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Sample records for allen belt radiation

  1. A Century after Van Allen's Birth: Conclusion of Reconnaissance of Radiation Belts in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    On May 1, 1958 in the Great Hall of the US National Academy of Sciences, James A. Van Allen, having instrumented Explorer-1 and follow-on satellites with radiation detectors, announced the discovery of intense radiation at high altitudes above Earth. The press dubbed the doughnut-shaped structures "Van Allen Belts" (VAB). Soon thereafter, the search began for VAB at nearby planets. Mariner 2 flew by Venus in 1962 at a distance of 41,000 km, but no radiation was detected. The Mariner 4 mission to Mars did not observe planet-associated increase in radiation, but scaling arguments with Earth's magnetosphere yielded an upper limit to the ratio of magnetic moments of MM/ME < 0.001 (Van Allen et al, 1965). Similarly, the Mariner 5 flyby closer to Venus resulted in a ratio of magnetic moments < 0.001 (Van Allen et al, 1967), dealing a blow to the expectation that all planetary bodies must possess significant VAB. The flyby of Mercury in 1974 by Mariner 10 revealed a weak magnetic field, but the presence of durably trapped higher energy particles remained controversial until MESSENGER in 2011.The first flybys of Jupiter by Pioneers 10, 11 in 1973 and 1974, respectively, measured a plethora of energetic particles in Jupiter's magnetosphere and established the fact that their intensities were rotationally modulated. Later flybys of Jupiter and Saturn by the two Voyagers in 1979 and 1981 revealed that those magnetospheres possessed their own internal plasma source(s) and radiation belts. Subsequent discoveries of Van Allen belts at Uranus and Neptune by Voyager 2 demonstrated that VAB are the rule rather than the exception in planetary environments. We now know from the Voyagers and through Energetic Neutral Atom images from Cassini and IBEX that an immense energetic particle population surrounds the heliosphere itself. Thus, the reconnaissance of radiation belts of our solar system has been completed, some 56 years after the discovery of the Van Allen Belts at Earth.

  2. New Results About the Earth’s Van Allen Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The first great scientific discovery of the Space Age was that the Earth is enshrouded in toroids, or 'belts', of very high-energy magnetically trapped charged particles. Early observations of the radiation environment clearly indicated that the Van Allen belts could be delineated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons in the energy range 100 keV < E< 1 MeV often populated both the inner and outer zones with a pronounced 'slot' region relatively devoid of energetic electrons existing between them. This two-belt structure for the Van Allen moderate-energy electron component was explained as being due to strong interactions of electrons with electromagnetic waves just inside the cold plasma (plasmapause) boundary. The energy distribution, spatial extent and particle species makeup of the Van Allen belts has been subsequently explored by several space missions. However, recent observations by the NASA dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission have revealed wholly unexpected properties of the radiation belts, especially at highly relativistic (E > 2 MeV) and ultra-relativistic (E > 5 MeV) kinetic energies. In this presentation we show using high spatial and temporal resolution data from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) experiment on board the Van Allen Probes that multiple belts can exist concurrently and that an exceedingly sharp inner boundary exists for ultra-relativistic electrons. Using additionally available Van Allen Probes data, we demonstrate that these remarkable features of energetic electrons are not due to a physical boundary within Earth's intrinsic magnetic field. Neither is it likely that human-generated electromagnetic transmitter wave fields might produce such effects. Rather, we conclude from these unique measurements that slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle

  3. An Impenetrable Barrier to Ultra-Relativistic Electrons in the Van Allen Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen belts could be delineated into an inner zone dominated by high energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that moderate-energy electrons (E≲1 MeV) often populate both zones with a deep "slot" region between them. This two-belt structure was explained as being due to strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary with the inner edge of the outer zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location. Recent Van Allen Probes observations have revealed unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultra-relativistic (E > 5 MeV) kinetic energies. Here we discuss an exceedingly sharp inner boundary exists for ultra-relativistic electrons. Concurrent data reveal that this barrier for inward electron radial transport is not due to a physical boundary within Earth's intrinsic magnetic field nor is it likely that scattering by human-generated electromagnetic transmitter wave fields would inhibit inward radial diffusion. Rather, we suggest that exceptionally slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere can conspire to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate.

  4. An impenetrable barrier to ultrarelativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Jaynes, A N; Hoxie, V C; Thorne, R M; Foster, J C; Li, X; Fennell, J F; Wygant, J R; Kanekal, S G; Erickson, P J; Kurth, W; Li, W; Ma, Q; Schiller, Q; Blum, L; Malaspina, D M; Gerrard, A; Lanzerotti, L J

    2014-11-27

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts could be separated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons of moderate energy (less than about one megaelectronvolt) often populate both zones, with a deep 'slot' region largely devoid of particles between them. There is a region of dense cold plasma around the Earth known as the plasmasphere, the outer boundary of which is called the plasmapause. The two-belt radiation structure was explained as arising from strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary, with the inner edge of the outer radiation zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location. Recent observations have revealed unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultrarelativistic kinetic energies (more than five megaelectronvolts). Here we analyse an extended data set that reveals an exceedingly sharp inner boundary for the ultrarelativistic electrons. Additional, concurrently measured data reveal that this barrier to inward electron radial transport does not arise because of a physical boundary within the Earth's intrinsic magnetic field, and that inward radial diffusion is unlikely to be inhibited by scattering by electromagnetic transmitter wave fields. Rather, we suggest that exceptionally slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere can combine to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate. PMID:25428500

  5. An impenetrable barrier to ultrarelativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Hoxie, V. C.; Thorne, R. M.; Foster, J. C.; Li, X.; Fennell, J. F.; Wygant, J. R.; Kanekal, S. G.; Erickson, P. J.; Kurth, W.; Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Schiller, Q.; Blum, L.; Malaspina, D. M.; Gerrard, A.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2014-11-01

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts could be separated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons of moderate energy (less than about one megaelectronvolt) often populate both zones, with a deep `slot' region largely devoid of particles between them. There is a region of dense cold plasma around the Earth known as the plasmasphere, the outer boundary of which is called the plasmapause. The two-belt radiation structure was explained as arising from strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary, with the inner edge of the outer radiation zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location. Recent observations have revealed unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultrarelativistic kinetic energies (more than five megaelectronvolts). Here we analyse an extended data set that reveals an exceedingly sharp inner boundary for the ultrarelativistic electrons. Additional, concurrently measured data reveal that this barrier to inward electron radial transport does not arise because of a physical boundary within the Earth's intrinsic magnetic field, and that inward radial diffusion is unlikely to be inhibited by scattering by electromagnetic transmitter wave fields. Rather, we suggest that exceptionally slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere can combine to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate.

  6. Characterizing Total Radiation Belt Electron Content Using Van Allen Probes Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. L.; Spence, H. E.; Boyd, A. J.; Jordan, A.; Paulson, K. W.; Zhang, J.; Blake, J. B.; Kletzing, C.

    2014-12-01

    The comprehensive particle and wave measurements of the Van Allen Probes enable us to monitor the entire radiation belt near the equator from L-shells of 2.5 to 6. Using the particle measurements, we create an improved, high-level quantity representing the entire outer belt. This quantity, the total radiation belt electron content (TRBEC), is the half-orbit sum of outer belt electrons over the radiation belt energy ranges of importance and all pitch angles using data from RBSP-ECT instrument on board both spacecraft. The goal is to characterize statistically the dynamics of the entire radiation belt by comparing TRBEC with solar wind parameters, magnetospheric waves, and electron seed population. When comparing TRBEC with solar wind velocity, our result shows a triangle-distribution similar to that which Reeves et al. (2011) found using geosynchronous electron flux. We also correlate TRBEC with other solar wind parameters to identify which solar wind conditions effectively enhance or deplete radiation belt electrons. In addition, plasma waves in the inner magnetosphere, via wave-particle interaction, are key elements affecting the dynamics of the radiation belt. Therefore, we compare TRBEC with integrated EMIC and chorus (upper and lower bands) wave power calculated from EMFISIS wave measurements to determine the relative importance between each wave-particle process. Finally, we demonstrate the ~100 keV seed population's characteristics that correspond to the MeV population enhancement. While the gross features of the two populations are similar, the MeV population's dynamics lag behind those of the seed population by 5 to 60 hours, which implies the acceleration or loss processes vary by event.

  7. Variability of the Inner Proton Radiation Belt Observed by Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Selesnick, R.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Inner radiation belt protons with kinetic energy above 10 MeV are known to be highly stable, with a maximum intensity near L = 1.5 that varies little evenon solar-cycle time scales. However, for L = 2 and above, more rapid changes occur: (1) protons are trapped during solar particle events, (2) steady intensity changes near L = 2 may result from radial diffusion, (3) for L > 2 there are rapid losses during magnetic storms, and (4) the losses are replenished by albedo neutron decay. New measurements from Van Allen Probes describe each of the last three processes in detail (the first has not yet been observed). These data provide new constraints on theories of trapped proton dynamics and improved empirical estimates of transport coefficients for radiation belt modeling.

  8. On the generation of large amplitude spiky solitons by ultralow frequency earthquake emission in the Van Allen radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Mofiz, U. A.

    2006-08-15

    The parametric coupling between earthquake emitted circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation and ponderomotively driven ion-acoustic perturbations in the Van Allen radiation belt is considered. A cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation for the modulated radiation envelope is derived, and then solved analytically. For ultralow frequency earthquake emissions large amplitude spiky supersonic bright solitons or subsonic dark solitons are found to be generated in the Van Allen radiation belt, detection of which can be a tool for the prediction of a massive earthquake may be followed later.

  9. From the IGY to the IHY: A Changing View of the Van Allen Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.

    2006-12-01

    Discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts by instrumentation flown on Explorer 1 in 1958 was the first major discovery of the Space Age. A view of the belts as static inner and outer zones of energetic particles with different sources, a double-doughnut encircling the Earth, became iconic to the point that their dynamic behavior and solar connection receded from public awareness and apparent scientific import. Then the Cycle 23 maximum in solar activity arrived in 1989-1991, the first approaching the activity level of the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58, when the Van Allen belts were first discovered. Delay in launch of the NASA-Air Force Combined Radiation Release and Effects Satellite, following the Challenger accident in 1986, led to having the right instruments in the right orbit at the right time to detect prompt injection of outer belt electrons and solar energetic protons into the `slot region' between the inner and outer belts, forming new trapped populations which lasted for years in an otherwise benign location. This event in March 1991, along with the great geomagnetic storm of March 1989, and our increased dependence on space technology since the early Explorer days, led to a resurgence of interest in the Van Allen radiation belts and understanding of their connectivity to the Sun. Additional instrumentation from NASA's International Solar Terrestrial Physics Program, the Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) and IMAGE spacecraft from the Explorer program, NOAA and DOD spacecraft, and improved worldwide linkages of groundbased measurements have contributed much since 1991 to our understanding of the dynamic characteristics of the Van Allen belts. Further, the presence of continuous solar wind measurements beginning with the launch of WIND in 1994, and SOHO images of Coronal Mass Ejections and coronal hole sources of high speed solar wind flow have filled in the connection with solar activity qualitatively anticipated

  10. Innermost Van Allen Radiation Belt for High Energy Protons at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The high energy proton radiation belts of Saturn are energetically dominated by the source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND), trapping of protons from beta decay of neutrons emitted from galactic cosmic ray nuclear interactions with the main rings. These belts were originally discovered in wide gaps between the A-ring, Janus/Epimetheus, Mimas, and Enceladus. The narrow F and G rings significant affected the CRAND protons but did not produce total depletion. Voyager 2 measurements subsequently revealed an outermost CRAND proton belt beyond Enceladus. Although the source rate is small, the trapping times limited by radial magnetospheric diffusion are very long, about ten years at peak measured flux inwards of the G ring, so large fluxes can accumulate unless otherwise limited in the trapping region by neutral gas, dust, and ring body interactions. One proposed final extension of the Cassini Orbiter mission would place perikrone in a 3000-km gap between the inner D ring and the upper atmosphere of Saturn. Experience with CRAND in the Earth's inner Van Allen proton belt suggests that a similar innermost belt might be found in this comparably wide region at Saturn. Radial dependence of magnetospheric diffusion, proximity to the ring neutron source, and northward magnetic offset of Saturn's magnetic equator from the ring plane could potentially produce peak fluxes several orders of magnitude higher than previously measured outside the main rings. Even brief passes through such an intense environment of highly penetrating protons would be a significant concern for spacecraft operations and science observations. Actual fluxes are limited by losses in Saturn's exospheric gas and in a dust environment likely comparable to that of the known CRAND proton belts. The first numerical model of this unexplored radiation belt is presented to determine limits on peak magnitude and radial profile of the proton flux distribution.

  11. Estimates of trapped radiation encountered on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, I. M.

    1973-01-01

    Estimates were made of the number of trapped protons and electrons encountered by vehicles on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts. The estimates serve as a first step in assessing whether these radiations present a problem to on-board sensitive components and payload. The integrated proton spectra and electron spectra are presented for the case of a trajectory described by a vehicle with a constant-thrust acceleration A sub c equal to 0.001 meter/sq sec. This value of acceleration corresponds to a trip time of about 54 days from low earth orbit to synchronous orbit. It is shown that the time spent in the belts and hence the radiation encountered vary nearly inversely with the value of thrust acceleration. Thus, the integrated spectral values presented for the case of A sub c = 0.001 meter/sq sec can be generalized for any other value of thrust acceleration by multiplying them by the factor 0.001/A sub c.

  12. How quickly, how deeply, and how strongly can dynamical outer boundary conditions impact Van Allen radiation belt morphology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian R.; Ozeke, Louis G.

    2016-06-01

    Here we examine the speed, strength, and depth of the coupling between dynamical variations of ultrarelativistic electron flux at the outer boundary and that in the heart of the outer radiation belt. Using ULF wave radial diffusion as an exemplar, we show how changing boundary conditions can completely change belt morphology even under conditions of identical wave power. In the case of ULF wave radial diffusion, the temporal dynamics of a new source population or a sink of electron flux at the outer plasma sheet boundary can generate a completely opposite response which reaches deep into the belt under identical ULF wave conditions. Very significantly, here we show that such coupling can occur on timescales much faster than previously thought. We show that even on timescales ~1 h, changes in the outer boundary electron population can dramatically alter the radiation belt flux in the heart of the belt. Importantly, these flux changes can at times occur on timescales much faster than the L shell revisit time obtained from elliptically orbiting satellites such as the Van Allen Probes. We underline the importance of such boundary condition effects when seeking to identify the physical processes which explain the dominant behavior of the Van Allen belts. Overall, we argue in general that the importance of temporal changes in the boundary conditions is sometimes overlooked in comparison to the pursuit of (ever) increasingly accurate estimates of wave power and other wave properties used in empirical representations of wave transport and diffusion rates.

  13. Van Allen Probes observations linking radiation belt electrons to chorus waves during 2014 multiple storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Si; Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; He, Yihua; Zhou, Qinghua; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    During 18 February to 2 March 2014, the Van Allen Probes encountered multiple geomagnetic storms and simultaneously observed intensified chorus and hiss waves. During this period, there were substantial enhancements in fluxes of energetic (53.8-108.3 keV) and relativistic (2-3.6 MeV) electrons. Chorus waves were excited at locations L = 4-6.2 after the fluxes of energetic were greatly enhanced, with a lower frequency band and wave amplitudes ˜20-100 pT. Strong hiss waves occurred primarily in the main phases or below the location L = 4 in the recovery phases. Relativistic electron fluxes decreased in the main phases due to the adiabatic (e.g., the magnetopause shadowing) or nonadiabatic (hiss-induced scattering) processes. In the recovery phases, relativistic electron fluxes either increased in the presence of enhanced chorus or remained unchanged in the absence of strong chorus or hiss. The observed relativistic electron phase space density peaked around L∗ = 4.5, characteristic of local acceleration. This multiple-storm period reveals a typical picture that chorus waves are excited by the energetic electrons at first and then produce efficient acceleration of relativistic electrons. This further demonstrates that the interplay between both competing mechanisms of chorus-driven acceleration and hiss-driven scattering often occurs in the outer radiation belts.

  14. Van Allen Probes Mission Space Academy: Educating middle school students about Earth's mysterious radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, L.; Turney, D.; Matiella Novak, A.; Smith, D.; Simon, M.

    2013-12-01

    How's the weather in space? Why on Earth did NASA send two satellites above Earth to study radiation belts and space weather? To learn the answer to questions about NASA's Van Allen Probes mission, 450 students and their teachers from Maryland middle schools attended Space Academy events highlighting the Van Allen Probes mission. Sponsored by the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and Discovery Education, the events are held at the APL campus in Laurel, MD. Space Academies take students and teachers on behind-the-scenes exploration of how spacecraft are built, what they are designed to study, and introduces them to the many professionals that work together to create some of NASA's most exciting projects. Moderated by a public relations representative in the format of an official NASA press conference, the daylong event includes a student press conference with students as reporters and mission experts as panelists. Lunch with mission team members gives students a chance to ask more questions. After lunch, students don souvenir clean room suits, enjoy interactive science demonstrations, and tour APL facilities where the Van Allen Probes were built and tested before launch. Students may even have an opportunity to peek inside a clean room to view spacecraft being assembled. Prior to the event, teachers are provided with classroom activities, lesson plans, and videos developed by APL and Discovery Education to help prepare students for the featured mission. The activities are aligned to National Science Education Standards and appropriate for use in the classroom. Following their visit, student journalists are encouraged to write a short article about their field trip; selections are posted on the Space Academy web site. Designed to engage, inspire, and influence attitudes about space science and STEM careers, Space Academies provide an opportunity to attract underserved populations and emphasize that space science is for everyone. Exposing students to a diverse group of

  15. Propagation properties of plasmaspheric hiss in the radiation belts: first systematic results from the Van Allen probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santolik, Ondrej; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kurth, William S.; Averkamp, Terrance F.; Kletzing, Craig A.

    2014-05-01

    The electromagnetic emission of plasmaspheric hiss has been considered to be an important component in the puzzle of the dynamical behavior of Van Allen radiation belts, being held responsible for the slot region between the inner and outer belts. The origin of plasmaspheric hiss is still being debated. A systematic analysis of propagation properties of these waves can provide us with inputs for modeling of radiation belt dynamics. We use new measurements of the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) onboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft. Multicomponent data processed by the EMFISIS/Waves instrument allow us to systematically estimate the wave polarization and propagation parameters. The survey data of this instrument are recorded with a nearly 100% coverage. This growing data set allows us to determine probability density functions of characteristics of electromagnetic waves in the typical frequency range of plasmaspheric hiss. This work receives EU support through the FP7-Space grant agreement no 284520 for the MAARBLE collaborative research project.

  16. Identification of Non-Linear Space Weather Models of the Van Allen Radiation Belts Using Volterra Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Vassiliadis, D.

    2010-07-01

    Many efforts have been made to develop general dynamical models of the Van Allen radiation belts based on data alone. Early linear prediction filter studies focused on the response of daily-averaged relativistic electrons at geostationary altitudes Nagai 1988, Baker et al. 1990). Vassiliadis et al (2005) extended this technique spatially by incorporating SAMPEX electron flux data into linear prediction filters for a broad range of L-shells from 1.1 to 10.0 RE. Nonlinear state space models (Rigler & Baker 2008) have provided useful initial results on the timescales involved in modeling the impulse-response of the radiation belts. Here, we show how NARMAX models, in conjunction with nonlinear time-delay FIR neural networks (Volterra networks) hold great promise for the development of accurate and fully data-derived space weather specification and forecast tools.

  17. Plasmatrough exohiss waves observed by Van Allen Probes: Evidence for leakage from plasmasphere and resonant scattering of radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hui; Su, Zhenpeng; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chao; Xian, Tao; Wang, Shui; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.

    2015-02-01

    Exohiss waves are whistler mode hiss observed in the plasmatrough region. We present a case study of exohiss waves and the corresponding background plasma distributions observed by the Van Allen Probes in the dayside low-latitude region. The analysis of wave Poynting fluxes, suprathermal electron fluxes, and cold electron densities supports the scenario that exohiss leaks from the plasmasphere into the plasmatrough. Quasilinear calculations further reveal that exohiss can potentially cause the resonant scattering loss of radiation belt electrons ˜radiation belt models.

  18. The Role of ULF Waves in Ring Current and Radiation Belt Dynamics as Revealed by NASA's Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Mann, I. R.; Takahashi, K.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Wiltberger, M. J.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Fennell, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Van Allen Probes have been on orbit since late-August 2012, precessing through all local times over the first two years of the mission, returning high-quality wave and particle observations in the near-Earth space environment. The Probes reveal radiation belt and ring current dynamics with unrivaled accuracy and resolution, providing unambiguous evidence of resonant wave-particle interactions in the inner magnetosphere (e.g., L<7). It is well known that a class of such wave-particle interactions, namely ultra-low frequency (ULF; ~1-10 mHz) wave interactions, contribute to the radial transport of electrons and protons in this region and thus, the large-scale, global morphology of the radiation belts. We focus our investigations on observations of drift-resonance with shock-induced ULF waves, drift-resonance with localized, monochromatic ULF waves, and ULF fluctuations related to nightside particle injections. We also discuss recent advances in the modeling of ULF waves and the challenges that lie ahead.

  19. Statistical properties of plasmaspheric hiss derived from Van Allen Probes data and their effects on radiation belt electron dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Nishimura, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is known to play an important role in controlling the overall structure and dynamics of radiation belt electrons inside the plasmasphere. Using newly available Van Allen Probes wave data, which provide excellent coverage in the entire inner magnetosphere, we evaluate the global distribution of the hiss wave frequency spectrum and wave intensity for different levels of substorm activity. Our statistical results show that observed hiss peak frequencies are generally lower than the commonly adopted value (~550 Hz), which was in frequent use, and that the hiss wave power frequently extends below 100 Hz, particularly at larger L shells (> ~3) on the dayside during enhanced levels of substorm activity. We also compare electron pitch angle scattering rates caused by hiss using the new statistical frequency spectrum and the previously adopted Gaussian spectrum and find that the differences are up to a factor of ~5 and are dependent on energy and L shell. Moreover, the new statistical hiss wave frequency spectrum including wave power below 100 Hz leads to increased pitch angle scattering rates by a factor of ~1.5 for electrons above ~100 keV at L~5, although their effect is negligible at L ≤ 3. Consequently, we suggest that the new realistic hiss wave frequency spectrum should be incorporated into future modeling of radiation belt electron dynamics.

  20. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission (RBSP) will explore the Van Allen Radiation Belts in the Earth's magnetosphere. The charge particles in these regions can be hazardous to both spacecraft and ...

  1. Intense low-frequency chorus waves observed by Van Allen Probes: Fine structures and potential effect on radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhonglei; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chao; Wang, Shui

    2016-02-01

    Frequency distribution is a vital factor in determining the contribution of whistler mode chorus to radiation belt electron dynamics. Chorus is usually considered to occur in the frequency range 0.1-0.8fce_eq (with the equatorial electron gyrofrequency fce_eq). We here report an event of intense low-frequency chorus with nearly half of wave power distributed below 0.1fce_eq observed by Van Allen Probe A on 27 August 2014. This emission propagated quasi-parallel to the magnetic field and exhibited hiss-like signatures most of the time. The low-frequency chorus can produce the rapid loss of low-energy (˜0.1 MeV) electrons, different from the normal chorus. For high-energy (≥0.5 MeV) electrons, the low-frequency chorus can yield comparable momentum diffusion to that of the normal chorus but much stronger (up to 2 orders of magnitude) pitch angle diffusion near the loss cone.

  2. Storm-time response of the Van Allen radiation belts organized by the large-scale solar wind drivers, energy and distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, Heli; Kilpua, Emilia; Turner, Drew

    2016-04-01

    We study the response of the Van Allen radiation belts during geomagnetic storms. A combination of the long-term geosynchronous observations from GOES (> 2.5 MeV) and energy (tens of keV to 2 MeV) and L-shell (2.5 < L < 6.0) resolved Van Allen Probe observations are used. We demonstrate that the radiation belt response (depletion, no-change, increase) is organized by the large-scale solar wind driver (coronal mass ejection ejecta/sheath, slow-fast stream interface region, fast stream) and that the response is highly dependent on both the electron energy and the L-shell. In addition, we show detailed Van Allen Probe observations from two geomagnetic storms that occurred during two consecutive Carrington rotations of the solar maximum year 2015. Both of these storms involved a slow-fast stream interaction region and a fast stream originating from the same coronal hole. However, the first storm also included a large-scale coronal mass ejection. We study in particular how the added presence of this coronal mass ejection affected the dynamics of the radiation belts.

  3. Investigating geomagnetic activity dependent sources of 100s of keV electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt using Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. L.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    By providing an unprecedented level of reliability in particle flux observations at low L-shells, NASA's Van Allen Probes mission has yielded a series of discoveries and unanswered questions concerning the inner electron radiation belt. Two such discoveries are: 1) a sharp cutoff in the energy distribution of electrons at ~900 keV, such that fluxes of electrons with energies greater than ~900 keV are below the detectability threshold of the Van Allen Probes' MagEIS instruments and consistent with upper flux limits of multi-MeV electrons calculated using the Van Allen Probes' REPT instruments, and 2) that impulsive injections of up to several hundred keV electrons may act as an activity-dependent source of electrons in the slot and inner radiation belt. In this presentation, we discuss results from phase space density (PSD) analysis of inner zone electrons. Such analysis, which examines PSD as a function of the three adiabatic invariants, effectively removes adiabatic variations in the particle observations allowing one to better identify source and loss processes ongoing in the system. We demonstrate that impulsive injections do indeed act as a source of inner radiation belt electrons and, when combined with losses in the slot region, can result in peaked radial distributions of electron PSD in the inner zone. We briefly discuss the nature of these low-L injections, which penetrate inside the plasmasphere and display strong energy and species dependencies. By examining such injections throughout the Van Allen Probes era, we also i) determine the occurrence rate of injections as a function of electron energy (and first adiabatic invariant), geomagnetic activity level, and L-shell; ii) estimate the contribution of such injections to the inner belt population; and iii) investigate how such injections disrupt coherent banded flux structures in the inner zone known as "zebra stripes".

  4. On the Control of Van Allen Radiation Belt Morphology by Coupling to the Plasmasheet: How Quickly, How Deeply, and How Strongly?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Ozeke, Louis

    2016-07-01

    Here we examine the speed, strength and depth of the coupling between dynamical variations of the electron flux at the outer boundary and that in the heart of the radiation belts. Using ULF wave radial diffusion as an exemplar, we show how changing boundary conditions can completely change belt morphology even under conditions of identical wave power. In the case of ULF wave radial diffusion, whether there is a new source population or a sink of electron flux at the outer plasmasheet boundary can generate a completely opposite response which reaches deep into the belt even under identical ULF wave conditions. Very significantly, here we show that such coupling can occur on timescales much faster than previously thought, being as short as one hour or less between the outer boundary and L-shells in the heart of the belts at L˜4 and significantly less than the L-shell revisit time obtained from elliptically orbiting satellites such as the Van Allen Probes. We underline the importance of such boundary condition effects when seeking to identify the physical processes which explain the dominant behaviour of the Van Allen belts. We further examine implications for reaching science closure in identifying causality in radiation belt wave-particle dynamics, and in relation to observational requirements for accurate radiation belt forecasting. Overall we argue in general that the importance of boundary conditions is sometimes overlooked in comparison to the pursuit of (ever) increasingly accurate estimates of wave power and other wave properties used in empirical representations of wave transport and diffusion rates.

  5. Survey of radiation belt energetic electron pitch angle distributions based on the Van Allen Probes MagEIS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run; Summers, Danny; Ni, Binbin; Fennell, Joseph F.; Blake, J. Bernard; Spence, Harlan E.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    2016-02-01

    A statistical survey of electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) is performed based on the pitch angle-resolved flux observations from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument on board the Van Allen Probes during the period from 1 October 2012 to 1 May 2015. By fitting the measured PADs to a sinnα form, where α is the local pitch angle and n is the power law index, we investigate the dependence of PADs on electron kinetic energy, magnetic local time (MLT), the geomagnetic Kp index, and L shell. The difference in electron PADs between the inner and outer belt is distinct. In the outer belt, the common averaged n values are less than 1.5, except for large values of the Kp index and high electron energies. The averaged n values vary considerably with MLT, with a peak in the afternoon sector and an increase with increasing L shell. In the inner belt, the averaged n values are much larger, with a common value greater than 2. The PADs show a slight dependence on MLT, with a weak maximum at noon. A distinct region with steep PADs lies in the outer edge of the inner belt where the electron flux is relatively low. The distance between the inner and outer belt and the intensity of the geomagnetic activity together determine the variation of PADs in the inner belt. Besides being dependent on electron energy, magnetic activity, and L shell, the results show a clear dependence on MLT, with higher n values on the dayside.

  6. Novel Estimates of ULF Wave Radial Diffusion of Relativistic Electrons in the Radiation Belts using the Van Allen Probes, THEMIS and GOES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarris, T. E.; Li, X.; Schiller, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Ultra-Low Frequency (ULF) waves are critical in radial diffusion processes of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts and their Power Spectral Density as a function of L is an integral part of the radial diffusion coefficients and of assimilative models of the radiation belts. Using simultaneous measurements from two GOES geosynchronous satellites, three spacecraft of the THEMIS constellation and the two Van Allen probes, we calculate the Power Spectral Density of ULF pulsations at different L, through which we provide improved estimates of the diffusion coefficient due to compressional magnetic perturbations as a function of L and Kp. These results can have significant implications in better defining the regions where radial diffusion can be effective vs. the regions where it cannot account for the observed changes in the phase space density of relativistic electrons.

  7. Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission Trailer

    NASA Video Gallery

    With launch scheduled for 2012, the Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) are two identical spacecraft that will investigate the doughnut shaped Van Allen radiation belts, the first discovery of the sp...

  8. Previously Undetected Radiation Belt Revealed

    NASA Video Gallery

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth'€™s Van Allen radiation belts have been considered to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. Observations f...

  9. Climatology of the Earth's inner magnetosphere as observed by the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manweiler, J. W.; Patterson, J. D.; Manweiler, R. M.; Gerrard, A. J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft measures energetic ion and electron particle populations in a species dependent energy range of 10's of KeV up to an MeV. The instrument separates the ion population into component species of protons, helium, and oxygen. This paper presents a climatological survey of RBSPICE measurements over the life of the mission to date. A comparison of spectrographs of the energetic particle populations (e, p, He, and O) is shown against key standard geomagnetic indices. Also shown is a summary of key electron and ion lower energy events based upon a systematic characterization of the type of event. The analyses of these events provide verification of the difference between electron and ion drift orbits and, based upon characterization schemes, show how the different event categories can vary as a function of L and MLT.

  10. Modeling gradual diffusion changes in radiation belt electron phase space density for the March 2013 Van Allen Probes case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao; Hudson, Mary; Jaynes, Allison; Boyd, Alexander; Malaspina, David; Thaller, Scott; Wygant, John; Henderson, Michael

    2014-10-01

    March 2013 provided the first equinoctial period when all of the instruments on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft were fully operational. This interval was characterized by disturbances of outer zone electrons with two time scales of variation, diffusive and rapid dropout and restoration. A radial diffusion model was applied to the monthlong interval to confirm that electron phase space density is well described by radial diffusion for the whole month at low first invariant ≤ 400 MeV/G but peaks in phase space density observed by the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) instrument suite at higher first invariant are not reproduced by radial transport from a source at higher L. The model does well for much of the monthlong interval, capturing three of four enhancements in phase space density which emerge from the outer boundary, while the strong enhancement following dropout on 17-18 March requires local acceleration at higher first invariant (M=1000 MeV/G versus 200 MeV/G) not included in our model. We have incorporated phase space density from ECT measurement at the outer boundary and plasmapause determination from the Electric Field and Waves (EFW) instrument to separate hiss and chorus loss models.

  11. Field-Aligned Electron Events Observed in the Radiation Belts by the HOPE Instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejosne, S.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.

    2015-12-01

    Field-aligned electron events (FAEs) are defined as events having the ratio of field-aligned to perpendicular flux greater than three. Time Domain Structures (TDS) are known to produce FAEs. Whistler and ECH waves are other possible candidates. Our objective is to derive the general features of the FAEs, to identify their driving mechanisms and to evaluate the importance of the different mechanisms. More than two years of measurements by the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron mass spectrometer and the Electric Field and Waves experiment are analyzed to identify low-energy (100eV-50keV) FAEs and to quantify the concurrent electric and magnetic wave components. We also peek at the observable waveforms with bursts of high-time resolution measurements. From statistical analysis and case studies, we suggest in particular that TDS cause field-alignment of ~300eV electrons in the pre-midnight sector while chorus waves cause field-alignment of electrons of ~10keV in the morning sector of the outer belt.

  12. Ultra-fast Electrons Explain Third Radiation Belt

    NASA Video Gallery

    In September 2012, NASA's Van Allen Probes observed the radiation belts around Earth had settled into a new configuration, separating into three belts instead of two. Scientists think the unusual p...

  13. Variability of the pitch angle distribution of radiation belt ultrarelativistic electrons during and following intense geomagnetic storms: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Z.; Ni, B.; Gu, X.; Zhao, Z.; Zhou, C.

    2015-12-01

    Fifteen month of pitch angle resolved Van Allen Probes Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) measurements of differential electron flux are analyzed to investigate the characteristics of the pitch angle distribution of radiation belt ultrarelativistic(> 2 MeV) electrons during storm conditions and during the long-storm decay. By modeling the ultrarelativistic electron pitch angle distribution as ,where is the equatorial pitch angle we examine the spatiotemporal variations of n value. The results show that in general n values increases with the level of geomagnetic activity. In principle the ultrarelativistic electrons respond to geomagnetic storms by becoming peaked at 90° pitch angle with n-values of 2 - 3 as a supportive signature of chorus acceleration outside the plasmasphere. High n-values also exists inside the plasmasphere, being localized adjacent to the plasmapause and energy dependent, which suggests a significant contribution from electronmagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves scattering. During quiet periods, n values generally evolve to become small, i.e., 0-1. The slow and long-term decays of the ultrarelativistic electrons after geomagnetic storms, while prominent, produce energy and L-shell-dependent decay time scales in association with the solar and geomagnetic activity and wave-particle interaction processes. At lower L shells inside the plasmasphere, the decay time scales for electrons at REPT energies are generally larger, varying from tens of days to hundreds of days, which can be mainly attributed to the combined effect of hiss-induced pitch angle scattering and inward radial diffusion. As L shell increases to L~3.5, a narrow region exists (with a width of ~0.5 L), where the observed ultrarelativistic electrons decay fastest, possibly resulting from efficient EMIC wave scattering. As L shell continues to increase, generally becomes larger again, indicating an overall slower loss process by waves at high L shells. Our investigation based

  14. Variability of the pitch angle distribution of radiation belt ultrarelativistic electrons during and following intense geomagnetic storms: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Binbin; Zou, Zhengyang; Gu, Xudong; Zhou, Chen; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob; Shi, Run; Zhao, Zhengyu; Baker, Daniel N.; Kanekal, Shrikhanth G.; Spence, Harlan E.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Li, Xinlin

    2015-06-01

    Fifteen months of pitch angle resolved Van Allen Probes Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) measurements of differential electron flux are analyzed to investigate the characteristic variability of the pitch angle distribution of radiation belt ultrarelativistic (>2 MeV) electrons during storm conditions and during the long-term poststorm decay. By modeling the ultrarelativistic electron pitch angle distribution as sinnα, where α is the equatorial pitch angle, we examine the spatiotemporal variations of the n value. The results show that, in general, n values increase with the level of geomagnetic activity. In principle, ultrarelativistic electrons respond to geomagnetic storms by becoming more peaked at 90° pitch angle with n values of 2-3 as a supportive signature of chorus acceleration outside the plasmasphere. High n values also exist inside the plasmasphere, being localized adjacent to the plasmapause and exhibiting energy dependence, which suggests a significant contribution from electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave scattering. During quiet periods, n values generally evolve to become small, i.e., 0-1. The slow and long-term decays of the ultrarelativistic electrons after geomagnetic storms, while prominent, produce energy and L-shell-dependent decay time scales in association with the solar and geomagnetic activity and wave-particle interaction processes. At lower L shells inside the plasmasphere, the decay time scales τd for electrons at REPT energies are generally larger, varying from tens of days to hundreds of days, which can be mainly attributed to the combined effect of hiss-induced pitch angle scattering and inward radial diffusion. As L shell increases to L~3.5, a narrow region exists (with a width of ~0.5 L), where the observed ultrarelativistic electrons decay fastest, possibly resulting from efficient EMIC wave scattering. As L shell continues to increase, τd generally becomes larger again, indicating an overall slower loss

  15. Radition belt dynamics : Recent results from van Allen Probes and future observations from CeREs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, Shrikanth; O'Brien, Paul; Baker, Daniel N.; Ogasawara, Keiichi; Fennell, Joseph; Christian, Eric; Claudepierre, Seth; Livi, Stefano; Desai, Mihir; Li, Xinlin; Jaynes, Allison; Turner, Drew; Jones, Ashley; Schiller, Quintin

    2016-07-01

    We describe recent observations of the Earth's radiation belts made by instruments on board the Van Allen Probes mission, particularly the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion spectrometer (MagEIS). These observations have significantly advanced our understanding of terrestrial radiation belt dynamics. The Van Allen Probes mission comprises two identically instrumented spacecraft which were launched 31 August, 2012 into low-inclination lapping equatorial orbits. The orbit periods are about 9 hours, with perigees and apogees of of ~600 km and 5.8 RE respectively. We discuss the new scientific findings of the Van Allen Probes mission regarding the physics of energization and loss of relativistic electrons and their implications for future low-cost missions, especially CubeSats. We describe the CeREs (a Compact Radiation belt Explorer) CubeSat mission currently being built at the Goddard Space Flight Center, and carrying on board, an innovative instrument, the Miniaturized Electron Proton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT is a compact low-mass low-power instrument measuring electrons from a few keV to tens of MeV in multiple differential channels. MERiT is optimized to measure electron microbursts with a high time resolution of a few milliseconds. We present and discuss possible future scientific contributions from CeREs.

  16. Remarkable new results for high-energy protons and electrons in the inner Van Allen belt regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-04-01

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts could be separated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons of moderate energy (less than about one megaelectronvolt) often populate both zones, with a deep 'slot' region largely devoid of particles between them. The two-belt radiation structure was explained as arising from strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary with the inner edge of the outer radiation zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location.. Recent Van Allen Probes observations have revealed an unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultrarelativistic kinetic energies (more than several megaelectronvolts). The data show an exceedingly sharp inner boundary for the ultrarelativistic electrons right at L=2.8. Additional, concurrently measured data reveal that this barrier to inward electron radial transport is likely due to scattering by powerful human electromagnetic transmitter (VLF) wave fields. We show that weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere due to manmade signals can act to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate. Inside of this distance, the Van Allen Probes data show that high energy (20 -100 MeV) protons have a double belt structure with a stable peak of flux at L~1.5 and a much more variable belt peaking at L~2.3.

  17. Applications of radiation belt research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2011-10-01

    When Arthur Clark and John Pierce proposed geosynchronous and low-Earth-orbiting (GEO and LEO) communications satellites, respectively, they did not envision that the environment in which their concepts would fly would be anything but benign. Discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts in 1958 fundamentally altered understanding of Earth's near-space environment and its impacts on technologies. Indeed, the first commercial telecommunications satellite, Telstar 1, in LEO, failed some 6 months after launch (10 July 1962) due to trapped radiation that had been enhanced from the Starfish Prime high-altitude nuclear test on the day prior to launch. Today radiation trapped in the geomagnetic field, as well as solar energetic particles that can access the magnetosphere, forms critical constraints on the design and operations of satellite systems. These considerations were important factors in the planning of the AGU Chapman Conference on radiation belts that was hosted in July 2011 by the Memorial University of Newfoundland in St. John's, Canada (see "Chapman Conference on Radiation Belts and the Inner Magnetosphere," page 4). The conference presentations, discussions, and hallway conversations illuminated current understanding of Earth's radiation belts and critical issues remaining. Certainly, fundamental understanding of radiation belt origins remains elusive. The relative roles of adiabatic processes, geomagnetic storm injections, and wave heating, among other considerations, are central topics of intense debate and of competing modeling regimes by numerous active groups.

  18. Three dimensional data-assimilative VERB-code simulations of the Earth's radiation belts: Reanalysis during the Van Allen Probe era, and operational forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, Adam; Shprits, Yuri; Podladchikova, Tatiana; Kondrashov, Dmitri

    2016-04-01

    The Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code 2.0 models the dynamics of radiation-belt electron phase space density (PSD) in Earth's magnetosphere. Recently, a data-assimilative version of this code has been developed, which utilizes a split-operator Kalman-filtering approach to solve for electron PSD in terms of adiabatic invariants. A new dataset based on the TS07d magnetic field model is presented, which may be utilized for analysis of past geomagnetic storms, and for initial and boundary conditions in running simulations. Further, a data-assimilative forecast model is introduced, which has the capability to forecast electron PSD several days into the future, given a forecast Kp index. The model assimilates an empirical model capable of forecasting the conditions at geosynchronous orbit. The model currently runs in real time and a forecast is available to view online http://rbm.epss.ucla.edu.

  19. Impacts of intense inward and outward ULF wave radial diffusion on the Van Allen belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Ozeke, Louis; Rae, I. Jonathan; Murphy, Kyle

    2016-07-01

    During geomagnetic storms, the power in ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves can be orders of magnitude larger than that predicted by statistics determined from an entire solar cycle. This is especially true during the main phase and early recovery phase. These periods of enhanced storm-time ULF wave power can have significant impacts on the morphology and structure of the Van Allen belts. Either fast inward or outward radial diffusion can result, depending on the profiles of the electron phase space density and the outer boundary condition at the edge of the belts. Small changes in the time sequence of powerful ULF waves, and the time sequence of any magnetopause shadowing or the recovery of plamasheet sources relative to the ULF wave occurrence, have a remarkable impact on the resulting structure of the belts. The overall impact of the enhanced ULF wave power is profound, but the response can be very different depending on the available source flux in the plasmasheet. We review these impacts by examining ultra-relativistic electron dynamics during seemingly different storms during the Van Allen Probe era, including during the Baker et al. third radiation belt, and show the observed behaviour can be largely explained by differences in the time sequence of events described above.

  20. Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Fox, N.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Mauk, B. H.

    2009-01-01

    Scheduled to launch in May 2012, NASA's dual spacecraft Living With a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission carries the field and particle instrumentation needed to determine the processes that produce enhancements in radiation belt ion and electron fluxes, the dominant mechanisms that cause the loss of relativistic electrons, and the manner by which the ring current and other geomagnetic phenomena affect radiation belt behavior. The two spacecraft will operate in low-inclination elliptical lapping orbits around the Earth, within and immediately exterior to the Van Allen radiation belts. During course of their two year primary mission, they will cover the full range of local times, measuring both AC and DC electric and magnetic fields to 10kHz, as well as ions from 50 eV to 1 GeV and electrons with energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 MeV.

  1. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-10-05

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day–night asymmetry in Earth’s magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. In conclusion, simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. Finally, the current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons.

  2. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day–night asymmetry in Earth's magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. Simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. The current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons. PMID:26436770

  3. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D N; Spence, H E; Funsten, H O; Blake, J B

    2015-01-01

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day-night asymmetry in Earth's magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. Simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. The current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons. PMID:26436770

  4. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-10-01

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day-night asymmetry in Earth's magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. Simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. The current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons.

  5. Precipitation of relativistic electrons of the Van Allen belts into the proton aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K; Miyoshi, Y; Sakaguchi, K; Shiokawa, K; Evans, D S; Connors, M

    2008-01-01

    The Van Allen electron belts consist of two regions encircling the earth in which relativistic electrons are trapped in the earth's magnetic field. Populations of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts vary greatly with geomagnetic disturbance and they are a major source of damage to space vehicles. In order to know when and by how much these populations of relativistic electrons increase, it is important to elucidate not only the cause of acceleration of relativistic electrons but also the cause of their loss from the Van Allen belts. Here we show the first evidence that left-hand polarized electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere, on the basis of results of an excellent set of ground and satellite observations showing coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The proton aurora was produced by precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV due to EMIC waves near the plasma pause, which is a manifestation of wave-particle interactions. These observations clarify that ions with energies of tens of keV affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts via parasitic resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  6. Development of a complex instrument measuring dose in the Van Allen belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirn, Attila; Apáthy, István; Bodnár, László; Csőke, Antal; Deme, Sándor; Pázmándi, Tamás

    One of the many risks of long-duration space flights is the excessive exposure to cosmic radiation. The objectives of this project are to develop a complex instrument comprising a Geiger-Muller counter and a three-dimensional (3D) silicon detector telescope (TriTel) in order to characterise the cosmic radiation in the Van Allen belts and to determine the radiation quality factor and the dose equivalent when and where it is feasible. The research and development of TriTel began in the Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute several years ago. The instrument presented in this paper will be mounted onboard a European satellite (European Student Earth Orbiter, ESEO) in geostationary transfer orbit. Elements of the TriTel system, issues of the electronic block diagram, requirements for the mechanical construction and the main data processing algorithms have been analysed. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed in order to investigate the dead time behaviour of TriTel. In order to give a rough estimation of the expected fluxes of protons and electrons in orbit, calculations were made with the space environment information system online tool.

  7. Moving belt radiator development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. Alan

    1988-01-01

    Development of the Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) as an advanced space radiator concept is discussed. The ralative merits of Solid Belt (SBR), Liquid Belt (LBR), and Hybrid Belt (HBR) Radiators are described. Analytical and experimental efforts related to the dynamics of a rotating belt in microgravity are reviewed. The development of methods for transferring heat to the moving belt is discussed, and the results from several experimental investigations are summarized. Limited efforts related to the belt deployment and stowage, and to fabrication of a hybrid belt, are also discussed. Life limiting factors such as seal wear and micrometeroid resistance are identified. The results from various MBR point design studies for several power levels are compared with advanced Heat Pipe Radiator technology. MBR designs are shown to compare favorable at both 300 and 1000 K temperature levels. However, additional effort will be required to resolve critical technology issues and to demonstrate the advantage of MBR systems.

  8. Local Acceleration of Radiation Belt Electrons: Where? When? and How?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, G. D.; Henderson, M. G.; Morley, S.; Larsen, B.; Friedel, R. H.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Boyd, A. J.; Spence, H.; Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2013-12-01

    Two broad classes of processes are capable of accelerating radiation belt electrons to ultra-relativistic energies: radial acceleration by inward diffusion from a high-altitude source population and local acceleration of an in situ source population by wave-particle interactions. Recently the Van Allen Probes mission provided unambiguous observations of local acceleration for one of the first radiation belt enhancement events of the mission on October 8-9, 2012 [Reeves et al., 2013]. Now, with over a year of Van Allen Probes observations, it is possible to conduct a larger survey of radiation belt enhancement events. Level 4 phase space densities recently been made available by the RBSP-ECT science operations center using data from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) [Blake et al., 2013] and Van Allen Probes magnetic ephemeris files [Henderson et al., 2013]. In this presentation we survey the radial profiles of phase space density as a function of the magnetic invariants (mu, K, and L*) for characteristic signatures of local acceleration through wave particle interactions. We examine how many radiation belt enhancement events show signatures of local acceleration and determine where the peak acceleration occurred. We compare the observations with the expectations from theories of local acceleration in order to better understand the generation mechanisms and the relative roles of local acceleration and radial diffusion in controlling radiation belt dynamics.

  9. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-10-05

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day–night asymmetry in Earth’s magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28more » June 2013 geomagnetic storm. In conclusion, simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. Finally, the current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons.« less

  10. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen belt

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.; Elkington, S. R.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Goldstein, J.; Hudson, M. K.; et al

    2013-02-28

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts are thought to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is comprised predominantly of mega-electron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. Thus, the spatially separated inner zone is comprised of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations revealmore » an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (E > 2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for over four weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.« less

  11. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen belt

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.; Elkington, S. R.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Goldstein, J.; Hudson, M. K.; Reeves, G. D.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2013-02-28

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts are thought to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is comprised predominantly of mega-electron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. Thus, the spatially separated inner zone is comprised of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations reveal an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (E > 2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for over four weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.

  12. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's outer Van Allen belt.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Kanekal, S G; Hoxie, V C; Henderson, M G; Li, X; Spence, H E; Elkington, S R; Friedel, R H W; Goldstein, J; Hudson, M K; Reeves, G D; Thorne, R M; Kletzing, C A; Claudepierre, S G

    2013-04-12

    Since their discovery more than 50 years ago, Earth's Van Allen radiation belts have been considered to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is composed predominantly of megaelectron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days, depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. The spatially separated inner zone is composed of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations reveal an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (>2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for more than 4 weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage. PMID:23450000

  13. Visualization of Radiation Belts from REPT Data

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization, created using actual data from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescopes (REPT) on NASA’s Van Allen Probes, clearly shows the emergence of new third belt and second slot reg...

  14. Electron Flux of Radiation Belts Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows meridional (from north-south) plane projections of the REPT-A and REPT-B electron flux values. The animation first shows the expected two-belt Van Allen zone structure; from Se...

  15. Investigation of solar wind driver effects on electron acceleration and loss in the outer Van Allen belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsavrias, Christos; Li, Wen; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Georgiou, Marina; Dimitrakoudis, Stavros

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the response of the outer Van Allen belt electrons to various types of solar wind and internal magnetospheric forcing - in particular to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), to High Speed Streams (HSS), to geospace magnetic storms of different intensities and to intense magnetospheric substorms. We have employed multi-point particle and field observations in the inner magnetosphere (both in-situ and through ground-based remote sensing), including the Cluster, THEMIS, Van Allen Probes and GOES constellations, the XMM and INTEGRAL spacecraft, and the CARISMA and IMAGE ground magnetometer arrays. The data provide a broad range of particle energies and a wide radial and azimuthal spatial coverage. Observations show that losses of equatorially mirroring electrons are primarily caused by magnetopause shadowing which in turn is achieved by outward diffusion driven by Pc5 ULF waves. Chorus wave activity, on the other hand, seems to be responsible for electron enhancements in the outer radiation belt even in the presence of pronounced outward diffusion.

  16. Orion GNC Mitigation Efforts for Van Allen Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ellis T.; Jackson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Crew Module (CM) is NASA's next generation manned space vehicle, scheduled to return humans to lunar orbit in the coming decade. The Orion avionics and GN&C architectures have progressed through a number of project phases and are nearing completion of a major milestone. The first unmanned test mission, dubbed "Exploration Flight Test One" (EFT-1) is scheduled to launch from NASA Kennedy Space Center late next year and provides the first integrated test of all the vehicle systems, avionics and software. The EFT-1 mission will be an unmanned test flight that includes a high speed re-entry from an elliptical orbit, which will be launched on an expendable launch vehicle (ELV). The ELV will place CM and the ELV upper stage into a low Earth orbit (LEO) for one revolution. After the first LEO, the ELV upper stage will re-ignite and place the combined upper stage/CM into an elliptical orbit whose perigee results in a high energy entry to test CM response in a relatively high velocity, high heating environment. While not producing entry velocities as high as those experienced in returning from a lunar orbit, the trajectory was chosen to provide higher stresses on the thermal protection and guided entry systems, as compared against a lower energy LEO entry. However the required entry geometry with constraints on inclination and landing site result in a trajectory that lingers for many hours in the Van Allen radiation belts. This exposes the vehicle and avionics to much higher levels of high energy proton radiation than a typical LEO or lunar trajectory would encounter. As a result, Van Allen radiation poses a significant risk to the Orion avionics system, and particularly the Flight Control Module (FCM) computers that house the GN&C flight software. The measures taken by the Orion GN&C, Flight Software and Avionics teams to mitigate the risks associated with the Van Allen radiation on EFT-1 are covered in the paper. Background on the Orion avionics subsystem is

  17. Dynamics of the Earth's Radiation Belts and Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-12-01

    Trapped by Earth's magnetic field far above the planet's surface, the energetic particles that fill the radiation belts are a sign of the Sun's influence and a threat to our technological future. In the AGU monograph Dynamics of the Earth's Radiation Belts and Inner Magnetosphere, editors Danny Summers, Ian R. Mann, Daniel N. Baker, and Michael Schulz explore the inner workings of the magnetosphere. The book reviews current knowledge of the magnetosphere and recent research results and sets the stage for the work currently being done by NASA's Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes). In this interview, Eos talks to Summers about magnetospheric research, whistler mode waves, solar storms, and the effects of the radiation belts on Earth.

  18. NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David G.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) mission, comprising two identically-instrumented spacecraft, is scheduled for launch in May 2012. In addition to identifying and quantifying the processes responsible for energizing, transporting, and removing energetic particles from the Earth's Van Allen radiation, the mission will determine the characteristics of the ring current and its effect upon the magnetosphere as a whole. The distances separating the two RBSP spacecraft will vary as they move along their 1000 km altitude x 5.8 RE geocentric orbits in order to enable the spacecraft to separate spatial from temporal effects, measure gradients that help identify particle sources, and determine the spatial extent of a wide array of phenomena. This talk explores the scientific objectives of the mission and the manner by which the mission has been tailored to achieve them.

  19. Shielding of manned space stations against Van Allen Belt protons: a preliminary scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Corbin, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    Calculated results are presented to aid in the design of the shielding required to protect astronauts in a space station that is orbiting through the Van Allen proton belt. The geometry considered - a spherical shell shield with a spherical tissue phantom at its center - is only a very approximate representation of an actual space station, but this simple geometry makes it possible to consider a wide range of possible shield materials. Both homogeneous and laminated shields are considered. Also, an approximation procedure - the equivalent thickness approximation - that allows dose rates to be estimated for any shield material or materials from the dose rates for an aluminum shield is presented and discussed.

  20. The earth's trapped radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, R. B.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    The near-earth charged particle environment is discussed in terms of spacecraft design criteria. Models are presented of the trapped radiation belts and based on in-situ data obtained from spacecraft.

  1. Using orbital tethers to remediate geomagnetic radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudoba de Badyn, Mathias; Marchand, Richard; Sydora, Richard D.

