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Sample records for allelic richness ar

  1. Ar-40/Ar-39 Ages for Maskelynites and K-Rich Melt from Olivine-Rich Lithology in (Kanagawa) Zagami

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Nyquist, L. E.; Lindsay, F.; Turrin, B.; Swisher, C. C., III; Delaney, J. S.; Shih, C.-Y.; Niihara, T.; Misawa, K.

    2013-01-01

    We report Ar/Ar release patterns for small maskelynite grains and samples of a K-rich phase separated from the basaltic shergottite Zagami. The purpose of the work is to investigate the well-known discrepancy between published Ar/Ar ages of Zagami, >200 Ma, and its age of approx. 170 Ma as determined by other methods [1-6]. Niihara et al. [7] divide less abundant darker material present in Zagami into an olivine-rich lithology (ORL), from which most of our samples came, and a pyroxene-rich one (Dark Mottled-Lithology: DML) [8, 9]. ORL consists of vermicular fayalitic olivine, coarse-grained pyroxene, maskelynite, and a glassy phase exceptionally rich in K (up to 8.5 wt%), Al, and Si, but poor in Fe and Mg. The elemental composition suggests a late-stage melt, i.e., residual material that solidified late in a fractional crystallization sequence. Below we refer to it as "K-rich melt." The K-rich melt contains laths of captured olivine, Ca-rich pyroxene, plagioclase, and opaques. It seemed to offer an especially promising target for Ar-40/Ar-39 dating.

  2. In silico identification and functional validation of allele-dependent AR enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Bisio, Alessandra; Gavoci, Antoneta; Inga, Alberto; Demichelis, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Androgen Receptor (AR) and Estrogen Receptors (ERs) are key nuclear receptors that can cooperate in orchestrating gene expression programs in multiple tissues and diseases, targeting binding elements in promoters and distant enhancers. We report the unbiased identification of enhancer elements bound by AR and ER-α whose activity can be allele-specific depending on the status of nearby Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP). ENCODE data were computationally mined to nominate genomic loci with: (i) chromatin signature of enhancer activity from activation histone marks, (ii) binding evidence by AR and ER-α, (iii) presence of a SNP. Forty-one loci were identified and two, on 1q21.3 and 13q34, selected for characterization by gene reporter, Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and RT-qPCR assays in breast (MCF7) and prostate (PC-3) cancer-derived cell lines. We observed allele-specific enhancer activity, responsiveness to ligand-bound AR, and potentially influence on the transcription of closely located genes (RAB20, ING1, ARHGEF7, ADAM15). The 1q21.3 variant, rs2242193, showed impact on AR binding in MCF7 cells that are heterozygous for the SNP. Our unbiased genome-wide search proved to be an efficient methodology to discover new functional polymorphic regulatory regions (PRR) potentially acting as risk modifiers in hormone-driven cancers and overall nominated SNPs in PRR across 136 transcription factors. PMID:25693204

  3. In-silico identification and functional validation of allele-dependent AR enhancers.

    PubMed

    Garritano, Sonia; Romanel, Alessandro; Ciribilli, Yari; Bisio, Alessandra; Gavoci, Antoneta; Inga, Alberto; Demichelis, Francesca

    2015-03-10

    Androgen Receptor (AR) and Estrogen Receptors (ERs) are key nuclear receptors that can cooperate in orchestrating gene expression programs in multiple tissues and diseases, targeting binding elements in promoters and distant enhancers. We report the unbiased identification of enhancer elements bound by AR and ER-α whose activity can be allele-specific depending on the status of nearby Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP). ENCODE data were computationally mined to nominate genomic loci with: (i) chromatin signature of enhancer activity from activation histone marks, (ii) binding evidence by AR and ER-α, (iii) presence of a SNP. Forty-one loci were identified and two, on 1q21.3 and 13q34, selected for characterization by gene reporter, Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and RT-qPCR assays in breast (MCF7) and prostate (PC-3) cancer-derived cell lines. We observed allele-specific enhancer activity, responsiveness to ligand-bound AR, and potentially influence on the transcription of closely located genes (RAB20, ING1, ARHGEF7, ADAM15). The 1q21.3 variant, rs2242193, showed impact on AR binding in MCF7 cells that are heterozygous for the SNP. Our unbiased genome-wide search proved to be an efficient methodology to discover new functional polymorphic regulatory regions (PRR) potentially acting as risk modifiers in hormone-driven cancers and overall nominated SNPs in PRR across 136 transcription factors.

  4. 40Ar/39Ar and cosmic ray exposure ages of plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith, 78461

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, J. P.; Baldwin, S. L.; Delano, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Argon isotopic data is used to assess the potential of low-mass samples collected by sample return missions on planetary objects (e.g., Moon, Mars, asteroids), to reveal planetary surface processes. We report the first 40Ar/39Ar ages and 38Ar cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages, determined for eleven submillimeter-sized (ranging from 0.06 to 1.2 mg) plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith sample 78461 collected at the base of the Sculptured Hills. Total fusion analysis was used to outgas argon from the lithic fragments. Three different approaches were used to determine 40Ar/39Ar ages and illustrate the sensitivity of age determination to the choice of trapped (40Ar/36Ar)t. 40Ar/39Ar ages range from ~4.0 to 4.4 Ga with one exception (Plag#10). Surface CRE ages, based on 38Ar, range from ~1 to 24 Ma. The relatively young CRE ages suggest recent re-working of the upper few centimeters of the regolith. The CRE ages may result from the effect of downslope movement of materials to the base of the Sculptured Hills from higher elevations. The apparent 40Ar/39Ar age for Plag#10 is >5 Ga and yielded the oldest CRE age (i.e., ~24 Ma). We interpret this data to indicate the presence of parentless 40Ar in Plag#10, originating in the lunar atmosphere and implanted in lunar regolith by solar wind. Based on a chemical mixing model, plagioclase compositions, and 40Ar/39Ar ages, we conclude that lithic fragments originated from Mg-suite of highland rocks, and none were derived from the mare region.

  5. Allelic Richness following Population Founding Events – A Stochastic Modeling Framework Incorporating Gene Flow and Genetic Drift

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, Gili; Templeton, Alan R.; Zarmi, Yair; Bar-David, Shirli

    2014-01-01

    Allelic richness (number of alleles) is a measure of genetic diversity indicative of a population's long-term potential for adaptability and persistence. It is used less commonly than heterozygosity as a genetic diversity measure, partially because it is more mathematically difficult to take into account the stochastic process of genetic drift for allelic richness. This paper presents a stochastic model for the allelic richness of a newly founded population experiencing genetic drift and gene flow. The model follows the dynamics of alleles lost during the founder event and simulates the effect of gene flow on maintenance and recovery of allelic richness. The probability of an allele's presence in the population was identified as the relevant statistical property for a meaningful interpretation of allelic richness. A method is discussed that combines the probability of allele presence with a population's allele frequency spectrum to provide predictions for allele recovery. The model's analysis provides insights into the dynamics of allelic richness following a founder event, taking into account gene flow and the allele frequency spectrum. Furthermore, the model indicates that the “One Migrant per Generation” rule, a commonly used conservation guideline related to heterozygosity, may be inadequate for addressing preservation of diversity at the allelic level. This highlights the importance of distinguishing between heterozygosity and allelic richness as measures of genetic diversity, since focusing merely on the preservation of heterozygosity might not be enough to adequately preserve allelic richness, which is crucial for species persistence and evolution. PMID:25526062

  6. Allelic richness following population founding events--a stochastic modeling framework incorporating gene flow and genetic drift.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Gili; Templeton, Alan R; Zarmi, Yair; Bar-David, Shirli

    2014-01-01

    Allelic richness (number of alleles) is a measure of genetic diversity indicative of a population's long-term potential for adaptability and persistence. It is used less commonly than heterozygosity as a genetic diversity measure, partially because it is more mathematically difficult to take into account the stochastic process of genetic drift for allelic richness. This paper presents a stochastic model for the allelic richness of a newly founded population experiencing genetic drift and gene flow. The model follows the dynamics of alleles lost during the founder event and simulates the effect of gene flow on maintenance and recovery of allelic richness. The probability of an allele's presence in the population was identified as the relevant statistical property for a meaningful interpretation of allelic richness. A method is discussed that combines the probability of allele presence with a population's allele frequency spectrum to provide predictions for allele recovery. The model's analysis provides insights into the dynamics of allelic richness following a founder event, taking into account gene flow and the allele frequency spectrum. Furthermore, the model indicates that the "One Migrant per Generation" rule, a commonly used conservation guideline related to heterozygosity, may be inadequate for addressing preservation of diversity at the allelic level. This highlights the importance of distinguishing between heterozygosity and allelic richness as measures of genetic diversity, since focusing merely on the preservation of heterozygosity might not be enough to adequately preserve allelic richness, which is crucial for species persistence and evolution.

  7. Conservation of allelic richness in wild crop relatives is aided by assessment of genetic markers.

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, D J; Brown, A H

    1993-01-01

    Wild crop relatives are an important source of genetic variation for improving domesticated species. Given limited resources, methods for maximizing the genetic diversity of collections of wild relatives are needed to help spread protection over a larger number of populations and species. Simulations were conducted to investigate the optimal strategy of sampling materials from populations of wild relatives, with the objective of maximizing the number of alleles (allelic richness) in collections of fixed size. Two methods, based on assessing populations for variation at marker loci (e.g., allozymes, restriction fragment length polymorphisms), were developed and compared with several methods that are not dependent on markers. Marker-assisted methods yielded higher overall allelic richness in the simulated collections, and they were particularly effective in conserving geographically localized alleles, the class of alleles that is most subject to loss. PMID:8248153

  8. Mineralogy and Ar-Ar Age of the Tarahumara IIE Iron, with Reference to the Origin of Alkali-Rich Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Bogard, Donald D.; Otsuki, Mayumi; Ishii, Teruaki

    2003-01-01

    Silicate inclusions in nine known IIE irons show diversity in mineralogy, and Colomera, Kodaikanal, Elga and Miles contain alkali-rich silicate inclusions. Bogard et al. showed evidence of a complex parent body evolution for IIE irons based on Ar-39-Ar-40 ages. Colomera contained a sanidine-rich surface inclusion and the K-enrichment trends in the Na-rich inclusions are different from those of other IIEs. To elucidate the origin of K-rich materials, we studied the mineralogy and Ar-Ar age of silicate inclusions from the Tarahumara IIE iron meteorite.

  9. sup 40 Ar- sup 39 Ar and K-Ar dating of K-rich rocks from the Roccamonfina volcano, Roman Comagmatic Region, Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Di Brozolo, F.R.; Di Girolamo, P.; Turi, B.; Oddone, M. )

    1988-06-01

    Roccamonfina is the northernmost Volcano of the Campanian area of the K-rich Roman comagmatic Region of Italy. It erupted a huge amount of pyroclastics and lavas belonging to both the Leucite-Basanite and Leucitite Series (LBLS) and the Shoshonite Series (SS), spread over an area of about 300 km{sup 2}. The above series correspond to the High-K Series (HKS) and Low-K Series (LKS) of Appleton (1971), respectively. {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar and K-Ar dating of samples from both series gave ages ranging from 0.656 to 0.096 Ma for the SS and from 1.03( ) to 0.053 Ma for the LBLS. These results indicate that the products of the two series were outpoured together at least between 0.7 and 0.1 Ma age, i.e. during both the so-called pre-caldera phase and the post-caldera phase of activity. The latest products of the volcanism at Roccamonfina were erupted just before the deposition of the Grey Campanian Ignimbrite, which erupted from vents located about 50 km to the south in the Phlegrean Fields near Naples and has an age of about 33,000 years. Taking into account all the available all the available radiometric data the authors conclude that Roccamonfina was active between 1.5 and 0.05 Ma ago, in excellent agreement with the stratigraphic evidence. In this same time span is concentrated the activity of all the centers of the Roman Region north of Naples.

  10. 40Ar- 39Ar and K-Ar dating of K-rich rocks from the Roccamonfina Volcano, Roman comagmatic Region, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radicati di Brozolo, Filippo; Di Girolamo, Pio; Turi, Bruno; Oddone, Massimo

    1988-06-01

    Roccamonfina is the northernmost Volcano of the Campanian area of the K-rich Roman comagmatic Region of Italy. It erupted a huge amount of pyroclastics and lavas belonging to both the Leucite-Basanite and Leucitite Series (LBLS) and the Shoshonite Series (SS), spread over an area of about 300 km 2. The above series correspond to the High-K. Series (HKS) and Low-K Series (LKS) of APPLETON (1972), respectively. 40Ar- 39Ar and K-Ar dating of samples from both series gave ages ranging from 0.656 to 0.096 Ma for the SS and from 1.03(?) to 0.053 Ma for the LBLS. These results indicate that the products of the two series were outpoured together at least between 0.7 and 0.1 Ma ago, i.e. during both the so-called pre-caldera phase and the post-caldera phase of activity. The latest products of the volcanism at Roccamonfina were erupted just before the deposition of the Grey Campanian Ignimbrite, which erupted from vents located about 50 km to the south in the Phlegrean Fields near Naples and has an age of about 33,000 years. Taking into account all the available radiometric data, we conclude that Roccamonfina was active between 1.5 and 0.05 Ma ago, in excellent agreement with the stratigraphie evidence. In this same time span is concentrated the activity of all the centers of the Roman Region north of Naples.

  11. Suppression among alleles encoding nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat resistance proteins interferes with resistance in F1 hybrid and allele-pyramided wheat plants.

    PubMed

    Stirnweis, Daniel; Milani, Samira D; Brunner, Susanne; Herren, Gerhard; Buchmann, Gabriele; Peditto, David; Jordan, Tina; Keller, Beat

    2014-09-01

    The development of high-yielding varieties with broad-spectrum durable disease resistance is the ultimate goal of crop breeding. In plants, immune receptors of the nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) class mediate race-specific resistance against pathogen attack. When employed in agriculture this type of resistance is often rapidly overcome by newly adapted pathogen races. The stacking of different resistance genes or alleles in F1 hybrids or in pyramided lines is a promising strategy for achieving more durable resistance. Here, we identify a molecular mechanism which can negatively interfere with the allele-pyramiding approach. We show that pairwise combinations of different alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3 in F1 hybrids and stacked transgenic wheat lines can result in suppression of Pm3-based resistance. This effect is independent of the genetic background and solely dependent on the Pm3 alleles. Suppression occurs at the post-translational level, as levels of RNA and protein in the suppressed alleles are unaffected. Using a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana, the LRR domain was identified as the domain conferring suppression. The results of this study suggest that the expression of closely related NB-LRR resistance genes or alleles in the same genotype can lead to dominant-negative interactions. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the frequently observed ineffectiveness of resistance genes introduced from the secondary gene pool into polyploid crop species and mark an important step in overcoming this limitation.

  12. Ar irradiated Cr rich Ni alloy studied using positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Sanjay; Menon, Ranjini; Sharma, S. K.; Srivastava, A. P.; Mukherjee, S.; Nabhiraj, P. Y.; Pujari, P. K.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.

    2016-10-01

    The present study focuses on understanding the effect of Ar ion irradiation at room temperature on Cr rich Ni-Cr alloy. The alloy is irradiated with Ar9+ ions (energy 315 keV) for total dose varying from 9.3 × 1014 to 2.3 × 1016 ion/cm2. The changes in the microstructure of the irradiated samples have been characterized by depth dependent Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (DBAR) measurements using a slow positron beam facility. The variation in S-E profiles as a function of total dose corroborated with S-W curves indicates that the type of defects is also varied with the increase in total dose. The S-E profiles have been fitted using variable energy positron fit (VEPFIT) program considering a three layer structure for the irradiated samples. Estimated displacement damage profile as a function of increasing dose has been analyzed and a possible mechanism has been attributed to explain the observations made from S-parameter variation.

  13. AT-rich sequences from the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora rosea exhibit ARS function in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bergero, Roberta

    2006-05-01

    Autonomous replicating sequences are DNA elements that trigger DNA replication and are widely used in the development of episomal transformation vectors for fungi. In this paper, a genomic library from the mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora rosea was constructed in the integrative plasmid YIp5 and screened in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for sequences that act as ARS and trigger plasmid replication. Two genetic elements (GrARS2, GrARS6) promoted high-rates of yeast transformation. Sequence analysis of these elements shows them to be AT-rich (72-80%) and to contain multiple near-matches to the yeast autonomous consensus sequences ACS and EACS. GrARS2 contained a putative miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) delimited by 28-bp terminal inverted repeats (TIRs). Disruption of this element and removal of one TIR increased plasmid stability several fold. The potential for palindromes to affect DNA replication is discussed. PMID:16504551

  14. 40Ar/39Ar dating of a Langhian biotite-rich clay layer in the pelagic sequence of the Cònero Riviera, Ancona, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Dieter; Montanari, Alessandro; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Koeberl, Christian; Handler, Robert; Coccioni, Rodolfo

    2001-12-01

    A nearly complete and undisturbed Miocene carbonate sequence is present in the easternmost part of the Umbria-Marche basin, Italy, which is ideal for detailed and integrated stratigraphic investigations of the Miocene Epoch. In this study, we were trying to obtain evidence for the presence or absence of distal ejecta from the 15 Ma Ries impact structure in southern Germany, located about 600 km to the north-northwest of the Umbria-Marche basin. The first step is to find coeval strata in the Umbria-Marche sequence. At the La Vedova section, Cònero Riviera, we dated a volcaniclastic biotite-rich clay layer, the Aldo Level, which is situated within planktonic foraminiferal Zone N8, at 14.9±0.2 Ma, using the 40Ar/39Ar method. Together with detailed geologic and stratigraphic information about the Aldo Level, the resulting age can be used confidentially to calibrate the Langhian stage. Besides providing new constraints on Miocene geochronology, this age can now be used for impact stratigraphic studies. To directly correlate the biotite ages of the La Vedova section with rocks from the Ries impact event, Ries impact glass was also analyzed and found to be coeval. Although unrelated to this impact event, the biotite-rich clay layer should help in the search for evidence of distal ejecta related to the Ries crater.

  15. High level of genetic differentiation for allelic richness among populations of the argan tree [Argania spinosa (L.) Skeels] endemic to Morocco.

    PubMed

    El Mousadik, A; Petit, R J

    1996-05-01

    Genetic diversity at nine isozyme loci was surveyed in an endangered tree species, the argan tree, endemic to south-western Morocco. The species is highly diverse (3.6 alleles/locus) with populations strongly differentiated from each other (F ST=0.25). This example is used to illustrate a method for standardizing measures of allelic richness in samples of unequal sample sizes, which was developed for the estimation of the number of species and relies on the technique of rarefaction. In addition, it is shown that the measure of subdivision, θ ST, obtained when allelic richness is used in place ofh (Nei's index of diversity), is much larger than the F ST [e.g. θ ST(40)=0.52, where (40) indicates the specified sample used to estimate the allelic richness]. This suggests that rare alleles (which strongly influence measures of allelic richness) have a more scattered distribution than more frequent ones, a result which raises special conservation issues for the argan tree. PMID:24166548

  16. 40 CFR 721.10023 - Benzenamine, N-phenyl-, ar ar′-(C9-rich C88-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-rich C88-10-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10023 Section 721.10023 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-10-branched alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzenamine, N-phenyl-, ar,ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10023 - Benzenamine, N-phenyl-, ar ar′-(C9-rich C88-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-rich C88-10-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10023 Section 721.10023 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-10-branched alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzenamine, N-phenyl-, ar,ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10023 - Benzenamine, N-phenyl-, ar ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10023 Section 721.10023 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-10-branched alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzenamine, N-phenyl-, ar,ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10023 - Benzenamine, N-phenyl-, ar ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10023 Section 721.10023 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-10-branched alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzenamine, N-phenyl-, ar,ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10023 - Benzenamine, N-phenyl-, ar ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10023 Section 721.10023 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-10-branched alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzenamine, N-phenyl-, ar,ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched...

  1. Development of β-Carotene Rich Maize Hybrids through Marker-Assisted Introgression of β-carotene hydroxylase Allele

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Vignesh; Hossain, Firoz; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Choudhary, Mukesh; Saha, Supradip; Bhat, Jayant S.; Prasanna, Boddupalli M.; Gupta, Hari S.

    2014-01-01

    Development of vitamin A-rich cereals can help in alleviating the widespread problem of vitamin A deficiency. We report here significant enhancement of kernel β-carotene in elite maize genotypes through accelerated marker-assisted backcross breeding. A favourable allele (543 bp) of the β-carotene hydroxylase (crtRB1) gene was introgressed in the seven elite inbred parents, which were low (1.4 µg/g) in kernel β-carotene, by using a crtRB1-specific DNA marker for foreground selection. About 90% of the recurrent parent genome was recovered in the selected progenies within two backcross generations. Concentration of β-carotene among the crtRB1-introgressed inbreds varied from 8.6 to 17.5 µg/g - a maximum increase up to 12.6-fold over recurrent parent. The reconstituted hybrids developed from improved parental inbreds also showed enhanced kernel β-carotene as high as 21.7 µg/g, compared to 2.6 µg/g in the original hybrid. The reconstituted hybrids evaluated at two locations possessed similar grain yield to that of original hybrids. These β-carotene enriched high yielding hybrids can be effectively utilized in the maize biofortification programs across the globe. PMID:25486271

  2. Variant mapping of the Apo(B) AT rich minisatellite. Dependence on nucleotide sequence of the copy number variations. Instability of the non-canonical alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Desmarais, E; Vigneron, S; Buresi, C; Cambien, F; Cambou, J P; Roizes, G

    1993-01-01

    Because of its variations in length, the AT rich Hyper-Variable Region (HVR) of the 3' end of the Apolipoprotein B gene is used as a polymorphic maker in genetic studies. It contains a SspI site in its repeated motif and we used this feature to precisely analyse the internal structure of the different alleles found at this locus in a Caucasian population. We performed total digestion on 194 alleles as well as Minisatellite Variant Repeat mapping (MVR mapping: partial digestion) on 54. The results show that the level of length variability (in copy number) of the 5' end of this locus is at least two times higher than that of the 3' end. This could be correlated with the difference in nucleotide sequence between the two parts of the HVR and suggests the dependence on the primary structure of the mechanism that produces length variability. A molecular model is proposed to explain this result. Moreover, the sharp analysis of the minisatellite structure by the distribution of SspI sites reveals differences between long and short alleles, indicating that in most cases, no recombination occurs between alleles of different sizes. Finally the rare alleles exhibit a non-canonical structure. These important points could explain the bimodal distribution of the frequencies of the alleles in the population. Images PMID:8502559

  3. A high-fat diet and the threonine-encoding allele (Thr54) polymorphism of fatty acid-binding protein 2 reduce plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    McColley, Steven P; Georgopoulos, Angeliki; Young, Lindsay R; Kurzer, Mindy S; Redmon, J Bruce; Raatz, Susan K

    2011-07-01

    The threonine-encoding allele (Thr54) of the fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2) DNA polymorphism is associated with increased triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins (TRL). We hypothesized that the TRL response to diets of varied fat content is affected by the FABP2 A54T polymorphism, specifically that a high-fat diet would reduce TRL and that the Thr54 allele would have an enhanced response. Sixteen healthy, postmenopausal women completed a crossover dietary intervention that included three 8-week, isoenergetic diet treatments. The treatments consisted of high fat (40% of energy as fat), low fat (20% of energy), and low fat + n-3 fatty acids (20% of energy plus 3% as n-3 fatty acids). Eight subjects were homozygous for the wild type (Ala54/Ala54) of the FABP2 polymorphism, whereas 8 subjects had at least 1 Thr54 allele (7, Ala54/Thr54; 1, Thr54/Thr54). High-fat diet showed significantly reduced plasma TGs, chylomicron TG, and very low-density lipoprotein TG from baseline in all participants. Although carriers of the Thr54 allele of the FABP2 polymorphism had significantly reduced TRL, there is no evidence of an interaction, which does not support our hypothesis. The alanine-encoding allele did not influence the dietary effects on the plasma lipids. PMID:21840466

  4. 40 CFR 721.10025 - 10H-Phenothiazine, ar, ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10025 Section 721.10025 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-branched alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as 10H-phenothiazine, ar, ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10025 - 10H-Phenothiazine, ar, ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10025 Section 721.10025 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-branched alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as 10H-phenothiazine, ar, ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10025 - 10H-Phenothiazine, ar, ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10025 Section 721.10025 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-branched alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as 10H-phenothiazine, ar, ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10025 - 10H-Phenothiazine, ar, ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10025 Section 721.10025 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-branched alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as 10H-phenothiazine, ar, ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10024 - 10H-Phenothiazine, ar-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10024 Section 721.10024 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 10H-phenothiazine, ar-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs (PMN P-01-771; CAS...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10024 - 10H-Phenothiazine, ar-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10024 Section 721.10024 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 10H-phenothiazine, ar-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs (PMN P-01-771; CAS...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10024 - 10H-Phenothiazine, ar-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10024 Section 721.10024 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 10H-phenothiazine, ar-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs (PMN P-01-771; CAS...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10024 - 10H-Phenothiazine, ar-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10024 Section 721.10024 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 10H-phenothiazine, ar-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs (PMN P-01-771; CAS...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10024 - 10H-Phenothiazine, ar-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10024 Section 721.10024 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 10H-phenothiazine, ar-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs (PMN P-01-771; CAS...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10025 - 10H-Phenothiazine, ar, ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs. 721.10025 Section 721.10025 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-branched alkyl) derivs. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as 10H-phenothiazine, ar, ar′-(C9-rich C8-10-branched alkyl) derivs (PMN...

  14. Mineralogy, Petrology, Chemistry, and Ar-39 - Ar-40 and Ages of the Caddo County IAB Iron: Evidence for Early Partial Melt Segregation of a Gabbro Area Rich in Plagioclase-Diopside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Bogard, Donald D.; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2000-01-01

    We found coarse-grained gabbroic material rich in plagioclase and diopside in the Caddo County IAB iron meteorite. The polished thin sections studied were made from areas rich in Al and Ca detected by a micro-focus X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping technique. The gabbro is not a clast within a breccia, but rather this area is located mainly at silicate-metal boundaries only a few cm away from an area with fine-grained, ultramafic silicate similar to winonaites. Medium-grained orthopyroxene and olivine are found in transitional areas showing no disturbance of their crystalline textures. A vein-like region, starting at the area rich in fine-grained mafic silicate, extends towards the gabbroic area with a gradual increase in abundance of plagioclase and diopside. This texture and our accumulated knowledge of the formation mechanism of IAB/winonaltes meteorites, suggest that the gabbroic materials were formed by inhomogeneous segregation of partial melts of chondritic source materials. Compositional data on two mineralogically distinct samples of the gabbro-rich portion of the inclusion were obtained by INAA. Compared to an average of LAB silicate inclusions or winonaites, the Caddo County gabbro is enriched in the incompatible lithophile elements Na, Ca, Sc, REE and Hf, which is consistent with a melt origin for the gabbro. The cosmogenic space exposure age of Caddo County (511 Ma) is significantly younger than exposure ages of some other IAB meteorites, An 39Ar-40Ar age determination of the gabbroic material indicates a series of upward steps in age from 4.516 Ga to 4.523 Ga, with a few high temperature ages up to 4.54 Ga. The older age could approximate the primary recrystallization age of silicates. The stepped Ar age spectrum may indicate differences in Ar closure temperatures during slow cooling of -2-20'C/Myr in the parent body. Alternatively, the younger Ar-Ar ages may date a shock event which occurred while Caddo County was hot and which also created textures

  15. Denitrification in nitrate-rich streams: Application of N2:Ar and 15N-tracer methods in intact cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, L.K.; Voytek, M.A.; Böhlke, J.K.; Harvey, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Rates of benthic denitrification were measured using two techniques, membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), applied to sediment cores from two NO3--rich streams draining agricultural land in the upper Mississippi River Basin. Denitrification was estimated simultaneously from measurements of N 2:Ar (MIMS) and 15N[N2] (IRMS) after the addition of low-level 15NO3- tracer ( 15N:N = 0.03-0.08) in stream water overlying intact sediment cores. Denitrification rates ranged from about 0 to 4400 lmol N??m -2??h-1 in Sugar Creek and from 0 to 1300 ??mol N??m-2??h-1 in Iroquois River, the latter of which possesses greater streamflow discharge and a more homogeneous streambed and water column. Within the uncertainties of the two techniques, there is good agreement between the MIMS and IRMS results, which indicates that the production of N2 by the coupled process of nitrification/denitrification was relatively unimportant and surface-water NO3- was the dominant source of NO3- for benthic denitrification in these streams. Variation in stream NO3- concentration (from about 20 ??mol/L during low discharge to 1000 ??mol/L during high discharge) was a significant control of benthic denitrification rates, judging from the more abundant MIMS data. The interpretation that NO3- concentration directly affects denitrification rate was corroborated by increased rates of denitrification in cores amended with NO 3-. Denitrification in Sugar Creek removed ???11% per day of the instream NO3- in late spring and removed roughly 15-20% in late summer. The fraction of NO3- removed in Iroquois River was less than that of Sugar Creek. Although benthic denitrification rates were relatively high during periods of high stream flow, when NO3 concentrations were also high, the increase in benthic denitrification could not compensate for the much larger increase in stream NO3- fluxes during high flow. Consequently, fractional NO3- losses were relatively low

  16. Argon, oxygen, and boron isotopic evidence documenting 40ArE accumulation in phengite during water-rich high-pressure subduction metasomatism of continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menold, Carrie A.; Grove, Marty; Sievers, Natalie E.; Manning, Craig E.; Yin, An; Young, Edward D.; Ziegler, Karen

    2016-07-01

    The Luliang Shan area of the North Qaidam high pressure (HP) to ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic terrane in northwestern China features thick, garnet- and phengite-rich metasomatic selvages that formed around gneiss-hosted mafic eclogite blocks during HP conditions. Here we present new 40Ar/39Ar, δ18 O, and δ11 B results from a previously studied 30 m, 18 sample traverse that extends from the host gneiss into a representative eclogite block. Previous thermobarometry and new mica-quartz oxygen isotope thermometry from the traverse reveal that the phengite-rich selvage formed at temperatures similar to those recorded by the eclogites at peak pressure. Quartz and white mica δ18 O data from the selvage cannot be explained by simple mixing of gneiss and eclogite, and indicate a fluid/rock ratio >1 during regional-scale infiltration of high δ18 O (ca. 14‰) fluids. Heavy δ18 O overgrowths of metamorphic zircon over lighter δ18 O detrital grains indicate that the gneiss was similarly affected. Starkly contrasting boron content and δ11 B compositions for the host gneiss and the selvage also cannot be explained by local-scale devolatilization of the gneiss to form the selvage. Instead, the boron systematics are best attributed to two distinct phases of fluid infiltration: (1) low-boron selvage phengite with δ11 B from -10 to -30‰ grew under HP conditions; and (2) tourmaline and boron-rich muscovite with generally positive δ11 B crystallized in the host gneiss under subsequent lower pressure epidote-amphibolite facies conditions as the Luliang Shan gneiss terrane was exhumed past shallower portions of the subduction channel. Consistent with observations made worldwide, we were able to identify uptake of excess argon (40ArE) in phengite as a high pressure phenomenon. Phengite 40Ar/39Ar ages from massive eclogite exceed the ca. 490 Ma zircon U-Pb age of eclogite metamorphism by a factor of 1.5. However, phengite ages from the more permeable schistose selvage

  17. Effects of sample size, number of markers, and allelic richness on the detection of spatial genetic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landguth, Erin L.; Gedy, Bradley C.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Garey, Andrew L.; Emel, Sarah L.; Mumma, Matthew; Wagner, Helene H.; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Cushman, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of study design on the ability to detect the effects of landscape pattern on gene flow is one of the most pressing methodological gaps in landscape genetic research. To investigate the effect of study design on landscape genetics inference, we used a spatially-explicit, individual-based program to simulate gene flow in a spatially continuous population inhabiting a landscape with gradual spatial changes in resistance to movement. We simulated a wide range of combinations of number of loci, number of alleles per locus and number of individuals sampled from the population. We assessed how these three aspects of study design influenced the statistical power to successfully identify the generating process among competing hypotheses of isolation-by-distance, isolation-by-barrier, and isolation-by-landscape resistance using a causal modelling approach with partial Mantel tests. We modelled the statistical power to identify the generating process as a response surface for equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions after introduction of isolation-by-landscape resistance. All three variables (loci, alleles and sampled individuals) affect the power of causal modelling, but to different degrees. Stronger partial Mantel r correlations between landscape distances and genetic distances were found when more loci were used and when loci were more variable, which makes comparisons of effect size between studies difficult. Number of individuals did not affect the accuracy through mean equilibrium partial Mantel r, but larger samples decreased the uncertainty (increasing the precision) of equilibrium partial Mantel r estimates. We conclude that amplifying more (and more variable) loci is likely to increase the power of landscape genetic inferences more than increasing number of individuals.

  18. Effects of sample size, number of markers, and allelic richness on the detection of spatial genetic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landguth, E.L.; Fedy, B.C.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.; Garey, A.L.; Emel, S.L.; Mumma, M.; Wagner, H.H.; Fortin, M.-J.; Cushman, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of study design on the ability to detect the effects of landscape pattern on gene flow is one of the most pressing methodological gaps in landscape genetic research. To investigate the effect of study design on landscape genetics inference, we used a spatially-explicit, individual-based program to simulate gene flow in a spatially continuous population inhabiting a landscape with gradual spatial changes in resistance to movement. We simulated a wide range of combinations of number of loci, number of alleles per locus and number of individuals sampled from the population. We assessed how these three aspects of study design influenced the statistical power to successfully identify the generating process among competing hypotheses of isolation-by-distance, isolation-by-barrier, and isolation-by-landscape resistance using a causal modelling approach with partial Mantel tests. We modelled the statistical power to identify the generating process as a response surface for equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions after introduction of isolation-by-landscape resistance. All three variables (loci, alleles and sampled individuals) affect the power of causal modelling, but to different degrees. Stronger partial Mantel r correlations between landscape distances and genetic distances were found when more loci were used and when loci were more variable, which makes comparisons of effect size between studies difficult. Number of individuals did not affect the accuracy through mean equilibrium partial Mantel r, but larger samples decreased the uncertainty (increasing the precision) of equilibrium partial Mantel r estimates. We conclude that amplifying more (and more variable) loci is likely to increase the power of landscape genetic inferences more than increasing number of individuals. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Magmatic-hydrothermal evolution of the Cretaceous Duolong gold-rich porphyry copper deposit in the Bangongco metallogenic belt, Tibet: Evidence from U-Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinxiang; Qin, Kezhang; Li, Guangming; Xiao, Bo; Zhao, Junxing; Chen, Lei

    2011-06-01

    The Duolong gold-rich porphyry copper deposit was recently discovered and represents a giant prospect (inferred resources of 4-5 Mt fine-Cu with a grade of 0.72% Cu; 30-50 t fine-gold with a grade of 0.23 g/t Au) in the Bangongco metallogenic belt, Tibet. Zircon SHRIMP and LA-ICP-MS U-Pb geochronology shows that the multiple porphyritic intrusions were emplaced during two episodes, the first at about 121 Ma (Bolong mineralized granodiorite porphyry (BMGP) and barren granodiorite porphyry (BGP)) and the second about 116 Ma (Duobuza mineralized granodiorite porphyry (DMGP)). Moreover, the basaltic andesites also have two episodes at about 118 Ma and 106 Ma, respectively. One andesite yields an U-Pb zircon age of 111.9 ± 1.9 Ma, indicating it formed after the multiple granodiorite porphyries. By contrast, the 40Ar/ 39Ar age of 115.2 ± 1.1 Ma (hydrothermal K-feldspar vein hosted in DMGP) reveals the close temporal relationship of ore-bearing potassic alteration to the emplacement of the DMGP. The sericite from quartz-sericite vein (hosted in DMGP) yields a 40Ar/ 39Ar age of 115.2 ± 1.2 Ma. Therefore, the ore-forming magmatic-hydrothermal evolution probably persisted for 6 m.y. Additionally, the zircon U-Pb ages (106-121 Ma) of the volcanic rocks and the porphyries suggest that the Neo-Tethys Ocean was still subducting northward during the Early Cretaceous.

  20. The Laramide Caborca orogenic gold belt of northwestern Sonora, Mexico; white mica 40Ar/39Ar geochronology from gold-rich quartz veins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izaguirre, Aldo; Kunk, Michael J.; Iriondo, Alexander; McAleer, Ryan; Caballero-Martinez, Juan Antonio; Espinosa-Arámburu, Enrique

    2016-02-12

    The COGB is approximately 600 kilometers long and 60 to 80 km wide, trends northwest, and extends from west-central Sonora to southern Arizona and California. The COGB contains mineralized gold-rich quartz veins that contain free gold associated with white mica (sericite), carbonate minerals (calcite and ankerite), and sulfides such as pyrite and galena. Limited geochronologic studies exist for parts of the COGB, and previous work was concentrated in mining districts. These previous studies recorded mineralization ages of approximately 70 to 40 Ma. Therefore, some workers proposed that the orogenic gold mineralization in the region occurred during a single pulse that was associated with the Laramide Orogeny that took place during the Cretaceous to early Eocene in the western margin of North America. However, the geochronologic dataset was quite limited, making any regional interpretations tenuous. Accordingly, one of the objectives of this geochronology study was to get a better representative sampling of the COGB in order to obtain a more complete record of the mineralization history. The 63 samples presented in this work are broadly distributed throughout the area of the COGB and allow us to better test the hypothesis that mineralization occurred in a single pulse.

  1. The Laramide Caborca orogenic gold belt of northwestern Sonora, Mexico; white mica 40Ar/39Ar geochronology from gold-rich quartz veins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izaguirre, Aldo; Kunk, Michael J.; Iriondo, Alexander; McAleer, Ryan; Caballero-Martinez, Juan Antonio; Espinosa-Arámburu, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The COGB is approximately 600 kilometers long and 60 to 80 km wide, trends northwest, and extends from west-central Sonora to southern Arizona and California. The COGB contains mineralized gold-rich quartz veins that contain free gold associated with white mica (sericite), carbonate minerals (calcite and ankerite), and sulfides such as pyrite and galena. Limited geochronologic studies exist for parts of the COGB, and previous work was concentrated in mining districts. These previous studies recorded mineralization ages of approximately 70 to 40 Ma. Therefore, some workers proposed that the orogenic gold mineralization in the region occurred during a single pulse that was associated with the Laramide Orogeny that took place during the Cretaceous to early Eocene in the western margin of North America. However, the geochronologic dataset was quite limited, making any regional interpretations tenuous. Accordingly, one of the objectives of this geochronology study was to get a better representative sampling of the COGB in order to obtain a more complete record of the mineralization history. The 63 samples presented in this work are broadly distributed throughout the area of the COGB and allow us to better test the hypothesis that mineralization occurred in a single pulse.

  2. Effect of thermal maturation on the K-Ar, Rb-Sr and REE systematics of an organic-rich New Albany Shale as determined by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clauer, Norbert; Chaudhuri, Sambhudas; Lewan, M.D.; Toulkeridis, T.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrous-pyrolysis experiments were conducted on an organic-rich Devonian-Mississippian shale, which was also leached by dilute HCl before and after pyrolysis, to identify and quantify the induced chemical and isotopic changes in the rock. The experiments significantly affect the organic-mineral organization, which plays an important role in natural interactions during diagenetic hydrocarbon maturation in source rocks. They produce 10.5% of volatiles and the amount of HCl leachables almost doubles from about 6% to 11%. The Rb-Sr and K-Ar data are significantly modified, but not just by removal of radiogenic 40Ar and 87Sr, as described in many studies of natural samples at similar thermal and hydrous conditions. The determining reactions relate to alteration of the organic matter marked by a significant change in the heavy REEs in the HCl leachate after pyrolysis, underlining the potential effects of acidic fluids in natural environments. Pyrolysis induces also release from organics of some Sr with a very low 87Sr/86Sr ratio, as well as part of U. Both seem to have been volatilised during the experiment, whereas other metals such as Pb, Th and part of U appear to have been transferred from soluble phases into stable (silicate?) components. Increase of the K2O and radiogenic 40Ar contents of the silicate minerals after pyrolysis is explained by removal of other elements that could only be volatilised, as the system remains strictly closed during the experiment. The observed increase in radiogenic 40Ar implies that it was not preferentially released as a volatile gas phase when escaping the altered mineral phases. It had to be re-incorporated into newly-formed soluble phases, which is opposite to the general knowledge about the behavior of Ar in supergene natural environments. Because of the strictly closed-system conditions, hydrous-pyrolysis experiments allow to better identify and even quantify the geochemical aspects of organic-inorganic interactions, such as

  3. Diverged Alleles of the Anopheles gambiae Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene APL1A Display Distinct Protective Profiles against Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Mitri, Christian; Riehle, Michelle M.; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Brito-Fravallo, Emma; Takashima, Eizo; Thiery, Isabelle; Zettor, Agnes; Petres, Stephane; Bourgouin, Catherine; Vernick, Kenneth D.; Eiglmeier, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Functional studies have demonstrated a role for the Anopheles gambiae APL1A gene in resistance against the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Here, we exhaustively characterize the structure of the APL1 locus and show that three structurally different APL1A alleles segregate in the Ngousso colony. Genetic association combined with RNAi-mediated gene silencing revealed that APL1A alleles display distinct protective profiles against P. falciparum. One APL1A allele is sufficient to explain the protective phenotype of APL1A observed in silencing experiments. Epitope-tagged APL1A isoforms expressed in an in vitro hemocyte-like cell system showed that under assay conditions, the most protective APL1A isoform (APL1A2) localizes within large cytoplasmic vesicles, is not constitutively secreted, and forms only one protein complex, while a less protective isoform (APL1A1) is constitutively secreted in at least two protein complexes. The tested alleles are identical to natural variants in the wild A. gambiae population, suggesting that APL1A genetic variation could be a factor underlying natural heterogeneity of vector susceptibility to P. falciparum. PMID:23285147

  4. Autotetraploids of Vicia cracca show a higher allelic richness in natural populations and a higher seed set after artificial selfing than diploids

    PubMed Central

    Eliášová, Anežka; Trávníček, Pavel; Mandák, Bohumil; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite the great importance of autopolyploidy in the evolution of angiosperms, relatively little attention has been devoted to autopolyploids in natural polyploid systems. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain why autopolyploids are so common and successful, for example increased genetic diversity and heterozygosity and the transition towards selfing. However, case studies on patterns of genetic diversity and on mating systems in autopolyploids are scarce. In this study allozymes were employed to investigate the origin, population genetic diversity and mating system in the contact zone between diploid and assumed autotetraploid cytotypes of Vicia cracca in Central Europe. Methods Four enzyme systems resolved in six putative loci were investigated in ten diploid, ten tetraploid and five mixed-ploidy populations. Genetic diversity and heterozygosity, partitioning of genetic diversity among populations and cytotypes, spatial genetic structure and fixed heterozygosity were analysed. These studies were supplemented by a pollination experiment and meiotic chromosome observation. Key Results and Conclusions Weak evidence of fixed heterozygosity, a low proportion of unique alleles and genetic variation between cytotypes similar to the variation among populations within cytotypes supported the autopolyploid origin of tetraploids, although no multivalent formation was observed. Tetraploids possessed more alleles than diploids and showed higher observed zygotic heterozygosity than diploids, but the observed gametic heterozygosity was similar to the value observed in diploids and smaller than expected under panmixis. Values of the inbreeding coefficient and differentiation among populations (ρST) suggested that the breeding system in both cytotypes of V. cracca is mixed mating with prevailing outcrossing. The reduction in seed production of tetraploids after selfing was less than that in diploids. An absence of correlation between genetic and

  5. CH-radical concentration measurements in fuel-rich CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/Ar and CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/NO/Ar mixtures behind shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Woiki, D.; Votsmeier, M.; Davidson, D.F.; Hanson, R.K.; Bowman, C.T.

    1998-06-01

    CH radicals are important precursors in prompt-NO formation and they also play a role in NO removal via reburning. Little information exists, however, on the absolute concentrations of CH during fuel-rich methane oxidation and their dependence on NO concentrations. Here the authors report results of CH-radical measurements for such conditions, using a shock tube in combination with a sensitive CH absorption diagnostic. These measurements provide useful data for the further development of large-scale reaction mechanisms, such as the recently developed Gas Research Institute methane oxidation and NO reburning mechanism (GRI-Mech 2.11). CH-radical profiles were measured at high temperatures for fuel-rich methane oxidation with and without addition of NO. Comparison of these data with predictions based on the GRI-Mech 2.11 mechanism shows significant deviations, suggesting the need for additional high-temperature rate data on important CH reactions and for further optimization of the detailed mechanism.

  6. Two-cell detonation: losses effects on cellular structure and propagation in rich H2-NO2/N2O4-Ar mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virot, F.; Khasainov, B.; Desbordes, D.; Presles, H.-N.

    2010-12-01

    Detonation experiments in H2-NO2/N2O4-Ar mixtures (Equivalence ratio 1.2 and initial pressure lower than 0.1 MPa) confined in a tube of internal diameter 52 mm reveal two propagation regimes depending on initial pressure: (1) a quasi-CJ regime is observed along with a double cellular structure at high pressures; (2) at lower pressures, a low velocity detonation regime is observed with a single structure. Transition between this two regimes happens when the spinning detonation of the larger cell vanishes. Each detonation regime is characterized by velocity and pressure measurements and cellular structure records. Coherence between all experimental data for each experiment leads in assumption that losses are responsible for the transition between one regime to another. In a second part, we study such behaviour for a two-step mixture through numerical simulations using a global two-step chemical kinetics and a simple losses model. Numerical simulations qualitatively agree with experiments. Both detonation regimes with their own cellular structures are reproduced.

  7. Neutron-hole states in 45Ar from 1H(46Ar, d) 45Ar reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, F.; Lee, Jenny; Tsang, M. B.; Bazin, D.; Coupland, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M.; Lynch, W. G.; Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Sun, Z. Y.; Youngs, M.; Charity, R. J.; Sobotka, L. G.; Famiano, M.; Hudan, S.; Horoi, M.; Ye, Y. L.

    2013-07-01

    To improve the effective interactions in the pf shell, it is important to measure the single-particle and single-hole states near the N = 28 shell gap. In this paper, the neutron spectroscopic factors of hole states from the unstable neutron-rich 45Ar (Z = 18,N = 27) nucleus have been studied using the 1H(46Ar,d) 45Ar transfer reaction in inverse kinematics. Comparison of our results with the particle states of 45Ar produced in 2H(44Ar, p) 45Ar reaction shows that the two reactions populate states with different angular momenta. Using the angular distributions, we are able to confirm the spin assignments of four low-lying states of 45Ar. These are the ground state (f7/2), the first-excited state (p3/2), and the s1/2 and d3/2 states. While large basis shell-model predictions describe spectroscopic properties of the ground and p3/2 states very well, they fail to describe the s1/2 and d3/2 hole states.

  8. Ar-Ar_Redux: rigorous error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rigorous data reduction and error propagation algorithms are needed to realise Earthtime's objective to improve the interlaboratory accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating to better than 1% and thereby facilitate the comparison and combination of the K-Ar and U-Pb chronometers. Ar-Ar_Redux is a new data reduction protocol and software program for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology which takes into account two previously underappreciated aspects of the method: 1. 40Ar/39Ar measurements are compositional dataIn its simplest form, the 40Ar/39Ar age equation can be written as: t = log(1+J [40Ar/39Ar-298.5636Ar/39Ar])/λ = log(1 + JR)/λ Where λ is the 40K decay constant and J is the irradiation parameter. The age t does not depend on the absolute abundances of the three argon isotopes but only on their relative ratios. Thus, the 36Ar, 39Ar and 40Ar abundances can be normalised to unity and plotted on a ternary diagram or 'simplex'. Argon isotopic data are therefore subject to the peculiar mathematics of 'compositional data', sensu Aitchison (1986, The Statistical Analysis of Compositional Data, Chapman & Hall). 2. Correlated errors are pervasive throughout the 40Ar/39Ar methodCurrent data reduction protocols for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology propagate the age uncertainty as follows: σ2(t) = [J2 σ2(R) + R2 σ2(J)] / [λ2 (1 + R J)], which implies zero covariance between R and J. In reality, however, significant error correlations are found in every step of the 40Ar/39Ar data acquisition and processing, in both single and multi collector instruments, during blank, interference and decay corrections, age calculation etc. Ar-Ar_Redux revisits every aspect of the 40Ar/39Ar method by casting the raw mass spectrometer data into a contingency table of logratios, which automatically keeps track of all covariances in a compositional context. Application of the method to real data reveals strong correlations (r2 of up to 0.9) between age measurements within a single irradiation batch. Propertly taking

  9. Topography evolution of 500 keV Ar(4+) ion beam irradiated InP(100) surfaces - formation of self-organized In-rich nano-dots and scaling laws.

    PubMed

    Sulania, Indra; Agarwal, Dinesh C; Kumar, Manish; Kumar, Sunil; Kumar, Pravin

    2016-07-27

    We report the formation of self-organized nano-dots on the surface of InP(100) upon irradiating it with a 500 keV Ar(4+) ion beam. The irradiation was carried out at an angle of 25° with respect to the normal at the surface with 5 different fluences ranging from 1.0 × 10(15) to 1.0 × 10(17) ions per cm(2). The morphology of the ion-irradiated surfaces was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the formation of the nano-dots on the irradiated surfaces was confirmed. The average size of the nano-dots varied from 44 ± 14 nm to 94 ± 26 nm with increasing ion fluence. As a function of the ion fluence, the variation in the average size of the nano-dots has a great correlation with the surface roughness, which changes drastically up to the ion fluence of 1.0 × 10(16) ions per cm(2) and attains almost a saturation level for further irradiation. The roughness and the growth exponent values deduced from the scaling laws suggest that the kinetic sputtering and the large surface diffusion steps of the atoms are the primary reasons for the formation of the self-organized nanodots on the surface. X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) studies show that the surface stoichiometry changes with the ion fluence. With irradiation, the surface becomes more indium (In)-rich owing to the preferential sputtering of the phosphorus atoms (P) and the pure metallic In nano-dots evolve at the highest ion fluence. The cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the sample irradiated with the highest fluence showed the absence of the nanostructuring beneath the surface. The surface morphological changes at this medium energy ion irradiation are discussed in correlation with the low and high energy experiments to shed more light on the mechanism of the well separated nano-dot formation.

  10. Ar-40/Ar-39 laser-probe dating of diamond inclusions from the Premier kimberlite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, D.; Onstott, T. C.; Harris, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The results of Ar-40/Ar-39 laser-probe analyses of individual eclogitic clinopyroxene inclusions from Premier diamonds are reported which yield a mean age of 1198 + or - 14 Myr. This age agrees well with Sm-Nd and Ar-40/Ar-39 analyses on similar Premier inclusions and is indistinguishable from the inferred time of emplacement of the host kimberlite, which implies that diamond formation was essentially synchronous with kimberlite generation. The extrapolated nonradiogenic Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio of 334 + or - 102 is similar to the present-day atmospheric composition. This value is inconsistent with Sr and Nd isotopic signatures from Premier eclogite inclusions, which suggest a depleted mantle source. Preentrapment equilibration of the inclusions with an Ar-36-rich fluid is the most probable explanation for the low nonradiogenic composition.

  11. Intragenic allele pyramiding combines different specificities of wheat Pm3 resistance alleles.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Susanne; Hurni, Severine; Streckeisen, Philipp; Mayr, Gabriele; Albrecht, Mario; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Keller, Beat

    2010-11-01

    Some plant resistance genes occur as allelic series, with each member conferring specific resistance against a subset of pathogen races. In wheat, there are 17 alleles of the Pm3 gene. They encode nucleotide-binding (NB-ARC) and leucine-rich-repeat (LRR) domain proteins, which mediate resistance to distinct race spectra of powdery mildew. It is not known if specificities from different alleles can be combined to create resistance genes with broader specificity. Here, we used an approach based on avirulence analysis of pathogen populations to characterize the molecular basis of Pm3 recognition spectra. A large survey of mildew races for avirulence on the Pm3 alleles revealed that Pm3a has a resistance spectrum that completely contains that of Pm3f, but also extends towards additional races. The same is true for the Pm3b and Pm3c gene pair. The molecular analysis of these allelic pairs revealed a role of the NB-ARC protein domain in the efficiency of effector-dependent resistance. Analysis of the wild-type and chimeric Pm3 alleles identified single residues in the C-terminal LRR motifs as the main determinant of allele specificity. Variable residues of the N-terminal LRRs are necessary, but not sufficient, to confer resistance specificity. Based on these data, we constructed a chimeric Pm3 gene by intragenic allele pyramiding of Pm3d and Pm3e that showed the combined resistance specificity and, thus, a broader recognition spectrum compared with the parental alleles. Our findings support a model of stepwise evolution of Pm3 recognition specificities.

  12. Spatial evaluation of Ar-systematics in rocks from the British Channel Islands: a UV laserprobe Ar/Ar study of excess 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Sherlock, S.; Kelley, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    The Ar-Ar method is a powerful tool for constraining thermal histories of metamorphic and plutonic rocks, most commonly undertaken on potassium rich mineral separates rather than whole rocks. While this approach usually yields reasonable thermal histories, it is rarely as precise as dating volcanics, and such rocks are also frequently contaminated by excess argon, artificially elevating the Ar-Ar ages. Understanding the evolution of excess argon represents a challenge; whilst it is possible to discern the ‘sink’ as the host mineral now contaminated by excess argon, examining the ‘source’ and ‘transport’ mechanism is more challenging. The approach we have taken here is to combine measurements of potassium rich and potassium poor minerals to understand the argon reservoirs and argon transfer between minerals, grain boundaries and fluids. Considering the system as a whole provides a method for understanding the complete history of the rock and thus assessing any interactions which may impact on the interpretation of ages and thermal history [Kelley, 2002, Chem. Geol. 188]. Here we have studied a series of plutonic and metamorphic basement samples from the British Channel Islands with different ages and post-emplacement histories, namely Icart Gneiss, Perelle Quartz Diorite, L’Ancresse Granodiorite, and Bordeaux Diorite. The formation age of Icart Gneiss is ~2000 Ma [D’Lemos et al., 1990, Geol. Soc. Spec. Pub. 51]. Ar-Ar ages of hornblendes and biotites from quartz diorites on Guernsey and Sark range between 606 and 596 Ma [Dallmeyer et al. 1991, J. Geol. Soc. London 148], whilst U-Pb zircon ages are in the range 710 to 613 Ma [Dallmeyer et al. 1991; Samson & D’Lemos 1998, J. Geol. Soc. London 155; Miller et al. 1999, Tectonophysics 132]. Detailed petrograpic (microscope, electron microprobe) investigations established the crystallization and deformation history of the samples, and revealed that post-magmatic alteration is unevenly distributed. This

  13. MAIZE ALLELIC DIVERSITY PROJECT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Of the estimated 250-300 races of maize, only 24 races are represented in materials utilized by the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) project, a collaborative effort between USDA-ARS and public and private sector research scientists. This is largely a result of poor performance of many races in ...

  14. Tracking fluid action in Little Sark Pluton (Channel Islands, UK): a UV laserprobe Ar/Ar study of excess 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Schwanethal, J.; Tindle, A. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Sherlock, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Little Sark pluton (Channel Islands, UK) is a weakly to moderately deformed pluton of quartz diorite composition. Zircon from Little Sark has been dated as 611.4(+2.1/-1.3) Ma [Miller et al. 1991, Tectonophysics, 312], whereas titanite has an age of 606.2±0.6 Ma. Hornblende yields an Ar-Ar age of 606.4±3.4 Ma [Dallmeyer et al., 1991, J. Geol. Soc. London 148]. The rocks show evidence for post-magmatic hydrous alteration including chloritisation of biotite, and sericite formation in feldspar. We investigated the alteration in order to understand its influence on the Ar-Ar system. Detailed petrographic investigations of two samples indicate different deformation levels - S1, (less deformed), and S2 (more deformed). The feldspar is andesine to oligoclase in composition, but contains K-rich areas with patchy and sometimes cleavage guided sericitization. Mafic minerals include hornblende and biotite (the latter partially chloritized). Ar-Ar investigations were carried out using high spatial resolution UV laser ablation gas release in combination with a Nu instruments Noblesse gas mass spectrometer using spots of 80 to 140 μm diameter. Mafic minerals in S1 have highly variable 38Ar/39Ar and 37Ar/39Ar ratios and unusually high atmospheric contents for such old samples, possibly reflecting the presence of fluid inclusions associated with the sericite, particularly in the feldspar. The apparent ages in their entirety range from 429 to 668 Ma. Hornblende yields homogeneous apparent ages, whereas the younger and older ages are measured in both micas and feldspars, whose apparent ages range from 245-670 Ma. The modal age for feldspar is around 400-450 Ma, but this may not have geological meaning. Sample S2 shows many of the same features as S1. Mafic minerals span a slightly smaller age range and feldspars display apparent ages of ~245-645 Ma with a mode around 480 Ma. The alteration of both samples appears to have been accompanied by the introduction of 40Ar-rich fluids

  15. 40Ar/39Ar systematics and argon diffusion in amber: implications for ancient earth atmospheres

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, G.P.; Snee, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    Argon isotope data indicate retained argon in bulk amber (matrix gas) is radiogenic [40Ar/39Ar ???32o] than the much more abundant surface absorbed argon [40Ar/39Ar ???295.5]. Neutron-induced 39Ar is retained in amber during heating experiments to 150?? -250??C, with no evidence of recoiled 39Ar found after irradiation. A maximum permissible volume diffusion coefficient of argon in amber (at ambient temperature) D???1.5 x 10-17 cm2S-1 is calculated from 39Ar retention. 40Ar/39Ar age calculations indicate Dominican Republic amber is ??? 45 Ma and North Dakota amber is ??? 89 Ma, both at least reasonable ages for the amber based upon stratigraphic and paleontological constraints and upon the small amount of radiogenic 40Ar. To date, over 300 gas analyses of ambers and resins of Cretaceous to Recent age that are geographically distributed among fifteen noted world locations identify mixtures of gases in different sites within amber (Berner and Landis, 1988). The presence of multiple mixing trends between compositionally distinct end-members gases within the same sample and evidence for retained radiogenic argon within the amber argue persuasivley against rapid exchange by diffusion of amber-contained gases with moder air. Only gas in primary bubbles entrapped between successive flows of tree resin has been interpreted as original "ancient air", which is an O2-rich end-member gas with air-like N2/Ar ratios. Gas analyses of these primary bubbles indicate atmospheric O2 levels in the Late Cretaceous of ??? 35%, and that atmospheric O2 dropped by early Tertiary time to near a present atmospheric level of 21% O2. A very low argon diffusion coefficient in amber persuasively argues for a gas in primary bubbles trapped in amber being ancient air (possibly modified only by O2 reaction with amber). ?? 1991.

  16. Plasma AR and abiraterone-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Romanel, Alessandro; Gasi Tandefelt, Delila; Conteduca, Vincenza; Jayaram, Anuradha; Casiraghi, Nicola; Wetterskog, Daniel; Salvi, Samanta; Amadori, Dino; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Rescigno, Pasquale; Bianchini, Diletta; Gurioli, Giorgia; Casadio, Valentina; Carreira, Suzanne; Goodall, Jane; Wingate, Anna; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Tunariu, Nina; Flohr, Penny; De Giorgi, Ugo; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene aberrations are rare in prostate cancer before primary hormone treatment but emerge with castration resistance. To determine AR gene status using a minimally invasive assay that could have broad clinical utility, we developed a targeted next-generation sequencing approach amenable to plasma DNA, covering all AR coding bases and genomic regions that are highly informative in prostate cancer. We sequenced 274 plasma samples from 97 castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone at two institutions. We controlled for normal DNA in patients' circulation and detected a sufficiently high tumor DNA fraction to quantify AR copy number state in 217 samples (80 patients). Detection of AR copy number gain and point mutations in plasma were inversely correlated, supported further by the enrichment of nonsynonymous versus synonymous mutations in AR copy number normal as opposed to AR gain samples. Whereas AR copy number was unchanged from before treatment to progression and no mutant AR alleles showed signal for acquired gain, we observed emergence of T878A or L702H AR amino acid changes in 13% of tumors at progression on abiraterone. Patients with AR gain or T878A or L702H before abiraterone (45%) were 4.9 and 7.8 times less likely to have a ≥50 or ≥90% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), respectively, and had a significantly worse overall [hazard ratio (HR), 7.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.51 to 15.34; P = 1.3 × 10(-9)) and progression-free (HR, 3.73; 95% CI, 2.17 to 6.41; P = 5.6 × 10(-7)) survival. Evaluation of plasma AR by next-generation sequencing could identify cancers with primary resistance to abiraterone.

  17. Neutron-Proton Asymmetry Dependence of Spectroscopic Factors in Ar Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jenny; Tsang, Betty; Shapira, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic factors have been extracted for proton-rich 34Ar and neutron-rich 46Ar using the (p, d) neutron transfer reaction. The experimental results show little reduction of the ground state neutron spectroscopic factor of the proton-rich nucleus 34Ar compared to that of 46Ar. The results suggest that correlations, which generally reduce such spectroscopic factors, do not depend strongly on the neutron-proton asymmetry of the nucleus in this isotopic region as was reported in knockout reactions. The present results are consistent with results from systematic studies of transfer reactions but inconsistent with the trends observed in knockout reaction measurements.

  18. Allelic loss in colorectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, S.E.; Fearon, E.R.; Tersmette, K.W.F.; Enterline, J.P.; Vogelstein, B.; Hamilton, S.R. ); Leppert, M.; Nakamura, Yusuke; White, R. )

    1989-06-02

    Clinical and pathological associations with molecular genetic alterations were studied in colorectal carcinomas from 83 patients. Fractional allelic loss, a measure of allelic deletions throughout the genome, and allelic deletions of specific chromosomal arms (the short arm of 17 and long arm of 18) each provided independent prognostic information by multivariate analysis when considered individually with Dukes' classification. Distant metastasis was significantly associated with high fractional allelic loss and with deletions of 17p and 18q. Mutations of ras proto-oncogenes and deletions of 5q had no prognostic importance. Statistically significant associations were also found between allelic losses and a family history of cancer, left-sided tumor location, and absence of extracellular tumor mucin. Allelic deletion analysis thus identified subsets of colorectal carcinoma with increased predilection for distant metastasis and cancer-related death. Further studies may define a subset of genetic alterations that can be used clinically to help assess prognosis.

  19. Alternative 3' splice acceptor sites modulate enzymic activity in derivative alleles of the maize bronze1-mutable 13 allele.

    PubMed Central

    Okagaki, R J; Sullivan, T D; Schiefelbein, J W; Nelson, O E

    1992-01-01

    The defective Suppressor-mutator (dSpm)-induced allele bronze1-mutable 13 (bz1-m13) and many of its derivative alleles are leaky mutants with measurable levels of flavonol O3-glucosyltransferase activity. This activity results from splicing at acceptor site-1, one of two cryptic 3' splice sites within the dSpm insertion in bz1-m13. In this study, splicing in bz1-m13 change-in-state (CS) alleles CS-3 and CS-64 was shown to be altered from bz1-m13; previous work found altered splicing in CS-9. CS-64 is a null allele and lacks the acceptor site-1-spliced transcript because this site is deleted. CS-3 and CS-9 had increased levels of the acceptor site-1 transcript relative to bz1-m13 and increased enzymic activities. A deletion in CS-9 altered splicing by eliminating acceptor site-2. Both acceptor sites were intact in CS-3, but a deletion removed most of a 275-bp GC-rich sequence in dSpm. This suggests that GC-rich sequences affect splicing and is consistent with models postulating a role for AU content in the splicing of plant introns. Splicing does not necessarily occur, however, at the junction of AU-rich intron sequences and GC-rich exon sequences. PMID:1477558

  20. Direct dating of tin-tungsten mineralization of the Piaotang tungsten deposit, South China, by 40Ar/39Ar progressive crushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Min; Jiang, Ying-De; Qiu, Hua-Ning

    2013-08-01

    Dating ore minerals is the most direct method to determine the mineralization age of a deposit, but only a few ore minerals can be directly dated by traditional isotopic geochronometers. The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of direct dating of the ore minerals cassiterite and wolframite from the Piaotang tungsten deposit using the 40Ar/39Ar stepwise crushing technique, comparing the age to coexisting K-rich muscovite dated by 40Ar/39Ar laser stepwise heating. The cassiterite, wolframite and muscovite samples were separated from four pieces of ore hand-specimens. The 40Ar/39Ar isochron ages of cassiterite and wolframite are concordant with ages of their coexisting muscovite, indicating that cassiterite and wolframite are suitable ore minerals for directly dating the ore-forming event by 40Ar/39Ar stepwise crushing.

  1. Maize ARGOS1 (ZAR1) transgenic alleles increase hybrid maize yield.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary A; Wei, Jun; Winkler, Chris; Goncalves-Butruille, Marymar; Weers, Ben P; Cerwick, Sharon F; Dieter, Jo Ann; Duncan, Keith E; Howard, Richard J; Hou, Zhenglin; Löffler, Carlos M; Cooper, Mark; Simmons, Carl R

    2014-01-01

    Crop improvement for yield and drought tolerance is challenging due to the complex genetic nature of these traits and environmental dependencies. This study reports that transgenic over-expression of Zea mays AR GOS1 (ZAR1) enhanced maize organ growth, grain yield, and drought-stress tolerance. The ZAR1 transgene exhibited environmental interactions, with yield increase under Temperate Dry and yield reduction under Temperate Humid or High Latitude environments. Native ZAR1 allele variation associated with drought-stress tolerance. Two founder alleles identified in the mid-maturity germplasm of North America now predominate in Pioneer's modern breeding programme, and have distinct proteins, promoters and expression patterns. These two major alleles show heterotic group partitioning, with one predominant in Pioneer's female and the other in the male heterotic groups, respectively. These two alleles also associate with favourable crop performance when heterozygous. Allele-specific transgene testing showed that, of the two alleles discussed here, each allele differed in their impact on yield and environmental interactions. Moreover, when transgenically stacked together the allelic pair showed yield and environmental performance advantages over either single allele, resembling heterosis effects. This work demonstrates differences in transgenic efficacy of native alleles and the differences reflect their association with hybrid breeding performance.

  2. An alternative hypothesis for high-T 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum discordance in polyphase extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, W. S.; Shuster, D. L.; Renne, P. R.; Weiss, B. P.

    2009-12-01

    A common feature observed in 40Ar/39Ar age spectra of extraterrestrial (ET) rocks is a conspicuous decrease in the ages of high temperature extractions relative to lower temperature steps and a correlated increase in Ca/K, often succeeded by a monotonic increase in ages. This feature is routinely attributed to recoil-implanted 39Ar from a potassium (K)-rich donor phase into a K-poor receptor phase (e.g., 1,2). While 39Ar recoil redistribution is undoubtedly manifested in many terrestrial and ET 40Ar/39Ar whole-rock age spectra, it cannot easily explain the magnitude of high release temperature 40Ar*/39ArK anomalies observed in Martian meteorites ALH 84001 and Nakhla, as well as other course-grained meteorites and lunar rocks. Depending on the aliquot and sample, 50 - 100% of the pyroxene release spectra in ALH 84001 and Nakhla appear strongly perturbed to lower ages. As the mean recoil distance of 39Ar ~0.1 µm, the recoil hypothesis demands that a high-K phase be ubiquitously distributed amongst sub-micron to micron sized pyroxene crystals to account for the observed pyroxene age spectra. However, in both Nakhla and ALH 84001, pyroxene is often completely isolated from high-K phases and individual grains commonly exceed 100 µm in diameter. 40Ar/39Ar analyses of pyroxene-bearing terrestrial basalts, wherein fine-grained pyroxene and plagioclase are intimately adjoined, show that recoil-implanted 39Ar into pyroxene produces much less precipitous anomalies in 40Ar*/39ArK, as predicted by the recoil lengthscale. An alternative hypothesis is that whole-rock age spectra of ET samples with anomalously low ages at high temperatures may reflect diffusive 40Ar distributions within considerably degassed pyroxene grains. Owing to apparent differences in activation energies between glass and/or plagioclase and pyroxene, 40Ar may diffuse more rapidly from pyroxene under certain high-temperature conditions (i.e., above the temperature at which the extrapolated Ar Arrhenius

  3. Earth-atmosphere evolution based on new determination of Devonian atmosphere Ar isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Finlay M.; Mark, Darren F.; Gandanger, Pierre; McConville, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The isotopic composition of the noble gases, in particular Ar, in samples of ancient atmosphere trapped in rocks and minerals provides the strongest constraints on the timing and rate of Earth atmosphere formation by degassing of the Earth's interior. We have re-measured the isotopic composition of argon in the Rhynie chert from northeast Scotland using a high precision mass spectrometer in an effort to provide constraints on the composition of Devonian atmosphere. Irradiated chert samples yield 40Ar/36Ar ratios that are often below the modern atmosphere value. The data define a 40Ar/36Ar value of 289.5 ± 0.4 at K/36Ar = 0. Similarly low 40Ar/36Ar are measured in un-irradiated chert samples. The simplest explanation for the low 40Ar/36Ar is the preservation of Devonian atmosphere-derived Ar in the chert, with the intercept value in 40Ar-39Ar-36Ar space representing an upper limit. In this case the Earth's atmosphere has accumulated only 3% (5.1 ± 0.4 ×1016 mol) of the total 40Ar inventory since the Devonian. The average accumulation rate of 1.27 ± 0.09 ×108 mol40Ar/yr overlaps the rate over the last 800 kyr. This implies that there has been no resolvable temporal change in the outgassing rate of the Earth since the mid-Palaeozoic despite the likely episodicity of Ar degassing from the continental crust. Incorporating the new Devonian atmosphere 40Ar/36Ar into the Earth degassing model of Pujol et al. (2013) provides the most precise constraints on atmosphere formation so far. The atmosphere formed in the first ∼100 Ma after initial accretion during a catastrophic degassing episode. A significant volume of 40Ar did not start to accumulate in the atmosphere until after 4 Ga which implies that stable K-rich continental crust did not develop until this time.

