot. The remaining particles analyzed so far released very little 40Ar and contrast sharply with the much larger amounts observed by Saxton et al. [3] in a suite

  17. ARS-NLT-SALT AND ARS-NLT-SALT/B SALINE TOLERANT NARROW LEAF TREFOIL GERMPLASM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ARS-NLT-SALT and ARS-NLT-SALT/B are narrow leaf trefoil germplasm that are tolerant of saline germination conditions that were developed from the broad based narrow leaf trefoil germplasm ARS-1207 using two cycles of saline condition selection during seed germination. ARS-NLT-SALT was developed usin...

  18. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: New B39 and B15 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, T.L.; Butler, L.M.; Watkins, D.I.

    1995-05-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles. 70 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Ar-Ar investigations on Quarternary volcanic sequences of Monte Vulture (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buettner, A.; Principe, C.; Villa, I. M.

    2003-04-01

    Volcanic sanidines and phlogopites from feldspathoid- or sanidine-bearing volcanic sequences of Monte Vulture (Southern Italy) were analysed using Ar-Ar stepwise heating. In all samples phlogopite and sanidine are internally inhomogeneous as observed in a plot of Cl/K ratio vs step-age. At least two phases that are degassed during different temperature steps can be distinguished, resulting in internal discordance. Hence, all samples are affected by impurities and have to be treated as heterochemical mixtures. These effects are strongest in phlogopite. The high uncertainty of the calculated ages mirrors the statistically significant age discordance. The calculation of average ages was focused on isochemical steps. Isochron calculations necessarily give less precise ages because of the excessive scatter of datapoints. Moreover, most coarse grained phlogopites could contain excess 40Ar (as suggested by non-atmospheric intercepts in isochron plots) which could be of mantle origin. The analysed phlogopites from carbonatitic and melilite-foiditolite rocks of the upper stratigraphical sequence of Monte Vulture are Mg-rich, which indicates a mantle provenance (Stoppa and Woolley, 1997). All calculated phlogopite ages have, therefore, to be considered with caution. One sample, PG5, contains both sanidine and matrix phlogopite. This offers the possibility to directly compare the analytical results and further decipher possible inconsistencies. Ages were calculated as the average of isochemical steps, and errors are indicated at the 95% confidence level. Sanidine gives a weighted average age of 752±13 ka in agreement with the phlogopite age of 801±88 ka. In comparison to these average step ages, an isochron over five sanidine-steps yields an age of 737±35 ka (MSWD=1.5) and an atmospheric intercept of 295±49. The eruptive time-span covered by the analysed samples is 75±20 ka, confirming that the eruption history of Monte Vulture has been organised in clusters of activity

  20. Microsatellite allele frequencies in humans and chimpanzees, with implications for constraints on allele size.

    PubMed

    Garza, J C; Slatkin, M; Freimer, N B

    1995-07-01

    The distributions of allele sizes at eight simple-sequence repeat (SSR) or microsatellite loci in chimpanzees are found and compared with the distributions previously obtained from several human populations. At several loci, the differences in average allele size between chimpanzees and humans are sufficiently small that there might be a constraint on the evolution of average allele size. Furthermore, a model that allows for a bias in the mutation process shows that for some loci a weak bias can account for the observations. Several alleles at one of the loci (Mfd 59) were sequenced. Differences between alleles of different lengths were found to be more complex than previously assumed. An 8-base-pair deletion was present in the nonvariable region of the chimpanzee locus. This locus contains a previously unrecognized repeated region, which is imperfect in humans and perfect in chimpanzees. The apparently greater opportunity for mutation conferred by the two perfect repeat regions in chimpanzees is reflected in the higher variance in repeat number at Mfd 59 in chimpanzees than in humans. These data indicate that interspecific differences in allele length are not always attributable to simple changes in the number of repeats. PMID:7659015

  1. Viscosity and phase separations of binary CO-He and CO-Ar mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, N.; Bayarjargal, L.; Morgenroth, W.; Ciezak-Jenkins, J. A.; Winkler, B.

    2015-01-01

    Binary mixtures of 10 and 25 vol% CO in He and 10 vol% CO in Ar have been studied at high pressures and ambient temperature in diamond anvil cells. Phase separations were observed at 5.7(3) GPa, 3.6(2) GPa and 1.6(1) GPa. Earlier studies of ?-He mixtures of comparable concentrations revealed phase separations at significantly larger pressures, while ?-Ar mixtures separate at pressures comparable to those observed in the CO-Ar system here. The viscosity of a CO-rich fluid phase was determined by measuring the velocities of rising He bubbles. After corrections for the influence of the finite container size and of remaining helium in CO, the viscosity of the CO-rich fluid at 3.8(1) GPa was ≈3(1) mPa s, similar to what would be expected for isoelectronic liquid ? under the same conditions.

  2. Do Heliconius butterfly species exchange mimicry alleles?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joel; Kronforst, Marcus R.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization has the potential to transfer beneficial alleles across species boundaries, and there are a growing number of examples in which this has apparently occurred. Recent studies suggest that Heliconius butterflies have transferred wing pattern mimicry alleles between species via hybridization, but ancestral polymorphism could also produce a signature of shared ancestry around mimicry genes. To distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we measured DNA sequence divergence around putatively introgressed mimicry loci and compared this with the rest of the genome. Our results reveal that putatively introgressed regions show strongly reduced sequence divergence between co-mimetic species, suggesting that their divergence times are younger than the rest of the genome. This is consistent with introgression and not ancestral variation. We further show that this signature of introgression occurs at sites throughout the genome, not just around mimicry genes. PMID:23864282

  3. Allele-specific expression assays using Solexa

    PubMed Central

    Main, Bradley J; Bickel, Ryan D; McIntyre, Lauren M; Graze, Rita M; Calabrese, Peter P; Nuzhdin, Sergey V

    2009-01-01

    Background Allele-specific expression (ASE) assays can be used to identify cis, trans, and cis-by-trans regulatory variation. Understanding the source of expression variation has important implications for disease susceptibility, phenotypic diversity, and adaptation. While ASE is commonly measured via relative fluorescence at a SNP, next generation sequencing provides an opportunity to measure ASE in an accurate and high-throughput manner using read counts. Results We introduce a Solexa-based method to perform large numbers of ASE assays using only a single lane of a Solexa flowcell. In brief, transcripts of interest, which contain a known SNP, are PCR enriched and barcoded to enable multiplexing. Then high-throughput sequencing is used to estimate allele-specific expression using sequencing counts. To validate this method, we measured the allelic bias in a dilution series and found high correlations between measured and expected values (r>0.9, p < 0.001). We applied this method to a set of 5 genes in a Drosophila simulans parental mix, F1 and introgression and found that for these genes the majority of expression divergence can be explained by cis-regulatory variation. Conclusion We present a new method with the capacity to measure ASE for large numbers of assays using as little as one lane of a Solexa flowcell. This will be a valuable technique for molecular and population genetic studies, as well as for verification of genome-wide data sets. PMID:19740431

  4. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.

  5. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; et al

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population andmore » functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.« less

  6. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  7. Reconstructing the prior probabilities of allelic phylogenies.

    PubMed Central

    Golding, G Brian

    2002-01-01

    In general when a phylogeny is reconstructed from DNA or protein sequence data, it makes use only of the probabilities of obtaining some phylogeny given a collection of data. It is also possible to determine the prior probabilities of different phylogenies. This information can be of use in analyzing the biological causes for the observed divergence of sampled taxa. Unusually "rare" topologies for a given data set may be indicative of different biological forces acting. A recursive algorithm is presented that calculates the prior probabilities of a phylogeny for different allelic samples and for different phylogenies. This method is a straightforward extension of Ewens' sample distribution. The probability of obtaining each possible sample according to Ewens' distribution is further subdivided into each of the possible phylogenetic topologies. These probabilities depend not only on the identity of the alleles and on 4N(mu) (four times the effective population size times the neutral mutation rate) but also on the phylogenetic relationships among the alleles. Illustrations of the algorithm are given to demonstrate how different phylogenies are favored under different conditions. PMID:12072482

  8. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; De Masi, Leon; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S; Fraser, George P; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W Florian; Edwards, Robert A; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R; Rankin, Shelley C; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  9. Evidence of synmagmatic foliation in the Selawik Hills, NW Alaska, based on [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar age determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Solie, D.N. ); Layer, P.W. . Geophysical Inst.)

    1993-04-01

    Based on [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar plateau ages from various rock units in the Selawik Hills plutonic complex, northwestern Alaska, the units were emplaced in the order syenite/monzonite, followed by nepheline syenite and then quartz monzonite. There is no evidence of disturbance of the Ar isotopic system in the dated plutonic minerals, and the ages compare fairly well with previously published K/Ar data. A cooling history of about ten m.y. for the Selawk Hills rocks is suggested, based on comparison of [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages with apatite fission-track data (Murphy and Till, 1992). Comparison of hornblende plateau ages between nonfoliated and foliated syenite indicates that foliated rocks crystallized later than nonfoliated rocks, but within the initial cooling history of the complex. Foliated syenite/monzonite has mineralogy similar to nonfoliated, but with generally higher color index. Foliated textures are distributed throughout the complex, but are more prevalent to the north, proximal to a large (about 2 km[sup 2]) xenolithic metamorphic block which is bounded on the north by an east-west-trending fault. The authors suggest that synmagmatic fault movement acted as a mechanism causing plutonic foliation and resulting in possible loss of late fluid from semicrystallized syenitic magma to form kspar-rich dikes. Foundering of the xenolithic block within the magma may also have contributed to development of foliation. Continued fault movement is indicated by cataclastic deformation along the fault trace.

  10. The Detrital White Mica 40Ar/39Ar Record of the Katawaz Remnant Ocean Basin, Pakistan, and Tectonic Implications for the Himalayan Source Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, G.; Najman, Y.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Millar, I.; Carter, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Paleogene-Neogene sedimentary rocks in the Katawaz remnant ocean basin, Pakistan were thought to be a product of a fan-deltaic system, analogous to the modern Indus River and delta. A preliminary detrital zircon U-Pb study (Carter et al 2010) supported materials derived from the nascent western Himalaya and associated magmatic arc but that study was based on too few samples to fully characterize the whole series. Moreover, the chronology in the Katawaz basin was previously not well constrained, which impedes accurate comparison to other Himalaya foreland records. Here, we present a densely sampled study of detrital white mica 40Ar/39Ar. This study aims to: (1) constrain sedimentary ages of major lithostratigraphic units, (2) understand the exhumation history of the source region, and (3) reconstruct the paleodrainage system in NW Himalayan foreland. New 40Ar/39Ar data, together with a complementary study of detrital zircon U-Pb, constrain the sand-rich, fluvial-dominated Shaigalu Member to span from <34-36 Ma (basal sample) to <22 Ma (uppermost sample). The basal Shaigalu Member demonstrates similarity of ages of detrital zircon U-Pb and detrital white mica 40Ar/39Ar; both are characterized by a dominant peak of ca. 37 Ma. The dominant 37 Ma peak of detrital white mica 40Ar/39Ar ages has also been identified in the late Eocene Balakot Formation (Najman et al. 2001), the oldest terrestrial unit in the Himalayan peripheral foreland basin, and which is Himalayan-derived. We interpret the similarity in youngest age peak (37 Ma) between U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar as a signal of rapid exhumation related to a rising western Himalaya. Our new 40Ar/39Ar data also reveal that sediment sources changed through time, as demonstrated by the disappearance of the 37 Ma population up-section and re-occurrence at the top. This could be related to either migration of the drainage system and/or changes in sediment sources. Finally, our study indicates that the latest Eocene rapid

  11. Nonfunctional alleles of long-day suppressor genes independently regulate flowering time.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Ming; Feng, Li; Wang, Junrui; Qiao, Weihua; Zhang, Lifang; Cheng, Yunlian; Yang, Qingwen

    2016-06-01

    Due to the remarkable adaptability to various environments, rice varieties with diverse flowering times have been domesticated or improved from Oryza rufipogon. Detailed knowledge of the genetic factors controlling flowering time will facilitate understanding the adaptation mechanism in cultivated rice and enable breeders to design appropriate genotypes for distinct preferences. In this study, four genes (Hd1, DTH8, Ghd7 and OsPRR37) in a rice long-day suppression pathway were collected and sequenced in 154, 74, 69 and 62 varieties of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) respectively. Under long-day conditions, varieties with nonfunctional alleles flowered significantly earlier than those with functional alleles. However, the four genes have different genetic effects in the regulation of flowering time: Hd1 and OsPRR37 are major genes that generally regulate rice flowering time for all varieties, while DTH8 and Ghd7 only regulate regional rice varieties. Geographic analysis and network studies suggested that the nonfunctional alleles of these suppression loci with regional adaptability were derived recently and independently. Alleles with regional adaptability should be taken into consideration for genetic improvement. The rich genetic variations in these four genes, which adapt rice to different environments, provide the flexibility needed for breeding rice varieties with diverse flowering times. PMID:26220807

  12. Age measurements of potassium-bearing sulfide minerals by the 40Ar/39Ar technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Lanphere, M.A.; Erd, Richard C.; Blake, M.C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    K-Ar ages have been determined for sulfide minerals for the first time. The occurrence of adequate amounts of potassium-bearing sulfides with ideal compositions K3Fe10S14 (???10 wt.% K) and KFe2S3 (???16 wt.% K) in samples from a mafic alkalic diatreme at Coyote Peak, California, prompted an attempt to date these materials. K3Fe10S14, a massive mineral with conchoidal fracture, gives an age of 29.4 ?? 0.5 m.y. (40Ar/39Ar), indistinguishable from the 28.3 ?? 0.4 m.y. (40Ar/39Ar) and 30.2 ?? 1.0 m.y.8 (conventional K-Ar) ages obtained for associated phlogopite (8.7 wt.% K). KFe2S3, a bladed, fibrous sulfide, gives a younger age, 26.5 ?? 0.5 m.y. (40Ar/39Ar), presumably owing to Ar loss. ?? 1978.

  13. Increasing long term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  14. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  15. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  16. K/AR dating of clinoptilolite, mordenite, and associated clays from Yucca Mountains, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    WoldeGabriel, G.

    1993-07-01

    Zeolites are abundant in the geologic record in both continental and marine environments. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the utility of K-bearing zeolites for dating by the K/Ar method to determine the time of zeolite diagenesis at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Fig. 1). At Yucca Mountain, K-rich clinoptilolite and possibly mordenite are the only potentially K/Ar dateable secondary minerals present in the zeolite-rich tuffs except for some illite/smectites ({ge}10% illite layers) associated with these minerals. Direct dating of K-rich clinoptilolite, the most abundant zeolite in the altered tuffs, is important to delineate zeolite chronology as part of the site characterization of Yucca Mountain.

  17. Inborn errors of human STAT1: allelic heterogeneity governs the diversity of immunological and infectious phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Okada, Satoshi; Cypowyj, Sophie; Puel, Anne; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The genetic dissection of various human infectious diseases has led to the definition of inborn errors of human STAT1 immunity of four types, including (i) autosomal recessive (AR) complete STAT1 deficiency, (ii) AR partial STAT1 deficiency, (iii) autosomal dominant (AD) STAT1 deficiency, and (iv) AD gain of STAT1 activity. The two types of AR STAT1 defect give rise to a broad infectious phenotype with susceptibility to intramacrophagic bacteria (mostly mycobacteria) and viruses (herpes viruses at least), due principally to the impairment of IFN-γ-mediated and IFN-α/β-mediated immunity, respectively. Clinical outcome depends on the extent to which the STAT1 defect decreases responsiveness to these cytokines. AD STAT1 deficiency selectively predisposes individuals to mycobacterial disease, owing to the impairment of IFN-γ-mediated immunity, as IFN-α/β-mediated immunity is maintained. Finally, AD gain of STAT1 activity is associated with autoimmunity, probably owing to an enhancement of IFN-α/β-mediated immunity. More surprisingly, it is also associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, through as yet undetermined mechanisms involving an inhibition of the development of IL-17-producing T cells. Thus, germline mutations in human STAT1 define four distinct clinical disorders. Various combinations of viral, mycobacterial and fungal infections are therefore allelic at the human STAT1 locus. These experiments of Nature neatly highlight the clinical and immunological impact of the human genetic dissection of infectious phenotypes. PMID:22651901

  18. Fixation probability with multiple alleles and projected average allelic effect on selection.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Sabin; Lahaie, Philippe

    2009-06-01

    The first-order effect of selection on the probability of fixation of an allele, with respect to an intensity of selection s>0 in a diploid population of fixed finite size N, undergoing discrete, non-overlapping generations, is shown to be given by the sum of the average effects of that allele on the coefficient of selection in the current generation and all future generations, given the population state in the current generation. This projected average allelic effect is a weighted sum of average allelic effects in allozygous and autozygous offspring in the initial generation, with weights given in terms of expected coalescence times, under neutrality, for the lineages of two or three gametes chosen at random in the same generation. This is shown in the framework of multiple alleles at one locus, with genotypic values determining either viability or fertility differences, and with either multinomial or exchangeable reproduction schemes. In the limit of weak selection in a large population such that Ns tends to zero, the initial average allelic effects in allozygous offspring and autozygous offspring have the same weight on the fixation probability only in the domain of application of the Kingman coalescent. With frequency-dependent selection in a linear-game-theoretic context with two phenotypes determined by additive gene action, the first-order effect on the fixation probability is a combination of two effects of frequency-independent selection, one in a haploid population, the other in a diploid population. In the domain of application of the Kingman coalescent as the population size goes to infinity and Ns to zero, the first effect is three times more important than the second effect. This explains the one-third law of evolutionary dynamics in this domain, and shows how this law can be extended beyond this domain. PMID:19249322

  19. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Brian J; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Weisman, Caroline M; Hollister, Jesse D; Salt, David E; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-07-19

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  20. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Brian J.; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M.; Weisman, Caroline M.; Hollister, Jesse D.; Salt, David E.; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-01-01

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata. In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata. This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  1. ACTN3 Allele Frequency in Humans Covaries with Global Latitudinal Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Lek, Monkol; North, Kathryn N.; Organ, Chris L.

    2013-01-01

    A premature stop codon in ACTN3 resulting in α-actinin-3 deficiency (the ACTN3 577XX genotype) is common in humans and reduces strength, muscle mass, and fast-twitch fiber diameter, but increases the metabolic efficiency of skeletal muscle. Linkage disequilibrium data suggest that the ACTN3 R577X allele has undergone positive selection during human evolution. The allele has been hypothesized to be adaptive in environments with scarce resources where efficient muscle metabolism would be selected. Here we test this hypothesis by using recently developed comparative methods that account for evolutionary relatedness and gene flow among populations. We find evidence that the ACTN3 577XX genotype evolved in association with the global latitudinal gradient. Our results suggest that environmental variables related to latitudinal variation, such as species richness and mean annual temperature, may have influenced the adaptive evolution of ACTN3 577XX during recent human history. PMID:23359641

  2. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  3. Allelic genealogies in sporophytic self-incompatibility systems in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Christiansen, F B

    1998-01-01

    Expectations for the time scale and structure of allelic genealogies in finite populations are formed under three models of sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance interactions among the alleles that determine the self-incompatibility phenotype: In the SSIcod model, alleles act codominantly in both pollen and style, in the SSIdom model, alleles form a dominance hierarchy, and in SSIdomcod, alleles are codominant in the style and show a dominance hierarchy in the pollen. Coalescence times of alleles rarely differ more than threefold from those under gametophytic self-incompatibility, and transspecific polymorphism is therefore expected to be equally common. The previously reported directional turnover process of alleles in the SSIdomcod model results in coalescence times lower and substitution rates higher than those in the other models. The SSIdom model assumes strong asymmetries in allelic action, and the most recessive extant allele is likely to be the most recent common ancestor. Despite these asymmetries, the expected shape of the allele genealogies does not deviate markedly from the shape of a neutral gene genealogy. The application of the results to sequence surveys of alleles, including interspecific comparisons, is discussed. PMID:9799270

  4. 40Ar/39Ar Interlaboratory Calibration into the Holocene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, M. T.; Jicha, B.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Miggins, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in 40Ar/39Ar analytical precision for very young rocks requires collaborative efforts amongst argon geochronology labs to demonstrate age reproducibility commensurate with high precision. NM Tech (NMT), the University of Wisconsin (UW) and Oregon State University (OSU) have each dated Quaternary flux monitor standard AC-2 sanidine (~1.185 Ma), a blind sanidine described as being 50-100 ka (BS) and sanidine from the Qixiangshan (QIX) flow (~10 ka), Changbaishan volcano, China. The samples were irradiated in a single package with FC-2 sanidine (28.201 Ma) as the flux monitor and the irradiated material was distributed amongst the labs. Heizler was present during analysis at both OSU and UW and Jicha attended OSU during analysis. Physical presence was key towards gaining understanding of individual protocols and prompted valuable discussions. Analyses were carried out on single crystals using total fusion and/or step heating approaches. Age agreement was achieved within 2s uncertainty that ranged between (0.03-0.3%, 0.13-0.37% and 1.8-2.6%) for AC-2, BS and QIX, respectively. Each lab found AC-2 to vary somewhat beyond a normal distribution and to yield an age relative to FC-2 of ~1.185 Ma that is ~1.3% (~5-10 sigma) lower than some published estimates. A key cause of the variation between this study and previous results may be variable gas pressure equilibration times between extraction line and mass spectrometer coupled with variable choices to estimate time zero by other laboratories. The majority of our efforts concentrated on the QIX sanidine where prior data obtained by our labs revealed a factor of two spread in age (~11 and 23 ka) based on experiments carried out by total fusion and bulk incremental heating. By conducting single crystal age spectrum analysis we were able to mitigate effects of melt inclusion hosted excess argon and xenocrystic contamination towards obtaining analytical agreement with apparent ages near 10 ka. However, philosophical

  5. Research: Rags to Rags? Riches to Riches?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2004-01-01

    Everyone has read about what might be called the "gold gap"--how the rich in this country are getting richer and controlling an ever-larger share of the nation's wealth. The Century Foundation has started publishing "Reality Check", a series of guides to campaign issues that sometimes finds gaps in these types of cherished delusions. The guides…

  6. 39Ar-40Ar Dating of Thermal Events on Meteorite Parent Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1999-03-01

    A summary of 39Ar-40Ar ages reveals the impact and thermal history of several meteorite parent bodies, i.e., eucrites, chondrites, mesosiderites, acapulcoites/lodranites, winonaites, enstatites, and IAB and IIE irons.

  7. The Chelyabinsk Meteorite: Variable Shock Effects Recorded by the 40Ar-39Ar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korochantseva, E. V.; Buikin, A. I.; Hopp, J.; Lorenz, C. A.; Trieloff, M.

    2015-07-01

    Shocked lithologies of the Chelyabinsk LL chondrite have higher apparent 40Ar-39Ar ages than the very young light lithology. We interpret previous impact events made shocked lithologies more retentive and resistant against thermal reset.

  8. Why is a Flare-rich Active Region CME-poor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijuan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Jingxiu; Shen, Chenglong; Ye, Pinzhong; Liu, Rui; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Wang, S.

    2016-08-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The largest AR in the past 24 years, NOAA AR 12192, which crossed the visible disk from 2014 October 17 to 30, unusually produced more than one hundred flares, including 32 M-class and 6 X-class ones, but only one small CME. Flares and CMEs are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process. Why is such a flare-rich AR so CME-poor? We compared this AR with other four ARs; two were productive in both and two were inert. The investigation of the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram reveals that the flare-rich AR 12192, as with the other two productive ARs, has larger magnetic flux, current, and free magnetic energy than the two inert ARs but, in contrast to the two productive ARs, it has no strong, concentrated current helicity along both sides of the flaring neutral line, indicating the absence of a mature magnetic structure consisting of highly sheared or twisted field lines. Furthermore, the decay index above the AR 12192 is relatively low, showing strong constraint. These results suggest that productive ARs are always large and have enough current and free energy to power flares, but whether or not a flare is accompanied by a CME is seemingly related to (1) the presence of a mature sheared or twisted core field serving as the seed of the CME, or (2) a weak enough constraint of the overlying arcades.

  9. First-principles calibration of 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and complete extraction of 40Ar* from sanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Kuiper, K.; Mark, D.; Postma, O.; Villa, I. M.; Wijbrans, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar geochronology relies on comparing argon isotopic data for unknowns to those for knowns. Mineral standards used as neutron fluence monitors must be dated by the K-Ar method (or at least referenced to a mineral of known K-Ar age). The commonly used age of 28.02 ± 0.28 Ma for the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) (Renne et al., 1998) is based upon measurements of radiogenic 40Ar in GA1550 biotite (McDougall and Roksandic, 1974), but underlying full data were not published (these measurements were never intended for use as an international standard), so uncertainties are difficult to assess. Recent developments by Kuiper et al. (2008) and Renne et al. (2010) are limited by their reliance on the accuracy of other systems. Modern technology should allow for more precise and accurate calibration of primary K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar standards. From the ideal gas law, the number of moles of 40Ar in a system can be calculated from measurements of pressure, volume, and temperature. Thus we have designed and are proceeding to build a pipette system to introduce well-determined amounts of 40Ar into noble gas extraction lines and mass spectrometers. This system relies on components with calibrations traceable to SI unit prototypes, including a diaphragm pressure gauge (MKS Instruments), thermocouples, and a “slug” of an accurately determined volume to be inserted into the reservoir for volume determinations of the reservoir and pipette. The system will be renewable, with a lifetime of ca. 1 month for gas in the reservoir, and portable, to permit interlaboratory calibrations. The quantitative extraction of 40Ar* from the mineral standard is of highest importance; for sanidine standards this is complicated by high melt viscosity during heating. Experiments adding basaltic “zero age glass” (ZAG) to decrease melt viscosity are underway. This has previously been explored by McDowell (1983) with a resistance furnace, but has not been quantitatively addressed with laser heating

  10. Rapid detection and sequencing of alleles in the 3' flanking region of the interleukin-6 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bowcock, A M; Ray, A; Erlich, H; Sehgal, P B

    1989-01-01

    The 3' flanking region of the interleukin 6 gene is polymorphic due to insertions of different size. Within this region lies a sequence of approximately 500 base pairs that is AT rich. Based on flanking sequence information we have constructed oligonucleotides which prime the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and amplify this AT rich region. The amplification products visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis gave fragment sizes for both homozygous and heterozygous individuals that were concordant with those observed by conventional genomic blotting techniques. Alleles that could not be typed by Southern analysis were resolved with this approach. These results illustrate the value of PCR for the rapid detection of length polymorphisms such as those due to variable numbers of tandem repeats. In contrast to RFLP analysis this procedure takes less than a day to perform, is cheaper, avoids the use of radioactivity and requires far less substrate DNA. Three different human alleles were sequenced, and differences were detected that were due to both large duplications and loss of one or two bases, suggesting that AT rich regions identify highly polymorphic loci. The same primers also amplified non-human primate DNA, allowing a comparison of the human sequence with that of the common chimpanzee and baboon. Images PMID:2789373

  11. Ion kinetics in Ar/H2 cold plasmas: the relevance of ArH+

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Cueto, Maite; Doménech, José Luis; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J.

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of ArH+ in the interstellar medium has awakened the interest in the chemistry of this ion. In this work, the ion-molecule kinetics of cold plasmas of Ar/H2 is investigated in glow discharges spanning the whole range of [H2]/([H2]+[Ar]) proportions for two pressures, 1.5 and 8 Pa. Ion concentrations are determined by mass spectrometry, and electron temperatures and densities, with Langmuir probes. A kinetic model is used for the interpretation of the results. The selection of experimental conditions evinces relevant changes with plasma pressure in the ion distributions dependence with the H2 fraction, particularly for the major ions: Ar+, ArH+ and H3+. At 1.5 Pa, ArH+ prevails for a wide interval of H2 fractions: 0.3<[H2]/([H2]+[Ar])<0.7. Nevertheless, a pronounced displacement of the ArH+ maximum towards the lowest H2 fractions is observed at 8 Pa, in detriment of Ar+, which becomes restricted to very small [H2]/([H2]+[Ar]) ratios, whereas H3+ becomes dominant for all [H2]/([H2]+[Ar]) > 0.1. The analysis of the data with the kinetic model allows the identification of the sources and sinks of the major ions over the whole range of experimental conditions sampled. Two key factors turn out to be responsible for the different ion distributions observed: the electron temperature, which determines the rate of Ar+ formation and thus of ArH+, and the equilibrium ArH+ + H2 ⇄ H3+ + Ar, which can be strongly dependent of the degree of vibrational excitation of H3+. The results are discussed and compared with previously published data on other Ar/H2 plasmas. PMID:26702354

  12. Re-Evaluation of Ar-39 - Ar-40 Ages for Apollo Lunar Rocks 15415 and 60015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Shih, C.-Y.

    2010-01-01

    We re-analyzed 39Ar-40Ar ages of Apollo lunar highland samples 15415 and 60015, two ferroan anorthosites analyzed previously in the 1970 s, with a more detailed approach and with revised decay constants. From these samples we carefully prepared 100-200 mesh mineral separates for analysis at the Noble Gas Laboratory at NASA-Johnson Space Center. The Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectra for 15415 yielded an age of 3851 +/- 38 Ma with 33-99% of Ar39 release, roughly in agreement with previously reported Ar-Ar ages. For 60015, we obtained an age of 3584 +/- 152 Ma in 23-98% of Ar39 release, also in agreement with previously reported Ar-Ar ages of approximately 3.5 Ga. Highland anorthosites like these are believed by many to be the original crust of the moon, formed by plagioclase floatation atop a magma ocean, however the Ar-Ar ages of 15415 and 60015 are considerably younger than lunar crust formation. By contrast, recently recovered lunar anorthosites such as Dhofar 489, Dhofar 908, and Yamato 86032 yield older Ar-Ar ages, up to 4.35 Ga, much closer to time of formation of the lunar crust. It follows that the Ar-Ar ages of the Apollo samples must have been reset by secondary heating, and that this heating affected highland anorthosites at both the Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 landing sites but did not affect lunar highland meteorites. One obvious consideration is that while the Apollo samples were collected from the near side of the moon, these lunar meteorites are thought to have originated from the lunar far side

  13. 40Ar/39Ar age spectra of some undisturbed terrestrial samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brent, Dalrymple G.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1974-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age spectra and 40Ar/36Ar vs 39Ar/36Ar isochrons were determined by incremental heating for 11 terrestrial rocks and minerals whose geology indicates that they represent essentially undisturbed systems. The samples include muscovite, biotite, hornblende, sanidine, plagioclase, dacite, diabase and basalt and range in age from 40 to 1700 m.y. For each sample, the 40Ar/39Ar ratios, corrected for atmospheric and neutron-generated argon isotopes, are the same for most of the gas fractions released and the age spectra, which show pronounced plateaus, thus are consistent with models previously proposed for undisturbed samples. Plateau ages and isochron ages calculated using plateau age fractions are concordant and appear to be meaningful estimates of the crystallization and cooling ages of these samples. Seemingly anomalous age spectrum points can be attributed entirely to small amounts of previously unrecognized argon loss and to gas fractions that contain too small (less than 2 per cent) a proportion of the 39Ar released to be geologically significant. The use of a quantitative abscissa for age spectrum diagrams is recommended so that the size of each gas fraction is readily apparent. Increments containing less than about 4-5 per cent of the total 39Ar released should be interpreted cautiously. Both the age spectrum and isochron methods of data reduction for incremental heating experiments are worthwhile, as each gives slightly different but complementary information about the sample from the same basic data. Use of a least-squares fit that allows for correlated errors is recommended for 40Ar/36Ar vs 39Ar/36Ar isochrons. The results indicate that the 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating technique can be used to distinguish disturbed from undisturbed rock and mineral systems and will be a valuable geochronological tool in geologically complex terranes. ?? 1994.

  14. Exquisite allele discrimination by toehold hairpin primers

    PubMed Central

    Byrom, Michelle; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to detect and monitor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biological samples is an enabling research and clinical tool. We have developed a surprising, inexpensive primer design method that provides exquisite discrimination between SNPs. The field of DNA computation is largely reliant on using so-called toeholds to initiate strand displacement reactions, leading to the execution of kinetically trapped circuits. We have now similarly found that the short toehold sequence to a target of interest can initiate both strand displacement within the hairpin and extension of the primer by a polymerase, both of which will further stabilize the primer:template complex. However, if the short toehold does not bind, neither of these events can readily occur and thus amplification should not occur. Toehold hairpin primers were used to detect drug resistance alleles in two genes, rpoB and katG, in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, and ten alleles in the Escherichia coli genome. During real-time PCR, the primers discriminate between mismatched templates with Cq delays that are frequently so large that the presence or absence of mismatches is essentially a ‘yes/no’ answer. PMID:24990378

  15. Microsatellite variation and rare alleles in a bottlenecked Hawaiian Islands endemic: implications for reintroductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Pearce, John M.; Lavretsky, Philip; Seixas, Pedro P.; Courtot, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Conservation of genetic biodiversity in endangered wildlife populations is an important challenge to address since the loss of alleles and genetic drift may influence future adaptability. Reintroduction aims to re-establish species to restored or protected ecosystems; however, moving a subset of individuals may result in loss of gene variants during the management-induced bottleneck (i.e. translocation). The endangered Laysan teal Anas laysanensis was once widespread across the Hawaiian archipelago, but became isolated on Laysan Island (415 ha) from the mid-1800s until 2004 when a translocation to Midway Atoll (596 ha) was undertaken to reduce extinction risks. We compared genetic diversity and quantified variation at microsatellite loci sampled from 230 individuals from the wild populations at Laysan (1999 to 2009) and Midway (2007 to 2010; n = 133 Laysan, n = 96 Midway birds). We identified polymorphic markers by screening nuclear microsatellites (N = 83). Low nuclear variation was detected, consistent with the species’ insular isolation and historical bottleneck. Six of 83 microsatellites were polymorphic. We found limited but similar estimates of allelic richness (2.58 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity within populations. However, 2 rare alleles found in the Laysan source population were not present in Midway’s reintroduced population, and a unique allele was discovered in an individual on Midway. Differentiation between island populations was low (FST = 0.6%), but statistically significant. Our results indicate that genetic drift had little effect on offspring generations 3 to 6 yr post-release and demonstrate the utility of using known founder events to help quantify genetic capture during translocations and to inform management decisions.

  16. Ar-Ar Age of NWA-1460 and Evidence For Young Formation Ages of the Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2006-01-01

    Agreement of Ar-Ar, Sm-Nd, and Rb-Sr ages for NWA1460, and the inconsistency between a low shock-heating temperature for Zagami and the proposition that a 4.0 Gyr-old Zagami lost most of its Ar-40 are inconsistent with ancient formation ages for these shergottites, but are consistent with relatively young igneous formation ages.

  17. Allelic disequilibrium and allele frequency distribution as a function of social and demographic history.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, E A; Neel, J V

    1997-01-01

    Allelic disequilibrium between closely linked genes is a common observation in human populations and often gives rise to speculation concerning the role of selective forces. In a previous treatment, we have developed a population model of the expected distribution of rare variants (including private polymorphisms) in Amerindians and have argued that, because of the great expansion of Amerindian numbers with the advent of agriculture, most of these rare variants are of relatively recent origin. Many other populations have similar histories of striking recent expansions. In this treatment, we demonstrate that, in consequence of this fact, a high degree of linkage disequilibrium between two nonhomologous alleles <0.5 cM apart is the "normal" expectation, even in the absence of selection. This expectation is enhanced by the previous subdivision of human populations into relatively isolated tribes characterized by a high level of endogamy and inbreeding. We also demonstrate that the alleles associated with a recessive disease phenotype are expected to exist in a population in very variable frequencies: there is no need to postulate positive selection with respect to the more common disease-associated alleles for such entities as phenylketonuria or cystic fibrosis. PMID:8981963

  18. Schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for alleles that affect gene expression in adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Alexander L; Jones, Lesley; Moskvina, Valentina; Kirov, George; Gejman, Pablo V; Levinson, Douglas F; Sanders, Alan R; Purcell, Shaun; Visscher, Peter M; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J; Holmans, Peter; O’Donovan, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    It is widely thought that alleles that influence susceptibility to common diseases, including schizophrenia, will frequently do so through effects on gene expression. Since only a small proportion of the genetic variance for schizophrenia has been attributed to specific loci, this remains an unproven hypothesis. The International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC) recently reported a substantial polygenic contribution to that disorder, and that schizophrenia risk alleles are enriched among SNPs selected for marginal evidence for association (p<0.5) from genome wide association studies (GWAS). It follows that if schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for those that affect gene expression, those marginally associated SNPs which are also eQTLs should carry more true association signals compared with SNPs which are not. To test this, we identified marginally associated (p<0.5) SNPs from two of the largest available schizophrenia GWAS datasets. We assigned eQTL status to those SNPs based upon an eQTL dataset derived from adult human brain. Using the polygenic score method of analysis reported by the ISC, we observed and replicated the observation that higher probability cis-eQTLs predicted schizophrenia better than those with a lower probability for being a cis-eQTL. Our data support the hypothesis that alleles conferring risk of schizophrenia are enriched among those that affect gene expression. Moreover, our data show that notwithstanding the likely developmental origin of schizophrenia, studies of adult brain tissue can in principle allow relevant susceptibility eQTLs to be identified. PMID:21339752

  19. Allelic Interactions Heritably Alter the Activity of a Metastable Maize Pl Allele

    PubMed Central

    Hollick, J. B.; Patterson, G. I.; Coe-Jr., E. H.; Cone, K. C.; Chandler, V. L.

    1995-01-01

    The maize pl locus encodes a transcriptional activator of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes. The Pl-Rhoades (Pl-Rh) allele confers robust purple anthocyanin pigment in several tissues. Spontaneous derivatives of Pl-Rh, termed Pl'-mahogany (Pl'-mah), arise that confer reduced pigment and are meiotically heritable. These derivatives influence other Pl-Rh alleles such that only Pl'-mah alleles are transmitted from a Pl-Rh/Pl'-mah heterozygote. Genetic crosses establish that chromosomal segregation distortion does not explain this exclusive transmission and suggest that Pl-Rh invariably changes to Pl'-mah when exposed to Pl'-mah. Such behavior is a hallmark of paramutation. Cosegregation experiments demonstrate that this paramutagenic activity is genetically linked to the pl locus. By visually quantifying pl action through successive crosses, we find that phenotypic expression is inversely related to paramutagenic strength. In addition, the paramutagenic state is metastable; reversion to a nonparamutagenic Pl-Rh state can occur. The behavior of Pl-Rh is unique, yet it shares characteristics with paramutation at two other maize loci, b and r. Previous analysis of b and r paramutation revealed extensive differences and led to suggestions of distinct molecular mechanisms. Consideration of the common features of all three systems reinvigorates the interpretation that the mechanistic processes of these three allelic interactions are similar. PMID:8647404

  20. 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    LANEY, T.

    2000-03-24

    The 244-AR Vault Facility, constructed between 1966 and 1968, was designed to provide lag storage and treatment for the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX) tank farm sludges. Tank farm personnel transferred the waste from the 244-AR Vault Facility to B Plant for recovery of cesium and strontium. B Plant personnel then transferred the treatment residuals back to the tank farms for storage of the sludge and liquids. The last process operations, which transferred waste supporting the cesium/strontium recovery mission, occurred in April 1978. After the final transfer in 1978, the 244-AR facility underwent a cleanout. However, 2,271 L (600 gal) of sludge were left in Tank 004AR from an earlier transfer from Tank 241-AX-104. When the cleanout was completed, the facility was placed in a standby status. The sludge had been transferred to Tank 004AR to support Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL] vitrification work. Documentation of waste transfers suggests that a portion of the sludge may have been moved from Tank 004AR to Tank 002AR in preparation for transfer back to the AX Tank Farm; however, quantities of the sludge that were moved to Tank 002AR from that transfer must be estimated.

  1. USDA/ARS Organic Production Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For much of its history, USDA/ARS had little to do with research on organic agriculture, however research in organic systems has made considerable gains at the agency over the past decade. In the 1980's and 1990's, as the organic food industry was taking off, ARS researchers who wanted to serve orga...

  2. Constraining the alteration history of a Late Cretaceous Patagonian volcaniclastic bentonite-ash-mudstone sequence using K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, L. N.; Hofmann, H.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2016-03-01

    Smectite is typically considered unsuitable for radiometric dating, as argon (40Ar) produced from decay of exchangeable potassium (40K) located in the interlayer sites can be lost during fluid-rock interaction and/or during wet sample preparation in the laboratory. However, age analysis of Late Cretaceous Argentinian bentonites and associated volcaniclastic rocks from Lago Pellegrini, Northern Patagonia, indicates that, in the case of these very low-permeability rocks, the radioactive 40Ar was retained and thus can provide information on smectite age and the timing of rock alteration. This study presents isotopic results that indicate the ash-to-bentonite conversion and alteration of the overlying tuffaceous mudstones in Northern Patagonia was complete ~13-17 my after middle Campanian sedimentation when the system isotopically closed. The general absence of illite in these smectite-rich lithologies reflects the low activity of K and the low temperature (<60 °C) of the formation waters that altered the parent ash.

  3. The effect of SEM imaging on the Ar/Ar system in feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, S.; Sherlock, S.; Lee, M.; Kelley, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    Complex microtextures form in K-feldspar crystals as they cool and are affected by deuteric alteration. This complex structure is the cause of variable closure temperatures for Ar-Ar, a phenomenon which has been utilized in multi domain diffusion (MDD) modelling to recover thermal histories [1]. However, there has been substantial controversy regarding the precise interaction between feldspar microtextures and Ar-diffusion [2,3]. A number of studies have addressed this issue using coupled SEM imaging and Ar/Ar UV laser ablation microprobe (UV-LAMP) analysis on the same sample, to enable direct comparison of microtextures with Ar/Ar age data [4]. Here we have tested the idea that SEM work may affect Ar/Ar ages, leading to inaccurate results in subsequent Ar/Ar analyses. Three splits of alkali feldspar from the Dartmoor Granite in SW England were selected for Ar/Ar UV-LAMP analysis. Split 1 (“control”) was prepared as a polished thick section for Ar/Ar analysis. Split 2 (“SEM”) was prepared as a polished thick section, was chemically-mechanically polished with colloidal silica and underwent SEM imaging (uncoated) and focussed ion beam (FIB) milling (gold coated); electron beam damage in the SEM was maximised by leaving the sample at high magnification for eight minutes. Split 3 (“Etch”) is a cleavage fragment that was etched with HF vapour and underwent low to moderate magnification SEM imaging. The control split gave a range of laser-spot ages consistent with the expected cooling age of the granite and high yields of radiogenic 40Ar* (>90%). The area of the “SEM” split that experienced significant electron beam damage gave younger than expected ages and 40Ar* yields as low as 57%. These are interpreted as a combination of implantation of atmospheric Ar and local redistribution of K within the sample. The area of “SEM” that underwent FIB milling gave ages and 40Ar* yields comparable to the control split, suggesting that the Au-coat minimises FIB

  4. Revised error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, Pieter

    2015-12-01

    The main advantage of the 40Ar/39Ar method over conventional K-Ar dating is that it does not depend on any absolute abundance or concentration measurements, but only uses the relative ratios between five isotopes of the same element -argon- which can be measured with great precision on a noble gas mass spectrometer. The relative abundances of the argon isotopes are subject to a constant sum constraint, which imposes a covariant structure on the data: the relative amount of any of the five isotopes can always be obtained from that of the other four. Thus, the 40Ar/39Ar method is a classic example of a 'compositional data problem'. In addition to the constant sum constraint, covariances are introduced by a host of other processes, including data acquisition, blank correction, detector calibration, mass fractionation, decay correction, interference correction, atmospheric argon correction, interpolation of the irradiation parameter, and age calculation. The myriad of correlated errors arising during the data reduction are best handled by casting the 40Ar/39Ar data reduction protocol in a matrix form. The completely revised workflow presented in this paper is implemented in a new software platform, Ar-Ar_Redux, which takes raw mass spectrometer data as input and generates accurate 40Ar/39Ar ages and their (co-)variances as output. Ar-Ar_Redux accounts for all sources of analytical uncertainty, including those associated with decay constants and the air ratio. Knowing the covariance matrix of the ages removes the need to consider 'internal' and 'external' uncertainties separately when calculating (weighted) mean ages. Ar-Ar_Redux is built on the same principles as its sibling program in the U-Pb community (U-Pb_Redux), thus improving the intercomparability of the two methods with tangible benefits to the accuracy of the geologic time scale. The program can be downloaded free of charge from

  5. The B AB AR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bazan, A.; Boucham, A.; Boutigny, D.; De Bonis, I.; Favier, J.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Jeremie, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Le Flour, T.; Lees, J. P.; Lieunard, S.; Petitpas, P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zachariadou, K.; Palano, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Stugu, B.; Abbott, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Amerman, L.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Clark, A. R.; Dardin, S.; Day, C.; Dow, S. F.; Fan, Q.; Gaponenko, I.; Gill, M. S.; Goozen, F. R.; Gowdy, S. J.; Gritsan, A.; Groysman, Y.; Hernikl, C.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Jared, R. C.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Karcher, A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kipnis, I.; Kluth, S.; Kral, J. F.; Lafever, R.; LeClerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, S. A.; Lionberger, C.; Liu, T.; Long, M.; Luo, L.; Lynch, G.; Luft, P.; Mandelli, E.; Marino, M.; Marks, K.; Matuk, C.; Meyer, A. B.; Minor, R.; Mokhtarani, A.; Momayezi, M.; Nyman, M.; Oddone, P. J.; Ohnemus, J.; Oshatz, D.; Patton, S.; Pedrali-Noy, M.; Perazzo, A.; Peters, C.; Pope, W.; Pripstein, M.; Quarrie, D. R.; Rasson, J. E.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Stone, R.; Strother, P. D.; Telnov, A. V.; von der Lippe, H.; Weber, T. F.; Wenzel, W. A.; Zizka, G.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Hawkes, C. M.; Kirk, A.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Koch, H.; Krug, J.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Andress, J. C.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; De Groot, N.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; Mass, A.; McFall, J. D.; Wallom, D.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Hearty, C.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Camanzi, B.; Harrison, T. J.; McKemey, A. K.; Tinslay, J.; Antohin, E. I.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Bukin, D. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kolachev, G. M.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Mikhailov, S. F.; Onuchin, A. P.; Salnikov, A. A.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Telnov, V. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Booth, J.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Pier, S.; Stoker, D. P.; Zioulas, G.; Ahsan, A.; Arisaka, K.; Buchanan, C.; Chun, S.; Faccini, R.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Prell, S. A.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Sharma, V.; Burke, S.; Callahan, D.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Hale, D.; Hart, P. A.; Kuznetsova, N.; Kyre, S.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; May, J.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S.; Beringer, J.; DeWitt, J.; Dorfan, D. E.; Eisner, A. M.; Frey, A.; Grillo, A. A.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Johnson, R. P.; Kroeger, W.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Rowe, W.; Sadrozinski, H.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. N.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Wilder, M.; Williams, D. C.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hanson, J. E.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Metzler, S.; Oyang, J.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Weaver, M.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Jayatilleke, S. M.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P.; Broomer, B.; Erdos, E.; Fahey, S.; Ford, W. T.; Gaede, F.; van Hoek, W. C.; Johnson, D. R.; Michael, A. K.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Sen, S.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, D. L.; Blouw, J.; Harton, J. L.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Warner, D. W.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Dahlinger, G.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Eckstein, P.; Futterschneider, H.; Kocian, M. L.; Krause, R.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Behr, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Ferrag, S.; Fouque, G.; Gastaldi, F.; Matricon, P.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Renard, C.; Roussot, E.; T'Jampens, S.; Thiebaux, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Di Lodovico, F.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Falbo, M.; Bozzi, C.; Dittongo, S.; Folegani, M.; Piemontese, L.; Ramusino, A. C.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Xie, Y.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Minutoli, S.; Monge, M. R.; Musenich, R.; Pallavicini, M.; Parodi, R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Priano, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Bartoldus, R.; Dignan, T.; Hamilton, R.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Fischer, P. A.; Lamsa, J.; McKay, R.; Meyer, W. T.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Albert, J. N.; Beigbeder, C.; Benkebil, M.; Breton, D.; Cizeron, R.; Du, S.; Grosdidier, G.; Hast, C.; Höcker, A.; Lacker, H. M.; LePeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.

    2002-02-01

    B AB AR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e +e - B Factory operating at the ϒ(4 S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagnetic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by d E/d x measurements in the tracking detectors and by a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

  6. 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar data bearing on the metamorphic and tectonic history of western New England.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutter, J.F.; Ratcliffe, N.M.; Mukasa, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar ages of coexisting biotite and hornblende from Proterozoic Y gneisses of the Berkshire and Green Mt massifs, as well as 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar mineral and whole-rock ages from Palaeozoic metamorphic rocks, suggest that the thermal peaks for the dominant metamorphic recrystallization in western New England occurred 465 + or - 5 m.y. (Taconian). 40Ar/39Ar age data from a poorly-defined terrain along the eastern strip of the area suggests that the area has been retrograded during a metamorphism that peaked at least 376 + or - 5 m.y. (Acadian). Available age and petrological data from western New England indicate the presence of at least three separate metamorphic-structure domains of Taconic age: 1) a small area of relict high-P and low-T metamorphism, 2) a broad area of normal Barrovian metamorphism from chlorite to garnet grade characterized by a gentle metamorphic gradient and, 3) a rather narrow belt of steep-gradient, Barrovian series metamorphic rocks. Areas of maximum metamorphic intensity within the last domain coincide with areas of maximum crustal thickening in the later stage of Taconic orogeny. -L.di H

  7. Allele-specific disparity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a cancer cell the number of copies of a locus may vary due to amplification and deletion and these variations are denoted as copy number alterations (CNAs). We focus on the disparity of CNAs in tumour samples, which were compared to those in blood in order to identify the directional loss of heterozygosity. Methods We propose a numerical algorithm and apply it to data from the Illumina 109K-SNP array on 112 samples from breast cancer patients. B-allele frequency (BAF) and log R ratio (LRR) of Illumina were used to estimate Euclidian distances. For each locus, we compared genotypes in blood and tumour for subset of samples being heterozygous in blood. We identified loci showing preferential disparity from heterozygous toward either the A/B-allele homozygous (allelic disparity). The chi-squared and Cochran-Armitage trend tests were used to examine whether there is an association between high levels of disparity in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and molecular, clinical and tumour-related parameters. To identify pathways and network functions over-represented within the resulting gene sets, we used Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results To identify loci with a high level of disparity, we selected SNPs 1) with a substantial degree of disparity and 2) with substantial frequency (at least 50% of the samples heterozygous for the respective locus). We report the overall difference in disparity in high-grade tumours compared to low-grade tumours (p-value < 0.001) and significant associations between disparity in multiple single loci and clinical parameters. The most significantly associated network functions within the genes represented in the loci of disparity were identified, including lipid metabolism, small-molecule biochemistry, and nervous system development and function. No evidence for over-representation of directional disparity in a list of stem cell genes was obtained, however genes appeared to be more often altered by deletion than by

  8. 40Ar/39Ar Ages of Carbonaceous Xenoliths in 2 HED Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turrin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Johnson, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    The generally young K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages of CM chondrites made us wonder whether carbonaceous xenoliths (CMX) entombed in Howardite–Eucrite–Diogenite (HED) meteorites might retain more radiogenic 40Ar than do ‘free-range’ CM-chondrites. To find out, we selected two HED breccias with carbonaceous inclusions in order to compare the 40Ar/39Ar release patterns and ages of the inclusions with those of nearby HED material. Carbonaceous inclusions (CMXs) in two HED meteorites lost a greater fraction of radiogenic 40Ar than did surrounding host material, but a smaller fraction of it than did free-range CM-chondrites such as Murchison or more heavily altered ones. Importantly, however, the siting of the CMXs in HED matrix did not prevent the 40Ar loss of about 40 percent of the radiogenic 40Ar, even from phases that degas at high laboratory temperatures. We infer that carbonaceous asteroids with perihelia of 1 astronomical unit probably experience losses of at least this size. The usefulness of 40Ar/39Ar dating for samples returned from C-type asteroids may hinge, therefore, on identifying and analyzing separately small quantities of the most retentive phases of carbonaceous chondrites.

  9. 40Ar/39Ar ages of lunar impact glasses: Relationships among Ar diffusivity, chemical composition, shape, and size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellner, N. E. B.; Delano, J. W.