    2016-02-01

    The Van Allen radiation belts pose a hazard to spacecraft and astronauts, and similar radiation belts around other planets pose a hazard to interplanetary probes. We discuss a method of remediating these radiation belts first proposed by Danilov and Vasilyev, and recently improved by Hoyt, Minor, and Cash, where a long, charged tether is placed in orbit inside a radiation belt. In this approach, an electric field of the tether scatters the belt particles into a pitch angle loss cone leading to absorption of the particles in the atmosphere. A test particle calculation is presented which computes the scattered pitch angle of belt particles as a function of initial pitch angle and gyrophase for different particle energies. The moments of the resulting distribution of scattered angle versus initial pitch angle are used to compute the number density of the belt as a function of time using a Fokker-Planck diffusion approximation. Finally, we use the characteristic timescales of scattering for particles of different energies to discuss the feasibility of using such a system of tethers as a long and short-term remediation solution.

  2. Ultrarelativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts: RPS observations and Geant4 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Blake, J. B.; George, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) aboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft is designed to measure protons from about 60 MeV to multiple GeV, but it is also sensitive to electrons above several MeV. Its Cherenkov subsystem provides energy resolution for protons above a few hundred MeV, and electrons at extremely high energies, around 50 MeV and above, can also produce high levels of Cherenkov light. While mapping protons in the inner Van Allen Belt with RPS, Mazur et al. (Fall 2014 AGU meeting, paper SM22A-02) observed a concentration of particle events around L = 2 with Cherenkov light corresponding to protons at energies well above the limit for stable trapping there. We present a preliminary analysis that shows that the patterns of the Cherenkov light distribution are consistent with these particle events instead being caused by electrons at energies of at least several tens of MeV. This energy range is well above that expected from magnetospheric energization, even by a violent event like the March 1991 shock, which injected electrons peaked around 15 MeV (Looper et al., GRL 1994, doi:10.1029/94GL01586). We discuss the possibility that these electrons are instead due to the decay of pions and muons produced by cosmic-ray interactions with the atmosphere, with a characteristic energy set by the pion rest mass of 140 MeV.

  3. The Role of Plasma in Radiation Belt Loss.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, J. M.; Bonnell, J. W.; Kurth, W. S.; Millan, R. M.; Goldstein, J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Blake, J. B.; Denton, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The radiation belts are zones of relativistic electrons encircling the Earth. Their radial structure is controlled by the competition between source and loss processes. Most commonly, a two-belt structure prevails, though a more complicated three-belt structure - an inner belt plus two outer electron belts - have repeatedly been observed. The plasma conditions that enable and enhance loss-facilitating wave activity in the inner magnetosphere are still under discussion. Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves (EMIC) when the total plasma density is large (i.e., in the plasmasphere and plume). However, there is evidence that this interaction may be not as strong as thought, and that instead the field-aligned motion of lower energy ring current ions (up to a few 10's keV) may play a key role. Similarly, the exact influence of large heavy ion (O+) concentrations remains unsettled. We use 2.5+ years of Van Allen Probes observations to study the region of plasmasphere-outer belt overlap (and its vicinity). By now, the Van Allen Probes provide a complete and very dense coverage of the complete magnetosphere inside geosynchronous orbit We focus our interest on understanding the plasma conditions that can favor EMIC wave growth. We investigate the temperature anisotropy A (modified by plasma β) of the warm/hot plasma, and contrast it with the location specifics of the plasmasphere (i.e., very high total density) and the occurrence of high O+ concentrations in the overlap regions with the radiation belt(s). We present both average conditions for all parameters during a variety of geomagnetic conditions, and highlight specific loss and overlap events in an effort to establish favorable plasma conditions for relativistic electron loss during those times.

  4. The Foundations of Radiation Belt Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, G. H.

    2008-12-01

    phenomenon. It also provided the first hint that there were two distinct radiation belts, although that conclusion was not reached until later. Although that new information was quickly announced, the results of the high altitude nuclear detonations were kept secret until well into 1959. They clearly revealed the charged particle shells created by the Argos nuclear detonations. The next major step in mapping and understanding the high-intensity radiation involved the launch of deep space probes Pioneers III and IV in December 1958 and March 1959. Although both launches fell short in their primary objective, to reach the moon, they traveled far enough from the Earth to fully meet the needs of the scientific experiment. They very clearly showed the two-radiation belt structure, and mapped its extent. They also showed the probable effect of a magnetic storm on 25 February, thus indicating the direct influence of solar activity on the outer belt. By the end of 1959, the existence of the Van Allen Radiation Belts and their general structure were solidly established, early information about the composition of the radiation was appearing in print, and energetic work was under way to understand the physics of the processes involved.

  5. "Nonempty" Gap Between Radiation Belts: The First Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, Mikhail

    2013-12-01

    The first space experiments carried out in 1958 by the scientific groups of James Van Allen (United States) on board the first Explorer satellites and Sergey Vernov (Soviet Union) on board the satellite Sputnik 3 led to the discovery of the Earth's radiation belts—the particles (mainly protons and electrons) captured by the magnetic field of the Earth. Two scientific groups independently came to the conclusion that the electrons in the geomagnetic trapping region fill two areas, inner and outer radiation belts, unlike the protons, which fill the whole trapping region [see, e.g., Lemaire, 2000].

  6. The seasonal dependence of relativistic electron fluxes in the Earth's outer van Allen Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; McPherron, R.

    2007-12-01

    It is well known that geomagnetic activity shows a marked seasonal dependence. This effect has been attributed to the seasonal variation of the Earth's dipole tilt angle exposing the magnetosphere to an increased southward component of the interplanetary field (the Russell-McPherron effect) or an increased solar wind velocity (the axial/equinoctial effect). We examine the seasonal dependence of relativistic electron fluxes in the Earth's outer Van Allen belt. An earlier investigation by Baker et. al., (1999) found that the relativistic electron fluxes do show a strong seasonal dependence with the equinoctial electron fluxes being almost three times higher than the solstitial fluxes. We extend this previous investigation using data obtained by sensors onboard SAMPEX. This study of the seasonal dependence is based on data with a higher time resolution as compared to the earlier study. The results of our analysis show that the peak electron fluxes are shifted in time from the nominal equinoctial times. We discuss some possible implications of our observations in the context of electron energization in the Earth's magnetosphere. Baker, D.N., S.G. Kanekal, T.I. Pulkkinen, and J.B. Blake, Equinoctial and solstitial averages of magnetospheric relativistic electrons: A strong semiannual modulation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 26, No. 20, 3193-3196, 1999.

  7. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Q. -G.; Zhou, X. -Z.; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Hao, Y. -X.; Gao, Zhonglei; He, Zhaoguo; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Blake, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-12-22

    The Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. So, our results demonstrate that the ULF waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fluxes by up to one order of magnitude near the slot region within about 10 h, providing strong evidence for the radial diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.

  8. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Q. -G.; Zhou, X. -Z.; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Hao, Y. -X.; Gao, Zhonglei; et al

    2015-12-22

    The Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. So, our results demonstrate that the ULFmore » waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fluxes by up to one order of magnitude near the slot region within about 10 h, providing strong evidence for the radial diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.« less

  9. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Hao, Y.-X.; Gao, Zhonglei; He, Zhaoguo; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Blake, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. Our results demonstrate that the ULF waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fluxes by up to one order of magnitude near the slot region within about 10 h, providing strong evidence for the radial diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons. PMID:26690250

  10. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Q-G; Zhou, X-Z; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Hao, Y-X; Gao, Zhonglei; He, Zhaoguo; Baker, D N; Spence, H E; Reeves, G D; Blake, J B; Wygant, J R

    2015-01-01

    Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. Our results demonstrate that the ULF waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fluxes by up to one order of magnitude near the slot region within about 10 h, providing strong evidence for the radial diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons. PMID:26690250

  11. Liquid belt radiator design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teagan, W. P.; Fitzgerald, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    The Liquid Belt Radiator (LBR) is an advanced concept developed to meet the needs of anticipated future space missions. A previous study documented the advantages of this concept as a lightweight, easily deployable alternative to present day space heat rejection systems. The technical efforts associated with this study concentrate on refining the concept of the LBR as well as examining the issues of belt dynamics and potential application of the LBR to intermediate and high temperature heat rejection applications. A low temperature point design developed in previous work is updated assuming the use of diffusion pump oil, Santovac-6, as the heat transfer media. Additional analytical and design effort is directed toward determining the impact of interface heat exchanger, fluid bath sealing, and belt drive mechanism designs on system performance and mass. The updated design supports the earlier result by indicating a significant reduction in system specific system mass as compared to heat pipe or pumped fluid radiator concepts currently under consideration (1.3 kg/sq m versus 5 kg/sq m).

  12. Modeling inward diffusion and slow decay of energetic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ni, B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Henderson, M. G.; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-02-01

    A new 3-D diffusion code is used to investigate the inward intrusion and slow decay of energetic radiation belt electrons (>0.5 MeV) observed by the Van Allen Probes during a 10 day quiet period on March 2013. During the inward transport, the peak differential electron fluxes decreased by approximately an order of magnitude at various energies. Our 3-D radiation belt simulation including radial diffusion and pitch angle and energy diffusion by plasmaspheric hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves reproduces the essential features of the observed electron flux evolution. The decay time scales and the pitch angle distributions in our simulation are consistent with the Van Allen Probe observations over multiple energy channels. Our study suggests that the quiet time energetic electron dynamics are effectively controlled by inward radial diffusion and pitch angle scattering due to a combination of plasmaspheric hiss and EMIC waves in the Earth's radiation belts.

  13. Unraveling the drivers of the storm time radiation belt response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpua, E. K. J.; Hietala, H.; Turner, D. L.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Reeves, G. D.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-05-01

    We present a new framework to study the time evolution and dynamics of the outer Van Allen belt electron fluxes. The framework is entirely based on the large-scale solar wind storm drivers and their substructures. The Van Allen Probe observations, revealing the electron flux behavior throughout the outer belt, are combined with continuous, long-term (over 1.5 solar cycles) geosynchronous orbit data set from GOES and solar wind measurements A superposed epoch analysis, where we normalize the timescales for each substructure (sheath, ejecta, and interface region) allows us to avoid smearing effects and to distinguish the electron flux evolution during various driver structures. We show that the radiation belt response is not random: The electron flux variations are determined by the combined effect of the structured solar wind driver and prestorm electron flux levels. In particular, we find that loss mechanisms dominate during stream interface regions, coronal mass ejection (CME) ejecta, and sheaths while enhancements occur during fast streams trailing the stream interface or the CME.

  14. Exploring the Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Chatzichristou, E. T.; Ropokis, G.; Giannakis, O.

    2012-09-01

    We present the outreach efforts of the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Loss and Energization) project, intended to provide the general public with simplified information concerning the scientific objectives of the project, its focus and its expected outcomes. MAARBLE involves monitoring of the geospace environment through space and ground-based observations, in order to understand various aspects of the radiation belts (torus-shaped regions encircling the Earth, in which high-energy charged particles are trapped by the geomagnetic field), which have direct impact on human endeavors in space (spacecraft and astronauts exposure). The public outreach website of MAARBLE, besides regular updates with relevant news, also employs a variety of multimedia (image and video galleries) and impressive sounds of space (characteristic sounds such as whistlers or tweeks) related to very low and ultra low frequency (VLF/ULF) electromagnetic waves. It also provides links to some of the most interesting relevant educational activities, including those at partner institutions such as the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at UCLA, the University of Alberta, the Swedish Institute of Space Physics and the Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.

  15. Jupiter's radiation belts and atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pater, I.; Dames, H. A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Maps and stripscans of the radio emission from Jupiter were made during the Pioneer 10 flyby in December 1973 at wavelengths of 6 cm, 21 cm, and 50 cm using the Westerbork telescope in the Netherlands. With this instrument the disk of the planet was resolved at 6 and 21 cm. The pictures are averaged over 15 deg of Jovian longitude. At 21 cm the stripscans clearly show the existence of a 'hot region' in the radiation belts at a System III longitude (1965.0) of 255 + or - 10 deg. Its flux is about 9% of the total nonthermal flux, and it has a volume emissivity enhanced by a factor of about 1.6 with respect to the general radiation belts. The temperature of the thermal disk at 21 cm appears to be 290 + or - 20 K. This is likely due to a high ammonia mixing ratio in the atmosphere, a factor of 4-5 larger than the expected solar value of 0.00015.

  16. Decay rate of the second radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  17. Investigation of Moving Belt Radiator Technology Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teagan, W. Peter; Aguilar, Jerry L.

    1994-01-01

    The development of an advanced spacecraft radiator technology is reported. The moving belt radiator is a thermal radiator concept with the promise of lower specific mass (per kW rejected) than that afforded by existing technologies. The results of a parametric study to estimate radiator mass for future space power systems is presented. It is shown that this technology can be scaled up to 200 MW for higher rejection temperatures. Several aspects of the design concept are discussed, including the dynamics of a large rotating belt in microgravity. The results of a computer code developed to model the belt dynamics are presented. A series of one-g experiments to investigate the dynamics of small belts is described. A comprehensive test program to investigate belt dynamics in microgravity aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft is discussed. It was found that the desired circular shape can readily be achieved in microgravity. It is also shown that a rotating belt is stable when subjected to simulated attitude control maneuvers. Heat exchanger design is also investigated. Several sealing concepts were examined experimentally, and are discussed. Overall heat transfer coefficients to the rotating belt are presented. Material properties for various belt materials, including screen meshes, are also presented. The results presented in this report indicate that the moving belt radiator concept is technically feasible.

  18. An Experimental Concept for Probing Nonlinear Radiation Belt Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amatucci, Bill; Ganguli, Guru; Crabtree, Chris; Mithaiwala, Manish; Siefring, Carl; Tejero, Erik

    2014-10-01

    The SMART sounding rocket is designed to probe the nonlinear response of a known ionospheric stimulus. High-speed neutral barium atoms generated by a shaped charge explosion perpendicular to the magnetic field in the ionosphere form a ring velocity distribution of photo-ionized Ba+ that will generate lower hybrid waves. Induced nonlinear scattering of lower hybrid waves into whistler/magnetosonic waves has been theoretically predicted, confirmed by simulations, and observed in the lab. The effects of nonlinear scattering on wave evolution and whistler escape to the radiation belts have been studied and observable signatures quantified. The fraction of the neutral atom kinetic energy converted into waves is estimated at 10-12%. SMART will carry a Ba release module and an instrumented daughter section with vector wave magnetic and electric field sensors, Langmuir probes and energetic particle detectors to determine wave spectra in the source region and detect precipitated particles. The Van Allen Probes can detect the propagation of the scattered whistlers and their effects in the radiation belts. By measuring the radiation belt whistler energy density, SMART will confirm the nonlinear scattering process and the connection to weak turbulence. Supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Funds.

  19. Vision for a Virtual Radiation Belt Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. C.; Baker, D. N.; Kroehl, H. W.; Kihn, E. A.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H.; McGuire, R. E.; Fung, S. F.; Kanekal, S. G.; Mason, G. M.; Rigler, E. J.; Weigel, R. S.; Elkington, , S. R.

    2004-05-01

    Satellite engineers, operators, and scientists now share a common desire to understand the structure and variability of the earth's radiation belts. Continuing upsets to space operations demonstrate a need for improved scientific understanding of the radiation belts, more accurate models, and better transfer of scientific understanding to space technology and operations. Currently, the resources necessary for such advancements are beyond the scope of an individual researcher. Thus, we discuss plans to advance our understanding of the radiation belts and mitigate the hazards they pose to society by creating a Virtual Radiation Belt Observatory (ViRBO). The observatory will be an open access near real time and long term archive of observed and simulated radiation belt model data. It will enable scientists to test theoretical mechanisms proposed to explain how particles are accelerated and removed from the radiation belts and it will provide improved tools for engineers designing satellites and operators assessing satellite malfunctions. The observatory will capitalize on radiation belt modeling efforts currently underway at institutions throughout the country and support the goals of the electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) endorsed by the world wide community.

  20. Jupiter's radiation belts: Can Pioneer 10 survive?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, W. N.; Birmingham, T. J.; Mead, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  1. Chapman Conference on the Earth's radiation belts and inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; Summers, Danny; Mann, Ian R.

    2011-10-01

    Late in the evening on 31 January 1958, a Juno (Jupiter-C) rocket blasted into space, lofting the first U.S. artificial Earth satellite into orbit. This spacecraft, dubbed Explorer 1, joined in space one other satellite, Sputnik 2, which had been launched on 3 November 1957 by the Soviet Union. The Explorer 1 mission was groundbreaking, for it carried a small scientific payload prepared at the University of Iowa by a team of researchers led by James A. Van Allen. The instrumentation on Explorer 1 (and on the subsequently successful Explorer 3) would make the first truly revolutionary discovery of the space age, namely, that Earth is enshrouded in toroids, or belts, of extraordinarily high energy, high-intensity radiation.

  2. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Green, J. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outer radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.

  3. Nonstorm time dropout of radiation belt electron fluxes on 24 September 2013

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Su, Zhenpeng; Gao, Zhonglei; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Zhu, Hui; Li, Wen; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Spence, H. E.; et al

    2016-07-15

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts during the main phase of geomagnetic storms have received increasing attention in recent years. Here we focus on a rarely reported nonstorm time dropout event observed by Van Allen Probes on 24 September 2013. Within several hours, the radiation belt electron fluxes exhibited a significant (up to 2 orders of magnitude) depletion over a wide range of radial distances (L > 4.5), energies (~500 keV to several MeV) and equatorial pitch angles (0° ≤ αe ≤ 180°). STEERB simulations show that the relativistic electron loss in the region L = 4.5–6.0 was primarily caused bymore » the pitch angle scattering of observed plasmaspheric hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. Furthermore, our results emphasize the complexity of radiation belt dynamics and the importance of wave-driven precipitation loss even during nonstorm times.« less

  4. Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Education and Public Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turney, D.; Matiella Novak, A.; Beisser, K.; Fox, N.

    2013-11-01

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program serves as a pipeline of activities to inspire and educate a broad audience about Heliophysics and the Sun-Earth system, specifically the Van Allen Radiation Belts. The program is comprised of a variety of formal, informal and public outreach activities that all align with the NASA Education Portfolio Strategic Framework outcomes. These include lesson plans and curriculum for use in the classroom, teacher workshops, internship opportunities, activities that target underserved populations, collaboration with science centers and NASA visitors' centers and partnerships with experts in the Heliophysics and education disciplines. This paper will detail the activities that make up the RBSP E/PO program, their intended audiences, and an explanation as to how they align with the NASA education outcomes. Additionally, discussions on why these activities are necessary as part of a NASA mission are included. Finally, examples of how the RBSP E/PO team has carried out some of these activities will be discussed throughout.

  5. Peculiar pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons in the inner radiation belt and slot region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Malaspina, D. M.; Kanekal, S. G.

    2014-04-01

    The relativistic electrons in the inner radiation belt have received little attention in the past due to sparse measurements and unforgiving contamination from the inner belt protons. The high-quality measurements of the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer instrument onboard Van Allen Probes provide a great opportunity to investigate the dynamics of relativistic electrons in the low L region. In this letter, we report the newly unveiled pitch angle distribution (PAD) of the energetic electrons with minima at 90° near the magnetic equator in the inner belt and slot region. Such a PAD is persistently present throughout the inner belt and appears in the slot region during storms. One hypothesis for 90° minimum PADs is that off 90° electrons are preferentially heated by chorus waves just outside the plasmapause (which can be at very low L during storms) and/or fast magnetosonic waves which exist both inside and outside the plasmasphere.

  6. Source and seed populations for relativistic electrons: their roles in radiation belt changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Singer, H. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Loto'aniu, P. T. M.; Ali, A.; Elkington, S. R.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    Strong enhancements of outer Van Allen belt electrons have been shown to have a clear dependence on solar wind speed and on the duration of southward interplanetary magnetic field. However, individual case study analyses also have demonstrated that many geomagnetic storms produce little in the way of outer belt enhancements and, in fact, may produce substantial losses of relativistic electrons. In this study, focused upon a key period in August-September 2014, we use GOES geostationary orbit electron flux data and Van Allen Probes particle and fields data to study the process of radiation belt electron acceleration. One particular interval, 13-22 September, initiated by a short-lived geomagnetic storm and characterized by a long period of primarily northward IMF, showed strong depletion of relativistic electrons (including an unprecedented observation of long-lasting depletion at geostationary orbit) while an immediately preceding, and another immediately subsequent, storm showed strong radiation belt enhancement. We demonstrate with these data that two distinct electron populations resulting from magnetospheric substorm activity are crucial elements in the ultimate acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the outer belt: the source population (tens of keV) that give rise to VLF wave growth; and the seed population (hundreds of keV) that are, in turn, accelerated through VLF wave interactions to much higher energies. ULF waves may also play a role by either inhibiting or enhancing this process through radial diffusion effects. If any components of the inner magnetospheric accelerator happen to be absent, the relativistic radiation belt enhancement fails to materialize. This comparative study of two distinct types of storms demonstrates the conditions under which a strong MeV outer radiation belt can be formed and maintained.

  7. Effects of chorus, hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves on radiation belt dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions are known to play an important role in the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons, and in the heating and loss of ring current ions. The effectiveness of each wave type on radiation belt dynamics depends on the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere and the properties of the waves which vary considerably with magnetic local time, radial distance and latitude. Furthermore the interaction of the waves with the particles is usually nonlinear. These factors present a major challenge to test and verify the theories. Here we discuss the role of several types of waves, including whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, in relation to radiation belt and ring current dynamics. We present simulations of the radiation belts using the BAS radiation belt model which includes the effects of chorus, hiss and EMIC waves along with radial diffusion. We show that chorus waves are required to form the peaks in the electron phase space density during storms, and that this occurs inside geostationary orbit. We compare simulations against observations in medium Earth orbit and the new results from Van Allen probes mission that shows conclusive evidence for a local electron acceleration process near L=4.5. We show the relative importance of plasmaspheric hiss and chorus and the location of the plasmapause for radiation belt dynamics near L=4.5 and demonstrate the losses due to EMIC waves that should occur at high energies. Finally we show how improving our basic physical understanding through missions such as Van Allen probes go to improve space weather forecasting in projects such as SPACECAST and have a direct benefit to society.

  8. Solar Wind Drivers of Storm-Time Radiation Belt Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpua, Emilia; Hietala, Heli; Turner, Drew; Koskinen, Hannu; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Rodriguez, Juan; Reeves, Geoffrey; Claudepierre, Seth; Spence, Harlan

    2015-04-01

    It is an outstanding question why some storms result in an increase of the outer radiation belt electron fluxes, while others deplete them or produce no change. One approach to this problem is to look at differences in the large-scale solar wind storm drivers. The drivers have traditionally been classified to Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs) and Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). However, ICMEs and SIRs are complex structures: SIRs consist of a slow stream followed by a turbulent, higher pressure interface region and then a faster stream. The core of the ICME is an ejecta. If the mass ejection is fast enough, it can drive a shock in front of it. This leads to the formation of a sheath region between the interplanetary shock and the leading edge of the ejecta. Fast streams that are integral part of SIR may or may not follow the ICME. The solar wind properties, and hence, the magnetospheric driving of different substructures in SIRs and ICMEs are very distinct. In this work we will investigate the radiation belt response to different storm drivers by combining near-Earth solar wind observations, long-term geosynchronous observations from GOES spanning over 1.5 solar cycles (1995-2013) and the state-of-the art Van Allen Probe data. Our study uses superposed epoch analysis with multiple reference times and we expand/contract each solar wind substructure to the population mean. This novel approach allows us to determine the typical evolution of the electron fluxes during each solar wind structure. Our results show that the separation of the effects from different parts of the ICME and SIRs will be crucial for understanding how radiation belt electrons react to different solar wind driving conditions.

  9. Modeling cross L shell impacts of magnetopause shadowing and ULF wave radial diffusion in the Van Allen belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeke, Louis G.; Mann, Ian R.; Turner, Drew L.; Murphy, Kyle R.; Degeling, Alex W.; Rae, I. Jonathan; Milling, David K.

    2014-10-01

    We present simulations of the outer electron radiation belt using a new ULF wave-driven radial diffusion model, including empirical representations of loss due to chorus and plasmaspheric hiss. With an outer boundary condition constrained by in situ electron flux observations, we focus on the impacts of magnetopause shadowing and outward radial diffusion in the heart of the radiation belt. Third invariant conserving solutions are combined to simulate the L shell and time dependence of the differential flux at a fixed energy. Results for the geomagnetically quiet year of 2008 demonstrate not only remarkable cross L shell impacts from magnetopause shadowing but also excellent agreement with the in situ observations even though no internal acceleration source is included in the model. Our model demonstrates powerful utility for capturing the cross-L impacts of magnetopause shadowing with significant prospects for improved space weather forecasting. The potential role of the plasmasphere in creating a third belt is also discussed.

  10. Wave Distribution Functions of Plasmaspheric Hiss and their Effects on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santolik, O.; Ripoll, J. F.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is formed by whistler-mode waves which play an important role in the dynamics the Earth's radiation belts, specifically in connection with the slot region between the inner and outer Van Allen belts. The origin of plasmaspheric hiss is still a subject of discussions and these waves are known for their complex propagation properties. They are often far from a single plane wave approximation, forming a continuous distribution of the wave energy density with respect to the wave vector direction (wave distribution function). Analysis of polarization and propagation parameters of these waves provides us with inputs for modeling of radiation belt dynamics. We use the data of the Waves instrument of Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) onboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft, to analyze simultaneous measurements of all electric and magnetic field components, together with measurements of the plasma density based on the determination of the upper hybrid resonance frequency. Using this unique data set we estimate the wave distribution functions of plasmaspheric hiss and we model the effects of these waves on the decay rates of radiation belt electrons through quasilinear pitch angle diffusion.

  11. The quest for discovery of planetary radiation belts: From Explorer 1 to MESSENGER (Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, Stamatios M.

    2014-05-01

    May 1, 1958 was an exciting time in the Great Hall of the US National Academy of Sciences. An announcement was made that the Earth possessed radiation belts at high altitudes with intensities thousands of times greater than those of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) that were known to penetrate the atmosphere and produce secondaries detectable at ground level. The leading scientist at the time was James A. Van Allen, head of the Physics Department at the University of Iowa, who instrumented Explorer-1 and follow-on satellites with radiation detectors, and the press labeled the doughnut-shaped structures Van Allen Belts. Once the basic properties of what was subsequently named Earth' s Magnetosphere were established, the quest began to search for Van Allen Belts at other nearby planets, namely Venus and Mars. Mariner 2 was launched to Venus in 1962, but did not have radiation detectors, although a plasma instrument was used to firmly establish the properties of the solar wind. The Mariner 4 mission to Mars was properly instrumented and expectations were high that radiation belts were likely to be present. No planet-associated increase in radiation was measured, however, but use of scaling arguments with Earth' s magnetosphere established an upper limit to the ratio of magnetic moments of MM/ME

  12. Radiation Belts Throughout the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B. H.

    2008-12-01

    The several preceding decades of deep space missions have demonstrated that the generation of planetary radiation belts is a universal phenomenon. All strongly magnetized planets show well developed radiation regions, specifically Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The similarities occur despite the tremendous differences between the planets in size, levels of magnetization, external environments, and most importantly, in the fundamental processes that power them. Some planets like Jupiter are powered overwhelmingly by planetary rotation, much like astrophysical pulsars, whereas others, like Earth and probably Uranus, are powered externally by the interplanetary environment. Uranus is a particularly interesting case in that despite the peculiarities engendered by its ecliptic equatorial spin axis orientation, its magnetosphere shows dynamical behavior similar to that of Earth as well as radiation belt populations and associated wave emissions that are perhaps more intense than expected based on Earth-derived theories. Here I review the similarities and differences between the radiation regions of radiation belts throughout the solar system. I discuss the value of the comparative approach to radiation belt physics as one that allows critical factors to be evaluated in environments that are divorced from the special complex conditions that prevail in any one environment, such as those at Earth.

  13. "Inner electron" radiation belt: problems of model creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnyi, V.

    The contents of intensive fluxes of trapped electrons J_e with energies E_e>40 keV in center of the inner terrestrial radiation belt is remains uncertain in model Vette AE-8, 1991. It is explained by methodical difficulties of discrete measurements of electrons by narrow-angle spectrometers with background from omnidirectional penetrating protons with energies E_p>40 MeV and electrons with E_e>1 MeV after STARFISH burst. The results of integral measurements of trapped electrons by 2 groups: Krassovsky V.I. on III Soviet satellite (May 1958) and J. Van Allen on EXPLORER-IV (July-August 1958) and on INJUN-1 (1961) heave given a performances concerning electron energy fluxes I_e(E_e>20 keV) ˜ (20-100) erg cm-2 c-1 into inner radiation belt. Improved integral measurements of electrons by Krassovsky group on satellites KOSMOS-3,-5 and ELECTRON-1,-3 (1962-1964) allow to determine the distributions of their intensities in the whole inner belt. They can add the central part of inner belt of AE-8 model (see report Bolunova et al., COSPAR-1965, publ. in SPACE RESEARCH VI, 1967, p. 649-661). From these data a maximum of trapped electrons J_e(E_e>40 keV)=2\\cdot10^9 cm-2 c-1 is placed on L=1,6, B/B_0=1. Intensities up to 2\\cdot10^7 cm-2 c-1 are determined only by coordinates (L, B). For smaller intensities become essential dependence from longitude along a drift shell. So, in the center of the inner radiation belt the energy fluxes I_e(E_e>40 keV) reach 500 erg cm-2 c-1 and density n_e=0,2 cm-3 while for trapped protons I_p(E_p>40 MeV) is less than 3 erg cm-2 c-1 and n_p< 5\\cdot10-6 cm-3. It forces to search a more powerful sources trapped electron than beta-decay of neutrons albedo of cosmic rays.

  14. CubeSat-Associated Radiation Belt Research: Recent and Upcoming Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Lauren; Li, Xinlin; Schiller, Quintin

    2016-07-01

    Interest in CubeSats has grown dramatically in the past decade within the space physics community. While CubeSats are generally accepted now to be useful tools for education and technology development/demonstration, their ability to provide scientific value is often still questioned. Radiation belt physics, however, is one area in which the scientific utility of these small platforms has been demonstrated and continues to offer great promise. The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, designed, built, tested, and operated by students at University of Colorado with mentoring from LASP professionals, was one of the first of now a long line of CubeSats designed to study radiation belt dynamics. Launched in September 2012, just a few weeks after NASA's Van Allen Probes, CSSWE provided valuable measurements of energetic electrons and protons from low-Earth orbit for two years, well beyond its nominal 3-month mission lifetime. The status of and results from CSSWE will be presented, with an emphasis on how these measurements have been combined with those from balloons and larger satellite missions to better understand radiation belt electron acceleration and loss processes. Some highlights from other radiation belt-related CubeSats will also be presented, along with upcoming missions. Radiation belt studies are a prime example of how small inexpensive CubeSats can be used to provide valuable scientific measurements and complement larger missions.

  15. Source and seed populations for relativistic electrons: Their roles in radiation belt changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Singer, H. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Loto'aniu, T. M.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-09-01

    Strong enhancements of outer Van Allen belt electrons have been shown to have a clear dependence on solar wind speed and on the duration of southward interplanetary magnetic field. However, individual case study analyses also have demonstrated that many geomagnetic storms produce little in the way of outer belt enhancements and, in fact, may produce substantial losses of relativistic electrons. In this study, focused upon a key period in August-September 2014, we use GOES geostationary orbit electron flux data and Van Allen Probes particle and fields data to study the process of radiation belt electron acceleration. One particular interval, 13-22 September, initiated by a short-lived geomagnetic storm and characterized by a long period of primarily northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), showed strong depletion of relativistic electrons (including an unprecedented observation of long-lasting depletion at geostationary orbit) while an immediately preceding, and another immediately subsequent, storm showed strong radiation belt enhancement. We demonstrate with these data that two distinct electron populations resulting from magnetospheric substorm activity are crucial elements in the ultimate acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the outer belt: the source population (tens of keV) that give rise to VLF wave growth and the seed population (hundreds of keV) that are, in turn, accelerated through VLF wave interactions to much higher energies. ULF waves may also play a role by either inhibiting or enhancing this process through radial diffusion effects. If any components of the inner magnetospheric accelerator happen to be absent, the relativistic radiation belt enhancement fails to materialize.

  16. Source and seed populations for relativistic electrons: Their roles in radiation belt changes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Singer, H. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Loto'aniu, T. M.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-09-09

    Strong enhancements of outer Van Allen belt electrons have been shown to have a clear dependence on solar wind speed and on the duration of southward interplanetary magnetic field. However, individual case study analyses also have demonstrated that many geomagnetic storms produce little in the way of outer belt enhancements and, in fact, may produce substantial losses of relativistic electrons. In this study, focused upon a key period in August–September 2014, we use GOES geostationary orbit electron flux data and Van Allen Probes particle and fields data to study the process of radiation belt electron acceleration. One particular interval, 13–22 September, initiated by a short-lived geomagnetic storm and characterized by a long period of primarily northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), showed strong depletion of relativistic electrons (including an unprecedented observation of long-lasting depletion at geostationary orbit) while an immediately preceding, and another immediately subsequent, storm showed strong radiation belt enhancement. We demonstrate with these data that two distinct electron populations resulting from magnetospheric substorm activity are crucial elements in the ultimate acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the outer belt: the source population (tens of keV) that give rise to VLF wave growth and the seed population (hundreds of keV) that are, in turn, accelerated through VLF wave interactions to much higher energies. ULF waves may also play a role by either inhibiting or enhancing this process through radial diffusion effects. Furthermore, if any components of the inner magnetospheric accelerator happen to be absent, the relativistic radiation belt enhancement fails to materialize.

  17. Source and seed populations for relativistic electrons: Their roles in radiation belt changes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Singer, H. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Loto'aniu, T. M.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Claudepierre, S. G.; et al

    2015-09-09

    Strong enhancements of outer Van Allen belt electrons have been shown to have a clear dependence on solar wind speed and on the duration of southward interplanetary magnetic field. However, individual case study analyses also have demonstrated that many geomagnetic storms produce little in the way of outer belt enhancements and, in fact, may produce substantial losses of relativistic electrons. In this study, focused upon a key period in August–September 2014, we use GOES geostationary orbit electron flux data and Van Allen Probes particle and fields data to study the process of radiation belt electron acceleration. One particular interval, 13–22more » September, initiated by a short-lived geomagnetic storm and characterized by a long period of primarily northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), showed strong depletion of relativistic electrons (including an unprecedented observation of long-lasting depletion at geostationary orbit) while an immediately preceding, and another immediately subsequent, storm showed strong radiation belt enhancement. We demonstrate with these data that two distinct electron populations resulting from magnetospheric substorm activity are crucial elements in the ultimate acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the outer belt: the source population (tens of keV) that give rise to VLF wave growth and the seed population (hundreds of keV) that are, in turn, accelerated through VLF wave interactions to much higher energies. ULF waves may also play a role by either inhibiting or enhancing this process through radial diffusion effects. Furthermore, if any components of the inner magnetospheric accelerator happen to be absent, the relativistic radiation belt enhancement fails to materialize.« less

  18. Upper limit on the inner radiation belt MeV electron intensity

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Selesnick, RS; Baker, DN; Jaynes, AN; Kanekal, SG; Schiller, Q; Blum, L; Fennell, J; Blake, JB

    2015-01-01

    No instruments in the inner radiation belt are immune from the unforgiving penetration of the highly energetic protons (tens of MeV to GeV). The inner belt proton flux level, however, is relatively stable; thus, for any given instrument, the proton contamination often leads to a certain background noise. Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment on board Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment CubeSat, in a low Earth orbit, clearly demonstrate that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt because their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background, while higher-energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Detailed analysis of high-quality measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope on board Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, provides, for the first time, quantified upper limits on MeV electron fluxes in various energy ranges in the inner belt. These upper limits are rather different from flux levels in the AE8 and AE9 models, which were developed based on older data sources. For 1.7, 2.5, and 3.3 MeV electrons, the upper limits are about 1 order of magnitude lower than predicted model fluxes. The implication of this difference is profound in that unless there are extreme solar wind conditions, which have not happened yet since the launch of Van Allen Probes, significant enhancements of MeV electrons do not occur in the inner belt even though such enhancements are commonly seen in the outer belt. Key Points Quantified upper limit of MeV electrons in the inner belt Actual MeV electron intensity likely much lower than the upper limit More detailed understanding of relativistic electrons in the magnetosphere PMID:26167446

  19. Rapid Rebuilding of the Outer Radiation Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, A.; Fok, M.-C.; Nagai, T.; Toth, G.; Guild, T.; Bkake, J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations by the radiation monitor (RDM) on the spacecraft Akebono have shown several cases of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. Similar enhancements are also seen in detectors on board the NOAA/POES and TWINS 1 satellites. These intervals are shorter than typical radial diffusion or wave-particle interactions can account for. We choose two so-called "rapid rebuilding" events that occur during high speed streams (4 September 2008 and 22 July 2009) and simulated them with the Space Weather Modeling Framework configured with global magnetosphere, radiation belt, ring current, and ionosphere electrodynamics model. Our simulations produce a weaker and delayed dipolarization as compared to observations, but the associated inductive electric field in the simulations is still strong enough to rapidly transport and accelerate MeV electrons resulting in an energetic electron flux enhancement that is somewhat weaker than is observed. Nevertheless, the calculated flux enhancement and dipolarization is found to be qualitatively consistent with the observations. Taken together, the modeling results and observations support the conclusion that storm-time dipolarization events in the magnetospheric magnetic field result in strong radial transport and energization of radiation belt electrons.

  20. Imaging Jupiter Radiation Belts At Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Zarka, P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sault, R.; Hess, S.; Cecconi, B.; Fender, R.; Pewg, Lofar

    2014-04-01

    The ultra-relativistic electrons, trapped in the inner radiation belts of Jupiter, generates a strong synchrotron radio emission (historically known as the jovian decimeter radiation (DIM)) which is beamed, polarized (~20% linear, ~1% circular) and broadband. It has been extensively observed by radio telescopes/ probes and imaged by radio interferometers over a wide frequency spectrum (from >300 MHz up to 22 GHz). This extended emission presents two main emission peaks constantly located on both sides of the planet close to the magnetic plane. High latitude emissions were also regularly observed at particular frequencies, times and in particular observational configurations. This region of the magnetosphere is "frozen" due to the strong magnetic field (~4.2 G as the equator) and therefore is forced to rotate at the planetary period (T≈9h55m). Due to the tilt (~ 10o) between the spin axis of the planet and the magnetic axis (which can be seen as dipolar in first approximation), the belts and the associated radio emission wobble around the planet center. The analysis of the flux at different frequencies highlighted spatial, temporal and spectral variabilities which origins are now partly understood. The emission varies at different time scales (short-time variations of hours to long-term variation over decades) due to the combination of visibility effect (wobbling, beaming, position of the observer in the magnetic rotating reference frame) [1], [2] and intrinsic local variations (interaction between relativistic electrons and satellites/dust, delayed effect of the solar wind ram pressure, impacts events) [3], [4], [5]. A complete framework is necessary to fully understand the source, loss and transport processes of the electrons originating from outside the belt, migrating by inward diffusion and populating the inner region of the magnetosphere. Only a few and unresolved measurements were made below 300 MHz and the nonsystematic observation of this radio emission

  1. Inward diffusion and loss of radiation belt protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2016-03-01

    Radiation belt protons in the kinetic energy range 24 to 76 MeV are being measured by the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope on each of the two Van Allen Probes. Data have been processed for the purpose of studying variability in the trapped proton intensity during October 2013 to August 2015. For the lower energies (≲32 MeV), equatorial proton intensity near L = 2 showed a steady increase that is consistent with inward diffusion of trapped solar protons, as shown by positive radial gradients in phase space density at fixed values of the first two adiabatic invariants. It is postulated that these protons were trapped with enhanced efficiency during the 7 March 2012 solar proton event. A model that includes radial diffusion, along with known trapped proton source and loss processes, shows that the observed average rate of increase near L = 2 is predicted by the same model diffusion coefficient that is required to form the entire proton radiation belt, down to low L, over an extended (˜103 year) interval. A slower intensity decrease for lower energies near L = 1.5 may also be caused by inward diffusion, though it is faster than predicted by the model. Higher-energy (≳40 MeV) protons near the L = 1.5 intensity maximum are from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay. Their observed intensity is lower than expected by a factor ˜2, but the discrepancy is resolved by adding an unspecified loss process to the model with a mean lifetime ˜120 years.

  2. What have we learned about the energetic particle dynamics in the inner belt and slot region from Van Allen Probes and CSSWE missions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinlin; Baker, Daniel N.; Kanekal, Shrikanth; Fennell, Joseph; Selesnick, Richard; Claudepierre, Seth; Blake, Bernard; Zhao, Hong; Jaynes, Allison

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive measurements of energetic protons (10s of MeV) in the inner belt (L<2) and slot region (2Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, revealed new features of these energetic protons in terms of their spectrum distribution, spatial distribution, pitch angle distribution, and their different source populations. Concurrent measurements from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, in a highly inclined low Earth orbit, demonstrated that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt and their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background associated with the inner belt protons, while higher energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Analysis on sub-MeV electrons data in the inner belt and slot region from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) on board Van Allen Probes revealed rather complicated pitch angle distribution of these energetic electrons, with the 90 deg-minimum (butterfly) pitch angle distribution dominating near the magnetic equator. These are part of a summary of the most recent measurements and understanding of the dynamics of energetic particles in the inner zone and slot region to be exhibited and discussed in this presentation.

  3. Jupiters radiation belts and their effects on spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. H.; Divita, E. L.; Gigas, G.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of electron and proton radiation on spacecraft which will operate in the trapped radiation belts of the planet Jupiter are described, and the techniques and results of the testing and simulation used in the radiation effects program are discussed. Available data from the Pioneer 10 encounter of Jupiter are compared with pre-encounter models of the Jupiter radiation belts. The implications that the measured Jovian radiation belts have for future missions are considered.

  4. A non-storm time enhancement of outer radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Q.; Li, X.; Blum, L. W.; Jaynes, A. N.; Malaspina, D.; Tu, W.; Turner, D. L.; Blake, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    On January 13th, 2013, a high-speed solar wind stream impacted Earth's magnetosphere, resulting in low geomagnetic activity (Real-Time Dst minimum of -30 nT). However, the relativistic electron population was enhanced by over two orders of magnitude in the outer radiation belt. Fortunately, during the event, the outer belt was well sampled by a variety of missions, including the Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, GOES, and the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE). The energetic electrons are measured in-situ using flux and phase space density observations from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) onboard the Van Allen Probes, the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) onboard CSSWE, and SST onboard THEMIS. These measured electron populations are the net result of the balance between concurrent loss and acceleration processes. Precipitation loss is quantified using REPTile measurements at low altitudes, while the energization mechanisms, namely interactions with whistler-mode chorus and Pc5 ULF waves, are investigated using Van Allen Probes' MagEIS and Electric Fields and Waves Suite (EFW), THEMIS' EFI and SCM instrument suites, and GOES magnetometers. The quantity and quality of measurements during this event provide a rare opportunity to address outstanding science questions; such as, whether the energetic electrons originate from inward injections associated with substorms or are accelerated via local heating, as well as what the energy dependence of the enhancement is during a period of such low geomagnetic activity.

  5. The Role of ULF Driven Radial Transport in Rebuilding the Earth's Outer Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Paral, J.; Selesnick, R.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    An outstanding question addressed by recent studies of the Earth's radiation belts is, what are the physical processes responsible rapid recovery of MeV electrons in the outer belt during geomagnetic storms? Rapid rebuilding of the ~1 MeV electron population near geosynchronous during periods of strongly southward IMF BZ is well modeled by computing test-particle trajectories in MHD magnetospheric model fields. The build up of ~2 MeV electrons at lower L, observed by the Van Allen Probes, is also reproduced in the test-particle model. It is not known however to what extent adiabatic transport is sufficient to produce the observed multi-MeV flux enhancements in the outer belt. By comparing observations with model results, we can determine the inward extent and high energy limit of radiation belt rebuilding due to ULF driven radial transport alone. Results from case studies of several recent geomagnetic storms occurring in conjunction with recovery of the outer radiation belts will be presented.

  6. Radiation Belt Loss at the Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onsager, T. G.; Green, J. C.; Singer, H. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Bourdarie, S.

    2005-12-01

    A critical factor controlling the dynamics of the outer electron radiation belt is the abrupt electron loss from the magnetosphere that frequently occurs. Although the major loss mechanisms are known to be transport out across the magnetopause and precipitation into the atmosphere, it is not known quantitatively how effective either of these mechanisms is under any set of circumstances. It is thought that a compression of the magnetopause should cause a reduction of the electron fluxes at the larger L shells, but it is not known what the magnitude of the flux reduction should be. In this study, we investigate the depletion of radiation belt electron flux associated with the compression of the magnetopause to inside geosynchronous orbit. Multiple geosynchronous satellites are used to determine the local-time dependence of the flux dropouts. A clear local-time dependence is observed as the flux decreases during the earthward compression of the magnetopause and during the recovery of the flux as the magnetopause expands back outward. Surprisingly, the flux recovers immediately to levels moderately below the original flux levels with the relaxation of the magnetopause to outside geosynchronous orbit. These results are used to quantify the loss of radiation belt electrons due to the inward motion of the magnetopause and the subsequent recovery.

  7. What is a radiation belt enhancement event?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, G. D.; Niehof, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Statistical studies of radiation belt enhancement events typically rely on other observations to define an "event". Those other observations could be based on Dst, solar wind speed, CME or CIR occurrence, etc. It is also interesting to start with an electron event and ask which geomagnetic or solar wind driving conditions are (or are not) related to those events. However, such studies have been hindered by the absence of a uniform, quantitative definition of "events". This is particularly true in phases of the solar cycle where background radiation belt fluxes are low but relative changes are large. Such events would be missed by picking an arbitrary flux threshold to define events. We examine two solar cycles of geosynchronous measurements to define the probability distribution of events with both fixed and solar cycle-dependent event criteria. These distributions allow us to define events based on radiation belt electron data alone, to classify types of enhancement events, and to ask: What conditions produced that class of events? The same distributions have important space weather forecasting applications as well. We can now quantify the criteria that define enhancement events that can be expected to occur once per month, once per year, or once per solar cycle.

  8. The Inward Radial Diffusion and Slow Decay of Energetic Electrons in the Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ni, B.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the inward intrusion of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts observed by the Van Allen probes during a 10-day quiet period in March 2013. The electron flux measurements from Mageis and REPT instruments on the Van Allen probes show the clear radial diffusion and slow decay of ~300 keV to ~4.5 MeV electrons. The energetic electrons are injected at L ~ 4.75 on March 06, and gradually diffuse inward at each energy channel to L ~ 4 until interrupted by a strong geomagnetic disturbance on March 17. Meanwhile, the differential energy flux of the energetic electrons decreased by about 1 order in 10 days. The electrons exhibit flattened pitch angle distributions above ~40°. We adopt a 3 dimensional radiation belt model which incorporates radial and local diffusion processes to simulate this event. The empirical radial diffusion rates provide reasonable agreement with the observed inward diffusion profile. The hiss wave amplitudes are observed by the THEMIS spacecraft on the dayside and by the Van Allen probes on the nightside. The electrons with energies lower than ~1 MeV are effectively scattered by hiss waves, causing the slow decay in consistent with observations. The higher energy electrons are effectively scattered by EMIC waves near the loss cone, and by hiss waves at higher pitch angles. The decaying timescale and the pitch angle distribution caused by the pitch angle scattering in the simulation are consistent with the observation at each energy channel. Our study demonstrates that the quiet time energetic electron dynamics are effectively controlled by the radial diffusion and pitch angle scattering processes in the Earth's radiation belts.

  9. Things we do not yet understand about solar driving of the radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, Mona

    2016-06-01

    This commentary explores how close we are to predicting the behavior of the radiations belts -- the primary science objective of NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. Starting with what we know or think we know about competing sources, enhancement, transport, and loss, I walk through recent papers that have improved our understanding and then focus on flux dropouts as one particular yardstick of success. I mention a new paradigm for electrons and the importance of reliably matching models and observations for different solar inputs. Although the case for prediction remains a work in progress, there are encouraging signs of progress.

  10. Volterra network modeling of the nonlinear finite-impulse reponse of the radiation belt flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Vassiliadis, D.

    2011-01-01

    We show how a general class of spatio-temporal nonlinear impulse-response forecast networks (Volterra networks) can be constructed from a taxonomy of nonlinear autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous inputs (NAR-MAX) input-output equations, and used to model the evolution of energetic particle f uxes in the Van Allen radiation belts. We present initial results for the nonlinear response of the radiation belts to conditions a month earlier. The essential features of spatio-temporal observations are recovered with the model echoing the results of state space models and linear f nite impulse-response models whereby the strongest coupling peak occurs in the preceding 1-2 days. It appears that such networks hold promise for the development of accurate and fully data-driven space weather modelling, monitoring and forecast tools.

  11. Volterra network modeling of the nonlinear finite-impulse reponse of the radiation belt flux

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Vassiliadis, D.

    2011-01-04

    We show how a general class of spatio-temporal nonlinear impulse-response forecast networks (Volterra networks) can be constructed from a taxonomy of nonlinear autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous inputs (NAR-MAX) input-output equations, and used to model the evolution of energetic particle f uxes in the Van Allen radiation belts. We present initial results for the nonlinear response of the radiation belts to conditions a month earlier. The essential features of spatio-temporal observations are recovered with the model echoing the results of state space models and linear f nite impulse-response models whereby the strongest coupling peak occurs in the preceding 1-2 days. It appears that such networks hold promise for the development of accurate and fully data-driven space weather modelling, monitoring and forecast tools.

  12. Losses of Energetic Electrons in Earth's Outer Radiation Belt During Unusual Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaz, Noé; Huang, Chia-Lin; Schwadron, Nathan; Spence, Harlan; Farrugia, Charles; Winslow, Reka

    2016-07-01

    The most extreme changes in solar wind parameters important for the coupling between the solar wind and the magnetosphere (dynamic pressure, dawn-to-dusk electric field, Alfven Mach number, plasma beta, …) occur during the passage at Earth of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). While the response of Earth's radiation belts to CMEs and CME-driven shocks has been investigated in great details, few studies have focused on what makes some CMEs and their shocks especially effective in driving losses of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt. Here, we present specific examples of losses during the passage at Earth of a coronal mass ejection. In particular, we discuss the conditions which may result in the magnetopause to retreat earthward up to geosynchronous orbit, resulting in significant losses of energetic electrons due to magnetopause shadowing. We also present the result of a low-density magnetic ejecta which impacted Earth in January 2013. Combining interplanetary, magnetosheath, outer magnetosphere and radiation belt measurements by more than ten satellites, including the Van Allen Probes, THEMIS and Cluster, we show how a period of extremely low Mach number and dynamic pressure during the passage of the magnetic cloud resulted in dramatic losses in the outer radiation belt and a large-scale reorganization of the entire day-side magnetosphere.

  13. Understanding the Dynamical Evolution of the Earth Radiation Belt and Ring Current Coupled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Yuri; Usanova, Maria; Kellerman, Adam; Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Modeling and understanding the ring current and radiation belt-coupled system has been a grand challenge since the beginning of the space age. In this study we show long-term simulations with a 3D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code of modeling the radiation belts with boundary conditions derived from observations around geosynchronous orbit. Simulations can reproduce long term variations of the electron radiation belt fluxes and show the importance of local acceleration, radial diffusion, loss to the atmosphere and loss to the magnetopause. We also present 4D VERB simulations that include convective transport, radial diffusion, pitch angle scattering and local acceleration. VERB simulations show that the lower energy inward transport is dominated by the convection and higher energy transport is dominated by the diffusive radial transport. We also show that at energies of 100s of keV, a number of processes work simultaneously, including convective transport, radial diffusion, local acceleration, loss to the loss cone and loss to the magnetopause. The results of the simulation of the March 2013 storm are compared with Van Allen Probes observations.

  14. Reanalysis and forecasting killer electrons in Earth's radiation belts using the VERB code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, Adam; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Shprits, Yuri; Podladchikova, Tatiana; Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The Van Allen radiation belts are torii-shaped regions of trapped energetic particles, that in recent years, have become a principle focus for satellite operators and engineers. During geomagnetic storms, electrons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies, where they may penetrate spacecraft shielding and damage electrical systems, causing permanent damage or loss of spacecraft. Data-assimilation provides an optimal way to combine observations of the radiation belts with a physics-based model in order to more accurately specify the global state of the Earth's radiation belts. We present recent advances to the data-assimilative version of the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, including more sophisticated error analysis, and incorporation of realistic field-models to more accurately specify fluxes at a given MLT or along a spacecraft trajectory. The effect of recent stream-interaction-region (SIR) driven enhancements are investigated using the improved model. We also present a real-time forecast model based on the data-assimilative VERB code, and discuss the forecast performance over the past 12 months.

  15. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission: Advancing Our Understanding of the Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David; Kanekal, Shrikanth; Kessel, Ramona; Fox, Nicola; Mauk, Barry

    2012-01-01

    We describe NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) mission, whose primary science objective is to understand, ideally to the point of predictability, the dynamics of relativistic electrons and penetrating ions in the Earth's radiation belts resulting from variable solar activity. The overarching scientific questions addressed include: 1. the physical processes that produce radiation belt enhancement events, 2. the dominant mechanisms for relativistic electron loss, and 3. how the ring current and other geomagnetic processes affect radiation belt behavior. The RBSP mission comprises two spacecraft which will be launched during Fall 2012 into low inclination lapping equatorial orbits. The orbit periods are about 9 hours, with perigee altitudes and apogee radial distances of 600 km and 5.8 RE respectively. During the two-year primary mission, the spacecraft orbits precess once around the Earth and lap each other twice in each local time quadrant. The spacecraft are each equipped with identical comprehensive instrumentation packages to measure, electrons, ions and wave electric and magnetic fields. We provide an overview of the RBSP mission, onboard instrumentation and science prospects and invite scientific collaboration.