  4. Ar-Ar ages and thermal histories of enstatite meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Dixon, Eleanor T.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2010-05-01

    Compared with ordinary chondrites, there is a relative paucity of chronological and other data to define the early thermal histories of enstatite parent bodies. In this study, we report 39Ar-40Ar dating results for five EL chondrites: Khairpur, Pillistfer, Hvittis, Blithfield, and Forrest; five EH chondrites: Parsa, Saint Marks, Indarch, Bethune, and Reckling Peak 80259; three igneous-textured enstatite meteorites that represent impact melts on enstatite chondrite parent bodies: Zaklodzie, Queen Alexandra Range 97348, and Queen Alexandra Range 97289; and three aubrites, Norton County, Bishopville, and Cumberland Falls Several Ar-Ar age spectra show unusual 39Ar recoil effects, possibly the result of some of the K residing in unusual sulfide minerals, such as djerfisherite and rodderite, and other age spectra show 40Ar diffusion loss. Few additional Ar-Ar ages for enstatite meteorites are available in the literature. When all available Ar-Ar data on enstatite meteorites are considered, preferred ages of nine chondrites and one aubrite show a range of 4.50-4.54Ga, whereas five other meteorites show only lower age limits over 4.35-4.46Ga. Ar-Ar ages of several enstatite chondrites are as old or older as the oldest Ar-Ar ages of ordinary chondrites, which suggests that enstatite chondrites may have derived from somewhat smaller parent bodies, or were metamorphosed to lower temperatures compared to other chondrite types. Many enstatite meteorites are brecciated and/or shocked, and some of the younger Ar-Ar ages may record these impact events. Although impact heating of ordinary chondrites within the last 1Ga is relatively common for ordinary chondrites, only Bethune gives any significant evidence for such a young event.

  5. Ar/Ar Dating Independent of Monitor Standard Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, S.; Hemming, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Because the reported age of an analyzed sample is dependent on the age of the co-irradiated monitor standard(s), Ar/Ar dating is a relative dating technique. There is disagreement at the 1% scale in the age of commonly used monitor standards, and there is a great need to improve the inter-laboratory calibrations. Additionally, new approaches and insights are needed to meet the challenge of bringing the Ar/Ar chronometer to the highest possible precision and accuracy. In this spirit, we present a conceptual framework for Ar/Ar dating that does not depend on the age of monitor standards, but only on the K content of a solid standard. The concept is demonstrated by introducing a re-expressed irradiation parameter (JK) that depends on the ratio of 39ArK to 40Ar* rather than the 40Ar*/39ArK ratio. JK is equivalent to the traditional irradiation parameter J and is defined as JK = (39Ar/40K) • (λ/λe). The ultimate precision and accuracy of the method will depend on how precisely and accurately the 39Ar and 40K can be estimated, and will require isotope dilution measurements of both from the same aliquot. We are testing the workability of our technique at the 1% level by measuring weighed and irradiated hornblende and biotite monitor standards using GLO-1 glauconite to define a calibration curve for argon signals versus abundance.

  6. Structure of the N=27 isotones derived from the {sup 44}Ar(d,p){sup 45}Ar reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudefroy, L.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Fortier, S.; Franchoo, S.; Hammache, F.; Roussel, P.; Stanoiu, M.; Tryggestad, E.; Dombradi, Z.; Sohler, D.; Grevy, S.; St Laurent, M. G.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Kratz, K. L.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.-E.

    2008-09-15

    The {sup 44}Ar(d,p){sup 45}Ar neutron transfer reaction was performed at 10A MeV. Measured excitation energies, deduced angular momenta, and spectroscopic factors of the states populated in {sup 45}Ar are reported. A satisfactory description of these properties is achieved in the shell model framework using a new sdpf interaction. The model analysis is extended to more exotic even-Z nuclei down to {sub 14}{sup 41}Si{sub 27} to study how collectivity impacts the low-lying structure of N=27 neutron-rich nuclei.

  7. 40Ar/39Ar Dating of Volcanic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Renne, P. R.; Watkins, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Application of the 40Ar/39Ar method to volcanic glasses has been somewhat stigmatized following several studies demonstrating secondary mobility of K and Ar. Much of the stigma is unwarranted, however, since most studies only impugned the reliability of the K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar techniques when applied to glass shards rather than obsidian clasts with low surface area to volume ratios. We provide further evidence for problematic K loss and/or 39Ar recoil ejection from glass shards in 40Ar/39Ar step heating results for comagmatic feldspars and shards. In an extreme case, the plateau age of the feldspars (0.17 ± 0.03 Ma at 2σ) is significantly younger than the plateau age of the glass (0.85 ± 0.05 Ma at 2σ). If the feldspar age is reasonably interpreted as the eruption age of the ash, it is likely that the glass shards experienced K and/or 39Ar loss. Electron microprobe analyses of the glass shards have low totals (~93%) and no systematic lateral variability (i.e., diffusion gradients) in K, suggesting that the lengthscale of the glass shards is smaller than the lengthscale of K diffusion. Obsidian clasts should not be as susceptible to K loss since any hydrated (K-depleted) volume represents a small fraction of the total material and can often be physically removed prior to analysis. Samples described here are detrital obsidian clasts from the Afar region of Ethiopia. Evidence from Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and previous work by Anovitz (1999), confirm that the scale of water and potassium mobility are often small in comparison to the size of obsidian clasts but large enough to effect the bulk composition of glass shards. This expectation is confirmed in another tuff wherein comagmatic obsidian clasts and sanidine phenocrysts yield indistinguishable 40Ar/39Ar ages of 4.4 Ma High abundances of non-radiogenic 40Ar, and kinetic fractionation of Ar isotopes during quenching and/or laboratory degassing resulting in incomplete equilibration between

  8. Allelic association between marker loci.

    PubMed

    Lonjou, C; Collins, A; Morton, N E

    1999-02-16

    Allelic association has proven useful to refine the location of major genes prior to positional cloning, but it is of uncertain value for genome scans in complex inheritance. We have extended kinship theory to give information content for linkage and allelic association. Application to pairs of closely linked markers as a surrogate for marker x oligogene pairs indicates that association is largely determined by regional founders, with little effect of subsequent demography. Sub-Saharan Africa has the least allelic association, consistent with settlement of other regions by small numbers of founders. Recent speculation about substantial advantages of isolates over large populations, of constant size over expansion, and of F1 hybrids over incrosses is not supported by theory or data. On the contrary, fewer affected cases, less opportunity for replication, and more stochastic variation tend to make isolates less informative for allelic association, as they are for linkage.

  9. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  10. 40Ar/36Ar analyses of historic lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.

    1969-01-01

    The ratio 40Ar/36Ar was measured for 26 subaerial historic lava flows. Approximately one-third of the samples had 40Ar/36Ar ratios either higher or lower than the atmospheric value of 295.5 at the 95% confidence level. Excess radiogenic 40Ar in five flows ranged from about 1 ?? 10-13 to 1.5 ?? 10-12 mol/g. Possible excess 36Ar in three flows was on the order of 10-16 to 10-15 mol/g. Upper 95% confidence limits for excess 40Ar in samples with normal 40Ar/36Ar ratios are generally less than 3 ?? 10-13 mol/g. The origin of the excess 36Ar is unknown but it may be due either to the incorporation of primitive argon that has been stored in the mantle in very low potassium environments or to enrichment in 36Ar as atmospheric argon diffuses into the rocks after they cool. ?? 1969.

  11. A natural laboratory for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology: ICDP cores from Lake Van, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Jonathan; Sudo, Masafumi; Oberhänsli, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Pore water samples from ICDP Paleovan cores indicate a limited pore water exchange within Quaternary lake sediments. The core's volcaniclastic sections bear unaltered K-rich ternary feldspar and fresh to altered glass shards of predominantly rhyolitic composition. Whereas applying the 40Ar/39Ar method on feldspars resulted in ages timing a late-stage crystallization, glass shards had the potential to date the eruption. Volcanic glass is prone to modifications such as hydrous alteration (palagonitization) and devitrification (Cerling et al., 1985). These modifications affect the glass' chemistry and challenge the application of the 40Ar/39Ar method. Gaining precise radiometric ages from two phases has the potential to strengthen a climate-stratigraphic age-model (Stockhecke et al., 2014), and to significantly increase the temporal resolution on the deposition of the lake sediments. Vice versa the core's previous age model has the ability to question the reliability of 40Ar/39Ar eruption ages derived from ternary feldspars and glass shards. Multi- and single-grain total fusion on alkali feldspars from six volcaniclastic deposits resulted in Pleistocene ages that are in good agreement with the predicted age model. Feldspar phenocrysts from three ashes in the core's youngest section yielded consistent isochron ages that are significantly older than the model's prediction. Several distinct stratigraphic and paleomagnetic time markers of similar stratigraphic positions contradict to the older radiometric dates (Stockhecke et al., 2014). Partial resorption features of inherited feldspar domains and the involvement of excess 40Ar indicate incomplete degassing of older domains. To evaluate the magmatic history of the different domains EMPA mappings of trace elements that could be interpreted as Ar diffusion couples are currently conducted. Geochronology on Paleovan cores offers unique opportunities to monitor the effect of alteration on the Ar-systematics of volcanic glass

  12. The Spectroscopic study of {sup 33}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Adimi, N.; Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O.; Bey, A.; Blank, B.; Dossat, C.; Giovinazzo, J.; Matea, I.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Knudsen, H. H.; Suemmerer, K.

    2011-10-28

    The proton-rich nucleus {sup 33}Ar has been produced at the low-energy facility SPIRAL at GANIL. Spectroscopic studies of gamma and p emission of this nucleus were performed with the 'Silicon Cube' detection system. The analysis of proton and gamma singles and coincidence spectra allowed us to establish a complete decay scheme of this nucleus. The comparison of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution deduced from our experiment and the theoretical one obtained with the Shell Model permitted the determination of a quenching factor for the Gamow-Teller strength.

  13. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients. Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3′-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5′-UTR polymorphisms). For neither the 3′- nor the 5′-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance. The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold

  14. Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of four ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    Ureilites Novo Urei, Havero, and Kenna show strong evidence of one or more Ar-40 degassing events in the time period of 3.3-4.1 Ga ago. These ages may be compared to current interpretations of ureilite chronology. These include the suggestion of metasomatic activity on the parent body 3.7 Ga ago that reset some Sm-Nd ages and the suggestion that ureilites have experienced terrestrial contamination of several trace elements (including Pb and LREE), which makes suspect ages younger than approximately 4.5 Ga. Because the K-Ar chronometer can be sensitive to metamorphic events, we made Ar-39-Ar-40 determinations on bulk samples (0.12-0.14 g each) of four ureilites. The Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectra and K/Ca ratios as a function of cumulative Ar release from stepwise temperature extractions for the four ureilites analyzed are shown. Because Ar-39-Ar-40 ages shown by low and high temperature extractions may be suspect, we examined the intermediate temperature extractions. Although interpretation of these spectra is obviously uncertain, we believe that the most recent times of Ar degassing can be roughly inferred. These times are approximately 3.3 Ga for Havero, 3.3-3.7 Ga for Novo Urei, and approximately 4.1 Ga for Kenna, for which Ar degassing may not have been complete. The indication of Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing ages of 3.3-4.1 Ga for three ureilites that also contain an enhanced LREE component and (excepting Havero) produce a 3.74 Ga Sm-Nd age, suggests that both chronometers may have responded to the same parent body event. On the other hand, it is also possible that the Ar data reflect one or more separate events that did not strongly affect the Sm-Nd system, a situation that commonly occurs in eucrites. Thus the existence of reset Ar ages does not require similarly reset Sm-Nd ages.

  15. AR-39-AR-40 "Age" of Basaltic Shergottite NWA-3171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2007-01-01

    North-West-Africa 3171 is a 506 g, relatively fresh appearing, basaltic shergottite with similarities to Zagami and Shergotty, but not obviously paired with any of the other known African basaltic shergottites. Its exposure age has the range of 2.5-3.1 Myr , similar to those of Zagami and Shergotty. We made AR-39-AR-40 analyses of a "plagioclase" (now shock-converted to maskelynite) separate and of a glass hand-picked from a vein connected to shock melt pockets.. Plagioclase was separated using its low magnetic susceptibility and then heavy liquid with density of <2.85 g/cm(exp 3). The AR-39-AR-40 age spectrum of NWA-317 1 plag displays a rise in age over 20-100% of the 39Ar release, from 0.24 Gyr to 0.27 Gy.

  16. A metrological approach to measuring 40Ar* concentrations in K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Leah E.; Postma, Onno; Kuiper, Klaudia F.; Mark, Darren F.; van der Plas, Wim; Davidson, Stuart; Perkin, Michael; Villa, Igor M.; Wijbrans, Jan R.

    2011-10-01

    In geochronology, isotopic ages are determined from the ratio of parent and daughter nuclide concentrations in minerals. For dating of geological material using the K-Ar system, the simultaneous determination of 40Ar and 40K concentrations on the same aliquot is not possible. Therefore, a widely used variant, the 40Ar/39Ar technique, involves the production of 39Ar from 39K by neutron bombardment and the reliance on indirect natural calibrators of the neutron flux, referred to as "mineral standards." Many mineral standards still in use rely on decades-old determinations of 40Ar concentrations; resulting uncertainties, both systematic and analytical, impede the determination of higher accuracy ages using the K-Ar decay system. We discuss the theoretical approach and technical design of a gas delivery system which emits metrologically traceable amounts of 40Ar and will allow for the sensitivity calibration of noble gas mass spectrometers. The design of this system is based on a rigorous assessment of the uncertainty budget and detailed tests of a prototype system. A number of obstacles and proposed resolutions are discussed along with the selection of components and their integration into a pipette system.

  17. Comparison of conventional K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating of young mafic volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages have been measured on nine mafic volcanic rocks younger than 1 myr from the Snake River Plain (Idaho), Mount Adams (Washington), and Crater Lake (Oregon). The K-Ar ages were calculated from Ar measurements made by isotope dilution and K2O measurements by flame photometry. The 40Ar/39Ar ages are incremental-heating experiments using a low-blank resistance-heated furnace. The results indicate that high-quality ages can be measured on young, mafic volcanic rocks using either the K-Ar or the 40Ar/39Ar technique. The precision of an 40Ar/39Ar plateau age generally is better than the precision of a K-Ar age because the plateau age is calculated by pooling the ages of several gas increments. The precision of a plateau age generally is better than the precision of an isotope correlation (isochron) age for the same sample. For one sample the intercept of the isochron yielded an 40Ar/36Ar value significantly different from the atmospheric value of 295.5. Recalculation of increment ages using the isochron intercept for the composition of nonradiogenic Ar in the sample resulted in much better agreement of ages for this sample. The results of this study also indicate that, given suitable material and modern equipment, precise K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages can be measured on volcanic rocks as young as the latest Pleistocene, and perhaps even the Holocene.

  18. Invasive Allele Spread under Preemptive Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasi, J. A.; Korniss, G.; Caraco, T.

    We study a discrete spatial model for invasive allele spread in which two alleles compete preemptively, initially only the "residents" (weaker competitors) being present. We find that the spread of the advantageous mutation is well described by homogeneous nucleation; in particular, in large systems the time-dependent global density of the resident allele is well approximated by Avrami's law.

  19. Pulsed discharge production Ar* metastables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiande; Heaven, Michael C.; Emmons, Daniel; Perram, Glen P.; Weeks, David E.; Bailey, William F.

    2016-03-01

    The production of relatively high densities of Ar* metastables (>1012 cm-3) in Ar/He mixtures, at total pressures close to 1 atm, is essential for the efficient operation of an optically pumped Ar* laser. We have used emission spectroscopy and diode laser absorption spectroscopy measurements to observe the production and decay of Ar* in a parallel plate pulsed discharge. With discharge pulses of 1 μs duration we find that metastable production is dominated by processes occurring within the first 100 ns of the gas break-down. Application of multiple, closely spaced discharge pulses yields insights concerning conditions that favor metastable production. This information has been combined with time-resolved measurements of voltage and current. The experimental results and preliminary modeling of the discharge kinetics are presented.

  20. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2015-10-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs.

  1. Ar-39-Ar-40 Ages of Two Nakhlites, MIL03346 and Y000593: A Detailed Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel; Bogard, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Radiometric dating of martian nakhlites by several techniques have given similar ages of approx.1.2-1.4 Ga [e.g. 1, 2]. Unlike the case with shergottites, where the presence of martian atmosphere and inherited radiogenic Ar-40 produce apparent Ar-39-Ar-40 ages older than other radiometric ages, Ar-Ar ages of nakhlites are similar to ages derived by other techniques. However, even in some nakhlites the presence of trapped martian Ar produces some uncertainty in the Ar-Ar age. We present here an analysis of such Ar-Ar ages from the MIL03346 and Y000593 nakhlites.

  2. Photosynthetic and antioxidant responses of Liquidambar formosana and Schima superba seedlings to sulfuric-rich and nitric-rich simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Liu, Ting-Wu; Wu, Fei-Hua; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-03-01

    To study whether differential responses occur in photosynthesis and antioxidant system for seedlings of Liquidambar formosana, an acid rain (AR)-sensitive tree species and Schima superba, an AR-tolerant tree species treated with three types of pH 3.0 simulated AR (SiAR) including sulfuric-rich (S-SiAR), nitric-rich (N-SiAR), sulfate and nitrate mixed (SN-SiAR), we investigated the changes of leaf necrosis, chlorophyll content, soluble protein and proline content, photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics, reactive oxygen species production, membrane lipid peroxidation, small molecular antioxidant content, antioxidant enzyme activities and related protein expressions. Our results showed that SiAR significantly caused leaf necrosis, inhibited photosynthesis, induced superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide generation, aggravated membrane lipid peroxidation, changed antioxidant enzyme activities, modified related protein expressions such as Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), l-ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1. 11. 1. 11), glutathione S transferase (GST, EC 2. 5. 1. 18) and Rubisco large subunit (RuBISCO LSU), altered non-protein thiols (NPT) and glutathione (GSH) content in leaves of L. formosana and S. superba. Taken together, we concluded that the damages caused by SiAR in L. formosana were more severe and suffered from more negative impacts than in S. superba. S-SiAR induced more serious damages for the plants than did SN-SiAR and N-SiAR.

  3. Photosynthetic and antioxidant responses of Liquidambar formosana and Schima superba seedlings to sulfuric-rich and nitric-rich simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Liu, Ting-Wu; Wu, Fei-Hua; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-03-01

    To study whether differential responses occur in photosynthesis and antioxidant system for seedlings of Liquidambar formosana, an acid rain (AR)-sensitive tree species and Schima superba, an AR-tolerant tree species treated with three types of pH 3.0 simulated AR (SiAR) including sulfuric-rich (S-SiAR), nitric-rich (N-SiAR), sulfate and nitrate mixed (SN-SiAR), we investigated the changes of leaf necrosis, chlorophyll content, soluble protein and proline content, photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics, reactive oxygen species production, membrane lipid peroxidation, small molecular antioxidant content, antioxidant enzyme activities and related protein expressions. Our results showed that SiAR significantly caused leaf necrosis, inhibited photosynthesis, induced superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide generation, aggravated membrane lipid peroxidation, changed antioxidant enzyme activities, modified related protein expressions such as Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), l-ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1. 11. 1. 11), glutathione S transferase (GST, EC 2. 5. 1. 18) and Rubisco large subunit (RuBISCO LSU), altered non-protein thiols (NPT) and glutathione (GSH) content in leaves of L. formosana and S. superba. Taken together, we concluded that the damages caused by SiAR in L. formosana were more severe and suffered from more negative impacts than in S. superba. S-SiAR induced more serious damages for the plants than did SN-SiAR and N-SiAR. PMID:23353765

  4. Allelic variation of the β-, γ- and δ-kafirin genes in diverse Sorghum genotypes.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, H K C; Mace, E S; Williams, S B; Sakrewski, K; Mudge, A M; Prentis, P J; Jordan, D R; Godwin, I D

    2010-11-01

    The β-, γ- and δ-kafirin genes were sequenced from 35 Sorghum genotypes to investigate the allelic diversity of seed storage proteins. A range of grain sorghums, including inbred parents from internationally diverse breeding programs and landraces, and three wild Sorghum relatives were selected to encompass an extensive array of improved and unimproved germplasm in the Eusorghum. A single locus exists for each of the expressed kafirin-encoding genes, unlike the multigenic α-kafirins. Significant diversity was found for each locus, with the cysteine-rich β-kafirin having four alleles, including the first natural null mutant reported for this prolamin subfamily. This allele contains a frame shift insertion at +206 resulting in a premature stop codon. SDS-PAGE revealed that lines with this allele do not produce β-kafirin. An analysis of flour viscosity reveals that these β-kafirin null lines have a difference in grain quality, with significantly lower viscosity observed over the entire Rapid ViscoAnalyser time course. There was less diversity at the protein level within the cysteine-rich γ-kafirin, with only two alleles in the cultivated sorghums. There were only two alleles for the δ-kafirin locus among the S. bicolor germplasm, with one allele encoding ten extra amino acids, of which five were methionine residues, with an additional methionine resulting from a nucleotide substitution. This longer allele encodes a protein with 19.1% methionine. The Asian species, S. propinquum, had distinct alleles for all three kafirin genes. We found no evidence for selection on the three kafirin genes during sorghum domestication even though the δ-kafirin locus displayed comparatively low genetic variation. This study has identified genetic diversity in all single copy seed storage protein genes, including a null mutant for β-kafirin in Sorghum.

  5. Unmixing 40Ar/39Ar Muscovite Ages Using Powder X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAleer, R. J.; Kunk, M. J.; Valley, P. M.; Walsh, G. J.; Bish, D. L.; Wintsch, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Whole rock powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments from eight samples collected across a retrograde ductile shear zone in the Devonian Littleton Formation near Claremont, NH, exhibit broad and asymmetric to bimodal muscovite 00l reflections. These composite 00l reflections exhibit a systematic change in shape with increasing retrograde strain. Microtextural relationships, electron microprobe quantitative analyses, and element mapping indicate that the change in peak shape reflects progressive dissolution of metastable Na-rich muscovite and the precipitation of stable Na-poor muscovite. 40Ar/39Ar step heating experiments on muscovite concentrates from these samples show a decrease in total gas age from 274 to 258 Ma as the highest strain zone is approached, and steps within individual spectra range in age by ~20 m.y. The correlation between age and 00l peak shape suggests that the argon isotopic system also tracks the dissolution-precipitation process. Furthermore, the variation in age during step heating indicates that these populations exhibit different in-vacuo degassing behavior. Comparison of whole rock and muscovite concentrate XRD patterns from the same samples shows that the mineral separation process can fractionate these muscovite populations. With this knowledge, four muscovite concentrates were prepared from a single hand sample, analyzed by XRD, and dated. Combining modal estimates from XRD experiments with total gas ages, the four splits narrowly define a mixing line that resolves end-member ages of 250 and 300 Ma for the neocrystallized and earlier high grade populations of muscovite, respectively. These ages are consistent with age data from all other samples. The results show that, in some settings, powder XRD provides a powerful and time effective method to both identify the existence of and establish the proportions of multiple compositional populations of muscovite prior to 40Ar/39Ar analysis. This approach will be especially useful in

  6. An Astronomically Dated Standard in 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, K.; Hilgen, F.; Krijgsman, W.; Wijbrans, J.

    2003-12-01

    The standard geological time scale of Berggren et al. (1995) and Cande and Kent (1995) is calibrated with different absolute dating techniques, i.e. the Plio - Pleistocene relies on astronomical tuning, and older parts of the time scale are based on radio-isotopic (40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb) calibration methods. In the new edition of the standard geological timescale (Lourens et al., to be published in 2004) the entire Neogene will rely on astronomical dating. Therefore, it is of crucial importance that all dating methods produce equivalent absolute ages when the same geological event is dated. The Mediterranean Neogene provides an excellent opportunity to compare different dating methods by isotopic dating (40Ar/39Ar, U/Pb) of volcanic ash layers intercalated in astronomically dated sediments. Here we will show that in spite of potential errors in all methods, we succeeded to intercalibrate the 40Ar/39Ar and astronomical methods, arriving at astronomically calibrated age of 28.24 +/- 0.01 Ma for the in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology commonly used standard FCT sanidine. The advantage of an astronomically calibrated FCT above a K/Ar calibrated standard is a smaller error in the absolute age due to the lack of uncertainties related to 40K and radiogenic 40Ar contents in the primary standard and a decreasing influence of errors in the decay constant (branching ratio is not required). In addition to an astronomically calibrated FCT age we propose to introduce an astronomically dated standard. A direct astronomically dated standard can be regarded as a "primary" standard and does not require intercalibration with other standards, thus reducing analytical (and geological) uncertainties. Ash layers intercalated in sedimentary sequences in the Melilla Basin, Morocco appear to be the most suitable for this purpose. A reliable astronomical time control is available and intercalated ash layers contain sanidine phenocrysts up to 2 mm. Four ash layers are not or barely affected by

  7. RHD allele distribution in Africans of Mali

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Franz F; Moulds, Joann M; Tounkara, Anatole; Kouriba, Bourema; Flegel, Willy A

    2003-01-01

    Background Aberrant and non-functional RHD alleles are much more frequent in Africans than in Europeans. The DAU cluster of RHD alleles exemplifies that the alleles frequent in Africans have evaded recognition until recently. A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in any African population was lacking. Results We surveyed the molecular structure and frequency of RHD alleles in Mali (West Africa) by evaluating 116 haplotypes. Only 69% could be attributed to standard RHD (55%) or the RHD deletion (14%). The aberrant RHD allele DAU-0 was predicted for 19%, RHDΨ for 7% and Ccdes for 4% of all haplotypes. DAU-3 and the new RHD allele RHD(L207F), dubbed DMA, were found in one haplotype each. A PCR-RFLP for the detection of the hybrid Rhesus box diagnostic for the RHD deletion in Europeans was false positive in 9 individuals, including all carriers of RHDΨ . Including two silent mutations and the RHD deletion, a total of 9 alleles could be differentiated. Conclusion Besides standard RHD and the RHD deletion, DAU-0, RHDΨ and Ccdes are major alleles in Mali. Our survey proved that the most frequent alleles of West Africans have been recognized allowing to devise reliable genotyping and phenotyping strategies. PMID:14505497

  8. Low-Lying Structure of (50)Ar and the N=32 Subshell Closure.

    PubMed

    Steppenbeck, D; Takeuchi, S; Aoi, N; Doornenbal, P; Matsushita, M; Wang, H; Utsuno, Y; Baba, H; Go, S; Lee, J; Matsui, K; Michimasa, S; Motobayashi, T; Nishimura, D; Otsuka, T; Sakurai, H; Shiga, Y; Shimizu, N; Söderström, P-A; Sumikama, T; Taniuchi, R; Valiente-Dobón, J J; Yoneda, K

    2015-06-26

    The low-lying structure of the neutron-rich nucleus (50)Ar has been investigated at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory using in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy with (9)Be((54)Ca,(50)Ar+γ)X, (9)Be((55)Sc,(50)Ar+γ)X, and (9)Be((56)Ti,(50)Ar+γ)X multinucleon removal reactions at ∼220  MeV/u. A γ-ray peak at 1178(18) keV is reported and assigned as the transition from the first 2(+) state to the 0(+) ground state. A weaker, tentative line at 1582(38) keV is suggested as the 4(1)(+)→2(1)(+) transition. The experimental results are compared to large-scale shell-model calculations performed in the sdpf model space using the SDPF-MU effective interaction with modifications based on recent experimental data for exotic calcium and potassium isotopes. The modified Hamiltonian provides a satisfactory description of the new experimental results for (50)Ar and, more generally, reproduces the energy systematics of low-lying states in neutron-rich Ar isotopes rather well. The shell-model calculations indicate that the N=32 subshell gap in (50)Ar is similar in magnitude to those in (52)Ca and (54)Ti and, notably, predict an N=34 subshell closure in (52)Ar that is larger than the one recently reported in (54)Ca.

  9. Ar-Ar Analysis of Chelyabinsk: Evidence for a Recent Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, S. P.; Kring, D. A.; Isachsen, C. E.; Lapen, T. J.; Zolensky, M. E.; Swindle, T. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite is an LL5 ordinary chondrite that fell as a spectacular fireball on February 15th, 2013, over the Ural region in Russia. The meteoroid exploded at an altitude of 25-30 km, producing shockwaves that broke windowpanes in Chelyabinsk and surrounding areas, injuring some 1500 people. Analyses of the samples show that the meteorite underwent moderate shock metamorphism (stage S4; 25-35 GPa) [1]. Most of the samples have a fusion crust ranging from 0.1-1mm thick, and roughly a third of the samples were composed of a dark fine-grained impact melt with chondrule fragments which were targeted for chronometry. A Pb-Pb age obtained by [2] of a shock-darkened and potentially melted sample of Chelyabinsk is reported as 4538.3 +/- 2.1 Ma, while a U-Pb study [3] gave an upper concordia intercept of 4454 +/- 67 Ma and a lower intercept of 585 +/- 390. Galimov et al. 2013 [1] suggest the Sm-Nd system records a recent impact event [290 Ma] that may represent separation from the parent body, while the Rb-Sr isotopic system is disturbed and does not give any definitive isochron. In order to better understand its history, we have performed 40Ar-39Ar analysis on multiple splits of two Chelyabinsk samples; clast- rich MB020f,2 and melt-rich MB020f,5. The term "clast-rich" lithology is meant to indicate a mechanical mixture of highly shock-darkened and less shocked components, both with some shock melt veining.

  10. A novel measurement of allele discrimination for assessment of allele-specific silencing by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masaki; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2014-11-01

    Allele-specific silencing by RNA interference (ASP-RNAi) is an atypical RNAi that is capable of discriminating target alleles from non-target alleles, and may be therapeutically useful for specific inhibition of disease-causing alleles without affecting their corresponding normal alleles. However, it is difficult to design and select small interfering RNA (siRNAs) that confer ASP-RNAi. A major problem is that there are few appropriate measures in determining optimal allele-specific siRNAs. Here we show two novel formulas for calculating a new measure of allele-discrimination, named "ASP-score". The formulas and ASP-score allow for an unbiased determination of optimal siRNAs, and may contribute to characterizing such allele-specific siRNAs.

  11. 39Ar-40Ar "ages" and origin of excess 40Ar in Martian shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, Donald; Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    We report new 39Ar-40Ar measurements on 15 plagioclase, pyroxene, and/or whole rock samples of 8 Martian shergottites. All age spectra suggest ages older than the meteorite formation ages, as defined by Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochrons. Employing isochron plots, only Los Angeles plagioclase and possibly Northwest Africa (NWA) 3171 plagioclase give ages in agreement with their formation ages. Isochrons for all shergottite samples reveal the presence of trapped Martian 40Ar (40Arxs), which exists in variable amounts in different lattice locations. Some 40Arxs is uniformly distributed throughout the lattice, resulting in a positive isochron intercept, and other 40Arxs occurs in association with K-bearing minerals and increases the isochron slope. These samples demonstrate situations where linear Ar isochrons give false ages that are too old. After subtracting 40Ar*that would accumulate by 40K decay since meteorite formation and small amounts of terrestrial 40Ar, all young age samples give similar 40Arxs concentrations of ˜1-2 × 10-6cm3/g, but a variation in K content by a factor of ˜80. Previously reported NASA Johnson Space Center data for Zagami, Shergotty, Yamato (Y-) 000097, Y-793605, and Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201 shergottites show similar concentrations of 40Arxs to the new meteorite data reported here. Similar 40Arxs in different minerals and meteorites cannot be explained as arising from Martian atmosphere carried in strongly shocked phases such as melt veins. We invoke the explanation given by Bogard and Park (2008) for Zagami, that this 40Arxs in shergottites was acquired from the magma. Similarity in 40Arxs among shergottites may reveal common magma sources and/or similar magma generation and emplacement processes.

  12. Efficient genotype elimination via adaptive allele consolidation.

    PubMed

    De Francesco, Nicoletta; Lettieri, Giuseppe; Martini, Luca

    2012-01-01

    We propose the technique of Adaptive Allele Consolidation, that greatly improves the performance of the Lange-Goradia algorithm for genotype elimination in pedigrees, while still producing equivalent output. Genotype elimination consists in removing from a pedigree those genotypes that are impossible according to the Mendelian law of inheritance. This is used to find errors in genetic data and is useful as a preprocessing step in other analyses (such as linkage analysis or haplotype imputation). The problem of genotype elimination is intrinsically combinatorial, and Allele Consolidation is an existing technique where several alleles are replaced by a single “lumped” allele in order to reduce the number of combinations of genotypes that have to be considered, possibly at the expense of precision. In existing Allele Consolidation techniques, alleles are lumped once and for all before performing genotype elimination. The idea of Adaptive Allele Consolidation is to dynamically change the set of alleles that are lumped together during the execution of the Lange-Goradia algorithm, so that both high performance and precision are achieved. We have implemented the technique in a tool called Celer and evaluated it on a large set of scenarios, with good results.

  13. Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    A review on the activities and achievements of Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) and Armenian astronomy in general during the last years is given. ArAS membership, ArAS electronic newsletters (ArASNews), ArAS webpage, Annual Meetings, Annual Prize for Young Astronomers (Yervant Terzian Prize) and other awards, international relations, presence in international organizations, local and international summer schools, science camps, astronomical Olympiads and other events, matters related to astronomical education, astronomical heritage, amateur astronomy, astronomy outreach and ArAS further projects are described and discussed.

  14. Ar-Ar chronology of the Martian meteorite ALH84001: evidence for the timing of the early bombardment of Mars.

    PubMed

    Turner, G; Knott, S F; Ash, R D; Gilmour, J D

    1997-09-01

    ALH84001, a cataclastic cumulate orthopyroxenite meteorite from Mars, has been dated by Ar-Ar stepped heating and laser probe methods. Both methods give ages close to 3,900 Ma. The age calculated is dependent on assumptions made about 39Ar recoil effects and on whether significant quantities of 40Ar from the Martian atmosphere are trapped in the meteorite. If, as suggested by xenon and nitrogen isotope studies, Martian atmospheric argon is present, then it must reside predominantly in the K-rich phase maskelynite. Independently determined 129Xe abundances in the maskelynite can be used to place limits on the concentration of the atmospheric 40Ar. These indicate a reduction of around 80 Ma to ages calculated on the assumption that no Martian atmosphere is present. After this correction, the nominal ages obtained are: 3940 +/- 50, 3870 +/- 80, and 3970 +/- 100 Ma. by stepped heating, and 3900 +/- 90 Ma by laser probe (1 sigma statistical errors), giving a weighted mean value of 3,920 Ma. Ambiguities in the interpretation of 39Ar recoil effects and in the contribution of Martian atmospheric 40Ar lead to uncertainties in the Ar-Ar age which are difficult to quantify, but we suggest that the true value lies somewhere between 4,050 and 3,800 Ma. This age probably dates a period of annealing of the meteorite subsequent to the shock event which gave it its cataclastic texture. The experiments provide the first evidence of an event occurring on Mars coincident with the time of the late heavy bombardment of the Moon and may reflect a similar period of bombardment in the Southern Highlands of Mars. Whether the age determined bears any relationship to the time of carbonate deposition in ALH84001 is not known. Such a link depends on whether the temperature associated with the metasomatic activity was sufficient to cause argon loss from the maskelynite and/or whether the metasomatism and metamorphism were linked in time through a common heat source. PMID:11541217

  15. Production of ArN+ ions in the reactions Ar++N2 and N2++Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Paolo; Correale, Raffaele; Lu, Wenyun; Bassi, Davide

    1999-03-01

    We have studied the production of ArN+ starting from the two symmetric charge-state reactants Ar++N2 and N2++Ar. For both reactions we measured the total cross sections as a function of the relative energy, in the energy range from 5 to 45 eV. Estimates of the reaction thresholds and symmetry considerations suggest that the reaction Ar++N2 produces ArN+ essentially in its first excited state A 3Π, while the reaction N2++Ar produces ground state ArN+ ions. This fact explains the discrepancies between different estimates of the dissociation energy of ArN+ obtained in previous studies.

  16. Resolvable miscalibration of the 40Ar/39Ar geochronometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundil, R.; Renne, P. R.; Min, K. K.; Ludwig, K. R.

    2006-12-01

    U/Pb and 40Ar/39Ar isotopic dating techniques are the most widely applied geochronometers, both capable of 0.1% internal precision. A robust intercalibration between the two isotopic systems is fundamental for reconstructing short term processes and events in geologic time. However, whereas the U decay constants are known precisely (to ca 0.1%), the currently used 40K decay constant (5.543×10^{-10}/yr, (1)) is associated with an unstated uncertainty that is about an order of magnitude larger than the former, making high-resolution comparisons of ages from the two isotopic systems impossible. We present an indirect calibration by comparing radio-isotopic ages derived from both isotopic systems of rapidly cooled volcanic rocks in order to minimize effects from protracted cooling history. Eleven data pairs of 206Pb/238U and conventional 40Ar/39Ar ages exhibit a bias between the two isotopic systems ranging from >-1.5% for young rocks to ca -0.5% for rocks as old as 2 Ga (possibly even smaller for rocks >2 Ga), with the 40Ar/39Ar ages being consistently younger. All Mesozoic and Paleozoic samples display a bias of about -1%. Most of this bias is probably the result of miscalibration of the electron capture decay constant of 404→ 40Ar (λ40Kec) by ca -1%, in combination with a miscalibration of smaller magnitude and opposite sense of the β- decay constant (λ40Kβ-) of 40K→ 40Ca. Bias greater than 1% for younger Cenozoic samples probably reflects pre-eruptive zircon saturation (magma residence time) whose effects become proportionately negligible beyond ca. 200 Ma. Whereas the currently used decay constant for 40K (see above) is based on an arguably arbitrary selection from counting experiments associated with large and sometimes incomprehensible uncertainties (mostly from experiments conducted in the 1940s to 1960s) two recent recalibrations of λ40Ktotal using liquid scintillation counting techniques suggest precise and mutually consistent values of 5.553 ± 0

  17. Retrieving the ars moriendi tradition.

    PubMed

    Leget, Carlo

    2007-09-01

    North Atlantic culture lacks a commonly shared view on dying well that helps the dying, their social environment and caregivers to determine their place and role, interpret death and deal with the process of ethical deliberation. What is lacking nowadays, however, has been part of Western culture in medieval times and was known as the ars moriendi (art of dying well) tradition. In this paper an updated version of this tradition is presented that meets the demands of present day secularized and multiform society. Five themes are central to the new art of dying: autonomy and the self, pain control and medical intervention, attachment and relations, life balance and guilt, death and afterlife. The importance of retrieving the ancient ars moriendi outreaches the boundaries of palliative medicine, since it deals with issues that play a central role in every context of medical intervention and treatment.

  18. Mineralogy and Ar-39 - Ar-40 of an old pristine basalt: Thermal history of the HED parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Mori, Hiroshi; Bogard, Donald D.

    1994-01-01

    Previous investigations of mineral chemistry and Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages indicated that clast,84 from eucrite Yamato 75011 had preserved the pristine nature of its initial crystallization during an early stage of the HED parent body. Microscale mineralogy and Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of this clast, however, revealed local disturbance of microtextures and partially reset ages. This evidence suggests that, in addition to initial crystallization and rapid cooling, the Y75011,84 clast experienced shock deformation, reheating of short duration at higher temperature, and brecciation. These characteristics suggest two or more impact events. Fe-rich olivine filling fractures in pyroxene may have been introduced during the accompanying shock fracturing. The inferred Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing ages for Y75011 matrix and clast, 84 are 3.94 +/- 0.04 Ga and 3.98 +/- 0.03 Ga, respectively. The suggested degassing age for a clast from Y790020, believed to be paired with Y75011, is approximately 4.03 Ga, but could be younger. We consider it likely that all three samples experienced a common degassing event 3.95 +/- 0.05 Ga ago, but we cannot rule out two or more events spaced over a approximately 0.1 Ga interval. Higher temperature extractions of the two clast samples show significantly older apparent ages up to approximately 4.5 Ga and suggest that the time/temperature regime of this event was not sufficient to degas Ar totally. Most likely, the K-Ar ages were reset by thermal metamorphism associated with one or more impact events associated with shock fracturing, formation of Fe-rich olivine veins, and/or meteorite brecciation. The pyroxene annealing that commonly occurs in many eucrites is likely to be a much earlier process than the impact-produced textural changes and reset K-Ar ages observed in these meteorites. The existence of mineralogical and chronological evidence for metamorphism in an otherwise pristine eucrite suggests that the HED parent body experienced an extensive degree of

  19. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  20. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. arXiv.org and Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramlo, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The website arXiv.org (pronounced "archive") is a free online resource for full-text articles in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science, nonlinear science, and quantitative biology that has existed for about 15 years. Available directly at http://www.arXiv.org, this e-print archive is searchable. As of Jan. 3, 2007, arXiv had open…

  2. Nucleotide variation and identification of novel blast resistance alleles of Pib by allele mining strategy.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, G; Madhav, M S; Devi, S J S Rama; Prasad, M S; Babu, V Ravindra

    2015-04-01

    Pib is one of significant rice blast resistant genes, which provides resistance to wide range of isolates of rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. Identification and isolation of novel and beneficial alleles help in crop enhancement. Allele mining is one of the best strategies for dissecting the allelic variations at candidate gene and identification of novel alleles. Hence, in the present study, Pib was analyzed by allele mining strategy, and coding and non-coding (upstream and intron) regions were examined to identify novel Pib alleles. Allelic sequences comparison revealed that nucleotide polymorphisms at coding regions affected the amino acid sequences, while the polymorphism at upstream (non-coding) region affected the motifs arrangements. Pib alleles from resistant landraces, Sercher and Krengosa showed better resistance than Pib donor variety, might be due to acquired mutations, especially at LRR region. The evolutionary distance, Ka/Ks and phylogenetic analyzes also supported these results. Transcription factor binding motif analysis revealed that Pib (Sr) had a unique motif (DPBFCOREDCDC3), while five different motifs differentiated the resistance and susceptible Pib alleles. As the Pib is an inducible gene, the identified differential motifs helps to understand the Pib expression mechanism. The identified novel Pib resistant alleles, which showed high resistance to the rice blast, can be used directly in blast resistance breeding program as alternative Pib resistant sources.

  3. Ar-40/Ar-39 age determinations for the Rotoiti eruption, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, S.; Storey, M.

    2013-12-01

    The contemporaneous Rotoiti and Earthquake Flat ignimbrites, erupted from the Taupo Volcanic zone, New Zealand, form a distinctive tephrostratigraphic horizon in the Southern Pacific. Radioisotopic dating results for these eruptions remain controversial, with published ages ranging from 35.1 × 2.8 ka [1] to 71 × 6 ka [2], with 61.0 × 1.5 ka [3] often being cited as the most widely accepted age. These eruptions are difficult to date as their age is near the limit for various radiometric dating techniques, which are complicated by a large proportion of inherited material (xenocrysts) and a lack of phases suitable for dating. Glass-bearing plutonic blocks erupted with the Rotoiti and Earthquake Flat ignimbrites have previously been interpreted as deriving from a slowly cooled and incompletely solidified magma body that was sampled by the eruptions. They contain large vugs lined with euhedral quartz, sanidine and biotite crystals, indicating that these crystals grew in a gas or aqueous fluid rich environment and are interpreted to have formed shortly before or during eruption. Here we will present Ar-40/Ar-39 ages for sanidines and biotites extracted from vugs in lithic blocks erupted as part of the Earthquake Flat ignimbrite. We show that, even for vug-lining material, inherited ages remain a problem and are the likely source of the wide variation in published radiometric ages. Nevertheless, many of the Ar-40/Ar-39 ages are much younger than the 61 ka age [3] and are more consistent with the recent stratigraphic, C-14 and U-238/Th-230+(U-Th)/He ages that have been suggested (e.g. [4,5]). 1. Whitehead, N. & Ditchburn, R. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics 37, 381-383 (1994). 2. Ota, Y., Omura, A. & Iwata, H. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics 32, 327-331 (1989). 3. Wilson, C. J. N. et al. Quaternary Science Reviews 26, 1861-1870 (2007). 4. Molloy, C., Shane, P. & Augustinus, P. Geological Society of America Bulletin 121, 1666-1677 (2009). 5

  4. Ar-Ar investigations on Quarternary volcanic sequences of Monte Vulture (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buettner, A.; Principe, C.; Villa, I. M.

    2003-04-01

    Volcanic sanidines and phlogopites from feldspathoid- or sanidine-bearing volcanic sequences of Monte Vulture (Southern Italy) were analysed using Ar-Ar stepwise heating. In all samples phlogopite and sanidine are internally inhomogeneous as observed in a plot of Cl/K ratio vs step-age. At least two phases that are degassed during different temperature steps can be distinguished, resulting in internal discordance. Hence, all samples are affected by impurities and have to be treated as heterochemical mixtures. These effects are strongest in phlogopite. The high uncertainty of the calculated ages mirrors the statistically significant age discordance. The calculation of average ages was focused on isochemical steps. Isochron calculations necessarily give less precise ages because of the excessive scatter of datapoints. Moreover, most coarse grained phlogopites could contain excess 40Ar (as suggested by non-atmospheric intercepts in isochron plots) which could be of mantle origin. The analysed phlogopites from carbonatitic and melilite-foiditolite rocks of the upper stratigraphical sequence of Monte Vulture are Mg-rich, which indicates a mantle provenance (Stoppa and Woolley, 1997). All calculated phlogopite ages have, therefore, to be considered with caution. One sample, PG5, contains both sanidine and matrix phlogopite. This offers the possibility to directly compare the analytical results and further decipher possible inconsistencies. Ages were calculated as the average of isochemical steps, and errors are indicated at the 95% confidence level. Sanidine gives a weighted average age of 752±13 ka in agreement with the phlogopite age of 801±88 ka. In comparison to these average step ages, an isochron over five sanidine-steps yields an age of 737±35 ka (MSWD=1.5) and an atmospheric intercept of 295±49. The eruptive time-span covered by the analysed samples is 75±20 ka, confirming that the eruption history of Monte Vulture has been organised in clusters of activity

  5. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  6. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Royle, N.J.; Armour, J.A.L.; Crosier, M.; Jeffreys, A.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemior homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  8. Detailed {beta}-decay study of {sup 33}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Adimi, N.; Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Madurga, M.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O.; Bey, A.; Blank, B.; Dossat, C.; Giovinazzo, J.; Matea, I.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Knudsen, H. H.; Suemmerer, K.

    2010-02-15

    The proton-rich nucleus {sup 33}Ar has been studied by detailed proton and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy at the low-energy facility of SPIRAL at GANIL. Proton and {gamma}-ray singles and coincidence measurements allowed to establish a quasicomplete decay scheme of this nucleus. By comparing the proton intensity to different daughter states, tentative spin assignments have been made for some of the states of {sup 33}Cl. The Gamow-Teller strength distribution is deduced and compared to shell-model calculations and a quenching factor is determined. States close to the isobaric analog state are searched for with respect to isospin mixing.

  9. Part II. Evaluation of 40Ar- 39Ar quartz ages: Implications for fluid inclusion retentivity and determination of initial 40Ar/ 36Ar values in Proterozoic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, M. A.; Miller, J. McL.; Phillips, D.

    2006-05-01

    The argon isotope systematics of vein-quartz samples with two different K-reservoirs have been evaluated in detail. Potassium is hosted by ultra-high-salinity fluid inclusions in quartz samples from the Eloise and Osborne iron-oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits of the Mt Isa Inlier, Australia. In contrast, K is hosted by accidentally trapped mica within lower-salinity fluid inclusions of a sample selected from the Railway Fault, 13 km south of the Mt Isa copper mine, Australia. Imprecise apparent ages have been obtained for all of the samples studied and conclusively demonstrate that quartz fluid inclusions are retentive to Ar and have not leaked over billions of years. IOCG samples that host K in fluid inclusions only, have K/Cl values of <1 and the ages obtained represent the maximum ages for mineralization. In contrast, the Railway Fault samples that include accidentally trapped mica have K/Cl values of ≫1. Excess 40Ar E plus Cl hosted by fluid inclusions, and radiogenic 40Ar R plus K, are strongly correlated in these samples and define a plane in 3D 40Ar- 36Ar-K-Cl space. In this case, the plane yields an 'excess 40Ar E' corrected age of ˜1030 Ma that is 100's of Ma younger than nearby Cu-mineralization at Mt Isa. The age is interpreted to reflect 40Ar-loss from the accidentally trapped mica into the surrounding fluid inclusions, and is not related to the samples' age of formation. The initial 40Ar/ 36Ar value of fluid inclusions is widely used to provide information on fluid origin. For the IOCG samples that host K in fluid inclusions only, the initial 40Ar/ 36Ar values are close to the measured values at every temperature of stepped heating experiments. For samples that include accidentally trapped mica, the correction for post-entrapment radiogenic 40Ar R production is significant. Furthermore, because 39Ar K present in accidentally trapped mica crystals is released at different temperatures to radiogenic 40Ar R lost to the surrounding fluid inclusions

  10. Age measurements of potassium-bearing sulfide minerals by the 40Ar/39Ar technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Lanphere, M.A.; Erd, Richard C.; Blake, M.C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    K-Ar ages have been determined for sulfide minerals for the first time. The occurrence of adequate amounts of potassium-bearing sulfides with ideal compositions K3Fe10S14 (???10 wt.% K) and KFe2S3 (???16 wt.% K) in samples from a mafic alkalic diatreme at Coyote Peak, California, prompted an attempt to date these materials. K3Fe10S14, a massive mineral with conchoidal fracture, gives an age of 29.4 ?? 0.5 m.y. (40Ar/39Ar), indistinguishable from the 28.3 ?? 0.4 m.y. (40Ar/39Ar) and 30.2 ?? 1.0 m.y.8 (conventional K-Ar) ages obtained for associated phlogopite (8.7 wt.% K). KFe2S3, a bladed, fibrous sulfide, gives a younger age, 26.5 ?? 0.5 m.y. (40Ar/39Ar), presumably owing to Ar loss. ?? 1978.

  11. Interpretation of discordant 40Ar/39Ar age-spectra of mesozoic tholeiites from antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, R.J.; Sutter, J.F.; Elliot, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    Conventional K-Ar ages of tholeiitic basalts of the Ferrar Group in the central Transantarctic Mountains indicate significant loss of radiogenic 40Ar from this unit over much of its outcrop area. Argon loss varies inversely with amount of devitrified matrix in the basalts, which have not been thermally or tectonically disturbed since extrusion. 40Ar/19Ar age-spectra of these tholeiites are generally discordant and indicate significant inhomogeneity in the distribution of radiogenic 40Ar with respect to 39Ar, but are distinctly different from release patterns of thermally disturbed samples. Amounts of argon redistribution vary directly with amounts of devitrification and are reflected in progressive modification of the age spectra. A model of redistribution of radiogenic 40Ar by devitrification of originally glassy matrix is suggested that is consistent with disturbance of the conventional K-Ar systematics as well as the 40Ar/39Ar age-spectra. Samples with substantial redistribution but minor loss of radiogenic argon yield age spectra whose apparent ages decrease from low-temperature to high-temperature steps, similar to those reported for some lunar basalts, breccias, and soils. Modification of all the age spectra is attributed to redistribution of radiogenic 40Ar during progressive devitrification, although 39Ar-recoil effects suggested by Turner and Cadogan (1974) may be a factor in some cases. Where devitrification involves most potassium sites within the basalt, 40Ar/39Ar age-plateaux may be formed that have no geologic significance. ?? 1977.

  12. Ar-40-Ar-39 and Rb-Sr age determinations on Quaternary volcanic rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radicati Di Brozolo, F.; Huneke, J. C.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Ages of leucite and biotite separates from samples of the potassic volcanics of the Roman Comagmatic region are derived by the stepwise degassing variant of the Ar-39-Ar-40 dating method and compared with those derived from Rb-Sr dating in order to evaluate the abilities of the methods to date Quaternary geological events. Six of the leucite separates are found to contain Ar with very high bulk 40/36 ratios and to have well correlated Ar-40 and Ar-39 contents, yielding ages of approximately 338,000 years. Two leucites observed to contain Ar with lower bulk 40/36 ratios and Ar-40/Ar-36 ratios significantly lower than atmospheric are found to have ages in substantial agreement with those of the other leucites despite the uncertainty in the composition of the trapped component. Ages obtained for the biotites are not as precise as those of the leucites, due to difficulties in obtaining a good separation of in situ radiogenic Ar-40 from trapped Ar-40. Ages determined from Rb-Sr measurements for selected tuff samples are found to be in good agreement with the Ar-40-Ar-39 ages of the leucites. Results demonstrate the possibility of attaining precisions of better than 5% in the dating of rocks 350,000 years old by both the Ar-40-Ar-39 and the Rb-Sr methods.

  13. Evidence of synmagmatic foliation in the Selawik Hills, NW Alaska, based on [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar age determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Solie, D.N. ); Layer, P.W. . Geophysical Inst.)

    1993-04-01

    Based on [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar plateau ages from various rock units in the Selawik Hills plutonic complex, northwestern Alaska, the units were emplaced in the order syenite/monzonite, followed by nepheline syenite and then quartz monzonite. There is no evidence of disturbance of the Ar isotopic system in the dated plutonic minerals, and the ages compare fairly well with previously published K/Ar data. A cooling history of about ten m.y. for the Selawk Hills rocks is suggested, based on comparison of [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages with apatite fission-track data (Murphy and Till, 1992). Comparison of hornblende plateau ages between nonfoliated and foliated syenite indicates that foliated rocks crystallized later than nonfoliated rocks, but within the initial cooling history of the complex. Foliated syenite/monzonite has mineralogy similar to nonfoliated, but with generally higher color index. Foliated textures are distributed throughout the complex, but are more prevalent to the north, proximal to a large (about 2 km[sup 2]) xenolithic metamorphic block which is bounded on the north by an east-west-trending fault. The authors suggest that synmagmatic fault movement acted as a mechanism causing plutonic foliation and resulting in possible loss of late fluid from semicrystallized syenitic magma to form kspar-rich dikes. Foundering of the xenolithic block within the magma may also have contributed to development of foliation. Continued fault movement is indicated by cataclastic deformation along the fault trace.

  14. Charge-induced dipole vs. relativistically enhanced covalent interactions in Ar-tagged Au-Ag tetramers and pentamers.

    PubMed

    Shayeghi, A; Schäfer, R; Rayner, D M; Johnston, R L; Fielicke, A

    2015-07-14

    Vibrational spectra of Au(n)Ag(m)(+)⋅Ar(k) (n + m = 4, 5; k = 1-4) clusters are determined by far-infrared resonant multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy in the range ν̃=100-250 cm(-1). The experimental spectra are assigned using density functional theory for geometries obtained by the Birmingham cluster genetic algorithm. Putative global minimum candidates of the Ar complexes are generated by adding Ar atoms to the Au(n)Ag(m)(+) low energy isomers and subsequent local optimization. Differential Ar binding energies indicate exceptionally strong Au-Ar bonds in Au-rich clusters, leading to fundamental changes to the IR spectra. The stronger Ar binding is attributed to a relativistically enhanced covalent character of the Au-Ar bond, while in Au-rich species charge-induced dipole interactions overcompensate the relativistic affinity to Au. Moreover, not only the absolute composition but also the topologies are essential in the description of Ar binding to a certain cluster.

  15. Chronology and shock history of the Bencubbin meteorite: A nitrogen, noble gas, and Ar-Ar investigation of silicates, metal and fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, Bernard; Kelley, Simon; Turner, Grenville

    2010-11-01

    We have investigated the distribution and isotopic composition of nitrogen and noble gases, and the Ar-Ar chronology of the Bencubbin meteorite. Gases were extracted from different lithologies by both stepwise heating and vacuum crushing. Significant amounts of gases were found to be trapped within vesicles present in silicate clasts. Results indicate a global redistribution of volatile elements during a shock event caused by an impactor that collided with a planetary regolith. A transient atmosphere was created that interacted with partially or totally melted silicates and metal clasts. This atmosphere contained 15N-rich nitrogen with a pressure ⩾3 × 10 5 hPa, noble gases, and probably, although not analyzed here, other volatile species. Nitrogen and noble gases were re-distributed among bubbles, metal, and partly or totally melted silicates, according to their partition coefficients among these different phases. The occurrence of N 2 trapped in vesicles and dissolved in silicates indicates that the oxygen fugacity ( fO2) was greater than the iron-wüstite buffer during the shock event. Ar-Ar dating of Bencubbin glass gives an age of 4.20 ± 0.05 Ga, which probably dates this impact event. The cosmic-ray exposure age is estimated at ˜40 Ma with two different methods. Noble gases present isotopic signatures similar to those of "phase Q" (the major host of noble gases trapped in chondrites) but elemental patterns enriched in light noble gases (He, Ne and Ar) relative to Kr and Xe, normalized to the phase Q composition. Nitrogen isotopic data together with 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios indicate mixing between a 15N-rich component (δ 15N = +1000‰), terrestrial N, and an isotopically normal, chondritic N. Bencubbin and related 15N-rich meteorites of the CR clan do not show stable isotope (H and C) anomalies, precluding contribution of a nucleosynthetic component as the source of 15N enrichments. This leaves two possibilities, trapping of an ancient, highly fractionated

  16. Metrologically-Calibrated 40Ar Concentrations and Ages of Mineral Standards Used in 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Davidheiser-Kroll, B.; Kuiper, K.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Mark, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    In geochronology, isotopic ages are determined from the ratio of parent and daughter nuclide concentrations in minerals. For dating of geological material using the K-Ar system, the simultaneous determination of 40Ar and 40K concentrations on the same aliquot is not possible. Therefore, a widely used variant, the 40Ar/39Ar technique, involves the production of 39Ar from 39K by neutron bombardment and the reliance on indirect natural calibrators of the neutron flux, referred to as "mineral standards." Many mineral standards still in use rely on decades-old determinations of 40Ar concentrations; resulting uncertainties, both systematic and analytical, impede the determination of higher accuracy ages using the K-Ar decay system. We present results for the 40Ar concentrations and ages of mineral standards determined based on a modern gas delivery system (Morgan et al. 2011), which delivers metrologically-traceable amounts of 40Ar and thus allows for the sensitivity calibration of noble gas mass spectrometers.

  17. The Detrital White Mica 40Ar/39Ar Record of the Katawaz Remnant Ocean Basin, Pakistan, and Tectonic Implications for the Himalayan Source Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, G.; Najman, Y.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Millar, I.; Carter, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Paleogene-Neogene sedimentary rocks in the Katawaz remnant ocean basin, Pakistan were thought to be a product of a fan-deltaic system, analogous to the modern Indus River and delta. A preliminary detrital zircon U-Pb study (Carter et al 2010) supported materials derived from the nascent western Himalaya and associated magmatic arc but that study was based on too few samples to fully characterize the whole series. Moreover, the chronology in the Katawaz basin was previously not well constrained, which impedes accurate comparison to other Himalaya foreland records. Here, we present a densely sampled study of detrital white mica 40Ar/39Ar. This study aims to: (1) constrain sedimentary ages of major lithostratigraphic units, (2) understand the exhumation history of the source region, and (3) reconstruct the paleodrainage system in NW Himalayan foreland. New 40Ar/39Ar data, together with a complementary study of detrital zircon U-Pb, constrain the sand-rich, fluvial-dominated Shaigalu Member to span from <34-36 Ma (basal sample) to <22 Ma (uppermost sample). The basal Shaigalu Member demonstrates similarity of ages of detrital zircon U-Pb and detrital white mica 40Ar/39Ar; both are characterized by a dominant peak of ca. 37 Ma. The dominant 37 Ma peak of detrital white mica 40Ar/39Ar ages has also been identified in the late Eocene Balakot Formation (Najman et al. 2001), the oldest terrestrial unit in the Himalayan peripheral foreland basin, and which is Himalayan-derived. We interpret the similarity in youngest age peak (37 Ma) between U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar as a signal of rapid exhumation related to a rising western Himalaya. Our new 40Ar/39Ar data also reveal that sediment sources changed through time, as demonstrated by the disappearance of the 37 Ma population up-section and re-occurrence at the top. This could be related to either migration of the drainage system and/or changes in sediment sources. Finally, our study indicates that the latest Eocene rapid

  18. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    PubMed

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API).

  19. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favorova, Olga O; Favorov, Alexander V; Boiko, Alexey N; Andreewski, Timofey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Alekseenkov, Alexey D; Kulakova, Olga G; Gusev, Eugenyi I; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion) of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGFβ1, CCR5 and CTLA4 genes and TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. Each allele carriership in patients and controls was compared by Fisher's exact test, and disease-associated combinations of alleles in the data set were sought using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method recently developed by our group. Results We identified two previously unknown MS-associated tri-allelic combinations: -509TGFβ1*C, DRB1*18(3), CTLA4*G and -238TNF*B1,-308TNF*A2, CTLA4*G, which perfectly separate MS cases from controls, at least in the present sample. The previously described DRB1*15(2) allele, the microsatellite TNFa9 allele and the biallelic combination CCR5Δ32, DRB1*04 were also reidentified as MS-associated. Conclusion These results represent an independent validation of MS association with DRB1*15(2) and TNFa9 in Russians and are the first to find the interplay of three loci in conferring susceptibility to MS. They demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for the identification of complex-disease-associated combinations of alleles. PMID:16872485

  20. Androgen receptor (AR) in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Lee, Soo Ok; Chang, Eugene; Pang, Haiyan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are still the highest leading cause of death worldwide. Several risk factors have been linked to CVDs, including smoking, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and gender among others. Sex hormones, especially the androgen and its receptor, androgen receptor (AR), have been linked to many diseases with a clear gender difference. Here, we summarize the effects of androgen/AR on CVDs, including hypertension, stroke, atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), myocardial hypertrophy, and heart failure, as well as the metabolic syndrome/diabetes and their impacts on CVDs. Androgen/AR signaling exacerbates hypertension, and anti-androgens may suppress hypertension. Androgen/AR signaling plays dual roles in strokes, depending on different kinds of factors; however, generally males have a higher incidence of strokes than females. Androgen and AR differentially modulate atherosclerosis. Androgen deficiency causes elevated lipid accumulation to enhance atherosclerosis; however, targeting AR in selective cells without altering serum androgen levels would suppress atherosclerosis progression. Androgen/AR signaling is crucial in AAA development and progression, and targeting androgen/AR profoundly restricts AAA progression. Men have increased cardiac hypertrophy compared with age-matched women that may be due to androgens. Finally, androgen/AR plays important roles in contributing to obesity and insulin/leptin resistance to increase the metabolic syndrome.

  1. 40Ar/39Ar Interlaboratory Calibration into the Holocene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, M. T.; Jicha, B.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Miggins, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in 40Ar/39Ar analytical precision for very young rocks requires collaborative efforts amongst argon geochronology labs to demonstrate age reproducibility commensurate with high precision. NM Tech (NMT), the University of Wisconsin (UW) and Oregon State University (OSU) have each dated Quaternary flux monitor standard AC-2 sanidine (~1.185 Ma), a blind sanidine described as being 50-100 ka (BS) and sanidine from the Qixiangshan (QIX) flow (~10 ka), Changbaishan volcano, China. The samples were irradiated in a single package with FC-2 sanidine (28.201 Ma) as the flux monitor and the irradiated material was distributed amongst the labs. Heizler was present during analysis at both OSU and UW and Jicha attended OSU during analysis. Physical presence was key towards gaining understanding of individual protocols and prompted valuable discussions. Analyses were carried out on single crystals using total fusion and/or step heating approaches. Age agreement was achieved within 2s uncertainty that ranged between (0.03-0.3%, 0.13-0.37% and 1.8-2.6%) for AC-2, BS and QIX, respectively. Each lab found AC-2 to vary somewhat beyond a normal distribution and to yield an age relative to FC-2 of ~1.185 Ma that is ~1.3% (~5-10 sigma) lower than some published estimates. A key cause of the variation between this study and previous results may be variable gas pressure equilibration times between extraction line and mass spectrometer coupled with variable choices to estimate time zero by other laboratories. The majority of our efforts concentrated on the QIX sanidine where prior data obtained by our labs revealed a factor of two spread in age (~11 and 23 ka) based on experiments carried out by total fusion and bulk incremental heating. By conducting single crystal age spectrum analysis we were able to mitigate effects of melt inclusion hosted excess argon and xenocrystic contamination towards obtaining analytical agreement with apparent ages near 10 ka. However, philosophical

  2. Ar-Ar Ages of Brachinite and Brachinite-Like Achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, S. P.; Swindle, T. D.; Isachsen, C.

    2016-08-01

    There are few chronology studies on brachinite and brachinite-like achondrites. This work presents the first data of the study of Ar-Ar on a suite of achondrites, including NWA 595, NWA 1500, and NWA 6077.

  3. K/AR dating of clinoptilolite, mordenite, and associated clays from Yucca Mountains, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    WoldeGabriel, G.

    1993-07-01

    Zeolites are abundant in the geologic record in both continental and marine environments. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the utility of K-bearing zeolites for dating by the K/Ar method to determine the time of zeolite diagenesis at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Fig. 1). At Yucca Mountain, K-rich clinoptilolite and possibly mordenite are the only potentially K/Ar dateable secondary minerals present in the zeolite-rich tuffs except for some illite/smectites ({ge}10% illite layers) associated with these minerals. Direct dating of K-rich clinoptilolite, the most abundant zeolite in the altered tuffs, is important to delineate zeolite chronology as part of the site characterization of Yucca Mountain.

  4. First-principles calibration of 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and complete extraction of 40Ar* from sanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Kuiper, K.; Mark, D.; Postma, O.; Villa, I. M.; Wijbrans, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar geochronology relies on comparing argon isotopic data for unknowns to those for knowns. Mineral standards used as neutron fluence monitors must be dated by the K-Ar method (or at least referenced to a mineral of known K-Ar age). The commonly used age of 28.02 ± 0.28 Ma for the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) (Renne et al., 1998) is based upon measurements of radiogenic 40Ar in GA1550 biotite (McDougall and Roksandic, 1974), but underlying full data were not published (these measurements were never intended for use as an international standard), so uncertainties are difficult to assess. Recent developments by Kuiper et al. (2008) and Renne et al. (2010) are limited by their reliance on the accuracy of other systems. Modern technology should allow for more precise and accurate calibration of primary K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar standards. From the ideal gas law, the number of moles of 40Ar in a system can be calculated from measurements of pressure, volume, and temperature. Thus we have designed and are proceeding to build a pipette system to introduce well-determined amounts of 40Ar into noble gas extraction lines and mass spectrometers. This system relies on components with calibrations traceable to SI unit prototypes, including a diaphragm pressure gauge (MKS Instruments), thermocouples, and a “slug” of an accurately determined volume to be inserted into the reservoir for volume determinations of the reservoir and pipette. The system will be renewable, with a lifetime of ca. 1 month for gas in the reservoir, and portable, to permit interlaboratory calibrations. The quantitative extraction of 40Ar* from the mineral standard is of highest importance; for sanidine standards this is complicated by high melt viscosity during heating. Experiments adding basaltic “zero age glass” (ZAG) to decrease melt viscosity are underway. This has previously been explored by McDowell (1983) with a resistance furnace, but has not been quantitatively addressed with laser heating

  5. 40Ar/39Ar age spectra of some undisturbed terrestrial samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brent, Dalrymple G.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1974-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age spectra and 40Ar/36Ar vs 39Ar/36Ar isochrons were determined by incremental heating for 11 terrestrial rocks and minerals whose geology indicates that they represent essentially undisturbed systems. The samples include muscovite, biotite, hornblende, sanidine, plagioclase, dacite, diabase and basalt and range in age from 40 to 1700 m.y. For each sample, the 40Ar/39Ar ratios, corrected for atmospheric and neutron-generated argon isotopes, are the same for most of the gas fractions released and the age spectra, which show pronounced plateaus, thus are consistent with models previously proposed for undisturbed samples. Plateau ages and isochron ages calculated using plateau age fractions are concordant and appear to be meaningful estimates of the crystallization and cooling ages of these samples. Seemingly anomalous age spectrum points can be attributed entirely to small amounts of previously unrecognized argon loss and to gas fractions that contain too small (less than 2 per cent) a proportion of the 39Ar released to be geologically significant. The use of a quantitative abscissa for age spectrum diagrams is recommended so that the size of each gas fraction is readily apparent. Increments containing less than about 4-5 per cent of the total 39Ar released should be interpreted cautiously. Both the age spectrum and isochron methods of data reduction for incremental heating experiments are worthwhile, as each gives slightly different but complementary information about the sample from the same basic data. Use of a least-squares fit that allows for correlated errors is recommended for 40Ar/36Ar vs 39Ar/36Ar isochrons. The results indicate that the 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating technique can be used to distinguish disturbed from undisturbed rock and mineral systems and will be a valuable geochronological tool in geologically complex terranes. ?? 1994.