    2015-07-01

    Lunar impact glasses, which are quenched melts produced during cratering events on the Moon, have the potential to provide not only compositional information about both the local and regional geology of the Moon but also information about the impact flux over time. We present in this paper the results of 73 new 40Ar/39Ar analyses of well-characterized, inclusion-free lunar impact glasses and demonstrate that size, shape, chemical composition, fraction of radiogenic 40Ar retained, and cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages are important for 40Ar/39Ar investigations of these samples. Specifically, analyses of lunar impact glasses from the Apollo 14, 16, and 17 landing sites indicate that retention of radiogenic 40Ar is a strong function of post-formation thermal history in the lunar regolith, size, and chemical composition. This is because the Ar diffusion coefficient (at a constant temperature) is estimated to decrease by ∼3-4 orders of magnitude with an increasing fraction of non-bridging oxygens, X(NBO), over the compositional range of most lunar impact glasses with compositions from feldspathic to basaltic. Based on these relationships, lunar impact glasses with compositions and sizes sufficient to have retained ∼90% of their radiogenic Ar during 750 Ma of cosmic ray exposure at time-integrated temperatures of up to 290 K have been identified and are likely to have yielded reliable 40Ar/39Ar ages of formation. Additionally, ∼50% of the identified impact glass spheres have formation ages of ⩽500 Ma, while ∼75% of the identified lunar impact glass shards and spheres have ages of formation ⩽2000 Ma. Higher thermal stresses in lunar impact glasses quenched from hyperliquidus temperatures are considered the likely cause of poor survival of impact glass spheres, as well as the decreasing frequency of lunar impact glasses in general with increasing age. The observed age-frequency distribution of lunar impact glasses may reflect two processes: (i) diminished

  10. Allele Specific p53 Mutant Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Vazquez, Alexei; Levine, Arnold J.; Carpizo, Darren R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Rescuing the function of mutant p53 protein is an attractive cancer therapeutic strategy. Using the NCI anticancer drug screen data, we identified two compounds from the thiosemicarbazone family that manifest increased growth inhibitory activity in mutant p53 cells, particularly for the p53R175 mutant. Mechanistic studies reveal that NSC319726 restores WT structure and function to the p53R175 mutant. This compound kills p53R172H knock-in mice with extensive apoptosis and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in a 175-allele specific mutant p53 dependent manner. This activity depends upon the zinc ion chelating properties of the compound as well as redox changes. These data identify NSC319726 as a p53R175 mutant reactivator and as a lead compound for p53 targeted drug development. PMID:22624712

  11. Unlocking wheat genetic resources for the molecular identification of previously undescribed functional alleles at the Pm3 resistance locus

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Navreet K.; Street, Kenneth; Mackay, Michael; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Keller, Beat

    2009-01-01

    The continuous improvement of crop plants is essential for agriculture in the coming decades and relies on the use of genetic variability through breeding. However, domestication and modern breeding have reduced diversity in the crop germplasm. Global gene banks conserve diversity, but these resources remain underexplored owing to a lack of efficient strategies to isolate important alleles. Here we describe a large-scale allele-mining project at the molecular level. We first selected a set of 1,320 bread wheat landraces from a database of 16,089 accessions, using the focused identification of germplasm strategy. On the basis of a hierarchical selection procedure on this set, we then isolated 7 resistance alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3, doubling the known functional allelic diversity at this locus. This targeted approach for molecular utilization of gene bank accessions reveals landraces as a rich resource of new functional alleles. This strategy can be implemented for other studies on the molecular diversity of agriculturally important genes, as well as for molecular breeding. PMID:19470492

  12. Unlocking wheat genetic resources for the molecular identification of previously undescribed functional alleles at the Pm3 resistance locus.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Navreet K; Street, Kenneth; Mackay, Michael; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Keller, Beat

    2009-06-01

    The continuous improvement of crop plants is essential for agriculture in the coming decades and relies on the use of genetic variability through breeding. However, domestication and modern breeding have reduced diversity in the crop germplasm. Global gene banks conserve diversity, but these resources remain underexplored owing to a lack of efficient strategies to isolate important alleles. Here we describe a large-scale allele-mining project at the molecular level. We first selected a set of 1,320 bread wheat landraces from a database of 16,089 accessions, using the focused identification of germplasm strategy. On the basis of a hierarchical selection procedure on this set, we then isolated 7 resistance alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3, doubling the known functional allelic diversity at this locus. This targeted approach for molecular utilization of gene bank accessions reveals landraces as a rich resource of new functional alleles. This strategy can be implemented for other studies on the molecular diversity of agriculturally important genes, as well as for molecular breeding. PMID:19470492

  13. arXiv.org and Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlo, Susan

    2007-09-01

    The website arXiv.org (pronounced archive) is a free online resource for full-text articles in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science, nonlinear science, and quantitative biology that has existed for about 15 years. Available directly at http://www.arXiv.org, this e-print archive is searchable. As of Jan. 3, 2007, arXiv had open access to 401,226 e-prints in the topic areas. Those who sign up for an ID and password can also sign up for daily submission abstract emails for specific subject classes of arXiv, including physics education, physics and society, and history of physics. Founded and developed by Paul Ginsparg when he was at Los Alamos National Laboratory, arXiv's original name was the LANL preprint archive or xxx.lanl.gov. The location and name changed after Ginsparg moved to the physics department at Cornell University. Today, arXiv is hosted and operated by Cornell University library. Mirror sites for arXiv exist worldwide.2

  14. RHCE variant allele: RHCE*ce254G,733G.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jessica A; Horn, Trina; Chiappa, Colleen; Melland, Camilla; Vietz, Christine; Castilho, Lilian; Keller, Margaret A

    2014-01-01

    A novel RHCE allele was identified in a 53-year-old African American female blood donor with an Rh phenotype of D+ CE-c+ e+ and a negative antibody screen. The donor's cells typed e+ with all antisera tested. By gel-based genotyping and Edna analysis, the two RHCE alleles in this donor were characterized.One allele was found to be the known allele RHCE*Ol.20.01(RHCE*ce733G) and the second was novel: RHCE*Ol.06.02(RHCE*ce254G,733G). PMID:25695437

  15. Nomenclature for human CYP2D6 alleles.

    PubMed

    Daly, A K; Brockmöller, J; Broly, F; Eichelbaum, M; Evans, W E; Gonzalez, F J; Huang, J D; Idle, J R; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Ishizaki, T; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Meyer, U A; Nebert, D W; Steen, V M; Wolf, C R; Zanger, U M

    1996-06-01

    To standardize CYP2D6 allele nomenclature, and to conform with international human gene nomenclature guidelines, an alternative to the current arbitrary system is described. Based on recommendations for human genome nomenclature, we propose that alleles be designated by CYP2D6 followed by an asterisk and a combination of roman letters and arabic numerals distinct for each allele with the number specifying the key mutation and, where appropriate, a letter specifying additional mutations. Criteria for classification as a separate allele and protein nomenclature are also presented. PMID:8807658

  16. The effect of deleterious alleles on adaptation in asexual populations.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Toby; Barton, Nick H

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the fixation probability of a beneficial allele that arises as the result of a unique mutation in an asexual population that is subject to recurrent deleterious mutation at rate U. Our analysis is an extension of previous works, which make a biologically restrictive assumption that selection against deleterious alleles is stronger than that on the beneficial allele of interest. We show that when selection against deleterious alleles is weak, beneficial alleles that confer a selective advantage that is small relative to U have greatly reduced probabilities of fixation. We discuss the consequences of this effect for the distribution of effects of alleles fixed during adaptation. We show that a selective sweep will increase the fixation probabilities of other beneficial mutations arising during some short interval afterward. We use the calculated fixation probabilities to estimate the expected rate of fitness improvement in an asexual population when beneficial alleles arise continually at some low rate proportional to U. We estimate the rate of mutation that is optimal in the sense that it maximizes this rate of fitness improvement. Again, this analysis relaxes the assumption made previously that selection against deleterious alleles is stronger than on beneficial alleles. PMID:12242249

  17. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency

    PubMed Central

    Castle, John C.; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D.; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency. PMID:24752137

  18. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency. PMID:24752137

  19. Differences in the nuclease sensitivity between the two alleles of the immunoglobulin kappa light chain genes in mouse liver and myeloma nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Weischet, W O; Glotov, B O; Schnell, H; Zachau, H G

    1982-01-01

    In mouse myeloma T the productive kappa light chain gene differs from its aberrantly rearranged allele in the patterns of DNAase I hypersensitive sites. In the region of the alleles where they are identical in sequence they have one site in common which lies 0.8 kb downstream of the coding region; but two sites upstream of and within the C gene segment (2) are found only on the non-productive allele. Within the region of different sequences both alleles have analogously located DNAase I hypersensitive sites; they lie 0.15 kb upstream of the respective leader segments and cover putative promoter sequences. Only one of the six DNAase I hypersensitive sites is also very sensitive towards micrococcal nuclease due to its particular DNA sequence. The non-rearranged gene studied in liver nuclei has no DNAase I hypersensitive sites but is preferentially cleaved in A/T rich regions. Images PMID:6287416

  20. Preliminary assessment of clinoptilolite K/Ar results from Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A potential high-level radioactive waste repository site

    SciTech Connect

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Bish, D.L.; Broxton, D.E.; Chipera, S.J.

    1992-03-01

    At Yucca Mountain, evidence for at least three distinct temporal groups of clinoptilolites can be delineated from the preliminary K/Ar dates (2--3 Ma; 4--5 Ma; 7--11 Ma). The older K/Ar dates that are similar to published illite/smectite ages (9--12 Ma) may be crystallization ages, whereas the younger dates probably represent continued diagenetic reactions of older clinoptilolites with percolating fluids. The K/Ar dates increase with depth, suggesting minimal argon loss in the deeper samples. Internal consistency of the clinoptilolite K/Ar results at different levels within the drill holes suggest that dating of K-rich zeolites may provide useful information for assessing the zeolitization at Yucca Mountain. Variations in the K/Ar dates are probably related to Ar loss during dissolution of older clinoptilolites and to contamination by finely crystalline feldspars.

  1. The 40Ar/39Ar dating technique applied to planetary sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, F.

    2012-12-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar technique is a powerful geochronological method that can help to unravel the evolution of the solar system. The 40Ar/39Ar system can not only record the timing of volcanic and metamorphic processes on asteroids and planets, it finds domain of predilection in dating impact events throughout the solar system. However, the 40Ar/39Ar method is a robust analytical technique if, and only if, the events to be dated are well understood and data are not over interpreted. Yet, too many 'ages' reported in the literature are still based on over-interpretation of perturbed age spectra which tends to blur the big picture. This presentation is centred on the most recent applications of the 40Ar/39Ar technique applied to planetary material and through several examples, will attempt to demonstrate the benefit of focusing on statistically robust data. For example, 40Ar/39Ar dating of volcanic events on the Moon suggests that volcanism was mostly concentrated between ca. 3.8 and 3.1 Ga but statistical filtering of the data allow identifying a few well-defined eruptive events. The study of lunar volcanism would also benefit from dating of volcanic spherules. Rigorous filtering of the 40Ar/39Ar age database of lunar melt breccias yielded concordant and ages with high precision for two major basins (i.e. Imbrium & Serenitatis) of the Moon. 40Ar/39Ar dating of lunar impact spherules recovered from four different sites and with high- and low-K compositions shows an increase of ages younger than 400 Ma suggesting a recent increase in the impact flux. The impact history of the LL parent body (bodies?) has yet to be well constrained but may mimic the LHB observed on the Moon, which would indicate that the LL parent body was quite large. 40Ar/39Ar dating (in progress) of grains from the asteroid Itokawa recovered by the japanese Hayabusa mission have the potential to constrain the formation history and exposure age of Itokawa and will allow us to compare the results with the

  2. The miR9863 family regulates distinct Mla alleles in barley to attenuate NLR receptor-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley Mla alleles encode coiled-coil (CC), nucleotide binding and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) intracellular receptors that trigger isolate-specific immune responses against the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). How Mla or NB-LRR genes in grass species are regulated at p...

  3. Allele-specific deposition of macroH2A1 in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, J H; Kim, J D; Chung, J H; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-01-13

    In the current study, we analyzed the deposition patterns of macroH2A1 at a number of different genomic loci located in X chromosome and autosomes. MacroH2A1 is preferentially deposited at methylated CpG CpG-rich regions located close to promoters. The macroH2A1 deposition patterns at the methylated CpG islands of several imprinted domains, including the Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) of Xist, Peg3, H19/Igf2 Igf2, Gtl2/Dlk1, and Gnas domains, show consistent allele-specificity towards inactive, methylated alleles. The macroH2A1 deposition levels at the ICRs and other Differentially Methylated Regions (DMRs) of these domains are also either higher or comparable to those observed at the inactive X chromosome of female mammals. Overall, our results indicate that besides DNA methylation macroH2A1 is another epigenetic component in the chromatin of ICRs displaying differential association with two parental alleles.

  4. Instrumentation development for planetary in situ 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidheiser-Kroll, B.; Morgan, L. E.; Munk, M.; Warner, N. H.; Gupta, S.; Slaybaugh, R.; Harkness, P.; Mark, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The chronology of the Solar System, particularly the timing of formation of extraterrestrial bodies and their features, is a major outstanding problem in planetary science. Although various chronological methods for in situ geochronology have been proposed (e.g. Rb-Sr, K-Ar), and even applied (K-Ar, Farley et al., 2014), the reliability, accuracy, and applicability of the 40Ar/39Ar method makes it by far the most desirable chronometer for dating extraterrestrial bodies. The method however relies on the neutron irradiation of samples, and thus a neutron source. We will discuss the challenges and feasibility of deploying a passive neutron source to planetary surfaces for the in situ application of the 40Ar/39Ar chronometer. Requirements in generating and shielding neutrons, as well as analyzing samples are discussed, along with an exploration of limitations such as mass, power, and cost. Two potential solutions for the in situ extraterrestrial deployment of the 40Ar/39Ar method will be presented. Although this represents a challenging task, developing the technology to apply the 40Ar/39Ar method on planetary surfaces would represent a major advance towards constraining the timescale of solar system formation and evolution.

  5. Ar-40/Ar-39 Studies of Martian Meteorite RBT 04262 and Terrestrial Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Turrin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Nagao, K.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2014-01-01

    Park et al. recently presented an Ar-40/Ar-39 dating study of maskelynite separated from the Martian meteorite RBT 04262. Here we report an additional study of Ar-40/Ar-39 patterns for smaller samples, each consisting of only a few maskelynite grains. Considered as a material for Ar-40/Ar-39 dating, the shock-produced glass maskelynite has both an important strength (relatively high K concentration compared to other mineral phases) and some potentially problematic weaknesses. At Rutgers, we have been analyzing small grains consisting of a single phase to explore local effects that might be averaged and remain hidden in larger samples. Thus, to assess the homogeneity of the RBT maskelynite and for comparison with the results of, we analyzed six approx. 30 microgram samples of the same maskelynite separate they studied. Furthermore, because most Ar-40/Ar-39 are calculated relative to the age of a standard, we present new Ar-40/Ar-39 age data for six standards. Among the most widely used standards are sanidine from Fish Canyon (FCs) and various hornblendes (hb3gr, MMhb-1, NL- 25), which are taken as primary standards because their ages have been determined by independent, direct measurements of K and A-40.

  6. Improvements Needed in the 40Ar/39Ar Study of Geomagnetic Excursion Chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, D. E.; Turrin, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Our knowledge of the existence and frequency of brief geomagnetic polarity. excursions only increases with time. Precise and accurate 40Ar/39Ar ages will be required to document this, because 25 or more excursions may have occurred within the Brunhes Epoch (780ky) separated in time by as little as 10ky. Excursions are and will dominantly be discovered in mafic, low K2O rocks. Improvements in the analytical protocol to 40Ar/39Ar date low K2O, "young", and thus low 40Arrad rocks are required. While conventional K/Ar dating "worked", the assumption of perfect atmospheric equilibration is flawed. In particular, using a measured isochron intercept (±2s) to embrace an atmospheric intercept assumption turns a 40Ar/39Ar diffusive extraction into a series of "K/Ar-lite" experiments. The near ubiquitous excess 40Ar exhibited in final steps of "matrix" or "groundmass" fractions from whole-rock experiments (no glass, crystals) suggests equilibration with the atmosphere is not achieved. Removing magnetic sample splits (glass?) thought subject to poor argon retention, and crystals subject to 40Ar inheritance are routinely done without documenting different isochrons. Short 15 to 20 minute irradiation times effectively eliminate recoil and dramatically minimize isotopic corrections, and the assumption of equivalence in Ar isotope recoil behavior. Assuming no pressure dependency and constancy of mass discrimination value ignores knowledge from other gas mass spectroscopy (O, H, He, Ne). Dynamic mass spectroscopy in stable isotopic analysis allows routine per mil and 0.1 per mil ratios to be measured. Maintaining more than daily bracketing air pipette measurements at differing pressures, and controlling the range of pressures from each diffusive step will approximate this dynamic precision. Experiments will be discussed that exhibit aspects of 40Ar/39Ar dating protocols with which precision and accuracy can be improved.

  7. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications. PMID:25549886

  8. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  9. Estimate of the 42Ar content in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, A. S.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Jants, V. E.

    1997-02-01

    42Ar is a potential source of background in large volume argon-based detectors. The production of the 42Ar isotope both by cosmic rays and by neutrons produced by testing of nuclear weapons is discussed. We demonstrate that main channel of the 42Ar production is from atmospheric testing of nuclear bombs from 1945 to 1962 and the 42Ar content must be less than 1.3 × 10 -23 parts of 42Ar per part of natAr.

  10. LASER MICROPROBE **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar DATING OF MINERAL GRAINS IN SITU.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutter, J.F.; Hartung, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-microprobe attached to a mass spectrometer for **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar age determination of single mineral grains in geological materials has been made operational at the US Geological Survey, Reston, VA. This microanalytical technique involves focusing a pulsed laser beam onto a sample contained in an ultra-high vacuum chamber attached to a rare-gas mass spectrometer. Argon in the neutron-irradiated sample is released by heating with the laser pulse and its isotopic composition is measured to yield an **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar age. Laser probe **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar ages of single mineral grains measured in situ can aid greatly in understanding the chronology of many geological situations where datable minerals are present but are not physically separable in quantities needed for conventional age dating.

  11. Ar-39-Ar-40 Ages of Euerites and the Thermal History of Asteroid 4-Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2002-01-01

    Eucrite meteorites are igneous rocks that derive from a large asteroid, probably 4 Vesta. Prior studies have shown that after eucrites formed, most were subsequently metamorphosed to temperatures up to equal to or greater than 800 C, and much later many were brecciated and heated by large impacts into the parent body surface. The uncommon basaltic, unbrecciated eucrites also formed near the surface but presumably escaped later brecciation, whereas the cumulate eucrites formed at depth where metamorphism may have persisted for a considerable period. To further understand the complex HED parent body thermal history, we determined new Ar-39-Ar-40 ages for nine eucrites classified as basaltic but unbrecciated, six eucrites classified as cumulate, and several basaltic-brecciated eucrites. Relatively precise Ar-Ar ages of two cumulate eucrites (Moama and EET87520) and four unbrecciated eucrites give a tight cluster at 4.48 +/1 0.01 Gyr. Ar-Ar ages of six additional unbrecciated eucrites are consistent with this age, within their larger age uncertainties. In contrast, available literature data on Pb-Pb isochron ages of four cumulate eucrites and one unbrecciated eucrite vary over 4.4-4.515 Gyr, and Sm-147 - Nd-143 isochron ages of four cumulate and three unbrecciated eucrites vary over 4.41-4.55 Gyr. Similar Ar-Ar ages for cumulate and unbrecciated eucrites imply that cumulate eucrites do not have a younger formation age than basaltic eucrites, as previously proposed. Rather, we suggest that these cumulate and unbrecciated eucrites resided at depth where parent body temperatures were sufficiently high to cause the K-Ar and some other chronometers to remain open diffusion systems. From the strong clustering of Ar-Ar ages at approximately 4.48 Gyr, we propose that these meteorites were excavated from depth in a single large impact event approximately 4.48 Gyr ago, which quickly cooled the samples and started the K-Ar chronometer. A large (approximately 460 km) crater

  12. Biased Allelic Expression in Human Primary Fibroblast Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santoni, Federico; Delaneau, Olivier; Fort, Alexandre; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Guipponi, Michel; Padioleau, Ismael; Carninci, Piero; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of gene expression in mammalian single cells via genomic technologies now provides the possibility to investigate the patterns of allelic gene expression. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to detect the allele-specific mRNA level in 203 single human primary fibroblasts over 133,633 unique heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (hetSNVs). We observed that at the snapshot of analyses, each cell contained mostly transcripts from one allele from the majority of genes; indeed, 76.4% of the hetSNVs displayed stochastic monoallelic expression in single cells. Remarkably, adjacent hetSNVs exhibited a haplotype-consistent allelic ratio; in contrast, distant sites located in two different genes were independent of the haplotype structure. Moreover, the allele-specific expression in single cells correlated with the abundance of the cellular transcript. We observed that genes expressing both alleles in the majority of the single cells at a given time point were rare and enriched with highly expressed genes. The relative abundance of each allele in a cell was controlled by some regulatory mechanisms given that we observed related single-cell allelic profiles according to genes. Overall, these results have direct implications in cellular phenotypic variability. PMID:25557783

  13. The ArsD As(III) metallochaperone

    PubMed Central

    Ajees, A. Abdul; Yang, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic, a toxic metalloid widely existing in the environment, causes a variety of health problems. The ars operon encoded by Escherichia coli plasmid R773 has arsD and arsA genes, where ArsA is an ATPase that is the catalytic subunit of the ArsAB As(III) extrusion pump, and ArsD is an arsenic chaperone for ArsA. ArsD transfers As(III) to ArsA and increases the affinity of ArsA for As(III), allowing resistance to environmental concentrations of arsenic. Cys12, Cys13 and Cys18 in ArsD form a three sulfur-coordinated As(III) binding site that is essential for metallochaperone activity. ATP hydrolysis by ArsA is required for transfer of As(III) from ArsD to ArsA, suggesting that transfer occurs with a conformation of ArsA that transiently forms during the catalytic cycle. The 1.4 Å x-ray crystal structure of ArsD shows a core of four β-strands flanked by four α-helices in a thioredoxin fold. Docking of ArsD with ArsA was modeled in silico. Independently ArsD mutants exhibiting either weaker or stronger interaction with ArsA were selected. The locations of the mutations mapped on the surface of ArsD are consistent with the docking model. The results suggest that the interface with ArsA involves one surface of α1 helix and metalloid binding site of ArsD. PMID:21188475

  14. Experimental Constraints on He, Ne, Ar Behavior at Mantle Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Kelley, S. P.; Parman, S. W.; Cooper, R. F.

    2010-12-01

    We have experimentally constrained He, Ne and Ar mineral-melt partitioning for olivine, enstatite and spinel under mantle P-T conditions. The experiments were run in a piston cylinder apparatus. Run products were analyzed by UV laser ablation microprobe (UVLAMP). Our data (Ol, Opx, Sp), along with literature data (Cpx), suggest He, Ne and Ar are incompatible during mantle melting. Gem quality crystals of En100, Sp and Fo90 were polished using colloidal silica and loaded along with a MgO rich, synthetic MORB powder into a graphite inner and Pt outer capsule. Within the inner capsule, crystals were faced against graphite, an identical crystal or polished glassy carbon. Equal pressures (40-60 total bars) of He, Ne and Ar were loaded into the outer capsule before it was welded closed. The run conditions were 1450C and 1-2 GPa for 10 hrs (Brown University). Depth profiles of the mineral faces were obtained using a 193 nm excimer laser (Open University). The large crystal area and short wavelength laser allows for measurements with high depth resolution and concentration precision: a 400 um aperture with 150 nm ablation depth can provide a detection limit (3 sigma > blank) of ~500 ppb He, ~1 ppm Ne and ~500 ppb Ar. Three mineral ablation pits were imaged using a white light interferometer at Tufts University and indicate an ablation rate of ~25 nm/pulse. Glass ablation rates are estimated using previous measurements. The melts were generally understaturated with respect to He, Ne and Ar (1-10, 3-200 and 4-1000 PPM, respectively). Concentrations in the minerals were mostly below detection limits. Where detectable, near surface gas concentrations visually correlate with the amount of adhering graphite. This could be due to trapped/adsorbed gas in the graphite or to surface deformation produced by the graphite. The surface with the least adhering graphite and smoothest surface (faced against glassy carbon) shows no observable near surface enrichment of He, Ne or Ar. Given

  15. An improved assay for the determination of Huntington`s disease allele size

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, C.; Klinger, K.; Miller, G.

    1994-09-01

    The hallmark of Huntington`s disease (HD) is the expansion of a polymorphic (CAG)n repeat. Several methods have been published describing PCR amplification of this region. Most of these assays require a complex PCR reaction mixture to amplify this GC-rich region. A consistent problem with trinucleotide repeat PCR amplification is the presence of a number of {open_quotes}stutter bands{close_quotes} which may be caused by primer or amplicon slippage during amplification or insufficient polymerase processivity. Most assays for HD arbitrarily select a particular band for diagnostic purposes. Without a clear choice for band selection such an arbitrary selection may result in inconsistent intra- or inter-laboratory findings. We present an improved protocol for the amplification of the HD trinucleotide repeat region. This method simplifies the PCR reaction buffer and results in a set of easily identifiable bands from which to determine allele size. HD alleles were identified by selecting bands of clearly greater signal intensity. Stutter banding was much reduced thus permitting easy identification of the most relevant PCR product. A second set of primers internal to the CCG polymorphism was used in selected samples to confirm allele size. The mechanism of action of N,N,N trimethylglycine in the PCR reaction is not clear. It may be possible that the minimal isostabilizing effect of N,N,N trimethylglycine at 2.5 M is significant enough to affect primer specificity. The use of N,N,N trimethylglycine in the PCR reaction facilitated identification of HD alleles and may be appropriate for use in other assays of this type.

  16. Versatile Dual-Technology System for Markerless Allele Replacement in Burkholderia pseudomallei▿ †

    PubMed Central

    López, Carolina M.; Rholl, Drew A.; Trunck, Lily A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2009-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiologic agent of melioidosis, a rare but serious tropical disease. In the United States, genetic research with this select agent bacterium is strictly regulated. Although several select agent compliant methods have been developed for allelic replacement, all of them suffer from some drawbacks, such as a need for specific host backgrounds or use of minimal media. Here we describe a versatile select agent compliant allele replacement system for B. pseudomallei based on a mobilizable vector, pEXKm5, which contains (i) a multiple cloning site within a lacZα gene for facile cloning of recombinant DNA fragments, (ii) a constitutively expressed gusA indicator gene for visual detection of merodiploid formation and resolution, and (iii) elements required for resolution of merodiploids using either I-SceI homing endonuclease-stimulated recombination or sacB-based counterselection. The homing endonuclease-based allele replacement system is completed by pBADSce, which contains an araC-PBAD-I-sceI expression cassette for arabinose-inducible I-SceI expression and a temperature-sensitive pRO1600 replicon for facile plasmid curing. Complementing these systems is the improved Δasd Escherichia coli mobilizer strain RHO3. This strain is susceptible to commonly used antibiotics and allows nutritional counterselection on rich media because of its diaminopimelic acid auxotrophy. The versatility of the I-SceI- and sacB-based methods afforded by pEXKm5 in conjunction with E. coli RHO3 was demonstrated by isolation of diverse deletion mutants in several clinical, environmental, and laboratory B. pseudomallei strains. Finally, sacB-based counterselection was employed to isolate a defined chromosomal fabD(Ts) allele that causes synthesis of a temperature-sensitive FabD, an essential fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme. PMID:19700544

  17. Chemical and physical erosion rhythms of the West African Cenozoic morphogenesis: The 39Ar-40Ar dating of supergene K-Mn oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, Anicet; Ruffet, Gilles; HéNocque, Olivier; Colin, Fabrice

    2008-12-01

    Chemical weathering and mechanical erosion are first-order processes of long-term tropical morphogenesis, which is still poorly deciphered for lack of time constraints. We address this issue by laser probe 39Ar-40Ar dating of generations of cryptomelane [K1-2Mn8O16, nH2O] from the manganese ore deposit of Tambao in northern Burkina Faso. This Mn deposit results from the supergene weathering of carbonate and silicate Mn protores underneath lateritic palaeolandsurfaces. It consists of an upper cryptomelane-rich domain and a lower domain where pyrolusite (β-MnO2) is the dominant Mn oxide. The oldest 39Ar-40Ar ages (59-45 Ma) are obtained on surface outcrops while the youngest ones characterize deep oxidation fronts (3.4-2.9 Ma). Apparent correlations of 39Ar-40Ar age groups with δ18O and eustatic curves allow definition of the different stages of morphogenesis. Paleocene-Eocene ages (59-45 Ma) bracket a greenhouse period propitious to bauxitic weathering. The lack of significant ages between ˜45 and 29 Ma characterizes a period dominated by mechanical erosion, during which detrital sediments, including lateritic materials, were accumulated in intracratonic basins allowing the exhumation of a new lateritic landsurface. Two major weathering periods separated by a second erosion episode (24-18 Ma) are also depicted at the end of Oligocene (29-24 Ma) and lower to mid-Miocene (18-11.5 Ma) in the upper domain, during which newly shaped land surfaces conspicuously weathered. The shorter-weathering and erosion episodes recorded in the lower domain from ˜18 to ˜2.9 Ma led to the final geomorphic changes that were conducive to the formation of glacis. The preservation of old cryptomelane (59-45 Ma) in the upper part of the ore deposit indicates a Cenozoic denudation limited to the erosion of previous bauxites, and partly, of ferricretes.

  18. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences. PMID:26416087

  19. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania. PMID:26711124

  20. Rapid kimberlite ascent and the significance of Ar-Ar ages in xenolith phlogopites

    PubMed

    Kelley; Wartho

    2000-07-28

    Kimberlite eruptions bring exotic rock fragments and minerals, including diamonds, from deep within the mantle up to the surface. Such fragments are rapidly absorbed into the kimberlite magma so their appearance at the surface implies rapid transport from depth. High spatial resolution Ar-Ar age data on phlogopite grains in xenoliths from Malaita in the Solomon Islands, southwest Pacific, and Elovy Island in the Kola Peninsula, Russia, indicate transport times of hours to days depending upon the magma temperature. In addition, the data show that the phlogopite grains preserve Ar-Ar ages recorded at high temperature in the mantle, 700 degrees C above the conventional closure temperature. PMID:10915621

  1. Ar-39-Ar-40 Evidence for Early Impact Events on the LL Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, E. T.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Rubin, A. E.

    2006-01-01

    We determined Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of eight LL chondrites, and one igneous inclusion from an LL chondrite, with the object of understanding the thermal history of the LL-chondrite parent body. The meteorites in this study have a range of petrographic types from LL3.3 to LL6, and shock stages from S1 to S4. These meteorites reveal a range of K-Ar ages from 23.66 to 24.50 Ga, and peak ages from 23.74 to 24.55 Ga. Significantly, three of the eight chondrites (LL4, 5, 6) have K-Ar ages of -4.27 Ga. One of these (MIL99301) preserves an Ar-39-Ar-40 age of 4.23 +/- 0.03 Ga from low-temperature extractions, and an older age of 4.52 +/- 0.08 Ga from the highest temperature extractions. In addition, an igneous-textured impact melt DOM85505,22 has a peak Ar-39-Ar-40 age of >= 4.27 Ga. We interpret these results as evidence for impact events that occurred at about 4.27 Ga on the LL parent body that produced local impact melts, reset the Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of some meteorites, and exhumed (or interred) others, resulting in a range of cooling ages. The somewhat younger peak age of 3.74 Ga from GR095658 (LL3.3) suggests an additional impact event close to timing of impact-reset ages of some other ordinary chondrites between 3.6-3.8 Ga. The results from MIL99301 suggest that some apparently unshocked (Sl) chondrites may have substantially reset Ar-39-Ar-40 ages. A previous petrographic investigation of MIL99301 suggested that reheating to temperatures less than or equal to type 4 petrographic conditions (600C) caused fractures in olivine to anneal, resulting in a low apparent shock stage of S1 (unshocked). The Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectrum of MIL99301 is consistent with this interpretation. Older ages from high-T extractions may date an earlier impact event at 4.52 +/- 0.08 Ga, whereas younger ages from lower-T extractions date a later impact event at 4.23 Ar-39-Ar-40 0.03 Ga that may have caused annealing of feldspar and olivine

  2. 40Ar/39Ar technique of KAr dating: a comparison with the conventional technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brent, Dalrymple G.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1971-01-01

    K-Ar ages have been determined by the 40Ar/39Ar total fusion technique on 19 terrestrial samples whose conventional K-Ar ages range from 3.4 my to nearly 1700 my. Sample materials included biotite, muscovite, sanidine, adularia, plagioclase, hornblende, actinolite, alunite, dacite, and basalt. For 18 samples there are no significant differences at the 95% confidence level between the KAr ages obtained by these two techniques; for one sample the difference is 4.3% and is statistically significant. For the neutron doses used in these experiments (???4 ?? 1018 nvt) it appears that corrections for interfering Ca- and K-derived Ar isotopes can be made without significant loss of precision for samples with K/Ca > 1 as young as about 5 ?? 105 yr, and for samples with K/Ca < 1 as young as about 107 yr. For younger samples the combination of large atmospheric Ar corrections and large corrections for Ca- and K-derived Ar may make the precision of the 40Ar/39Ar technique less than that of the conventional technique unless the irradiation parameters are adjusted to minimize these corrections. ?? 1971.

  3. Saddle-shaped 40Ar /39Ar age spectra from young, microstructurally complex potassium feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, Peter K.; Fitz Gerald, John D.

    1986-06-01

    A suite of young potassium feldspars show markedly saddle-shaped 40Ar /39Ar age spectra as a result of incorporating 10 -10 to 10 -9 mol/g of excess 40Ar. The minima of these age spectra record reasonable cooling ages, based on the known thermal history and geology of the samples. Acid etching of one sample indicates that excess 40Ar is concentrated near grain margins. The release of a substantial portion of this excess Ar at high temperatures in the laboratory requires that this component be situated in a more retentive site than radiogenic 40Ar. Anion vacancies have been proposed to act in this role in plagioclase, and we speculate that this is so in K-feldspar as well. Such a mechanism would explain the observation that relative to radiogenic 40Ar, excess 40Ar is incorporated at low temperatures in nature but is released at high temperatures in the laboratory. Oxygen diffusion provides an appropriate analogy for this phenomenon, being relatively fast under natural, hydrothermal conditions, but extremely slow in anhydrous environments such as an Ar-extraction system. TEM observations made on two of the samples confirm that their effective grain sizes for diffusion are likely to be on the order of ten microns, due to the presence of such microstructures as incoherent exsolution lamellae, dislocations, and stepped twins. TEM observations also reveal the presence in one sample of orthoclase enclaves in a microcline host.

  4. 40Ar/39Ar age of Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary tektites from Haiti

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izett, G.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Snee, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating of tektites discovered recently in Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary marine sedimentary rocks on Haiti indicates that the K-T boundary and impact event are coeval at 64.5 ?? 0.1 million years ago. Sanidine from a bentonite that lies directly above the K-T boundary in continental, coal-bearing, sedimentary rocks of Montana was also dated and has a 40Ar/39Ar age of 64.6 ?? 0.2 million years ago, which is indistinguishable statistically from the age of the tektites.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar ages of the AD 79 eruption of Vesuvius, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.; Champion, D.; Melluso, L.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Scarpati, C.; Tedesco, D.; Calvert, A.

    2007-01-01

    The Italian volcano, Vesuvius, erupted explosively in AD 79. Sanidine from pumice collected at Casti Amanti in Pompeii and Villa Poppea in Oplontis yielded a weighted-mean 40Ar/39Ar age of 1925??66 years in 2004 (1?? uncertainty) from incremental-heating experiments of eight aliquants of sanidine. This is the calendar age of the eruption. Our results together with the work of Renne et al. (1997) and Renne and Min (1998) demonstrate the validity of the 40Ar/39Ar method to reconstruct the recent eruptive history of young, active volcanoes. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  6. Recognition and Activation Domains Contribute to Allele-Specific Responses of an Arabidopsis NLR Receptor to an Oomycete Effector Protein

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrenner, Adam D.; Goritschnig, Sandra; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    In plants, specific recognition of pathogen effector proteins by nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) receptors leads to activation of immune responses. RPP1, an NLR from Arabidopsis thaliana, recognizes the effector ATR1, from the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, by direct association via C-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). Two RPP1 alleles, RPP1-NdA and RPP1-WsB, have narrow and broad recognition spectra, respectively, with RPP1-NdA recognizing a subset of the ATR1 variants recognized by RPP1-WsB. In this work, we further characterized direct effector recognition through random mutagenesis of an unrecognized ATR1 allele, ATR1-Cala2, screening for gain-of-recognition phenotypes in a tobacco hypersensitive response assay. We identified ATR1 mutants that a) confirm surface-exposed residues contribute to recognition by RPP1, and b) are recognized by and activate the narrow-spectrum allele RPP1-NdA, but not RPP1-WsB, in co-immunoprecipitation and bacterial growth inhibition assays. Thus, RPP1 alleles have distinct recognition specificities, rather than simply different sensitivity to activation. Using chimeric RPP1 constructs, we showed that RPP1-NdA LRRs were sufficient for allele-specific recognition (association with ATR1), but insufficient for receptor activation in the form of HR. Additional inclusion of the RPP1-NdA ARC2 subdomain, from the central NB-ARC domain, was required for a full range of activation specificity. Thus, cooperation between recognition and activation domains seems to be essential for NLR function. PMID:25671309

  7. The CBM RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Akishin, P.; Becker, K.-H.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Boldyreva, N.; Chernogorov, A.; Deveaux, C.; Dobyrn, V.; Dürr, M.; Eschke, J.; Förtsch, J.; Heep, J.; Höohne, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kochenda, L.; Kopfer, J.; Kravtsov, P.; Kres, I.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Leonova, E.; Linev, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Michel, J.; Miftakhov, N.; Niebur, W.; Ovcharenko, E.; Pauly, C.; Pfeifer, D.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Reinecke, S.; Riabov, Y.; Roshchin, E.; Samsonov, V.; Tarasenkova, O.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2016-05-01

    The CBM RICH detector will use CO2 as radiator gas, focussing glass mirrors with Al+MgF2 reflective and protective coating and Hamamatsu H12700 MAPMTs as photon detectors. The detector will serve for electron to pion separation up to momenta of 8 GeV/c and thus enable in CBM the measurement of electromagnetic radiation from the early and dense fireball in A+A collisions at SIS 100. In this article, the current status of the CBM RICH development will be presented including new measurements of the radiation hardness of the H12700 MAPMT and WLS coatings with p-terphenyl, the new concept for the readout electronics, and optimizations ongoing with respect to the mirror mount structure and overall geometry. Prior to the usage in CBM, part of the already ordered MAPMTs will be used to upgrade the HADES RICH detector for a new measurement campaign at SIS 18 from 2018-2020.

  8. 40Ar/39Ar ages in deformed potassium feldspar: evidence of microstructural control on Ar isotope systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Steven M.; Potts, Graham J.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2001-05-01

    Detailed field and microstructural studies have been combined with high spatial resolution ultraviolet laser 40Ar/39Ar dating of naturally deformed K-feldspar to investigate the direct relationship between deformation-related microstructure and Ar isotope systematics. The sample studied is a ~1,000 Ma Torridonian arkose from Skye, Scotland, that contains detrital feldspars previously metamorphosed at amphibolite-facies conditions ~1,700 Ma. The sample was subsequently deformed ~430 Ma ago during Caledonian orogenesis. The form and distribution of deformation-induced microstructures within three different feldspar clasts has been mapped using atomic number contrast and orientation contrast imaging, at a range of scales, to identify intragrain variations in composition and lattice orientation. These variations have been related to thin section and regional structural data to provide a well-constrained deformation history for the feldspar clasts. One hundred and forty-three in-situ 40Ar/39Ar analyses measured using ultraviolet laser ablation record a range of apparent ages (317-1030 Ma). The K-feldspar showing the least strain records the greatest range of apparent ages from 420-1,030 Ma, with the oldest apparent ages being found close to the centre of the feldspar away from fractures and the detrital grain boundary. The most deformed K-feldspar yields the youngest apparent ages (317-453 Ma) but there is no spatial relationship between apparent age and the detrital grain boundary. Within this feldspar, the oldest apparent ages are recorded from orientation domain boundaries and fracture surfaces where an excess or trapped 40Ar component resides. Orientation contrast images at a similar scale to the Ar analyses illustrate a significant deformation-related microstructural difference between the feldspars and we conclude that deformation plays a significant role in controlling Ar systematics of feldspars at both the inter- and intragrain scales even at relatively low

  9. Susceptibility to Dental Caries and the Salivary Proline-Rich Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Early childhood caries affects 28% of children aged 2–6 in the US and is not decreasing. There is a well-recognized need to identify susceptible children at birth. Caries-free adults neutralize bacterial acids in dental biofilms better than adults with severe caries. Saliva contains acidic and basic proline-rich proteins (PRPs) which attach to oral streptococci. The PRPs are encoded within a small region of chromosome 12. An acidic PRP allele (Db) protects Caucasian children from caries but is more common in African Americans. Some basic PRP allelic phenotypes have a three-fold greater frequency in caries-free adults than in those with severe caries. Early childhood caries may associate with an absence of certain basic PRP alleles which bind oral streptococci, neutralize biofilm acids, and are in linkage disequilibrium with Db in Caucasians. The encoding of basic PRP alleles is updated and a new technology for genotyping them is described. PMID:22190937

  10. Susceptibility to dental caries and the salivary proline-rich proteins.

    PubMed

    Levine, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Early childhood caries affects 28% of children aged 2-6 in the US and is not decreasing. There is a well-recognized need to identify susceptible children at birth. Caries-free adults neutralize bacterial acids in dental biofilms better than adults with severe caries. Saliva contains acidic and basic proline-rich proteins (PRPs) which attach to oral streptococci. The PRPs are encoded within a small region of chromosome 12. An acidic PRP allele (Db) protects Caucasian children from caries but is more common in African Americans. Some basic PRP allelic phenotypes have a three-fold greater frequency in caries-free adults than in those with severe caries. Early childhood caries may associate with an absence of certain basic PRP alleles which bind oral streptococci, neutralize biofilm acids, and are in linkage disequilibrium with Db in Caucasians. The encoding of basic PRP alleles is updated and a new technology for genotyping them is described. PMID:22190937

  11. Excess Ar-40 in the Zagami Shergottite: Does It Reveal Crystallization History?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2007-01-01

    The Zagami basaltic shergottite has fine- and coarse-grained (FG & CG) areas, which may reflect partial crystallization in a deep, slowly cooled magma chamber to form Mg-rich pyroxene cores, followed by entrainment of these crystals into a magma that rose and crystallized near the surface. Late-stage melt pockets formed mesostasis and feldspar (maskelynite) having a range of compositions, but low water abundance. Higher I(sub Sr) in the FG portion may result from the second stage having incorporated old crustal rocks that failed to reach isotopic equilibrium. Zagami, like other shergottites, contains excess Ar-40(sub xs) beyond that expected from internal decay of K-40 during its Sm-Nd age of 177 Myr. We suggest that at least a portion of this Ar-40(sub xs) in Zagami and some other shergottites was inherited from the magma, much as is the case of MORBs on Earth. We made Ar-39-Ar-40 age determinations on feldspar and pyroxene separates from both the FG and CG portions of Zagami. If Zagami experienced an evolving fractional crystallization history, including possible crustal contamination of the magma, that might be indicated in differing amounts of Ar-40(sub xs) between mineral phases and between FG and CG portions.

  12. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Rupe, J. H.; Kushida, R. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by injecting air and hydrocarbon fuel at one end of a cylindrically shaped chamber to form a mixture and igniting the mixture to provide hot combustion gases by partial oxidation of the hydrocarbon fuel. The combustion gases move away from the ignition region to another region where water is injected to be turned into steam by the hot combustion gases. The steam which is formed mixes with the hot gases to yield a uniform hot gas whereby a steam reforming reaction with the hydrocarbon fuel takes place to produce a hydrogen rich gas.

  13. Population Dynamics of Sex-Determining Alleles in Honey Bees and Self-Incompatibility Alleles in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Nei, Masatoshi

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical theories of the population dynamics of sex-determining alleles in honey bees are developed. It is shown that in an infinitely large population the equilibrium frequency of a sex allele is 1/n, where n is the number of alleles in the population, and the asymptotic rate of approach to this equilibrium is 2/(3n) per generation. Formulae for the distribution of allele frequencies and the effective and actual numbers of alleles that can be maintained in a finite population are derived by taking into account the population size and mutation rate. It is shown that the allele frequencies in a finite population may deviate considerably from 1/n. Using these results, available data on the number of sex alleles in honey bee populations are discussed. It is also shown that the number of self-incompatibility alleles in plants can be studied in a much simpler way by the method used in this paper. A brief discussion about general overdominant selection is presented. PMID:17248901

  14. Successful prediction of genetic richness at wild potato collection sites in southeastern Arizona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much time, money, and effort is needed to collect even a fraction of the potential geographic range of wild potato species, so there is efficiency to gain if one could predict and prioritize spots particularly rich in unique alleles for collecting. A previous experiment that used AFLP markers to com...

  15. From Rags to Riches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the "Rags to Riches" design project she introduced to her students. She assigned each of her students one item from an array to thrift store goods which included old scarves, sweaters, jackets, and even evening gowns. The design problem was to imagine what a clothing tag might look like if the assigned item…

  16. Thinking about "Rich" Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Box, Lorna; Watson, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an e-mail conversation between two teachers discussing how to have a "rich task" lesson in which they get to the heart of mathematical modeling and in which students are motivated into working on mathematics. One teacher emphasizes that the power of maths is in developing mathematical descriptions of situations by looking at…

  17. Allele frequencies at microsatellite loci: The stepwise mutation model revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, A.M.; Slatkin, M. ); Freimer, N.B. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors summarize available data on the frequencies of alleles at microsatellite loci in human populations and compare observed distributions of allele frequencies to those generated by a simulation of the stepwise mutation model. They show that observed frequency distributions at 108 loci are consistent with the results of the model under the assumption that mutations cause an increase or decrease in repeat number by one and under the condition that the product Nu, where N is the effective population size and u is the mutation rate, is larger than one. It is also shown that the variance of the distribution of allele sizes is a useful estimator of Nu and performs much better than previously suggested estimators for the stepwise mutation model. In the data, there is no correlation between the mean and variance in allele size at a locus or between the number of alleles and mean allele size, which suggests that the mutation rate at these loci is independent of allele size. 39 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Common alleles contribute to schizophrenia in CNV carriers

    PubMed Central

    Tansey, K E; Rees, E; Linden, D E; Ripke, S; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; McCarroll, S A; Holmans, P; Kirov, G; Walters, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of schizophrenia is complex, involving risk alleles ranging from common alleles of weak effect to rare alleles of large effect, the best exemplar of the latter being large copy number variants (CNVs). It is currently unknown whether pathophysiology in those with defined rare mutations overlaps with that in other individuals with the disorder who do not share the same rare mutation. Under an extreme heterogeneity model, carriers of specific high-penetrance mutations form distinct subgroups. In contrast, under a polygenic threshold model, high-penetrance rare allele carriers possess many risk factors, of which the rare allele is the only one, albeit an important, factor. Under the latter model, cases with rare mutations can be expected to share some common risk alleles, and therefore pathophysiological mechanisms, with cases without the same mutation. Here we show that, compared with controls, individuals with schizophrenia who have known pathogenic CNVs carry an excess burden of common risk alleles (P=2.25 × 10−17) defined from a genome-wide association study largely based on individuals without known CNVs. Our finding is not consistent with an extreme heterogeneity model for CNV carriers, but does offer support for the polygenic threshold model of schizophrenia. That this is so provides support for the notion that studies aiming to model the effects of rare variation may uncover pathophysiological mechanisms of relevance to those with the disorder more widely. PMID:26390827

  19. Common alleles contribute to schizophrenia in CNV carriers.

    PubMed

    Tansey, K E; Rees, E; Linden, D E; Ripke, S; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; McCarroll, S A; Holmans, P; Kirov, G; Walters, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-08-01

    The genetic architecture of schizophrenia is complex, involving risk alleles ranging from common alleles of weak effect to rare alleles of large effect, the best exemplar of the latter being large copy number variants (CNVs). It is currently unknown whether pathophysiology in those with defined rare mutations overlaps with that in other individuals with the disorder who do not share the same rare mutation. Under an extreme heterogeneity model, carriers of specific high-penetrance mutations form distinct subgroups. In contrast, under a polygenic threshold model, high-penetrance rare allele carriers possess many risk factors, of which the rare allele is the only one, albeit an important, factor. Under the latter model, cases with rare mutations can be expected to share some common risk alleles, and therefore pathophysiological mechanisms, with cases without the same mutation. Here we show that, compared with controls, individuals with schizophrenia who have known pathogenic CNVs carry an excess burden of common risk alleles (P=2.25 × 10(-17)) defined from a genome-wide association study largely based on individuals without known CNVs. Our finding is not consistent with an extreme heterogeneity model for CNV carriers, but does offer support for the polygenic threshold model of schizophrenia. That this is so provides support for the notion that studies aiming to model the effects of rare variation may uncover pathophysiological mechanisms of relevance to those with the disorder more widely. PMID:26390827

  20. Bayesian Inference of Natural Selection from Allele Frequency Time Series.

    PubMed

    Schraiber, Joshua G; Evans, Steven N; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2016-05-01

    The advent of accessible ancient DNA technology now allows the direct ascertainment of allele frequencies in ancestral populations, thereby enabling the use of allele frequency time series to detect and estimate natural selection. Such direct observations of allele frequency dynamics are expected to be more powerful than inferences made using patterns of linked neutral variation obtained from modern individuals. We developed a Bayesian method to make use of allele frequency time series data and infer the parameters of general diploid selection, along with allele age, in nonequilibrium populations. We introduce a novel path augmentation approach, in which we use Markov chain Monte Carlo to integrate over the space of allele frequency trajectories consistent with the observed data. Using simulations, we show that this approach has good power to estimate selection coefficients and allele age. Moreover, when applying our approach to data on horse coat color, we find that ignoring a relevant demographic history can significantly bias the results of inference. Our approach is made available in a C++ software package. PMID:27010022

  1. N[sub 2]-Ar-He compositions in fluid inclusions: Indicators of fluid source

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, D.I. ); Musgrave, J.A. )

    1994-02-01

    A quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to measure bulk samples of conservative gas species N[sub 2], Ar, and He in fluid inclusions from a variety of hydrothermal systems. Analysis of these tracer elements help determine (1) if gases extracted by bulk inclusion analysis can provide accurate measurement of N[sub 2]-Ar-He in active and fossil geothermal systems, (2) if hydrothermal fluids associated with paleogeothermal systems in a continental setting follow N[sub 2]-Ar-He systematics similar to those in the western Pacific Rim active geothermal systems, specifically New Zealand, and (3) whether different deposit types systematically vary with regard to N[sub 2]-Ar-He. The N[sub 2]-Ar-He ratios of fluid inclusion volatiles released from recently deposited minerals from the Valles system are similar to those of present day Valles thermal waters. Those inclusion samples from deep within the Valles system, below a regional aquitard, increase in N[sub 2]. Compositions for inclusions from the Questa and Copper Flat-porphyry deposits are N[sub 2]-rich, similar to those of arc-related volcanic gases, whereas those from Taylor Creek Sn deposit appear to be mixtures of magmatic and crustal components. N[sub 2]-Ar-He ratios of the Precambrian Tribag deposit suggest a basalt source, but significant levels of self-generated He from U and Th in the inclusion fluids are also possible. Inclusions from two epithermal deposits with low-salinity inclusions have N[sub 2]-Ar-He ratios trending towards air-saturated meteoric waters (ASW), and those inclusions with higher salinities indicate minor to no ASW component. The N[sub 2]-Ar-He ratios in Fresnillo and Cochiti inclusions, which have magmatic helium isotopic ratios, indicate additions of magmatic gases to meteoric fluids. Inclusions from sediment-hosted deposits that contain hydrocarbon-bearing brines are He-rich, as are meteoric waters with a long residence time in the crust.

  2. Timing of Hydrocarbon Fluid Emplacement in Sandstone Reservoirs in Neogene in Huizhou Sag, Southern China Sea, by Authigenic Illite 40Ar- 39Ar Laser Stepwise Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesheng, Shi; Junzhang, Zhu; Huaning, Qiu; yu, Shu; Jianyao, Wu; Zulie, Long

    Timing of oil or gas emplacements is a new subject in isotopic geochronology and petroleum geology. Hamilton et al. expounded the principle of the illite K-Ar age: Illite is often the last or one of the latest mineral cements to form prior to hydrocarbon accumulation. Since the displacement of formation water by hydrocarbons will cause silicate diagenesis to cease, K-Ar ages for illite will constrain the timing of this event, and also constrain the maximum age of formation of the trap structure. In this study, the possibility of authigenic illites 40Ar- 39Ar dating has been investigated. The illite samples were separated from the Tertiary sandstones in three rich oil reservoir belts within the Huizhou sag by cleaning, fracturing by cycled cooling-heating, soxhlet-extraction with solvents of benzene and methanol and separating with centrifugal machine. If oil is present in the separated samples, ionized organic fragments with m/e ratios of 36 to 40 covering the argon isotopes will be yielded by the ion source of a mass spectrometer, resulting in wrong argon isotopic analyses and wrong 40Ar- 39Ar ages. The preliminary experiments of illite by heating did show the presence of ionized organic fragments with m/e ratios of 36 to 44. In order to clean up the organic gases completely and obtain reliable analysis results, a special purification apparatus has been established by Qiu et al. and proved valid by the sequent illite analyses. All the illite samples by 40Ar- 39Ar IR-laser stepwise heating yield stair-up age spectra in lower laser steps and plateaux in higher laser steps. The youngest apparent ages corresponding to the beginning steps are reasonable to be interpreted for the hydrocarbon accumulation ages. The weighted mean ages of the illites from the Zhuhai and Zhujiang Formations are (12.1 ± 1.1) Ma and (9.9 ± 1.2) Ma, respectively. Therefore, the critical emplacement of petroleum accumulation in Zhujiang Formation in Huizhou sag took place in ca 10 Ma. Late

  3. Preservation of ancient impact ages on the R chondrite parent body: 40Ar/39Ar age of hornblende-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M. A.; Morgan, L. E.

    2016-09-01

    The hornblende- and biotite-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840 is a rare kind of meteorite possibly containing outer solar system water stored during metamorphism or postshock annealing deep within an asteroid. Because little is known regarding its age and origin, we determined 40Ar/39Ar ages on hornblende-rich separates of the meteorite, and obtained plateau ages of 4340(±40) to 4380(±30) Ma. These well-defined plateau ages, coupled with evidence for postshock annealing, indicate this meteorite records an ancient shock event and subsequent annealing. The age of 4340-4380 Ma (or 4.34-4.38 Ga) for this and other previously dated R chondrites is much older than most impact events recorded by ordinary chondrites and points to an ancient event or events that predated the late heavy bombardment that is recorded in so many meteorites and lunar samples.

  4. Preservation of ancient impact ages on the R chondrite parent body: 40Ar/39Ar age of hornblende-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M. A.; Morgan, L. E.

    2016-07-01

    The hornblende- and biotite-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840 is a rare kind of meteorite possibly containing outer solar system water stored during metamorphism or postshock annealing deep within an asteroid. Because little is known regarding its age and origin, we determined 40Ar/39Ar ages on hornblende-rich separates of the meteorite, and obtained plateau ages of 4340(±40) to 4380(±30) Ma. These well-defined plateau ages, coupled with evidence for postshock annealing, indicate this meteorite records an ancient shock event and subsequent annealing. The age of 4340-4380 Ma (or 4.34-4.38 Ga) for this and other previously dated R chondrites is much older than most impact events recorded by ordinary chondrites and points to an ancient event or events that predated the late heavy bombardment that is recorded in so many meteorites and lunar samples.

  5. Increased expression of ACTH (MC2R) and androgen (AR) receptors in giant bilateral myelolipomas from patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although chronic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and androgen hyperstimulation are assumed to be involved in the pathogenesis of adrenal myelolipomas associated with poor-compliance patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), the expression of their receptors has not yet been demonstrated in these tumors so far. Methods We analyzed Melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), Androgen Receptor (AR), Leptin (LEP), and Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) expression using real-time qRT-PCR in two giant bilateral adrenal myelolipomas from two untreated simple virilizing CAH cases and in two sporadic adrenal myelolipomas. In addition, the X-chromosome inactivation pattern and CAG repeat numbers in AR exon 1 gene were evaluated in the 4 cases. Results The MC2R gene was overexpressed in myelolipomas from 3 out of 4 patients. AR overexpression was detected in 2 tumors: a giant bilateral myelolipoma in a CAH patient and a sporadic case. Simultaneous overexpression of AR and MC2R genes was found in two of the cases. Interestingly, the bilateral giant myelolipoma associated with CAH that had high androgen and ACTH levels but lacked MC2R and AR overexpression presented a significantly shorter AR allele compared with other tumors. In addition, X-chromosome inactivation pattern analysis showed a polyclonal origin in all tumors, suggesting a stimulatory effect as the trigger for tumor development. Conclusion These findings are the first evidence for MC2R or AR overexpression in giant bilateral myelolipomas from poor-compliance CAH patients. PMID:24884994

  6. Comparative 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar dating of illite-type clay minerals: A tentative explanation for age identities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, Norbert; Zwingmann, Horst; Liewig, Nicole; Wendling, Raymond

    2012-10-01

    The 40K/40Ar (K-Ar) and 40Ar/39Ar dating methods are applied here to the same, very small, micrometric illite-type particles that crystallized under low-temperature (< 175 °C) hydrothermal conditions in deeply buried Rotliegend (Permian) gas-bearing sandstones of NW Germany. Four samples with a total of fifteen size fractions from < 2 to 20-40 μm yield K-Ar ages that range from 166.0 ± 3.4 to 214.0 ± 5.9 Ma. The same size fractions dated by the 40Ar/39Ar method give total-gas ages ranging from 173.3 ± 2.0 to 228.8 ± 1.6 Ma. Nearly all 40Ar/39Ar total-gas ages are slightly older, which cannot be explained by the recoil effect only, the impact of which being amplified by the inhomogeneous shape of the clay minerals and their crystallographic characteristics, with varied crystallinity indices, and a particle width about 10 times large than thickness. The 40Ar/39Ar data outline some advantages, such as the plateaus obtained by incremental step heating of the various size fractions, even if not translatable straight as ages of the illite populations; they allow identification of two generations of authigenic illite that formed at about 200 and 175 Ma, and one detrital generation. However, 40Ar/39Ar dating of clay minerals remains challenging as technical factors, such as the non-standardized encapsulation, may have potential unexpected effects. Both dating methods have their limitations: (1) K-Ar dating requires relatively large samples (ca. 10-20 mg) incurring potential sample homogeneity problems, with two aliquots required for K and Ar analysis for an age determination, also inducing a higher analytical uncertainty; (2) an identified drawback of 40Ar/39Ar dating is Ar recoil and therefore potential loss that occurs during neutronic creation of 39Ar from 39K, mostly in the finer mineral particles. If all the recoiled 39Ar is redistributed into adjacent grains/minerals, the final 40Ar/39Ar age of the analyzed size fraction remains theoretically identical, but it

  7. Hazard evaluation for 244-AR vault facility

    SciTech Connect

    BRAUN, D.J.