  16. Prediction of MeV electron fluxes throughout the outer radiation belt using multivariate autoregressive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Kaori; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen radiation belts surrounding the Earth are filled with MeV-energy electrons. This region poses ionizing radiation risks for spacecraft that operate within it, including those in geostationary orbit (GEO) and medium Earth orbit. To provide alerts of electron flux enhancements, 16 prediction models of the electron log-flux variation throughout the equatorial outer radiation belt as a function of the McIlwain L parameter were developed using the multivariate autoregressive model and Kalman filter. Measurements of omnidirectional 2.3 MeV electron flux from the Van Allen Probes mission as well as >2 MeV electrons from the GOES 15 spacecraft were used as the predictors. Model explanatory parameters were selected from solar wind parameters, the electron log-flux at GEO, and geomagnetic indices. For the innermost region of the outer radiation belt, the electron flux is best predicted by using the Dst index as the sole input parameter. For the central to outermost regions, at L ≧ 4.8 and L ≧ 5.6, the electron flux is predicted most accurately by including also the solar wind velocity and then the dynamic pressure, respectively. The Dst index is the best overall single parameter for predicting at 3 ≦ L ≦ 6, while for the GEO flux prediction, the KP index is better than Dst. A test calculation demonstrates that the model successfully predicts the timing and location of the flux maximum as much as 2 days in advance and that the electron flux decreases faster with time at higher L values, both model features consistent with the actually observed behavior.

  17. The Living with a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission and Related Missions of Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David G.; Mauk, Barry H.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Fox, Nicola J.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Living With a Star (LWS) Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission in the context of the broader Geospace program. Missions to Geospace offer an opportunity to observe in situ the fundamental processes that operate throughout the solar system and in particular those that generate hazardous space weather effects in the vicinity of Earth. The recently selected investigations on NASA's LWS program's RBSP will provide the measurements needed to characterize and quantify the processes that supply and remove energetic particles from the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. Instruments on the RBSP spacecraft will observe charged particles that comprise the Earth's radiation belts over the full energy range from 1 eV to more than 10 MeV (including composition), the plasma waves which energize them, the electric fields which transport them, and the magnetic fields which guide their motion. The two-point measurements by the RBSP spacecraft will enable researchers to discriminate between spatial and temporal effects, and therefore between the various proposed mechanisms for particle acceleration and loss. The measurements taken by the RBSP spacecraft will be used in data modeling projects in order to improve the understanding of these fundamental processes and allow better predictions to be made. NASA's LWS program has also recently selected three teams to study concepts for Missions of Opportunity that will augment the RBSP program, by (1) providing an instrument for a Canadian spacecraft in the Earth's radiation belts, (2) quantifying the flux of particles precipitating into the Earth's atmosphere from the Earth's radiation belts, and (3) remotely sensing both spatial and temporal variations in the Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere.

  18. Implementation of Localized Ensemble Assimilation for a Three-Dimensional Radiation Belt Model (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez, H. C.; Chen, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.; Subbotin, D.; Shprits, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's outer radiation belt is very dynamic and energetic electrons therein undergo constant changes due to acceleration, loss, and trans- port processes. In this work we improve the accuracy of simulated electron phase space density (PSD) of the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, a three-dimensional radiation belt model, by implementing the localized ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) assimilation method. Assimilation methods based on Kalman filtering have been successfully applied to one-dimensional radial diffusion radiation belt models, where it has been shown to greatly improve the model estimation of electron phase space density (PSD). This work expands upon previous research by implementing the LETKF method to assimilate observed electron density into VERB, a three-dimensional radiation belt model. In particular, the LETKF will perform the assimilation locally, where the size of the local region is defined by the diffusion of electrons in the model. This will enable the optimal assimilation of data throughout the model consistently with the flow of electrons. Two sets of assimilation experiments are presented. The first is an identical-twin experiment, where artificial data is generated from the same model, with the purpose of verifying the assimilation method. In the second set of experiments, real PSD observational data from missions such as CRRES and/or the Van Allen Probes are assimilated into VERB. The results show that data assimilation significantly improves the accuracy of the VERB model by efficiently including the available observations at the appropriate pitch angles, energy levels, and L-shell regions throughout the model.

  19. Studying the Saturn Inner Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, A.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Dandouras, I.

    2013-09-01

    In 2004 the MIMI/INCA detector onboard the Cassini spacecraft measured the significant flux of the energetic neutral atoms (ENA) coming from the area between the D-ring and the Saturn's atmosphere, what brought up the idea of the possible existence of the innermost radiation belt in this narrow gap. In the present study we estimate the possible sources for this radiation belt, assuming the two main processes: the double charge exchange of the ENAs, coming from the middle magnetosphere, what can bring the keV ions to the region of our interest, and the interaction of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) with the Saturn's atmosphere and rings, which due to CRAND process can produce the keV-MeV ions or electrons in the region. Both of these possible sources are possible to evaluate using the charged particle tracer. In our group we developed such charged particle tracer, which works in all different modes (Newton-Lorentz full equation of motion, guiding center or bounce averaged approximations), and allows using the different magnetic field models (from simple dipole magnetic field till complex realistic magnetic field model like Khurana model of Saturn's magnetosphere) for both forward and backward tracing simulations. This charged particle tracer was validated using the comparison of the simulation results and observations during several flybys of Cassini by icy moons of Saturn. Using the particle tracer we can calculate the access of GCRs to the atmosphere and rings of the planet and evaluate the filtering of the GCR spectrum that hits the atmosphere from the direction of the Saturn's main rings. Also we can investigate different non-dipolar effects which possible can change the Stroemer cutoff rigidities of GCRs, especially for the high-latitude atmosphere, which maps magnetically in the outer magnetosphere. We can also estimate the production of secondaries as well (and also from the multiple impacts of these secondaries on the rings or atmosphere) and evaluate the

  20. Artificial perturbations of the radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cladis, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    A review is given of the properties of the radiation belts which have been produced by high-altitude nuclear detonations. The low-yield, Argus devices, 1, 2, and 3, and the Soviet test of 1 November 1962 injected intense electron fluxes in narrow L-shell intervals, with peaks at L = 1.72, 2.11, 2.17, and 1.77, respectively. The energy spectra of the electrons were indistinguishable from the equilibrium fission beta spectrum, and the fluxes initially decayed at rates approximately proportional to (time) sup -1.1. The high-yield devices, Starfish and the Soviet tests of 22 October and 28 October 1962, injected electrons over wide ranges. At L values near the lower boundary, the electron spectra appeared to be softer at the higher L values.

  1. Trapped radiation belts of Saturn: first look

    SciTech Connect

    Fillius, W.; Ip, W.H.; McIlwain, C.E.

    1980-01-25

    Pioneer 11 made the first exploration of the magnetosphere and trapped radiation belts of Saturn. Saturn's magnetosphere is intermediate in size between Earth's and Jupiter's, with trapped particle intensities comparable to Earth's. The outer region of Saturn's magnetosphere contains lower energy radiation and is variable with time; the inner region contains higher-energy particles. The pitch angle distributions show a remarkable variety of field-aligned and locally mirroring configurations. The moons and especially the rings of Saturn are effective absorbers of trapped particles; underneath the rings, the trapped radiation is completely absorbed. The discovery of a new ring, called the F ring, a new division, the Pioneer division, and a moon, called 1979 S 2, is confirmed. The latter has probably been seen from Earth. There may be evidence for more bodies like 1979 S 2, but at this stage the interpretation of the data is ambiguous. Estimates that the cross-sectional area of the F ring is >7 x 10/sup 13/ square centimeters and that the opacity is >10/sup -5/ were obtained with the aid of particle diffusion rates. Cosmic-ray albedo neutron decay should be looked into as a source of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn. 7 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Trapped radiation belts of saturn: first look.

    PubMed

    Fillius, W; Ip, W H; McIlwain, C E

    1980-01-25

    Pioneer 11 has made the first exploration of the magnetosphere and trapped radiation belts of Saturn. Saturn's magnetosphere is intermediate in size between Earth's and Jupiter's, with trapped particle intensities comparable to Earth's. The outer region of Saturn's magnetosphere contains lower energy radiation and is variable with time; the inner region contains higher energy particles. The pitch angle distributions show a remarkable variety of field-aligned and locally mirroring configurations. The moons and especially the rings of Saturn are effective absorbers of trapped particles; underneath the rings, the trapped radiation is completely absorbed. We confirm the discovery of a new ring, called the F ring, a new division, the Pioneer division, and a moon, called 1979 S 2. The latter has probably been seen from Earth. There may be evidence for more bodies like 1979 S 2, but at this stage the interpretation of the data is ambiguous. Using particle diffusion rates, we estimate that the cross-sectional area of the F ring is > 7 x 10(13) square centimeters and that the opacity is > 10(-5). Cosmic-ray albedo neutron decay should be looked into as a source of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn. PMID:17833553

  3. On the Connection between Microbursts and Nonlinear Electronic Structures in Planetary Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmane, Adnane; Wilson, Lynn B., III; Blum, Lauren; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a dynamical-system approach, we have investigated the efficiency of large-amplitude whistler waves for causing microburst precipitation in planetary radiation belts by modeling the microburst energy and particle fluxes produced as a result of nonlinear wave-particle interactions. We show that wave parameters, consistent with large-amplitude oblique whistlers, can commonly generate microbursts of electrons with hundreds of keV-energies as a result of Landau trapping. Relativistic microbursts (>1 MeV) can also be generated by a similar mechanism, but require waves with large propagation angles {θ }{kB}\\gt 50^\\circ and phase-speeds {v}{{Φ }}≥slant c/9. Using our result for precipitating density and energy fluxes, we argue that holes in the distribution function of electrons near the magnetic mirror point can result in the generation of double layers and electron solitary holes consistent in scales (of the order of Debye lengths) to nonlinear structures observed in the radiation belts by the Van Allen Probes. Our results indicate a relationship between nonlinear electrostatic and electromagnetic structures in the dynamics of planetary radiation belts and their role in the cyclical production of energetic electrons (E≥slant 100 keV) on kinetic timescales, which is much faster than previously inferred.

  4. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Green, J. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outermore » radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.« less

  5. On the Connection Between Microbursts and Nonlinear Electronic Structures in Planetary Radiation Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osmane, Adnane; Wilson, Lynn B., III; Blum, Lauren; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a dynamical-system approach, we have investigated the efficiency of large-amplitude whistler waves for causing microburst precipitation in planetary radiation belts by modeling the microburst energy and particle fluxes produced as a result of nonlinear wave-particle interactions. We show that wave parameters, consistent with large amplitude oblique whistlers, can commonly generate microbursts of electrons with hundreds of keV-energies as a result of Landau trapping. Relativistic microbursts (greater than 1 MeV) can also be generated by a similar mechanism, but require waves with large propagation angles Theta (sub k)B greater than 50 degrees and phase-speeds v(sub phi) greater than or equal to c/9. Using our result for precipitating density and energy fluxes, we argue that holes in the distribution function of electrons near the magnetic mirror point can result in the generation of double layers and electron solitary holes consistent in scales (of the order of Debye lengths) to nonlinear structures observed in the radiation belts by the Van Allen Probes. Our results indicate a relationship between nonlinear electrostatic and electromagnetic structures in the dynamics of planetary radiation belts and their role in the cyclical production of energetic electrons (E greater than or equal to 100 keV) on kinetic timescales, which is much faster than previously inferred.

  6. Radiation Belt Storm Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr Y.; Mauk, Barry H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Sibeck, David G.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.

  7. NASA's Van Allen Probes RBSP-ECT Data Products and Access to Them: An Insider's Outlook on the Inner and Outer Belts (and We Don't Mean the Nation's Beltway...)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. S.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    In this poster, we present a summary of access to the data products of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes - Energetic Particle Composition, and Thermal plasma (RBSP-ECT) suite of NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. The RBSP-ECT science investigation (http://rbsp-ect.sr.unh.edu) measures comprehensively the near-Earth charged particle environment in order to understand the processes that control the acceleration, global distribution, and variability of radiation belt electrons and ions. RBSP-ECT data products derive from the three instrument elements that comprise the suite, which collectively covers the broad energies that define the source and seed populations, the core radiation belts, and also their highest energy ultra-relativistic extensions. These RBSP-ECT instruments include, from lowest to highest energies: the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) sensor, the Magnetic Electron and Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), and the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT). We provide a brief overview of their principles of operation, as well as a description of the Level 1-3 data products that the HOPE, MagEIS, and REPT instruments produce, both separately and together. We provide a summary of how to access these RBSP-ECT data products at our Science Operation Center and Science Data Center (http://www.rbsp-ect.lanl.gov/rbsp_ect.php ) as well as caveats for their use. Finally, in the spirit of efficiently and effectively promoting and encouraging new collaborations, we present a summary of past publications, current studies, and opportunities for your future participation in RBSP-ECT science analyses.

  8. The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J.; Friesen, L.; Lin, A.; Mabry, D.; Katz, N.; Dotan, Y.; George, J.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M.; Redding, M.; O'Brien, T. P.; Cha, J.; Birkitt, A.; Carranza, P.; Lalic, M.; Fuentes, F.; Galvan, R.; McNab, M.

    2013-11-01

    The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft is a particle spectrometer designed to measure the flux, angular distribution, and energy spectrum of protons from ˜60 MeV to ˜2000 MeV. RPS will investigate decades-old questions about the inner Van Allen belt proton environment: a nearby region of space that is relatively unexplored because of the hazards of spacecraft operation there and the difficulties in obtaining accurate proton measurements in an intense penetrating background. RPS is designed to provide the accuracy needed to answer questions about the sources and losses of the inner belt protons and to obtain the measurements required for the next-generation models of trapped protons in the magnetosphere. In addition to detailed information for individual protons, RPS features count rates at a 1-second timescale, internal radiation dosimetry, and information about electrostatic discharge events on the RBSP spacecraft that together will provide new information about space environmental hazards in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  9. The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Friesen, L.; Lin, A.; Mabry, D.; Katz, N.; Dotan, Y.; George, J. S.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Redding, M.; O'Brien, P. P.; Cha, J.; Birkitt, A.; Carranza, P.; Lalic, M.; Fuentes, F.; Galvan, R.; McNab, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft is a particle spectrometer designed to measure the flux, angular distribution, and energy spectrum of protons from ~60 MeV to ~2000 MeV. RPS will investigate decades-old questions about the inner Van Allen belt proton environment: a nearby region of space that is relatively unexplored because of the hazards of spacecraft operation there and the difficulties in obtaining accurate proton measurements in an intense penetrating background. RPS is designed to provide the accuracy needed to answer questions about the sources and losses of the inner belt protons and to obtain the measurements required for the next-generation models of trapped protons in the magnetosphere. In addition to detailed information for individual protons, RPS features count rates at a 1-second timescale, internal radiation dosimetry, and information about electrostatic discharge events on the RBSP spacecraft that together will provide new information about space environmental hazards in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  10. Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics: Modeling Atmospheric Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    The first year of work on this project has been completed. This report provides a summary of the progress made and the plan for the coming year. Also included with this report is a preprint of an article that was accepted for publication in Journal of Geophysical Research and describes in detail most of the results from the first year of effort. The goal for the first year was to develop a radiation belt electron model for fitting to data from the SAMPEX and Polar satellites that would provide an empirical description of the electron losses into the upper atmosphere. This was largely accomplished according to the original plan (with one exception being that, for reasons described below, the inclusion of the loss cone electrons in the model was deferred). The main concerns at the start were to accurately represent the balance between pitch angle diffusion and eastward drift that determines the dominant features of the low altitude data, and then to accurately convert the model into simulated data based on the characteristics of the particular electron detectors. Considerable effort was devoted to achieving these ends. Once the model was providing accurate results it was applied to data sets selected from appropriate periods in 1997, 1998, and 1999. For each interval of -30 to 60 days, the model parameters were calculated daily, thus providing good short and long term temporal resolution, and for a range of radial locations from L = 2.7 to 3.9. .

  11. Statistics of the outer radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, D.J.; Johnstone, A.D.

    1996-07-01

    The highly variable electron flux levels in the outer radiation belt come about by competition between time-dependent source and loss mechanisms. In order to identify some of the different mechanisms involved, we examine the statistics of the variability of fluxes at geostationary orbit. Data from the SEM-2 analyzer on Meteosat-3 and from GOES-7 are used. Correlation analysis is used to find time-delays between changes in flux at different energies. We see that low energy flux is added to this region during sub-storms and that higher energy fluxes appear after 2 or 3 days. Whilst the timescale for this process is brief compared to a complete cycle of the {open_quote}Recirculation{close_quote} energization process, it is consistent with the timescale of its final step{endash}outward radial diffusion. By isolating periods when no new injection of plasma occurs, we make an assessment of flux loss rates in a quiet magnetosphere. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Radiation belts study in RESONANCE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilevsky, Mikhail; Demekhov, Andrei; Zelenyi, Lev; Petrukovich, Anatoly; Shklyar, David

    The Earth’s inner magnetosphere is an important part of space weather framework. Outer radiation belt is a home for numerous communication and navigation satellites. But besides this practical problem, this region is a theoretical nugget. Hot magnetospheric, cold plas¬mospheric, and, in contrast, high energy plasma coexist here. Such non-equilibrium state of plasma is glued by various plasma oscillations actively interacting with particles and resulting, in particular, in spatial and velocity diffusion. Diffusion influences acceleration and precipitation of particles and defines their life¬time in the Earth’s magnetosphere. The project RESONANCE is aimed to study the whole complex of these issues, both practical (space weather), and fundamental (nonlinear plasma dynamics). The project RESONANCE is a part of the Russian Federal State Program. Lavochkin Association is responsi¬ble for preparation and testing of the satellites. Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences is a leading scientific organization. Besides Russian scientists, specialists from Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Re¬public, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Ukraine, USA take part.

  13. Inner Radiation Belt Dynamics and Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, P. P.; Looper, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    We present preliminary results of inner belt proton data assimilation using an augmented version of the Selesnick et al. Inner Zone Model (SIZM). By varying modeled physics parameters and solar particle injection parameters to generate many ensembles of the inner belt, then optimizing the ensemble weights according to inner belt observations from SAMPEX/PET at LEO and HEO/DOS at high altitude, we obtain the best-fit state of the inner belt. We need to fully sample the range of solar proton injection sources among the ensemble members to ensure reasonable agreement between the model ensembles and observations. Once this is accomplished, we find the method is fairly robust. We will demonstrate the data assimilation by presenting an extended interval of solar proton injections and losses, illustrating how these short-term dynamics dominate long-term inner belt climatology.

  14. A Physical Model of Electron Radiation Belts of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzato, L.; Sicard-Piet, A.; Bourdarie, S.

    2012-09-01

    Enrolling on the Cassini age, a physical Salammbô model for the radiation belts of Saturn have been developed including several physical processes governing the kronian magnetosphere. Results have been compared with Cassini MIMI LEMMS data.

  15. Forecasting the Radiation Belts for Satellites Undergoing Electric-Orbit Raising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, R. B.; Glauert, S. A.; Meredith, N. P.; Kersten, T.; Heynderickx, D.; Maget, V.; Li, W.; Pitchford, D. A.; Wade, D.

    2015-12-01

    The introduction of commercial satellites with all-electric propulsion systems is nothing less than a revolution in the quest for low-cost access to space. As a consequence, it can take as long as 200 - 400 days to raise the perigee of the satellite to final geostationary orbit. During this time the satellites are exposed to the most intense part of the van Allen radiation belts where the electron radiation environment can vary by orders of magnitude as a result of changes in the solar wind. Here we describe briefly this new method of launch and discuss the importance of radiation protection, the need for real-time data on orbit and how physics based models can help supply this need. We describe the forecasting system that was developed in the European SPACECAST project, and is now continued in the SPACESTORM project, and how we use physics based models to forecast the electron flux throughout the outer radiation belt in real-time, updated hourly. We show that forecasts are much improved when the physics of wave-particle interactions is included, and show comparisons between models using different wave models for plasmaspheric hiss and chorus waves. The results emphasise the importance of chorus wave amplitudes. Finally, we discuss some areas of research needed to improve the forecasts, such as the need to understand electron flux drop-outs and their relation to distortions of the geomagnetic field in the tail region, and the need for additional wave models.

  16. BARREL observations of an ICME-shock impact with the magnetosphere and the resultant radiation belt electron loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halford, A. J.; McGregor, S. L.; Murphy, K. R.; Millan, R. M.; Hudson, M. K.; Woodger, L. A.; Cattel, C. A.; Breneman, A. W.; Mann, I. R.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gkioulidou, M.; Fennell, J. F.

    2015-04-01

    The Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) mission of opportunity working in tandem with the Van Allen Probes was designed to study the loss of radiation belt electrons to the ionosphere and upper atmosphere. BARREL is also sensitive to X-rays from other sources. During the second BARREL campaign, the Sun produced an X-class flare followed by a solar energetic particle event (SEP) associated with the same active region. Two days later on 9 January 2014, the shock generated by the coronal mass ejection (CME) originating from the active region hits the Earth while BARREL was in a close conjunction with the Van Allen Probes. Time History Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellite observed the impact of the interplanetary CME (ICME) shock near the magnetopause, and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) were on either side of the BARREL/Van Allen Probe array. The solar interplanetary magnetic field was not ideally oriented to cause a significant geomagnetic storm, but compression from the shock impact led to the loss of radiation belt electrons. We propose that an azimuthal electric field impulse generated by magnetopause compression caused inward electron transport and minimal loss. This process also drove chorus waves, which were responsible for most of the precipitation observed outside the plasmapause. Observations of hiss inside the plasmapause explain the absence of loss at this location. ULF waves were found to be correlated with the structure of the precipitation. We demonstrate how BARREL can monitor precipitation following an ICME-shock impact at Earth in a cradle-to-grave view; from flare, to SEP, to electron precipitation.

  17. Jupiter's radiation belt ions: A comparison of theory and observation

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.; Thorne, R.M.; Mei, Y.

    1989-03-01

    We construct radial profiles for the Jovian radiation belt flux-tube content Y from the reported phase-space density of energetic particles obtained from the Voyager 1 LECP data over the range L = 6 to L = 9. These experimental profiles are compared with theoretical solutions for Y/sup */ from our interchange-diffusion model of the coupled radiation belt and Iogenic ion populations, which incorporates the pressure gradient of the radiation belt ions and spatially-varying forms for the precipitation loss-rate of the radiation belt ions and the concomitant height-integrated Pedersen ionospheric conductivity. Subject to certain limitations of the Voyager 1 data, the model solutions are found to be consistent with the data for a variety of input parameters. Model solutions are also found corresponding to radiation belt ions in the energy range 1(MeV/G)less than or equal to..mu..less than or equal to 10(MeV/G) (which was not sampled by Voyager) that are expected to be mainly responsible for the auroral energy input. Comparison of our theoretical profiles with the data implies that the energetic radiation belt ions should have a peak loss rate within a factor of three of that for strong diffusion scattering. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  18. Radiation Belts Storage Ring : What the Cluster-CIS data can tell us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I. S.; Ganushkina, N.; Amariutei, O. A.; Reme, H.

    2013-12-01

    Following the launch by NASA of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) twin spacecraft, now named the Van Allen Probes, the discovery of a storage ring was announced: Baker et al., Science, 2013. This transient feature was observed during September 2012, following the arrival of an interplanetary shock, was located between L=3.0 and L=3.5 and consisted of about 4 to 6 MeV electrons. During that period the Cluster spacecraft had a high-inclination orbit, with a perigee just above 2 Re. The CIS experiment onboard Cluster is sensitive to penetrating energetic electrons (E > 2 MeV), which produce background counts and thus allow to localize the boundaries of the outer and inner radiation belts (Ganushkina et al., JGR, 2011). A search was undertaken in the September 2012 CIS data for eventual signatures of the storage ring, and indeed a small increase of the instrument background was observed between L=3.0 and L=3.5. This is clearly separated from the main outer radiation belt, which presents a much stronger background due to higher fluxes of relativistic electrons. A mono-energetic ion drift band was also observed by CIS inside the storage ring, at about 5 keV for He+ and O+ ions. This result provides an independent confirmation for the storage ring. In addition, it allows also to examine Cluster and Double Star data from earlier years, covering a full solar cycle, for other such signatures of a transient storage ring. It results that this 3-belt structure is seen several times.

  19. The Evolving Space Weather System—Van Allen Probes Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, L. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Fox, N. J.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Sotirelis, T. S.; Raouafi, N.-E.; Kessel, R. L.; Becker, H. N.

    2014-10-01

    The overarching goal and purpose of the study of space weather is clear—to understand and address the issues caused by solar disturbances on humans and technological systems. Space weather has evolved in the past few decades from a collection of concerned agencies and researchers to a critical function of the National Weather Service of NOAA. The general effects have also evolved from the well-known telegraph disruptions of the mid-1800s to modern day disturbances of the electric power grid, communications and navigation, human spaceflight and spacecraft systems. The last two items in this list, and specifically the effects of penetrating radiation, were the impetus for the space weather broadcast implemented on NASA's Van Allen Probes' twin pair of satellites, launched in August of 2012 and orbiting directly through Earth's severe radiation belts. The Van Allen Probes mission, formerly the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), was renamed soon after launch to honor the discoverer of Earth's radiation belts at the beginning of the space age, the late James Van Allen (the spacecraft themselves are still referred to as RBSP-A and RBSP-B). The Van Allen Probes are one part of NASA's Living With a Star program formulated to advance the scientific understanding of the connection between solar disturbances, the resulting heliospheric conditions, and their effects on the geospace and Earth environment.

  20. Repeatable and Predictable Dynamics of the Outer Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. R.; Mann, I. R.; Sibeck, D. G.; Ozeke, L.; Rae, J.; Watt, C.

    2015-12-01

    Many believe that the response of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt to each geomagnetic storm is unique, such that the response to any two storms in never the same. This has coined the popular phrase "If you've seen one storm, you've seen one storm". Here we investigate the response of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt to geomagnetic storms driven by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and Co-rotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) during the SAMPEX era through solar cycle 23 (1994-2004). We demonstrate that the outer radiation belt responds consistently and predictably to external solar wind energy input and magnetospheric wave dynamics such that larger geomagnetic storms are associated with both increased loss and acceleration. In particular, we demonstrate that the amount of electron loss in the outer radiation belt and subsequent acceleration during a geomagnetic storms is very well characterised by the total energy input from the solar wind, the minimum location of the magnetopause, minimum Dst, and ULF wave power within the inner magnetosphere. Finally we demonstrate that CMEs and CIRs have different external and internal driving conditions that produce distinct belt morphologies. However, a simple ULF wave diffusion model can reproduce both morphologies. This demonstrates how the radiation belts respond predictably for different storm drivers and magnetospheric dynamics.

  1. Survey of current situation in radiation belt modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.

    2004-01-01

    The study of Earth's radiation belts is one of the oldest subjects in space physics. Despite the tremendous progress made in the last four decades, we still lack a complete understanding of the radiation belts in terms of their configurations, dynamics, and detailed physical accounts of their sources and sinks. The static nature of early empirical trapped radiation models, for examples, the NASA AP-8 and AE-8 models, renders those models inappropriate for predicting short-term radiation belt behaviors associated with geomagnetic storms and substorms. Due to incomplete data coverage, these models are also inaccurate at low altitudes (e.g., <1000 km) where many robotic and human space flights occur. The availability of radiation data from modern space missions and advancement in physical modeling and data management techniques have now allowed the development of new empirical and physical radiation belt models. In this paper, we will review the status of modern radiation belt modeling. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  2. Radiation-belt dynamics during solar minimum. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gussenhoven, M.S.; Mullen, E.G.; Holeman, E.

    1989-12-01

    Two types of temporal variation in the radiation belts are studied using low altitude data taken onboard the DMSP F7 satellite: those associated with the solar cycle and those associated with large magnetic storm effects. Over a three-year period from 1984 to 1987 and encompassing solar minimum, the protons in the heart of the inner belt increased at a rate of approximately 6% per year. Over the same period, outer zone electron enhancements declined both in number and peak intensity. During the large magnetic storm of February 1986, following the period of peak ring current intensity, a second proton belt with energies up to 50 MeV was found at magnetic latitudes between 45 deg. and 55 deg. The belt lasted for more than 100 days. The slot region between the inner and outer electron belts collapsed by the merging of the two populations and did not reform for 40 days.

  3. On the Cross-Energy Cross-Pitch-Angle Coherence of Electrons in the Outer Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Reeves, G. D.; Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Henderson, M. G.; Kletzing, C.; Redmon, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Relativistic electrons, mainly trapped in the Earth's outer radiation belt, present a highly hazardous radiation environment for electronic hardware on board satellites and spacecraft. Thus developing a predictive capability for MeV electron levels as well as understanding the physics have been deemed critical for both space research and industry communities. In this work, we first demonstrate that a high cross-energy cross-pitch-angle coherence exists between the trapped ~MeV electrons and precipitating ~100s KeV electrons—observed respectively by Van Allen Probes and NOAA POES satellites in different orbits—by conducting a correlation survey on measurements from both high- and low-altitudes. Then, based upon the results, we further test the possibility of using a linear prediction filter model, driven by POES observations from low-Earth-orbits, to predict the energization of MeV electrons after geomagnetic storms, as well as the evolving distributions of MeV electrons in real time. Finally, to account for this high coherence, we provide our hypothesis based upon theoretical calculations and numerical simulations for individual events using diffusion codes with realistic particle and wave inputs from missions including Van Allen Probes. Results from this study unveil new knowledge on radiation belt dynamics, add new science significance to a long existing space infrastructure, and provide practical and useful tools to the whole space community.

  4. A Physical Model of Electron Radiation Belts of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzato, L.; Sicard-Piet, A.; Bourdarie, S.

    2012-04-01

    Radiation belts causes irreversible damages on on-board instruments materials. That's why for two decades, ONERA proposes studies about radiation belts of magnetized planets. First, in the 90's, the development of a physical model, named Salammbô, carried out a model of the radiation belts of the Earth. Then, for few years, analysis of the magnetosphere of Jupiter and in-situ data (Pioneer, Voyager, Galileo) allow to build a physical model of the radiation belts of Jupiter. Enrolling on the Cassini age and thanks to all information collected, this study permits to adapt Salammbô jovian radiation belts model to the case of Saturn environment. Indeed, some physical processes present in the kronian magnetosphere are similar to those present in the magnetosphere of Jupiter (radial diffusion; interaction of energetic electrons with rings, moons, atmosphere; synchrotron emission). However, some physical processes have to be added to the kronian model (compared to the jovian model) because of the particularity of the magnetosphere of Saturn: interaction of energetic electrons with neutral particles from Enceladus, and wave-particle interaction. This last physical process has been studied in details with the analysis of CASSINI/RPWS (Radio and Plasma Waves Science) data. The major importance of the wave particles interaction is now well known in the case of the radiation belts of the Earth but it is important to investigate on its role in the case of Saturn. So, importance of each physical process has been studied and analysis of Cassini MIMI-LEMMS and CAPS data allows to build a model boundary condition (at L = 6). Finally, results of this study lead to a kronian electrons radiation belts model including radial diffusion, interactions of energetic electrons with rings, moons and neutrals particles and wave-particle interaction (interactions of electrons with atmosphere particles and synchrotron emission are too weak to be taken into account in this model). Then, to

  5. Recent Developments in the Radiation Belt Environment Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Glocer, A.; Zheng, Q.; Horne, R. B.; Meredith, N. P.; Albert, J. M.; Nagai, T.

    2010-01-01

    The fluxes of energetic particles in the radiation belts are found to be strongly controlled by the solar wind conditions. In order to understand and predict the radiation particle intensities, we have developed a physics-based Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model that considers the influences from the solar wind, ring current and plasmasphere. Recently, an improved calculation of wave-particle interactions has been incorporated. In particular, the model now includes cross diffusion in energy and pitch-angle. We find that the exclusion of cross diffusion could cause significant overestimation of electron flux enhancement during storm recovery. The RBE model is also connected to MHD fields so that the response of the radiation belts to fast variations in the global magnetosphere can be studied.Weare able to reproduce the rapid flux increase during a substorm dipolarization on 4 September 2008. The timing is much shorter than the time scale of wave associated acceleration.

  6. Radiation Belt Environment Model: Application to Space Weather and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics and variability of the radiation belts are of great scientific and space weather significance. A physics-based Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model has been developed to simulate and predict the radiation particle intensities. The RBE model considers the influences from the solar wind, ring current and plasmasphere. It takes into account the particle drift in realistic, time-varying magnetic and electric field, and includes diffusive effects of wave-particle interactions with various wave modes in the magnetosphere. The RBE model has been used to perform event studies and real-time prediction of energetic electron fluxes. In this talk, we will describe the RBE model equation, inputs and capabilities. Recent advancement in space weather application and artificial radiation belt study will be discussed as well.

  7. Nonstorm loss of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsavrias, Ch.; Daglis, I. A.; Turner, D. L.; Sandberg, I.; Papadimitriou, C.; Georgiou, M.; Balasis, G.

    2015-12-01

    We report observations of electron Phase Space Density (PSD) dropout and evidence that supports the loss mechanism of magnetopause shadowing and outward radial diffusion during a nonstorm period characterized by persistently positive values of the SYM->H index. On 14 April 2013 an electron PSD dropout of 2 orders of magnitude was observed at the nightside magnetosphere by the Van Allen Probes. The magnetopause shadowing was associated with a strong pulse attributed to the arrival of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection. It is shown, for the first time in detail, that significant losses to the magnetosheath may occur even in the absence of significant reconnection and magnetic storm activity. Signatures of substorm injections that penetrate the outer belt and enhance the low-energy electrons were also observed right after the interplanetary pressure pulse. Moreover, particle measurements from THEMIS constellation also show a PSD depletion in the dayside magnetosphere.

  8. Radiation belt electron acceleration by chorus waves during the 17 March 2013 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ma, Q.; Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Green, J. C.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2014-06-01

    Local acceleration driven by whistler-mode chorus waves is fundamentally important for accelerating seed electron populations to highly relativistic energies in the outer radiation belt. In this study, we quantitatively evaluate chorus-driven electron acceleration during the 17 March 2013 storm, when the Van Allen Probes observed very rapid electron acceleration up to several MeV within ~12 hours. A clear radial peak in electron phase space density (PSD) observed near L* ~4 indicates that an internal local acceleration process was operating. We construct the global distribution of chorus wave intensity from the low-altitude electron measurements made by multiple Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) satellites over a broad region, which is ultimately used to simulate the radiation belt electron dynamics driven by chorus waves. Our simulation results show remarkable agreement in magnitude, timing, energy dependence, and pitch angle distribution with the observed electron PSD near its peak location. However, radial diffusion and other loss processes may be required to explain the differences between the observation and simulation at other locations away from the PSD peak. Our simulation results, together with previous studies, suggest that local acceleration by chorus waves is a robust and ubiquitous process and plays a critical role in accelerating injected seed electrons with convective energies (~100 keV) to highly relativistic energies (several MeV).

  9. Structure and evolution of electron "zebra stripes" in the inner radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Foster, J. C.; Rankin, R.

    2016-05-01

    "Zebra stripes" are newly found energetic electron energy-spatial (L shell) distributed structure with an energy between tens to a few hundreds keV in the inner radiation belt. Using high-quality measurements of electron fluxes from Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) on board the twin Van Allen Probes, we carry out case and statistical studies from April 2013 to April 2014 to study the structural and evolutionary characteristics of zebra stripes below L = 3. It is revealed that the zebra stripes can be transformed into evenly spaced patterns in the electron drift frequency coordinate: the detrended logarithmic fluxes in each L shell region can be well described by sinusoidal functions of drift frequency. The "wave number" of this sinusoidal function, which corresponds to the reciprocal of the gap between two adjacent peaks in the drift frequency coordinate, increases in proportion to real time. Further, these structural and evolutionary characteristics of zebra stripes can be reproduced by an analytic model of the evolution of the particle distribution under a single monochromatic or static azimuthal electric field. It is shown that the essential ingredient for the formation of multiple zebra stripes is the periodic drift of particles. The amplitude of the zebra stripes shows a good positive correlation with Kp index, which indicates that the generation mechanism of zebra stripes should be related to geomagnetic activities.

  10. Inner Magnetosphere Modeling at the CCMC: Ring Current, Radiation Belt and Magnetic Field Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastaetter, L.; Mendoza, A. M.; Chulaki, A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Zheng, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of the inner magnetosphere has entered center stage with the launch of the Van Allen Probes (RBSP) in 2012. The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) has drastically improved its offerings of inner magnetosphere models that cover energetic particles in the Earth's ring current and radiation belts. Models added to the CCMC include the stand-alone Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (CIMI) model by M.C. Fok, the Rice Convection Model (RCM) by R. Wolf and S. Sazykin and numerous versions of the Tsyganenko magnetic field model (T89, T96, T01quiet, TS05). These models join the LANL* model by Y. Yu hat was offered for instant run earlier in the year. In addition to these stand-alone models, the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) by M.C. Fok and N. Buzulukova joined as a component of the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) in the magnetosphere model run-on-request category. We present modeling results of the ring current and radiation belt models and demonstrate tracking of satellites such as RBSP. Calculations using the magnetic field models include mappings to the magnetic equator or to minimum-B positions and the determination of foot points in the ionosphere.

  11. Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Loss and Energization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I.; Balasis, G.; Bourdarie, S.; Horne, R.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Mann, I.; Santolik, O.; Turner, D.; Anastasiadis, A.; Georgiou, M.; Giannakis, O.; Papadimitriou, C.; Ropokis, G.; Sandberg, I.; Angelopoulos, V.; Glauert, S.; Grison, B., Kersten T.; Kolmasova, I.; Lazaro, D.; Mella, M.; Ozeke, L.; Usanova, M.

    2013-09-01

    We present the concept, objectives and expected impact of the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Loss and Energization) project, which is being implemented by a consortium of seven institutions (five European, one Canadian and one US) with support from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme. The MAARBLE project employs multi-spacecraft monitoring of the geospace environment, complemented by ground-based monitoring, in order to analyze and assess the physical mechanisms leading to radiation belt particle energization and loss. Particular attention is paid to the role of ULF/VLF waves. A database containing properties of the waves is being created and will be made available to the scientific community. Based on the wave database, a statistical model of the wave activity dependent on the level of geomagnetic activity, solar wind forcing, and magnetospheric region will be developed. Multi-spacecraft particle measurements will be incorporated into data assimilation tools, leading to new understanding of the causal relationships between ULF/VLF waves and radiation belt dynamics. Data assimilation techniques have been proven as a valuable tool in the field of radiation belts, able to guide 'the best' estimate of the state of a complex system. The MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-2011-1) under grant agreement no. 284520.

  12. Rotationally driven 'zebra stripes' in Earth's inner radiation belt.

    PubMed

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Mitchell, D G; Takahashi, K; Lanzerotti, L J; Mauk, B H

    2014-03-20

    Structured features on top of nominally smooth distributions of radiation-belt particles at Earth have been previously associated with particle acceleration and transport mechanisms powered exclusively by enhanced solar-wind activity. Although planetary rotation is considered to be important for particle acceleration at Jupiter and Saturn, the electric field produced in the inner magnetosphere by Earth's rotation can change the velocity of trapped particles by only about 1-2 kilometres per second, so rotation has been thought inconsequential for radiation-belt electrons with velocities of about 100,000 kilometres per second. Here we report that the distributions of energetic electrons across the entire spatial extent of Earth's inner radiation belt are organized in regular, highly structured and unexpected 'zebra stripes', even when the solar-wind activity is low. Modelling reveals that the patterns are produced by Earth's rotation. Radiation-belt electrons are trapped in Earth's dipole-like magnetic field, where they undergo slow longitudinal drift motion around the planet because of the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field. Earth's rotation induces global diurnal variations of magnetic and electric fields that resonantly interact with electrons whose drift period is close to 24 hours, modifying electron fluxes over a broad energy range into regular patterns composed of multiple stripes extending over the entire span of the inner radiation belt. PMID:24646996

  13. Rotationally driven `zebra stripes' in Earth's inner radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sitnov, M. I.; Mitchell, D. G.; Takahashi, K.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Mauk, B. H.

    2014-03-01

    Structured features on top of nominally smooth distributions of radiation-belt particles at Earth have been previously associated with particle acceleration and transport mechanisms powered exclusively by enhanced solar-wind activity. Although planetary rotation is considered to be important for particle acceleration at Jupiter and Saturn, the electric field produced in the inner magnetosphere by Earth's rotation can change the velocity of trapped particles by only about 1-2 kilometres per second, so rotation has been thought inconsequential for radiation-belt electrons with velocities of about 100,000 kilometres per second. Here we report that the distributions of energetic electrons across the entire spatial extent of Earth's inner radiation belt are organized in regular, highly structured and unexpected `zebra stripes', even when the solar-wind activity is low. Modelling reveals that the patterns are produced by Earth's rotation. Radiation-belt electrons are trapped in Earth's dipole-like magnetic field, where they undergo slow longitudinal drift motion around the planet because of the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field. Earth's rotation induces global diurnal variations of magnetic and electric fields that resonantly interact with electrons whose drift period is close to 24 hours, modifying electron fluxes over a broad energy range into regular patterns composed of multiple stripes extending over the entire span of the inner radiation belt.

  14. The variable extent of Saturn's electron radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Arridge, C. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    The structure of Saturn's radiation belts is significantly different for electrons and protons. The permanent MeV proton belts are relatively stable in intensity over both short and long time scales, they have a outer boundary that continuously coincides with the L-shell of Saturn's moon Tethys (L=4.89) and comprise different sectors, each separated from the other by a proton depleted region that is centered on the L-shells of the planet's inner icy moons. On the other hand, the electron radiation belt (>500 keV) is a continuous structure that extends between the outer edge of the main rings and has its outer boundary at an average distance of about 8 Rs (Saturn radii) from the planet. The latter distance, however, appears to scatter considerably from orbit to orbit, while flux levels within the belts may vary by several orders of magnitude. Using 8 years of MIMI/LEMMS and CAPS observations, we study the variable extent of the Saturnian electron belt. Preliminary results show a series of interesting features, such as recurrent sudden belt expansions with periods in the order of one to several weeks and considerably variable responses following periods of CME interactions with Saturn's magnetosphere. Of particular interest is a period in the second half of 2011, when, following a CME, the outer boundary of the electron radiation belt drops to a distance of about 4.5-5.0 Rs, taking about 2-3 months to recover to its typical values.During that period, energetic electron and ion fluxes measured by the LEMMS detector are up to two or even three orders of magnitude below the typical levels. We will discuss how these observations relate to the global dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere and whether the outer boundary of the electron belt is a useful index for organising other magnetospheric datasets.

  15. Effects of Complex Interplanetary Structures on the Dynamics of the Earth's Outer Radiation Belt During the 16-30 September 2014 Period: II) Corotating Solar Wind Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, V. M. C. E. S.; Da Silva, L. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Alves, L. R.; Jauer, P. R.; Dias Silveira, M. V.; Medeiros, C.; Marchezi, J.; Rockenbach, M.; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C.; Kanekal, S. G.; Georgiou, M.; Mendes, O., Jr.; Dal Lago, A.; Vieira, L. E. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a case study describing the dynamics of the outer radiation belt for two different solar wind conditions. First, we discuss a dropout of outer belt energetic electron fluxes corresponding to the arrival of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) followed by a corotating stream in September 2014. Second, we discuss the reformation of the outer radiation belt that began on September 22nd. We find that the arrival of the ICME and the corotating interaction region that preceded the stream cause a long-duration (many day) dropout of high-energy electrons. The recovery in radiation belt fluxes only begins when the high-speed stream begins to develop IMF Bz fluctuations and auroral activity resumes. Furthermore, during periods in which several consecutive solar wind structures appear, the first structure primes the outer radiation belt prior to the interaction of the subsequent solar wind structures with the magnetosphere. Consequently, the evolution of the outer radiation belt through the solar cycle is significantly affected by the dominant structure of each phase of the cycle. We use energetic electron and magnetic field observations provided by the Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and GOES missions.

  16. The Living with a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Mauk, B. H.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Fox, N. J.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Living With a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission is to understand, ideally to the point of predictability, how populations of relativistic electrons and ions in space form or change in response to the variable inputs of energy from the Sun. The investigations selected for this 2-spacecraft mission scheduled for launch in early 2012 address this task by making extensive observations of the plasma waves, thermal, ring current, and relativistic particle populations, and DC electric and magnetic fields within the Earth's inner and outer radiation belts. We first describe the current mission concept within the scope of NASA's strategic plan and the Vision for Exploration, and then consider how its observations will be used to define and quantify the processes that accelerate, transport, and remove particles in the Earth's radiation belts.

  17. Numerical Techniques for Coupled Ring Current - Radiation Belt Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseev, N.; Shprits, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts can be described by the Fokker-Planck equation which includes radial diffusion and local energy and pitch angle diffusion. Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB-3D) code was developed to solve the Fokker-Planck equation. It incorporates a range of numerical techniques which are appropriate for this purpose. The code has been recently extended to include convection and now solves the convection-diffusion problem in 4D. The report is devoted to several numerical algorithms for modeling of the Earth's radiation belts. We concentrate on high-order schemes ( 7th and 9th order) for solution of an advection-diffusion problem in 1D, 2D,3D and 4D. Results of tests performed to study accuracy and speed of these schemes are presented in the report.

  18. A plan to clear energetic protons from the radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-11-01

    The Earth's radiation belts have been a known hazard to satellites since at least 1962, when an American high-altitude nuclear weapons test named Starfish Prime produced an artificial belt that disabled the first commercial communications satellite, TelStar 1. In the years since the Cold War, thousands of satellites have been put into orbit, and surface charging, high-energy protons, high-energy electrons known as "killer electrons," and other hazards of the inner magnetosphere have continued to take their toll. Satellites can be hardened against these radiation hazards, but some researchers have recently floated a more radical idea: If specially designed transmitters are put into space and set to emit tightly tuned waves, known as electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, they could potentially push the highly energetic protons out of the Earth's inner radiation belt, clearing the satellite's path.

  19. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A.; Shprits, Y.; Subbotin, D.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Resonant interactions between Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves and relativistic electrons may violate the third adiabatic invariant of motion, which produces radial diffusion in the electron radiation belts. This process plays an important role in the formation and structure of the outer electron radiation belt and is important for electron acceleration and losses in that region. Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interaction of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate their relative effect on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes quiet time and storm time geomagnetic activity and is compared to data based on satellite observations. Our calculations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. We show that the results of the 3D diffusion simulations depend on the assumed parametrization of waves. The differences between the simulations and potential missing physical mechanisms are discussed. References Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  20. Mission Overview for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratton, J. M.; Harvey, R. J.; Heyler, G. A.

    2013-11-01

    Provided here is an overview of Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission design. The driving mission and science requirements are presented, and the unique engineering challenges of operating in Earth's radiation belts are discussed in detail. The implementation of both the space and ground segments are presented, including a discussion of the challenges inherent with operating multiple observatories concurrently and working with a distributed network of science operation centers. An overview of the launch vehicle and the overall mission design will be presented, and the plan for space weather data broadcast will be introduced.

  1. Reproducing the observed energy-dependent structure of Earth's electron radiation belts during storm recovery with an event-specific diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripoll, J.-F.; Reeves, G. D.; Cunningham, G. S.; Loridan, V.; Denton, M.; Santolík, O.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C. A.; Turner, D. L.; Henderson, M. G.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    We present dynamic simulations of energy-dependent losses in the radiation belt "slot region" and the formation of the two-belt structure for the quiet days after the 1 March storm. The simulations combine radial diffusion with a realistic scattering model, based data-driven spatially and temporally resolved whistler-mode hiss wave observations from the Van Allen Probes satellites. The simulations reproduce Van Allen Probes observations for all energies and L shells (2-6) including (a) the strong energy dependence to the radiation belt dynamics (b) an energy-dependent outer boundary to the inner zone that extends to higher L shells at lower energies and (c) an "S-shaped" energy-dependent inner boundary to the outer zone that results from the competition between diffusive radial transport and losses. We find that the characteristic energy-dependent structure of the radiation belts and slot region is dynamic and can be formed gradually in ~15 days, although the "S shape" can also be reproduced by assuming equilibrium conditions. The highest-energy electrons (E > 300 keV) of the inner region of the outer belt (L ~ 4-5) also constantly decay, demonstrating that hiss wave scattering affects the outer belt during times of extended plasmasphere. Through these simulations, we explain the full structure in energy and L shell of the belts and the slot formation by hiss scattering during storm recovery. We show the power and complexity of looking dynamically at the effects over all energies and L shells and the need for using data-driven and event-specific conditions.

  2. Solar Modulation of Inner Trapped Belt Radiation Dose Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Abel

    2002-03-01

    The two steady sources of radiation in low Earth orbit are the inner trapped-belt and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), which present a very significant hazard to the astronauts and flight equipment electronics. The fluxes of GCR and inner trapped-belt particles at a fixed altitude are modulated by solar activity. They decrease with increasing solar activity in general. The mechanism of these two sources of radiation are, however, very different. In this project we shall be concerned with modeling the inner trapped-belt protons. The existing trapped-belt models, namely AP-8 is based on data acquired prior to 1970 during solar cycle 20 with relatively low solar flux. These models describe the environment at solar minimum and solar maximum only. Cycles 21 and 22 were much larger, but no valid radiation model exists for such large values. Moreover, the existing models like AP-8, CRRESPRO, and GOST describe the flux to an accuracy of a factor of two to five. There is clear need to accurately predict radiation exposure of astronauts and equipment at all times between the solar minimum and solar maximum, not only on the short duration Space Shuttle flights, but also the longer term stay onboard the International Space Station. In our approach we are taking into account some important parameters, which are responsible for energy losses of protons within the belts. These energy losses are primarily to electrons and by collisions to atmospheric nuclei. Accordingly the atmospheric density dependence at a certain altitude during a specific solar activity is an important parameter that needs to be accurately incorporated into a realistic model. We are involved in developing such a model, which would enable us to predict the radiation exposure for all occasions.

  3. Radiation Belt Transport Driven by Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mueller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The creation of the Earth's outer zone radiation belts is attributed to earthward transport and adiabatic acceleration of electrons by drift-resonant interactions with electromagnetic fluctuations in the magnetosphere. Three types of radial transport driven by solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations that have been identified are: (1) radial diffusion [Falthammer, 1965], (2) significant changes in the phase space density radial profile due to a single or few ULF drift-resonant interactions [Ukhorskiy et al., 2006; Degeling et al., 2008], and (3) shock associated injections of radiation belt electrons occurring in less than a drift period [Li et al., 1993]. A progress report will be given on work to fully characterize different forms of radial transport and their effect on the Earth's radiation belts. The work is being carried out by computing test-particle trajectories in electric and magnetic fields from a simple analytic ULF field model and from global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere. Degeling, A. W., L. G. Ozeke, R. Rankin, I. R. Mann, and K. Kabin (2008), Drift resonant generation of peaked relativistic electron distributions by Pc 5 ULF waves, textit{J. Geophys. Res., 113}, A02208, doi:10.1029/2007JA012411. Fälthammar, C.-G. (1965), Effects of Time-Dependent Electric Fields on Geomagnetically Trapped Radiation, J. Geophys. Res., 70(11), 2503-2516, doi:10.1029/JZ070i011p02503. Li, X., I. Roth, M. Temerin, J. R. Wygant, M. K. Hudson, and J. B. Blake (1993), Simulation of the prompt energization and transport of radiation belt particles during the March 24, 1991 SSC, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 20}(22), 2423-2426, doi:10.1029/93GL02701. Ukhorskiy, A. Y., B. J. Anderson, K. Takahashi, and N. A. Tsyganenko (2006), Impact of ULF oscillations in solar wind dynamic pressure on the outer radiation belt electrons, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 33}(6), L06111, doi:10.1029/2005GL024380.

  4. Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Loss and Energization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I. A.; Bourdarie, S.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Santolik, O.; Horne, R.; Mann, I.; Turner, D.; Anastasiadis, A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Balasis, G.; Chatzichristou, E.; Cully, C.; Georgiou, M.; Glauert, S.; Grison, B.; Kolmasova, I.; Lazaro, D.; Macusova, E.; Maget, V.; Papadimitriou, C.; Ropokis, G.; Sandberg, I.; Usanova, M.

    2012-09-01

    We present the concept, objectives and expected impact of the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Loss and Energization) project, which is being implemented by a consortium of seven institutions (five European, one Canadian and one US) with support from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme. The MAARBLE project employs multi-spacecraft monitoring of the geospace environment, complemented by ground-based monitoring, in order to analyze and assess the physical mechanisms leading to radiation belt particle energization and loss. Particular attention is paid to the role of ULF/VLF waves. A database containing properties of the waves is being created and will be made available to the scientific community. Based on the wave database, a statistical model of the wave activity dependent on the level of geomagnetic activity, solar wind forcing, and magnetospheric region will be developed. Furthermore, we will incorporate multi-spacecraft particle measurements into data assimilation tools, aiming at a new understanding of the causal relationships between ULF/VLF waves and radiation belt dynamics. Data assimilation techniques have been proven to be a valuable tool in the field of radiation belts, able to guide 'the best' estimate of the state of a complex system.

  5. Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Payload Safety Introduction Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, Chuck; Lampert, Dianna; Herrburger, Eric; Smith, Clay; Hill, Stuart; VonMehlem, Judi

    2008-01-01

    Mission of the Geospace Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) is: Gain s cientific understanding (to the point of predictability) of how populations of relativistic electrons and ions in space form or change in response to changes in solar activity and the solar wind.

  6. The importance of energetic particle injections and cross-energy and -species interactions to the acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons in Earth's outer radiation belt (invited talk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Drew; Gkioulidou, Matina; Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr; Gabrielse, Christine; Runov, Andrei; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2014-05-01

    Earth's radiation belts provide a natural laboratory to study a variety of physical mechanisms important for understanding the nature of energetic particles throughout the Universe. The outer electron belt is a particularly variable population, with drastic changes in relativistic electron intensities occurring on a variety of timescales ranging from seconds to decades. Outer belt variability ultimately results from the complex interplay between different source, loss, and transport processes, and all of these processes are related to the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere. Currently, an unprecedented number of spacecraft are providing in situ observations of the inner magnetospheric environment, including missions such as NASA's THEMIS and Van Allen Probes and ESA's Cluster and operational monitors such as NOAA's GOES and POES constellations. From a sampling of case studies using multi-point observations, we present examples showcasing the significant importance of two processes to outer belt dynamics: energetic particle injections and wave-particle interactions. Energetic particle injections are transient events that tie the inner magnetosphere to the near-Earth magnetotail; they involve the rapid inward transport of plasmasheet particles into the trapping zone in the inner magnetosphere. We briefly review key concepts and present new evidence from Van Allen Probes, GOES, and THEMIS of how these injections provide: 1. the seed population of electrons that are subsequently accelerated locally to relativistic energies in the outer belt and 2. the source populations of ions and electrons that produce a variety of ULF and VLF waves, which are also important for driving outer belt dynamics via wave-particle interactions. Cases of electron acceleration by chorus waves, losses by plasmaspheric hiss and EMIC waves, and radial transport driven by ULF waves will also be presented. Finally, we discuss the implications of this developing picture of the system, namely how

  7. On the time needed to reach an equilibrium structure of the radiation belts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ripoll, J. -F.; Loran, V.; Cunningham, Gregory Scott; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Shprits, Y. Y.