  6. Diffusion of sup 40 Ar and sup 39 Ar in irradiated orthoclase

    SciTech Connect

    Foland, K.A.; Xu, Yuping )

    1990-11-01

    The important concerns of whether neutron irradiation affects Ar diffusion behavior in minerals and whether the diffusivities of natural radiogenic {sup 40}Ar and induced {sup 39}Ar are identical are considered. Both issues are addressed with isothermal and incremental-heating experiments on natural, homogeneous orthoclase from Benson Mines which was subjected to irradiation similar to typical {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar measurements. Previous study of this feldspar shows that laboratory {sup 40}Ar loss occurs by volume diffusion with physical grain sizes as the effective transport dimensions following a single Arrhenius relation. Isothermal-heating experiments on irradiated feldspar show the same loss and apparent {sup 40}Ar diffusion coefficients, within uncertainty, as unirradiated sample. For these heating times and temperatures, the experiments indicatet that the defects accompanying irradiation have only very minor, if any, effects on Ar behavior with regard to both diffusion kinetics and effective transport domains and that {sup 39}Ar and {sup 40}Ar diffusivities do not differ radically. Step-heating experiments yield essential flat spectra but with minor yet significant apparent discordance which is the same for different grain sizes. The spectra show high ages for small, initial low-temperature fractions and a slight increase in age with progressive Ar release. While these variations are potentially explicable by sample heterogeneities, the preferred explanation is that they result from {sup 39}Ar recoil loss and a slightly higher diffusivity of {sup 39}Ar relative to {sup 40}Ar. The results have important implications for diffusion processes in feldspar and the application of the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar method.

  7. Re-Evaluation of Ar-39 - Ar-40 Ages for Apollo Lunar Rocks 15415 and 60015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Shih, C.-Y.

    2010-01-01

    We re-analyzed 39Ar-40Ar ages of Apollo lunar highland samples 15415 and 60015, two ferroan anorthosites analyzed previously in the 1970 s, with a more detailed approach and with revised decay constants. From these samples we carefully prepared 100-200 mesh mineral separates for analysis at the Noble Gas Laboratory at NASA-Johnson Space Center. The Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectra for 15415 yielded an age of 3851 +/- 38 Ma with 33-99% of Ar39 release, roughly in agreement with previously reported Ar-Ar ages. For 60015, we obtained an age of 3584 +/- 152 Ma in 23-98% of Ar39 release, also in agreement with previously reported Ar-Ar ages of approximately 3.5 Ga. Highland anorthosites like these are believed by many to be the original crust of the moon, formed by plagioclase floatation atop a magma ocean, however the Ar-Ar ages of 15415 and 60015 are considerably younger than lunar crust formation. By contrast, recently recovered lunar anorthosites such as Dhofar 489, Dhofar 908, and Yamato 86032 yield older Ar-Ar ages, up to 4.35 Ga, much closer to time of formation of the lunar crust. It follows that the Ar-Ar ages of the Apollo samples must have been reset by secondary heating, and that this heating affected highland anorthosites at both the Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 landing sites but did not affect lunar highland meteorites. One obvious consideration is that while the Apollo samples were collected from the near side of the moon, these lunar meteorites are thought to have originated from the lunar far side

  8. Ar-Ar Age of NWA-1460 and Evidence For Young Formation Ages of the Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2006-01-01

    Agreement of Ar-Ar, Sm-Nd, and Rb-Sr ages for NWA1460, and the inconsistency between a low shock-heating temperature for Zagami and the proposition that a 4.0 Gyr-old Zagami lost most of its Ar-40 are inconsistent with ancient formation ages for these shergottites, but are consistent with relatively young igneous formation ages.

  9. AR function in promoting metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Augello, Michael A.; Den, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in the USA. While localized lesions are effectively treated through radical prostatectomy and/or radiation therapy, treatment for metastatic disease leverages the addiction of these tumors on the androgen receptor (AR) signaling axis for growth and disease progression. Though initially effective, tumors resistant to AR-directed therapeutics ultimately arise (a stage of the disease known as castration-resistant prostate cancer) and are responsible for PCa-specific mortality. Importantly, an abundance of clinical and preclinical evidence strongly implicates AR signaling cascades in the development of metastatic disease in both early and late stages, and thus a concerted effort has been made to delineate the AR-specific programs that facilitate progression to metastatic PCa. A multitude of downstream AR targets as well as critical AR cofactors have been identified which impinge upon both the AR pathway as well as associated metastatic phenotypes. This review will highlight the functional significance of these pathways to disseminated disease and define the molecular underpinnings behind these unique, AR-driven, metastatic signatures. PMID:24425228

  10. USDA/ARS Organic Production Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For much of its history, USDA/ARS had little to do with research on organic agriculture, however research in organic systems has made considerable gains at the agency over the past decade. In the 1980's and 1990's, as the organic food industry was taking off, ARS researchers who wanted to serve orga...

  11. 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    LANEY, T.

    2000-03-24

    The 244-AR Vault Facility, constructed between 1966 and 1968, was designed to provide lag storage and treatment for the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX) tank farm sludges. Tank farm personnel transferred the waste from the 244-AR Vault Facility to B Plant for recovery of cesium and strontium. B Plant personnel then transferred the treatment residuals back to the tank farms for storage of the sludge and liquids. The last process operations, which transferred waste supporting the cesium/strontium recovery mission, occurred in April 1978. After the final transfer in 1978, the 244-AR facility underwent a cleanout. However, 2,271 L (600 gal) of sludge were left in Tank 004AR from an earlier transfer from Tank 241-AX-104. When the cleanout was completed, the facility was placed in a standby status. The sludge had been transferred to Tank 004AR to support Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL] vitrification work. Documentation of waste transfers suggests that a portion of the sludge may have been moved from Tank 004AR to Tank 002AR in preparation for transfer back to the AX Tank Farm; however, quantities of the sludge that were moved to Tank 002AR from that transfer must be estimated.

  12. Revised error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, Pieter

    2015-12-01

    The main advantage of the 40Ar/39Ar method over conventional K-Ar dating is that it does not depend on any absolute abundance or concentration measurements, but only uses the relative ratios between five isotopes of the same element -argon- which can be measured with great precision on a noble gas mass spectrometer. The relative abundances of the argon isotopes are subject to a constant sum constraint, which imposes a covariant structure on the data: the relative amount of any of the five isotopes can always be obtained from that of the other four. Thus, the 40Ar/39Ar method is a classic example of a 'compositional data problem'. In addition to the constant sum constraint, covariances are introduced by a host of other processes, including data acquisition, blank correction, detector calibration, mass fractionation, decay correction, interference correction, atmospheric argon correction, interpolation of the irradiation parameter, and age calculation. The myriad of correlated errors arising during the data reduction are best handled by casting the 40Ar/39Ar data reduction protocol in a matrix form. The completely revised workflow presented in this paper is implemented in a new software platform, Ar-Ar_Redux, which takes raw mass spectrometer data as input and generates accurate 40Ar/39Ar ages and their (co-)variances as output. Ar-Ar_Redux accounts for all sources of analytical uncertainty, including those associated with decay constants and the air ratio. Knowing the covariance matrix of the ages removes the need to consider 'internal' and 'external' uncertainties separately when calculating (weighted) mean ages. Ar-Ar_Redux is built on the same principles as its sibling program in the U-Pb community (U-Pb_Redux), thus improving the intercomparability of the two methods with tangible benefits to the accuracy of the geologic time scale. The program can be downloaded free of charge from

  13. Constraining the alteration history of a Late Cretaceous Patagonian volcaniclastic bentonite-ash-mudstone sequence using K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, L. N.; Hofmann, H.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2016-03-01

    Smectite is typically considered unsuitable for radiometric dating, as argon (40Ar) produced from decay of exchangeable potassium (40K) located in the interlayer sites can be lost during fluid-rock interaction and/or during wet sample preparation in the laboratory. However, age analysis of Late Cretaceous Argentinian bentonites and associated volcaniclastic rocks from Lago Pellegrini, Northern Patagonia, indicates that, in the case of these very low-permeability rocks, the radioactive 40Ar was retained and thus can provide information on smectite age and the timing of rock alteration. This study presents isotopic results that indicate the ash-to-bentonite conversion and alteration of the overlying tuffaceous mudstones in Northern Patagonia was complete ~13-17 my after middle Campanian sedimentation when the system isotopically closed. The general absence of illite in these smectite-rich lithologies reflects the low activity of K and the low temperature (<60 °C) of the formation waters that altered the parent ash.

  14. 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar data bearing on the metamorphic and tectonic history of western New England.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutter, J.F.; Ratcliffe, N.M.; Mukasa, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar ages of coexisting biotite and hornblende from Proterozoic Y gneisses of the Berkshire and Green Mt massifs, as well as 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar mineral and whole-rock ages from Palaeozoic metamorphic rocks, suggest that the thermal peaks for the dominant metamorphic recrystallization in western New England occurred 465 + or - 5 m.y. (Taconian). 40Ar/39Ar age data from a poorly-defined terrain along the eastern strip of the area suggests that the area has been retrograded during a metamorphism that peaked at least 376 + or - 5 m.y. (Acadian). Available age and petrological data from western New England indicate the presence of at least three separate metamorphic-structure domains of Taconic age: 1) a small area of relict high-P and low-T metamorphism, 2) a broad area of normal Barrovian metamorphism from chlorite to garnet grade characterized by a gentle metamorphic gradient and, 3) a rather narrow belt of steep-gradient, Barrovian series metamorphic rocks. Areas of maximum metamorphic intensity within the last domain coincide with areas of maximum crustal thickening in the later stage of Taconic orogeny. -L.di H

  15. ³⁹Ar/Ar measurements using ultra-low background proportional counters.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jeter; Aalseth, Craig E; Bonicalzi, Ricco M; Brandenberger, Jill M; Day, Anthony R; Humble, Paul H; Mace, Emily K; Panisko, Mark E; Seifert, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Age-dating groundwater and seawater using the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is an important tool to understand water mass-flow rates and mean residence time. Low-background proportional counters developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory use mixtures of argon and methane as counting gas. We demonstrate sensitivity to (39)Ar by comparing geological (ancient) argon recovered from a carbon dioxide gas well and commercial argon. The demonstrated sensitivity to the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is sufficient to date water masses as old as 1000 years. PMID:26516993

  16. ³⁹Ar/Ar measurements using ultra-low background proportional counters.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jeter; Aalseth, Craig E; Bonicalzi, Ricco M; Brandenberger, Jill M; Day, Anthony R; Humble, Paul H; Mace, Emily K; Panisko, Mark E; Seifert, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Age-dating groundwater and seawater using the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is an important tool to understand water mass-flow rates and mean residence time. Low-background proportional counters developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory use mixtures of argon and methane as counting gas. We demonstrate sensitivity to (39)Ar by comparing geological (ancient) argon recovered from a carbon dioxide gas well and commercial argon. The demonstrated sensitivity to the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is sufficient to date water masses as old as 1000 years.

  17. 40Ar/39Ar Ages of Carbonaceous Xenoliths in 2 HED Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turrin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Johnson, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    The generally young K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages of CM chondrites made us wonder whether carbonaceous xenoliths (CMX) entombed in Howardite–Eucrite–Diogenite (HED) meteorites might retain more radiogenic 40Ar than do ‘free-range’ CM-chondrites. To find out, we selected two HED breccias with carbonaceous inclusions in order to compare the 40Ar/39Ar release patterns and ages of the inclusions with those of nearby HED material. Carbonaceous inclusions (CMXs) in two HED meteorites lost a greater fraction of radiogenic 40Ar than did surrounding host material, but a smaller fraction of it than did free-range CM-chondrites such as Murchison or more heavily altered ones. Importantly, however, the siting of the CMXs in HED matrix did not prevent the 40Ar loss of about 40 percent of the radiogenic 40Ar, even from phases that degas at high laboratory temperatures. We infer that carbonaceous asteroids with perihelia of 1 astronomical unit probably experience losses of at least this size. The usefulness of 40Ar/39Ar dating for samples returned from C-type asteroids may hinge, therefore, on identifying and analyzing separately small quantities of the most retentive phases of carbonaceous chondrites.

  18. Initial invasion of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles in the absence of tight linkage between pollen and pistil S alleles.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Satoki; Wakoh, Haluka

    2014-08-01

    In homomorphic self-incompatibility (SI) systems of plants, the loci controlling the pollen and pistil types are tightly linked, and this prevents the generation of compatible combinations of alleles expressing pollen and pistil types, which would result in self-fertilization. We modeled the initial invasion of the first pollen and pistil alleles in gametophytic SI to determine whether these alleles can stably coexist in a population without tight linkage. We assume pollen and pistil loci each carry an incompatibility allele S and an allele without an incompatibility function N. We assume that pollen with an S allele are incompatible with pistils carrying S alleles, whereas other crosses are compatible. Ovules in pistils carrying an S allele suffer viability costs because recognition consumes resources. We found that the cost of carrying a pistil S allele allows pollen and pistil S alleles to coexist in a stable equilibrium if linkage is partial. This occurs because parents that carry pistil S alleles but are homozygous for pollen N alleles cannot avoid self-fertilization; however, they suffer viability costs. Hence, pollen N alleles are selected again. When pollen and pistil S alleles can coexist in a polymorphic equilibrium, selection will favor tighter linkage.

  19. Why is a Flare-rich Active Region CME-poor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijuan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Jingxiu; Shen, Chenglong; Ye, Pinzhong; Liu, Rui; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Wang, S.

    2016-08-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The largest AR in the past 24 years, NOAA AR 12192, which crossed the visible disk from 2014 October 17 to 30, unusually produced more than one hundred flares, including 32 M-class and 6 X-class ones, but only one small CME. Flares and CMEs are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process. Why is such a flare-rich AR so CME-poor? We compared this AR with other four ARs; two were productive in both and two were inert. The investigation of the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram reveals that the flare-rich AR 12192, as with the other two productive ARs, has larger magnetic flux, current, and free magnetic energy than the two inert ARs but, in contrast to the two productive ARs, it has no strong, concentrated current helicity along both sides of the flaring neutral line, indicating the absence of a mature magnetic structure consisting of highly sheared or twisted field lines. Furthermore, the decay index above the AR 12192 is relatively low, showing strong constraint. These results suggest that productive ARs are always large and have enough current and free energy to power flares, but whether or not a flare is accompanied by a CME is seemingly related to (1) the presence of a mature sheared or twisted core field serving as the seed of the CME, or (2) a weak enough constraint of the overlying arcades.

  20. GRS Measurements of Ar in Mars' Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.; Kerry, K. E.; Janes, D. M.; Kelly, N. J.; Crombie, M. K.; Hunten, D. M.; Nelli, S. M.; Murphy, J. R.; Reedy, R. C.; Metzger, A. E.

    2005-08-01

    One and one half Mars years of atmospheric argon (Ar) measurements are described in the context of understanding how Ar, a minor constituent of Mars atmosphere that does not condense at Mars temperatures, can be used to study martian circulation and dynamics. There is a repeated factor of 6 enhancement of Ar measured over south polar latitudes. The maximum in Ar abundance occurs near the onset of southern winter. There is no similar strong enhancement of Ar over north-polar regions during northern winter; only modest evidence for an enhancement peak is present. Part of this difference is explained by the global topographic dichotomy and the fact that the duration of northern autumn and winter is shorter than southern autumn and winter. Rapid seasonal fluctuations in Ar abundance may indicate evidence for wave activity at the perimeter of the southern seasonal polar cap. The apparent lack of coincidence of Ar enhancement with the relatively cold, cryptic terrain or relatively warm, bright albedo regions, indirectly supports the conclusion that the low temperatures measured over the south polar region by IRTM are probably caused by the combination of low CO2 abundance over south polar night and low emissivity regions on the surface associated with small grain size.

  1. arXiv.org and Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlo, Susan

    2007-09-01

    The website arXiv.org (pronounced archive) is a free online resource for full-text articles in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science, nonlinear science, and quantitative biology that has existed for about 15 years. Available directly at http://www.arXiv.org, this e-print archive is searchable. As of Jan. 3, 2007, arXiv had open access to 401,226 e-prints in the topic areas. Those who sign up for an ID and password can also sign up for daily submission abstract emails for specific subject classes of arXiv, including physics education, physics and society, and history of physics. Founded and developed by Paul Ginsparg when he was at Los Alamos National Laboratory, arXiv's original name was the LANL preprint archive or xxx.lanl.gov. The location and name changed after Ginsparg moved to the physics department at Cornell University. Today, arXiv is hosted and operated by Cornell University library. Mirror sites for arXiv exist worldwide.2

  2. Do Heliconius butterfly species exchange mimicry alleles?

    PubMed

    Smith, Joel; Kronforst, Marcus R

    2013-08-23

    Hybridization has the potential to transfer beneficial alleles across species boundaries, and there are a growing number of examples in which this has apparently occurred. Recent studies suggest that Heliconius butterflies have transferred wing pattern mimicry alleles between species via hybridization, but ancestral polymorphism could also produce a signature of shared ancestry around mimicry genes. To distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we measured DNA sequence divergence around putatively introgressed mimicry loci and compared this with the rest of the genome. Our results reveal that putatively introgressed regions show strongly reduced sequence divergence between co-mimetic species, suggesting that their divergence times are younger than the rest of the genome. This is consistent with introgression and not ancestral variation. We further show that this signature of introgression occurs at sites throughout the genome, not just around mimicry genes.

  3. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; De Masi, Leon; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S; Fraser, George P; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W Florian; Edwards, Robert A; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R; Rankin, Shelley C; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  4. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.

  5. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; et al

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population andmore » functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.« less

  6. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  7. The 40Ar/39Ar dating technique applied to planetary sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, F.

    2012-12-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar technique is a powerful geochronological method that can help to unravel the evolution of the solar system. The 40Ar/39Ar system can not only record the timing of volcanic and metamorphic processes on asteroids and planets, it finds domain of predilection in dating impact events throughout the solar system. However, the 40Ar/39Ar method is a robust analytical technique if, and only if, the events to be dated are well understood and data are not over interpreted. Yet, too many 'ages' reported in the literature are still based on over-interpretation of perturbed age spectra which tends to blur the big picture. This presentation is centred on the most recent applications of the 40Ar/39Ar technique applied to planetary material and through several examples, will attempt to demonstrate the benefit of focusing on statistically robust data. For example, 40Ar/39Ar dating of volcanic events on the Moon suggests that volcanism was mostly concentrated between ca. 3.8 and 3.1 Ga but statistical filtering of the data allow identifying a few well-defined eruptive events. The study of lunar volcanism would also benefit from dating of volcanic spherules. Rigorous filtering of the 40Ar/39Ar age database of lunar melt breccias yielded concordant and ages with high precision for two major basins (i.e. Imbrium & Serenitatis) of the Moon. 40Ar/39Ar dating of lunar impact spherules recovered from four different sites and with high- and low-K compositions shows an increase of ages younger than 400 Ma suggesting a recent increase in the impact flux. The impact history of the LL parent body (bodies?) has yet to be well constrained but may mimic the LHB observed on the Moon, which would indicate that the LL parent body was quite large. 40Ar/39Ar dating (in progress) of grains from the asteroid Itokawa recovered by the japanese Hayabusa mission have the potential to constrain the formation history and exposure age of Itokawa and will allow us to compare the results with the

  8. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  9. Rich catalytic injection

    DOEpatents

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  10. Ar-40/Ar-39 Studies of Martian Meteorite RBT 04262 and Terrestrial Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Turrin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Nagao, K.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2014-01-01

    Park et al. recently presented an Ar-40/Ar-39 dating study of maskelynite separated from the Martian meteorite RBT 04262. Here we report an additional study of Ar-40/Ar-39 patterns for smaller samples, each consisting of only a few maskelynite grains. Considered as a material for Ar-40/Ar-39 dating, the shock-produced glass maskelynite has both an important strength (relatively high K concentration compared to other mineral phases) and some potentially problematic weaknesses. At Rutgers, we have been analyzing small grains consisting of a single phase to explore local effects that might be averaged and remain hidden in larger samples. Thus, to assess the homogeneity of the RBT maskelynite and for comparison with the results of, we analyzed six approx. 30 microgram samples of the same maskelynite separate they studied. Furthermore, because most Ar-40/Ar-39 are calculated relative to the age of a standard, we present new Ar-40/Ar-39 age data for six standards. Among the most widely used standards are sanidine from Fish Canyon (FCs) and various hornblendes (hb3gr, MMhb-1, NL- 25), which are taken as primary standards because their ages have been determined by independent, direct measurements of K and A-40.

  11. Instrumentation development for planetary in situ 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidheiser-Kroll, B.; Morgan, L. E.; Munk, M.; Warner, N. H.; Gupta, S.; Slaybaugh, R.; Harkness, P.; Mark, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The chronology of the Solar System, particularly the timing of formation of extraterrestrial bodies and their features, is a major outstanding problem in planetary science. Although various chronological methods for in situ geochronology have been proposed (e.g. Rb-Sr, K-Ar), and even applied (K-Ar, Farley et al., 2014), the reliability, accuracy, and applicability of the 40Ar/39Ar method makes it by far the most desirable chronometer for dating extraterrestrial bodies. The method however relies on the neutron irradiation of samples, and thus a neutron source. We will discuss the challenges and feasibility of deploying a passive neutron source to planetary surfaces for the in situ application of the 40Ar/39Ar chronometer. Requirements in generating and shielding neutrons, as well as analyzing samples are discussed, along with an exploration of limitations such as mass, power, and cost. Two potential solutions for the in situ extraterrestrial deployment of the 40Ar/39Ar method will be presented. Although this represents a challenging task, developing the technology to apply the 40Ar/39Ar method on planetary surfaces would represent a major advance towards constraining the timescale of solar system formation and evolution.

  12. Research: Rags to Rags? Riches to Riches?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2004-01-01

    Everyone has read about what might be called the "gold gap"--how the rich in this country are getting richer and controlling an ever-larger share of the nation's wealth. The Century Foundation has started publishing "Reality Check", a series of guides to campaign issues that sometimes finds gaps in these types of cherished delusions. The guides…

  13. Improvements Needed in the 40Ar/39Ar Study of Geomagnetic Excursion Chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, D. E.; Turrin, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Our knowledge of the existence and frequency of brief geomagnetic polarity. excursions only increases with time. Precise and accurate 40Ar/39Ar ages will be required to document this, because 25 or more excursions may have occurred within the Brunhes Epoch (780ky) separated in time by as little as 10ky. Excursions are and will dominantly be discovered in mafic, low K2O rocks. Improvements in the analytical protocol to 40Ar/39Ar date low K2O, "young", and thus low 40Arrad rocks are required. While conventional K/Ar dating "worked", the assumption of perfect atmospheric equilibration is flawed. In particular, using a measured isochron intercept (±2s) to embrace an atmospheric intercept assumption turns a 40Ar/39Ar diffusive extraction into a series of "K/Ar-lite" experiments. The near ubiquitous excess 40Ar exhibited in final steps of "matrix" or "groundmass" fractions from whole-rock experiments (no glass, crystals) suggests equilibration with the atmosphere is not achieved. Removing magnetic sample splits (glass?) thought subject to poor argon retention, and crystals subject to 40Ar inheritance are routinely done without documenting different isochrons. Short 15 to 20 minute irradiation times effectively eliminate recoil and dramatically minimize isotopic corrections, and the assumption of equivalence in Ar isotope recoil behavior. Assuming no pressure dependency and constancy of mass discrimination value ignores knowledge from other gas mass spectroscopy (O, H, He, Ne). Dynamic mass spectroscopy in stable isotopic analysis allows routine per mil and 0.1 per mil ratios to be measured. Maintaining more than daily bracketing air pipette measurements at differing pressures, and controlling the range of pressures from each diffusive step will approximate this dynamic precision. Experiments will be discussed that exhibit aspects of 40Ar/39Ar dating protocols with which precision and accuracy can be improved.

  14. Estimate of the 42Ar content in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, A. S.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Jants, V. E.

    1997-02-01

    42Ar is a potential source of background in large volume argon-based detectors. The production of the 42Ar isotope both by cosmic rays and by neutrons produced by testing of nuclear weapons is discussed. We demonstrate that main channel of the 42Ar production is from atmospheric testing of nuclear bombs from 1945 to 1962 and the 42Ar content must be less than 1.3 × 10 -23 parts of 42Ar per part of natAr.

  15. Nonfunctional alleles of long‐day suppressor genes independently regulate flowering time

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao‐Ming; Feng, Li; Wang, Junrui; Qiao, Weihua; Zhang, Lifang; Cheng, Yunlian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Due to the remarkable adaptability to various environments, rice varieties with diverse flowering times have been domesticated or improved from Oryza rufipogon. Detailed knowledge of the genetic factors controlling flowering time will facilitate understanding the adaptation mechanism in cultivated rice and enable breeders to design appropriate genotypes for distinct preferences. In this study, four genes (Hd1, DTH8, Ghd7 and OsPRR37) in a rice long‐day suppression pathway were collected and sequenced in 154, 74, 69 and 62 varieties of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) respectively. Under long‐day conditions, varieties with nonfunctional alleles flowered significantly earlier than those with functional alleles. However, the four genes have different genetic effects in the regulation of flowering time: Hd1 and OsPRR37 are major genes that generally regulate rice flowering time for all varieties, while DTH8 and Ghd7 only regulate regional rice varieties. Geographic analysis and network studies suggested that the nonfunctional alleles of these suppression loci with regional adaptability were derived recently and independently. Alleles with regional adaptability should be taken into consideration for genetic improvement. The rich genetic variations in these four genes, which adapt rice to different environments, provide the flexibility needed for breeding rice varieties with diverse flowering times. PMID:26220807

  16. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  17. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  18. Increasing long term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  19. LASER MICROPROBE **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar DATING OF MINERAL GRAINS IN SITU.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutter, J.F.; Hartung, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-microprobe attached to a mass spectrometer for **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar age determination of single mineral grains in geological materials has been made operational at the US Geological Survey, Reston, VA. This microanalytical technique involves focusing a pulsed laser beam onto a sample contained in an ultra-high vacuum chamber attached to a rare-gas mass spectrometer. Argon in the neutron-irradiated sample is released by heating with the laser pulse and its isotopic composition is measured to yield an **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar age. Laser probe **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar ages of single mineral grains measured in situ can aid greatly in understanding the chronology of many geological situations where datable minerals are present but are not physically separable in quantities needed for conventional age dating.

  20. Ar-39-Ar-40 Ages of Euerites and the Thermal History of Asteroid 4-Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2002-01-01

    Eucrite meteorites are igneous rocks that derive from a large asteroid, probably 4 Vesta. Prior studies have shown that after eucrites formed, most were subsequently metamorphosed to temperatures up to equal to or greater than 800 C, and much later many were brecciated and heated by large impacts into the parent body surface. The uncommon basaltic, unbrecciated eucrites also formed near the surface but presumably escaped later brecciation, whereas the cumulate eucrites formed at depth where metamorphism may have persisted for a considerable period. To further understand the complex HED parent body thermal history, we determined new Ar-39-Ar-40 ages for nine eucrites classified as basaltic but unbrecciated, six eucrites classified as cumulate, and several basaltic-brecciated eucrites. Relatively precise Ar-Ar ages of two cumulate eucrites (Moama and EET87520) and four unbrecciated eucrites give a tight cluster at 4.48 +/1 0.01 Gyr. Ar-Ar ages of six additional unbrecciated eucrites are consistent with this age, within their larger age uncertainties. In contrast, available literature data on Pb-Pb isochron ages of four cumulate eucrites and one unbrecciated eucrite vary over 4.4-4.515 Gyr, and Sm-147 - Nd-143 isochron ages of four cumulate and three unbrecciated eucrites vary over 4.41-4.55 Gyr. Similar Ar-Ar ages for cumulate and unbrecciated eucrites imply that cumulate eucrites do not have a younger formation age than basaltic eucrites, as previously proposed. Rather, we suggest that these cumulate and unbrecciated eucrites resided at depth where parent body temperatures were sufficiently high to cause the K-Ar and some other chronometers to remain open diffusion systems. From the strong clustering of Ar-Ar ages at approximately 4.48 Gyr, we propose that these meteorites were excavated from depth in a single large impact event approximately 4.48 Gyr ago, which quickly cooled the samples and started the K-Ar chronometer. A large (approximately 460 km) crater

  1. The ArsD As(III) metallochaperone

    PubMed Central

    Ajees, A. Abdul; Yang, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic, a toxic metalloid widely existing in the environment, causes a variety of health problems. The ars operon encoded by Escherichia coli plasmid R773 has arsD and arsA genes, where ArsA is an ATPase that is the catalytic subunit of the ArsAB As(III) extrusion pump, and ArsD is an arsenic chaperone for ArsA. ArsD transfers As(III) to ArsA and increases the affinity of ArsA for As(III), allowing resistance to environmental concentrations of arsenic. Cys12, Cys13 and Cys18 in ArsD form a three sulfur-coordinated As(III) binding site that is essential for metallochaperone activity. ATP hydrolysis by ArsA is required for transfer of As(III) from ArsD to ArsA, suggesting that transfer occurs with a conformation of ArsA that transiently forms during the catalytic cycle. The 1.4 Å x-ray crystal structure of ArsD shows a core of four β-strands flanked by four α-helices in a thioredoxin fold. Docking of ArsD with ArsA was modeled in silico. Independently ArsD mutants exhibiting either weaker or stronger interaction with ArsA were selected. The locations of the mutations mapped on the surface of ArsD are consistent with the docking model. The results suggest that the interface with ArsA involves one surface of α1 helix and metalloid binding site of ArsD. PMID:21188475

  2. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications.

  3. Alu Sx repeat-induced homozygous deletion of the StAR gene causes lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Eiden-Plach, Antje; Nguyen, Huy-Hoang; Schneider, Ursula; Hartmann, Michaela F; Bernhardt, Rita; Hannemann, Frank; Wudy, Stefan A

    2012-05-01

    Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (Lipoid CAH) is the most severe form of the autosomal recessive disorder CAH. A general loss of the steroid biosynthetic activity caused by defects in the StAR gene manifests as life-threatening primary adrenal insufficiency. We report a case of Lipoid CAH caused by a so far not described homozygous deletion of the complete StAR gene and provide diagnostic results based on a GC-MS steroid metabolomics and molecular genetic analysis. The patient presented with postnatal hypoglycemia, vomiting, adynamia, increasing pigmentation and hyponatremia. The constellation of urinary steroid metabolites suggested Lipoid CAH and ruled out all other forms of CAH or defects of aldosterone biosynthesis. After treatment with sodium supplementation, hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone the child fully recovered. Molecular genetic analysis demonstrated a homozygous 12.1 kb deletion in the StAR gene locus. The breakpoints of the deletion are embedded into two typical genomic repetitive Alu Sx elements upstream and downstream of the gene leading to the loss of all exons and regulatory elements. We established deletion-specific and intact allele-specific PCR methods and determined the StAR gene status of all available family members over three generations. This analysis revealed that one of the siblings, who died a few weeks after birth, carried the same genetic defect. Since several Alu repeats at the StAR gene locus increase the probability of deletions, patients with typical symptoms of lipoid CAH lacking evidence for the presence of both StAR alleles should be analyzed carefully for this kind of disorder.

  4. Update on allele nomenclature for human cytochromes P450 and the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Database.

    PubMed

    Sim, Sarah C; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in xenobiotic metabolism and drug response is extensive and genetic factors play an important role in this variation. A majority of clinically used drugs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system and interindividual variability in expression and function of these enzymes is a major factor for explaining individual susceptibility for adverse drug reactions and drug response. Because of the existence of many polymorphic CYP genes, for many of which the number of allelic variants is continually increasing, a universal and official nomenclature system is important. Since 1999, all functionally relevant polymorphic CYP alleles are named and published on the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Web site (http://www.cypalleles.ki.se). Currently, the database covers nomenclature of more than 660 alleles in a total of 30 genes that includes 29 CYPs as well as the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene. On the CYP-allele Web site, each gene has its own Webpage, which lists the alleles with their nucleotide changes, their functional consequences, and links to publications identifying or characterizing the alleles. CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 are the most important CYPs in terms of drug metabolism, which is also reflected in their corresponding highest number of Webpage hits at the CYP-allele Web site.The main advantage of the CYP-allele database is that it offers a rapid online publication of CYP-alleles and their effects and provides an overview of peer-reviewed data to the scientific community. Here, we provide an update of the CYP-allele database and the associated nomenclature.

  5. Ar-39-Ar-40 Evidence for Early Impact Events on the LL Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, E. T.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Rubin, A. E.

    2006-01-01

    We determined Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of eight LL chondrites, and one igneous inclusion from an LL chondrite, with the object of understanding the thermal history of the LL-chondrite parent body. The meteorites in this study have a range of petrographic types from LL3.3 to LL6, and shock stages from S1 to S4. These meteorites reveal a range of K-Ar ages from 23.66 to 24.50 Ga, and peak ages from 23.74 to 24.55 Ga. Significantly, three of the eight chondrites (LL4, 5, 6) have K-Ar ages of -4.27 Ga. One of these (MIL99301) preserves an Ar-39-Ar-40 age of 4.23 +/- 0.03 Ga from low-temperature extractions, and an older age of 4.52 +/- 0.08 Ga from the highest temperature extractions. In addition, an igneous-textured impact melt DOM85505,22 has a peak Ar-39-Ar-40 age of >= 4.27 Ga. We interpret these results as evidence for impact events that occurred at about 4.27 Ga on the LL parent body that produced local impact melts, reset the Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of some meteorites, and exhumed (or interred) others, resulting in a range of cooling ages. The somewhat younger peak age of 3.74 Ga from GR095658 (LL3.3) suggests an additional impact event close to timing of impact-reset ages of some other ordinary chondrites between 3.6-3.8 Ga. The results from MIL99301 suggest that some apparently unshocked (Sl) chondrites may have substantially reset Ar-39-Ar-40 ages. A previous petrographic investigation of MIL99301 suggested that reheating to temperatures less than or equal to type 4 petrographic conditions (600C) caused fractures in olivine to anneal, resulting in a low apparent shock stage of S1 (unshocked). The Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectrum of MIL99301 is consistent with this interpretation. Older ages from high-T extractions may date an earlier impact event at 4.52 +/- 0.08 Ga, whereas younger ages from lower-T extractions date a later impact event at 4.23 Ar-39-Ar-40 0.03 Ga that may have caused annealing of feldspar and olivine

  6. 40Ar/39Ar age of Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary tektites from Haiti

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izett, G.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Snee, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating of tektites discovered recently in Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary marine sedimentary rocks on Haiti indicates that the K-T boundary and impact event are coeval at 64.5 ?? 0.1 million years ago. Sanidine from a bentonite that lies directly above the K-T boundary in continental, coal-bearing, sedimentary rocks of Montana was also dated and has a 40Ar/39Ar age of 64.6 ?? 0.2 million years ago, which is indistinguishable statistically from the age of the tektites.

  7. Rapid kimberlite ascent and the significance of Ar-Ar ages in xenolith phlogopites

    PubMed

    Kelley; Wartho

    2000-07-28

    Kimberlite eruptions bring exotic rock fragments and minerals, including diamonds, from deep within the mantle up to the surface. Such fragments are rapidly absorbed into the kimberlite magma so their appearance at the surface implies rapid transport from depth. High spatial resolution Ar-Ar age data on phlogopite grains in xenoliths from Malaita in the Solomon Islands, southwest Pacific, and Elovy Island in the Kola Peninsula, Russia, indicate transport times of hours to days depending upon the magma temperature. In addition, the data show that the phlogopite grains preserve Ar-Ar ages recorded at high temperature in the mantle, 700 degrees C above the conventional closure temperature.

  8. 40Ar/39Ar ages of the AD 79 eruption of Vesuvius, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.; Champion, D.; Melluso, L.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Scarpati, C.; Tedesco, D.; Calvert, A.

    2007-01-01

    The Italian volcano, Vesuvius, erupted explosively in AD 79. Sanidine from pumice collected at Casti Amanti in Pompeii and Villa Poppea in Oplontis yielded a weighted-mean 40Ar/39Ar age of 1925??66 years in 2004 (1?? uncertainty) from incremental-heating experiments of eight aliquants of sanidine. This is the calendar age of the eruption. Our results together with the work of Renne et al. (1997) and Renne and Min (1998) demonstrate the validity of the 40Ar/39Ar method to reconstruct the recent eruptive history of young, active volcanoes. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  9. 40Ar/39Ar technique of KAr dating: a comparison with the conventional technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brent, Dalrymple G.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1971-01-01

    K-Ar ages have been determined by the 40Ar/39Ar total fusion technique on 19 terrestrial samples whose conventional K-Ar ages range from 3.4 my to nearly 1700 my. Sample materials included biotite, muscovite, sanidine, adularia, plagioclase, hornblende, actinolite, alunite, dacite, and basalt. For 18 samples there are no significant differences at the 95% confidence level between the KAr ages obtained by these two techniques; for one sample the difference is 4.3% and is statistically significant. For the neutron doses used in these experiments (???4 ?? 1018 nvt) it appears that corrections for interfering Ca- and K-derived Ar isotopes can be made without significant loss of precision for samples with K/Ca > 1 as young as about 5 ?? 105 yr, and for samples with K/Ca < 1 as young as about 107 yr. For younger samples the combination of large atmospheric Ar corrections and large corrections for Ca- and K-derived Ar may make the precision of the 40Ar/39Ar technique less than that of the conventional technique unless the irradiation parameters are adjusted to minimize these corrections. ?? 1971.

  10. Rapid kimberlite ascent and the significance of Ar-Ar ages in xenolith phlogopites

    PubMed

    Kelley; Wartho

    2000-07-28

    Kimberlite eruptions bring exotic rock fragments and minerals, including diamonds, from deep within the mantle up to the surface. Such fragments are rapidly absorbed into the kimberlite magma so their appearance at the surface implies rapid transport from depth. High spatial resolution Ar-Ar age data on phlogopite grains in xenoliths from Malaita in the Solomon Islands, southwest Pacific, and Elovy Island in the Kola Peninsula, Russia, indicate transport times of hours to days depending upon the magma temperature. In addition, the data show that the phlogopite grains preserve Ar-Ar ages recorded at high temperature in the mantle, 700 degrees C above the conventional closure temperature. PMID:10915621

  11. 40Ar/39Ar Age of Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary Tektites from Haiti.

    PubMed

    Izett, G A; Dalrymple, G B; Snee, L W

    1991-06-14

    (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of tektites discovered recently in Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary marine sedimentary rocks on Haiti indicates that the K-T boundary and impact event are coeval at 64.5 +/- 0.1 million years ago. Sanidine from a bentonite that lies directly above the K-T boundary in continental, coal-bearing, sedimentary rocks of Montana was also dated and has a (40)Ar/(39)Ar age of 64.6 +/- 0.2 million years ago, which is indistinguishable statistically from the age of the tektites.

  12. Determination of DQB1 alleles using PCR amplification and allele-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Lepage, V; Ivanova, R; Loste, M N; Mallet, C; Douay, C; Naoumova, E; Charron, D

    1995-10-01

    Molecular genotyping of HLA class II genes is commonly carried out using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in combination with sequence-specific oligotyping (PCR-SSO) or a combination of the PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods (PCR-RFLP). However, the identification of the DQB1 type by PCR-SSO and PCR-RFLP is very time-consuming which is disadvantageous for the typing of cadaveric organ donors. We have developed a DQB1 typing method using PCR in combination with allele-specific amplification (PCR-ASA), which allows the identification of the 17 most frequent alleles in one step using seven amplification mixtures. PCR allele-specific amplification HLA-DQB1 typing is easy to perform, and the results are easy to interpret in routine clinical practice. The PCR-ASA method is therefore better suited to DQB1 typing for organ transplantation than other methods.

  13. 40Ar/39Ar ages in deformed potassium feldspar: evidence of microstructural control on Ar isotope systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Steven M.; Potts, Graham J.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2001-05-01

    Detailed field and microstructural studies have been combined with high spatial resolution ultraviolet laser 40Ar/39Ar dating of naturally deformed K-feldspar to investigate the direct relationship between deformation-related microstructure and Ar isotope systematics. The sample studied is a ~1,000 Ma Torridonian arkose from Skye, Scotland, that contains detrital feldspars previously metamorphosed at amphibolite-facies conditions ~1,700 Ma. The sample was subsequently deformed ~430 Ma ago during Caledonian orogenesis. The form and distribution of deformation-induced microstructures within three different feldspar clasts has been mapped using atomic number contrast and orientation contrast imaging, at a range of scales, to identify intragrain variations in composition and lattice orientation. These variations have been related to thin section and regional structural data to provide a well-constrained deformation history for the feldspar clasts. One hundred and forty-three in-situ 40Ar/39Ar analyses measured using ultraviolet laser ablation record a range of apparent ages (317-1030 Ma). The K-feldspar showing the least strain records the greatest range of apparent ages from 420-1,030 Ma, with the oldest apparent ages being found close to the centre of the feldspar away from fractures and the detrital grain boundary. The most deformed K-feldspar yields the youngest apparent ages (317-453 Ma) but there is no spatial relationship between apparent age and the detrital grain boundary. Within this feldspar, the oldest apparent ages are recorded from orientation domain boundaries and fracture surfaces where an excess or trapped 40Ar component resides. Orientation contrast images at a similar scale to the Ar analyses illustrate a significant deformation-related microstructural difference between the feldspars and we conclude that deformation plays a significant role in controlling Ar systematics of feldspars at both the inter- and intragrain scales even at relatively low

  14. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Brian J; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Weisman, Caroline M; Hollister, Jesse D; Salt, David E; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-07-19

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  15. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Brian J.; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M.; Weisman, Caroline M.; Hollister, Jesse D.; Salt, David E.; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-01-01

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata. In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata. This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  16. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Brian J; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Weisman, Caroline M; Hollister, Jesse D; Salt, David E; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-07-19

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment.

  17. Biased gene conversion skews allele frequencies in human populations, increasing the disease burden of recessive alleles.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A

    2014-10-01

    Gene conversion results in the nonreciprocal transfer of genetic information between two recombining sequences, and there is evidence that this process is biased toward G and C alleles. However, the strength of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) in human populations and its effects on hereditary disease have yet to be assessed on a genomic scale. Using high-coverage whole-genome sequences of African hunter-gatherers, agricultural populations, and primate outgroups, we quantified the effects of GC-biased gene conversion on population genomic data sets. We find that genetic distances (FST and population branch statistics) are modified by gBGC. In addition, the site frequency spectrum is left-shifted when ancestral alleles are favored by gBGC and right-shifted when derived alleles are favored by gBGC. Allele frequency shifts due to gBGC mimic the effects of natural selection. As expected, these effects are strongest in high-recombination regions of the human genome. By comparing the relative rates of fixation of unbiased and biased sites, the strength of gene conversion was estimated to be on the order of Nb ≈ 0.05 to 0.09. We also find that derived alleles favored by gBGC are much more likely to be homozygous than derived alleles at unbiased SNPs (+42.2% to 62.8%). This results in a curse of the converted, whereby gBGC causes substantial increases in hereditary disease risks. Taken together, our findings reveal that GC-biased gene conversion has important population genetic and public health implications.

  18. Newly combined 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb ages of the Upper Cretaceous timescale from Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaylor, J. R.; Heredia, B. D.; Quidelleur, X.; Takashima, R.; Nishi, H.; Mezger, K.

    2011-12-01

    The main targets for GTS next project (www.gtsnext.eu) are to develop highly refined geological time scales, including the Upper Cretaceous. The Cretaceous period is characterised by numerous global anoxic events in the marine realm, rich ammonitic fossil assemblages and specialised foraminifera. However, lack of age diagnostic macro and micro fossils in the North Pacific sections has made it difficult to link these with global sections such as the Western Interior Basin (North America). Using advances with terrestrial C-isotope and planktic foraminifera records within Central Hokkaido we are able to correlate these sections globally. The Cretaceous Yezo group in Central Hokkaido comprises deep marine mudstones and turbidite sandstones interbedded with acidic volcanic tuffs. Using various sections within the Yezo group, we radiometrically dated tuffs at the main stage boundaries in the Upper Cretaceous. The samples derive from the Kotanbetsu, Shumarinai, Tiomiuchi and the Hakkin river sections, spanning the time from the Albian-Cenomanian up until the Campanian-Santonian boundaries, and were dated using 40Ar/39Ar, K/Ar and U-Pb techniques. Recent age constraints in the Hokkaido counterparts (Kotanbetsu sections) show good coherence between radiometric chronometers on the various Upper Cretaceous stage boundaries. These additional ages together with our isotope ages from the different sections around the Hokkaido basin are well linked by the various faunal assemblages and C-isotope curves. The combined radio isotope ages contribute to previous attempts (such as those focused in the Western Interior Basin) supporting the synchronicity of events such as global oceanic anoxic events. Finally, the ages obtained here also compliment the previous C-isotope and planktic foraminifera records allowing for a more precise climatic history of the Northwest Pacific during the Cretaceous. The research within the GTSnext project is funded by the European Community's Seventh

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of near-surface modification of polystyrene: Bombardment with Ar{sup +} and Ar{sup +}/radical chemistries

    SciTech Connect

    Vegh, J. J.; Nest, D.; Graves, D. B.; Bruce, R.; Engelmann, S.; Kwon, T.; Phaneuf, R. J.; Oehrlein, G. S.; Long, B. K.; Willson, C. G.

    2008-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to examine the effects of Ar{sup +}, Ar{sup +}/H, and Ar{sup +}/F bombardment of a model polystyrene (PS) surface. For bombardment with 100 eV Ar{sup +} only, the simulations show the formation of a heavily cross-linked dehydrogenated damaged layer in the near-surface region after some initial fluence, consistent with plasma and beam system experimental results. The 1-2 nm thick amorphous carbon-rich modified layer has a much lower sputter yield compared to that of the virgin PS, which has a H:C ratio of 1. Simultaneous bombardment of the damaged dehydrogenated PS layer with 300 K H or F radicals and 100 eV Ar{sup +} can facilitate the removal of the layer as well as inhibit its initial formation. The development of the steady-state dehydrogenated layer under Ar{sup +}-only bombardment results from a competition between the breaking of carbon-hydrogen bonds (which leads to dehydrogenation and subsequent cross-linking) and the breaking of carbon-carbon bonds (which leads to sputtering of polymer fragments). For the conditions presented in this study, the loss of hydrogen eventually overtakes the removal of polymer fragments, resulting in the formation of the dehydrogenated cross-linked near-surface layer. The final properties of the dehydrogenated layer from the MD simulations are compared at steady state to ellipsometric data for plasma-exposed PS samples, and the initial and final sputter yields from MD are compared to experimental beam system data.

  20. New 40Ar/ 39Ar dating results from the Shanwang Basin, eastern China: Constraints on the age of the Shanwang Formation and associated biota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Huaiyu; Deng, Chenglong; Pan, Yongxin; Deng, Tao; Luo, Zhaohua; Sun, Jimin; Zhu, Rixiang

    2011-07-01

    The fluvio-lacustrine sequence of the Shanwang Basin, eastern China, preserves a rich and important terrestrial fossil fauna and flora; the exceptional preservation of these fossils reveals the dynamics of ancient mammalian ecosystems and plant biology. However, the timing of this sedimentary sequence has been the subject of debate for decades. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting the detailed results of 40Ar/ 39Ar analysis of the basalts above, below, and within the Shanwang Formation. These dates place stringent constraints on the age of Shanwang Formation and associated biota. 40Ar/ 39Ar ages obtained from basalts of the Niushan and Yaoshan Formations, which underlie and overlie the Shanwang Formation, are 21.0 ± 2.5 Ma (2σ, full external error) and 17.3 ± 1.5 Ma (2σ, full external error), respectively. The 40Ar/ 39Ar age of the basalt in the Shanwang Formation is 17-18 Ma. Given the age constraints of the basalts of the Yaoshan and Shanwang Formations, the age of the Shanwang biota is estimated to be ca. 17 Ma, late Burdigalian of the Early Miocene, indicating that the deposition of this fauna coincided with the onset of the mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum. The results provide new age constraints on the Shanwang mammal fauna, and independently support interpretations that this fauna can be assigned to chronozone MN4, and correlated with middle Orleanian of the European Land Mammal Age, and to late Hemingfordian of the North American Land Mammal Age. Biological diversity of the Shanwang Formation could reflect the global-scale mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum.

  1. Characterizing allelic association in the genome era

    PubMed Central

    WEIR, B. S.; LAURIE, C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Whole genome data are allowing the estimation of population genetic parameters with an accuracy not imagined 50 years ago. Variation in these parameters along the genome is being found empirically where once only approximate theoretical values were available. Along with increased information, however, has come the issue of multiple testing and the realization that high values of the coefficients of variation of quantities such as relatedness measures may make it difficult to draw inferences. This review concentrates on measures of allelic association within and between individuals and within and between populations. PMID:21429275

  2. Mineralogy and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of supergene Mn-oxides in the Dongxiangqiao deposit, Hunan Province, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiao-Dong; Li, Jian-Wei

    2016-09-01

    The Dongxiangqiao Mn deposit in Hunan Province is one of numerous supergene Mn-oxide deposits in central South China. This deposit is derived from chemical weathering of Permian Mn-rich shales and limestones. Mn-oxide samples from the Dongxiangqiao deposit consist mainly of pyrolusite, lithiophorite, and cryptomelane, with minor amounts of hollandite and nsutite. Cobalt and Ni are enriched in lithiophorite and cryptomelane-hollandite. Our studies suggest that Co occurs mainly in the structural and adsorption sites of lithiophorite. Cobalt in lithiophorite accounts for ~80 % of the bulk Mn-oxide ores, thus it can be comprehensively utilized when lithiophorite has been separated by a suitable physical beneficiation process. Four cryptomelane-dominated grains from the saprolite zone yield 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages ranging from 10.3 ± 0.3 to 4.19 ± 0.08 Ma (2σ). This indicates that intense enrichment of supergene Mn-oxides has prevailed at least in the late Miocene and persisted into the Pliocene at Dongxiangqiao. When combined sedimentalogical and thermochronoloical data, our dating results suggest that central South China has a relatively rapid surface uplift rate.

  3. Excess Ar-40 in the Zagami Shergottite: Does It Reveal Crystallization History?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2007-01-01

    The Zagami basaltic shergottite has fine- and coarse-grained (FG & CG) areas, which may reflect partial crystallization in a deep, slowly cooled magma chamber to form Mg-rich pyroxene cores, followed by entrainment of these crystals into a magma that rose and crystallized near the surface. Late-stage melt pockets formed mesostasis and feldspar (maskelynite) having a range of compositions, but low water abundance. Higher I(sub Sr) in the FG portion may result from the second stage having incorporated old crustal rocks that failed to reach isotopic equilibrium. Zagami, like other shergottites, contains excess Ar-40(sub xs) beyond that expected from internal decay of K-40 during its Sm-Nd age of 177 Myr. We suggest that at least a portion of this Ar-40(sub xs) in Zagami and some other shergottites was inherited from the magma, much as is the case of MORBs on Earth. We made Ar-39-Ar-40 age determinations on feldspar and pyroxene separates from both the FG and CG portions of Zagami. If Zagami experienced an evolving fractional crystallization history, including possible crustal contamination of the magma, that might be indicated in differing amounts of Ar-40(sub xs) between mineral phases and between FG and CG portions.

  4. ArsP: a methylarsenite efflux permease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Madegowda, Mahendra; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Trivalent organoarsenic compounds are far more toxic than either pentavalent organoarsenicals or inorganic arsenite. Many microbes methylate inorganic arsenite (As(III)) to more toxic and carcinogenic methylarsenite (MAs(III)). Additionally, monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA or MAs(V)) has been used widely as an herbicide and is reduced by microbial communities to MAs(III). Roxarsone (3-nitro-4-hydroxybenzenearsonic acid) is a pentavalent aromatic arsenical that is used as antimicrobial growth promoter for poultry and swine, and its active form is the trivalent species Rox(III). A bacterial permease, ArsP, from Campylobacter jejuni, was recently shown to confer resistance to roxarsone. In this study C. jejuni arsP was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to confer resistance to MAs(III) and Rox(III) but not to inorganic As(III) or pentavalent organoarsenicals. Cells of E. coli expressing arsP did not accumulate trivalent organoarsenicals. Everted membrane vesicles from those cells accumulated MAs(III)>Rox(III) with energy supplied by NADH oxidation, reflecting efflux from cells. The vesicles did not transport As(III), MAs(V) or pentavalent roxarsone. Mutation or modification of the two conserved cysteine residues resulted in loss of transport activity, suggesting that they play a role in ArsP function. Thus ArsP is the first identified efflux system specific for trivalent organoarsenicals. PMID:26234817

  5. Assessment of allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Yusuke; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kaneko, Kiyotoshi; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2006-02-28

    Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is therapeutically useful for specifically suppressing the expression of alleles associated with disease. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASPRNAi), the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital, but is also difficult. Here, we show ASP-RNAi against the Swedish- and London-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) variants related to familial Alzheimer's disease using two reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes and carrying mutant and wild-type allelic sequences in their 3'-untranslated regions. We examined the effects of siRNA duplexes against the mutant alleles in allele-specific gene silencing and off-target silencing against the wild-type allele under heterozygous conditions, which were generated by cotransfecting the reporter alleles and siRNA duplexes into cultured human cells. Consistently, the siRNA duplexes determined to confer ASP-RNAi also inhibited the expression of the bona fide mutant APP and the production of either amyloid beta 40- or 42-peptide in Cos-7 cells expressing both the full-length Swedish- and wild-type APP alleles. The present data suggest that the system with reporter alleles may permit the preclinical assessment of siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi, and thus contribute to the design and selection of the most suitable of such siRNA duplexes.

  6. Deleterious alleles in the human genome are on average younger than neutral alleles of the same frequency.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, Adam; Pulit, Sara L; Francioli, Laurent C; van Dijk, Freerk; Swertz, Morris; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Slagboom, P Eline; van Ommen, G J B; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I W; Sunyaev, Shamil R

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale population sequencing studies provide a complete picture of human genetic variation within the studied populations. A key challenge is to identify, among the myriad alleles, those variants that have an effect on molecular function, phenotypes, and reproductive fitness. Most non-neutral variation consists of deleterious alleles segregating at low population frequency due to incessant mutation. To date, studies characterizing selection against deleterious alleles have been based on allele frequency (testing for a relative excess of rare alleles) or ratio of polymorphism to divergence (testing for a relative increase in the number of polymorphic alleles). Here, starting from Maruyama's theoretical prediction (Maruyama T (1974), Am J Hum Genet USA 6:669-673) that a (slightly) deleterious allele is, on average, younger than a neutral allele segregating at the same frequency, we devised an approach to characterize selection based on allelic age. Unlike existing methods, it compares sets of neutral and deleterious sequence variants at the same allele frequency. When applied to human sequence data from the Genome of the Netherlands Project, our approach distinguishes low-frequency coding non-synonymous variants from synonymous and non-coding variants at the same allele frequency and discriminates between sets of variants independently predicted to be benign or damaging for protein structure and function. The results confirm the abundance of slightly deleterious coding variation in humans.

  7. Correlation diagrams in 40 Ar/39Ar dating: is there a correct choice?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Lanphere, M.A.; Pringle, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Contrary to published assertions, the 2 types of correlation diagrams used in the interpretation of 40Ar/39Ar incremental-heating data yield the same information provided the correct mathematics are used for estimating correlation coefficients and for the least squares fit. The choice is simply between 2 illustrative, graphical displays, neither of which is fundamentally superior to the other. -Authors

  8. Allelic barley MLA immune receptors recognize sequence-unrelated avirulence effectors of the powdery mildew pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xunli; Kracher, Barbara; Saur, Isabel M. L.; Bauer, Saskia; Ellwood, Simon R.; Wise, Roger; Yaeno, Takashi; Maekawa, Takaki; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Disease-resistance genes encoding intracellular nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs) are key components of the plant innate immune system and typically detect the presence of isolate-specific avirulence (AVR) effectors from pathogens. NLR genes define the fastest-evolving gene family of flowering plants and are often arranged in gene clusters containing multiple paralogs, contributing to copy number and allele-specific NLR variation within a host species. Barley mildew resistance locus a (Mla) has been subject to extensive functional diversification, resulting in allelic resistance specificities each recognizing a cognate, but largely unidentified, AVRa gene of the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). We applied a transcriptome-wide association study among 17 Bgh isolates containing different AVRa genes and identified AVRa1 and AVRa13, encoding candidate-secreted effectors recognized by Mla1 and Mla13 alleles, respectively. Transient expression of the effector genes in barley leaves or protoplasts was sufficient to trigger Mla1 or Mla13 allele-specific cell death, a hallmark of NLR receptor-mediated immunity. AVRa1 and AVRa13 are phylogenetically unrelated, demonstrating that certain allelic MLA receptors evolved to recognize sequence-unrelated effectors. They are ancient effectors because corresponding loci are present in wheat powdery mildew. AVRA1 recognition by barley MLA1 is retained in transgenic Arabidopsis, indicating that AVRA1 directly binds MLA1 or that its recognition involves an evolutionarily conserved host target of AVRA1. Furthermore, analysis of transcriptome-wide sequence variation among the Bgh isolates provides evidence for Bgh population structure that is partially linked to geographic isolation. PMID:27702901

  9. Microsatellite variation and rare alleles in a bottlenecked Hawaiian Islands endemic: implications for reintroductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Pearce, John M.; Lavretsky, Philip; Seixas, Pedro P.; Courtot, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Conservation of genetic biodiversity in endangered wildlife populations is an important challenge to address since the loss of alleles and genetic drift may influence future adaptability. Reintroduction aims to re-establish species to restored or protected ecosystems; however, moving a subset of individuals may result in loss of gene variants during the management-induced bottleneck (i.e. translocation). The endangered Laysan teal Anas laysanensis was once widespread across the Hawaiian archipelago, but became isolated on Laysan Island (415 ha) from the mid-1800s until 2004 when a translocation to Midway Atoll (596 ha) was undertaken to reduce extinction risks. We compared genetic diversity and quantified variation at microsatellite loci sampled from 230 individuals from the wild populations at Laysan (1999 to 2009) and Midway (2007 to 2010; n = 133 Laysan, n = 96 Midway birds). We identified polymorphic markers by screening nuclear microsatellites (N = 83). Low nuclear variation was detected, consistent with the species’ insular isolation and historical bottleneck. Six of 83 microsatellites were polymorphic. We found limited but similar estimates of allelic richness (2.58 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity within populations. However, 2 rare alleles found in the Laysan source population were not present in Midway’s reintroduced population, and a unique allele was discovered in an individual on Midway. Differentiation between island populations was low (FST = 0.6%), but statistically significant. Our results indicate that genetic drift had little effect on offspring generations 3 to 6 yr post-release and demonstrate the utility of using known founder events to help quantify genetic capture during translocations and to inform management decisions.

  10. Microarrays for high-throughput genotyping of MICA alleles using allele-specific primer extension.

    PubMed

    Baek, I C; Jang, J-P; Choi, H-B; Choi, E-J; Ko, W-Y; Kim, T-G

    2013-10-01

    The role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene A (MICA), a ligand of NKG2D, has been defined in human diseases by its allele associations with various autoimmune diseases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and cancer. This study describes a practical system to develop MICA genotyping by allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) on microarrays. From the results of 20 control primers, strict and reliable cut-off values of more than 30,000 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) as positive and less than 3000 MFI as negative, were applied to select high-quality specific extension primers. Among 55 allele-specific primers, 44 primers could be initially selected as optimal primer. Through adjusting the length, six primers were improved. The other failed five primers were corrected by refractory modification. MICA genotypes by ASPE on microarrays showed the same results as those by nucleotide sequencing. On the basis of these results, ASPE on microarrays may provide high-throughput genotyping for MICA alleles for population studies, disease-gene associations and HSCT.

  11. Allelic disequilibrium and allele frequency distribution as a function of social and demographic history.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, E A; Neel, J V

    1997-01-01

    Allelic disequilibrium between closely linked genes is a common observation in human populations and often gives rise to speculation concerning the role of selective forces. In a previous treatment, we have developed a population model of the expected distribution of rare variants (including private polymorphisms) in Amerindians and have argued that, because of the great expansion of Amerindian numbers with the advent of agriculture, most of these rare variants are of relatively recent origin. Many other populations have similar histories of striking recent expansions. In this treatment, we demonstrate that, in consequence of this fact, a high degree of linkage disequilibrium between two nonhomologous alleles <0.5 cM apart is the "normal" expectation, even in the absence of selection. This expectation is enhanced by the previous subdivision of human populations into relatively isolated tribes characterized by a high level of endogamy and inbreeding. We also demonstrate that the alleles associated with a recessive disease phenotype are expected to exist in a population in very variable frequencies: there is no need to postulate positive selection with respect to the more common disease-associated alleles for such entities as phenylketonuria or cystic fibrosis. PMID:8981963

  12. DQB1*06:02 allele specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status

    PubMed Central

    lachmi, Karin Weiner; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Rico, Tom; Lo, Betty; Aran, Adi; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single allele HLA associations. In this study, we explored genome wide expression in peripheral white blood cells of 50 narcolepsy versus 47 controls (half of whom were DQB1*06:02 positive) and found the largest differences between the groups to be in the signal from HLA probes. Further studies of HLA-DQ expression (mRNA and protein in a subset) in 125 controls and 147 narcolepsy cases did not reveal any difference, a result we explain by the lack of proper control of allelic diversity in Affymetrix HLA probes. Rather, a clear effect of DQB1*06:02 allelic dosage on DQB1*06:02 mRNA levels (1.65 fold) and protein (1.59 fold) could be demonstrated independent of the disease status. These results indicate that allelic dosage is transmitted into changes in heterodimer availability, a phenomenon that may explain increased risk for narcolepsy in DQB1*06:02 homozygotes versus heterozygotes. PMID:22326585

  13. DQB1*06:02 allele-specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status.

    PubMed

    Weiner Lachmi, Karin; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Rico, Tom; Lo, Betty; Aran, Adi; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2012-04-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single-allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. In this study, we explored genome-wide expression in peripheral white blood cells of 50 narcolepsy versus 47 controls (half of whom were DQB1*06:02 positive) and observed the largest differences between the groups in the signal from HLA probes. Further studies of HLA-DQ expression (mRNA and protein in a subset) in 125 controls and 147 narcolepsy cases did not reveal any difference, a result we explain by the lack of proper control of allelic diversity in Affymetrix HLA probes. Rather, a clear effect of DQB1*06:02 allelic dosage on DQB1*06:02 mRNA levels (1.65-fold) and protein (1.59-fold) could be demonstrated independent of disease status. These results indicate that allelic dosage is transmitted into changes in heterodimer availability, a phenomenon that may explain the increased risk for narcolepsy in DQB1*06:02 homozygotes versus heterozygotes.

  14. Comparative 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar dating of illite-type clay minerals: A tentative explanation for age identities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, Norbert; Zwingmann, Horst; Liewig, Nicole; Wendling, Raymond

    2012-10-01

    The 40K/40Ar (K-Ar) and 40Ar/39Ar dating methods are applied here to the same, very small, micrometric illite-type particles that crystallized under low-temperature (< 175 °C) hydrothermal conditions in deeply buried Rotliegend (Permian) gas-bearing sandstones of NW Germany. Four samples with a total of fifteen size fractions from < 2 to 20-40 μm yield K-Ar ages that range from 166.0 ± 3.4 to 214.0 ± 5.9 Ma. The same size fractions dated by the 40Ar/39Ar method give total-gas ages ranging from 173.3 ± 2.0 to 228.8 ± 1.6 Ma. Nearly all 40Ar/39Ar total-gas ages are slightly older, which cannot be explained by the recoil effect only, the impact of which being amplified by the inhomogeneous shape of the clay minerals and their crystallographic characteristics, with varied crystallinity indices, and a particle width about 10 times large than thickness. The 40Ar/39Ar data outline some advantages, such as the plateaus obtained by incremental step heating of the various size fractions, even if not translatable straight as ages of the illite populations; they allow identification of two generations of authigenic illite that formed at about 200 and 175 Ma, and one detrital generation. However, 40Ar/39Ar dating of clay minerals remains challenging as technical factors, such as the non-standardized encapsulation, may have potential unexpected effects. Both dating methods have their limitations: (1) K-Ar dating requires relatively large samples (ca. 10-20 mg) incurring potential sample homogeneity problems, with two aliquots required for K and Ar analysis for an age determination, also inducing a higher analytical uncertainty; (2) an identified drawback of 40Ar/39Ar dating is Ar recoil and therefore potential loss that occurs during neutronic creation of 39Ar from 39K, mostly in the finer mineral particles. If all the recoiled 39Ar is redistributed into adjacent grains/minerals, the final 40Ar/39Ar age of the analyzed size fraction remains theoretically identical, but it

  15. Hazard evaluation for 244-AR vault facility

    SciTech Connect

    BRAUN, D.J.