    1999-08-25

    This document presents the results of a hazard identification and evaluation performed on the 244-AR Vault Facility to close a USQ (USQ No.TF-98-0785, Potential Inadequacy in Authorization Basis (PIAB): To Evaluate Miscellaneous Facilities Listed In HNF-2503 And Not Addressed In The TWRS Authorization Basis) that was generated as part of an evaluation of inactive TWRS facilities. A hazard evaluation for the Hanford Site 244-AR Vault Facility was performed. The process and results of the hazard evaluation are provided in this document. A previous hazard evaluation was performed for the 244-AR Vault Facility in 1996 in support of the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The results of that evaluation are provided in the BIO. Upon review of those results it was determined that hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the 244-AR vaults due to flooding was not addressed in the original hazards evaluation. This supplemental hazard evaluation addresses this oversight of the original hazard evaluation. The results of the hazard evaluation were compared to the current TWRS BIO to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting changes to the AB. It is only intended to provide information about hazardous conditions associated with the condition and configuration of the 244-AR vault facility. The AB Control Decision process could be used to determine the applicability and adequacy of existing AB controls as well as any new controls that may be needed for the identified hazardous conditions associated with 244-AR vault flooding. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  8. ARS5 is a component of the 26S proteasome complex, and negatively regulates thiol biosynthesis and arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Kim, Tae-Houn; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2009-09-01

    A forward-genetic screen in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of several arsenic tolerance mutants. ars5 was the strongest arsenate- and arsenite-resistant mutant identified in this genetic screen. Here, we report the characterization and cloning of the ars5 mutant gene. ars5 is shown to exhibit an increased accumulation of arsenic and thiol compounds during arsenic stress. Rough mapping together with microarray-based expression mapping identified the ars5 mutation in the alpha subunit F (PAF1) of the 26S proteasome complex. Characterization of an independent paf1 T-DNA insertion allele and complementation by PAF1 confirmed that paf1 mutation is responsible for the enhanced thiol accumulation and arsenic tolerance phenotypes. Arsenic tolerance was not observed in a knock-out mutant of the highly homologous PAF2 gene. However, genetic complementation of ars5 by the overexpression of PAF2 suggests that the PAF2 protein is functionally equivalent to PAF1 when expressed at high levels. No detectible difference was observed in total ubiquitinylated protein profiles between ars5 and wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, suggesting that the arsenic tolerance observed in ars5 is not derived from a general impairment in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that arsenic induces the enhanced transcriptional activation of several key genes that function in glutathione and phytochelatin biosynthesis in the WT, and this arsenic induction of gene expression is more dramatic in ars5. The enhanced transcriptional response to arsenic and the increased accumulation of thiol compounds in ars5, compared with WT, suggest the presence of a positive regulation pathway for thiol biosynthesis that is enhanced in the ars5 background. PMID:19453443

  9. ARS5 is a component of the 26S proteasome complex and negatively regulates thiol biosynthesis and arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Kim, Tae-Houn; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A forward genetic screen in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of several arsenic tolerance mutants. ars5 is the strongest arsenate and arsenite resistant mutant identified in this genetic screen. Here, we report the characterization and cloning of the ars5 mutant gene. ars5 is shown to exhibit an increased accumulation of arsenic and thiol compounds during arsenic stress. Rough mapping together with microarray-based expression mapping identified the ars5 mutation in the alpha subunit F (PAF1) of the 26S proteasome complex. Characterization of an independent paf1 T-DNA insertion allele and complementation by PAF1 confirmed that paf1 mutation is responsible for the enhanced thiol accumulation and the arsenic tolerance phenotypes. Arsenic tolerance was not observed in a knockout mutant of the highly homologous PAF2 gene. However, genetic complementation of ars5 by over expression of PAF2 suggests that the PAF2 protein is functionally equivalent to PAF1 when expressed at high levels. No detectible difference was observed in total ubiquitinylated protein profiles between ars5 and wild type Arabidopsis, suggesting that the arsenic tolerance observed in ars5 is not derived from a general impairment in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that arsenic induces enhanced transcriptional activation of several key genes that function in glutathione and phytochelatin biosynthesis in wild type and this arsenic-induction of gene expression is more dramatic in ars5. The enhanced transcriptional response to arsenic and the increased accumulation of thiol compounds in ars5 compared to WT suggest the presence of a positive regulation pathway for thiol biosynthesis that is enhanced in the ars5 background. PMID:19453443

  10. β-3AR W64R Polymorphism and 30-Minute Post-Challenge Plasma Glucose Levels in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Verdi, Hasibe; Tulgar Kınık, Sibel; Yılmaz Yalçın, Yaprak; Muratoğlu Şahin, Nursel; Yazıcı, Ayşe Canan; Ataç, F. Belgin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the association of W64R polymorphism of the β3-adrenergic receptor gene (β-3AR) with childhood obesity and related pathologies. Methods: β-3AR gene W64R genotyping was carried out in 251 children aged 6-18 years. Of these subjects, 130 were obese (62 boys) and 121 were normal-weight (53 boys). In the obese group, fasting lipids, glucose and insulin levels were measured. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in 75 of the obese patients. Results: The frequency of W64R genotype was similar in obese and non-obese children. In obese children, relative body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, serum lipid, glucose and insulin levels, as well as homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) scores were not different between Arg allele carriers (W64R and R64R) and noncarriers (W64W). In 75 obese children, OGTT results showed that Arg allele carriers had significantly higher 30-minute glucose levels (p=0.027). Conclusion: W64R polymorphism of the β-3AR gene is not associated with obesity and waist-to-hip ratio in Turkish children. Although there were no relationships between the genotypes and lipid, glucose/insulin levels or HOMA-IR, the presence of W64R variant seemed to have an unfavorable influence on early glucose excursion after glucose loading. PMID:25800470

  11. Ar-Ar and I-Xe Ages and the Thermal History of IAB Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Studies of several samples of the large Caddo County IAB iron meteorite reveal andesitic material, enriched in Si, Na, Al and Ca, which is essentially unique among meteorites. This material is believed to have formed from a chondritic source by partial melting and to have further segregated by grain coarsening. Such an origin implies extended metamorphism of the IAB parent body. New Ar-39- Ar-40 ages for silicate from three different Caddo samples are consistent with a common age of 4.50-4.51 Gyr ago. Less well defined Ar-Ar degassing ages for inclusions from two other IABs, EET8333 and Udei Station, are approx.4.32 Gyr, whereas the age for Campo del Cielo varies considerably over approx.3.23-4.56 Gyr. New I-129-Xe-129 ages for Caddo County and EET8333 are 4557.9+/-0.1 Myr and 4557-4560 Myr, respectively, relative to an age of 4562.3 Myr for Shallowater. Considering all reported Ar-Ar degassing ages for IABs and related winonaites, the range is approx.4.32-4.53 Gyr, but several IABs give similar Ar ages of 4.50-4.52 Gyr. We interpret these older Ar ages to represent cooling after the time of last significant metamorphism on the parent body, and the younger ages to represent later 40Ar diffusion loss. The older Ar-Ar ages for IABs are similar to Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature for Caddo County. Considering the possibility that IAB parent body formation was followed by impact disruption, reassembly, and metamorphism (e.g., Benedix et al. 2000), the Ar-Ar ages and IAB cooling rates deduced from Ni concentration profiles in IAB metal (Herpfer et al., 1994) are consistent if the time of the post-assembly metamorphism was as late as approx.4.53 Gyr ago. However, I-Xe ages reported for some IABs define much older ages of approx.4558-4566 Myr, which cannot easily be reconciled with the much younger Ar-Ar and Sm-Nd ages. An explanation for the difference in radiometric ages of IABs may reside in combinations of the following: a) I-Xe ages have very

  12. Penning ionization : In benzene · Ar and fluorobenzene · Ar van der waals molecules and in collisions of benzene with metastable Ar atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühl, E.; Bisling, P.; Brutschy, B.; Beckmann, K.; Leisen, O.; Morgner, H.

    1986-08-01

    The photoion efficiency curves of the van der Waals complexes benzene ·Ar (Bz·Ar) and fluorobenzene·Ar (Fb·Ar) exhibit sharp resonances, which correspond to excitation to the Ar 2P 3/24s and 2P 1/24s resonance states. The peaks are redshifted relative to their asymptotic values (Bz·Ar, Δ E = -70 ± 10 meV; Fb·Ar, Δ E = -40 ± 10 meV). These findings are supported by electron spectroscopy studies of the Penning ionization of benzene by state-selected metastable Ar ( 3p 2, 3p 0) atoms. Strong evidence is presented that Penning ionization is the process observed in both cases.

  13. 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar dating of low grade metamorphism: examples on metabasites from Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, L.; Feraud, G.; Fuentes, F.; Delbar, M.; Morata, D.

    2003-04-01

    Dating low to very low-grade burial metamorphic assemblages is often difficult because of (1) few mineral phases compositionally suitable to apply the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar methods, and (2) small amount in which these phases are commonly found. K-feldspar adularia, sericitic mica, and celadonite are the best known K-bearing secondary minerals. We present some successful attempts to analyse two distinct secondary phases from a same volcanic formation that allow to test the validity of the measured ages. These ages have been also compared with the crystallisation age of the volcanic rocks in which the secondary phases were lately developed. Adularia and sericite were selected from basic lava flows from a 3 to 13 km thick Cretaceous sequence from the Coastal Range of central Chile, at two different locations: the Bustamante Hill (west from Santiago), and the Cordón de Chacana, c. 80 km further north. Adularia came from a low-variance assemblage with pumpellyite, chlorite and low-albite contained in amygdules whereas sericite was present in milky-white strongly sericitized plagioclase crystals. While small clusters of rare fresh plagioclase grains from lava flows from Bustamante and Chacana displayed concordant plateau ages 119.4 ± 2.4 (2 sigma) and 118.7 ± 0.6 Ma, respectively, the adularia from the same formations gave sensibly younger ages around 94 Ma (high temperature steps), and 96.8 ± 0.2 Ma (plateau age) in Bustamante and Chacana, respectively. Sericite ages were measured in situ into single crystals of strongly transformed plagioclases. The relative proportion of sericite and plagioclase corresponding to each degasing step was monitored by measuring the Ca/K ratio (deduced from 37ArCa/39Ar_K). While intermediate ages were measured on some sericite of both sites (corresponding to a variable but permanent contribution of plagioclase on each step), a plateau age of 97.0 ± 1.6 Ma (concordant with adularia) could be obtained on a strongly sericitized plagioclase

  14. A New Electrophoresis Technique to Seperate Microsatellite Alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis have been used commonly for microsatellite (simple sequence repeats, SSRs) analysis, but they are labor- intensive and not always able to provide accurate sizes for different alleles. Capillary sequencers provide automated analysis and accur...

  15. Differential and limited expression of mutant alleles in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Naim U.; Sperling, Adam S.; Bolli, Niccolo; Wedge, David C.; Van Loo, Peter; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Shammas, Masood A.; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Samur, Mehmet K.; Richardson, Paul G.; Magrangeas, Florence; Minvielle, Stephane; Futreal, P. Andrew; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Parmigiani, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has delineated mutational profiles in multiple myeloma and reported a median of 52 mutations per patient, as well as a set of commonly mutated genes across multiple patients. In this study, we have used deep sequencing of RNA from a subset of these patients to evaluate the proportion of expressed mutations. We find that the majority of previously identified mutations occur within genes with very low or no detectable expression. On average, 27% (range, 11% to 47%) of mutated alleles are found to be expressed, and among mutated genes that are expressed, there often is allele-specific expression where either the mutant or wild-type allele is suppressed. Even in the absence of an overall change in gene expression, the presence of differential allelic expression within malignant cells highlights the important contribution of RNA-sequencing in identifying clinically significant mutational changes relevant to our understanding of myeloma biology and also for therapeutic applications. PMID:25237203

  16. Differential and limited expression of mutant alleles in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Naim U; Sperling, Adam S; Bolli, Niccolo; Wedge, David C; Van Loo, Peter; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Shammas, Masood A; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Samur, Mehmet K; Richardson, Paul G; Magrangeas, Florence; Minvielle, Stephane; Futreal, P Andrew; Anderson, Kenneth C; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Campbell, Peter J; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2014-11-13

    Recent work has delineated mutational profiles in multiple myeloma and reported a median of 52 mutations per patient, as well as a set of commonly mutated genes across multiple patients. In this study, we have used deep sequencing of RNA from a subset of these patients to evaluate the proportion of expressed mutations. We find that the majority of previously identified mutations occur within genes with very low or no detectable expression. On average, 27% (range, 11% to 47%) of mutated alleles are found to be expressed, and among mutated genes that are expressed, there often is allele-specific expression where either the mutant or wild-type allele is suppressed. Even in the absence of an overall change in gene expression, the presence of differential allelic expression within malignant cells highlights the important contribution of RNA-sequencing in identifying clinically significant mutational changes relevant to our understanding of myeloma biology and also for therapeutic applications. PMID:25237203

  17. High Spatial Resolution 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology of Impact Melt Breccias from Apollo 17 Boulders at Stations 2, 6, and 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, C. M.; Hodges, K. V.; Jolliff, B. L.; Van Soest, M. C.; Wartho, J. A.; Weirich, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Several boulders located at the bases of the North and South Massifs were among the primary field targets of the Apollo 17 mission to the Taurus-Littrow Valley on the Moon [1]. Some boulders are polylithologic, including Boulder 1 at Station 2 and the boulders at Stations 6 and 7. These boulders were the subjects of consortium studies [2, 3] that included 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to determine the ages of distinct lithologies within each boulder [e.g., 4-6]. We report new 40Ar/39Ar data for the impact melt breccias 72255, 76315, 77075, and 77135 obtained using the UV laser ablation microprobe (UVLAMP) methods of [7]. For 72255, we obtained a preliminary isochron date ca. 3814 Ma from 22 melt analyses, which is younger than published plateau dates (e.g., 3951-3835 Ma [4, 8]). Fifteen melt analyses of 76315 yield a preliminary isochron date ca. 3850 Ma, younger than the 3900 ± 16 Ma date reported by [8]. Melt analyses of 77075 yield preliminary dates between ca. 3797-3584 Ma, possibly reflecting partial loss of 40Ar. In this case, the oldest date may provide a minimum age for the formation of melt in 77075. Finally, the UVLAMP dates for the 77135 melt range from 3810-3361 Ma and corresponding Ca/K ratios range from ca. 100-6. Electron microprobe analyses of small (ca. 10s of microns wide) pockets of K-rich materials show that both K-rich glass and K-feldspar are present. The UVLAMP dates for 77135 likely reflect spatially variable 40Ar loss, consistent with published step heating results [e.g., 6]. References: [1] Schmitt (1973) Science, 182, 681-690. [2] Ryder (1993). Catalog of Apollo 17 Rocks: Volume 1 - Stations 2 and 3 (South Massif). LPI. [3] Ryder (1993). Catalog of Apollo 17 Rocks: Volume 4 - North Massif. LPI. [4] Leich et al. (1975) The Moon, 14, 407-444. [5] Cadogan & Turner (1976). LPSC, 7, 2267-2285. [6] Stettler et al. (1978). LPSC, 9, 1113-1115. [7] Mercer et al. (2015) Sci. Adv., 1, e1400050. [8] Dalrymple & Ryder (1996). JGR, 101, 26069-26084.

  18. DRD4 dopamine receptor allelic diversity in various primate species

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Higley, D.; O`Brien, S.

    1994-09-01

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is uniquely characterized by a 48 bp repeating segment within the coding region, located in exon III. Different DRD4 alleles are produced by the presence of additional 48 bp repeats, each of which adds 16 amino acids to the length of the 3rd intracytoplasmic loop of the receptor. The DRD4 receptor is therefore an intriguing candidate gene for behaviors which are influenced by dopamine function. In several human populations, DRD4 alleles with 2-8 and 10 repeats have previously been identified, and the 4 and 7 repeat alleles are the most abundant. We have determined DRD4 genotypes in the following nonhuman primate species: chimpanzee N=2, pygmy chimpanzee N=2, gorilla N=4, siamang N=2, Gelada baboon N=1, gibbon N=1, orangutan (Bornean and Sumatran) N=62, spider monkey N=4, owl monkey N=1, Colobus monkey N=1, Patas monkey N=1, ruffed lemur N=1, rhesus macaque N=8, and vervet monkey N=28. The degree of DRD4 polymorphism and which DRD4 alleles were present both showed considerable variation across primate species. In contrast to the human, rhesus macaque monkeys were monomorphic. The 4 and 7 repeat allels, highly abundant in the human, may not be present in certain other primates. For example, the four spider monkeys we studied showed the 7, 8 and 9 repeat length alleles and the only gibbon we analyzed was homozygous for the 9 repeat allele (thus far not observed in the human). Genotyping of other primate species and sequencing of the individual DRD4 repeat alleles in different species may help us determine the ancestral DRD4 repeat length and identify connections between DRD4 genotype and phenotype.

  19. New 40Ar/39Ar Chronostratigraphy for Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, and Orbital Forcing of Lacustrine Sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deino, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Pleistocene sedimentary and volcanic deposits of Olduvai Gorge, north-central Tanzania, have been a focus of geological, paleontological, paleoanthropological and archaeological investigation since Louis Leakey initiated fossil and artifact excavations there in 1931. Although more than half a century of effort has been applied to radiometric dating of the volcaniclastic strata within this sequence, vexing questions persist regarding details of the chronostratigraphy. Renewed dating efforts have enabled revision of the chronostratigraphy of Bed I, providing a more accurate evaluation of the absolute ages of volcanic events, and the rates of geological processes. The new 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, based primarily on phenocrystic K-feldspar from interbedded marker tuffs, resolves some of the anomalies apparent in earlier Olduvai basin Bed I chronostratigraphies. A new age of 1.88 ± 0.05 for Tuff IA near the base of Bed I, while relatively imprecise, agrees with a projected age 1.91 Ma based on magnetostratigraphy and sedimentation rates toward the base of Bed I. The key marker tuff IB in the upper part of Bed I has a well-determined age of 1.848 ± 0.003 Ma. Comparative dating of early and late erupted phases of this unit yields identical ages, resolving the conundrum of an apparent hiatus of ~80 ka between the crystal-rich fallout base and the body of the Tuff IB ignimbrite in the eastern exposures proposed by Walter et al. (1991, 1992). New ages for tuffs above Tuff IB to the top of Bed I (i.e., Tuff IE 'vitric,' Tuff IE, Ng'eju tuff, and Tuff IF), fall in stratigraphic order and are consistent with the paleomagnetic age constraint of 1.778 Ma imposed by the top of the Olduvai Subchron in overlying Bed II. The new high-precision chronostratigraphy provides age control for a series of wet/dry paleoclimate indicators previously documented in upper Bed I (Hay, 1976; Hay and Kyser, 2001; Sikes and Ashley, 2007). The most prominent event is a major lake expansion

  20. Ar-Ar Impact Heating Ages of Eucrites and Timing of the LHB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald; Garrison, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Eucrites and howardites, more than most meteorite types, show extensive impact resetting of their Ar-39-Ar-40 (K-Ar) ages approximately equal to 3.4-4.1 Ga ago, and many specimens show some disturbance of other radiometry chronometers as well. Bogard (1995) argued that this age resetting occurred on Vesta and was produced by the same general population of objects that produced many of the lunar impact basins. The exact nature of the lunar late heavy bombardment (LHB or 'cataclysm') remains controversial, but the timing is similar to the reset ages of eucrites. Neither the beginning nor ending time of the lunar LHB is well constrained. Comparison of Ar-Ar ages of brecciated eucrites with data for the lunar LHB can resolve both the origin of these impactors and the time period over which they were delivered to the inner solar system. This abstract reports some new Ar-Ar age data for eucrites, obtained since the authors' 1995 and 2003 papers.

  1. Ar-40/Ar-39 Ages of Maskelynite Grains from ALHA 77005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turrin, B.; Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Nyquist, L. E.; Swisher, C., III

    2013-01-01

    We present Ar-40/Ar-39 measurements for twelve small (20-60 micro-g) maskelynite samples from the heavily shocked martian meteorite ALHA 77005. The reported modal composition for ALHA 77005 is 50-60% olivine (Fa28), 30-40% pyroxene (Wo5Fs23En72), approx.8% maskelynite (An53), and approx.2% opaques by volume [1]). The meteorite is usually classified as a lherzolite. Previous Studies - Ar-40/Ar-39 results from previous work display disturbed release spectra [2,3]. In study [2], Ar-40/Ar-39 measurements on a 52-mg whole-rock sample produced an extremely disturbed release spec-trum, with all calculated apparent ages > 1 Ga, (Fig. 1). In a subsequent study [3], a light and a dark phase were analyzed. A 2.3-mg sample of the light, relatively low-K phase produced a disturbed release spectrum. For the first 20% of the Ar-39(sub K), most of the apparent ages exceeded >1 Ga; the remaining 80% yielded ages between 0.3-0.5 Ga. The integrated age for this phase is 0.9 Ga.

  2. Application of deuteron-deuteron (D-D) fusion neutrons to 40Ar/39Ar geochronology.

    PubMed

    Renne, Paul R; Knight, Kim B; Nomade, Sébastien; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak-Pui

    2005-01-01

    Neutron irradiation of samples for 40Ar/39Ar dating in a 235U fission reactor requires error-producing corrections for the argon isotopes created from Ca, K, and, to a lesser extent, Cl. The fission spectrum includes neutrons with energies above 2-3 MeV, which are not optimal for the 39K(n,p)39Ar reaction. These higher-energy neutrons are responsible for the largest recoil displacements, which may introduce age artifacts in the case of fine-grained samples. Both interference corrections and recoil displacements would be significantly reduced by irradiation with 2.45 MeV neutrons, which are produced by the deuteron-deuteron (D-D) fusion reaction 2H(d,n)3He. A new generation of D-D reactors should yield sufficiently high neutron fluxes (>10(12) n cm(-2)s(-1)) to be useful for 40Ar/39Ar dating. Modeling indicates that irradiation with D-D neutrons would result in scientific benefits of improved accuracy and broader applicability to fine-grained materials. In addition, radiological safety would be improved, while both maintenance and operational costs would be reduced. Thus, development of high-flux D-D fusion reactors is a worthy goal for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. PMID:15498681

  3. Study of Ar and Ar-CO2 microwave surfaguide discharges by optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Tiago; Britun, Nikolay; Godfroid, Thomas; van der Mullen, Joost; Snyders, Rony

    2016-05-01

    A surfaguide microwave discharge operating at 2.45 GHz in Ar and Ar-CO2 mixtures is studied using diagnostics methods based on optical emission spectroscopy. The population densities of Ar metastable and resonant states of the lowest group of excited levels ( 1 s x ) are investigated for several experimental conditions using the self-absorption technique. It is found that the densities of these levels, ranging from 1017 to 1016 m-3 for the pure Ar case, are dependent on the discharge pressure and applied power. The electron temperature and electron density are calculated via the balances of creation/loss mechanisms of radiative and metastable levels. In the range of the studied experimental conditions (50-300 W of applied power and 0.5-6 Torr of gas pressure), the results have shown that lower values of electron temperature correspond to higher values of power and pressure in the discharge. Adding CO2 to the argon plasma results in a considerable decrease (about 3 orders of magnitude) of the Ar metastable atom density. The feasibility of using the ratio of two Ar emission line intensities to measure the electron temperature in CO2 discharges with small Ar admixtures is studied.

  4. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chaoyong; Odeberg, Jacob; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per . E-mail: Per.Eriksson@ki.se

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  5. Potassium Isotopic Compositions of NIST Potassium Standards and 40Ar/39Ar Mineral Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Leah; Tappa, Mike; Ellam, Rob; Mark, Darren; Higgins, John; Simon, Justin I.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the isotopic ratios of standards, spikes, and reference materials is fundamental to the accuracy of many geochronological methods. For example, the 238U/235U ratio relevant to U-Pb geochronology was recently re-determined [1] and shown to differ significantly from the previously accepted value employed during age determinations. These underlying values are fundamental to accurate age calculations in many isotopic systems, and uncertainty in these values can represent a significant (and often unrecognized) portion of the uncertainty budget for determined ages. The potassium isotopic composition of mineral standards, or neutron flux monitors, is a critical, but often overlooked component in the calculation of K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages. It is currently assumed that all terrestrial materials have abundances indistinguishable from that of NIST SRM 985 [2]; this is apparently a reasonable assumption at the 0.25per mille level (1s) [3]. The 40Ar/39Ar method further relies on the assumption that standards and samples (including primary and secondary standards) have indistinguishable 40K/39K values. We will present data establishing the potassium isotopic compositions of NIST isotopic K SRM 985, elemental K SRM 999b, and 40Ar/39Ar biotite mineral standard GA1550 (sample MD-2). Stable isotopic compositions (41K/39K) were measured by the peak shoulder method with high resolution MC-ICP-MS (Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus), using the accepted value of NIST isotopic SRM 985 [2] for fractionation [4] corrections [5]. 40K abundances were measured by TIMS (Thermo Scientific TRITON), using 41K/39K values from ICP-MS measurements (or, for SRM 985, values from [2]) for internal fractionation corrections. Collectively these data represent an important step towards a metrologically traceable calibration of 40K concentrations in primary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and improve uncertainties by ca. an order of magnitude in the potassium isotopic compositions of standards.

  6. Overview of the ARS Culture Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Culture Collection in Peoria, IL, maintains more than 95,000 strains of agriculturally and industrially important bacteria and fungi. Most of these isolates are maintained in an open collection that distributes 6,000 – 8,000 strains annually in response to req...

  7. Experiences from the ARS croplands CEAP program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The multi-agency Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) within USDA produced a number of lessons that should be applicable to the use of landscape approaches to place bioenergy crops. Results from the ARS Croplands Watersheds CEAP, the NRCS CEAP, and the NIFA CEAP Watershed Assessment Studie...

  8. RECENTLY RELEASED USDA/ARS GRAPE VARIETIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production practices for the latest table grape varieties released by ARS, SJVASC, Parlier, California are summarized along with their performance. Sweet Scarlet provides growers with a mid-season, red seedless grape with a light Muscat flavor. It has exceptional eating quality because of its ...

  9. Lignocellulosic Biofuels: Bioenergy Research at ARS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growth and long-term viability of bioenergy production in the Nation are impeded by a number of technical and commercial barriers. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) addresses technical barriers and does so by leveraging its strengths and unique capabilities to (1) pursue technical barriers th...

  10. USDA-ARS BRAMBLE RESEARCH AT BELTSVILLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS bramble cultivar development program at Beltsville, Maryland has a long history. Perhaps the greatest success from this program has been the development of several thornless blackberry cultivars including Chester, which currently is the most commonly grown blackberry cultivar in the Ea...

  11. The USDA/ARS Raisin Breeding Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA/ARS breeding program is developing: 1) natural dry-on-the-vine raisin grape cultivars; 2) powdery mildew resistant raisin grape cultivars; 3) Pierce’s Disease resistant raisin grape cultivars; and 4) raisin grape cultivars with increased anthocyanins for health benefits. A natural dry-on-t...

  12. The ChArMEx database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Hélène; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Cloché, Sophie; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mière, Arnaud; Ramage, Karim; Vermeulen, Anne; Boulanger, Damien

    2015-04-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters , intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the database task is to organize data management, distribution system and services, such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The database relies on a strong collaboration between ICARE, IPSL and OMP data centers and has been set up in the framework of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. ChArMEx data, either produced or used by the project, are documented and accessible through the database website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. The website offers the usual but user-friendly functionalities: data catalog, user registration procedure, search tool to select and access data... The metadata (data description) are standardized, and comply with international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) assignement procedure allows to automatically register the datasets, in order to make them easier to access, cite, reuse and verify. At present, the ChArMEx database contains about 120 datasets, including more than 80 in situ datasets (2012, 2013 and 2014 summer campaigns, background monitoring station of Ersa...), 25 model output sets (dust model intercomparison, MEDCORDEX scenarios...), a high resolution emission inventory over the Mediterranean... Many in situ datasets

  13. A limit to the divergent allele advantage model supported by variable pathogen recognition across HLA-DRB1 allele lineages.

    PubMed

    Lau, Q; Yasukochi, Y; Satta, Y

    2015-11-01

    Genetic diversity in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules is thought to have arisen from the co-evolution between host and pathogen and maintained by balancing selection. Heterozygote advantage is a common proposed scenario for maintaining high levels of diversity in HLA genes, and extending from this, the divergent allele advantage (DAA) model suggests that individuals with more divergent HLA alleles bind and recognize a wider array of antigens. While the DAA model seems biologically suitable for driving HLA diversity, there is likely an upper threshold to the amount of sequence divergence. We used peptide-binding and pathogen-recognition capacity of DRB1 alleles as a model to further explore the DAA model; within the DRB1 locus, we examined binding predictions based on two distinct phylogenetic groups (denoted group A and B) previously identified based on non-peptide-binding region (PBR) nucleotide sequences. Predictions in this study support that group A allele and group B allele lineages have contrasting binding/recognition capacity, with only the latter supporting the DAA model. Furthermore, computer simulations revealed an inconsistency in the DAA model alone with observed extent of polymorphisms, supporting that the DAA model could only work effectively in combination with other mechanisms. Overall, we support that the mechanisms driving HLA diversity are non-exclusive. By investigating the relationships among HLA alleles, and pathogens recognized, we can provide further insights into the mechanisms on how humans have adapted to infectious diseases over time. PMID:26392055

  14. Impriniting of human H19: Allele-specific CpG methylation, loss of the active allele in Wilms tumor, and potential for somatic allele switching

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Shields, T.; Crenshaw, T.; Hao, Y.; Moulton, T.; Tycko, B. )

    1993-07-01

    Genomic imprinting and monoallelic gene expression appear to play a role in human genetic disease and tumorigenesis. The human H19 gene, at chromosome 11p15, has previously been shown to be monoallelically expressed. Since CpG methylation has been implicated in imprinting, the authors analyzed methylation of H19 DNA. In fetal and adult organs the transcriptionally silent H19 allele was extensively hypermethylated through the entire gene and its promoter, and, consistent with a functional role for DNA methylation, expression of an H19 promoter-reporter construct was inhibited by in vitro methylation. Gynogenetic ovarian teratomas were found to contain only hypomethylated H19 DNA, suggesting that the expressed H19 allele might be maternal. This was confirmed by analysis of 11p15 polymorphisms in a patient with Wilms tumor. The tumor had lost the maternal 11p15, and H19 expression in the normal kidney was exclusively from this allele. Imprinting of human H19 appears to be susceptible to tissue-specific modulation in somatic development; in one individual, cerebellar cells were found to express only the otherwise silent allele. Implications of these findings for the role of DNA methylation in imprinting and for H19 as a candidate imprinted tumor-suppressor gene are discussed. 57 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Six Recessive Viable Alleles of the Mouse Agouti Locus

    PubMed Central

    Hustad, C. M.; Perry, W. L.; Siracusa, L. D.; Rasberry, C.; Cobb, L.; Cattanach, B. M.; Kovatch, R.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1995-01-01

    The agouti locus on mouse chromosome 2 encodes a secreted cysteine-rich protein of 131 amino acids that acts as a molecular switch to instruct the melanocyte to make either yellow pigment (phaeomelanin) or black pigment (eumelanin). Mutations that up-regulate agouti expression are dominant to those causing decreased expression and result in yellow coat color. Other associated effects are obesity, diabetes, and increased susceptibility to tumors. To try to define important functional domains of the agouti protein, we have analyzed the molecular defects present in a series of recessive viable agouti mutations. In total, six alleles (a(mJ), a(u), a(da), a(16H), a(18H), a(e)) were examined at both the RNA and DNA level. Two of the alleles, a(16H) and a(e), result from mutations in the agouti coding region. Four alleles (a(mJ), a(u), a(18H), and a(da)) appear to represent regulatory mutations that down-regulate agouti expression. Interestingly, one of these mutations, a(18H), also appears to cause an immunological defect in the homozygous condition. This immunological defect is somewhat analogous to that observed in motheaten (me) mutant mice. Short and long-range restriction enzyme analyses of homozygous a(18H) DNA are consistent with the hypothesis that a(18H) results from a paracentric inversion where one end of the inversion maps in the 5' regulatory region of agouti and the other end in or near a gene that is required for normal immunological function. Cloning the breakpoints of this putative inversion should allow us to identify the gene that confers this interesting immunological disorder. PMID:7635290

  16. Age and origin of carlsbad cavern and related caves from 40Ar/39Ar of alunite

    PubMed

    Polyak; McIntosh; Guven; Provencio

    1998-03-20

    40Ar/39Ar dating of fine-grained alunite that formed during cave genesis provides ages of formation for the Big Room level of Carlsbad Cavern [4.0 to 3.9 million years ago (Ma)], the upper level of Lechuguilla Cave (6.0 to 5.7 Ma), and three other hypogene caves (11.3 to 6.0 Ma) in the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico. Alunite ages increase and are strongly correlative with cave elevations, which indicates an 1100-meter decline in the water table, apparently related to tectonic uplift and tilting, from 11.3 Ma to the present. 40Ar/39Ar dating studies of the hypogene caves have the potential to help resolve late Cenozoic climatic, speleologic, and tectonic questions. PMID:9506939

  17. The relation between solar jets and 3He-rich solar energetic particle events at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nai-Hwa; Mason, Glenn; Innes, Davina; Bucik, Radoslav

    The solar sources of (3) He-rich solar energetic particle events detected by ULEIS on ACE and SIT on STEREO-A, when two spacecraft were close to quadrature, are investigated in this study. We use the photospheric magnetic field with potential field source surface extrapolations and in-situ magnetic field to identify the candidate connected active regions (ARs). We also examine the activity in all nearby ARs by using SDO and STEREO EUV images and space-based radio observations on Wind and STEREO. The 3He-rich events seem to occur shortly after an increase in jet production from the connected ARs. To study the long-term evolution in the source ARs, we compare the 3He enrichment measured at ACE and STEREO seven days apart which is the time for a region to rotate from the ACE to the STEREO connection point.

  18. Planar defects as Ar traps in trioctahedral micas: A mechanism for increased Ar retentivity in phlogopite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, A.; Lee, J. K. W.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.; Zhao, J.; Abdu, Y. A.; Jenkins, D. M.; Hawthorne, F. C.; Kyser, T. K.; Creaser, R. A.; Armstrong, R.; Heaman, L. W.

    2012-08-01

    The effects of planar defects and composition on Ar mobility in trioctahedral micas have been investigated in samples from a small marble outcrop (∼500 m2) in the Frontenac Terrane, Grenville Province, Ontario. These micas crystallized during amphibolite-facies metamorphism at ∼1170 Ma and experienced a thermal pulse ∼100 Ma later at shallow crustal levels associated with the emplacement of plutons. 87Rb/86Sr ages of the phlogopites range from ∼950 to ∼1050 Ma, consistent with resetting during the later thermal event. The same phlogopites however, give 40Ar/39Ar ages between ∼950 and 1160 Ma, spanning the age range of the two thermal events. This result is intriguing because these micas have undergone the same thermal history and were not deformed after peak metamorphic conditions. In order to understand this phenomenon, the chemical, crystallographical, and microstructural nature of four mica samples has been characterized in detail using a wide range of analytical techniques. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron microprobe (EMP), and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) data show that the micas are chemically homogeneous (with the exception of Ba) and similar in composition. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Mossbauer results show that the M sites for three of the micas are dominated by divalent cations and the Fe3+/(Fe2++Fe3+) ratio for all four phlogopites ranges from 0.10 to 0.25. The stable-isotopic data for calcite indicate that this outcrop was not affected by hydrothermal fluids after peak metamorphism. No correlation between chemical composition and 87Rb/86Sr and 40Ar/39Ar age or between crystal size and 40Ar/39Ar age is observed. The only major difference among all of the micas was revealed through transmitted electron microscope (TEM), which shows that the older 1M micas contain significantly more layer stacking defects, associated with crystallization, than the younger micas. We

  19. How the Number of Alleles Influences Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hat, Beata; Paszek, Pawel; Kimmel, Marek; Piechor, Kazimierz; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2007-07-01

    The higher organisms, eukaryotes, are diploid and most of their genes have two homological copies (alleles). However, the number of alleles in a cell is not constant. In the S phase of the cell cycle all the genome is duplicated and then in the G2 phase and mitosis, which together last for several hours, most of the genes have four copies instead of two. Cancer development is, in many cases, associated with a change in allele number. Several genetic diseases are caused by haploinsufficiency: Lack of one of the alleles or its improper functioning. In the paper we consider the stochastic expression of a gene having a variable number of copies. We applied our previously developed method in which the reaction channels are split into slow (connected with change of gene state) and fast (connected with mRNA/protein synthesis/decay), the later being approximated by deterministic reaction rate equations. As a result we represent gene expression as a piecewise deterministic time-continuous Markov process, which is further related with a system of partial differential hyperbolic equations for probability density functions (pdfs) of protein distribution. The stationary pdfs are calculated analytically for haploidal gene or numerically for diploidal and tetraploidal ones. We distinguished nine classes of simultaneous activation of haploid, diploid and tetraploid genes. This allows for analysis of potential consequences of gene duplication or allele loss. We show that when gene activity is autoregulated by a positive feedback, the change in number of gene alleles may have dramatic consequences for its regulation and may not be compensated by the change of efficiency of mRNA synthesis per allele.

  20. Ar-39/Ar-40 and Space Exposure Ages of the Unique Portales Valley H-Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, D. H.; Bogard, D. D.

    2001-01-01

    The space exposure age of the unique Portales Valley H-chondrite is approx. 40-45 Myr. The 39 Ar-40 Ar ages of two samples are 4.477 +/- 0.016 and 4.46 +/- 0.02 Ga and show no evidence of more recent disturbance, in contrast to previous radiometric determinations Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract..

  1. Early Pleistocene 40Ar/39Ar ages for Bapang Formation hominins, Central Jawa, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Larick, Roy; Ciochon, Russell L.; Zaim, Yahdi; Sudijono; Suminto; Rizal, Yan; Aziz, Fachroel; Reagan, Mark; Heizler, Matthew

    2001-01-01

    The Sangiran dome is the primary stratigraphic window for the Plio-Pleistocene deposits of the Solo basin of Central Jawa. The dome has yielded nearly 80 Homo erectus fossils, around 50 of which have known findspots. With a hornblende 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 1.66 ± 0.04 mega-annum (Ma) reportedly associated with two fossils [Swisher, C.C., III, Curtis, G. H., Jacob, T., Getty, A. G., Suprijo, A. & Widiasmoro (1994) Science 263, 1118–1121), the dome offers evidence that early Homo dispersed to East Asia during the earliest Pleistocene. Unfortunately, the hornblende pumice was sampled at Jokotingkir Hill, a central locality with complex lithostratigraphic deformation and dubious specimen provenance. To address the antiquity of Sangiran H. erectus more systematically, we investigate the sedimentary framework and hornblende 40Ar/39Ar age for volcanic deposits in the southeast quadrant of the dome. In this sector, Bapang (Kabuh) sediments have their largest exposure, least deformation, and most complete tephrostratigraphy. At five locations, we identify a sequence of sedimentary cycles in which H. erectus fossils are associated with epiclastic pumice. From sampled pumice, eight hornblende separates produced 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages ranging from 1.51 ± 0.08 Ma at the Bapang/Sangiran Formation contact, to 1.02 ± 0.06 Ma, at a point above the hominin-bearing sequence. The chronological sequence of 40Ar/39Ar ages follows stratigraphic order across the southeast quadrant. An intermediate level yielding four nearly complete crania has an age of about 1.25 Ma. PMID:11309488

  2. Ar-Ar Dating of Martian Meteorite, Dhofar 378: An Early Shock Event?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Bogard, D. D.

    2006-01-01

    Martian meteorite, Dhofar 378 (Dho378) is a basaltic shergottite from Oman, weighing 15 g, and possessing a black fusion crust. Chemical similarities between Dho378 and the Los Angeles 001 shergottite suggests that they might have derived from the same Mars locale. The plagioclase in other shergottites has been converted to maskelenite by shock, but Dho378 apparently experienced even more intense shock heating, estimated at 55-75 GPa. Dho378 feldspar (approximately 43 modal %) melted, partially flowed and vesiculated, and then partially recrystallized. Areas of feldspathic glass are appreciably enriched in K, whereas individual plagioclases show a range in the Or/An ratio of approximately 0.18-0.017. Radiometric dating of martian shergottites indicate variable formation times of 160-475 Myr, whereas cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of shergottites indicate most were ejected from Mars within the past few Myr. Most determined Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of shergottites appear older than other radiometric ages because of the presence of large amounts of martian atmosphere or interior Ar-40. Among all types of meteorites and returned lunar rocks, the impact event that initiated the CRE age very rarely reset the Ar-Ar age. This is because a minimum time and temperature is required to facilitate Ar diffusion loss. It is generally assumed that the shock-texture characteristics in martian meteorites were produced by the impact events that ejected the rocks from Mars, although the time of these shock events (as opposed to CRE ages) are not directly dated. Here we report Ar-39-Ar-40 dating of Dho378 plagioclase. We suggest that the determined age dates the intense shock heating event this meteorite experienced, but that it was not the impact that initiated the CRE age.

  3. PAP-LMPCR for improved, allele-specific footprinting and automated chromatin fine structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, R.; Gao, C.; LeBon, J.; Liu, Q.; Mayoral, R. J.; Sommer, S. S.; Hoogenkamp, M.; Riggs, A. D.; Bonifer, C.

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of chromatin fine structure and transcription factor occupancy of differentially expressed genes by in vivo footprinting and ligation-mediated-PCR (LMPCR) is a powerful tool to understand the impact of chromatin on gene expression. However, as with all PCR-based techniques, the accuracy of the experiments has often been reduced by sequence similarities and the presence of GC-rich or repeat sequences, and some sequences are completely refractory to analysis. Here we describe a novel method, pyrophosphorolysis activated polymerization LMPCR or PAP-LMPCR, which is capable of generating accurate and reproducible footprints specific for individual alleles and can read through sequences previously not accessible for analysis. In addition, we have adapted this technique for automation, thus enabling the simultaneous and rapid analysis of chromatin structure at many different genes. PMID:18208840

  4. Ar-40-Ar-39 microanalysis of single 74220 glass balls and 72435 breccia clasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneke, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Ar-40-Ar-39 age measurements on single orange glass balls from the Apollo 17 soil 74220 and individual clasts from the Apollo 17 highland breccia 72435 are reported. The measurements required the use of newly established microanalytical techniques to obtain high quality analyses on about 0.5 mg particles with only a few hundred ppm K. An age of 3.60 plus or minus 0.04 b.y. is determined for the orange glass. No corrections for a trapped Ar-40 component were required. The glass forming event occurred at the very end of or after the extrusion of the mare basalts at the Apollo 17 site. An extremely well defined age plateau at 3.86 plus or minus 0.04 b.y. was determined for a 72435 plagioclase clast with attached matrix. A second large plagioclase crystal yielded significantly older ages over the last 60% of Ar release at high temperatures and is a relict clast incompletely degassed at the time of breccia formation. 72435 also contains plagioclase clasts with primitive Sr and a 4.55 AE old dunite clast. The Ar results provide additional evidence for the association of chemically unequilibrated, relict clasts with both primitive Sr and older K/Ar ages.

  5. Laser {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar microprobe analyses of fine-grained illite

    SciTech Connect

    Onstott, T.C.; Mueller, C.; Vrolijk, P.J.; Pevear, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    Fine-grained (<0.02 {mu}m) to coarse-grained (2.0-0.2 {mu}m) illite separates and finely powdered muscovite standards were analyzed with a microencapsulation technique and an {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar laser microprobe. The integrated ages of the illite agreed within error with conventional K/Ar analyses, even though the sample sizes, 1-100 micrograms, were at least a 10,000-fold less. Incremental laser heating of an artificial mixture of illite and muscovite of two different ages yielded a stair step profile, where the youngest and oldest incremental ages approximately coincided with their K/Ar ages. The thermally activated argon release rate from illite was distinct from that of the muscovite and may result from differences in grain thickness, lower K concentration, and the presence of cis vs. trans-sited vacancies. Incremental heating, therefore, may prove capable of delineating detrital from authigenic components in illite extracted from shale and sandstone. Microencapsulation and laser {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses, when combined with sophisticated techniques for separating clays, will permit dating of samples where clay is a minor constituent, such as sandstones and meteorites, and will enhance identification of endmember ages in naturally occurring clay. 45 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. The ChArMEx database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Hélène; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Mière, Arnaud; Vermeulen, Anne

    2013-04-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters, intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the database task is to organize data management, distribution system and services such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The database relies on a strong collaboration between OMP and ICARE data centres and falls within the scope of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. All the data produced by or of interest for the ChArMEx community will be documented in the data catalogue and accessible through the database website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. The database website offers different tools: - A registration procedure which enables any scientist to accept the data policy and apply for a user database account. - Forms to document observations or products that will be provided to the database in compliance with metadata international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). - A search tool to browse the catalogue using thematic, geographic and/or temporal criteria. - Sorted lists of the datasets by thematic keywords, by measured parameters, by instruments or by platform type. - A shopping-cart web interface to order in situ data files. At present datasets from the background monitoring station of Ersa, Cape Corsica and from the 2012 ChArMEx pre-campaign are available. - A user-friendly access to satellite products

  7. Application of the 40Ar/39Ar technique to date the Minoan Tuff, Santorini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijbrans, J. R.; Kuiper, K.; Morgan, L. E.; Klaver, M.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2012-12-01

    The age of the catastrophic eruption of the volcano of Santorini during the Bronze Age is well established from 14C dating at 3344.9 ± 7.5 a1 (uncertainties quoted as 1-σ). Application of the 40Ar/39Ar technique to products from this eruption is used here to (1) investigate the limits of the technique using conventional single collector mass spectrometry on a MAP215-50 instrument, (2) analyse sources of uncertainty to identify major contributing factors for the uncertainty of young 40Ar/39Ar ages, and (3) provide 40Ar/39Ar ages for a sample that has been previously dated via 14C and dendrochronology to further investigate issues with the accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating in the late Quaternary. We have separated the plagioclase fraction from the lower Minoan Tuff that immediately overlies the Cape Riva (rp6) tuff in a bay on the west coast of Thira, NW of the town of Oia. Using the calibration of 40Ar/36Ar of Lee et al.2, the decay constant recommended by Min at al.3, and the FCs age of Kuiper et al.4, we calculate an inverse isochron age of 3.7 ± 1.6 ka and a trapped 40Ar/36Ar intercept of 299.8 ± 1.2, slightly higher than the ratio for atmospheric argon of 298.56 ± 0.31, when all steps with ages > 50 ka are included in the regression. Enrichment in radiogenic 40Ar in the steps used for the isochron is extremely low, given the low concentration of K2O in plagioclase and the extremely young age. The stepwise heating approach proved useful because in all 5 replicate experiments unexpectedly high ages showed up at higher step temperatures, suggesting that in each separate some older contaminant was present. The plateaus of each of the replicate experiments had quite reproducible ages, however, and a pooled age was calculated for 23 out of 48 individual steps. The pooled age for the plateau was 17.6 ± 4.1 ka, which is high due to the slight component of excess 40Ar in the non-radiogenic component, as revealed from regression analysis. refs: 1SW Manning et al. (2006

  8. Human apolipoprotein E allele and docosahexaenoic acid intake modulate peripheral cholesterol homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Pinçon, Anthony; Coulombe, Jean-Denis; Chouinard-Watkins, Raphaël; Plourde, Mélanie

    2016-08-01

    Carrying at least one apolipoprotein E ε4 allele (E4+) is the main genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies support that consuming fatty fish rich in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6ω3) is protective against development of AD. However, this protective effect seems not to hold in E4+. The involvement of APOE genotype on the relationship between DHA intake and cognitive decline could be mediated through cholesterol. Many studies show a link between cholesterol metabolism and AD progression. In this study, we investigated whether cholesterol metabolism is improved in E3+ and E4+ mice consuming a diet rich in DHA. Plasma cholesterol was 36% lower in E4+ mice compared to E3+ mice fed the control diet (P=.02), and in the liver, there was a significant genotype effect where cholesterol levels were 18% lower in E4+ mice than E3+ mice. The low-density lipoprotein receptor was overexpressed in the liver of E4+ mice. Plasma cholesterol levels were 33% lower after the DHA diet (P=.02) in E3+ mice only, and there was a significant diet effect where cholesterol level was 67% lower in the liver of mice fed DHA. Mice fed the DHA diet also had 62% less lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor expression in the liver compared to mice fed the control diet (P<.0001), but there was no genotype effect. These findings suggest that plasma and liver cholesterol homeostasis and the receptors regulating uptake of cholesterol in the liver are modulated differently and independently by APOE allele and DHA intake. PMID:27239755

  9. Combined experimental and modeling studies of microwave activated CH4/H2/Ar plasmas for microcrystalline, nanocrystalline, and ultrananocrystalline diamond deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richley, James C.; Fox, Oliver J. L.; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Mankelevich, Yuri A.

    2011-03-01

    A comprehensive study of microwave (MW) activated CH4/H2/Ar plasmas used for diamond chemical vapor deposition is reported, focusing particularly on the effects of gross variations in the H2/Ar ratio in the input gas mixture (from H2/Ar mole fraction ratios of > 10:1, through to ˜1:99). Absolute column densities of C2(a) and CH(X) radicals and of H(n = 2) atoms have been determined by cavity ringdown spectroscopy, as functions of height (z) above a substrate and of process conditions (CH4, H2, and Ar input mole fractions, total pressure, p, and input microwave power, P). Optical emission spectroscopy has also been used to explore the relative densities of electronically excited H atoms, and CH, C2, and C3 radicals, as functions of these same process conditions. These experimental data are complemented by extensive 2D (r, z) modeling of the plasma chemistry, which provides a quantitative rationale for all of the experimental observations. Progressive replacement of H2 by Ar (at constant p and P) leads to an expanded plasma volume. Under H2-rich conditions, > 90% of the input MW power is absorbed through rovibrational excitation of H2. Reducing the H2 content (as in an Ar-rich plasma) leads to a reduction in the absorbed power density; the plasma necessarily expands in order to accommodate a given input power. The average power density in an Ar-rich plasma is much lower than that in an H2-rich plasma operating at the same p and P. Progressive replacement of H2 by Ar is shown also to result in an increased electron temperature, an increased [H]/[H2] number density ratio, but little change in the maximum gas temperature in the plasma core (which is consistently ˜3000 K). Given the increased [H]/[H2] ratio, the fast H-shifting (CyHx + H ↔ CyHx-1 + H2; y = 1-3) reactions ensure that the core of Ar-rich plasma contains much higher relative abundances of "product" species like C atoms, and C2, and C3 radicals. The effects of Ar dilution on the absorbed power

  10. Combined experimental and modeling studies of microwave activated CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasmas for microcrystalline, nanocrystalline, and ultrananocrystalline diamond deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Richley, James C.; Fox, Oliver J. L.; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Mankelevich, Yuri A.