    2016-06-04

    In this paper, we complement the notion of equilibrium states of the radiation belts with a discussion on the dynamics and time needed to reach equilibrium. We solve for the equilibrium states obtained using 1D radial diffusion with recently developed hiss and chorus lifetimes at constant values of Kp = 1, 3 and 6. We find that the equilibrium states at moderately low Kp, when plotted vs L-shell (L) and energy (E), display the same interesting S-shape for the inner edge of the outer belt as recently observed by the Van Allen Probes. The S-shape is also produced as themore » radiation belts dynamically evolve toward the equilibrium state when initialized to simulate the buildup after a massive dropout or to simulate loss due to outward diffusion from a saturated state. Physically, this shape, intimately linked with the slot structure, is due to the dependence of electron loss rate (originating from wave-particle interactions) on both energy and L-shell. Equilibrium electron flux profiles are governed by the Biot number (τDiffusion/τloss), with large Biot number corresponding to low fluxes and low Biot number to large fluxes. The time it takes for the flux at a specific (L, E) to reach the value associated with the equilibrium state, starting from these different initial states, is governed by the initial state of the belts, the property of the dynamics (diffusion coefficients), and the size of the domain of computation. Its structure shows a rather complex scissor form in the (L, E) plane. The equilibrium value (phase space density or flux) is practically reachable only for selected regions in (L, E) and geomagnetic activity. Convergence to equilibrium requires hundreds of days in the inner belt for E > 300 keV and moderate Kp (≤3). It takes less time to reach equilibrium during disturbed geomagnetic conditions (Kp ≥ 3), when the system evolves faster. Restricting our interest to the slot region, below L = 4, we find that only small regions in (L, E) space

  8. Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baker, Daniel N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; et al

    2016-07-26

    Two of the largest geomagnetic storms of the last decade were witnessed in 2015. On 17 March 2015, a coronal mass ejection-driven event occurred with a Dst (storm time ring current index) value reaching –223 nT. On 22 June 2015 another strong storm (Dst reaching –204 nT) was recorded. These two storms each produced almost total loss of radiation belt high-energy (E ≳ 1 MeV) electron fluxes. Following the dropouts of radiation belt fluxes there were complex and rather remarkable recoveries of the electrons extending up to nearly 10 MeV in kinetic energy. The energized outer zone electrons showed amore » rich variety of pitch angle features including strong “butterfly” distributions with deep minima in flux at α = 90°. However, despite strong driving of outer zone earthward radial diffusion in these storms, the previously reported “impenetrable barrier” at L ≈ 2.8 was pushed inward, but not significantly breached, and no E ≳ 2.0 MeV electrons were seen to pass through the radiation belt slot region to reach the inner Van Allen zone. Altogether, these intense storms show a wealth of novel features of acceleration, transport, and loss that are demonstrated in the present detailed analysis.« less

  9. On the connection between large-amplitude whistlers, microbursts and nonlinear kinetic structures in the Earth's Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmane, A.; Wilson, L. B., III; Blum, L. W.; Pulkkinen, T. I.

    2015-12-01

    Using a dynamical-system approach we have investigated the efficiency of large-amplitude whistler waves for causing microburst precipitation in planetary radiation belts by modeling the microburst energy and particle fluxes produced as a result of non-linear wave-particle interactions. We show that wave parameters consistent with large-amplitude oblique whistlers commonly generate microbursts of electrons with hundreds of keV-energies, as a result of Landau trapping. Relativistic microbursts (> 1 MeV) can also be generated by a similar mechanism, but require waves with large propagation angles θkB > 50o and phase-speeds vΦ > c/9. Using our result for precipitating density and energy fluxes, we argue that holes in the distribution function of electrons near the magnetic mirror point can result in the generation of electrostatic structures consistent in scales (of the order the Debye length) and electric field amplitudes (of the order of 1 mV/m) to nonlinear structures observed in the radiation belts by the Van Allen Probes. Our results indicate a relationship between nonlinear electrostatic and electromagnetic structures in the dynamics of planetary radiation belts and their role in the cyclical production of energetic electrons (i.e. E > 100 keV) on kinetic timescales, that is much faster than previously inferred.

  10. Effects of Emic Waves on the Outer Electron Radiation Belt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, R. B.; Kersten, T.; Glauert, S.; Meredith, N. P.; Fraser, B. J.; Grew, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last few years there has been substantial progress to incorporate wave-particle interactions into global simulation models of the radiation belts. Models of plasmaspheric hiss and whistler mode chorus make a huge impact on the variability of the relativistic electron flux. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves also cause electron loss from the radiation belts but their effectiveness has not been fully quantified. Here we present the results of simulations using a new chorus diffusion matrix and demonstrate that in principle the outer electron radiation belt can be formed by wave acceleration from a soft electron spectrum. We also describe a new model for EMIC waves. Wave data derived from the fluxgate magnetometer on CRRES was used to define the power spectrum as a function of geomagnetic activity, L* and magnetic local time for Hydrogen and Helium band waves. We show that wave power depends on activity as measured by AE and Kp. Using an assumed ion composition, and previously defined plasma density models the PADIE code was used to calculate bounce and drift averaged diffusion rates for EMIC waves and incorporated into the BAS Radiation Belt Model together with whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss and radial diffusion. Thus the model can be driven by a time sequence of Kp with appropriate boundary conditions. By simulating a 100 day period in 1990 we show that the model can produce electron flux up to energies of several MeV. When EMIC waves are included they cause a significant reduction in the electron flux for energies greater than 2 MeV but only for pitch angles lower than about 60 degrees. The simulations show that the distribution of electrons left behind in space looks like a pancake distribution at MeV energies. We show that EMIC waves cannot remove electrons at all pitch angles even at 30 MeV and are therefore unlikely to set an upper energy limit to the outer radiation belt.

  11. A New Perspective on Trapped Radiation Belts in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, A.; Lodhi, M. A. K.; Wilson, T. L.

    2005-01-01

    The charged particle fluxes trapped in the magnetic dipole fields of certain planets in our Solar System are interesting signatures of planetary properties in space physics. They also represent a source of potentially hazardous radiation to spacecraft during planetary and interplanetary exploration. The Earth s trapped radiation belts have been studied for years and the physical mechanisms by which primary radiation from the Sun and Galaxy is captured is well understood. The higher-energy particles collide with molecules in the planetary atmosphere and initiate large cascades of secondary radiation which itself becomes trapped by the magnetic dipole field of the planet. Some of it is even backscattered as albedo neutrons.

  12. Large enhancement of highly energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt and its transport into the inner radiation belt inferred from MDS-1 satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, T.; Matsumoto, H.

    2016-03-01

    We have examined a large increase of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt and its penetration into the inner radiation belt over slot region using the MDS-1 satellite observations. Result of analyses demonstrates that a large increase took place in the spring and autumn seasons, and we have newly confirmed that the penetration of outer belt electrons to the inner radiation zone took place during the big magnetic storms by examining a pitch angle distribution of the penetrating electrons.

  13. Summary of types of radiation belt electron precipitation observed by BARREL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halford, Alexa

    2016-07-01

    The Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation belt Electron Loss (BARREL) was able to infer precipitation of radiation belt electrons on multiple time scales and due to multiple loss mechanisms. One storm will be specifically highlighted which occurred on 26 January 2013 when a solar wind shock hit the Earth. Although MeV electrons were observed to be lost due to an EMIC wave event [Zhang et al in prep], and multiple periods of electron loss during substorms were observed [Rae et al submitted JGR, Mann et al in prep], we will consider an event period where loss associated with multiple time scales, and thus possibly different loss mechanisms was observed from 1000 - 1200 UT on 26 January 2013. At about 1005 UT on 26 January 2013 an injection of radiation belt electrons followed by drift echoes for energies of ˜80 - 400 keV. BARREL observed X-rays with energies less than 180 keV associated with multiple temporal structures during the drift echo event period. The Van Allen Probes were at similar L-values but upwards of 2 hours away in MLT. Upper band chorus and ULF waves were observed during the event period. Throughout the beginning of the event period, microbursts were clearly observed. During this time lower band chorus waves as well as time domain structures were observed at Van Allen Probe A located upwards of 2 hours away in MLT. This large difference in MLT meant that neither potential loss mechanism was able to be clearly associated with the microbursts. As the lower band chorus and time domain structures were observed to recede, the microbursts were also observed to subside. ULF time scale modulation of the X-rays was also observed throughout most of the event period. We will examine if the ULF waves are the cause of the precipitation themselves, or are modulating the loss of particles from a secondary loss mechanism [Brito et al 2015 JGR, Rae et al Submitted JGR]. Although the 100s ms and ULF time scales are clearly observed, there is an ˜20 minute

  14. Simulation of radiation belt electron dynamics using in-situ global model of chorus waves inferred from the low-altitude electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Ma, Q.; Chen, L.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Green, J. C.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Henderson, M. G.; Spence, H.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    The global evolution of chorus wave intensity is crucial to evaluate the electron local acceleration by chorus waves, which is fundamentally important for radiation belt electron dynamics. Based on the fact that chorus waves play a dominant role in scattering 30-100 keV electrons, we adopt a physics-based technique of inferring chorus wave amplitudes from the low-altitude electron population (30-100 keV) measured by multiple POES/MetOp satellites, which provide extensive coverage over a broad L-MLT region. This technique is validated through analyzing conjunction events with the Van Allen Probes measuring chorus wave amplitudes near the equator and POES/MetOp satellites measuring the 30-100 keV electron population at the conjugate low altitudes. We adopt this technique to construct chorus wave intensity distributions, which are then used to simulate the radiation belt electron dynamics during the 09 October 2012 storm. The simulation results show that the pronounced electron acceleration to relativistic energies with a peak in phase space density observed by the Van Allen probes was primarily caused by chorus-driven local acceleration. Our numerical simulation of local stochastic acceleration not only accounts for the timescale and energy dependence of the rapid increase in electron flux in the heart of the outer radiation belt, but also reproduces the evolution of the observed electron pitch angle distribution.

  15. Diffusion models for Jupiter's radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacques, S. A.; Davis, L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Solutions are given for the diffusion of trapped particles in a planetary magnetic field in which the first and second adiabatic invariants are preserved but the third is not, using as boundary conditions a fixed density at the outer boundary (the magnetopause) and a zero density at an inner boundary (the planetary surface). Losses to an orbiting natural satellite are included and an approximate evaluation is made of the effects of the synchrotron radiation on the energy of relativistic electrons. Choosing parameters appropriate to Jupiter, the electrons required to produce the observed synchrotron radiation are explained. If a speculative mechanism in which the diffusion is driven by ionospheric wind is the true explanation of the electrons producing the synchrotron emission it can be concluded that Jupiter's inner magnetosphere is occupied by an energetic proton flux that would be a serious hazard to spacecraft.

  16. Modeling the Impenetrable Barrier to Inward Transport of Ultra-relativistic Radiation Belt Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Chen, Y.; Baker, D. N.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    It has long been considered that the inner edge of the Earth's outer radiation belt is closely correlated with the minimum plasmapause location. However, recent discoveries by Baker et al. [1] show that it is not the case for ultra-relativistic electrons (2-10 MeV) in the radiation belt. Based on almost two years of Van Allen Probes/REPT data, they find that the inner edge of highly relativistic electrons is rarely collocated with the plasmapause; and more interestingly, there is a clear, persistent, and nearly impenetrable barrier to inward transport of high energy electrons, observed to locate at L~2.8. The presence of such an impenetrable barrier at this very specific location poses a significant puzzle. Using our DREAM3D diffusion model, which includes radial, pitch angle, and momentum diffusion, we are able to simulate the observed impenetrable barrier of ultra-relativistic electrons. The simulation demonstrates that during strong geomagnetic storms the plasmapause can be compressed to very low L region (sometimes as low as L~3), then strong chorus waves just outside the plasmapause can locally accelerate electrons up to multiple-MeV; when storm recovers, plasmapause moves back to large L, while the highly-relativistic electrons generated at low L continue to diffuse inward and slow decay by pitch angle diffusion from plasmaspheric hiss. The delicate balance between slow inward radial diffusion and weak pitch angle scattering creates a fixed inner boundary or barrier for ultra-relativistic electrons. The barrier is found to locate at a fixed L location, independent of the initial penetration depth of electrons that is correlated with the plasmapause location. Our simulation results quantitatively reproduce the evolution of the flux versus L profile, the L location of the barrier, and the decay rate of highly energetic electrons right outside the barrier. 1Baker, D. N., et al. (2014), Nearly Impenetrable Barrier to Inward Ultra-relativistic Magnetospheric

  17. Radiation belt electron acceleration during the 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm: Observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Zhang, X.-J.; Li, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Kanekal, S. G.; Angelopoulos, V.; Green, J. C.; Goldstein, J.

    2016-06-01

    Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. During the largest storm over the past decade (17 March 2015), relativistic electrons experienced fairly rapid acceleration up to ~7 MeV within 2 days after an initial substantial dropout, as observed by Van Allen Probes. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during the recovery phase of this large storm using a 3-D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the observed and simulated electron evolution, we found that chorus plays a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV near the developing peak location and produces characteristic flat-top pitch angle distributions. By only including radial diffusion, the simulation underestimates the observed electron acceleration, while radial diffusion plays an important role in redistributing electrons and potentially accelerates them to even higher energies. Moreover, plasmaspheric hiss is found to provide efficient pitch angle scattering losses for hundreds of keV electrons, while its scattering effect on > 1 MeV electrons is relatively slow. Although an additional loss process is required to fully explain the overestimated electron fluxes at multi-MeV, the combined physical processes of radial diffusion and pitch angle and energy diffusion by chorus and hiss reproduce the observed electron dynamics remarkably well, suggesting that quasi-linear diffusion theory is reasonable to evaluate radiation belt electron dynamics during this big storm.

  18. Megavolt parallel potentials arising from double-layer streams in the Earth's outer radiation belt.

    PubMed

    Mozer, F S; Bale, S D; Bonnell, J W; Chaston, C C; Roth, I; Wygant, J

    2013-12-01

    Huge numbers of double layers carrying electric fields parallel to the local magnetic field line have been observed on the Van Allen probes in connection with in situ relativistic electron acceleration in the Earth's outer radiation belt. For one case with adequate high time resolution data, 7000 double layers were observed in an interval of 1 min to produce a 230,000 V net parallel potential drop crossing the spacecraft. Lower resolution data show that this event lasted for 6 min and that more than 1,000,000 volts of net parallel potential crossed the spacecraft during this time. A double layer traverses the length of a magnetic field line in about 15 s and the orbital motion of the spacecraft perpendicular to the magnetic field was about 700 km during this 6 min interval. Thus, the instantaneous parallel potential along a single magnetic field line was the order of tens of kilovolts. Electrons on the field line might experience many such potential steps in their lifetimes to accelerate them to energies where they serve as the seed population for relativistic acceleration by coherent, large amplitude whistler mode waves. Because the double-layer speed of 3100  km/s is the order of the electron acoustic speed (and not the ion acoustic speed) of a 25 eV plasma, the double layers may result from a new electron acoustic mode. Acceleration mechanisms involving double layers may also be important in planetary radiation belts such as Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, in the solar corona during flares, and in astrophysical objects. PMID:24476280

  19. Megavolt Parallel Potentials Arising from Double-Layer Streams in the Earth's Outer Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozer, F. S.; Bale, S. D.; Bonnell, J. W.; Chaston, C. C.; Roth, I.; Wygant, J.

    2013-12-01

    Huge numbers of double layers carrying electric fields parallel to the local magnetic field line have been observed on the Van Allen probes in connection with in situ relativistic electron acceleration in the Earth’s outer radiation belt. For one case with adequate high time resolution data, 7000 double layers were observed in an interval of 1 min to produce a 230 000 V net parallel potential drop crossing the spacecraft. Lower resolution data show that this event lasted for 6 min and that more than 1 000 000 volts of net parallel potential crossed the spacecraft during this time. A double layer traverses the length of a magnetic field line in about 15 s and the orbital motion of the spacecraft perpendicular to the magnetic field was about 700 km during this 6 min interval. Thus, the instantaneous parallel potential along a single magnetic field line was the order of tens of kilovolts. Electrons on the field line might experience many such potential steps in their lifetimes to accelerate them to energies where they serve as the seed population for relativistic acceleration by coherent, large amplitude whistler mode waves. Because the double-layer speed of 3100km/s is the order of the electron acoustic speed (and not the ion acoustic speed) of a 25 eV plasma, the double layers may result from a new electron acoustic mode. Acceleration mechanisms involving double layers may also be important in planetary radiation belts such as Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, in the solar corona during flares, and in astrophysical objects.

  20. Post-workshop models of Jupiter's radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, N.

    1972-01-01

    Models for the charged particle populations of Jupiter's trapped radiation belts were derived at the Jupiter Radiation Belt Workshop on the basis of several assumptions which represented a consensus of opinion. It was possible to improve the models on the basis of work performed after the workshop concluded. These improvements affect the models in two ways. The effects of special relativity on the particle energy and flux dependences in the magnetosphere were included in a derivation based on L-shell diffusion with conservation of the magnetic moment. Quantitative conclusions are available for the limit which ion cyclotron instability places on the proton population. A set of models which incorporates these developments in a way consistent with the original workshop assumptions and conclusions is described.

  1. Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics Driven by Large-Amplitude Whistlers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Tel'nikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration of radiation belt electrons driven by oblique large-amplitude whistler waves is studied. We show analytically and numerically that this is a stochastic process; the intensity of which depends on the wave power modified by Bessel functions. The type of this dependence is determined by the character of the nonlinear interaction due to coupling between action and phase. The results show that physically significant quantities have a relatively weak dependence on the wave power.

  2. Processes forming and sustaining Saturn's proton radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, P.; Roussos, E.; Paranicas, C.; Krupp, N.; Haggerty, D. K.

    2013-01-01

    Saturn's proton radiation belts extend over the orbits of several moons that split this region of intense radiation into several distinct belts. Understanding their distribution requires to understand how their particles are created and evolve. High-energy protons are thought to be dominantly produced by cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND). The source of the lower energies and the role of other effects such as charge exchange with the gas originating from Enceladus is still an open question. There is also no certainty so far if the belts exist independently from each other and the rest of the magnetosphere or if and how particles are exchanged between these regions. We approach these problems by using measurements acquired by the MIMI/LEMMS instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft. Protons in the range from 500 keV to 40 MeV are considered. Their intensities are averaged over 7 years of the mission and converted to phase space densities at constant first and second adiabatic invariant. We reproduce the resulting radial profiles with a numerical model that includes radial diffusion, losses from moons and interactions with gas, and a phenomenological source. Our results show that the dominating effects away from the moon sweeping corridors are diffusion and the source, while interactions with gas are secondary. Based on a GEANT4 simulation of the interaction of cosmic rays with Saturn's rings, we conclude that secondary particles produced within the rings can only account for the high-energy part of the source. A comparison with the equivalent processes within Earth's atmosphere shows that Saturn's atmosphere can contribute to the production of the lower energies and might be even dominating at the higher energies. Other possibilities to supply the belts and exchange particles between them, as diffusion and injections from outside the belts, or stripping of ENAs, can be excluded.

  3. Electron losses from the radiation belts caused by EMIC waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, Tobias; Horne, Richard B.; Glauert, Sarah A.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Fraser, Brian J.; Grew, Russell S.

    2014-11-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves cause electron loss in the radiation belts by resonating with high-energy electrons at energies greater than about 500 keV. However, their effectiveness has not been fully quantified. Here we determine the effectiveness of EMIC waves by using wave data from the fluxgate magnetometer on CRRES to calculate bounce-averaged pitch angle and energy diffusion rates for L*=3.5-7 for five levels of Kp between 12 and 18 MLT. To determine the electron loss, EMIC diffusion rates were included in the British Antarctic Survey Radiation Belt Model together with whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, and radial diffusion. By simulating a 100 day period in 1990, we show that EMIC waves caused a significant reduction in the electron flux for energies greater than 2 MeV but only for pitch angles lower than about 60°. The simulations show that the distribution of electrons left behind in space looks like a pancake distribution. Since EMIC waves cannot remove electrons at all pitch angles even at 30 MeV, our results suggest that EMIC waves are unlikely to set an upper limit on the energy of the flux of radiation belt electrons.

  4. Modeling the Inner Magnetosphere: Radiation Belts, Ring Current, and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The space environment is a complex system defined by regions of differing length scales, characteristic energies, and physical processes. It is often difficult, or impossible, to treat all aspects of the space environment relative to a particular problem with a single model. In our studies, we utilize several models working in tandem to examine this highly interconnected system. The methodology and results will be presented for three focused topics: 1) Rapid radiation belt electron enhancements, 2) Ring current study of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), Dst, and plasma composition, and 3) Examination of the outflow of ionospheric ions. In the first study, we use a coupled MHD magnetosphere - kinetic radiation belt model to explain recent Akebono/RDM observations of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. In the second study, we present initial results of a ring current study using a newly coupled kinetic ring current model with an MHD magnetosphere model. Results of a dst study for four geomagnetic events are shown. Moreover, direct comparison with TWINS ENA images are used to infer the role that composition plays in the ring current. In the final study, we directly model the transport of plasma from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. We especially focus on the role of photoelectrons and and wave-particle interactions. The modeling methodology for each of these studies will be detailed along with the results.

  5. A CIR impact study on the radiation belts fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochel Grimald, Sandrine; Benacquista, Rémi; Rolland, Guy

    2016-04-01

    A magnetosphere is an isolated sphere dropped inside the solar wind where it is in equilibrium. When a solar wind structure impacts the magnetosphere, then, the equilibrium is broken and the whole magnetospheric reacts to prevent a magnetospheric collapse. The CIRs are one of the main solar wind structures. They are not considered as the most disturbing solar wind structure, but the evolution of the magnetic indices indicates that the magnetosphere is disturbed deeply during a CIR impact. The radiation belts are a key region located in the deepest part of the magnetosphere, close to the Earth. They constitute a sensitive region to the variations of magnetosphere activity as the study of the radiation belts fluxes show disturbances and increasing of the high energetic particles fluxes during magnetospheric storms and substorms. The purpose of this work is to understand how a CIR impacts the radiation belts depending on the solar wind parameters. To do so, the NOAA and Ace data have been used during more than a solar cycle, and the electrons fluxes at various L have been analysed depending on the CIR caracteristics.

  6. Earth's Radiation Belts: The View from Juno's Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, H. N.; Joergensen, J. L.; Hansen, C. J.; Caplinger, M. A.; Ravine, M. A.; Gladstone, R.; Versteeg, M. H.; Mauk, B.; Paranicas, C.; Haggerty, D. K.; Thorne, R. M.; Connerney, J. E.; Kang, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    Juno's cameras, particle instruments, and ultraviolet imaging spectrograph have been heavily shielded for operation within Jupiter's high radiation environment. However, varying quantities of >1-MeV electrons and >10-MeV protons will be energetic enough to penetrate instrument shielding and be detected as transient background signatures by the instruments. The differing shielding profiles of Juno's instruments lead to differing spectral sensitivities to penetrating electrons and protons within these regimes. This presentation will discuss radiation data collected by Juno in the Earth's magnetosphere during Juno's October 9, 2013 Earth flyby (559 km altitude at closest approach). The focus will be data from Juno's Stellar Reference Unit, Advanced Stellar Compass star cameras, and JunoCam imager acquired during coordinated proton measurements within the inner zone and during the spacecraft's inbound and outbound passages through the outer zone (L ~3-5). The background radiation signatures from these cameras will be correlated with dark count background data collected at these geometries by Juno's Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) and Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI). Further comparison will be made to Van Allen Probe data to calibrate Juno's camera results and contribute an additional view of the Earth's radiation environment during this unique event.

  7. Role of ULF Waves in Radiation Belt and Ring Current Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, I. R.; Murphy, K. R.; Rae, I. J.; Ozeke, L.; Milling, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    combination of data from ground arrays such as CARISMA and the contemporaneous operation of the NASA Van Allen Probes (VAP) mission offers an excellent basis for understanding this cross-energy plasma coupling which spans more than 6 orders of magnitude in energy. Explaining the casual connections between plasmas in the plasmasphere (eV), ring current (keV), and radiation belt (MeV), via the intermediaries of plasma waves, is key to understanding inner magnetosphere dynamics. This work has received funding from the European Union under the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-Space) under grant agreement n 284520 for the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project.

  8. What (maybe) you do not know about radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscher, D. M.; Sicard-Piet, A.; Rolland, G.

    2013-12-01

    As observed by several authors, the outer electron radiation belt reacts globally to the solar cycle. This is well known. Their trend at very low L shells is less known. Using NOAA POES 0° detector between L=1.16 and 1.18, we discovered a factor 10 increase of the 30-300keV electron flux in the declining phase of the solar cycle. It was observed in 2003, using SEM-2 detector on board POES 15, but the same trend was observed in 1983 and in 1991-1992 using the old SEM detector on the NOAA LEO satellites. Protons in the same range of energy (50-500keV) exhibits a similar behaviour. The second proton belt has been highlighted by the USAF-NASA CRRES satellite. Such proton belt was observed a few times in the past ( in 1963 by McIlwain, in February 1986 by Gussenhoven et al.), but if the good energy range is observed, this can appear several times in a solar cycle. We will show measurements of 10 MeV protons on board the SSO satellite SAC-C, showing the dynamics of the proton belt following the events of March and November 2001, October-November 2003 and September 2005. The NASA AP8 proton model is limited to 300MeV. Is it a physical limitation or simply a question of signal to noise limitation at the time this model was developed? Using old NOAA satellites which have on board a very high energy detector (HEPAD), we will show trapped particles at energies not far from 1GeV. This was measured during several years, from 1979 to 1986, showing the long beating of the belt with the solar cycle.

  9. Characteristics of pitch angle distributions of hundreds of keV electrons in the slot region and inner radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Malaspina, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The pitch angle distribution (PAD) of energetic electrons in the slot region and inner radiation belt received little attention in the past decades due to the lack of quality measurements. Using the state-of-the-art pitch angle-resolved data from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer instrument onboard the Van Allen Probes, a detailed analysis of hundreds of keV electron PADs below L = 4 is performed, in which the PADs are categorized into three types: normal (flux peaking at 90°), cap (exceedingly peaking narrowly around 90°), and 90° minimum (lower flux at 90°) PADs. By examining the characteristics of the PADs of ˜460 keV electrons for over a year, we find that the 90° minimum PADs are generally present in the inner belt (L<2), while normal PADs dominate at L˜3.5-4. In the region between, 90° minimum PADs dominate during injection times and normal PADs dominate during quiet times. Cap PADs appear mostly at the decay phase of storms in the slot region and are likely caused by the pitch angle scattering of hiss waves. Fitting the normal PADs into sinnα form, the parameter n is much higher below L = 3 than that in the outer belt and relatively constant in the inner belt but changes significantly in the slot region (2 < L < 3) during injection times. As for the 90° minimum PADs, by performing a detailed case study, we find in the slot region this type of PAD is likely caused by chorus wave heating, but this mechanism can hardly explain the formation of 90° minimum PADs at the center of inner belt.

  10. Canadian radiation belt science in the ILWS era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, I. R.

    The Outer Radiation Belt Injection, Transport, Acceleration, and Loss Satellite (ORBITALS) is a Canadian Space Agency small satellite mission proposed as a Canadian contribution to the satellite infrastructure for the International Living With a Star (ILWS) program. Planned to operate contemporaneously with the NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), the ORBITALS will monitor the energetic electron and ion populations in the inner magnetosphere across a wide range of energies (keV to tens of MeV) as well as the dynamic electric and magnetic fields, waves, and cold plasma environment which govern the injection, transport, acceleration and loss of these energetic and space weather critical particle populations in the inner magnetosphere. Currently in Phase A Design Study, the ORBITALS will be launched into a low-inclination GTO-like orbit which every second orbit maximizes the long lasting apogee-pass conjunctions with both the ground-based instruments of the Canadian Geospace Monitoring (CGSM) array as well as with the GOES East and West and geosynchronous communications satellites in the North American sector. In a twelve-hour orbit, every second apogee will conjunct with instrumentation 180 degree in longitude away in the Asian sector. Specifically, the ORBITALS will make the measurements necessary to reach reveal fundamental new understanding of the relative importance of different physical processes (for example VLF verses ULF waves) which shape the energetic particle populations in the inner magnetosphere, as well as providing the raw radiation measurements at MEO altitudes necessary for the development of the next-generation of radiation belt specification models. On-board experiments will also monitor the dose, single event upset, and deep-dielectric charging responses of electronic components on-orbit. Supporting ground-based measurements of ULF and higher frequency wave fields from the Canadian CARISMA (www.carisma.ca) magnetometer array, as well as from

  11. Jupiter's radiation belts and the sweeping effect of its satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, G. D.; Hess, W. N.

    1972-01-01

    Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts were analyzed, with particular reference to the effect of its five inner satellites, located within its magnetosphere. The characteristics of trapped electrons and protons with a magnetic moment of 50 MeV/gauss, considered typical at Jupiter, were calculated. The mean absorption time before impact was calculated for particles located at the radial distance of each of the satellites. A characteristic diffusion time near each satellite was calculated, assuming violation of the third invariant due to magnetic fluctuations associated with fluctuations in the solar wind. This diffusion time was found to be long compared with the absorption lifetimes at Europa and Amalthea.

  12. Galactic Cosmic Rays impact on Saturn innermost radiation belt formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, A.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Dandouras, I.

    2014-04-01

    Rely on Cassini observations of ENAs during the orbital insertion in 2004, Krimigis et al. pointed out possible existence of the innermost radiation belt between Saturn 's atmosphere and D-ring (1). In the end of mission in 2017, Cassini is going to come again to this enigmatic and various region and pass directly through this narrow gap between planet and its rings. In our study we would like to simulate possible sources and losses for energetic particles population there and model the environment, which Cassini will meet during these last orbits. As a main possible sources for the innermost radiation belt we assume the interaction of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) with the Saturn's atmosphere and rings, which due to CRAND process can produce the keV-MeV ions or electrons in the region and the double charge exchange of the ENAs, coming from the middle magnetosphere, what can bring the keV ions to the region of our interest. Both of these possible sources are possible to evaluate using the charged particle tracer, which we developed in our group. It works in different modes (Newton-Lorentz full equation of motion, guiding centre or bounce averaged approximations), and allows use of different magnetic field models (from simple dipole magnetic field till complex realistic magnetic field model like Khurana model of Saturn's magnetosphere) for both forward and backward tracing simulations. This charged particle tracer was validated using the comparison of the simulation results and observations during several flybys of Cassini by icy moons of Saturn. Through the backward-tracing of GCRs around the planet we evaluate how the ring shadow filters the GCR spectrum that hits the Saturn's atmosphere and how non-dipolar effects change the Strömer cutoff rigidities of GCRs, especially for the high-latitude atmosphere that maps magnetically in the outer magnetosphere. Also we estimate the production of secondaries (and from the multiple impacts of these secondaries on the

  13. GCR as a source for Inner radiation belt of Saturn.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, A.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Dandouras, I. S.

    2014-12-01

    During the insertion orbit of Cassini in 2004 the Ion and Neutron Camera measured significant fluxes of the energetic neutral atoms (ENA) coming from the area between the D-ring and the Saturn's atmosphere, what brought up the idea of the possible existence of the innermost radiation belt in this narrow gap (1). There are two main sources of energetic charged particles for such inner radiation belt: the interaction of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) with the Saturn's atmosphere and rings, which due to CRAND process can produce the keV-MeV ions or electrons in the region, and the double charge exchange of the ENAs, coming from the middle magnetosphere, what can bring the keV ions to the region of our interest. Using the particles tracer, which was developed in our group, and GEANT4 software, we study in details those two processes. With a particle tracer we evaluate the GCR access to the Saturn atmosphere and rings. Simulation of the GCR trajectories allows to calculate the energy spectra of the arriving energetic particles, which is much more accurate, compare to the analytically predicted spectra using the Stoermer theory, since simulation includes effects of the ring shadow and non-dipolar processes in the magnetosphere. Using the GEANT4 software the penetration of the GCR through the matter of rings was simulated, and the production of secondaries particles was estimated. Finally, the motion of secondaries was simulated using the particles tracer, and evaluation of the energy spectrum of neutrons the decay of which leads to the production of final CRAND elements in the inner Saturnian radiation belts was done. We show that for inner radiation belt most energetic ions comes from GCR interaction with rings, it's penetration and from interaction of secondaries with Saturn's atmosphere. This simulation allows us to predict the fluxes of energetic ions and electrons, which particle detector MIMI/LEMMS onboard the Cassini can measure during the so-called "proximal

  14. Radial diffusion of radiation belt electrons in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Kara Lynn

    It is becoming increasingly important to understand the dynamics of radiation belt energetic particles given their potentially hazardous effects on satellites and our ever-increasing dependence on those satellites. There is a need to determine whether existing two-dimensional models are adequate in estimating the dynamics of the radiation belts or if a three-dimensional model is required. Discussion of general space physics and radiation belt topology is followed by an account of existing models and how these models can be improved by extending dynamic calculations from two dimensions to three. A model is then developed describing magnetic and electric fields associated with poloidal mode Pc5 ULF waves. The frequency and L dependence of the ULF wave power is included in this model by incorporating published ground-based magnetometer data. The influence of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves in the Pc5 frequency range on radiation belt electrons in a dipole magnetic field is examined. This is the first analysis in three dimensions utilizing model ULF wave electric and magnetic fields in the guiding center trajectories of relativistic electrons. It is demonstrated here that realistic spectral characteristics play a significant role in the rate of diffusion of relativistic electrons via drift resonance with poloidal mode ULF waves. Radial diffusion rates including bounce motion are calculated for alphaeq ≥ 50° (lambda ≤ 20°). Energy, L and pitch angle dependence of diffusion rates are calculated for L-independent, L-dependent, frequency independent and frequency dependent field power. During geomagnetic storms when ULF wave power is increased, ULF waves are a significant driver of increased fluxes of relativistic electrons inside geosynchronous orbit. Diffusion time scales obtained here, when frequency and L dependence compared to observations of ULF wave power is included, support this conclusion. A compression is then added to the dipole field model and diffusion

  15. Temporal and Spatial Characterization of ULF power and its relation to relativistic electrons in the radiation belts during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Moya, P. S.; Pinto, V. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Kanekal, S.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    The response of the inner magnetosphere to different geomagnetic storm and solar wind conditions is still not fully understood. For example, electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt can be enhanced or depleted depending on the energy of the particles, and the phase or driver of the storm. In addition, the time scale of the process can vary from minutes to several days. Wave-particle interactions (such as stochastic diffusion or resonant acceleration) are believed to play an important role regulating the dynamics of the particles. However, despite decades of intense theoretical and observational studies, a definitive framework for the wave-particle interactions and the resulting effects in the magnetospheric dynamics remains an open problem. To progress towards a better understanding of the inner magnetosphere dynamics, we need a complete characterization of the electromagnetic fluctuations during storms. Here, using Van Allen Probe magnetic field and relativistic electron observations, we present an statistical study of the relationship between ULF wave power and relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt during several geomagnetic storms between 2012 and 2015, depending on local time, geocentric distance and storm phase.

  16. Development of a new Global RAdiation Belt model: GRAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard-Piet, Angelica; Lazaro, Didier; Maget, Vincent; Rolland, Guy; Ecoffet, Robert; Bourdarie, Sébastien; Boscher, Daniel; Standarovski, Denis

    2016-07-01

    The well known AP8 and AE8 NASA models are commonly used in the industry to specify the radiation belt environment. Unfortunately, there are some limitations in the use of these models, first due to the covered energy range, but also because in some regions of space, there are discrepancies between the predicted average values and the measurements. Therefore, our aim is to develop a radiation belt model, covering a large region of space and energy, from LEO altitudes to GEO and above, and from plasma to relativistic particles. The aim for the first version is to correct the AP8 and AE8 models where they are deficient or not defined. At geostationary, we developed ten years ago for electrons the IGE-2006 model which was proven to be more accurate than AE8, and used commonly in the industry, covering a broad energy range, from 1keV to 5MeV. From then, a proton model for geostationary orbit was also developed for material applications, followed by the OZONE model covering a narrower energy range but the whole outer electron belt, a SLOT model to asses average electron values for 2Radiation Belt model. We will present first beta version during this conference.

  17. The Importance of Electron Source Population to the Remarkable Enhancement of Radiation belt Electrons during the October 2012 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Reeves, G. D.; Chen, Y.; Henderson, M. G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2013-12-01

    During the October 8-9 2012 storm, the MeV electron fluxes in the heart of the outer radiation belt are first wiped out then exhibit a three-orders-of-magnitude increase on the timescale of hours, as observed by the MagEIS and REPT instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes. There is strong observational evidence that the remarkable enhancement is due to local acceleration by chorus waves, as shown in the recent Science paper by Reeves et al.1. However, the importance of the dynamic electron source population transported in from the plasma sheet, to the observed remarkable enhancement, has not been studied. We illustrate the importance of the source population with our simulation of the event using the DREAM 3D diffusion model. Three new modifications have been implemented in the model: 1) incorporating a realistic and time-dependent low-energy boundary condition at 100 keV obtained from the MagEIS data; 2) utilizing event-specific chorus wave distributions derived from the low-energy electron precipitation observed by POES and validated against the in situ wave data from EMFISIS; 3) using an ';open' boundary condition at L*=11 and implementing electron lifetimes on the order of the drift period outside the solar-wind driven last closed drift shell. The model quantitatively reproduces the MeV electron dynamics during this event, including the fast dropout at the start of Oct. 8th, low electron flux during the first Dst dip, and the remarkable enhancement peaked at L*=4.2 during the second Dst dip. By comparing the model results with realistic source population against those with constant low-energy boundary (see figure), we find that the realistic electron source population is critical to reproduce the observed fast and significant increase of MeV electrons. 1Reeves, G. D., et al. (2013), Electron Acceleration in the Heart of the Van Allen Radiation Belts, Science, DOI:10.1126/science.1237743. Comparison between data and model results during the October 2012 storm for

  18. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV—even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Key Points Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presented The coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m value The electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic PMID:26167440

  19. Space Earthquake Perturbation Simulation (SEPS) an application based on Geant4 tools to model and simulate the interaction between the Earthquake and the particle trapped on the Van Allen belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroglini, Filippo; Jerome Burger, William; Battiston, Roberto; Vitale, Vincenzo; Zhang, Yu

    2014-05-01

    During last decades, few space experiments revealed anomalous bursts of charged particles, mainly electrons with energy larger than few MeV. A possible source of these bursts are the low-frequency seismo-electromagnetic emissions, which can cause the precipitation of the electrons from the lower boundary of their inner belt. Studies of these bursts reported also a short-term pre-seismic excess. Starting from simulation tools traditionally used on high energy physics we developed a dedicated application SEPS (Space Perturbation Earthquake Simulation), based on the Geant4 tool and PLANETOCOSMICS program, able to model and simulate the electromagnetic interaction between the earthquake and the particles trapped in the inner Van Allen belt. With SEPS one can study the transport of particles trapped in the Van Allen belts through the Earth's magnetic field also taking into account possible interactions with the Earth's atmosphere. SEPS provides the possibility of: testing different models of interaction between electromagnetic waves and trapped particles, defining the mechanism of interaction as also shaping the area in which this takes place,assessing the effects of perturbations in the magnetic field on the particles path, performing back-tracking analysis and also modelling the interaction with electric fields. SEPS is in advanced development stage, so that it could be already exploited to test in details the results of correlation analysis between particle bursts and earthquakes based on NOAA and SAMPEX data. The test was performed both with a full simulation analysis, (tracing from the position of the earthquake and going to see if there were paths compatible with the burst revealed) and with a back-tracking analysis (tracing from the burst detection point and checking the compatibility with the position of associated earthquake).

  20. Ultra-relativistic electrons in Jupiter's radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Bolton, S J; Janssen, M; Thorne, R; Levin, S; Klein, M; Gulkis, S; Bastian, T; Sault, R; Elachi, C; Hofstadter, M; Bunker, A; Dulk, G; Gudim, E; Hamilton, G; Johnson, W T K; Leblanc, Y; Liepack, O; McLeod, R; Roller, J; Roth, L; West, R

    2002-02-28

    Ground-based observations have shown that Jupiter is a two-component source of microwave radio emission: thermal atmospheric emission and synchrotron emission from energetic electrons spiralling in Jupiter's magnetic field. Later in situ measurements confirmed the existence of Jupiter's high-energy electron-radiation belts, with evidence for electrons at energies up to 20[?]MeV. Although most radiation belt models predict electrons at higher energies, adiabatic diffusion theory can account only for energies up to around 20[?]MeV. Unambiguous evidence for more energetic electrons is lacking. Here we report observations of 13.8[?]GHz synchrotron emission that confirm the presence of electrons with energies up to 50[?]MeV; the data were collected during the Cassini fly-by of Jupiter. These energetic electrons may be repeatedly accelerated through an interaction with plasma waves, which can transfer energy into the electrons. Preliminary comparison of our data with model results suggests that electrons with energies of less than 20[?]MeV are more numerous than previously believed. PMID:11875557

  1. Internal Charging Design Environments for the Earths Radiation Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Edwards, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Relativistic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts are a widely recognized threat to spacecraft because they penetrate lightly shielded vehicle hulls and deep into insulating materials where they accumulate to sufficient levels to produce electrostatic discharges. Strategies for evaluating the magnitude of the relativistic electron flux environment and its potential for producing ESD events are varied. Simple "rule of thumb" estimates such as the widely used 10(exp 10) e-/sq cm fluence within 10 hour threshold for the onset of pulsing in dielectric materials provide a quick estimate of when to expect charging issues. More sophisticated strategies based on models of the trapped electron flux within the Earth s magnetic field provide time dependent estimates of electron flux along spacecraft orbits and orbit integrate electron flux. Finally, measurements of electron flux can be used to demonstrate mean and extreme relativistic electron environments. This presentation will evaluate strategies used to specify energetic electron flux and fluence environments along spacecraft trajectories in the Earth s radiation belts.

  2. Short-Term Forecasting of Radiation Belt and Ring Current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements a mathematical model of the radiation-belt and ring-current plasmas resulting from interactions between the solar wind and the Earth s magnetic field, for the purpose of predicting fluxes of energetic electrons (10 keV to 5 MeV) and protons (10 keV to 1 MeV), which are hazardous to humans and spacecraft. Given solar-wind and interplanetary-magnetic-field data as inputs, the program solves the convection-diffusion equations of plasma distribution functions in the range of 2 to 10 Earth radii. Phenomena represented in the model include particle drifts resulting from the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field; electric fields associated with the rotation of the Earth, convection, and temporal variation of the magnetic field; and losses along particle-drift paths. The model can readily accommodate new magnetic- and electric-field submodels and new information regarding physical processes that drive the radiation-belt and ring-current plasmas. Despite the complexity of the model, the program can be run in real time on ordinary computers. At present, the program can calculate present electron and proton fluxes; after further development, it should be able to predict the fluxes 24 hours in advance

  3. Radiation Belt Electron Pitch Angle Measurements from the GOES Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onsager, T. G.; Green, J. C.; Singer, H. J.

    2004-12-01

    Radiation belt electron pitch angle distributions provide important information regarding the source and loss processes that control the electron flux levels. As the flux levels vary, it is important to understand the extent to which the distinctive pitch angle distributions are formed through specific source and loss processes versus adiabatic drifts. In addition, pitch angle information is critical when mapping electron fluxes from one location to another. In this presentation, we give an analysis of the pitch angle distribution of >2 MeV electrons measured at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES satellites. Although the current GOES satellites are three-axis stabilized during normal operation, extensive data coverage is available during on-orbit storage of the satellites when they were spinning. During these times, well resolved pitch angle distributions have been obtained using the simultaneous electron and magnetic field measurements. These measurements are available from late 1998 to the present, allowing us to characterize the radiation belt electron pitch angle distributions as a function of local time, flux level, and geomagnetic activity during key phases of the current solar cycle.

  4. Novel Techniques for Exploring the Physics of the Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2012-10-01

    The plasma physics of the Radiation Belts (RB) is a premier scientific topic with important technological implications. A new mission the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) will be launched in August, 2012, fully instrumented to explore the RB Physics with emphasis on particle interactions with low frequency plasma waves that control the rates of energetic particle precipitation, acceleration and transport. An important difficulty with passive observation, such as the RBSP, is the ``chicken & egg'' problem. Namely particles drive waves while waves precipitate, accelerate and transport particles. It is a complex, non-linear interaction with multiple feedbacks. The two-satellite coverage provided by RBSP and similar missions does not allow for uniquely identifying cause and effect. A new technology recently developed using ionospheric heaters -- powerful HF transmitters or phased arrays - that allow controlled heating of the ionosphere provides us with means for injecting low frequency waves in the ULF/ELF/VLF range into the RB and using the satellites overflying the heater magnetic flux tubes to diagnose the wave particle interactions. The paper will provide a comprehensive planning of experiments that use the HAARP, Arecibo and SURA heaters in conjunction with RBSP and other satellite missions, such as the Air Force DSX and the Russian RESONANCE, to provide new inroads into the RB physics.

  5. Atmospheric scattering and decay of inner radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamics of inner radiation belt electrons are governed by competing source, loss, and transport processes. However, during the recent extended solar minimum period the source was inactive and electron intensity was characterized by steady decay. This provided an opportunity to determine contributions to the decay rate of losses by precipitation into the atmosphere and of diffusive radial transport. To this end, a stochastic simulation of inner radiation belt electron transport is compared to data taken by the IDP instrument on the DEMETER satellite during 2009. For quasi-trapped, 200 keV electrons atL= 1.3, observed in the drift loss cone (DLC), results are consistent with electron precipitation losses by atmospheric scattering alone, provided account is taken of non-diffusive wide-angle scattering. Such scattering is included in the stochastic simulation using a Markov jump process. Diffusive small-angle atmospheric scattering, while causing most of the precipitation losses, is too slow relative to azimuthal drift to contribute significantly to DLC intensity. Similarly there is no contribution from scattering by VLF plasma waves. Energy loss, energy diffusion, and azimuthal drift are also included in the model. Even so, observed decay rates of stably-trapped electrons withL < 1.5 are slower than predicted by scattering losses alone, requiring radial diffusion with coefficient DLL ˜ 3 × 10-10 s-1 to replenish electrons lost to the atmosphere at low L values.

  6. Competing source and loss mechanisms due to wave-particle interactions in Earth's outer radiation belt during the 30 September to 3 October 2012 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Li, W.; Bortnik, J.; Ni, B.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Morley, S. K.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Usanova, M.; Mann, I. R.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Huang, C.-L.; Spence, H.; Kurth, W.; Kletzing, C.; Rodriguez, J. V.

    2014-03-01

    Drastic variations of Earth's outer radiation belt electrons ultimately result from various competing source, loss, and transport processes, to which wave-particle interactions are critically important. Using 15 spacecraft including NASA's Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and SAMPEX missions and NOAA's GOES and POES constellations, we investigated the evolution of the outer belt during the strong geomagnetic storm of 30 September to 3 October 2012. This storm's main phase dropout exhibited enhanced losses to the atmosphere at L* < 4, where the phase space density (PSD) of multi-MeV electrons dropped by over an order of magnitude in <4 h. Based on POES observations of precipitating >1 MeV electrons and energetic protons, SAMPEX >1 MeV electrons, and ground observations of band-limited Pc1-2 wave activity, we show that this sudden loss was consistent with pitch angle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the dusk magnetic local time sector at 3 < L* < 4. At 4 < L* < 5, local acceleration was also active during the main and early recovery phases, when growing peaks in electron PSD were observed by both Van Allen Probes and THEMIS. This acceleration corresponded to the period when IMF Bz was southward, the AE index was >300 nT, and energetic electron injections and whistler-mode chorus waves were observed throughout the inner magnetosphere for >12 h. After this period, Bz turned northward, and injections, chorus activity, and enhancements in PSD ceased. Overall, the outer belt was depleted by this storm. From the unprecedented level of observations available, we show direct evidence of the competitive nature of different wave-particle interactions controlling relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt.

  7. Examining Relativistic Electron Loss in the Outer Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. C.; Onsager, T. G.; O'Brien, P.

    2003-12-01

    Since the discovery of earth's radiation belts researchers have sought to identify the mechanisms that dictate the seemingly erratic relativistic electron flux levels in the outer belt. Contrary to intuition, relativistic electron flux levels do not always increase during geomagnetic storms even though these storms signify enhanced energy input from the solar wind to the magnetosphere [Reeves et al., 2003; O'Brien et al., 2001]. The fickle response of the radiation belt electrons to geomagnetic activity suggests that flux levels are determined by the outcome of a continuous competition between acceleration and loss. Some progress has been made developing and testing acceleration mechanisms but little is known about how relativistic electrons are lost. We examine relativistic electron losses in the outer belt focusing our attention on flux decrease events of the type first described by Onsager et al. [2002]. The study showed a sudden decrease of geosynchronous >2MeV electron flux occurring simultaneously with local stretching of the magnetic field. The decrease was first observed near 15:00 MLT and progressed to all local times after a period of ˜10 hours. Expanding on the work of Onsager et al. [2002], we have identified ˜ 51 such flux decrease events in the GOES and LANL data and present the results of a superposed epoch analysis of solar wind data, geomagnetic activity indicators, and locally measured magnetic field and plasma data. The analysis shows that flux decreases occur after 1-2 days of quiet condition. They begin when either the solar wind dynamic pressure increases or Bz turns southward pushing hot dense plasma earthward to form a partial ring current and stretched magnetic field at dusk. Adiabatic electron motion in response to the stretched magnetic field may explain the initial flux reduction; however, often the flux does not recover with the magnetic field recovery, indicating that true loss from the magnetosphere is occurring. Using Polar and

  8. Recent Advances in Understanding Radiation Belt Dynamics in the Earth's Inner Zone and Slot Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.

    2015-12-01

    Comprehensive measurements of the inner belt protons from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) onboard Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, revealed new features of inner belt protons in terms of their spectrum distribution, spatial distribution, pitch angle distribution, and their different source populations. Concurrent measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, in a highly inclined low Earth orbit, and REPT demonstrated that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt and their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background associated with the inner belt protons, while higher energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Analysis on sub-MeV electrons data in the inner belt and slot region from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) on board Van Allen Probes revealed rather complicated pitch angle distribution of these energetic electrons, with the 90 deg-minimum (butterfly) pitch angle distribution dominating near the magnetic equator. Furthermore, it is clearly shown from MagEIS measurements that 10s - 100s keV electrons are commonly seen penetrating into the inner belt region during geomagnetic active times while protons of similar energies are hardly seen there. These are part of a summary of the most recent measurements and understanding of the dynamics of energetic particles in the inner zone and slot region to be exhibited and discussed in this presentation.

  9. Data From HANE-Generated Radiation Belts and the Origin of Diffusion Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, Dan

    2012-07-16

    In this presentation we briefly review some of the published data regarding the artificial radiation belts produced by the Starfish and R2 high altitude nuclear explosions in 1962. The data showed slow temporal variations of the belts in altitude (L) and pitch angle ({alpha}) that could be modeled as a diffusion process. That early work formed the basis for more complex radiation belt diffusion models that are in use at present.

  10. The Van Allen Probes first year of discovery and understanding (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B.; Fox, N. J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Kessel, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes twin spacecraft were launched on 30 August 2012 and inserted into nearly identical, 1.1 x 5.8 RE elliptical, low inclination (10°), 9-hour period Earth orbits with one of the two spacecraft lapping the other about every 2.5 months. The discoveries and understandings achieved by the Van Allen Probes science investigations since the operational mission began on 1 November 2012 are all that we had hoped. The probes are discovering new and unanticipated behaviors of the radiation belts, for example coherently ordered multiple structures, and are revealing quantitatively how and why those behaviors occur. The probes are answering definitely outstanding important questions regarding Earth's inner magnetosphere, for example, the extent to which and the processes by which local acceleration contributes to creation of the belts. With its close 2-month coordination with the BARREL mission of opportunity array of Antarctic balloons, the Probes are contributing greatly to our understanding of the causes of radiation belt loss and the relationship between high and low altitude radiation belt phenomena. In this overview presentation we assess the discoveries and findings of the Van Allen Probes mission following its first year of operation, and provide a guide to the activities and achievements anticipated over the next year.

  11. Observations of Whistler-Mode Chorus with Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, William; Hospodarsky, George; Santolik, Ondrej; Kletzing, Craig; Bounds, Scott

    2014-10-01

    The Van Allen Probes mission provides an excellent opportunity to observe whistler-mode chorus and its role in the radiation belts. The plasma wave instrument on the two probes, called Waves, includes six identical waveform receivers covering the frequency range from 10 Hz to 12 kHz. The instrument measures three orthogonal magnetic field components and three orthogonal electric field components of waves. This complement supports wave-normal and Poynting flux analyses of chorus as well as other wave modes that interact with radiation belt particles. Extensive use of burst modes provides multicomponent waveforms enabling the study of individual chorus elements, including their substructure. The early-mission publications confirm the importance of chorus to the local acceleration of electrons in the outer radiation belts. The orbital precession of the twin Van Allen Probes through a complete range of local times now allows for a new survey of the distribution of chorus emissions. Hence, we now have the tools to study chorus from the nonlinear growth in chorus element substructures through synoptic studies of the near-equatorial occurrence of chorus out to a distance of approximately 5.8 Earth radii.

  12. The "zebra stripes": An effect of F region zonal plasma drifts on the longitudinal distribution of radiation belt particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejosne, Solène; Roederer, Juan G.