    1999-08-25

    This document presents the results of a hazard identification and evaluation performed on the 244-AR Vault Facility to close a USQ (USQ No.TF-98-0785, Potential Inadequacy in Authorization Basis (PIAB): To Evaluate Miscellaneous Facilities Listed In HNF-2503 And Not Addressed In The TWRS Authorization Basis) that was generated as part of an evaluation of inactive TWRS facilities. A hazard evaluation for the Hanford Site 244-AR Vault Facility was performed. The process and results of the hazard evaluation are provided in this document. A previous hazard evaluation was performed for the 244-AR Vault Facility in 1996 in support of the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The results of that evaluation are provided in the BIO. Upon review of those results it was determined that hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the 244-AR vaults due to flooding was not addressed in the original hazards evaluation. This supplemental hazard evaluation addresses this oversight of the original hazard evaluation. The results of the hazard evaluation were compared to the current TWRS BIO to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting changes to the AB. It is only intended to provide information about hazardous conditions associated with the condition and configuration of the 244-AR vault facility. The AB Control Decision process could be used to determine the applicability and adequacy of existing AB controls as well as any new controls that may be needed for the identified hazardous conditions associated with 244-AR vault flooding. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  16. Timing of Hydrocarbon Fluid Emplacement in Sandstone Reservoirs in Neogene in Huizhou Sag, Southern China Sea, by Authigenic Illite 40Ar- 39Ar Laser Stepwise Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesheng, Shi; Junzhang, Zhu; Huaning, Qiu; yu, Shu; Jianyao, Wu; Zulie, Long

    Timing of oil or gas emplacements is a new subject in isotopic geochronology and petroleum geology. Hamilton et al. expounded the principle of the illite K-Ar age: Illite is often the last or one of the latest mineral cements to form prior to hydrocarbon accumulation. Since the displacement of formation water by hydrocarbons will cause silicate diagenesis to cease, K-Ar ages for illite will constrain the timing of this event, and also constrain the maximum age of formation of the trap structure. In this study, the possibility of authigenic illites 40Ar- 39Ar dating has been investigated. The illite samples were separated from the Tertiary sandstones in three rich oil reservoir belts within the Huizhou sag by cleaning, fracturing by cycled cooling-heating, soxhlet-extraction with solvents of benzene and methanol and separating with centrifugal machine. If oil is present in the separated samples, ionized organic fragments with m/e ratios of 36 to 40 covering the argon isotopes will be yielded by the ion source of a mass spectrometer, resulting in wrong argon isotopic analyses and wrong 40Ar- 39Ar ages. The preliminary experiments of illite by heating did show the presence of ionized organic fragments with m/e ratios of 36 to 44. In order to clean up the organic gases completely and obtain reliable analysis results, a special purification apparatus has been established by Qiu et al. and proved valid by the sequent illite analyses. All the illite samples by 40Ar- 39Ar IR-laser stepwise heating yield stair-up age spectra in lower laser steps and plateaux in higher laser steps. The youngest apparent ages corresponding to the beginning steps are reasonable to be interpreted for the hydrocarbon accumulation ages. The weighted mean ages of the illites from the Zhuhai and Zhujiang Formations are (12.1 ± 1.1) Ma and (9.9 ± 1.2) Ma, respectively. Therefore, the critical emplacement of petroleum accumulation in Zhujiang Formation in Huizhou sag took place in ca 10 Ma. Late

  17. SUMO-specific protease 1 modulates cadmium-augmented transcriptional activity of androgen receptor (AR) by reversing AR SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruiqin; Cui, Yaxiong; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Haitao; Wang, Yimei; He, Jun; Zhao, Jun; Peng, Shuangqing

    2014-09-01

    Cadmium is a potential prostate carcinogen and can mimic the effects of androgen by a mechanism that involves the hormone-binding domain of the androgen receptor (AR), which is a key transcriptional factor in prostate carcinogenesis. We focused on transcriptional activity of AR to investigate the toxicity of cadmium exposure on human prostate cell lines. Cadmium increased the proliferative index of LNCaP and the proliferative effect was obstructed significantly by AR blocking agent. In luciferase assay, cadmium activated the transcriptional activity of AR in 293T cells co-transfected with wild-type AR and an ARE (AR response elements)-luciferase reporter gene. Cadmium also increased expression of PSA, a downstream gene of AR, whereas the metal had no significant effect on AR amount. AR is regulated by multiple posttranslational modifications including SUMOylation. SUMOylated AR shows a lower transcriptional activity. SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1) decreases AR SUMOylation by deconjugating AR-SUMO covalent bond. We detected that cadmium increased the amount of SENP1 in a dose and time dependent manner. Knocking down of SENP1 by RNAi led to decrease of PSA expression and transcriptional activity of AR in luciferase assay. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) results showed that SUMOylation level of AR was decreased after cadmium treatment. In conclusion, our results indicated that cadmium-induced SENP1 enhanced AR transcriptional activity by decreasing AR SUMOylation.

  18. 40Ar/39Ar Age Dating of Two Chondrules from the Bjurböle (L/LL4) Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lindsay, F. N.; Turrin, B. D.; Herzog, G. F.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present detailed 40Ar/39Ar results for two Bjurböle chondrules. Younger Ar/Ar step ages for one Bjurböle chondrule suggest that the analysis of single chondrules can yield more accurate meteorite ages than are obtainable from bulk samples.

  19. N 2-Ar-He compositions in fluid inclusions: Indicators of fluid source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, David I.; Musgrave, John A.

    1994-02-01

    A quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to measure bulk samples of conservative gas species N 2, Ar, and He in fluid inclusions from a variety of hydrothermal systems. Analyses of these tracer elements help determine (1) if gases extracted by bulk inclusion analyses can provide accurate measurement of N 2-Ar-He in active and fossil geothermal systems, (2) if hydrothermal fluids associated with paleogeothermal systems in a continental setting follow N 2ArHe systematics similar to th the western Pacific Rim active geothermal systems, specifically New Zealand, and (3) whether different deposit types systematically vary with regard to N 2ArHe. The N 2ArHe ratios of fluid inclusion volatiles released from recently deposited minerals from the Valles system are similar to those of present day Valles thermal waters. Those inclusion samples from deep within the Valles system, below a regional aquitard, increase in N 2. Compositions for inclusions from the Questa and Copper Flat-porphyry deposits are N 2-rich, similar to those of arc-related volcanic gases, whereas those from Taylor Creek Sn deposit appear to be mixtures of magmatic and crustal components. N 2-Ar-He ratios of the Precambrian Tribag deposit suggest a basalt source, but significant levels of self-generated He from U and Th in the inclusion fluids are also possible. Inclusions from two epithermal deposits with low-salinity inclusions have N 2-Ar-He ratios trending towards air-saturated meteoric waters (ASW), and those inclusions with higher salinities indicate minor to no ASW component. The N 2-Ar-He ratios in Fresnillo and Cochiti inclusions, which have magmatic helium isotopic ratios, indicate additions of magmatic gases to meteoric fluids. Inclusions from sediment-hosted deposits that contain hydrocarbon-bearing brines are He-rich, as are meteoric waters with a long residence time in the crust. At relevant pressure-temperature-composition conditions, Henry's Law constants of N 2, Ar, and He

  20. Mobility of Ar+ in CF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitovic, Zeljka; Stojanovic, Vladimir; Raspopovic, Zoran; Jovanovic, Jasmina; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present a complete cross section set for Ar+ in CF4 where existing experimentally obtained data are selected and extrapolated. Monte Carlo simulation method is applied to accurately calculate transport parameters in hydrodynamic regime. We discuss new data for Ar+ ions in CF4 where flux and bulk values of reduced mobility are given as a function of E/N (E-electric field, N-gas density). We find that internally resonant exothermic dissociative charge transfer cross section for CF3+production significantly increases zero field ion mobility with respect to the polarization limit.

  1. Ar-Ar and I-Xe Ages and the Thermal History of IAB Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Studies of several samples of the large Caddo County IAB iron meteorite reveal andesitic material, enriched in Si, Na, Al and Ca, which is essentially unique among meteorites. This material is believed to have formed from a chondritic source by partial melting and to have further segregated by grain coarsening. Such an origin implies extended metamorphism of the IAB parent body. New Ar-39- Ar-40 ages for silicate from three different Caddo samples are consistent with a common age of 4.50-4.51 Gyr ago. Less well defined Ar-Ar degassing ages for inclusions from two other IABs, EET8333 and Udei Station, are approx.4.32 Gyr, whereas the age for Campo del Cielo varies considerably over approx.3.23-4.56 Gyr. New I-129-Xe-129 ages for Caddo County and EET8333 are 4557.9+/-0.1 Myr and 4557-4560 Myr, respectively, relative to an age of 4562.3 Myr for Shallowater. Considering all reported Ar-Ar degassing ages for IABs and related winonaites, the range is approx.4.32-4.53 Gyr, but several IABs give similar Ar ages of 4.50-4.52 Gyr. We interpret these older Ar ages to represent cooling after the time of last significant metamorphism on the parent body, and the younger ages to represent later 40Ar diffusion loss. The older Ar-Ar ages for IABs are similar to Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature for Caddo County. Considering the possibility that IAB parent body formation was followed by impact disruption, reassembly, and metamorphism (e.g., Benedix et al. 2000), the Ar-Ar ages and IAB cooling rates deduced from Ni concentration profiles in IAB metal (Herpfer et al., 1994) are consistent if the time of the post-assembly metamorphism was as late as approx.4.53 Gyr ago. However, I-Xe ages reported for some IABs define much older ages of approx.4558-4566 Myr, which cannot easily be reconciled with the much younger Ar-Ar and Sm-Nd ages. An explanation for the difference in radiometric ages of IABs may reside in combinations of the following: a) I-Xe ages have very

  2. Preservation of ancient impact ages on the R chondrite parent body: 40Ar/39Ar age of hornblende-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M. A.; Morgan, L. E.

    2016-09-01

    The hornblende- and biotite-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840 is a rare kind of meteorite possibly containing outer solar system water stored during metamorphism or postshock annealing deep within an asteroid. Because little is known regarding its age and origin, we determined 40Ar/39Ar ages on hornblende-rich separates of the meteorite, and obtained plateau ages of 4340(±40) to 4380(±30) Ma. These well-defined plateau ages, coupled with evidence for postshock annealing, indicate this meteorite records an ancient shock event and subsequent annealing. The age of 4340-4380 Ma (or 4.34-4.38 Ga) for this and other previously dated R chondrites is much older than most impact events recorded by ordinary chondrites and points to an ancient event or events that predated the late heavy bombardment that is recorded in so many meteorites and lunar samples.

  3. Preservation of ancient impact ages on the R chondrite parent body: 40Ar/39Ar age of hornblende-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M. A.; Morgan, L. E.

    2016-07-01

    The hornblende- and biotite-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840 is a rare kind of meteorite possibly containing outer solar system water stored during metamorphism or postshock annealing deep within an asteroid. Because little is known regarding its age and origin, we determined 40Ar/39Ar ages on hornblende-rich separates of the meteorite, and obtained plateau ages of 4340(±40) to 4380(±30) Ma. These well-defined plateau ages, coupled with evidence for postshock annealing, indicate this meteorite records an ancient shock event and subsequent annealing. The age of 4340-4380 Ma (or 4.34-4.38 Ga) for this and other previously dated R chondrites is much older than most impact events recorded by ordinary chondrites and points to an ancient event or events that predated the late heavy bombardment that is recorded in so many meteorites and lunar samples.

  4. The Effects of Androgens on Murine Cortical Bone Do Not Require AR or ERα Signaling in Osteoblasts and Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Ucer, Serra; Iyer, Srividhya; Bartell, Shoshana M; Martin-Millan, Marta; Han, Li; Kim, Ha-Neui; Weinstein, Robert S; Jilka, Robert L; O'Brien, Charles A; Almeida, Maria; Manolagas, Stavros C

    2015-07-01

    In men, androgens are critical for the acquisition and maintenance of bone mass in both the cortical and cancellous bone compartment. Male mice with targeted deletion of the androgen receptor (AR) in mature osteoblasts or osteocytes have lower cancellous bone mass, but no cortical bone phenotype. We have investigated the possibility that the effects of androgens on the cortical compartment result from AR signaling in osteoprogenitors or cells of the osteoclast lineage; or via estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling in either or both of these two cell types upon conversion of testosterone to estradiol. To this end, we generated mice with targeted deletion of an AR or an ERα allele in the mesenchymal (AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre or ERα(f/f);Osx1-Cre) or myeloid cell lineage (AR(f/y);LysM-Cre or ERα(f/f);LysM-Cre) and their descendants. Male AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre mice exhibited decreased bone volume and trabecular number, and increased osteoclast number in the cancellous compartment. Moreover, they did not undergo the loss of cancellous bone volume and trabecular number caused by orchidectomy (ORX) in their littermate controls. In contrast, AR(f/y);LysM-Cre, ERα(f/f);Osx1-Cre, or ERα(f/f);LysM-Cre mice had no cancellous bone phenotype at baseline and lost the same amount of cancellous bone as their controls following ORX. Most unexpectedly, adult males of all four models had no discernible cortical bone phenotype at baseline, and lost the same amount of cortical bone as their littermate controls after ORX. Recapitulation of the effects of ORX by AR deletion only in the AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre mice indicates that the effects of androgens on cancellous bone result from AR signaling in osteoblasts-not on osteoclasts or via aromatization. The effects of androgens on cortical bone mass, on the other hand, do not require AR or ERα signaling in any cell type across the osteoblast or osteoclast differentiation lineage. Therefore, androgens must exert their effects indirectly by actions on

  5. Four novel PEPD alleles causing prolidase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Ledoux, P.; Scriver, C.; Hechtman, P. )

    1994-06-01

    Mutations at the PEPD locus cause prolidase (an enzyme specific for proline- and hydroxyproline-terminated dipeptides) deficiency (McKusick 170100), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by iminodipeptiduria, skin ulcers, mental retardation, and recurrent infections. Four PEPD mutations from five severely affected individuals were characterized by analysis of reverse-transcribed, PCR-amplified (RT-PCR) cDNA. The authors used SSCP analysis on four overlapping cDNA fragments covering the entire coding region of the PEPD gene and detected abnormal SSCP bands for the fragments spanning all or part of exons 13-15 in three of the probands. Direct sequencing of the mutant cDNAs showed a G[yields]A, 1342 substitution (G448R) in two patients and a 3-bp deletion ([Delta]E452 or [Delta]E453) in another. In the other two probands the amplified products were of reduced size. Direct sequencing of these mutant cDNAs revealed a deletion of exon 5 in one patient and of exon 7 in the other. Intronic sequences flanking exons 5 and 7 were identified using inverse PCR followed by direct sequencing. Conventional PCR and direct sequencing then established the intron-exon borders of the mutant genomic DNA revealing two splice acceptor mutations: a G[yields]C substitution at position -1 of intron 4 and an A[yields]G substitution at position -2 of intron 6. The results indicate that the severe form of prolidase deficiency is caused by multiple PEPD alleles. In this report the authors attempt to begin the process of describing these alleles and cataloging their phenotype expression. 31 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Study of Ar and Ar-CO2 microwave surfaguide discharges by optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Tiago; Britun, Nikolay; Godfroid, Thomas; van der Mullen, Joost; Snyders, Rony

    2016-05-01

    A surfaguide microwave discharge operating at 2.45 GHz in Ar and Ar-CO2 mixtures is studied using diagnostics methods based on optical emission spectroscopy. The population densities of Ar metastable and resonant states of the lowest group of excited levels ( 1 s x ) are investigated for several experimental conditions using the self-absorption technique. It is found that the densities of these levels, ranging from 1017 to 1016 m-3 for the pure Ar case, are dependent on the discharge pressure and applied power. The electron temperature and electron density are calculated via the balances of creation/loss mechanisms of radiative and metastable levels. In the range of the studied experimental conditions (50-300 W of applied power and 0.5-6 Torr of gas pressure), the results have shown that lower values of electron temperature correspond to higher values of power and pressure in the discharge. Adding CO2 to the argon plasma results in a considerable decrease (about 3 orders of magnitude) of the Ar metastable atom density. The feasibility of using the ratio of two Ar emission line intensities to measure the electron temperature in CO2 discharges with small Ar admixtures is studied.

  7. Ar-40/Ar-39 Ages of Maskelynite Grains from ALHA 77005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turrin, B.; Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Nyquist, L. E.; Swisher, C., III

    2013-01-01

    We present Ar-40/Ar-39 measurements for twelve small (20-60 micro-g) maskelynite samples from the heavily shocked martian meteorite ALHA 77005. The reported modal composition for ALHA 77005 is 50-60% olivine (Fa28), 30-40% pyroxene (Wo5Fs23En72), approx.8% maskelynite (An53), and approx.2% opaques by volume [1]). The meteorite is usually classified as a lherzolite. Previous Studies - Ar-40/Ar-39 results from previous work display disturbed release spectra [2,3]. In study [2], Ar-40/Ar-39 measurements on a 52-mg whole-rock sample produced an extremely disturbed release spec-trum, with all calculated apparent ages > 1 Ga, (Fig. 1). In a subsequent study [3], a light and a dark phase were analyzed. A 2.3-mg sample of the light, relatively low-K phase produced a disturbed release spectrum. For the first 20% of the Ar-39(sub K), most of the apparent ages exceeded >1 Ga; the remaining 80% yielded ages between 0.3-0.5 Ga. The integrated age for this phase is 0.9 Ga.

  8. Ar-Ar Impact Heating Ages of Eucrites and Timing of the LHB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald; Garrison, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Eucrites and howardites, more than most meteorite types, show extensive impact resetting of their Ar-39-Ar-40 (K-Ar) ages approximately equal to 3.4-4.1 Ga ago, and many specimens show some disturbance of other radiometry chronometers as well. Bogard (1995) argued that this age resetting occurred on Vesta and was produced by the same general population of objects that produced many of the lunar impact basins. The exact nature of the lunar late heavy bombardment (LHB or 'cataclysm') remains controversial, but the timing is similar to the reset ages of eucrites. Neither the beginning nor ending time of the lunar LHB is well constrained. Comparison of Ar-Ar ages of brecciated eucrites with data for the lunar LHB can resolve both the origin of these impactors and the time period over which they were delivered to the inner solar system. This abstract reports some new Ar-Ar age data for eucrites, obtained since the authors' 1995 and 2003 papers.

  9. Moving Beyond the Androgen Receptor (AR): Targeting AR-Interacting Proteins to Treat Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Foley, Christopher; Mitsiades, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Medical or surgical castration serves as the backbone of systemic therapy for advanced and metastatic prostate cancer, taking advantage of the importance of androgen signaling in this disease. Unfortunately, resistance to castration emerges almost universally. Despite the development and approval of new and more potent androgen synthesis inhibitors and androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, prostate cancers continue to develop resistance to these therapeutics, while often maintaining their dependence on the AR signaling axis. This highlights the need for innovative therapeutic approaches that aim to continue disrupting AR downstream signaling but are orthogonal to directly targeting the AR itself. In this review, we discuss the preclinical research that has been done, as well as clinical trials for prostate cancer, on inhibiting several important families of AR-interacting proteins, including chaperones (such as heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and FKBP52), pioneer factors (including forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) and GATA-2), and AR transcriptional coregulators such as the p160 steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs) SRC-1, SRC-2, SRC-3, as well as lysine deacetylases (KDACs) and lysine acetyltransferases (KATs). Researching the effect of-and developing new therapeutic agents that target-the AR signaling axis is critical to advancing our understanding of prostate cancer biology, to continue to improve treatments for prostate cancer and for overcoming castration resistance.

  10. Potassium Isotopic Compositions of NIST Potassium Standards and 40Ar/39Ar Mineral Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Leah; Tappa, Mike; Ellam, Rob; Mark, Darren; Higgins, John; Simon, Justin I.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the isotopic ratios of standards, spikes, and reference materials is fundamental to the accuracy of many geochronological methods. For example, the 238U/235U ratio relevant to U-Pb geochronology was recently re-determined [1] and shown to differ significantly from the previously accepted value employed during age determinations. These underlying values are fundamental to accurate age calculations in many isotopic systems, and uncertainty in these values can represent a significant (and often unrecognized) portion of the uncertainty budget for determined ages. The potassium isotopic composition of mineral standards, or neutron flux monitors, is a critical, but often overlooked component in the calculation of K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages. It is currently assumed that all terrestrial materials have abundances indistinguishable from that of NIST SRM 985 [2]; this is apparently a reasonable assumption at the 0.25per mille level (1s) [3]. The 40Ar/39Ar method further relies on the assumption that standards and samples (including primary and secondary standards) have indistinguishable 40K/39K values. We will present data establishing the potassium isotopic compositions of NIST isotopic K SRM 985, elemental K SRM 999b, and 40Ar/39Ar biotite mineral standard GA1550 (sample MD-2). Stable isotopic compositions (41K/39K) were measured by the peak shoulder method with high resolution MC-ICP-MS (Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus), using the accepted value of NIST isotopic SRM 985 [2] for fractionation [4] corrections [5]. 40K abundances were measured by TIMS (Thermo Scientific TRITON), using 41K/39K values from ICP-MS measurements (or, for SRM 985, values from [2]) for internal fractionation corrections. Collectively these data represent an important step towards a metrologically traceable calibration of 40K concentrations in primary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and improve uncertainties by ca. an order of magnitude in the potassium isotopic compositions of standards.

  11. Whole-Rock 40Ar/39Ar Step-heating Analyses, Problems and Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, M.; Heizler, M. T.; Lovera, O. M.; Warren, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    Whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating analyses of extra-terrestrial materials are used to constrain the impact history of the inner solar system, the formation age of the Moon, and timing of paleomagnetic fields. Despite the importance of knowing the timing of these important events, the samples we have in hand are usually disturbed through mixing, (multiple?) impact events, and perhaps recoil loss. Extra-terrestrial 40Ar/39Ar data are typically interpreted through the assignment of essentially arbitrary plateau ages rather than through a robust physical model. Although the use of models capable of quantitatively assessing diffusive 40Ar* loss in extra-terrestrial samples has been around for nearly 50 years, this early advance has been widely ignored. Here we present implications of applying a robust, multi-activation energy, multi-diffusion domain model to step-heated 40Ar/39Ar data, with temperature cycling. Our findings show that for even a single heating event, "plateau" ages are unlikely to record meaningful ages. Further, if the sample has experienced multiple heating events or contains inherited clasts, recovering a unique solution may be impossible. Indeed the most readily interpretable portion of the age spectrum is the early heating steps which represents a maximum age estimate of the last re-heating event. Our results challenge the chronologic validity of 40Ar/39Ar "plateau" ages and by extension the hypotheses that are based on this data (e.g., the Late Heavy Bombardment). Future work will require new analytical procedures, interpretative frameworks, and (potentially) the combination of multiple chronometers to derive a robust impact history for the early solar system.

  12. Utility of nuclear allele networks for the analysis of closely related species in the genus Carabus, subgenus Ohomopterus.

    PubMed

    Sota, Teiji; Sasabe, Masataka

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear DNA sequence data for diploid organisms are potentially a rich source of phylogenetic information for disentangling the evolutionary relationships of closely related organisms, but present special phylogenetic problems owing to difficulties arising from heterozygosity and recombination. We analyzed allelic relationships for two nuclear gene regions (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and elongation factor-1a), along with a mitochondrial gene region (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5), for an assemblage of closely related species of carabid beetles (Carabus subgenus Ohomopterus). We used a network approach to examine whether the nuclear gene sequences provide substantial phylogenetic information on species relationships and evolutionary history. The mitochondrial gene genealogy strongly contradicted the morphological species boundary as a result of introgression of heterospecific mitochondria. Two nuclear gene regions showed high allelic diversity within species, and this diversity was partially attributable to recombination between various alleles and high variability in the intron region. Shared nuclear alleles among species were rare and were considered to represent shared ancestral polymorphism. Despite the presence of recombination, nuclear allelic networks recovered species monophyly more often and presented genetic differentiation patterns (low to high) among species more clearly. Overall, nuclear gene networks provide clear evidence for separate biological species and information on the phylogenetic relationships among closely related carabid beetles.

  13. ARS5 is a component of the 26S proteasome complex and negatively regulates thiol biosynthesis and arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Kim, Tae-Houn; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A forward genetic screen in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of several arsenic tolerance mutants. ars5 is the strongest arsenate and arsenite resistant mutant identified in this genetic screen. Here, we report the characterization and cloning of the ars5 mutant gene. ars5 is shown to exhibit an increased accumulation of arsenic and thiol compounds during arsenic stress. Rough mapping together with microarray-based expression mapping identified the ars5 mutation in the alpha subunit F (PAF1) of the 26S proteasome complex. Characterization of an independent paf1 T-DNA insertion allele and complementation by PAF1 confirmed that paf1 mutation is responsible for the enhanced thiol accumulation and the arsenic tolerance phenotypes. Arsenic tolerance was not observed in a knockout mutant of the highly homologous PAF2 gene. However, genetic complementation of ars5 by over expression of PAF2 suggests that the PAF2 protein is functionally equivalent to PAF1 when expressed at high levels. No detectible difference was observed in total ubiquitinylated protein profiles between ars5 and wild type Arabidopsis, suggesting that the arsenic tolerance observed in ars5 is not derived from a general impairment in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that arsenic induces enhanced transcriptional activation of several key genes that function in glutathione and phytochelatin biosynthesis in wild type and this arsenic-induction of gene expression is more dramatic in ars5. The enhanced transcriptional response to arsenic and the increased accumulation of thiol compounds in ars5 compared to WT suggest the presence of a positive regulation pathway for thiol biosynthesis that is enhanced in the ars5 background. PMID:19453443

  14. Experiences from the ARS croplands CEAP program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The multi-agency Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) within USDA produced a number of lessons that should be applicable to the use of landscape approaches to place bioenergy crops. Results from the ARS Croplands Watersheds CEAP, the NRCS CEAP, and the NIFA CEAP Watershed Assessment Studie...

  15. "Ars Dictaminis" and Modern Rhetorical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Ernestine P.

    Although not all the problems of writing are solved by practice in letter writing, a review of the classical texts on "ars dictaminis"--letter writing--creates a strong argument for its increased use as an exercise in college composition classrooms. By incorporating the lessons of dictamen as a device for achieving rhetorical modes--narration,…

  16. 75 FR 7637 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Arkansas dated...

  17. 76 FR 27140 - Arkansas Disaster # AR-00049

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  18. 75 FR 7636 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00042

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00042 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  19. 76 FR 42154 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00050

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00050 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Arkansas...

  20. 78 FR 39821 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00064

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00064 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  1. 76 FR 42155 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00051

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00051 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  2. 75 FR 30872 - Arkansas Disaster # AR-00043

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00043 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Arkansas dated...

  3. 78 FR 56979 - Arkansas Disaster # AR-00065

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00065 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  4. 76 FR 27139 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Arkansas...

  5. 78 FR 9448 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00061

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00061 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  6. A novel HLA-A allele: A*0257.

    PubMed

    García-Ortiz, J E; Cox, S T; Sandoval-Ramirez, L; Little, A M; Marsh, S G E; Madrigal, J A; Argüello, J R

    2004-01-01

    A novel human leucocyte antigen-A*02 (HLA-A*02) allele was detected by reference strand-mediated conformation analysis (RSCA) of a DNA sample from a Tarahumara individual. Direct sequencing of HLA-A locus polymerase chain reaction products identified a mutation in one of the alleles. Cloning and sequencing confirmed the presence of a new allele, A*0257 which differed from A*0206 by two nucleotides at positions 355 and 362, inducing changes in residues 95 and 97, respectively, within the peptide-binding site. Those changes suggest that allele A*0257 may have resulted from an intralocus recombination event.

  7. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-04-22

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency.

  8. Nomenclature for human CYP2D6 alleles.

    PubMed

    Daly, A K; Brockmöller, J; Broly, F; Eichelbaum, M; Evans, W E; Gonzalez, F J; Huang, J D; Idle, J R; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Ishizaki, T; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Meyer, U A; Nebert, D W; Steen, V M; Wolf, C R; Zanger, U M

    1996-06-01

    To standardize CYP2D6 allele nomenclature, and to conform with international human gene nomenclature guidelines, an alternative to the current arbitrary system is described. Based on recommendations for human genome nomenclature, we propose that alleles be designated by CYP2D6 followed by an asterisk and a combination of roman letters and arabic numerals distinct for each allele with the number specifying the key mutation and, where appropriate, a letter specifying additional mutations. Criteria for classification as a separate allele and protein nomenclature are also presented. PMID:8807658

  9. A noncomplementation screen for quantitative trait alleles in saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Seok; Huh, Juyoung; Riles, Linda; Reyes, Alejandro; Fay, Justin C

    2012-07-01

    Both linkage and linkage disequilibrium mapping provide well-defined approaches to mapping quantitative trait alleles. However, alleles of small effect are particularly difficult to refine to individual genes and causative mutations. Quantitative noncomplementation provides a means of directly testing individual genes for quantitative trait alleles in a fixed genetic background. Here, we implement a genome-wide noncomplementation screen for quantitative trait alleles that affect colony color or size by using the yeast deletion collection. As proof of principle, we find a previously known allele of CYS4 that affects colony color and a novel allele of CTT1 that affects resistance to hydrogen peroxide. To screen nearly 4700 genes in nine diverse yeast strains, we developed a high-throughput robotic plating assay to quantify colony color and size. Although we found hundreds of candidate alleles, reciprocal hemizygosity analysis of a select subset revealed that many of the candidates were false positives, in part the result of background-dependent haploinsufficiency or second-site mutations within the yeast deletion collection. Our results highlight the difficulty of identifying small-effect alleles but support the use of noncomplementation as a rapid means of identifying quantitative trait alleles of large effect. PMID:22870398

  10. High Spatial Resolution 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology of Impact Melt Breccias from Apollo 17 Boulders at Stations 2, 6, and 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, C. M.; Hodges, K. V.; Jolliff, B. L.; Van Soest, M. C.; Wartho, J. A.; Weirich, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Several boulders located at the bases of the North and South Massifs were among the primary field targets of the Apollo 17 mission to the Taurus-Littrow Valley on the Moon [1]. Some boulders are polylithologic, including Boulder 1 at Station 2 and the boulders at Stations 6 and 7. These boulders were the subjects of consortium studies [2, 3] that included 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to determine the ages of distinct lithologies within each boulder [e.g., 4-6]. We report new 40Ar/39Ar data for the impact melt breccias 72255, 76315, 77075, and 77135 obtained using the UV laser ablation microprobe (UVLAMP) methods of [7]. For 72255, we obtained a preliminary isochron date ca. 3814 Ma from 22 melt analyses, which is younger than published plateau dates (e.g., 3951-3835 Ma [4, 8]). Fifteen melt analyses of 76315 yield a preliminary isochron date ca. 3850 Ma, younger than the 3900 ± 16 Ma date reported by [8]. Melt analyses of 77075 yield preliminary dates between ca. 3797-3584 Ma, possibly reflecting partial loss of 40Ar. In this case, the oldest date may provide a minimum age for the formation of melt in 77075. Finally, the UVLAMP dates for the 77135 melt range from 3810-3361 Ma and corresponding Ca/K ratios range from ca. 100-6. Electron microprobe analyses of small (ca. 10s of microns wide) pockets of K-rich materials show that both K-rich glass and K-feldspar are present. The UVLAMP dates for 77135 likely reflect spatially variable 40Ar loss, consistent with published step heating results [e.g., 6]. References: [1] Schmitt (1973) Science, 182, 681-690. [2] Ryder (1993). Catalog of Apollo 17 Rocks: Volume 1 - Stations 2 and 3 (South Massif). LPI. [3] Ryder (1993). Catalog of Apollo 17 Rocks: Volume 4 - North Massif. LPI. [4] Leich et al. (1975) The Moon, 14, 407-444. [5] Cadogan & Turner (1976). LPSC, 7, 2267-2285. [6] Stettler et al. (1978). LPSC, 9, 1113-1115. [7] Mercer et al. (2015) Sci. Adv., 1, e1400050. [8] Dalrymple & Ryder (1996). JGR, 101, 26069-26084.

  11. The ChArMEx database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Hélène; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Cloché, Sophie; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mière, Arnaud; Ramage, Karim; Vermeulen, Anne; Boulanger, Damien

    2015-04-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters , intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the database task is to organize data management, distribution system and services, such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The database relies on a strong collaboration between ICARE, IPSL and OMP data centers and has been set up in the framework of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. ChArMEx data, either produced or used by the project, are documented and accessible through the database website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. The website offers the usual but user-friendly functionalities: data catalog, user registration procedure, search tool to select and access data... The metadata (data description) are standardized, and comply with international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) assignement procedure allows to automatically register the datasets, in order to make them easier to access, cite, reuse and verify. At present, the ChArMEx database contains about 120 datasets, including more than 80 in situ datasets (2012, 2013 and 2014 summer campaigns, background monitoring station of Ersa...), 25 model output sets (dust model intercomparison, MEDCORDEX scenarios...), a high resolution emission inventory over the Mediterranean... Many in situ datasets

  12. The CBM RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Akishin, P.; Becker, K.-H.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Boldyreva, N.; Chernogorov, A.; Deveaux, C.; Dobyrn, V.; Dürr, M.; Eschke, J.; Förtsch, J.; Heep, J.; Höohne, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kochenda, L.; Kopfer, J.; Kravtsov, P.; Kres, I.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Leonova, E.; Linev, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Michel, J.; Miftakhov, N.; Niebur, W.; Ovcharenko, E.; Pauly, C.; Pfeifer, D.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Reinecke, S.; Riabov, Y.; Roshchin, E.; Samsonov, V.; Tarasenkova, O.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2016-05-01

    The CBM RICH detector will use CO2 as radiator gas, focussing glass mirrors with Al+MgF2 reflective and protective coating and Hamamatsu H12700 MAPMTs as photon detectors. The detector will serve for electron to pion separation up to momenta of 8 GeV/c and thus enable in CBM the measurement of electromagnetic radiation from the early and dense fireball in A+A collisions at SIS 100. In this article, the current status of the CBM RICH development will be presented including new measurements of the radiation hardness of the H12700 MAPMT and WLS coatings with p-terphenyl, the new concept for the readout electronics, and optimizations ongoing with respect to the mirror mount structure and overall geometry. Prior to the usage in CBM, part of the already ordered MAPMTs will be used to upgrade the HADES RICH detector for a new measurement campaign at SIS 18 from 2018-2020.

  13. Heterogeneity of dN/dS Ratios at the Classical HLA Class I Genes over Divergence Time and Across the Allelic Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Bitarello, Bárbara Domingues; Francisco, Rodrigo dos Santos; Meyer, Diogo

    2016-01-01

    The classical class I HLA loci of humans show an excess of nonsynonymous with respect to synonymous substitutions at codons of the antigen recognition site (ARS), a hallmark of adaptive evolution. Additionally, high polymporphism, linkage disequilibrium, and disease associations suggest that one or more balancing selection regimes have acted upon these genes. However, several questions about these selective regimes remain open. First, it is unclear if stronger evidence for selection on deep timescales is due to changes in the intensity of selection over time or to a lack of power of most methods to detect selection on recent timescales. Another question concerns the functional entities which define the selected phenotype. While most analyses focus on selection acting on individual alleles, it is also plausible that phylogenetically defined groups of alleles ("lineages") are targets of selection. To address these questions, we analyzed how dN/dS (ω) varies with respect to divergence times between alleles and phylogenetic placement (position of branches). We find that ω for ARS codons of class I HLA genes increases with divergence time and is higher for inter-lineage branches. Throughout our analyses, we used non-selected codons to control for possible effects of inflation of ω associated to intra-specific analysis, and showed that our results are not artifactual. Our findings indicate the importance of considering the timescale effect when analysing ω over a wide spectrum of divergences. Finally, our results support the divergent allele advantage model, whereby heterozygotes with more divergent alleles have higher fitness than those carrying similar alleles.

  14. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Rupe, J. H.; Kushida, R. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by injecting air and hydrocarbon fuel at one end of a cylindrically shaped chamber to form a mixture and igniting the mixture to provide hot combustion gases by partial oxidation of the hydrocarbon fuel. The combustion gases move away from the ignition region to another region where water is injected to be turned into steam by the hot combustion gases. The steam which is formed mixes with the hot gases to yield a uniform hot gas whereby a steam reforming reaction with the hydrocarbon fuel takes place to produce a hydrogen rich gas.

  15. The miR9863 family regulates distinct Mla alleles in barley to attenuate NLR receptor-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley Mla alleles encode coiled-coil (CC), nucleotide binding and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) intracellular receptors that trigger isolate-specific immune responses against the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). How Mla or NB-LRR genes in grass species are regulated at p...

  16. Allele-specific deposition of macroH2A1 in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, J H; Kim, J D; Chung, J H; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-01-13

    In the current study, we analyzed the deposition patterns of macroH2A1 at a number of different genomic loci located in X chromosome and autosomes. MacroH2A1 is preferentially deposited at methylated CpG CpG-rich regions located close to promoters. The macroH2A1 deposition patterns at the methylated CpG islands of several imprinted domains, including the Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) of Xist, Peg3, H19/Igf2 Igf2, Gtl2/Dlk1, and Gnas domains, show consistent allele-specificity towards inactive, methylated alleles. The macroH2A1 deposition levels at the ICRs and other Differentially Methylated Regions (DMRs) of these domains are also either higher or comparable to those observed at the inactive X chromosome of female mammals. Overall, our results indicate that besides DNA methylation macroH2A1 is another epigenetic component in the chromatin of ICRs displaying differential association with two parental alleles.

  17. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications. PMID:25549886

  18. Age and origin of carlsbad cavern and related caves from 40Ar/39Ar of alunite

    PubMed

    Polyak; McIntosh; Guven; Provencio

    1998-03-20

    40Ar/39Ar dating of fine-grained alunite that formed during cave genesis provides ages of formation for the Big Room level of Carlsbad Cavern [4.0 to 3.9 million years ago (Ma)], the upper level of Lechuguilla Cave (6.0 to 5.7 Ma), and three other hypogene caves (11.3 to 6.0 Ma) in the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico. Alunite ages increase and are strongly correlative with cave elevations, which indicates an 1100-meter decline in the water table, apparently related to tectonic uplift and tilting, from 11.3 Ma to the present. 40Ar/39Ar dating studies of the hypogene caves have the potential to help resolve late Cenozoic climatic, speleologic, and tectonic questions.

  19. Comparative in vivo expression of beta(+)-thalassemia alleles.

    PubMed

    Marwan, M M; Scerri, C A; Zarroag, S O; Cao, A; Kyrri, A; Kalogirou, E; Kleanthous, M; Ioannou, P; Angastiniotis, M; Felice, A E

    1999-08-01

    Double heterozygotes who inherit one abnormal though stable beta-globin variant in association with a molecularly identified beta(+)-thalassaemia allele provide unique opportunities to quantify the in vivo expression of particular beta(+)-thalassemia alleles. The globin products of the two alleles can be separated, quantified and the output of the beta(+)-thalassaemia allele expressed as the MCH-beta(A) in pg beta(A)-globin/beta(+)-thalassemia allele/RBC = 0.5 MCH x Hb A%. In this communication we provide new quantitative data on the expression of five mutations as follows: the beta(+)-87 (C-->G) = 3.8 pg beta(A)-globin/beta(+)-thalassemia allele/RBC (n = 1); the beta(+) IVS-I-1 (G-->A) = 0.2 pg beta(A)-globin/beta(+)-thalassemia allele/RBC (n = 1); the beta(+) IVS-I-6 (T-->C) = 2.9 pg beta(A)-globin/beta(+)-thalassemia allele/RBC (n = 7); the beta(+) IVS-I-110 (G-->A) = 1.1 pg beta(A)-globin/beta(+)-thalassemia allele/RBC (n = 13), and the beta(+) IVS-II-745 (C-->G) = 1.74 pg beta(A)-globin/beta(+)-thalassemia allele/RBC (n = 2). The values obtained are compared with those of other beta(+)-thalassemia alleles from the literature. It can be seen that the MCH-beta(A) value may be a correct index of thalassemia severity useful for the correlation of genotype with phenotype, and for understanding the effects of mutations in beta-globin genes on pathophysiologically meaningful beta-globin gene expression. PMID:10490134

  20. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher L.; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9 +/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  1. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  2. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape.

  3. Planar defects as Ar traps in trioctahedral micas: A mechanism for increased Ar retentivity in phlogopite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, A.; Lee, J. K. W.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.; Zhao, J.; Abdu, Y. A.; Jenkins, D. M.; Hawthorne, F. C.; Kyser, T. K.; Creaser, R. A.; Armstrong, R.; Heaman, L. W.

    2012-08-01

    The effects of planar defects and composition on Ar mobility in trioctahedral micas have been investigated in samples from a small marble outcrop (∼500 m2) in the Frontenac Terrane, Grenville Province, Ontario. These micas crystallized during amphibolite-facies metamorphism at ∼1170 Ma and experienced a thermal pulse ∼100 Ma later at shallow crustal levels associated with the emplacement of plutons. 87Rb/86Sr ages of the phlogopites range from ∼950 to ∼1050 Ma, consistent with resetting during the later thermal event. The same phlogopites however, give 40Ar/39Ar ages between ∼950 and 1160 Ma, spanning the age range of the two thermal events. This result is intriguing because these micas have undergone the same thermal history and were not deformed after peak metamorphic conditions. In order to understand this phenomenon, the chemical, crystallographical, and microstructural nature of four mica samples has been characterized in detail using a wide range of analytical techniques. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron microprobe (EMP), and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) data show that the micas are chemically homogeneous (with the exception of Ba) and similar in composition. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Mossbauer results show that the M sites for three of the micas are dominated by divalent cations and the Fe3+/(Fe2++Fe3+) ratio for all four phlogopites ranges from 0.10 to 0.25. The stable-isotopic data for calcite indicate that this outcrop was not affected by hydrothermal fluids after peak metamorphism. No correlation between chemical composition and 87Rb/86Sr and 40Ar/39Ar age or between crystal size and 40Ar/39Ar age is observed. The only major difference among all of the micas was revealed through transmitted electron microscope (TEM), which shows that the older 1M micas contain significantly more layer stacking defects, associated with crystallization, than the younger micas. We

  4. Early Pleistocene 40Ar/39Ar ages for Bapang Formation hominins, Central Jawa, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Larick, Roy; Ciochon, Russell L.; Zaim, Yahdi; Sudijono; Suminto; Rizal, Yan; Aziz, Fachroel; Reagan, Mark; Heizler, Matthew

    2001-01-01

    The Sangiran dome is the primary stratigraphic window for the Plio-Pleistocene deposits of the Solo basin of Central Jawa. The dome has yielded nearly 80 Homo erectus fossils, around 50 of which have known findspots. With a hornblende 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 1.66 ± 0.04 mega-annum (Ma) reportedly associated with two fossils [Swisher, C.C., III, Curtis, G. H., Jacob, T., Getty, A. G., Suprijo, A. & Widiasmoro (1994) Science 263, 1118–1121), the dome offers evidence that early Homo dispersed to East Asia during the earliest Pleistocene. Unfortunately, the hornblende pumice was sampled at Jokotingkir Hill, a central locality with complex lithostratigraphic deformation and dubious specimen provenance. To address the antiquity of Sangiran H. erectus more systematically, we investigate the sedimentary framework and hornblende 40Ar/39Ar age for volcanic deposits in the southeast quadrant of the dome. In this sector, Bapang (Kabuh) sediments have their largest exposure, least deformation, and most complete tephrostratigraphy. At five locations, we identify a sequence of sedimentary cycles in which H. erectus fossils are associated with epiclastic pumice. From sampled pumice, eight hornblende separates produced 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages ranging from 1.51 ± 0.08 Ma at the Bapang/Sangiran Formation contact, to 1.02 ± 0.06 Ma, at a point above the hominin-bearing sequence. The chronological sequence of 40Ar/39Ar ages follows stratigraphic order across the southeast quadrant. An intermediate level yielding four nearly complete crania has an age of about 1.25 Ma. PMID:11309488

  5. Ar-Ar Dating of Martian Meteorite, Dhofar 378: An Early Shock Event?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Bogard, D. D.

    2006-01-01

    Martian meteorite, Dhofar 378 (Dho378) is a basaltic shergottite from Oman, weighing 15 g, and possessing a black fusion crust. Chemical similarities between Dho378 and the Los Angeles 001 shergottite suggests that they might have derived from the same Mars locale. The plagioclase in other shergottites has been converted to maskelenite by shock, but Dho378 apparently experienced even more intense shock heating, estimated at 55-75 GPa. Dho378 feldspar (approximately 43 modal %) melted, partially flowed and vesiculated, and then partially recrystallized. Areas of feldspathic glass are appreciably enriched in K, whereas individual plagioclases show a range in the Or/An ratio of approximately 0.18-0.017. Radiometric dating of martian shergottites indicate variable formation times of 160-475 Myr, whereas cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of shergottites indicate most were ejected from Mars within the past few Myr. Most determined Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of shergottites appear older than other radiometric ages because of the presence of large amounts of martian atmosphere or interior Ar-40. Among all types of meteorites and returned lunar rocks, the impact event that initiated the CRE age very rarely reset the Ar-Ar age. This is because a minimum time and temperature is required to facilitate Ar diffusion loss. It is generally assumed that the shock-texture characteristics in martian meteorites were produced by the impact events that ejected the rocks from Mars, although the time of these shock events (as opposed to CRE ages) are not directly dated. Here we report Ar-39-Ar-40 dating of Dho378 plagioclase. We suggest that the determined age dates the intense shock heating event this meteorite experienced, but that it was not the impact that initiated the CRE age.

  6. Preliminary 40Ar-39Ar thermochronological study of Dien Bien Phu Fault, northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T.; Lo, C.; Wang, P.; Lee, T.; Chung, S.; Lan, C.

    2003-12-01

    The Song Ma belt, located along the suture zone between the South China and Indochina blocks, was offset by the Dien Bien Phu Fault (DBF) in northern Vietnam. Many previous studies suggested that the Dien Bien Phu Fault is one of the Tertiary shear zones, resulted from the Cenozoic extrusion tectonics due to the Eurasian-Indian collision. However, the timing of the movement of DBF is remained unclear due to lacking of age data. In the present study, schists and mylonitic granites from DBF, and undeformed granites from the granitic belt along the south China block, were analysed by 40Ar-39Ar method. K-feldspar, hornblende, and biotite samples form granite plutons along south edge of South China block displayed different age ranges between opposite sides of DBF. Samples from plutonic body which is located in west side exhibit plateau ages ranging form 207Ma to 229Ma. Whereas, hornblende separates from granites on the west side exhibit much older plateau dates at around 277Ma. More detail studies were required to get better understand about the discrepancy of dating results between granitic masses located in different sides of DBF. On the other hand, Laser 40Ar-39Ar single-grain analyses conducted on deformed biotites and muscovites separated from the schists in DBF, show 40Ar-39Ar ages ranging form 185Ma to 205Ma, which are much younger than the plateau dates of those undeformed granitic samples. In summary, K-feldspar, hornblende and biotite samples from the undeformed granites, exhibit plateau dates in the range of 207- 277Ma, reflecting the ages of plutonism during the Indosinian orogeny. Whereas, muscovites and biotites extracted from schists and deformed granites in DBF, display young 40Ar-39Ar ages in the range of 205-185 Ma. This may suggest that although the DBF might have been reactivated during the Cenozoic extrusion tectonics, but it was in fact active in the Mesozoic.

  7. Ar-40-Ar-39 microanalysis of single 74220 glass balls and 72435 breccia clasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneke, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Ar-40-Ar-39 age measurements on single orange glass balls from the Apollo 17 soil 74220 and individual clasts from the Apollo 17 highland breccia 72435 are reported. The measurements required the use of newly established microanalytical techniques to obtain high quality analyses on about 0.5 mg particles with only a few hundred ppm K. An age of 3.60 plus or minus 0.04 b.y. is determined for the orange glass. No corrections for a trapped Ar-40 component were required. The glass forming event occurred at the very end of or after the extrusion of the mare basalts at the Apollo 17 site. An extremely well defined age plateau at 3.86 plus or minus 0.04 b.y. was determined for a 72435 plagioclase clast with attached matrix. A second large plagioclase crystal yielded significantly older ages over the last 60% of Ar release at high temperatures and is a relict clast incompletely degassed at the time of breccia formation. 72435 also contains plagioclase clasts with primitive Sr and a 4.55 AE old dunite clast. The Ar results provide additional evidence for the association of chemically unequilibrated, relict clasts with both primitive Sr and older K/Ar ages.

  8. Trans allele methylation and paramutation-like effects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Herry; Lu, Michael; Anggraini, Melly; Sikora, Aimee; Chang, Yanjie; Yoon, Bong June; Soloway, Paul D

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, imprinted genes have parent-of-origin–specific patterns of DNA methylation that cause allele-specific expression. At Rasgrf1 (encoding RAS protein-specific guanine nucleotide-releasing factor 1), a repeated DNA element is needed to establish methylation and expression of the active paternal allele1. At Igf2r (encoding insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor), a sequence called region 2 is needed for methylation of the active maternal allele2,3. Here we show that replacing the Rasgrf1 repeats on the paternal allele with region 2 allows both methylation and expression of the paternal copy of Rasgrf1, indicating that sequences that control methylation can function ectopically. Paternal transmission of the mutated allele also induced methylation and expression in trans of the normally unmethylated and silent wild-type maternal allele. Once activated, the wild-type maternal Rasgrf1 allele maintained its activated state in the next generation independently of the paternal allele. These results recapitulate in mice several features in common with paramutation described in plants4. PMID:12740578

  9. Rescue of Progeria in Trichothiodystrophy by Homozygous Lethal Xpd Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Jans, Judith; de Wit, Jan; Coin, Frederic; Hoogstraten, Deborah; van de Ven, Marieke; Toussaint, Wendy; Huijmans, Jan; Thio, H. Bing; van Leeuwen, Wibeke J; de Boer, Jan; Egly, Jean-Marc; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J; Mitchell, James R

    2006-01-01

    Although compound heterozygosity, or the presence of two different mutant alleles of the same gene, is common in human recessive disease, its potential to impact disease outcome has not been well documented. This is most likely because of the inherent difficulty in distinguishing specific biallelic effects from differences in environment or genetic background. We addressed the potential of different recessive alleles to contribute to the enigmatic pleiotropy associated with XPD recessive disorders in compound heterozygous mouse models. Alterations in this essential helicase, with functions in both DNA repair and basal transcription, result in diverse pathologies ranging from elevated UV sensitivity and cancer predisposition to accelerated segmental progeria. We report a variety of biallelic effects on organismal phenotype attributable to combinations of recessive Xpd alleles, including the following: (i) the ability of homozygous lethal Xpd alleles to ameliorate a variety of disease symptoms when their essential basal transcription function is supplied by a different disease-causing allele, (ii) differential developmental and tissue-specific functions of distinct Xpd allele products, and (iii) interallelic complementation, a phenomenon rarely reported at clinically relevant loci in mammals. Our data suggest a re-evaluation of the contribution of “null” alleles to XPD disorders and highlight the potential of combinations of recessive alleles to affect both normal and pathological phenotypic plasticity in mammals. PMID:17020410

  10. Biased Allelic Expression in Human Primary Fibroblast Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santoni, Federico; Delaneau, Olivier; Fort, Alexandre; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Guipponi, Michel; Padioleau, Ismael; Carninci, Piero; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of gene expression in mammalian single cells via genomic technologies now provides the possibility to investigate the patterns of allelic gene expression. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to detect the allele-specific mRNA level in 203 single human primary fibroblasts over 133,633 unique heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (hetSNVs). We observed that at the snapshot of analyses, each cell contained mostly transcripts from one allele from the majority of genes; indeed, 76.4% of the hetSNVs displayed stochastic monoallelic expression in single cells. Remarkably, adjacent hetSNVs exhibited a haplotype-consistent allelic ratio; in contrast, distant sites located in two different genes were independent of the haplotype structure. Moreover, the allele-specific expression in single cells correlated with the abundance of the cellular transcript. We observed that genes expressing both alleles in the majority of the single cells at a given time point were rare and enriched with highly expressed genes. The relative abundance of each allele in a cell was controlled by some regulatory mechanisms given that we observed related single-cell allelic profiles according to genes. Overall, these results have direct implications in cellular phenotypic variability. PMID:25557783

  11. CYP2D6: novel genomic structures and alleles

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Whitney E.; Walker, Denise L.; O’Kane, Dennis J.; Mrazek, David A.; Fisher, Pamela K.; Dukek, Brian A.; Bruflat, Jamie K.; Black, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective CYP2D6 is a polymorphic gene. It has been observed to be deleted, to be duplicated and to undergo recombination events involving the CYP2D7 pseudogene and surrounding sequences. The objective of this study was to discover the genomic structure of CYP2D6 recombinants that interfere with clinical genotyping platforms that are available today. Methods Clinical samples containing rare homozygous CYP2D6 alleles, ambiguous readouts, and those with duplication signals and two different alleles were analyzed by long-range PCR amplification of individual genes, PCR fragment analysis, allele-specific primer extension assay, and DNA sequencing to characterize alleles and genomic structure. Results Novel alleles, genomic structures, and the DNA sequence of these structures are described. Interestingly, in 49 of 50 DNA samples that had CYP2D6 gene duplications or multiplications where two alleles were detected, the chromosome containing the duplication or multiplication had identical tandem alleles. Conclusion Several new CYP2D6 alleles and genomic structures are described which will be useful for CYP2D6 genotyping. The findings suggest that the recombination events responsible for CYP2D6 duplications and multiplications are because of mechanisms other than interchromosomal crossover during meiosis. PMID:19741566

  12. Application of the 40Ar/39Ar technique to date the Minoan Tuff, Santorini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijbrans, J. R.; Kuiper, K.; Morgan, L. E.; Klaver, M.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2012-12-01

    The age of the catastrophic eruption of the volcano of Santorini during the Bronze Age is well established from 14C dating at 3344.9 ± 7.5 a1 (uncertainties quoted as 1-σ). Application of the 40Ar/39Ar technique to products from this eruption is used here to (1) investigate the limits of the technique using conventional single collector mass spectrometry on a MAP215-50 instrument, (2) analyse sources of uncertainty to identify major contributing factors for the uncertainty of young 40Ar/39Ar ages, and (3) provide 40Ar/39Ar ages for a sample that has been previously dated via 14C and dendrochronology to further investigate issues with the accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating in the late Quaternary. We have separated the plagioclase fraction from the lower Minoan Tuff that immediately overlies the Cape Riva (rp6) tuff in a bay on the west coast of Thira, NW of the town of Oia. Using the calibration of 40Ar/36Ar of Lee et al.2, the decay constant recommended by Min at al.3, and the FCs age of Kuiper et al.4, we calculate an inverse isochron age of 3.7 ± 1.6 ka and a trapped 40Ar/36Ar intercept of 299.8 ± 1.2, slightly higher than the ratio for atmospheric argon of 298.56 ± 0.31, when all steps with ages > 50 ka are included in the regression. Enrichment in radiogenic 40Ar in the steps used for the isochron is extremely low, given the low concentration of K2O in plagioclase and the extremely young age. The stepwise heating approach proved useful because in all 5 replicate experiments unexpectedly high ages showed up at higher step temperatures, suggesting that in each separate some older contaminant was present. The plateaus of each of the replicate experiments had quite reproducible ages, however, and a pooled age was calculated for 23 out of 48 individual steps. The pooled age for the plateau was 17.6 ± 4.1 ka, which is high due to the slight component of excess 40Ar in the non-radiogenic component, as revealed from regression analysis. refs: 1SW Manning et al. (2006

  13. Susceptibility to dental caries and the salivary proline-rich proteins.

    PubMed

    Levine, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Early childhood caries affects 28% of children aged 2-6 in the US and is not decreasing. There is a well-recognized need to identify susceptible children at birth. Caries-free adults neutralize bacterial acids in dental biofilms better than adults with severe caries. Saliva contains acidic and basic proline-rich proteins (PRPs) which attach to oral streptococci. The PRPs are encoded within a small region of chromosome 12. An acidic PRP allele (Db) protects Caucasian children from caries but is more common in African Americans. Some basic PRP allelic phenotypes have a three-fold greater frequency in caries-free adults than in those with severe caries. Early childhood caries may associate with an absence of certain basic PRP alleles which bind oral streptococci, neutralize biofilm acids, and are in linkage disequilibrium with Db in Caucasians. The encoding of basic PRP alleles is updated and a new technology for genotyping them is described. PMID:22190937

  14. Susceptibility to Dental Caries and the Salivary Proline-Rich Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Early childhood caries affects 28% of children aged 2–6 in the US and is not decreasing. There is a well-recognized need to identify susceptible children at birth. Caries-free adults neutralize bacterial acids in dental biofilms better than adults with severe caries. Saliva contains acidic and basic proline-rich proteins (PRPs) which attach to oral streptococci. The PRPs are encoded within a small region of chromosome 12. An acidic PRP allele (Db) protects Caucasian children from caries but is more common in African Americans. Some basic PRP allelic phenotypes have a three-fold greater frequency in caries-free adults than in those with severe caries. Early childhood caries may associate with an absence of certain basic PRP alleles which bind oral streptococci, neutralize biofilm acids, and are in linkage disequilibrium with Db in Caucasians. The encoding of basic PRP alleles is updated and a new technology for genotyping them is described. PMID:22190937

  15. Allelic diversity at class II DRB1 and DQB loci of the pig MHC (SLA).

    PubMed

    Kanai, T H; Tanioka, Y; Tanigawa, M; Matsumoto, Y; Ueda, S; Onodera, T; Matsumoto, Y

    1999-12-01

    The loci encoding the beta chain of the pig major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens, SLA-DR and -DQ, have been known to exhibit a remarkable degree of allelic polymorphism. Here, to understand the generation of SLA class II polymorphism, 25 SLA-DRB1 and 24 SLA-DQB genes including newly identified 12 SLA-DRB1 and 7 SLA-DQB genes obtained from miniature pigs were analyzed based on the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences. Most of the allelic diversity was attributed to the variable sequences which encode a beta1 domain consisting of a beta-pleated sheet followed by an a helix. In the beta1 domain coding region, there were four GC-rich sequences, which have been considered to involve the intra-exon sequence exchange also in other gene evolutions. The first and second GC-rich sequences were alpha-like sequences, which have been shown to be a putative recombination signal, and were stably conserved among SLA-DRB1 and DQB genes. These alpha-like sequences identified in SLA-DRB1 and SLA-DQB were found to encode the first turning point of the beta-pleated sheet and the boundary between the beta-pleated sheet and the alpha helix. Analysis of clustered sequence variation also suggested intra-exon gene conversions in which the alpha-like sequences act as putative breakpoints. In addition to point mutations and selection mechanism, intra-exon gene conversions must be an important mechanism in the generation of allelic polymorphism at the SLA-DRB1 and SLA-DQB.

  16. Statistical Studies on Protein Polymorphism in Natural Populations. III. Distribution of Allele Frequencies and the Number of Alleles per Locus

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Ranajit; Fuerst, Paul A.; Nei, Masatoshi

    1980-01-01

    With the aim of understanding the mechanism of maintenance of protein polymorphism, we have studied the properties of allele frequency distribution and the number of alleles per locus, using gene-frequency data from a wide range of organisms (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, Drosophila and non-Drosophila invertebrates) in which 20 or more loci with at least 100 genes were sampled. The observed distribution of allele frequencies was U-shaped in all of the 138 populations (mostly species or subspecies) examined and generally agreed with the theoretical distribution expected under the mutation-drift hypothesis, though there was a significant excess of rare alleles (gene frequency, 0 ∼ 0.05) in about a quarter of the populations. The agreement between the mutation-drift theory and observed data was quite satisfactory for the numbers of polymorphic (gene frequency, 0.05 ∼ 0.95) and monomorphic (0.95 ∼ 1.0) alleles.—The observed pattern of allele-frequency distribution was incompatible with the prediction from the overdominance hypothesis. The observed correlations of the numbers of rare alleles, polymorphic alleles and monomorphic alleles with heterozygosity were of the order of magnitude that was expected under the mutation-drift hypothesis. Our results did not support the view that intracistronic recombination is an important source of genetic variation. The total number of alleles per locus was positively correlated with molecular weight in most of the species examined, and the magnitude of the correlation was consistent with the theoretical prediction from mutation-drift hypothesis. The correlation between molecular weight and the number of alleles was generally higher than the correlation between molecular weight and heterozygosity, as expected. PMID:17249018

  17. Successful prediction of genetic richness at wild potato collection sites in southeastern Arizona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much time, money, and effort is needed to collect even a fraction of the potential geographic range of wild potato species, so there is efficiency to gain if one could predict and prioritize spots particularly rich in unique alleles for collecting. A previous experiment that used AFLP markers to com...

  18. An improved assay for the determination of Huntington`s disease allele size

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, C.; Klinger, K.; Miller, G.

    1994-09-01

    The hallmark of Huntington`s disease (HD) is the expansion of a polymorphic (CAG)n repeat. Several methods have been published describing PCR amplification of this region. Most of these assays require a complex PCR reaction mixture to amplify this GC-rich region. A consistent problem with trinucleotide repeat PCR amplification is the presence of a number of {open_quotes}stutter bands{close_quotes} which may be caused by primer or amplicon slippage during amplification or insufficient polymerase processivity. Most assays for HD arbitrarily select a particular band for diagnostic purposes. Without a clear choice for band selection such an arbitrary selection may result in inconsistent intra- or inter-laboratory findings. We present an improved protocol for the amplification of the HD trinucleotide repeat region. This method simplifies the PCR reaction buffer and results in a set of easily identifiable bands from which to determine allele size. HD alleles were identified by selecting bands of clearly greater signal intensity. Stutter banding was much reduced thus permitting easy identification of the most relevant PCR product. A second set of primers internal to the CCG polymorphism was used in selected samples to confirm allele size. The mechanism of action of N,N,N trimethylglycine in the PCR reaction is not clear. It may be possible that the minimal isostabilizing effect of N,N,N trimethylglycine at 2.5 M is significant enough to affect primer specificity. The use of N,N,N trimethylglycine in the PCR reaction facilitated identification of HD alleles and may be appropriate for use in other assays of this type.

  19. ALFRED: an allele frequency resource for research and teaching

    PubMed Central

    Rajeevan, Haseena; Soundararajan, Usha; Kidd, Judith R.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Kidd, Kenneth K.

    2012-01-01

    ALFRED (http://alfred.med.yale.edu) is a free, web accessible, curated compilation of allele frequency data on DNA sequence polymorphisms in anthropologically defined human populations. Currently, ALFRED has allele frequency tables on over 663 400 polymorphic sites; 170 of them have frequency tables for more than 100 different population samples. In ALFRED, a population may have multiple samples with each ‘sample’ consisting of many individuals on which an allele frequency is based. There are 3566 population samples from 710 different populations with allele frequency tables on at least one polymorphism. Fifty of those population samples have allele frequency data for over 650 000 polymorphisms. Records also have active links to relevant resources (dbSNP, PharmGKB, OMIM, Ethnologue, etc.). The flexible search options and data display and download capabilities available through the web interface allow easy access to the large quantity of high-quality data in ALFRED. PMID:22039151

  20. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences.

  1. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania.

  2. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania. PMID:26711124

  3. Estimating Relatedness in the Presence of Null Alleles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang; Ritland, Kermit; Dunn, Derek W; Qi, Xiaoguang; Guo, Songtao; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of genetics and ecology often require estimates of relatedness coefficients based on genetic marker data. However, with the presence of null alleles, an observed genotype can represent one of several possible true genotypes. This results in biased estimates of relatedness. As the numbers of marker loci are often limited, loci with null alleles cannot be abandoned without substantial loss of statistical power. Here, we show how loci with null alleles can be incorporated into six estimators of relatedness (two novel). We evaluate the performance of various estimators before and after correction for null alleles. If the frequency of a null allele is <0.1, some estimators can be used directly without adjustment; if it is >0.5, the potency of estimation is too low and such a locus should be excluded. We make available a software package entitled PolyRelatedness v1.6, which enables researchers to optimize these estimators to best fit a particular data set.

  4. The new 39Ar/40Ar dating facility of the LSCE, background and performances.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaillet, S.; Nomade, S.; Guillou, H.; Scaillet-Vita, G.

    2007-12-01

    Precise and accurate timescales are increasingly needed in most disciplines of the Earth sciences. To contribute to this challenging task, a new 39Ar/40Ar laboratory, specifically devoted to the dating of very recent (down to 1 ka) volcanic products, has been developed at the LSCE (CEA-IPSL-UVSQ, France). In this contribution, we present the first data obtained from this new facility. The laboratory comprises a VG 5400 mass spectrometer coupled with a high sensitivity and high dynamic range ion counting system. Gas extraction is achieved with a 25 watts C02 laser or a double vacuum furnace depending of the analyzed samples. The full metal vacuum and purification line feature a GP50 and a compact Ti flash getters which permit extremely low blank for all Argon isotopes (e.g. ~ 3.0 10e-19 Moles for 36Ar). Both analytical protocols and hardware were specifically developed and optimized to date extremely young samples. Analytical performances including protocols, flux monitoring as well mass spectrometer discrimination correction method will be presented in the light of data obtained over the last 10 months. All samples were irradiated, under cadmium, in the Β-1 position (~1.0 10e+13 fast n cm-2 s-1) of the 70MWh-1 OSIRIS reactor (Pierre Süe laboratory, CEA-Saclay, France). Irradiation package is composed of home-design Aluminium disks constituting a 4 cm stack (10 to 30 unknowns/irradiation). Analyzed neutrons flux standards indicate less than 1% variation along the 4cm stack and validate the use of this reactor for high-precision 39Ar/40Ar dating. The precision and accuracy of the facility has been checked from cross-comparison of international single grain standards including FCs (28.02Ma), ACR-2 (1.194Ma) and TCR (28.32Ma) using the most recent recommended values for these monitors. A total of 80 grains in two irradiations (10 and 120 minutes) will be presented in details. Results from single-grain analyses agree within errors with those proposed by Renne et al

  5. Calibration of a Carboniferous U-Pb and Ar-Ar Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, E. K.; Machlus, M.; Hemming, S. R.; Bowring, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    An important goal of the EARTHTIME initiative is to produce an accurate and precise sequence of geologic events, allowing the evaluation of the rates of geologic processes. Toward this end, the Ar-Ar and U-Pb communities require a set of standards that permit inter-laboratory and inter-technique comparisons. Natural zircon and sanidine samples that are extensively analyzed by multiple labs play a critical role for these comparisons, but are currently limited in number (Plesovice, R33, Temora 2 zircons; Fish Canyon, Alder Creek, Taylor Creek sanidine). Calibration between the sanidine Ar-Ar and zircon U-Pb is sparse and complexity in one or both of the systems is a general problem. Further, there is currently no Paleozoic sanidine monitor standard for Ar-Ar geochronology. The sanidine- and zircon-bearing Carboniferous Fire Clay tonstein provides potential natural Paleozoic standards for these two systems. The Fire Clay tonstein is a voluminous Carboniferous ash bed from the Appalachian basin. Exposures of the tonstein span over 300 km, making it a valuable marker bed for Appalachian geology. Here we report the results of 64 single-grain zircon U-Pb TIMS analyses and 223 single-grain sanidine Ar/Ar analyses. Although previous efforts have been plagued by xenocrystic zircons, by careful selection of only elongate crystals we were able to entirely avoid discordant analyses older than 316 Ma. Unfiltered analyses of zircons analyzed from a population of acicular crystals give a range of dates between ~315 and ~314 Ma with 2 sigma uncertainties of ~0.2 Ma. A weighted mean of these dates has an MSWD of ~4.0, suggesting geological complexity in the magma chamber or post-eruption lead loss. Sanidine ages have a range of less than 1 %, and only a single population can be distinguished with precision at the 1 Ma level for individual crystals. The ability to select crystals of both zircon and sanidine that give a narrow range of ages suggests that the Fire Clay tonstein holds

  6. 40Ar* loss in experimentally deformed muscovite and biotite with implications for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of naturally deformed rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosca, M.; Stunitz, H.; Bourgeix, A.-L.; Lee, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of deformation on radiogenic argon (40Ar*) retentivity in mica are described from high pressure experiments performed on rock samples of peraluminous granite containing euhedral muscovite and biotite. Cylindrical cores, ???15mm in length and 6.25mm in diameter, were drilled from granite collected from the South Armorican Massif in northwestern France, loaded into gold capsules, and weld-sealed in the presence of excess water. The samples were deformed at a pressure of 10kb and a temperature of 600??C over a period 29 of hours within a solid medium assembly in a Griggs-type triaxial hydraulic deformation apparatus. Overall shortening in the experiments was approximately 10%. Transmitted light and secondary and backscattered electron imaging of the deformed granite samples reveals evidence of induced defects and for significant physical grain size reduction by kinking, cracking, and grain segmentation of the micas.Infrared (IR) laser (CO2) heating of individual 1.5-2.5mm diameter grains of muscovite and biotite separated from the undeformed granite yield well-defined 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages of 311??2Ma (2??). Identical experiments on single grains separated from the experimentally deformed granite yield results indicating 40Ar* loss of 0-35% in muscovite and 2-3% 40Ar* loss in biotite. Intragrain in situ ultraviolet (UV) laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar ages (??4-10%, 1??) of deformed muscovites range from 309??13 to 264??7Ma, consistent with 0-16% 40Ar* loss relative to the undeformed muscovite. The in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar ages of deformed biotite vary from 301 to 217Ma, consistent with up to 32% 40Ar* loss. No spatial correlation is observed between in situ 40Ar/39Ar age and position within individual grains. Using available argon diffusion data for muscovite the observed 40Ar* loss in the experimentally treated muscovite can be utilized to predict average 40Ar* diffusion dimensions. Maximum 40Ar/39Ar ages obtained by UV laser ablation overlap those

  7. Alpha gas state in 36Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimune, Hidetoshi; Gibelin, Julien; Harakeh, Muhsin; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kawabata, Takahiro; Tamii, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Miki, Kenjiro; Iwamoto, Chiro; Otsu, Hideaki; Oha, Shinsuke; Tanihata, Isao; Muramoto, Tomoyuki; Kadono, Chika; Kalantar, Nasser; Ando, Shun; Leblond, Sylvian; Ayyad, Yassid; Furuno, Tatsuya; Tsynyra, Miho; Baba, Tasuo; Adachi, Satoshi; Freer, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The α cluster structures in light nuclei with N = Z are expected to appear abov the threshold energy of breakup into α particles. After the proposal of an α cluster wave function with α particle condensate type, such condensate states are both theoretically and experimentally discussed extensively. Theoretically, the existence of dilute α cluster state in nuclei with mass region of A > 16, experimentally, is not confirmed for N- α cluster states in nuclei heavier than A = 16. Recently, we measured α inelastic scattering of 36Ar followed by α decay in an inverse kinematics setup. A 50 MeV/u 36Ar beam from RCNP ring cyclotron was used to bombard a 4He gas target. α particles were detected in the magnetic spectrometer LAS which was set at 0 degrees. The α cluster structures in light nuclei with N = Z are expected to appear abov the threshold energy of breakup into α particles. After the proposal of an α cluster wave function with α particle condensate type, such condensate states are both theoretically and experimentally discussed extensively. Theoretically, the existence of dilute α cluster state in nuclei with mass region of A > 16, experimentally, is not confirmed for N- α cluster states in nuclei heavier than A = 16. Recently, we measured α inelastic scattering of 36Ar followed by α decay in an inverse kinematics setup. A 50 MeV/u 36Ar beam from RCNP ring cyclotron was used to bombard a 4He gas target. α particles were detected in the magnetic spectrometer LAS which was set at 0 degrees. Taro Hirao Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research.