    2011-03-15

    A comprehensive study of microwave (MW) activated CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasmas used for diamond chemical vapor deposition is reported, focusing particularly on the effects of gross variations in the H{sub 2}/Ar ratio in the input gas mixture (from H{sub 2}/Ar mole fraction ratios of > 10:1, through to {approx}1:99). Absolute column densities of C{sub 2}(a) and CH(X) radicals and of H(n = 2) atoms have been determined by cavity ringdown spectroscopy, as functions of height (z) above a substrate and of process conditions (CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, and Ar input mole fractions, total pressure, p, and input microwave power, P). Optical emission spectroscopy has also been used to explore the relative densities of electronically excited H atoms, and CH, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3} radicals, as functions of these same process conditions. These experimental data are complemented by extensive 2D (r, z) modeling of the plasma chemistry, which provides a quantitative rationale for all of the experimental observations. Progressive replacement of H{sub 2} by Ar (at constant p and P) leads to an expanded plasma volume. Under H{sub 2}-rich conditions, > 90% of the input MW power is absorbed through rovibrational excitation of H{sub 2}. Reducing the H{sub 2} content (as in an Ar-rich plasma) leads to a reduction in the absorbed power density; the plasma necessarily expands in order to accommodate a given input power. The average power density in an Ar-rich plasma is much lower than that in an H{sub 2}-rich plasma operating at the same p and P. Progressive replacement of H{sub 2} by Ar is shown also to result in an increased electron temperature, an increased [H]/[H{sub 2}] number density ratio, but little change in the maximum gas temperature in the plasma core (which is consistently {approx}3000 K). Given the increased [H]/[H{sub 2}] ratio, the fast H-shifting (C{sub y}H{sub x} + H {r_reversible} C{sub y}H{sub x-1} + H{sub 2}; y = 1-3) reactions ensure that the core of Ar-rich plasma

  11. Systematic Detection of Epistatic Interactions Based on Allele Pair Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Marit; Beyer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Epistatic genetic interactions are key for understanding the genetic contribution to complex traits. Epistasis is always defined with respect to some trait such as growth rate or fitness. Whereas most existing epistasis screens explicitly test for a trait, it is also possible to implicitly test for fitness traits by searching for the over- or under-representation of allele pairs in a given population. Such analysis of imbalanced allele pair frequencies of distant loci has not been exploited yet on a genome-wide scale, mostly due to statistical difficulties such as the multiple testing problem. We propose a new approach called Imbalanced Allele Pair frequencies (ImAP) for inferring epistatic interactions that is exclusively based on DNA sequence information. Our approach is based on genome-wide SNP data sampled from a population with known family structure. We make use of genotype information of parent-child trios and inspect 3×3 contingency tables for detecting pairs of alleles from different genomic positions that are over- or under-represented in the population. We also developed a simulation setup which mimics the pedigree structure by simultaneously assuming independence of the markers. When applied to mouse SNP data, our method detected 168 imbalanced allele pairs, which is substantially more than in simulations assuming no interactions. We could validate a significant number of the interactions with external data, and we found that interacting loci are enriched for genes involved in developmental processes. PMID:22346757

  12. Rare allelic forms of PRDM9 associated with childhood leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hussin, Julie; Sinnett, Daniel; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; de Malliard, Thibault; Busche, Stephan; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Gibson, Greg; Andersson, Anna; Holmfeldt, Linda; Ma, Jing; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jinghui; Andelfinger, Gregor; Downing, James R.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-01-01

    One of the most rapidly evolving genes in humans, PRDM9, is a key determinant of the distribution of meiotic recombination events. Mutations in this meiotic-specific gene have previously been associated with male infertility in humans and recent studies suggest that PRDM9 may be involved in pathological genomic rearrangements. In studying genomes from families with children affected by B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we characterized meiotic recombination patterns within a family with two siblings having hyperdiploid childhood B-ALL and observed unusual localization of maternal recombination events. The mother of the family carries a rare PRDM9 allele, potentially explaining the unusual patterns found. From exomes sequenced in 44 additional parents of children affected with B-ALL, we discovered a substantial and significant excess of rare allelic forms of PRDM9. The rare PRDM9 alleles are transmitted to the affected children in half the cases; nonetheless there remains a significant excess of rare alleles among patients relative to controls. We successfully replicated this latter observation in an independent cohort of 50 children with B-ALL, where we found an excess of rare PRDM9 alleles in aneuploid and infant B-ALL patients. PRDM9 variability in humans is thought to influence genomic instability, and these data support a potential role for PRDM9 variation in risk of acquiring aneuploidies or genomic rearrangements associated with childhood leukemogenesis. PMID:23222848

  13. Estimating allelic diversity generated by excision of different transposon types.

    PubMed

    Nordborg, M; Walbot, V

    1995-05-01

    Methods are presented for calculating the number and type of different DNA sequences generated by base excision and insertion events at a given site in a known DNA sequence. We calculate, for example, that excision of the Mu1 transposon from the bz1::Mu1 allele of maize should generate more than 500,000 unique alleles given the extent of base deletion (up to 34 bases removed) and base insertion (0-5 bases) observed thus far in sequenced excision alleles. Analysis of this universe of potential alleles can, for example, be used to predict the frequency of creation of stop codons or repair-generated duplications. In general, knowledge of the distribution of alleles can be used to evaluate models of both excision and repair by determining whether particular events occur more frequently than expected. Such quantitative analysis complements the qualitative description provided by the DNA sequence of individual events. Similar methods can be used to evaluate the outcome of other cases of DNA breakage and repair such as programmed V(D)J recombination in immunoglobin genes. PMID:24172918

  14. STR allele sequence variation: Current knowledge and future issues.

    PubMed

    Gettings, Katherine Butler; Aponte, Rachel A; Vallone, Peter M; Butler, John M

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews what is currently known about short tandem repeat (STR) allelic sequence variation in and around the twenty-four loci most commonly used throughout the world to perform forensic DNA investigations. These STR loci include D1S1656, TPOX, D2S441, D2S1338, D3S1358, FGA, CSF1PO, D5S818, SE33, D6S1043, D7S820, D8S1179, D10S1248, TH01, vWA, D12S391, D13S317, Penta E, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, Penta D, and D22S1045. All known reported variant alleles are compiled along with genomic information available from GenBank, dbSNP, and the 1000 Genomes Project. Supplementary files are included which provide annotated reference sequences for each STR locus, characterize genomic variation around the STR repeat region, and compare alleles present in currently available STR kit allelic ladders. Looking to the future, STR allele nomenclature options are discussed as they relate to next generation sequencing efforts underway. PMID:26197946

  15. Ar-Ar Age Distributions of Glacially Derived Hornblende Grains in the Eastern Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlhauser, E. M.; Pierce, E. L.; Hemming, S. R.; Williams, T.; Steponaitis, E. A.; Brachfeld, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    How the East Antarctic Ice Sheet has responded to past changes in climate is an important question in paleo- and future-climate research. Subglacial water is increasingly recognized as a major weakness that allows the destabilization of glaciers, and thus an important avenue of provenance research around Antarctica is to characterize the composition of glaciogenic detritus on the perimeter of Antarctica downstream from large subglacial lakes. For this study we use the Ar-Ar method to date detrital hornblendes from thirteen marine sediment cores from the Eastern Weddell Sea and off the coast of Dronning Maud Land. This area could be an important iceberg source in some climate conditions due to its proximity to the Recovery Subglacial Basin (Bell et al., 2007, Nature), a potential weak spot in the ice sheet. Research conducted by Roy et al., (2007, Chemical Geology) and Williams et al., (2010, EPSL) demonstrates that Ar-Ar of glacially derived detrital hornblende grains from marine sediments can be used: 1) to characterize Antarctica’s subglacial geology and 2) as a sedimentary provenance tool to study Antarctic Ice Sheet dynamics. The purpose of this project is to learn more about the subglacial geology around the Eastern Weddell Sea by characterizing the composition of ice rafted detritus (IRD). The relatively high closure temperature of Ar-Ar in hornblende (~500°C) allows this system to record the last major tectonothermal event to effect a body of Antarctic rock such as orogenic metamorphism or, often, initial crystallization from magma. The detrial hornblende ages are consistent with limited on-land ages showing dominant populations of 400-600 Ma, 900-1100 Ma, and 2800-3200 Ma. These ages correspond to the Pan-African, Grenville, and Humboldt orogenies respectively. Comparison of the Ar-Ar ages and the core sites’ proximities to the ice streams and ice divides allows us to determine the likely source areas. The ~500 Ma population to corresponds to the

  16. Calibration of a Carboniferous U-Pb and Ar-Ar Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, E. K.; Machlus, M.; Hemming, S. R.; Bowring, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    An important goal of the EARTHTIME initiative is to produce an accurate and precise sequence of geologic events, allowing the evaluation of the rates of geologic processes. Toward this end, the Ar-Ar and U-Pb communities require a set of standards that permit inter-laboratory and inter-technique comparisons. Natural zircon and sanidine samples that are extensively analyzed by multiple labs play a critical role for these comparisons, but are currently limited in number (Plesovice, R33, Temora 2 zircons; Fish Canyon, Alder Creek, Taylor Creek sanidine). Calibration between the sanidine Ar-Ar and zircon U-Pb is sparse and complexity in one or both of the systems is a general problem. Further, there is currently no Paleozoic sanidine monitor standard for Ar-Ar geochronology. The sanidine- and zircon-bearing Carboniferous Fire Clay tonstein provides potential natural Paleozoic standards for these two systems. The Fire Clay tonstein is a voluminous Carboniferous ash bed from the Appalachian basin. Exposures of the tonstein span over 300 km, making it a valuable marker bed for Appalachian geology. Here we report the results of 64 single-grain zircon U-Pb TIMS analyses and 223 single-grain sanidine Ar/Ar analyses. Although previous efforts have been plagued by xenocrystic zircons, by careful selection of only elongate crystals we were able to entirely avoid discordant analyses older than 316 Ma. Unfiltered analyses of zircons analyzed from a population of acicular crystals give a range of dates between ~315 and ~314 Ma with 2 sigma uncertainties of ~0.2 Ma. A weighted mean of these dates has an MSWD of ~4.0, suggesting geological complexity in the magma chamber or post-eruption lead loss. Sanidine ages have a range of less than 1 %, and only a single population can be distinguished with precision at the 1 Ma level for individual crystals. The ability to select crystals of both zircon and sanidine that give a narrow range of ages suggests that the Fire Clay tonstein holds

  17. 40Ar* loss in experimentally deformed muscovite and biotite with implications for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of naturally deformed rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosca, M.; Stunitz, H.; Bourgeix, A.-L.; Lee, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of deformation on radiogenic argon (40Ar*) retentivity in mica are described from high pressure experiments performed on rock samples of peraluminous granite containing euhedral muscovite and biotite. Cylindrical cores, ???15mm in length and 6.25mm in diameter, were drilled from granite collected from the South Armorican Massif in northwestern France, loaded into gold capsules, and weld-sealed in the presence of excess water. The samples were deformed at a pressure of 10kb and a temperature of 600??C over a period 29 of hours within a solid medium assembly in a Griggs-type triaxial hydraulic deformation apparatus. Overall shortening in the experiments was approximately 10%. Transmitted light and secondary and backscattered electron imaging of the deformed granite samples reveals evidence of induced defects and for significant physical grain size reduction by kinking, cracking, and grain segmentation of the micas.Infrared (IR) laser (CO2) heating of individual 1.5-2.5mm diameter grains of muscovite and biotite separated from the undeformed granite yield well-defined 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages of 311??2Ma (2??). Identical experiments on single grains separated from the experimentally deformed granite yield results indicating 40Ar* loss of 0-35% in muscovite and 2-3% 40Ar* loss in biotite. Intragrain in situ ultraviolet (UV) laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar ages (??4-10%, 1??) of deformed muscovites range from 309??13 to 264??7Ma, consistent with 0-16% 40Ar* loss relative to the undeformed muscovite. The in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar ages of deformed biotite vary from 301 to 217Ma, consistent with up to 32% 40Ar* loss. No spatial correlation is observed between in situ 40Ar/39Ar age and position within individual grains. Using available argon diffusion data for muscovite the observed 40Ar* loss in the experimentally treated muscovite can be utilized to predict average 40Ar* diffusion dimensions. Maximum 40Ar/39Ar ages obtained by UV laser ablation overlap those

  18. 40Ar ∗ loss in experimentally deformed muscovite and biotite with implications for 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology of naturally deformed rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosca, Michael; Stunitz, Holger; Bourgeix, Anne-Lise; Lee, John P.

    2011-12-01

    The effects of deformation on radiogenic argon ( 40Ar ∗) retentivity in mica are described from high pressure experiments performed on rock samples of peraluminous granite containing euhedral muscovite and biotite. Cylindrical cores, ˜15 mm in length and 6.25 mm in diameter, were drilled from granite collected from the South Armorican Massif in northwestern France, loaded into gold capsules, and weld-sealed in the presence of excess water. The samples were deformed at a pressure of 10 kb and a temperature of 600 °C over a period 29 of hours within a solid medium assembly in a Griggs-type triaxial hydraulic deformation apparatus. Overall shortening in the experiments was approximately 10%. Transmitted light and secondary and backscattered electron imaging of the deformed granite samples reveals evidence of induced defects and for significant physical grain size reduction by kinking, cracking, and grain segmentation of the micas. Infrared (IR) laser (CO 2) heating of individual 1.5-2.5 mm diameter grains of muscovite and biotite separated from the undeformed granite yield well-defined 40Ar/ 39Ar plateau ages of 311 ± 2 Ma (2σ). Identical experiments on single grains separated from the experimentally deformed granite yield results indicating 40Ar ∗ loss of 0-35% in muscovite and 2-3% 40Ar ∗ loss in biotite. Intragrain in situ ultraviolet (UV) laser ablation 40Ar/ 39Ar ages (±4-10%, 1σ) of deformed muscovites range from 309 ± 13 to 264 ± 7 Ma, consistent with 0-16% 40Ar ∗ loss relative to the undeformed muscovite. The in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/ 39Ar ages of deformed biotite vary from 301 to 217 Ma, consistent with up to 32% 40Ar ∗ loss. No spatial correlation is observed between in situ40Ar/ 39Ar age and position within individual grains. Using available argon diffusion data for muscovite the observed 40Ar ∗ loss in the experimentally treated muscovite can be utilized to predict average 40Ar ∗ diffusion dimensions. Maximum 40Ar/ 39Ar ages

  19. Deciphering post-Deccan weathering and erosion history of South Indian Archean rocks from cryptomelane 40Ar-39Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Arnaud, Nicolas; Beauvais, Anicet; Chardon, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    Since the extrusion of Deccan traps ~ 63 Ma ago, weathering and erosion processes have shaped the landscapes of this Peninsula India. This resulted in pervasive bauxitic weathering on traps and deep lateritic weathering of their basement on either side of the Western Ghats Escarpment, which separates a coastal lowland from an East-dipping highland plateau. Mn-rich lateritic profiles formed by supergene weathering of Late Archean manganiferous protores in the different greenstone belts are exposed on relict paleosurfaces, which are preserved at different elevations on the highland plateau and in the coastal lowland, allowing for direct comparison of paleosurfaces and geomorphological processes across one of the most prominent relief in the Indian peninsula. Detailed petrological and geochemical investigations of samples collected in the different Mn-rich lateritic profiles allowed for precise characterization of cryptomelane [Kx Mn8-xIV MnxIII O16, nH2O], a Mn-oxide suitable for 40Ar-39Ar dating. The ages obtained document major weathering periods at ~ 53-50 Ma, ~ 40-32 Ma, and ~ 30-23 Ma in the highland profiles, and ~ 47-45 Ma, ~ 24-19 Ma and a younger age at ~ 9 Ma in the coastal lowland profiles. The age clusters are in good agreement with major regional and global Cenozoic paleoclimatic events, e.g., the Eocene climatic optimum and the early beginnings of Asian monsoons at ~ 40 Ma. The old ages obtained both in the coastal lowland and high plateau indicate synchronous lateritic (mostly bauxitic) weathering on both sides of the escarpment. The ages also indicate that most of the incision and dissection of plateau landsurfaces must have taken place during successive periods after 45, 32 and 23 Ma, while the coastal lowland surface was only weakly incised after 19 Ma. Our results thus document post-Eocene divergent erosion and weathering histories across the escarpment since it was formed at least 47 Ma ago, suggesting installation of a dual climatic regime on

  20. Alpha gas state in 36Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimune, Hidetoshi; Gibelin, Julien; Harakeh, Muhsin; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kawabata, Takahiro; Tamii, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Miki, Kenjiro; Iwamoto, Chiro; Otsu, Hideaki; Oha, Shinsuke; Tanihata, Isao; Muramoto, Tomoyuki; Kadono, Chika; Kalantar, Nasser; Ando, Shun; Leblond, Sylvian; Ayyad, Yassid; Furuno, Tatsuya; Tsynyra, Miho; Baba, Tasuo; Adachi, Satoshi; Freer, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The α cluster structures in light nuclei with N = Z are expected to appear abov the threshold energy of breakup into α particles. After the proposal of an α cluster wave function with α particle condensate type, such condensate states are both theoretically and experimentally discussed extensively. Theoretically, the existence of dilute α cluster state in nuclei with mass region of A > 16, experimentally, is not confirmed for N- α cluster states in nuclei heavier than A = 16. Recently, we measured α inelastic scattering of 36Ar followed by α decay in an inverse kinematics setup. A 50 MeV/u 36Ar beam from RCNP ring cyclotron was used to bombard a 4He gas target. α particles were detected in the magnetic spectrometer LAS which was set at 0 degrees. The α cluster structures in light nuclei with N = Z are expected to appear abov the threshold energy of breakup into α particles. After the proposal of an α cluster wave function with α particle condensate type, such condensate states are both theoretically and experimentally discussed extensively. Theoretically, the existence of dilute α cluster state in nuclei with mass region of A > 16, experimentally, is not confirmed for N- α cluster states in nuclei heavier than A = 16. Recently, we measured α inelastic scattering of 36Ar followed by α decay in an inverse kinematics setup. A 50 MeV/u 36Ar beam from RCNP ring cyclotron was used to bombard a 4He gas target. α particles were detected in the magnetic spectrometer LAS which was set at 0 degrees. Taro Hirao Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research.

  1. Comparison of Ca and Ar Diffusion in Phlogopite: Implications for K-Ca and K-Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, M. F.; Szilas, K.; Grove, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled geochronology based upon branched decay of 40K-40Ar and 40K-40Ca decay is rarely exploited because 40Ca is the major common isotope of calcium and 40Ca and 40K are difficult to resolve isotopically without resorting to isotope dilution wet chemistry. Recently developed ion microprobe methods based upon measurement of doubly ionized species partially overcome the latter problem and have been applied to high K/Ca micas. The ability to interpret K-Ar and K-Ca results is limited due to uncertainty in the relative diffusion properties of Ca and Ar. To address this problem, we are performing Ar and Ca diffusion experiments and fluid-crystal Ar partitioning experiments with anhydrous F-phlogopite that is stable to 1390°C. As an additional check, we are comparing K-Ca and K-Ar ages from natural mantle phlogopites from a variety of settings to assess the relative retentivity of Ar and Ca. South African xenoliths tend to yield 40Ar/39Ar ages that are much older than K-Ca ages from the same phologopites. Possible excess 40Ar and high common Ca render the comparisons inconclusive, but this suggests that Ca diffuses more readily than Ar in phlogopite. Our most definitive K-Ca phlogopite results (i.e., least affected by common Ca) come from the Archean Seqi dunite of SW Greenland. The K-Ca ages of Seqi phlogopites is 927 ± 26 Ma (2s). Incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar results from the same sample yields a much older result with a terminal age of 3.5 Ga. However, the first 5-10% of 39Ar release are consistent with transient heating at ca. 900 Ma. Considered together, the K-Ca and 40Ar/39Ar results from the Seqi dunite locality strongly suggest that Ca diffusion is more rapid than Ar diffusion in phlogopite.

  2. CCAR1 promotes chromatin loading of androgen receptor (AR) transcription complex by stabilizing the association between AR and GATA2

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Woo-Young; Jeong, Byong Chang; Yu, Eun Ji; Kim, Hwa Jin; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Lim, Joung Eun; Kwon, Ghee Young; Lee, Hyun Moo; Kim, Jeong Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor, plays a critical role in prostate cancer onset and progression, and its transcriptional function is mediated largely by distinct nuclear receptor co-regulators. Here, we show that cell cycle and apoptosis regulator 1 (CCAR1) functions as an AR co-activator. CCAR1 interacted with and enhanced the transcriptional activity of AR. Depletion of CCAR1 caused reduction in androgen-dependent expression of a subset of AR target genes. We further showed that CCAR1 is required for recruitment of AR, MED1 and RNA polymerase II to the enhancers of AR target genes and for androgen-induced long-range prostate specific antigen enhancer–promoter interaction. The molecular mechanism underlying CCAR1 function in AR-mediated transcription involves CCAR1-mediated enhanced recruitment of GATA2, a pioneer factor for AR, to AR-binding sites. CCAR1 stabilized the interaction between AR and GATA2 by interacting directly with both proteins, thereby facilitating AR and GATA2 occupancy on the enhancers. Furthermore, CCAR1 depletion inhibited the growth, migration, invasion of prostate cancer cells and reduced the tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cells in vivo. Our results firmly established CCAR1 as an AR co-activator that plays a key role in AR transcription complex assembly and has an important physiological role in androgen signaling and prostate tumorigenesis. PMID:23887938

  3. Puroindoline allelic diversity in Indian wheat germplasm and identification of new allelic variants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Arora, Shaweta; Singh, Kashmir; Garg, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Grain hardness is an important quality trait that influences product development in wheat. This trait is governed by variation in puroindoline proteins (PINA and PINB). Our study evaluated 551 Indian wheat germplasm lines for diversity in Pina and Pinb genes. Eighty-two lines were shortlisted for full length sequencing and grain hardness studies. Sequencing studies identified six unknown alleles: two for the Pina gene and four for the Pinb gene. Five of them were novel with non-synonymous changes in the corresponding amino acid sequences. Identified mutations in the deduced mature proteins and their pre- and pro-peptides influenced the hardness characteristics of the grain. We classified these 82 varieties into different hardness categories with reference to international and Indian systems of classification. The majority of Indian wheat varieties were categorized as hard. This study revealed that unexplored Indian wheat germplasm can be a good source of genetic variability for both Pina and Pinb genes, helping in marker-assisted breeding and in obtaining wheat with different textural properties. PMID:26366114

  4. 40Ar 39Ar age constraints on neogene sedimentary beds, Upper Ramparts, half-way Pillar and Canyon village sites, Porcupine river, east-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunk, M.J.; Rieck, H.; Fouch, T.D.; Carter, L.D.

    1994-01-01

    40Ar 39Ar ages of volcanic rocks are used to provide numerical constraints on the age of middle and upper Miocene sedimentary strata collected along the Porcupine River. Intercalated sedimentary rocks north of latitude 67??10???N in the Porcupine terrane of east-central Alaska contain a rich record of plant fossils. The fossils are valuable indicators of this interior region's paleoclimate during the time of their deposition. Integration of the 40Ar 39Ar results with paleomagnetic and sedimentological data allows for refinements in estimating the timing of deposition and duration of selected sedimentary intervals. 40Ar 39Ar plateau age spectra, from whole rock basalt samples, collected along the Upper Ramparts and near Half-way Pillar on the Porcupine River, range from 15.7 ?? 0.1 Ma at site 90-6 to 14.4 ?? 0.1 Ma at site 90-2. With exception of the youngest basalt flow at site 90-2, all of the samples are of reversed magnetic polarity, and all 40Ar 39Ar age spectrum results are consistent with the deposition of the entire stratigraphic section during a single interval of reversed magnetic polarity. The youngest flow at site 90-2 was emplaced during an interval of normal polarity. With age, paleomagnetic and sedimentological data, the ages of the Middle Miocene sedimentary rocks between the basalt flows at sites 90-1 and 90-2 can be assigned to an interval within the limits of analytical precision of 15.2 ?? 0.1 Ma; thus, the sediments were deposited during the peak of the Middle Miocene thermal maximum. Sediments in the upper parts of sites 90-1 and 90-2 were probably deposited during cooling from the Middle Miocene thermal maximum. 40Ar 39Ar results of plagioclase and biotite from a single tephra, collected at sites 90-7 and 90-8 along the Canyon Village section of the Porcupine River, indicate an age of 6.57 ?? 0.02 Ma for its time of eruption and deposition. These results, together with sedimentological and paleomagnetic data, suggest that all of the Upper

  5. Generation of Mice with a Conditional Allele for Ift172

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Paul W.; Howard, Tiffani L.; Maurer, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Ift172 encodes a gene product that is part of a complex that mediates intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process necessary for the genesis and maintenance of cilia. Genetic studies in mice have offered evidence that Ift172 also plays a role in hedgehog signaling. Disruption of Ift172 in mice is associated with lethality at about embryonic day 11, limiting studies to understand the role for Ift172 in later development and the adult. To further our understanding of the later roles of Ift172, we have generated mice with a conditional allele for Ift172. We have confirmed the phenotype of the disrupted allele by using CRE expression directed by the prx1 enhancer to disrupt the conditional Ift172 allele in the developing limb. PMID:19521792

  6. Allele surfing promotes microbial adaptation from standing variation.

    PubMed

    Gralka, Matti; Stiewe, Fabian; Farrell, Fred; Möbius, Wolfram; Waclaw, Bartlomiej; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2016-08-01

    The coupling of ecology and evolution during range expansions enables mutations to establish at expanding range margins and reach high frequencies. This phenomenon, called allele surfing, is thought to have caused revolutions in the gene pool of many species, most evidently in microbial communities. It has remained unclear, however, under which conditions allele surfing promotes or hinders adaptation. Here, using microbial experiments and simulations, we show that, starting with standing adaptive variation, range expansions generate a larger increase in mean fitness than spatially uniform population expansions. The adaptation gain results from 'soft' selective sweeps emerging from surfing beneficial mutations. The rate of these surfing events is shown to sensitively depend on the strength of genetic drift, which varies among strains and environmental conditions. More generally, allele surfing promotes the rate of adaptation per biomass produced, which could help developing biofilms and other resource-limited populations to cope with environmental challenges. PMID:27307400

  7. Apolipoprotein E alleles in women with severe pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, B; Rigó, J; Fintor, L; Karádi, I; Tóth, T

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the frequency of apolipoprotein E (apoE) alleles among women with severe pre-eclampsia. The presence of the three most common apoE alleles (epsilon 2, epsilon 3, epsilon 4) was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in three groups of white women: non-pregnant healthy (n = 101), pregnant healthy (n = 52), and pregnant with a diagnosis of severe pre-eclampsia (n = 54). The frequency of apo epsilon 2 was highest among women with severe pre-eclampsia (16.6%) followed by non-pregnant women (12.9%), and those experiencing a healthy pregnancy (10.6%). The higher frequency of the apo epsilon 2 allele detected among women with severe pre-eclampsia suggests that apoE may play a role in the development of pre-eclampsia. PMID:9659248

  8. Extensive HLA class I allele promiscuity among viral CTL epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Nicole; Yusim, Karina; Suscovich, Todd J.; Adams, Sharon; Sidney, John; Hraber, Peter; Hewitt, Hannah S.; Linde, Caitlyn H.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Woodberry, Tonia; Henry, Leah M.; Faircloth, Kellie; Listgarten, Jennifer; Kadie, Carl; Jojic, Nebojsa; Sango, Kaori; Brown, Nancy V.; Pae, Eunice; Zaman, M. Tauheed; Bihl, Florian; Khatri, Ashok; John, Mina; Mallal, Simon; Marincola, Francesco M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Sette, Alessandro; Heckerman, David; Korber, Bette T.; Brander, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Summary Promiscuous binding of T helper epitopes to MHC class II molecules has been well established, but few examples of promiscuous class I restricted epitopes exist. To address the extent of promiscuity of HLA class I peptides, responses to 242 well-defined viral epitopes were tested in 100 subjects regardless of the individuals’ HLA type. Surprisingly, half of all detected responses were seen in the absence of the originally reported restricting HLA class I allele, and only 3% of epitopes were recognized exclusively in the presence of their original allele. Functional assays confirmed the frequent recognition of HLA class I-restricted T cell epitopes on several alternative alleles across HLA class I supertypes and encoded on different class I loci. These data have significant implications for the understanding of MHC class I restricted antigen presentation and vaccine development. PMID:17705138

  9. Distribution of a pseudodeficiency allele among Tay-Sachs carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tomczak, J.; Grebner, E.E. ); Boogen, C. )

    1993-08-01

    Recently Triggs-Raine et al. (1992) identified a new mutation in the gene coding for the [alpha]-subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (hex A), the enzyme whose deficiency causes Tay-Sachs disease. This mutation, a C[sub 739]-to-T transition in exon 7, results in an altered enzyme that is active (albeit at reduced levels) in cells but that has essentially no activity in serum. This so-called pseudodeficient allele was first detected in compound heterozygotes who also carried a Tay-Sachs disease allele and therefore had no detectable hex A in their serum but who were in good health. Carriers of this apparently benign mutation are generally indistinguishable from carriers of a lethal mutation by means of routine enzyme-based screening tests, because the product of the pseudodeficient allele is not detectable in serum and has decreased activity in cells. This suggests that some individuals who have been classified as Tay-Sachs carriers are actually carriers of the pseudodeficient allele and are not at risk to have a child affected with Tay-Sachs disease. The pseudodeficient allele may also be responsible for some inconclusive diagnoses, where leukocyte values fall below the normal range but are still above the carrier range. The fact that there are now two mutant alleles (the psuedodeficient and the adult) that are indistinguishable from the lethal infantile mutations by means of enzyme assay yet that are phenotypically very different and that together may account for as much as 12% of enzyme-defined carriers on the basis of the data here suggests that DNA analysis should be part of a comprehensive screening program. It will be particularly useful to identify the mutations in couples at risk, before they undergo prenatal diagnosis. DNA analysis will also resolve some inconclusive diagnoses.

  10. Allele-specific DNA methylation reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Izzi, Benedetta; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Cludts, Katrien; Akkor, Pinar; Lambrechts, Diether; Verfaillie, Catherine; Verhamme, Peter; Freson, Kathleen; Hoylaerts, Marc F

    2016-08-18

    Genetic variation in the PEAR1 locus is linked to platelet reactivity and cardiovascular disease. The major G allele of rs12041331, an intronic cytosine guanine dinucleotide-single-nucleotide polymorphism (CpG-SNP), is associated with higher PEAR1 expression in platelets and endothelial cells than the minor A allele. The molecular mechanism underlying this difference remains elusive. We have characterized the histone modification profiles of the intronic region surrounding rs12041331 and identified H3K4Me1 enhancer-specific enrichment for the region that covers the CpG-SNP. Interestingly, methylation studies revealed that the CpG site is fully methylated in leukocytes of GG carriers. Nuclear protein extracts from megakaryocytes, endothelial cells, vs control HEK-293 cells show a 3-fold higher affinity for the methylated G allele compared with nonmethylated G or A alleles in a gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. To understand the positive relationship between methylation and gene expression, we studied DNA methylation at 4 different loci of PEAR1 during in vitro megakaryopoiesis. During differentiation, the CpG-SNP remained fully methylated, while we observed rapid methylation increases at the CpG-island overlapping the first 5'-untranslated region exon, paralleling the increased PEAR1 expression. In the same region, A-allele carriers of rs12041331 showed significantly lower DNA methylation at CGI1 compared with GG homozygote. This CpG-island contains binding sites for the methylation-sensitive transcription factor CTCF, whose binding is known to play a role in enhancer activation and/or repression. In conclusion, we report the molecular characterization of the first platelet function-related CpG-SNP, a genetic predisposition that reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity through allele-specific DNA methylation. PMID:27313330

  11. Molecular dynamics study on Ar ion bombardment effects in amorphous SiO{sub 2} deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Masafumi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2006-12-15

    Argon ion bombardment effects on growing amorphous SiO{sub 2} films during reactive sputtering deposition processes were examined based on molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation techniques. The system we have considered here is a film that is subject to energetic Ar bombardment while it is formed by surface reactions of Si and O atoms separately supplied at low kinetic energies. It has been found that (1) Ar injections preferentially sputter O atoms from the surface over Si and (2) also have a compressing effect on the growing film during the deposition process. In other words, our MD/MC simulations have demonstrated at the atomic level that, with higher energy Ar injections, an amorphous SiO{sub 2} film grown in a reactive sputtering deposition process is denser and more Si rich.

  12. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  13. Data-adaptive algorithms for calling alleles in repeat polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Stoughton, R; Bumgarner, R; Frederick, W J; McIndoe, R A

    1997-01-01

    Data-adaptive algorithms are presented for separating overlapping signatures of heterozygotic allele pairs in electrophoresis data. Application is demonstrated for human microsatellite CA-repeat polymorphisms in LiCor 4000 and ABI 373 data. The algorithms allow overlapping alleles to be called correctly in almost every case where a trained observer could do so, and provide a fast automated objective alternative to human reading of the gels. The algorithm also supplies an indication of confidence level which can be used to flag marginal cases for verification by eye, or as input to later stages of statistical analysis. PMID:9059812

  14. Reduced Height (Rht) Alleles Affect Wheat Grain Quality

    PubMed Central

    Casebow, Richard; Hadley, Caroline; Uppal, Rajneet; Addisu, Molla; Loddo, Stefano; Kowalski, Ania; Griffiths, Simon; Gooding, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The effects of dwarfing alleles (reduced height, Rht) in near isogenic lines on wheat grain quality are characterised in field experiments and related to effects on crop height, grain yield and GA-sensitivity. Alleles included those that conferred GA-insensitivity (Rht-B1b, Rht-B1c, Rht-D1b, Rht-D1c) as well as those that retained GA-sensitivity (rht(tall), Rht8, Rht8 + Ppd-D1a, Rht12). Full characterisation was facilitated by including factors with which the effects of Rht alleles are known to interact for grain yield (i.e. system, [conventional or organic]; tillage intensity [plough-based, minimum or zero]; nitrogen fertilizer level [0–450 kg N/ha]; and genetic backgrounds varying in height [cvs Maris Huntsman, Maris Widgeon, and Mercia]. Allele effects on mean grain weight and grain specific weight were positively associated with final crop height: dwarfing reduced these quality criteria irrespective of crop management or GA-sensitivity. In all but two experiments the effects of dwarfing alleles on grain nitrogen and sulphur concentrations were closely and negatively related to effects on grain yield, e.g. a quadratic relationship between grain yield and crop height manipulated by the GA-insensitive alleles was mirrored by quadratic relationships for nitrogen and sulphur concentrations: the highest yields and most dilute concentrations occurred around 80cm. In one of the two exceptional experiments the GA-insensitive Rht-B1b and Rht-B1c significantly (P<0.05) reduced grain nitrogen concentration in the absence of an effect on yield, and in the remaining experiment the GA-sensitive Rht8 significantly reduced both grain yield and grain nitrogen concentration simultaneously. When Rht alleles diluted grain nitrogen concentration, N:S ratios and SDS-sedimentation volumes were often improved. Hagberg falling number (HFN) was negatively related to crop height but benefits from dwarfing were only seen for GA-insensitive alleles. For HFN, therefore, there was the

  15. Reduced Height (Rht) Alleles Affect Wheat Grain Quality.

    PubMed

    Casebow, Richard; Hadley, Caroline; Uppal, Rajneet; Addisu, Molla; Loddo, Stefano; Kowalski, Ania; Griffiths, Simon; Gooding, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The effects of dwarfing alleles (reduced height, Rht) in near isogenic lines on wheat grain quality are characterised in field experiments and related to effects on crop height, grain yield and GA-sensitivity. Alleles included those that conferred GA-insensitivity (Rht-B1b, Rht-B1c, Rht-D1b, Rht-D1c) as well as those that retained GA-sensitivity (rht(tall), Rht8, Rht8 + Ppd-D1a, Rht12). Full characterisation was facilitated by including factors with which the effects of Rht alleles are known to interact for grain yield (i.e. system, [conventional or organic]; tillage intensity [plough-based, minimum or zero]; nitrogen fertilizer level [0-450 kg N/ha]; and genetic backgrounds varying in height [cvs Maris Huntsman, Maris Widgeon, and Mercia]. Allele effects on mean grain weight and grain specific weight were positively associated with final crop height: dwarfing reduced these quality criteria irrespective of crop management or GA-sensitivity. In all but two experiments the effects of dwarfing alleles on grain nitrogen and sulphur concentrations were closely and negatively related to effects on grain yield, e.g. a quadratic relationship between grain yield and crop height manipulated by the GA-insensitive alleles was mirrored by quadratic relationships for nitrogen and sulphur concentrations: the highest yields and most dilute concentrations occurred around 80cm. In one of the two exceptional experiments the GA-insensitive Rht-B1b and Rht-B1c significantly (P<0.05) reduced grain nitrogen concentration in the absence of an effect on yield, and in the remaining experiment the GA-sensitive Rht8 significantly reduced both grain yield and grain nitrogen concentration simultaneously. When Rht alleles diluted grain nitrogen concentration, N:S ratios and SDS-sedimentation volumes were often improved. Hagberg falling number (HFN) was negatively related to crop height but benefits from dwarfing were only seen for GA-insensitive alleles. For HFN, therefore, there was the

  16. Call for Development of New Mineral Standards for 40Ar/39Ar Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deino, A. L.; Turrin, B. D.; Renne, P. R.; Hemming, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Age determination via the 40Ar/39Ar dating method relies on the intercomparison of measured 40Ar*/39ArK ratios of geological unknowns with those of co-irradiated mineral standards. Good analytical procedure dictates that these ratios (and the evolution of the Ar ion beams underpinning them) be as similar as practical for the greatest accuracy. Unfortunately, throughout several intervals of the geological time scale this 'best practice' cannot be achieved with existing widely used standards. Only two internationally utilized sanidine standards are available for the middle to late Cenozoic: the Alder Creek Rhyolite sanidine (ACs), at ~1.2 Ma (Turrin et al., 1994; Nomade et al., 2005), and the Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine (FCs) at ~28.2 Ma (e.g., Kuiper et al., 2008; Renne et al, 2011). The situation is even worse throughout much of the rest of the Phanerozoic, as the next oldest standard in common use is the Hb3gr hornblende standard with an age of ~1.1 Ga (Turner, 1971; Jourdan et al., 2006). We propose, as a community effort, the development a set of standards covering the entire target range of high-precision 40Ar/39Ar dating, i.e. the Phanerozoic. Their ages would be stepped in a regular fashion with no more than approximately a factor of 3 between standards, such that in the worse case the 40Ar*/39Ar ratios of standards and unknown need differ by no more than a factor of two. While somewhat arbitrary, an approximately 3 X age progression allows the entire time scale to be covered by a manageable number of standards. Anchoring the progression in the widely used ACs, FCs, and Hb3gr (in bold, below) yields the following set of suggested standard ages: 0.4, 1.2, 3.3, 9.4, 28.2, 95, 320, and 1100 Ma. A suitable standard should be highly reproducible in age at the grain-to-grain and sub-grain levels, and highly radiogenic. The mineral should be abundant and easily separated from the host rock. These criteria may be most easily achieved by focusing on sanidine phenocrysts

  17. Potassium isotopic compositions of NIST potassium standards and 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Tappa, M.; Ellam, R. M.; Mark, D. F.; Lloyd, N. S.; Higgins, J. A.; Simon, J. I.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the isotopic ratios of standards, spikes, and reference materials is fundamental to the accuracy of many geochronological methods. For example, the 238U/235U ratio relevant to U-Pb geochronology was recently re-determined [1] and shown to differ significantly from the previously accepted value employed during age determinations. These underlying values are fundamental to accurate age calculations in many isotopic systems, and uncertainty in these values can represent a significant (and often unrecognized) portion of the uncertainty budget for determined ages. The potassium isotopic composition of mineral standards, or neutron flux monitors, is a critical, but often overlooked component in the calculation of K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages. It is currently assumed that all terrestrial materials have abundances indistinguishable from that of NIST SRM 985 [2]; this is apparently a reasonable assumption at the 0.25‰ level (1σ) [3]. The 40Ar/39Ar method further relies on the assumption that standards and samples (including primary and secondary standards) have indistinguishable 40K/39K values. We will present data establishing the potassium isotopic compositions of NIST isotopic K SRM 985, elemental K SRM 999b, and 40Ar/39Ar biotite mineral standard GA1550 (sample MD-2). Stable isotopic compositions (41K/39K) were measured by the peak shoulder method with high resolution MC-ICP-MS (Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus), using the accepted value of NIST isotopic SRM 985 [2] for fractionation [4] corrections [5]. 40K abundances were measured by TIMS (Thermo Scientific TRITON), using 41K/39K values from ICP-MS measurements (or, for SRM 985, values from [2]) for internal fractionation corrections. Collectively these data represent an important step towards a metrologically traceable calibration of 40K concentrations in primary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and improve uncertainties by ca. an order of magnitude in the potassium isotopic compositions of standards. [1] Hiess

  18. First 40Ar/39Ar dating of intense Late Palaeogene lateritic weathering in Peninsular India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Nicolas J.; Beauvais, Anicet; Arnaud, Nicolas; Chardon, Dominique; Jayananda, Mudlappa

    2014-01-01

    Lateritic surface processes have shaped large platform and cratons of the tropical belt. Constraining the timing of such processes is crucial to decipher their role in cratonic morphogenesis and their response to long-term climatic change and lithospheric deformation. Weathering histories have been documented for South America, Africa and Australia, but precise time constraints of the lateritic weathering processes in South India are still lacking. We present 40Ar/39Ar ages of supergene cryptomelane (K-Mn oxide) formed in the Sandur Mn ore deposits exposed on the highest lateritic paleolandsurface that once covered the Mysore plateau and the adjacent Deccan Traps. Significant 40Ar/39Ar ages are estimated between ∼36 and ∼26 Ma from well-defined plateaus in step heating 39Ar release spectra and from best-fitted inverse isochrones. These ages constitute firm time constraints that document intense late Eocene-Oligocene lateritic weathering over Peninsular India under the influence of warm and wet climate comparable to that prevailing in tropical humid forests. These results imply that Southern India was weathered between ∼36 and 26 Ma and may have been dissected mostly in the Neogene.

  19. A test of the 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum technique on some terrestrial materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1971-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age spectra were determined for 10 terrestrial rock and mineral samples whose geologic history is known from independent evidence. The spectra for six mineral and whole rock samples, including biotite, feldspar, hornblende, muscovite, and granodiorite, that have experienced post-crystallization heating did not reveal the age of crystallization in any obvious way. Minima in the spectra, however, give reasonable maximum ages for reheating and high-temperature maxima can be interpreted as minimum crystallization ages. High-temperature ages of microcline and albite that have not been reheated are approximately 10% younger than the known crystallization age. Apparently there are no domains in these feldspars that have retained radiogenic 40Ar quantitatively. Spectra from two diabase samples that contain significant quantities of excess argon might mistakenly be interpreted as spectra from reheated samples and do not give the age of emplacement. The 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum technique may be a potentially valuable tool for the study of geologic areas with complex histories, but the interpretation of age spectra from terrestrial samples seems to be more difficult than suggested by some previous studies. ?? 1971.

  20. Stable isotope and Ar/Ar evidence of prolonged multiscale fluid flow during exhumation of orogenic crust: Example from the Mont Blanc and Aar Massifs (NW Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M.; Rolland, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The spatial and temporal scales and the geometry of fluid pathways in a collisional orogen are investigated using stable isotope analysis (O, C, and H) and 40Ar/39Ar dating of vein minerals formed at circa 11-16 Ma in the Mont Blanc and the Aar External Crystalline Massifs. In both massifs 40Ar/39Ar dating of veins adularia provides evidence for progressive crystallization from 16 to 9 Ma, and mainly at 11-12 Ma following veins opening during shear zone activity. The fluid flow duration thus ranges from 4 to 5 Ma in the two massifs. The δ18O values of vein quartz and calcite are similar to those of undeformed crystalline and sedimentary host rocks, suggesting rock buffering, while carbon isotope ratios of vein calcites fall into three compositional groups. A-type veins have δ13C values that are buffered by the Helvetic metasediments, which suggests that these veins formed in a closed system from a locally derived CO2-rich fluid. The fluid in equilibrium with C-type veins has depleted δ13C values similar to mantle-CO2, while the intermediate δ13C values of B-type veins suggest mixing between the A-type and C-type fluids. These results are in agreement with crustal- to lithosphere-scale upward vertical fluid flow along vertical shear zones related to the strike-slip system bounding the Adriatic block since 16-20 Ma, connecting a deep-seated fluid to some downward flow in the sedimentary cover of External Crystalline Massifs.

  1. Measuring 36Ar without H35Cl interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton, John

    2015-04-01

    Noble gas measurements are usually made in static mode, when the mass spectrometer sensitivity is inversely proportional to volume: this makes the building of very large instruments to obtain high mass resolution impracticable. A particularly challenging interference has hitherto been H35Cl, which differs in mass from 36Ar by 1 part in 3937. We have developed a method which makes improved use of the available MRP to remove interferences, and used it to obtain HCl-free 36Ar measurements on a multicollector instrument with MRP of only ~6000 (MRP= mass resolving power = m/dm 5-95% on side of peak). By arranging that the target mass position on a minor isotope (e.g. 36Ar), from which the interference must be removed, coincides with the ~50% point on the side of a major isotope (e.g. 40Ar), it is possible both to set the mass accurately and to verify the mass position and stability during measurements. The peak top of 40Ar is measured in a separate mass step. Two small corrections are necessary. One compensates for the residual HCl tail at the 36Ar position. The other arises because the peak is not totally flat in the region of interest: 40Ar and 36Ar+HCl are measured on the peak top, whilst 36Ar is measured at the extreme edge, with slightly lower efficiency. The required correction parameters can be obtained from a series of air calibrations with different target/interference ratios. With samples containing 4x10-15to 3x10-14moles of 40Ar, 36Ar/40Ar was measured, without HCl interference, to a 1σ precision of 0.5%, only slightly worse than counting statistics. This is potentially useful for 40Ar/39Ar dating, where 36Ar is used to correct for trapped air, and may be particularly significant for smaller or younger samples.

  2. KAr and {40Ar }/{39}Ar study of metamorphic rocks associated with the Oman ophiolite: Tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montigny, R.; Le Mer, O.; Thuizat, R.; Whitechurch, H.

    1988-09-01

    K-Ar analyses on extracted minerals are reported for a variety of metamorphic rocks associated with the Sumail ophiolite. Amphibolites lying at the sole of the ophiolite yield ages of 95-100 Ma, which are viewed as reflecting times of crystallization. High-pressure metamorphics of the Saih Hatat reveal complex results: white micas range in age from 80 to 131 Ma whereas blue amphiboles indicate ages that are systematically lower than those of coexisting white micas. Investigation of a few white micas by the {40Ar }/{39Ar } step heating method yields rather intricate age spectra, featuring low apparent ages in the first and the last stages of gas release and high apparent ages in between. Two explanations can be equally envisaged for these convex-upward age spectra. The first is the mixing of two generations of micas, corresponding to two main metamorphisms. The first one ( M1) is a low- to medium-temperature, high-pressure event which conceivably occurred between 130 and 114 m.y. ago. The second ( M2) overprints M1 and has produced rocks typical of the greenschist facies. It took place 80 m.y. ago and also affected the sole of the ophiolites. The second is the presence of excess argon in mica mixtures with complex degassing properties. Thus, the two metamorphic phases identified by microscopic inspection are not significantly different in age. They occurred in the 70-80 Ma interval. Moreover, K-Ar dates on amphibole from gabbroic dikes intersecting the peridotites suggest that they are genetically linked to the mafic part of the ophiolites. Assuming that metamorphism is a tracer of tectonic events, we view the infraophiolitic amphibolites as the result of an intraoceanic thrusting which took place near a spreading center. Nevertheless, the uncertainty as to the age of the blueschist metamorphism precludes the possibility of indicating a timetable, based on metamorphic ages, for the motion shift of Africa relative to Eurasia during the Late Cretaceous. A tentative

  3. Paleotemperatures at the lunar surfaces from open system behavior of cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shuster, David L.; Cassata, William S.

    2015-02-10

    The simultaneous diffusion of both cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar from solid phases is controlled by the thermal conditions of rocks while residing near planetary surfaces. Combined observations of 38Ar/37Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ratios during stepwise degassing analyses of neutron-irradiated Apollo samples can distinguish between diffusive loss of Ar due to solar heating of the rocks and that associated with elevated temperatures during or following impact events; the data provide quantitative constraints on the durations and temperatures of each process. From sequentially degassed 38Ar/37Ar ratios can be calculated a spectrum of apparent 38Ar exposure ages versus the cumulative release fraction ofmore » 37Ar, which is particularly sensitive to conditions at the lunar surface typically over ~106–108 year timescales. Due to variable proportions of K- and Ca-bearing glass, plagioclase and pyroxene, with variability in the grain sizes of these phases, each sample will have distinct sensitivity to, and therefore different resolving power on, past near-surface thermal conditions. Furthermore, we present the underlying assumptions, and the analytical and numerical methods used to quantify the Ar diffusion kinetics in multi-phase whole-rock analyses that provide these constraints.« less

  4. Clonal Ordering of 17p and 5q Allelic Losses in Barrett Dysplasia and Adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blount, Patricia L.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Yin, Jing; Huang, Ying; Krasna, Mark J.; Reid, Brian J.

    1993-04-01

    Both 17p and 5q allelic losses appear to be involved in the pathogenesis or progression of many human solid tumors. In colon carcinogenesis, there is strong evidence that the targets of the 17p and 5q allelic losses are TP53, the gene encoding p53, and APC, respectively. It is widely accepted that 5q allelic losses precede 17p allelic losses in the progression to colonic carcinoma. The data, however, supporting this proposed order are largely based on the prevalence of 17p and 5q allelic losses in adenomas and unrelated adenocarcinomas from different patients. We investigated the order in which 17p and 5q allelic losses developed during neoplastic progression in Barrett esophagus by evaluating multiple aneuploid cell populations from the same patient. Using DNA content flow cytometric cell sorting and polymerase chain reaction, 38 aneuploid cell populations from 14 patients with Barrett esophagus who had high grade dysplasia, cancer or both were evaluated for 17p and 5q allelic losses. 17p allelic losses preceded 5q allelic losses in 7 patients, both 17p and 5q allelic losses were present in all aneuploid populations of 4 patients, and only 17p (without 5q) allelic losses were present in the aneuploid populations of 3 patients. In no patient did we find that a 5q allelic loss preceded a 17p allelic loss. Our data suggest that 17p allelic losses typically occur before 5q allelic losses during neoplastic progression in Barrett esophagus.

  5. Direct dating of weathering phenomena by [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar and K-Ar analysis of supergene K-Mn oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcelos, P.M.; Brimhall, G.H. ); Renne, P.R.; Becker, T.A. )

    1994-03-01

    Potassium-bearing manganese oxides, cryptomelane, K[sub 1-2](Mn[sup 3+]Mn[sup 4+])[sub 8] O[sub 16] [center dot] xH[sub 2]O, and hollandite, (K,Ba)[sub 1-2](Mn[sup 3+],Mn[sup 4+])[sub 8] O[sub 16] [center dot] xH[sub 2]O, are often authigenically precipitated in weathering profiles. Dating of these phases allows timing of the progression of oxidation fronts during weathering and pedogenic processes. Potential problems in manganese oxide dating, such as Ar and/or K losses, excess argon, [sup 39]Ar loss by recoil during neutron irradiation, etc. are addressed. The K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar analytical results indicate that Ar and/or K losses, excess [sup 40]Ar, and [sup 39]Ar recoil seem not to pose problems in manganese oxide dating. This investigation suggests that the fine scale, laser-probe [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar technique is most appropriate for dating of weathering phenomena because this technique permits identification of contaminating phases and the presence of multiple generations of weathering minerals in the inherently complex mineral assemblage characteristic of weathering profiles. K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating of supergene K-bearing manganese oxides formed during lateritization of Archean and Proterozoic bedrocks in the Carajas Region, Amazonia, Brazil, indicates that weathering started before 72 [+-] 6 Ma. Petrographic, electron microscope, and electron microprobe investigation reveal multiple generations of manganese oxide precipitation. Age clusters at 65-69, 51-56, 40-43, 33-35, 20, 24, 12-17 Ma, and zero-age (0.2 [+-] 0.2 Ma) suggest episodic precipitation of K-Mn oxides resulting form changing weathering conditions in the Amazon throughout the Cenozoic. K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating of supergene cryptomelane from weathering profiles in eastern Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil, suggests continuous weathering from 10 to 5.6 Ma ago, possibly reflecting local climatic conditions due to the proximity with the Atlantic Ocean.

  6. Ribosomal protein genes are highly enriched among genes with allele-specific expression in the interspecific F1 hybrid catfish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ailu; Wang, Ruijia; Liu, Shikai; Peatman, Eric; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Jiang, Chen; Li, Chao; Li, Yun; Zeng, Qifan; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-06-01

    Interspecific hybrids provide a rich source for the analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE). In this work, we analyzed ASE in F1 hybrid catfish using RNA-Seq datasets. While the vast majority of genes were expressed with both alleles, 7-8 % SNPs exhibited significant differences in allele ratios of expression. Of the 66,251 and 177,841 SNPs identified from the datasets of the liver and gill, 5420 (8.2 %) and 13,390 (7.5 %) SNPs were identified as significant ASE-SNPs, respectively. With these SNPs, a total of 1519 and 3075 ASE-genes were identified. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (RP) were highly enriched among ASE genes. Parent-of-origin was determined for 27 and 30 ASE RP genes in the liver and gill, respectively. The results indicated that genes from both channel catfish and blue catfish were involved in ASE. However, each RP gene appeared to be almost exclusively expressed from only one parent, indicating that ribosomes in the hybrid catfish were in the "hybrid" form. Overall representation of RP transcripts among the transcriptome appeared lower in the F1 hybrid catfish than in channel catfish or blue catfish, suggesting that the "hybrid" ribosomes may work more efficiently for translation in the F1 hybrid catfish. PMID:26747053

  7. Potential energy surface and bound states of the NH3-Ar and ND3-Ar complexes.

    PubMed

    Loreau, J; Liévin, J; Scribano, Y; van der Avoird, A

    2014-12-14

    A new, four-dimensional potential energy surface for the interaction of NH3 and ND3 with Ar is computed using the coupled-cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations and large basis sets. The umbrella motion of the ammonia molecule is explicitly taken into account. The bound states of both NH3-Ar and ND3-Ar are calculated on this potential for total angular momentum values from J = 0 to 10, with the inclusion of Coriolis interactions. The energies and splittings of the rovibrational levels are in excellent agreement with the extensive high-resolution spectroscopic data accumulated over the years in the infrared and microwave regions for both complexes, which demonstrates the quality of the potential energy surface. PMID:25494745

  8. Ar-Ar and Rb-Sr Ages of the Tissint Olivine-phyric Martian Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Turin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Agee, C.

    2013-01-01

    The fifth martian meteorite fall, Tissint, is an olivine-phyric shergottite that contains olivine macrocrysts (approximately 1.5 mm) [1]. [2] reported the Sm-Nd age of Tissint as 596 plus or minus 23 Ma along with Rb-Sr data that defined no isochron. [3] reported Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd ages of 583 plus or minus 86 Ma and 616 plus or minus 67 Ma, respectively. The cosmic-ray exposure ages of Tissint are 1.10 plus or minus 0.15 Ma based on 10Be [4], and 1.0-1.1 Ma, based on 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar [5,6].We report Ar-Ar ages and Rb-Sr data.

  9. Laser /39/Ar-/40/Ar dating of two clasts from consortium breccia 73215

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichhorn, G.; Schaeffer, O. A.; James, O. B.; Mueller, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    A laser Ar-39-Ar-40 study of the components of an ANT-suite anorthositic gabbro and a black aphanite from a consortium breccia is reported. A wide range of K-Ar ages is found for the plagioclase in the anorthositic gabbro; at the centers of the largest grains is material showing the greatest age (older than 4.11 billion years) while the youngest material (3.81-3.88 billion years) is found near the grain margins. Partial outgassing of the clasts upon incorporation into the breccia could account for the age patterns. The black aphanite clast appears to be cogenetic with the aphanite that forms the breccia matrix. The time of crystallization of a lunar granite has also been measured by the laser technique.

  10. Oldest reliable Ar-40/Ar-39 ages for terrestrial rocks Barberton Mountain komatiites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Martinez, M.; York, D.; Hall, C. M.; Hanes, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The first Ar-40/Ar-39 ages for komatiites and komatiitic basalts from the Barberton Mountain Greenstone Belt on the Transvaal-Swaziland border in southern Africa are reported. Both rock types display remarkable argon retentivity. While some variation is found among the samples, the best argon age estimate for the time of metamorphism is in the 3450-3490 Myr range. This age is only slightly less than that found in komatiites from the same area by Sm-Nd dating. The results show that the principal pervasive greenschist metamorphism in the area must have occurred within 100 Myr of the eruption of the komatiite. These results represent by far the oldest reliable ages obtained for terrestrial rocks using the K-Ar system.

  11. Ar-Ar and I-Xe Ages and the Thermal History of IAB Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Studies of several samples of the large Caddo County IAB iron meteorite reveal andesitic material, enriched in Si, Nay Al and Ca, which is essentially unique among meteorites. This material is believed to have formed from a chondritic source by partial melting and to have further segregated by grain coarsening. Such an origin implies extended metamorphism of the IAB parent body. New Ar-39-Ar-40 ages for silicate from three different Caddo samples are consistent with a common age of 4.50- 4.51 Gyr ago. Less well defined Ar-Ar degassing ages for inclusions from two other IABs, EET8333 and Udei Station, are approx.4.32 Gyr, whereas the age for Campo del Cielo varies considerably over approx.3.23-4.56 Gyr. New I-129-Xe-129 ages for Caddo County and EET8333 are 4561.9 +/-0.1 Myr and 4560-4563 Myr, respectively, relative to an age of 4566 Myr for Shallowater. Considering all reported Ar-Ar ages for IABs and related winonaites, the range is approx.4.32-4.53 Gyr, but several IABs give similar Ar ages of 4.50-4.52 Gyr. We interpret these older ages to represent cooling after the time of last significant metamorphism on the parent body, and the younger ages to represent later Ar-40 diffusion loss. These older Ar-Ar ages are similar to Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature for Caddo County. Considering the possibility that IAB parent body formation was followed by impact disruption, reassembly, and metamorphism (e.g., Benedix et al. 2000), the time of the post-assembly metamorphism may have been as late as approx.4.53 Gyr ago. However, precise I-Xe ages reported for some IABs define a range of ages of approx.4560 to approx.4576 My. The older I-Xe ages exceed the oldest precise radiometric ages of meteorites, appear unrealistic, and suggest a bias in the calibration of all I-Xe ages. But even with such a bias, the I-Xe ages of IABs cannot easily be reconciled with the much younger Ar-Ar and Sm-Nd ages and with cooling rates deduced from Ni concentration

  12. Ar-Ar and I-XE Ages and the Thermal History of IAB Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Studies of several samples of the large Caddo County IAB iron meteorite reveal andesitic material, enriched in Si, Na, Al and Ca which is essentially unique among meteorites. This material is believed to have formed from a chondritic source by partial melting and to have further segregated by grain coarsening. Such an origin implies extended metamorphism of the IAB parent body. New Ar-39- Ar-40 ages for silicate from three different Caddo samples are consistent with a common age of 4.50- 4.51 Gyr ago. Less well defined Ar-Ar degassing ages for inclusions from two other IABs, EET8333 and Udei Station, are approx. 4.32 Gyr, whereas the age for Campo del Cielo varies considerably over approx. 3.23-4.56 Gyr. New I-129-Xe-129 ges for Caddo County and EET8333 are 4561.9 plus or minus 0.1 Myr and 4560-4563 Myr, respectively, relative to an age of 4566 Myr for Shallowater. Considering all reported Ar-Ar ages for IABs and related winonaites, the range is approx. 4.32-4.53 Gyr, but several IABs give similar Ar ages of 4.50-4.52 Gyr. We interpret these older ages to represent cooling after the time of last significant metamorphism on the parent body, and the younger ages to represent later 40Ar diffusion loss. These older Ar-Ar ages are similar to Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature for Caddo County. Considering the possibility that IAB parent body formation was followed by impact disruption, reassembly, and metamorphism (e.g., Benedix et al. 2000), the time of the postassembly metamorphism may have been as late as approx. 4.53 Gyr ago. However, precise I-Xe ages reported for some IABs define a range of ages of approx. 4560 to approx. 4576 Myr. The older I-Xe ages exceed the oldest precise radiometric ages of meteorites, appear unrealistic, and suggest a bias in the calibration of all I-Xe ages. But even with such a bias, the I-Xe ages of IABs cannot easily be reconciled with the much younger Ar-Ar and Sm-Nd ages and with cooling rates deduced from Ni

  13. Ar-Ar and I-Xe Ages and the Thermal History of IAB Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Studies of several samples of the large Caddo County IAB iron meteorite reveal andesitic material, enriched in Si, Na, Al and Ca, which is essentially unique among meteorites. This material is believed to have formed from a chondritic source by partial melting and to have further segregated by grain coarsening. Such an origin implies extended metamorphism of the IAB parent body. New Ar-39-Ar-40 ages for silicate from three different Caddo samples are consistent with a common age of 4.50-4.51 Gyr ago. Less well defined Ar-Ar degassing ages for inclusions from two other IABs, EET8333 and Udei Station, are approx.4.32 Gyr, whereas the age for Campo del Cielo varies considerably over approx.3.23-4.56 Gyr. New I-129-Xe-129 ages for Caddo County and EET8333 are 4561.9+/-0.1 Myr and 4560- 4563 Myr, respectively, relative to an age of 4566 Myr for Shallowater. Considering all reported Ar-Ar ages for IABs and related winonaites, the range is approx.4.32-4.53 Gyr, but several IABs give similar Ar ages of 4.50-4.52 Gyr. We interpret these older ages to represent cooling after the time of last significant metamorphism on the parent body, and the younger ages to represent later Ar-40 diffusion loss. These older Ar-Ar ages are similar to Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature for Caddo County. Considering the possibility that IAB parent body formation was followed by impact disruption, reassembly, and metamorphism (e.g., Benedix et al. 2000), the time of the post-assembly metamorphism may have been as late as approx.4.53 Gyr ago. However, precise I-Xe ages reported for some IABs define a range of ages of approx.4560 to approx.4576 Myr. The older I-Xe ages exceed the oldest precise radiometric ages of meteorites, appear unrealistic, and s,uggest a bias in the calibration of all I-Xe ages. But even with such a bias, the I-Xe ages of IABs cannot easily be reconciled with the much younger Ar-Ar and Sm-Nd ages and with cooling rates deduced from Ni concentration

  14. Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Brian J.; Seroyer, Shane T.; Filardo, Giuseppe; Bajaj, Sarvottam; Fortier, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may affect soft tissue healing via growth factors released after platelet degranulation. Because of this potential benefit, clinicians have begun to inject PRP for the treatment of tendon, ligament, muscle, and cartilage injuries and early osteoarthritis. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was performed for studies relating to PRP, growth factors, and soft tissue injuries from 1990 to 2010. Relevant references from these studies were also retrieved. Results: Soft tissue injury is a major source of disability that may often be complicated by prolonged and incomplete recovery. Numerous growth factors may potentiate the healing and regeneration of tendons and ligaments. The potential benefits of biologically enhanced healing processes have led to a recent interest in the use of PRP in orthopaedic sports medicine. There has been widespread anecdotal use of PRP for muscle strains, tendinopathy, and ligament injuries and as a surgical adjuvant to rotator cuff repair, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and meniscal or labral repairs. Although the fascination with this emerging technology has led to a dramatic increase in its use, scientific data supporting this use are still in their infancy. Conclusions: The literature is replete with studies on the basic science of growth factors and their relation to the maintenance, proliferation, and regeneration of various tissues and tissue-derived cells. Despite the promising results of several animal studies, well-controlled human studies are lacking. PMID:23015939

  15. MEIS1 functions as a potential AR negative regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Liang; Yang, Yutao; Hang, Xingyi; Cui, Jiajun; Gao, Jiangping

    2014-10-15

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays critical roles in human prostate carcinoma progression and transformation. However, the activation of AR is regulated by co-regulators. MEIS1 protein, the homeodomain transcription factor, exhibited a decreased level in poor-prognosis prostate tumors. In this study, we investigated a potential interaction between MEIS1 and AR. We found that overexpression of MEIS1 inhibited the AR transcriptional activity and reduced the expression of AR target gene. A potential protein–protein interaction between AR and MEIS1 was identified by the immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation and the recruitment to androgen response element in prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene promoter sequences. In addition, MEIS1 promoted the recruitment of NCoR and SMRT in the presence of R1881. Finally, MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells. Taken together, our data suggests that MEIS1 functions as a novel AR co-repressor. - Highlights: • A potential interaction was identified between MEIS1 and AR signaling. • Overexpression of MEIS1 reduced the expression of AR target gene. • MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation. • MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells.