    2016-01-01

    We examine a characteristic effect, namely, the ubiquitous appearance of structured peaks and valleys called zebra stripes in the spectrograms of energetic electrons and ions trapped in the inner belt below L ~ 3. We propose an explanation of this phenomenon as a purely kinematic consequence of particle drift velocity modulation caused by F region zonal plasma drifts in the ionosphere. In other words, we amend the traditional assumption that the electric field associated with ionospheric plasma drives trapped particle distributions into rigid corotation with the Earth. An equation based on a simple first-order model is set up to determine quantitatively the appearance of zebra stripes as a function of magnetic time. Our numerical predictions are in agreement with measurements by the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment detector onboard Van Allen Probes, namely: (1) the central energy of any peak identified in the spectrum on the dayside is the central energy of a spectral valley on the night side, and vice versa; (2) there is also an approximate peak-to-valley inversion when comparing the spectrum of trapped electrons with that of trapped ions in the same place; and (3) the actual energy separation between two consecutive peaks (or number of stripes) in the spectrogram of a trapped population is an indicator of the time spent by the particles drifting under quiet conditions.

  13. ULF Waves in the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: Role in Radiation Belt and Ring Current Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, I. R.; Murphy, K. R.; Rae, J.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Ozeke, L.; Milling, D. K.

    2013-05-01

    . Finally, the combination of data from ground arrays such as CARISMA and the contemporaneous operation of the NASA Van Allen Probes mission offers an excellent basis for understanding this cross-energy plasma coupling which spans more than 6 orders of magnitude in energy; we present an initial example of ULF-wave particle interaction using early mission data. This work has received funding from the European Union under the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-Space) under grant agreement n 284520 for the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project.

  14. Exploring the Jupiter's and Saturn's radiation belts with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Julien N.; Zarka, Philippe; Pater Imke, de; Hess, Sebastien; Tasse, Cyril; Courtin, Regis; Hofstadter, Mark; Santos-Costa, Daniel; Nettelmann, Nadine; lorenzato, Lise

    2014-05-01

    Since its detection in the mid-fifties, the decimeter synchrotron radiation (DIM), originating from the radiation belts of Jupiter, has been extensively observed over a wide spectrum (from >300 MHz to 22 GHz) by various radio instruments (VLA, ATCA, WSRT, Cassini...). They provided accurate flux measurements as well as resolved maps of the emission that revealed spatial, temporal and spectral variabilities. The strong magnetic field (~4.2 G at the equator) is responsible for the radio emission generated by relativistic electrons. The emission varies at different time scales (short-time variations of hours to long-term variation over decades) due to the combination of visibility configuration (fast rotating 'dipole' magnetic field, beamed radio emission) and intrinsic local variations (interaction between relativistic electrons and satellites/dust, delayed effect of the solar wind ram pressure, impacts events) (e.g. de Pater & Klein, 1989; de Pater & Dunn, 2003; Bagenal (ed.) et al., 2004; Santos-Costa, 2009, 2011). A complete framework is necessary to fully understand the source, loss and transport processes of the electrons populating the inner magnetosphere over a wide frequency range. The low frequencies are associated with electron of lower energies situated in weaker magnetic field regions. LOFAR, the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) (van Haarlem et al., 2012), the last generation of versatile and digital ground-based radio interferometer operates in the [30-250] MHz bandwidth. It brings very high time (~μsec), frequency (~kHz) and angular (~asec) resolutions and huge sensitivities (~mJy). In November 2011, a single 10-hour track enabled to cover an entire planetary rotation and led to image, for the first time, the radiation belts between 127-172 MHz (Girard et al. 2012, 2013). In Feb 2013, an 11-hour joint LOFAR/WSRT observing campaign seized the dyname state of the radiation belts from 45 MHz up to 5 GHz. We will present the current study of the radiation belts

  15. Three Whistler Excitation Bands in Jupiter's Radiation Belts.*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, V. G.; Bespalov, P. A.; Stefan, V.

    1996-11-01

    The instability of Jupiter's radiation belts is studied from the perspective of whistler wave excitation at cyclotron resonance. In accordance with direct measurement a dumbbell-shaped distribution function is used for relativistic electrons with both transverse and longitudinal anisotropy, i.e., the maximum of the angular distribution in the equatorial plane is not perpendicular to the magnetic field. It is shown that instability occurs in three bands: one band is situated below the relativistic gyrofrequency while the other two are centered at half the nonrelativistic gyrofrequency. These results are important because the experiments on board the ``Voyager-1'' indicated that the whistler emission in the magnetosphere of Jupiter is typically registered in three spectral bands. Supported in part by Tesla Labs, Inc., La Jolla, CA 92038-2946, within the project ``Plasma Astrophysics.''. ^1Permanent address: Institute for Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia.

  16. New High Energy Electron Component of Earth Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, V. V.; Galper, A. M.; Gratchev, V. M.; Kirillov-Ugryumov, V. G.; Ulin, S. E.; Voronov, S. A.

    The Earth Radiation Belt (ERB) was discovered in the course of the first flights of Russian and American satellites with conventional instruments (gas discharge and scintillation counters), which made it possible to investigate many characteristics of trapped particles and simulate adequate radiation belt models. However, the experimental and theoretical evidence accumulated over recent time, needs more elaborate measurements for its interpretation. These measurements became feasible after the development of devices based on more perfect detectors (solid and gas-filled Cherenkov detectors, magnetic spectrometer, scintillation time-of-flight systems). The evidence requiring new direct measurements in the ERB was obtained in the late 1960s in the course of balloon flights carried out by Cosmophysics Laboratory of the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute. In these flights a correlation between the high energy electron flux in the upper atmosphere and perturbations ofthe Earth's magnetosphere was established. This phenomenon could be explained assuming there exist high energy electron fluxes in the ERB. High energy electron fluxes in the ERB were recorded for the first time in the direct experiments carried out on board orbital station 'Salyut-6' (orbit altitude - 350 km, inclination 51.6 deg). A scintillation-Cherenkov telescope 'Elena' controlled by cosmonauts was preset to different programmed positions. The measurements were made in the periphery of the ERB, namely, in the part which goes as low as several hundred km in the Brazil Anomaly Region (BRA). The flux of electrons with energies above 30 MeV was up to 104 (m2s sr)-1.

  17. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.W.; Schulz, M.; Lyons, L.R.; Gorney, D.J.

    1993-04-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. The method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants [mu]) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. The simulation results are compared qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For [mu] approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of the model storm, and the authors find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For [mu] approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For [mu] approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion.

  18. Simulation of energy-dependent electron diffusion processes in the Earth's outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Nishimura, Y.; Zhang, X.-J.; Reeves, G. D.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Henderson, M. G.; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-05-01

    The radial and local diffusion processes induced by various plasma waves govern the highly energetic electron dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts, causing distinct characteristics in electron distributions at various energies. In this study, we present our simulation results of the energetic electron evolution during a geomagnetic storm using the University of California, Los Angeles 3-D diffusion code. Following the plasma sheet electron injections, the electrons at different energy bands detected by the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) instruments on board the Van Allen Probes exhibit a rapid enhancement followed by a slow diffusive movement in differential energy fluxes, and the radial extent to which electrons can penetrate into depends on energy with closer penetration toward the Earth at lower energies than higher energies. We incorporate radial diffusion, local acceleration, and loss processes due to whistler mode wave observations to perform a 3-D diffusion simulation. Our simulation results demonstrate that chorus waves cause electron flux increase by more than 1 order of magnitude during the first 18 h, and the subsequent radial extents of the energetic electrons during the storm recovery phase are determined by the coupled radial diffusion and the pitch angle scattering by EMIC waves and plasmaspheric hiss. The radial diffusion caused by ULF waves and local plasma wave scattering are energy dependent, which lead to the observed electron flux variations with energy dependences. This study suggests that plasma wave distributions in the inner magnetosphere are crucial for the energy-dependent intrusions of several hundred keV to several MeV electrons.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of a liquid belt radiator for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teagan, W. P.; Fitzgerald, K.

    1984-01-01

    The liquid belt radiator (LBR) is discussed. The LBR system operates either in the sensible heat mode or in the latent heat mode. Parametric analysis shows that the LBR may reduce the mass of heat pipe radiators by 70 to 90% when the LBR surface has a total emissivity in excess of 0.3. It is indicated that the diffusion pump oils easily meet this criteria with emissivities greater than 0.8. Measurements on gallium indicate that its emissivity is probably in excess of 0.3 in the solid state when small amounts of impurities are on the surface. The point design exhibits a characteristic mass of 3.1 kg/kW of power dissipation, a mass per unit prime radiating area of approximately 0.9 kg/sq ms and a total package volume of approximately 2.50 cubic m. This compares favorably with conventional technologies which have weights on the order of 4 kg/sq m.

  20. Imaging Jupiter's radiation belts down to 127 MHz with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. N.; Zarka, P.; Tasse, C.; Hess, S.; de Pater, I.; Santos-Costa, D.; Nenon, Q.; Sicard, A.; Bourdarie, S.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Bell, M. E.; van Bemmel, I.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Breton, R. P.; Broderick, J. W.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Corbel, S.; Corstanje, A.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Hörandel, J.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Loose, M.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Moldon, J.; Munk, H.; Nelles, A.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wucknitz, O.

    2016-03-01

    Context. With the limited amount of in situ particle data available for the innermost region of Jupiter's magnetosphere, Earth-based observations of the giant planets synchrotron emission remain the sole method today of scrutinizing the distribution and dynamical behavior of the ultra energetic electrons magnetically trapped around the planet. Radio observations ultimately provide key information about the origin and control parameters of the harsh radiation environment. Aims: We perform the first resolved and low-frequency imaging of the synchrotron emission with LOFAR. At a frequency as low as 127 MHz, the radiation from electrons with energies of ~1-30 MeV are expected, for the first time, to be measured and mapped over a broad region of Jupiter's inner magnetosphere. Methods: Measurements consist of interferometric visibilities taken during a single 10-hour rotation of the Jovian system. These visibilities were processed in a custom pipeline developed for planetary observations, combining flagging, calibration, wide-field imaging, direction-dependent calibration, and specific visibility correction for planetary targets. We produced spectral image cubes of Jupiter's radiation belts at the various angular, temporal, and spectral resolutions from which flux densities were measured. Results: The first resolved images of Jupiter's radiation belts at 127-172 MHz are obtained with a noise level ~20-25 mJy/beam, along with total integrated flux densities. They are compared with previous observations at higher frequencies. A greater extent of the synchrotron emission source (≥4 RJ) is measured in the LOFAR range, which is the signature - as at higher frequencies - of the superposition of a "pancake" and an isotropic electron distribution. Asymmetry of east-west emission peaks is measured, as well as the longitudinal dependence of the radial distance of the belts, and the presence of a hot spot at λIII = 230° ± 25°. Spectral flux density measurements are on the low

  1. Observational evidence of competing source, loss, and transport processes for relativistic electrons in Earth's outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Drew; Mann, Ian; Usanova, Maria; Rodriguez, Juan; Henderson, Mike; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Morley, Steven; Claudepierre, Seth; Li, Wen; Kellerman, Adam; Boyd, Alexander; Kim, Kyung-Chan

    Earth’s outer electron radiation belt is a region of extreme variability, with relativistic electron intensities changing by orders of magnitude over time scales ranging from minutes to years. Extreme variations of outer belt electrons ultimately result from the relative impacts of various competing source (and acceleration), loss, and transport processes. Most of these processes involve wave-particle interactions between outer belt electrons and different types of plasma waves in the inner magnetosphere, and in turn, the activity of these waves depends on different solar wind and magnetospheric driving conditions and thus can vary drastically from event to event. Using multipoint analysis with data from NASA’s Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and SAMPEX missions, NOAA’s GOES and POES constellations, and ground-based observatories, we present results from case studies revealing how different source/acceleration and loss mechanisms compete during active periods to result in drastically different distributions of outer belt electrons. By using a combination of low-Earth orbiting and high-altitude-equatorial orbiting satellites, we briefly review how it is possible to get a much more complete picture of certain wave activity and electron losses over the full range of MLTs and L-shells throughout the radiation belt. We then show example cases highlighting the importance of particular mechanisms, including: substorm injections and whistler-mode chorus waves for the source and acceleration of relativistic electrons; magnetopause shadowing and wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves for sudden losses; and ULF wave activity for driving radial transport, a process which is important for redistributing relativistic electrons, contributing both to acceleration and loss processes. We show how relativistic electron enhancement events involve local acceleration that is consistent with wave-particle interactions between a seed population of 10s to 100s of keV electrons, with a

  2. Gradual Diffusion and Punctuated Phase Space Density Enhancements of Highly Relativistic Electrons: Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Henderson, M. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Hudson, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission has provided a new window into mega electron volt (MeV) particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. Observations (up to E (is) approximately 10MeV) show clearly the behavior of the outer electron radiation belt at different timescales: months-long periods of gradual inward radial diffusive transport and weak loss being punctuated by dramatic flux changes driven by strong solar wind transient events. We present analysis of multi-MeV electron flux and phase space density (PSD) changes during March 2013 in the context of the first year of Van Allen Probes operation. This March period demonstrates the classic signatures both of inward radial diffusive energization and abrupt localized acceleration deep within the outer Van Allen zone (L (is) approximately 4.0 +/- 0.5). This reveals graphically that both 'competing' mechanisms of multi-MeV electron energization are at play in the radiation belts, often acting almost concurrently or at least in rapid succession.

  3. Science Highlights from the RBSP-ECT Particle Instrument Suite on NASA's Van Allen Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Harlan

    2014-05-01

    The NASA Van Allen Probes mission includes an instrument suite known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) - Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) suite. RBSP-ECT contains a well-proven complement of particle instruments to ensure the highest quality measurements ever made in the radiation belts and the inner magnetosphere. The coordinated RBSP-ECT particle measurements, analyzed in combination with fields and waves observations and state of-the-art theory and modeling, provide new understanding on the acceleration, global distribution, and variability of radiation belt electrons and ions, key science objectives of NASA's Living With a Star program and the Van Allen Probes mission. The RBSP-ECT suite consists of three highly-coordinated instruments: the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) spectrometer, the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), and the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT). Collectively these three instrument types cover comprehensively the full electron and ion spectra from one eV to 10's of MeV with sufficient energy resolution, pitch angle coverage and resolution, and with composition measurements in the critical energy range up to 50 keV and also from a few to 50 MeV/nucleon. All three instruments are based on measurement techniques proven in the radiation belts, then optimized to provide unambiguous separation of ions and electrons and clean energy responses even in the presence of extreme penetrating background environments. In this presentation, we summarize overall ECT science goals and then show scientific results derived from the ECT suite on the dual Van Allen Probes spacecraft to date. Mission operations began only in late October 2012, and we have now achieved significant results. Results presented here will include substantial progress toward resolving primary Van Allen Probes science targets, such as: the relative role of localized acceleration versus transport-generated particle acceleration

  4. Radiation belt measurements strategy for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdarie, Sebastien; Maget, Vincent; Lazaro, Didier; Daglis, Yannis; Sandberg, Ingmar

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the EU-FP7 MAARBLE project, the Salammbô code and an ensemble Kalman filter is being used to reproduce the electron radiation belt dynamics during storms. One of the most widely used and reliable methods of assessing a data assimilation scheme is that of the twin experiments. The identical-twin experiments consist in a numerical procedure where synthetic data can be generated by the model to which data assimilation is applied, subject to a specified stochastic forcing term. The data with assigned errors are then evaluated for their effectiveness in obtaining optimal state estimates. The convergence of the unassimilated model fields from the second run towards those of the first run ("true" state) can then be measured. This set up is used here to define what is the minimum data required and along which orbits to still ensure a good estimate of the true state. The number of data being assimilated (cadence as well as distinct orbits) will be considered as a parameter such as to check data assimilation tool performance in each case. This analysis will be very useful in the case of optimizing a space surveillance system for ionizing particles. MAARBLE has received fundings from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-.2010-1, SP1 Cooperation, Collaborative project) under grant agreement n284520. This paper reflects only the authors' views and the European Union is not liable for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

  5. Whistler mode wave intensities in the radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Helliwell, R.A.; Walworth, K.F.

    1996-07-01

    A critical factor in the equilibrium of the Earth{close_quote}s radiation belts is the intensity of the whistler mode waves that scatter trapped electrons into the loss cone. Whistler-mode waves include whistlers (from lightning), signals from ground based VLF stations, chorus, hiss and impulses. Those signals that are not trapped in magnetospheric ducts are observed with rockets or satellites, both inside and outside the plasmapause. Ducted signals, occurring mostly inside the plasmapause, have been difficult to observe {ital in} {ital situ}, but are commonly observed at ground stations from which equatorial wave intensities can be estimated only crudely. Models of the process of coherent wave growth based on interaction with gyro resonant counter streaming electrons in an interaction region near the equator, fall into two classes depending on whether the wave field is less or greater than that required for trapping of resonant electrons in the wave{close_quote}s potential wall. Data on the estimated {ital B}{sub in} and {ital B}{sub out} of ducted signals at the input and output of the interaction region, respectively, together with associated total growth (20{endash}35 dB) appear to support the small-signal model. Since the ratios between predictions of the small-signal and large-signal models are of the order of 20 dB, it is critically important to test both models with measurements of appropriate wave fields and associated particle fluxes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Radial diffusion of radiation belt particles in nondipolar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Gregory S.

    2016-06-01

    The fact that charged particles trapped in Earth's magnetic field can be redistributed along their radial distance from Earth due to drift-resonant interactions with small-amplitude waves has been known since early in the space age. Early theoretical efforts assumed that a dipole background magnetic field was modified by a time-varying electromagnetic perturbation that changed the particle's distance from Earth while preserving the first two invariants of motion. The stochastic nature of the perturbation allowed the effect of the waves on the trapped particles to be represented by a Fokker-Planck equation, which updates the phase space density in time via radial diffusion with diffusion coefficients that depend on the wave characteristics. In this paper, we extend those early theoretical efforts to define radial diffusion coefficients in arbitrary static background fields and define a numerical scheme for their evaluation. The background fields we consider are allowed to have significant deviations from a dipole field. Radial diffusion coefficients are computed using the new scheme for one of the empirical magnetic field models (T89) developed by Tsyganenko and coauthors as the background on top of which the perturbations are added. The new diffusion coefficients are shown to be substantially larger than those computed with a dipole background field model, especially at large radial distances and during geomagnetically active times, and it is suggested that outward radial diffusion may be a more substantial loss process for trapped electrons in the outer radiation belt than previously believed.

  7. Saturn's radiation belts in the view of Cassini's MIMI/LEMMS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, Elias; Krupp, Norbert; Kollmann, Peter; Paranicas, Chris; Armstrong, Tom P.; Mitchell, Donald G.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Kotova, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Energetic charged particle measurements by Cassini's MIMI/LEMMS detector between 2004 and 2013 have revealed that the processes which form and sustain Saturn's radiation belts differ significantly for their electron and ion components. The permanent MeV ion belts are relatively stable in intensity over both short and long time scales, they have a outer boundary that continuously coincides with the L-shell of Saturn's moon Tethys (L=4.89) and comprise different sectors, each separated from the other by an ion depleted region that is centered on an L-shell of one of the planet's inner icy moons. Fluxes within these belts are dominated by secondaries that result from nuclear collisions between Galactic Cosmic Rays and the planet's main rings and atmosphere. Extensions of the ion belts beyond the orbit of Tethys, that may last several months, may occur after the interaction of Saturn's magnetosphere with a Solar Proton Event. Still, these transient extensions have no impact on the structure of the inner belts, making these inner belts ideal for detailed and a precise studies of nuclear source processes, such as CRAND. Contrary to the ion belts, the electron radiation belt is a continuous structure that extends between the outer edge of the main rings and has its outer boundary at an average distance of about 8 Saturn radii from the planet. The latter distance scatters considerably from orbit to orbit, while flux levels within the belt may vary by several orders of magnitude. MIMI/LEMMS observations show a series of interesting features, such as recurrent sudden belt expansions with periods in the order of one to several weeks and considerably variable responses following periods of ICME interactions with Saturn's magnetosphere. As the elecron belts extend until the very dynamic middle magnetosphere and the dominant electron source and loss processes change as a function of L-shell, energy and pitch angle, modelling of these belts is very challenging.

  8. Radiation Belt Modeling for Spacecraft Design: Model Comparisons for Common Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, J.-M.; Barth, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    We present the current status of radiation belt modeling, providing model details and comparisons with AP-8 and AE-8 for commonly used orbits. Improved modeling of the particle environment enables smarter space system design.

  9. The Magnetic and Shielding Effects of Ring Current on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching

    2012-01-01

    The ring current plays many key roles in controlling magnetospheric dynamics. A well-known example is the magnetic depression produced by the ring current, which alters the drift paths of radiation belt electrons and may cause significant electron flux dropout. Little attention is paid to the ring current shielding effect on radiation belt dynamics. A recent simulation study that combines the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) with the Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model has revealed that the ring current-associated shielding field directly and/or indirectly weakens the relativistic electron flux increase during magnetic storms. In this talk, we will discuss how ring current magnetic field and electric shielding moderate the radiation belt enhancement.

  10. Halloween 2003 Solar Storm and the Effects on Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Video Gallery

    This scientific visualization relies on data from the SAMPEX mission, which observed particles in the Radiation Belts during a large solar storm in October 2003. The movie clearly shows just how mu...

  11. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes

    PubMed Central

    Pakhotin, I P; Drozdov, A Y; Shprits, Y Y; Boynton, R J; Subbotin, D A; Balikhin, M A

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system has been tested for three extended time periods totalling several weeks of observations. The time periods involved periods of quiet, moderate, and strong geomagnetic activity and captured a range of dynamics typical of the radiation belts. The model has successfully simulated energetic electron fluxes for various magnetospheric conditions. Physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the discrepancies between the model results and observations are discussed. PMID:26167432

  12. CRRES observation and STEERB simulation of the 9 October 1990 electron radiation belt dropout event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhenpeng; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Shui

    2011-03-01

    We examine and simulate the electron radiation belt dropout event on 9 October 1990. CRRES observations show that significant depletions of electron fluxes occurred at energies ˜0.1-1.0 MeV beyond 6 RE and at energies > ˜0.4 MeV within 6 RE. The three-dimensional kinetic radiation belt model STEERB is used to simulate this dropout event, taking into account the magnetopause shadowing, adiabatic transport, radial diffusion, and plume and chorus wave-particle interactions. Our results show that STEERB code can basically reproduce the observed depletion of ˜0.1-1.0 MeV electron fluxes throughout the outer radiation belt, suggesting that the competition and combination of all these physical mechanisms can well explain this electron radiation belt dropout event.

  13. Spacecraft-level verification of the Van Allen Probes' RF communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowne, M. J.; Srinivasan, D.; Royster, D.; Weaver, G.; Matlin, D.; Mosavi, N.

    This paper presents the verification process, lessons learned, and selected test results of the radio frequency (RF) communication system of the Van Allen Probes, formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). The Van Allen Probes mission is investigating the doughnut-shaped regions of space known as the Van Allen radiation belts where the Sun interacts with charged particles trapped in Earth's magnetic field. Understanding this dynamic area that surrounds our planet is important to improving our ability to design spacecraft and missions for reliability and astronaut safety. The Van Allen Probes mission features two nearly identical spacecraft designed, built, and operated by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The RF communication system features the JHU/APL Frontier Radio. The Frontier Radio is a software-defined radio (SDR) designed for spaceborne communications, navigation, radio science, and sensor applications. This mission marks the first spaceflight usage of the Frontier Radio. RF ground support equipment (RF GSE) was developed using a ground station receiver similar to what will be used in flight and whose capabilities provided clarity into RF system performance that was previously not obtained until compatibility testing with the ground segments. The Van Allen Probes underwent EMC, acoustic, vibration, and thermal vacuum testing at the environmental test facilities at APL. During this time the RF communication system was rigorously tested to ensure optimal performance, including system-level testing down to threshold power levels. Compatibility tests were performed with the JHU/APL Satellite Communication Facility (SCF), the Universal Space Network (USN), and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Successful completion of this program as described in this paper validated the design of the system and demonstrated that it will be able to me

  14. Plasma Wave Measurements in Earth's Magnetosphere by Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Bolton, S. J.; Gurnett, D. A.; Santolik, O.; Kletzing, C.; Thorne, R. M.; Pickett, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    On October 9, 2013, Juno will fly within about 550 km of Earth in the process of executing a gravity assist on its way to its eventual arrival at Jupiter in July 2016. Since this will be the only magnetospheric plasma regime Juno will sample prior to arrival at Jupiter, it presents both engineering and scientific opportunities. One of the scientific opportunities is to make observations in the inner magnetosphere at the same time as the twin Van Allen Probes and Cluster. During the Juno flyby, which is on the dusk side at closest approach, the Van Allen Probes' apoapsis is also in the dusk sector. The Cluster orbits favor comparisons on the nightside after Juno's closest approach. Models of the radiation belts suggest that Juno will traverse both the inner and outer belts, albeit at higher latitudes than the low-inclination Van Allen Probes while the Cluster spacecraft are in a rather high inclination orbit. The Waves instrument on Juno utilizes a single electric dipole antenna and a single search coil sensor for measurements of the electric and magnetic components of plasma waves, consequently it will provide wave spectra and brief bursts of waveforms. The Waves instrument on Van Allen Probes, on the other hand makes triaxial electric and magnetic measurements of plasma waves, hence, can determine the propagation characteristics of waves such as the wave-normal angle, Poynting flux, and polarization characteristics of the waves. The Wideband Instrument on Cluster can be configured to capture single axis (electric or magnetic) waveforms at selected times to coincide with Juno and Van Allen Probes burst observations. We will compare observations of whistler-mode emissions and electron cyclotron harmonic emissions in and near the radiation belts from the vantage points of these spacecraft.

  15. On the poleward expansion of the outer radiation belt during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazutin, Leonid

    Poleward expansions of the outer radiation belt are examined using measurements of the low altitude satellites. Such behavior of the radiation belt boundary indicates on the effect of hyper-dipolarization, the poleward expansion of the nightime quasitrapping region. It is shown that such shifts are created by substorm activity, leading to the so called polar cap substorms. High latitude bursts of the energetic electrons might be generated during polar cap substorms similarly as in regular auroral substorms.

  16. Global-scale coherence modulation of radiation-belt electron loss from plasmaspheric hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breneman, A. W.; Halford, A.; Millan, R.; McCarthy, M.; Fennell, J.; Sample, J.; Woodger, L.; Hospodarsky, G.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Goldstein, J.; Malaspina, D.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2015-07-01

    Over 40 years ago it was suggested that electron loss in the region of the radiation belts that overlaps with the region of high plasma density called the plasmasphere, within four to five Earth radii, arises largely from interaction with an electromagnetic plasma wave called plasmaspheric hiss. This interaction strongly influences the evolution of the radiation belts during a geomagnetic storm, and over the course of many hours to days helps to return the radiation-belt structure to its `quiet' pre-storm configuration. Observations have shown that the long-term electron-loss rate is consistent with this theory but the temporal and spatial dynamics of the loss process remain to be directly verified. Here we report simultaneous measurements of structured radiation-belt electron losses and the hiss phenomenon that causes the losses. Losses were observed in the form of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by hiss-scattered electrons colliding with the Earth's atmosphere after removal from the radiation belts. Our results show that changes of up to an order of magnitude in the dynamics of electron loss arising from hiss occur on timescales as short as one to twenty minutes, in association with modulations in plasma density and magnetic field. Furthermore, these loss dynamics are coherent with hiss dynamics on spatial scales comparable to the size of the plasmasphere. This nearly global-scale coherence was not predicted and may affect the short-term evolution of the radiation belts during active times.

  17. Global-scale coherence modulation of radiation-belt electron loss from plasmaspheric hiss.

    PubMed

    Breneman, A W; Halford, A; Millan, R; McCarthy, M; Fennell, J; Sample, J; Woodger, L; Hospodarsky, G; Wygant, J R; Cattell, C A; Goldstein, J; Malaspina, D; Kletzing, C A

    2015-07-01

    Over 40 years ago it was suggested that electron loss in the region of the radiation belts that overlaps with the region of high plasma density called the plasmasphere, within four to five Earth radii, arises largely from interaction with an electromagnetic plasma wave called plasmaspheric hiss. This interaction strongly influences the evolution of the radiation belts during a geomagnetic storm, and over the course of many hours to days helps to return the radiation-belt structure to its 'quiet' pre-storm configuration. Observations have shown that the long-term electron-loss rate is consistent with this theory but the temporal and spatial dynamics of the loss process remain to be directly verified. Here we report simultaneous measurements of structured radiation-belt electron losses and the hiss phenomenon that causes the losses. Losses were observed in the form of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by hiss-scattered electrons colliding with the Earth's atmosphere after removal from the radiation belts. Our results show that changes of up to an order of magnitude in the dynamics of electron loss arising from hiss occur on timescales as short as one to twenty minutes, in association with modulations in plasma density and magnetic field. Furthermore, these loss dynamics are coherent with hiss dynamics on spatial scales comparable to the size of the plasmasphere. This nearly global-scale coherence was not predicted and may affect the short-term evolution of the radiation belts during active times. PMID:26123022

  18. The Roles of Transport and Wave-Particle Interactions on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua

    2011-01-01

    Particle fluxes in the radiation belts can vary dramatically during geomagnetic active periods. Transport and wave-particle interactions are believed to be the two main types of mechanisms that control the radiation belt dynamics. Major transport processes include substorm dipolarization and injection, radial diffusion, convection, adiabatic acceleration and deceleration, and magnetopause shadowing. Energetic electrons and ions are also subjected to pitch-angle and energy diffusion when interact with plasma waves in the radiation belts. Important wave modes include whistler mode chorus waves, plasmaspheric hiss, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and magnetosonic waves. We investigate the relative roles of transport and wave associated processes in radiation belt variations. Energetic electron fluxes during several storms are simulated using our Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model. The model includes important transport and wave processes such as substorm dipolarization in global MHD fields, chorus waves, and plasmaspheric hiss. We discuss the effects of these competing processes at different phases of the storms and validate the results by comparison with satellite and ground-based observations. Keywords: Radiation Belts, Space Weather, Wave-Particle Interaction, Storm and Substorm

  19. Obituary: James Alfred Van Allen, 1914-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, George H.; McIlwain, Carl Edwin

    2006-12-01

    successful field expeditions from 1952 through 1957. As the prospect for launching Earth satellites began to materialize, Van Allen became an enthusiastic participant in planning and executing the U.S. program. After gaining a spot on the short list of initial experiments for the Vanguard satellite program, development of the cosmic ray instrument that he had proposed became a high laboratory priority. That instrument was launched in abbreviated form by an Army Jupiter C vehicle as Explorer I on 31 January 1958, and the full version was launched less than two months later as Explorer III. The two satellites resulted in what Van Allen considered the crowning event of his long and distinguished career — the discovery, with his university associates, of the bands of intense radiation that surround the Earth, now known as the "Van Allen Radiation Belts." Van Allen continued to take a leading role in extending space research beyond Earth's orbit. His group sent instruments to the Moon, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and throughout interplanetary space. During his outstandingly productive career, Van Allen served as principal investigator on more than twenty-five space science missions. James Van Allen was the consummate teacher and mentor. Years ago, when asked how he would most like to be remembered, he replied simply, "As a teacher." He supervised the preparation of forty-eight master's and thirty-four doctor's theses by sixty different individuals. He gave those graduate students extraordinary freedom and responsibility in the conduct of their projects. He always treated his students, both undergraduate and graduate, with respect, listening to them, learning from them, and guiding them with wisdom and kindness. The folksy, pipe-smoking scientist worked from 1951 until 1964 in a modest office on the second floor of the old Physics and Mathematics building. He maintained his own private laboratory, where he continued to spend many hours with hands-on work at the bench. When the

  20. The variable extension of Saturn's electron radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.; Carbary, J. F.; Kollmann, P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mitchell, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Contrary to the permanent MeV ion belts which are relatively stable in intensity over both short and long time scales and are modulated by a single Galactic Cosmic Ray driven source, the electron belts of Saturn appear to be much more complex in both structure and temporal evolution. In order to understand the responses of this system to the different factors that may control it (internal or external/solar sources) we study its long-term, temporal evolution. We achieve that by tracking the equatorial distance of the belts' outer boundary, using MIMI/LEMMS energetic charged particle observations over a period of more than 7 years. This boundary is defined at the distance that a selected count rate level is measured in a LEMMS channel that has the properties of an omnidirectional, integral energy detector. Simulated solar wind moments, energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations and solar irradiance data are used to support the analysis. In many cases, correlations of the different datasets are weak, suggesting that the electron belts are modulated in time scales that are much shorter than the sampling of the electron belt boundary (typically every 10-30 days). Still, we find several cases of persistent, long term and strong perturbations in the system that appear to have corresponding disturbances in the extension of the electron belts, even on such long time scales. From the analysis of those intervals we believe that we have established a solid link with the planetary ring current as the primary source of the electron belts of Saturn. This is concluded mostly on the basis of an extended ring current decay in 2011 (inferred through ENA observations), coinciding with a similar, unusual drop in the electron belt extension (and intensity). This means that the electron belts should reflect also the modulation of the ring current. We suggest that possible sources of long term modulation are both the solar UV irradiance of the Saturnian thermosphere and the solar wind. The

  1. Outer radiation belt dynamics following the arrival of an interplanetary shock : What the Cluster-CIS and Double Star-HIA data can tell us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, Iannis; Ganushkina, Natalia; Rème, Henri

    2014-05-01

    Following the launch by NASA of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) twin spacecraft, now named the Van Allen Probes, the discovery of a storage ring was announced: Baker et al., Science, 2013. This transient feature was observed during September 2012, following the arrival of an interplanetary shock, was located between L=3.0 and L=3.5 and consisted of about 4 to 6 MeV electrons. During that period the Cluster spacecraft had a high-inclination orbit, with a perigee just above 2 Re. The CIS experiment onboard Cluster is sensitive to penetrating energetic electrons (E > 2 MeV), which produce background counts and thus allow to localise the boundaries of the outer and inner radiation belts (Ganushkina et al., JGR, 2011). A search was undertaken in the September 2012 CIS data for eventual signatures of the storage ring, and indeed a small increase of the instrument background was observed between L=3.0 and L=3.5. This is clearly separated from the main outer radiation belt, which presents a much stronger background due to higher fluxes of relativistic electrons. A mono-energetic ion drift band was also observed by CIS inside the storage ring, at about 5 keV for He+ and O+ ions. This result provides an independent confirmation for the storage ring. In addition, it allows also to examine Cluster and Double Star data from earlier years, covering a solar cycle, for other such signatures of a transient storage ring. It results that this 3-belt structure is seen several times, following the arrival of an interplanetary shock and if the orbital configuration is suitable.

  2. Penetration of Solar Wind Driven ULF Waves into the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: Role in Radiation Belt and Ring Current Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Murphy, Kyle; Rae, Jonathan; Ozeke, Louis; Milling, David

    2013-04-01

    combination of data from ground arrays such as CARISMA and the contemporaneous operation of the NASA Van Allen Probes (VAP) mission offers an excellent basis for understanding this cross-energy plasma coupling which spans more than 6 orders of magnitude in energy. Explaining the casual connections between plasmas in the plasmasphere (eV), ring current (keV), and radiation belt (MeV), via the intermediaries of plasma waves, is key to understanding inner magnetosphere dynamics. This work has received funding from the European Union under the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-Space) under grant agreement n 284520 for the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project.

  3. Combined scattering loss of radiation belt relativistic electrons by simultaneous three-band EMIC waves: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fengming; Cao, Xing; Ni, Binbin; Xiang, Zheng; Zhou, Chen; Gu, Xudong; Zhao, Zhengyu; Shi, Run; Wang, Qi

    2016-05-01

    Multiband electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can drive efficient scattering loss of radiation belt relativistic electrons. However, it is statistically uncommon to capture the three bands of EMIC waves concurrently. Utilizing data from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science magnetometer onboard Van Allen Probe A, we report the simultaneous presence of three (H+, He+, and O+) emission bands in an EMIC wave event, which provides an opportunity to look into the combined scattering effect of all EMIC emissions and the relative roles of each band in diffusing radiation belt relativistic electrons under realistic circumstances. Our quantitative results, obtained by quasi-linear diffusion rate computations and 1-D pure pitch angle diffusion simulations, demonstrate that the combined resonant scattering by the simultaneous three-band EMIC waves is overall dominated by He+ band wave diffusion, mainly due to its dominance over the wave power (the mean wave amplitudes are approximately 0.4 nT, 1.6 nT, and 0.15 nT for H+, He+, and O+ bands, respectively). Near the loss cone, while 2-3 MeV electrons undergo pitch angle scattering at a rate of the order of 10-6-10-5 s-1, 5-10 MeV electrons can be diffused more efficiently at a rate of the order of 10-3-10-2 s-1, which approaches the strong diffusion level and results in a moderately or heavily filled loss cone for the atmospheric loss. The corresponding electron loss timescales (i.e., lifetimes) vary from several days at the energies of ~2 MeV to less than 1 h at ~10 MeV. This case study indicates the leading contribution of He+ band waves to radiation belt relativistic electron losses during the coexistence of three EMIC wave bands and suggests that the roles of different EMIC wave bands in the relativistic electron dynamics should be carefully incorporated in future modeling efforts.

  4. Convection Electric Field Observations by THEMIS and the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Bonnell, J. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Malaspina, D.; Hartinger, M.; Thaller, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present direct electric field measurements made by THEMIS and the Van Allen Probes in the inner magnetosphere, focusing on the large-scale, near-DC convection electric field. The convection electric field drives plasma Earthward from the tail into the inner magnetosphere, playing a critical role in forming the ring current. Although it is normally shielded deep inside the magnetosphere, during storm times this large-scale electric field can penetrate to low L values (L < 3), eroding the plasmasphere and also providing a mechanism for ~100 keV electron injection into the slot region and inner radiation belt. The relationship of the convection electric field with the plasmasphere is also important for understanding the dynamic outer radiation belt, as the plasmapause boundary has been strongly correlated with the dynamic variation of the outer radiation belt electrons.

  5. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, L. R.; Gorney, David J.

    1993-01-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. Our method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants mu) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. We compare our simulation results qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For mu approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of our model storm, and we find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For mu approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For mu approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion. By computing the mean and mean-square cumulative changes in 1/L among (in this case) 12 representative

  6. Radiation belt electron precipitation by man-made VLF transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, Rory J.; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Sauvaud, Jean-André; Thomson, Neil R.; Stewart, S. L.; McCormick, Robert J.; Parrot, Michel; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques

    2008-10-01

    Enhancements of drift-loss cone fluxes in the inner radiation belt have been observed to coincide with the geographic location of the powerful VLF transmitter NWC. In this paper we expand upon the earlier study to examine the occurrence frequency of drift-loss cone enhancements observed above transmitters and the intensity of the flux enhancements and to demonstrate the linkage to transmitter operation. Our study has confirmed the strong dependence that these enhancements have upon nighttime ionospheric conditions. No enhancements were observed during daytime periods, consistent with the increased ionospheric absorption. We have also confirmed the persistent occurrence of the wisp features east of the NWC transmitter. The enhancements are initially observed within a few degrees west of NWC and are present in 95% of the nighttime orbital data east of the transmitter for time periods when the transmitter is broadcasting. No enhancements are observed when NWC is not broadcasting. This provides conclusive evidence of the linkage between these drift-loss cone electron flux enhancements and transmissions from NWC. When contrasted with periods when NWC is nonoperational, there are typically ˜430 times more 100-260 keV resonant electrons present in the drift-loss cone across L = 1.67-1.9 owing to NWC transmissions. There are almost no wisp-like enhancements produced by the transmitter NPM, despite its low-latitude location and relatively high output power. The lack of any wisp enhancement for L < 1.6 suggests that nonducted propagation is an inefficient mechanism for scattering electrons, which explains the lower cutoff in L of the NWC-generated wisps and the lack of NPM-generated wisps.

  7. RF communications subsystem for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Dipak K.; Artis, David; Baker, Ben; Stilwell, Robert; Wallis, Robert

    2009-12-01

    The NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission, currently in Phase B, is a two-spacecraft, Earth-orbiting mission, which will launch in 2012. The spacecraft's S-band radio frequency (RF) telecommunications subsystem has three primary functions: provide spacecraft command capability, provide spacecraft telemetry and science data return, and provide accurate Doppler data for navigation. The primary communications link to the ground is via the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory's (JHU/APL) 18 m dish, with secondary links to the NASA 13 m Ground Network and the Tracking and Data Relay Spacecraft System (TDRSS) in single-access mode. The on-board RF subsystem features the APL-built coherent transceiver and in-house builds of a solid-state power amplifier and conical bifilar helix broad-beam antennas. The coherent transceiver provides coherency digitally, and controls the downlink data rate and encoding within its field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The transceiver also provides a critical command decoder (CCD) function, which is used to protect against box-level upsets in the C&DH subsystem. Because RBSP is a spin-stabilized mission, the antennas must be symmetric about the spin axis. Two broad-beam antennas point along both ends of the spin axis, providing communication coverage from boresight to 70°. An RF splitter excites both antennas; therefore, the mission is designed such that no communications are required close to 90° from the spin axis due to the interferometer effect from the two antennas. To maximize the total downlink volume from the spacecraft, the CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP) has been baselined for the RBSP mission. During real-time ground contacts with the APL ground station, downlinked files are checked for errors. Handshaking between flight and ground CFDP software results in requests to retransmit only the file fragments lost due to dropouts. This allows minimization of RF link margins, thereby maximizing data rate and

  8. Characteristics of Pitch Angle Distributions of 100s Kev Electrons in the Slot Region and Inner Radiation Belt­­­­­­­­

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Malaspina, D.

    2014-12-01

    The pitch angle distribution (PAD) of energetic electrons in the slot region and inner radiation belt received little attention in the past decades due to the lack of quality measurements. Using the state-of-art pitch-angle-resolved data from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument onboard the Van Allen Probes, a detailed analysis of 100s keV electron PADs below L =4 is performed, in which the PADs is categorized into three types: normal (flux peaking at 90°), cap (exceedingly peaking narrowly around 90°) and 90°-minimum (lower flux at 90°) PADs. By examining the characteristics of the PADs of 460 keV electrons for over a year, we find that the 90°-minimum PADs are generally present in the inner belt (L<2), while normal PADs dominate at L~3.5-4. In the region between, 90°-minimum PADs dominate during injection times and normal PADs dominate during quiet times. Cap PADs appear mostly at the decay phase of storms in the slot region and are likely caused by the pitch angle scattering of hiss waves. Fitting the normal PADs into sinnα form, the parameter n is much higher below L=3 than that in the outer belt and relatively constant in the inner belt but changes significantly in the slot region (2belt. These new and compelling observations, made possible by the high-quality measurements of MagEIS, present a challenge for the wave modelers, and future work is still needed to fully understand them.

  9. Thermal electron acceleration by electric field spikes in the outer radiation belt: Generation of field-aligned pitch angle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F. S.; Artemyev, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    Van Allen Probes observations in the outer radiation belt have demonstrated an abundance of electrostatic electron-acoustic double layers (DL). DLs are frequently accompanied by field-aligned (bidirectional) pitch angle distributions (PAD) of electrons with energies from hundred eVs up to several keV. We perform numerical simulations of the DL interaction with thermal electrons making use of the test particle approach. DL parameters assumed in the simulations are adopted from observations. We show that DLs accelerate thermal electrons parallel to the magnetic field via the electrostatic Fermi mechanism, i.e., due to reflections from DL potential humps. The electron energy gain is larger for larger DL scalar potential amplitudes and higher propagation velocities. In addition to the Fermi mechanism, electrons can be trapped by DLs in their generation region and accelerated due to transport to higher latitudes. Both mechanisms result in formation of field-aligned PADs for electrons with energies comparable to those found in observations. The Fermi mechanism provides field-aligned PADs for <1 keV electrons, while the trapping mechanism extends field-aligned PADs to higher-energy electrons. It is shown that the Fermi mechanism can result in scattering into the loss cone of up to several tenths of percent of electrons with flux peaking at energies up to several hundred eVs.

  10. Superposed Epoch Analysis Comparing the Reaction of the Proton Radiation Belt and the Electron Radiation Belt during High-Speed-Stream-Driven Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayton, T. E.; Borovsky, J.; Denton, M.; Belian, R. D.; Christensen, R. A.; Ingraham, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In the years 1976 - 1995, the CPA ion and electron energetic-particle detectors were operated on multiple geosynchronous-orbit spacecraft. Unlike later instruments at geosynchronous orbit, the CPA detectors had separate ion and electron instruments and the ion instruments did not suffer from false counts caused by energetic electrons. Hence, the ion-radiation-belt measurements by the multispacecraft CPA detectors are of high quality. Contrary to common opinion, the proton radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit is robust; its number density is about 10 times higher than the number density of the electron radiation belt. Recently, (1) reprocessed CPA proton and electron measurements have become available for the years 1976-1995 and (2) a collection of 53 high-speed-stream-driven storms in the years 1976-1992 have been identified. These 53 storms are used to examine the evolution of the proton and electron radiation belts at geosynchronous orbit in high-speed-stream storms. The pre-storm decay, the early storm dropout, the sudden recovery, and the slow long-duration stormtime hardening of the spectra are examined. Some of the stormtime phenomena are similar between protons and electrons (i.e. the pre-storm decay, dropout, and sudden recovery) and some are different (the longtime enhancement during extended storms). The question is posed: Do similar behaviors of the protons and electrons imply that the same physical processes are acting on both populations?

  11. The Electric Field and Waves Instruments on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Goetz, K.; Ergun, R. E.; Mozer, F. S.; Bale, S. D.; Ludlam, M.; Turin, P.; Harvey, P. R.; Hochmann, R.; Harps, K.; Dalton, G.; McCauley, J.; Rachelson, W.; Gordon, D.; Donakowski, B.; Shultz, C.; Smith, C.; Diaz-Aguado, M.; Fischer, J.; Heavner, S.; Berg, P.; Malsapina, D. M.; Bolton, M. K.; Hudson, M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Baker, D. N.; Li, X.; Albert, J.; Foster, J. C.; Chaston, C. C.; Mann, I.; Donovan, E.; Cully, C. M.; Cattell, C. A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Kersten, K.; Brenneman, A.; Tao, J. B.

    2013-11-01

    The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the two Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) are designed to measure three dimensional quasi-static and low frequency electric fields and waves associated with the major mechanisms responsible for the acceleration of energetic charged particles in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. For this measurement, the instrument uses two pairs of spherical double probe sensors at the ends of orthogonal centripetally deployed booms in the spin plane with tip-to-tip separations of 100 meters. The third component of the electric field is measured by two spherical sensors separated by ˜15 m, deployed at the ends of two stacer booms oppositely directed along the spin axis of the spacecraft. The instrument provides a continuous stream of measurements over the entire orbit of the low frequency electric field vector at 32 samples/s in a survey mode. This survey mode also includes measurements of spacecraft potential to provide information on thermal electron plasma variations and structure. Survey mode spectral information allows the continuous evaluation of the peak value and spectral power in electric, magnetic and density fluctuations from several Hz to 6.5 kHz. On-board cross-spectral data allows the calculation of field-aligned wave Poynting flux along the magnetic field. For higher frequency waveform information, two different programmable burst memories are used with nominal sampling rates of 512 samples/s and 16 k samples/s. The EFW burst modes provide targeted measurements over brief time intervals of 3-d electric fields, 3-d wave magnetic fields (from the EMFISIS magnetic search coil sensors), and spacecraft potential. In the burst modes all six sensor-spacecraft potential measurements are telemetered enabling interferometric timing of small-scale plasma structures. In the first burst mode, the instrument stores all or a substantial fraction of the high frequency

  12. Conceptual design of a Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) shuttle-attached experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Jerry L.

    1990-01-01

    The conceptual design of a shuttle-attached Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) experiment is presented. The MBR is an advanced radiator concept in which a rotating belt is used to radiate thermal energy to space. The experiment is developed with the primary focus being the verification of the dynamic characteristics of a rotating belt with a secondary objective of proving the thermal and sealing aspects in a reduced gravity, vacuum environment. The mechanical design, selection of the belt material and working fluid, a preliminary test plan, and program plan are presented. The strategy used for selecting the basic sizes and materials of the components are discussed. Shuttle and crew member requirements are presented with some options for increasing or decreasing the demands on the STS. An STS carrier and the criteria used in the selection process are presented. The proposed carrier for the Moving Belt Radiator experiment is the Hitchhiker-M. Safety issues are also listed with possible results. This experiment is designed so that a belt can be deployed, run at steady state conditions, run with dynamic perturbations imposed, verify the operation of the interface heat exchanger and seals, and finally be retracted into a stowed position for transport back to earth.

  13. TSUBASA (MDS-1) observations of energetic electrons and magnetic field variations in outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.; Matsuoka, H.; Liu, H.; Koshiishi, H.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Goka, T.

    2002-12-01

    We have investigated variations of energetic electrons (> 0.4 MeV) and magnetic field in the radiation belt obtained from the Standard DOse Monitor (SDOM) and the MAgnetoMeter (MAM) of the Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA) onboard TSUBASA (the Mission Demonstration Test Satellite (MDS)-1) launched on February 4, 2002. Since TSUBASA is operated in the geostationary transfer orbit, it has provided rare opportunities of directly observing near-equatorial radiation belt plasma particles and magnetic field, having already included several large magnetic storms. The energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt are contributors to the total radiation dose deposited in lightly shielded spacecraft electronics for high altitude orbits and are known to have a drastic variability associated with geomagnetic storm and high speed solar wind streams. The abrupt energetic electron flux decreases in the outside of outer radiation belt show characteristic variations of in situ magnetic field. These observations have implications for the possible mechanisms of the depletion and the following recovery and/or buildup of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  14. Simulation of ULF wave-modulated radiation belt electron precipitation during the 17 March 2013 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, T.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B.; Paral, J.; Halford, A.; Millan, R.; Usanova, M.

    2015-05-01

    Balloon-borne instruments detecting radiation belt precipitation frequently observe oscillations in the millihertz frequency range. Balloons measuring electron precipitation near the poles in the 100 keV to 2.5 MeV energy range, including the MAXIS, MINIS, and most recently the Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation belt Electron Losses balloon experiments, have observed this modulation at ULF wave frequencies. Although ULF waves in the magnetosphere are seldom directly linked to increases in electron precipitation since their oscillation periods are much larger than the gyroperiod and the bounce period of radiation belt electrons, test particle simulations show that this interaction is possible. Three-dimensional simulations of radiation belt electrons were performed to investigate the effect of ULF waves on precipitation. The simulations track the behavior of energetic electrons near the loss cone, using guiding center techniques, coupled with an MHD simulation of the magnetosphere, using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry code, during a coronal mass ejection (CME)-shock event on 17 March 2013. Results indicate that ULF modulation of precipitation occurs even without the presence of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, which are not resolved in the MHD simulation. The arrival of a strong CME-shock, such as the one simulated, disrupts the electric and magnetic fields in the magnetosphere and causes significant changes in both components of momentum, pitch angle, and L shell of radiation belt electrons, which may cause them to precipitate into the loss cone.

  15. Conceptual design of a moving belt radiator shuttle-attached experiments: Technical requirement Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Jerry L.

    1989-01-01

    The technical requirements for a shuttle-attached Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) experiment are defined. The MBR is an advanced radiator concept in which a rotating belt radiates thermal energy to space. The requirements for integrating the MBR experiment in the shuttle bay are discussed. Requirements for the belt material and working fluid are outlined along with some possible options. The proposed size and relationship to a full scale Moving Belt Radiator are defined. The experiment is defined with the primary goal of dynamic testing and a secondary goal of demonstrating the sealing and heat transfer characteristics. A perturbation system which will simulate a docking maneuver or other type of short term acceleration is proposed for inclusion in the experimental apparatus. A deployment and retraction capability which will aid in evaluating the dynamics of a belt during such a maneuver is also described. The proposed test sequence for the experiment is presented. Details of the conceptual design are not presented herein, but rather in a separate Final Report.

  16. Nature's Grand Experiment: Linkage between magnetospheric convection and the radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, Craig J.; Cresswell-Moorcock, Kathy; Clilverd, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The solar minimum of 2007-2010 was unusually deep and long lived. In the later stages of this period the electron fluxes in the radiation belts dropped to extremely low levels. The flux of relativistic electrons (>1 MeV) was significantly diminished and at times was below instrument thresholds both for spacecraft located in geostationary orbits and also those in low-Earth orbit. This period has been described as a natural "Grand Experiment" allowing us to test our understanding of basic radiation belt physics and in particular the acceleration mechanisms which lead to enhancements in outer belt relativistic electron fluxes. Here we test the hypothesis that processes which initiate repetitive substorm onsets drive magnetospheric convection, which in turn triggers enhancement in whistler mode chorus that accelerates radiation belt electrons to relativistic energies. Conversely, individual substorms would not be associated with radiation belt acceleration. Contrasting observations from multiple satellites of energetic and relativistic electrons with substorm event lists, as well as chorus measurements, show that the data are consistent with the hypothesis. We show that repetitive substorms are associated with enhancements in the flux of energetic and relativistic electrons and enhanced whistler mode wave intensities. The enhancement in chorus wave power starts slightly before the repetitive substorm epoch onset. During the 2009/2010 period the only relativistic electron flux enhancements that occurred were preceded by repeated substorm onsets, consistent with enhanced magnetospheric convection as a trigger.

  17. Energetic particles and waves in the Jupiter's and Saturn's radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupp, Norbert; Roussos, Elias; Paranicas, Chris; Sicard, Angelica; Hospodarsky, George; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    The radiation belts of Jupiter and Saturn are among the harshest environments in our solar system. In extremely strong internal closed magnetic field configurations energetic particles up to several hundred MeV energies are trapped and bounce back and forth along the magnetic field lines emitting waves in a whole variety of frequencies. Charged particle drift paths in the rotationally-dominated magnetospheres close around the whole planet to substantial planetary distances, unlike in the case of Earth. The combination of a strong internal magnetic field and quasi-stable trapping allows the fluxes of energetic ions and electrons to become very large. In this presentation the available in-situ measurements of Jupiter's and Saturn's radiation belts are reviewed as well as current modelling approaches. In addition some aspects of the expected measurements of the Jovian radiation belts from the upcoming JUNO mission will be discussed.