  8. Comparison of Ca and Ar Diffusion in Phlogopite: Implications for K-Ca and K-Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, M. F.; Szilas, K.; Grove, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled geochronology based upon branched decay of 40K-40Ar and 40K-40Ca decay is rarely exploited because 40Ca is the major common isotope of calcium and 40Ca and 40K are difficult to resolve isotopically without resorting to isotope dilution wet chemistry. Recently developed ion microprobe methods based upon measurement of doubly ionized species partially overcome the latter problem and have been applied to high K/Ca micas. The ability to interpret K-Ar and K-Ca results is limited due to uncertainty in the relative diffusion properties of Ca and Ar. To address this problem, we are performing Ar and Ca diffusion experiments and fluid-crystal Ar partitioning experiments with anhydrous F-phlogopite that is stable to 1390°C. As an additional check, we are comparing K-Ca and K-Ar ages from natural mantle phlogopites from a variety of settings to assess the relative retentivity of Ar and Ca. South African xenoliths tend to yield 40Ar/39Ar ages that are much older than K-Ca ages from the same phologopites. Possible excess 40Ar and high common Ca render the comparisons inconclusive, but this suggests that Ca diffuses more readily than Ar in phlogopite. Our most definitive K-Ca phlogopite results (i.e., least affected by common Ca) come from the Archean Seqi dunite of SW Greenland. The K-Ca ages of Seqi phlogopites is 927 ± 26 Ma (2s). Incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar results from the same sample yields a much older result with a terminal age of 3.5 Ga. However, the first 5-10% of 39Ar release are consistent with transient heating at ca. 900 Ma. Considered together, the K-Ca and 40Ar/39Ar results from the Seqi dunite locality strongly suggest that Ca diffusion is more rapid than Ar diffusion in phlogopite.

  9. Precise K-Ar, 40Ar/39Ar, Rb-Sr and U/Pb mineral ages from the 27.5 Ma fish canyon tuff reference standard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Baadsgaard, H.

    2001-01-01

    The accuracy of ages measured using the 40Ar/39Ar technique is affected by uncertainties in the age of radiation fluence-monitor minerals. At present, there is lack of agreement about the ages of certain minerals used as fluence monitors. The accuracy of the age of a standard may be improved if the age can be measured using different decay schemes. This has been done by measuring ages on minerals from the Oligocene Fish Canyon Tuff (FCT) using the K-Ar, 40Ar/39Ar. Rb-Sr and U/Pb methods. K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar total fusion ages of sanidine, biotite and hornblende yielded a mean age of 27.57 ?? 0.36 Ma. The weighted mean 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of sanidine and biotite is 27.57 ?? 0.18 Ma. A biotite-feldspar Rb-Sr isochron yielded an age of 27.44 ?? 0.16 Ma. The U-Pb data for zircon are complex because of the presence of Precambrian zircons and inheritance of radiogenic Pb. Zircons with 207Pb/235U < 0.4 yielded a discordia line with a lower concordia intercept of 27.52 ?? 0.09 Ma. Evaluation of the combined data suggests that the best age for FCT is 27.51 Ma. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  10. Allele-specific H3K79 Di- versus trimethylation distinguishes opposite parental alleles at imprinted regions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Han, Li; Rivas, Guillermo E; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Nicholson, Thomas B; Larson, Garrett P; Chen, Taiping; Szabó, Piroska E

    2010-06-01

    Imprinted gene expression corresponds to parental allele-specific DNA CpG methylation and chromatin composition. Histone tail covalent modifications have been extensively studied, but it is not known whether modifications in the histone globular domains can also discriminate between the parental alleles. Using multiplex chromatin immunoprecipitation-single nucleotide primer extension (ChIP-SNuPE) assays, we measured the allele-specific enrichment of H3K79 methylation and H4K91 acetylation along the H19/Igf2 imprinted domain. Whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac displayed a paternal-specific enrichment at the paternally expressed Igf2 locus, H3K79me3 was paternally biased at the maternally expressed H19 locus, including the paternally methylated imprinting control region (ICR). We found that these allele-specific differences depended on CTCF binding in the maternal ICR allele. We analyzed an additional 11 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and found that, in general, H3K79me3 was associated with the CpG-methylated alleles, whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac enrichment was specific to the unmethylated alleles. Our data suggest that allele-specific differences in the globular histone domains may constitute a layer of the "histone code" at imprinted genes.

  11. Allele-Specific Reduction of the Mutant Huntingtin Allele Using Transcription Activator-Like Effectors in Human Huntington's Disease Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fink, Kyle D; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Josh; Anderson, Joseph S; Torrest, Audrey; Komarla, Anvita; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cary, Whitney; Anderson, Johnathon D; Gruenloh, William; Duffy, Alexandra; Tempkin, Teresa; Annett, Geralyn; Wheelock, Vicki; Segal, David J; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats. Although pathogenesis has been attributed to this polyglutamine expansion, the underlying mechanisms through which the huntingtin protein functions have yet to be elucidated. It has been suggested that postnatal reduction of mutant huntingtin through protein interference or conditional gene knockout could prove to be an effective therapy for patients suffering from HD. For allele-specific targeting, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) were designed to target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the mutant allele and packaged into a vector backbone containing KRAB to promote transcriptional repression of the disease-associated allele. Additional TALEs were packaged into a vector backbone containing heterodimeric FokI and were designed to be used as nucleases (TALEN) to cause a CAG-collapse in the mutant allele. Human HD fibroblasts were treated with each TALE-SNP or TALEN. Allele-expression was measured using a SNP-genotyping assay and mutant protein aggregation was quantified with Western blots for anti-ubiquitin. The TALE-SNP and TALEN significantly reduced mutant allele expression (p < 0.05) when compared to control transfections while not affecting expression of the nondisease allele. This study demonstrates the potential of allele-specific gene modification using TALE proteins, and provides a foundation for targeted treatment for individuals suffering from Huntington's or other genetically linked diseases. PMID:26850319

  12. A Risk Allele for Nicotine Dependence in CHRNA5 Is a Protective Allele for Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Grucza, Richard A; Wang, Jen C.; Stitzel, Jerry A.; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Saccone, Scott F.; Saccone, Nancy L.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Cloninger, C. Robert; Neuman, Rosalind J.; Budde, John P.; Fox, Louis; Bertelsen, Sarah; Kramer, John; Hesselbrock, Victor; Tischfield, Jay; Nurnberger, John. I.; Almasy, Laura; Porjesz, Bernice; Kuperman, Samuel; Schuckit, Marc A.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Rice, John P.; Goate, Alison M.; Bierut, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    Background A non-synonymous coding polymorphism, rs16969968, of the CHRNA5 gene which encodes the alpha-5 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been found to be associated with nicotine dependence (20). The goal of the present study is to examine the association of this variant with cocaine dependence. Methods Genetic association analysis in two, independent samples of unrelated cases and controls; 1.) 504 European-American participating in the Family Study on Cocaine Dependence (FSCD); 2.) 814 European Americans participating in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholsim (COGA). Results In the FSCD, there was a significant association between the CHRNA5 variant and cocaine dependence (OR = 0.67 per allele, p = 0.0045, assuming an additive genetic model), but in the reverse direction compared to that previously observed for nicotine dependence. In multivariate analyses that controlled for the effects of nicotine dependence, both the protective effect for cocaine dependence and the previously documented risk effect for nicotine dependence were statistically significant. The protective effect for cocaine dependence was replicated in the COGA sample. In COGA, effect sizes for habitual smoking, a proxy phenotype for nicotine dependence, were consistent with those observed in FSCD. Conclusion The minor (A) allele of rs16969968, relative to the major G allele, appears to be both a risk factor for nicotine dependence and a protective factor for cocaine dependence. The biological plausibility of such a bidirectional association stems from the involvement of nAChRs with both excitatory and inhibitory modulation of dopamine-mediated reward pathways. PMID:18519132

  13. Ethical guideposts for allelic variation databases.

    PubMed

    Knoppers, B M; Laberge, C M

    2000-01-01

    Basically, a mutation database (MDB) is a repository where allelic variations are described and assigned within a specific gene locus. The purposes of an MDB may vary greatly and have different content and structure. The curator of an electronic and computer-based MDB will provide expert feedback (clinical and research). This requires ethical guideposts. Going to direct on-line public access for the content of an MDB or to interactive communication also raises other considerations. Currently, HUGO's MDI (Mutation Database Initiative) is the only integrated effort supporting and guiding the coordinated deployment of MDBs devoted to genetic diversity. Thus, HUGO's ethical "Statements" are applicable. Among the ethical principles, the obligation of preserving the confidentiality of information transferred by a collaborator to the curator is particularly important. Thus, anonymization of such data prior to transmission is essential. The 1997 Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights of UNESCO addresses the participation of vulnerable persons. Researchers in charge of MDBs should ensure that information received on the testing of children or incompetent adults is subject to ethical review and approval in the country of origin. Caution should be taken against the involuntary consequences of public disclosure of results without complete explanation. Clear and enforceable regulations must be developed to protect the public against misuse of genetic databanks. Interaction with a databank could be seen as creating a "virtual" physician-patient relationship. However, interactive public MDBs should not give medical advice. We have identified new social ethical principles to govern different levels of complexity of genetic information. They are: reciprocity, mutuality, solidarity, and universality. Finally, precaution and prudence at this early stage of the MDI may not only avoid ethically inextricable conundrums but also provide for the respect for the rights

  14. Integration of Mobile AR Technology in Performance Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo-Hung, Chao; Kuo-En, Chang; Chung-Hsien, Lan; Kinshuk; Yao-Ting, Sung

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at exploring how to use augmented reality (AR) technology to enhance the effect of performance assessment (PA). A mobile AR performance assessment system (MARPAS) was developed by integrating AR technology to reduce the limitations in observation and assessment during PA. This system includes three modules: Authentication, AR…

  15. 40Ar 39Ar age constraints on neogene sedimentary beds, Upper Ramparts, half-way Pillar and Canyon village sites, Porcupine river, east-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunk, M.J.; Rieck, H.; Fouch, T.D.; Carter, L.D.

    1994-01-01

    40Ar 39Ar ages of volcanic rocks are used to provide numerical constraints on the age of middle and upper Miocene sedimentary strata collected along the Porcupine River. Intercalated sedimentary rocks north of latitude 67??10???N in the Porcupine terrane of east-central Alaska contain a rich record of plant fossils. The fossils are valuable indicators of this interior region's paleoclimate during the time of their deposition. Integration of the 40Ar 39Ar results with paleomagnetic and sedimentological data allows for refinements in estimating the timing of deposition and duration of selected sedimentary intervals. 40Ar 39Ar plateau age spectra, from whole rock basalt samples, collected along the Upper Ramparts and near Half-way Pillar on the Porcupine River, range from 15.7 ?? 0.1 Ma at site 90-6 to 14.4 ?? 0.1 Ma at site 90-2. With exception of the youngest basalt flow at site 90-2, all of the samples are of reversed magnetic polarity, and all 40Ar 39Ar age spectrum results are consistent with the deposition of the entire stratigraphic section during a single interval of reversed magnetic polarity. The youngest flow at site 90-2 was emplaced during an interval of normal polarity. With age, paleomagnetic and sedimentological data, the ages of the Middle Miocene sedimentary rocks between the basalt flows at sites 90-1 and 90-2 can be assigned to an interval within the limits of analytical precision of 15.2 ?? 0.1 Ma; thus, the sediments were deposited during the peak of the Middle Miocene thermal maximum. Sediments in the upper parts of sites 90-1 and 90-2 were probably deposited during cooling from the Middle Miocene thermal maximum. 40Ar 39Ar results of plagioclase and biotite from a single tephra, collected at sites 90-7 and 90-8 along the Canyon Village section of the Porcupine River, indicate an age of 6.57 ?? 0.02 Ma for its time of eruption and deposition. These results, together with sedimentological and paleomagnetic data, suggest that all of the Upper

  16. Antarlides: A New Type of Androgen Receptor (AR) Antagonist that Overcomes Resistance to AR-Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shun; Fujimaki, Takahiro; Panbangred, Watanalai; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Imoto, Masaya

    2016-02-18

    Prostate cancer is treated with androgen receptor (AR) antagonists but most patients experience disease progression after long-term treatment with these compounds. Therefore, new AR antagonists are required for patient follow-up treatment. In the course of screening for a new AR antagonist, we isolated the novel compounds antarlides A-E (1-5) from Streptomyces sp. BB47. Antarlides are mutually isomeric with respect to the double bond and have a 22-membered-ring macrocyclic structure. The full stereostructure of 1 was established by chemical modifications, including methanolysis, the Trost method, acetonide formation, and the PGME method. 1-5 inhibited the binding of androgen to ARs in vitro. In addition, 2 inhibited the transcriptional activity of not only wild-type AR but also mutant ARs, which are seen in patients with acquired resistance to clinically used AR antagonists. Therefore, antarlides are a potent new generation of AR antagonists that overcome resistance.

  17. Assignment of SNP allelic configuration in polyploids using competitive allele-specific PCR: application to citrus triploid progeny

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploidy is a major component of eukaryote evolution. Estimation of allele copy numbers for molecular markers has long been considered a challenge for polyploid species, while this process is essential for most genetic research. With the increasing availability and whole-genome coverage of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, it is essential to implement a versatile SNP genotyping method to assign allelic configuration efficiently in polyploids. Scope This work evaluates the usefulness of the KASPar method, based on competitive allele-specific PCR, for the assignment of SNP allelic configuration. Citrus was chosen as a model because of its economic importance, the ongoing worldwide polyploidy manipulation projects for cultivar and rootstock breeding, and the increasing availability of SNP markers. Conclusions Fifteen SNP markers were successfully designed that produced clear allele signals that were in agreement with previous genotyping results at the diploid level. The analysis of DNA mixes between two haploid lines (Clementine and pummelo) at 13 different ratios revealed a very high correlation (average = 0·9796; s.d. = 0·0094) between the allele ratio and two parameters [θ angle = tan−1 (y/x) and y′ = y/(x + y)] derived from the two normalized allele signals (x and y) provided by KASPar. Separated cluster analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) from mixed DNA simulating triploid and tetraploid hybrids provided 99·71 % correct allelic configuration. Moreover, triploid populations arising from 2n gametes and interploid crosses were easily genotyped and provided useful genetic information. This work demonstrates that the KASPar SNP genotyping technique is an efficient way to assign heterozygous allelic configurations within polyploid populations. This method is accurate, simple and cost-effective. Moreover, it may be useful for quantitative studies, such as relative allele-specific expression analysis and bulk segregant analysis

  18. Ar-39-Ar-40 Age Dating Of Two Angrites and Two Brachinites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Daniel; Bogard, Donald

    2003-01-01

    Angrites are a rare group (approximately 7 known) of igneous meteorites with basalt-like composition, which probably derive from a relatively small parent body that differs from those of other igneous meteorites. Angrites show evidence for extinct Mn-53, Sm-146, and Pu-244, and precise U-Pb, and Pb-Pb ages of 4.558 Gyr for two angrites define the time of early parent body differentiation. The Sm-147-Nd-143 ages of two angrites range between 4.53 +/- 0.04 and 4.56 +/- 0.04 Gyr, but no Ar-39-Ar-40 or Rb-Sr ages have been reported. Most angrites show no evidence for either shock brecciation or metamorphism. Brachinites are another very rare group' of differentiated meteorites consisting primarily of olivine, with minor augite, chromite, Fe-sulfides, and sometimes plagioclase and opx. Presence of excess Xe-129 and excess Cr53 from decay of Mn-53 in some brachinites indicate that they also formed very early. Brachinite petrogenesis is poorly defined. They may be igneous cumulates or metamorphic products of chondritic-like starting material. If after their formation, angrites and brachinites cooled quickly with minimal subsequent heating, then one might expect them to show uniquely old K-Ar ages, at least in comparison to other differentiated meteorites such as eucrites and mesosiderites. Most angrites and brachinites contain very little, if any K-feldspar, which has deterred measurements of their Ar-Ar ages. We made Ar-39-Ar-40 analyses on two angrites, LEW86010 (metamorphosed) and D'Orbigny, and on two brachinites, EET99402 and Brachina. All are finds. Any feldspar in angrites is highly calcic, with expected K concentrations of <100 ppm. We selected LEW86010 and D'Orbigny because they have been the objects of several other studies and because chemical analyses suggested [K] was approximately 70 ppm in both meteorites. Brachina contains approximately 9.9% plagioclase of higher K-content than angrites, and EET99402 is estimated to contain approximately 5% K

  19. Potassium isotopic compositions of NIST potassium standards and 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Tappa, M.; Ellam, R. M.; Mark, D. F.; Lloyd, N. S.; Higgins, J. A.; Simon, J. I.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the isotopic ratios of standards, spikes, and reference materials is fundamental to the accuracy of many geochronological methods. For example, the 238U/235U ratio relevant to U-Pb geochronology was recently re-determined [1] and shown to differ significantly from the previously accepted value employed during age determinations. These underlying values are fundamental to accurate age calculations in many isotopic systems, and uncertainty in these values can represent a significant (and often unrecognized) portion of the uncertainty budget for determined ages. The potassium isotopic composition of mineral standards, or neutron flux monitors, is a critical, but often overlooked component in the calculation of K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages. It is currently assumed that all terrestrial materials have abundances indistinguishable from that of NIST SRM 985 [2]; this is apparently a reasonable assumption at the 0.25‰ level (1σ) [3]. The 40Ar/39Ar method further relies on the assumption that standards and samples (including primary and secondary standards) have indistinguishable 40K/39K values. We will present data establishing the potassium isotopic compositions of NIST isotopic K SRM 985, elemental K SRM 999b, and 40Ar/39Ar biotite mineral standard GA1550 (sample MD-2). Stable isotopic compositions (41K/39K) were measured by the peak shoulder method with high resolution MC-ICP-MS (Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus), using the accepted value of NIST isotopic SRM 985 [2] for fractionation [4] corrections [5]. 40K abundances were measured by TIMS (Thermo Scientific TRITON), using 41K/39K values from ICP-MS measurements (or, for SRM 985, values from [2]) for internal fractionation corrections. Collectively these data represent an important step towards a metrologically traceable calibration of 40K concentrations in primary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and improve uncertainties by ca. an order of magnitude in the potassium isotopic compositions of standards. [1] Hiess

  20. Call for Development of New Mineral Standards for 40Ar/39Ar Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deino, A. L.; Turrin, B. D.; Renne, P. R.; Hemming, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Age determination via the 40Ar/39Ar dating method relies on the intercomparison of measured 40Ar*/39ArK ratios of geological unknowns with those of co-irradiated mineral standards. Good analytical procedure dictates that these ratios (and the evolution of the Ar ion beams underpinning them) be as similar as practical for the greatest accuracy. Unfortunately, throughout several intervals of the geological time scale this 'best practice' cannot be achieved with existing widely used standards. Only two internationally utilized sanidine standards are available for the middle to late Cenozoic: the Alder Creek Rhyolite sanidine (ACs), at ~1.2 Ma (Turrin et al., 1994; Nomade et al., 2005), and the Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine (FCs) at ~28.2 Ma (e.g., Kuiper et al., 2008; Renne et al, 2011). The situation is even worse throughout much of the rest of the Phanerozoic, as the next oldest standard in common use is the Hb3gr hornblende standard with an age of ~1.1 Ga (Turner, 1971; Jourdan et al., 2006). We propose, as a community effort, the development a set of standards covering the entire target range of high-precision 40Ar/39Ar dating, i.e. the Phanerozoic. Their ages would be stepped in a regular fashion with no more than approximately a factor of 3 between standards, such that in the worse case the 40Ar*/39Ar ratios of standards and unknown need differ by no more than a factor of two. While somewhat arbitrary, an approximately 3 X age progression allows the entire time scale to be covered by a manageable number of standards. Anchoring the progression in the widely used ACs, FCs, and Hb3gr (in bold, below) yields the following set of suggested standard ages: 0.4, 1.2, 3.3, 9.4, 28.2, 95, 320, and 1100 Ma. A suitable standard should be highly reproducible in age at the grain-to-grain and sub-grain levels, and highly radiogenic. The mineral should be abundant and easily separated from the host rock. These criteria may be most easily achieved by focusing on sanidine phenocrysts

  1. Natural selenium-rich feeds manage selenium deficiency in Oregon sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A natural selenium-rich feed product (SePR) was developed by the USDA, ARS, U.S. Sheep Experiment Station for the purposes of enhancing the long-term selenium status of grazing livestock. In cooperation with Intermountain Farmers Association (Salt Lake City, UT), a bulk amount of SePR was manufactur...

  2. A test of the 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum technique on some terrestrial materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1971-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age spectra were determined for 10 terrestrial rock and mineral samples whose geologic history is known from independent evidence. The spectra for six mineral and whole rock samples, including biotite, feldspar, hornblende, muscovite, and granodiorite, that have experienced post-crystallization heating did not reveal the age of crystallization in any obvious way. Minima in the spectra, however, give reasonable maximum ages for reheating and high-temperature maxima can be interpreted as minimum crystallization ages. High-temperature ages of microcline and albite that have not been reheated are approximately 10% younger than the known crystallization age. Apparently there are no domains in these feldspars that have retained radiogenic 40Ar quantitatively. Spectra from two diabase samples that contain significant quantities of excess argon might mistakenly be interpreted as spectra from reheated samples and do not give the age of emplacement. The 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum technique may be a potentially valuable tool for the study of geologic areas with complex histories, but the interpretation of age spectra from terrestrial samples seems to be more difficult than suggested by some previous studies. ?? 1971.

  3. Cosmic Ray Exposure Ages, Ar-Ar Ages, and the Origin and History of Eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, Kelli; Bogard, Donald; Garrison, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    HED meteorites likely formed at different depths on the large asteroid 4-Vesta, but passed through Vesta-derived, km-sized intermediary bodies (Vestoids), before arriving at Earth. Most eucrites and diogenites (and all howardites) are brecciated, and impact heating disturbed or reset the K-Ar ages (and some Rb-Sr ages) of most eucrites in the time period of approx. 3.4 - 4.1 Gyr ago. Some basaltic eucrites and most cumulate eucrites, however, are not brecciated. We recently showed that the Ar-39 - Ar-40 ages for several of these eucrites tightly cluster about a value of 4.48 +/- 0.02 Gyr, and we argue that this time likely represents a single large impact event on Vesta, which ejected these objects from depth and quenched their temperatures. A different parent body has been suggested for cumulate eucrites, although the Ar-Ar ages argue for a common parent. Similarities in the cosmic-ray (space) exposure ages for basaltic eucrites and diogenites also have been used to infer a common parent body for some HEDs. Here we present CRE ages of several cumulate and unbrecciated basaltic (UB) eucrites and compare these with CRE ages of other HEDs. This comparison also has some interesting implications for the relative locations of various HED types on Vesta and/or the Vestoids.

  4. First 40Ar/39Ar dating of intense Late Palaeogene lateritic weathering in Peninsular India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Nicolas J.; Beauvais, Anicet; Arnaud, Nicolas; Chardon, Dominique; Jayananda, Mudlappa

    2014-01-01

    Lateritic surface processes have shaped large platform and cratons of the tropical belt. Constraining the timing of such processes is crucial to decipher their role in cratonic morphogenesis and their response to long-term climatic change and lithospheric deformation. Weathering histories have been documented for South America, Africa and Australia, but precise time constraints of the lateritic weathering processes in South India are still lacking. We present 40Ar/39Ar ages of supergene cryptomelane (K-Mn oxide) formed in the Sandur Mn ore deposits exposed on the highest lateritic paleolandsurface that once covered the Mysore plateau and the adjacent Deccan Traps. Significant 40Ar/39Ar ages are estimated between ∼36 and ∼26 Ma from well-defined plateaus in step heating 39Ar release spectra and from best-fitted inverse isochrones. These ages constitute firm time constraints that document intense late Eocene-Oligocene lateritic weathering over Peninsular India under the influence of warm and wet climate comparable to that prevailing in tropical humid forests. These results imply that Southern India was weathered between ∼36 and 26 Ma and may have been dissected mostly in the Neogene.

  5. Allelic interactions at the nivea locus of Antirrhinum.

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, J; Carpenter, R; Coen, E S

    1991-01-01

    Most null alleles at the nivea (niv) locus are recessive to Niv+ and, when homozygous, give white flowers rather than the red of the wild type. In contrast, the niv-571 allele is semidominant; although it gives white flowers when homozygous, very pale flowers result when this allele is heterozygous with NIV+. We showed that in heterozygotes, niv-571 acts in trans to inhibit expression of its Niv+ homology 25-fold to 50-fold. The inhibition is reversible after meiosis and partially reversible somatically. The niv-571 allele carries a transposable element Tam3 insertion and three truncated copies of the niv gene, one copy being in inverse orientation. Analysis of two further niv alleles, niv-572 and niv-527, showed that excision of Tam3 from niv-571 does not affect the ability of the allele to repress Niv+ and that one truncated niv copy alone is insufficient to confer semidominance. The detailed structures of various semidominant niv alleles suggest that their effects in trans are not readily explained by production of antisense RNA but are more easily reconciled with a direct recognition/interaction between homologous genes, reminiscent of cosuppression and transvection phenomena described in other systems. PMID:1840900

  6. Allele frequencies at microsatellite loci: The stepwise mutation model revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, A.M.; Slatkin, M. ); Freimer, N.B. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors summarize available data on the frequencies of alleles at microsatellite loci in human populations and compare observed distributions of allele frequencies to those generated by a simulation of the stepwise mutation model. They show that observed frequency distributions at 108 loci are consistent with the results of the model under the assumption that mutations cause an increase or decrease in repeat number by one and under the condition that the product Nu, where N is the effective population size and u is the mutation rate, is larger than one. It is also shown that the variance of the distribution of allele sizes is a useful estimator of Nu and performs much better than previously suggested estimators for the stepwise mutation model. In the data, there is no correlation between the mean and variance in allele size at a locus or between the number of alleles and mean allele size, which suggests that the mutation rate at these loci is independent of allele size. 39 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Common alleles contribute to schizophrenia in CNV carriers

    PubMed Central

    Tansey, K E; Rees, E; Linden, D E; Ripke, S; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; McCarroll, S A; Holmans, P; Kirov, G; Walters, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of schizophrenia is complex, involving risk alleles ranging from common alleles of weak effect to rare alleles of large effect, the best exemplar of the latter being large copy number variants (CNVs). It is currently unknown whether pathophysiology in those with defined rare mutations overlaps with that in other individuals with the disorder who do not share the same rare mutation. Under an extreme heterogeneity model, carriers of specific high-penetrance mutations form distinct subgroups. In contrast, under a polygenic threshold model, high-penetrance rare allele carriers possess many risk factors, of which the rare allele is the only one, albeit an important, factor. Under the latter model, cases with rare mutations can be expected to share some common risk alleles, and therefore pathophysiological mechanisms, with cases without the same mutation. Here we show that, compared with controls, individuals with schizophrenia who have known pathogenic CNVs carry an excess burden of common risk alleles (P=2.25 × 10−17) defined from a genome-wide association study largely based on individuals without known CNVs. Our finding is not consistent with an extreme heterogeneity model for CNV carriers, but does offer support for the polygenic threshold model of schizophrenia. That this is so provides support for the notion that studies aiming to model the effects of rare variation may uncover pathophysiological mechanisms of relevance to those with the disorder more widely. PMID:26390827

  8. Allelic Diversity and Its Implications for the Rate of Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Armando; García-Dorado, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation is usually estimated empirically from statistics based on population gene frequencies, but alternative statistics based on allelic diversity (number of allelic types) can provide complementary information. There is a lack of knowledge, however, on the evolutionary implications attached to allelic-diversity measures, particularly in structured populations. In this article we simulated multiple scenarios of single and structured populations in which a quantitative trait subject to stabilizing selection is adapted to different fitness optima. By forcing a global change in the optima we evaluated which diversity variables are more strongly correlated with both short- and long-term adaptation to the new optima. We found that quantitative genetic variance components for the trait and gene-frequency-diversity measures are generally more strongly correlated with short-term response to selection, whereas allelic-diversity measures are more correlated with long-term and total response to selection. Thus, allelic-diversity variables are better predictors of long-term adaptation than gene-frequency variables. This observation is also extended to unlinked neutral markers as a result of the information they convey on the demographic population history. Diffusion approximations for the allelic-diversity measures in a finite island model under the infinite-allele neutral mutation model are also provided. PMID:24121776

  9. The relation between solar jets and 3He-rich solar energetic particle events at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nai-Hwa; Mason, Glenn; Innes, Davina; Bucik, Radoslav

    The solar sources of (3) He-rich solar energetic particle events detected by ULEIS on ACE and SIT on STEREO-A, when two spacecraft were close to quadrature, are investigated in this study. We use the photospheric magnetic field with potential field source surface extrapolations and in-situ magnetic field to identify the candidate connected active regions (ARs). We also examine the activity in all nearby ARs by using SDO and STEREO EUV images and space-based radio observations on Wind and STEREO. The 3He-rich events seem to occur shortly after an increase in jet production from the connected ARs. To study the long-term evolution in the source ARs, we compare the 3He enrichment measured at ACE and STEREO seven days apart which is the time for a region to rotate from the ACE to the STEREO connection point.

  10. Structures of and allelic diversity and relationships among the major outer membrane protein (ompA) genes of the four chlamydial species.

    PubMed

    Kaltenboeck, B; Kousoulas, K G; Storz, J

    1993-01-01

    DNA sequences coding for 81% of the ompA gene from 24 chlamydial strains, representing all chlamydial species, were determined from DNA amplified by polymerase chain reactions. Chlamydial strains of serovars and strains with similar chromosomal restriction fragment length polymorphism had identical ompA DNA sequences. The ompA sequences were segregated into 23 different ompA alleles and aligned with each other, and phylogenetic relationships among them were inferred by neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony analyses. The neighbor-joining method produced a single phylogram which was rooted at the branch between two major clusters. One cluster included all Chlamydia trachomatis ompA alleles (trachoma group). The second cluster was composed of three major groups of ompA alleles: psittacosis group (alleles MN, 6BC, A22/M, B577, LW508, FEPN, and GPIC), pneumonia group (Chlamydia pneumoniae AR388 with the allele KOALA), and polyarthritis group (ruminant and porcine chlamydial alleles LW613, 66P130, L71, and 1710S with propensity for polyarthritis). These groups were distinguished through specific DNA sequence signatures. Maximum parsimony analysis yielded two equally most parsimonious phylograms with topologies similar to the ompA tree of neighbor joining. Two phylograms constructed from chlamydial genomic DNA distances had topologies identical to that of the ompA phylogram with respect to branching of the chlamydial species. Human serovars of C. trachomatis with essentially identical genomes represented a single taxonomic unit, while they were divergent in the ompA tree. Consistent with the ompA phylogeny, the porcine isolate S45, previously considered to be Chlamydia psittaci, was identified as C. trachomatis through biochemical characteristics. These data demonstrate that chlamydial ompA allelic relationships, except for human serovars of C. trachomatis, are cognate with chromosomal phylogenies.

  11. Structures of and allelic diversity and relationships among the major outer membrane protein (ompA) genes of the four chlamydial species.

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenboeck, B; Kousoulas, K G; Storz, J

    1993-01-01

    DNA sequences coding for 81% of the ompA gene from 24 chlamydial strains, representing all chlamydial species, were determined from DNA amplified by polymerase chain reactions. Chlamydial strains of serovars and strains with similar chromosomal restriction fragment length polymorphism had identical ompA DNA sequences. The ompA sequences were segregated into 23 different ompA alleles and aligned with each other, and phylogenetic relationships among them were inferred by neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony analyses. The neighbor-joining method produced a single phylogram which was rooted at the branch between two major clusters. One cluster included all Chlamydia trachomatis ompA alleles (trachoma group). The second cluster was composed of three major groups of ompA alleles: psittacosis group (alleles MN, 6BC, A22/M, B577, LW508, FEPN, and GPIC), pneumonia group (Chlamydia pneumoniae AR388 with the allele KOALA), and polyarthritis group (ruminant and porcine chlamydial alleles LW613, 66P130, L71, and 1710S with propensity for polyarthritis). These groups were distinguished through specific DNA sequence signatures. Maximum parsimony analysis yielded two equally most parsimonious phylograms with topologies similar to the ompA tree of neighbor joining. Two phylograms constructed from chlamydial genomic DNA distances had topologies identical to that of the ompA phylogram with respect to branching of the chlamydial species. Human serovars of C. trachomatis with essentially identical genomes represented a single taxonomic unit, while they were divergent in the ompA tree. Consistent with the ompA phylogeny, the porcine isolate S45, previously considered to be Chlamydia psittaci, was identified as C. trachomatis through biochemical characteristics. These data demonstrate that chlamydial ompA allelic relationships, except for human serovars of C. trachomatis, are cognate with chromosomal phylogenies. Images PMID:8419295

  12. Microwave spectroscopic and atoms in molecules theoretical investigations on the Ar···propargyl alcohol complex: Ar···H-O, Ar···π, and Ar···C interactions.

    PubMed

    Mani, Devendra; Arunan, Elangannan

    2013-03-18

    The structure of the Ar···propargyl alcohol (Ar···PA) complex is determined from the rotational spectra of the parent complex and its two deuterated isotopologues, namely Ar···PA-D(OD) and Ar···PA-D(CD). The spectra confirm a geometry in which PA exists in the gauche form with Ar located in between -OH and -C≡C-H groups. All a, b and c types of transitions show small splitting due to some large-amplitude motion dominated by C-OH torsion, as in the monomer. Splittings in a- and b-type transitions are of the order of a few kilohertz, whereas splitting in the c-type transitions is relatively larger (0.9-2.6 MHz) and decreases in the order Ar···PA>Ar···PA-D(CD)>Ar···PA-D(OD). The assignments are well supported by ab initio calculations. Atoms in molecules (AIM) and electrostatic potential calculations are used to explore the nature of the interactions in this complex. AIM calculations not only reveal the expected O-H···Ar and π···Ar interactions in the Ar···gauche-PA complex, but also novel C···Ar (of CH2OH group) and O-H···Ar interactions in the Ar···trans-PA complex. Similar interactions are also present in the Ar···methanol complex.

  13. Measuring 36Ar without H35Cl interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton, John

    2015-04-01

    Noble gas measurements are usually made in static mode, when the mass spectrometer sensitivity is inversely proportional to volume: this makes the building of very large instruments to obtain high mass resolution impracticable. A particularly challenging interference has hitherto been H35Cl, which differs in mass from 36Ar by 1 part in 3937. We have developed a method which makes improved use of the available MRP to remove interferences, and used it to obtain HCl-free 36Ar measurements on a multicollector instrument with MRP of only ~6000 (MRP= mass resolving power = m/dm 5-95% on side of peak). By arranging that the target mass position on a minor isotope (e.g. 36Ar), from which the interference must be removed, coincides with the ~50% point on the side of a major isotope (e.g. 40Ar), it is possible both to set the mass accurately and to verify the mass position and stability during measurements. The peak top of 40Ar is measured in a separate mass step. Two small corrections are necessary. One compensates for the residual HCl tail at the 36Ar position. The other arises because the peak is not totally flat in the region of interest: 40Ar and 36Ar+HCl are measured on the peak top, whilst 36Ar is measured at the extreme edge, with slightly lower efficiency. The required correction parameters can be obtained from a series of air calibrations with different target/interference ratios. With samples containing 4x10-15to 3x10-14moles of 40Ar, 36Ar/40Ar was measured, without HCl interference, to a 1σ precision of 0.5%, only slightly worse than counting statistics. This is potentially useful for 40Ar/39Ar dating, where 36Ar is used to correct for trapped air, and may be particularly significant for smaller or younger samples.

  14. 76 FR 27077 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11 and Form AR-11SR, Extension of an Existing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11 and...; OMB Control No. 1615-0007. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration... collection: Form AR-11 and Form AR-11SR. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. (4) Affected public...

  15. Paleotemperatures at the lunar surfaces from open system behavior of cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar

    DOE PAGES

    Shuster, David L.; Cassata, William S.

    2015-02-10

    The simultaneous diffusion of both cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar from solid phases is controlled by the thermal conditions of rocks while residing near planetary surfaces. Combined observations of 38Ar/37Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ratios during stepwise degassing analyses of neutron-irradiated Apollo samples can distinguish between diffusive loss of Ar due to solar heating of the rocks and that associated with elevated temperatures during or following impact events; the data provide quantitative constraints on the durations and temperatures of each process. From sequentially degassed 38Ar/37Ar ratios can be calculated a spectrum of apparent 38Ar exposure ages versus the cumulative release fraction ofmore » 37Ar, which is particularly sensitive to conditions at the lunar surface typically over ~106–108 year timescales. Due to variable proportions of K- and Ca-bearing glass, plagioclase and pyroxene, with variability in the grain sizes of these phases, each sample will have distinct sensitivity to, and therefore different resolving power on, past near-surface thermal conditions. Furthermore, we present the underlying assumptions, and the analytical and numerical methods used to quantify the Ar diffusion kinetics in multi-phase whole-rock analyses that provide these constraints.« less

  16. Quantifying RNA allelic ratios by microfluidic multiplex PCR and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Xin; Ramaswami, Gokul; Smith, Kevin S; Turecki, Gustavo; Montgomery, Stephen B; Li, Jin Billy

    2014-01-01

    We developed a targeted RNA sequencing method that couples microfluidics-based multiplex PCR and deep sequencing (mmPCR-seq) to uniformly and simultaneously amplify up to 960 loci in 48 samples independently of their gene expression levels and to accurately and cost-effectively measure allelic ratios even for low-quantity or low-quality RNA samples. We applied mmPCR-seq to RNA editing and allele-specific expression studies. mmPCR-seq complements RNA-seq for studying allelic variations in the transcriptome.

  17. Dynamics and kinetics of the metastable decay series: Ar/sub 3//sup +/*. -->. Ar/sub 2//sup +/*. -->. Ar/sup +/

    SciTech Connect

    Scheier, P.; Stamatovic, A.; Maerk, T.D.

    1988-07-01

    Metastable decay of Ar/sup +//sup *//sub 3/ produced by electron impact ionization of a supersonic Ar cluster beam has been investigated qualitatively and quantitatively with a double focusing sector field mass spectrometer. We present direct experimental proof that the observed metastable decay of Ar/sup +//sup *//sub 3/ into Ar/sup +/ in the microsecond time regime proceeds predominantly via a sequential decay series Ar/sup +//sup *//sub 3/..-->../sup k//sup =/Ar/sup +//sup *//sub 2/..-->.. /sup k//sup =/Ar/sup +/ involving the evaporation of a single monomer in each of these successive decays. The metastable decay rates deduced are very different, i.e., k/sub 3,2/ = 45 s/sup -1/ and k/sub 2,1/ = 680 s/sup -1/ at an ion acceleration voltage of 3 kV. Moreover, the metastable decay rates of Ar/sup +//sup *//sub 3/ exhibit a strong dependence on time elapsed since electron impact production of the Ar/sup +//sub 3/, and on ion production parameters (i.e., size and internal excitation energy of the neutral precursor). For instance photodissociation (with visible laser light) of the neutral cluster beam leads to a dramatic increase of the observed metastable reaction rules yielding values of up to 100 000 3/sup -1/ in the ..mu..s time regime.

  18. Direct dating of weathering phenomena by [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar and K-Ar analysis of supergene K-Mn oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcelos, P.M.; Brimhall, G.H. ); Renne, P.R.; Becker, T.A. )

    1994-03-01

    Potassium-bearing manganese oxides, cryptomelane, K[sub 1-2](Mn[sup 3+]Mn[sup 4+])[sub 8] O[sub 16] [center dot] xH[sub 2]O, and hollandite, (K,Ba)[sub 1-2](Mn[sup 3+],Mn[sup 4+])[sub 8] O[sub 16] [center dot] xH[sub 2]O, are often authigenically precipitated in weathering profiles. Dating of these phases allows timing of the progression of oxidation fronts during weathering and pedogenic processes. Potential problems in manganese oxide dating, such as Ar and/or K losses, excess argon, [sup 39]Ar loss by recoil during neutron irradiation, etc. are addressed. The K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar analytical results indicate that Ar and/or K losses, excess [sup 40]Ar, and [sup 39]Ar recoil seem not to pose problems in manganese oxide dating. This investigation suggests that the fine scale, laser-probe [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar technique is most appropriate for dating of weathering phenomena because this technique permits identification of contaminating phases and the presence of multiple generations of weathering minerals in the inherently complex mineral assemblage characteristic of weathering profiles. K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating of supergene K-bearing manganese oxides formed during lateritization of Archean and Proterozoic bedrocks in the Carajas Region, Amazonia, Brazil, indicates that weathering started before 72 [+-] 6 Ma. Petrographic, electron microscope, and electron microprobe investigation reveal multiple generations of manganese oxide precipitation. Age clusters at 65-69, 51-56, 40-43, 33-35, 20, 24, 12-17 Ma, and zero-age (0.2 [+-] 0.2 Ma) suggest episodic precipitation of K-Mn oxides resulting form changing weathering conditions in the Amazon throughout the Cenozoic. K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating of supergene cryptomelane from weathering profiles in eastern Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil, suggests continuous weathering from 10 to 5.6 Ma ago, possibly reflecting local climatic conditions due to the proximity with the Atlantic Ocean.

  19. New constraints on the release of noble gases during in vacuo crushing and application to scapolite Br-Cl-I and 40Ar/ 39Ar age determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, M. A.; Phillips, D.

    2009-10-01

    The release of irradiation-produced noble gas isotopes ( 38Ar Cl, 80Kr Br, 128Xe I and 39Ar K) during in vacuo crushing scapolite has been investigated and is compared to quartz. Three thousand crushing strokes released ˜98% of fluid inclusion-hosted noble gas from quartz. In comparison, 3000 crushing strokes released only ˜4% of the lattice-hosted 38Ar Cl from a scapolite gem. In vacuo crushing released lattice Ar preferentially relative to lattice Kr or Xe and prolonged crushing released ˜88% of the lattice-hosted noble gas in 96,000 crushing strokes. We suggest fast diffusion pathways generated by crushing are an important noble gas release mechanism and we demonstrate two applications of prolonged in vacuo crushing on irradiated scapolite. Firstly, scapolite molar Br/Cl and I/Cl values are shown to vary over a similar range as crustal fluids. The Cl-rich scapolite gem from Hunza, Pakistan has Br/Cl of 0.5-0.6 × 10 -3 and I/Cl values of 0.3-2 × 10 -6, that are similar to fluids that have dissolved evaporites. In contrast, three out of four skarn-related scapolites from the Canadian Grenville Province have molar Br/Cl values of 1.5-2.4 × 10 -3, and I/Cl values of 11-24 × 10 -6, that are broadly consistent with skarn formation by magmatic fluids. The fourth Grenvillian scapolite, with only 0.02 wt% Cl, has an exceptionally elevated molar Br/Cl value of up to ˜54 × 10 -3 and I/Cl of 284 × 10 -6. It is unclear if these values reflect the composition of fluids formed during metamorphism or preferential incorporation of Br and I in Cl-poor meionitic scapolite. Secondly, the Grenvillian scapolites give plateau ages of between 830 Ma and 400 Ma. The oldest ages post-date regional skarn formation by ˜200 Myr, but are similar to feldspar cooling ages in the Province. The age variation in these samples is attributed to a combination of factors including variable thermal history and the presence of mineral sub-grains in some of the samples. These sub

  20. Potential energy surface and bound states of the NH3-Ar and ND3-Ar complexes.

    PubMed

    Loreau, J; Liévin, J; Scribano, Y; van der Avoird, A

    2014-12-14

    A new, four-dimensional potential energy surface for the interaction of NH3 and ND3 with Ar is computed using the coupled-cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations and large basis sets. The umbrella motion of the ammonia molecule is explicitly taken into account. The bound states of both NH3-Ar and ND3-Ar are calculated on this potential for total angular momentum values from J = 0 to 10, with the inclusion of Coriolis interactions. The energies and splittings of the rovibrational levels are in excellent agreement with the extensive high-resolution spectroscopic data accumulated over the years in the infrared and microwave regions for both complexes, which demonstrates the quality of the potential energy surface.

  1. Ar-Ar and I-Xe Ages and the Thermal History of IAB Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Studies of several samples of the large Caddo County IAB iron meteorite reveal andesitic material, enriched in Si, Na, Al and Ca, which is essentially unique among meteorites. This material is believed to have formed from a chondritic source by partial melting and to have further segregated by grain coarsening. Such an origin implies extended metamorphism of the IAB parent body. New Ar-39-Ar-40 ages for silicate from three different Caddo samples are consistent with a common age of 4.50-4.51 Gyr ago. Less well defined Ar-Ar degassing ages for inclusions from two other IABs, EET8333 and Udei Station, are approx.4.32 Gyr, whereas the age for Campo del Cielo varies considerably over approx.3.23-4.56 Gyr. New I-129-Xe-129 ages for Caddo County and EET8333 are 4561.9+/-0.1 Myr and 4560- 4563 Myr, respectively, relative to an age of 4566 Myr for Shallowater. Considering all reported Ar-Ar ages for IABs and related winonaites, the range is approx.4.32-4.53 Gyr, but several IABs give similar Ar ages of 4.50-4.52 Gyr. We interpret these older ages to represent cooling after the time of last significant metamorphism on the parent body, and the younger ages to represent later Ar-40 diffusion loss. These older Ar-Ar ages are similar to Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature for Caddo County. Considering the possibility that IAB parent body formation was followed by impact disruption, reassembly, and metamorphism (e.g., Benedix et al. 2000), the time of the post-assembly metamorphism may have been as late as approx.4.53 Gyr ago. However, precise I-Xe ages reported for some IABs define a range of ages of approx.4560 to approx.4576 Myr. The older I-Xe ages exceed the oldest precise radiometric ages of meteorites, appear unrealistic, and s,uggest a bias in the calibration of all I-Xe ages. But even with such a bias, the I-Xe ages of IABs cannot easily be reconciled with the much younger Ar-Ar and Sm-Nd ages and with cooling rates deduced from Ni concentration

  2. Ar-Ar and I-XE Ages and the Thermal History of IAB Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Studies of several samples of the large Caddo County IAB iron meteorite reveal andesitic material, enriched in Si, Na, Al and Ca which is essentially unique among meteorites. This material is believed to have formed from a chondritic source by partial melting and to have further segregated by grain coarsening. Such an origin implies extended metamorphism of the IAB parent body. New Ar-39- Ar-40 ages for silicate from three different Caddo samples are consistent with a common age of 4.50- 4.51 Gyr ago. Less well defined Ar-Ar degassing ages for inclusions from two other IABs, EET8333 and Udei Station, are approx. 4.32 Gyr, whereas the age for Campo del Cielo varies considerably over approx. 3.23-4.56 Gyr. New I-129-Xe-129 ges for Caddo County and EET8333 are 4561.9 plus or minus 0.1 Myr and 4560-4563 Myr, respectively, relative to an age of 4566 Myr for Shallowater. Considering all reported Ar-Ar ages for IABs and related winonaites, the range is approx. 4.32-4.53 Gyr, but several IABs give similar Ar ages of 4.50-4.52 Gyr. We interpret these older ages to represent cooling after the time of last significant metamorphism on the parent body, and the younger ages to represent later 40Ar diffusion loss. These older Ar-Ar ages are similar to Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature for Caddo County. Considering the possibility that IAB parent body formation was followed by impact disruption, reassembly, and metamorphism (e.g., Benedix et al. 2000), the time of the postassembly metamorphism may have been as late as approx. 4.53 Gyr ago. However, precise I-Xe ages reported for some IABs define a range of ages of approx. 4560 to approx. 4576 Myr. The older I-Xe ages exceed the oldest precise radiometric ages of meteorites, appear unrealistic, and suggest a bias in the calibration of all I-Xe ages. But even with such a bias, the I-Xe ages of IABs cannot easily be reconciled with the much younger Ar-Ar and Sm-Nd ages and with cooling rates deduced from Ni

  3. Ar-Ar and I-Xe Ages and the Thermal History of IAB Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Studies of several samples of the large Caddo County IAB iron meteorite reveal andesitic material, enriched in Si, Nay Al and Ca, which is essentially unique among meteorites. This material is believed to have formed from a chondritic source by partial melting and to have further segregated by grain coarsening. Such an origin implies extended metamorphism of the IAB parent body. New Ar-39-Ar-40 ages for silicate from three different Caddo samples are consistent with a common age of 4.50- 4.51 Gyr ago. Less well defined Ar-Ar degassing ages for inclusions from two other IABs, EET8333 and Udei Station, are approx.4.32 Gyr, whereas the age for Campo del Cielo varies considerably over approx.3.23-4.56 Gyr. New I-129-Xe-129 ages for Caddo County and EET8333 are 4561.9 +/-0.1 Myr and 4560-4563 Myr, respectively, relative to an age of 4566 Myr for Shallowater. Considering all reported Ar-Ar ages for IABs and related winonaites, the range is approx.4.32-4.53 Gyr, but several IABs give similar Ar ages of 4.50-4.52 Gyr. We interpret these older ages to represent cooling after the time of last significant metamorphism on the parent body, and the younger ages to represent later Ar-40 diffusion loss. These older Ar-Ar ages are similar to Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature for Caddo County. Considering the possibility that IAB parent body formation was followed by impact disruption, reassembly, and metamorphism (e.g., Benedix et al. 2000), the time of the post-assembly metamorphism may have been as late as approx.4.53 Gyr ago. However, precise I-Xe ages reported for some IABs define a range of ages of approx.4560 to approx.4576 My. The older I-Xe ages exceed the oldest precise radiometric ages of meteorites, appear unrealistic, and suggest a bias in the calibration of all I-Xe ages. But even with such a bias, the I-Xe ages of IABs cannot easily be reconciled with the much younger Ar-Ar and Sm-Nd ages and with cooling rates deduced from Ni concentration

  4. Investigation of the Gardnos Impact Structure: 40Ar/39Ar Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, J. A.; Swindle, T. D.; Kring, D. A.; Melosh, H. J.

    1995-09-01

    Introduction: The Gardnos structure (Norway) [1], has recently been identified as an impact crater [2,3], despite being deformed by a series of tectonic processes [2]. The age of the structure is uncertain, although attempts to date the impact event have been made on the basis of stratigraphic relationships [2,3]. Unfortunately, these estimates differ by more than 100 million years. The first study suggested that the impact corresponded roughly with the Cambro-Ordovician boundary, ~500 Ma [2], while a second stratigraphic interpretation suggested a Precambrian age of 650 Ma [3]. To try and resolve this discrepancy, we attempted to determine the age of the structure with radiometric techniques, which typically have an error of < 10 Ma. Method: We examined three samples from the crater, in an attempt to determine the age using the 40Ar/39Ar dating method. The samples (plagioclase feldspar, alkali feldspar, and shards of gray, semi-transparent, glassy-looking material) were obtained from the suevite breccia unit of [2]. This unit should be the most promising for 40Ar/39Ar dating, since it is melt bearing, and no other unit is likely to be less affected by subsequent tectonism and sedimentation. Results: Our experiments yielded complicated age spectra interpreted to reflect a thermal event at 385+/-5 Ma and another possible event at 312+/-5 Ma (Fig. 1). All three samples yielded similar results. If the stratigraphic interpretations are correct, it thus seems clear that the impact event itself was not dated. The 385 Ma age corresponds to the end of the Caledonian Orogeny, which significantly altered this section of Norway [4]. It is suspected that late Caledonian folding occurred during this time [4], and we therefore interpret the 385 Ma age as the thermal metamorphic overprint of the Caledonian Orogeny. Another event clearly occurred afterwards, which is responsible for the 312 Ma signature. The cause of this thermal overprint has not yet been identified, since

  5. Ar-Ar and Rb-Sr Ages of the Tissint Olivine-phyric Martian Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Turin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Agee, C.

    2013-01-01

    The fifth martian meteorite fall, Tissint, is an olivine-phyric shergottite that contains olivine macrocrysts (approximately 1.5 mm) [1]. [2] reported the Sm-Nd age of Tissint as 596 plus or minus 23 Ma along with Rb-Sr data that defined no isochron. [3] reported Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd ages of 583 plus or minus 86 Ma and 616 plus or minus 67 Ma, respectively. The cosmic-ray exposure ages of Tissint are 1.10 plus or minus 0.15 Ma based on 10Be [4], and 1.0-1.1 Ma, based on 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar [5,6].We report Ar-Ar ages and Rb-Sr data.

  6. Laser /39/Ar-/40/Ar dating of two clasts from consortium breccia 73215

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichhorn, G.; Schaeffer, O. A.; James, O. B.; Mueller, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    A laser Ar-39-Ar-40 study of the components of an ANT-suite anorthositic gabbro and a black aphanite from a consortium breccia is reported. A wide range of K-Ar ages is found for the plagioclase in the anorthositic gabbro; at the centers of the largest grains is material showing the greatest age (older than 4.11 billion years) while the youngest material (3.81-3.88 billion years) is found near the grain margins. Partial outgassing of the clasts upon incorporation into the breccia could account for the age patterns. The black aphanite clast appears to be cogenetic with the aphanite that forms the breccia matrix. The time of crystallization of a lunar granite has also been measured by the laser technique.

  7. MEIS1 functions as a potential AR negative regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Liang; Yang, Yutao; Hang, Xingyi; Cui, Jiajun; Gao, Jiangping

    2014-10-15

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays critical roles in human prostate carcinoma progression and transformation. However, the activation of AR is regulated by co-regulators. MEIS1 protein, the homeodomain transcription factor, exhibited a decreased level in poor-prognosis prostate tumors. In this study, we investigated a potential interaction between MEIS1 and AR. We found that overexpression of MEIS1 inhibited the AR transcriptional activity and reduced the expression of AR target gene. A potential protein–protein interaction between AR and MEIS1 was identified by the immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation and the recruitment to androgen response element in prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene promoter sequences. In addition, MEIS1 promoted the recruitment of NCoR and SMRT in the presence of R1881. Finally, MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells. Taken together, our data suggests that MEIS1 functions as a novel AR co-repressor. - Highlights: • A potential interaction was identified between MEIS1 and AR signaling. • Overexpression of MEIS1 reduced the expression of AR target gene. • MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation. • MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells.

  8. The 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Pelona schist and related rocks, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    Seventeen 40Ar/39Ar ages for hornblende, celadonitic muscovite, and biotite from the Pelona, Orocopia, Rand, and Portal Ridge (POR) schists range from 39 to 85 Ma. The 85 Ma is from Portal Ridge, consistent with the proposed correlation of that body with the schist of Sierra de Salinas. Two muscovites and one hornblende from the Rand Schist have ages of 72 to 74 Ma, indistinguishable from the K-Ar age of 74 Ma for hornblende from a posttectonic granodiorite that intrudes the schist, but younger than the 79 Ma U-Pb age of the intrusion. Four muscovite and two hornblende ages for schist and mylonite from the East Fork area of the San Gabriel Mountains range from 55 to 61 Ma, similar to K-Ar ages from nearby upper plate rocks. A third hornblende has an age of 73 Ma but is not well constrained. Concordance of schist and upper plate ages confirms structural and metamorphic evidence that the Vincent thrust in the San Gabriel Mountains has not undergone significant postmetamorphic disruption. Ages from the Orocopia Mountains are 75 Ma for hornblende from nonmylonitic upper plate, 52 Ma for muscovite from structurally high Orocopia Schist that is mylonitic, and 41 Ma for muscovite from nonmylonitic Orocopia Schist. These are consistent with field evidence that the Orocopia "thrust" is a postmetamorphic normal fault. Muscovite and hornblende from the Gavilan Hills have ages of 48 to 50 Ma, younger than ages from the San Gabriel Mountains but similar to schist ages from the Orocopia Mountains. The geochronologic and structural complexities of the Vincent, Chocolate Mountains, Orocopia, and Rand thrusts imply that previously cited northeastward vergence may not relate to prograde metamorphism (subduction) of the POR schists. The 40Ar/39Ar data indicate substantial uplift of the POR schists prior to middle Tertiary detachment faulting, which confirms other geochronologic evidence of uplift in southern California and southern Arizona during the Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary.

  9. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar thermochronology in the northern Bitterroot mylonite zone, Mt

    SciTech Connect

    House, M.A.; Hodges, K.V. . Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The extensional Bitterroot mylonite zone defines the eastern and southern border of the Bitterroot metamorphic core complex and is generally interpreted to be the major structure which accommodated unroofing of the metamorphic core. The most commonly cited evidence for the age of mylonitization are [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages for hornblend, muscovite, biotite, and potassium feldspar from the southern Bitterroot mylonite zone that indicate rapid cooling of the core rocks between 45.5 and 43.5 Ma. More recently, an [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar K-feldspar age of 46.4 [+-] 0.8 Ma for an undeformed rhyolite dike that cuts across the mylonitic fabric places a minimum age constraint on the southern part of the shear zone. The authors have obtained new [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar data for metapelitic rocks and amphibolites from the northeast border of the Bitterroot metamorphic core complex near an area where mylonitized granitoid rocks yielding 48--52 Ma U-Pb zircon crystallization ages constrain the maximum age of mylonitization. Isochran ages of 47.9 [+-] 0.9 and 49 [+-] 1 Ma for hornblende separated from deformed amphibolite pods in the northeast border zone are within analytical uncertainty of the younger mylonitized granitoid crystallization ages and indicate rapid post-crystallization cooling through temperatures of [approximately]780--800 K. They attribute this cooling to denudation related to shear zone development. Muscovite and biotite isochron ages from metapelitic rocks within the shear zone are significantly younger, between 42 and 44 Ms., and generally agree with mica ages obtained by Garmezy and Sutter for the southern part of the shear zone. However, all mica ages from the Bitterroot shear zone are younger than the minimum age of the shear zone deduced from the age of cross-cutting rhyolite dikes.

  10. Data Rich, Information Poor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, P.G.; Rautman, C.A.

    1998-11-09

    Surviving in a data-rich environment means understanding the difference between data and information. This paper reviews an environmental case study that illustrates that understanding and shows its importance. In this study, a decision problem was stated in terms of au economic-objective fimction. The function contains a term that defines the stochastic relationship between the decision and the information obtained during field chamctetition for an environmental contaminant. Data is defied as samples drawn or experimental realizations of a mudom fimction. Information is defined as the quantitative change in the value of the objective fiction as a result of the sample.

  11. Ar-Ar Dating of Martian Chassignites, NWA2737 and Chassigny, and Nakhlite MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Until recently only three nakhlites and one chassignite had been identified among martian meteorites. These four exhibit very similar radiometric ages and cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages, indicating that they may have derived from a common location on Mars and were ejected into space by a single impact. This situation is quite different from that of martian shergottites, which exhibit a range of radiometric ages and CRE ages (1). Recently, several new nakhlites and a new martian dunite (NWA2737) have been recognized. Here we report our results of Ar-39-Ar-40 dating for the MIL03346 nakhlite and the NWA2737 "chassignite", along with new results on Chassigny.

  12. The barents sea magmatic province: Geological-geophysical evidence and new 40Ar/39Ar dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipilov, E. V.; Karyakin, Yu. V.

    2011-07-01

    Resulting from study of the geological structure of the Franz Josef Land and Svalbard archipelagoes, this work presents new 17 40Ar/39Ar age datings for basalts taken during coastal expeditions in 2006-2010. Radiological age determination for intrusive units (sills) located in the western part of Nordensciold Land (Spitzbergen Island) has been made for the first time. In relation to use of the interpretation results of marine geological-geophysical data, the distribution peculiarities and time ranges for Jurassic-Cretaceous basic magmatism within the studied regions of the Barents Sea continental margin and within the Arctic as a whole are discussed.

  13. SUMER-IRIS Observations of AR11875

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Donald; Innes, Davina

    2014-05-01

    We present results of the first joint observing campaign of IRIS and SOHO/SUMER. While the IRIS datasets provide information on the chromosphere and transition region, SUMER provides complementary diagnostics on the corona. On 2013-10-24, we observed an active region, AR11875, and the surrounding plage for approximately 4 hours using rapid-cadence observing programs. These datasets include spectra from a small C -class flare which occurs in conjunction with an Ellerman-bomb type event. Our analysis focusses on how the high spatial resolution and slit jaw imaging capabilities of IRIS shed light on the unresolved structure of transient events in the SUMER catalog.

  14. Theoretical photoabsorption spectra of Ar n+ clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doltsinis, Nikos L.; Knowles, Peter J.

    2000-08-01

    The photoabsorption spectra of selected Ar n+ clusters ( n=7, 8, 17, 19, 23) have been investigated theoretically using an extended Diatomics-in-Molecules approach including induced dipole - induced dipole and spin-orbit coupling interaction effects. Our calculations at 0 K confirm the experimentally observed spectral red-shift of the visible photoabsorption peak in the region 15< n<20 [Levinger et al., J. Chem. Phys. 89 (1988) 5654]. Furthermore, we have been able to reproduce the additional red-shift measured for 7⩽ n⩽9 [Haberland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 67 (1991) 3290] by carrying out finite temperature Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin genes: models and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vettermann, Christian; Schlissel, Mark S

    2010-09-01

    The allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes is one of the most evolutionarily conserved features of the adaptive immune system and underlies the monospecificity of B cells. While much has been learned about how Ig allelic exclusion is established during B-cell development, the relevance of monospecificity to B-cell function remains enigmatic. Here, we review the theoretical models that have been proposed to explain the establishment of Ig allelic exclusion and focus on the molecular mechanisms utilized by developing B cells to ensure the monoallelic expression of Ig kappa and Ig lambda light chain genes. We also discuss the physiological consequences of Ig allelic exclusion and speculate on the importance of monospecificity of B cells for immune recognition.

  16. Genetic mapping of the interface between the ArsD metallochaperone and the ArsA ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianbo; Ajees, Abdul; Salam, Abdul; Rosen, Barry P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The ArsD metallochaperone delivers trivalent metalloids, As(III) or Sb(III), to the ArsA ATPase, the catalytic subunit of the ArsAB As(III) efflux pump. Transfer of As(III) increases the affinity of ArsA for As(III), allowing resistance to environmental arsenic concentrations. As(III) transfer is channeled from chaperone to ATPase, implying that ArsD and ArsA form an interface at their metal binding sites. A genetic approach was used to test this hypothesis. Thirteen ArsD mutants exhibiting either weaker or stronger interaction with ArsA were selected by either repressed transactivator yeast two-hybrid or reverse yeast two-hybrid assays. Additionally, Lys-37 and Lys-62 were identified as being involved in ArsD function by site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification. Substitution at either position with arginine was tolerated, suggesting participation of a positive charge. By yeast two-hybrid analysis K37A and K62A mutants lost interaction with ArsA. All fifteen mutations were mapped on the surface of the ArsD structure, and their locations are consistent with a structural model generated by in silico docking. Four are close to metalloid binding site residues Cys-12, Cys-13 and Cys18, and seven are on the surface of helix 1. These results suggest that the interface involves one surface of helix 1 and the metalloid binding site. PMID:21299644

  17. DRD4 dopamine receptor allelic diversity in various primate species

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Higley, D.; O`Brien, S.

    1994-09-01

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is uniquely characterized by a 48 bp repeating segment within the coding region, located in exon III. Different DRD4 alleles are produced by the presence of additional 48 bp repeats, each of which adds 16 amino acids to the length of the 3rd intracytoplasmic loop of the receptor. The DRD4 receptor is therefore an intriguing candidate gene for behaviors which are influenced by dopamine function. In several human populations, DRD4 alleles with 2-8 and 10 repeats have previously been identified, and the 4 and 7 repeat alleles are the most abundant. We have determined DRD4 genotypes in the following nonhuman primate species: chimpanzee N=2, pygmy chimpanzee N=2, gorilla N=4, siamang N=2, Gelada baboon N=1, gibbon N=1, orangutan (Bornean and Sumatran) N=62, spider monkey N=4, owl monkey N=1, Colobus monkey N=1, Patas monkey N=1, ruffed lemur N=1, rhesus macaque N=8, and vervet monkey N=28. The degree of DRD4 polymorphism and which DRD4 alleles were present both showed considerable variation across primate species. In contrast to the human, rhesus macaque monkeys were monomorphic. The 4 and 7 repeat allels, highly abundant in the human, may not be present in certain other primates. For example, the four spider monkeys we studied showed the 7, 8 and 9 repeat length alleles and the only gibbon we analyzed was homozygous for the 9 repeat allele (thus far not observed in the human). Genotyping of other primate species and sequencing of the individual DRD4 repeat alleles in different species may help us determine the ancestral DRD4 repeat length and identify connections between DRD4 genotype and phenotype.

  18. Identification of incompatibility alleles in the tetraploid species sour cherry.

    PubMed

    Tobutt, K R; Bosković, R; Cerović, R; Sonneveld, T; Ruzić, D

    2004-03-01

    The incompatibility genetics of sour cherry ( Prunus cerasus), an allotetraploid species thought to be derived from sweet cherry (diploid) and ground cherry (tetraploid), were investigated by test crossing and by analysis of stylar ribonucleases which are known to be the products of incompatibility alleles in sweet cherry. Stylar extracts of 36 accessions of sour cherry were separated electrophoretically and stained for ribonuclease activity. The zymograms of most accessions showed three bands, some two or four. Of the ten bands seen, six co-migrated with bands that in sweet cherry are attributed to the incompatibility alleles S(1), S(3), S(4), S(6, ) S(9) and S(13). 'Cacanski Rubin', 'Erdi Botermo B', 'Koros' and 'Ujfehertoi Furtos', which showed bands apparently corresponding to S(1) and S(4), were test pollinated with the sweet cherry 'Merton Late' ( S(1) S(4)). Monitoring pollen tube growth, and, in one case, fruit set, showed that these crosses were incompatible and that the four sour cherries indeed have the alleles S(1) and S(4). Likewise, test pollination of 'Marasca Piemonte', 'Marasca Savena' and 'Morello, Dutch' with 'Noble' ( S(6) S(13)) showed that these three sour cherries have the alleles S(6) and S(13). S(13) was very frequent in sour cherry cultivars, but is rare in sweet cherry cultivars, whereas with S(3) the situation is reversed. It was suggested that the other four bands are derived from ground cherry and one of these, provisionally attributed to S(B), occurred frequently in a small set of ground cherry accessions surveyed. Analysing some progenies from sour by sweet crosses by S allele-specific PCR and monitoring the success of some sweet by sour crosses were informative. They indicated mostly disomic inheritance, with sweet cherry S alleles belonging to one locus and, presumably, the ground cherry alleles to the other, and helped clarify the genomic arrangement of the alleles and the interactions in heteroallelic pollen. PMID:14689184

  19. Robust identification of local adaptation from allele frequencies.

    PubMed

    Günther, Torsten; Coop, Graham

    2013-09-01

    Comparing allele frequencies among populations that differ in environment has long been a tool for detecting loci involved in local adaptation. However, such analyses are complicated by an imperfect knowledge of population allele frequencies and neutral correlations of allele frequencies among populations due to shared population history and gene flow. Here we develop a set of methods to robustly test for unusual allele frequency patterns and correlations between environmental variables and allele frequencies while accounting for these complications based on a Bayesian model previously implemented in the software Bayenv. Using this model, we calculate a set of "standardized allele frequencies" that allows investigators to apply tests of their choice to multiple populations while accounting for sampling and covariance due to population history. We illustrate this first by showing that these standardized frequencies can be used to detect nonparametric correlations with environmental variables; these correlations are also less prone to spurious results due to outlier populations. We then demonstrate how these standardized allele frequencies can be used to construct a test to detect SNPs that deviate strongly from neutral population structure. This test is conceptually related to FST and is shown to be more powerful, as we account for population history. We also extend the model to next-generation sequencing of population pools-a cost-efficient way to estimate population allele frequencies, but one that introduces an additional level of sampling noise. The utility of these methods is demonstrated in simulations and by reanalyzing human SNP data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel populations and pooled next-generation sequencing data from Atlantic herring. An implementation of our method is available from http://gcbias.org. PMID:23821598

  20. Robust Identification of Local Adaptation from Allele Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Torsten; Coop, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Comparing allele frequencies among populations that differ in environment has long been a tool for detecting loci involved in local adaptation. However, such analyses are complicated by an imperfect knowledge of population allele frequencies and neutral correlations of allele frequencies among populations due to shared population history and gene flow. Here we develop a set of methods to robustly test for unusual allele frequency patterns and correlations between environmental variables and allele frequencies while accounting for these complications based on a Bayesian model previously implemented in the software Bayenv. Using this model, we calculate a set of “standardized allele frequencies” that allows investigators to apply tests of their choice to multiple populations while accounting for sampling and covariance due to population history. We illustrate this first by showing that these standardized frequencies can be used to detect nonparametric correlations with environmental variables; these correlations are also less prone to spurious results due to outlier populations. We then demonstrate how these standardized allele frequencies can be used to construct a test to detect SNPs that deviate strongly from neutral population structure. This test is conceptually related to FST and is shown to be more powerful, as we account for population history. We also extend the model to next-generation sequencing of population pools—a cost-efficient way to estimate population allele frequencies, but one that introduces an additional level of sampling noise. The utility of these methods is demonstrated in simulations and by reanalyzing human SNP data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel populations and pooled next-generation sequencing data from Atlantic herring. An implementation of our method is available from http://gcbias.org. PMID:23821598

  1. The role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation in the regulation of StAR activity and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana F; Orlando, Ulises; Helfenberger, Katia E; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2015-06-15

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein regulates the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis, i.e. the delivery of cholesterol from the outer (OMM) to the inner (IMM) mitochondrial membrane. StAR is a 37-kDa protein with an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence that is cleaved off during mitochondrial import to yield 30-kDa intramitochondrial StAR. StAR acts exclusively on the OMM and its activity is proportional to how long it remains on the OMM. However, the precise fashion and the molecular mechanism in which StAR remains on the OMM have not been elucidated yet. In this work we will discuss the role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation by the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) as part of the mechanism that regulates StAR retention on the OMM and activity.