  16. K/Ar dating of lunar soils. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, E. C., Jr.; Bates, A.; Coscio, M. R., Jr.; Dragon, J. C.; Murthy, V. R.; Pepin, R. O.; Venkatesan, T. R.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt is made to identify those K/Ar techniques which extract the most reliable chronological information from lunar soils and to define the situations in which the best data are obtainable. Results are presented for determinations of the exposure and K/Ar ages of five lunar soil samples, which were performed by applying correlation techniques for a two-component argon structure to stepwise-heated and neutron-irradiated aliquots of grain-sized separates. It is found that ages deduced from Ar-40/surface-correlated Ar-36 vs K-40/surface-correlated Ar-36 and analogous plots of data from grain-sized separates appear to be the best available K/Ar ages of submature to mature lunar soils, that ages deduced from Ar-40 vs Ar-36 and analogous plots which assume a uniform K content can be significantly in error, and that stepwise-heating (Ar-40)-(Ar-39) experiments yield useful information only for simple immature soils where the K-Ar systematics are dominated by a single component.

  17. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar thermochronology in the northern Bitterroot mylonite zone, Mt

    SciTech Connect

    House, M.A.; Hodges, K.V. . Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The extensional Bitterroot mylonite zone defines the eastern and southern border of the Bitterroot metamorphic core complex and is generally interpreted to be the major structure which accommodated unroofing of the metamorphic core. The most commonly cited evidence for the age of mylonitization are [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages for hornblend, muscovite, biotite, and potassium feldspar from the southern Bitterroot mylonite zone that indicate rapid cooling of the core rocks between 45.5 and 43.5 Ma. More recently, an [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar K-feldspar age of 46.4 [+-] 0.8 Ma for an undeformed rhyolite dike that cuts across the mylonitic fabric places a minimum age constraint on the southern part of the shear zone. The authors have obtained new [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar data for metapelitic rocks and amphibolites from the northeast border of the Bitterroot metamorphic core complex near an area where mylonitized granitoid rocks yielding 48--52 Ma U-Pb zircon crystallization ages constrain the maximum age of mylonitization. Isochran ages of 47.9 [+-] 0.9 and 49 [+-] 1 Ma for hornblende separated from deformed amphibolite pods in the northeast border zone are within analytical uncertainty of the younger mylonitized granitoid crystallization ages and indicate rapid post-crystallization cooling through temperatures of [approximately]780--800 K. They attribute this cooling to denudation related to shear zone development. Muscovite and biotite isochron ages from metapelitic rocks within the shear zone are significantly younger, between 42 and 44 Ms., and generally agree with mica ages obtained by Garmezy and Sutter for the southern part of the shear zone. However, all mica ages from the Bitterroot shear zone are younger than the minimum age of the shear zone deduced from the age of cross-cutting rhyolite dikes.

  18. The ChArMEx database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Helene; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Mière, Arnaud; Vermeulen, Anne

    2014-05-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters, intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the database task is to organize data management, distribution system and services, such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The database relies on a strong collaboration between OMP and ICARE data centres and has been set up in the framework of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. All the data produced by or of interest for the ChArMEx community will be documented in the data catalogue and accessible through the database website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. At present, the ChArMEx database contains about 75 datasets, including 50 in situ datasets (2012 and 2013 campaigns, Ersa background monitoring station), 25 model outputs (dust model intercomparison, MEDCORDEX scenarios), and a high resolution emission inventory over the Mediterranean. Many in situ datasets have been inserted in a relational database, in order to enable more accurate data selection and download of different datasets in a shared format. The database website offers different tools: - A registration procedure which enables any scientist to accept the data policy and apply for a user database account. - A data catalogue that complies with metadata international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). - Metadata forms to document

  19. Registration of two allelic erect leaf mutants of sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two allelic sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] erect leaf (erl) mutants were isolated from an Annotated Individually-pedigreed Mutagenized Sorghum (AIMS) mutant library developed at the Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Unit, at Lubbock, Texas. The two mutants, erl1-1 and erl1-2, were isol...

  20. Efficient nonmeiotic allele introgression in livestock using custom endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wenfang; Carlson, Daniel F.; Lancto, Cheryl A.; Garbe, John R.; Webster, Dennis A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Fahrenkrug, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    We have expanded the livestock gene editing toolbox to include transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nuclease (TALEN)- and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-stimulated homology-directed repair (HDR) using plasmid, rAAV, and oligonucleotide templates. Toward the genetic dehorning of dairy cattle, we introgressed a bovine POLLED allele into horned bull fibroblasts. Single nucleotide alterations or small indels were introduced into 14 additional genes in pig, goat, and cattle fibroblasts using TALEN mRNA and oligonucleotide transfection with efficiencies of 10–50% in populations. Several of the chosen edits mimic naturally occurring performance-enhancing or disease- resistance alleles, including alteration of single base pairs. Up to 70% of the fibroblast colonies propagated without selection harbored the intended edits, of which more than one-half were homozygous. Edited fibroblasts were used to generate pigs with knockout alleles in the DAZL and APC genes to model infertility and colon cancer. Our methods enable unprecedented meiosis-free intraspecific and interspecific introgression of select alleles in livestock for agricultural and biomedical applications. PMID:24014591

  1. Generation of mice with a conditional Lbh null allele.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Linsey E; Briegel, Karoline J

    2013-07-01

    Limb bud and heart (LBH) is a developmentally expressed, tissue-specific transcription cofactor in vertebrates that acts in the WNT signaling pathway, a genetic program critical for embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Aberrant gain-of-function of LBH is implicated in both human congenital disease and cancer. The normal physiological function of LBH has remained elusive owing to a lack of genetic loss-of-function models. Here, we have generated mice with a conditional null allele of Lbh by flanking exon 2 with loxP sites (Lbh(flox)). Homozygous Lbh(flox) and Lbh(loxP) mice, in which the Neo cassette was removed through FLPe-mediated recombination, were viable and fertile, indicating that these conditional Lbh alleles are fully functional. Lbh(loxP) mice were then crossed with a Rosa26-Cre line, resulting in ubiquitous deletion of exon 2 and abolishment of LBH protein expression. Mice homozygous for the Lbh null allele (Lbh(Δ)(2)) displayed normal embryonic development and postnatal growth with morphologies indistinguishable from wild-type littermates. However, mammary gland development, which occurs primarily after birth, was perturbed. Thus, the conditional Lbh allele will be a valuable tool to uncover the currently unknown tissue-specific roles of LBH in postnatal development and disease. PMID:23495064

  2. MHC class II DR allelic diversity in bighorn sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that decreased diversity and/or unique polymorphisms in MHC class II alleles of bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are responsible for lower titer of antibodies against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). To test this hypothesis, DRA...

  3. Multifragment alleles in DNA fingerprints of the parrot, Amazona ventralis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, M.K.; White, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    Human DNA probes that identify variable numbers of tandem repeat loci are being used to generate DNA fingerprints in many animal and plant species. In most species the majority of the sc rable autoradiographic bands of the DNA fingerprint represent alleles from numerous unlinked loci. This study was initiated to use DNA fingerprints to determine the amount of band-sharing among captive Hispaniolan parrots (Amazona ventralis) with known genetic relationships. This would form the data base to examine DNA fingerprints of the closely related and endangered Puerto Rican parrot (A. vittata) and to estimate the degree of inbreeding in the relic population. We found by segregation analysis of the bands scored in the DNA fingerprints of the Hispaniolan parrots that there may be as few as two to five loci identified by the human 33.15 probe. Furthermore, at one locus we identified seven alleles, one of which is represented by as many as 19 cosegregating bands. It is unknown how common multiband alleles might be in natural populations, and their existence will cause problems in the assessment of relatedness by band-sharing analysis. We believe, therefore, that a pedigree analysis should be included in all DNA fingerprinting studies, where possible, in order to estimate the number of loci identified by a minisatellite DNA probe and to examine the nature of their alleles.

  4. Functional Allelic Variation at Key Photoperiod Response QTL in Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical maize represents a valuable genetic resource containing unique alleles not present in elite temperate maize. The strong delay in flowering in response to long daylength photoperiods exhibited by most tropical maize hinders its incorporation into temperate maize breeding programs. We tested ...

  5. RECOVERY OF EXOTIC ALLELES IN ENHANCED TROPICAL YELLOW GERMPLASM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhancement of overall diversity levels and the incorporation of new favorable traits are major benefits of using exotic germplasm in elite breeding programs. Agronomic deficiencies and poor adaptation often limits use of exotic germplasm in plant breeding programs. To introgress exotic alleles into...

  6. PUTATIVE ALLELES FOR INCREASED YIELD FROM SOYBEAN PLANT INTRODUCTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving seed yield of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars is an important goal of breeding programs. The objective of this study was to evaluate two soybean plant introductions (PIs) as sources of alleles for the enhancement of seed yield in North American cultivars. A soybean population ...

  7. Distribution of forensic marker allelic frequencies in Pernambuco, Northestern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Rabelo, K C N; Souza, P R E; Moura, R R; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S

    2015-01-01

    Pernambuco is one of the 27 federal units of Brazil, ranking seventh in the number of inhabitants. We examined the allele frequencies of 13 short tandem repeat loci (CFS1PO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, FGA, TH01, vWA, and TPOX), the minimum recommended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and commonly used in forensic genetics laboratories in Brazil, in a sample of 609 unrelated individuals from all geographic regions of Pernambuco. The allele frequencies ranged from 5 to 47.2%. No significant differences for any loci analyzed were observed compared with other publications in other various regions of Brazil. Most of the markers observed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The occurrence of the allele 47.2 (locus FGA) and alleles 35.1 and 39 (locus D21S11), also described in a single study of the Brazilian population, was observed. The other forensic parameters analyzed (matching probability, power of discrimination, polymorphic information content, paternity exclusion, complement factor I, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity) indicated that the studied markers are very informative for human forensic identification purposes in the Pernambuco population. PMID:25966202

  8. Natural allelic variations in highly polyploidy Saccharum complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) as important sugar and biofuel crop are highly polypoid with complex genomes. A large amount of natural phenotypic variation exists in sugarcane germplasm. Understanding its allelic variance has been challenging but is a critical foundation for discovery of the genomic seq...

  9. Tissue-specific patterns of allelically-skewed DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marzi, Sarah J.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Dempster, Emma L.; Lunnon, Katie; Paya-Cano, Jose L.; Smith, Rebecca G.; Volta, Manuela; Troakes, Claire; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Mill, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While DNA methylation is usually thought to be symmetrical across both alleles, there are some notable exceptions. Genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation are two well-studied sources of allele-specific methylation (ASM), but recent research has indicated a more complex pattern in which genotypic variation can be associated with allelically-skewed DNA methylation in cis. Given the known heterogeneity of DNA methylation across tissues and cell types we explored inter- and intra-individual variation in ASM across several regions of the human brain and whole blood from multiple individuals. Consistent with previous studies, we find widespread ASM with > 4% of the ∼220,000 loci interrogated showing evidence of allelically-skewed DNA methylation. We identify ASM flanking known imprinted regions, and show that ASM sites are enriched in DNase I hypersensitivity sites and often located in an extended genomic context of intermediate DNA methylation. We also detect examples of genotype-driven ASM, some of which are tissue-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the nature of differential DNA methylation across tissues and have important implications for genetic studies of complex disease. As a resource to the community, ASM patterns across each of the tissues studied are available in a searchable online database: http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/ASMBrainBlood. PMID:26786711

  10. Further evidence for allelic heterogeneity in Hartnup disorder.

    PubMed

    Azmanov, Dimitar N; Kowalczuk, Sonja; Rodgers, Helen; Auray-Blais, Christiane; Giguère, Robert; Rasko, John E J; Bröer, Stefan; Cavanaugh, Juleen A

    2008-10-01

    Hartnup disorder is an autosomal recessive impairment of amino acid transport in kidney and intestine. Mutations in SLC6A19 have been shown to cosegregate with the disease in the predicted recessive manner; however, in two previous studies (Seow et al., Nat Genet 2004;36:1003-1007; Kleta et al., Nat Genet 2004;36:999-1002), not all causative alleles were identified in all affected individuals, raising the possibility that other genes may contribute to Hartnup disorder. We have now investigated six newly acquired families of Australian and Canadian (Province of Quebec) origin and resequenced the entire coding region of SLC6A19 in families with only a single disease allele identified. We also studied one American family in whom no mutations had been identified in a previous study (Kleta et al., Nat Genet 2004;36:999-1002). We have identified seven novel mutations in SLC6A19 that show functional obliteration of the protein in vitro, explaining Hartnup disorder in all reported families so far. We demonstrate that Hartnup disorder is allelically heterogeneous with two mutated SLC6A19 alleles, whether identical or not, necessary for manifestation of the characteristic aminoaciduria in affected individuals. This study resolves the previous hypothesis that other genes contribute to the Hartnup phenotype. PMID:18484095

  11. Recovery of Exotic Alleles in Enhanced Tropical Yellow Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhancement of overall diversity levels and the incorporation of new favorable traits are major benefits of using exotic germplasm in elite breeding programs. Agronomic deficiencies and poor adaptation often limits use of exotic germplasm in plant breeding programs. To introgress exotic alleles into...

  12. Estimating the age of alleles by use of intraallelic variability

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, M.; Rannala, B.

    1997-02-01

    A method is presented for estimating the age of an allele by use of its frequency and the extent of variation among different copies. The method uses the joint distribution of the number of copies in a population sample and the coalescence times of the intraallelic gene genealogy conditioned on the number of copies. The linear birth-death process is used to approximate the dynamics of a rare allele in a finite population. A maximum-likelihood estimate of the age of the allele is obtained by Monte Carlo integration over the coalescence times. The method is applied to two alleles at the cystic fibrosis (CFTR) locus, {Delta}F508 and G542X, for which intraallelic variability at three intronic microsatellite loci has been examined. Our results indicate that G542X is somewhat older than {Delta}F508. Although absolute estimates depend on the mutation rates at the microsatellite loci, our results support the hypothesis that {Delta}F508 arose <500 generations ({approx}10,000 years) ago. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Increase in NRAS mutant allele percentage during metastatic melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Funck-Brentano, Elisa; Hélias-Rodzewicz, Zofia; Longvert, Christine; Mokhtari, Karima; Saiag, Philippe; Emile, Jean-François

    2016-06-01

    One-fifth of cutaneous melanomas have dominant gain-of-function mutations of the NRAS oncogene. We report the first two cases of increasing NRAS mutant allele frequency in melanoma metastases and show that the chromosomal mechanism of this homozygosity is an increased polysomy of chromosome 1. We observed an increase in NRAS mutant allele percentage (NRAS-MA%) in the metastatic melanoma progression from 2 patients with melanomas harbouring a NRAS mutation (p.Q61K in case 1 and p.Q61R in case 2). In case 1, we observed a NRAS-MA% increase from 18% within the first metastatic node to 81%, 92% and 85% respectively in the three subsequent metastases: lymph node, brain and subcutaneous metastases biopsied 1, 6 and 17 months, respectively, after the initial lymph node biopsy. In case 2, we observed an increase in NRAS-MA% from 40% within the primary melanoma to 63% within the metastatic lymph node. FISH analysis showed the same results in both cases: a frequent polysomy of chromosome 1 in metastasis samples with NRAS mutant allele percentage >60%, while most cells were disomic in the samples with well-balanced heterozygous mutations. The percentage of NRAS mutant allele may increase during metastatic progression and may be associated with chromosomal instability. Further studies are needed to evaluate the prognostic impact of the NRAS homozygous status and/or polyploidy in metastatic cutaneous melanomas. PMID:26990546

  14. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology of isotopically zoned micas: Insights from the southwestern USA proterozoic orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, K. V.; Bowring, S. A.

    1995-08-01

    We have used three different 40Ar/39Ar laser microprobe methods to explore the distribution of radiogenic 40Ar in 1.0-1.5-mm biotite crystals from the ca. 1680 Ma Horse Mountain monzogranite of central Arizona. Incremental heating of two single crystals with a defocused laser beam produced flat age spectra with near-plateau ages of ˜1190 Ma, showing no indication of intracrystalline 40Ar inhomogeneity. In contrast, total fusion of twenty-five biotite fragments (˜ 100 pm) yielded apparent ages ranging from 1006.7 to 1212.0 Ma. Detailed age mapping in the {001} plane of two crystals, with the laser focused to a minimum spot size, confirms that the age dispersion in the fragment data reflects the existence of 200 m.y. age gradients in single crystals. The two mapped crystals display very different age distribution patterns that suggest radiogenic 40Ar loss through two mechanisms: volume diffusion on a scale comparable to that of the grain radius, and more rapid diffusion along discrete zones of high crystal defect density. Simple inverse modeling of the overall age dispersion in the two mapped crystals and the fragment population is consistent with the development of the observed age gradients by slow cooling at an average rate of ˜0.5 K/m.y. The Horse Mountain results, as well as previously published studies, indicate that conventional, incremental heating of hydrous phases can homogenize intracrystalline gradients in 40Ar, thereby masking important details of the thermal history of analyzed samples. In contrast, detailed isotopic mapping studies offer a wealth of information, and will become more powerful with continued improvement in the spatial resolution of 40Ar/39Ar laser microprobes. Total-fusion studies of crystal fragment populations can be readily automated, making them less labor-intensive than mapping studies. Our preliminary experiment on a limited Horse Mountain fragment population suggests that this procedure has great potential as a reconnaissance

  15. The barents sea magmatic province: Geological-geophysical evidence and new 40Ar/39Ar dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipilov, E. V.; Karyakin, Yu. V.

    2011-07-01

    Resulting from study of the geological structure of the Franz Josef Land and Svalbard archipelagoes, this work presents new 17 40Ar/39Ar age datings for basalts taken during coastal expeditions in 2006-2010. Radiological age determination for intrusive units (sills) located in the western part of Nordensciold Land (Spitzbergen Island) has been made for the first time. In relation to use of the interpretation results of marine geological-geophysical data, the distribution peculiarities and time ranges for Jurassic-Cretaceous basic magmatism within the studied regions of the Barents Sea continental margin and within the Arctic as a whole are discussed.

  16. Ar-Ar Dating of Martian Chassignites, NWA2737 and Chassigny, and Nakhlite MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Until recently only three nakhlites and one chassignite had been identified among martian meteorites. These four exhibit very similar radiometric ages and cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages, indicating that they may have derived from a common location on Mars and were ejected into space by a single impact. This situation is quite different from that of martian shergottites, which exhibit a range of radiometric ages and CRE ages (1). Recently, several new nakhlites and a new martian dunite (NWA2737) have been recognized. Here we report our results of Ar-39-Ar-40 dating for the MIL03346 nakhlite and the NWA2737 "chassignite", along with new results on Chassigny.

  17. SUMER-IRIS Observations of AR11875

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Donald; Innes, Davina

    2014-05-01

    We present results of the first joint observing campaign of IRIS and SOHO/SUMER. While the IRIS datasets provide information on the chromosphere and transition region, SUMER provides complementary diagnostics on the corona. On 2013-10-24, we observed an active region, AR11875, and the surrounding plage for approximately 4 hours using rapid-cadence observing programs. These datasets include spectra from a small C -class flare which occurs in conjunction with an Ellerman-bomb type event. Our analysis focusses on how the high spatial resolution and slit jaw imaging capabilities of IRIS shed light on the unresolved structure of transient events in the SUMER catalog.

  18. Theoretical photoabsorption spectra of Ar n+ clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doltsinis, Nikos L.; Knowles, Peter J.

    2000-08-01

    The photoabsorption spectra of selected Ar n+ clusters ( n=7, 8, 17, 19, 23) have been investigated theoretically using an extended Diatomics-in-Molecules approach including induced dipole - induced dipole and spin-orbit coupling interaction effects. Our calculations at 0 K confirm the experimentally observed spectral red-shift of the visible photoabsorption peak in the region 15< n<20 [Levinger et al., J. Chem. Phys. 89 (1988) 5654]. Furthermore, we have been able to reproduce the additional red-shift measured for 7⩽ n⩽9 [Haberland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 67 (1991) 3290] by carrying out finite temperature Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Genotypic richness predicts phenotypic variation in an endangered clonal plant.

    PubMed

    Evans, Suzanna M; Sinclair, Elizabeth A; Poore, Alistair G B; Bain, Keryn F; Vergés, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Declines in genetic diversity within a species can affect the stability and functioning of populations. The conservation of genetic diversity is thus a priority, especially for threatened or endangered species. The importance of genetic variation, however, is dependent on the degree to which it translates into phenotypic variation for traits that affect individual performance and ecological processes. This is especially important for predominantly clonal species, as no single clone is likely to maximise all aspects of performance. Here we show that intraspecific genotypic diversity as measured using microsatellites is a strong predictor of phenotypic variation in morphological traits and shoot productivity of the threatened, predominantly clonal seagrass Posidonia australis, on the east coast of Australia. Biomass and surface area variation was most strongly predicted by genotypic richness, while variation in leaf chemistry (phenolics and nitrogen) was unrelated to genotypic richness. Genotypic richness did not predict tissue loss to herbivores or epiphyte load, however we did find that increased herbivore damage was positively correlated with allelic richness. Although there was no clear relationship between higher primary productivity and genotypic richness, variation in shoot productivity within a meadow was significantly greater in more genotypically diverse meadows. The proportion of phenotypic variation explained by environmental conditions varied among different genotypes, and there was generally no variation in phenotypic traits among genotypes present in the same meadows. Our results show that genotypic richness as measured through the use of presumably neutral DNA markers does covary with phenotypic variation in functionally relevant traits such as leaf morphology and shoot productivity. The remarkably long lifespan of individual Posidonia plants suggests that plasticity within genotypes has played an important role in the longevity of the species

  20. Genotypic richness predicts phenotypic variation in an endangered clonal plant

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Elizabeth A.; Poore, Alistair G.B.; Bain, Keryn F.; Vergés, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Declines in genetic diversity within a species can affect the stability and functioning of populations. The conservation of genetic diversity is thus a priority, especially for threatened or endangered species. The importance of genetic variation, however, is dependent on the degree to which it translates into phenotypic variation for traits that affect individual performance and ecological processes. This is especially important for predominantly clonal species, as no single clone is likely to maximise all aspects of performance. Here we show that intraspecific genotypic diversity as measured using microsatellites is a strong predictor of phenotypic variation in morphological traits and shoot productivity of the threatened, predominantly clonal seagrass Posidonia australis, on the east coast of Australia. Biomass and surface area variation was most strongly predicted by genotypic richness, while variation in leaf chemistry (phenolics and nitrogen) was unrelated to genotypic richness. Genotypic richness did not predict tissue loss to herbivores or epiphyte load, however we did find that increased herbivore damage was positively correlated with allelic richness. Although there was no clear relationship between higher primary productivity and genotypic richness, variation in shoot productivity within a meadow was significantly greater in more genotypically diverse meadows. The proportion of phenotypic variation explained by environmental conditions varied among different genotypes, and there was generally no variation in phenotypic traits among genotypes present in the same meadows. Our results show that genotypic richness as measured through the use of presumably neutral DNA markers does covary with phenotypic variation in functionally relevant traits such as leaf morphology and shoot productivity. The remarkably long lifespan of individual Posidonia plants suggests that plasticity within genotypes has played an important role in the longevity of the species

  1. Ar diffusion in hydrous silicic melts: implications for volatile diffusion mechanisms and fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Harald; Zhang, Youxue

    2001-10-01

    The effect of dissolved water on the diffusivity of Ar in glasses and melts of rhyolitic and albitic compositions was investigated experimentally at pressures up to 1500 MPa and water contents of 0.1-5 wt%. The data for water-poor rhyolitic composition at 500 MPa can be described in the whole temperature range of 480-1102°C by a simple Arrhenius relationship DAr=2.14×10 -6 m 2/s exp(-18 883/ T). A 4.0 wt% increase in water content increases the Ar diffusivity by approximately one order of magnitude in both rhyolitic and albitic melts at 1000°C. In contrast to viscosity and total water diffusion, an exponential dependence of Ar diffusivity on water content was observed for the rhyolitic composition in the whole range of water contents. For water-poor rhyolite, Ar diffusivity depends on pressure with an apparent activation volume of 13-15 cm 3/mol at pressures up to 800 MPa. For water-rich rhyolite (˜5 wt% water), there is no significant pressure effect at 1000°C in the range 500-1500 MPa. Combining our data with previous data from Carroll [M.R. Carroll, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 103 (1991) 156-168], Ar diffusivity (in 10 -12 m 2/s) in rhyolitic melts can be expressed as: D Ar= exp[( 14.627- 17 913/T- 2.569P/T)+( 35 936/T+ 27.42P/T)X water] where T is in K, P in MPa, and Xwater is the mol fraction of water on a single oxygen basis. Except for two outlier points, error of estimates is ≤0.455 in terms of ln D for all data, covering a wide range of temperatures (480-1200°C), pressures (0.1-1500 MPa), and water contents (0.1-5 wt%). The new Ar diffusion data support the assumption that molecular H 2O diffusivity exponentially increases with water content [Y. Zhang, H. Behrens, Chem. Geol. 169 (2000) 243-262].

  2. Nomenclature for alleles of the thiopurine methyltransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Appell, Malin L; Berg, Jonathan; Duley, John; Evans, William E; Kennedy, Martin A; Lennard, Lynne; Marinaki, Tony; McLeod, Howard L; Relling, Mary V; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Weinshilboum, Richard; Yeoh, Allen E J; McDonagh, Ellen M; Hebert, Joan M; Klein, Teri E; Coulthard, Sally A

    2013-04-01

    The drug-metabolizing enzyme thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) has become one of the best examples of pharmacogenomics to be translated into routine clinical practice. TPMT metabolizes the thiopurines 6-mercaptopurine, 6-thioguanine, and azathioprine, drugs that are widely used for treatment of acute leukemias, inflammatory bowel diseases, and other disorders of immune regulation. Since the discovery of genetic polymorphisms in the TPMT gene, many sequence variants that cause a decreased enzyme activity have been identified and characterized. Increasingly, to optimize dose, pretreatment determination of TPMT status before commencing thiopurine therapy is now routine in many countries. Novel TPMT sequence variants are currently numbered sequentially using PubMed as a source of information; however, this has caused some problems as exemplified by two instances in which authors' articles appeared on PubMed at the same time, resulting in the same allele numbers given to different polymorphisms. Hence, there is an urgent need to establish an order and consensus to the numbering of known and novel TPMT sequence variants. To address this problem, a TPMT nomenclature committee was formed in 2010, to define the nomenclature and numbering of novel variants for the TPMT gene. A website (http://www.imh.liu.se/tpmtalleles) serves as a platform for this work. Researchers are encouraged to submit novel TPMT alleles to the committee for designation and reservation of unique allele numbers. The committee has decided to renumber two alleles: nucleotide position 106 (G>A) from TPMT*24 to TPMT*30 and position 611 (T>C, rs79901429) from TPMT*28 to TPMT*31. Nomenclature for all other known alleles remains unchanged. PMID:23407052

  3. Lu Hf and Ar Ar chronometry supports extreme rate of subduction zone metamorphism deduced from geospeedometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippot, Pascal; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Perchuk, Alexei; Costa, Sylvie; Gerasimov, Vladimir

    2001-12-01

    Recent diffusion modeling of eclogitic garnets from the Great Caucasus, Russia, and Yukon, Canada, have shown that the preservation of garnet growth zoning in rocks that have equilibrated at high temperature (680-700 °C) is possible only if rates of pressure and temperature change on the burial and/or exhumation paths are in the order of several cm/year and several hundreds of °C/Ma. In order to confirm this observation, we performed Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd dating of garnet and Ar-Ar dating of mica on the same samples that were used for geospeedometry measurements in an earlier study. In both localities, garnet grew during prograde metamorphism at 690±40 °C and >1.5 GPa (Yukon) and 680±40 °C and >1.6 GPa (Great Caucasus). In contrast, phengite formed soon after the main eclogitic foliation at 520±50 °C (Yukon) and 600±40 °C (Great Caucasus). Garnet of the Yukon samples yielded Lu-Hf ages of 252±7, 255±7, 257±6 and 264±6 Ma that fall within error of phengite Ar-Ar integrated ages of 261±2 (laser spot date) and 256±3 Ma (age of mineral separates). No Sm-Nd ages were measured on the Yukon samples. For Great Caucasus samples, all Sm-Nd ages with the exception of one garnet-whole rock pair yielding a Sm-Nd age of 311±22 Ma are poorly constrained. In contrast, the Lu-Hf garnet chronometer yields ages of 322±14, 316±5 and 296±11 Ma that again fall within error of the phengite Ar-Ar mean age of 303±5 Ma. Because the geospeedometry approach provides information on cooling rates, information on the closure temperature of a given isotopic system can be extracted from the analytical solution of Dodson [Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 40 (1973) 259] using appropriate sets of experimentally determined diffusion data. The results of these calculations indicate that uncertainties of more than 200 °C are to be expected for the Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf closure temperatures for both the Great Caucasus (750±150 °C) and Yukon samples (710±120 °C). In all cases, calculated closure

  4. Genetic mapping of the interface between the ArsD metallochaperone and the ArsA ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianbo; Ajees, Abdul; Salam, Abdul; Rosen, Barry P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The ArsD metallochaperone delivers trivalent metalloids, As(III) or Sb(III), to the ArsA ATPase, the catalytic subunit of the ArsAB As(III) efflux pump. Transfer of As(III) increases the affinity of ArsA for As(III), allowing resistance to environmental arsenic concentrations. As(III) transfer is channeled from chaperone to ATPase, implying that ArsD and ArsA form an interface at their metal binding sites. A genetic approach was used to test this hypothesis. Thirteen ArsD mutants exhibiting either weaker or stronger interaction with ArsA were selected by either repressed transactivator yeast two-hybrid or reverse yeast two-hybrid assays. Additionally, Lys-37 and Lys-62 were identified as being involved in ArsD function by site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification. Substitution at either position with arginine was tolerated, suggesting participation of a positive charge. By yeast two-hybrid analysis K37A and K62A mutants lost interaction with ArsA. All fifteen mutations were mapped on the surface of the ArsD structure, and their locations are consistent with a structural model generated by in silico docking. Four are close to metalloid binding site residues Cys-12, Cys-13 and Cys18, and seven are on the surface of helix 1. These results suggest that the interface involves one surface of helix 1 and the metalloid binding site. PMID:21299644

  5. The role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation in the regulation of StAR activity and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana F; Orlando, Ulises; Helfenberger, Katia E; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2015-06-15

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein regulates the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis, i.e. the delivery of cholesterol from the outer (OMM) to the inner (IMM) mitochondrial membrane. StAR is a 37-kDa protein with an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence that is cleaved off during mitochondrial import to yield 30-kDa intramitochondrial StAR. StAR acts exclusively on the OMM and its activity is proportional to how long it remains on the OMM. However, the precise fashion and the molecular mechanism in which StAR remains on the OMM have not been elucidated yet. In this work we will discuss the role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation by the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) as part of the mechanism that regulates StAR retention on the OMM and activity. PMID:25540920

  6. Allelic variation at the vernalization and photoperiod sensitivity loci in Chinese winter wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangfen; Gao, Manxia; Wang, Shasha; Chen, Feng; Cui, Dangqun

    2015-01-01

    A total of 205 wheat cultivars from the Yellow and Huai valley of China were used to identify allelic variations of vernalization and photoperiod response genes, as well as the copy number variations (CNVs) of Ppd-B1 and Vrn-A1 genes. A novel Vrn-D1 allele with 174-bp insertion in the promoter region of the recessive allele vrn-D1 was discovered in three Chinese wheat cultivars and designated as Vrn-D1c. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that cultivars with the Vrn-D1c allele exhibited significantly higher expression of the Vrn-D1 gene than that in cultivars with the recessive allele vrn-D1, indicating that the 174-bp insertion of Vrn-D1c contributed to the increase in Vrn-D1 gene expression and caused early heading and flowering. The five new cis-elements (Box II-like, 3-AF1 binding site, TC-rich repeats, Box-W1 and CAT-box) in the 174-bp insertion possibly promoted the basal activity level of Vrn-D1 gene. Two new polymorphism combinations of photoperiod genes were identified and designated as Ppd-D1_Hapl-IX and Ppd-D1_Hapl-X. Association of the CNV of Ppd-B1 gene with the heading and flowering days showed that the cultivars with Ppd-B1_Hapl-VI demonstrated the earliest heading and flowering times, and those with Ppd-B1_Hapl-IV presented the latest heading and flowering times in three cropping seasons. Distribution of the vernalization and photoperiod response genes indicated that all recessive alleles at the four vernalization response loci, Ppd-B1_Hapl-I at Ppd-B1 locus, and Ppd-D1_Hapl-I at the Ppd-D1 locus were predominant in Chinese winter wheat cultivars. This study can provide useful information for wheat breeding programs to screen wheat cultivars with relatively superior adaptability and maturity. PMID:26191066

  7. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-03-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  8. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-01-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27030405

  9. Allelic divergence and cultivar-specific SSR alleles revealed by capillary electrophoresis using fluorescence-labeled SSR markers in sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) are complex aneu-polyploid hybrids, genetic evaluation and tracking of clone- or cultivar-specific alleles become possible due to capillary electrophoregrams (CE) using fluorescence-labeled SSR primer pairs. Twenty-four sugarcane cultivars, 12 each...

  10. Chandra's First Decade Observing AR Lac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratzlaff, Peter; Drake, Jeremy J.; Durham, R. Nicholas; Kashyap, Vinay; Posson-Brown, Jennifer; Wargelin, Bradford J.

    2009-09-01

    X-ray observations of the eclipsing RS CVn-type binary AR Lacertae have been obtained every year from 1999 to 2008 with the Chandra High Resolution Camera imaging and spectroscopic detectors (HRC-I, HRC-S) as part of their gain and point spread function calibration. These represent the best quality data yet obtained on the long term variability of the X-ray emission of an RS CVn star, and are rendered especially valuable for the multi-epoch coverage of the AR Lac eclipses. The data are characterised by stochastic variability by factors of ˜2 on timescales of one to several ks, and by minor flaring events in which count rates are observed to be elevated by slightly larger factors. During primary eclipse, the X-ray count rate is generally observed at approximately 60% of its value outside of eclipse and during periods of relative quiescence. Little evidence for secondary eclipses is present in the data, reminiscent of earlier X-ray and EUV observations. The X-ray count rate modulation through the eclipses allow us to place an upper limit on the extent of a spherically symmetric coronae of about two stellar radii, the exact limit depending on the details of the coronal models and partition of emission between the component stars. We compare the observed Chandra count rates to earlier EUVE, EINSTEIN, EXOSAT and ROSAT observations and comment on the apparent lack of cyclic coronal activity on RS CVn-type binaries.

  11. 40Ar/39Ar age of material returned from asteroid 25143 Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jisun; Turrin, Brent D.; Herzog, Gregory F.; Lindsay, Fara N.; Delaney, Jeremy S.; Swisher, Carl C.; Uesugi, Masayuki; Karouji, Yuzuru; Yada, Toru; Abe, Masanao; Okada, Tatsuaki; Ishibashi, Yukihiro

    2015-11-01

    The Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143, Itokawa, brought back 2000 small particles, which most closely resemble material found in LL4-6 chondrites. We report an 40Ar/39Ar age of 1.3 ± 0.3 Ga for a sample of Itokawa consisting of three grains with a total mass of ~2 μg. This age is lower than the >4.0 Ga ages measured for 75% of LL chondrites but close to one for Y-790964 and its pairs. The flat 40Ar/39Ar release spectrum of the sample suggests complete degassing 1.3 Ga ago. Recent solar heating in Itokawa's current orbit does not appear likely to have reset that age. Solar or impact heating 1.3 Ga ago could have done so. If impact heating was responsible, then the 1.3 Ga age sets an upper bound on the time at which the Itokawa rubble pile was assembled and suggests that rubble pile creation was an ongoing process in the inner solar system for at least the first 3 billion years of solar system history.

  12. Ar40-Ar39 systematics in rocks and separated minerals from Apollo 14.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, G.; Huneke, J. C.; Podosek, F. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    The Ar40-Ar39 dating technique has been applied to separated minerals (plagioclase, pyroxene, quintessence and an 'ilmenite' concentrate), and whole rock samples of Apollo 14 rocks 14310 and 14073. Plagioclase shows the best gas retention characteristics, with no evidence of anomalous behavior and only a small amount of gas loss in the initial release. Ages determined from the plagioclase of 14310 and 14073 are (3.87 plus or minus 0.05) and (3.88 plus or minus 0.05) AE respectively. Low apparent ages at low release temperatures, which are frequently observed in whole rock Ar40-Ar39 experiments on lunar basalts, are shown to be principally due to gas loss in the high-K interstitial glass (quintessence) phase, confirming earlier suggestions. The decrease in apparent ages in the high-temperature release previously observed in several total rock samples of Apollo 14 basalts has been identified with the pyroxene. Plagioclase is also found to be the most suitable mineral for the determination of cosmic ray exposure ages, and exposure ages of 280 and 113 m.y. are found for 14310 and 14073, respectively, indicating that these rocks, which are very similar in many respects, have different exposure histories.

  13. New high-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages on Oligocene volcanic rocks of northwestern Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Francis H.; Jicha, Brian R.

    2016-02-01

    New, high-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages from volcanic rocks in northwestern Kenya are provided for some areas of exposure in this remote area. We report seven 40Ar/39Ar ages generated from single crystal total fusion experiments on alkali feldspar separated from volcanic rocks in the Mogila, Songot, and Lokwanamur Ranges and the Gatome valley. A rhyolite from the lower part of the sequence in the Mogila Range yielded ages of 32.31 ± 0.06 Ma and 32.33 ± 0.07 Ma, and a rhyolite near the top of that sequence yielded 31.67 ± 0.04 Ma. A single sample from the Songot Range yielded an age of 32.49 ± 0.07 Ma, slightly older than the rocks collected from Mogila. In both ranges the early Oligocene rhyolites are underlain by basalts, as is also the case in the Labur Range. Ages of 25.95 ± 0.03 Ma, 25.91 ± 0.04 Ma, and 27.15 ± 0.03 Ma were measured on alkali feldspar from rhyolites from the Lokwanamur Range, and the nearby Gatome valley. All of these rocks are part of an episode of widespread volcanism in northwestern Kenya in the mid-to late Oligocene that is not currently known from the Ethiopian Rift Valley.

  14. The 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar dating of lavas from the Hilo 1-km core hole, Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, W.D.; Turrin, B.D.; Renne, P.R.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Mauna Kea lava flows cored in the HilIo hole range in age from <200 ka to about 400 ka based on 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating and K-Ar analyses of 16 groundmass samples and one coexisting plagioclase. The lavas, all subaerially deposited, include a lower section consisting only of tholeiitic basalts and an upper section of interbedded alkalic, transitional tholeiitic, and tholeiitic basalts. The lower section has yielded predominantly complex, discordant 40Ar/39Ar age spectra that result from mobility of 40Ar and perhaps K, the presence of excess 40Ar, and redistribution of 39Ar by recoil. Comparison of K-Ar ages with 40Ar/39Ar integrated ages indicates that some of these samples have also lost 39Ar. Nevertheless, two plateau ages of 391 ?? 40 and 400 ?? 26 ka from deep in the hole, combined with data from the upper section, show that the tholeiitic section accumulated at an average rate of about 7 to 8 m/kyr and has an mean recurrence interval of 0.5 kyr/flow unit. Samples from the upper section yield relatively precise 40Ar/39Ar plateau and isotope correlation ages of 326 ?? 23, 241 ?? 5, 232 ?? 4, and 199 ?? 9 ka for depths of -415.7 m to -299.2 m. Within their uncertainty, these ages define a linear relationship with depth, with an average accumulation rate of 0.9 m/kyr and an average recurrence interval of 4.8 kyr/flow unit. The top of the Mauna Kea sequence at -280 m must be older than the plateau age of 132 ?? 32 ka, obtained for the basal Mauna Loa flow in the corehole. The upward decrease in lava accumulation rate is a consequence of the decreasing magma supply available to Mauna Kea as it rode the Pacific plate away from its magma source, the Hawaiian mantle plume. The age-depth relation in the core hole may be used to test and refine models that relate the growth of Mauna Kea to the thermal and compositional structure of the mantle plume.

  15. Transvection in the Drosophila Ultrabithorax Gene: A Cbx(1) Mutant Allele Induces Ectopic Expression of a Normal Allele in Trans

    PubMed Central

    Castelli-Gair, J. E.; Micol, J. L.; Garcia-Bellido, A.

    1990-01-01

    In wild-type Drosophila melanogaster larvae, the Ultrabithorax (Ubx) gene is expressed in the haltere imaginal discs but not in the majority of cells of the wing imaginal discs. Ectopic expression of the Ubx gene in wing discs can be elicited by the presence of Contrabithorax (Cbx) gain-of-function alleles of the Ubx gene or by loss-of-function mutations in Polycomb (Pc) or in other trans-regulatory genes which behave as repressors of Ubx gene activity. Several Ubx loss-of-function alleles cause the absence of detectable Ubx proteins (UBX) or the presence of truncated UBX lacking the homeodomain. We have compared adult wing phenotypes with larval wing disc UBX patterns in genotypes involving double mutant chromosomes carrying in cis one of those Ubx mutations and the Cbx(1) mutation. We show that such double mutant genes are (1) active in the same cells in which the single mutant Cbx(1) is expressed, although they are unable to yield functional proteins, and (2) able to induce ectopic expression of a normal homologous Ubx allele in a part of the cells in which the single mutant Cbx(1) is active. That induction is conditional upon pairing of the homologous chromosomes (the phenomenon known as transvection), and it is not mediated by UBX. Depletion of Pc gene products by Pc(3) mutation strongly enhances the induction phenomenon, as shown by (1) the increase of the number of wing disc cells in which induction of the homologous allele is detectable, and (2) the induction of not only a paired normal allele but also an unpaired one. PMID:2121595

  16. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tourmaline as a tool for high-temperature metamorphism thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, Fred; Thern, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Tourmaline is an ubiquitous mineral, with properties making it ideal for studying metamorphic processes as well as a useful tool for a wide range of applications (e.g, magmatism, metasomatism, ore deposits [1]), mostly because it is not sensitive to chemical or mechanical alteration and is stable over a wide range of pressure-temperature conditions (up to 6 GPa and 850° C [2]). Typical metamorphic tourmaline types include dravite and shorl which, along with elbaite, belong to the alkali group [1]. The alkali group is notable because tourmalines from this group tend to incorporate trace amounts of K2O and therefore, can be dated using the 40Ar/39Ar technique. In order to understand the maximum temperature below which the K/Ar chronometer stays closed to argon loss by thermally activated diffusion, we carried out temperature controlled furnace diffusion experiments on well-behaved 40Ar/39Ar plateau-forming Archean tourmaline of 2935 ± 9 Ma [3]. Each experiment yielded an Arrhenius profile (Do vs. 1/temperature) that shows that the 39Ar data form two linear arrays with two distinct slopes. The first array only includes a few % of the total gas, has a shallow slope and shows very fast diffusivity at low temperature. We interpret these data as indicating very fast release of argon by cracks and defects. The second array of data points includes most of the gas of each experiment and forms a much steeper slope. These data yielded Ea (activation energy) values ranging from 120 to 157 Kcal/mol and D0 (pre-exponential diffusion factor) values ranging from 1.9x106 to 2.5x109 cm2/s for crystals with an average radius of 100 ± 25 μm. Three additional experiments using a laser (resulting in poor temperature control) suggest similar values although the latter experiments are considered semi-quantitative. The furnace experiments suggest that tourmaline has a weighted mean closure temperature of 804 ± 90 ° C (1σ) for a cooling rate of 10° C/Ma. Monte Carlo simulations using

  17. Genomewide Association Study of Tacrolimus Concentrations in African American Kidney Transplant Recipients Identifies Multiple CYP3A5 Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Oetting, W. S.; Schladt, D. P.; Guan, W.; Miller, M. B.; Remmel, R. P.; Dorr, C.; Sanghavi, K.; Mannon, R. B.; Herrera, B.; Matas, A. J.; Salomon, D. R.; Kwok, P.-Y.; Keating, B. J.; Israni, A. K.; Jacobson, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that tacrolimus (TAC) trough blood concentrations for African American (AA) kidney allograft recipients were lower than those observed in white patients. Subtherapeutic TAC troughs may be associated with acute rejection (AR) and AR-associated allograft failure. This variation in TAC troughs is due, in part, to differences in the frequency of the cytochrome P450 CYP3A5*3 allele (rs776746, expresses nonfunctional enzyme) between white and AA recipients; however, even after accounting for this variant, variability in AA-associated troughs is significant. We conducted a genomewide association study of TAC troughs in AA kidney allograft recipients to search for additional genetic variation. We identified two additional CYP3A5 variants in AA recipients independently associated with TAC troughs: CYP3A5*6 (rs10264272) and CYP3A5*7 (rs41303343). All three variants and clinical factors account for 53.9% of the observed variance in troughs, with 19.8% of the variance coming from demographic and clinical factors including recipient age, glomerular filtration rate, anti-cytomegalovirus drug use, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant and antibody induction. There was no evidence of common genetic variants in AA recipients significantly influencing TAC troughs aside from the CYP3A gene. These results reveal that additional and possibly rare functional variants exist that account for the additional variation. PMID:26485092

  18. Human Leukocyte Antigen Alleles and Cytomegalovirus Infection After Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Futohi, Farzaneh; Saber, Azadeh; Nemati, Eglim; Einollahi, Behzad; Rostami, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have been conducted on the relationship between a number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and cytomegalovirus infection (CMV), in kidney transplant recipients, after transplantation. However, only a limited number of HLAs have been investigated, so far, and the results have been contradictory. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between 59 HLA alleles and the CMV infection, in transplant recipients, after kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods: This retrospective cohort study was conducted on 200 patients, receiving a kidney transplant, in Baqiyatallah Hospital, in Tehran, during 2013. Throughout a one-year follow-up of kidney transplant recipients, in case of detecting the CMV antigen in patients’ blood, at any time, they were placed in the group of patients with CMV infection, whereas, if no CMV-specific antigen was developed, over a year, patients were placed in the group of patients without CMV infection, after transplantation. This study investigated the relationship between CMV infection in kidney transplant recipients and 59 HLA alleles, including 14 HLA-A, 28 HLA-B, and 17 HLA-DRB1 cases. Results: Of all participants, 104 patients (52%) were diagnosed with CMV infection. There was no significant difference between the two groups, with and without CMV infection, in terms of patient’s characteristics. The CMV infection, in patients receiving a transplanted organ from deceased donor, was significantly more prevalent than in those receiving kidney transplant from living donor (63% vs. 39%, respectively, P = 0.001). Recipients with HLA-B44 were more infected with CMV compared with patients without this allele (80% vs. 50%, respectively, P = 0.024); on the contrary, kidney recipients with HLA-DRB1-1 were less infected with CMV than patients without this allele (31% vs. 55%, respectively, P = 0.020). There was no significant relationship between CMV infection and other HLA alleles. Results of

  19. The bombardment history of the Moon as recorded by 40Ar-39Ar chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, V. A.; Fritz, J.; Weiss, B. P.; Garrick-Bethell, I.; Shuster, D. L.

    2013-02-01

    New petrography and 40Ar-39Ar ages have been obtained for 1-3 mm sized rock fragments from Apollo 16 Station 13 soil 63503 (North Ray crater ejecta) and chips from three rocks collected by Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions. Selection of these samples was aimed at the old 40Ar-39Ar ages to understand the early history of the lunar magnetic field and impact flux. Fifteen samples were studied including crustal material, polymict feldspathic fragmental breccias, and impact melts. The impact ages obtained range between approximately 3.3 and 4.3 billion years (Ga). Polymict fragmental breccia 63503,1 exhibits the lowest signs of recrystallization observed and a probable old relic age of 4.547 ± 0.027. The plateau age of 4.293 ± 0.044 Ga obtained for impact melt rock 63503,13 represents the oldest known age for such a lithology. Possibly, this age represents the minimum age for the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) Basin. In agreement with literature data, these results show that impact ages >3.9 Ga are found in lunar rocks, especially within soil 63503. Impact exhumation of deep-seated warm crustal material onto the lunar surface is considered to explain the common 4.2 Ga ages obtained for weakly shocked samples from soil 63503 and Apollo 17. This would directly imply that one or more basin-forming events occurred at that time. Some rock fragments showing none to limited petrologic features indicate thermal annealing. These rocks may have lost Ar while resident within the hot-ejecta of a large basin. Concurrent with previous studies, these results lead us to advocate for a complex impact flux in the inner solar system during the initial approximately 1.3 Ga.

  20. Characterization of alleles in a diversity panel of tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Approximately 6,000 accessions of domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), including open-pollinated populations and inbred lines, are conserved at the USDA, ARS Plant Genetic Resources Unit (PGRU). This collection provides a publicly available resource for breeding and experimentation to end-...

  1. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR), and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:26372468

  2. One-electron pseudopotential investigation of the RbAr and FrAr van der Waals systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhiflaoui, J.; Berriche, H.

    2012-12-01

    The potential energy curves of the ground state and many excited states of RbAr and FrAr van der Waals systems have been determined using a one-electron pseudopotential approach. The pseudopotential technique is used to replace the effect of the Rb+ and Fr+ cores and the electron-Ar interaction. In addition a core-core interaction is included. This has permitted to reduce the number of active electrons of the RbAr and FrAr systems to only one electron, the valence electron. This has led to use very large basis sets for Rb, Fr and Ar atoms. In this context, the potential energy curves of the ground and many excited states are performed at the SCF level. The core-core interactions for Rb+Ar and Fr+Ar are included using the CCSD(T) accurate potentials of Hickling et al. [H. Hickling, L. Viehland, D. Shepherd, P. Soldan, E. Lee and T. Wright, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 6 (2004) 4233]. In addition, the spectroscopic constants of these states are derived and compared with the available theoretical works. Such comparison for RbAr has shown a very good agreement for the ground and the first excited states. However, the FrAr system was not studied previously and its spectroscopic constants are presented here for the first time.

  3. Human immunoglobulin allotypes: previously unrecognized determinants and alleles defined with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Zelaschi, D; Newby, C; Parsons, M; van West, B; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1983-01-01

    The highly polymorphic system of serologically defined genetic markers on human IgG heavy chains (Gm allotypes) is second only to the HLA complex in terms of the large number of determinants, alleles, and haplotypes that can be used for analyses of disease associations and other genetic studies. However, present typing methods are based on the use of anti-Gm antisera that are derived mainly from fortuitously immunized human donors, often requiring processing before use, and must be used in a hemagglutination-inhibition assay that cannot be used in typing for isoallotypic determinants (currently termed "non-markers"). In studies presented here, we describe an allotyping system that utilizes monoclonal antibodies in a "sandwich" modification of the solid-phase radioimmunoassay, which is capable of reliable quantitative typing of allotypic, isoallotypic, and isotypic immunoglobulin determinants. We show that these highly reproducible, easily disseminated, and essentially inexhaustible reagents can be used for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative Gm typing. Using this system we define two previously unrecognized Gm determinants, one of which, found to date only in Caucasians, is different from all known Gm markers and thus defines previously unrecognized alleles and haplotypes. The other determinant co-segregates with the conventional G3m(b1) marker but is distinct from that marker on serological grounds. The successful preparation of mouse monoclonal antibodies that detect human Gm allotypic differences and the development of an assay system capable of typing isoallotypic as well as allotypic determinants opens the way to further dissection and application of this rich genetic system. PMID:6190180

  4. Attenuated APC alleles produce functional protein from internal translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Heppner Goss, Kathleen; Trzepacz, Chris; Tuohy, Thérèse M. F.; Groden, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    Some truncating mutations of the APC tumor suppressor gene are associated with an attenuated phenotype of familial adenomatous polyposis coli (AAPC). This work demonstrates that APC alleles with 5′ mutations produce APC protein that down-regulates β-catenin, inhibits β-catenin/T cell factor-mediated transactivation, and induces cell-cycle arrest. Transfection studies demonstrate that cap-independent translation is initiated internally at an AUG at codon 184 of APC. Furthermore, APC coding sequence between AAPC mutations and AUG 184 permits internal ribosome entry in a bicistronic vector. These data suggest that AAPC alleles in vivo may produce functional APC by internal initiation and establish a functional correlation between 5′ APC mutations and their associated clinical phenotype. PMID:12034871

  5. High throughput automated allele frequency estimation by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Doostzadeh, Julie; Shokralla, Shadi; Absalan, Farnaz; Jalili, Roxana; Mohandessi, Sharareh; Langston, James W; Davis, Ronald W; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Gharizadeh, Baback

    2008-01-01

    Pyrosequencing is a DNA sequencing method based on the principle of sequencing-by-synthesis and pyrophosphate detection through a series of enzymatic reactions. This bioluminometric, real-time DNA sequencing technique offers unique applications that are cost-effective and user-friendly. In this study, we have combined a number of methods to develop an accurate, robust and cost efficient method to determine allele frequencies in large populations for association studies. The assay offers the advantage of minimal systemic sampling errors, uses a general biotin amplification approach, and replaces dTTP for dATP-apha-thio to avoid non-uniform higher peaks in order to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that this newly developed assay is a robust, cost-effective, accurate and reproducible approach for large-scale genotyping of DNA pools. We also discuss potential improvements of the software for more accurate allele frequency analysis. PMID:18628978

  6. High Throughput Automated Allele Frequency Estimation by Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Absalan, Farnaz; Jalili, Roxana; Mohandessi, Sharareh; Langston, James W.; Davis, Ronald W.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Gharizadeh, Baback

    2008-01-01

    Pyrosequencing is a DNA sequencing method based on the principle of sequencing-by-synthesis and pyrophosphate detection through a series of enzymatic reactions. This bioluminometric, real-time DNA sequencing technique offers unique applications that are cost-effective and user-friendly. In this study, we have combined a number of methods to develop an accurate, robust and cost efficient method to determine allele frequencies in large populations for association studies. The assay offers the advantage of minimal systemic sampling errors, uses a general biotin amplification approach, and replaces dTTP for dATP-apha-thio to avoid non-uniform higher peaks in order to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that this newly developed assay is a robust, cost-effective, accurate and reproducible approach for large-scale genotyping of DNA pools. We also discuss potential improvements of the software for more accurate allele frequency analysis. PMID:18628978

  7. Parallel Mapping of Antibiotic Resistance Alleles in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Pooneh; Knight, Rob; Gill, Ryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical genomics expands our understanding of microbial tolerance to inhibitory chemicals, but its scope is often limited by the throughput of genome-scale library construction and genotype-phenotype mapping. Here we report a method for rapid, parallel, and deep characterization of the response to antibiotics in Escherichia coli using a barcoded genome-scale library, next-generation sequencing, and streamlined bioinformatics software. The method provides quantitative growth data (over 200,000 measurements) and identifies contributing antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility alleles. Using multivariate analysis, we also find that subtle differences in the population responses resonate across multiple levels of functional hierarchy. Finally, we use machine learning to identify a unique allelic and proteomic fingerprint for each antibiotic. The method can be broadly applied to tolerance for any chemical from toxic metabolites to next-generation biofuels and antibiotics. PMID:26771672

  8. Early allelic selection in maize as revealed by ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Jaenicke-Després, Viviane; Buckler, Ed S; Smith, Bruce D; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Cooper, Alan; Doebley, John; Pääbo, Svante

    2003-11-14

    Maize was domesticated from teosinte, a wild grass, by approximately 6300 years ago in Mexico. After initial domestication, early farmers continued to select for advantageous morphological and biochemical traits in this important crop. However, the timing and sequence of character selection are, thus far, known only for morphological features discernible in corn cobs. We have analyzed three genes involved in the control of plant architecture, storage protein synthesis, and starch production from archaeological maize samples from Mexico and the southwestern United States. The results reveal that the alleles typical of contemporary maize were present in Mexican maize by 4400 years ago. However, as recently as 2000 years ago, allelic selection at one of the genes may not yet have been complete. PMID:14615538

  9. Clostridium difficile Genome Editing Using pyrE Alleles.

    PubMed

    Ehsaan, Muhammad; Kuehne, Sarah A; Minton, Nigel P

    2016-01-01

    Precise manipulation (in-frame deletions and substitutions) of the Clostridium difficile genome is possible through a two-stage process of single-crossover integration and subsequent isolation of double-crossover excision events using replication-defective plasmids that carry a counterselection marker. Use of a codA (cytosine deaminase) or pyrE (orotate phosphoribosyltransferase) as counter selection markers appears equally effective, but there is considerable merit in using a pyrE mutant as the host as, through the use of allele-coupled exchange (ACE) vectors, mutants created (by whatever means) can be rapidly complemented concomitant with restoration of the pyrE allele. This avoids the phenotypic effects frequently observed with high-copy-number plasmids and dispenses with the need to add antibiotic to ensure plasmid retention. PMID:27507332

  10. Geochemistry and Ar/Ar dating of upper pleistocene volcanic rocks from Kerguelen islands (Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ethien, R.; Feraud, G.; Gerbe, M. C.; Cottin, J. Y.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Giret, A.