  18. Simulating the Outer Radiation Belt During the Rising Phase of Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Kanekal, Shri; Nagai, Tsungunobu; Albert, Jay

    2011-01-01

    After prolonged period of solar minimum, there has been an increase in solar activity and its terrestrial consequences. We are in the midst of the rising phase of solar cycle 24, which began in January 2008. During the initial portion of the cycle, moderate geomagnetic storms occurred follow the 27 day solar rotation. Most of the storms were accompanied by increases in electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. These enhancements were often preceded with rapid dropout at high L shells. We seek to understand the similarities and differences in radiation belt behavior during the active times observed during the of this solar cycle. This study includes extensive data and simulations our Radiation Belt Environment Model. We identify the processes, transport and wave-particle interactions, that are responsible for the flux dropout and the enhancement and recovery.

  19. TSUBASA(MDS-1) observations of the radiation belt during magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, K.

    2002-12-01

    Recently, in situ observation is required to investigate the fluctuation of the radiation belt. TSUBASA(MDS-1) measures magnetic field and high energy charged particle (electron, proton, alpha-particle) in equatorial plane from 500 to 36000km, so that, particle flux, pitch angle distribution, phase space density and it_fs equatorial distribution can be measured. Information of these measurement results is very useful in order to clarify the cause of the radiation belt fluctuation, especially high-energy electron. TSUBASA was successfully launched by H-IIA launch vehicle from the Tanegashima Space Center on February 4, 2002. TSUBASA was injected into an elliptical orbit called a geostationary transfer orbit (GTO), with a spin rate of 5rpm, which makes the satellite attitude stable. We will report the observation result of TSUBASA during magnetic storms, and which is applicable in proposed theory about radiation belt fluctuation will be examined.

  20. Theory for charge states of energetic oxygen ions in the earth's radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Fluxes of geomagnetically trapped energetic oxygen ions have been studied in detail. Ion distributions in radial locations below the geostationary orbit, energy spectra between 1 keV and 100 MeV, and the distribution over charge states have been computed for equatorially mirroring ions. Both ionospheric and solar wind oxygen ion sources have been considered, and it is found that the charge state distributions in the interior of the radiation belts are largely independent of the charge state characteristics of the sources. In the MeV range, oxygen ions prove to be a more sensitive probe for radiation belt dynamics than helium ions and protons.

  1. 3D and 4D Simulations of the Dynamics of the Radiation Belts using VERB code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam; Drozdov, Alexander; Orlova, Ksenia

    2015-04-01

    Modeling and understanding of ring current and higher energy radiation belts has been a grand challenge since the beginning of the space age. In this study we show long term simulations with a 3D VERB code of modeling the radiation belts with boundary conditions derived from observations around geosynchronous orbit. We also present 4D VERB simulations that include convective transport, radial diffusion, pitch angle scattering and local acceleration. We show that while lower energy radial transport is dominated by the convection and higher energy transport is dominated by the diffusive radial transport. We also show there exists an intermediate range of energies for electrons for which both processes work simultaneously.

  2. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Baker, Daniel N.; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interactions of electrons with ultra-low frequency waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2014] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate the effect of changing a diffusion coefficient on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes geomagnetically quiet and active time. The simulations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion.

  3. Discovering Earth's Radiation Belts: Remembering Explorer 1 and 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Frank; Naugle, John E.

    2008-09-01

    On 31 January 1958, at 10:48 P.M. eastern standard time, the United States launched its first satellite, Explorer 1, on a modified Jupiter-C rocket. Later, at about 1:30 A.M., after confirming that it was indeed in orbit, three men triumphantly held aloft a full-scale model of Explorer 1 at a crowded press conference in the Great Hall of the National Academy of Sciences (Figure 1). In the center stood James A. Van Allen, head of the physics department at the University of Iowa and the scientist responsible for the scientific experiment. Flanking him were Wernher von Braun, director of development operations for the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA), which was responsible for constructing the Jupiter-C, and William H. Pickering, director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), which provided the Explorer spacecraft, the solid-fueled upper stages, and the guidance and control system. The United States had just successfully entered the race to explore, understand, and utilize space.

  4. Effect of Low Frequency Waves on the Lifetime of Protons in the Earth's Inner Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, X.; Sharma, A. S.; Demekhov, A.

    2008-12-01

    Commercial electronics on LEO satellites are affected by protons in the 30-100 MeV range trapped in the inner radiation belt mainly when transiting the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). As the feature size of commercial electronic components shrinks to 65 nm, the probability of single event upsets increases by two to three orders of magnitude, reducing the utility of LEO orbiting satellites and making micro-satellites obsolete. Reduction of the flux of energetic protons in the inner belts,in the range of 1.5-1.8 becomes national priority. The paper examines the physics requirements for reducing the lifetime of the energetic protons in the inner belts from 10-20 years to 1-2 years. In reviewing the current understanding of the proton lifetimes we note that the lifetime of the outer belt protons is by more than four orders of magnitude shorter than in the inner belts. The reason for this sharp lifetime gradient is that the lifetime in the outer belts is controlled by fast pitch angle scattering of the protons into the loss cone by resonant interaction with naturally generated Alfven waves. Since these waves are constrained to regions with L>2, the inner belt lifetimes are controlled by slowing down of the protons exciting and ionizing oxygen atoms in the thermosphere. Results, obtained using a global plasma code indicate that injection of Alfven waves, from the ground or satellites, in the frequency range of 1-5 Hz with average amplitude 20-30 pT can reduce the energetic proton lifetime in the inner belts to 1- 2 years. The paper concludes by presenting the energy and power requirements for achieving such lifetime reduction as well as brief discussion.

  5. Improving the Salammbo code modelling and using it to better predict radiation belts dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maget, Vincent; Sicard-Piet, Angelica; Grimald, Sandrine Rochel; Boscher, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of the FP7-SPACESTORM project, one objective is to improve the reliability of the model-based predictions performed of the radiation belt dynamics (first developed during the FP7-SPACECAST project). In this purpose we have analyzed and improved the way the simulations using the ONERA Salammbô code are performed, especially in : - Better controlling the driving parameters of the simulation; - Improving the initialization of the simulation in order to be more accurate at most energies for L values between 4 to 6; - Improving the physics of the model. For first point a statistical analysis of the accuracy of the Kp index has been conducted. For point two we have based our method on a long duration simulation in order to extract typical radiation belt states depending on the solar wind stress and geomagnetic activity. For last point we have first improved separately the modelling of different processes acting in the radiation belts and then, we have analyzed the global improvements obtained when simulating them together. We'll discuss here on all these points and on the balance that has to be taken into account between modeled processes to globally improve the radiation belt modelling.

  6. Radial Transport, Local Acceleration, and Loss in the Radiation Belts: Integration of Theories and Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. A.; Elkington, S. R.; Albert, J.; Zheng, L.

    2013-12-01

    Although much is known about the dynamics of the radiation belts there are still many unanswered questions on the basic physical processes responsible for the storm-time variations of relativistic electrons. Two physical processes that are thought to be especially important are (i) drift-resonant wave-particle interactions with ULF perturbations, which may lead to radial diffusion, and (ii) cyclotron-resonant wave-particle interactions with VLF/ELF waves, which may lead to local energy and pitch-angle diffusion. While there is theoretical and observational support that both of these processes play important roles in radiation belt dynamics, their relative contributions are still not well understood quantitatively. Also, recent work suggests that magnetopause shadowing may play a larger role than previously expected, and the physical connections between changes in the radiation belts and different solar interplanetary drivers are not well understood. In this presentation I will briefly review published work on radial transport, local acceleration, and loss, and I will also present recent results (particularly for high-speed-stream storms) that emphasize the value of integrating theories and observations of the radiation belts, including comments on theories and observations of related electromagnetic fields and plasma populations in the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  7. An efficient and positivity-preserving layer method for modeling radiation belt diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, X.; Zhang, L.; Wang, C.; Li, X.; Albert, J. M.; Chan, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    An efficient and positivity-preserving layer method is introduced to solve the radiation belt diffusion equation and is applied to study the bounce resonance interaction between relativistic electrons and magnetosonic waves. The layer method with linear interpolation, denoted by LM-L (layer method-linear), requires the use of a large number of grid points to ensure accurate solutions. We introduce a monotonicity- and positivity-preserving cubic interpolation method to be used with the Milstein-Tretyakov layer method. The resulting method, called LM-MC (layer method-monotone cubic), can be used to solve the radiation belt diffusion equation with a much smaller number of grid points than LM-L while still being able to preserve the positivity of the solution. We suggest that LM-MC can be used to study long-term dynamics of radiation belts. We then develop a 2-D LM-MC code and use it to investigate the bounce resonance diffusion of radiation belt electrons by magnetosonic waves. Using a previously published magnetosonic wave model, we demonstrate that bounce resonance with magnetosonic waves is as important as gyroresonance; both can cause several orders of magnitude increase of MeV electron fluxes within 1 day. We conclude that bounce resonance with magnetosonic waves should be taken into consideration together with gyroresonance.

  8. Proton Radiation Belt Dynamics in Low Earth Orbits Interrelated with Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakhov, Vitaly; Aleksandrin, Sergey; Mikhailov, Vladimir; Bakaldin, Alexey; Mayorov, Andrey; Mayorova, Marina; Koldashov, Sergey; Sharonova, Nadezhda; Galper, Arkady; Zharaspaev, Temir; Batischev, Alexey

    Existing empirical radiation belt models do not able to calculate trapped particle fluxes with taking into account changing solar activity. Widely using AP-8 model allows to evaluate proton fluxes just in two cases: for minimum or maximum of a solar cycle. New AP-9 model is under developing. Also new additional possibilities for experimental study of radiation belt dynamics is opened up. Since 2006 year PAMELA and ARINA experiments onboard satelite RESURS-DK1 are carried out. PAMELA is in the first place spectrometer to study antiparticles in cosmic rays. The ARINA instrument is intended studying high-energy charged particle bursts in the magnetosphere. Along with such fundamental goals these instruments give opportunity to carry out measurements of trapped particles in the inner radiation belt. Complex of two mentioned instruments covers proton energy range from 30 MeV up to energy limit for trapping (~2 GeV). Continuous measurements with PAMELA and ARINA include falling and rising phases of 23/24 solar cycles. In this report we present temporal profile of proton fluxes in the inner zone of the radiation belt (1.1130MeV at the solar minimum several times greater than at the solar maximum.

  9. Science Objectives and Rationale for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Fox, N. J.; Kanekal, S. G.; Kessel, R. L.; Sibeck, D. G.; Ukhorskiy, A.

    2013-11-01

    The NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission addresses how populations of high energy charged particles are created, vary, and evolve in space environments, and specifically within Earth's magnetically trapped radiation belts. RBSP, with a nominal launch date of August 2012, comprises two spacecraft making in situ measurements for at least 2 years in nearly the same highly elliptical, low inclination orbits (1.1×5.8 RE, 10∘). The orbits are slightly different so that 1 spacecraft laps the other spacecraft about every 2.5 months, allowing separation of spatial from temporal effects over spatial scales ranging from ˜0.1 to 5 RE. The uniquely comprehensive suite of instruments, identical on the two spacecraft, measures all of the particle (electrons, ions, ion composition), fields ( E and B), and wave distributions ( d E and d B) that are needed to resolve the most critical science questions. Here we summarize the high level science objectives for the RBSP mission, provide historical background on studies of Earth and planetary radiation belts, present examples of the most compelling scientific mysteries of the radiation belts, present the mission design of the RBSP mission that targets these mysteries and objectives, present the observation and measurement requirements for the mission, and introduce the instrumentation that will deliver these measurements. This paper references and is followed by a number of companion papers that describe the details of the RBSP mission, spacecraft, and instruments.

  10. Science Objectives and Rationale for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B.H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Kanekal, S. G.; Kessel, R. L.; Sibek, D. G.; Ukhorskiy, A.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission addresses how populationsof high energy charged particles are created, vary, and evolve in space environments,and specifically within Earths magnetically trapped radiation belts. RBSP, with a nominallaunch date of August 2012, comprises two spacecraft making in situ measurements for atleast 2 years in nearly the same highly elliptical, low inclination orbits (1.1 5.8 RE, 10).The orbits are slightly different so that 1 spacecraft laps the other spacecraft about every2.5 months, allowing separation of spatial from temporal effects over spatial scales rangingfrom 0.1 to 5 RE. The uniquely comprehensive suite of instruments, identical on the twospacecraft, measures all of the particle (electrons, ions, ion composition), fields (E and B),and wave distributions (dE and dB) that are needed to resolve the most critical science questions.Here we summarize the high level science objectives for the RBSP mission, providehistorical background on studies of Earth and planetary radiation belts, present examples ofthe most compelling scientific mysteries of the radiation belts, present the mission design ofthe RBSP mission that targets these mysteries and objectives, present the observation andmeasurement requirements for the mission, and introduce the instrumentation that will deliverthese measurements. This paper references and is followed by a number of companionpapers that describe the details of the RBSP mission, spacecraft, and instruments.

  11. Localized Adaptive Inflation in Ensemble Data Assimilation: Application to a Radiation Belt Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, J.; Godinez, H. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) has become an important data assimilation tool for numerical models in the geosciences. Recently, the EnKF has been applied to radiation belt models to accurately estimate Earth's radiation belt particle distribution. A particular concern in data assimilation for radiation belts is model deficiencies, due to lack of appropriate source and/or loss terms for trapped particles, which can adversely impact the solution of the assimilation. In this work we present a localized adaptive covariance inflation technique used to account for model uncertainty in EnKF. A one-dimensional radial diffusion model for phase space density, together with observational satellite data, is used in EnKF with the purpose of accurately estimating Earth's radiation belt particle distribution. Numerical results from identical-twin experiments, where data is generated from the same model, as well as the assimilation of real observational data, are presented. The results show improvement in the predictive skill of the model solution due to the proper inclusion of model errors in the data assimilation.

  12. A statistical study of proton pitch angle distributions measured by the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run; Summers, Danny; Ni, Binbin; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Mitchell, Donald G.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2016-06-01

    A statistical study of ring current-energy proton pitch angle distributions (PADs) in Earth's inner magnetosphere is reported here. The data are from the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) on board the Van Allen Probe B spacecraft from 1 January 2013 to 15 April 2015. By fitting the data to the functional form sinnα, where α is the proton pitch angle, we examine proton PADs at the energies 50, 100, 180, 328, and 488 keV in the L shell range from L = 2.5 to L = 6. Three PAD types are classified: trapped (90° peaked), butterfly, and isotropic. The proton PAD dependence on the particle energy, magnetic local time (MLT), L shell, and geomagnetic activity are analyzed in detail. The results show a strong dependence of the proton PADs on MLT. On the nightside, the n values outside the plasmapause are clearly lower than those inside the plasmapause. At higher energies and during intense magnetic activity, nightside butterfly PADs can be observed at L shells down to the vicinity of the plasmapause. The averaged n values on the dayside are larger than on the nightside. A maximum of the averaged n values occurs around L = 4.5 in the postnoon sector (12-16 MLT). The averaged n values show a dawn-dusk asymmetry with lower values on the dawnside at high L shells, which is consistent with previous studies of butterfly PADs. The MLT dependence of the proton PADs becomes more distinct with increasing particle energy. These features suggest that drift shell splitting coupled with a radial flux gradient play an important role in the formation of PADs, particularly at L > ~ 4.5.

  13. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-01

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < -2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00-18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00-06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. These variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  14. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-22

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancakemore » distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.« less

  15. Multiple loss processes of relativistic electrons outside the heart of outer radiation belt during a storm sudden commencement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Yuan, Z. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Spence, H.

    2015-12-01

    By examining the compression-induced changes in the electron phase space density and pitch angle distribution observed by two satellites of Van Allen Probes (RBSP-A/B), we find that the relativistic electrons (>2 MeV) outside the heart of outer radiation belt (L* ≥ 5) undergo multiple losses during a storm sudden commencement. The relativistic electron loss mainly occurs in the field-aligned direction (pitch angle α < 30° or >150°), and the flux decay of the field-aligned electrons is independent of the spatial location variations of the two satellites. However, the relativistic electrons in the pitch angle range of 30°-150° increase (decrease) with the decreasing (increasing) geocentric distance (|ΔL| < 0.25) of the RBSP-B (RBSP-A) location, and the electron fluxes in the quasi-perpendicular direction display energy-dispersive oscillations in the Pc5 period range (2-10 min). The relativistic electron loss is confirmed by the decrease of electron phase space density at high-L shell after the magnetospheric compressions, and their loss is associated with the intense plasmaspheric hiss, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, relativistic electron precipitation (observed by POES/NOAA satellites at 850 km), and magnetic field fluctuations in the Pc5 band. The intense EMIC waves and whistler mode hiss jointly cause the rapidly pitch angle scattering loss of the relativistic electrons within 10 h. Moreover, the Pc5 ULF waves also lead to the slowly outward radial diffusion of the relativistic electrons in the high-L region with a negative electron phase space density gradient.

  16. Implementation of Ensemble Data Assimilation for a Three-Dimensional Radiation Belt Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez, H. C.; Chen, Y.; Shprits, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.; Subbotin, D.

    2013-05-01

    Earth's outer radiation belt is very dynamic and undergoes constant changes due to acceleration, loss, and transport processes of the energetic electrons. In this work the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) assimilation method is applied to the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, a three-dimensional radiation belt model developed at the University of California Los Angeles. The VERB model includes radial, pitch angle, and energy diffusion caused by low-latitude and high-latitude chorus, plasma- spheric hiss, and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. Assimi- lation methods based on Kalman filtering have been successfully applied to one-dimensional radial diffusion radiation belt models, where it has been shown that assimilating real observational data into the radiation belt models greatly improves the accuracy of electron PSD estimation. In our work we implement the EnKF for assimilation of real electron PSD data into the VERB model. In particular the assimilation is performed locally along the direction of the dominant diffusion of electrons in the model. This will enable the correct assimilation of data to be consistent with the flow of electrons throughout the model. Two set of assimila- tion experiments are presented. The first is an identical-twin experiment, where artificial data is generated from the same model, with the purpose of validating the assimilation method. In the second set of experiments, real PSD observational data from CRRES are assimilated into VERB in order to improve the model estimation of the electron PSD distribution. The results show that data assimilation significantly improves the accu- racy of the VERB model by efficiently including observations to correct the model PSD estimation.

  17. The Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) Instrument on Board the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Spacecraft: Characterization of Earth's Radiation Belt High-Energy Particle Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Batiste, S.; Bolton, M.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; Monk, S.; Reukauf, R.; Steg, S.; Westfall, J.; Belting, C.; Bolton, B.; Braun, D.; Cervelli, B.; Hubbell, K.; Kien, M.; Knappmiller, S.; Wade, S.; Lamprecht, B.; Stevens, K.; Wallace, J.; Yehle, A.; Spence, H. E.; Friedel, R.

    2013-11-01

    Particle acceleration and loss in the million electron Volt (MeV) energy range (and above) is the least understood aspect of radiation belt science. In order to measure cleanly and separately both the energetic electron and energetic proton components, there is a need for a carefully designed detector system. The Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) on board the Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) pair of spacecraft consists of a stack of high-performance silicon solid-state detectors in a telescope configuration, a collimation aperture, and a thick case surrounding the detector stack to shield the sensors from penetrating radiation and bremsstrahlung. The instrument points perpendicular to the spin axis of the spacecraft and measures high-energy electrons (up to ˜20 MeV) with excellent sensitivity and also measures magnetospheric and solar protons to energies well above E=100 MeV. The instrument has a large geometric factor ( g=0.2 cm2 sr) to get reasonable count rates (above background) at the higher energies and yet will not saturate at the lower energy ranges. There must be fast enough electronics to avert undue dead-time limitations and chance coincidence effects. The key goal for the REPT design is to measure the directional electron intensities (in the range 10-2-106 particles/cm2 s sr MeV) and energy spectra (Δ E/ E˜25 %) throughout the slot and outer radiation belt region. Present simulations and detailed laboratory calibrations show that an excellent design has been attained for the RBSP needs. We describe the engineering design, operational approaches, science objectives, and planned data products for REPT.

  18. Control of the energetic proton flux in the inner radiation belt by artificial means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Papadopoulos, K.; Sharma, A. S.

    2009-07-01

    Earth's inner radiation belt located inside L = 2 is dominated by a relatively stable flux of trapped protons with energy from a few to over 100 MeV. Radiation effects in spacecraft electronics caused by the inner radiation belt protons are the major cause of performance anomalies and lifetime of Low Earth Orbit satellites. For electronic components with large feature size, of the order of a micron, anomalies occur mainly when crossing the South Atlantic Anomaly. However, current and future commercial electronic systems are incorporating components with submicron size features. Such systems cannot function in the presence of the trapped 30-100 MeV protons, as hardening against such high-energy protons is essentially impractical. The paper discusses the basic physics of the interaction of high-energy protons with low-frequency Shear Alfven Wave (SAW) under conditions prevailing in the radiation belts. Such waves are observed mainly in the outer belt, and it is believed that they are excited by an Alfven Ion Cyclotron instability driven by anisotropic equatorially trapped energetic protons. The paper derives the bounce and drift-averaged diffusion coefficients and uses them to determine the proton lifetime as a function of the spectrum and amplitude of the volume-averaged SAW resonant with the trapped energetic protons. The theory is applied to the outer and inner radiation belts. It is found that the resonant interaction of observed SAW with nT amplitude in the outer belt results in low flux of trapped protons by restricting their lifetime to periods shorter than days. A similar analysis for the inner radiation belt indicates that broadband SAW in the 1-10 Hz frequency range and average amplitude of 25 pT would reduce the trapped energetic proton flux by more than an order of magnitude within 2 to 3 years. In the absence of naturally occurring SAW waves, such reduction can be achieved by injecting such waves from ground-based transmitters. The analysis indicates

  19. Dawn-dusk asymmetry and adiabatic dynamic of the radiation belt electrons during magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazutin, Leonid L.

    2016-09-01

    The changes of the latitudinal profiles of outer belt energetic electrons during magnetic storms are mostly explained by the precipitation into the loss cone caused by VLF and EMIC waves or by the scattering into the magnetopause. In present work, energetic electron dynamics during magnetic storm of August 29-30, 2004 we attributed at most to the adiabatic transformation of the magnetic drift trajectories and Dst effect. This conclusion was based on the analysis of dawn-dusk asymmetry of the electron latitudinal profiles measured by low altitude polar orbiter SERVIS-1 and on the coincidence of pre-storm and after-storm profiles of radiation belt electrons and protons.

  20. Understanding enhancements in outer radiation belt electrons through measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Quintin George

    Electrons in Earth's magnetosphere typically originate with energies below ten kiloelectron volts (keV). Electrons trapped in the radiation belts can have energies that exceed 10 MeV and must be naturally accelerated within Earth's magnetosphere. Still, the processes that govern this highly dynamic region are not fully understood. The outer radiation belt is not only a scientific puzzle but understanding it is an operational necessity, as these high energy electrons are capable of damaging spacecraft and can even result in spacecraft failure. In this work, we investigate our ability to observe these particles and understand the natural acceleration processes that generate them. We approach the problem on three fronts: (i) from an instrumentation perspective we develop a first-of-its- kind miniaturized particle telescope flown on a CubeSat platform, (ii) from an observational perspective we investigate in detail an outer belt enhancement case-study, and (iii) from a modeling perspective we develop a data assimilation model to better understand the mechanisms causing the acceleration. Finally, we construct an event-specific method to estimate electron lifetimes for diffusion models using CubeSat data, and use it to fully investigate the case study using the assimilative model, ultimately combining the three approaches. The ensuing results substantiate CubeSats as scientific observatories, demonstrate new data assimilation applications to the radiation belts, and strengthen our understanding of magnetospheric dynamics and the role of acceleration mechanisms.

  1. The Engineering Radiation Monitor for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsten, J. O.; Maurer, R. H.; Peplowski, P. N.; Holmes-Siedle, A. G.; Herrmann, C. C.; Mauk, B. H.

    2013-11-01

    An Engineering Radiation Monitor (ERM) has been developed as a supplementary spacecraft subsystem for NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission. The ERM will monitor total dose and deep dielectric charging at each RBSP spacecraft in real time. Configured to take the place of spacecraft balance mass, the ERM contains an array of eight dosimeters and two buried conductive plates. The dosimeters are mounted under covers of varying shielding thickness to obtain a dose-depth curve and characterize the electron and proton contributions to total dose. A 3-min readout cadence coupled with an initial sensitivity of ˜0.01 krad should enable dynamic measurements of dose rate throughout the 9-hr RBSP orbit. The dosimeters are Radiation-sensing Field Effect Transistors (RadFETs) and operate at zero bias to preserve their response even when powered off. The range of the RadFETs extends above 1000 krad to avoid saturation over the expected duration of the mission. Two large-area (˜10 cm2) charge monitor plates set behind different thickness covers will measure the dynamic currents of weakly-penetrating electrons that can be potentially hazardous to sensitive electronic components within the spacecraft. The charge monitors can handle large events without saturating (˜3000 fA/cm2) and provide sufficient sensitivity (˜0.1 fA/cm2) to gauge quiescent conditions. High time-resolution (5 s) monitoring allows detection of rapid changes in flux and enables correlation of spacecraft anomalies with local space weather conditions. Although primarily intended as an engineering subsystem to monitor spacecraft radiation levels, real-time data from the ERM may also prove useful or interesting to a larger community.

  2. Magnetospheric Observations from JUNO and the Van Allen Probes on Oct 9, 2013 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    During the Earth Flyby of JUNO on October 9, 2013, the two Van Allen probes will make observations of magnetospheric waves and particles from a near equatorial orbit with apogee near 5.8 RE in the dusk sector. Both the MagEIS and the RBSPICE instruments on the Van Allen probes will measure the radiation belt and the ring current population over an energy range similar to the JEDI instrument on JUNO, which will be used to provide an important calibration of JEDI during the flyby. Measurements at considerable higher energy obtained from the REPT and RPS instruments on the Van Allen probes can be used to investigate the sensitivity of several instruments and other critical components on JUNO to the type of high-energy penetrating particles, to which the satellite will be exposed after orbital insertion in the Jovian magnetosphere. Several other JUNO instruments such as MAG and WAVES will be operational during the flyby allowing comparison with similar measurement on the Van Allen probes. Highlights of the coordinated observations obtained during the JUNO Earth flyby will be presented.

  3. Phase Synchronization for Clock Event in the Jovian Electron Radiation Belts.*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, P. A.; Efremova, V. G.; Stefan, V.

    1996-11-01

    This work deals with nonlinear time-dependent processes in the outer Jupiter's electron radiation belts. The cyclotron instability dynamics of a plasma magnetospheric maser are described by a relativistic system of quasilinear equations. This system takes into account the diffusion of particles in the adiabatic invariant space, the synchrotron losses, and the electromagnetic radiation evolution. Analysis shows the importance of the effect of global resonance, i.e., the oscillation eigen-frequencies of the radiation belt parameters are virtually independent on the magnetic shell and coincide with the planet's angular rotation velocity. Supported in part by Tesla Labs, Inc., La Jolla, CA 92038-2946. ^1Also with Tesla Labs, Inc., La Jolla CA 92038-2946.

  4. Pitch-angle diffusion of radiation belt electrons within the plasmasphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Thorne, R. M.; Kennel, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the formation of the quiet-time electron slot, which divides the radiation belt electrons into an inner and an outer zone. The pitch-angle diffusion of radiation belt electrons resulting from resonant interactions with the observed plasmaspheric whistler-mode wave band is quantitatively investigated. The effects of wave propagation obliquely to the geomagnetic field direction with the resulting diffusion at all cyclotron-harmonic resonances and the Landau resonance are evaluated along with the effects of interactions occuring at all geomagnetic latitudes. The results obtained account for the long-term stability of the inner radiation zone, the location of its outer edge as a function of electron energy, and the removal of electrons to levels near zero throughout the slot. Computed pitch-angle distributions and precipitation decay rates are in good agreement with slot-region observations.

  5. Modeling Earth's Outer Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics---Radial Diffusion, Heating, and Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Weichao

    Earth's outer radiation belt is a relativistic electron environment that is hazardous to space systems. It is characterized by large variations in the electron flux, which are controlled by the competition between source, transport, and loss processes. One of the central questions in outer radiation belt research is to resolve the relative contribution of radial diffusion, wave heating, and loss to the enhancement and decay of the radiation belt electrons. This thesis studies them together and separately. Firstly, we develop an empirical Fokker-Planck model that includes radial diffusion, an internal source, and finite electron lifetimes parameterized as functions of geomagnetic indices. By simulating the observed electron variations, the model suggests that the required magnitudes of radial diffusion and internal heating for the enhancement of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt vary from storm to storm, and generally internal heating contributes more to the enhancements of MeV energy electrons at L=4 (L is approximately the radial distance in Earth radii at the equator). However, since the source, transport, and loss terms in the model are empirical, the model results have uncertainties. To eliminate the uncertainty in the loss rate, both the precipitation and the adiabatic loss of radiation belt electrons are quantitatively studied. Based on the observations from Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), a Drift-Diffusion model is applied to quantify electron precipitation loss, which is the dominant non-adiabatic loss mechanism for electrons in the heart of the outer radiation belt. Model results for a small storm, a moderate storm, and an intense storm indicate that fast precipitation losses of relativistic electrons, on the time scale of hours, persistently occur in the storm main phases and with more efficient losses at higher energies over wide range of L regions. Additionally, calculations of adiabatic effects on radiation

  6. Saturn Neutron Exosphere as Source for Inner and Innermost Radiation Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John; Lipatov, Alexander; Sittler, Edward; Sturner, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Energetic proton and electron measurements by the ongoing Cassini orbiter mission are expanding our knowledge of the highest energy components of the Saturn magnetosphere in the inner radiation belt region after the initial discoveries of these belts by the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 missions. Saturn has a neutron exosphere that extends throughout the magnetosphere from the cosmic ray albedo neutron source at the planetary main rings and atmosphere. The neutrons emitted from these sources at energies respectively above 4 and 8 eV escape the Saturn system, while those at lower energies are gravitationally bound. The neutrons undergo beta decay in average times of about 1000 seconds to provide distributed sources of protons and electrons throughout Saturn's magnetosphere with highest injection rates close to the Saturn and ring sources. The competing radiation belt source for energetic electrons is rapid inward diffusion and acceleration of electrons from the middle magnetosphere and beyond. Minimal losses during diffusive transport across the moon orbits, e.g. of Mimas and Enceladus, and local time asymmetries in electron intensity, suggest that drift resonance effects preferentially boost the diffusion rates of electrons from both sources. Energy dependences of longitudinal gradient-curvature drift speeds relative to the icy moons are likely responsible for hemispheric differences (e.g., Mimas, Tethys) in composition and thermal properties as at least partly produced by radiolytic processes. A continuing mystery is the similar radial profiles of lower energy (<10 MeV) protons in the inner belt region. Either the source of these lower energy protons is also neutron decay, but perhaps alternatively from atmospheric albedo, or else all protons from diverse distributed sources are similarly affected by losses at the moon' orbits, e.g. because the proton diffusion rates are extremely low. Enceladus cryovolcanism, and radiolytic processing elsewhere on the icy moon and

  7. Whistler-Mode Waves inside Density Ducts Observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosborough, S.; Bengtson, M.; Stein, R. L.; Streltsov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes satellites launched by NASA in 2012 are currently orbiting in Earth's radiation belts collecting data about electromagnetic waves and charged particles in the near-earth space environment. Whistler-mode waves are naturally occurring right-hand polarized, very-low frequency waves (< 30 kHz), that can efficiently interact with the energetic electrons in the earth's radiation belts magnetosphere and remediate them from the magnetosphere by precipitating these particles into the atmosphere. The important property of the whistler-mode waves is that they can be guided by density inhomogeneities extended along the ambient magnetic field and localized in the direction perpendicular to the field. Such density channels can be formed by the density enhancement or depletion and they are called ducts. The primary goal of our research is to find density duct and whistler waves in the data recorded by the Van Allen Probes satellites in the magnetosphere, and to reproduce these data with numerical simulations of time-dependent, two-dimensional electron MHD model. In this paper, we present results from our analysis of the observations performed by the Van Allen Probes satellites on 15 October 2014. Data from the probes show the electric and magnetic fields and plasma density. In this event whistler-mode waves were observed from 01:42 to 01:54 UT inside the localized density enhancement coincided with the flux of energetic electrons. Short time intervals, high concentrated electron density, and electron flux gradient activity make this event very interesting for the investigation. Numerical simulations of the electron MHD model revels reasonable quantitative agreement between numerical results and satellite observations, suggesting that the electromagnetic disturbances recorded by the Van Allen Probes satellites, are the whistler-mode waves indeed.

  8. Van Allen Probes Multipoint Measurements of the Spatial and Coherence Scales of EMIC Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, L. W.; Bonnell, J. W.; Agapitov, O. V.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are able to resonate with MeV electrons and cause precipitation loss of radiation belt electrons. EMIC waves can provide a strong source of electron pitch angle diffusion, but the waves are often quite localized - thus the spatial extents of these waves can have a large effect on their overall scattering efficiency. Using measurements from the Van Allen Probes, we characterize the spatial extents of EMIC wave active regions, and how these depend on local time, radial distance, and driver. As the separation between the spacecraft along the orbital track varies in time, with one spacecraft lapping the other every ~70 days, we can determine the correlation between EMIC wave measurements at varying spacecraft separations. During individual events at close approaches (Jan 17 2013, for example - see attached figure), analysis of the detailed wave properties and coherence is performed. These studies provide important information on parameters relevant for determining resonance of EMIC waves with radiation belt electrons.

  9. Multi-point observations of energetic particle injection deep into the inner magnetosphere: Implications for the ring current and radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, G. D.; Larsen, B.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Henderson, M. G.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J.; Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Spence, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    For thirty years, the "injection boundary" model of substorm injections has provided a framework for studies of the impulsive transport of energetic electrons and ions into the inner magnetosphere. New, multi-satellite observations of substorm injections show signatures that require revision and rethinking of the classical picture. Recent observations by the LANL-GEO and GOES energetic particle instruments provide unprecedented coverage at geosynchronous orbit while the Van Allen Probes satellites provide simultaneous multi-point measurements inside geosynchronous orbit. With these satellites we can observe injections at three different radial distances and up to ten different local times - simultaneously. These observations reveal a complex and varied set of dynamics that have important implications for the development of the radiation belts and ring current. In this study we look specifically at the radial penetration of energetic particle injections in storms and substorms. Radial alignments of satellites confirm and extend the CRRES/LANL-GEO observations of relatively slow inward propagation of the injection region inside geosynchronous orbit [1]. At the same time, synoptic Van Allen Probes observations show frequent storm-time "injection" of energetic (~50-500 keV) electrons to very low L-shells (L < 3) that have not previously been reported. The radial distribution of electrons and ions injected during storms and substorms have profound implications for the generation of waves, for the availability of a radiation belt "seed population", and for the radial distribution of ring current ions. In this paper we will use multi-point satellite observations to understand the processes that inject energetic particles into the inner magnetosphere, the Earthward propagation of these injections, the conditions that control variation in Earthward extent of energetic particle injections, and how particles can be injected deep inside the plasmasphere and even through the

  10. Radiation belt electron reanalysis over two solar cycles: Comparitive modeling and analysis of several geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, Adam; Turner, Drew; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Shprits, Yuri; Podladchikova, Tatiana; Drozdov, Alexander

    Earth’s electron radiation belts are a dynamic system, coupled to the solar wind and to the ionosphere. Understanding the observed dynamics requires consideration of the coupling between the three systems. Remote sensing and in situ observations provide information on the current state of the radiation belt system, and together with careful modeling may be used to resolve the physical processes at work. The Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) model solves the Fokker-Planck diffusion equation in three dimensional invariant coordinates, which allows one to more effectively separate adiabatic and non-adiabatic changes in the radiation belt electron population. The model includes geomagnetic storm intensity dependent parameterizations of the following dominant magnetospheric waves: day- and night-side chorus, plasmaspheric hiss (in the inner magnetosphere and inside the plume region), lightning and anthropogenic generated waves, and electro-magnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, also inside of plasmaspheric plumes. The model is used to forecast the future state of the radiation belt electron population, while real-time data may be used to update the current state of the belts through assimilation with the model. The Kalman filter provides a computationally inexpensive method to assimilate data with a model, while taking into account the errors associated with each. A split-operator Kalman filter approach is applied in this study, which provides a fast and effective way to assimilate data over very long time periods. Data error estimates are derived through the intercalibration, while model error estimates are adjusted dynamically based on the model forecast performance. In the current study, a set of geomagnetic storms are investigated comparatively using solar wind data, and reanalysis of electron phase space density from several different spacecraft missions. The storms occurred during periods that span over two solar cycles, and include CME and CIR driven

  11. Evaluation of the new radiation belt AE9/AP9/SPM model for a cislunar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Walker, Steven A.; Santos Koos, Lindsey M.

    2014-09-01

    Space mission planners continue to experience challenges associated with human space flight. Concerned with the omnipresence of harmful ionizing radiation in space, at the mission design stage, mission planners must evaluate the amount of exposure the crew of a spacecraft is subjected to during the transit trajectory from low Earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO) and beyond (free space). The Earth's geomagnetic field is located within the domain of LEO-GEO and, depending on latitude, extends out some 40,000-60,000 km. This field contains the Van Allen trapped electrons, protons, and low-energy plasmas, such as the nuclei of hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and to a lesser degree other atoms. In addition, there exist the geomagnetically attenuated energetic galactic cosmic rays (GCR). These particles are potentially harmful to improperly shielded crew members and onboard subsystems. Mitigation strategies to limit the exposure due to free space GCR and sporadic solar energetic particles (SEP) such as flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) must also be exercised beyond the trapped field. Presented in this work is the exposure analysis for a multi-vehicle mission planned for the epoch of February 2020 from LEO to the Earth-moon Lagrange-point two (L2), located approximately 63,000 km beyond the orbit of the Earth-moon binary system. Space operation at L2 provides a gravitationally stable orbit for a vehicle and partially eliminates the need for periodic thrust-vectoring to maintain orbital stability. In the cislunar (Earth-moon) space of L2, the mission trajectory and timeline in this work call for a cargo vehicle to rendezvous with a crew vehicle. This is followed by 15 days of space activities at L2 while the cargo and crew vehicles are docked after which the crew returns to Earth. The mission epoch of 2020 is specifically chosen as it is anticipated that the next solar minimum (i.e. end of cycle 24) in the Sun's approximate 11 years cycle will take place around

  12. Observation of Relativistic Electron Microbursts in Conjunction with Intense Radiation Belt Whistler-Mode Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kersten, K.; Cattell, C. A.; Breneman, A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Wilson, L. B., III; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Roth, I.

    2011-01-01

    We present multi-satellite observations of large amplitude radiation belt whistler-mode waves and relativistic electron precipitation. On separate occasions during the Wind petal orbits and STEREO phasing orbits, Wind and STEREO recorded intense whistler-mode waves in the outer nightside equatorial radiation belt with peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 300 mV/m. During these intervals of intense wave activity, SAMPEX recorded relativistic electron microbursts in near magnetic conjunction with Wind and STEREO. This evidence of microburst precipitation occurring at the same time and at nearly the same magnetic local time and L-shell with a bursty temporal structure similar to that of the observed large amplitude wave packets suggests a causal connection between the two phenomena. Simulation studies corroborate this idea, showing that nonlinear wave.particle interactions may result in rapid energization and scattering on timescales comparable to those of the impulsive relativistic electron precipitation.

  13. Enhanced radial transport and energization of radiation belt electrons due to drift orbit bifurcations

    PubMed Central

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Millan, R M; Kress, B T; Smith, D C

    2014-01-01

    [1]Relativistic electron intensities in Earth's outer radiation belt can vary by multiple orders of magnitude on the time scales ranging from minutes to days. One fundamental process contributing to dynamic variability of radiation belt intensities is the radial transport of relativistic electrons across their drift shells. In this paper we analyze the properties of three-dimensional radial transport in a global magnetic field model driven by variations in the solar wind dynamic pressure. We use a test particle approach which captures anomalous effects such as drift orbit bifurcations. We show that the bifurcations lead to an order of magnitude increase in radial transport rates and enhance the energization at large equatorial pitch angles. Even at quiet time fluctuations in dynamic pressure, radial transport at large pitch angles exhibits strong deviations from the diffusion approximation. The radial transport rates are much lower at small pitch angle values which results in a better agreement with the diffusion approximation. PMID:26167431

  14. Solar Modulation of Inner Trapped Belt Radiation Flux as a Function of Atmospheric Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2005-01-01

    No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose.

  15. Localized adaptive inflation in ensemble data assimilation for a radiation belt model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez, H. C.; Koller, J.

    2012-08-01

    In this work a one-dimensional radial diffusion model for phase space density, together with observational satellite data, is used in an ensemble data assimilation with the purpose of accurately estimating Earth's radiation belt particle distribution. A particular concern in data assimilation for radiation belt models are model deficiencies, which can adversely impact the solution of the assimilation. To adequately address these deficiencies, a localized adaptive covariance inflation technique is implemented in the data assimilation to account for model uncertainty. Numerical results from identical-twin experiments, where data is generated from the same model, as well as the assimilation of real observational data, are presented. The results show improvement in the predictive skill of the model solution due to the proper inclusion of model errors in the data assimilation.

  16. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Cayton, Thomas E; Denton, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  17. Kalman filtering and smoothing of radiation belt observations on the basis of model and measurement error identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikova, T.; Shprits, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.; Kondrashov, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Data assimilation by Kalman filter of the radiation belts observations requires specification of poorly known relevant error statistics that need to be identified to provide the accurate reconstruction of the radiation belt dynamics. Identification of error statistics in data assimilation is of particular importance for radiation belt models, since large uncertainties of the observations and the model may cause the failure of data assimilation solution and lead to false conclusions about the state and evolution of radiation belts. In this study, we develop the identification technique of unknown model and observation errors for the successive assimilation of multiple-satellite observations characterized by large variety of observation error statistics. Further improvement and the accuracy increase of PSD reconstruction is demonstrated by the implementation of the backward smoothing procedure applied to the forward Kalman filter estimates.

  18. Geomagnetic Storms and EMIC waves: Van Allen Probe observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dedong; Yuan, Zhigang; Yu, Xiongdong; Huang, Shiyong; Deng, Xiaohua; Zhou, Meng; Li, Haimeng

    2016-04-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are believed to play a crucial role in the dynamics of ring current ions and radiation belt electrons, especially during geomagnetic storms. However, there is little consensus on which phase of the storm is more favorable for the generation of EMIC waves. Utilizing the data from magnetometer instrument of EMFISIS suite on board Van Allen Probe A, the occurrences of EMIC waves during geomagnetic storms are investigated in this paper. 76 storms were identified during the period under research, from 8 September 2012 to 30 April 2014, when the apogee of Van Allen Probe A covered all the MLT sectors. 50 of the 76 storms observed 124 EMIC wave events, of which 80 are found in the recovery phase, more than those observed in the main phase. Evolution of the distribution characteristics of EMIC waves respect to L and MLT in different geomagnetic phases is investigated, which is found to be consistent with that of the plasmasphere. These results are different from those derived by the observations of the CRRES satellite. The different results may result from the different orbit coverage of the two different satellite missions or from the different activity level of the magnetosphere during the different periods. Few EMIC waves in the dayside sector during the pre-onset periods are observed. It is implied that, to the generation of EMIC waves, the effect of solar wind dynamic pressure in the inner magnetosphere is not so significant as that in the outer magnetosphere.

  19. Chorus wave-normal statistics in the Earth's radiation belts from ray tracing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuillard, H.; Zaliznyak, Y.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Agapitov, O.; Artemyev, A.; Rolland, G.

    2012-08-01

    Discrete ELF/VLF (Extremely Low Frequency/Very Low Frequency) chorus emissions are one of the most intense electromagnetic plasma waves observed in radiation belts and in the outer terrestrial magnetosphere. These waves play a crucial role in the dynamics of radiation belts, and are responsible for the loss and the acceleration of energetic electrons. The objective of our study is to reconstruct the realistic distribution of chorus wave-normals in radiation belts for all magnetic latitudes. To achieve this aim, the data from the electric and magnetic field measurements onboard Cluster satellite are used to determine the wave-vector distribution of the chorus signal around the equator region. Then the propagation of such a wave packet is modeled using three-dimensional ray tracing technique, which employs K. Rönnmark's WHAMP to solve hot plasma dispersion relation along the wave packet trajectory. The observed chorus wave distributions close to waves source are first fitted to form the initial conditions which then propagate numerically through the inner magnetosphere in the frame of the WKB approximation. Ray tracing technique allows one to reconstruct wave packet properties (electric and magnetic fields, width of the wave packet in k-space, etc.) along the propagation path. The calculations show the spatial spreading of the signal energy due to propagation in the inhomogeneous and anisotropic magnetized plasma. Comparison of wave-normal distribution obtained from ray tracing technique with Cluster observations up to 40° latitude demonstrates the reliability of our approach and applied numerical schemes.

  20. Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Denton, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

  1. Relative abundance of heavy ions in the inner zone of the radiation belts of the earth

    SciTech Connect

    Panasyuk, M.I.

    1986-03-01

    The energy dependences of the relative abundances of energetic (E > 1 MeV/nucleon) H, He, and O ions in the radiation belts are analyzed on the basis of experimental results obtained from measurement of their spectral characteristics on several satellites: Molniya-2, Kosmos-900, Prognoz-5, Explorer-45, ISEE-1, and OV1-19. It is shown that the formation of the energy dependence of He/H and O/H can be explained with a model providing for ion diffusion into the interior of the radiation belts with Coulomb losses taken into account under thecondition that the total-energy spectra at the boundary are more rigid for the heavy ions and are determined by such parameters of the quiet solar wind as the relative concentrations of the individual ion components and their charge states. It is shown that the fluxes of O and Fe ions with E > 1 MeV/nucleon measured on the orbital stations Salyut-6 and Skylab have an energy dependence of the relative abundances not inconsistent with above-noted mechanism for the formation of energetic ions of the inner radiation belt.

  2. Responses of relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ying; Xie, Lun; Pu, Zuyin; Fu, Suiyan; Chen, Lunjin; Ni, Binbin; Li, Wen; Li, Jinxing; Guo, Ruilong; Parks, G. K.

    2015-11-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. A statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies, while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies. In about 87% of the storms, 0.3-2.5 MeV electron fluxes show an increase, whereas 2.5-14 MeV electron fluxes increase in only 35% of the storms. Superposed epoch analyses suggest that such "energy-dependent" responses of electrons preferably occur during conditions of high solar wind density which is favorable to generate magnetospheric electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, and these events are associated with relatively weaker chorus activities. We have examined one of the cases where observed EMIC waves can resonate effectively with >2.5 MeV electrons and scatter them into the atmosphere. The correlation study further illustrates that electron flux dropouts during storm main phases do not correlate well with the flux buildup during storm recovery phases. We suggest that a combination of efficient EMIC-induced scattering and weaker chorus-driven acceleration provides a viable candidate for the energy-dependent responses of outer radiation belt relativistic electrons to geomagnetic storms. These results are of great interest to both understanding of the radiation belt dynamics and applications in space weather.

  3. Energy Dependent Responses of Relativistic Electron Fluxes in the Outer Radiation Belt to Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, L.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase 4 or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. A statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies. In about 87% of the storms, 0.3-2.5 MeV electrons fluxes show increase, whereas 2.5-14 MeV electron fluxes increase in only 35% of the storms. Superposed epoch analyses suggest that such 'energy dependent' behavior of electrons preferably occurs during conditions of high solar wind density which is favorable to generate magnetospheric electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves and these 'energy dependent' events are associated with relatively weaker chorus activities. We have examined one of the cases where observed EMIC waves can resonate effectively with >2.5 MeV electrons and scatter them into the atmosphere. The correlation study further illustrates that electron flux drop-outs during storm main phases do not correlate well with the flux build-up during storm recovery phases. We suggest that a combination of efficient EMIC-induced scattering and weaker chorus-driven acceleration provide a viable candidate for the energy dependent responses of outer radiation belt relativistic electrons to geomagnetic storms. These results are of great interest to both understanding of the radiation belt dynamics and applications in space weather.

  4. High Latitude Outer Radiation Belt Boundary Dynamics In Comparison With the Ovation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barinova, Vera; Kalegaev, Vladimir; Myagkova, Irina; Riazantseva, Maria; Dolenko, Sergey; Shirokii, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    The geometry and the dynamics of the Earth's outer radiation belt polar boundary is described at the altitudes between 500 and 1000 km from the Earth surface in dependence on universal time and geomagnetic activity level expressed by the Dst-index. The quantitative model which was built earlier for the Northern hemisphere in quiet conditions using the Coronas-Photon data measured during extremely quiet 2009 epoch is generalized for both quiet and disturbed conditions using Meteor-M 1 and Meteor-M 2 data obtained from 2009 till now. Both hemispheres are studied. Observations of different satellites were mapped to the single altitude using A2000 magnetospheric magnetic field model. The outer radiation belt boundary is compared with equatorward auroral oval boundary represented by Patrick Newel's Ovation Model at NOAA Web-site for the period from July till December 2015. Prediction of the Earth's outer radiation belt polar boundary for one hour is provided based on the Dst forecasting model. Real-time prediction model was implemented into the set of space weather applications of Space Monitoring Data Center of Moscow State University.

  5. Rapid local acceleration of relativistic radiation-belt electrons by magnetospheric chorus.

    PubMed

    Thorne, R M; Li, W; Ni, B; Ma, Q; Bortnik, J; Chen, L; Baker, D N; Spence, H E; Reeves, G D; Henderson, M G; Kletzing, C A; Kurth, W S; Hospodarsky, G B; Blake, J B; Fennell, J F; Claudepierre, S G; Kanekal, S G

    2013-12-19

    Recent analysis of satellite data obtained during the 9 October 2012 geomagnetic storm identified the development of peaks in electron phase space density, which are compelling evidence for local electron acceleration in the heart of the outer radiation belt, but are inconsistent with acceleration by inward radial diffusive transport. However, the precise physical mechanism responsible for the acceleration on 9 October was not identified. Previous modelling has indicated that a magnetospheric electromagnetic emission known as chorus could be a potential candidate for local electron acceleration, but a definitive resolution of the importance of chorus for radiation-belt acceleration was not possible because of limitations in the energy range and resolution of previous electron observations and the lack of a dynamic global wave model. Here we report high-resolution electron observations obtained during the 9 October storm and demonstrate, using a two-dimensional simulation performed with a recently developed time-varying data-driven model, that chorus scattering explains the temporal evolution of both the energy and angular distribution of the observed relativistic electron flux increase. Our detailed modelling demonstrates the remarkable efficiency of wave acceleration in the Earth's outer radiation belt, and the results presented have potential application to Jupiter, Saturn and other magnetized astrophysical objects. PMID:24352287

  6. Determining the spectra of radiation belt electron losses: Fitting DEMETER electron flux observations for typical and storm times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Ian C.; Gamble, Rory J.; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Sauvaud, Jean-André

    2013-12-01

    The energy spectra of energetic electron precipitation from the radiation belts are studied in order to improve our understanding of the influence of radiation belt processes. The Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) microsatellite electron flux instrument is comparatively unusual in that it has very high energy resolution (128 channels with 17.9 keV widths in normal survey mode), which lends itself to this type of spectral analysis. Here electron spectra from DEMETER have been analyzed from all six years of its operation, and three fit types (power law, exponential, and kappa-type) have been applied to the precipitating flux observations. We show that the power law fit consistently provides the best representation of the flux and that the kappa-type is rarely valid. We also provide estimated uncertainties in the flux for this instrument as a function of energy. Average power law gradients for nontrapped particles have been determined for geomagnetically nondisturbed periods to get a typical global behavior of the spectra in the inner radiation belt, slot region, and outer radiation belt. Power law spectral gradients in the outer belt are typically -2.5 during quiet periods, changing to a softer spectrum of ˜-3.5 during geomagnetic storms. The inner belt does the opposite, hardening from -4 during quiet times to ˜-3 during storms. Typical outer belt e-folding values are ˜200 keV, dropping to ˜150 keV during geomagnetic storms, while the inner belt e-folding values change from ˜120 keV to >200 keV. Analysis of geomagnetic storm periods show that the precipitating flux enhancements evident from such storms take approximately 13 days to return to normal values for the outer belt and slot region and approximately 10 days for the inner belt.

  7. Multi-Spacecraft Data Assimilation and Reanalysis During the THEMIS and Van Allen Probes Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, A. C.; Shprits, Y.; Kondrashov, D. A.; Podladchikova, T.; Drozdov, A.; Subbotin, D.

    2013-12-01

    consideration of the innovation vector may lead to a new physical understanding of the radiation belt system, which can later be used to improve our model forecasts. In the current study, we explore the radiation belt dynamics of the current era including data from the THEMIS, Van Allen Probes, GPS satellites, Akebono, NOAA and Cluster spacecraft. Intercalibration is performed between spacecraft on an individual energy channel basis, and in invariant coordinates. The global reanalysis allows an unprecedented analysis of the source-acceleration-transport-loss relationship in Earth's radiation belts. This analysis is used to refine our model capabilities, and to prepare the 3-D reanalysis for real-time data. The global 3-D reanalysis is an important step towards full-scale modeling and operational forecasting of this dynamic region of space.

  8. Evolution of relativistic outer belt electrons during extended quiescent period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Schiller, Q.; Blum, L. W.; Tu, W.; Malaspina, D.; Turner, D.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    To effectively study loss due to precipitation of relativistic electron fluxes in the radiation belt, it is necessary to isolate this loss from the Dst effect and magnetopause shadowing by studying loss during a time of relatively quiet geomagnetic activity. We present a study of the slow decay of 200 keV - 2 MeV electron populations in the outer radiation belt during an extended quiescent period from ~15 Dec 2012 - 10 Jan 2013, wherein Dst never extended below -25 nT. We incorporate particle measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) onboard the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat with measurements from the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) on the Van Allen Probes twin spacecraft to understand the evolution of the electron populations across pitch angle and energy. First, we present REPTile measurements of the precipitating populations (along with trapped & quasi-trapped) at a low-earth orbit, offering a view into the loss cone that is not as easily resolved using only the Van Allen Probes. Electron loss to the atmosphere during this event is quantified through use of a precipitation loss model, using the REPTile measurements. Additionally, phase space densities are derived using pitch-angle-resolved flux data from the REPT and MagEIS instruments, as well as from THEMIS SST data. Finally, we present the net loss effect on the outer radiation belt content during this time, by incorporating the modeled precipitation loss (from REPTile measurements) with Van Allen Probes electron flux data. Hiss and chorus wave data, along with approximate plasmapause location, from Van Allen Probes' Electric Field and Waves Suite (EFW) completes the picture by suggesting mechanisms for the precipitation loss of relativistic electrons during quiet time.