  2. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chaoyong; Odeberg, Jacob; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per . E-mail: Per.Eriksson@ki.se

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  3. SSR allelic variation in almond (Prunus dulcis Mill.).

    PubMed

    Xie, Hua; Sui, Yi; Chang, Feng-Qi; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rong-Cai

    2006-01-01

    Sixteen SSR markers including eight EST-SSR and eight genomic SSRs were used for genetic diversity analysis of 23 Chinese and 15 international almond cultivars. EST- and genomic SSR markers previously reported in species of Prunus, mainly peach, proved to be useful for almond genetic analysis. DNA sequences of 117 alleles of six of the 16 SSR loci were analysed to reveal sequence variation among the 38 almond accessions. For the four SSR loci with AG/CT repeats, no insertions or deletions were observed in the flanking regions of the 98 alleles sequenced. Allelic size variation of these loci resulted exclusively from differences in the structures of repeat motifs, which involved interruptions or occurrences of new motif repeats in addition to varying number of AG/CT repeats. Some alleles had a high number of uninterrupted repeat motifs, indicating that SSR mutational patterns differ among alleles at a given SSR locus within the almond species. Allelic homoplasy was observed in the SSR loci because of base substitutions, interruptions or compound repeat motifs. Substitutions in the repeat regions were found at two SSR loci, suggesting that point mutations operate on SSRs and hinder the further SSR expansion by introducing repeat interruptions to stabilize SSR loci. Furthermore, it was shown that some potential point mutations in the flanking regions are linked with new SSR repeat motif variation in almond and peach.

  4. New high-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages on Oligocene volcanic rocks of northwestern Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Francis H.; Jicha, Brian R.

    2016-02-01

    New, high-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages from volcanic rocks in northwestern Kenya are provided for some areas of exposure in this remote area. We report seven 40Ar/39Ar ages generated from single crystal total fusion experiments on alkali feldspar separated from volcanic rocks in the Mogila, Songot, and Lokwanamur Ranges and the Gatome valley. A rhyolite from the lower part of the sequence in the Mogila Range yielded ages of 32.31 ± 0.06 Ma and 32.33 ± 0.07 Ma, and a rhyolite near the top of that sequence yielded 31.67 ± 0.04 Ma. A single sample from the Songot Range yielded an age of 32.49 ± 0.07 Ma, slightly older than the rocks collected from Mogila. In both ranges the early Oligocene rhyolites are underlain by basalts, as is also the case in the Labur Range. Ages of 25.95 ± 0.03 Ma, 25.91 ± 0.04 Ma, and 27.15 ± 0.03 Ma were measured on alkali feldspar from rhyolites from the Lokwanamur Range, and the nearby Gatome valley. All of these rocks are part of an episode of widespread volcanism in northwestern Kenya in the mid-to late Oligocene that is not currently known from the Ethiopian Rift Valley.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar age of material returned from asteroid 25143 Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jisun; Turrin, Brent D.; Herzog, Gregory F.; Lindsay, Fara N.; Delaney, Jeremy S.; Swisher, Carl C.; Uesugi, Masayuki; Karouji, Yuzuru; Yada, Toru; Abe, Masanao; Okada, Tatsuaki; Ishibashi, Yukihiro

    2015-11-01

    The Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143, Itokawa, brought back 2000 small particles, which most closely resemble material found in LL4-6 chondrites. We report an 40Ar/39Ar age of 1.3 ± 0.3 Ga for a sample of Itokawa consisting of three grains with a total mass of ~2 μg. This age is lower than the >4.0 Ga ages measured for 75% of LL chondrites but close to one for Y-790964 and its pairs. The flat 40Ar/39Ar release spectrum of the sample suggests complete degassing 1.3 Ga ago. Recent solar heating in Itokawa's current orbit does not appear likely to have reset that age. Solar or impact heating 1.3 Ga ago could have done so. If impact heating was responsible, then the 1.3 Ga age sets an upper bound on the time at which the Itokawa rubble pile was assembled and suggests that rubble pile creation was an ongoing process in the inner solar system for at least the first 3 billion years of solar system history.

  6. Ar40-Ar39 systematics in rocks and separated minerals from Apollo 14.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, G.; Huneke, J. C.; Podosek, F. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    The Ar40-Ar39 dating technique has been applied to separated minerals (plagioclase, pyroxene, quintessence and an 'ilmenite' concentrate), and whole rock samples of Apollo 14 rocks 14310 and 14073. Plagioclase shows the best gas retention characteristics, with no evidence of anomalous behavior and only a small amount of gas loss in the initial release. Ages determined from the plagioclase of 14310 and 14073 are (3.87 plus or minus 0.05) and (3.88 plus or minus 0.05) AE respectively. Low apparent ages at low release temperatures, which are frequently observed in whole rock Ar40-Ar39 experiments on lunar basalts, are shown to be principally due to gas loss in the high-K interstitial glass (quintessence) phase, confirming earlier suggestions. The decrease in apparent ages in the high-temperature release previously observed in several total rock samples of Apollo 14 basalts has been identified with the pyroxene. Plagioclase is also found to be the most suitable mineral for the determination of cosmic ray exposure ages, and exposure ages of 280 and 113 m.y. are found for 14310 and 14073, respectively, indicating that these rocks, which are very similar in many respects, have different exposure histories.

  7. cAMP stimulation of StAR expression and cholesterol metabolism is modulated by co-expression of labile suppressors of transcription and mRNA turnover.

    PubMed

    Jefcoate, Colin R; Lee, Jinwoo; Cherradi, Nadia; Takemori, Hiroshi; Duan, Haichuan

    2011-04-10

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein is generated in rodents from 1.6 kb and 3.5 kb mRNA formed by alternative polyadenylation. The zinc finger protein, TIS11B (also Znf36L1), is elevated by cAMP in adrenal cells in parallel with StAR mRNA. TIS11b selectively destabilizes the 3.5 kb mRNA through AU-rich sequences at the end of the 3'UTR. siRNA suppression shows that TIS11b surprisingly increases StAR protein and cholesterol metabolism. StAR transcription is directly activated by PKA phosphorylation. cAMP responsive element binding (CREB) protein 1 phosphorylation is a key step leading to recruitment of the co-activator, CREB binding protein (CBP). A second protein, CREB regulated transcription coactivator (TORC/CRTC), enhances this recruitment, but is inhibited by salt inducible kinase (SIK). Basal StAR transcription is constrained through this phosphorylation of TORC. PKA provides an alternative stimulation by phosphorylating SIK, which prevents TORC inactivation. PKA stimulation of StAR nuclear transcripts substantially precedes TORC recruitment to the StAR promoter, which may, therefore, mediate a later step in mRNA production. Inhibition of SIK by staurosporine elevates StAR transcription and TORC recruitment to maximum levels, but without CREB phosphorylation. TORC suppression by SIK evidently limits basal StAR transcription. Staurosporine and cAMP stimulate synergistically. SIK targets the phosphatase, PP2a (activation), and Type 2 histone de-acetylases (inhibition), which may each contribute to suppression. Staurosporine stimulation through SIK inhibition is repeated in cAMP stimulation of many steroidogenic genes regulated by steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) and CREB. TIS11b and SIK may combine to attenuate StAR expression when hormonal stimuli decline.

  8. The 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar dating of lavas from the Hilo 1-km core hole, Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, W.D.; Turrin, B.D.; Renne, P.R.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Mauna Kea lava flows cored in the HilIo hole range in age from <200 ka to about 400 ka based on 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating and K-Ar analyses of 16 groundmass samples and one coexisting plagioclase. The lavas, all subaerially deposited, include a lower section consisting only of tholeiitic basalts and an upper section of interbedded alkalic, transitional tholeiitic, and tholeiitic basalts. The lower section has yielded predominantly complex, discordant 40Ar/39Ar age spectra that result from mobility of 40Ar and perhaps K, the presence of excess 40Ar, and redistribution of 39Ar by recoil. Comparison of K-Ar ages with 40Ar/39Ar integrated ages indicates that some of these samples have also lost 39Ar. Nevertheless, two plateau ages of 391 ?? 40 and 400 ?? 26 ka from deep in the hole, combined with data from the upper section, show that the tholeiitic section accumulated at an average rate of about 7 to 8 m/kyr and has an mean recurrence interval of 0.5 kyr/flow unit. Samples from the upper section yield relatively precise 40Ar/39Ar plateau and isotope correlation ages of 326 ?? 23, 241 ?? 5, 232 ?? 4, and 199 ?? 9 ka for depths of -415.7 m to -299.2 m. Within their uncertainty, these ages define a linear relationship with depth, with an average accumulation rate of 0.9 m/kyr and an average recurrence interval of 4.8 kyr/flow unit. The top of the Mauna Kea sequence at -280 m must be older than the plateau age of 132 ?? 32 ka, obtained for the basal Mauna Loa flow in the corehole. The upward decrease in lava accumulation rate is a consequence of the decreasing magma supply available to Mauna Kea as it rode the Pacific plate away from its magma source, the Hawaiian mantle plume. The age-depth relation in the core hole may be used to test and refine models that relate the growth of Mauna Kea to the thermal and compositional structure of the mantle plume.

  9. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of submarine Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jicha, Brian R.; Rhodes, J. Michael; Singer, Brad S.; Garcia, Michael O.

    2012-09-01

    New geochronologic constraints refine the growth history of Mauna Loa volcano and enhance interpretations of the petrologic, geochemical, and isotopic evolution of Hawaiian magmatism. We report results of 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating experiments on low-K, tholeiitic lavas from the 1.6 km high Kahuku landslide scarp cutting Mauna Loa's submarine southwest rift zone, and from lavas in a deeper section of the rift. Obtaining precise40Ar/39Ar ages from young, tholeiitic lavas containing only 0.2-0.3 wt.% K2O is challenging due to their extremely low radiogenic 40Ar contents. Analyses of groundmass from 45 lavas yield 14 new age determinations (31% success rate) with plateau and isochron ages that agree with stratigraphic constraints. Lavas collected from a 1250 m thick section in the landslide scarp headwall were all erupted around 470 ± 10 ka, implying an extraordinary period of accumulation of ˜25 mm/yr, possibly correlating with the peak of the shield-building stage. This rate is three times higher than the estimated vertical lava accumulation rate for shield-building at Mauna Kea (8.6 ± 3.1 mm/yr) based on results from the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project. Between ˜470 and 273 ka, the lava accumulation rate along the southwest rift zone decreased dramatically to ˜1 mm/yr. We propose that the marked reduction in lava accumulation rate does not mark the onset of post-shield volcanism as previously suggested, but rather indicates the upward migration of the magma system as Mauna Loa evolved from a submarine stage of growth to one that is predominantly subaerial, thereby cutting off supply to the distal rift zone. Prior to ˜250 ka, lavas with Loihi-like isotopic signatures were erupted along with lavas having typical Mauna Loa values, implying greater heterogeneity in the plume source earlier in Mauna Loa's growth. In addition to refining accumulation rates and the isotopic evolution of the lavas erupted along the southwest rift zone, our new40Ar/39Ar results

  10. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tourmaline as a tool for high-temperature metamorphism thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, Fred; Thern, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Tourmaline is an ubiquitous mineral, with properties making it ideal for studying metamorphic processes as well as a useful tool for a wide range of applications (e.g, magmatism, metasomatism, ore deposits [1]), mostly because it is not sensitive to chemical or mechanical alteration and is stable over a wide range of pressure-temperature conditions (up to 6 GPa and 850° C [2]). Typical metamorphic tourmaline types include dravite and shorl which, along with elbaite, belong to the alkali group [1]. The alkali group is notable because tourmalines from this group tend to incorporate trace amounts of K2O and therefore, can be dated using the 40Ar/39Ar technique. In order to understand the maximum temperature below which the K/Ar chronometer stays closed to argon loss by thermally activated diffusion, we carried out temperature controlled furnace diffusion experiments on well-behaved 40Ar/39Ar plateau-forming Archean tourmaline of 2935 ± 9 Ma [3]. Each experiment yielded an Arrhenius profile (Do vs. 1/temperature) that shows that the 39Ar data form two linear arrays with two distinct slopes. The first array only includes a few % of the total gas, has a shallow slope and shows very fast diffusivity at low temperature. We interpret these data as indicating very fast release of argon by cracks and defects. The second array of data points includes most of the gas of each experiment and forms a much steeper slope. These data yielded Ea (activation energy) values ranging from 120 to 157 Kcal/mol and D0 (pre-exponential diffusion factor) values ranging from 1.9x106 to 2.5x109 cm2/s for crystals with an average radius of 100 ± 25 μm. Three additional experiments using a laser (resulting in poor temperature control) suggest similar values although the latter experiments are considered semi-quantitative. The furnace experiments suggest that tourmaline has a weighted mean closure temperature of 804 ± 90 ° C (1σ) for a cooling rate of 10° C/Ma. Monte Carlo simulations using

  11. Inter-monitor standard calibration and tests for Ar-Ar biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemming, S. R.; Turrin, B. D.; Swisher, C. C.; Cox, S. E.; Mesko, G. T.; Chang, S.

    2010-12-01

    A major issue facing the geochronology community is that there are biases between chronometers that have become significant as we interrogate the rock record with ever increasing levels of precision. Despite much progress there are still major issues with building a timescale with multiple chronometers and for testing synchroneity of anomalous events in Earth history. Improvements in methods for determining U-Pb zircon dates has led to their application at precisions of 0.2% or better in rocks even younger than a million years (e.g., Crowley et al., 2007, Geology), and significantly better than 0.1% in some cases (e.g., Bowring et al., 2006, Paleontological Society Papers, Volume 12). Additionally, the inter-calibration experiments for U-Pb using the EARTHTIME tracer have yielded excellent agreement among labs (0.05%) and these values are traceable back to SI units through the EARTHTIME tracer calibration experiment (e.g., Condon et al., in press, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta). These advances have greatly extended the need for cross calibrations of the two chronometers and ultimately seamless integration into the Geologic Time Scale. The direct comparison of ages using different chronometers and laboratories is the central aspect in the quest for a highly resolved and accurate time scale of Earth History. A significant obstacle to high precision inter-comparison of U-Pb and Ar-Ar age results is the current inability of Ar-Ar labs to achieve agreement on monitor standard ages at the 0.1% level. At the heart of Ar-Ar geochronology is the assumption of a known absolute age of a standard, to which all applicable unknowns are referenced. While individual labs are able to achieve highly precise apparent ages on monitor standards, the lack of a “gold standard” for Ar-Ar dating means that we do not know who is, or indeed if anybody is correct. In order to improve our understanding of factors that may lead to biases in our own laboratories at Lamont-Doherty Earth

  12. Polymorphisms in MHC-DRA and -DRB alleles of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) reveal different features from cattle DR alleles.

    PubMed

    Sena, L; Schneider, M P C; Brenig, B; Honeycutt, R L; Womack, J E; Skow, L C

    2003-02-01

    Seventy-five individuals of Bubalus bubalis belonging to four different breeds, three of river buffalo and one of swamp buffalo, were studied for polymorphism in MHC DRB (Bubu-DRB) and DRA (Bubu-DRA) loci. Eight alleles of Bubu-DRB were found, and all alleles in the swamp type were shared with the three river breeds. All alleles sampled from the breed of European origin (Mediterranean) were present in breeds sampled in Brazil, thus variability of this locus may have been preserved to a great extent in the more recently founded Brazilian population. Bubu-DRB alleles contained higher proportions of synonymous vs. non-synonymous substitutions in the non-peptide-binding sites (PBS) region, in contrast to the pattern of variation found in BoLA-DRB3, the orthologous locus in cattle. This indicated that either the first domain exon (exon 2) of Bubu-DRB has not undergone as much recombination and/or gene conversion as in cattle alleles, or Bubu-DRB may be more ancient than BoLA-DRB3 alleles. Phylogenetic analysis of DRB alleles from Bubalus, Syncerus c. caffer, the Cape buffalo, and domestic cattle demonstrated transspecies polymorphism. Water buffalo contained two alleles of DRA that differed from each other in two amino acid positions, including one in the PBS (alpha22) that was also shared with Anoa depressicornis, the anoa. Discovery of variation in DRA was surprising as the first domain of DRA is a highly conserved polypeptide in mammals in general and especially in ruminants, where no other substitution in PBS was seen.

  13. The bombardment history of the Moon as recorded by 40Ar-39Ar chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, V. A.; Fritz, J.; Weiss, B. P.; Garrick-Bethell, I.; Shuster, D. L.

    2013-02-01

    New petrography and 40Ar-39Ar ages have been obtained for 1-3 mm sized rock fragments from Apollo 16 Station 13 soil 63503 (North Ray crater ejecta) and chips from three rocks collected by Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions. Selection of these samples was aimed at the old 40Ar-39Ar ages to understand the early history of the lunar magnetic field and impact flux. Fifteen samples were studied including crustal material, polymict feldspathic fragmental breccias, and impact melts. The impact ages obtained range between approximately 3.3 and 4.3 billion years (Ga). Polymict fragmental breccia 63503,1 exhibits the lowest signs of recrystallization observed and a probable old relic age of 4.547 ± 0.027. The plateau age of 4.293 ± 0.044 Ga obtained for impact melt rock 63503,13 represents the oldest known age for such a lithology. Possibly, this age represents the minimum age for the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) Basin. In agreement with literature data, these results show that impact ages >3.9 Ga are found in lunar rocks, especially within soil 63503. Impact exhumation of deep-seated warm crustal material onto the lunar surface is considered to explain the common 4.2 Ga ages obtained for weakly shocked samples from soil 63503 and Apollo 17. This would directly imply that one or more basin-forming events occurred at that time. Some rock fragments showing none to limited petrologic features indicate thermal annealing. These rocks may have lost Ar while resident within the hot-ejecta of a large basin. Concurrent with previous studies, these results lead us to advocate for a complex impact flux in the inner solar system during the initial approximately 1.3 Ga.

  14. Impriniting of human H19: Allele-specific CpG methylation, loss of the active allele in Wilms tumor, and potential for somatic allele switching

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Shields, T.; Crenshaw, T.; Hao, Y.; Moulton, T.; Tycko, B. )

    1993-07-01

    Genomic imprinting and monoallelic gene expression appear to play a role in human genetic disease and tumorigenesis. The human H19 gene, at chromosome 11p15, has previously been shown to be monoallelically expressed. Since CpG methylation has been implicated in imprinting, the authors analyzed methylation of H19 DNA. In fetal and adult organs the transcriptionally silent H19 allele was extensively hypermethylated through the entire gene and its promoter, and, consistent with a functional role for DNA methylation, expression of an H19 promoter-reporter construct was inhibited by in vitro methylation. Gynogenetic ovarian teratomas were found to contain only hypomethylated H19 DNA, suggesting that the expressed H19 allele might be maternal. This was confirmed by analysis of 11p15 polymorphisms in a patient with Wilms tumor. The tumor had lost the maternal 11p15, and H19 expression in the normal kidney was exclusively from this allele. Imprinting of human H19 appears to be susceptible to tissue-specific modulation in somatic development; in one individual, cerebellar cells were found to express only the otherwise silent allele. Implications of these findings for the role of DNA methylation in imprinting and for H19 as a candidate imprinted tumor-suppressor gene are discussed. 57 refs., 7 figs.

  15. A limit to the divergent allele advantage model supported by variable pathogen recognition across HLA-DRB1 allele lineages.

    PubMed

    Lau, Q; Yasukochi, Y; Satta, Y

    2015-11-01

    Genetic diversity in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules is thought to have arisen from the co-evolution between host and pathogen and maintained by balancing selection. Heterozygote advantage is a common proposed scenario for maintaining high levels of diversity in HLA genes, and extending from this, the divergent allele advantage (DAA) model suggests that individuals with more divergent HLA alleles bind and recognize a wider array of antigens. While the DAA model seems biologically suitable for driving HLA diversity, there is likely an upper threshold to the amount of sequence divergence. We used peptide-binding and pathogen-recognition capacity of DRB1 alleles as a model to further explore the DAA model; within the DRB1 locus, we examined binding predictions based on two distinct phylogenetic groups (denoted group A and B) previously identified based on non-peptide-binding region (PBR) nucleotide sequences. Predictions in this study support that group A allele and group B allele lineages have contrasting binding/recognition capacity, with only the latter supporting the DAA model. Furthermore, computer simulations revealed an inconsistency in the DAA model alone with observed extent of polymorphisms, supporting that the DAA model could only work effectively in combination with other mechanisms. Overall, we support that the mechanisms driving HLA diversity are non-exclusive. By investigating the relationships among HLA alleles, and pathogens recognized, we can provide further insights into the mechanisms on how humans have adapted to infectious diseases over time.

  16. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR), and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:26372468

  17. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Chae; Chen, Congcong; Bolton, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR), and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation.

  18. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Six Recessive Viable Alleles of the Mouse Agouti Locus

    PubMed Central

    Hustad, C. M.; Perry, W. L.; Siracusa, L. D.; Rasberry, C.; Cobb, L.; Cattanach, B. M.; Kovatch, R.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1995-01-01

    The agouti locus on mouse chromosome 2 encodes a secreted cysteine-rich protein of 131 amino acids that acts as a molecular switch to instruct the melanocyte to make either yellow pigment (phaeomelanin) or black pigment (eumelanin). Mutations that up-regulate agouti expression are dominant to those causing decreased expression and result in yellow coat color. Other associated effects are obesity, diabetes, and increased susceptibility to tumors. To try to define important functional domains of the agouti protein, we have analyzed the molecular defects present in a series of recessive viable agouti mutations. In total, six alleles (a(mJ), a(u), a(da), a(16H), a(18H), a(e)) were examined at both the RNA and DNA level. Two of the alleles, a(16H) and a(e), result from mutations in the agouti coding region. Four alleles (a(mJ), a(u), a(18H), and a(da)) appear to represent regulatory mutations that down-regulate agouti expression. Interestingly, one of these mutations, a(18H), also appears to cause an immunological defect in the homozygous condition. This immunological defect is somewhat analogous to that observed in motheaten (me) mutant mice. Short and long-range restriction enzyme analyses of homozygous a(18H) DNA are consistent with the hypothesis that a(18H) results from a paracentric inversion where one end of the inversion maps in the 5' regulatory region of agouti and the other end in or near a gene that is required for normal immunological function. Cloning the breakpoints of this putative inversion should allow us to identify the gene that confers this interesting immunological disorder. PMID:7635290

  19. One-electron pseudopotential investigation of the RbAr and FrAr van der Waals systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhiflaoui, J.; Berriche, H.

    2012-12-01

    The potential energy curves of the ground state and many excited states of RbAr and FrAr van der Waals systems have been determined using a one-electron pseudopotential approach. The pseudopotential technique is used to replace the effect of the Rb+ and Fr+ cores and the electron-Ar interaction. In addition a core-core interaction is included. This has permitted to reduce the number of active electrons of the RbAr and FrAr systems to only one electron, the valence electron. This has led to use very large basis sets for Rb, Fr and Ar atoms. In this context, the potential energy curves of the ground and many excited states are performed at the SCF level. The core-core interactions for Rb+Ar and Fr+Ar are included using the CCSD(T) accurate potentials of Hickling et al. [H. Hickling, L. Viehland, D. Shepherd, P. Soldan, E. Lee and T. Wright, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 6 (2004) 4233]. In addition, the spectroscopic constants of these states are derived and compared with the available theoretical works. Such comparison for RbAr has shown a very good agreement for the ground and the first excited states. However, the FrAr system was not studied previously and its spectroscopic constants are presented here for the first time.

  20. How the Number of Alleles Influences Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hat, Beata; Paszek, Pawel; Kimmel, Marek; Piechor, Kazimierz; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2007-07-01

    The higher organisms, eukaryotes, are diploid and most of their genes have two homological copies (alleles). However, the number of alleles in a cell is not constant. In the S phase of the cell cycle all the genome is duplicated and then in the G2 phase and mitosis, which together last for several hours, most of the genes have four copies instead of two. Cancer development is, in many cases, associated with a change in allele number. Several genetic diseases are caused by haploinsufficiency: Lack of one of the alleles or its improper functioning. In the paper we consider the stochastic expression of a gene having a variable number of copies. We applied our previously developed method in which the reaction channels are split into slow (connected with change of gene state) and fast (connected with mRNA/protein synthesis/decay), the later being approximated by deterministic reaction rate equations. As a result we represent gene expression as a piecewise deterministic time-continuous Markov process, which is further related with a system of partial differential hyperbolic equations for probability density functions (pdfs) of protein distribution. The stationary pdfs are calculated analytically for haploidal gene or numerically for diploidal and tetraploidal ones. We distinguished nine classes of simultaneous activation of haploid, diploid and tetraploid genes. This allows for analysis of potential consequences of gene duplication or allele loss. We show that when gene activity is autoregulated by a positive feedback, the change in number of gene alleles may have dramatic consequences for its regulation and may not be compensated by the change of efficiency of mRNA synthesis per allele.

  1. Distribution of HLA-B alleles in Mexican Amerindian populations.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Hernández-Pacheco, Guadalupe; Zuñiga, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Rangel, Carlos; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Martínez-Laso, Jorge; Granados, Julio; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2003-02-01

    In the present study we analyzed by PCR-SSO technique the HLA-B gene frequencies in 281 healthy individuals from four Mexican Amerindian populations (66 Mayos, 90 Mazatecans, 72 Nahuas and 53 Teenek). The most frequent alleles in all studied populations were HLA-B35, HLA-B39, and HLA-B40; however, some differences were observed between populations. The HLA-B35 allele was the most frequent in three of the four populations studied (Mayos, Nahuas and Teenek), whereas in Mazatecans the most frequent allele was HLA-B39. HLA-B40 presented frequencies higher than 10% in all groups. On the other hand, only Mayos presented an HLA-B51 gene frequency higher than 10%. When comparisons were made, important differences between groups were observed. The Teenek group presented an increased frequency of HLA-B35 when compared to Mazatecans and the HLA-B52 allele was increased in Nahuas and Teenek when compared to Mayos. An increased frequency of HLA-B39 was observed in Mazatecans when compared to Nahuas, Mayos and Teenek. Also, an increased frequency of HLA-B51 was observed in Mayos when compared to Mazatecans and Nahuas. These data corroborate the restricted polymorphism of HLA-B alleles and the high frequency of HLA-B35, HLA-B39 and HLA-B40 alleles in autochthonous American populations. In spite of the restriction in this polymorphism, differences in frequencies of HLA-B alleles could be helpful in distinguishing each of these populations.

  2. Triaxial superdeformation in {sup 40}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Ikeda, Kiyomi; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko; Kimura, Masaaki; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Ideguchi, Eiji

    2010-07-15

    Superdeformed (SD) states in {sup 40}Ar have been studied using the deformed-basis antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. Low-energy states were calculated by the parity and angular momentum projection and the generator coordinate method (GCM). Basis wave functions were obtained by the energy variation with a constraint on the quadrupole deformation parameter beta, while other quantities such as triaxiality gamma were optimized by the energy variation. By the GCM calculation, an SD band was obtained just above the ground-state band. The SD band involves a K{sup p}i=2{sup +} side band due to the triaxiality. The calculated electric quadrupole transition strengths of the SD band reproduce the experimental values appropriately. Triaxiality is significant for understanding low-lying states.

  3. High resolution photoionisation spectroscopy of vibrationally excited Ar · NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, O. L. A.; Cruse, H. A.; Softley, T. P.; Mackenzie, S. R.

    2001-01-01

    Mass-analysed threshold ionisation (MATI) spectra of the Ar · NO complex have been obtained for the first time. These spectra have been used to determine unambiguously the nature of three bands detected by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation (REMPI) spectroscopy via the à state of Ar · NO. The features are shown to originate from vibrationally excited states of Ar · NO in its electronic ground state. The assignment is in agreement with recent theoretical calculations.

  4. Cross sections of the 36Ar(d,α)34mCl, 40Ar(d,α)38Cl, and 40Ar(d,p)41Ar nuclear reactions below 8.4 MeV.

    PubMed

    Engle, J W; Severin, G W; Barnhart, T E; Knutson, L D; Nickles, R J

    2012-02-01

    We have measured the cross section for production of the medically interesting isotope (34m)Cl, along with (38)Cl and (41)Ar, using deuteron bombardments of (36)Ar and (40)Ar below 8.4 MeV. ALICE/ASH analytical codes were employed to determine the shape of nuclear excitation functions, and experiments were performed using the University of Wisconsin tandem electrostatic accelerator to irradiate thin targets of argon gas.

  5. Statistical estimation of mineral age by K-Ar method

    SciTech Connect

    Vistelius, A.B.; Drubetzkoy, E.R.; Faas, A.V. )

    1989-11-01

    Statistical estimation of age of {sup 40}Ar/{sup 40}K ratios may be considered a result of convolution of uniform and normal distributions with different weights for different minerals. Data from Gul'shad Massif (Nearbalkhash, Kazakhstan, USSR) indicate that {sup 40}Ar/{sup 40}K ratios reflecting the intensity of geochemical processes can be resolved using convolutions. Loss of {sup 40}Ar in biotites is shown whereas hornblende retained the original content of {sup 40}Ar throughout the geological history of the massif. Results demonstrate that different estimation methods must be used for different minerals and different rocks when radiometric ages are employed for dating.

  6. β -delayed three-proton decay of 31Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, A. A.; Mazzocchi, C.; Dominik, W.; Janas, Z.; Pfützner, M.; Pomorski, M.; Acosta, L.; Baraeva, S.; Casarejos, E.; Duénas-Díaz, J.; Dunin, V.; Espino, J. M.; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Fomichev, A.; Geissel, H.; Gorshkov, A.; Kamiński, G.; Kiselev, O.; Knöbel, R.; Krupko, S.; Kuich, M.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marquinez-Durán, G.; Martel, I.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ordúz, A. K.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Simon, H.; Sitar, B.; Slepnev, R.; Stanoiu, M.; Strmen, P.; Szarka, I.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2015-06-01

    The β decay of 31Ar , produced by fragmentation of an 36Ar beam at 880 MeV/nucleon, was investigated. Identified ions of 31Ar were stopped in a gaseous time projection chamber with optical readout allowing us to record decay events with emission of protons. In addition to β -delayed emission of one and two protons we clearly observed the β -delayed three-proton branch. The branching ratio for this channel in 31Ar is found to be 0.07 ±0.02 %.

  7. Age and Duration of Weathering by 40K-40Ar and 40Ar/39Ar Analysis of Potassium-Manganese Oxides.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, P M; Becker, T A; Renne, P R; Brimhall, G H

    1992-10-16

    Supergene cryptomelane [K(1-2)(Mn(3+)Mn(4+))(8)O(16). chiH(2)O] samples from deeply weathered pegmatites in southeastern Brazil subjected to (40)K-(40)Ar and (40)Ar/(39)Ar analysis yielded (40)K-(40)Ar dates ranging from 10.1 +/- 0.5 to 5.6 +/- 0.2 Ma (million years ago). Laser-probe (40)Ar/(39)Ar step-heating of the two most disparate samples yielded plateau dates of 9.94 +/- 0.05 and 5.59 +/- 0.10 Ma, corresponding, within 2 sigma, to the (40)K-(40)Ar dates. The results imply that deep weathering profiles along the eastern Brazilian margin do not reflect present climatic conditions but are the result of a long-term process that was already advanced by the late Miocene. Weathering ages predate pulses of continental sedimentation along the eastern Brazilian margin and suggest that there was a time lag between weathering and erosion processes and sedimentation processes.

  8. Human apolipoprotein E allele and docosahexaenoic acid intake modulate peripheral cholesterol homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Pinçon, Anthony; Coulombe, Jean-Denis; Chouinard-Watkins, Raphaël; Plourde, Mélanie

    2016-08-01

    Carrying at least one apolipoprotein E ε4 allele (E4+) is the main genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies support that consuming fatty fish rich in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6ω3) is protective against development of AD. However, this protective effect seems not to hold in E4+. The involvement of APOE genotype on the relationship between DHA intake and cognitive decline could be mediated through cholesterol. Many studies show a link between cholesterol metabolism and AD progression. In this study, we investigated whether cholesterol metabolism is improved in E3+ and E4+ mice consuming a diet rich in DHA. Plasma cholesterol was 36% lower in E4+ mice compared to E3+ mice fed the control diet (P=.02), and in the liver, there was a significant genotype effect where cholesterol levels were 18% lower in E4+ mice than E3+ mice. The low-density lipoprotein receptor was overexpressed in the liver of E4+ mice. Plasma cholesterol levels were 33% lower after the DHA diet (P=.02) in E3+ mice only, and there was a significant diet effect where cholesterol level was 67% lower in the liver of mice fed DHA. Mice fed the DHA diet also had 62% less lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor expression in the liver compared to mice fed the control diet (P<.0001), but there was no genotype effect. These findings suggest that plasma and liver cholesterol homeostasis and the receptors regulating uptake of cholesterol in the liver are modulated differently and independently by APOE allele and DHA intake.

  9. 40Ar/39Ar ages from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California: age of the Cobb Mountain normal-polarity subchron revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, B.D.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Hearn, B.C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California, indicate a 1.186 ?? 0.006 Ma age for the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron. The hew age is statistically older (?? = 0.05) than the previously reported K-Ar age (1.12 ?? 0.02 Ma) and agrees with the age suggested by the astronomical polarity time scale. Incomplete extraction of radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) from the sanidine is the most likely reason for the disparity between the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages. Because the Cobb Mountain subchron is a worldwide, short-duration event, and because no widely used interlaboratory 40Ar/39Ar standard younger than 27 Ma exists, it is proposed that sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek be considered for use as a new Quaternary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standard. -Authors

  10. STR allele sequence variation: Current knowledge and future issues.

    PubMed

    Gettings, Katherine Butler; Aponte, Rachel A; Vallone, Peter M; Butler, John M

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews what is currently known about short tandem repeat (STR) allelic sequence variation in and around the twenty-four loci most commonly used throughout the world to perform forensic DNA investigations. These STR loci include D1S1656, TPOX, D2S441, D2S1338, D3S1358, FGA, CSF1PO, D5S818, SE33, D6S1043, D7S820, D8S1179, D10S1248, TH01, vWA, D12S391, D13S317, Penta E, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, Penta D, and D22S1045. All known reported variant alleles are compiled along with genomic information available from GenBank, dbSNP, and the 1000 Genomes Project. Supplementary files are included which provide annotated reference sequences for each STR locus, characterize genomic variation around the STR repeat region, and compare alleles present in currently available STR kit allelic ladders. Looking to the future, STR allele nomenclature options are discussed as they relate to next generation sequencing efforts underway. PMID:26197946

  11. Rare allelic forms of PRDM9 associated with childhood leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hussin, Julie; Sinnett, Daniel; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; de Malliard, Thibault; Busche, Stephan; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Gibson, Greg; Andersson, Anna; Holmfeldt, Linda; Ma, Jing; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jinghui; Andelfinger, Gregor; Downing, James R; Mullighan, Charles G; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-03-01

    One of the most rapidly evolving genes in humans, PRDM9, is a key determinant of the distribution of meiotic recombination events. Mutations in this meiotic-specific gene have previously been associated with male infertility in humans and recent studies suggest that PRDM9 may be involved in pathological genomic rearrangements. In studying genomes from families with children affected by B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we characterized meiotic recombination patterns within a family with two siblings having hyperdiploid childhood B-ALL and observed unusual localization of maternal recombination events. The mother of the family carries a rare PRDM9 allele, potentially explaining the unusual patterns found. From exomes sequenced in 44 additional parents of children affected with B-ALL, we discovered a substantial and significant excess of rare allelic forms of PRDM9. The rare PRDM9 alleles are transmitted to the affected children in half the cases; nonetheless there remains a significant excess of rare alleles among patients relative to controls. We successfully replicated this latter observation in an independent cohort of 50 children with B-ALL, where we found an excess of rare PRDM9 alleles in aneuploid and infant B-ALL patients. PRDM9 variability in humans is thought to influence genomic instability, and these data support a potential role for PRDM9 variation in risk of acquiring aneuploidies or genomic rearrangements associated with childhood leukemogenesis.

  12. Identification and characterization of variant alleles at CODIS STR loci.

    PubMed

    Allor, Catherine; Einum, David D; Scarpetta, Marco

    2005-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from 32,671 individuals generated by the ABI Profiler Plus and Cofiler systems were screened for variant alleles not represented within manufacturer-provided allelic ladders. A total of 85 distinct variants were identified at 12 of the 13 CODIS loci, most of which involve a truncated tetranucleotide repeat unit. Twelve novel alleles, identified at D3S1358, FGA, D18S51, D5S818, D7S820 and TPOX, were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis and include both insertions and deletions involving the repeat units themselves as well as DNA flanking the repeat regions. Population genetic data were collected for all variants and frequencies range from 0.0003 (many single observations) to 0.0042 (D7S820 '10.3' in North American Hispanics). In total, the variant alleles identified in this study are carried by 1.6% of the estimated 1 million individuals tested annually in the U.S. for the purposes of parentage resolution. A paternity case involving a recombination event of paternal origin is presented and demonstrates how variant alleles can significantly strengthen the genetic evidence in troublesome cases. In such instances, increased costs and turnaround time associated with additional testing may be eliminated.

  13. Assessing allelic dropout and genotype reliability using maximum likelihood.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Craig R; Joyce, Paul; Waits, Lisette P

    2002-01-01

    A growing number of population genetic studies utilize nuclear DNA microsatellite data from museum specimens and noninvasive sources. Genotyping errors are elevated in these low quantity DNA sources, potentially compromising the power and accuracy of the data. The most conservative method for addressing this problem is effective, but requires extensive replication of individual genotypes. In search of a more efficient method, we developed a maximum-likelihood approach that minimizes errors by estimating genotype reliability and strategically directing replication at loci most likely to harbor errors. The model assumes that false and contaminant alleles can be removed from the dataset and that the allelic dropout rate is even across loci. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed method marks a vast improvement in efficiency while maintaining accuracy. When allelic dropout rates are low (0-30%), the reduction in the number of PCR replicates is typically 40-50%. The model is robust to moderate violations of the even dropout rate assumption. For datasets that contain false and contaminant alleles, a replication strategy is proposed. Our current model addresses only allelic dropout, the most prevalent source of genotyping error. However, the developed likelihood framework can incorporate additional error-generating processes as they become more clearly understood. PMID:11805071

  14. Rare allelic forms of PRDM9 associated with childhood leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hussin, Julie; Sinnett, Daniel; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; de Malliard, Thibault; Busche, Stephan; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Gibson, Greg; Andersson, Anna; Holmfeldt, Linda; Ma, Jing; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jinghui; Andelfinger, Gregor; Downing, James R.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-01-01

    One of the most rapidly evolving genes in humans, PRDM9, is a key determinant of the distribution of meiotic recombination events. Mutations in this meiotic-specific gene have previously been associated with male infertility in humans and recent studies suggest that PRDM9 may be involved in pathological genomic rearrangements. In studying genomes from families with children affected by B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we characterized meiotic recombination patterns within a family with two siblings having hyperdiploid childhood B-ALL and observed unusual localization of maternal recombination events. The mother of the family carries a rare PRDM9 allele, potentially explaining the unusual patterns found. From exomes sequenced in 44 additional parents of children affected with B-ALL, we discovered a substantial and significant excess of rare allelic forms of PRDM9. The rare PRDM9 alleles are transmitted to the affected children in half the cases; nonetheless there remains a significant excess of rare alleles among patients relative to controls. We successfully replicated this latter observation in an independent cohort of 50 children with B-ALL, where we found an excess of rare PRDM9 alleles in aneuploid and infant B-ALL patients. PRDM9 variability in humans is thought to influence genomic instability, and these data support a potential role for PRDM9 variation in risk of acquiring aneuploidies or genomic rearrangements associated with childhood leukemogenesis. PMID:23222848

  15. Allele-dependent barley grain beta-amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Erkkilä, M J; Leah, R; Ahokas, H; Cameron-Mills, V

    1998-06-01

    The wild ancestor of cultivated barley, Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum (K. Koch) A. & Gr. (H. spontaneum), is a source of wide genetic diversity, including traits that are important for malting quality. A high beta-amylase trait was previously identified in H. spontaneum strains from Israel, and transferred into the backcross progeny of a cross with the domesticated barley cv Adorra. We have used Southern-blot analysis and beta-amy1 gene characterization to demonstrate that the high beta-amylase trait in the backcross line is co-inherited with the beta-amy1 gene from the H. spontaneum parent. We have analyzed the beta-amy1 gene organization in various domesticated and wild-type barley strains and identified three distinct beta-amy1 alleles. Two of these beta-amy1 alleles were present in modern barley, one of which was specifically found in good malting barley cultivars. The third allele, linked with high grain beta-amylase activity, was found only in a H. spontaneum strain from the Judean foothills in Israel. The sequences of three isolated beta-amy1 alleles are compared. The involvement of specific intron III sequences, in particular a 126-bp palindromic insertion, in the allele-dependent expression of beta-amylase activity in barley grain is proposed.

  16. Allele-Dependent Barley Grain β-Amylase Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Erkkilä, Maria J.; Leah, Robert; Ahokas, Hannu; Cameron-Mills, Verena

    1998-01-01

    The wild ancestor of cultivated barley, Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum (K. Koch) A. & Gr. (H. spontaneum), is a source of wide genetic diversity, including traits that are important for malting quality. A high β-amylase trait was previously identified in H. spontaneum strains from Israel, and transferred into the backcross progeny of a cross with the domesticated barley cv Adorra. We have used Southern-blot analysis and β-amy1 gene characterization to demonstrate that the high β-amylase trait in the backcross line is co-inherited with the β-amy1 gene from the H. spontaneum parent. We have analyzed the β-amy1 gene organization in various domesticated and wild-type barley strains and identified three distinct β-amy1 alleles. Two of these β-amy1 alleles were present in modern barley, one of which was specifically found in good malting barley cultivars. The third allele, linked with high grain β-amylase activity, was found only in a H. spontaneum strain from the Judean foothills in Israel. The sequences of three isolated β-amy1 alleles are compared. The involvement of specific intron III sequences, in particular a 126-bp palindromic insertion, in the allele-dependent expression of β-amylase activity in barley grain is proposed. PMID:9625721

  17. A Platform for Interrogating Cancer-Associated p53 Alleles

    PubMed Central

    D’Brot, Alejandro; Kurtz, Paula; Regan, Erin; Jakubowski, Brandon; Abrams, John M

    2016-01-01

    p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. Compelling evidence argues that full transformation involves loss of growth suppression encoded by wild-type p53 together with poorly understood oncogenic activity encoded by missense mutations. Furthermore, distinguishing disease alleles from natural polymorphisms is an important clinical challenge. To interrogate the genetic activity of human p53 variants, we leveraged the Drosophila model as an in vivo platform. We engineered strains that replace the fly p53 gene with human alleles, producing a collection of stocks that are, in effect, ‘humanized’ for p53 variants. Like the fly counterpart, human p53 transcriptionally activated a biosensor and induced apoptosis after DNA damage. However, all humanized strains representing common alleles found in cancer patients failed to complement in these assays. Surprisingly, stimulus-dependent activation of hp53 occurred without stabilization, demonstrating that these two processes can be uncoupled. Like its fly counterpart, hp53 formed prominent nuclear foci in germline cells but cancer-associated p53 variants did not. Moreover, these same mutant alleles disrupted hp53 foci and inhibited biosensor activity, suggesting that these properties are functionally linked. Together these findings establish a functional platform for interrogating human p53 alleles and suggest that simple phenotypes could be used to stratify disease variants. PMID:26996664

  18. Ar-39 - Ar-40 Evidence for an Approximately 4.26 Ga Impact Heating Event on the LL Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, E. T.; Bogard, D. D.; Rubin, A. E.

    2003-01-01

    Miller Range 99301 is a type 6, unbrecciated LL chondrite. MIL 99301 is of interest because some compositional and petrographic features suggest it experienced rather high shock grades, whereas other features suggest it is relatively unshocked. Inconsistent shock indicators could be explained if MIL 99301 was shocked but then partly annealed by heat produced by impacts on the parent body. The hypothesis that MIL 99301 experienced high temperature metamorphism (type 6) followed by a later shock event that heated, but did not melt, the constituent feldspar can be evaluated using (39)Ar-(40)Ar chronology. This is because (39)Ar-(40)Ar ages of shocked ordinary chondrites are generally <4.2 Ga, whereas (39)Ar-(40)Ar ages of unshocked meteorites are generally older, and between 4.52 - 4.38 Ga.

  19. Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Brian J.; Seroyer, Shane T.; Filardo, Giuseppe; Bajaj, Sarvottam; Fortier, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may affect soft tissue healing via growth factors released after platelet degranulation. Because of this potential benefit, clinicians have begun to inject PRP for the treatment of tendon, ligament, muscle, and cartilage injuries and early osteoarthritis. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was performed for studies relating to PRP, growth factors, and soft tissue injuries from 1990 to 2010. Relevant references from these studies were also retrieved. Results: Soft tissue injury is a major source of disability that may often be complicated by prolonged and incomplete recovery. Numerous growth factors may potentiate the healing and regeneration of tendons and ligaments. The potential benefits of biologically enhanced healing processes have led to a recent interest in the use of PRP in orthopaedic sports medicine. There has been widespread anecdotal use of PRP for muscle strains, tendinopathy, and ligament injuries and as a surgical adjuvant to rotator cuff repair, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and meniscal or labral repairs. Although the fascination with this emerging technology has led to a dramatic increase in its use, scientific data supporting this use are still in their infancy. Conclusions: The literature is replete with studies on the basic science of growth factors and their relation to the maintenance, proliferation, and regeneration of various tissues and tissue-derived cells. Despite the promising results of several animal studies, well-controlled human studies are lacking. PMID:23015939

  20. Differential unroofing within the central metasedimentary Belt of the Grenville Orogen: constraints from 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosca, M.A.; Essene, E.J.; Kunk, M.J.; Sutter, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    An 40Ar/39Ar thermochronological investigation of upper greenschist to granulite facies gneiss, amphibolite and marble was conducted in the Central Metasedimentary Belt (CMB), Ontario, to constrain its cooling history. Incremental 40Ar/39Ar release spectra indicate that substantial differential unroofing occurred in the CMB between ??? 1000 and ??? 600 Ma. A consistent pattern of significantly older hornblende and phlogopite 40Ar/3Ar cooling ages on the southeast sides of major northeast striking shear zones is interpreted to reflect late displacement due to extensional deformation. Variations in hornblende 40Ar/39Ar age plateaus exceeding 200 Ma occur over distances less than 50 km with major age discontinuities occurring across the Robertson Lake shear zone and the Sharbot Lake mylonite zone which separate the Sharbot Lake terrane from the Elzevir and Frontenac terranes. Extensional displacements of up to 14 km are inferred between the Frontenac and Elzevir terranes of the CMB. No evidence for significant post argon-closure vertical displacement is indicated in the vicinity of the Perth Road mylonite within the Frontenac terrane. Variations of nearly 100 Ma in phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages occur in undeformed marble on either side of the Bancroft Shear Zone. Phlogopites from sheared and mylonitized marble within the shear zone yield 40Ar/39Ar diffusional loss profiles, but have older geologically meaningless ages thought to reflect incorporation of excess argon. By ??? 900 Ma, southeast directed extension was occurring throughout the CMB, possibly initiated along previous zones of compressional shearing. An easterly migration of active zones of extension is inferred, possibly related to an earlier, overall easterly migration of active zones of regional thrusting and easterly migration of an ancient subduction zone. The duration of extensional shearing is not well constrained, but must have ceased before ??? 600 Ma as required by the deposition of overlying

  1. 40Ar/39Ar Age of the Lathrop Wells Volcanic Center, Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Turrin, B D; Champion, D; Fleck, R J

    1991-08-01

    Paleomagnetic and (40)Ar/(39)Ar analyses from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, indicate that two eruptive events have occurred there. The ages (136 +/- 8 and 141 +/- 9 thousand years ago) for these two events are analytically indistinguishable. The small angular difference (4.7 degrees ) between the paleomagnetic directions from these two events suggests they differ in age by only about 100 years. These ages are consistent with the chronology of the surficial geological units in the Yucca Mountain area. These results contradict earlier interpretations of the cinder-cone geomorphology and soil-profile data that suggest that at least five temporally discrete eruptive events occurred at Lathrop Wells approximately 20,000 years ago. PMID:17772371

  2. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS): ARS300 operations manual, software version 2.01

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-25

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a nondestructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The ARS technique is a fast, safe, and nonintrusive technique that is particularly useful when a large number of objects need to be tested. Any physical object, whether solid, hollow, or fluid filled, has many modes of vibration. These modes of vibration, commonly referred to as the natural resonant modes or resonant frequencies, are determined by the object`s shape, size, and physical properties, such as elastic moduli, speed of sound, and density. If the object is mechanically excited at frequencies corresponding to its characteristic natural vibrational modes, a resonance effect can be observed when small excitation energies produce large amplitude vibrations in the object. At other excitation frequencies, i.e., vibrational response of the object is minimal.

  3. 40Ar/39Ar Age of the Lathrop Wells Volcanic Center, Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Turrin, B D; Champion, D; Fleck, R J

    1991-08-01

    Paleomagnetic and (40)Ar/(39)Ar analyses from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, indicate that two eruptive events have occurred there. The ages (136 +/- 8 and 141 +/- 9 thousand years ago) for these two events are analytically indistinguishable. The small angular difference (4.7 degrees ) between the paleomagnetic directions from these two events suggests they differ in age by only about 100 years. These ages are consistent with the chronology of the surficial geological units in the Yucca Mountain area. These results contradict earlier interpretations of the cinder-cone geomorphology and soil-profile data that suggest that at least five temporally discrete eruptive events occurred at Lathrop Wells approximately 20,000 years ago.

  4. 40Ar/39Ar age of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, B.D.; Champion, D.; Fleck, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar analyses from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, indicate that two eruptive events have occurred there. The ages (136 ?? 8 and 141 ?? 9 thousand years ago) for these two events are analytically indistinguishable. The small angular difference (4.7??) between the paleomagnetic directions from these two events suggests they differ in age by only about 100 years. These ages are consistent with the chronology of the surficial geological units in the Yucca Mountain area. These results contradict earlier interpretations of the cinder-cone geomorphology and soil-profile data that suggest that at least five temporally discrete eruptive events occurred at Lathrop Wells approximately 20,000 years ago.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar dates from the West Siberian Basin: Siberian flood basalt province doubled.

    PubMed

    Reichow, Marc K; Saunders, Andrew D; White, Rosalind V; Pringle, Malcolm S; Al'Mukhamedov, Alexander I; Medvedev, Alexander I; Kirda, Nikolay P

    2002-06-01

    Widespread basaltic volcanism occurred in the region of the West Siberian Basin in central Russia during Permo-Triassic times. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on plagioclase grains from deep boreholes in the basin reveal that the basalts were erupted 249.4 +/- 0.5 million years ago. This is synchronous with the bulk of the Siberian Traps, erupted further east on the Siberian Platform. The age and geochemical data confirm that the West Siberian Basin basalts are part of the Siberian Traps and at least double the confirmed area of the volcanic province as a whole. The larger area of volcanism strengthens the link between the volcanism and the end-Permian mass extinction. PMID:12052954

  6. In-situ Ar isotope, 40Ar/39Ar analysis and mineral chemistry of nosean in the phonolite from Olbrück volcano, East Eifel volcanic field, Germany: Implication for the source of excess 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, Masafumi; Altenberger, Uwe; Günter, Christina

    2014-05-01

    Since the report by Lippolt et al. (1990), hauyne and nosean phenocrysts in certain phonolites from the northwest in the Quaternary East Eifel volcanic field in Germany were known to contain significant amounts of excess 40Ar, thus, show apparent older ages than the other minerals. However, its petrographic meaning have not been well known. Meanwhile, Sumino et al. (2008) has identified the source of the excess 40Ar in the plagioclase phenocrysts from the historic Unzen dacite lava as the melt inclusions in the zones parallely developed to the plagioclase rim by in-situ laser Ar isotope analysis. In order to obtain eruption ages of very young volcanoes as like Quaternary Eifel volcanic field by the K-Ar system, it is quite essential to know about the location of excess 40Ar in volcanic rocks. We have collected phonolites from the Olbrück volcano in East Eifel and investigated its petrography and mineral chemistry and also performed in-situ Ar isotope analyses of unirradiated rock section sample and also in-situ 40Ar/39Ar analysis of neutron irradiated section sample with the UV pulse laser (wavelength 266 nm) and 40Ar/39Ar analytical system of the University of Potsdam. Petrographically, nosean contained fine melt and/or gas inclusions of less than 5 micrometer, which mostly distribute linearly and are relatively enriched in chlorine than the areas without inclusions. Solid inclusions of similar sizes contain CaO and fluorine. In nosean, typically around 5 wt% of sulfur is contained. The 40Ar/39Ar dating was also performed to leucite, sanidine and groundmass in the same section for comparison of those ages with that of nosean. In each analysis, 200 micrometer of beam size was used for making a pit with depth of up to 300 micrometer by laser ablation. As our 40Ar/39Ar analyses were conducted one and half year after the neutron irradiation, thus, short lived 37Ar derived from Ca had decayed very much, we measured Ca and K contents in nosean by SEM-EDS then applied

  7. The Berkeley Instrumental Neutron Generator (BINGE) for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Becker, T. A.; Bernstein, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Kirsch, L.; Leung, K. N.; Rogers, A.; Van Bibber, K.; Waltz, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Berkeley Instrumental Neutron Generator (BINGE) facility is the product of a consortium involving the Berkeley Geochronology Center (BGC), the U.C. Berkeley Nuclear Engineering Dept. (UCB/NE), and Lawrence Berkeley (LBNL) and Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) National Labs. BINGE was initially designed (and funded by NSF) for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. BINGE uses a plasma-based deuteron ion source and a self-loading Ti-surfaced target to induce deuteron-deuterium (DD) fusion via the reaction 2H(d,n)3He, producing 2.45 MeV neutrons. The limited neutron energy spectrum is aimed at reducing recoil effects, interfering nuclear reactions, and unwanted radioactive byproducts, all of which are undesirable consequences of conventional irradiation with 235U fission spectrum neutrons. Minimization of interfering reactions such as 40Ca(n,na)36Ar greatly reduces penalties for over-irradiation, enabling improved signal/background measurement of e.g. 39Ar. BINGE will also be used for a variety of nuclear physics and engineering experiments that require a high flux of monoenergetic neutrons. Neutron energies lower than 2.45 MeV can be obtained via irradiation ports within and external to polyethylene shielding. Initial commissioning produced a neutron flux of 108 n/sec/cm2 at 1 mA source current and 100 kV anode voltage, as expected. When scaled up to the 1 A source current as planned, this indicates that BINGE will achieve the design objective neutron flux of 1011 n/sec/cm2. Further progress towards this goal will be reported. Supported by NSF (grant #EAR-0960138), BGC, UCB/NE, University of California Office of the President, and DOE through LLNL under contract #DE-AC52-07NA27344 and LBNL under contract #DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution 40Ar/39Ar dating of impact melts

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Cameron M.; Young, Kelsey E.; Weirich, John R.; Hodges, Kip V.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Wartho, Jo-Anne; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative constraints on the ages of melt-forming impact events on the Moon are based primarily on isotope geochronology of returned samples. However, interpreting the results of such studies can often be difficult because the provenance region of any sample returned from the lunar surface may have experienced multiple impact events over the course of billions of years of bombardment. We illustrate this problem with new laser microprobe 40Ar/39Ar data for two Apollo 17 impact melt breccias. Whereas one sample yields a straightforward result, indicating a single melt-forming event at ca. 3.83 Ga, data from the other sample document multiple impact melt–forming events between ca. 3.81 Ga and at least as young as ca. 3.27 Ga. Notably, published zircon U/Pb data indicate the existence of even older melt products in the same sample. The revelation of multiple impact events through 40Ar/39Ar geochronology is likely not to have been possible using standard incremental heating methods alone, demonstrating the complementarity of the laser microprobe technique. Evidence for 3.83 Ga to 3.81 Ga melt components in these samples reinforces emerging interpretations that Apollo 17 impact breccia samples include a significant component of ejecta from the Imbrium basin impact. Collectively, our results underscore the need to quantitatively resolve the ages of different melt generations from multiple samples to improve our current understanding of the lunar impact record, and to establish the absolute ages of important impact structures encountered during future exploration missions in the inner Solar System. PMID:26601128

  9. Ar-40/Ar-39 Age of Hornblende-bearing R Chondrite LAP 04840

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M.

    2014-01-01

    Chondrites have a complex chronology due to several variables affecting and operating on chondritic parent bodies such as radiogenic heating, pressure and temperature variation with depth, aqueous alteration, and shock or impact heating [1]. Unbrecciated chondrites can record ages from 4.56 to 4.4 Ga that represent cooling in small parent bodies. Some brecciated chondrites exhibit younger ages (<<4 to 4.4 Ga) that may reflect the age of brecciation, disturbance, or shock and impact events (<< 4 Ga). A unique R chondrite was recently found in the LaPaz Icefield of Antarctica - LAP 04840 [2]. This chondrite contains approx.15% hornblende and trace amounts of biotite, making it the first of its kind. Studies have revealed an equigranular texture, mineral equilibria yielding equilibration near 650-700 C and 250-500 bars, hornblende that is dominantly OH-bearing (very little Cl or F), and high D/H ratios [8,9,10]. To help gain a better understanding of the origin of this unique sample, we have measured the Ar-40/Ar-39 age. Age of 4.290 +/- 0.030 Ga is younger than one would expect for a sample that has cooled within a small body [4], and one might instead attribute the age to a younger shock event, On the other hand, there is no evidence for extensive shock in this meteorite (shock stage S2; [3]), so this sample may have been reannealed after the shock event. This age is similar to Ar-Ar ages determined for some other R chondrites

  10. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and paleomagnetism of Independence volcano, Absaroka volcanic supergroup, Beartooth mountains, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, S.S.; Snee, L.W.; Geissman, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    Independence volcano is a major volcanic complex in the lower part of the Absaroka Volcanic Supergroup (AVS) of Montana and Wyoming. Recently reported Rb-Sr mineral dates from the complex give apparent ages of 91 and 84 Ma, whereas field relationships and the physical and compositional similarity of the rocks with other dated parts of the AVS indicate an Early to Middle Eocene age for eruption and deposition. To resolve the conflict between age assignments based on stratigraphic correlations and Rb-Sr dates, we report new paleomagnetic data and 40Ar/39Ar dates for Independence volcano. Paleomagnetic data for the stock and an and andesite plug that cuts the stock are well grouped, of reverse polarity, and yield a virtual geomagnetic pole that is essentially identical to Late Cretaceous and Tertiary reference poles. The reverse polarity indicates that the magnetization of these rocks is probably younger than the Cretaceous normal superchron, or less than about 83.5 Ma. Hornblende from a volcanic breccia near the base of the volcanic pile gives a 40Ar/39Ar age of 51.57 Ma, whereas biotites from a dacite sill and a granodiorite stock that forms the core of the volcano give dates that range from 49.96 to 48.50 Ma. These dates record the age of eruption and intrusion of these rocks and clearly show that the age of Independence volcano is Early to Middle Eocene, consistent with stratigraphic relations. We suggest that the Rb-Sr mineral dates from the Independence stock and related intrusions are unreliable.

  11. Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of impact melts.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Cameron M; Young, Kelsey E; Weirich, John R; Hodges, Kip V; Jolliff, Bradley L; Wartho, Jo-Anne; van Soest, Matthijs C

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative constraints on the ages of melt-forming impact events on the Moon are based primarily on isotope geochronology of returned samples. However, interpreting the results of such studies can often be difficult because the provenance region of any sample returned from the lunar surface may have experienced multiple impact events over the course of billions of years of bombardment. We illustrate this problem with new laser microprobe (40)Ar/(39)Ar data for two Apollo 17 impact melt breccias. Whereas one sample yields a straightforward result, indicating a single melt-forming event at ca. 3.83 Ga, data from the other sample document multiple impact melt-forming events between ca. 3.81 Ga and at least as young as ca. 3.27 Ga. Notably, published zircon U/Pb data indicate the existence of even older melt products in the same sample. The revelation of multiple impact events through (40)Ar/(39)Ar geochronology is likely not to have been possible using standard incremental heating methods alone, demonstrating the complementarity of the laser microprobe technique. Evidence for 3.83 Ga to 3.81 Ga melt components in these samples reinforces emerging interpretations that Apollo 17 impact breccia samples include a significant component of ejecta from the Imbrium basin impact. Collectively, our results underscore the need to quantitatively resolve the ages of different melt generations from multiple samples to improve our current understanding of the lunar impact record, and to establish the absolute ages of important impact structures encountered during future exploration missions in the inner Solar System. PMID:26601128

  12. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology of mesoproterozoic metamorphism in the Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, C.A.; Snee, L.W.; Selverstone, J.; Reed, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    A low-pressure metamorphic episode in the Colorado Front Range has been identified by the presence of staurolite, andalusite, cordierite, and garnet porphyroblasts overprinting earlier assemblages. The overprinting assemblages and reaction textures are most consistent with porphyroblast growth on a prograde metamorphic path with peak temperatures exceeding ~525??C. Twenty-eight 40Ar/39Ar dates on hornblende, muscovite, biotite, and microcline were used to infer the age and thermal conditions of metamorphism. Muscovite and biotite 40Ar/39Ar ages fall mainly in the interval 1400-1340 Ma, consistent with cooling through the closure temperature interval of micas (~400??-300??C) after about 1400 Ma. In contrast, hornblende apparent ages (T(c)~500??-550??C) between 1600 and 1390 Ma reflect variable retention of radiogenic argon. Forward modeling of argon diffusion shows that the distribution of hornblende and mica ages is consistent with the partial resetting of argon systematics ca. 1400 Ma by a thermal pulse reaching maximum temperatures around 550??C and decaying within <20 m.yr. These temperatures match the conditions inferred from the overprinting assemblage; thus, muscovite and biotite ages are interpreted to date the cooling phase of this metamorphic event. This late metamorphism is broadly coeval with the intrusion of ca. 1400-Ma granitic plutons in the study area and throughout the southwestern United States. However, thermal effects are observed far from pluton margins, suggesting pervasive, regional crustal heating rather than restricted contact metamorphism. Our results suggest that ca. 1400-Ma metamorphism and plutonism are manifestations of a regional thermal episode that both partially melted the lower crust and pervasively metamorphosed middle crustal rocks.

  13. Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of impact melts.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Cameron M; Young, Kelsey E; Weirich, John R; Hodges, Kip V; Jolliff, Bradley L; Wartho, Jo-Anne; van Soest, Matthijs C

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative constraints on the ages of melt-forming impact events on the Moon are based primarily on isotope geochronology of returned samples. However, interpreting the results of such studies can often be difficult because the provenance region of any sample returned from the lunar surface may have experienced multiple impact events over the course of billions of years of bombardment. We illustrate this problem with new laser microprobe (40)Ar/(39)Ar data for two Apollo 17 impact melt breccias. Whereas one sample yields a straightforward result, indicating a single melt-forming event at ca. 3.83 Ga, data from the other sample document multiple impact melt-forming events between ca. 3.81 Ga and at least as young as ca. 3.27 Ga. Notably, published zircon U/Pb data indicate the existence of even older melt products in the same sample. The revelation of multiple impact events through (40)Ar/(39)Ar geochronology is likely not to have been possible using standard incremental heating methods alone, demonstrating the complementarity of the laser microprobe technique. Evidence for 3.83 Ga to 3.81 Ga melt components in these samples reinforces emerging interpretations that Apollo 17 impact breccia samples include a significant component of ejecta from the Imbrium basin impact. Collectively, our results underscore the need to quantitatively resolve the ages of different melt generations from multiple samples to improve our current understanding of the lunar impact record, and to establish the absolute ages of important impact structures encountered during future exploration missions in the inner Solar System.

  14. Results of 40Ar/39Ar dating of phlogopites from kelyphitic rims around garnet grains (Udachnaya-Vostochnaya kimberlite pipe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, D. S.; Tomilenko, A. A.; Alifirova, T. A.; Travin, A. V.; Murzintsev, N. G.; Pokhilenko, N. P.

    2016-07-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating of phlogopite from kelyphitic rims around garnet grains from the Udachnaya-Vostochnaya kimberlite pipe in the Sakha (Yakutia) Republic (Russia) revealed that when this mineral has contact with a kimberlite melt its age corresponds (within error limits) to that of the formation of the kimberlite pipe, thus indicating that the method may be used for dating kimberlites and related rocks. In mantle xenoliths, kelyphitic phlogopites rimming garnet grains partially lose radiogenic Ar, which results in a complex age spectrum. Rejuvenation of the K/Ar system in them is determined by the thermal impact of the kimberlite melt on captured rocks.

  15. Specific modification of polysulfone with cluster bombardment with assistance of Ar ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guochun; Hibino, Y.; Awazu, K.; Tanihara, M.; Imanishi, Y.

    2000-02-01

    Objective: To develop a rapid method for the modification of polysulfone with ammonium sulfamate with the assistance of Ar ion irradiation with a multi-source cluster deposition apparatus. These surfaces mimicking the structure of heparin, a bioactive molecule, have a high anti-thrombosis property. Experimental Design: Polysulfone film, setting on a turning holder, was irradiated by Ar ions during bombardment with ammonium sulfamate clusters. The Ar ion source serves for the activation of a polymer surface and a cluster ion source supplies ammonium sulfamate molecules to react with the activated surface. After thorough washing with de-ionized sterile water, the modified surfaces were evaluated in terms of the contact angle of water, elemental composition, and binding state on electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and platelet adhesion with platelet rich plasma. Results: The modification of polysulfone decreased the contact angle of water on surfaces from 82.6 ° down to 34.5 °. Ammonium, amine, sulfate, and thiophene combinations were formed on the modified surfaces. The adhesion numbers of the platelet were decreased to one tenth compared to the original surface. The same process was also applied to other polymers such as polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene and similar outcomes were also observed. Conclusion: The primary studies showed successful modification of polysulfone with ammonium sulfamate with the assistance of Ar ion irradiation. Since the same concept can also be applied to other materials with various substrates, combined with the features of no solvent and no topographic changes, this method might be developed into a promising way for modification of polymeric materials.

  16. High-resolution 40Ar 39Ar chronology of Oligocene volcanic rocks, San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The central San Juan caldera complex consists of seven calderas from which eight major ash-flow tuffs were erupted during a period of intense volcanic activity that lasted for approximately 2 m.y. about 26-28 Ma. The analytical precision of conventional K-Ar dating in this time interval is not sufficient to unambiguously resolve this complex history. However, 40Ar 39Ar incremental-heating experiments provide data for a high-resolution chronology that is consistent with stratigraphie relations. Weighted-mean age-spectrum plateau ages of biotite and sanidine are the most precise with standard deviations ranging from 0.08 to 0.21 m.y. The pooled estimate of standard deviation for the plateau ages of 12 minerals is about 0.5 percent or about 125,000 to 135,000 years. Age measurements on coexisting minerals from one tuff and on two samples of each of two other tuffs indicate that a precision in the age of a tuff of better than 100,000 years can be achieved at 27 Ma. New data indicate that the San Luis caldera is the youngest caldera in the central complex, not the Creede caldera as previously thought. ?? 1988.