    2003-04-01

    The Kerguelen islands archipelago (6500 Km^2) is the third largest oceanic island in the world, after Island and Hawaï. It is located upon the Kerguelen plateau, which is the second Large Igneous Province (LIP) after Ontong-Java. This oceanic plateau consist of an accumulation of flood basalts, related to the long-lived ˜119 Ma Kerguelen plume. The flood basalts (˜29-24 Ma; Nicolaysen et al., 2000) represent 85% of the rocks of Kerguelen. The Rallier-du-Baty (R.d.B.) peninsula, which forms the southwestern part of the Kerguelen archipelago, is mostly made of alkaline rocks constituting two well-defined ring-complexes. The northern ring-complex consists of a succession of seven discrete syenitic ring-dykes, one later caldera volcano and a more recent volcanic complex. The volcanism is bimodal with trachy-basalts and trachy-andesites, with true scarce basalts constituting the mafic lavas and trachytes and rhyolites constituting the felsic lavas. The felsic magmas were erupted as abundant pyroclastic deposits and lava flows. The mineralogy of those volcanic rocks is typical of an alcaline series, with the presence of K-feldspars (sanidines) in the most differentiated volcanic rocks. The evolution from trachyte to rhyolite seems to be controlled by crystal fractionation, with some trace element distribution and Sr isotopic ratios largely disturbed by open-system processes such as assimilation of hydrothermally altered crust and interaction with seawater. The studies of the oxygen isotopes confirm this hypothesis. Indeed, the high values of δ18O for the rhyolites (δ18O= 10.3 and 12.4) could be interpreted by an alteration by fluids at low temperatures. The Nd isotopic ratio are typical of mantellic values, with no significant variations. Whereas some units of the northern R.d.B. plutonic complex yield a narrow range of K/Ar ages on bulk rocks, from 6.2 ± 0.2 Ma to 4.9 ± 0.2 Ma (Dosso and al., 1979), the formation of a discrete caldera centered on the "Table de l

  11. Mammalian interspecies substitution of immune modulatory alleles by genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Lillico, Simon G.; Proudfoot, Chris; King, Tim J.; Tan, Wenfang; Zhang, Lei; Mardjuki, Rachel; Paschon, David E.; Rebar, Edward J.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Mileham, Alan J.; McLaren, David G.; Whitelaw, C. Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a fundamentally novel feat of animal genetic engineering: the precise and efficient substitution of an agronomic haplotype into a domesticated species. Zinc finger nuclease in-embryo editing of the RELA locus generated live born domestic pigs with the warthog RELA orthologue, associated with resilience to African Swine Fever. The ability to efficiently achieve interspecies allele introgression in one generation opens unprecedented opportunities for agriculture and basic research. PMID:26898342

  12. Natural Allelic Variations in Highly Polyploidy Saccharum Complex

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jian; Yang, Xiping; Resende, Marcio F. R.; Neves, Leandro G.; Todd, James; Zhang, Jisen; Comstock, Jack C.; Wang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is an important sugar and biofuel crop with high polyploid and complex genomes. The Saccharum complex, comprised of Saccharum genus and a few related genera, are important genetic resources for sugarcane breeding. A large amount of natural variation exists within the Saccharum complex. Though understanding their allelic variation has been challenging, it is critical to dissect allelic structure and to identify the alleles controlling important traits in sugarcane. To characterize natural variations in Saccharum complex, a target enrichment sequencing approach was used to assay 12 representative germplasm accessions. In total, 55,946 highly efficient probes were designed based on the sorghum genome and sugarcane unigene set targeting a total of 6 Mb of the sugarcane genome. A pipeline specifically tailored for polyploid sequence variants and genotype calling was established. BWA-mem and sorghum genome approved to be an acceptable aligner and reference for sugarcane target enrichment sequence analysis, respectively. Genetic variations including 1,166,066 non-redundant SNPs, 150,421 InDels, 919 gene copy number variations, and 1,257 gene presence/absence variations were detected. SNPs from three different callers (Samtools, Freebayes, and GATK) were compared and the validation rates were nearly 90%. Based on the SNP loci of each accession and their ploidy levels, 999,258 single dosage SNPs were identified and most loci were estimated as largely homozygotes. An average of 34,397 haplotype blocks for each accession was inferred. The highest divergence time among the Saccharum spp. was estimated as 1.2 million years ago (MYA). Saccharum spp. diverged from Erianthus and Sorghum approximately 5 and 6 MYA, respectively. The target enrichment sequencing approach provided an effective way to discover and catalog natural allelic variation in highly polyploid or heterozygous genomes. PMID:27375658

  13. Triploidy with cyclopia and identical HLA alleles in the parents.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, J C; Philip, P; Charpentier, G; Ferrari, M; Donzeau, M; Ayraud, N

    1984-01-01

    A 22-week pregnancy was terminated after discovery of serious echographic abnormalities. Fetal examination showed cyclopia, sacral meningocele, and syndactyly. The karyotype was 69,XXX. The parents had identical HLA alleles A1, A2, and Bw21. The mechanism of the triploidy was determined by chromosome marker analysis to be digyny. The association of triploidy with holoprosencephaly and the parents' identical immunological status are discussed. Images PMID:6607355

  14. Mammalian interspecies substitution of immune modulatory alleles by genome editing.

    PubMed

    Lillico, Simon G; Proudfoot, Chris; King, Tim J; Tan, Wenfang; Zhang, Lei; Mardjuki, Rachel; Paschon, David E; Rebar, Edward J; Urnov, Fyodor D; Mileham, Alan J; McLaren, David G; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    We describe a fundamentally novel feat of animal genetic engineering: the precise and efficient substitution of an agronomic haplotype into a domesticated species. Zinc finger nuclease in-embryo editing of the RELA locus generated live born domestic pigs with the warthog RELA orthologue, associated with resilience to African Swine Fever. The ability to efficiently achieve interspecies allele introgression in one generation opens unprecedented opportunities for agriculture and basic research. PMID:26898342

  15. Natural Allelic Variations in Highly Polyploidy Saccharum Complex.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Yang, Xiping; Resende, Marcio F R; Neves, Leandro G; Todd, James; Zhang, Jisen; Comstock, Jack C; Wang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is an important sugar and biofuel crop with high polyploid and complex genomes. The Saccharum complex, comprised of Saccharum genus and a few related genera, are important genetic resources for sugarcane breeding. A large amount of natural variation exists within the Saccharum complex. Though understanding their allelic variation has been challenging, it is critical to dissect allelic structure and to identify the alleles controlling important traits in sugarcane. To characterize natural variations in Saccharum complex, a target enrichment sequencing approach was used to assay 12 representative germplasm accessions. In total, 55,946 highly efficient probes were designed based on the sorghum genome and sugarcane unigene set targeting a total of 6 Mb of the sugarcane genome. A pipeline specifically tailored for polyploid sequence variants and genotype calling was established. BWA-mem and sorghum genome approved to be an acceptable aligner and reference for sugarcane target enrichment sequence analysis, respectively. Genetic variations including 1,166,066 non-redundant SNPs, 150,421 InDels, 919 gene copy number variations, and 1,257 gene presence/absence variations were detected. SNPs from three different callers (Samtools, Freebayes, and GATK) were compared and the validation rates were nearly 90%. Based on the SNP loci of each accession and their ploidy levels, 999,258 single dosage SNPs were identified and most loci were estimated as largely homozygotes. An average of 34,397 haplotype blocks for each accession was inferred. The highest divergence time among the Saccharum spp. was estimated as 1.2 million years ago (MYA). Saccharum spp. diverged from Erianthus and Sorghum approximately 5 and 6 MYA, respectively. The target enrichment sequencing approach provided an effective way to discover and catalog natural allelic variation in highly polyploid or heterozygous genomes. PMID:27375658

  16. Fast spatial ancestry via flexible allele frequency surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rañola, John Michael; Novembre, John; Lange, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Unique modeling and computational challenges arise in locating the geographic origin of individuals based on their genetic backgrounds. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) vary widely in informativeness, allele frequencies change non-linearly with geography and reliable localization requires evidence to be integrated across a multitude of SNPs. These problems become even more acute for individuals of mixed ancestry. It is hardly surprising that matching genetic models to computational constraints has limited the development of methods for estimating geographic origins. We attack these related problems by borrowing ideas from image processing and optimization theory. Our proposed model divides the region of interest into pixels and operates SNP by SNP. We estimate allele frequencies across the landscape by maximizing a product of binomial likelihoods penalized by nearest neighbor interactions. Penalization smooths allele frequency estimates and promotes estimation at pixels with no data. Maximization is accomplished by a minorize–maximize (MM) algorithm. Once allele frequency surfaces are available, one can apply Bayes’ rule to compute the posterior probability that each pixel is the pixel of origin of a given person. Placement of admixed individuals on the landscape is more complicated and requires estimation of the fractional contribution of each pixel to a person’s genome. This estimation problem also succumbs to a penalized MM algorithm. Results: We applied the model to the Population Reference Sample (POPRES) data. The model gives better localization for both unmixed and admixed individuals than existing methods despite using just a small fraction of the available SNPs. Computing times are comparable with the best competing software. Availability and implementation: Software will be freely available as the OriGen package in R. Contact: ranolaj@uw.edu or klange@ucla.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at

  17. Inferring Selection Intensity and Allele Age from Multilocus Haplotype Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    It is a challenging task to infer selection intensity and allele age from population genetic data. Here we present a method that can efficiently estimate selection intensity and allele age from the multilocus haplotype structure in the vicinity of a segregating mutant under positive selection. We use a structured-coalescent approach to model the effect of directional selection on the gene genealogies of neutral markers linked to the selected mutant. The frequency trajectory of the selected allele follows the Wright-Fisher model. Given the position of the selected mutant, we propose a simplified multilocus haplotype model that can efficiently model the dynamics of the ancestral haplotypes under the joint influence of selection and recombination. This model approximates the ancestral genealogies of the sample, which reduces the number of states from an exponential function of the number of single-nucleotide polymorphism loci to a quadratic function. That allows parameter inference from data covering DNA regions as large as several hundred kilo-bases. Importance sampling algorithms are adopted to evaluate the probability of a sample by exploring the space of both allele frequency trajectories of the selected mutation and gene genealogies of the linked sites. We demonstrate by simulation that the method can accurately estimate selection intensity for moderate and strong positive selection. We apply the method to a data set of the G6PD gene in an African population and obtain an estimate of 0.0456 (95% confidence interval 0.0144−0.0769) for the selection intensity. The proposed method is novel in jointly modeling the multilocus haplotype pattern caused by recombination and mutation, allowing the analysis of haplotype data in recombining regions. Moreover, the method is applicable to data from populations under exponential growth and a variety of other demographic histories. PMID:23797107

  18. Natural Allelic Variations in Highly Polyploidy Saccharum Complex

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Jian; Yang, Xiping; Resende, Marcio F. R.; Neves, Leandro G.; Todd, James; Zhang, Jisen; Comstock, Jack C.; Wang, Jianping

    2016-06-08

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is an important sugar and biofuel crop with high polyploid and complex genomes. The Saccharum complex, comprised of Saccharum genus and a few related genera, are important genetic resources for sugarcane breeding. A large amount of natural variation exists within the Saccharum complex. Though understanding their allelic variation has been challenging, it is critical to dissect allelic structure and to identify the alleles controlling important traits in sugarcane. To characterize natural variations in Saccharum complex, a target enrichment sequencing approach was used to assay 12 representative germplasm accessions. In total, 55,946 highly efficient probes were designed basedmore » on the sorghum genome and sugarcane unigene set targeting a total of 6 Mb of the sugarcane genome. A pipeline specifically tailored for polyploid sequence variants and genotype calling was established. BWAmem and sorghum genome approved to be an acceptable aligner and reference for sugarcane target enrichment sequence analysis, respectively. Genetic variations including 1,166,066 non -redundant SNPs, 150,421 InDels, 919 gene copy number variations, and 1,257 gene presence/absence variations were detected. SNPs from three different callers (Samtools, Freebayes, and GATK) were compared and the validation rates were nearly 90%. Based on the SNP loci of each accession and their ploidy levels, 999,258 single dosage SNPs were identified and most loci were estimated as largely homozygotes. An average of 34,397 haplotype blocks for each accession was inferred. The highest divergence time among the Saccharum spp. was estimated as 1.2 million years ago (MYA). Saccharum spp, diverged from Erianthus and Sorghum approximately 5 and 6 MYA, respectively. The target enrichment sequencing approach provided an effective way to discover and catalog natural allelic variation in highly polyploid or heterozygous genomes.« less

  19. Stark beats of Ar Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, Y.; Aoto, T.; Yoshii, H.

    2001-11-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence decay spectra of Ar atom resonance lines excited by pulsed vacuum ultraviolet light in a synchrotron single bunch operation were obtained under a static electric field. When an atom under the static electric field was excited simultaneously to both the magnetic sublevels M=0 and \\|M\\|=1 by polarized light and the observation area was asymmetric, Stark beats were observed in the fluorescent decay spectra. All observed beat frequencies varied proportionally to the square of the external electric field. The results for 8d and 9d doublet lines were compared with those obtained by the usual second order perturbation theory, assuming mixing ratios between three jl coupling scheme d-type states. The beat frequencies were also measured for other resonance lines.

  20. Tracing pastoralist migrations to southern Africa with lactase persistence alleles.

    PubMed

    Macholdt, Enrico; Lede, Vera; Barbieri, Chiara; Mpoloka, Sununguko W; Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-04-14

    Although southern African Khoisan populations are often assumed to have remained largely isolated during prehistory, there is growing evidence for a migration of pastoralists from eastern Africa some 2,000 years ago, prior to the arrival of Bantu-speaking populations in southern Africa. Eastern Africa harbors distinctive lactase persistence (LP) alleles, and therefore LP alleles in southern African populations may be derived from this eastern African pastoralist migration. We sequenced the lactase enhancer region in 457 individuals from 18 Khoisan and seven Bantu-speaking groups from Botswana, Namibia, and Zambia and additionally genotyped four short tandem repeat (STR) loci that flank the lactase enhancer region. We found nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms, of which the most frequent is -14010(∗)C, which was previously found to be associated with LP in Kenya and Tanzania and to exhibit a strong signal of positive selection. This allele occurs in significantly higher frequency in pastoralist groups and in Khoe-speaking groups in our study, supporting the hypothesis of a migration of eastern African pastoralists that was primarily associated with Khoe speakers. Moreover, we find a signal of ongoing positive selection in all three pastoralist groups in our study, as well as (surprisingly) in two foraging groups. PMID:24704073

  1. Pollution-tolerant allele in fingernail clams (Musculium transversum).

    PubMed

    Sloss, B L; Romano, M A; Anderson, R V

    1998-08-01

    For nearly 50 years, the fingernail clam (Musculium transversum) was believed to be virtually eliminated from the Illinois River. In 1991, workers began finding substantial populations of M. transversum in the Illinois River including several beds in and around the highly polluted Chicago Sanitary District. In order to determine if populations of M. transversum from polluted sites exhibited any genetic response to the high levels of toxins and to examine the genetic structure of several populations of M. transversum for any changes due to the population crash, starch-gel electrophoresis was performed on M. transversum from three Illinois River localities and four Mississippi River basin locations. The sampled populations produced an inbreeding coefficient (FIS) of 0.929, indicating that the populations were highly inbred. The results of a suspected founder effect due to a bottleneck was suggested by an FST = 0.442. The isozyme Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase-2 (Gpi-2) produced allelic frequency patterns that were consistent with expected patterns of a pollution-tolerant allele. Polluted sites exhibited elevated frequencies of Gpi-2(100) whereas nonpolluted sites exhibited elevated frequencies of Gpi-2(74). This frequency pattern suggested that natural selection was occurring in populations under severe toxic pressures, leading to an increase in the frequency of the allele Gpi-2(100). Therefore, Gpi-2(100) is a possible pollution-tolerant mutation in M. transversum. PMID:9680522

  2. Allele-specific tumor spectrum in pten knockin mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Karikomi, Matt; Naidu, Shan; Rajmohan, Ravi; Caserta, Enrico; Chen, Hui-Zi; Rawahneh, Maysoon; Moffitt, Julie; Stephens, Julie A; Fernandez, Soledad A; Weinstein, Michael; Wang, Danxin; Sadee, Wolfgang; La Perle, Krista; Stromberg, Paul; Rosol, Thomas J; Eng, Charis; Ostrowski, Michael C; Leone, Gustavo

    2010-03-16

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome 10) cause Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba (BRR) syndromes, two dominantly inherited disorders characterized by mental retardation, multiple hamartomas, and variable cancer risk. Here, we modeled three sentinel mutant alleles of PTEN identified in patients with Cowden syndrome and show that the nonsense Pten(4-5) and missense Pten(C124R) and Pten(G129E) alleles lacking lipid phosphatase activity cause similar developmental abnormalities but distinct tumor spectra with varying severity and age of onset. Allele-specific differences may be accounted for by loss of function for Pten(4-5), hypomorphic function for Pten(C124R), and gain of function for Pten(G129E). These data demonstrate that the variable tumor phenotypes observed in patients with Cowden and BRR syndromes can be attributed to specific mutations in PTEN that alter protein function through distinct mechanisms. PMID:20194734

  3. Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis and Polymorphisms of the ADRB2, AR, and GABRA3 Genes in Men with Graves Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Soyoung; Lim, Seonhee; Kim, Mijin; Kwon, Hyemi; Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2016-01-01

    Background Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is a rare complication of thyrotoxicosis characterized by acute attacks of muscle weakness and hypokalemia. Recently, variation in several genes was suggested to be associated with TPP. This study evaluated the genetic predisposition to TPP in terms of the β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2), androgen receptor (AR), and γ-aminobutyric acid receptor α3 subunit (GABRA3) genes. Methods This study enrolled 48 men with Graves disease (GD) and TPP, and 48 GD patients without TPP. We compared the frequencies of candidate polymorphisms between the two groups. Results The frequency of the Gly16/Gly16 genotype in ADRB2 was not significantly associated with TPP (P=0.32). More CAG repeats (≥26) in the AR gene were not correlated with TPP (odds ratio [OR], 2.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81 to 8.09; P=0.08). The allele frequency of the TT genotype in the GABRA3 gene was not associated with TPP (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 0.54 to 6.74; P=0.41). Conclusion The polymorphisms in the ADRB2, AR, and GABRA3 genes could not explain the genetic susceptibility to TPP in Korean men with GD. PMID:26676335

  4. Statistical estimation of mineral age by K-Ar method

    SciTech Connect

    Vistelius, A.B.; Drubetzkoy, E.R.; Faas, A.V. )

    1989-11-01

    Statistical estimation of age of {sup 40}Ar/{sup 40}K ratios may be considered a result of convolution of uniform and normal distributions with different weights for different minerals. Data from Gul'shad Massif (Nearbalkhash, Kazakhstan, USSR) indicate that {sup 40}Ar/{sup 40}K ratios reflecting the intensity of geochemical processes can be resolved using convolutions. Loss of {sup 40}Ar in biotites is shown whereas hornblende retained the original content of {sup 40}Ar throughout the geological history of the massif. Results demonstrate that different estimation methods must be used for different minerals and different rocks when radiometric ages are employed for dating.

  5. Age and Duration of Weathering by 40K-40Ar and 40Ar/39Ar Analysis of Potassium-Manganese Oxides.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, P M; Becker, T A; Renne, P R; Brimhall, G H

    1992-10-16

    Supergene cryptomelane [K(1-2)(Mn(3+)Mn(4+))(8)O(16). chiH(2)O] samples from deeply weathered pegmatites in southeastern Brazil subjected to (40)K-(40)Ar and (40)Ar/(39)Ar analysis yielded (40)K-(40)Ar dates ranging from 10.1 +/- 0.5 to 5.6 +/- 0.2 Ma (million years ago). Laser-probe (40)Ar/(39)Ar step-heating of the two most disparate samples yielded plateau dates of 9.94 +/- 0.05 and 5.59 +/- 0.10 Ma, corresponding, within 2 sigma, to the (40)K-(40)Ar dates. The results imply that deep weathering profiles along the eastern Brazilian margin do not reflect present climatic conditions but are the result of a long-term process that was already advanced by the late Miocene. Weathering ages predate pulses of continental sedimentation along the eastern Brazilian margin and suggest that there was a time lag between weathering and erosion processes and sedimentation processes. PMID:17833140

  6. 40Ar/39Ar ages from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California: age of the Cobb Mountain normal-polarity subchron revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, B.D.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Hearn, B.C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California, indicate a 1.186 ?? 0.006 Ma age for the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron. The hew age is statistically older (?? = 0.05) than the previously reported K-Ar age (1.12 ?? 0.02 Ma) and agrees with the age suggested by the astronomical polarity time scale. Incomplete extraction of radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) from the sanidine is the most likely reason for the disparity between the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages. Because the Cobb Mountain subchron is a worldwide, short-duration event, and because no widely used interlaboratory 40Ar/39Ar standard younger than 27 Ma exists, it is proposed that sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek be considered for use as a new Quaternary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standard. -Authors

  7. Ar-39 - Ar-40 Evidence for an Approximately 4.26 Ga Impact Heating Event on the LL Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, E. T.; Bogard, D. D.; Rubin, A. E.

    2003-01-01

    Miller Range 99301 is a type 6, unbrecciated LL chondrite. MIL 99301 is of interest because some compositional and petrographic features suggest it experienced rather high shock grades, whereas other features suggest it is relatively unshocked. Inconsistent shock indicators could be explained if MIL 99301 was shocked but then partly annealed by heat produced by impacts on the parent body. The hypothesis that MIL 99301 experienced high temperature metamorphism (type 6) followed by a later shock event that heated, but did not melt, the constituent feldspar can be evaluated using (39)Ar-(40)Ar chronology. This is because (39)Ar-(40)Ar ages of shocked ordinary chondrites are generally <4.2 Ga, whereas (39)Ar-(40)Ar ages of unshocked meteorites are generally older, and between 4.52 - 4.38 Ga.

  8. Specific modification of polysulfone with cluster bombardment with assistance of Ar ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guochun; Hibino, Y.; Awazu, K.; Tanihara, M.; Imanishi, Y.

    2000-02-01

    Objective: To develop a rapid method for the modification of polysulfone with ammonium sulfamate with the assistance of Ar ion irradiation with a multi-source cluster deposition apparatus. These surfaces mimicking the structure of heparin, a bioactive molecule, have a high anti-thrombosis property. Experimental Design: Polysulfone film, setting on a turning holder, was irradiated by Ar ions during bombardment with ammonium sulfamate clusters. The Ar ion source serves for the activation of a polymer surface and a cluster ion source supplies ammonium sulfamate molecules to react with the activated surface. After thorough washing with de-ionized sterile water, the modified surfaces were evaluated in terms of the contact angle of water, elemental composition, and binding state on electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and platelet adhesion with platelet rich plasma. Results: The modification of polysulfone decreased the contact angle of water on surfaces from 82.6 ° down to 34.5 °. Ammonium, amine, sulfate, and thiophene combinations were formed on the modified surfaces. The adhesion numbers of the platelet were decreased to one tenth compared to the original surface. The same process was also applied to other polymers such as polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene and similar outcomes were also observed. Conclusion: The primary studies showed successful modification of polysulfone with ammonium sulfamate with the assistance of Ar ion irradiation. Since the same concept can also be applied to other materials with various substrates, combined with the features of no solvent and no topographic changes, this method might be developed into a promising way for modification of polymeric materials.

  9. Perceptual presence without counterfactual richness.

    PubMed

    Madary, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, I suggest that non-visual perceptual modalities provide counterexamples to Seth's claim that perceptual presence depends on counterfactual richness. Then I suggest a modification to Seth's view that is not vulnerable to these counterexamples. PMID:24739124

  10. Conditional Allele Mouse Planner (CAMP): software to facilitate the planning and design of breeding strategies involving mice with conditional alleles.

    PubMed

    Hoffert, Jason D; Pisitkun, Trairak; Miller, R Lance

    2012-06-01

    Transgenic and conditional knockout mouse models play an important role in biomedical research and their use has grown exponentially in the last 5-10 years. Generating conditional knockouts often requires breeding multiple alleles onto the background of a single mouse or group of mice. Breeding these mice depends on parental genotype, litter size, transmission frequency, and the number of breeding rounds. Therefore, a well planned breeding strategy is critical for keeping costs to a minimum. However, designing a viable breeding strategy can be challenging. With so many different variables this would be an ideal task for a computer program. To facilitate this process, we created a Java-based program called Conditional Allele Mouse Planner (CAMP). CAMP is designed to provide an estimate of the number of breeders, amount of time, and costs associated with generating mice of a particular genotype. We provide a description of CAMP, how to use it, and offer it freely as an application. PMID:21870117

  11. Differential unroofing within the central metasedimentary Belt of the Grenville Orogen: constraints from 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosca, M.A.; Essene, E.J.; Kunk, M.J.; Sutter, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    An 40Ar/39Ar thermochronological investigation of upper greenschist to granulite facies gneiss, amphibolite and marble was conducted in the Central Metasedimentary Belt (CMB), Ontario, to constrain its cooling history. Incremental 40Ar/39Ar release spectra indicate that substantial differential unroofing occurred in the CMB between ??? 1000 and ??? 600 Ma. A consistent pattern of significantly older hornblende and phlogopite 40Ar/3Ar cooling ages on the southeast sides of major northeast striking shear zones is interpreted to reflect late displacement due to extensional deformation. Variations in hornblende 40Ar/39Ar age plateaus exceeding 200 Ma occur over distances less than 50 km with major age discontinuities occurring across the Robertson Lake shear zone and the Sharbot Lake mylonite zone which separate the Sharbot Lake terrane from the Elzevir and Frontenac terranes. Extensional displacements of up to 14 km are inferred between the Frontenac and Elzevir terranes of the CMB. No evidence for significant post argon-closure vertical displacement is indicated in the vicinity of the Perth Road mylonite within the Frontenac terrane. Variations of nearly 100 Ma in phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages occur in undeformed marble on either side of the Bancroft Shear Zone. Phlogopites from sheared and mylonitized marble within the shear zone yield 40Ar/39Ar diffusional loss profiles, but have older geologically meaningless ages thought to reflect incorporation of excess argon. By ??? 900 Ma, southeast directed extension was occurring throughout the CMB, possibly initiated along previous zones of compressional shearing. An easterly migration of active zones of extension is inferred, possibly related to an earlier, overall easterly migration of active zones of regional thrusting and easterly migration of an ancient subduction zone. The duration of extensional shearing is not well constrained, but must have ceased before ??? 600 Ma as required by the deposition of overlying

  12. In-situ Ar isotope, 40Ar/39Ar analysis and mineral chemistry of nosean in the phonolite from Olbrück volcano, East Eifel volcanic field, Germany: Implication for the source of excess 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, Masafumi; Altenberger, Uwe; Günter, Christina

    2014-05-01

    Since the report by Lippolt et al. (1990), hauyne and nosean phenocrysts in certain phonolites from the northwest in the Quaternary East Eifel volcanic field in Germany were known to contain significant amounts of excess 40Ar, thus, show apparent older ages than the other minerals. However, its petrographic meaning have not been well known. Meanwhile, Sumino et al. (2008) has identified the source of the excess 40Ar in the plagioclase phenocrysts from the historic Unzen dacite lava as the melt inclusions in the zones parallely developed to the plagioclase rim by in-situ laser Ar isotope analysis. In order to obtain eruption ages of very young volcanoes as like Quaternary Eifel volcanic field by the K-Ar system, it is quite essential to know about the location of excess 40Ar in volcanic rocks. We have collected phonolites from the Olbrück volcano in East Eifel and investigated its petrography and mineral chemistry and also performed in-situ Ar isotope analyses of unirradiated rock section sample and also in-situ 40Ar/39Ar analysis of neutron irradiated section sample with the UV pulse laser (wavelength 266 nm) and 40Ar/39Ar analytical system of the University of Potsdam. Petrographically, nosean contained fine melt and/or gas inclusions of less than 5 micrometer, which mostly distribute linearly and are relatively enriched in chlorine than the areas without inclusions. Solid inclusions of similar sizes contain CaO and fluorine. In nosean, typically around 5 wt% of sulfur is contained. The 40Ar/39Ar dating was also performed to leucite, sanidine and groundmass in the same section for comparison of those ages with that of nosean. In each analysis, 200 micrometer of beam size was used for making a pit with depth of up to 300 micrometer by laser ablation. As our 40Ar/39Ar analyses were conducted one and half year after the neutron irradiation, thus, short lived 37Ar derived from Ca had decayed very much, we measured Ca and K contents in nosean by SEM-EDS then applied

  13. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS): ARS300 operations manual, software version 2.01

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-25

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a nondestructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The ARS technique is a fast, safe, and nonintrusive technique that is particularly useful when a large number of objects need to be tested. Any physical object, whether solid, hollow, or fluid filled, has many modes of vibration. These modes of vibration, commonly referred to as the natural resonant modes or resonant frequencies, are determined by the object`s shape, size, and physical properties, such as elastic moduli, speed of sound, and density. If the object is mechanically excited at frequencies corresponding to its characteristic natural vibrational modes, a resonance effect can be observed when small excitation energies produce large amplitude vibrations in the object. At other excitation frequencies, i.e., vibrational response of the object is minimal.

  14. 40Ar/39Ar age of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, B.D.; Champion, D.; Fleck, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar analyses from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, indicate that two eruptive events have occurred there. The ages (136 ?? 8 and 141 ?? 9 thousand years ago) for these two events are analytically indistinguishable. The small angular difference (4.7??) between the paleomagnetic directions from these two events suggests they differ in age by only about 100 years. These ages are consistent with the chronology of the surficial geological units in the Yucca Mountain area. These results contradict earlier interpretations of the cinder-cone geomorphology and soil-profile data that suggest that at least five temporally discrete eruptive events occurred at Lathrop Wells approximately 20,000 years ago.

  15. 40Ar/39Ar Age of the Lathrop Wells Volcanic Center, Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Turrin, B D; Champion, D; Fleck, R J

    1991-08-01

    Paleomagnetic and (40)Ar/(39)Ar analyses from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, indicate that two eruptive events have occurred there. The ages (136 +/- 8 and 141 +/- 9 thousand years ago) for these two events are analytically indistinguishable. The small angular difference (4.7 degrees ) between the paleomagnetic directions from these two events suggests they differ in age by only about 100 years. These ages are consistent with the chronology of the surficial geological units in the Yucca Mountain area. These results contradict earlier interpretations of the cinder-cone geomorphology and soil-profile data that suggest that at least five temporally discrete eruptive events occurred at Lathrop Wells approximately 20,000 years ago. PMID:17772371

  16. Ar-39 - Ar-40 Dating of Two Angrites and Two Brachnites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Daniel; Bogard, Donald

    2003-01-01

    Angrites are a rare group (approx.7 known) of igneous meteorites with basalt-like composition, which probably derive from a relatively small parent body that differs from those of other igneous meteorites. Angrites show evidence for extinct Mn-53, Sm-146, and Pu-244, and precise U-Pb, and Pb-Pb ages of 4.558 Gyr for two angrites define the time of early parent body differentiation. The S-147 - Nd-143 ages of two angrites range between 4.53+/-0.04 and 4.56+/-0.04 Gyr, but no Ar-39 - Ar-40 or Rb-Sr ages have been reported. Most angrites show no evidence for either shock brecciation or metamorphism.

  17. The miR9863 Family Regulates Distinct Mla Alleles in Barley to Attenuate NLR Receptor-Triggered Disease Resistance and Cell-Death Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Cheng, Xiliu; Liu, Da; Xu, Weihui; Wise, Roger; Shen, Qian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Mla alleles encode coiled-coil (CC), nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors that trigger isolate-specific immune responses against the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). How Mla or NB-LRR genes in grass species are regulated at post-transcriptional level is not clear. The microRNA family, miR9863, comprises four members that differentially regulate distinct Mla alleles in barley. We show that miR9863 members guide the cleavage of Mla1 transcripts in barley, and block or reduce the accumulation of MLA1 protein in the heterologous Nicotiana benthamiana expression system. Regulation specificity is determined by variation in a unique single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) in mature miR9863 family members and two SNPs in the Mla miR9863-binding site that separates these alleles into three groups. Further, we demonstrate that 22-nt miR9863s trigger the biogenesis of 21-nt phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs) and together these sRNAs form a feed-forward regulation network for repressing the expression of group I Mla alleles. Overexpression of miR9863 members specifically attenuates MLA1, but not MLA10-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling. We propose a key role of the miR9863 family in dampening immune response signaling triggered by a group of MLA immune receptors in barley. PMID:25502438

  18. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and paleomagnetism of Independence volcano, Absaroka volcanic supergroup, Beartooth mountains, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, S.S.; Snee, L.W.; Geissman, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    Independence volcano is a major volcanic complex in the lower part of the Absaroka Volcanic Supergroup (AVS) of Montana and Wyoming. Recently reported Rb-Sr mineral dates from the complex give apparent ages of 91 and 84 Ma, whereas field relationships and the physical and compositional similarity of the rocks with other dated parts of the AVS indicate an Early to Middle Eocene age for eruption and deposition. To resolve the conflict between age assignments based on stratigraphic correlations and Rb-Sr dates, we report new paleomagnetic data and 40Ar/39Ar dates for Independence volcano. Paleomagnetic data for the stock and an and andesite plug that cuts the stock are well grouped, of reverse polarity, and yield a virtual geomagnetic pole that is essentially identical to Late Cretaceous and Tertiary reference poles. The reverse polarity indicates that the magnetization of these rocks is probably younger than the Cretaceous normal superchron, or less than about 83.5 Ma. Hornblende from a volcanic breccia near the base of the volcanic pile gives a 40Ar/39Ar age of 51.57 Ma, whereas biotites from a dacite sill and a granodiorite stock that forms the core of the volcano give dates that range from 49.96 to 48.50 Ma. These dates record the age of eruption and intrusion of these rocks and clearly show that the age of Independence volcano is Early to Middle Eocene, consistent with stratigraphic relations. We suggest that the Rb-Sr mineral dates from the Independence stock and related intrusions are unreliable.

  19. Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of impact melts.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Cameron M; Young, Kelsey E; Weirich, John R; Hodges, Kip V; Jolliff, Bradley L; Wartho, Jo-Anne; van Soest, Matthijs C

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative constraints on the ages of melt-forming impact events on the Moon are based primarily on isotope geochronology of returned samples. However, interpreting the results of such studies can often be difficult because the provenance region of any sample returned from the lunar surface may have experienced multiple impact events over the course of billions of years of bombardment. We illustrate this problem with new laser microprobe (40)Ar/(39)Ar data for two Apollo 17 impact melt breccias. Whereas one sample yields a straightforward result, indicating a single melt-forming event at ca. 3.83 Ga, data from the other sample document multiple impact melt-forming events between ca. 3.81 Ga and at least as young as ca. 3.27 Ga. Notably, published zircon U/Pb data indicate the existence of even older melt products in the same sample. The revelation of multiple impact events through (40)Ar/(39)Ar geochronology is likely not to have been possible using standard incremental heating methods alone, demonstrating the complementarity of the laser microprobe technique. Evidence for 3.83 Ga to 3.81 Ga melt components in these samples reinforces emerging interpretations that Apollo 17 impact breccia samples include a significant component of ejecta from the Imbrium basin impact. Collectively, our results underscore the need to quantitatively resolve the ages of different melt generations from multiple samples to improve our current understanding of the lunar impact record, and to establish the absolute ages of important impact structures encountered during future exploration missions in the inner Solar System. PMID:26601128

  20. The Berkeley Instrumental Neutron Generator (BINGE) for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Becker, T. A.; Bernstein, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Kirsch, L.; Leung, K. N.; Rogers, A.; Van Bibber, K.; Waltz, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Berkeley Instrumental Neutron Generator (BINGE) facility is the product of a consortium involving the Berkeley Geochronology Center (BGC), the U.C. Berkeley Nuclear Engineering Dept. (UCB/NE), and Lawrence Berkeley (LBNL) and Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) National Labs. BINGE was initially designed (and funded by NSF) for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. BINGE uses a plasma-based deuteron ion source and a self-loading Ti-surfaced target to induce deuteron-deuterium (DD) fusion via the reaction 2H(d,n)3He, producing 2.45 MeV neutrons. The limited neutron energy spectrum is aimed at reducing recoil effects, interfering nuclear reactions, and unwanted radioactive byproducts, all of which are undesirable consequences of conventional irradiation with 235U fission spectrum neutrons. Minimization of interfering reactions such as 40Ca(n,na)36Ar greatly reduces penalties for over-irradiation, enabling improved signal/background measurement of e.g. 39Ar. BINGE will also be used for a variety of nuclear physics and engineering experiments that require a high flux of monoenergetic neutrons. Neutron energies lower than 2.45 MeV can be obtained via irradiation ports within and external to polyethylene shielding. Initial commissioning produced a neutron flux of 108 n/sec/cm2 at 1 mA source current and 100 kV anode voltage, as expected. When scaled up to the 1 A source current as planned, this indicates that BINGE will achieve the design objective neutron flux of 1011 n/sec/cm2. Further progress towards this goal will be reported. Supported by NSF (grant #EAR-0960138), BGC, UCB/NE, University of California Office of the President, and DOE through LLNL under contract #DE-AC52-07NA27344 and LBNL under contract #DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  1. Ar-40/Ar-39 Age of Hornblende-bearing R Chondrite LAP 04840

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M.

    2014-01-01

    Chondrites have a complex chronology due to several variables affecting and operating on chondritic parent bodies such as radiogenic heating, pressure and temperature variation with depth, aqueous alteration, and shock or impact heating [1]. Unbrecciated chondrites can record ages from 4.56 to 4.4 Ga that represent cooling in small parent bodies. Some brecciated chondrites exhibit younger ages (<<4 to 4.4 Ga) that may reflect the age of brecciation, disturbance, or shock and impact events (<< 4 Ga). A unique R chondrite was recently found in the LaPaz Icefield of Antarctica - LAP 04840 [2]. This chondrite contains approx.15% hornblende and trace amounts of biotite, making it the first of its kind. Studies have revealed an equigranular texture, mineral equilibria yielding equilibration near 650-700 C and 250-500 bars, hornblende that is dominantly OH-bearing (very little Cl or F), and high D/H ratios [8,9,10]. To help gain a better understanding of the origin of this unique sample, we have measured the Ar-40/Ar-39 age. Age of 4.290 +/- 0.030 Ga is younger than one would expect for a sample that has cooled within a small body [4], and one might instead attribute the age to a younger shock event, On the other hand, there is no evidence for extensive shock in this meteorite (shock stage S2; [3]), so this sample may have been reannealed after the shock event. This age is similar to Ar-Ar ages determined for some other R chondrites

  2. Union of /sup 40/Ar//sup 38/Ar with paleomagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    York, D.

    1985-01-01

    To interpret the paleomagnetic record written in Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks, it is essential to know the post-crystallization thermal histories of these bodies. The best method (i.e., if only one decay scheme is used) to determine the latter is to apply the /sup 40/Ar//sup 38/Ar step-heating technique to the minerals derived from the rocks containing the magnetic record. Thus the argon blocking temperatures of amphiboles, micas and feldspars span the range of magnetic blocking temperatures usually found. Illustrations will be given of how such a combined thermochronometric-paleomagnetic approach has been used to begin the unravelling of some of the Precambrian plate motions of North America, South America and Africa. Two illustrations will also be given of how this combined isotopic-magnetic approach has revealed the hitherto unsuspected existence of mild thermal events in certain regions of the Grenville and Superior Provinces. Finally, it will be shown that old ages and/or very low potassium contents (/approx/80 p.p.m.) are not insuperable barriers to the successful determination of thermal histories with the /sup 40/Ar//sup 38/Ar age spectrum approach. Examples of this will be taken from Barberton Mountain komatiites (3.5 b.y.), a Superior Province ultra-mafic intrusive (2.7 b.y.) and Sudbury silicates (1.85 b.y.). The results presented in this paper represent the work of numerous people, based at the University of Toronto, Queen's University, Kingston (Ontario), and Princeton University (N.J.).

  3. CHEMILUMINESCENT CHEMI-IONIZATION: Ar* + Ca AND THE CaAr+ EMISSION SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Dennis C.; Winn, John S.

    1980-09-01

    A flowing afterglow chemiluminescence apparatus has been used to analyze visible fluorescence in the Ar* ({sup 3}P{sub 2}{sup o}) + Ca ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) reaction. The rate constants for production of Ca{sup +} ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}{sup o}) and Ca{sup +} ({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{sup o}) were measured to be 1.6 x 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3}-molecule{sup -1} sec{sup -1} and 3.2 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} sec{sup -1}, respectively. These results demonstrate a transfer of the total electronic angular momentum polarization in Ar* tothe excited ion levels. The molecular band spectrum of the associative ionization product CaAr{sup +} (A{sup 2}{Pi}) was observed. Molecular fluorescence constituted 14% of the total fluorescence from all ion products. This spectrum was analyzed with a model (exp-Z4) potential, yielding, for the ground state, {Chi}{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}, R{sub e} = 2.8 {angstrom}, {omega}''{sub e} = 87 cm{sup -1}, and D''{sub e} = 1000 cm{sup -1}, and, for the A{sup 2}{Pi} state, R{sub e} = 2.6 {angstrom}, {omega}'{sub e} = 200 cm{sup -1}, and D'{sub e} = 4900 cm{sup -1}. The nascent internal state distribution in CaAr{sup +} is found to consist of a fairly narrow range of high vibrational levels. The analysis of spectra from chemiluminescent reaction is a well established technique for elucidating the product state distributions of elementary processes. In this paper, they use the analysis of the chemiluminescent chemi-ionization reactions between metastable argon atoms and calcium atoms to expose the dynamics of associative ionization (AI) and to measure the branching ratios for chemi-ionization into more than one product channel.

  4. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology of mesoproterozoic metamorphism in the Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, C.A.; Snee, L.W.; Selverstone, J.; Reed, J.C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A low-pressure metamorphic episode in the Colorado Front Range has been identified by the presence of staurolite, andalusite, cordierite, and garnet porphyroblasts overprinting earlier assemblages. The overprinting assemblages and reaction textures are most consistent with porphyroblast growth on a prograde metamorphic path with peak temperatures exceeding ~525??C. Twenty-eight 40Ar/39Ar dates on hornblende, muscovite, biotite, and microcline were used to infer the age and thermal conditions of metamorphism. Muscovite and biotite 40Ar/39Ar ages fall mainly in the interval 1400-1340 Ma, consistent with cooling through the closure temperature interval of micas (~400??-300??C) after about 1400 Ma. In contrast, hornblende apparent ages (T(c)~500??-550??C) between 1600 and 1390 Ma reflect variable retention of radiogenic argon. Forward modeling of argon diffusion shows that the distribution of hornblende and mica ages is consistent with the partial resetting of argon systematics ca. 1400 Ma by a thermal pulse reaching maximum temperatures around 550??C and decaying within <20 m.yr. These temperatures match the conditions inferred from the overprinting assemblage; thus, muscovite and biotite ages are interpreted to date the cooling phase of this metamorphic event. This late metamorphism is broadly coeval with the intrusion of ca. 1400-Ma granitic plutons in the study area and throughout the southwestern United States. However, thermal effects are observed far from pluton margins, suggesting pervasive, regional crustal heating rather than restricted contact metamorphism. Our results suggest that ca. 1400-Ma metamorphism and plutonism are manifestations of a regional thermal episode that both partially melted the lower crust and pervasively metamorphosed middle crustal rocks.

  5. Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution 40Ar/39Ar dating of impact melts

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Cameron M.; Young, Kelsey E.; Weirich, John R.; Hodges, Kip V.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Wartho, Jo-Anne; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative constraints on the ages of melt-forming impact events on the Moon are based primarily on isotope geochronology of returned samples. However, interpreting the results of such studies can often be difficult because the provenance region of any sample returned from the lunar surface may have experienced multiple impact events over the course of billions of years of bombardment. We illustrate this problem with new laser microprobe 40Ar/39Ar data for two Apollo 17 impact melt breccias. Whereas one sample yields a straightforward result, indicating a single melt-forming event at ca. 3.83 Ga, data from the other sample document multiple impact melt–forming events between ca. 3.81 Ga and at least as young as ca. 3.27 Ga. Notably, published zircon U/Pb data indicate the existence of even older melt products in the same sample. The revelation of multiple impact events through 40Ar/39Ar geochronology is likely not to have been possible using standard incremental heating methods alone, demonstrating the complementarity of the laser microprobe technique. Evidence for 3.83 Ga to 3.81 Ga melt components in these samples reinforces emerging interpretations that Apollo 17 impact breccia samples include a significant component of ejecta from the Imbrium basin impact. Collectively, our results underscore the need to quantitatively resolve the ages of different melt generations from multiple samples to improve our current understanding of the lunar impact record, and to establish the absolute ages of important impact structures encountered during future exploration missions in the inner Solar System. PMID:26601128

  6. Increasing long-term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  7. An Improved Cluster Richness Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy; Hao, Jiangang; Evrard, August; Wechsler, Risa H.; Hansen, Sarah; Sheldon, Erin; Johnston, David; Becker, Matthew R.; Annis, James T.; Bleem, Lindsey; Scranton, Ryan; /Pittsburgh U.

    2009-08-03

    Minimizing the scatter between cluster mass and accessible observables is an important goal for cluster cosmology. In this work, we introduce a new matched filter richness estimator, and test its performance using the maxBCG cluster catalog. Our new estimator significantly reduces the variance in the L{sub X}-richness relation, from {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.86 {+-} 0.02){sup 2} to {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.69 {+-} 0.02){sup 2}. Relative to the maxBCG richness estimate, it also removes the strong redshift dependence of the richness scaling relations, and is significantly more robust to photometric and redshift errors. These improvements are largely due to our more sophisticated treatment of galaxy color data. We also demonstrate the scatter in the L{sub X}-richness relation depends on the aperture used to estimate cluster richness, and introduce a novel approach for optimizing said aperture which can be easily generalized to other mass tracers.

  8. Results of 40Ar/39Ar dating of phlogopites from kelyphitic rims around garnet grains (Udachnaya-Vostochnaya kimberlite pipe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, D. S.; Tomilenko, A. A.; Alifirova, T. A.; Travin, A. V.; Murzintsev, N. G.; Pokhilenko, N. P.

    2016-07-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating of phlogopite from kelyphitic rims around garnet grains from the Udachnaya-Vostochnaya kimberlite pipe in the Sakha (Yakutia) Republic (Russia) revealed that when this mineral has contact with a kimberlite melt its age corresponds (within error limits) to that of the formation of the kimberlite pipe, thus indicating that the method may be used for dating kimberlites and related rocks. In mantle xenoliths, kelyphitic phlogopites rimming garnet grains partially lose radiogenic Ar, which results in a complex age spectrum. Rejuvenation of the K/Ar system in them is determined by the thermal impact of the kimberlite melt on captured rocks.

  9. High-resolution 40Ar 39Ar chronology of Oligocene volcanic rocks, San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The central San Juan caldera complex consists of seven calderas from which eight major ash-flow tuffs were erupted during a period of intense volcanic activity that lasted for approximately 2 m.y. about 26-28 Ma. The analytical precision of conventional K-Ar dating in this time interval is not sufficient to unambiguously resolve this complex history. However, 40Ar 39Ar incremental-heating experiments provide data for a high-resolution chronology that is consistent with stratigraphie relations. Weighted-mean age-spectrum plateau ages of biotite and sanidine are the most precise with standard deviations ranging from 0.08 to 0.21 m.y. The pooled estimate of standard deviation for the plateau ages of 12 minerals is about 0.5 percent or about 125,000 to 135,000 years. Age measurements on coexisting minerals from one tuff and on two samples of each of two other tuffs indicate that a precision in the age of a tuff of better than 100,000 years can be achieved at 27 Ma. New data indicate that the San Luis caldera is the youngest caldera in the central complex, not the Creede caldera as previously thought. ?? 1988.

  10. Age of Popigai impact event using the Ar-40 - Ar-39 method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottomley, R. J.; Grieve, R. A. F.

    1993-03-01

    The Popigai impact structure of central Siberia is the largest known impact crater in the Commonwealth of Independent States with an original diameter of some 100 km. The age of the crater is constrained by the existing stratigraphy to a period between 5-65 Ma. Attempts to date the impact event using conventional K-Ar on whole rock samples and fission track dating on glasses yield a spread of ages between 30 and 45 Ma. Argon step-heating analyses of several whole-rock samples performed with the Argon Laserprobe at the University of Toronto indicated an age of impact of about 36 Ma. However, a more recently reported Ar-40 - Ar-49 result on glass separated from a suevite sample gave a 65 Ma age and raised the possibility that Popigai was involved with the K/T boundary event. We have pursued further analyses at the University of Toronto on a broader spectrum of Popigai samples. These results confirm an age of about 36 Ma for the formation of this crater, and indicate that Popigai was not associated with the K/T boundary event.

  11. Age of Popigai impact event using the Ar-40 - Ar-39 method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottomley, R. J.; Grieve, R. A. F.

    1993-01-01

    The Popigai impact structure of central Siberia is the largest known impact crater in the Commonwealth of Independent States with an original diameter of some 1OO km. The age of the crater is constrained by the existing stratigraphy to a period between 5-65 Ma. Attempts to date the impact event using conventional K-Ar on whole rock samples and fission track dating on glasses yield a spread of ages between 30 and 45 Ma. Argon step-heating analyses of several whole-rock samples performed with the Argon Laserprobe at the University of Toronto indicated an age of impact of about 36 Ma. However, a more recently reported Ar-40 - Ar-49 result on glass separated from a suevite sample gave a 65 Ma age and raised the possibility that Popigai was involved with the K/T boundary event. We have pursued further analyses at the University of Toronto on a broader spectrum of Popigai samples. These results confirm an age of about 36 Ma for the formation of this crater, and indicate that Popigai was not associated with the K/T boundary event.

  12. Allele Name Translation Tool and Update NomenCLature: software tools for the automated translation of HLA allele names between successive nomenclatures.

    PubMed

    Mack, S J; Hollenbach, J A

    2010-05-01

    In this brief communication, we describe the Allele Name Translation Tool (antt) and Update NomenCLature (uncl), free programs developed to facilitate the translation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele names recorded using the December 2002 version of the HLA allele nomenclature (e.g. A*01010101) to those recorded using the colon-delimited version of the HLA allele nomenclature (e.g. A*01:01:01:01) that was adopted in April 2010. In addition, the antt and uncl translate specific HLA allele-name changes (e.g. DPB1*0502 is translated to DPB1*104:01), as well as changes to the locus prefix for HLA-C (i.e. Cw* is translated to C*). The antt and uncl will also translate allele names that have been truncated to two, four, or six digits, as well as ambiguous allele strings. The antt is a locally installed and run application, while uncl is a web-based tool that requires only an Internet connection and a modern browser. The antt accepts a variety of HLA data-presentation and allele-name formats. In addition, the antt can translate using user-defined conversion settings (e.g. the names of alleles that encode identical peptide binding domains can be translated to a common 'P-code'), and can serve as a preliminary data-sanity tool. The antt is available for download, and uncl for use, at www.igdawg.org/software. PMID:20412076

  13. Timing and duration of supergene mineralization at the Xinrong manganese deposit, western Guangdong Province, South China: cryptomelane 40Ar/39Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Wei; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Xiao-Dong; Duzgoren-Aydin, Nurdan; Yan, Dai-Rong; Zhang, Jian-Qiang; Hu, Ming-An

    2007-04-01

    Supergene Mn-oxide deposits are widely distributed in Guangxi, Guangdong, Yunnan, and Hunan Provinces, South China, accounting for 18% of the total Mn reserves in the country. Direct dating of supergene Mn enrichment, however, is lacking. In this paper, we present high-resolution 40Ar/39Ar ages of Mn oxides from the Xinrong Mn deposit, western Guangdong, to place numerical constraints on the timing and duration of supergene Mn enrichment. A total of ten cryptomelane samples, spanning a vertical extent of 67 m, were dated using the 40Ar/39Ar laser incremental heating technique, with seven samples yielding well-defined plateau or pseudo-plateau ages ranging from 23.48 ± 0.91 to 2.06 ± 0.05 Ma (2 σ). One sample yields a staircase spectrum that does not reach a plateau; the spectrum, however, indicates the presence of two or more generations of Mn oxides in the sample, whose ages are best estimated at 22.34 ± 0.31 and 10.2 ± 0.86 Ma, respectively. The remaining two samples gave meaningless or uninterpretable results due to significant 39Ar recoil and contamination by old phases. The 40Ar/39Ar data thus reveal a protracted history of weathering and supergene Mn enrichment that started at least in the end of the Oligocene or beginning of Miocene and extending into the latest Pliocene. Staircase-apparent age spectra, resulting from banded or botryoidal samples, yield an average growth rate of Mn oxides at 0.6-0.7 × 10-3 mm kyr-1. The values indicate that a 1-mm grain of Mn oxides may host minerals precipitated during a time span of ca. 1.5 m.y., and accumulation of Mn oxides to form economic deposits under weathering environments may take millions of years. The distribution of weathering ages shows that the oldest Mn oxides occur on the top of the profile, whereas the youngest minerals are found at the bottom, suggesting downward propagation of weathering fronts. However, two samples located at the intermediate depths of the profile yield ages comparable with those

  14. 40Ar/39Ar Ages for the Sentinel-Arlington Volcanic Field, Southwestern Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, S. R.; Greeley, R.; Champion, D. E.; Turrin, B. D.