  9. Energy ranges and pitch angles of outer radiation belt electrons depleted by an intense dayside hydrogen band EMIC wave event on February 23, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Huang, C. L.; Kanekal, S. G.; Fok, M. C. H.; Rodger, C. J.; Smith, C. W.; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Although most studies of the effect of EMIC waves on relativistic electrons have focused on wave events in the afternoon sector in the outer plasmasphere or plume region, strong magnetospheric compressions provide an additional stimulus for EMIC wave generation across a large range of local times and L shells. We present here observations of the effects of an intense, long-duration hydrogen band EMIC wave event on February 23, 2014 that was stimulated by a gradual 4-hour rise and subsequent sharp increases in solar wind pressure. Large-amplitude linearly polarized hydrogen band EMIC waves (up to 25 nT p-p) that included triggered emissions appeared for over 4 hours at both Van Allen Probes while these spacecraft were outside the plasmapause, in a region with densities ~5-20 cm-3, as they passed near apogee from late morning through local noon. Observations of radiation belt electrons by the REPT and MagEIS instruments on these spacecraft showed that these waves caused significant depletions of more field-aligned electrons at ultrarelativistic energies from 5.2 MeV down to ~2 MeV, and some depletions at energies down to below 1 MeV as well.

  10. Long-term loss and re-formation of the outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.-Y.; Shin, D.-K.; Kim, J.-H.; Cho, J.-H.; Kim, K.-C.; Hwang, J. A.; Turner, D. L.; Kim, T. K.; Park, M.-Y.

    2013-06-01

    Earth's outer radiation belt is known to vary often and significantly on various time scales. In this study, we have used the data of various instruments onboard the THEMIS spacecraft to study long-term changes of the outer radiation belt electrons around the year 2009. We find that the entire outer belt became extremely weak for nearly a year and was practically lost a few times, each time lasting ~20 days up to ~2 months, before eventually re-forming. This was revealed at a wide energy range from several tens of keV to up to 719 keV, which was covered by the THEMIS spacecraft measurements. The loss of the outer belt was associated with extremely weak solar wind conditions, i.e., low interplanetary magnetic field magnitude and slow solar wind speed. In particular, this set greatly reduced magnetospheric convection and/or injections for a prolonged time interval, which led to a large expansion of the plasmasphere, even beyond geosynchronous altitude and thus invading the majority of the typical outer belt territory for the same prolonged time interval. Consequently, preexisting electrons inside the plasmasphere had enough time to be lost into the atmosphere gradually over a time scale of several days without being supplied with fresh electrons from the plasma sheet under the same reduced convection and/or injections. Plasmaspheric hiss waves with an amplitude of up to a few tens of pT persisted to exist during the gradual decay periods, implying that they are likely responsible for the continual loss of the electrons inside the plasmasphere. A complete re-formation of the outer belt to full intensity was then realized over an interval of a few months. During the re-formation process, the magnetospheric convection and/or injections increased, which led to a gradual increase of whistler chorus wave activity, contraction of the plasmasphere, and supply of the plasma sheet electrons at high L shells. This set first an outward increasing profile of the phase space

  11. Long- and short-term variability of Saturn's ionic radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C. P.; Kollmann, P.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Armstrong, T. P.; Went, D. R.; Dougherty, M. K.; Jones, G. H.

    2011-02-01

    Earlier studies of Saturn's inner ionic radiation belts revealed that their content was surprisingly constant while their evolution appeared decoupled from dynamics of the Saturnian magnetosphere. Saturn's icy moons in combination with the neutral gas and dust that surround the planet seem to effectively restrict radial transport of energetic ions and are responsible for all these unusual characteristics. A possible process through which MeV ions may be populating the regions between the icy moons is cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND). While some circumstantial evidence suggests that this process actually occurs, the concept of CRAND has only been applied to the proton energy spectrum above ˜10 MeV; the source of ions below 10 MeV is not yet obvious. Additional hints about the nature of this source are now becoming evident by monitoring Saturn's radiation belts about half a solar cycle (from the declining phase of the solar maximum to solar minimum). Using Cassini's magnetosphere imaging instrument and low-energy magnetospheric measurement system (MIMI/LEMMS) data from June 2004 to June 2010, we detect a weak intensification of the trapped proton component that probably originates from CRAND (>10 MeV). This anticipated enhancement, due to the solar cycle modulation of the galactic cosmic ray influx at Saturn, is closely followed by ions in the 1-10 MeV range. This observation sets constraints on the nature of those ions' source: this source should be connected (directly or indirectly) to the access of galactic cosmic rays in the Saturnian system. We also find evidence indicating that the ionic belts experience short-term variability following the occurrence of solar energetic particle events at Saturn's distance, probably associated with coronal mass ejections that propagate in the heliosphere. LEMMS data contain clear evidence of Earth-like Forbush decreases following such events. These decreases may explain the lack of an (expected) ionic belt

  12. Observations and Simulations of Whistler-mode Waves Detected by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtson, M.; Rosborough, S.; Stein, R. L.; Streltsov, A. V.; Matheny, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    In March of 2014, Van Allen Probe A observed several packets of whistler-mode waves while passing through the apogee of an orbit on the dayside magnetosphere. These waves were localized in regions of strong density inhomogeneity. For one observed wave, the wave maximum occurred within the center of the channel formed by a density enhancement. The other two waves were observed on either side of strong density depletion. We first determine the wave characteristics using data from Van Allen Probe A. Then, we use the observations to specify parameters in an electron MHD simulation to model the propagation of whistler-mode waves inside density structures. These observations and simulations demonstrate how whistler-mode waves can become trapped inside density structures, a phenomenon known as ducting. The density ducts serve to guide the whistler-mode waves into the earth's radiation belt while minimizing damping effects. The purpose of this research is to understand the role of density ducts in guiding whistler-mode waves, which will have important applications for remediation of energetic particles from the radiation belt.

  13. Modelling formation of new radiation belts and response to ULF oscillations following March 24, 1991 SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, M.K.; Kotelnikov, A.D.; Li, X.; Lyon, J.G.; Roth, I.; Temerin, M.; Wygant, J.R.; Blake, J.B.; Gussenhoven, M.S.; Yumoto, K.; Shiokawa, K.

    1996-07-01

    The rapid formation of a new proton radiation belt at {ital L}{approx_equal}2.5 following the March 24, 1991 Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) observed at the CRRES satellite is modelled using a relativistic guiding center test particle code. The new radiation belt formed on a time scale shorter than the drift period of eg. 20 MeV protons. The SSC is modelled by a bipolar electric field and associated compression and relaxation in the magnetic field, superimposed on a background dipole magnetic field. The source population consists of solar protons that populated the outer magnetosphere during the solar proton event that preceeded the SSC and trapped inner zone protons. The simulations show that both populations contribute to drift echoes in the 20{endash}80 MeV range measured by the Aerospace instrument and in lower energy channels of the Protel instrument on CRRES, while primary contribution to the newly trapped population is from solar protons. Proton acceleration by the SSC differs from electron acceleration in two notable ways: different source populations contribute and nonrelativistic conservation of the first adiabatic invariant leads to greater energization of protons for a given decrease in {ital L} than for relativistic electrons. Model drift echoes, energy spectra and flux distribution in {ital L} at the time of injection compare well with CRRES observations. On the outbound pass, {approximately}2 hours after the SSC, the broad spectral peak of the new radiation belt extends to higher energies (20{endash}40 MeV) than immediately after formation. Electron flux oscillations observed at this later time are attributed to post-SSC impulses evident in ground magnetograms, while two minute period ULF oscillations also evident in CRRES field data appear to be cavity modes in the inner magnetosphere. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Simulation of Radiation Belt Precipitation During the March 17, 2013 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, T. V.; Hudson, M. K.; Paral, J.

    2014-12-01

    Balloon-borne instruments detecting radiation belt precipitation frequently observe oscillations in the mHZ frequency range. Several balloon missions measuring electron precipitation near the poles in the 100 keV to 2.5 MeV energy range, including the MAXIS, MINIS, and most recently the BARREL campaign, have observed this modulation at ULF wave frequencies (Clilverd et al., 2007; Millan et al., 2011). However, ULF waves in the magnetosphere, commonly associated with oscillations in solar wind dynamic pressure on the dayside and with Kelvin-Helmhotz instabilities in the flanks, are seldom directly linked to increases in electron precipitation since their oscillation periods are much larger than the gyroperiod and the bounce period of radiation belt electrons. It has been conjectured that ULF oscillations in the magnetosphere may modulate EMIC wave growth rates. EMIC waves, in turn, have long been associated with energetic electron precipitation, since they can cause pitch angle scattering of these particles, thus lowering their mirror points (Miyoshi et al., 2008; Carson et al., 2013). This would explain the ULF modulation of MeV electrons seen by the balloon instruments. However, test particle simulations show that another hypothesis is possible (Brito et al., 2012). 3D simulations of radiation belt electrons were performed to investigate the effect of ULF waves on precipitation. The simulations track the behavior of energetic electrons near the loss cone, using guiding center techniques, coupled with an MHD simulation of the magnetosphere, using the LFM code, during a CME-shock event on March 17, 2013. Results indicate that ULF modulation of precipitation occurs even without the presence of VLF-type waves, which are not resolved in the MHD simulation.

  15. Conjugate In-situ and Incoherent Scatter Radar Observations of Radiation Belt Loss Mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaeppler, S. R.; Jaynes, A. N.; Sanchez, E. R.; Nicolls, M. J.; Varney, R. H.; Marshall, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from conjugate observations between the Radiation Belt Storms Probe (RBSP) and the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) of energetic radiation belt precipitation. A key objective of the RBSP mission is to understand loss mechanisms of energetic particles from the radiation belt. The relative contribution from plasma waves (e.g., EMIC, hiss, chorus, and etc.) that pitch angle scatter particles into the loss cone remains an open scientific question. Rigorous experimental validation of these mechanisms is difficult to achieve because nearly simultaneous conjugate observations of in-situ pitch angle scattering and precipitation into the atmosphere are required. One ground-based signature of energetic precipitation is enhanced ionization and electron density at D-region altitudes. Incoherent scatter radar is a powerful remote sensing technique that is sensitive to electron density enhancements. By measuring the altitude profiles of ionization we infer the flux of particles precipitating into the atmosphere. PFISR observations show frequent occurrence of D-region ionization during both quiet-time and storm-time conditions. We present results from two events when the foot-points of the RBSP satellite were within 500 km of PFISR: a quiet-time event on January 13, 2015, and a storm-time event on April 16, 2015. PFISR observations of the D-region ionization signatures are presented, along with simultaneous conjugate RBSP observations of the magnetic field, electric field, and electron flux. Plasma waves are identified using the electric and magnetic field data, and evaluated as possible pitch angle scattering mechanisms. A direct comparison between the measured fluxes and loss cone fluxes predicted by theoretical wave-particle diffusion rates into the loss cone is used to test the validity of particle loss mechanisms predicted by the different theories. Preliminary results are presented of PFISR inversions of the D-region ionization to quantify the

  16. Wave-particle interactions in the radiation belts: effect of wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, Dimitris; Tornquist, Mattias; Koepke, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Particle acceleration in Earth's radiation belts is often explain in terms of radial diffusion theory. Some of the most important contributions to diffusive transport are stochastic as well as resonant interactions with low-frequency (Alfven/magnetosonic) waves. While spectra of such waves are traditionally assumed to be broadband and spectrally white, a number of recent studies [Rae et al., 2012; Ozeke et al., 2012] indicate that the spectra of ground geomagnetic pulsations are significantly more complex. We examine power-law spectra in particle simulations in a realistic magnetospheric field configuration and report on their effect on the transport and energization of the pre-storm electron population.

  17. A virtual radiation belt observatory: Looking forward to the electronic geophysical year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Green, J. C.; Kroehl, H. W.; Kihn, E.; Virbo Team

    During the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958), member countries established many new capabilities pursuing the major IGY objectives of collecting geophysical data as widely as possible and providing free access to these data for all scientists around the globe. A key achievement of the IGY was the establishment of a worldwide system of data centers and physical observatories. The worldwide scientific community has now endorsed and is promoting an electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) initiative. The proposed eGY concept would both commemorate the 50th anniversary of the IGY in 2007-2008 and would provide a forward impetus to geophysics in the 21st century, similar to that provide by the IGY fifty years ago. The eGY concept advocates the establishment of a series of virtual geophysical observatories now being deployed in cyberspace. We are developing the concept of a Virtual Radiation Belt Observatory (ViRBO) that will bring together near-earth particle and field measurements acquired by NASA, NOAA, DoD, DOE, and other spacecraft. We discuss plans to aggregate these measurements into a readily accessible database along with analysis, visualization, and display tools that will make radiation belt information available and useful both to the scientific community and to the user community. We envision that data from the various agencies along with models being developed under the auspices of the National Science Foundation Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) will help us to provide an excellent `climatology' of the radiation belts over the past several decades. In particular, we would plan to use these data to drive physical models of the radiation belts to form a gridded database which would characterize particle and field properties on solar-cycle (11-year) time scales. ViRBO will also provide up-to-date specification of conditions for event analysis and anomaly resolution. We are even examining the possibilities for near-realtime acquisition of

  18. High-energy electrons in the inner radiation belt of the earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilova, R. N.; Gusev, A. A.; Pugacheva, G. I.; Titenkov, A. F.

    1982-08-01

    Measurements of electron fluxes with energies greater than 40 MeV obtained by Kosmos 490, Salut 6, and Interkosmos 17 satellites at heights of 270-500 km in the Brazilian anomaly region are discussed. The observed electron flux is explained in terms of the decomposition of pi meson, produced by the interaction between high-energy protons (0.35-1 GeV) of the inner radiation belt and atoms of the residual atmosphere. A formula describing the electron flux is presented.

  19. Van Allen Probes, NOAA, and Ground Observations of an Intense Pc 1 Wave Event Extending 12 Hours in MLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.; Lessard, M.; Horne, R. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Gkioulidou, M.; Fennell, J.; Oksavik, K.; Raita, T.

    2014-12-01

    On February 23, 2014 a Pc 1 wave event extending 8 hours in UT and 12 hours in MLT was observed at Halley, Antarctica and Ivalo, Finland in the dawn sector, and by both Van Allen Probes spacecraft from late morning through local noon. The wave activity was stimulated by a gradual 4-hour rise and subsequent sharp increases in solar wind pressure. Intense hydrogen band, linearly polarized Pc 1 wave activity (up to 25 nT p-p) with very similar time variations also appeared for over 4 hours at both Van Allen Probes, located ~8 and ~9 hours east of Halley. Waves appeared when these spacecraft were outside the plasmapause, with densities ~5-20 cm-3. Ten passes of NOAA-POES and METOP satellites near the northern hemisphere footpoint of the Van Allen Probes (over Siberia) show the presence of 30-80 keV subauroral proton precipitation. This is the longest-duration and most intense Pc1 event we have yet observed with the Van Allen Probes. The combination of its duration, intensity, and large local time extent (from before 02 to nearly 14 hours MLT) suggests that it might have a significant effect on the ring current, and possibly even electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  20. Evolution of relativistic outer belt electrons during an extended quiescent period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Schiller, Q. G.; Blum, L. W.; Tu, W.; Turner, D. L.; Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Wygant, J.

    2014-12-01

    To effectively study loss due to hiss-driven precipitation of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt, it is useful to isolate this loss by studying a time of relatively quiet geomagnetic activity. We present a case of initial enhancement and slow, steady decay of 700 keV-2 MeV electron populations in the outer radiation belt during an extended quiescent period from ˜15 December 2012 to 13 January 2013. We incorporate particle measurements from a constellation of satellites, including the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, the Van Allen Probes twin spacecraft, and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), to understand the evolution of the electron populations across pitch angle and energy. Additional data from calculated phase space density, as well as hiss and chorus wave data from Van Allen Probes, help complete the picture of the slow precipitation loss of relativistic electrons during a quiet time. Electron loss to the atmosphere during this event is quantified through use of the Loss Index Method, utilizing CSSWE measurements at low Earth orbit. By comparing these results against equatorial Van Allen Probes electron flux data, we conclude the net precipitation loss of the outer radiation belt content to be greater than 92%, suggesting no significant acceleration during this period, and resulting in faster electron loss rates than have previously been reported.

  1. Integration of the Radiation Belt Environment Model Into the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, A.; Toth, G.; Fok, M.; Gombosi, T.; Liemohn, M.

    2009-01-01

    We have integrated the Fok radiation belt environment (RBE) model into the space weather modeling framework (SWMF). RBE is coupled to the global magnetohydrodynamics component (represented by the Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar-wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme, BATS-R-US, code) and the Ionosphere Electrodynamics component of the SWMF, following initial results using the Weimer empirical model for the ionospheric potential. The radiation belt (RB) model solves the convection-diffusion equation of the plasma in the energy range of 10 keV to a few MeV. In stand-alone mode RBE uses Tsyganenko's empirical models for the magnetic field, and Weimer's empirical model for the ionospheric potential. In the SWMF the BATS-R-US model provides the time dependent magnetic field by efficiently tracing the closed magnetic field-lines and passing the geometrical and field strength information to RBE at a regular cadence. The ionosphere electrodynamics component uses a two-dimensional vertical potential solver to provide new potential maps to the RBE model at regular intervals. We discuss the coupling algorithm and show some preliminary results with the coupled code. We run our newly coupled model for periods of steady solar wind conditions and compare our results to the RB model using an empirical magnetic field and potential model. We also simulate the RB for an active time period and find that there are substantial differences in the RB model results when changing either the magnetic field or the electric field, including the creation of an outer belt enhancement via rapid inward transport on the time scale of tens of minutes.

  2. New Galileo and VLA/DSN observations of Jupiter's radiation belts near the vicinity of Amalthea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, S. J.; Galileo; Vla/Dsn Team

    2003-04-01

    On November 5, 2002, the Galileo spacecraft trajectory provided a close flyby of Amalthea, one of Jupiter's inner most moons (~2.4 RJ). During this pass, Galileo entered into a region rarely explored by spacecraft, the inner radiation belts of Jupiter. This region also contains the outer rings of Jupiter, known as the Gossamer rings. We present VLA/DSN observations of Jupiter's synchrotron emission obtained simultaneously with Galileo's flyby of Amalthea. We compare in-situ measurements from Galileo's Energetic Particle Detector, Plasma Wave Subsystem and Plasma Subsystem with model results based on the synchrotron emission maps at 6 and 20 cm wavelengths. We will also include data from the Galileo dust detector as an additional constraint for the model analysis. The total measurement set provides new constraints for the high-energy electron distribution functions near Amalthea and the role of plasma waves in maintaining the particle distribution in the vicinity of Amalthea. These observations represent the first opportunity for direct comparison of Jupiter's radiation belts by both in-situ and remote observations near Amalthea.

  3. The effects of precipitating radiation belt electrons on the mesospheric hydroxyl and ozone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Monika; Verronen, Pekka T.; Seppälä, Annika; Clilverd, Mark; Rodger, C. J.; Carson, Bonar; Wang, Shuhui

    Energetic electron precipitation (EEP) from the Earth’s outer radiation belt continuously affects the chemical composition of the mesosphere in the polar regions. With the magnitude of the forcing depending on solar activity and magnetic storms, EEP contributes to catalytic ozone loss in the mesosphere through ionisation and enhanced production of hydroxyl (OH). By analysing OH time series from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS/AURA) together with electron count rate observations from Medium-Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED/POES) we provide clear evidence of the connection between precipitating radiation belt electrons and mesospheric OH at geomagnetic latitudes 55-65 N/S. Our analysis indicates that for the time period 2004-2009 EEP has measurable effect in about 30% of cases. We investigate the longitudinal distribution of the OH changes, compare the results with MEPED precipitation maps, and discuss the similarities and differences. Finally, by utilising 11 years of observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS/ENVISAT), Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER/TIMED) and MLS instruments, we show that the precipitation-induced increase in OH is typically accompanied by decrease in ozone at altitudes between 60-80 km.

  4. Combined radial diffusion and adiabatic transport of radiation belt electrons with arbitrary pitch angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhenpeng; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Shui

    2010-10-01

    Storm-time radial diffusion of radiation belt electrons with arbitrary pitch angles in a time-varying geomagnetic field is simulated based on our recently developed STEERB code. In particular, the fully adiabatic response of energetic electrons to the variation of geomagnetic field is self-consistently incorporated. Simulation results show that the outward adiabatic transport (instead of outward radial diffusion) is primarily responsible for the main phase depletion of energetic electron fluxes at large pitch angles beyond 5Re (Re is the Earth's radius). However, combined radial diffusion and adiabatic transport contributes insignificantly to the main phase depletion of energetic electron fluxes within 5Re, or the recovery phase enhancement of energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. Moreover, the simulation with both radial diffusion and adiabatic transport shows that the pitch angle distribution of energetic outer zone electrons can evolve from a rounded 90°-peaked distribution to a butterfly-shaped distribution during the main phase, and back to a rounded 90°-peaked distribution during the recovery phase. Such essential changes of pitch angle distribution may further affect the efficiency of other local loss and energization mechanisms.

  5. Prompt Recovery and Enhancement of the Earth's Outer Radiation Belt due to Relativistic Electron Injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. L.; Zhang, J.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    We present multipoint observations (RBSP, GEOS and THEMIS) of the substorm electron injections during the substorm event on 16 August 2013. RBSP-A detected the MeV electron phase space density increased by an order of magnitude in about one hour at L* > 5.0. At L* = 4.4, the injected MeV electrons were also detected. It is suggested that the magnetic field dipolarization associated with the substorm injections alone can explain that the prompt recovery and enhancements of the relativistic electron (~ MeV) fluxes in the outer radiation belt. The observations of THEMIS-A also first presented that the near-Earth magnetotail at substorm onset is important in the MeV electron injection event: the enhanced fluxes of ~200 keV electrons are the source population and intense electromagnetic pulses are the driving source of MeV injected electrons. The pulse model is used to explain the dispersionless MeV injected electrons in the outer radiation belt observed by GEOS-13 and RBSP-A.

  6. Accaleration of Electrons of the Outer Electron Radiation Belt and Auroral Oval Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, Elizaveta; Ovchinnikov, Ilya; Riazantseva, Maria; Znatkova, Svetlana; Pulinets, Maria; Vorobjev, Viachislav; Yagodkina, Oksana; Stepanova, Marina

    2016-07-01

    We summarize the results of experimental observations demonstrating the role of auroral processes in the formation of the outer electron radiation belt and magnetic field distortion during magnetic storms. We show that the auroral oval does not mapped to the plasma sheet proper (region with magnetic field lines stretched in the tailward direction). It is mapped to the surrounding the Earth plasma ring in which transverse currents are closed inside the magnetosphere. Such currents constitute the high latitude continuation of the ordinary ring current. Mapping of the auroral oval to the region of high latitude continuation of the ordinary ring current explains the ring like shape of the auroral oval with finite thickness near noon and auroral oval dynamics during magnetic storms. The auroral oval shift to low latitudes during storms. The development of the ring current produce great distortion of the Earth's magnetic field and corresponding adiabatic variations of relativistic electron fluxes. Development of the asymmetric ring current produce the dawn-dusk asymmetry of such fluxes. We analyze main features of the observed processes including formation of sharp plasma pressure profiles during storms. The nature of observed pressure peak is analyzed. It is shown that the observed sharp pressure peak is directly connected with the creation of the seed population of relativistic electrons. The possibility to predict the position of new radiation belt during recovery phase of the magnetic storm using data of low orbiting and ground based observations is demonstrated.

  7. A new way to estimate the solar wind geoefficiency and its impact on the radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochel Grimald, Sandrine; Boscher, Daniel; Benacquista, Rémi

    2016-04-01

    A magnetosphere is an isolated volume dropped inside the solar wind. It is in equilibrium in the solar wind. If the solar wind parameters change, then, the magnetospheric balance is upset. Moreover, the magnetosphere is not a solar-wind-proof bulkhead. Using several processes, particles and energy from the solar wind can go inside, disturbing the magnetosphere and being responsible of variation of currents and generation of waves. Those phenomena allow absorbing the energy overflow and the come back to the equilibrium. Nevertheless, if the phenomenon is geoefficient, it also impacts the inner magnetosphere populations, and in particular the radiation belts particle flux. The purpose of this work is to understand the solar wind main structures (CMEs and CIRs) impact in the terrestrial magnetosphere. The existing magnetic indices allow estimating how much the system is disturbed at a given time, but they do not allow estimating how long the disturbance modify the magnetosphere. In this paper, we use the Am index to define a new parameter allowing estimating the energy level in the magnetosphere. Using this parameter, we will first present a comparative study of the impact of the CIRs and of the CMEs on the magnetosphere. This study will highlight the role of the multiple CMEs events to fill the magnetosphere energy level. Then, the radiation belts will be analysed from this new point of view in order to understand their role as energy tanks.

  8. Relativistic electron flux dropouts in the outer radiation belt associated with corotating interaction regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C.-J.; Zong, Q.-G.; Wan, W.-X.; Zhang, H.; Du, A.-M.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding how the relativistic electron fluxes drop out in the outer radiation belt under different conditions is of great importance. To investigate which mechanisms may affect the dropouts under different solar wind conditions, 1.5-6.0 MeV electron flux dropout events associated with 223 corotating interaction regions (CIRs) from 1994 to 2003 are studied using the observations of Solar, Anomalous, Magnetospheric Particle Explorer satellite. According to the superposed epoch analysis, it is found that high solar wind dynamic pressure with the peak median value of about 7 nPa is corresponding to the dropout of the median of the radiation belt content (RBC) index to 20% of the level before stream interface arrival, whereas low dynamic pressure with the peak median value of about 3 nPa is related to the dropout of the median of RBC index to 40% of the level before stream interface arrival. Furthermore, the influences of Russell-McPherron effect with respect to interplanetary magnetic field orientation on dropouts are considered. It is pointed out that under positive Russell-McPherron effect (+RM effect) condition, the median of RBC index can drop to 23% of the level before stream interface arrival, while for negative Russell-McPherron effect (-RM effect) events, the median of RBC index only drops to 37% of the level before stream interface arrival. From the evolution of phase space density profiles, the effect of +RM on dropouts can be through nonadiabatic loss.

  9. H. Julian Allen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    H. Julian Allen stands beside the observation window of the 8 x 7 foot test section of the NACA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. H. Julian Allen is best known for his 'Blunt Body Theory' of aerodynamics, a design technique for alleviating the severe re-entry heating problem which was then delaying the development of ballistic missiles. His findings revolutionized the fundamental design of ballistic missle re-entry shapes. Subsequently, applied research led to applications of the 'blunt' shape to ballistic missles and spacecraft which were intended to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. This application led to the design of ablative heat shields that protected the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts as their space capsules re- entered the Earth's atmosphere. 'Harvey' Allen as he was called by most, was not only a brilliant scientist and aeronautical engineer but was also admired for his kindness, thoughtfulness and sense of humor. Among his many other accomplishments, Harvey Allen served as Center Director of the NASA Ames Research Center from 1965 to 1969. He died of a heart attack on January 29, 1977 at the age of 66.

  10. Screw-Retaining Allen Wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granett, D.

    1985-01-01

    Steadying screws with fingers unnecessary. Crimp in uncompressed spring wire slightly protrudes from one facet of Allen wrench. Compressed spring retains Allen screw. Tool used with Allen-head screws in cramped spaces with little or no room for fingers to hold fastener while turned by wrench.

  11. Simulation of proton radiation belt formation during the March 24, 1991 SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kotelnikov, A. D.; Li, X.; Roth, I.; Temerin, M.; Wygant, J.; Blake, J. B.; Gussenhoven, M. S.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid formation of a new proton radiation belt at L approximately = 2.5 following the March 24, 1991 Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) observed at the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) satellite is modeled using a relativistic guiding center test particle code. The SSC is modeled by a bipolar electric field and associated compression and relaxation in the magnetic field, superimposed on a dipole magnetic field. The source population consists of both solar and trapped inner zone protons. The simulations show that while both populations contribute to drift echoes in the 20-80 MeV range, primary conditions is from the solar protons. Proton acceleration by the SSC differs from relativistic electron acceleration in that different source populations contribute and nonrelativistic conservation of the first adiabatic invariation leads to greater energization of protons for a given decrease in L. Model drift echoes and flux distribution in L at the time of injection compare well with CRRES observations.

  12. Time Domain Structures: Generation Mechanisms and Their Role for Electron Acceleration in the Earth's Outer Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozer, F.; Artemyev, A.; Agapitov, O. V.; Drake, J. F.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Lejosne, S.; Mournas, D.; Vasko, I.

    2015-12-01

    Time Domain Structures (TDS) is the generic name for short duration (~msec) electric field pulses that occur in streams and that have significant components parallel to the background magnetic field. Examples of TDS are electrostatic or electromagnetic double layers, electron holes, and non-linear whistlers. They are found in copious quantities in the Earth's outer radiation belt and on auroral zone magnetic field lines, in the tail, the plasma sheet, the plasma sheet boundary layer, at shocks, at magnetic field reconnection sites, in the solar wind and at Saturn. Mechanisms for the generation of TDS and their role in accelerating radiation belt electrons will be described.

  13. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  14. Relativistic electron microbursts induced by EMIC triggered emissions in the Earth's radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Omura, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have performed test particle simulations to demonstrate that relativistic electron microbursts are induced by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) triggered emissions. Pitch-angle scattering of relativistic electrons arising from the anomalous cyclotron resonance with left-hand polarized EMIC waves contributes to the sharp decrease of the relativistic electron flux in the outer radiation belt in the main phase of magnetic-storms. We investigate the nonlinear dynamics of relativistic electrons interacting with a coherent EMIC wave in the radiation belts[1]. We perform test particle simulations to reproduce the time histories of pitch angles, trajectories in the theta-zeta phase space, distribution of pitch angles assuming a left-hand polarized EMIC wave with a varying frequency as observed by Cluster spacecraft[2,3]. We found that the efficiency of pitch-angle scattering depends on the frequency sweep rate, the gradient of the magnetic field, and the wave amplitude. The most effective pitch-angle scattering takes place for the case of a rising-tone emission with an enhanced magnetic field gradient. EMIC triggered emissions with frequencies typically increasing in time are generated in the equatorial region and propagate along the magnetic field line both northward and southward. Due to the short bounce time of the electrons compared to EMIC propagation time, the electrons after adiabatic bounce motion at the mirror points interact with another wave packet near the equator and scattered into the loss cone. We find that EMIC triggered emissions are very effective in precipitating the relativistic electrons from the radiation belts. [1] Y. Omura and Q. Zhao, Nonlinear pitch-angle scattering of relativistic electrons by EMIC waves in the inner magnetosphere,J. Geophys. Res., in press. [2] J. S. Pickett,, B. Grison, Y. Omura, M. J. Engebretson, I. Dandouras, A. Masson, M. L. Adrian, O. Santolik, P. M. E.Decreau, N. Cornilleau-Wehrlin, and D. Constantinescu, Cluster

  15. EPICS: Allen-Bradley hardware reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocki, G.

    1993-04-05

    This manual covers the following hardware: Allen-Bradley 6008 -- SV VMEbus I/O scanner; Allen-Bradley universal I/O chassis 1771-A1B, -A2B, -A3B, and -A4B; Allen-Bradley power supply module 1771-P4S; Allen-Bradley 1771-ASB remote I/O adapter module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IFE analog input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OFE analog output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IG(D) TTL input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OG(d) TTL output; Allen-Bradley 1771-IQ DC selectable input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OW contact output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IBD DC (10--30V) input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OBD DC (10--60V) output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IXE thermocouple/millivolt input module; and the Allen-Bradley 2705 RediPANEL push button module.

  16. Study on geomagnetic storms driving motion of 0.1-2 MeV radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenxia; Li, Xinqiao

    2016-08-01

    Using more than five years' worth of data observed by the Instrument for the Detection of Particles (IDP) spectrometer onboard the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite, we studied the motion characteristics of energetic electrons in different regions, i.e., the inner radiation belt, the outer radiation belt, and the slot region in geomagnetic storms. We investigated the flux change of 0.1-2.4 MeV electrons and the energy change of 0.1-1.0 MeV electrons in these different regions. By cross correlation analysis, we came to the following conclusions. First, when Dst < -50, the correlation coefficient (c.c.) of the electron flux and Dst index ranges from -0.63 to -0.86, and the enhancement of the electron flux generally occurs during the storm's main and recovery phases. Second, the storms greatly influence the lower energy region of the electron energy spectrum in the inner radiation belt, while the enhancement in the higher energy region is more significant in the outer radiation belt and the slot region. Third, the effects of geomagnetic storms on electrons are not distinguished significantly between in the day and night, and independent of the timing of the events. For storms with -50 < Dst < -30, there is a negative correlation of -0.51 to -0.57 between the Dst index and the electron flux in the outer radiation belt. Our analysis suggests that strong storms cause energetic electron ejections across a wide range, and the ejection level is affected by the storm intensity. Furthermore, the electron energy region influenced by the strong geomagnetic storms is opposite in the inner and outer radiation belts. The proportion of electrons accelerated to relativistic energies is greater in the outer radiation and slot regions, while the ejection energetic electrons are more concentrated in the low energy region of the inner radiation belt. This phenomenon reflects the different electron injection mechanisms and

  17. Reanalysis of Radiation Belt Electron Phase Space Density using the UCLA 1-D VERB code and Kalman filtering: Correlation between the inner edge of the outer radiation belt phase space density and the plasmapause location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy, P. J.; Daae, M.; Shprits, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The correlation between the inner edge of the outer radiation belt phase space density (PSD) and the plasmapause location (Lpp) using reanalysis is investigated. A large data set is applied for the statistical analysis, using data from 1990-1991 from the CRRES satellite, GEO 1989, GPS-ns18 and Akebono. These data are incorporated into reanalysis by means of a Kalman filter with the UCLA 1-D VERB code. The result is a continuous radial and temporal distribution of the PSD from L*=3 to L*=7. The innovation vector of the reconstructed PSD can give us information about regions where local loss or source processes are dominating. We analyze both the PSD and the innovation vector by binning them into slots of Dst and Kp values. This has been done by finding the time for when the Dst (Kp) is within each bin-size of 20 nT (1) from 10 nT to -130 nT (1 to 8). The PSD and innovation vector was then averaged over each of those times. The result shows a good correlation between the location of the inner edge of the outer radiation belt in the PSD and the location of the plasmapause, which is consistent with previous observations. The boundary between the inner edge of the radiation belt and the Lpp becomes sharper, and the radiation belt becomes thinner, during times of high geomagnetic activity. The innovation vector shows that the inner edge of the source region also lines up well with the Lpp, and further showing a battle between losses and sources during active times. This study also illustrates how data assimilation in the radiation belts can be used to understand the underlining processes of acceleration and loss in the inner magnetosphere.

  18. Quasi-linear simulations of inner radiation belt electron pitch angle and energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Jay M.; Starks, Michael J.; Horne, Richard B.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Glauert, Sarah A.

    2016-03-01

    "Peculiar" or "butterfly" electron pitch angle distributions (PADs), with minima near 90°, have recently been observed in the inner radiation belt. These electrons are traditionally treated by pure pitch angle diffusion, driven by plasmaspheric hiss, lightning-generated whistlers, and VLF transmitter signals. Since this leads to monotonic PADs, energy diffusion by magnetosonic waves has been proposed to account for the observations. We show that the observed PADs arise readily from two-dimensional diffusion at L = 2, with or without magnetosonic waves. It is necessary to include cross diffusion, which accounts for the relationship between pitch angle and energy changes. The distribution of flux with energy is also in good agreement with observations between 200 keV and 1 MeV, dropping to very low levels at higher energy. Thus, at this location radial diffusion may be negligible at subrelativistic as well as ultrarelativistic energy.

  19. Evidence for solar wind origin of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of data from our energetic ion composition experiment on ISEE-1 has revealed the presence of substantial fluxes of carbon, oxygen, and heavier ions above 400 keV/nucleon at L values between approximately 2.5 and 4 earth radii. The measured C/O ratio varies systematically from 1.3 at 450 keV/nucleon to 4.1 at 1.3 MeV/nucleon, and no iron is observed above 200 keV/nucleon. These results provide strong evidence for a solar wind origin for energetic ions in the outer radiation belt. The absence of iron and the increase of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio with energy suggest that the condition for the validity of the first adiabatic invariant may have a strong influence on the trapping of these particles.

  20. New Galileo and VLA Observations of Jupiter's Radiation Belts near the vicinty of Amalthea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, S. J.; Thorne, R. M.; Levin, S.; Michael, K.

    2002-12-01

    In November, 2002, the Galileo spacecraft is scheduled to flyby Amalthea, one of Jupiter's inner most moons (~2.4 RJ). We present VLA observations of Jupiter's synchrotron emission obtained simultaneously with Galileo's flyby of Amalthea. If available, in-situ measurements from Galileo's Energetic Particle Detector and Plasma Wave Subsystem will be compared with the synchrotron emission maps at 6 and 20 cm wavelengths. The total measurement set will provide constraints on the high energy electron distribution functions near Amalthea and the types of waves affecting the particle population in the vicinity of Amalthea. These observations represent the first opportunity for direct comparison of Jupiter's radiation belts by both in-situ and remote observations near Amalthea.

  1. Stochastic simulation of inner radiation belt electron decay by atmospheric scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    2016-02-01

    Decay of inner radiation belt electron intensity, resulting from elastic and inelastic collisions with neutral atoms, ions, and free electrons of the upper atmosphere, ionosphere, and plasmasphere, is described by stochastic Monte Carlo simulation. Modified collision cross sections allow detailed simulation of large-angle scattering and large-energy-loss collisions while preserving mean effective scattering and slowing-down rates resulting from all collisions. Scattering from bound electrons and δ-ray production are also included. Results show that traditional methods describing diffusion of the mirror point magnetic field, equivalent to diffusion in equatorial pitch angle, and energy loss by continuous slowing down are generally good approximations. Updated formulae for these approximations are provided. The drift-averaging approximation is also shown to provide a generally accurate description of trapped electron decay. The approximate methods overestimate decay rates by small factors, and the detailed stochastic simulation should be used when greater accuracy is required.

  2. CeREs, A Compact Radiation Belt Explorer to study charged particle dynamics in geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Summerlin, E. J.; Christian, E. R.; Crum, G.; Desai, M. I.; Evans, A.; Dumonthier, J.; Jamison, T.; Jones, A. D.; Livi, S. A.; Ogasawara, K.; Paschalidis, N.; Suarez, G.; Patel, D.

    2015-12-01

    The CeREs 3U CubeSat, set to be launched in mid-2016, will study the physics of the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons, particularly loss due to electron microbursts. CeRES will also observe solar electrons and protons entering the magnetosphere via the open field-line polar caps. CeREs is expected to be in a low earth high inclination orbit and carries onboard the Miniaturized Electron pRoton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT instrument measures electrons and protons ranging in energy from 5 keV to >10 MeV with high time resolution of ~5ms in multiple differential energy channels. MERiT is particle telescope using a stack of solid-state detectors and space-facing avalanche photo diodes.We will describe the CeRES spacecraft, science goals and the MERiT instrument.

  3. Long-Term Variations of the Electron Slot Region and Global Radiation Belt Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Shao, Xi; Tan, Lun C.

    2005-01-01

    We report the observations of changes of the nominal position of the quiet-time radiation belt slot over the solar cycles. It has been found that the slot region, believed to be a result of enhanced precipitation losses of energetic electrons due to their interactions with VLF waves in the magnetosphere, tends to shift to higher L (approximately 3) during a solar maximum compared to its canonical L value of approximately 2.5, which is more typical of a solar minimum. The solar-cycle migration of the slot can be understood in terms of the solar-cycle changes in ionospheric densities, which may cause the optimal wave-particle interaction region during higher solar activity periods to move to higher altitudes and higher latitudes, thus higher L. Our analysis also suggests that the primary wave-particle interaction processes that result in the slot formation are located off of the magnetic equator.

  4. Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by EMIC waves, observed from ground and space

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K; Miyoski, Y; Sakaguchi, K; Shiokawa, K; Evans, D S; Albert, Jay; Connors, M

    2008-01-01

    We show evidence that left-hand polarised electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere. Our unique set of ground and satellite observations shows coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keY and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The coincident precipitation was produced by wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves near the plasmapause. The estimation of pitch angle diffusion coefficients supports that the observed EMIC waves caused coincident precipitation ofboth ions and relativistic electrons. This study clarifies that ions with energies of tens of ke V affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts via cyclotron resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  5. Nonlinear Landau resonant scattering of near equatorially mirroring radiation belt electrons by oblique EMIC waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Shengwei; Wang, Geng

    2016-04-01

    In response to solar wind disturbances, radiation belt (a few hundreds of keV to several MeV) electron fluxes can be depleted significantly over the entire equatorial pitch angle range. The frequently mentioned cyclotron resonant scattering is applicable only for electrons mirroring off the equator. Here we propose a new physical mechanism, nonlinear Landau resonance with oblique electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, to effectively scatter the near equatorially mirroring electrons. Our test particle simulations show that the nonlinear Landau trapping can occur over a wide energy range and yield the net decrease in equatorial pitch angle Δαeq≈10° within several seconds. Our parametric studies further reveal that this nonlinear Landau-trapping process is favored by a low plasma density, an intense wave field, a high wave frequency close to ion gyrofrequencies, and a large wave normal angle.

  6. Relativistic electron precipitation enhancements near the outer edge of the radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, R.; Baker, N. D.; Blake, J. B.; Kanekal, S.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.

    1995-05-01

    Characteristics of relativistic electron precipitation bursts observed by the Heavy Ion Large Telescope (HILT) experiment onboard the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Partical Explorer (SAMPEX) satellite were examined. Relatively narrow, persistent, latitudinal bands of precipitation with time scales of 10 to approximately 30 sec near the outer edge of the radiation belt which develop and decay with a time scale of a few hours are reported. Acceleration processes more effective than the usual radial diffusion process or scattering process would be needed to explain this strong precipitation band phenomenon. Another prominent signature is microbursts with a time scale down to a few hundred milliseconds. It is suggested that these microbursts are due to wave-particle interaction involving a relaxation-oscillator type of mechanism.

  7. Non-adiabatic response of relativistic radiation belt electrons to GEM magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdams, K. L.; Reeves, G. D.

    The importance of fully adiabatic effects in the relativistic radiation belt electron response to magnetic storms is poorly characterized due to many difficulties in calculating adiabatic flux response. Using the adiabatic flux model of Kim and Chan [1997a] and Los Alamos National Laboratory geosynchronous satellite data, we examine the relative timing of the adiabatic and non-adiabatic flux responses. In the three storms identified by the GEM community for in depth study, the non-adiabatic energization occurs hours earlier than the adiabatic re-energization. The adiabatic energization can account for only 10-20% of the flux increases in the first recovery stages, and only 1% of the flux increase if there is continuing activity.

  8. Simulation of proton radiation belt formation during the March 24, 1991 SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, M.K.; Kotelnikov, A.D.; Li, X.; Roth, I.; Temerin, M.; Wygant, J.; Blake, J.B.; Gussenhoven, M.S.

    1995-02-01

    The rapid formation of a new proton radiation belt at L {approx_equal} 2.5 following the March 24, 1991 Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) observed at the CRRES satellite is modelled using a relativistic guiding center test particle code. The SSC is modelled by a bipolar electric field and associated compression and relaxation in the magnetic field, superimposed on a dipole magnetic field. The source population consists of both solar and trapped inner zone protons. The simulations show that while both populations contribute to drift echoes in the 20-80 MeV range, primary contribution is from the solar protons. Proton acceleration by the SSC differs from relativistic electron acceleration in that different source populations contribute and nonrelativistic conservation of the first adiabatic invariant leads to greater energization of protons for a given decrease in L. Model drift echoes and flux distribution in L at the time of injection compare well with CRRES observations. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients for relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Mann, Ian; Baker, Daniel N.; Subbotin, Dmitriy; Ozeke, Louis; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam

    Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interactions of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate the effect of changing a diffusion coefficient on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes geomagnetically quiet and active time. The simulations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. 1. Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 2. Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  10. Hiss induced radiation belt electron loss timescales in the plasmasphere based on ray tracings of wave propagation angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Ni, B.; Li, W.; Bortnik, J.; Gu, X.; Zhao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss plays an important role in driving resonant scattering losses of radiation belt electrons and thereby largely controls the lifetimes of electrons in the plasmasphere. Besides the spectral information of waves, an accurate investigation of hiss induced radiation belt electron loss timescales requires the details of wave normal angle distribution during propagation along the field line, which however is difficult to obtain directly from in situ measurements but can be reasonably evaluated from ray tracing of hiss propagation on basis of reasonable setups of background field and plasma density. By assuming a nominal and suitable plasmapause location at L = 4.5, we report the ray tracing results of hiss wave propagation angles for various hiss wave frequencies at various L-shells in the plasmasphere. Subsequently, we construct the improved model of hiss wave normal angle distribution with dependence on both wave frequency, magnetic latitude and L-shell, which is used to compute the quasi-linear bounce-averaged rates of electron scattering due to plasmaspheric hiss and perform the pure pitch angle diffusion simulations. Hiss induced radiation belt electron loss timescales are then determined from the simulated temporal evolution of electron fluxes after reaching the equilibrium state, as a function of electron kinetic energy and L-shell, which is of importance for incorporation into future simulations of the radiation belt electron dynamics under various geomagnetic conditions to comprehend the exact contribution of plasmaspheric hiss.

  11. A statistical approach to determining energetic outer radiation belt electron precipitation fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon Wedlund, Mea; Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.; Cresswell-Moorcock, Kathy; Cobbett, Neil; Breen, Paul; Danskin, Donald; Spanswick, Emma; Rodriguez, Juan V.

    2014-05-01

    Subionospheric radio wave data from an Antarctic-Arctic Radiation-Belt (Dynamic) Deposition VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortia (AARDDVARK) receiver located in Churchill, Canada, is analyzed to determine the characteristics of electron precipitation into the atmosphere over the range 3 < L < 7. The study advances previous work by combining signals from two U.S. transmitters from 20 July to 20 August 2010, allowing error estimates of derived electron precipitation fluxes to be calculated, including the application of time-varying electron energy spectral gradients. Electron precipitation observations from the NOAA POES satellites and a ground-based riometer provide intercomparison and context for the AARDDVARK measurements. AARDDVARK radiowave propagation data showed responses suggesting energetic electron precipitation from the outer radiation belt starting 27 July 2010 and lasting ~20 days. The uncertainty in >30 keV precipitation flux determined by the AARDDVARK technique was found to be ±10%. Peak >30 keV precipitation fluxes of AARDDVARK-derived precipitation flux during the main and recovery phase of the largest geomagnetic storm, which started on 4 August 2010, were >105 el cm-2 s-1 sr-1. The largest fluxes observed by AARDDVARK occurred on the dayside and were delayed by several days from the start of the geomagnetic disturbance. During the main phase of the disturbances, nightside fluxes were dominant. Significant differences in flux estimates between POES, AARDDVARK, and the riometer were found after the main phase of the largest disturbance, with evidence provided to suggest that >700 keV electron precipitation was occurring. Currently the presence of such relativistic electron precipitation introduces some uncertainty in the analysis of AARDDVARK data, given the assumption of a power law electron precipitation spectrum.

  12. Gyro-resonant scattering of radiation belt electrons during the solar minimum by fast magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Runov, Andrei; Ni, Binbin

    2013-02-01

    In the current study, we perform statistical analysis of the magnetosonic (MS) waves (also often referred to as extremely low frequency (ELF) equatorial noise) in the range between the ion cyclotron frequency and the lower hybrid resonance frequency within 10° of the magnetic equator. Observations were made between 2 and 9 RE using THEMIS Filter Bank (FBK) data. ELF waves with spectral power exceeding 10-6 nT2/Hz are registered in ~3% of all samples in the inner magnetosphere. The survey has shown that, during the solar minimum, the average amplitude of equatorial ELF waves is less than 0.025 nT. Interpreting ELF events as MS waves, we have evaluated the corresponding wave-induced resonant scattering coefficients of radiation belt energetic electrons. We also study the effect of heavy ions on the scattering rates. The analysis reveals that the scattering by magnetosonic waves for various plasma compositions during geomagnetically quiet times is by up to two orders of magnitude slower than was previously reported and cannot significantly contribute to the long-term dynamics of the radiation belts. Computed electron scattering rates by magnetosonic waves extends to higher αeq when the fraction of H+ in the plasma decreases, while the range of pitch angles for which resonance occurs remains relatively insensitive to the plasma composition. While inclusion of multi-ion species into the wave dispersion relation produces noticeable changes in bounce-averaged scattering rates, the average rates are still significantly below typical scattering rates of chorus or hiss waves.

  13. GOES Observations of Pitch Angle Evolution During an Electron Radiation Belt Dropout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, D. P.; Denton, M. H.; Green, J. C.; Onsager, T. G.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Singer, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    High Speed Stream (HSS) events exhibit characteristic structure in the solar wind which, when studied in conjunction with in situ observations at geostationary orbit (GEO) from GOES, allows us to examine the temporal evolution of dropouts in the outer electron radiation belt. Using pitch-angle-resolved Magnetospheric Electron Detector (MAGED) data, we study the evolution of perpendicular and parallel electron flux. During the HSS commencing on January 6th 2011, the flux over the entire energy distribution (30-600 keV) takes ~1.5 hours to dropout by two orders of magnitude from its pre-onset level. At this time, the lower energy electrons begin to reappear at GEO; however the 350-600 keV electron flux becomes highly parallel oriented and continues to decrease. Calculating the phase space density as a function of the three adiabatic invariants allows us to further investigate these loss mechanisms. Taking partial moments of the available electron distribution, we observe the number density quickly recovers (~4 hours), as well as the flux of the lower energy channels, however, the highest energy channel takes ~18 hours to recover to an approximately constant elevated level. This indicates that the electrons quickly reappear at GEO following the dropout before being heated over a period of days. This is consistent with the temperature values from GOES, showing an increase after the arrival of the HSS, peaking after ~3 days. This study provides independent confirmation of earlier statistical work and is a first step toward gaining understanding of the electron radiation belt dropout and recovery phenomena, in conjunction with coincident magnetic field measurements.

  14. Field-aligned chorus wave spectral power in Earth's outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuillard, H.; Agapitov, O.; Artemyev, A.; Kronberg, E. A.; Haaland, S. E.; Daly, P. W.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Boscher, D.; Bourdarie, S.; Zaliznyak, Y.; Rolland, G.

    2015-05-01

    Chorus-type whistler waves are one of the most intense electromagnetic waves generated naturally in the magnetosphere. These waves have a substantial impact on the radiation belt dynamics as they are thought to contribute to electron acceleration and losses into the ionosphere through resonant wave-particle interaction. Our study is devoted to the determination of chorus wave power distribution on frequency in a wide range of magnetic latitudes, from 0 to 40°. We use 10 years of magnetic and electric field wave power measured by STAFF-SA onboard Cluster spacecraft to model the initial (equatorial) chorus wave spectral power, as well as PEACE and RAPID measurements to model the properties of energetic electrons (~ 0.1-100 keV) in the outer radiation belt. The dependence of this distribution upon latitude obtained from Cluster STAFF-SA is then consistently reproduced along a certain L-shell range (4 ≤ L ≤ 6.5), employing WHAMP-based ray tracing simulations in hot plasma within a realistic inner magnetospheric model. We show here that, as latitude increases, the chorus peak frequency is globally shifted towards lower frequencies. Making use of our simulations, the peak frequency variations can be explained mostly in terms of wave damping and amplification, but also cross-L propagation. These results are in good agreement with previous studies of chorus wave spectral extent using data from different spacecraft (Cluster, POLAR and THEMIS). The chorus peak frequency variations are then employed to calculate the pitch angle and energy diffusion rates, resulting in more effective pitch angle electron scattering (electron lifetime is halved) but less effective acceleration. These peak frequency parameters can thus be used to improve the accuracy of diffusion coefficient calculations.

  15. ULF waves and relativistic electron acceleration and losses from the radiation belts: A superposed epoch analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Marina; Daglis, Ioannis; Zesta, Eftyhia; Katsavrias, Christos; Balasis, Georgios; Mann, Ian; Tsinganos, Kanaris

    2015-04-01

    Geospace magnetic storms are associated with either enhancements or decreases of the fluxes of electrons in the outer radiation belt. We examine the response of relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons to 39 moderate and intense magnetic storms and compare these with concurrent observations of ULF wave power and of the plasmapause location. Following 27 of the magnetic storms, the ultra-relativistic electron population of the outer radiation belt was enhanced in the 2 - 6 MeV electron fluxes, as observed by SAMPEX. This enhancement was also seen in the electron phase space density derived from electron fluxes observed by the geosynchronous GOES satellites. On the other hand, the remaining 12 magnetic storms were not followed by enhancements in the relativistic electron population. We compare relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons observations with the concurrent latitudinal and global distribution of wave power enhancements at Pc5 frequencies as detected by the CARISMA and IMAGE magnetometer arrays, as well as by magnetic stations collaborating in SuperMAG. During the main phase of both sets of magnetic storms, there is a marked penetration of Pc5 wave power to L shells as low as 2 -- especially during magnetic storms characterised by enhanced post-storm electron fluxes. Later in the recovery phase, Pc5 wave activity returns to more typical values and radial distribution with a peak at outer L shells. Pc5 wave activity was found to persist longer for the electron-enhanced storms than for those that do not produce such enhancements. We put our Pc5 wave observations in the context of the plasmapause location, as determined by IMAGE EUV observations. Specifically, we discuss the growth and decay characteristics of Pc5 waves in association with the plasmapause location, as a controlling factor for wave power penetration deep into the magnetosphere.