  17. Allele surfing promotes microbial adaptation from standing variation.

    PubMed

    Gralka, Matti; Stiewe, Fabian; Farrell, Fred; Möbius, Wolfram; Waclaw, Bartlomiej; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2016-08-01

    The coupling of ecology and evolution during range expansions enables mutations to establish at expanding range margins and reach high frequencies. This phenomenon, called allele surfing, is thought to have caused revolutions in the gene pool of many species, most evidently in microbial communities. It has remained unclear, however, under which conditions allele surfing promotes or hinders adaptation. Here, using microbial experiments and simulations, we show that, starting with standing adaptive variation, range expansions generate a larger increase in mean fitness than spatially uniform population expansions. The adaptation gain results from 'soft' selective sweeps emerging from surfing beneficial mutations. The rate of these surfing events is shown to sensitively depend on the strength of genetic drift, which varies among strains and environmental conditions. More generally, allele surfing promotes the rate of adaptation per biomass produced, which could help developing biofilms and other resource-limited populations to cope with environmental challenges. PMID:27307400

  18. Sequence analysis of two novel HLA-DMA alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, M.; Harding, A.

    1994-12-31

    Several novel genes have been mapped recently in the HLA class II region between DQ and DP. Two of these genes, DMA and DMB, are predicted to encode a protein which has a structure similar to that of the DR, DQ, and DP molecules. The function of the DM molecule, however, is unlikely to mimic precisely that of the other class II molecules, since they share a low level of similarity and both DMA and DMB have limited polymorphism. Based on sequences from the third exon, four alleles of DMB and two alleles of DMA were previously characterized. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) patterns of amplified DMA exon 3 products indicated the existence of two additional DMA alleles, which were subsequently sequenced and are now reported here. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Allele-Specific DNA Methylation Detection by Pyrosequencing®.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays important roles in healthy as well as diseased cells, by influencing the transcription of genes. In spite the fact that human somatic cells are diploid, most of the currently available methods for the study of DNA methylation do not provide information on the methylation status of individual alleles of genes. This information may be of importance in many situations. In particular, in cancer both alleles of tumour suppressor genes generally need to be inactivated for a phenotypic effect to be observed. Here, we present a simple and cost-effective protocol for allele-specific DNA methylation detection based on Pyrosequencing(®) of methylation-specific PCR (MSP) products including a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the amplicon. PMID:26103906

  20. Apolipoprotein E alleles in women with severe pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, B; Rigó, J; Fintor, L; Karádi, I; Tóth, T

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the frequency of apolipoprotein E (apoE) alleles among women with severe pre-eclampsia. The presence of the three most common apoE alleles (epsilon 2, epsilon 3, epsilon 4) was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in three groups of white women: non-pregnant healthy (n = 101), pregnant healthy (n = 52), and pregnant with a diagnosis of severe pre-eclampsia (n = 54). The frequency of apo epsilon 2 was highest among women with severe pre-eclampsia (16.6%) followed by non-pregnant women (12.9%), and those experiencing a healthy pregnancy (10.6%). The higher frequency of the apo epsilon 2 allele detected among women with severe pre-eclampsia suggests that apoE may play a role in the development of pre-eclampsia. PMID:9659248

  1. Allele-specific DNA methylation reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Izzi, Benedetta; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Cludts, Katrien; Akkor, Pinar; Lambrechts, Diether; Verfaillie, Catherine; Verhamme, Peter; Freson, Kathleen; Hoylaerts, Marc F

    2016-08-18

    Genetic variation in the PEAR1 locus is linked to platelet reactivity and cardiovascular disease. The major G allele of rs12041331, an intronic cytosine guanine dinucleotide-single-nucleotide polymorphism (CpG-SNP), is associated with higher PEAR1 expression in platelets and endothelial cells than the minor A allele. The molecular mechanism underlying this difference remains elusive. We have characterized the histone modification profiles of the intronic region surrounding rs12041331 and identified H3K4Me1 enhancer-specific enrichment for the region that covers the CpG-SNP. Interestingly, methylation studies revealed that the CpG site is fully methylated in leukocytes of GG carriers. Nuclear protein extracts from megakaryocytes, endothelial cells, vs control HEK-293 cells show a 3-fold higher affinity for the methylated G allele compared with nonmethylated G or A alleles in a gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. To understand the positive relationship between methylation and gene expression, we studied DNA methylation at 4 different loci of PEAR1 during in vitro megakaryopoiesis. During differentiation, the CpG-SNP remained fully methylated, while we observed rapid methylation increases at the CpG-island overlapping the first 5'-untranslated region exon, paralleling the increased PEAR1 expression. In the same region, A-allele carriers of rs12041331 showed significantly lower DNA methylation at CGI1 compared with GG homozygote. This CpG-island contains binding sites for the methylation-sensitive transcription factor CTCF, whose binding is known to play a role in enhancer activation and/or repression. In conclusion, we report the molecular characterization of the first platelet function-related CpG-SNP, a genetic predisposition that reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity through allele-specific DNA methylation. PMID:27313330

  2. Distribution of a pseudodeficiency allele among Tay-Sachs carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tomczak, J.; Grebner, E.E. ); Boogen, C. )

    1993-08-01

    Recently Triggs-Raine et al. (1992) identified a new mutation in the gene coding for the [alpha]-subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (hex A), the enzyme whose deficiency causes Tay-Sachs disease. This mutation, a C[sub 739]-to-T transition in exon 7, results in an altered enzyme that is active (albeit at reduced levels) in cells but that has essentially no activity in serum. This so-called pseudodeficient allele was first detected in compound heterozygotes who also carried a Tay-Sachs disease allele and therefore had no detectable hex A in their serum but who were in good health. Carriers of this apparently benign mutation are generally indistinguishable from carriers of a lethal mutation by means of routine enzyme-based screening tests, because the product of the pseudodeficient allele is not detectable in serum and has decreased activity in cells. This suggests that some individuals who have been classified as Tay-Sachs carriers are actually carriers of the pseudodeficient allele and are not at risk to have a child affected with Tay-Sachs disease. The pseudodeficient allele may also be responsible for some inconclusive diagnoses, where leukocyte values fall below the normal range but are still above the carrier range. The fact that there are now two mutant alleles (the psuedodeficient and the adult) that are indistinguishable from the lethal infantile mutations by means of enzyme assay yet that are phenotypically very different and that together may account for as much as 12% of enzyme-defined carriers on the basis of the data here suggests that DNA analysis should be part of a comprehensive screening program. It will be particularly useful to identify the mutations in couples at risk, before they undergo prenatal diagnosis. DNA analysis will also resolve some inconclusive diagnoses.

  3. Silencing of genes and alleles by RNAi in Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Lamacchia, Marina; Clayton, John R; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Steinmetz, Lars M; Levashina, Elena A; Blandin, Stéphanie A

    2013-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes are the major vectors of human malaria parasites. However, mosquitoes are not passive hosts for parasites, actively limiting their development in vivo. Our current understanding of the mosquito antiparasitic response is mostly based on the phenotypic analysis of gene knockdowns obtained by RNA interference (RNAi), through the injection or transfection of long dsRNAs in adult mosquitoes or cultured cells, respectively. Recently, RNAi has been extended to silence specifically one allele of a given gene in a heterozygous context, thus allowing to compare the contribution of different alleles to a phenotype in the same genetic background. PMID:22990777

  4. Data-adaptive algorithms for calling alleles in repeat polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Stoughton, R; Bumgarner, R; Frederick, W J; McIndoe, R A

    1997-01-01

    Data-adaptive algorithms are presented for separating overlapping signatures of heterozygotic allele pairs in electrophoresis data. Application is demonstrated for human microsatellite CA-repeat polymorphisms in LiCor 4000 and ABI 373 data. The algorithms allow overlapping alleles to be called correctly in almost every case where a trained observer could do so, and provide a fast automated objective alternative to human reading of the gels. The algorithm also supplies an indication of confidence level which can be used to flag marginal cases for verification by eye, or as input to later stages of statistical analysis. PMID:9059812

  5. Simultaneous inference of haplotypes and alleles at a causal gene.

    PubMed

    Larribe, Fabrice; Dupont, Mathieu J; Boucher, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    We present a methodology which jointly infers haplotypes and the causal alleles at a gene influencing a given trait. Often in human genetic studies, the available data consists of genotypes (series of genetic markers along the chromosomes) and a phenotype. However, for many genetic analyses, one needs haplotypes instead of genotypes. Our methodology is not only able to estimate haplotypes conditionally on the disease status, but is also able to infer the alleles at the unknown disease locus. Some applications of our methodology are in genetic mapping and in genetic counseling.

  6. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  7. Reduced Height (Rht) Alleles Affect Wheat Grain Quality.

    PubMed

    Casebow, Richard; Hadley, Caroline; Uppal, Rajneet; Addisu, Molla; Loddo, Stefano; Kowalski, Ania; Griffiths, Simon; Gooding, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The effects of dwarfing alleles (reduced height, Rht) in near isogenic lines on wheat grain quality are characterised in field experiments and related to effects on crop height, grain yield and GA-sensitivity. Alleles included those that conferred GA-insensitivity (Rht-B1b, Rht-B1c, Rht-D1b, Rht-D1c) as well as those that retained GA-sensitivity (rht(tall), Rht8, Rht8 + Ppd-D1a, Rht12). Full characterisation was facilitated by including factors with which the effects of Rht alleles are known to interact for grain yield (i.e. system, [conventional or organic]; tillage intensity [plough-based, minimum or zero]; nitrogen fertilizer level [0-450 kg N/ha]; and genetic backgrounds varying in height [cvs Maris Huntsman, Maris Widgeon, and Mercia]. Allele effects on mean grain weight and grain specific weight were positively associated with final crop height: dwarfing reduced these quality criteria irrespective of crop management or GA-sensitivity. In all but two experiments the effects of dwarfing alleles on grain nitrogen and sulphur concentrations were closely and negatively related to effects on grain yield, e.g. a quadratic relationship between grain yield and crop height manipulated by the GA-insensitive alleles was mirrored by quadratic relationships for nitrogen and sulphur concentrations: the highest yields and most dilute concentrations occurred around 80cm. In one of the two exceptional experiments the GA-insensitive Rht-B1b and Rht-B1c significantly (P<0.05) reduced grain nitrogen concentration in the absence of an effect on yield, and in the remaining experiment the GA-sensitive Rht8 significantly reduced both grain yield and grain nitrogen concentration simultaneously. When Rht alleles diluted grain nitrogen concentration, N:S ratios and SDS-sedimentation volumes were often improved. Hagberg falling number (HFN) was negatively related to crop height but benefits from dwarfing were only seen for GA-insensitive alleles. For HFN, therefore, there was the

  8. Reduced Height (Rht) Alleles Affect Wheat Grain Quality

    PubMed Central

    Casebow, Richard; Hadley, Caroline; Uppal, Rajneet; Addisu, Molla; Loddo, Stefano; Kowalski, Ania; Griffiths, Simon; Gooding, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The effects of dwarfing alleles (reduced height, Rht) in near isogenic lines on wheat grain quality are characterised in field experiments and related to effects on crop height, grain yield and GA-sensitivity. Alleles included those that conferred GA-insensitivity (Rht-B1b, Rht-B1c, Rht-D1b, Rht-D1c) as well as those that retained GA-sensitivity (rht(tall), Rht8, Rht8 + Ppd-D1a, Rht12). Full characterisation was facilitated by including factors with which the effects of Rht alleles are known to interact for grain yield (i.e. system, [conventional or organic]; tillage intensity [plough-based, minimum or zero]; nitrogen fertilizer level [0–450 kg N/ha]; and genetic backgrounds varying in height [cvs Maris Huntsman, Maris Widgeon, and Mercia]. Allele effects on mean grain weight and grain specific weight were positively associated with final crop height: dwarfing reduced these quality criteria irrespective of crop management or GA-sensitivity. In all but two experiments the effects of dwarfing alleles on grain nitrogen and sulphur concentrations were closely and negatively related to effects on grain yield, e.g. a quadratic relationship between grain yield and crop height manipulated by the GA-insensitive alleles was mirrored by quadratic relationships for nitrogen and sulphur concentrations: the highest yields and most dilute concentrations occurred around 80cm. In one of the two exceptional experiments the GA-insensitive Rht-B1b and Rht-B1c significantly (P<0.05) reduced grain nitrogen concentration in the absence of an effect on yield, and in the remaining experiment the GA-sensitive Rht8 significantly reduced both grain yield and grain nitrogen concentration simultaneously. When Rht alleles diluted grain nitrogen concentration, N:S ratios and SDS-sedimentation volumes were often improved. Hagberg falling number (HFN) was negatively related to crop height but benefits from dwarfing were only seen for GA-insensitive alleles. For HFN, therefore, there was the

  9. 40Ar/39Ar Ages for the Sentinel-Arlington Volcanic Field, Southwestern Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, S. R.; Greeley, R.; Champion, D. E.; Turrin, B. D.

    2007-12-01

    .16-51.48. Geochronology using 40Ar/39Ar method revealed an age of 1.94 +/- 0.85 Ma for Painted Rock Low Shield (New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory), 1.64 +/- 0.14 Ma for Theba Low Shield (Rutgers University) and 1.24 +/- 0.040 Ma for Wild Horse Low Shield (Rutgers University). Some ages were precise enough to correspond to the Matuyama reversed polarity epoch, with SAVF initiation possibly within the Olduvai normal polarity event. These dates represent an overall improvement in precision and accuracy over previous dates (values corresponding to 6.20 Ma to 1.28 Ma) collected in the late 1970s and early 1980s using K-Ar technique. The 40Ar/39Ar ages correspond to expected magnetic polarities and stratigraphic sequences.

  10. Noble gases in CH 4-rich gas fields, Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiyagon, H.; Kennedy, B. M.

    1992-04-01

    The elemental and isotopic compositions of helium, neon, argon, and xenon in twenty-one CH 4-rich natural gas samples from Cretaceous and Devonian reservoirs in the Alberta, Canada, sedimentary basin were measured. In all but a few cases, radiogenic ( 4He, 40Ar, and 131-136Xe) and nucleogenic ( 21,22Ne) isotopes dominated. Based solely on the noble gas composition, two types of natural gas reservoirs are identified. One (Group B) is highly enriched in radiogenic-nucleogenic noble gases and varies little in composition: 3He /4He = 1.5 ± 0.5 × 10 -8, 40Ar /36Ar = 5000-6500 , 40∗Ar /4He = 0.10 , 136∗Xe /4He ~ 0.7 × 10 -9, and 21∗Ne /22∗Ne = 0.452 ± 0.041 (∗ denotes radiogenic or nucleogenic origin; all 4He is radiogenic). High nitrogen content with 4He /N 2 ~ 0.06 is also characteristic of Group B samples. The remaining samples (Group A) contain a radiogenic-nucleogenic component with a different composition and, relative to Group B samples, the extent of enrichment in this component is less and more variable: 3He /4He = 10-70 × 10 -8, 40Ar /36Ar < 1550 , and 40∗Ar /4He ~ 0.25 . The composition of Group B radiogenic-nucleogenic noble gases is consistent with production in crust of average composition. Enrichment in Group B noble gases and nitrogen increases with proximity to the underlying Precambrian basement, consistent with a present-day mass flux into the overlying sedimentary basin. Inferred 40∗Ar /136∗Xe 4He ratios imply a basement source enriched in thorium relative to uranium and potassium (Th/U > 20). Combined, the overall lower total radiogenic-nucleogenic content of Group A reservoirs, the greater variability in composition, and the appearance of Group A noble gases in reservoirs higher in the sedimentary sequence relative to the underlying basement implies that the Group A radiogenic-nucleogenic noble gases are indigenous to the sediments. The most interesting aspect of the Group A noble gases are the very high 3He /4He ratios; ~ 10

  11. Genotypic richness predicts phenotypic variation in an endangered clonal plant.

    PubMed

    Evans, Suzanna M; Sinclair, Elizabeth A; Poore, Alistair G B; Bain, Keryn F; Vergés, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Declines in genetic diversity within a species can affect the stability and functioning of populations. The conservation of genetic diversity is thus a priority, especially for threatened or endangered species. The importance of genetic variation, however, is dependent on the degree to which it translates into phenotypic variation for traits that affect individual performance and ecological processes. This is especially important for predominantly clonal species, as no single clone is likely to maximise all aspects of performance. Here we show that intraspecific genotypic diversity as measured using microsatellites is a strong predictor of phenotypic variation in morphological traits and shoot productivity of the threatened, predominantly clonal seagrass Posidonia australis, on the east coast of Australia. Biomass and surface area variation was most strongly predicted by genotypic richness, while variation in leaf chemistry (phenolics and nitrogen) was unrelated to genotypic richness. Genotypic richness did not predict tissue loss to herbivores or epiphyte load, however we did find that increased herbivore damage was positively correlated with allelic richness. Although there was no clear relationship between higher primary productivity and genotypic richness, variation in shoot productivity within a meadow was significantly greater in more genotypically diverse meadows. The proportion of phenotypic variation explained by environmental conditions varied among different genotypes, and there was generally no variation in phenotypic traits among genotypes present in the same meadows. Our results show that genotypic richness as measured through the use of presumably neutral DNA markers does covary with phenotypic variation in functionally relevant traits such as leaf morphology and shoot productivity. The remarkably long lifespan of individual Posidonia plants suggests that plasticity within genotypes has played an important role in the longevity of the species

  12. Genotypic richness predicts phenotypic variation in an endangered clonal plant

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Elizabeth A.; Poore, Alistair G.B.; Bain, Keryn F.; Vergés, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Declines in genetic diversity within a species can affect the stability and functioning of populations. The conservation of genetic diversity is thus a priority, especially for threatened or endangered species. The importance of genetic variation, however, is dependent on the degree to which it translates into phenotypic variation for traits that affect individual performance and ecological processes. This is especially important for predominantly clonal species, as no single clone is likely to maximise all aspects of performance. Here we show that intraspecific genotypic diversity as measured using microsatellites is a strong predictor of phenotypic variation in morphological traits and shoot productivity of the threatened, predominantly clonal seagrass Posidonia australis, on the east coast of Australia. Biomass and surface area variation was most strongly predicted by genotypic richness, while variation in leaf chemistry (phenolics and nitrogen) was unrelated to genotypic richness. Genotypic richness did not predict tissue loss to herbivores or epiphyte load, however we did find that increased herbivore damage was positively correlated with allelic richness. Although there was no clear relationship between higher primary productivity and genotypic richness, variation in shoot productivity within a meadow was significantly greater in more genotypically diverse meadows. The proportion of phenotypic variation explained by environmental conditions varied among different genotypes, and there was generally no variation in phenotypic traits among genotypes present in the same meadows. Our results show that genotypic richness as measured through the use of presumably neutral DNA markers does covary with phenotypic variation in functionally relevant traits such as leaf morphology and shoot productivity. The remarkably long lifespan of individual Posidonia plants suggests that plasticity within genotypes has played an important role in the longevity of the species

  13. What Makes a Rich Task?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Pete

    2009-01-01

    A common view seems to be emerging in the mathematics education world at the moment that the development and use of "rich tasks" is a good thing; a "right thing" to do. There are many examples of these "rich tasks" and teachers are encouraged to use them whenever they can. Professional learners don't just accept this uncritically, but question…

  14. Study of HLA-DQA1 alleles in celiac children.

    PubMed

    Nieto, A; Blanco Quirós, A; Arranz, E; Alonso Franch, M; Garrote, J A; Calvo, C

    1995-01-01

    The familial incidence of celiac disease (CD) confirms its genetic basis, although acquired factors are also involved. Many authors have reported a linkage between celiac disease and HLA antigens, but there are differences which depend on geographical areas, and nowadays the study must be done at the genetic level. Thirty-eight celiac children and 52 normal controls were included in this study. All individuals were chosen from the Castilla and Leon area. We used the reverse ¿dot block¿ technique, using sequence-specific oligonucleotide DNA probes (Cetus, USA) to determine the HLA-DQA1 alleles in DNA samples previously amplified by PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The different frequency of alleles in patients and controls was assessed by 3 statistical tests: chi square (chi(2)), relative risk (RR) and etiologic fraction (EF). A very high frequency of DQA1*0201 (chi(2):p <0.0001) and DQA1*0501 (chi(2): p <0.0001) alleles was observed in patients; all but one (97%) had the DQA1*0501 allele vs. 40% of controls (RR: 37.00; EF: 0.955). The DQA1*0201 allele also had a high prevalence in celiacs (58%)(RR: 1.375: EF:0.438). The DQA1*01 allele was only found in 10.5% of patients compared to 79% of controls (chi(2): p <0.0001) and the DQA1*03 allele was also decreased in celiacs. There was only one celiac girl without the DQA1*0501 allele. She had no other clinical or serological differences, as compared to the other patients. In the study of allele subtypes, among the DQA1*01 allele, 50% of patients were positive for DQA1*101 and the remaining 50% had DQA1*0102, but none of the individuals were positive for DQA1*0103. Among normal controls, 32 individuals (61.5%) expressed the DQA1*0102 subtype, 15 (28.9%) the DQA1*0101 subtype and 5 (9.6%) the DQA1*0103 subtype. All positive cases for DQA1-*05 belong to the DQA1* 0501 subtype, in both celiac and control groups. There were 10 possible combinations of HLA-DQA1 genes, but we found a very unequal distribution in both celiacs

  15. Androgen Receptor (AR) Physiological Roles in Male and Female Reproductive Systems: Lessons Learned from AR-Knockout Mice Lacking AR in Selective Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chawnshang; Lee, Soo Ok; Wang, Ruey-Sheng; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Ta-Min

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Androgens/androgen receptor (AR) signaling is involved primarily in the development of male-specific phenotypes during embryogenesis, spermatogenesis, sexual behavior, and fertility during adult life. However, this signaling has also been shown to play an important role in development of female reproductive organs and their functions, such as ovarian folliculogenesis, embryonic implantation, and uterine and breast development. The establishment of the testicular feminization (Tfm) mouse model exploiting the X-linked Tfm mutation in mice has been a good in vivo tool for studying the human complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, but this mouse may not be the perfect in vivo model. Mouse models with various cell-specific AR knockout (ARKO) might allow us to study AR roles in individual types of cells in these male and female reproductive systems, although discrepancies are found in results between labs, probably due to using various Cre mice and/or knocking out AR in different AR domains. Nevertheless, no doubt exists that the continuous development of these ARKO mouse models and careful studies will provide information useful for understanding AR roles in reproductive systems of humans and may help us to develop more effective and more specific therapeutic approaches for reproductive system-related diseases. PMID:23782840

  16. Eruption age of an approximately 100,000-year-old basalt from Ar-40/Ar-39 analysis of partially degassed xenoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.; Huneke, J. C.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven samples from five partially degassed Mesozoic granitic xenoliths and two late Pleistocene host basalt samples from Sawmill Canyon in Sierra Nevada, California, have been analyzed using stepwise Ar-40/Ar-39 dating techniques. The petrography and analytic techniques are described and the results are presented. Isotopic compositions of Ar released from the xenoliths in several extraction steps at temperatures below about 900 C were colinear in Ar-36/Ar-40 versus Ar-39/Ar-40 diagrams and defined isochrons, giving a mean age of degassing of 119,000 + or - 7000 yr. Ar-40 extracted at higher temperatures included ancient radiogenic Ar-40 that never diffused from the xenoliths during immersion in the magma. This Ar-40 caused an increase in the apparent age for the high-temperature extractions. The high precision of the eruption age determined by this method is comparable to that obtained elsewhere by conventional K/Ar dating of sanidine.

  17. Effect of surface derived hydrocarbon impurities on Ar plasma properties

    SciTech Connect

    Fox-Lyon, Nick; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Godyak, Valery

    2014-05-15

    The authors report on Langmuir probe measurements that show that hydrocarbon surfaces in contact with Ar plasma cause changes of electron energy distribution functions due to the flux of hydrogen and carbon atoms released by the surfaces. The authors compare the impact on plasma properties of hydrocarbon species gasified from an etching hydrocarbon surface with injection of gaseous hydrocarbons into Ar plasma. They find that both kinds of hydrocarbon injections decrease electron density and slightly increase electron temperatures of low pressure Ar plasma. For low percentages of impurities (∼1% impurity in Ar plasma explored here), surface-derived hydrocarbon species and gas phase injected hydrocarbon molecules cause similar changes of plasma properties for the same number of hydrocarbon molecules injected into Ar with a decrease in electron density of ∼4%.

  18. Molecular analysis of HLA-B35 alleles and their relationship to HLA-B15 alleles.

    PubMed

    Cereb, N; Kim, C; Hughes, A L; Yang, S Y

    1997-04-01

    The HLA-B35 serotype is one of the largest allelic groups of HLA class I molecules and includes four isotypes. Of the four, the B35 variant isoform is relatively rare and is the most acidic form. DNA sequencing of the rare isoforms revealed three alleles, B*1522, B*3511, and B*3517. A phylogenetic tree of HLA-B15- and HLA-B35-related alleles for the exon 2 and 3 nucleotide sequences showed that exon 2 of B*1522 clusters with B35 alleles whereas exon 3 clusters with B15 alleles. Branches of the tree suggest that the serodeterminants of B35, B62, B63, and B70 may reside in the alpha 1 domain, encoded by exon 2. The B*1520 and B*1522 genes, which type as B62 and B35, respectively, are hybrid molecules alternatively using exon 2 and exon 3 sequences of B*3501 and B*1501. A comparison of intron 2 sequences for B*3501, B*1501 and B*1522 suggests that the recombination site may have been in the region at the 3' end of intron 2. Despite being flanked by two highly polymorphic exons (exons 2 and 3), intron 2 is relatively well conserved in the B-locus, and it is characterized by seven to eight tandem repeats of the CGGGG pentanucleotide. A high degree of sequence homology and repetitive sequences are essential for a significant frequency of recombination. In this report, we reveal more about the complex evolutionary history of the HLA-B alleles.

  19. Search for cosmogenic Ar-42 in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Cane, D.; Taricco, C.; Bhandari, N.

    2003-04-01

    We have evidence for decreasing galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux in the past 3 centuries by a factor about two [1]. The measurements of the activity of cosmogenic 44Ti (T1/2 = 59.2 y) produced by GCR in stony meteorites that fell during the last two centuries are in good agreement with the calculated values and validate the decreasing trend of GCR flux. The measurements were obtained by an hyperpure (372 cm3) Ge-NaI(Tl) spectrometer operating in the Monte dei Cappuccini laboratory in Torino[2]. To further improve upon statistical precision of 44Ti data and also to be able to measure the 42Ar (T1/2 = 33 y) which is produced in even smaller amounts by GCR in meteorites, we have set up in the same laboratory a larger (581 cm3) hyperpure Ge detector operating in coincidence with a 100 kg NaI(Tl) crystal assembly. This should enable us to confirm the above results about GCR variations. We wish to acknowledge our deep gratitude to professor Bonino, deceased on September 29, 2002, to whom the assemblage of the new equipment is due. [1] G. Bonino, G. Cini Castagnoli, D. Cane, C. Taricco and N. Bhandari,Proc. XXVII Intern. Cosmic Ray Conf. (Hamburg, 2001) 3769-3772. [2] Bonino G., Cini Castagnoli G., Cane D., Taricco C., Bhandari N, textit {34th COSPAR Sci. Ass. Houston 2002 (Adv. Space Res.)}, in press

  20. A compilation of K-Ar-ages for southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Fred K.; Morton, Douglas M.; Morton, Janet L.; Miller, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to make available a large body of conventional K-Ar ages for granitic, volcanic, and metamorphic rocks collected in southern California. Although one interpretive map is included, the report consists primarily of a systematic listing, without discussion or interpretation, of published and unpublished ages that may be of value in future regional and other geologic studies. From 1973 to 1979, 468 rock samples from southern California were collected for conventional K-Ar dating under a regional geologic mapping project of Southern California (predecessor of the Southern California Areal Mapping Project). Most samples were collected and dated between 1974 and 1977. For 61 samples (13 percent of those collected), either they were discarded for varying reasons, or the original collection data were lost. For the remaining samples, 518 conventional K-Ar ages are reported here; coexisting mineral pairs were dated from many samples. Of these K-Ar ages, 225 are previously unpublished, and identified as such in table 1. All K-Ar ages are by conventional K-Ar analysis; no 40Ar/39Ar dating was done. Subsequent to the rock samples collected in the 1970s and reported here, 33 samples were collected and 38 conventional K-Ar ages determined under projects directed at (1) characterization of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic igneous rocks in and on both sides of the Transverse Ranges and (2) clarifying the Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonics of the eastern Mojave Desert. Although previously published (Beckerman et al., 1982), another eight samples and 11 conventional K-Ar ages are included here, because they augment those completed under the previous two projects.

  1. Clonal Ordering of 17p and 5q Allelic Losses in Barrett Dysplasia and Adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blount, Patricia L.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Yin, Jing; Huang, Ying; Krasna, Mark J.; Reid, Brian J.

    1993-04-01

    Both 17p and 5q allelic losses appear to be involved in the pathogenesis or progression of many human solid tumors. In colon carcinogenesis, there is strong evidence that the targets of the 17p and 5q allelic losses are TP53, the gene encoding p53, and APC, respectively. It is widely accepted that 5q allelic losses precede 17p allelic losses in the progression to colonic carcinoma. The data, however, supporting this proposed order are largely based on the prevalence of 17p and 5q allelic losses in adenomas and unrelated adenocarcinomas from different patients. We investigated the order in which 17p and 5q allelic losses developed during neoplastic progression in Barrett esophagus by evaluating multiple aneuploid cell populations from the same patient. Using DNA content flow cytometric cell sorting and polymerase chain reaction, 38 aneuploid cell populations from 14 patients with Barrett esophagus who had high grade dysplasia, cancer or both were evaluated for 17p and 5q allelic losses. 17p allelic losses preceded 5q allelic losses in 7 patients, both 17p and 5q allelic losses were present in all aneuploid populations of 4 patients, and only 17p (without 5q) allelic losses were present in the aneuploid populations of 3 patients. In no patient did we find that a 5q allelic loss preceded a 17p allelic loss. Our data suggest that 17p allelic losses typically occur before 5q allelic losses during neoplastic progression in Barrett esophagus.

  2. 40Ar-39Ar Results of Lunar Meteorites Dhofar 025, 280, 309, 730, 733, 1436, 1442, SAU 449, NWA 6888

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korochantseva, E. V.; Buikin, A. I.; Hopp, J.; Korochantsev, A. V.; Trieloff, M.

    2016-08-01

    40Ar-39Ar ages vary between 3.0 and 4.2 Ga common for lunar rocks, but only Dho 025, Dho 309 and Dho 1436 are consistent with the LHB. Dho 280, 733, 1442, and NWA 6888 were affected by young impact events ≤1 Ga ago, partially also reset of CRE ages.

  3. Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic data from late Proterozoic mafic dikes and sills, Montana and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, Stephen S.; Geissman, John William; Snee, Lawrence W.

    1997-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar results from mafic dikes and sills in northwestern Wyoming and western Montana yield similar virtual geomagnetic poles and isotopic dates. In combination with paleomagnetic and geochronologic data from elsewhere in the western Cordillera, these data provide evidence for a regional mafic magnetic event at 780 to 770 Ma that affected a large area of western North America.

  4. On Full Disclosure and Transparent Data Flow from 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology Measurements to Data Reduction to Online Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Arguably 40Ar/39Ar geochronology is one of the most versatile techniques available to Earth scientists today for the dating of rocks and minerals and determining the rates of geological processes on Earth and in our solar system. Over the last four decades large quantities of high (and lower) quality 40Ar/39Ar data have been produced using many different generations of mass spectrometry instrumentation. This wealth of data is only as useful as its description and availability of metadata allows. Many online data sets or compilations available in the science literature only carry the resulting product, an age and a related uncertainty in millions of years, for example. These data points are far from desirable as these don't allow recalculation against modern-day age standards, decay constants and other parameters essential in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Over time these data will become less useful to the research community and eventually these will be put by the wayside. In this presentation I will emphasize the need for full disclosure of all data and metadata involved in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. I will give examples of how a complex data flow can be kept transparent from sample preparation to measurement to data reduction and eventually the uploading into online data repositories. Without the full disclosure of our data and a transparent data flow, it is evident that we cannot live up to one of the governing doctrines in the sciences, namely reproducibility of our scientific experiments and findings.

  5. Differential distribution of cAMP receptors cAR2 and cAR3 during Dictyostelium development.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Saxe, C L

    1996-01-10

    Signal transduction via a family of cAMP receptor subtypes (cARs) is critical for proper development in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. Genes encoding four related subtypes have been cloned and their expression, based on RNA accumulation, has been previously reported. Here we report the differential spatial and temporal distribution of cAR2 and cAR3 proteins, based on indirect double immunofluorescence. Cells were transformed with a carB::lacZ construct, and an antibody against beta-galactosidase was used to visualize cAR2 expression. Simultaneously, a cAR3-specific antibody was used to identify cAR3-expressing cells. Results indicate that by the time of tip formation (12-14 hr) both receptors are expressed and distribute in a virtually nonoverlapping pattern, with cAR2 being expressed on anterior, prestalk cells and cAR3 present in the rest of the organism. Differential distribution of these two receptor subtypes may result in distinct cAMP signaling mechanisms in the two major regions of the organism. PMID:8575636

  6. MHC class II DR allelic diversity in bighorn sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that decreased diversity and/or unique polymorphisms in MHC class II alleles of bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are responsible for lower titer of antibodies against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). To test this hypothesis, DRA...

  7. Estimating the age of alleles by use of intraallelic variability

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, M.; Rannala, B.

    1997-02-01

    A method is presented for estimating the age of an allele by use of its frequency and the extent of variation among different copies. The method uses the joint distribution of the number of copies in a population sample and the coalescence times of the intraallelic gene genealogy conditioned on the number of copies. The linear birth-death process is used to approximate the dynamics of a rare allele in a finite population. A maximum-likelihood estimate of the age of the allele is obtained by Monte Carlo integration over the coalescence times. The method is applied to two alleles at the cystic fibrosis (CFTR) locus, {Delta}F508 and G542X, for which intraallelic variability at three intronic microsatellite loci has been examined. Our results indicate that G542X is somewhat older than {Delta}F508. Although absolute estimates depend on the mutation rates at the microsatellite loci, our results support the hypothesis that {Delta}F508 arose <500 generations ({approx}10,000 years) ago. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Multifragment alleles in DNA fingerprints of the parrot, Amazona ventralis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, M.K.; White, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    Human DNA probes that identify variable numbers of tandem repeat loci are being used to generate DNA fingerprints in many animal and plant species. In most species the majority of the sc rable autoradiographic bands of the DNA fingerprint represent alleles from numerous unlinked loci. This study was initiated to use DNA fingerprints to determine the amount of band-sharing among captive Hispaniolan parrots (Amazona ventralis) with known genetic relationships. This would form the data base to examine DNA fingerprints of the closely related and endangered Puerto Rican parrot (A. vittata) and to estimate the degree of inbreeding in the relic population. We found by segregation analysis of the bands scored in the DNA fingerprints of the Hispaniolan parrots that there may be as few as two to five loci identified by the human 33.15 probe. Furthermore, at one locus we identified seven alleles, one of which is represented by as many as 19 cosegregating bands. It is unknown how common multiband alleles might be in natural populations, and their existence will cause problems in the assessment of relatedness by band-sharing analysis. We believe, therefore, that a pedigree analysis should be included in all DNA fingerprinting studies, where possible, in order to estimate the number of loci identified by a minisatellite DNA probe and to examine the nature of their alleles.

  9. Natural allelic variations in highly polyploidy Saccharum complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) as important sugar and biofuel crop are highly polypoid with complex genomes. A large amount of natural phenotypic variation exists in sugarcane germplasm. Understanding its allelic variance has been challenging but is a critical foundation for discovery of the genomic seq...

  10. Efficient nonmeiotic allele introgression in livestock using custom endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wenfang; Carlson, Daniel F.; Lancto, Cheryl A.; Garbe, John R.; Webster, Dennis A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Fahrenkrug, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    We have expanded the livestock gene editing toolbox to include transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nuclease (TALEN)- and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-stimulated homology-directed repair (HDR) using plasmid, rAAV, and oligonucleotide templates. Toward the genetic dehorning of dairy cattle, we introgressed a bovine POLLED allele into horned bull fibroblasts. Single nucleotide alterations or small indels were introduced into 14 additional genes in pig, goat, and cattle fibroblasts using TALEN mRNA and oligonucleotide transfection with efficiencies of 10–50% in populations. Several of the chosen edits mimic naturally occurring performance-enhancing or disease- resistance alleles, including alteration of single base pairs. Up to 70% of the fibroblast colonies propagated without selection harbored the intended edits, of which more than one-half were homozygous. Edited fibroblasts were used to generate pigs with knockout alleles in the DAZL and APC genes to model infertility and colon cancer. Our methods enable unprecedented meiosis-free intraspecific and interspecific introgression of select alleles in livestock for agricultural and biomedical applications. PMID:24014591

  11. Registration of two allelic erect leaf mutants of sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two allelic sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] erect leaf (erl) mutants were isolated from an Annotated Individually-pedigreed Mutagenized Sorghum (AIMS) mutant library developed at the Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Unit, at Lubbock, Texas. The two mutants, erl1-1 and erl1-2, were isol...

  12. Extensive allele-specific translational regulation in hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jingyi; Wang, Xi; McShane, Erik; Zauber, Henrik; Sun, Wei; Selbach, Matthias; Chen, Wei

    2015-08-07

    Translational regulation is mediated through the interaction between diffusible trans-factors and cis-elements residing within mRNA transcripts. In contrast to extensively studied transcriptional regulation, cis-regulation on translation remains underexplored. Using deep sequencing-based transcriptome and polysome profiling, we globally profiled allele-specific translational efficiency for the first time in an F1 hybrid mouse. Out of 7,156 genes with reliable quantification of both alleles, we found 1,008 (14.1%) exhibiting significant allelic divergence in translational efficiency. Systematic analysis of sequence features of the genes with biased allelic translation revealed that local RNA secondary structure surrounding the start codon and proximal out-of-frame upstream AUGs could affect translational efficiency. Finally, we observed that the cis-effect was quantitatively comparable between transcriptional and translational regulation. Such effects in the two regulatory processes were more frequently compensatory, suggesting that the regulation at the two levels could be coordinated in maintaining robustness of protein expression.

  13. Distribution of forensic marker allelic frequencies in Pernambuco, Northestern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Rabelo, K C N; Souza, P R E; Moura, R R; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S

    2015-04-30

    Pernambuco is one of the 27 federal units of Brazil, ranking seventh in the number of inhabitants. We examined the allele frequencies of 13 short tandem repeat loci (CFS1PO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, FGA, TH01, vWA, and TPOX), the minimum recommended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and commonly used in forensic genetics laboratories in Brazil, in a sample of 609 unrelated individuals from all geographic regions of Pernambuco. The allele frequencies ranged from 5 to 47.2%. No significant differences for any loci analyzed were observed compared with other publications in other various regions of Brazil. Most of the markers observed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The occurrence of the allele 47.2 (locus FGA) and alleles 35.1 and 39 (locus D21S11), also described in a single study of the Brazilian population, was observed. The other forensic parameters analyzed (matching probability, power of discrimination, polymorphic information content, paternity exclusion, complement factor I, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity) indicated that the studied markers are very informative for human forensic identification purposes in the Pernambuco population.

  14. ``Smoking From The Same Pipe": Developement of an 40Ar/39Ar Datting Intercalibration PIpette System (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, B. D.; Swisher, C. C.; Deino, A.; Hemming, S. R.; Hodges, K.; Renne, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    The precision and accuracy of Ar isotope ratio measurements is one of the main limiting factors in the uncertainties of an 40Ar/39Ar age. Currently, it is relatively common to measure Ar isotopic ratios to a precision of 1-2‰ or better on an intralaboratory basis. This level of analytical precision equates to a comparable level of precision (1-3‰) in the calculated age, depending on the extent of atmospheric Ar contamination, importance of nucleogenic interference corrections, and other factors. However, it has become clear that improving the precision of mass spectrometry is not the only bottleneck towards improving the accuracy and precision of 40Ar/39Ar dating in general. Rather, the most urgent issue is interlaboratory reproducibility. This became obvious in a recent EARTHTIME initiative undertaken to intercalibrate two commonly used 40Ar/39Ar standards [the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) and the Alder Creek sanidine (ACs)]. This effort revealed variations amongst laboratories (at the 1-2% level), an order of magnitude greater than the internal analytical precisions. To address these issues, we have proposed (to NSF) to construct two identical pipette systems loaded to identical starting pressures and with identical isotopic compositions. One pipette system will travel between participating 40Ar/39Ar labs and the second system will not travel and serve as the “Master” system to test for any fractionation or undocumented depletion of the traveling pipette system. In order to ensure delivery of uniform amounts of homogenous gas, the pipette system will be computer-controlled with preprogrammed routines and lockouts to prevent compromising the reservoirs. The pipette systems will deliver three gas samples with different isotopic ratios at two different pressures/concentrations. One pipette bulb will be of atmospheric isotopic composition, and the other two pipette bulbs will have 40Ar*/39ArK ratios corresponding to co-irradiated ACs and FCs fixed by their

  15. Evaluation of the IPCC Models (AR4 and AR5) in the Precipitation Simulation in the Northeast of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, José; Vasconcelos Junior, Francisco; Chaves, Rosane; Silva, Emerson; Servain, Jacques; Costa, Alexandre; Sombra, Sérgio; Barbosa, Augusto; Dos Santos, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    With the simulations of the models used in the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), comparative studies are necessary between observations and the so-called historical run (C20) and future projections of the AR4 (A2) and AR5 (RCP8.5) experiments, in order to assess whether the AR5 models had a better performance in the representation of physical processes. This article compares the sensitivity of IPCC models (AR4 and AR5) in representing the anuall average and seasonal rainfall variation (summer and autumn) in three regions of the Northeast of Brazil between 1979 and 2000, using the CMAP - CPC (Merged Analysis of Precipitation) data as reference. The projections made by these models for the period 2040-2070 were also analyzed.

  16. Toward a high-resolution 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Tatun Volcano Group, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesko, G. T.; Song, S.; Chang, S.; Hemming, S. R.; Turrin, B. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Tatun Volcano Group [TVG] consists of five volcanic subgroups of which ~30 edifices have been identified, all in close proximity to the densely populated Taipei Basin to its south (Song et al., 2000, Journal of the Geological Society of China, in Chinese). Evidence of eruptions is in the form of mostly lava flows, with pyroclastic flows, and ash deposition (Tsai et al., 2010, TAO), consistent with vulcanian and plinian eruptions that are only minimally preserved because of the region’s high weathering rate (Belousov et al., 2010, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research). The TVG is made up of calc-alkaline andesite, with few interspersed basaltic lava flows that bear geochemical signatures consistent with subduction volcanism, yet due to tectonic location Teng (1996, Geology) describes it as Ryukyu back-arc basin volcanism, and still others attribute volcanism here to post-collisional collapse of the Taiwan orogen (Wang et al., 1999, Tectonophysics and 2004, Journal of Petrology). Various TVG samples were previously K-Ar dated by Juang and Chen (1989, Bulletin of Central Geological Survey, in Chinese), Tsao (1994, Bulletin of Central Geological Survey, in Chinese), and 40Ar/39Ar whole rock analyses by Lee (1996, masters thesis, National Taiwan University) to suggest volcanism from 2.8-2.5Ma and then from 1.5-.22Ma after which volcanic events ceased. In contrast, radiocarbon dates obtained from charcoal in related sediment by Chen et al. (2010, TAO) and Belousov et al. (2010, Journal of Volcanology Geothermal Research) suggest volcanic activity was present at 20ka and 6ka respectively. The andesite samples are microcrystalline; therefore hand picked aliquots of groundmass from the hand magnetic fraction were subjected to several iterations of sonic rinse in glycine-based soap, then 4N HNO3, then quartz-distilled water in a preparation modified from Nicolaysen et al. (2000, EPSL). Samples were co-irradiated at the USGS facility in Denver using Alder

  17. Genomewide Association Study of Tacrolimus Concentrations in African American Kidney Transplant Recipients Identifies Multiple CYP3A5 Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Oetting, W. S.; Schladt, D. P.; Guan, W.; Miller, M. B.; Remmel, R. P.; Dorr, C.; Sanghavi, K.; Mannon, R. B.; Herrera, B.; Matas, A. J.; Salomon, D. R.; Kwok, P.-Y.; Keating, B. J.; Israni, A. K.; Jacobson, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that tacrolimus (TAC) trough blood concentrations for African American (AA) kidney allograft recipients were lower than those observed in white patients. Subtherapeutic TAC troughs may be associated with acute rejection (AR) and AR-associated allograft failure. This variation in TAC troughs is due, in part, to differences in the frequency of the cytochrome P450 CYP3A5*3 allele (rs776746, expresses nonfunctional enzyme) between white and AA recipients; however, even after accounting for this variant, variability in AA-associated troughs is significant. We conducted a genomewide association study of TAC troughs in AA kidney allograft recipients to search for additional genetic variation. We identified two additional CYP3A5 variants in AA recipients independently associated with TAC troughs: CYP3A5*6 (rs10264272) and CYP3A5*7 (rs41303343). All three variants and clinical factors account for 53.9% of the observed variance in troughs, with 19.8% of the variance coming from demographic and clinical factors including recipient age, glomerular filtration rate, anti-cytomegalovirus drug use, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant and antibody induction. There was no evidence of common genetic variants in AA recipients significantly influencing TAC troughs aside from the CYP3A gene. These results reveal that additional and possibly rare functional variants exist that account for the additional variation. PMID:26485092

  18. Unique Thermal Histories from Whole-Rock 40Ar/39Ar Step-heating Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, M.; Heizler, M. T.; Lovera, O. M.; Warren, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Step-heating 40Ar/39Ar analysis can reveal spatial distributions of 40Ar* at the micron scale imparted by post- crystallization heating events through complex, multi-diffusion domain models. These efforts have largely focused on single-phase, terrestrial samples with only scant attention paid to multi-phase or extra-terrestrial materials. Generalizing these models to incorporate the multiple activation energies (E) expected from bulk rock samples introduces significant interpretational ambiguity. This is because the thermal crossovers explicit in multi-E cases make the age spectrum a function of the lab heating schedule in thermally disturbed samples. A further difficulty is that unique interpretation of the associated Arrhenius plot is no longer possible and a range of E's can be fitted with equal goodness of fit. In order to address these challenges, we developed a new computational approach that simultaneously inverts the Arrhenius spectra and release pattern using a variant of the Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization (APSO) algorithm for a square-pulse heating event. Our version uses a Levy Flight to break the swarm out of a local minima rather than randomly modifying a single dimension as in the original APSO. Further we explored issues of Pareto efficiency arising from fitting two fitness functions (i.e., the fit to the age spectra and to the Arrhenius plot) and found an adequate resolution to the classic inability to have a single best fit. By utilizing multiple-E samples, we are able to obtain unique thermal history solutions. Application of these methods to high resolution age spectra of the Jilin chondrite and Apollo 16 samples (North Ray Crater) and found fits of sufficiently high fidelity to constrain the absolute temperature of the thermal episode to better than ±10%.

  19. Segregation of male-sterility alleles across a species boundary.

    PubMed

    Weller, S G; Sakai, A K; Culley, T M; Duong, L; Danielson, R E

    2014-02-01

    Hybrid zones may serve as bridges permitting gene flow between species, including alleles influencing the evolution of breeding systems. Using greenhouse crosses, we assessed the likelihood that a hybrid zone could serve as a conduit for transfer of nuclear male-sterility alleles between a gynodioecious species and a hermaphroditic species with very rare females in some populations. Segregation patterns in progeny of crosses between rare females of hermaphroditic Schiedea menziesii and hermaphroditic plants of gynodioecious Schiedea salicaria heterozygous at the male-sterility locus, and between female S. salicaria and hermaphroditic plants from the hybrid zone, were used to determine whether male-sterility was controlled at the same locus in the parental species and the hybrid zone. Segregations of females and hermaphrodites in approximately equal ratios from many of the crosses indicate that the same nuclear male-sterility allele occurs in the parent species and the hybrid zone. These rare male-sterility alleles in S. menziesii may result from gene flow from S. salicaria through the hybrid zone, presumably facilitated by wind pollination in S. salicaria. Alternatively, rare male-sterility alleles might result from a reversal from gynodioecy to hermaphroditism in S. menziesii, or possibly de novo evolution of male sterility. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that some species of Schiedea have probably evolved separate sexes independently, but not in the lineage containing S. salicaria and S. menziesii. High levels of selfing and expression of strong inbreeding depression in S. menziesii, which together should favour females in populations, argue against a reversal from gynodioecy to hermaphroditism in S. menziesii.

  20. Testing allele homogeneity: the problem of nested hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The evaluation of associations between genotypes and diseases in a case-control framework plays an important role in genetic epidemiology. This paper focuses on the evaluation of the homogeneity of both genotypic and allelic frequencies. The traditional test that is used to check allelic homogeneity is known to be valid only under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, a property that may not hold in practice. Results We first describe the flaws of the traditional (chi-squared) tests for both allelic and genotypic homogeneity. Besides the known problem of the allelic procedure, we show that whenever these tests are used, an incoherence may arise: sometimes the genotypic homogeneity hypothesis is not rejected, but the allelic hypothesis is. As we argue, this is logically impossible. Some methods that were recently proposed implicitly rely on the idea that this does not happen. In an attempt to correct this incoherence, we describe an alternative frequentist approach that is appropriate even when Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium does not hold. It is then shown that the problem remains and is intrinsic of frequentist procedures. Finally, we introduce the Full Bayesian Significance Test to test both hypotheses and prove that the incoherence cannot happen with these new tests. To illustrate this, all five tests are applied to real and simulated datasets. Using the celebrated power analysis, we show that the Bayesian method is comparable to the frequentist one and has the advantage of being coherent. Conclusions Contrary to more traditional approaches, the Full Bayesian Significance Test for association studies provides a simple, coherent and powerful tool for detecting associations. PMID:23176636

  1. Exact break point of a 50 kb deletion 8 kb centromeric of the HLA-A locus with HLA-A*24:02: the same deletion observed in other A*24 alleles and A*23:01 allele.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, Shigeki; Okudaira, Yuko; Kunii, Nanae; Cui, Tailin; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Oka, Akira; Suzuki, Yasuo; Homma, Yasuhiko; Sato, Shinji; Inoue, Ituro; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2011-08-01

    In a structural aberration analysis of patients with arthritis mutilans, a 50 kb deletion near the HLA-A locus with HLA-A*24:02 allele was detected. It was previously reported that HLA-A*24:02 haplotype harbored a large-scale deletion telomeric of the HLA-A gene in healthy individuals. In order to confirm that the deletion are the same in patients with arthritis mutilans and in healthy individuals, and to identify the break point of this deletion, the boundary sequences across the deletion in A*24:02 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a 3.7 kb genomic fragment and subjected to nucleotide sequence determination. A comparison of these genomic sequences with those of the non-A*24:02 haplotype revealed that the deleted genomic region spanning 50 kb was flanked by 3.7 kb repetitive element-rich segments homologous to each other on both sides in non-A*24. The nucleotide sequences of the PCR products were identical in patients with arthritis mutilans and in healthy individuals, revealing that the deletion linked to A*24:02 is irrelevant to the onset of arthritis mutilans. The deletion was detected in all other A*24 alleles so far examined but not in other HLA-A alleles, except A*23:01. This finding, along with the phylogenic tree of HLA-A alleles and the presence of the 3.7 kb highly homologous segments at the boundary of the deleted genomic region in A*03 and A*32, may suggest that this HLA-A*24:02-linked deletion was generated by homologous recombination within two 3.7 kb homologous segments situated 50 kb apart in the ancestral A*24 haplotype after divergence from the A*03 and A*32 haplotypes.

  2. A new approach to cosmogenic corrections in 40Ar/39Ar chronometry: Implications for the ages of Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, W. S.; Borg, L. E.

    2016-08-01

    Anomalously old 40Ar/39Ar ages are commonly obtained from Shergottites and are generally attributed to uncertainties regarding the isotopic composition of the trapped component and/or the presence of excess 40Ar. Old ages can also be obtained if inaccurate corrections for cosmogenic 36Ar are applied. Current methods for making the cosmogenic correction require simplifying assumptions regarding the spatial homogeneity of target elements for cosmogenic production and the distribution of cosmogenic nuclides relative to trapped and reactor-derived Ar isotopes. To mitigate uncertainties arising from these assumptions, a new cosmogenic correction approach utilizing the exposure age determined on an un-irradiated aliquot and step-wise production rate estimates that account for spatial variations in Ca and K is described. Data obtained from NWA 4468 and an unofficial pairing of NWA 2975, which yield anomalously old ages when corrected for cosmogenic 36Ar using conventional techniques, are used to illustrate the efficacy of this new approach. For these samples, anomalous age determinations are rectified solely by the improved cosmogenic correction technique described herein. Ages of 188 ± 17 and 184 ± 17 Ma are obtained for NWA 4468 and NWA 2975, respectively, both of which are indistinguishable from ages obtained by other radioisotopic systems. For other Shergottites that have multiple trapped components, have experienced diffusive loss of Ar, or contain excess Ar, more accurate cosmogenic corrections may aid in the interpretation of anomalous ages. The trapped 40Ar/36Ar ratios inferred from inverse isochron diagrams obtained from NWA 4468 and NWA 2975 are significantly lower than the Martian atmospheric value, and may represent upper mantle or crustal components.

  3. 40Ar/(39)Ar dating of the Kapthurin Formation, Baringo, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; McBrearty, Sally

    2002-01-01

    The(40)Ar/(39)Ar radiometric dating technique has been applied to tuffs and lavas of the Kapthurin Formation in the Tugen Hills, Kenya Rift Valley. Two variants of the(40)Ar/(39)Ar technique, single-crystal total fusion (SCTF) and laser incremental heating (LIH) have been employed to date five marker horizons within the formation: near the base, the Kasurein Basalt at 0.61+/-0.04 Ma; the Pumice Tuff at 0.543+/-0.004 Ma; the Upper Kasurein Basalt at 0.552+/-0.015 Ma; the Grey Tuff at 0.509+/-0.009 Ma; and within the upper part of the formation, the Bedded Tuff at 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. The new, precise radiometric age determination for the Pumice Tuff also provides an age for the widespread Lake Baringo Trachyte, since the Pumice Tuff is the early pyroclastic phase of this voluminous trachyte eruption. These results establish the age of fossil hominids KNM-BK 63-67 and KNM-BK 8518 at approximately 0.510-0.512 Ma, a significant finding given that few Middle Pleistocene hominids are radiometrically dated. The Kapthurin hominids are thus the near contemporaries of those from Bodo, Ethiopia and Tanzania. A flake and core industry from lacustrine sediments in the lower part of the formation is constrained by new dates of 0.55-0.52 Ma, a period during which the Acheulian industry, characterized by handaxes, is known throughout East Africa. Points, typical of the Middle Stone Age (MSA), are found in Kapthurin Formation sediments now shown to date to between 0.509+/-0.009 Ma and 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. This date exceeds previous estimates for the age of the MSA elsewhere in East Africa by 49 ka, and establishes the age of Acheulian to MSA transition for the region. Evidence of the use of the Levallois technique for the manufacture of both small flakes and biface preforms, the systematic production of blades, and the use and processing of red ochre also occurs in this interval. The presence of blades and red ochre at this depth is important as blades signify a high degree of technical

  4. 40Ar/(39)Ar dating of the Kapthurin Formation, Baringo, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; McBrearty, Sally

    2002-01-01

    The(40)Ar/(39)Ar radiometric dating technique has been applied to tuffs and lavas of the Kapthurin Formation in the Tugen Hills, Kenya Rift Valley. Two variants of the(40)Ar/(39)Ar technique, single-crystal total fusion (SCTF) and laser incremental heating (LIH) have been employed to date five marker horizons within the formation: near the base, the Kasurein Basalt at 0.61+/-0.04 Ma; the Pumice Tuff at 0.543+/-0.004 Ma; the Upper Kasurein Basalt at 0.552+/-0.015 Ma; the Grey Tuff at 0.509+/-0.009 Ma; and within the upper part of the formation, the Bedded Tuff at 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. The new, precise radiometric age determination for the Pumice Tuff also provides an age for the widespread Lake Baringo Trachyte, since the Pumice Tuff is the early pyroclastic phase of this voluminous trachyte eruption. These results establish the age of fossil hominids KNM-BK 63-67 and KNM-BK 8518 at approximately 0.510-0.512 Ma, a significant finding given that few Middle Pleistocene hominids are radiometrically dated. The Kapthurin hominids are thus the near contemporaries of those from Bodo, Ethiopia and Tanzania. A flake and core industry from lacustrine sediments in the lower part of the formation is constrained by new dates of 0.55-0.52 Ma, a period during which the Acheulian industry, characterized by handaxes, is known throughout East Africa. Points, typical of the Middle Stone Age (MSA), are found in Kapthurin Formation sediments now shown to date to between 0.509+/-0.009 Ma and 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. This date exceeds previous estimates for the age of the MSA elsewhere in East Africa by 49 ka, and establishes the age of Acheulian to MSA transition for the region. Evidence of the use of the Levallois technique for the manufacture of both small flakes and biface preforms, the systematic production of blades, and the use and processing of red ochre also occurs in this interval. The presence of blades and red ochre at this depth is important as blades signify a high degree of technical

  5. New 40Ar/39Ar Ages From Southwest Bolivia Refine the Timing of APVC Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, M.; de Silva, S. L.; Jicha, B.; Singer, B.; Jiménez, N.; Ort, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC) of the Central Andes has produced prodigious silicic volcanism (at least 11,000 km3 of magma) over the last 10 Ma including some of the largest known ignimbrites on Earth. Despite excellent exposure, little previous work had been conducted on the timing and distribution of ignimbrite volcanism in the Lípez region of southwestern Bolivia, the heart of the APVC. To address this deficiency we have performed ~612 single crystal laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar analyses from 39 pumice and bulk matrix samples collected from the main ignimbrite units within the Lípez region. Geochemistry of pumice and mineral samples, and paleomagnetic data are also being used to correlate individual ignimbrite units. Our new 40Ar/39Ar results establish new or refined eruption ages (with 2σ error) from the Vilama caldera at 8.41±0.02 Ma, Pastos Grandes caldera at 5.45±0.02 and 2.94±0.01 Ma, and Guacha caldera at 5.65±0.01, and 3.57±0.02 Ma. New ages were also determined for eruptions from the Panizos ignimbrite shield (6.86±0.03 Ma), Juvina ignimbrite shield (5.23±0.01 Ma), and the Laguna Colorado ignimbrite shield (2.21±0.05 and 1.95±0.03 Ma). The oldest ignimbrite we have found in the area is 10.33±0.64 Ma, a local unit beneath the Vilama ignimbrite. The youngest units have been identified west of the Guacha caldera with eruption ages of 1.70±0.6 Ma and 0.70±0.01 Ma. These results demonstrate that ignimbrite-producing eruptions in the Lípez region span the age of APVC volcanism previously established, with the largest eruptions occurring from long-lived, cyclic supervolcano caldera systems like Guacha and Pastos Grandes. The aggregate data from the APVC support the hypothesis that the APVC developed predominantly during distinct pulses of massive ignimbrite eruptions at ~8, 6, and 4 Ma and attest to episodic behavior of the magmatic system. Ignimbrites of <1 Ma, the cyclical nature of activity, and the continued geothermal presence and

  6. Implications of new 40Ar/39Ar data for the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Deino, A.; Hilgen, F.; Kuiper, K.; Mark, D. F.; Mitchell, W. S.; Morgan, L. E.; Smit, J.

    2012-12-01

    The cause of the mass extinctions across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary (KPB) is still controversial. Previous geochronological data [1-3] appear to preclude the Chicxulub impact as a causal mechanism as they indicate that the KPB predated the impact by 181 ± 71 ka (1σ here and throughout). New 40Ar/39Ar data, determined blind in the BGC and SUERC labs, for the terrestrial KPB (IrZ-coal bentonite) from the Hell Creek area of northeastern Montana yield an age of 66.044 ± 0.011/0.045 Ma (without/with systematic uncertainties, calibrated per [4]). New 40Ar/39Ar data for Haitian tektites, combined with previous work [2,3], yield an age of 66.038 ± 0.025/0.049 Ma thereby establishing synchrony between the terrestrial KPB and the Chicxulub bolide impact to within 33 ka. The absolute boundary age of 66.044 Ma ± 0.045 [4] or 65.837 ± 0.061 Ma [5] allows clear discrimination between Earth's 405 ka orbital eccentricity cycles and both calibrations favor the orbital tuning chronology of [5] for the KPB at Zumaia, Spain. The former calibration is corroborated by U/Pb data [6]. In contrast, a recent orbital chronology proposed for the Zumaia section [7] infers an age of 65.2 Ma for the KPB, suggesting that the tuning missed two 405 ka eccentricity cycles. New data for tuffs above the KPB indicate a dramatic reduction in the post-KPB timescale of faunal recovery during the Puercan1 NALMA substage, and for the restoration of pre-KPB atmospheric δ13C values, to several tens of ka at most. Our new data clearly implicate a significant role for the Chicxulub impact in the KPB extinctions, but this cannot explain the significant pre-KPB climate instability or precursory faunal turnover [8]. The Chicxulub impact likely delivered the final blow to stressed ecosystems rather than being the sole cause of the KPB extinctions. The role of roughly synchronous phenomena such as eruption of the multiphased Deccan Traps [9] remains to be tested via high-precision geochronology. Refs

  7. The Next Generation Cretaceous Time Scale: How to integrate 40Ar/39Ar, U-Pb and Astrochronologic ages? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.; Condon, D. J.; Siewert, S. E.; Sageman, B. B.; Sawyer, D. A.; Obradovich, J. D.; Meyers, S. R.; Jicha, B.

    2010-12-01

    TThe Cretaceous Time Scale of Obradovich (1993), based on 40Ar/39Ar dating of ash beds within a framework of ammonite biostratigraphy, achieved a resolution of ~0.5%. To build from this toward the EARTHTIME goal of 0.1% resolution, we are undertaking new 40Ar/39Ar dating of these and previously undated ash beds, coupled with U-Pb dating of zircons and newly developed astrochronologic age models and methods for key intervals. Initial focus is on Cenomanian to Campanian stages which: span 37 ammonite zones, include a GSSP associated with OAE2, and yield, through spectral analysis of cores, floating astrochronologies for ~7 Ma. 40Ar/39Ar ages of sanidine from newly collected samples are identical to those obtained from legacy samples of Obradovich (1993). Although individual 40Ar/39Ar analyses, each derived from laser fusion of 1- 5 sanidine crystals, yield 2 sigma analytical precisions of ˜2 Ma, large numbers (33-103) of such analyses reveal few outliers (analyses <97% 40Ar*), give Guassian distributions from as many as three separate sites in a single ash bed, and have wtd. mean analytical uncertainties of 100 -170 ka, i.e., <0.2%. Using the ET535 tracer and CA-TIMS methods multiple zircons (single crystals and fragments) have also been measured in samples from 8 of the ash beds for which we have new 40Ar/39Ar data. The high precision of each single crystal 206Pb/238U age of about 0.1% is a strength and each sample yields zircon 206Pb/238U ages that typically span 0.5 to 1.0 Ma, reflecting inheritance or recycling of some zircon during protracted evolution of the volcanic sources. The selection of which group of the youngest zircons from several of these ash beds best estimates the eruptive age requires some choice as to whether chemical abrasion has eliminated all zircon affected by Pb loss. Choosing the ‘youngest zircons’ in 6 of these ash beds yields wtd. mean 206Pb/238U ages that are indistinguishable from the wtd. mean 40Ar/39Ar ages, provided the latter

  8. Molecular modeling of the effects of 40Ar recoil in illite particles on their K-Ar isotope dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczerba, Marek; Derkowski, Arkadiusz; Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Środoń, Jan

    2015-06-01

    The radioactive decay of 40K to 40Ar is the basis of isotope age determination of micaceous clay minerals formed during diagenesis. The difference in K-Ar ages between fine and coarse grained illite particles has been interpreted using detrital-authigenic components system, its crystallization history or post-crystallization diffusion. Yet another mechanism should also be considered: natural 40Ar recoil. Whether this recoil mechanism can result in a significant enough loss of 40Ar to provide observable decrease of K-Ar age of the finest illite crystallites at diagenetic temperatures - is the primary objective of this study which is based on molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. All the simulations were performed for the same kinetic energy (initial velocity) of the 40Ar atom, but for varying recoil angles that cover the entire range of their possible values. The results show that 40Ar recoil can lead to various deformations of the illite structure, often accompanied by the displacement of OH groups or breaking of the Si-O bonds. Depending on the recoil angle, there are four possible final positions of the 40Ar atom with respect to the 2:1 layer at the end of the simulation: it can remain in the interlayer space or end up in the closest tetrahedral, octahedral or the opposite tetrahedral sheet. No simulation angles were found for which the 40Ar atom after recoil passes completely through the 2:1 layer. The energy barrier for 40Ar passing through the hexagonal cavity from the tetrahedral sheet into the interlayer was calculated to be 17 kcal/mol. This reaction is strongly exothermic, therefore there is almost no possibility for 40Ar to remain in the tetrahedral sheet of the 2:1 layer over geological time periods. It will either leave the crystal, if close enough to the edge, or return to the interlayer space. On the other hand, if 40Ar ends up in the octahedral sheet after recoil, a substantially higher energy barrier of 55 kcal/mol prevents it from leaving

  9. Allelic imbalance analysis by high-density single-nucleotide polymorphic allele (SNP) array with whole genome amplified DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Tsang, Yvonne T. M.; Shen, Jianhe; Cheng, Rita S.; Chang, Yi-Mieng; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Lau, Ching C.

    2004-01-01

    Besides their use in mRNA expression profiling, oligonucleotide microarrays have also been applied to single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) or allelic imbalance studies. In this report, we evaluate the reliability of using whole genome amplified DNA for analysis with an oligonucleotide microarray containing 11 560 SNPs to detect allelic imbalance and chromosomal copy number abnormalities. Whole genome SNP analyses were performed with DNA extracted from osteosarcoma tissues and patient-matched blood. SNP calls were then generated by Affymetrix® GeneChip® DNA Analysis Software. In two osteosarcoma cases, using unamplified DNA, we identified 793 and 1070 SNP loci with allelic imbalance, respectively. In a parallel experiment with amplified DNA, 78% and 83% of these SNP loci with allelic imbalance was detected. The average false-positive rate is 13.8%. Furthermore, using the Affymetrix® GeneChip® Chromosome Copy Number Tool to analyze the SNP array data, we were able to detect identical chromosomal regions with gain or loss in both amplified and unamplified DNA at cytoband resolution. PMID:15148342

  10. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-03-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  11. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-01-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27030405

  12. Allelic divergence and cultivar-specific SSR alleles revealed by capillary electrophoresis using fluorescence-labeled SSR markers in sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) are complex aneu-polyploid hybrids, genetic evaluation and tracking of clone- or cultivar-specific alleles become possible due to capillary electrophoregrams (CE) using fluorescence-labeled SSR primer pairs. Twenty-four sugarcane cultivars, 12 each...

  13. Nonfrequent but well-documented, rare and very rare HLA alleles observed in the Croatian population.

    PubMed

    Grubic, Z; Burek Kamenaric, M; Maskalan, M; Stingl Jankovic, K; Zunec, R

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of nonfrequent, rare and very rare alleles among Croats and to estimate whether they are associated with specific alleles at other human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci. This retrospective study included the typing results from the last 10 years; total number of individuals included was approximately 45,000. Among 17 alleles so far observed only once in our population, 6 (A*24:41, B*07:02:28, B*35:03:03, B*39:40N, DRB1*13:23 and DRB1*14:111) belong to very rare alleles, 2 (B*44:16 and DRB1*01:31) belong to rare alleles according to the 'Rare Alleles Detector' tool ( www.allelefrequencies.net), while for the B*35:101:01 allele published data exist only in the IMGT/HLA database. The remaining eight HLA alleles observed only once among Croats are considered as frequent according to the 'Rare Alleles Detector'. Those 17 HLA alleles are not declared as common well defined (CWD) alleles in the CWD allele catalogue 2.0.0. Haplotype analysis of nonfrequent alleles detected in our sample supports the idea that different populations, although similar in some aspects regarding HLA allele and haplotype distribution, still have some unique characteristics. This is the case for A*01:02, B*39:10 and DRB1*13:32 which form haplotypes unreported to date among our subjects.