    2007-12-01

    .16-51.48. Geochronology using 40Ar/39Ar method revealed an age of 1.94 +/- 0.85 Ma for Painted Rock Low Shield (New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory), 1.64 +/- 0.14 Ma for Theba Low Shield (Rutgers University) and 1.24 +/- 0.040 Ma for Wild Horse Low Shield (Rutgers University). Some ages were precise enough to correspond to the Matuyama reversed polarity epoch, with SAVF initiation possibly within the Olduvai normal polarity event. These dates represent an overall improvement in precision and accuracy over previous dates (values corresponding to 6.20 Ma to 1.28 Ma) collected in the late 1970s and early 1980s using K-Ar technique. The 40Ar/39Ar ages correspond to expected magnetic polarities and stratigraphic sequences.

  15. 40Ar/39Ar constraints on the activity of the Temsamane extensional detachment (eastern Rif, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabaloy Sánchez, A.; Booth-Rea, G.; Azdimousa, A.; Asebriy, L.; Vázquez-Vílchez, M.; Martínez-Martínez, J. M.; Gabites, J.

    2012-04-01

    The subducted North Maghrebian passive margin was exhumed by an upper crustal brittle-ductile extensional detachment and brittle low-angle normal faults in a continental subduction transform setting. The Temsamane detachment in the eastern Rif is defined by a ductile shear zone approximately 100 m thick with a low-angle ramp geometry that cuts down into the Temsamane fold-nappe stack. The shear zone shows southwestward kinematics and separates epizone metapelites of the Temsamane units below from the epizone to diagenetic rocks of the Tanger-Ketama-Aknoul units above. To the east, the detachment becomes brittle, branching into a listric-fan that cuts through 10-6 Ma sediments and volcanoclastics in the Tres Forcas cape. New 40Ar/39Ar radiometric ages on amphiboles and micas from the footwall of the Temsamane detachment indicate that the metamorphic peak was reached in the footwall (Temsamane units) at ca. 21 Ma, producing the amphibolite epidote facies in the Ras Afrou Unit. The cooling of the footwall rocks below the 325 °C occurred between the 16 and 13 Ma, while apatite fission track ages indicate that the cooling below the 120 °C occurred at ca. 11 Ma. The 40Ar/39Ar radiometric ages on amphiboles and micas of the metamorphic klippes over the Temsamene units (Ait-Amrâne massif) indicates that the Jurassic marbles of the Tanger-Ketama Unit reached their metamorphic peak at ca. 80 Ma, in agreement with previously published K/Ar ages in micas. The rocks of the Tanger-Ketama Unit cooled below the 120 °C between 17.0 ± 2.4 Ma and 13.9 ± 1.8 Ma. We interpret the increase of cooling rates of the footwall rocks between 15-13 Ma and 11 Ma as due to the activity of the Temsamane detachment fault. Thus, both the North Maghrebian and the South Iberian subducted passive margins were exhumed in the Betic and Rif branches of the Gibraltar arc by SW-directed brittle-ductile detachments during the Late Miocene in an oblique collisional setting.

  16. Experimental introduction of excess Ar40 into a granitic melt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fyfe, W.S.; Lanphere, M.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.

    1969-01-01

    Samples of a Precambrian granite were melted in sealed capsules to produce a radiogenic Ar40 atmosphere over the melt. The amount of Ar40 incorporated in the quenched charge was then determined. Under these experimental conditions the amount of argon dissolved in the quenched melt was appreciable and could be an important source of error in potassiumargon dating. ?? 1969 Springer-Verlag.

  17. 75 FR 12162 - Class E Airspace; Manila, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Class E Airspace; Manila, AR AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Class E airspace at Manila, AR. Decommissioning of the Manila non-directional beacon (NDB) at...

  18. 75 FR 12165 - Class E Airspace; Batesville, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Class E Airspace; Batesville, AR AGENCY: Federal... proposes to amend Class E airspace at Batesville, AR. Decommissioning of the Independence County...

  19. USDA-ARS RESEARCH ON BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF ARTHROPODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During 1999-2001, ARS scientists published over 100 papers on biocontrol of 30 insect pests. These papers address issues crucial to the three strategies of biological control: conservation, augmentation, and introduction. ARS scientists have been very active in determining the effects of pesticides...

  20. Dating the longevity of ductile shear zones: Insight from 40Ar/39Ar in situ analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Susanne; Hammerschmidt, Konrad; Rosenberg, Claudio L.

    2013-05-01

    We attempt to improve temporal constraints on the longevity and the termination of ductile shear zones by performing texturally-controlled in situ 40Ar/39Ar analyses of pre-kinematic muscovite, biotite and K-feldspars, of syn-kinematic phengite and K-feldspar, and of post-kinematic phengite within the same samples of sinistral shear zones from the western Tauern Window (Eastern Alps). Additionally two samples were dated by the Rb/Sr method (microsampling). Relative sequences of mineral formation based on microstructural, cross-cutting relationships were confirmed by in situ 40Ar/39Ar analyses, showing that syn-kinematic minerals are, in general, younger than pre-kinematic minerals and older or of equal age than the post-kinematic minerals of the same sample. From the rim to the core of the western Tauern Window syn-kinematic phengite and K-feldspar reveal a set of formation ages varying between 33 and 15 Ma for the northernmost and peripheral shear zone (Ahorn Shear Zone), between 24 and 12 Ma for the intermediate shear zone network (Tuxer Shear Zones), and between 20 and 7 Ma for the southernmost and central shear zone (Greiner Shear Zone). The age variation of syn-kinematic phengite and K-feldspar analyses is larger than the analytical error of each age obtained. In addition, isochron calculations of the syn-kinematic minerals reveal atmospheric-like 40Ar/36Ar intercepts. Therefore, the obtained age values of the syn-kinematic minerals are interpreted as formation ages which date increments of a long lasting deformation period. The time range of deformation of each shear zone system is bracketed by the oldest and youngest formation ages of syn-kinematic phengite and K-feldspar. Post-kinematic phengite laths show the youngest formation ages and overlap with the youngest syn-kinematic formation ages. This relationship indicates that post-kinematic growth occurred immediately after syn-kinematic mineral formation at the end of ductile sinistral shear. Hence, the

  1. Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Kay-Uwe; Stühmer, Roland; Dörflinger, Jörg; Rahmani, Tirdad; Thomas, Susan; Stojanovic, Ljiljana

    Rich Internet Applications significantly raise the user experience compared with legacy page-based Web applications because of their highly responsive user interfaces. Although this is a tremendous advance, it does not solve the problem of the one-size-fits-all approach1 of current Web applications. So although Rich Internet Applications put the user in a position to interact seamlessly with the Web application, they do not adapt to the context in which the user is currently working. In this paper we address the on-the-fly personalization of Rich Internet Applications. We introduce the concept of ARRIAs: Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications and elaborate on how they are able to adapt to the current working context the user is engaged in. An architecture for the ad hoc adaptation of Rich Internet Applications is presented as well as a holistic framework and tools for the realization of our on-the-fly personalization approach. We divided both the architecture and the framework into two levels: offline/design-time and online/run-time. For design-time we explain how to use ontologies in order to annotate Rich Internet Applications and how to use these annotations for conceptual Web usage mining. Furthermore, we describe how to create client-side executable rules from the semantic data mining results. We present our declarative lightweight rule language tailored to the needs of being executed directly on the client. Because of the event-driven nature of the user interfaces of Rich Internet Applications, we designed a lightweight rule language based on the event-condition-action paradigm.2 At run-time the interactions of a user are tracked directly on the client and in real-time a user model is built up. The user model then acts as input to and is evaluated by our client-side complex event processing and rule engine.

  2. Ar-40/Ar-39 age constraints for the Jaramillo Normal Subchron and the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izett, Glen A.; Obradovich, John D.

    1994-02-01

    Our mid-Pleistocene Ar-40/Ar-39 age recalibration of the geomagnetic polarity timescale is nearly in accord with the oxygen isotope, climate record calibration of the astronomical timescale proposed by Johnson (1982) and Shackleton et al. (1990). Ar-40/Ar-39 ages of a normally magnetized rhyolite dome in the Valles caldera, northern Mexico, yielded a weighted-mean age of 1.004 +/- 0.019 Ma. A K-Ar age of 0.909 +/- 0.019 Ma for this rock by Doell and Dalrymple (1966) was the linchpin for the recognition and calibration of the Jaramillo Normal Subchron (JNS). Other Ar-40/Ar-39 ages from the Valles caldera and Ar-40/Ar-39 ages of Ivory Coast tektites indicate that the JNS began at about 1.11 Ma and ended before 0.92 Ma, probably near 0.97 Ma. The Matuyama-Brunhes boundary occurred between 0.79 Ma and 0.76 Ma on the basis of Ar-40/Ar-39 sanidine ages from (1) three reversely magnetized rhyolite domes of the Valles caldera (0.793 +/- 0.018 Ma, 0.794 +/- 0.007 Ma, and 0.812 +/- 0.023 Ma) and pumice (0.789 +/- 0.006 Ma) from the reversely magnetized Oldest Toba Tuff of Sumatra and (2) pumice (0.764 +/- 0.005 Ma and 0.757 +/- 0.009 Ma) from the lower and upper units of the normally magnetized Bishop Tuff. The age of the boundary may be close to 0.77 Ma as deduced from rates of sedimentation in ancient Lake Bonneville, Utah.

  3. On the doubly ionized states of Ar{sub 2} and their intra- and interatomic decay to Ar{sub 2}{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect

    Stoychev, Spas D.; Kuleff, Alexander I.; Tarantelli, Francesco; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2008-01-07

    Potential energy curves of the Auger state Ar{sup +}(2p{sup -1})-Ar, the different one- and two-site dicationic states Ar{sub 2}{sup ++} (with energies in the range of 32-77 eV), and the lowest two-site tricationic states Ar{sup ++}-Ar{sup +} (with energies in the range of 64-76 eV) computed using elaborated ab initio methods are reported. The accessible relaxation channels of the electronic states of Ar{sup ++}-Ar populated by Auger decay are studied. In particular, we study in detail the interatomic Coulombic decay following the population of one-site satellite states of Ar{sup ++}(3s{sup -1}3p{sup -1})-Ar recently observed experimentally. Other relaxation pathways of Ar{sup ++}-Ar, including radiative charge transfer, nuclear dynamics through curve crossing, and intra-atomic decay processes are also investigated.

  4. Androgen Receptor (AR) Physiological Roles in Male and Female Reproductive Systems: Lessons Learned from AR-Knockout Mice Lacking AR in Selective Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chawnshang; Lee, Soo Ok; Wang, Ruey-Sheng; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Ta-Min

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Androgens/androgen receptor (AR) signaling is involved primarily in the development of male-specific phenotypes during embryogenesis, spermatogenesis, sexual behavior, and fertility during adult life. However, this signaling has also been shown to play an important role in development of female reproductive organs and their functions, such as ovarian folliculogenesis, embryonic implantation, and uterine and breast development. The establishment of the testicular feminization (Tfm) mouse model exploiting the X-linked Tfm mutation in mice has been a good in vivo tool for studying the human complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, but this mouse may not be the perfect in vivo model. Mouse models with various cell-specific AR knockout (ARKO) might allow us to study AR roles in individual types of cells in these male and female reproductive systems, although discrepancies are found in results between labs, probably due to using various Cre mice and/or knocking out AR in different AR domains. Nevertheless, no doubt exists that the continuous development of these ARKO mouse models and careful studies will provide information useful for understanding AR roles in reproductive systems of humans and may help us to develop more effective and more specific therapeutic approaches for reproductive system-related diseases. PMID:23782840

  5. Effect of surface derived hydrocarbon impurities on Ar plasma properties

    SciTech Connect

    Fox-Lyon, Nick; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Godyak, Valery

    2014-05-15

    The authors report on Langmuir probe measurements that show that hydrocarbon surfaces in contact with Ar plasma cause changes of electron energy distribution functions due to the flux of hydrogen and carbon atoms released by the surfaces. The authors compare the impact on plasma properties of hydrocarbon species gasified from an etching hydrocarbon surface with injection of gaseous hydrocarbons into Ar plasma. They find that both kinds of hydrocarbon injections decrease electron density and slightly increase electron temperatures of low pressure Ar plasma. For low percentages of impurities (∼1% impurity in Ar plasma explored here), surface-derived hydrocarbon species and gas phase injected hydrocarbon molecules cause similar changes of plasma properties for the same number of hydrocarbon molecules injected into Ar with a decrease in electron density of ∼4%.

  6. Touch interface for markless AR based on Kinect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Ching-Tang; Kuo, Tai-Ku; Wang, Hui-Chun; Wu, Yeh-Kuang; Chang, Liung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    We develop an augmented reality (AR) environment with hidden-marker via touch interface using Kinect device, and then also set up a touch painting game with the AR environment. This environment is similar to that of the touch screen interface which allows user to paint picture on a tabletop with his fingers, and it is designed with depth image information from Kinect device setting up above a tabletop. We incorporate support vector machine (SVM) to classify painted pictures which correspond to the inner data and call out its AR into the tabletop in color images information from Kinect device. Because users can utilize this similar touch interface to control AR, we achieve a marker-less AR and interactive environment.

  7. Search for cosmogenic Ar-42 in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Cane, D.; Taricco, C.; Bhandari, N.

    2003-04-01

    We have evidence for decreasing galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux in the past 3 centuries by a factor about two [1]. The measurements of the activity of cosmogenic 44Ti (T1/2 = 59.2 y) produced by GCR in stony meteorites that fell during the last two centuries are in good agreement with the calculated values and validate the decreasing trend of GCR flux. The measurements were obtained by an hyperpure (372 cm3) Ge-NaI(Tl) spectrometer operating in the Monte dei Cappuccini laboratory in Torino[2]. To further improve upon statistical precision of 44Ti data and also to be able to measure the 42Ar (T1/2 = 33 y) which is produced in even smaller amounts by GCR in meteorites, we have set up in the same laboratory a larger (581 cm3) hyperpure Ge detector operating in coincidence with a 100 kg NaI(Tl) crystal assembly. This should enable us to confirm the above results about GCR variations. We wish to acknowledge our deep gratitude to professor Bonino, deceased on September 29, 2002, to whom the assemblage of the new equipment is due. [1] G. Bonino, G. Cini Castagnoli, D. Cane, C. Taricco and N. Bhandari,Proc. XXVII Intern. Cosmic Ray Conf. (Hamburg, 2001) 3769-3772. [2] Bonino G., Cini Castagnoli G., Cane D., Taricco C., Bhandari N, textit {34th COSPAR Sci. Ass. Houston 2002 (Adv. Space Res.)}, in press

  8. Bovine Polledness – An Autosomal Dominant Trait with Allelic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Medugorac, Ivica; Seichter, Doris; Graf, Alexander; Russ, Ingolf; Blum, Helmut; Göpel, Karl Heinrich; Rothammer, Sophie; Förster, Martin; Krebs, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The persistent horns are an important trait of speciation for the family Bovidae with complex morphogenesis taking place briefly after birth. The polledness is highly favourable in modern cattle breeding systems but serious animal welfare issues urge for a solution in the production of hornless cattle other than dehorning. Although the dominant inhibition of horn morphogenesis was discovered more than 70 years ago, and the causative mutation was mapped almost 20 years ago, its molecular nature remained unknown. Here, we report allelic heterogeneity of the POLLED locus. First, we mapped the POLLED locus to a ∼381-kb interval in a multi-breed case-control design. Targeted re-sequencing of an enlarged candidate interval (547 kb) in 16 sires with known POLLED genotype did not detect a common allele associated with polled status. In eight sires of Alpine and Scottish origin (four polled versus four horned), we identified a single candidate mutation, a complex 202 bp insertion-deletion event that showed perfect association to the polled phenotype in various European cattle breeds, except Holstein-Friesian. The analysis of the same candidate interval in eight Holsteins identified five candidate variants which segregate as a 260 kb haplotype also perfectly associated with the POLLED gene without recombination or interference with the 202 bp insertion-deletion. We further identified bulls which are progeny tested as homozygous polled but bearing both, 202 bp insertion-deletion and Friesian haplotype. The distribution of genotypes of the two putative POLLED alleles in large semi-random sample (1,261 animals) supports the hypothesis of two independent mutations. PMID:22737241

  9. Chromosome 5 allele loss in human colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E; Voss, R; Hall, V; Bodmer, W F; Jass, J R; Jeffreys, A J; Lucibello, F C; Patel, I; Rider, S H

    That the sporadic and inherited forms of a particular cancer could both result from mutations in the same gene was first proposed by Knudson. He further proposed that these mutations act recessively at the cellular level, and that both copies of the gene must be lost for the cancer to develop. In sporadic cases both events occur somatically whereas in dominant familial cases susceptibility is inherited through a germline mutation and the cancer develops after a somatic change in the homologous allele. This model has since been substantiated in the case of retinoblastoma, Wilms tumour, acoustic neuroma and several other tumours, in which loss of heterozygosity was shown in tumour material compared to normal tissue from the same patient. The dominantly inherited disorder, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, also called familial polyposis coli), which gives rise to multiple adenomatous polyps in the colon that have a relatively high probability of progressing to a malignant adenocarcinoma, provides a basis for studying recessive genes in the far more common colorectal carcinomas using this approach. Following a clue as to the location of the FAP gene given by a case report of an individual with an interstitial deletion of chromosome 5q, who had FAP and multiple developmental abnormalities, we have examined sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas for loss of alleles on chromosome 5. Using a highly polymorphic 'minisatellite' probe which maps to chromosome 5q we have shown that at least 20% of this highly heterogeneous set of tumours lose one of the alleles present in matched normal tissue. This parallels the assignment of the FAP gene to chromosome 5 (see accompanying paper) and suggests that becoming recessive for this gene may be a critical step in the progression of a relatively high proportion of colorectal cancers. PMID:2886919

  10. A compilation of K-Ar-ages for southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Fred K.; Morton, Douglas M.; Morton, Janet L.; Miller, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to make available a large body of conventional K-Ar ages for granitic, volcanic, and metamorphic rocks collected in southern California. Although one interpretive map is included, the report consists primarily of a systematic listing, without discussion or interpretation, of published and unpublished ages that may be of value in future regional and other geologic studies. From 1973 to 1979, 468 rock samples from southern California were collected for conventional K-Ar dating under a regional geologic mapping project of Southern California (predecessor of the Southern California Areal Mapping Project). Most samples were collected and dated between 1974 and 1977. For 61 samples (13 percent of those collected), either they were discarded for varying reasons, or the original collection data were lost. For the remaining samples, 518 conventional K-Ar ages are reported here; coexisting mineral pairs were dated from many samples. Of these K-Ar ages, 225 are previously unpublished, and identified as such in table 1. All K-Ar ages are by conventional K-Ar analysis; no 40Ar/39Ar dating was done. Subsequent to the rock samples collected in the 1970s and reported here, 33 samples were collected and 38 conventional K-Ar ages determined under projects directed at (1) characterization of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic igneous rocks in and on both sides of the Transverse Ranges and (2) clarifying the Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonics of the eastern Mojave Desert. Although previously published (Beckerman et al., 1982), another eight samples and 11 conventional K-Ar ages are included here, because they augment those completed under the previous two projects.

  11. Analysis of the distribution of HLA-A alleles in populations from five continents.

    PubMed

    Middleton, D; Williams, F; Meenagh, A; Daar, A S; Gorodezky, C; Hammond, M; Nascimento, E; Briceno, I; Perez, M P

    2000-10-01

    The variation and frequency of HLA-A genotypes were established by PCR-SSOP typing in diverse geographically distributed populations: Brazilian, Colombian Kogui, Cuban, Mexican, Omani, Singapore Chinese, and South African Zulu. HLA-A allelic families with only one allele were identified for HLA-A*01, -A*23, -A*25, -A*31, -A*32, -A*36, -A*43, -A*69, -A*80; and with two alleles for HLA-A*03, -A*11, -A*26, -A*29, -A*33, -A*34, and -A*66. Greater variation was detected for HLA-A*02, -A*24, and -A*68 allele families. Colombian Kogui and Mexican Seris showed the least diversity with respect to HLA-A alleles, albeit with small numbers tested, with only four and five HLA-A alleles identified, respectively. It would appear by their presence in all populations studied, either rural or indigenous, that certain alleles are very important in pathogen peptide presentation. PMID:11082518

  12. Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic data from late Proterozoic mafic dikes and sills, Montana and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, Stephen S.; Geissman, John William; Snee, Lawrence W.

    1997-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar results from mafic dikes and sills in northwestern Wyoming and western Montana yield similar virtual geomagnetic poles and isotopic dates. In combination with paleomagnetic and geochronologic data from elsewhere in the western Cordillera, these data provide evidence for a regional mafic magnetic event at 780 to 770 Ma that affected a large area of western North America.

  13. Differential distribution of cAMP receptors cAR2 and cAR3 during Dictyostelium development.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Saxe, C L

    1996-01-10

    Signal transduction via a family of cAMP receptor subtypes (cARs) is critical for proper development in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. Genes encoding four related subtypes have been cloned and their expression, based on RNA accumulation, has been previously reported. Here we report the differential spatial and temporal distribution of cAR2 and cAR3 proteins, based on indirect double immunofluorescence. Cells were transformed with a carB::lacZ construct, and an antibody against beta-galactosidase was used to visualize cAR2 expression. Simultaneously, a cAR3-specific antibody was used to identify cAR3-expressing cells. Results indicate that by the time of tip formation (12-14 hr) both receptors are expressed and distribute in a virtually nonoverlapping pattern, with cAR2 being expressed on anterior, prestalk cells and cAR3 present in the rest of the organism. Differential distribution of these two receptor subtypes may result in distinct cAMP signaling mechanisms in the two major regions of the organism. PMID:8575636

  14. On Full Disclosure and Transparent Data Flow from 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology Measurements to Data Reduction to Online Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Arguably 40Ar/39Ar geochronology is one of the most versatile techniques available to Earth scientists today for the dating of rocks and minerals and determining the rates of geological processes on Earth and in our solar system. Over the last four decades large quantities of high (and lower) quality 40Ar/39Ar data have been produced using many different generations of mass spectrometry instrumentation. This wealth of data is only as useful as its description and availability of metadata allows. Many online data sets or compilations available in the science literature only carry the resulting product, an age and a related uncertainty in millions of years, for example. These data points are far from desirable as these don't allow recalculation against modern-day age standards, decay constants and other parameters essential in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Over time these data will become less useful to the research community and eventually these will be put by the wayside. In this presentation I will emphasize the need for full disclosure of all data and metadata involved in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. I will give examples of how a complex data flow can be kept transparent from sample preparation to measurement to data reduction and eventually the uploading into online data repositories. Without the full disclosure of our data and a transparent data flow, it is evident that we cannot live up to one of the governing doctrines in the sciences, namely reproducibility of our scientific experiments and findings.

  15. New primer for specific amplification of the CAG repeat in Huntington disease alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, C.E.; Hodes, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat near the 5{prime} end of the gene for Huntington disease (IT15). The CAG repeat is flanked by a variable-length CCG repeat that is included in the amplification product obtained with most currently used primer sets and PCR protocols. Inclusion of this adjacent CCG repeat complicates the accurate assessment of CAG repeat length and interferes with the genotype determination of those individuals carrying alleles in the intermediate range between normal and expanded sized. Due to the GC-rich nature of this region, attempts at designing a protocol for amplification of only the CAG repeat have proved unreliable and difficult to execute. We report here the development of a compatible primer set and PCR protocol that yields consistent amplification of the CAG-repeat region. PCR products can be visualized in ethidium bromide-stained agarose gels for rapid screening or in 6% polyacrylamide gels for determination of exact repeat length. This assay produces bands that can be sized accurately, while eliminating most nonspecific products. Fifty-five specimens examined showed consistency with another well-known method, but one that amplifies the CCG repeats as well. The results we obtained also matched the known carrier status of the donors.

  16. ``Smoking From The Same Pipe": Developement of an 40Ar/39Ar Datting Intercalibration PIpette System (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, B. D.; Swisher, C. C.; Deino, A.; Hemming, S. R.; Hodges, K.; Renne, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    The precision and accuracy of Ar isotope ratio measurements is one of the main limiting factors in the uncertainties of an 40Ar/39Ar age. Currently, it is relatively common to measure Ar isotopic ratios to a precision of 1-2‰ or better on an intralaboratory basis. This level of analytical precision equates to a comparable level of precision (1-3‰) in the calculated age, depending on the extent of atmospheric Ar contamination, importance of nucleogenic interference corrections, and other factors. However, it has become clear that improving the precision of mass spectrometry is not the only bottleneck towards improving the accuracy and precision of 40Ar/39Ar dating in general. Rather, the most urgent issue is interlaboratory reproducibility. This became obvious in a recent EARTHTIME initiative undertaken to intercalibrate two commonly used 40Ar/39Ar standards [the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) and the Alder Creek sanidine (ACs)]. This effort revealed variations amongst laboratories (at the 1-2% level), an order of magnitude greater than the internal analytical precisions. To address these issues, we have proposed (to NSF) to construct two identical pipette systems loaded to identical starting pressures and with identical isotopic compositions. One pipette system will travel between participating 40Ar/39Ar labs and the second system will not travel and serve as the “Master” system to test for any fractionation or undocumented depletion of the traveling pipette system. In order to ensure delivery of uniform amounts of homogenous gas, the pipette system will be computer-controlled with preprogrammed routines and lockouts to prevent compromising the reservoirs. The pipette systems will deliver three gas samples with different isotopic ratios at two different pressures/concentrations. One pipette bulb will be of atmospheric isotopic composition, and the other two pipette bulbs will have 40Ar*/39ArK ratios corresponding to co-irradiated ACs and FCs fixed by their

  17. Evaluation of the IPCC Models (AR4 and AR5) in the Precipitation Simulation in the Northeast of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, José; Vasconcelos Junior, Francisco; Chaves, Rosane; Silva, Emerson; Servain, Jacques; Costa, Alexandre; Sombra, Sérgio; Barbosa, Augusto; Dos Santos, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    With the simulations of the models used in the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), comparative studies are necessary between observations and the so-called historical run (C20) and future projections of the AR4 (A2) and AR5 (RCP8.5) experiments, in order to assess whether the AR5 models had a better performance in the representation of physical processes. This article compares the sensitivity of IPCC models (AR4 and AR5) in representing the anuall average and seasonal rainfall variation (summer and autumn) in three regions of the Northeast of Brazil between 1979 and 2000, using the CMAP - CPC (Merged Analysis of Precipitation) data as reference. The projections made by these models for the period 2040-2070 were also analyzed.

  18. Toward a high-resolution 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Tatun Volcano Group, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesko, G. T.; Song, S.; Chang, S.; Hemming, S. R.; Turrin, B. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Tatun Volcano Group [TVG] consists of five volcanic subgroups of which ~30 edifices have been identified, all in close proximity to the densely populated Taipei Basin to its south (Song et al., 2000, Journal of the Geological Society of China, in Chinese). Evidence of eruptions is in the form of mostly lava flows, with pyroclastic flows, and ash deposition (Tsai et al., 2010, TAO), consistent with vulcanian and plinian eruptions that are only minimally preserved because of the region’s high weathering rate (Belousov et al., 2010, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research). The TVG is made up of calc-alkaline andesite, with few interspersed basaltic lava flows that bear geochemical signatures consistent with subduction volcanism, yet due to tectonic location Teng (1996, Geology) describes it as Ryukyu back-arc basin volcanism, and still others attribute volcanism here to post-collisional collapse of the Taiwan orogen (Wang et al., 1999, Tectonophysics and 2004, Journal of Petrology). Various TVG samples were previously K-Ar dated by Juang and Chen (1989, Bulletin of Central Geological Survey, in Chinese), Tsao (1994, Bulletin of Central Geological Survey, in Chinese), and 40Ar/39Ar whole rock analyses by Lee (1996, masters thesis, National Taiwan University) to suggest volcanism from 2.8-2.5Ma and then from 1.5-.22Ma after which volcanic events ceased. In contrast, radiocarbon dates obtained from charcoal in related sediment by Chen et al. (2010, TAO) and Belousov et al. (2010, Journal of Volcanology Geothermal Research) suggest volcanic activity was present at 20ka and 6ka respectively. The andesite samples are microcrystalline; therefore hand picked aliquots of groundmass from the hand magnetic fraction were subjected to several iterations of sonic rinse in glycine-based soap, then 4N HNO3, then quartz-distilled water in a preparation modified from Nicolaysen et al. (2000, EPSL). Samples were co-irradiated at the USGS facility in Denver using Alder

  19. Hydrogen-rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus are described for producing hydrogen-rich product gases. A spray of liquid hydrocarbon is mixed with a stream of air in a startup procedure and the mixture is ignited for partial oxidation. The stream of air is then heated by the resulting combustion to reach a temperature such that a signal is produced. The signal triggers a two way valve which directs liquid hydrocarbon from a spraying mechanism to a vaporizing mechanism with which a vaporized hydrocarbon is formed. The vaporized hydrocarbon is subsequently mixed with the heated air in the combustion chamber where partial oxidation takes place and hydrogen-rich product gases are produced.

  20. Effect of metallothionein 2A gene polymorphism on allele-specific gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Jóźwiak, Paweł; Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Bryś, Magdalena

    2013-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are highly conserved, small molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins. The major physiological functions of metallothioneins include homeostasis of essential metals Zn and Cu and protection against cytotoxicity of heavy metals. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between the − 5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs28366003) in core promoter region and expression of metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene and metal concentration in prostate cancer tissues. MT2A polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism technique (PCR–RFLP) using 412 prostate cancer tissue samples. MT2A gene expression analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR method. A significant association between rs28366003 genotype and MT2A expression level was found. The average mRNA level was found to be lower among minor allele carriers (the risk allele) than average expression among homozygotes for the major allele. Metal levels were analyzed by flamed atomic absorption spectrometer system. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels. The results of Spearman's rank correlation showed that the expressions of MT2A and Cu, Pb and Ni concentrations were negatively correlated. On the basis of the results obtained in this study, we suggest that SNP polymorphism may affect the MT2A gene expression in prostate and this is associated with some metal accumulation. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cu, Pb and Ni levels.

  1. 40Ar/39Ar constraints on the temporal evolution of Graciosa Island, Azores (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrea, Patricia; Wijbrans, Jan R.; Galé, Carlos; Ubide, Teresa; Lago, Marceliano; França, Zilda; Widom, Elisabeth

    2014-02-01

    Lava flows spanning the eruptive record of Graciosa Island (Azores archipelago) and a gabbro xenolith were dated by 40Ar/39Ar in order to constrain the Pleistocene and Holocene volcanic evolution of the island. The results range from 1.05 Ma to 3.9 ka, whereas prior published K-Ar and 14C ages range from 620 to 2 ka. The formation of the Serra das Fontes shield volcano started at minimum 1.05 Ma, and the magmatic system was active for ca. 600 ky, as suggested by the formation of the gabbro xenolith by magmatic differentiation. Evolved magmas making up the Serra das Fontes-Serra Branca composite volcano were generated at ca. 450 ka. After a period of ca. 110 ky of volcanic inactivity and erosion of volcanic edifices, volcanism was reactivated with the formation of the Vitória Unit NW platform. Later, the development of the Vulcão Central Unit started with the formation of monogenetic cones located to the south of the Serra das Fontes-Serra Branca-Vitória Unit. This volcanism became progressively more evolved and was concentrated in a main eruptive center, forming the Vulcão Central stratovolcano with an age older than 50 ka. The caldera related to this stratovolcano is older than 47 ka and was followed by effusion of basaltic magmas into the caldera, resulting in the formation of a lava lake, which ultimately spilled over the caldera rim at ca. 11 ka. The most recent eruptions on Graciosa formed two small pyroclastic cones within the caldera and the Pico do Timão cone within the Vitória Unit at ca 3.9 ka.

  2. Unique Thermal Histories from Whole-Rock 40Ar/39Ar Step-heating Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, M.; Heizler, M. T.; Lovera, O. M.; Warren, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Step-heating 40Ar/39Ar analysis can reveal spatial distributions of 40Ar* at the micron scale imparted by post- crystallization heating events through complex, multi-diffusion domain models. These efforts have largely focused on single-phase, terrestrial samples with only scant attention paid to multi-phase or extra-terrestrial materials. Generalizing these models to incorporate the multiple activation energies (E) expected from bulk rock samples introduces significant interpretational ambiguity. This is because the thermal crossovers explicit in multi-E cases make the age spectrum a function of the lab heating schedule in thermally disturbed samples. A further difficulty is that unique interpretation of the associated Arrhenius plot is no longer possible and a range of E's can be fitted with equal goodness of fit. In order to address these challenges, we developed a new computational approach that simultaneously inverts the Arrhenius spectra and release pattern using a variant of the Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization (APSO) algorithm for a square-pulse heating event. Our version uses a Levy Flight to break the swarm out of a local minima rather than randomly modifying a single dimension as in the original APSO. Further we explored issues of Pareto efficiency arising from fitting two fitness functions (i.e., the fit to the age spectra and to the Arrhenius plot) and found an adequate resolution to the classic inability to have a single best fit. By utilizing multiple-E samples, we are able to obtain unique thermal history solutions. Application of these methods to high resolution age spectra of the Jilin chondrite and Apollo 16 samples (North Ray Crater) and found fits of sufficiently high fidelity to constrain the absolute temperature of the thermal episode to better than ±10%.

  3. A new approach to cosmogenic corrections in 40Ar/39Ar chronometry: Implications for the ages of Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, W. S.; Borg, L. E.

    2016-08-01

    Anomalously old 40Ar/39Ar ages are commonly obtained from Shergottites and are generally attributed to uncertainties regarding the isotopic composition of the trapped component and/or the presence of excess 40Ar. Old ages can also be obtained if inaccurate corrections for cosmogenic 36Ar are applied. Current methods for making the cosmogenic correction require simplifying assumptions regarding the spatial homogeneity of target elements for cosmogenic production and the distribution of cosmogenic nuclides relative to trapped and reactor-derived Ar isotopes. To mitigate uncertainties arising from these assumptions, a new cosmogenic correction approach utilizing the exposure age determined on an un-irradiated aliquot and step-wise production rate estimates that account for spatial variations in Ca and K is described. Data obtained from NWA 4468 and an unofficial pairing of NWA 2975, which yield anomalously old ages when corrected for cosmogenic 36Ar using conventional techniques, are used to illustrate the efficacy of this new approach. For these samples, anomalous age determinations are rectified solely by the improved cosmogenic correction technique described herein. Ages of 188 ± 17 and 184 ± 17 Ma are obtained for NWA 4468 and NWA 2975, respectively, both of which are indistinguishable from ages obtained by other radioisotopic systems. For other Shergottites that have multiple trapped components, have experienced diffusive loss of Ar, or contain excess Ar, more accurate cosmogenic corrections may aid in the interpretation of anomalous ages. The trapped 40Ar/36Ar ratios inferred from inverse isochron diagrams obtained from NWA 4468 and NWA 2975 are significantly lower than the Martian atmospheric value, and may represent upper mantle or crustal components.

  4. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar age for the Jehol Biota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.; Zhang, H.; Renne, P. R.; Fang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Abundant fossils of the terrestrial Jehol Biota, including plants, insects, dinosaurs, birds, mammals and freshwater invertebrates, were discovered from the Yixian Formation and the overlying Jiufotang Formation in Inner Mongolia, Hebei Province and Liaoning Province, northeastern China. Because of the exceptional preservation of fossils, the Jehol Biota is one of the most important Mesozoic fossil outcrops and referred to as a "Mesozoic Pompeii". The Jehol Biota has provided a rare opportunity to address questions about the origin of birds, the evolution of feathers and flight, the early diversification of angiosperms and the timing of the radiation of placental mammals. The Tuchengzi Formation, which lies unconformably just below the Yixian Formation and consists mainly of variegated sandstones, is less fossiliferous than the two overlying formations. However, dinosaur tracks, silicified wood and compressed plants are found in this formation. A systematic 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Yixian and the Jiufotang formations was undertaken to provide a framework for understanding the timing and duration of the Jehol Biota and evolutionary events represented within it. Furthermore, determining the absolute age of the Tuchengzi Formation provides information to interpret abundant dinosaur tracks within and provide better age constrains for the beginning of the Jehol Biota. Here we present robust high-precision 40Ar/39Ar data for six tuff samples and two basalt samples collected from the Tuchengzi, the Yixian and the Jiufotang formations near the classic outcrops in western Liaoning, NE China. We obtain an age of 139.5 ± 1.0 Ma for the uppermost Tuchengzi Formation, an age of 129.7 ± 0.5 Ma for a basaltic lava from the bottom of the Yixian Formation and an age of 122.1 ± 0.3 Ma for a tuff from the base of the overlying Jiufotang Formation. Our data indicate that the Yixian Formation was deposited during the Early Cretaceous, the Barremian to early Aptian, within a time span

  5. New 40Ar/39Ar Ages From Southwest Bolivia Refine the Timing of APVC Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, M.; de Silva, S. L.; Jicha, B.; Singer, B.; Jiménez, N.; Ort, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC) of the Central Andes has produced prodigious silicic volcanism (at least 11,000 km3 of magma) over the last 10 Ma including some of the largest known ignimbrites on Earth. Despite excellent exposure, little previous work had been conducted on the timing and distribution of ignimbrite volcanism in the Lípez region of southwestern Bolivia, the heart of the APVC. To address this deficiency we have performed ~612 single crystal laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar analyses from 39 pumice and bulk matrix samples collected from the main ignimbrite units within the Lípez region. Geochemistry of pumice and mineral samples, and paleomagnetic data are also being used to correlate individual ignimbrite units. Our new 40Ar/39Ar results establish new or refined eruption ages (with 2σ error) from the Vilama caldera at 8.41±0.02 Ma, Pastos Grandes caldera at 5.45±0.02 and 2.94±0.01 Ma, and Guacha caldera at 5.65±0.01, and 3.57±0.02 Ma. New ages were also determined for eruptions from the Panizos ignimbrite shield (6.86±0.03 Ma), Juvina ignimbrite shield (5.23±0.01 Ma), and the Laguna Colorado ignimbrite shield (2.21±0.05 and 1.95±0.03 Ma). The oldest ignimbrite we have found in the area is 10.33±0.64 Ma, a local unit beneath the Vilama ignimbrite. The youngest units have been identified west of the Guacha caldera with eruption ages of 1.70±0.6 Ma and 0.70±0.01 Ma. These results demonstrate that ignimbrite-producing eruptions in the Lípez region span the age of APVC volcanism previously established, with the largest eruptions occurring from long-lived, cyclic supervolcano caldera systems like Guacha and Pastos Grandes. The aggregate data from the APVC support the hypothesis that the APVC developed predominantly during distinct pulses of massive ignimbrite eruptions at ~8, 6, and 4 Ma and attest to episodic behavior of the magmatic system. Ignimbrites of <1 Ma, the cyclical nature of activity, and the continued geothermal presence and

  6. Implications of new 40Ar/39Ar data for the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Deino, A.; Hilgen, F.; Kuiper, K.; Mark, D. F.; Mitchell, W. S.; Morgan, L. E.; Smit, J.

    2012-12-01

    The cause of the mass extinctions across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary (KPB) is still controversial. Previous geochronological data [1-3] appear to preclude the Chicxulub impact as a causal mechanism as they indicate that the KPB predated the impact by 181 ± 71 ka (1σ here and throughout). New 40Ar/39Ar data, determined blind in the BGC and SUERC labs, for the terrestrial KPB (IrZ-coal bentonite) from the Hell Creek area of northeastern Montana yield an age of 66.044 ± 0.011/0.045 Ma (without/with systematic uncertainties, calibrated per [4]). New 40Ar/39Ar data for Haitian tektites, combined with previous work [2,3], yield an age of 66.038 ± 0.025/0.049 Ma thereby establishing synchrony between the terrestrial KPB and the Chicxulub bolide impact to within 33 ka. The absolute boundary age of 66.044 Ma ± 0.045 [4] or 65.837 ± 0.061 Ma [5] allows clear discrimination between Earth's 405 ka orbital eccentricity cycles and both calibrations favor the orbital tuning chronology of [5] for the KPB at Zumaia, Spain. The former calibration is corroborated by U/Pb data [6]. In contrast, a recent orbital chronology proposed for the Zumaia section [7] infers an age of 65.2 Ma for the KPB, suggesting that the tuning missed two 405 ka eccentricity cycles. New data for tuffs above the KPB indicate a dramatic reduction in the post-KPB timescale of faunal recovery during the Puercan1 NALMA substage, and for the restoration of pre-KPB atmospheric δ13C values, to several tens of ka at most. Our new data clearly implicate a significant role for the Chicxulub impact in the KPB extinctions, but this cannot explain the significant pre-KPB climate instability or precursory faunal turnover [8]. The Chicxulub impact likely delivered the final blow to stressed ecosystems rather than being the sole cause of the KPB extinctions. The role of roughly synchronous phenomena such as eruption of the multiphased Deccan Traps [9] remains to be tested via high-precision geochronology. Refs

  7. 40Ar/(39)Ar dating of the Kapthurin Formation, Baringo, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; McBrearty, Sally

    2002-01-01

    The(40)Ar/(39)Ar radiometric dating technique has been applied to tuffs and lavas of the Kapthurin Formation in the Tugen Hills, Kenya Rift Valley. Two variants of the(40)Ar/(39)Ar technique, single-crystal total fusion (SCTF) and laser incremental heating (LIH) have been employed to date five marker horizons within the formation: near the base, the Kasurein Basalt at 0.61+/-0.04 Ma; the Pumice Tuff at 0.543+/-0.004 Ma; the Upper Kasurein Basalt at 0.552+/-0.015 Ma; the Grey Tuff at 0.509+/-0.009 Ma; and within the upper part of the formation, the Bedded Tuff at 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. The new, precise radiometric age determination for the Pumice Tuff also provides an age for the widespread Lake Baringo Trachyte, since the Pumice Tuff is the early pyroclastic phase of this voluminous trachyte eruption. These results establish the age of fossil hominids KNM-BK 63-67 and KNM-BK 8518 at approximately 0.510-0.512 Ma, a significant finding given that few Middle Pleistocene hominids are radiometrically dated. The Kapthurin hominids are thus the near contemporaries of those from Bodo, Ethiopia and Tanzania. A flake and core industry from lacustrine sediments in the lower part of the formation is constrained by new dates of 0.55-0.52 Ma, a period during which the Acheulian industry, characterized by handaxes, is known throughout East Africa. Points, typical of the Middle Stone Age (MSA), are found in Kapthurin Formation sediments now shown to date to between 0.509+/-0.009 Ma and 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. This date exceeds previous estimates for the age of the MSA elsewhere in East Africa by 49 ka, and establishes the age of Acheulian to MSA transition for the region. Evidence of the use of the Levallois technique for the manufacture of both small flakes and biface preforms, the systematic production of blades, and the use and processing of red ochre also occurs in this interval. The presence of blades and red ochre at this depth is important as blades signify a high degree of technical

  8. SHRIMP U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar age constraints for relating plutonism and mineralization in the Boulder batholith region, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, K.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Kunk, M.J.; Unruh, D.M.; Zeihen, G.D.; Hodges, W.C.; du Bray, E.A.; O'Neill, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    The composite Boulder batholith, Montana, hosts a variety of mineral deposit types, including important silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein districts in the northern part of the batholith and the giant Butte porphyry copper-molybdenum pre-Main Stage system and crosscutting copper-rich Main Stage vein system in the southern part of the batholith. Previous dating studies have identified ambiguous relationships among igneous and mineralizing events. Mineralizing hydrothermal fluids for these types of deposits and magma for quartz porphyry dikes at Butte have all been considered to be late-stage differentiates of the Boulder batholith. However, previous dating studies indicated that the Boulder batholith plutons cooled from about 78 to 72 Ma, whereas copper-rich Main Stage veins at Butte were dated at about 61 Ma. Recent efforts to date the porphyry copper-molybdenum pre-Main Stage deposits at Butte resulted in conflicting estimates of both 64 and 76 Ma for the mineralizing events. Silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein deposits elsewhere in the batholith have not been dated previously. To resolve this controversy, we used the U.S. Geological Survey, Stanford, SHRIMP RG ion mic??roprobe to date single-age domains within zircons from plutonic rock samples and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to date white mica, biotite, and K-feldspar from mineral deposits. U-Pb zircon ages are Rader Creek Granodiorite, 80.4 ?? 1.2 Ma; Unionville Granodiorite, 78.2 ?? 0.8 Ma; Pulpit Rock granite, 76.5 ?? 0.8 Ma; Butte Granite, 74.5 ?? 0.9 Ma; altered Steward-type quartz porphyry dike (I-15 roadcut), 66.5 ?? 1.0 Ma; altered Steward-type quartz porphyry dike (Continental pit), 65.7 ?? 0.9 Ma; and quartz monzodiorite of Boulder Baldy (Big Belt Mountains), 66.2 ?? 0.9 Ma. Zircons from Rader Creek Granodiorite and quartz porphyry dike samples contain Archean inheritance. The 40Ar/39Ar ages are muscovite, silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein (Basin district), 74.4 ?? 0.3 Ma; muscovite, silver-rich

  9. Inferring the age of a fixed beneficial allele.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Louise; Foll, Matthieu; Ewing, Gregory B; Pfeifer, Susanne P; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the age and strength of beneficial alleles is central to understanding how adaptation proceeds in response to changing environmental conditions. Several haplotype-based estimators exist for inferring the age of segregating beneficial mutations. Here, we develop an approximate Bayesian-based approach that rather estimates these parameters for fixed beneficial mutations in single populations. We integrate a range of existing diversity, site frequency spectrum, haplotype- and linkage disequilibrium-based summary statistics. We show that for strong selective sweeps on de novo mutations the method can estimate allele age and selection strength even in nonequilibrium demographic scenarios. We extend our approach to models of selection on standing variation, and co-infer the frequency at which selection began to act upon the mutation. Finally, we apply our method to estimate the age and selection strength of a previously identified mutation underpinning cryptic colour adaptation in a wild deer mouse population, and compare our findings with previously published estimates as well as with geological data pertaining to the presumed shift in selective pressure. PMID:26576754

  10. Allele mining and enhanced genetic recombination for rice breeding.

    PubMed

    Leung, Hei; Raghavan, Chitra; Zhou, Bo; Oliva, Ricardo; Choi, Il Ryong; Lacorte, Vanica; Jubay, Mona Liza; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Gregorio, Glenn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ulat, Victor Jun; Borja, Frances Nikki; Mauleon, Ramil; Alexandrov, Nickolai N; McNally, Kenneth L; Sackville Hamilton, Ruaraidh

    2015-12-01

    Traditional rice varieties harbour a large store of genetic diversity with potential to accelerate rice improvement. For a long time, this diversity maintained in the International Rice Genebank has not been fully used because of a lack of genome information. The publication of the first reference genome of Nipponbare by the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP) marked the beginning of a systematic exploration and use of rice diversity for genetic research and breeding. Since then, the Nipponbare genome has served as the reference for the assembly of many additional genomes. The recently completed 3000 Rice Genomes Project together with the public database (SNP-Seek) provides a new genomic and data resource that enables the identification of useful accessions for breeding. Using disease resistance traits as case studies, we demonstrated the power of allele mining in the 3,000 genomes for extracting accessions from the GeneBank for targeted phenotyping. Although potentially useful landraces can now be identified, their use in breeding is often hindered by unfavourable linkages. Efficient breeding designs are much needed to transfer the useful diversity to breeding. Multi-parent Advanced Generation InterCross (MAGIC) is a breeding design to produce highly recombined populations. The MAGIC approach can be used to generate pre-breeding populations with increased genotypic diversity and reduced linkage drag. Allele mining combined with a multi-parent breeding design can help convert useful diversity into breeding-ready genetic resources. PMID:26606925

  11. A bird's eye view of a deleterious recessive allele.

    PubMed

    Ekblom, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In the endangered Scottish chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax) population, a lethal blindness syndrome is found to be caused by a deleterious recessive allele. Photo: Gordon Yates. In Focus: Trask, A.E., Bignal, E.M., McCracken, D.I., Monaghan, P., Piertney, S.B. & Reid, J.M. (2016) Evidence of the phenotypic expression of a lethal recessive allele under inbreeding in a wild population of conservation concern. Journal of Animal Ecology, 85, 879-891. In this issue of Journal of Animal Ecology, Trask et al. () report on a strange, lethal, blindness that regularly affects chicks of an endangered bird population. The authors show that the inheritance mode of this blindness disease precisely matches the expectations of a recessive deleterious mutation. Intriguingly, there is also an indication that the disease-causing variant might be maintained in the population by balancing selection, due to a selective advantage for heterozygotes. Could this finding have consequences for conservation actions implemented for the population? PMID:27279331

  12. Assessment of PAX6 alleles in 66 families with aniridia.

    PubMed

    Bobilev, A M; McDougal, M E; Taylor, W L; Geisert, E E; Netland, P A; Lauderdale, J D

    2016-06-01

    We report on PAX6 alleles associated with a clinical diagnosis of classical aniridia in 81 affected individuals representing 66 families. Allelic variants expected to affect PAX6 function were identified in 61 families (76 individuals). Ten cases of sporadic aniridia (10 families) had complete (8 cases) or partial (2 cases) deletion of the PAX6 gene. Sequence changes that introduced a premature termination codon into the open reading frame of PAX6 occurred in 47 families (62 individuals). Three individuals with sporadic aniridia (three families) had sequence changes (one deletion, two run-on mutations) expected to result in a C-terminal extension. An intronic deletion of unknown functional significance was detected in one case of sporadic aniridia (one family), but not in unaffected relatives. Within these 61 families, single nucleotide substitutions accounted for 30/61 (49%), indels for 23/61 (38%), and complete deletion of the PAX6 locus for 8/61 (13%). In five cases of sporadic aniridia (five families), no disease-causing mutation in the coding region was detected. In total, 23 unique variants were identified that have not been reported in the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) database. Within the group assessed, 92% had sequence changes expected to reduce PAX6 function, confirming the primacy of PAX6 haploinsufficiency as causal for aniridia. PMID:26661695

  13. An allele of the crm gene blocks cyanobacterial circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Joseph S.; Bordowitz, Juliana R.; Bree, Anna C.; Golden, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    The SasA-RpaA two-component system constitutes a key output pathway of the cyanobacterial Kai circadian oscillator. To date, rhythm of phycobilisome associated (rpaA) is the only gene other than kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC, which encode the oscillator itself, whose mutation causes completely arrhythmic gene expression. Here we report a unique transposon insertion allele in a small ORF located immediately upstream of rpaA in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 termed crm (for circadian rhythmicity modulator), which results in arrhythmic promoter activity but does not affect steady-state levels of RpaA. The crm ORF complements the defect when expressed in trans, but only if it can be translated, suggesting that crm encodes a small protein. The crm1 insertion allele phenotypes are distinct from those of an rpaA null; crm1 mutants are able to grow in a light:dark cycle and have no detectable oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, whereas low-amplitude KaiC phosphorylation rhythms persist in the absence of RpaA. Levels of phosphorylated RpaA in vivo measured over time are significantly altered compared with WT in the crm1 mutant as well as in the absence of KaiC. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Crm polypeptide modulates a circadian-specific activity of RpaA. PMID:23918383

  14. Allele frequency of CODIS 13 in Indonesian population.

    PubMed

    Untoro, Evi; Atmadja, Djaja Surya; Pu, Chang-En; Wu, Fang-Chi

    2009-04-01

    Since the first application of DNA technology in 1985 in forensic cases, and the acceptance of this technology in 1988 at court, the DNA typing is widely used in personal identification, parentage cases and tracing the source of biological samples found in the crime scene. The FBI on 1990 had recommended the forensic labs to used 13 loci of Short Tandem Repeats (STR), known as CODIS 13, as the loci of choice for forensic use. The research on the population DNA database on these loci is extremely important for calculating the Paternity Index as well as Matching Probability for forensic application of DNA technology. As many as 402 unrelated persons, consisted of 322 from western part of Indonesia and 80 from eastern part of Indonesia, were chosen as the respondents of this research, after signing the informed consent. The peripheral blood sample was taken using sterile lancets and dropped onto FTA classic cards. The DNA was extracted by FTA purification solution (3x) and TE(-1) (2x), and amplified by PCR mix, either Cofiler or Profiler Plus (Perkin Elmers), followed by sequencing using ABI Prism type 3100 Avant Genetic Analyzer. The analysis showed that the alleles frequencies of Indonesian is specific, different with the other Asian populations with some specific alleles and microvariant were found. PMID:19261522

  15. Cytochrome allelic variants and clopidogrel metabolism in cardiovascular diseases therapy.

    PubMed

    Jarrar, Mohammed; Behl, Shalini; Manyam, Ganiraju; Ganah, Hany; Nazir, Mohammed; Nasab, Reem; Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-06-01

    Clopidogrel and aspirin are among the most prescribed dual antiplatelet therapies to treat the acute coronary syndrome and heart attacks. However, their potential clinical impacts are a subject of intense debates. The therapeutic efficiency of clopidogrel is controlled by the actions of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYPs) enzymes and impacted by individual genetic variations. Inter-individual polymorphisms in CYPs enzymes affect the metabolism of clopidogrel into its active metabolites and, therefore, modify its turnover and clinical outcome. So far, clinical trials fail to confirm higher or lower adverse cardiovascular effects in patients treated with combinations of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors, compared with clopidogrel alone. Such inconclusive findings may be due to genetic variations in the cytochromes CYP2C19 and CYP3A4/5. To investigate potential interactions/effects of these cytochromes and their allele variants on the treatment of acute coronary syndrome with clopidogrel alone or in combination with proton pump inhibitors, we analyze recent literature and discuss the potential impact of the cytochrome allelic variants on cardiovascular events and stent thrombosis treated with clopidogrel. The diversity of CYP2C19 polymorphisms and prevalence span within various ethnic groups, subpopulations and demographic areas are also debated. PMID:27072373

  16. Molecular modeling of the effects of 40Ar recoil in illite particles on their K-Ar isotope dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczerba, Marek; Derkowski, Arkadiusz; Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Środoń, Jan

    2015-06-01

    The radioactive decay of 40K to 40Ar is the basis of isotope age determination of micaceous clay minerals formed during diagenesis. The difference in K-Ar ages between fine and coarse grained illite particles has been interpreted using detrital-authigenic components system, its crystallization history or post-crystallization diffusion. Yet another mechanism should also be considered: natural 40Ar recoil. Whether this recoil mechanism can result in a significant enough loss of 40Ar to provide observable decrease of K-Ar age of the finest illite crystallites at diagenetic temperatures - is the primary objective of this study which is based on molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. All the simulations were performed for the same kinetic energy (initial velocity) of the 40Ar atom, but for varying recoil angles that cover the entire range of their possible values. The results show that 40Ar recoil can lead to various deformations of the illite structure, often accompanied by the displacement of OH groups or breaking of the Si-O bonds. Depending on the recoil angle, there are four possible final positions of the 40Ar atom with respect to the 2:1 layer at the end of the simulation: it can remain in the interlayer space or end up in the closest tetrahedral, octahedral or the opposite tetrahedral sheet. No simulation angles were found for which the 40Ar atom after recoil passes completely through the 2:1 layer. The energy barrier for 40Ar passing through the hexagonal cavity from the tetrahedral sheet into the interlayer was calculated to be 17 kcal/mol. This reaction is strongly exothermic, therefore there is almost no possibility for 40Ar to remain in the tetrahedral sheet of the 2:1 layer over geological time periods. It will either leave the crystal, if close enough to the edge, or return to the interlayer space. On the other hand, if 40Ar ends up in the octahedral sheet after recoil, a substantially higher energy barrier of 55 kcal/mol prevents it from leaving

  17. Methotrexate-induced mucositis in acute leukemia patients is not associated with the MTHFR 677T allele in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J; Coconi-Linares, Lucia Nancy; Garcés-Eisele, Javier; Reyes-Núñez, Virginia

    2007-10-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) has two common variants with reduced activity due to polymorphisms at nucleotides 677 and 1298. Both affect folate metabolism and thus remethylation of homocysteine, but are also thought to affect nucleotide synthesis and DNA methylation. Methotrexate (MTX), which interrupts folate metabolism, is used in the treatment of a variety of diseases including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but exerts in some patients toxic effects on fast dividing tissues such as mucosal epithelia. The enhanced toxicity may be due to cooperative effects between MTX and MTHFR variants. Accordingly, it has been reported that carrying the 677T allele of the MTHFR is a risk factor for MTX-associated mucositis. As in the Mexican population, which is characterized by a high prevalence of the 677T MTHFR variant, several of its commonly associated defects have not been observed, we investigated the relationship between MTX toxicity and the 677T allele. Out of 28 patients with ALL (CC: 2, CT: 10, TT: 16), 16 had episodes of MTX-associated mucositis (CC: 0, CT: 6, TT: 10). Neither at the gene level nor at the genotype level was a significant association with mucositis found. It may be postulated that the risk of higher MTX toxicity in patients with decreased MTHFR activity could be neutralized by the normally folate rich diet in Mexico. PMID:17891601

  18. Null allele, allelic dropouts or rare sex detection in clonal organisms: simulations and application to real data sets of pathogenic microbes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pathogens and their vectors are organisms whose ecology is often only accessible through population genetics tools based on spatio-temporal variability of molecular markers. However, molecular tools may present technical difficulties due to the masking of some alleles (allelic dropouts and/or null alleles), which tends to bias the estimation of heterozygosity and thus the inferences concerning the breeding system of the organism under study. This is especially critical in clonal organisms in which deviation from panmixia, as measured by Wright’s FIS, can, in principle, be used to infer both the extent of clonality and structure in a given population. In particular, null alleles and allelic dropouts are locus specific and likely produce high variance of Wright’s FIS across loci, as rare sex is expected to do. In this paper we propose a tool enabling to discriminate between consequences of these technical problems and those of rare sex. Methods We have performed various simulations of clonal and partially clonal populations. We introduce allelic dropouts and null alleles in clonal data sets and compare the results with those that exhibit increasing rates of sexual recombination. We use the narrow relationship that links Wright’s FIS to genetic diversity in purely clonal populations as assessment criterion, since this relationship disappears faster with sexual recombination than with amplification problems of certain alleles. Results We show that the relevance of our criterion for detecting poorly amplified alleles depends partly on the population structure, the level of homoplasy and/or mutation rate. However, the interpretation of data becomes difficult when the number of poorly amplified alleles is above 50%. The application of this method to reinterpret published data sets of pathogenic clonal microbes (yeast and trypanosomes) confirms its usefulness and allows refining previous estimates concerning important pathogenic agents. Conclusion Our

  19. Temporal changes in allele frequencies in a small marble trout Salmo marmoratus population threatened by extreme flood events.

    PubMed

    Pujolar, J M; Vincenzi, S; Zane, L; Crivelli, A J

    2016-03-01

    The effect of extreme floods on the genetic composition of marble trout Salmo marmoratus living in Lipovscek, a tributary of the Soca River in Slovenia, which has been affected by multiple destructive flood events for centuries was investigated. By monitoring genetic variability during the period 2004-2011, apparent signatures of genetic erosion including a decline in observed and expected heterozygosities and allelic richness were observed. Contemporary effective population size was estimated between 11 and 55 individuals, which is congruent with census data. The data suggest asymmetric gene flow between the two sections of the river. The existence of substantial downstream migration (15-19%) was confirmed by paternity analysis. A small (1-3%) upstream migration was also suggested, which was confirmed by tagging data. Overall, low genetic diversity has not prevented the survival of the Lipovscek population, which might be a common feature of salmonid freshwater populations. PMID:26832308

  20. Cell biological approaches to investigate polyglutamine-expanded AR metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Lori J; Merry, Diane E

    2013-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR). In vivo and in vitro studies have suggested that some steps of normal AR function and metabolism, such as hormone binding and nuclear translocation of the AR, are necessary for toxicity and aggregation of the mutant protein. Mutation of discreet functional domains of the AR and sites of posttranslational modification enable the detailed analysis of the role of AR function and metabolism in toxicity and aggregation of polyglutamine-expanded AR. This analysis could potentially lead to the development of targeted therapy for the treatment of SBMA. We have developed a stably transfected, tetracycline-inducible, cell model that replicates many of the hallmarks of disease, including ligand-dependent aggregation and toxicity, and provides a relatively quick system for the reliable expression and analysis of the mutated polyglutamine-expanded AR. Multiple cell lines, each expressing the androgen receptor with a distinct functional mutation, can be created and the dose of tetracycline modulated to produce equal protein expression across lines in order to evaluate the structural and functional requirements of AR toxicity and aggregation. Results from these studies can then be validated in a disease-relevant cell type, spinal motor neurons, using viral delivery of the gene of interest into dissociated spinal cord cultures. Utilization of these cell models provides a relatively rapid, cost-effective experimental pathway to analyze the role of distinct steps in AR metabolism in disease pathogenesis using in vitro systems. PMID:23719921

  1. Ar/Ar age data of muscovite from the Keivy Terrane (central Kola Peninsula, arctic European Russia) imply a prolonged fluid-assisted recrystallisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, K.; Ruffet, G.; Marker, M.

    2012-04-01

    Single grain muscovite 40Ar/39Ar age data from metasediments of the Keivy Terrane point to a prolonged recrystallisation, and imply that the younger age set in metamorphic terranes with a long history cannot always be simply interpreted as due to late and slow cooling. The Keivy terrane is an element of the Palaeoproterozoic Lapland-Kola collisional belt developed along the northern margin of the Fennoscandian (Baltic) Shield. It comprises a lower series of late Archaean meta-volcanic rocks, intruded by earliest Palaeoproterozoic alkali granites that are covered by strongly deformed quartz-rich kyanite-staurolite-garnet-micaschists of the Keivy unit that have yielded magmatic zircons as young as ~2.35 Ga, which were derived from the substratum's alkaline granite. 40Ar/39Ar step-heating dating with a defocussed laser beam of muscovite grains from seven metasediments of the Keivy unit yielded saddle-shaped age spectra in most experiments. In five out of seven cases the base of the saddle corresponded to a plateau age in the range of 1667 to 1593 Ma (60-90% of the gas release; 1 sigma errors: 1.0-1.2 Ma). We do not simply interpret these 40Ar/39Ar ages in the classical way as due to cooling, because the saddle shape of the spectra enables a more complete and detailed interpretation. Saddle-shaped age spectra may result from the presence of different argon reservoirs in partially recrystallised and chemically distinct micas that degas over a different energy interval: a primary, not recrystallised or inherited domain (low and high temperature steps) and a newly formed or recrystallised one (saddle minimum in the intermediate steps). The younger subdomains formed by growth or recrystallisation could characterise the last isotopic record during an extended (re)crystallisation history. It is striking that 1612 and 1615 Ma saddle minimum ages in two samples correspond to a plateau age of 1612 Ma in another sample. Also elevated high and/or low temperature apparent ages of

  2. 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He - 4He/3He geochronology of landscape evolution and channel iron deposit genesis at Lynn Peak, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Heim, Jonathan A.; Farley, Kenneth A.; Monteiro, Hevelyn; Waltenberg, Kathryn

    2013-09-01

    (U-Th)/He geochronology of authigenic goethite cements from the Lynn Peak channel iron deposit (CID), Hamersley Province, Western Australia, reveals a history of mineral precipitation ranging from ca. 33 to 14 Ma. Massive goethites from nearby weathering profiles at Roy Hill North, a possible source of detrital material during the aggradation of the Lynn Peak channels, yield (U-Th)/He results as old as ca. 64 Ma. The combination of (U-Th)/He geochronology with incremental outgassing 4He/3He studies on proton-irradiated samples reveals that Lynn Peak goethites host radiogenic 4He in low retentivity (LRD) and high retentivity (HRD) domains and that the HRDs account for most of the sample mass and have lost very little of their original 4He over geologic time. Such high retentivity is especially notable given the goethites were collected from the surface, where they were subject to significant heating by solar irradiation. Minor contamination by detrital fragments of potentially 4He-rich primary phases (e.g., rutile, ilmenite, zircon) occurs in some samples. Fortunately, the 4He/3He method permits characterization of this extraneous 4He component, which is small (<10 wt.% of the total 4He in the goethite) and can be corrected out in estimating the goethite formation age. These results indicate that the Lynn Peak channel was already aggraded and undergoing goethite cementation by ca. 33 Ma. The history of aggradation and channel cementation independently measured through 40Ar/39Ar geochronology is consistent with that obtained from the (U-Th)/He and 4He/3He record. Laser incremental-heating 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of detrital and authigenic Mn oxides, primarily cryptomelane (KMn8O16·xH2O), from the same locality in the Lynn Peak channel reveals that detrital oxides are older than ca. 44 Ma (and as old as ca. 65 Ma) and authigenic oxides are younger than ca. 35 Ma and as young as ca. 16 Ma. Authigenic cryptomelane precipitation and channel cementation occurred

  3. A generic interface element for COMET-AR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccleary, Susan L.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1995-01-01

    The implementation of an interface element capability within the COMET-AR software system is described. The report is intended for use by both users of currently implemented interface elements and developers of new interface element formulations. Guidance on the use of COMET-AR is given. A glossary is provided as an Appendix to this report for readers unfamiliar with the jargon of COMET-AR. A summary of the currently implemented interface element formulation is presented in Section 7.3 of this report.

  4. The Mono Lake Excursion Recorded in Phonolitic Lavas From Tenerife (Canary Islands): Paleomagnetic Analyses and Coupled K/Ar and Ar/Ar Dating.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissel, C.; Guillou, H.; Laj, C. E.; Carracedo, J. C.; Nomade, S.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Wandres, C.

    2011-12-01

    Studies of geomagnetic excursions is important for the knowledge of the geodynamo, and also because they may be used as precise time markers in various geological records (sediments, lavas and ice via their impact on the production of cosmogenic isotopes). In volcanic rocks, the identification of excursions is very challenging given the sporadic nature of the volcanic eruptions. However, it is a critical step because it allows absolute paleointensity determinations to be obtained, coupled with absolute dating methods. We present here a coupled paleomagnetic/dating investigation conducted on three different lava flows from the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands; Spain) erupted during the Mono Lake excursion (MLE). Paleomagnetic analyses consist in zero field demagnetizations (AF and/or thermal) and of Thellier and Thellier experiments using the PICRIT-03 set of criteria to select reliable intensity determinations. For dating, the unspiked K-Ar and the 40Ar/39Ar methods were coupled at LSCE for two of the flows and the third flow, with lower content in radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) was dated only using the unspiked K-Ar method. One of the flows is characterized by a direction largely deviated from the one expected from an axial geocentric dipole (GAD) field. Its paleointensity value is very low (7.8 μT). The two other sites are characterized by inclinations slightly shallower than the GAD value and by low intensity values (about 12 and 21 μT; present value: 38μT). The three K/Ar ages combined with two 40Ar/39Ar ages range from 32.0 to 33.2 ka and they are not statistically distinguishable from one another. It therefore appears that these lavas have recorded the MLE (the only excursion in this time interval) confirming its brief duration (shorter than the minimum age uncertainties available). The mean age is younger but, within the uncertainties and depending on the age of the standard we use, consistent with the age of the 10Be peak and of the marine intensity low when

  5. Be Bold ... Be Enrollment Rich

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, marketing specialist Mark Perna offers advice on how career and technical schools can market themselves and their programs. To become "enrollment rich," he suggests the following: (1) develop a brand plan--something that separates your organization from competitors in the mind of the community; (2) deliver the message--the community…

  6. Rich-Cores in Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Athen; Mondragón, Raúl J.

    2015-01-01

    A core comprises of a group of central and densely connected nodes which governs the overall behaviour of a network. It is recognised as one of the key meso-scale structures in complex networks. Profiling this meso-scale structure currently relies on a limited number of methods which are often complex and parameter dependent or require a null model. As a result, scalability issues are likely to arise when dealing with very large networks together with the need for subjective adjustment of parameters. The notion of a rich-club describes nodes which are essentially the hub of a network, as they play a dominating role in structural and functional properties. The definition of a rich-club naturally emphasises high degree nodes and divides a network into two subgroups. Here, we develop a method to characterise a rich-core in networks by theoretically coupling the underlying principle of a rich-club with the escape time of a random walker. The method is fast, scalable to large networks and completely parameter free. In particular, we show that the evolution of the core in World Trade and C. elegans networks correspond to responses to historical events and key stages in their physical development, respectively. PMID:25799585

  7. Technology-Rich Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thach, Kim J.; Norman, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    This article uses one of the authors' classroom experiences to explore how teachers can create technology-rich learning environments that support upper elementary students' mathematical understanding of algebra and number and operations. They describe a unit that presents a common financial problem (the use of credit cards) to engage sixth graders…

  8. Mass Spectrometric and Langmuir Probe Measurements in Inductively Coupled Plasmas in Ar, CHF3/Ar and CHF3/Ar/O2 Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. S.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, S. P.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Absolute fluxes and energy distributions of ions in inductively coupled plasmas of Ar, CHF3/Ar, and CHF3/Ar/O2 have been measured. These plasmas were generated in a Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) cell modified for inductive coupling at pressures 10-50 mTorr and 100-300 W of 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) power in various feedgas mixtures. In pure Ar plasmas, the Ar(+) flux increases linearly with pressure as well as RF-power. Total ion flux in CHF3 mixtures decreases with increase in pressure and also CHF3 concentration. Relative ion fluxes observed in the present studies are analyzed with the help of available cross sections for electron impact ionization and charge-exchange ion-molecule reactions. Measurements of plasma potential, electron and ion number densities, electron energy distribution function, and mean electron energy have also been made in the center of the plasma with a RF compensated Langmuir probe. Plasma potential values are compared with the mean ion energies determined from the measured ion energy distributions and are consistent. Electron temperature, plasma potential, and mean ion energy vary inversely with pressure, but increase with CHF3 content in the mixture.

  9. Tetra-allelic SNPs: Informative forensic markers compiled from public whole-genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Phillips, C; Amigo, J; Carracedo, Á; Lareu, M V

    2015-11-01

    Multiple-allele single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are potentially useful for forensic DNA analysis as they can provide more discrimination power than normal binary SNPs. In addition, the presence in a profile of more than two alleles per marker provides a clearer indication of mixed DNA than assessments of imbalanced signals in the peak pairs of binary SNPs. Using the 1000 Genomes Phase III human variant data release of 2014 as the starting point, this study collated 961 tetra-allelic SNPs that pass minimum sequence quality thresholds and where four separate nucleotide substitution alleles were detected. Although most of these loci had three of the four alleles in combined frequencies of 2% or less, 160 had high heterozygosities with 50 exceeding those of 'ideal' 0.5:0.5 binary SNPs. From this set of most polymorphic tetra-allelic SNPs, we identified markers most informative for forensic purposes and explored these loci in detail. Subsets of the most polymorphic tetra-allelic SNPs will make useful additions to current panels of forensic identification SNPs and ancestry-informative SNPs. The 24 most discriminatory tetra-allelic SNPs were estimated to detect more than two alleles in at least one marker per profile in 99.9% of mixtures of African contributors. In European contributor mixtures 99.4% of profiles would show multiple allele patterns, but this drops to 92.6% of East Asian contributor mixtures due to reduced levels of polymorphism for the 24 SNPs in this population group. PMID:26209763

  10. Effective marker alleles associated with type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight infection in fields

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Luo, Meng; Zhang, Dadong; Wu, Di; Li, Lei; Bai, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers associated with known quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in bi-parental mapping population usually have more than two alleles in breeding populations. Therefore, understanding the association of each allele with FHB response is particularly important to marker-assisted enhancement of FHB resistance. In this paper, we evaluated FHB severities of 192 wheat accessions including landraces and commercial varieties in three field growing seasons, and genotyped this panel with 364 genome-wide informative molecular markers. Among them, 11 markers showed reproducible marker-trait association (p < 0.05) in at least two experiments using a mixed model. More than two alleles were identified per significant marker locus. These alleles were classified into favorable, unfavorable and neutral alleles according to the normalized genotypic values. The distributions of effective alleles at these loci in each wheat accession were characterized. Mean FHB severities increased with decreased number of favorable alleles at the reproducible loci. Chinese wheat landraces and Japanese accessions have more favorable alleles at the majority of the reproducible marker loci. FHB resistance levels of varieties can be greatly improved by introduction of these favorable alleles and removal of unfavorable alleles simultaneously at these QTL-linked marker loci. PMID:27436944

  11. Noble-gas-rich separates from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moniot, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    Acid-resistant residues were prepared by HCl-HF demineralization of three H-type ordinary chondrites: Brownfield 1937 (H3), Dimmitt (H3, 4), and Estacado (H6). These residues were found to contain a large proportion of the planetary-type trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe in the meteorites. The similarity of these acid residues to those from carbonaceous chondrites and LL-type ordinary chondrites suggests that the same phase carries the trapped noble gases in all these diverse meteorite types. Because the H group represents a large fraction of all meteorites, this result indicates that the gas-rich carrier phase is as universal as the trapped noble-gas component itself. When treated with an oxidizing etchant, the acid residues lost almost all their complement of noble gases.

  12. Rare-gas-rich separates from carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, J. H.; Frick, U.; Neil, J. M.; Phinney, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of carbon-rich separates prepared by demineralization of colloidal fractions after disaggregation of bulk samples of the type C2 meteorites Murray, Murchison, and Cold Bokkeveld, as well as a methanol colloid extracted from acid-resistant residues of the Allende meteorite (type C3V) obtained by dissolution of most of the minerals in HCl and HF acids. The carbonaceous separates, or lAlates (a coined word designating colloids prepared sometimes before and sometimes after acid treatment), are characterized incompletely and with difficulty. A stepwise heating experiment on a Murray lAlate is discussed which revealed bimodal release of all noble gases, with similar patterns for Ar, Kr, and Xe. Chemical reactions are suggested as the likely mechanism for gas release. The results are shown to support the concept of a carbonaceous gas carrier uniformly present in meteorites of various types.

  13. Noble-gas-rich separates from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniot, R. K.

    1980-02-01

    Acid-resistant residues were prepared by HCl-HF demineralization of three H-type ordinary chondrites: Brownfield 1937 (H3), Dimmitt (H3, 4), and Estacado (H6). These residues were found to contain a large proportion of the planetary-type trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe in the meteorites. The similarity of these acid residues to those from carbonaceous chondrites and LL-type ordinary chondrites suggests that the same phase carries the trapped noble gases in all these diverse meteorite types. Because the H group represents a large fraction of all meteorites, this result indicates that the gas-rich carrier phase is as universal as the trapped noble-gas component itself. When treated with an oxidizing etchant, the acid residues lost almost all their complement of noble gases.

  14. 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of the emplacement of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Boudier, Françoise; Gnos, Edwin; Monié, Patrick; Nicolas, Adolphe

    1995-11-01

    The obduction-related basal part of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite (Baluchistan, Pakistan) and the underlying metamorphic sequence were studied structurally which demonstrated a WSW-ENE-trending thrusting sequence for the initial obduction. 40Ar/ 39Ar measurements on amphiboles and plagioclase from the subophiolitic metamorphic rocks, and on plastically deformed and recrystallized dolerite samples from the base of the sheeted dyke complex give apparent ages between 70.7 ± 5.0 and 65.1 ± 4.1 Ma interpreted as cooling ages dating approximately the formation of the plastic deformation and obduction. The results indicate that the Muslim Bagh ophiolite represents a segment of ocean floor from the small and slow-spreading ocean branch of the Neo-Tethys located between the Indo-Pakistani and the Afro-Arabian plates. The WSW-ENE-oriented obduction of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite onto the Indo-Pakistani continental margin occurred with the convergence of the Neo-Tethys branch during the Late Cretaceous and before the Tertiary collision of the Indo-Pakistani plate with the Eurasian plate.

  15. (40)Ar/(39)Ar Age of Hornblende-Bearing R Chondrite LAP 04840

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrites have a complex chronology due to several variables affecting and operating on chondritic parent bodies such as radiogenic heating, pressure and temperature variation with depth, aqueous alteration, and shock or impact heating. Unbrecciated chondrites can record ages from 4.56 to 4.4 Ga that represent cooling in small parent bodies. Some brecciated chondrites exhibit younger ages (much less than 4 to 4.4 Ga) that may reflect the age of brecciation, disturbance, or shock and impact events (much less than 4 Ga). A unique R chondrite was recently found in the LaPaz Icefield of Antarctica - LAP 04840. This chondrite contains approximately 15% hornblende and trace amounts of biotite, making it the first of its kind. Studies have revealed an equigranular texture, mineral equilibria yielding equilibration near 650-700 C and 250-500 bars, hornblende that is dominantly OH-bearing (very little Cl or F), and high D/H ratios. To help gain a better understanding of the origin of this unique sample, we have measured the (40)Ar/(39)Ar age (LAP 04840 split 39).

  16. Soft X-Ray Emission Lines of Argon, ArIX -- ArXVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Behar, E.; Kahn, S. M.

    2002-04-01

    The soft x-ray region of 20 - 50 Å is nearly unknown territory to astrophysicists. This spectral band remains virtually unstudied, even in solar observations, and laboratory measurements are similarly lacking. Spectra obtained from Chandra and XMM-Newton X-Ray Observatories show a wealth of lines in this region, albeit weak in most cases. Most of these lines remain unidentified as observations have now outpaced the available databases. In support of these missions we have undertaken laboratory measurements of astrophysically relevant ions in the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions using the Livermore electron beam ion trap EBIT-II. We present here results of argon, covering ArIX - ArXVI between 20 - 50 Åand compare our spectra with calculations from the Hebrew University - Lawrence Livermore Atomic Code HULLAC. EBIT-II data agree broadly with HULLAC calculations, with accuracy of ± 0.3 Å for most major lines. Given the density of lines in Chandra and XMM-Newton spectra, this accuracy is often insufficient for line identification in the absence of careful laboratory mesaurements. Work performed under auspices of DOE by UC LLNL and funded by NASA SARA.

  17. 40Ar/39Ar dating of Pleistocene tuffs: an accurate age for the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic reversal (MBGR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, D. F.; Renne, P. R.; Morgan, L. E.; Deino, A.; Smith, V. C.; Ellis, B. S.; Pearce, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent recalibrations of the 40Ar/39Ar system [1,2] reveal inconsistencies with some previous ages inferred for the MBGR. An Ar/Ar age [3] for the Bishop Tuff (BT) (which post-dates the MBGR by at least 15.3 ± 2.2 ka [3]) recalculated [2] yields an age of 778.0 ± 3.8 ka (1σ, full systematic uncertainty). The age is c. 10 ka older than the BT zircon ID-TIMS U-Pb age [4] and places the MBGR at c. 793 ka, c. 13 and 20 ka older than astronomical ages for the MBGR of 780 ka [5] and 773 ka [6], respectively. To determine an accurate age for the MBGR, we have made a series of 40Ar/39Ar age determinations for Pleistocene tuffs from both Indonesia and North America that have direct relationships to the MBGR. Blind analyses were conducted at SUERC and BGC. We observed excellent inter-laboratory agreement and no systematic offset in data. Ar/Ar ages are reported relative to [2] (1σ, full systematic uncertainty). Drill cores from ODP Site 758 show the precise location of the MBGR. Below the MBGR are two distal tephra horizons that we have identified as products of two temporally distinct Old Toba Tuff (OTT) eruptions (layer d OTT1 and layer D OTT2). Continuous sedimentation between OTT1 (802.8 ± 0.7 ka, n = 100, MSWD 1.2) and OTT2 (796.2 ± 0.8 ka, n = 62, MSWD 1.3) allows for calculation of an accurate sedimentation rate and for extrapolation of an age from OTT2 to the MBGR. Data define an age for the MBGR of 795.2 ± 0.9 ka. Using tephra above the MBGR boundary, the Middle Toba Tuff (layer C) and Young Toba Tuff (layer A), extrapolation down core supports a MBGR age of c. 795 ka. Recent age data for BT sanidine reported relative to FCs at 28.172 Ma (767.4 ± 1.1 Ma) [7] oddly yielded an Ar/Ar age that was indistinguishable from the BT zircon U-Pb age [4], which is consistent with previous 40Ar/39Ar age measurements made relative to FCs at 28.02 Ma [3]. Thus we made a series of 40Ar/39Ar measurements on the exact same sample as used by Rivera et al. [7] and observed

  18. Geology and 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology of Akutan Volcano, Eastern Aleutian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, M. L.; Jicha, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating and new whole-rock geochemical analyses are used to establish an eruptive chronology for Akutan volcano, Akutan Island, in the eastern Aleutian island arc. Akutan Island (166° W, 54.1° N) is the site of long-lived volcanism and the entire island comprises volcanic rocks as old as 3.3 Ma (Richter et al., 1998, USGS Open-File 98-135). Our current focus is on the 225 km2 western half of the island, which is home to the Holocene active cone, Holocene to latest Pleistocene satellite vents, and underlying middle Pleistocene volcanic basement rocks. Eruptive products span the tholeiitic-calc-alkaline boundary, are medium-K, and range from basalt to dacite. Furnace incremental heating experiments on groundmass separates of 38 samples resulted in 29 40Ar/39Ar ages. The remainder did not yield radiogenic 40Ar contents and are likely Holocene in age. The oldest ages (1251×10 and 1385×12 ka) are from a wedge of flat-lying dissected lavas north of the Holocene cone; these likely represent the upper part of the volcanic basement that underlies the entire island. Above a major unconformity lie basaltic andesite to dacite lavas that range from 765× 4 to 522×8 ka. The eroded remnants of the source volcano for these flows appears to crop out as a series of variably hydrothermally altered breccias and domes 5 km east-northeast of the current summit. A 625 m-tall eroded basaltic center, Lava Peak, sits 6 km northwest of the summit; its deeply incised western flank exposes lava flows and a plug. Two flows are dated at 598×16 and 602×15 ka. A high ridge 1.5 km south of the summit is made of oxidized, mostly andesitic lavas 284-249 ka old; these are presumably the remnants of an eruptive center located near the current cone. Flat Top Peak, 3.5 km southwest of the summit, produced almost exclusively basalts and six dated lavas range from 155×8 to 98×18 ka. Lavas from Flat Top (1065 m asl) are deeply eroded suggesting extensive ice cover during marine isotope

  19. Experimental study of NO2 reduction in N2/Ar and O2/Ar mixtures by pulsed corona discharge.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinbo; Zheng, Chenghang; Gao, Xiang; Shen, Xu; Wang, Zhihua; Luo, Zhongyang; Cen, Kefa

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal plasma technology has been regarded as a promising alternative technology for NOx removal. The understanding of NO2 reduction characteristics is extremely important since NO2 reduction could lower the total NO oxidation rate in the plasma atmosphere. In this study, NO2 reduction was experimentally investigated using a non-thermal plasma reactor driven by a pulsed power supply for different simulated gas compositions and operating parameters. The NO2 reduction was promoted by increasing the specific energy density (SED), and the highest conversion rates were 33.7%, 42.1% and 25.7% for Ar, N2/Ar and O2/Ar, respectively. For a given SED, the NO2 conversion rate had the order N2/Ar>Ar>O2/Ar. The highest energy yield of 3.31g/kWh was obtained in N2/Ar plasma and decreased with increasing SED; the same trends were also found in the other two gas compositions. The conversion rate decreased with increasing initial NO2 concentration. Furthermore, the presence of N2 or O2 led to different reaction pathways for NO2 conversion due to the formation of different dominating reactive radicals. PMID:25458679

  20. 40Ar/39Ar and U-Th-Pb dating of separated clasts from the Abee E4 chondrite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bogard, D.D.; Unruh, D.M.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1983-01-01

    Determinations of 40Ar/39Ar and U-Th-Pb are reported for three clasts from the Abee (E4) enstatite chondrite, which has been the object of extensive consortium investigations. The clasts give 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages and/or maximum ages of 4.5 Gy, whereas two of the clasts give average ages of 4.4 Gy. Within the range of 4.4-4.5 Gy these data do not resolve any possible age differences among the three clasts. 206Pb measured in these clasts is only ???1.5-2.5% radiogenic, which leads to relatively large uncertainties in the Pb isochron age and in the 207Pb/206Pb model ages. The Pb data indicate that the initial 207Pb/206Pb was no more than 0.08??0.07% higher than this ratio in Can??on Diablo troilite. The U-Th-Pb data are consistent with the interpretation that initial formation of these clasts occurred 4.58 Gy ago and that the clasts have since remained closed systems, but are contaminated with terrestrial Pb. The 40Ar/39Ar ages could be gas retention ages after clast formation or impact degassing ages. The thermal history of Abee deduced from Ar data appears consistent with that deduced from magnetic data, and suggests that various Abee components experienced separate histories until brecciation no later than 4.4 Gy ago, and experienced no appreciable subsequent heating. ?? 1983.

  1. Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching of III-V Antimonides in BCl(3)/Ar and Cl(2)/Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, R.P.; Lester, L.F.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.; Zhang, L.

    1998-11-04

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching characteristics of GaSb and AIGaAsSb have been investigated in BC13/Ar and Clz/Ar plasmas. The etch rates and selectivity between GaSb and AIGaAsSb are reported as functions of plasma chemistry, ICP power, RF self-bias, and chamber pressure. It is found that physical sputtering resorption of the etch products plays a dominant role in BC13/Ar ICP etching, while in Clz/Ar plasma, the chemical reaction dominates the etching. GaSb etch rates exceeding 2 ~rnhnin are achieved in Clz/Ar plasmas with smooth surfaces and anisotropic profiles. In BC13/Ar plasmas, etch rates of 5100 Mmin and 4200 Mmin are obtained for GaSb and AIGaAsSb, respectively. The surfaces of both GaSb and AIGaAsSb etched in BC13/Ar plasmas remain smooth and stoichiometric over the entire range of plasma conditions investigated. This result is attributed to effective removal of etch products by physical sputtering. For a wide range of plasma conditions, the selectivity between GaSb and AIGaAsSb is close to unity, which is desirable for fabricating etched mirrors and gratings for Sb-based mid-IR laser diodes.

  2. Quinolone resistance locus nfxD of Escherichia coli is a mutant allele of the parE gene encoding a subunit of topoisomerase IV.

    PubMed Central

    Breines, D M; Ouabdesselam, S; Ng, E Y; Tankovic, J; Shah, S; Soussy, C J; Hooper, D C

    1997-01-01

    The locus nfxD, which contributes to high-level quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli KF111b (gyrAr nfxB nfxD), is only expressed in the presence of a gyrA mutation, and maps to the region of the parC and parE genes, was outcrossed into strain KF130, creating strain DH161 (gyrAr nfxD). DNA sequence analysis of DH161 revealed no changes in the topoisomerase IV parC quinolone resistance-determining region but did identify a single T-to-A mutation in parE at codon 445, leading to a change from Leu to His. Full-length cloned parE+ partially complemented the resistance phenotype in KF111b and DH161, but did not complement the resistance phenotype in strain KF130 (gyrAr). No complementation was seen with cloned, truncated parE+. To confirm these findings, gyrAr was first outcrossed from KF130 into E. coli W3110parE10 [parE temperature sensitive(Ts)] and KL16. The transduced strains KL16 and W3110parE10 were subsequently transformed with plasmids containing cloned parE from DH161 or KL16. Cloned parE from DH161 increased norfloxacin resistance in the parE(Ts) background twofold at 30 degrees C and fourfold at 42 degrees C compared to those for cloned parE from KL16. The same experiment with a non-Ts background revealed a twofold increase in the norfloxacin MIC at both 30 and 42 degrees C. These data identify the nfxD conditional resistance locus as a mutant allele of parE. This report is the first of a quinolone-resistant parE mutant and confirms the role of topoisomerase IV as a secondary target of norfloxacin in E. coli. PMID:8980775

  3. Comparison Between 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb Geochronometers at ca. 2.1 Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Renne, P. R.; Min, K.; Schmitz, M. D.; Bowring, S. A.; de Wit, M. J.; Morelli, C.

    2001-12-01

    Recent sudies have revealed 1-2% age bias between conventional calibrations of the 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb geochronologic methods applied to quickly cooled volcanic rocks whose isotopic systems should be uncomplicated by differential retention of radiogenic daughter isotopes. The U-Pb system serves as an ideal basis for comparison because of its rigorous internal reliability criteria and precisely-determined decay constants via alpha counting. Studies capable of providing useful comparison have been limited to samples younger than 1.1 Ga, which offers useful constraints primarily on 40Ar/40K of 40Ar/39Ar standards and the electron capture decay constant of 40K. The magnitude of observed bias for these samples is within the range of realistically propagated errors in those quantities. The beta decay constant of 40K is comparably poorly constrained, leading to ambiguities about early solar system cooling rates among other issues, and is more difficult to test directly due to a paucity of appropriate (e.g., minimally altered with demonstrably simple thermal history) rocks for comparison. A strikingly fresh hornblende-biotite dacite from the Eglab region of the Requibat massif, West Africa, offers an exceptional opportunity for head-to-head comparison of the two geochronometers at nearly twice the age limit currently available. Zircons from this unit are concordant to nearly concordant.and indicate an age of ca 2076 Ma. 40Ar/39Ar analysis of individual hornblende grains, step-heated with a CO2 laser, reveal some complexities but generally yield plateau ages of 2050-2060 Ma based on IUGS 1977 decay constants and 28.02 Ma for the Fish Canyon sanidine. Thus the bias between 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb systems in this case is of order 1%, suggesting that relative error in the conventional beta decay constant is somewhat less than that of the electron capture constant for 40K.

  4. The Thermo Scientific HELIX-SFT noble gas mass spectrometer: (preliminary) performance for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfod, D. N.; Mark, D. F.; Morgan, L. E.; Tomkinson, T.; Stuart, F.; Imlach, J.; Hamilton, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Thermo Scientific HELIX-platform Split Flight Tube (HELIX-SFT) noble gas mass spectrometer is specifically designed for simultaneous collection of helium isotopes. The high mass spur houses a switchable 1011 - 1012 Ω resistor Faraday cup and the low mass spur a digital pulse-counting secondary electron multiplier (SEM). We have acquired the HELIX-SFT with the specific intention to measure argon isotopes for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. This contribution will discuss preliminary performance (resolution, reproducibility, precision etc.) with respect to measuring argon isotope ratios for 40Ar/39Ar dating of geological materials. We anticipate the greatest impact for 40Ar/39Ar dating will be increased accuracy and precision, especially as we approach the techniques younger limit. Working with Thermo Scientific we have subtly modified the source, alpha and collector slits of the HELIX-SFT mass spectrometer to improve its resolution for resolving isobaric interferences at masses 36 to 40. The enhanced performance will allow for accurate and precise measurement of argon isotopes. Preliminary investigations show that we can obtain a valley resolution of >700 and >1300 (compared to standard HELIX-SFT specifications of >400 and >700) for the high and low mass spurs, respectively. The improvement allows for full resolution of hydrocarbons (C3+) at masses 37 - 40 and almost full resolution at mass 36. The HELIX-SFT will collect data in dual collection mode with 40Ar+ ion beams measured using the switchable 1011 - 1012 Ω resistor Faraday cup and 39Ar through 36Ar measured using the SEM. The HELIX-SFT requires Faraday-SEM inter-calibration but negates the necessity to inter-calibrate multiple electron multipliers. We will further present preliminary data from the dating of mineral standards: Alder Creek sanidine, Fish Canyon sanidine and Mount Dromedary biotite (GA1550).

  5. Argon diffusion in Apollo 16 impact glass spherules: Implications for 40Ar/39Ar dating of lunar impact events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombosi, David J.; Baldwin, Suzanne L.; Watson, E. Bruce; Swindle, Timothy D.; Delano, John W.; Roberge, Wayne G.

    2015-01-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar technique applied to impact glass has been used to date both terrestrial and lunar impact events. The ability to utilize the 40Ar/39Ar technique rests on the assumption that impact glasses are closed to the loss of daughter product, 40Ar∗, after formation. Diffusion experiments were performed on three Apollo 16 lunar impact glasses and yielded activation energies for 39Ar of ∼17 to 20 kcal mol-1 and log10(D0/a2) values of -5.2 to -6.0 s-1. The resulting diffusion coefficients are interpreted as minimum values and the Apollo 16 glass is probably some of the least retentive of lunar glasses, as the degree of non-bridging oxygen is at one end of the range in lunar glasses. At temperatures below the glass transition temperature (i.e., ∼660 °C), the data can be explained by volume diffusion from a single diffusion domain. Modeling shows that Apollo 16 composition glass could lose significant quantities of radiogenic argon (40Ar∗) (∼90-100% over 20-40 Myr assuming a diffusion domain size (a) of 75 μm) due to diurnal temperature variations on the lunar surface, although 40Ar∗ loss is highly sensitive to exposure duration and effective diffusion domain size. Modeling shows that loss from transient thermal events (e.g., heating to ∼200 °C for 102 yr duration) can also cause partial resetting of apparent 40Ar/39Ar ages. In small (a = 75 μm) glasses a maximum of 50-60% of 40Ar∗ is lost over 4 Ga when buried to depths corresponding to temperatures of -15 °C. Results indicate that caution should be exercised in interpreting lunar impact glass 40Ar/39Ar ages, as the assumption of closed system behavior may have been violated, particularly in glasses with low fractions of non-bridging oxygen.

  6. Multi-spacecraft observations of recurrent {sup 3}He-rich solar energetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bučík, R.; Innes, D. E.; Mall, U.; Korth, A.; Mason, G. M.; Gómez-Herrero, R.

    2014-05-01

    We study the origin of {sup 3}He-rich solar energetic particles (<1 MeV nucleon{sup –1}) that are observed consecutively on STEREO-B, Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), and STEREO-A spacecraft when they are separated in heliolongitude by more than 90°. The {sup 3}He-rich period on STEREO-B and STEREO-A commences on 2011 July 1 and 2011 July 16, respectively. The ACE {sup 3}He-rich period consists of two sub-events starting on 2011 July 7 and 2011 July 9. We associate the STEREO-B July 1 and ACE July 7 {sup 3}He-rich events with the same sizeable active region (AR) producing X-ray flares accompanied by prompt electron events, when it was near the west solar limb as seen from the respective spacecraft. The ACE July 9 and STEREO-A July 16 events were dispersionless with enormous {sup 3}He enrichment, lacking solar energetic electrons and occurring in corotating interaction regions. We associate these events with a small, recently emerged AR near the border of a low-latitude coronal hole that produced numerous jet-like emissions temporally correlated with type III radio bursts. For the first time we present observations of (1) solar regions with long-lasting conditions for {sup 3}He acceleration and (2) solar energetic {sup 3}He that is temporarily confined/re-accelerated in interplanetary space.

  7. Differential regulation of metabolic pathways by androgen receptor (AR) and its constitutively active splice variant, AR-V7, in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shafi, Ayesha A.; Putluri, Vasanta; Arnold, James M.; Tsouko, Efrosini; Maity, Suman; Roberts, Justin M.; Coarfa, Cristian; Frigo, Daniel E.; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Weigel, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) is primarily an androgen-dependent disease, which is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Tumors usually develop resistance (castration-resistant PCa [CRPC]), but remain androgen receptor (AR) dependent. Numerous mechanisms for AR-dependent resistance have been identified including expression of constitutively active AR splice variants lacking the hormone-binding domain. Recent clinical studies show that expression of the best-characterized AR variant, AR-V7, correlates with resistance to ADT and poor outcome. Whether AR-V7 is simply a constitutively active substitute for AR or has novel gene targets that cause unique downstream changes is unresolved. Several studies have shown that AR activation alters cell metabolism. Using LNCaP cells with inducible expression of AR-V7 as a model system, we found that AR-V7 stimulated growth, migration, and glycolysis measured by ECAR (extracellular acidification rate) similar to AR. However, further analyses using metabolomics and metabolic flux assays revealed several differences. Whereas AR increased citrate levels, AR-V7 reduced citrate mirroring metabolic shifts observed in CRPC patients. Flux analyses indicate that the low citrate is a result of enhanced utilization rather than a failure to synthesize citrate. Moreover, flux assays suggested that compared to AR, AR-V7 exhibits increased dependence on glutaminolysis and reductive carboxylation to produce some of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) metabolites. These findings suggest that these unique actions represent potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26378018

  8. Hydrothermal fluids, argon isotopes and mineralization ages of the Fankou Pb-Zn deposit in south China: Insights from sphalerite 40Ar/39Ar progressive crushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying-De; Qiu, Hua-Ning; Xu, Yi-Gang

    2012-05-01

    Hydrothermal fluid geochemistry and mineralization timing are two important factors in the genesis of a hydrothermal deposit. 40Ar/39Ar analyses of fluid inclusions not only provide time constraints for the mineralization but also help to clarify the K-Ca-Cl-Ar characteristics for the ore-forming fluids. In this study, six sphalerite samples collected from the Fankou lead-zinc sulfide deposit are investigated by 40Ar/39Ar in vacuo crushing. Gases liberated from the early and late crushing steps exhibit distinct Ar isotopic compositions and 40Ar/39Ar apparent ages. Argon released in the early steps has much higher 40Ar and 38ArCl and lower 37ArCa contents than those in the late steps. The significant excess Ar (40ArE) extracted in the early crushing steps shows a strong correlation with 38ArCl with very high 40ArE/38ArCl ratios. In contrast, those of the late steps mainly consist of atmospheric Ar and K-correlated radiogenic Ar with a constant 40ArR/39ArK ratio and the atmospheric initial 40Ar/36Ar ratio. As a result, all samples yield similar declining age spectra: the fore segments with anomalously old apparent ages decline quickly in the early crushing steps and the rear ones are flat with concordant apparent ages in the late crushing steps. The data points of the early steps define linear correlations in plots of 40ArNA/39ArK vs. 38ArCl/39ArK and 38ArCl/40ArNA vs. 39ArK/40ArNA (NA for non-atmospheric) and most yield ages of 240-230 Ma. On the other hand, the data of the late steps always construct well-defined isochrons in the plots of 36ArA/40ArNA vs. 39ArK/40ArNA with consistent ages of ˜300 Ma. We interpret that gases released in the early steps were from the secondary fluid inclusions (SFIs) due to their distribution characteristics along cracks leading to be easily extracted, and those released in the later steps represented the contribution of the primary fluid inclusions (PFIs). The initial 40Ar/36Ar ratios of SFIs, much higher than the modern

  9. Single-crystal 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating reveals bimodal sanidine ages in the Bishop Tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, N. L.; Jicha, B. R.; Singer, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    The 650 km3 Bishop Tuff (BT) is among the most studied volcanic deposits because it is an extensive marker bed deposited just after the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary. Reconstructions of the vast BT magma reservoir from which high-silica rhyolite erupted have long influenced thinking about how large silicic magma systems are assembled, crystallized, and mixed. Yet, the longevity of the high silica rhyolitic melt and exact timing of the eruption remain controversial due to recent conflicting 40Ar/39Ar sanidine vs. SIMS and ID-TIMS U-Pb zircon dates. We have undertaken 21 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating ages on 2 mm BT sanidine crystals from pumice in 3 widely separated outcrops of early-erupted fall and flow units. Plateau ages yield a bimodal distribution: a younger group has a mean of 766 ka and an older group gives a range between 772 and 782 ka. The younger population is concordant with the youngest ID-TIMS and SIMS U-Pb zircon ages recently published, as well as the astronomical age of BT in marine sediment. Of 21 crystals, 17 yield older, non-plateau, steps likely affected by excess Ar that would bias traditional 40Ar/39Ar total crystal fusion ages. The small spread in older sanidine ages, together with 25+ kyr of pre-eruptive zircon growth, suggest that the older sanidines are not partially outgassed xenocrysts. A bimodal 40Ar/39Ar age distribution implies that some fraction of rhyolitic melt cooled below the Ar closure temperature at least 10 ky prior to eruption. We propose that rapid "thawing" of a crystalline mush layer released older crystals into rhyolitic melt from which sanidine also nucleated and grew immediately prior to the eruption. High precision 40Ar/39Ar dating can thus provide essential information on thermo-physical processes at the millenial time scale that are critical to interpreting U-Pb zircon age distributions that are complicated by large uncertainties associated with zircon-melt U-Th systematics.

  10. Collisional-radiative modelling of an Ar helicon plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Stuart

    2005-10-01

    We report on recent modelling results of emission observed from a helicon plasma, comparing theoretical and observed line intensities and line ratios of Ar, Ar^+ and Ar^2+. Our Helicon plasma is from the ASTRAL device at Auburn University, with spectral measurements from 275 nm through to 1015 nm. We concentrate on the Ar^+ ion stage, and present the results of a collisional-radiative model using various qualities of atomic data. In particular, we compare the modelling results using Plane-Wave Born, Distorted-Wave and R-matrix electron impact excitation data with those observed from the plasma. As part of the modelling work, we investigate the potential use of various lines as plasma diagnostic tools.

  11. Ar2 photoelectron spectroscopy mediated by autoionizing states.

    PubMed

    Briant, Marc; Poisson, Lionel; Hochlaf, Majdi; de Pujo, Patrick; Gaveau, Marc-André; Soep, Benoît

    2012-11-01

    This experimental work focuses on the complex autoionization dynamics of Ar(2) clusters below the first ionization energy of the argon atom. Ar(2) is submitted to vacuum ultraviolet radiation, and the photoelectron spectra are collected in coincidence with the cluster ions. The ionization dynamics is revealed by the dependence on the photon energy. We applied a new experimental method which we developed to analyze the photoelectron signal. Thus, we were able (i) to get the complete vibrational progression of Ar(2)(+) that was never observed up to now, especially identifying the 0-0 transition overcoming the usual Franck-Condon limitations during single photoionization, and (ii) to obtain the projections of the vibrational wave functions of the autoionizing states over the Ar(2)(+) functions. This method provides a powerful tool to test the potential energy curves computed by high level theoretical calculations on Rydberg states. PMID:23215381

  12. Electron capture and fragmentation in Ar11+ + CO collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Itzhak, I.; Wells, E.; Stöckli, M. P.; Tawara, H.; Carnes, K. D.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between 32.2, 130.5 and 570.5 keV Ar11+ ions and CO molecules have been studied using the Macdonald Laboratory CRYEBIS. Coincidence time of flight was used to detect all recoil ions originating from each molecule and a position sensitive detector was used to determine final projectile charge states. Single-and double-electron capture cross-sections are much larger than those for ionization at these collision energies. The dominant recoil channel associated with the Ar10+ final charge state is the CO+ molecular ion. The main ion-pair channel is the C+ + O+ dissociation of CO2+ while the relative yields of higher charge states of the transient COq+ fall off rapidly. The dissociated ions corresponding to charge states up to CO4+ were detected in coincidence with Ar10+ (and Ar9+), indicating that multielectron capture followed by autoionization occurs.

  13. 76 FR 29284 - Arkansas Disaster Number AR-00049

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster Number AR-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... original declaration remains unchanged. ] (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and...

  14. K/Ar dating of illite in understanding fault-related diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.

    1996-12-31

    K/Ar dating of diagenetic illite provides quantitative information regarding the timing of major geological events within sedimentary basins. K/Ar data, however, have to be evaluated in the framework of sedimentological, mineralogical and structural configuration. These information together with other quantitative data can reveal the dynamics of diagenetic events, such as timing, condition, fluid source, and their relationship to structural/tectonic processes. In several Rotliegendes gas fields in the North Sea basins, abundant 1M(cis) illite are found in some reservoirs. These samples are located near fracture/faulted zones. Synchrotron diffraction data and WIDEFIRE illite polytype modeling show that these illites consist of single 1M(cis) enantiomorph. Morphologically, they are platy, and form grain-coating clays oriented perpendicular to the grain surface. In these samples, detrital feldspars and lithic fragments are severely altered and pore-filling quartz cements, co-precipitated with illites, are extensive. In samples away from fractured/faulted zones, detrital feldspars are less altered and only moderate to minor amounts of 1M(trans) illites are found. K/Ar data show that illite in samples closest to the fractured/faulted regions formed first. Stable oxygen isotopes of illite and hand-picked quartz cements and fluid inclusions show hot, high salinity(>20 wt.%), CaCl{sub 2}-rich fluids were involved in these diagenetic processes, suggestive of hydrothermal origin. Our data and other published data show that these processes may be very common in rift settings, and significant reservoir heterogeneity could be generated by fault-related diagenesis.

  15. K/Ar dating of illite in understanding fault-related diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M. )

    1996-01-01

    K/Ar dating of diagenetic illite provides quantitative information regarding the timing of major geological events within sedimentary basins. K/Ar data, however, have to be evaluated in the framework of sedimentological, mineralogical and structural configuration. These information together with other quantitative data can reveal the dynamics of diagenetic events, such as timing, condition, fluid source, and their relationship to structural/tectonic processes. In several Rotliegendes gas fields in the North Sea basins, abundant 1M(cis) illite are found in some reservoirs. These samples are located near fracture/faulted zones. Synchrotron diffraction data and WIDEFIRE illite polytype modeling show that these illites consist of single 1M(cis) enantiomorph. Morphologically, they are platy, and form grain-coating clays oriented perpendicular to the grain surface. In these samples, detrital feldspars and lithic fragments are severely altered and pore-filling quartz cements, co-precipitated with illites, are extensive. In samples away from fractured/faulted zones, detrital feldspars are less altered and only moderate to minor amounts of 1M(trans) illites are found. K/Ar data show that illite in samples closest to the fractured/faulted regions formed first. Stable oxygen isotopes of illite and hand-picked quartz cements and fluid inclusions show hot, high salinity(>20 wt.%), CaCl[sub 2]-rich fluids were involved in these diagenetic processes, suggestive of hydrothermal origin. Our data and other published data show that these processes may be very common in rift settings, and significant reservoir heterogeneity could be generated by fault-related diagenesis.

  16. Allelic diversity at the DLA-88 locus in Golden Retriever and Boxer breeds is limited.

    PubMed

    Ross, P; Buntzman, A S; Vincent, B G; Grover, E N; Gojanovich, G S; Collins, E J; Frelinger, J A; Hess, P R

    2012-08-01

    In the dog, previous analyses of major histocompatibility complex class I genes suggest a single polymorphic locus, dog leukocyte antigen (DLA)-88. While 51 alleles have been reported, estimates of prevalence have not been made. We hypothesized that, within a breed, DLA-88 diversity would be restricted, and one or more dominant alleles could be identified. Accordingly, we determined allele usage in 47 Golden Retrievers and 39 Boxers. In each population, 10 alleles were found; 4 were shared. Seven novel alleles were identified. DLA-88*05101 and *50801 predominated in Golden Retrievers, while most Boxers carried *03401. In these breeds, DLA-88 polymorphisms are limited and largely non-overlapping. The finding of highly prevalent alleles fulfills an important prerequisite for studying canine CD8+ T-cell responses. PMID:22571293

  17. An Allele Real-Coded Quantum Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Hybrid Updating Strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Xian; Qian, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Hui-Deng; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    For improving convergence rate and preventing prematurity in quantum evolutionary algorithm, an allele real-coded quantum evolutionary algorithm based on hybrid updating strategy is presented. The real variables are coded with probability superposition of allele. A hybrid updating strategy balancing the global search and local search is presented in which the superior allele is defined. On the basis of superior allele and inferior allele, a guided evolutionary process as well as updating allele with variable scale contraction is adopted. And H ε gate is introduced to prevent prematurity. Furthermore, the global convergence of proposed algorithm is proved by Markov chain. Finally, the proposed algorithm is compared with genetic algorithm, quantum evolutionary algorithm, and double chains quantum genetic algorithm in solving continuous optimization problem, and the experimental results verify the advantages on convergence rate and search accuracy. PMID:27057159

  18. An Allele Real-Coded Quantum Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Hybrid Updating Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Xian; Qian, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Hui-Deng; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    For improving convergence rate and preventing prematurity in quantum evolutionary algorithm, an allele real-coded quantum evolutionary algorithm based on hybrid updating strategy is presented. The real variables are coded with probability superposition of allele. A hybrid updating strategy balancing the global search and local search is presented in which the superior allele is defined. On the basis of superior allele and inferior allele, a guided evolutionary process as well as updating allele with variable scale contraction is adopted. And Hε gate is introduced to prevent prematurity. Furthermore, the global convergence of proposed algorithm is proved by Markov chain. Finally, the proposed algorithm is compared with genetic algorithm, quantum evolutionary algorithm, and double chains quantum genetic algorithm in solving continuous optimization problem, and the experimental results verify the advantages on convergence rate and search accuracy. PMID:27057159

  19. Two classes of deleterious recessive alleles in a natural population of zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Amy R.; Houle, David; McMillan, Kyle; Annable, Rebecca; Kondrashov, Alexey S.

    2004-01-01

    Natural populations carry deleterious recessive alleles which cause inbreeding depression. We compared mortality and growth of inbred and outbred zebrafish, Danio rerio, between 6 and 48 days of age. Grandparents of the studied fish were caught in the wild. Inbred fish were generated by brother-sister mating. Mortality was 9% in outbred fish, and 42% in inbred fish, which implies at least 3.6 lethal equivalents of deleterious recessive alleles per zygote. There was no significant inbreeding depression in the growth, perhaps because the surviving inbred fish lived under less crowded conditions. In contrast to alleles that cause embryonic and early larval mortality in the same population, alleles responsible for late larval and early juvenile mortality did not result in any gross morphological abnormalities. Thus, deleterious recessive alleles that segregate in a wild zebrafish population belong to two sharply distinct classes: early-acting, morphologically overt, unconditional lethals; and later-acting, morphologically cryptic, and presumably milder alleles. PMID:15451692

  20. Allelic diversity at the DLA-88 locus in Golden Retriever and Boxer breeds is limited

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Peter; Buntzman, Adam S.; Vincent, Benjamin G.; Grover, Elise N.; Gojanovich, Gregory S.; Collins, Edward J.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.; Hess, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    In the dog, previous analyses of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes suggest a single polymorphic locus, Dog Leukocyte Antigen (DLA)-88. While 51 alleles have been reported, estimates of prevalence have not been made. We hypothesized that, within a breed, DLA-88 diversity would be restricted, and one or more dominant alleles could be identified. Accordingly, we determined allele usage in 47 Golden Retrievers and 39 Boxers. In each population, 10 alleles were found; 4 were shared. Seven novel alleles were identified. DLA-88*05101 and *50801 predominated in Golden Retrievers, while most Boxers carried *03401. In these breeds DLA-88 polymorphisms are limited and largely non-overlapping. The finding of highly prevalent alleles fulfills an important prerequisite for studying canine CD8+ T-cell responses. PMID:22571293

  1. vidence of low genetic variation and rare alleles in a bottlenecked endangered island endemic, the Lasan Teal (Anas laysanensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Pearce, John M.; Lavretsky, Philip; Peters Jeffrey L; Courtot, Karen; Seixas, Pedro P.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity is assumed to reflect the evolutionary potential and adaptability of populations, and thus quantifying the genetic diversity of endangered species is useful for recovery programs. In particular, if conservation strategies include reintroductions, periodic genetic assessments are useful to evaluate whether management efforts have resulted in the maximization or loss of genetic variation within populations over generations. In this study, we collected blood, feather, and tissue samples during 1999–2009 and quantified genetic diversity for a critically endangered waterfowl species endemic to the Hawaiian archipelago, the Laysan teal or duck (Anas laysanensis; n = 239 individual birds sampled). The last extant population of this species at Laysan Island was sourced in 2004–2005 for a ‘wild to wild’ translocation of 42 individuals for an experimental reintroduction to Midway Atoll. To inform future management strategies, we compared genetic diversity sampled from the source population (n = 133 Laysan birds) including 23 of Midway’s founders and offspring of the translocated population 2–5 years post release (n = 96 Midway birds). We attempted to identify polymorphic markers by screening nuclear microsatellite (N = 83) and intronic loci (N = 19), as well as the mitochondrial control region (mtDNA) for a subset of samples. Among 83 microsatellite loci screened, six were variable. We found low nuclear variation consistent with the species’ historical population bottlenecks and sequence variation was observed at a single intron locus. We detected no variation within the mtDNA. We found limited but similar estimates of allelic richness (2.58 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity within islands. Two rare alleles found in the Laysan Island source population were not present in the Midway translocated g