  14. Tri-allelic pattern at the TPOX locus: a familial study.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Alvarez, Luís; Amorim, António; Batista Dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2014-02-10

    Alleles at the TPOX STR locus have 6-14 different numbers of a four-nucleotide (AATG) repeat motif arranged in tandem. Although tri-allelic genotypes are generally rare, the TPOX tri-allelic pattern has a higher frequency, varying widely among populations. Despite this, there are few accurate reports to disclose the nature of the TPOX third allele. In this work we present data obtained from 45 individuals belonging to the same pedigree, in which there are cases of tri-allelic TPOX genotypes. The subjects were apparently healthy with a normal biological development. We noticed six tri-allelic cases in this family, and all of them were women. Karyotype analysis showed no occurrence of partial 2p trisomy. All the tri-allelic cases had the genotype 8-10-11, probably due to three copies of the TPOX STR sequence in all cells (Type 2 tri-allelic pattern). Based on previous data we assumed the allele 10 as the TPOX third allele. The pedigree analyses show evidences that the TPOX extra-allele was the allele10, it is placed far from the main TPOX locus, and that there is a potential linkage of the TPOX extra-allele-10 with Xq. This was the first study that included a large pedigree analysis in order to understand the nature TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

  15. Age of Lucy and the First Family: Single-crystal 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Denen Dora and lower Kada Hadar members of the Hadar Formation, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Robert C.

    1994-01-01

    Single-crystal laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar analyses on previously undatable tephra deposits provide the first reliable dates for the important hominid fossils popularly called "Lucy" and the "First Family,"here dated to 3.18 and 3.20 Ma, respectively. These results help to establish an age framework for hominid and biostratigraphic evolution for the fossil-rich Hadar Formation. The abundance of well-preserved vertebrate fossils at Hadar can be attributed, in part, to an unusually high sediment-accumulation rate of approximately 80 cm/ka, which might be due to increased tectonic subsidence of the Hadar basin between 3.4 and 3.2 Ma. The new dates also provide supportive evidence that the boundary ages for the Kaena and Mammoth subchrons, of the geomagnetic polarity time scale, need to be increased by as much as 4% to 5%.

  16. Rare Homologous Gene Targeting in Histoplasma capsulatum: Disruption of the URA5Hc Gene by Allelic Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Jon P.; Retallack, Diane M.; Heinecke, Elizabeth L.; Goldman, William E.

    1998-01-01

    URA5 genes encode orotidine-5′-monophosphate pyrophosphorylase (OMPpase), an enzyme involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. We cloned the Histoplasma capsulatum URA5 gene (URA5Hc) by using a probe generated by PCR with inosine-rich primers based on relatively conserved sequences in OMPpases from other organisms. Transformation with this gene restored uracil prototrophy and OMPpase activity to UV-mutagenized ura5 strains of H. capsulatum. We attempted to target the genomic URA5 locus in this haploid organism to demonstrate homologous allelic replacement with transforming DNA, which has not been previously done in H. capsulatum and has been challenging in some other pathogenic fungi. Several strategies commonly used in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other eukaryotes were unsuccessful, due to the frequent occurrence of ectopic integration, linear plasmid formation, and spontaneous resistance to 5-fluoroorotic acid, which is a selective agent for URA5 gene inactivation. Recent development of an efficient electrotransformation system and of a second selectable marker (hph, conferring hygromycin B resistance) for this fungus enabled us to achieve allelic replacement by using transformation with an insertionally inactivated Δura5Hc::hph plasmid, followed by dual selection with hygromycin B and 5-fluoroorotic acid, or by screening hygromycin B-resistant transformants for uracil auxotrophy. The relative frequency of homologous gene targeting was approximately one allelic replacement event per thousand transformants. This work demonstrates the feasibility but also the potential challenge of gene disruption in this organism. To our knowledge, it represents the first example of experimentally directed allelic replacement in H. capsulatum, or in any dimorphic systemic fungal pathogen of humans. PMID:9748447

  17. A generic interface element for COMET-AR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccleary, Susan L.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1995-01-01

    The implementation of an interface element capability within the COMET-AR software system is described. The report is intended for use by both users of currently implemented interface elements and developers of new interface element formulations. Guidance on the use of COMET-AR is given. A glossary is provided as an Appendix to this report for readers unfamiliar with the jargon of COMET-AR. A summary of the currently implemented interface element formulation is presented in Section 7.3 of this report.

  18. Deactivation of lipopolysaccharide by Ar and H2 inductively coupled low-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartis, E. A. J.; Barrett, C.; Chung, T.-Y.; Ning, N.; Chu, J.-W.; Graves, D. B.; Seog, J.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    Using an inductively coupled plasma system, we study the effects of direct plasma, plasma-generated high-energy photons in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet (UV/VUV), and radical treatments on lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is a biomolecule found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and a potent stimulator of the immune system composed of polysaccharide and lipid A, which contains six aliphatic chains. LPS film thickness spun on silicon was monitored by ellipsometry while the surface chemistry was characterized before and after treatments by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, biological activity was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay under (a) a sensitive regime (sub-µM concentrations of LPS) and (b) a bulk regime (above µM concentrations of LPS) after plasma treatments. Direct plasma treatment causes rapid etching and deactivation of LPS in both Ar and H2 feed gases. To examine the effect of UV/VUV photons, a long-pass filter with a cut-off wavelength of 112 nm was placed over the sample. H2 UV/VUV treatment causes material removal and deactivation due to atomic and molecular UV/VUV emission while Ar UV/VUV treatment shows minimal effects as Ar plasma does not emit UV/VUV photons in the transmitted wavelength range explored. Interestingly, radical treatments remove negligible material but cause deactivation. Based on the amphiphilic structure of LPS, we expect a lipid A rich surface layer to form at the air-water interface during sample preparation with polysaccharide layers underneath. XPS shows that H2 plasma treatment under direct and UV/VUV conditions causes oxygen depletion through removal of C-O and O-C = O bonds in the films, which does not occur in Ar treatments. Damage to these groups can remove aliphatic chains that contribute to the pyrogenicity of LPS. Radical treatments from both Ar and H2 plasmas remove aliphatic carbon from the near-surface, demonstrating the important role of neutral species.

  19. Perceptual presence without counterfactual richness.

    PubMed

    Madary, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, I suggest that non-visual perceptual modalities provide counterexamples to Seth's claim that perceptual presence depends on counterfactual richness. Then I suggest a modification to Seth's view that is not vulnerable to these counterexamples. PMID:24739124

  20. Maximizing allele detection: Effects of analytical threshold and DNA levels on rates of allele and locus drop-out.

    PubMed

    Rakay, Christine A; Bregu, Joli; Grgicak, Catherine M

    2012-12-01

    Interpretation of DNA evidence depends upon the ability of the analyst to accurately compare the DNA profile obtained from an item of evidence and the DNA profile of a standard. This interpretation becomes progressively more difficult as the number of 'drop-out' and 'drop-in' events increase. Analytical thresholds (AT) are typically selected to ensure the false detection of noise is minimized. However, there exists a tradeoff between the erroneous labeling of noise as alleles and the false non-detection of alleles (i.e. drop-out). In this study, the effect ATs had on both types of error was characterized. Various ATs were tested, where three relied upon the analysis of baseline signals obtained from 31 negative samples. The fourth AT was determined by utilizing the relationship between RFU signal and DNA input. The other ATs were the commonly employed 50, 150 and 200 RFU thresholds. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) plots showed that although high ATs completely negated the false labeling of noise, DNA analyzed with ATs derived using analysis of the baseline signal exhibited the lowest rates of drop-out and the lowest total error rates. In another experiment, the effect small changes in ATs had on drop-out was examined. This study showed that as the AT increased from ∼10 to 60 RFU, the number of heterozygous loci exhibiting the loss of one allele increased. Between ATs of 60 and 150 RFU, the frequency of allelic drop-out remained constant at 0.27 (±0.02) and began to decrease when ATs of 150 RFU or greater were utilized. In contrast, the frequency of heterozygous loci exhibiting the loss of both alleles consistently increased with AT. In summary, for samples amplified with less than 0.5ng of DNA, ATs derived from baseline analysis of negatives were shown to decrease the frequency of drop-out by a factor of 100 without significantly increasing rates of erroneous noise detection.

  1. Mass Spectrometric and Langmuir Probe Measurements in Inductively Coupled Plasmas in Ar, CHF3/Ar and CHF3/Ar/O2 Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. S.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, S. P.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Absolute fluxes and energy distributions of ions in inductively coupled plasmas of Ar, CHF3/Ar, and CHF3/Ar/O2 have been measured. These plasmas were generated in a Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) cell modified for inductive coupling at pressures 10-50 mTorr and 100-300 W of 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) power in various feedgas mixtures. In pure Ar plasmas, the Ar(+) flux increases linearly with pressure as well as RF-power. Total ion flux in CHF3 mixtures decreases with increase in pressure and also CHF3 concentration. Relative ion fluxes observed in the present studies are analyzed with the help of available cross sections for electron impact ionization and charge-exchange ion-molecule reactions. Measurements of plasma potential, electron and ion number densities, electron energy distribution function, and mean electron energy have also been made in the center of the plasma with a RF compensated Langmuir probe. Plasma potential values are compared with the mean ion energies determined from the measured ion energy distributions and are consistent. Electron temperature, plasma potential, and mean ion energy vary inversely with pressure, but increase with CHF3 content in the mixture.

  2. (40)Ar/(39)Ar Age of Hornblende-Bearing R Chondrite LAP 04840

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrites have a complex chronology due to several variables affecting and operating on chondritic parent bodies such as radiogenic heating, pressure and temperature variation with depth, aqueous alteration, and shock or impact heating. Unbrecciated chondrites can record ages from 4.56 to 4.4 Ga that represent cooling in small parent bodies. Some brecciated chondrites exhibit younger ages (much less than 4 to 4.4 Ga) that may reflect the age of brecciation, disturbance, or shock and impact events (much less than 4 Ga). A unique R chondrite was recently found in the LaPaz Icefield of Antarctica - LAP 04840. This chondrite contains approximately 15% hornblende and trace amounts of biotite, making it the first of its kind. Studies have revealed an equigranular texture, mineral equilibria yielding equilibration near 650-700 C and 250-500 bars, hornblende that is dominantly OH-bearing (very little Cl or F), and high D/H ratios. To help gain a better understanding of the origin of this unique sample, we have measured the (40)Ar/(39)Ar age (LAP 04840 split 39).

  3. 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of the emplacement of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Boudier, Françoise; Gnos, Edwin; Monié, Patrick; Nicolas, Adolphe

    1995-11-01

    The obduction-related basal part of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite (Baluchistan, Pakistan) and the underlying metamorphic sequence were studied structurally which demonstrated a WSW-ENE-trending thrusting sequence for the initial obduction. 40Ar/ 39Ar measurements on amphiboles and plagioclase from the subophiolitic metamorphic rocks, and on plastically deformed and recrystallized dolerite samples from the base of the sheeted dyke complex give apparent ages between 70.7 ± 5.0 and 65.1 ± 4.1 Ma interpreted as cooling ages dating approximately the formation of the plastic deformation and obduction. The results indicate that the Muslim Bagh ophiolite represents a segment of ocean floor from the small and slow-spreading ocean branch of the Neo-Tethys located between the Indo-Pakistani and the Afro-Arabian plates. The WSW-ENE-oriented obduction of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite onto the Indo-Pakistani continental margin occurred with the convergence of the Neo-Tethys branch during the Late Cretaceous and before the Tertiary collision of the Indo-Pakistani plate with the Eurasian plate.

  4. Duration of sedimentation of Creede Formation from 40Ar/39Ar ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2000-01-01

    The Oligocene Creede Formation was deposited in the moat of the Creede caldera, which formed as a result of eruption of ythe Snowshoe Mountains Tuff. The Creede Formation in the two moat drill holes contains ash layers that are considered fallout tuffs derived from Fisher Dacite volcanoes that were erupting during accumulation of the Creede Formation. The duration of sedimentation of the Creede Formation could hnot be determinted directly by measuring the ages of the ash layers because 40Ar/39Ar ages of biotite from the asj layers do not stack in the correct stratigraphic order, indicating that the ash layers have been contaminated by biotite from older units. The duration of sedimentation is constrained by the ages of volcanic unites that stratigraphically bracket the Creede Formation. Pooling all ages for the underlyinh Snowshoe Mountain Tuff yields an age of 26.92 ± 0.07 Ma for the unit. The age of the stratigraphically highest lavas of Fisher Dacite, which overlie the Creede Formation, is 26.26 ± 0.04 Ma. The two limits give a maximum duration for sedimentation of the Creede Formation of 0.66 m.y. Using the ages of older Fisher Dacite lavas, on which some beds of the Creede Formation were deposited, a more realistic maximum duration of 0.34 m.y. for sedimentation of the Creede Formation can be determined.

  5. SHRIMP U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar age constraints for relating plutonism and mineralization in the Boulder batholith region, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, K.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Kunk, M.J.; Unruh, D.M.; Zeihen, G.D.; Hodges, W.C.; du Bray, E.A.; O'Neill, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    The composite Boulder batholith, Montana, hosts a variety of mineral deposit types, including important silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein districts in the northern part of the batholith and the giant Butte porphyry copper-molybdenum pre-Main Stage system and crosscutting copper-rich Main Stage vein system in the southern part of the batholith. Previous dating studies have identified ambiguous relationships among igneous and mineralizing events. Mineralizing hydrothermal fluids for these types of deposits and magma for quartz porphyry dikes at Butte have all been considered to be late-stage differentiates of the Boulder batholith. However, previous dating studies indicated that the Boulder batholith plutons cooled from about 78 to 72 Ma, whereas copper-rich Main Stage veins at Butte were dated at about 61 Ma. Recent efforts to date the porphyry copper-molybdenum pre-Main Stage deposits at Butte resulted in conflicting estimates of both 64 and 76 Ma for the mineralizing events. Silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein deposits elsewhere in the batholith have not been dated previously. To resolve this controversy, we used the U.S. Geological Survey, Stanford, SHRIMP RG ion mic??roprobe to date single-age domains within zircons from plutonic rock samples and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to date white mica, biotite, and K-feldspar from mineral deposits. U-Pb zircon ages are Rader Creek Granodiorite, 80.4 ?? 1.2 Ma; Unionville Granodiorite, 78.2 ?? 0.8 Ma; Pulpit Rock granite, 76.5 ?? 0.8 Ma; Butte Granite, 74.5 ?? 0.9 Ma; altered Steward-type quartz porphyry dike (I-15 roadcut), 66.5 ?? 1.0 Ma; altered Steward-type quartz porphyry dike (Continental pit), 65.7 ?? 0.9 Ma; and quartz monzodiorite of Boulder Baldy (Big Belt Mountains), 66.2 ?? 0.9 Ma. Zircons from Rader Creek Granodiorite and quartz porphyry dike samples contain Archean inheritance. The 40Ar/39Ar ages are muscovite, silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein (Basin district), 74.4 ?? 0.3 Ma; muscovite, silver-rich

  6. Unimolecular and collision-induced dissociation of Ar/sub 2/ /sup +/ produced by electron ionization of Ar/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, K.; Stamatovic, A.; Mark, T.D.

    1983-11-01

    Unimolecular and collision-induced dissociation of Ar/sub 2/ /sup +/ produced by electron-impact ionization of Ar/sub 2/ were studied quantitatively with a double-focusing mass spectrometer. The occurrence of the metastable dissociation process Ar/sub 2/ /sup +asterisk/..-->..Ar/sup +/+Ar is interpreted qualitatively in terms of potential-energy curves calculated recently using quantum-mechanical methods.

  7. Two-neutron knockout from neutron-deficient {sup 34}Ar, {sup 30}S, and {sup 26}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, K.; Obertelli, A.; Bazin, D.; Hoagland, T.; Lecouey, J.-L.; Mueller, W. F.; Gade, A.; Brown, B. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Cook, J. M.; Davies, A. D.; Dinca, D.-C.; Glasmacher, T.; Hansen, P. G.; Terry, J. R.; Zwahlen, H.; Cottle, P. D.; Kemper, K. W.; Reynolds, R. R.; Roeder, B. T.

    2006-08-15

    Two-neutron knockout reactions from nuclei in the proximity of the proton dripline have been studied using intermediate-energy beams of neutron-deficient {sup 34}Ar, {sup 30}S, and {sup 26}Si. The inclusive cross sections, and also the partial cross sections for the population of individual bound final states of the {sup 32}Ar, {sup 28}S and {sup 24}Si knockout residues, have been determined using the combination of particle and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Similar to the two-proton knockout mechanism on the neutron-rich side of the nuclear chart, these two-neutron removal reactions from already neutron-deficient nuclei are also shown to be consistent with a direct reaction mechanism.

  8. 40Ar/39Ar dating of Pleistocene tuffs: an accurate age for the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic reversal (MBGR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, D. F.; Renne, P. R.; Morgan, L. E.; Deino, A.; Smith, V. C.; Ellis, B. S.; Pearce, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent recalibrations of the 40Ar/39Ar system [1,2] reveal inconsistencies with some previous ages inferred for the MBGR. An Ar/Ar age [3] for the Bishop Tuff (BT) (which post-dates the MBGR by at least 15.3 ± 2.2 ka [3]) recalculated [2] yields an age of 778.0 ± 3.8 ka (1σ, full systematic uncertainty). The age is c. 10 ka older than the BT zircon ID-TIMS U-Pb age [4] and places the MBGR at c. 793 ka, c. 13 and 20 ka older than astronomical ages for the MBGR of 780 ka [5] and 773 ka [6], respectively. To determine an accurate age for the MBGR, we have made a series of 40Ar/39Ar age determinations for Pleistocene tuffs from both Indonesia and North America that have direct relationships to the MBGR. Blind analyses were conducted at SUERC and BGC. We observed excellent inter-laboratory agreement and no systematic offset in data. Ar/Ar ages are reported relative to [2] (1σ, full systematic uncertainty). Drill cores from ODP Site 758 show the precise location of the MBGR. Below the MBGR are two distal tephra horizons that we have identified as products of two temporally distinct Old Toba Tuff (OTT) eruptions (layer d OTT1 and layer D OTT2). Continuous sedimentation between OTT1 (802.8 ± 0.7 ka, n = 100, MSWD 1.2) and OTT2 (796.2 ± 0.8 ka, n = 62, MSWD 1.3) allows for calculation of an accurate sedimentation rate and for extrapolation of an age from OTT2 to the MBGR. Data define an age for the MBGR of 795.2 ± 0.9 ka. Using tephra above the MBGR boundary, the Middle Toba Tuff (layer C) and Young Toba Tuff (layer A), extrapolation down core supports a MBGR age of c. 795 ka. Recent age data for BT sanidine reported relative to FCs at 28.172 Ma (767.4 ± 1.1 Ma) [7] oddly yielded an Ar/Ar age that was indistinguishable from the BT zircon U-Pb age [4], which is consistent with previous 40Ar/39Ar age measurements made relative to FCs at 28.02 Ma [3]. Thus we made a series of 40Ar/39Ar measurements on the exact same sample as used by Rivera et al. [7] and observed

  9. Modification of an HLA-B PCR-SSOP typing system leading to improved allele determination.

    PubMed

    Middleton, D; Williams, F; Cullen, C; Mallon, E

    1995-04-01

    Modifications have been introduced to a previously reported HLA-B PCR-SSOP typing system. This has enabled further definition of alleles, determination of the probe pattern of some alleles not previously examined and identification of patterns of possible new alleles. However there are still some alleles that cannot be differentiated and there are several alleles which when present as a homozygote have the same pattern as in combination with another allele. When the method was applied to the typing of 66 consecutive cadaveric donors there were three donors whose type differed from the serological type.

  10. Single-crystal sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar dating of the Olorgesailie Formation, southern Kenya rift

    SciTech Connect

    Deino, A. ); Potts, R. )

    1990-06-10

    Single-crystal laser fusion {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses and several conventional bulk fusion {sup 40}K- {sup 40}Ar dates have been used to determine the age of volcaniclastic strata within the Olorgesailie Formation and of associated volcanic and sedimentary units of the southern Kenya rift. In the principal exposures along the southern edge of the Legemunge Plain, the formation spans the interval from approximately 500 to 1,000 ka. Deposition continued to the east along the Ol Keju Nyiro river where a tuff near the top of the formation has been dated at 215 ka. In these exposures, the formation is unconformably overlain by sediments dated at 49 ka. A possible source for the Olorgesailie tephra, the Ol Doinyo Nyokie volcanic complex, contains as ash flow dated at {approximately} 1 Ma, extending the known age range of this complex to encompass that of virtually the entire Olorgesailie Formation in the Legemunge Plain. These geologic examples illustrate the importance of the single-crystal {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating technique whereby contaminant, altered, or otherwise aberrant grains can be identified and eliminated from the determination of eruptive ages for reworked or altered pyroclastic deposits. The authors have presented a computer-modeling procedure based on an inverse-isochron analysis that promotes a more objective approach to trimming {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar isotope data sets of this type.

  11. Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching of III-V Antimonides in BCl(3)/Ar and Cl(2)/Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, R.P.; Lester, L.F.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.; Zhang, L.

    1998-11-04

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching characteristics of GaSb and AIGaAsSb have been investigated in BC13/Ar and Clz/Ar plasmas. The etch rates and selectivity between GaSb and AIGaAsSb are reported as functions of plasma chemistry, ICP power, RF self-bias, and chamber pressure. It is found that physical sputtering resorption of the etch products plays a dominant role in BC13/Ar ICP etching, while in Clz/Ar plasma, the chemical reaction dominates the etching. GaSb etch rates exceeding 2 ~rnhnin are achieved in Clz/Ar plasmas with smooth surfaces and anisotropic profiles. In BC13/Ar plasmas, etch rates of 5100 Mmin and 4200 Mmin are obtained for GaSb and AIGaAsSb, respectively. The surfaces of both GaSb and AIGaAsSb etched in BC13/Ar plasmas remain smooth and stoichiometric over the entire range of plasma conditions investigated. This result is attributed to effective removal of etch products by physical sputtering. For a wide range of plasma conditions, the selectivity between GaSb and AIGaAsSb is close to unity, which is desirable for fabricating etched mirrors and gratings for Sb-based mid-IR laser diodes.

  12. 40Ar/39Ar and U-Th-Pb dating of separated clasts from the Abee E4 chondrite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bogard, D.D.; Unruh, D.M.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1983-01-01

    Determinations of 40Ar/39Ar and U-Th-Pb are reported for three clasts from the Abee (E4) enstatite chondrite, which has been the object of extensive consortium investigations. The clasts give 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages and/or maximum ages of 4.5 Gy, whereas two of the clasts give average ages of 4.4 Gy. Within the range of 4.4-4.5 Gy these data do not resolve any possible age differences among the three clasts. 206Pb measured in these clasts is only ???1.5-2.5% radiogenic, which leads to relatively large uncertainties in the Pb isochron age and in the 207Pb/206Pb model ages. The Pb data indicate that the initial 207Pb/206Pb was no more than 0.08??0.07% higher than this ratio in Can??on Diablo troilite. The U-Th-Pb data are consistent with the interpretation that initial formation of these clasts occurred 4.58 Gy ago and that the clasts have since remained closed systems, but are contaminated with terrestrial Pb. The 40Ar/39Ar ages could be gas retention ages after clast formation or impact degassing ages. The thermal history of Abee deduced from Ar data appears consistent with that deduced from magnetic data, and suggests that various Abee components experienced separate histories until brecciation no later than 4.4 Gy ago, and experienced no appreciable subsequent heating. ?? 1983.

  13. An Improved Cluster Richness Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy; Hao, Jiangang; Evrard, August; Wechsler, Risa H.; Hansen, Sarah; Sheldon, Erin; Johnston, David; Becker, Matthew R.; Annis, James T.; Bleem, Lindsey; Scranton, Ryan; /Pittsburgh U.

    2009-08-03

    Minimizing the scatter between cluster mass and accessible observables is an important goal for cluster cosmology. In this work, we introduce a new matched filter richness estimator, and test its performance using the maxBCG cluster catalog. Our new estimator significantly reduces the variance in the L{sub X}-richness relation, from {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.86 {+-} 0.02){sup 2} to {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.69 {+-} 0.02){sup 2}. Relative to the maxBCG richness estimate, it also removes the strong redshift dependence of the richness scaling relations, and is significantly more robust to photometric and redshift errors. These improvements are largely due to our more sophisticated treatment of galaxy color data. We also demonstrate the scatter in the L{sub X}-richness relation depends on the aperture used to estimate cluster richness, and introduce a novel approach for optimizing said aperture which can be easily generalized to other mass tracers.

  14. Observation of micron to centimetre scale argon in alkali feldspars: implications for 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, S. P.; Flude, S.

    2012-04-01

    New data from gem quality K-feldspar from Itrongay, Madagascar indicates that such crystals behave as a single diffusion domain for Ar diffusion. A study of such a grain allows us to measure natural Ar diffusion from micron to centimetre scales in gem quality feldspars. UV-laserprobe 40Ar/39Ar ages from single gem quality grains indicate that the natural crystal surface acted as the main diffusion domain boundary. UV-Laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar dating of 1 cm whole crystal of gem quality K-feldspar was undertaken at a range of length scales. Micron scale UV laser depth profiling was used to determine Ar diffusion adjacent to the natural crystal surface (presumed to have formed as the pegmatite crystalised). UV laser spot dating was used to measure the age variations on a length scales of 10s of microns to mm and even cm. The high potassium content and age of the Itrongay sample make it possible to measure natural argon diffusion at high precision and high spatial resolution, to address some of the issues surrounding Ar diffusion, at a scale that can be imaged in the laboratory. The analysis reveals the presence of age gradients in the Itrongay feldspar spanning more than 50Ma - between 420 and 470 Ma. As previous work on Itrongay feldspar has tended to be carried out on mm-sized fragments without knowledge of the original crystal boundaries, the variation in radiometric ages in the published literature is likely due to these internal age variations. These gradients are interpreted as diffusion profiles caused by the diffusion loss of 40Ar from the crystal and we have modeled the likely differences between slow cooling/storage at elevated temperature, episodic loss, or different diffusion mechanisms. The age gradients appear to be in agreement with previous thermochronology in the area.

  15. The Thermo Scientific HELIX-SFT noble gas mass spectrometer: (preliminary) performance for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfod, D. N.; Mark, D. F.; Morgan, L. E.; Tomkinson, T.; Stuart, F.; Imlach, J.; Hamilton, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Thermo Scientific HELIX-platform Split Flight Tube (HELIX-SFT) noble gas mass spectrometer is specifically designed for simultaneous collection of helium isotopes. The high mass spur houses a switchable 1011 - 1012 Ω resistor Faraday cup and the low mass spur a digital pulse-counting secondary electron multiplier (SEM). We have acquired the HELIX-SFT with the specific intention to measure argon isotopes for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. This contribution will discuss preliminary performance (resolution, reproducibility, precision etc.) with respect to measuring argon isotope ratios for 40Ar/39Ar dating of geological materials. We anticipate the greatest impact for 40Ar/39Ar dating will be increased accuracy and precision, especially as we approach the techniques younger limit. Working with Thermo Scientific we have subtly modified the source, alpha and collector slits of the HELIX-SFT mass spectrometer to improve its resolution for resolving isobaric interferences at masses 36 to 40. The enhanced performance will allow for accurate and precise measurement of argon isotopes. Preliminary investigations show that we can obtain a valley resolution of >700 and >1300 (compared to standard HELIX-SFT specifications of >400 and >700) for the high and low mass spurs, respectively. The improvement allows for full resolution of hydrocarbons (C3+) at masses 37 - 40 and almost full resolution at mass 36. The HELIX-SFT will collect data in dual collection mode with 40Ar+ ion beams measured using the switchable 1011 - 1012 Ω resistor Faraday cup and 39Ar through 36Ar measured using the SEM. The HELIX-SFT requires Faraday-SEM inter-calibration but negates the necessity to inter-calibrate multiple electron multipliers. We will further present preliminary data from the dating of mineral standards: Alder Creek sanidine, Fish Canyon sanidine and Mount Dromedary biotite (GA1550).

  16. Argon diffusion in Apollo 16 impact glass spherules: Implications for 40Ar/39Ar dating of lunar impact events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombosi, David J.; Baldwin, Suzanne L.; Watson, E. Bruce; Swindle, Timothy D.; Delano, John W.; Roberge, Wayne G.

    2015-01-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar technique applied to impact glass has been used to date both terrestrial and lunar impact events. The ability to utilize the 40Ar/39Ar technique rests on the assumption that impact glasses are closed to the loss of daughter product, 40Ar∗, after formation. Diffusion experiments were performed on three Apollo 16 lunar impact glasses and yielded activation energies for 39Ar of ∼17 to 20 kcal mol-1 and log10(D0/a2) values of -5.2 to -6.0 s-1. The resulting diffusion coefficients are interpreted as minimum values and the Apollo 16 glass is probably some of the least retentive of lunar glasses, as the degree of non-bridging oxygen is at one end of the range in lunar glasses. At temperatures below the glass transition temperature (i.e., ∼660 °C), the data can be explained by volume diffusion from a single diffusion domain. Modeling shows that Apollo 16 composition glass could lose significant quantities of radiogenic argon (40Ar∗) (∼90-100% over 20-40 Myr assuming a diffusion domain size (a) of 75 μm) due to diurnal temperature variations on the lunar surface, although 40Ar∗ loss is highly sensitive to exposure duration and effective diffusion domain size. Modeling shows that loss from transient thermal events (e.g., heating to ∼200 °C for 102 yr duration) can also cause partial resetting of apparent 40Ar/39Ar ages. In small (a = 75 μm) glasses a maximum of 50-60% of 40Ar∗ is lost over 4 Ga when buried to depths corresponding to temperatures of -15 °C. Results indicate that caution should be exercised in interpreting lunar impact glass 40Ar/39Ar ages, as the assumption of closed system behavior may have been violated, particularly in glasses with low fractions of non-bridging oxygen.

  17. Comparison Between 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb Geochronometers at ca. 2.1 Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Renne, P. R.; Min, K.; Schmitz, M. D.; Bowring, S. A.; de Wit, M. J.; Morelli, C.

    2001-12-01

    Recent sudies have revealed 1-2% age bias between conventional calibrations of the 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb geochronologic methods applied to quickly cooled volcanic rocks whose isotopic systems should be uncomplicated by differential retention of radiogenic daughter isotopes. The U-Pb system serves as an ideal basis for comparison because of its rigorous internal reliability criteria and precisely-determined decay constants via alpha counting. Studies capable of providing useful comparison have been limited to samples younger than 1.1 Ga, which offers useful constraints primarily on 40Ar/40K of 40Ar/39Ar standards and the electron capture decay constant of 40K. The magnitude of observed bias for these samples is within the range of realistically propagated errors in those quantities. The beta decay constant of 40K is comparably poorly constrained, leading to ambiguities about early solar system cooling rates among other issues, and is more difficult to test directly due to a paucity of appropriate (e.g., minimally altered with demonstrably simple thermal history) rocks for comparison. A strikingly fresh hornblende-biotite dacite from the Eglab region of the Requibat massif, West Africa, offers an exceptional opportunity for head-to-head comparison of the two geochronometers at nearly twice the age limit currently available. Zircons from this unit are concordant to nearly concordant.and indicate an age of ca 2076 Ma. 40Ar/39Ar analysis of individual hornblende grains, step-heated with a CO2 laser, reveal some complexities but generally yield plateau ages of 2050-2060 Ma based on IUGS 1977 decay constants and 28.02 Ma for the Fish Canyon sanidine. Thus the bias between 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb systems in this case is of order 1%, suggesting that relative error in the conventional beta decay constant is somewhat less than that of the electron capture constant for 40K.

  18. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar Age of the Janisjärvi Impact Structure (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, F.; Renne, P. R.; Reimold, U. W.

    2007-12-01

    The ~14 km Jänisjärvi impact structure occurs within the Svecofennian Proterozoic terrains, in the southeastern part of the Baltic shield, Karelia, Russia. Previous K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar studies were interpreted to give ages of 700 ± 5 Ma and 698 ± 22 Ma respectively, both results being difficult to interpret. Recent paleomagnetic results challenged those ages and propose instead ages of either 500 Ma or 850-900 Ma. In order to better constrain the age of the Jänisjärvi impact structure, we present new 40Ar/39Ar data for melt rocks from the crater. We obtained five concordant isochron ages (based on a total decay constant of 5.543 x 10-10/y and an age of 28.03 Ma for the FCs standard) that yield a combined isochron age of 682 ± 4 Ma (2 sigma) with a MSWD of 1.2, P = 0.14 and 40Ar/36Ar intercept of 475 ± 3. We suggest that this date indicates the age of the impact and therefore can be used in conjunction with existing paleomagnetic results to refine the position of the Baltica paleocontinent at this time. Argon isotopic results imply that melt homogenization has been achieved at the hundred-micron scale certainly because of the low-silica content of the molten target rock that allows fast 40Ar* diffusion in the melt. However, the large range of F(40Ar*inherited) (3 to 8 percents) observed for seven grains show that complete isotopic homogenization was not reached at the centimeter and perhaps millimeter scale. This result is in good agreement with previous Rb and Sr isotopic data.

  19. Differential regulation of metabolic pathways by androgen receptor (AR) and its constitutively active splice variant, AR-V7, in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Ayesha A; Putluri, Vasanta; Arnold, James M; Tsouko, Efrosini; Maity, Suman; Roberts, Justin M; Coarfa, Cristian; Frigo, Daniel E; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Weigel, Nancy L

    2015-10-13

    Metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) is primarily an androgen-dependent disease, which is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Tumors usually develop resistance (castration-resistant PCa [CRPC]), but remain androgen receptor (AR) dependent. Numerous mechanisms for AR-dependent resistance have been identified including expression of constitutively active AR splice variants lacking the hormone-binding domain. Recent clinical studies show that expression of the best-characterized AR variant, AR-V7, correlates with resistance to ADT and poor outcome. Whether AR-V7 is simply a constitutively active substitute for AR or has novel gene targets that cause unique downstream changes is unresolved. Several studies have shown that AR activation alters cell metabolism. Using LNCaP cells with inducible expression of AR-V7 as a model system, we found that AR-V7 stimulated growth, migration, and glycolysis measured by ECAR (extracellular acidification rate) similar to AR. However, further analyses using metabolomics and metabolic flux assays revealed several differences. Whereas AR increased citrate levels, AR-V7 reduced citrate mirroring metabolic shifts observed in CRPC patients. Flux analyses indicate that the low citrate is a result of enhanced utilization rather than a failure to synthesize citrate. Moreover, flux assays suggested that compared to AR, AR-V7 exhibits increased dependence on glutaminolysis and reductive carboxylation to produce some of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) metabolites. These findings suggest that these unique actions represent potential therapeutic targets.

  20. Ar-40 intercept values and young apparent /K-40/-/Ar-40/ ages of five Apollo 15 fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. L.; Heymann, D.

    1977-01-01

    Correlations between Ar-40 and Ar-36 from size fractions of three Apollo 15 fines (15071, 15421, 15501) have been obtained. The Ar-40 intercept values of these fines and of 15091 and 15601 are generally lower than what one would expect for fines resulting from the comminution of rocks having ages of about 3.3 billion yr, typical for basalts of the landing site. This is interpreted to be the result of contamination by ray material from the Copernican age (equal or less than about 1 billion yr) craters, Autolycus and Aristillus, north of the landing site.

  1. Single-crystal 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating reveals bimodal sanidine ages in the Bishop Tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, N. L.; Jicha, B. R.; Singer, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    The 650 km3 Bishop Tuff (BT) is among the most studied volcanic deposits because it is an extensive marker bed deposited just after the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary. Reconstructions of the vast BT magma reservoir from which high-silica rhyolite erupted have long influenced thinking about how large silicic magma systems are assembled, crystallized, and mixed. Yet, the longevity of the high silica rhyolitic melt and exact timing of the eruption remain controversial due to recent conflicting 40Ar/39Ar sanidine vs. SIMS and ID-TIMS U-Pb zircon dates. We have undertaken 21 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating ages on 2 mm BT sanidine crystals from pumice in 3 widely separated outcrops of early-erupted fall and flow units. Plateau ages yield a bimodal distribution: a younger group has a mean of 766 ka and an older group gives a range between 772 and 782 ka. The younger population is concordant with the youngest ID-TIMS and SIMS U-Pb zircon ages recently published, as well as the astronomical age of BT in marine sediment. Of 21 crystals, 17 yield older, non-plateau, steps likely affected by excess Ar that would bias traditional 40Ar/39Ar total crystal fusion ages. The small spread in older sanidine ages, together with 25+ kyr of pre-eruptive zircon growth, suggest that the older sanidines are not partially outgassed xenocrysts. A bimodal 40Ar/39Ar age distribution implies that some fraction of rhyolitic melt cooled below the Ar closure temperature at least 10 ky prior to eruption. We propose that rapid "thawing" of a crystalline mush layer released older crystals into rhyolitic melt from which sanidine also nucleated and grew immediately prior to the eruption. High precision 40Ar/39Ar dating can thus provide essential information on thermo-physical processes at the millenial time scale that are critical to interpreting U-Pb zircon age distributions that are complicated by large uncertainties associated with zircon-melt U-Th systematics.

  2. Hydrothermal fluids, argon isotopes and mineralization ages of the Fankou Pb-Zn deposit in south China: Insights from sphalerite 40Ar/39Ar progressive crushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying-De; Qiu, Hua-Ning; Xu, Yi-Gang

    2012-05-01

    Hydrothermal fluid geochemistry and mineralization timing are two important factors in the genesis of a hydrothermal deposit. 40Ar/39Ar analyses of fluid inclusions not only provide time constraints for the mineralization but also help to clarify the K-Ca-Cl-Ar characteristics for the ore-forming fluids. In this study, six sphalerite samples collected from the Fankou lead-zinc sulfide deposit are investigated by 40Ar/39Ar in vacuo crushing. Gases liberated from the early and late crushing steps exhibit distinct Ar isotopic compositions and 40Ar/39Ar apparent ages. Argon released in the early steps has much higher 40Ar and 38ArCl and lower 37ArCa contents than those in the late steps. The significant excess Ar (40ArE) extracted in the early crushing steps shows a strong correlation with 38ArCl with very high 40ArE/38ArCl ratios. In contrast, those of the late steps mainly consist of atmospheric Ar and K-correlated radiogenic Ar with a constant 40ArR/39ArK ratio and the atmospheric initial 40Ar/36Ar ratio. As a result, all samples yield similar declining age spectra: the fore segments with anomalously old apparent ages decline quickly in the early crushing steps and the rear ones are flat with concordant apparent ages in the late crushing steps. The data points of the early steps define linear correlations in plots of 40ArNA/39ArK vs. 38ArCl/39ArK and 38ArCl/40ArNA vs. 39ArK/40ArNA (NA for non-atmospheric) and most yield ages of 240-230 Ma. On the other hand, the data of the late steps always construct well-defined isochrons in the plots of 36ArA/40ArNA vs. 39ArK/40ArNA with consistent ages of ˜300 Ma. We interpret that gases released in the early steps were from the secondary fluid inclusions (SFIs) due to their distribution characteristics along cracks leading to be easily extracted, and those released in the later steps represented the contribution of the primary fluid inclusions (PFIs). The initial 40Ar/36Ar ratios of SFIs, much higher than the modern

  3. Human immunoglobulin allotypes: previously unrecognized determinants and alleles defined with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Zelaschi, D; Newby, C; Parsons, M; van West, B; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1983-01-01

    The highly polymorphic system of serologically defined genetic markers on human IgG heavy chains (Gm allotypes) is second only to the HLA complex in terms of the large number of determinants, alleles, and haplotypes that can be used for analyses of disease associations and other genetic studies. However, present typing methods are based on the use of anti-Gm antisera that are derived mainly from fortuitously immunized human donors, often requiring processing before use, and must be used in a hemagglutination-inhibition assay that cannot be used in typing for isoallotypic determinants (currently termed "non-markers"). In studies presented here, we describe an allotyping system that utilizes monoclonal antibodies in a "sandwich" modification of the solid-phase radioimmunoassay, which is capable of reliable quantitative typing of allotypic, isoallotypic, and isotypic immunoglobulin determinants. We show that these highly reproducible, easily disseminated, and essentially inexhaustible reagents can be used for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative Gm typing. Using this system we define two previously unrecognized Gm determinants, one of which, found to date only in Caucasians, is different from all known Gm markers and thus defines previously unrecognized alleles and haplotypes. The other determinant co-segregates with the conventional G3m(b1) marker but is distinct from that marker on serological grounds. The successful preparation of mouse monoclonal antibodies that detect human Gm allotypic differences and the development of an assay system capable of typing isoallotypic as well as allotypic determinants opens the way to further dissection and application of this rich genetic system. PMID:6190180

  4. Collisional-radiative modelling of an Ar helicon plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Stuart

    2005-10-01

    We report on recent modelling results of emission observed from a helicon plasma, comparing theoretical and observed line intensities and line ratios of Ar, Ar^+ and Ar^2+. Our Helicon plasma is from the ASTRAL device at Auburn University, with spectral measurements from 275 nm through to 1015 nm. We concentrate on the Ar^+ ion stage, and present the results of a collisional-radiative model using various qualities of atomic data. In particular, we compare the modelling results using Plane-Wave Born, Distorted-Wave and R-matrix electron impact excitation data with those observed from the plasma. As part of the modelling work, we investigate the potential use of various lines as plasma diagnostic tools.

  5. Parallel Mapping of Antibiotic Resistance Alleles in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Pooneh; Knight, Rob; Gill, Ryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical genomics expands our understanding of microbial tolerance to inhibitory chemicals, but its scope is often limited by the throughput of genome-scale library construction and genotype-phenotype mapping. Here we report a method for rapid, parallel, and deep characterization of the response to antibiotics in Escherichia coli using a barcoded genome-scale library, next-generation sequencing, and streamlined bioinformatics software. The method provides quantitative growth data (over 200,000 measurements) and identifies contributing antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility alleles. Using multivariate analysis, we also find that subtle differences in the population responses resonate across multiple levels of functional hierarchy. Finally, we use machine learning to identify a unique allelic and proteomic fingerprint for each antibiotic. The method can be broadly applied to tolerance for any chemical from toxic metabolites to next-generation biofuels and antibiotics. PMID:26771672

  6. Dense deposit disease and the factor H H402 allele.

    PubMed

    Lau, Keith K; Smith, Richard J; Kolbeck, Peter C; Butani, Lavjay

    2008-06-01

    Herein, we describe the case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with a nephritic nephrotic syndrome. His laboratory investigation was significant for a persistently low serum complement 3 level. A renal biopsy was performed, based on which, he was diagnosed with dense deposit disease/membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II (DDD/MPGN II). He was treated with alternate-day oral corticosteroids, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and tacrolimus. Factor H mutational analysis showed the Y402H and I62V allele polymorphisms. The purpose of our report is to discuss the association of the H402 allele variant of factor H with the DDD/MPGN II phenotype and its possible therapeutic implications.

  7. Clostridium difficile Genome Editing Using pyrE Alleles.

    PubMed

    Ehsaan, Muhammad; Kuehne, Sarah A; Minton, Nigel P

    2016-01-01

    Precise manipulation (in-frame deletions and substitutions) of the Clostridium difficile genome is possible through a two-stage process of single-crossover integration and subsequent isolation of double-crossover excision events using replication-defective plasmids that carry a counterselection marker. Use of a codA (cytosine deaminase) or pyrE (orotate phosphoribosyltransferase) as counter selection markers appears equally effective, but there is considerable merit in using a pyrE mutant as the host as, through the use of allele-coupled exchange (ACE) vectors, mutants created (by whatever means) can be rapidly complemented concomitant with restoration of the pyrE allele. This avoids the phenotypic effects frequently observed with high-copy-number plasmids and dispenses with the need to add antibiotic to ensure plasmid retention. PMID:27507332

  8. Ubiquitous Argonium, ArH+, in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilke, P.; Müller, H. S. P.; Comito, C.; Sanchez-Monge, A.; Neufeld, D. A.; Indriolo, N.; Bergin, E.; Lis, D. C.; Gerin, M.; Black, J. H.; Wolfire, M. G.; Pearson, J.; Menten, K.; Winkel, B.

    2014-06-01

    ArH+ is isoelectronic with HCl. The J = 1-0 and 2-1 transitions of 36ArH+ near 617.5 and 1234.6 GHz, respectively, have been identified very recently as emission lines in spectra obtained with Herschel toward the Crab Nebula supernova remnant.1 On Earth, 40Ar is by far the most abundant isotope, being almost exclusively formed by the radioactive decay of 40K. However, 36Ar is the dominant isotope in the Universe. In the course of unbiased line surveys of the massive and very luminous Galactic Center star-forming regions Sagittarius B2(M) and (N) with the high-resolution instrument HIFI on board of Herschel, we detected the J = 1-0 transition of 36ArH+ as a moderately strong absorption line initially associated with an unidentified carrier.2 In both cases, the absorption feature is unique in its appearance at all velocity components associated with diffuse foreground molecular clouds, together with its conspicuous absence at velocities related to the denser sources themselves. Model calculations are able to reproduce the derived ArH+ column densities and suggest that argonium resides in the largely atomic, diffuse interstellar medium with a molecular fraction of no more than ˜10-3. The 38ArH+ isotopologue was also detected. Subsequent observations toward the continuum sources W51, W49, W31C, and G34.3+0.1 resulted in unequivocal detections of 36ArH+ absorption. Hence, argonium is a good probe of the transition zone between atomic and molecular gas, in particular in combination with OH+ and H2O+, whose abundances peak at a molecular fraction of ˜0.1. Moreover, argonium is a good indicator of an enhanced cosmic ray ionization rate. Therefore, it may be prominent toward, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in addition to supernova remnants.

  9. The emission spectra of Ar, Kr and Xe + TEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masayo; Strock, Pierre; Sauli, Fabio; Charpak, Georges

    1987-03-01

    The emission spectra of Ar, Kr and Xe + 6% TEA gas mixtures are measured by using a single wire proportional counter as the emission source. Asymmetric emission bands are observed in the range of 270 to 350 nm, which can be attributed to the radiative deexcitation of excited TEA molecules. For the practical application of optical readout of avalanche chambers, the Ar + 2.0% TEA + 20% isobutane gas mixture is also examined, and nearly the same emission band is observed.

  10. Natural Allelic Variations in Highly Polyploidy Saccharum Complex

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jian; Yang, Xiping; Resende, Marcio F. R.; Neves, Leandro G.; Todd, James; Zhang, Jisen; Comstock, Jack C.; Wang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is an important sugar and biofuel crop with high polyploid and complex genomes. The Saccharum complex, comprised of Saccharum genus and a few related genera, are important genetic resources for sugarcane breeding. A large amount of natural variation exists within the Saccharum complex. Though understanding their allelic variation has been challenging, it is critical to dissect allelic structure and to identify the alleles controlling important traits in sugarcane. To characterize natural variations in Saccharum complex, a target enrichment sequencing approach was used to assay 12 representative germplasm accessions. In total, 55,946 highly efficient probes were designed based on the sorghum genome and sugarcane unigene set targeting a total of 6 Mb of the sugarcane genome. A pipeline specifically tailored for polyploid sequence variants and genotype calling was established. BWA-mem and sorghum genome approved to be an acceptable aligner and reference for sugarcane target enrichment sequence analysis, respectively. Genetic variations including 1,166,066 non-redundant SNPs, 150,421 InDels, 919 gene copy number variations, and 1,257 gene presence/absence variations were detected. SNPs from three different callers (Samtools, Freebayes, and GATK) were compared and the validation rates were nearly 90%. Based on the SNP loci of each accession and their ploidy levels, 999,258 single dosage SNPs were identified and most loci were estimated as largely homozygotes. An average of 34,397 haplotype blocks for each accession was inferred. The highest divergence time among the Saccharum spp. was estimated as 1.2 million years ago (MYA). Saccharum spp. diverged from Erianthus and Sorghum approximately 5 and 6 MYA, respectively. The target enrichment sequencing approach provided an effective way to discover and catalog natural allelic variation in highly polyploid or heterozygous genomes. PMID:27375658

  11. Allelic exchange in Mycobacterium tuberculosis with long linear recombination substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, V; Pavelka, M S; Bardarov, S S; Martin, J; Weisbrod, T R; McAdam, R A; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1996-01-01

    Genetic studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been greatly hampered by the inability to introduce specific chromosomal mutations. Whereas the ability to perform allelic exchanges has provided a useful method of gene disruption in other organisms, in the clinically important species of mycobacteria, such as M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis, similar approaches have thus far been unsuccessful. In this communication, we report the development of a shuttle mutagenesis strategy that involves the use of long linear recombination substrates to reproducibly obtain recombinants by allelic exchange in M. tuberculosis. Long linear recombination substrates, approximately 40 to 50 kb in length, were generated by constructing libraries in the excisable cosmid vector pYUB328. The cosmid vector could be readily excised from the recombinant cosmids by digestion with PacI, a restriction endonuclease for which there exist few, if any, sites in mycobacterial genomes. A cosmid containing the mycobacterial leuD gene was isolated, and a selectable marker conferring resistance to kanamycin was inserted into the leuD gene in the recombinant cosmid by interplasmid recombination in Escherichia coli. A long linear recombination substrate containing the insertionally mutated leuD gene was generated by PacI digestion. Electroporation of this recombination substrate containing the insertionally mutated leuD allele resulted in the generation of leucine auxotrophic mutants by homologous recombination in 6% of the kanamycin-resistant transformants for both the Erdman and H37Rv strains of M. tuberculosis. The ability to perform allelic exchanges provides an important approach for investigating the biology of this pathogen as well as developing new live-cell M. tuberculosis-based vaccines. PMID:8550428

  12. Natural Allelic Variations in Highly Polyploidy Saccharum Complex.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Yang, Xiping; Resende, Marcio F R; Neves, Leandro G; Todd, James; Zhang, Jisen; Comstock, Jack C; Wang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is an important sugar and biofuel crop with high polyploid and complex genomes. The Saccharum complex, comprised of Saccharum genus and a few related genera, are important genetic resources for sugarcane breeding. A large amount of natural variation exists within the Saccharum complex. Though understanding their allelic variation has been challenging, it is critical to dissect allelic structure and to identify the alleles controlling important traits in sugarcane. To characterize natural variations in Saccharum complex, a target enrichment sequencing approach was used to assay 12 representative germplasm accessions. In total, 55,946 highly efficient probes were designed based on the sorghum genome and sugarcane unigene set targeting a total of 6 Mb of the sugarcane genome. A pipeline specifically tailored for polyploid sequence variants and genotype calling was established. BWA-mem and sorghum genome approved to be an acceptable aligner and reference for sugarcane target enrichment sequence analysis, respectively. Genetic variations including 1,166,066 non-redundant SNPs, 150,421 InDels, 919 gene copy number variations, and 1,257 gene presence/absence variations were detected. SNPs from three different callers (Samtools, Freebayes, and GATK) were compared and the validation rates were nearly 90%. Based on the SNP loci of each accession and their ploidy levels, 999,258 single dosage SNPs were identified and most loci were estimated as largely homozygotes. An average of 34,397 haplotype blocks for each accession was inferred. The highest divergence time among the Saccharum spp. was estimated as 1.2 million years ago (MYA). Saccharum spp. diverged from Erianthus and Sorghum approximately 5 and 6 MYA, respectively. The target enrichment sequencing approach provided an effective way to discover and catalog natural allelic variation in highly polyploid or heterozygous genomes.

  13. Natural Allelic Variations in Highly Polyploidy Saccharum Complex.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Yang, Xiping; Resende, Marcio F R; Neves, Leandro G; Todd, James; Zhang, Jisen; Comstock, Jack C; Wang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is an important sugar and biofuel crop with high polyploid and complex genomes. The Saccharum complex, comprised of Saccharum genus and a few related genera, are important genetic resources for sugarcane breeding. A large amount of natural variation exists within the Saccharum complex. Though understanding their allelic variation has been challenging, it is critical to dissect allelic structure and to identify the alleles controlling important traits in sugarcane. To characterize natural variations in Saccharum complex, a target enrichment sequencing approach was used to assay 12 representative germplasm accessions. In total, 55,946 highly efficient probes were designed based on the sorghum genome and sugarcane unigene set targeting a total of 6 Mb of the sugarcane genome. A pipeline specifically tailored for polyploid sequence variants and genotype calling was established. BWA-mem and sorghum genome approved to be an acceptable aligner and reference for sugarcane target enrichment sequence analysis, respectively. Genetic variations including 1,166,066 non-redundant SNPs, 150,421 InDels, 919 gene copy number variations, and 1,257 gene presence/absence variations were detected. SNPs from three different callers (Samtools, Freebayes, and GATK) were compared and the validation rates were nearly 90%. Based on the SNP loci of each accession and their ploidy levels, 999,258 single dosage SNPs were identified and most loci were estimated as largely homozygotes. An average of 34,397 haplotype blocks for each accession was inferred. The highest divergence time among the Saccharum spp. was estimated as 1.2 million years ago (MYA). Saccharum spp. diverged from Erianthus and Sorghum approximately 5 and 6 MYA, respectively. The target enrichment sequencing approach provided an effective way to discover and catalog natural allelic variation in highly polyploid or heterozygous genomes. PMID:27375658

  14. Inferring Selection Intensity and Allele Age from Multilocus Haplotype Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    It is a challenging task to infer selection intensity and allele age from population genetic data. Here we present a method that can efficiently estimate selection intensity and allele age from the multilocus haplotype structure in the vicinity of a segregating mutant under positive selection. We use a structured-coalescent approach to model the effect of directional selection on the gene genealogies of neutral markers linked to the selected mutant. The frequency trajectory of the selected allele follows the Wright-Fisher model. Given the position of the selected mutant, we propose a simplified multilocus haplotype model that can efficiently model the dynamics of the ancestral haplotypes under the joint influence of selection and recombination. This model approximates the ancestral genealogies of the sample, which reduces the number of states from an exponential function of the number of single-nucleotide polymorphism loci to a quadratic function. That allows parameter inference from data covering DNA regions as large as several hundred kilo-bases. Importance sampling algorithms are adopted to evaluate the probability of a sample by exploring the space of both allele frequency trajectories of the selected mutation and gene genealogies of the linked sites. We demonstrate by simulation that the method can accurately estimate selection intensity for moderate and strong positive selection. We apply the method to a data set of the G6PD gene in an African population and obtain an estimate of 0.0456 (95% confidence interval 0.0144−0.0769) for the selection intensity. The proposed method is novel in jointly modeling the multilocus haplotype pattern caused by recombination and mutation, allowing the analysis of haplotype data in recombining regions. Moreover, the method is applicable to data from populations under exponential growth and a variety of other demographic histories. PMID:23797107

  15. Tracing pastoralist migrations to southern Africa with lactase persistence alleles.

    PubMed

    Macholdt, Enrico; Lede, Vera; Barbieri, Chiara; Mpoloka, Sununguko W; Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-04-14

    Although southern African Khoisan populations are often assumed to have remained largely isolated during prehistory, there is growing evidence for a migration of pastoralists from eastern Africa some 2,000 years ago, prior to the arrival of Bantu-speaking populations in southern Africa. Eastern Africa harbors distinctive lactase persistence (LP) alleles, and therefore LP alleles in southern African populations may be derived from this eastern African pastoralist migration. We sequenced the lactase enhancer region in 457 individuals from 18 Khoisan and seven Bantu-speaking groups from Botswana, Namibia, and Zambia and additionally genotyped four short tandem repeat (STR) loci that flank the lactase enhancer region. We found nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms, of which the most frequent is -14010(∗)C, which was previously found to be associated with LP in Kenya and Tanzania and to exhibit a strong signal of positive selection. This allele occurs in significantly higher frequency in pastoralist groups and in Khoe-speaking groups in our study, supporting the hypothesis of a migration of eastern African pastoralists that was primarily associated with Khoe speakers. Moreover, we find a signal of ongoing positive selection in all three pastoralist groups in our study, as well as (surprisingly) in two foraging groups. PMID:24704073

  16. The Joint Allele-Frequency Spectrum in Closely Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Green, Richard E.; Pääbo, Svante; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2007-01-01

    We develop the theory for computing the joint frequency spectra of alleles in two closely related species. We allow for arbitrary population growth in both species after they had a common ancestor. We focus on the case in which a single chromosome is sequenced from one of the species. We use classical diffusion theory to show that, if the ancestral species was at equilibrium under mutation and drift and a chromosome from one of the descendant species carries the derived allele, the frequency spectrum in the other species is uniform, independently of the demographic history of both species. We also predict the expected densities of segregating and fixed sites when the chromosome from the other species carries the ancestral allele. We compare the predictions of our model with the site-frequency spectra of SNPs in the four HapMap populations of humans when the nucleotide present in the Neanderthal DNA sequence is ancestral or derived, using the chimp genome as the outgroup. PMID:17603120

  17. FKBP5 risk alleles and the development of intrusive memories.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jessica; Bryant, Richard A

    2015-11-01

    Intrusive memories are unwanted recollections that maintain distress and are central to numerous psychological disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Convergent evidence suggests that glucocorticoid increases enhance the strength of emotional memories. The FKBP5 polymorphism modulates glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity, and has been shown to increase risk for PTSD. Healthy high and low risk FKBP5 allele carriers (N=46) underwent a cold pressor task, and then viewed negative and neutral images. Two days later participants were given a surprise recall test and measure of intrusive memories of the images. Following the cold pressor task, high-risk allele participants had a higher cortisol response than low-risk participants. High-risk carriers also reported more intrusive memories of the negative and neutral images than low-risk carriers. These findings point to the minor alleles of the FKBP5 polymorphism being a risk factor for development of intrusive memories, possibly as a result of impaired glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity. This may explain one mechanism for FKBP5 being a risk factor for PTSD following traumatic events.

  18. Tracing pastoralist migrations to southern Africa with lactase persistence alleles.

    PubMed

    Macholdt, Enrico; Lede, Vera; Barbieri, Chiara; Mpoloka, Sununguko W; Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-04-14

    Although southern African Khoisan populations are often assumed to have remained largely isolated during prehistory, there is growing evidence for a migration of pastoralists from eastern Africa some 2,000 years ago, prior to the arrival of Bantu-speaking populations in southern Africa. Eastern Africa harbors distinctive lactase persistence (LP) alleles, and therefore LP alleles in southern African populations may be derived from this eastern African pastoralist migration. We sequenced the lactase enhancer region in 457 individuals from 18 Khoisan and seven Bantu-speaking groups from Botswana, Namibia, and Zambia and additionally genotyped four short tandem repeat (STR) loci that flank the lactase enhancer region. We found nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms, of which the most frequent is -14010(∗)C, which was previously found to be associated with LP in Kenya and Tanzania and to exhibit a strong signal of positive selection. This allele occurs in significantly higher frequency in pastoralist groups and in Khoe-speaking groups in our study, supporting the hypothesis of a migration of eastern African pastoralists that was primarily associated with Khoe speakers. Moreover, we find a signal of ongoing positive selection in all three pastoralist groups in our study, as well as (surprisingly) in two foraging groups.

  19. Improving the Precision of the Half Life of 34Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, J. C.; Bencomo, M.; Chen, L.; Horvat, V.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.

    2016-03-01

    Currently, precise ft-values measured for superallowed 0+ -->0+ β transitions provide the most accurate value for Vud, the up-down quark mixing element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. This enables the most demanding test of CKM unitarity, one of the pillars of the Standard Model. Further improvements in precision are possible if the ft values for pairs of mirror 0+ -->0+ transitions can be measured with 0.1% precision or better. The decays of 34Ar and 34Cl are members of such a mirror pair, but so far the former is not known with sufficient precision. Since our 2006 publication of the half-life of 34Ar, we have improved significantly our acquisition and analysis techniques, adding refinements that have led to increased accuracy. The 34Cl half-life is about twice that of 34Ar. This obscures the 34Ar contribution to the decay in measurements such as ours, which detected the decay positrons and was thus unable to differentiate between the parent and daughter decays. We report here two experiments aiming to improve the half-life of 34Ar: The first detected positrons as in but with improved controls; the second measured γ rays in coincidence with positrons, thus achieving a clear separation of 34Ar decay from 34Cl.

  20. The structure and bond energy of ArCl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evard, Dwight D.; Cline, Joseph I.; Janda, Kenneth C.

    1988-05-01

    The geometry and bond energy of ArCl2 are obtained by the technique of parity selected excitation spectroscopy. This is a pump-probe technique in which the probe laser is set to detect specific rotational levels of the B state of Cl2 while the pump laser is tuned through an ArCl2 B-X band. Since the excitation spectrum obtained depends on the parity of the detected Cl2 rotational level, the ArCl2 complex must have a symmetrical, T-shaped geometry on average over the time scale of the experiment, ˜100 ps. Simulation of the observed spectra, which show partially resolved rotational structure, yields an argon to chlorine center of mass distance of 3.7 Å for both the X and B electronic states of the complex. By measuring the threshold for dissociation to the v=6, j=8 level of the Cl2 B state, the Ar-Cl2 bond energy was determined to be 178 cm-1 in the B state and 188 cm-1 in the X state. These results are quite different from those on the isovalent complex ArClF which is a linear molecule with an Ar-Cl bond length of 3.33 Å, and a bond energy of 230 cm-1.

  1. Some Footnotes to the Optimization-based Calibration of the 40Ar/39Ar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Deino, A.

    2011-12-01

    Calibration of the 40Ar/39Ar system presented by Renne et al. (2010) provides a robust synthesis of data from disintegration counting, isotopic composition of a standard, and normalization to the precisely-determined 238U decay constant. Recognition of the incompatibility of liquid scintillation counting (LSC) data for the total 40K decay constant, and subsequent exclusion of these data, provides a minor improvement to accuracy that is most important for pre-Phanerozoic samples (Renne et al., 2011). Discrepancies remain, however, with some results from the literature recalculated using this calibration. To investigate these discrepancies, we have analyzed sanidine from (1) the Bishop Tuff (Sarna et al., 2002) and (2) the IrZ coal (Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary; KPB) (Swisher et al., 1993). Preliminary results give 775.8 ± 1.7 ka (1σ here and throughout, including systematic errors) for the Bishop Tuff and 66.041 ± 0.046 Ma for the IrZ coal, contrasting with ages of 778.1 ± 3.7 ka and 66.214 ± 0.060 (respectively) recalculated from the original work by Renne et al. (2011). Our Bishop Tuff results, though younger than recalculated previous results, still conflict with the U-Pb zircon age (767.1 ± 0.5 ka) reported by Crowley et al. (2007), and with the age of the Brunhes-Matuyama geomagnetic polarity transition inferred by Channell et al. (2010). Our age for the IrZ coal (KPB) agrees with the preferred astronomically tuned age of 65.957 ± 0.040 Ma inferred for the KPB by Kuiper et al. (2008), although the recent work of Laskar et al. (2011) may undermine this result. Some misconceptions regarding the approach and results of Renne et al. (2010) need to be rectified. First, the age of the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) standard arising from this approach is not the primary output of the approach but rather a consequence of output parameters having correlated errors- it should not be used in conjunction with other decay constants such as those of Steiger and J

  2. Higher Precision: Opening A New 40Ar/39Ar Can Of Worms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Advances in technology often lead to advances in science and this is true for the noble gas community that is currently being inundated with new multi-collector mass spectrometers. For the 40Ar/39Ar community, the ARGUS VI mass spectrometers are yielding age precision on individual age spectrum steps or single grain fusion ages that is commonly an order of magnitude improved over the MAP-215-50 instruments. Just as age spectrum analyses did in the 1960's, and single crystal laser fusion did in the 1980's, new data now yields another level of insight about isotopic behavior and an improved geological understanding, but also reveals difficult to understand complexity. Ongoing with geochronology studies, NM Tech is revisiting many of the commonly used 40Ar/39Ar flux monitor standards used throughout the argon community. Single grain analysis of AC-2, FC-2 sanidine, TCR-2 sanidine, GA1550 biotite, Fireclay sanidine and PP20 hornblende all yield scattered distributions except for AC-2. Typical single crystal 1 sigma precision for FC-2 and TCR sanidine is 0.02 and 0.06%, respectively with both samples heterogeneous at the 25 ka level. GA1550 biotite is measured to 0.02% and as governed by an MSWD value of 3.5 has a relatively tight age population. The ca. 313 Ma Fireclay sanidine grains yields ~0.1 Ma age precision, but scatters by more than 1 Ma. PP20 hornblende single grains (~1175 Ma) vary by ~25 Ma however most scatter by ±5 Ma. AC-2 is the youngest standard (~1.18 Ma) and we obtain single grain precision of 0.15% and commonly a normal distribution about a total age error of <1 ka 1 sigma. Incremental heating of single grain sanidine standards yields a variety of age spectrum shapes that are commonly not flat. For instance FC-2 shows disturbance for individual steps at about 0.3 Ma that is well resolved with high precision analysis. In general, nearly all sanidines step heated on the ARGUS VI show non-ideal behavior indicating that combinations of slight argon loss

  3. 40Ar/39Ar Dating of the Brunhes-Matuyama Geomagnetic Field Reversal.

    PubMed

    Baksi, A K; Hsu, V; McWilliams, M O; Farrar, E

    1992-04-17

    Magnetostratigraphic studies are widely used in conjunction with the geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS) to date events in the range 0 to 5 million years ago. A critical tie point on the GPTS is the potassium-argon age of the most recent (Brunhes-Matuyama) geomagnetic field reversal. Astronomical values for the forcing frequencies observed in the oxygen isotope record in Ocean Drilling Project site 677 suggest that the age of this last reversal is 780 ka (thousand years ago), whereas the potassium-argon-based estimate is 730 ka. Results from 4039; Ar incremental heating studies on a series of lavas from Maui that straddle the Brunhes-Matuyama reversal give an age of 783 + 11 ka, in agreement with the astronomically derived value. The astronomically based technique appears to be a viable tool for dating young sedimentary sequences. PMID:17743111

  4. A reconnaissance 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic study of ore-bearing and related rocks, Siberian Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Czamanske, G.K.; Fedorenko, V.A.; Simonov, O.N.; Lanphere, M.A.; Likhachev, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age spectra of biotite from a mineralized vein in the ore-bearing, Noril'sk I intrusion and from picritic-like gabbrodolerite from the weakly mineralized, Lower Talnakh intrusion show that these bodies were emplaced at 249 ?? 2 Ma, which is not significantly different from the age of the Permian-Triassic boundary. The ore-bearing intrusions postdate the lower third of the flood-basalt sequence in the Noril'sk area and, on the basis of geochemistry, can best be correlated with lavas slightly younger than those which they cut. Thus, flood basalt was erupted at the time of the Permian-Triassic mass extinction event, although its role in this event is, as yet, ill defined. Additional new 40Ar/39Ar age data for a group of intrusive and extrusive rocks on the western margin of the Siberian craton are discussed. -from Authors

  5. Evolution of the northern Sierra Nevada metamorphic belt: Petrological, structural, and Ar/Ar constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, B.R.

    1993-05-01

    The Sierra Nevada metamorphic belt constitutes an important record of the growth of continental crust from essentially oceanic materials. In the northern Sierra, the central part of the belt is made up of volcanoplutonic arcs and sediment-dominated units inferred to be accretionary wedges or closed ocean basins. The latter are broken formation and melange composed of radiolarian chert, lava, and volcanogenic and continental turbidites. Sedimentary detritus in the largest of these units can be plausibly linked to sources farther east in the Sierra, suggesting that deposition occurred near the eastern Sierran arc. Isoclinal folds, steeply dipping foliations, and steeply plunging down-dip lineations are characteristics structures. The westernmost unit is only feebly recrystallized, and deformation was accomplished principally by stress solution and local redeposition in veins. More easterly, inboard units are compositionally similar, but they recrystallized at pumpellyite-actinolite-and blueschist-facies conditions and deformed via solution-transfer and dislocation creep. Phengite silica contents, the degree of quartz veining, and the locations of pseudo-isograds support an eastward increase in metamorphic pressure and temperature. Metamorphic conditions during the growth of pumpellyite and actinolite ranged from {approximately}150-350 {degrees}C and 200-400 MPa, compatible with recrystallization and deformation in subduction zones or the deeper levels of magmatic arcs. Ar/Ar ages of volcanisclastic rocks and crosscutting plutons constrain the age of deformation and metamorphism in the western part of the region to 174-165 Ma. Deformation and recrystallization in more easterly units may have been coeval or begun as early as Triassic time. 58 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Chronostratigraphy of Monte Vulture volcano (southern Italy): secondary mineral microtextures and 39A