  16. The problem of the acceleration of electrons of the outer radiation belt and magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, E. E.; Stepanova, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    Predicting of the location of the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes filling a new radiation belt is an endeavor being carried out by physicists studying the magnetosphere. We analyzed the data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites and ground-based magnetometers obtained during geomagnetic storm on 8-9 October 2012. The minimum value of the disturbance storm time (Dst) was -111 nT, and the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes that appeared during the recovery phase was observed at L = 4 Re. At the same time, we analyzed the motion of the auroral oval toward lower latitudes and related substorm activity using the data of the low-orbiting DMSP satellites and the IMAGE magnetic meridian network. It was found from the DMSP satellites' measurements that the maximum of the energy density of precipitating ions, the maximum of the plasma pressure, and the most equatorial part of the westward auroral electrojet are all located at the 60° geomagnetic latitude. This value corresponds to L = 4 Re, i.e., it coincides with the location of the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes. This L-value also agrees with the predictions of the Tverskaya relation between the minimum in Dst variation and the location of the maximum of the energetic electron fluxes, filling a new radiation belt. The obtained results show that the location of this maximum could be predicted solely from the data of the auroral particle precipitations and/or ground-based magnetic observations.

  17. Ground-based estimates of outer radiation belt energetic electron precipitation fluxes into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.; Gamble, Rory J.; Ulich, Thomas; Raita, Tero; SeppäLä, Annika; Green, Janet C.; Thomson, Neil R.; Sauvaud, Jean-André; Parrot, Michel

    2010-12-01

    AARDDVARK data from a radio wave receiver in Sodankylä, Finland have been used to monitor transmissions across the auroral oval and just into the polar cap from the very low frequency communications transmitter, call sign NAA (24.0 kHz, 44°N, 67°W, L = 2.9), in Maine, USA, since 2004. The transmissions are influenced by outer radiation belt (L = 3-7) energetic electron precipitation. In this study, we have been able to show that the observed transmission amplitude variations can be used to determine routinely the flux of energetic electrons entering the upper atmosphere along the total path and between 30 and 90 km. Our analysis of the NAA observations shows that electron precipitation fluxes can vary by 3 orders of magnitude during geomagnetic storms. Typically when averaging over L = 3-7 we find that the >100 keV POES "trapped" fluxes peak at about 106 el. cm-2 s-1 sr-1 during geomagnetic storms, with the DEMETER >100 keV drift loss cone showing peak fluxes of 105 el. cm-2 s-1 sr-1, and both the POES >100 keV "loss" fluxes and the NAA ground-based >100 keV precipitation fluxes showing peaks of ˜104 el. cm-2 s-1 sr-1. During a geomagnetic storm in July 2005, there were systematic MLT variations in the fluxes observed: electron precipitation flux in the midnight sector (22-06 MLT) exceeded the fluxes from the morning side (0330-1130 MLT) and also from the afternoon sector (1130-1930 MLT). The analysis of NAA amplitude variability has the potential of providing a detailed, near real-time, picture of energetic electron precipitation fluxes from the outer radiation belts.

  18. Survival of bacterial isolates exposed to simulated Jovian trapped radiation belt electrons and solar wind protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, D. M.; Hagen, C. A.; Renninger, G. M.; Simko, G. J.; Smith, C. D.; Yelinek, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    With missions to Jupiter, the spacecraft will be exposed for extended duration to solar wind radiation and the Jovian trapped radiation belt. This study is designed to determine the effect of these radiation environments on spacecraft bacterial isolates. The information can be used in the probability of contamination analysis for these missions. A bacterial subpopulation from Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft (nine sporeforming and three nonsporeforming isolates) plus two comparative organisms, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 17917 and a strain of Bacillus subtilis var. niger, were exposed to 2-, 12-, and 25-MeV electrons at different doses with simultaneous exposure to a vacuum of 0.0013 N/sqm at 20 and -20 C. The radioresistance of the subpopulation was dependent on the isolate, dose, and energy of electrons. Temperature affected the radioresistance of only the sporeforming isolates. Survival data indicated that spores were reduced approximately 1 log/1500 J/kg, while nonsporeforming isolates (micrococci) were reduced 1.5 to 2 logs/1500 J/kg with the exception of an apparent radioresistant isolate whose resistance approached that of the spores. The subpopulation was found to be less resistant to lower energy than to higher energy electrons.

  19. High Altitude Balloons as a Platform for Space Radiation Belt Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzino, L.; Buttenschoen, A.; Farr, Q.; Hodgson, C.; Johnson, W.; Mann, I. R.; Rae, J.; University of Alberta High Altitude Balloons (UA-HAB)

    2011-12-01

    The goals of the University of Alberta High Altitude Balloons Program (UA-HAB) are to i) use low cost balloons to address space radiation science, and ii) to utilise the excitement of "space mission" involvement to promote and facilitate the recruitment of undergraduate and graduate students in physics, engineering, and atmospheric sciences to pursue careers in space science and engineering. The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloons (UA-HAB) is a unique opportunity for University of Alberta students (undergraduate and graduate) to engage in the hands-on design, development, build, test and flight of a payload to operate on a high altitude balloon at around 30km altitude. The program development, including formal design and acceptance tests, reports and reviews, mirror those required in the development of an orbital satellite mission. This enables the students to gain a unique insight into how space missions are flown. UA-HAB is a one and half year program that offers a gateway into a high-altitude balloon mission through hands on experience, and builds skills for students who may be attracted to participate in future space missions in their careers. This early education will provide students with the experience necessary to better assess opportunities for pursuing a career in space science. Balloons offer a low-cost alternative to other suborbital platforms which can be used to address radiation belt science goals. In particular, the participants of this program have written grant proposal to secure funds for this project, have launched several 'weather balloon missions', and have designed, built, tested, and launched their particle detector called "Maple Leaf Particle Detector". This detector was focussed on monitoring cosmic rays and space radiation using shielded Geiger tubes, and was flown as one of the payloads from the institutions participating in the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP), organized by the Louisiana State University and the Louisiana

  20. RAM - C P L Simulations of Electron Transport and Plasma Wave Scattering Using Van Allen Probes Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V.; Zhang, J.; Saikin, A.; Albert, J.; Tu, W.; Chen, Y.; Morley, S.; De Pascuale, S.; Kletzing, C.

    2014-12-01

    The high variability of energetic electron fluxes in the inner magnetosphere remains inadequately explained due to their complex dynamics including competing particle acceleration and loss processes. We study the combined effects from scattering by chorus and EMIC waves and radial transport on ring current and radiation belt dynamics. We use our ring current-atmosphere interactions model that solves the kinetic equation for H+, O+, and He+ ions and electrons and is coupled with a time-dependent 2-D plasmasphere model (RAM-CPL). The plasma boundary conditions are specified from LANL geosynchronous observations. We simulate wave-particle interactions on a global scale as particles drift around the Earth using L and MLT-dependent event-specific chorus and EMIC wave models. The precipitating electron fluxes measured by multiple NOAA satellites are fitted to the equatorial wave measurements made by the EMFISIS instrument on the Van Allen Probes to infer the chorus wave amplitudes on a global scale. The fast dropout of the radiation belts during the October 2012 "double-dip" storm event is investigated and the role of various processes such as outward radial diffusion combined with magnetopause shadowing and enhanced electron precipitation into the atmosphere is evaluated. The simulated cold plasma densities are compared with in situ EMFISIS observations along the Van Allen Probes' orbits showing good agreement.

  1. A three-dimensional phase space dynamical model of the Earth{close_quote}s radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Boscher, D.M.; Beutier, T.; Bourdarie, S.

    1996-07-01

    A three dimensional phase space model of the Earth{close_quote}s radiation belt is presented. We have taken into account the magnetic and electric radial diffusions, the pitch angle diffusions due to Coulomb interactions and interactions with the plasmaspheric hiss, and the Coulomb drag. First, a steady state of the belt is presented. Two main maxima are obtained, corresponding to the inner and outer parts of the belt. Then, we have modelled a simple injection at the external boundary. The particle transport seems like what was measured aboard satellites. A high energy particle loss is found, by comparing the model results and the measurements. It remains to be explained. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Flux enhancement of the outer radiation belt electrons after the arrival of stream interaction regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Kataoka, Ryuho

    2008-03-01

    The Earth's outer radiation belt electrons increase when the magnetosphere is surrounded by the high-speed solar wind stream, while the southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is also known as an important factor for the flux enhancement. In order to distinguish the two different kinds of solar wind parameter dependence statistically, we investigate the response of the outer belt to stream interaction regions (SIRs). A total of 179 SIR events are identified for the time period from 1994 to 2005. We classify the SIR events into two groups according to the so-called "spring-toward fall-away" rule: IMF sector polarity after the stream interface is toward in spring or away in fall (group A) and vice versa (group B). According to the Russell-McPherron effect, groups A and B have a significant negative and positive offset of the IMF Bz after the stream interface, respectively. Comparing groups A and B by superposing about the stream interface, only IMF Bz dependence can be obtained because the other solar wind parameters change in the same manner. As a result, the greatest flux enhancement is found in the highest-speed streams with a southward offset of the IMF Bz, indicating that only the solar wind speed by itself is not a sufficient condition for the large flux enhancement. It is also found that the large flux enhancement tends to be associated with weak geomagnetic activities with minimum Dst of about -50 nT on average, implying that the existence of intense magnetic storms is not essential for the flux enhancement.

  3. Flux enhancement mechanism of the outer radiation belt electrons associated with coronal hole streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Y.; Kataoka, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Earth's outer radiation belt electrons increase when the magnetosphere is surrounded by the high speed solar wind stream, while the southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is also known as an important factor for the flux enhancement. In order to distinguish the two different kinds of solar wind parameter dependence statistically, we investigate the response of the outer belt to stream interaction regions (SIRs). We classify the SIR events from 1994 to 2005 into two groups according to so-called "gspring-toward fall-away"h (STFA) rule: (A) IMF sector polarity after the stream interface is toward in spring or away in fall, and (B) vice versa. According to the Russell-McPherron effect, the groups A and B have a significant negative and positive offset of the IMF Bz after the stream interface. Comparing the groups A and B, by superposing about the stream interface, only IMF Bz dependence can be obtained because the other solar wind parameters change in the same manner. As a result, the greatest flux enhancement is found in the high-speed streams with a southward offset of the IMF Bz, indicating that only the solar wind speed by itself is not a sufficient condition for the large flux enhancement. Based on the obtained dependence on the STFA rule and the solar wind speed, it is possible to operate a probabilistic space weather forecast of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit for secure satellite operations. The probability is defined by the number of events with daily maximum flux above the NOAA alert levels, and the stream interface is used as a precursor of coming coronal hole stream in the forecast algorithm. We report how it works and evaluate the skill score of our test operation of the probabilistic forecast.

  4. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy

    PubMed Central

    Artemyev, A.V.; Agapitov, O.V.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V.V.; Mozer, F.S.

    2015-01-01

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave–particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity. PMID:25975615

  5. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V; Agapitov, O V; Mourenas, D; Krasnoselskikh, V V; Mozer, F S

    2015-01-01

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave-particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity. PMID:25975615

  6. Prevalence of oral submucous fibrosis in the high natural radiation belt of Kerala, south India.

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, R.; Raju, G. K.; Nair, S. M.; Balasubramanian, G.

    1992-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a crippling disorder which is confined almost exclusively to the Indian subcontinent. Despite its association with a significantly increased risk of cancer, the etiology is still not clear. An epidemiological assessment showed 0.4% prevalence for OSMF in Kerala, South India, which is among the highest recorded. Recently the National Tumour Registry in Trivandrum reported the highest recorded site-specific incidence rate for oral cancer (ICD 140-145) in this area. The coastal belt of the Trivandrum and Quilon districts of Kerala has a very high natural radioactivity (over 1500 mR (387 microC) per year); about 500 mR (129 microC) per year is considered to be the maximum permissible dose for populations in general. An epidemiological survey in this area and in a comparable population (without exposure to high background radiation) as a control showed that the percentage prevalence of OSMF in the study area was 0.27 and in the control area 0.32. It appears highly improbable that the OSMF in the study area was induced by high background radiation. PMID:1486676

  7. From Low Altitude to High Altitude: Assimilating SAMPEX Data in Global Radiation Belt Models by Quantifying Precipitation and Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, W.; Reeves, G. D.; Cunningham, G.; Selesnick, R. S.; Li, X.; Looper, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Since its launch in 1992, SAMPEX has been continuously providing measurements of radiation belt electrons at low altitude, which are not only ideal for the direct quantification of the electron precipitation loss in the radiation belt, but also provide data coverage in a critical region for global radiation belt data assimilation models. However, quantitatively combining high-altitude and low-earth-orbit (LEO) measurements on the same L-shell is challenging because LEO measurements typically contain a dynamic mixture of trapped and precipitating populations. Specifically, the electrons measured by SAMPEX can be distinguished as trapped, quasi-trapped (in the drift loss cone), and precipitating (in the bounce loss cone). To simulate the low-altitude electron distribution observed by SAMPEX/PET, a drift-diffusion model has been developed that includes the effects of azimuthal drift and pitch angle diffusion. The simulation provides direct quantification of the rates and variations of electron loss to the atmosphere, a direct input to our Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) as the electron loss lifetimes. The current DREAM uses data assimilation to combine a 1D radial diffusion model with observational data of radiation belt electrons. In order to implement the mixed electron measurements from SAMPEX into DREAM, we need to map the SAMPEX data from low altitude to high altitudes. To perform the mapping, we will first examine the well-known 'global coherence' of radiation belt electrons by comparing SAMPEX electron fluxes with the energetic electron data from LANL GEO and GPS spacecraft. If the correlation is good, we can directly map the SAMPEX fluxes to high altitudes based on the global coherence; if not, we will use the derived pitch angle distribution from the drift-diffusion model to map up the field and test the mapping by comparing to the high-altitude flux measurements. Then the globally mapped electron fluxes can be assimilated into DREAM

  8. The effects of the storm events in 2015 on the radiation belts observed by EPT/PROBA-V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Rosson, Graciela; Pierrard, Viviane

    2016-04-01

    With the Energetic Particle Telescope (EPT) on board the ESA satellite PROBA-V, we analyze the high-resolution measurements of electrons at LEO (820 km). On 17 March 2015, a big geomagnetic storm event injected unusual fluxes up to low radial distances in the radiation belts. EPT electron measurements show a deep dropout at L>4 starting during the main phase of the storm, associated to the penetration of high energy fluxes at L value lower than 2 filling completely the slot region. After 10 days, the formation of a new slot around L=2.8 separates the outer belt from the inner belt extending at other longitudes than the South Atlantic Anomaly. This is believed to be a result of enhanced precipitation losses of energetic electrons due to their interactions with VLF waves in the magnetosphere. Two other similar events occurred in January and June 2015, again with injection of electrons in the inner belt, contrary to what was observed in 2013 and 2014. These events and the EPT measurements help us to better understand the formation of three belts structures.

  9. Van Allen Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr; Sibeck, David; Fox, Nicola; Mauk, Barry; Kessel, Ramona

    The Van Allen Probes twin spacecraft were launched on 30 August 2012 into nearly identical, 1.1 x 5.8 Re elliptical, low inclination (10°) Earth orbits with one of the two spacecraft lapping the other about every 2.5 months. The goal of the mission is to provide understanding of how populations of relativistic electrons and penetrating ions in space form or change in response to variable inputs of energy from the Sun. In this paper we overview the new understanding and discoveries of the Van Allen Probes science investigations since the operational mission began on 1 November 2012, which include formation of multiple coherently ordered structures within the outer electron belt and new persistent “zebra stripes” in the inner electron belt.

  10. Allene ether Nazarov cyclization.

    PubMed

    Tius, Marcus A

    2014-05-01

    The ease of synthesis and the exceptional reactivity of alkoxyallenes has led to their use in a large number of highly diverse applications. This Report describes their use in various versions of the allene ether Nazarov cyclization. Following a brief introduction to the Nazarov cyclization (Section 1), the oxidative cyclization of vinyl alkoxyallenes is discussed first (Section 2). Nazarov cyclizations of α-alkoxyallenyl vinyl ketones and of α-alkoxyallenyl vinyl tertiary carbinols are covered (Section 3). The discovery and the subsequent rational design of acetals that serve as chiral auxiliaries on the allene in highly enantioselective Nazarov cyclizations is explained (Section 4). Interrupted Nazarov cyclizations of alkoxyallenes that are generated in situ from the isomerization of propargyl ethers on solid supports are discussed, including the evolution of a highly diastereoselective, chiral auxiliary controlled version of the reaction. Some applications of the methodology to natural products total synthesis have been included so as to provide the reader with benchmarks with which to judge the utility of the methodology. PMID:24196585

  11. Ground-based estimates of outer radiation belt energetic electron precipitation fluxes into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, C. J.; Clilverd, M.; Gamble, R. J.; Ulich, T.; Raita, T.; Seppälä, A. M.; Green, J. C.; Thomson, N. R.; Sauvaud, J.; Parrot, M.

    2010-12-01

    The variations of subionospheric VLF amplitudes observed at ground-based receivers can be used to determine the flux of electrons precipitating into the ionosphere along the path between the transmitter and receiver. A network of VLF receivers has been established to observe the upper atmosphere (~40-85 km), and tools are being developed to extract electron precipitation fluxes from the observations of this network, which is termed AARDDVARK (Antarctic-Arctic Radiation-belt (Dynamic) Deposition - VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortium). AARDDVARK data from a radiowave receiver in Sodankylä, Finland have been used to monitor transmissions across the auroral oval and just into the polar cap from the very low frequency communications transmitter, call sign NAA, (24.0 kHz, 44°N, 67°W, L=2.9) in Maine, USA, since 2004. The propagating signals are influenced by outer radiation belt (L=3-7) energetic electron precipitation. In this study we show that the observed amplitude variations can be used to routinely determine the flux of energetic electrons entering the upper atmosphere along the entire path, and between 30-90 km in altitude. Our analysis of the NAA observations shows that electron precipitation fluxes can vary by three orders of magnitude during geomagnetic storms. Typically when averaging over L=3-7 we find that the >100 keV POES ‘trapped’ fluxes peak at about 106 el.cm-2s-1sr-1 during geomagnetic storms, with the DEMETER >100 keV drift loss cone showing peak fluxes of 105 el.cm-2s-1sr-1, and both the POES >100 keV ‘loss’ fluxes and the NAA ground-based >100 keV precipitation fluxes showing peaks of ~104 el.cm-2s-1sr-1. During a geomagnetic storm in July 2005 there were systematic MLT variations in the fluxes observed: electron precipitation flux in the midnight sector (22-06 MLT) exceeded the fluxes from the morning side (0330-1130 MLT) and also from the afternoon sector (1130-1930 MLT). The analysis of NAA amplitude variability has the potential of

  12. ICME-driven sheath regions deplete the outer radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, H.; Kilpua, E. K.; Turner, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    It is an outstanding question in space weather and solar wind-magnetosphere interaction studies, why some storms result in an increase of the outer radiation belt electron fluxes, while others deplete them or produce no change. One approach to this problem is to look at differences in the storm drivers. Traditionally drivers have been classified to Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs) and Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). However, an 'ICME event' is a complex structure: The core is a magnetic cloud (MC; a clear flux rope structure). If the mass ejection is fast enough, it can drive a shock in front of it. This leads to the formation of a sheath region between the interplanetary shock and the leading edge of the MC. While both the sheath and the MC feature elevated solar wind speed, their other properties are very different. For instance, the sheath region has typically a much higher dynamic pressure than the magnetic cloud. Moreover, the sheath region has a high power in magnetic field and dynamic pressure Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) range fluctuations, while the MC is characterised by an extremely smooth magnetic field. Magnetic clouds have been recognised as important drivers magnetospheric activity since they can comprise long periods of very large southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). Nevertheless, previous studies have shown that sheath regions can also act as storm drivers. In this study, we analyse the effects of ICME-driven sheath regions on the relativistic electron fluxes observed by GOES satellites on the geostationary orbit. We perform a superposed epoch analysis of 31 sheath regions from solar cycle 23. Our results show that the sheaths cause an approximately one order of magnitude decrease in the 24h-averaged electron fluxes. Typically the fluxes also stay below the pre-event level for more than two days. Further analysis reveals that the decrease does not depend on, e.g., whether the sheath interval contains predominantly northward

  13. Statistical Analysis of Pitch Angle Distribution of Radiation Belt Energetic Electrons Near the Geostationary Orbit: CRRES Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Gu, X.; Ni, B.; Shprits, Y.; Zhou, C.; Ionosphere Laboratory of Wuhan University

    2011-12-01

    A statistical analysis of energetic radiation belt electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) at the radial distances of 6 RE and 6.6 RE is performed on the basis of the pitch angle resolved flux observations from the Medium Electrons A (MEA) instrument onboard the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). While previous studies of Vampola [1998] and Gannon et al. [2007] have used CRRES MEA data to investigate the general variations in electron PAD at particular energies, in this study we present a detailed statistical analysis of electron PADs including the dependence on electron kinetic energy, magnetic local time (MLT), and the level of geomagnetic activity. By fitting the measured PADs with a power law function of sine of local pitch angle, the power law index n that relates to the category of radiation belt electron PAD is quantified in detail as a function of electron kinetic energy, MLT interval and geomagnetic index Kp. Statistical averaged n-values vary considerably with respect to MLT, ranging from n ~ 0 within 00-04 MLT to n ~ 1.5 within 12-16 MLT, due to the MLT dependence of wave scattering and the effects associated with drift shell splitting and magnetopause shadowing. Drift shell splitting and magnetopause shadowing result in often observed negative values of n. At lower energies of a few hundred keV the pitch angle distributions are more flat than at MeV energies, which is consistent with faster pitch angle scattering at low energies by chorus waves. These quantitative results of radiation belt electron PAD, consistent with the previous studies by Vampola [1998] and Gannon et al. [2007], provide further insight into the global dynamics of energetic radiation belt electrons near the geostationary orbit and also are useful for inferring electron phase space densities and assimilating their radial profiles using omni-directional electron flux measurements.

  14. Evidence for Nonlinear VLF Wave Physics from Van Allen Probe Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, C. E.; Tejero, E. M.; Ganguli, G.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    VLF waves in the whistler mode branch in the Earth's radiation belts play a critical role in both the acceleration and loss of energetic electrons. VLF waves are often observed with magnetic field amplitudes that are a significant fraction of the background magnetic field suggesting that nonlinear effects may be important. We develop new Bayesian time-series analysis tools to investigate magnetic and electric field data from the EMFISIS instrument on board the Van Allen Probes. We also validate the analysis techniques through laboratory experiments. We apply these tools to Chorus waves to show that the picture of a single coherent plane wave is insufficient to explain EMFISIS data and that nonlinear collective wave interactions play an important role in moderating Chorus wave growth. We also apply these techniques to show that nonlinear induced scattering by thermal electrons can play a significant role in controlling the propagation of large amplitude lightning generated whistlers inside the plasmasphere.

  15. Inner zone electron radial diffusion coefficients - An update with Van Allen Probes MagEIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul; Fennell, Joseph; Guild, Timothy; Mazur, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Clemmons, James; Turner, Drew; Blake, Bernard; Roeder, James

    2016-07-01

    Using MagEIS data from NASA's recent Van Allen Probes mission, we estimate the quiet-time radial diffusion coefficients for electrons in the inner radiation belt and slot, for energies up to ~700 keV. We provide observational evidence that energy diffusion is negligible. The main dynamic processes, then, are radial diffusion and elastic pitch angle scattering. We use a coordinate system in which these two modes of diffusion are separable. Then we integrate over pitch angle to obtain a field line content whose dynamics consist of radial diffusion and loss to the atmosphere. We estimate the loss timescale from periods of exponential decay in the time series. We then estimate the radial diffusion coefficient from the temporal and radial variation of the field line content. We show that our diffusion coefficients agree well with previously determined values. Our coefficients are consistent with diffusion by electrostatic impulses, whereas outer zone radial diffusion is thought to be dominated by electromagnetic fluctuations.

  16. Gyroresonant interactions between the radiation belt electrons and whistler mode chorus waves in the radiation environments of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Y. Y.; Menietti, J. D.; Gu, X.; Kim, K. C.; Horne, R. B.

    2012-11-01

    In the current study we perform a comparative analysis of the gyroresonant interactions of whistler mode waves with radiation belt electrons in the magnetospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn. Our primary goal is to evaluate the effect of resonant wave-particle interactions with chorus waves and determine whether chorus waves can produce net acceleration or net loss of radiation belt electrons on the outer planets. The ratio of plasma frequency to gyrofrequency is a key parameter that determines the efficiency of the pitch angle and energy resonant scattering. We present a comparison of statistical maps of the ratio of plasma frequency to gyrofrequency for Jupiter, Saturn and Earth in terms of radial distance and latitude. Preliminary maps of the plasma frequency to gyrofrequency ratio and 2D simulations of pitch angle and energy diffusion using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) indicate that the Kronian plasma environment is not likely to support as efficient gyroresonant interactions with whistler mode chorus waves as in the Terrestrial or Jovian environments. Inefficiency of the local acceleration by whistler mode waves in the Kronian environment raises important questions about the origin of the relativistic electrons in the Saturn's radiation belts. Two-dimensional diffusive simulations of local acceleration and loss to the atmosphere using the VERB code confirm previous suggestions that the acceleration of electrons may be very efficient in the outer radiation belt of Jupiter. However, sensitivity simulations also show that the result of the competition between acceleration and loss in the Jupiter's magnetosphere strongly depends on the currently unknown latitudinal distribution of chorus waves that will be provided by the upcoming Juno mission. If waves extend to high latitudes, it is likely that the loss rates due to whistler mode waves will exceed energization rates.

  17. Gyroresonant interactions between the radiation belt electrons and whistler mode chorus waves in the radiation environments of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Yuri; Horn, Richard; Gu, Xudong; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Menietti, Doug

    2013-04-01

    In the current study we perform a comparative analysis of the gyroresonant interactions of whistler mode waves with radiation belt electrons in the magnetospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn. Our primary goal is to evaluate the effect of resonant wave-particle interactions with chorus waves and determine whether chorus waves can produce net acceleration or net loss of radiation belt electrons on the outer planets. The ratio of plasma frequency to gyrofrequency is a key parameter that determines the efficiency of the pitch angle and energy resonant scattering. We present a comparison of statistical maps of the ratio of plasma frequency to gyrofrequency for Jupiter, Saturn and Earth in terms of radial distance and latitude. Preliminary maps of the plasma frequency to gyrofrequency ratio and 2D simulations of pitch angle and energy diffusion using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) indicate that the Kronian plasma environment is not likely to support as efficient gyroresonant interactions with whistler mode chorus waves as in the Terrestrial or Jovian environments. Inefficiency of the local acceleration by whistler mode waves in the Kronian environment raises important questions about the origin of the relativistic electrons in the Saturn's radiation belts. Two-dimensional diffusive simulations of local acceleration and loss to the atmosphere using the VERB code confirm previous suggestions that the acceleration of electrons may be very efficient in the outer radiation belt of Jupiter. However, sensitivity simulations also show that the result of the competition between acceleration and loss in the Jupiter's magnetosphere strongly depends on the currently unknown latitudinal distribution of chorus waves that will be provided by the upcoming Juno mission. If waves extend to high latitudes, it is likely that the loss rates due to whistler mode waves will exceed energization rates.

  18. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-11-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  19. On the possibility to use semiconductive hybrid pixel detectors for study of radiation belt of the Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guskov, A.; Shelkov, G.; Smolyanskiy, P.; Zhemchugov, A.

    2016-02-01

    The scientific apparatus GAMMA-400 designed for study of electromagnetic and hadron components of cosmic rays will be launched to an elliptic orbit with the apogee of about 300 000 km and the perigee of about 500 km. Such a configuration of the orbit allows it to cross periodically the radiation belt and the outer part of magnetosphere. We discuss the possibility to use hybrid pixel detecters based on the Timepix chip and semiconductive sensors on board the GAMMA-400 apparatus. Due to high granularity of the sensor (pixel size is 55 mum) and possibility to measure independently an energy deposition in each pixel, such compact and lightweight detector could be a unique instrument for study of spatial, energy and time structure of electron and proton components of the radiation belt.

  20. LANL* V2.0: A New Radiation Belt Drift Shell Model for Real-Time and Reanalysis Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, Josef; Reeves, Geoffrey; Friedel, Reiner

    More and more radiation belt models are being combined with data using data assimila-tion methods. One important step towards this goal is to convert radiation belt data into phase space densities and adiabatic coordinates. This step of converting fluxes into phase space densities requires accurate calculations of particle drift shells or magnetic drift invari-ants L*. In a dynamic and realistic field, calculating L* as one of the adiabatic coordinates needs sophisticated magnetic field models that, in turn, require computationally intensive nu-merical integration. Typically a single L* drift shell integration can take on the order of 105 callstoamagneticf ieldmodel.Inaddition, thedrif tshellhastoberecalculatedeveryf ewminutesbecauseei ordersof magnitudesf asterthandirectnumericalintegrationmethods.Ourmethodisbasedonaneuralnetwor calculationwiththeT syganenkoSitnov2005model.T hisnewsurrogatemodelhasapplicationstoreal- timeradiationbeltf orecasting, analysisof datasetsspanningdecadesof observations, andotherspaceweathe

  1. On the calculation of electric diffusion coefficient of radiation belt electrons with in situ electric field measurements by THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenlong; Tu, Weichao; Li, Xinlin; Sarris, Theodore; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Fu, Huishan; Zhang, Hui; Shi, Quanqi

    2016-02-01

    Based on 7 years' observations from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), we investigate the statistical distribution of electric field Pc5 ULF wave power under different geomagnetic activities and calculate the radial diffusion coefficient due to electric field, , for outer radiation belt electrons. A simple empirical expression of is also derived. Subsequently, we compare to previous DLL models and find similar Kp dependence with the model, which is also based on in situ electric field measurements. The absolute value of is constantly higher than , probably due to the limited orbital coverage of CRRES. The differences between and the commonly used and models are significant, especially in Kp dependence and energy dependence. Possible reasons for these differences and their implications are discussed. The diffusion coefficient provided in this paper, which also has energy dependence, will be an important contributor to quantify the radial diffusion process of radiation belt electrons.

  2. Pitch-angle diffusion of electrons through growing and propagating along a magnetic field electromagnetic wave in Earth's radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, C.-R. Dokgo, K.; Min, K.-W.; Woo, M.-H.; Choi, E.-J.; Hwang, J.; Park, Y.-D.; Lee, D.-Y.

    2015-06-15

    The diffusion of electrons via a linearly polarized, growing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagating along a uniform magnetic field is investigated. The diffusion of electrons that interact with the growing EM wave is investigated through the autocorrelation function of the parallel electron acceleration in several tens of electron gyration timescales, which is a relatively short time compared with the bounce time of electrons between two mirror points in Earth's radiation belts. Furthermore, the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient is derived for the resonant and non-resonant electrons, and the effect of the wave growth on the electron diffusion is discussed. The results can be applied to other problems related to local acceleration or the heating of electrons in space plasmas, such as in the radiation belts.

  3. New results from the Colorado CubeSat and comparison with Van Allen Probes data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.

    2013-05-01

    The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) is a 3-unit (10cm x 10cm x 30cm) CubeSat mission funded by the NSF, launched into a highly inclined (650) low-Earth (490km x 790km) orbit on 09/13/12 as a secondary payload under NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program. CSSWE contains a single science payload, the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile), which is a simplified and miniaturized version of the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) built at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) of University of Colorado for NASA/Van Allen Probes mission, which consists of two identical spacecraft, launched on 08/30/12, that traverse the heart of the radiation belts in a low inclination (100) orbit. REPTile is designed to measure the directional differential flux of protons ranging from 9 to 40 MeV and electrons from 0.5 to >3.3 MeV. Three-month science mission (full success) was completed on 1/05/13. We are now into the extended mission phase, focusing on data analysis and modeling. REPTile measures a fraction of the total population that has small enough equatorial pitch angles to reach the altitude of CSSWE, thus measuring the precipitating population as well as the trapped population. These measurements are critical for understanding the loss of outer radiation belt electrons. New results from CSSWE and comparison with Van Allen Probes data will be presented. The CSSWE is also an ideal class project, involving over 65 graduate and undergraduate students and providing training for the next generation of engineers and scientists over the full life-cycle of a satellite project.

  4. Relativistic electron acceleration and decay time scales in the inner and outer radiation belts: SAMPEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Callis, L. B.; Cummings, J. R.; Hovestadt, D.; Kanekal, S.; Klecker, B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    High-energy electrons have been measured systematically in a low-altitude (520 x 675 km), nearly polar (inclination = 82 deg) orbit by sensitive instruments onboard the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX). Count rate channels with electron energy thresholds ranging from 0.4 MeV to 3.5 MeV in three different instruments have been used to examine relativistic electron variations as a function of L-shell parameter and time. A long run of essentially continuous data (July 1992 - July 1993) shows substantial acceleration of energetic electrons throughout much of the magnetosphere on rapid time scales. This acceleration appears to be due to solar wind velocity enhancements and is surprisingly large in that the radiation belt 'slot' region often is filled temporarily and electron fluxes are strongly enhanced even at very low L-values (L aprroximately 2). A superposed epoch analysis shows that electron fluxes rise rapidly for 2.5 is approximately less than L is approximately less than 5. These increases occur on a time scale of order 1-2 days and are most abrupt for L-values near 3. The temporal decay rate of the fluxes is dependent on energy and L-value and may be described by J = Ke-t/to with t(sub o) approximately equals 5-10 days. Thus, these results suggest that the Earth's magnetosphere is a cosmic electron accelerator of substantial strength and efficiency.

  5. Ionization losses of the Earth's radiation belt protons according to the radial diffusion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtyukh, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Using modern models of the plasmasphere and exosphere, radial profiles of the rates of ionization losses of protons with μ = 0.3-10 keV/nT (μ is the first adiabatic invariant) of the Earth's radiation belts (ERBs) have been constructed. To calculate Coulomb losses of protons, we used the ISEE-1 satellite data at L = 3-9 and CRRES satellite data at L ≤ 3 ( L is the McIlwain parameter). The relation of contributions of Coulomb losses and charge exchange in the rate of ionization losses of protons has been considered. We have discovered the effect of subtracting Coulomb losses from charge exchange of ERB protons for small μ and L, which can imitate a local particle source. It has been demonstrated that, with decreasing L, the rate of ionization losses of ERB protons decreases as a whole. The radial dependence of this rate only has a negative gradient in the narrow range (Δ L ~ 0.5) in the region of the plasmapause and only for protons with μ > 1.2 keV/nT.

  6. Outer radiation belt dropout dynamics following the arrival of two interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L. R.; Da Silva, L. A.; Souza, V. M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Jauer, P. R.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Walsh, B. M.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Marchezi, J. P.; Rockenbach, M.; Lago, A. Dal; Mendes, O.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Koga, D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetopause shadowing and wave-particle interactions are recognized as the two primary mechanisms for losses of electrons from the outer radiation belt. We investigate these mechanisms, using satellite observations both in interplanetary space and within the magnetosphere and particle drift modeling. Two interplanetary shocks/sheaths impinged upon the magnetopause causing a relativistic electron flux dropout. The magnetic cloud (MC) and interplanetary structure sunward of the MC had primarily northward magnetic field, perhaps leading to a concomitant lack of substorm activity and a 10 daylong quiescent period. The arrival of two shocks caused an unusual electron flux dropout. Test-particle simulations have shown ˜ 2 to 5 MeV energy, equatorially mirroring electrons with initial values of L≥5.5 can be lost to the magnetosheath via magnetopause shadowing alone. For electron losses at lower L-shells, coherent chorus wave-driven pitch angle scattering and ULF wave-driven radial transport have been shown to be viable mechanisms.

  7. Evaluation of Radiation Belt Space Weather Forecasts for Internal Charging Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Coffey, Victoria N.; Jun, Insoo; Garrett, Henry B.

    2007-01-01

    A variety of static electron radiation belt models, space weather prediction tools, and energetic electron datasets are used by spacecraft designers and operations support personnel as internal charging code inputs to evaluate electrostatic discharge risks in space systems due to exposure to relativistic electron environments. Evaluating the environment inputs is often accomplished by comparing whether the data set or forecast tool reliability predicts measured electron flux (or fluence over a given period) for some chosen period. While this technique is useful as a model metric, it does not provide the information necessary to evaluate whether short term deviances of the predicted flux is important in the charging evaluations. In this paper, we use a 1-D internal charging model to compute electric fields generated in insulating materials as a function of time when exposed to relativistic electrons in the Earth's magnetosphere. The resulting fields are assumed to represent the "true" electric fields and are compared with electric field values computed from relativistic electron environments derived from a variety of space environment and forecast tools. Deviances in predicted fields compared to the "true" fields which depend on insulator charging time constants will be evaluated as a potential metric for determining the importance of predicted and measured relativistic electron flux deviations over a range of time scales.

  8. A BATSE investigation of radiation belt electrons precipitated by VLF waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, Dayton W.

    1995-01-01

    The Compton Observatory commonly encounters fluxes of energetic electrons which have been scattered from the inner radiation belt to the path of the satellite by resonant interactions with VLF waves from powerful man-made transmitters. The present investigation was motivated by the fact that in the Fall of 1993, the Gamma Ray Observatory was boosted from a 650 km altitude circular orbit to a 750 km altitude circular orbit. This was an opportunity, for the first time, to make observations at two different altitudes using the same instrument. We have examined DISCLA data from the Burst & Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) experiment from 1 Sep. 1993 to 29 Jan. 1994. During the period of study we identified 48 instances of the satellite encountering a cloud of energetic electrons which had been scattered by VLF transmitters. We find that boosting the altitude of the circular orbit from 650 km to 750 km increased the intensity of cyclotron resonance scattered electrons by a factor of two. To search for long term changes in the cyclotron resonance precipitation, we have compared the approx. 750 km altitude data from 106 days at the end of 1993 with data at the same altitudes and time of year in 1991. The cyclotron resonance events in 1991 were three times more frequent and 25% of those cases were more intense than any seen in the 1993 data. We attribute this difference to increased level of geomagnetic activity in 1991 near the Solar Maximum.

  9. Radial diffusion simulations of the 20 September 2007 radiation belt dropout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, J.

    2014-08-01

    This is a study of a dropout of radiation belt electrons, associated with an isolated solar wind density pulse on 20 September 2007, as seen by the solid-state telescopes (SST) detectors on THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms). Omnidirectional fluxes were converted to phase space density at constant invariants M = 700 MeV G-1 and K = 0.014 RE G1/2, with the assumption of local pitch angle α ≈ 80° and using the T04 magnetic field model. The last closed drift shell, which was calculated throughout the time interval, never came within the simulation outer boundary of L* = 6. It is found, using several different models for diffusion rates, that radial diffusion alone only allows the data-driven, time-dependent boundary values at Lmax = 6 and Lmin = 3.7 to propagate a few tenths of an RE during the simulation; far too slow to account for the dropout observed over the broad range of L* = 4-5.5. Pitch angle diffusion via resonant interactions with several types of waves (chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and plasmaspheric and plume hiss) also seems problematic, for several reasons which are discussed.

  10. Dependence of radiation belt enhancements on the radial extent of Pc5 waves and the plasmapause location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Zesta, E.; Balasis, G.; Katsavrias, C.; Mann, I. R.; Tsinganos, K.

    2014-12-01

    Low-energy electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies through different mechanisms, transporting them across their drift shells to the outer radiation belt. Among the different acceleration mechanisms, radial diffusion describes the result of ULF magnetic field pulsations resonantly interacting with radiation belt electrons. In this paper, the radial positioning of the relativistic electron population during 39 intense and moderate magnetic storms is examined against that of ULF Pc5 wave power and the plasmapause location. The relativistic electron population of the outer radiation belt appeared enhanced in the 2 - 6 MeV electron flux data from SAMPEX and in > 2 MeV electron flux data from the geosynchronous GOES satellites following 27 of the magnetic storms. We compared relativistic electrons observations with concurrent radial distribution of wave power enhancements at Pc5 frequencies as detected by the IMAGE and CARISMA magnetometer arrays, as well as by additional magnetic stations collaborating in SuperMAG. We discuss the growth and decay characteristics of Pc5 waves in association with the plasmapause location, determined from IMAGE EUV observations, as the controlling factor for wave power penetration deep into the magnetosphere. We show that, during magnetic storms characterized by increased post-storm fluxes, Pc5 wave power penetrates to L shells of 4 and lower. On the other hand, magnetic storms which were characterised by loss of electrons were related to low Pc5 wave activity, which was not intensified at low L shells. These observations provide support for the hypothesis that enhanced Pc5 wave activity deep into the magnetosphere during the main and recovery phase can discriminate between storms that result in increases of electron fluxes from those that do not. The work leading to this paper has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-2011-1) under grant agreement no. 284520 for the MAARBLE

  11. Two Duskside Relativistic Electron Precipitation Events Seen During the 2008/2009 Balloon Array for Radiation-belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) Piggyback Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, A. X.

    2009-12-01

    The Balloon Array for Radiation-belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) is a balloon-based mission studying the loss of relativistic electrons from the outer radiation belts. Understanding and quantifying electron losses is a vital component of understanding radiation belt dynamics. Radiation belt electrons lost to the Earth's atmosphere, called relativistic electron precipitation (REP), can be observed by the bremsstrahlung X-rays produced as the electrons are scattered in the atmosphere. In December 2008 a test balloon payload with an X-ray detector was launched and collected data for 54 days. Analysis of the data from this flight shows two intense and spectrally hard events occurring during the dusk sector of MLT. Interpretation requires modeling both the interaction of electrons in the atmosphere to make gammas and the interaction of the gammas in the atmosphere and in the instrument. A spectral analysis of these two events will be presented and electron spectra will be derived for these events.

  12. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: evidence for radiative heating and contamination in the W40 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.; Hatchell, J.; Pattle, K.; Kirk, H.; Wilson, T.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Francesco, J. Di; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present SCUBA-2 450{\\mu}m and 850{\\mu}m observations of the W40 complex in the Serpens-Aquila region as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey (GBS) of nearby star-forming regions. We investigate radiative heating by constructing temperature maps from the ratio of SCUBA-2 fluxes using a fixed dust opacity spectral index, {\\beta} = 1.8, and a beam convolution kernel to achieve a common 14.8" resolution. We identify 82 clumps ranging between 10 and 36K with a mean temperature of 20{\\pm}3K. Clump temperature is strongly correlated with proximity to the external OB association and there is no evidence that the embedded protostars significantly heat the dust. We identify 31 clumps that have cores with densities greater than 105cm{^{-3}}. Thirteen of these cores contain embedded Class 0/I protostars. Many cores are associated with bright-rimmed clouds seen in Herschel 70 {\\mu}m images. From JCMT HARP observations of the 12CO 3-2 line, we find contamination of the 850{\\mu}m band of up to 20 per cent. We investigate the free-free contribution to SCUBA-2 bands from large-scale and ultracompact H ii regions using archival VLA data and find the contribution is limited to individual stars, accounting for 9 per cent of flux per beam at 450 {\\mu}m or 12 per cent at 850 {\\mu}m in these cases. We conclude that radiative heating has potentially influenced the formation of stars in the Dust Arc sub-region, favouring Jeans stable clouds in the warm east and fragmentation in the cool west.

  13. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: evidence for radiative heating and contamination in the W40 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.; Hatchell, J.; Pattle, K.; Kirk, H.; Wilson, T.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Francesco, J. Di; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present SCUBA-2 450 μm and 850 μm observations of the W40 complex in the Serpens-Aquila region as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey (GBS) of nearby star-forming regions. We investigate radiative heating by constructing temperature maps from the ratio of SCUBA-2 fluxes using a fixed dust opacity spectral index, β = 1.8, and a beam convolution kernel to achieve a common 14.8 arcsec resolution. We identify 82 clumps ranging between 10 and 36 K with a mean temperature of 20 ± 3 K. Clump temperature is strongly correlated with proximity to the external OB association and there is no evidence that the embedded protostars significantly heat the dust. We identify 31 clumps that have cores with densities greater than 105cm-3. 13 of these cores contain embedded Class 0/I protostars. Many cores are associated with bright-rimmed clouds seen in Herschel 70 μm images. From JCMT HARP observations of the 12CO 3-2 line, we find contamination of the 850 μm band of up to 20 per cent. We investigate the free-free contribution to SCUBA-2 bands from large-scale and ultracompact H II regions using archival VLA data and find the contribution is limited to individual stars, accounting for 9 per cent of flux per beam at 450 μm or 12 per cent at 850 μm in these cases. We conclude that radiative heating has potentially influenced the formation of stars in the Dust Arc sub-region, favouring Jeans stable clouds in the warm east and fragmentation in the cool west.

  14. Earthquake related VLF activity and Electron Precipitation as a Major Agent of the Inner Radiation Belt Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, Georgios C.; Sidiropoulos, Nikolaos; Barlas, Georgios

    2015-04-01

    The radiation belt electron precipitation (RBEP) into the topside ionosphere is a phenomenon which is known for several decades. However, the inner radiation belt source and loss mechanisms have not still well understood, including PBEP. Here we present the results of a systematic study of RBEP observations, as obtained from the satellite DEMETER and the series of POES satellites, in comparison with variation of seismic activity. We found that a type of RBEP bursts lasting for ~1-3 min present special characteristics in the inner region of the inner radiation belt before large (M >~7, or even M>~5) earthquakes (EQs), as for instance: characteristic (a) flux-time profiles, (b) energy spectrum, (c) electron flux temporal evolution, (d) spatial distributions (e) broad band VLF activity, some days before an EQ and (f) stopping a few hours before the EQ occurrence above the epicenter. In this study we present results from both case and statistical studies which provide significant evidence that, among EQs-lightings-Earth based transmitters, strong seismic activity during a substorm makes the main contribution to the long lasting (~1-3 min) RBEP events at middle latitudes.

  15. Observing the Edge of the Inner Radiation Belt: the South Atlantic Anomaly Seen with Photometers in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Wolven, B. C.; Paxton, L.; Romeo, G.; Selby, C.; Hsieh, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is a region where the Earth's inner radiation belt dips down and bathes low earth orbit satellites with energetic charged particles sometimes causing problems for satellite operations. We will describe data from a series of UV spectrographic imagers (DMSP/SSUSI) that remain on through 4 daily SAA passages. Using spectrographic information, we are able to separate, study, and remove the detector counts due to energetic (~ 1 MeV and above) particle hits. We have made a model of the SAA at Defense Meteorological Satellite Program altitudes (~850 km), and we are able to monitor the intensity of the SAA over the long term (> a decade). Using this window into the inner radiation belt, we are able to see seasonal and solar cycle variations in intensity. In this talk we will describe the techniques, the model, and show results of our study, and and indicate directions for future development and usefulness of using SSUSI as an inner radiation belt particle intensity monitor. Nighttime 427 nm Photometer count rates as seen by SSUSI binned onto a 3 x 3 degree grid and accumulated over the year 2006. The classic shape of the South Atlantic Anomaly is clearly traced by the data.

  16. Oblique Whistler-Mode Waves in the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: Energy Distribution, Origins, and Role in Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, Anton; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mourenas, Didier; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Shastun, Vitalii; Mozer, Forrest

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we review recent spacecraft observations of oblique whistler-mode waves in the Earth's inner magnetosphere as well as the various consequences of the presence of such waves for electron scattering and acceleration. In particular, we survey the statistics of occurrences and intensity of oblique chorus waves in the region of the outer radiation belt, comprised between the plasmapause and geostationary orbit, and discuss how their actual distribution may be explained by a combination of linear and non-linear generation, propagation, and damping processes. We further examine how such oblique wave populations can be included into both quasi-linear diffusion models and fully nonlinear models of wave-particle interaction. On this basis, we demonstrate that varying amounts of oblique waves can significantly change the rates of particle scattering, acceleration, and precipitation into the atmosphere during quiet times as well as in the course of a storm. Finally, we discuss possible generation mechanisms for such oblique waves in the radiation belts. We demonstrate that oblique whistler-mode chorus waves can be considered as an important ingredient of the radiation belt system and can play a key role in many aspects of wave-particle resonant interactions.

  17. Near-Earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J. Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Turner, Drew L.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Spence, Harlan E.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Fruehauff, Dennis; Chen, Lunjin; Thaller, Scott; Breneman, Aaron; Tang, Xiangwei

    2015-08-01

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeVelectron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L ˜ 5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ˜40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ˜3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.

  18. Near-earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; et al

    2015-08-10

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L~5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ~40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ~3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front.more » Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.« less

  19. Near-earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J. Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Turner, Drew L.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Spence, Harlan E.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Fruehauff, Dennis; Chen, Lunjin; Thaller, Scott; Breneman, Aaron; Tang, Xiangwei

    2015-08-10

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L~5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ~40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ~3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.

  20. New global loss model of energetic and relativistic electrons based on Van Allen Probes measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Ksenia; Shprits, Yuri; Spasojevic, Maria

    2016-02-01

    The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrument on the Van Allen Probes provides a vast quantity of fully resolved wave measurements below L = 5.5, a critical region for radiation belt acceleration and loss. EMFISIS data show that plasmaspheric hiss waves can be observed at frequencies as low as 20 Hz and provide three-component magnetic field measurements that can be directly used for electron scattering calculations. Updated models of hiss properties based on statistical analysis of Van Allen Probes data were recently developed. We use these new models to compute and parameterize the lifetime of electrons as a function of kinetic energy, L shell, Kp index, and magnetic local time. We present a detailed analysis of the electron lifetime sensitivity to the model of the wave intensity and spectral distribution. We also compare the results with previous models of electron loss, which were based on single-component electric field measurements from the sweep frequency receiver on board the CRRES satellite.

  1. Survival of bacterial isolates exposed to simulated Jovian trapped radiation belt electrons and solar wind protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, D. M.; Hagen, C. A.; Renninger, G. M.; Simko, G. J.; Smith, C. D.; Yelinek, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    With missions to Jupiter, the spacecraft will be exposed for extended durations to solar wind radiation and the Jovian trapped radiation belt. This study is designed to determine the effect of these radiation environments on spacecraft bacterial isolates. The information can be used in the probability of contamination analysis for these missions. A bacterial subpopulation from Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft (nine spore-forming and three non-spore-forming isolates) plus two comparative organisms, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 17917 and a strain of Bacillus subtilis var. niger, were exposed to 2, 12, and 25 MeV electrons at different doses with simultaneous exposure to a vacuum of 1.3 x 10(-4) N m-2 at 20 and -20 degrees C. The radioresistance of the subpopulation was dependent on the isolate, dose and energy of electrons. Temperature affected the radioresistance of only the spore-forming isolates. Survival data indicated that spores were reduced approximately 1 log/1500 J kg-1 (10 J kg-1=1 krad), while non-spore-forming isolates (micrococci) were reduced 1.5-2 logs/1500 J kg-1 with the exception of an apparent radioresistant isolate whose resistance approached that of the spores. The subpopulation was found to be less resistant to lower energy than to higher energy electrons. The bacterial isolates were exposed to 3 keV protons under the same conditions as the electrons with a total fluence of 1.5 x 10(13) p cm-2 and a dose rate of 8.6 x 10(9) p cm-2 s-1. The results showed that only 20% of S. epidermidis and 45% of B. subtilis populations survived exposure to the 3 keV protons, while the mean survival of the spacecraft subpopulation was 45% with a range from 31.8% (non-spore-former) to 64.8% (non-spore-former). No significant difference existed between spore-forming and non-spore-forming isolates.

  2. Survival of bacterial isolates exposed to simulated Jovian trapped radiation belt electrons and solar wind protons.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D M; Hagen, C A; Renninger, G M; Simko, G J; Smith, C D; Yelinek, J A

    1973-01-01

    With missions to Jupiter, the spacecraft will be exposed for extended durations to solar wind radiation and the Jovian trapped radiation belt. This study is designed to determine the effect of these radiation environments on spacecraft bacterial isolates. The information can be used in the probability of contamination analysis for these missions. A bacterial subpopulation from Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft (nine spore-forming and three non-spore-forming isolates) plus two comparative organisms, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 17917 and a strain of Bacillus subtilis var. niger, were exposed to 2, 12, and 25 MeV electrons at different doses with simultaneous exposure to a vacuum of 1.3 x 10(-4) N m-2 at 20 and -20 degrees C. The radioresistance of the subpopulation was dependent on the isolate, dose and energy of electrons. Temperature affected the radioresistance of only the spore-forming isolates. Survival data indicated that spores were reduced approximately 1 log/1500 J kg-1 (10 J kg-1=1 krad), while non-spore-forming isolates (micrococci) were reduced 1.5-2 logs/1500 J kg-1 with the exception of an apparent radioresistant isolate whose resistance approached that of the spores. The subpopulation was found to be less resistant to lower energy than to higher energy electrons. The bacterial isolates were exposed to 3 keV protons under the same conditions as the electrons with a total fluence of 1.5 x 10(13) p cm-2 and a dose rate of 8.6 x 10(9) p cm-2 s-1. The results showed that only 20% of S. epidermidis and 45% of B. subtilis populations survived exposure to the 3 keV protons, while the mean survival of the spacecraft subpopulation was 45% with a range from 31.8% (non-spore-former) to 64.8% (non-spore-former). No significant difference existed between spore-forming and non-spore-forming isolates. PMID:12523379

  3. The Global Positioning System constellation as a space weather monitor: Comparison of electron measurements with Van Allen Probes data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Steven K.; Sullivan, John P.; Henderson, Michael G.; Blake, J. Bernard; Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-02-01

    Energetic electron observations in Earth's radiation belts are typically sparse, and multipoint studies often rely on serendipitous conjunctions. This paper establishes the scientific utility of the Combined X-ray Dosimeter (CXD), currently flown on 19 satellites in the Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation, by cross-calibrating energetic electron measurements against data from the Van Allen Probes. By breaking our cross calibration into two parts—one that removes any spectral assumptions from the CXD flux calculation and one that compares the energy spectra—we first validate the modeled instrument response functions, then the calculated electron fluxes. Unlike previous forward modeling of energetic electron spectra, we use a combination of four distributions that together capture a wide range of observed spectral shapes. Our two-step approach allowed us to identify, and correct for, small systematic offsets between block IIR and IIF satellites. Using the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer and Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope on Van Allen Probes as a "gold standard," we demonstrate that the CXD instruments are well understood. A robust statistical analysis shows that CXD and Van Allen Probes fluxes are similar and the measured fluxes from CXD are typically within a factor of 2 of Van Allen Probes at energies ≲4 MeV. We present data from 17 CXD-equipped GPS satellites covering the 2015 "St. Patrick's Day" geomagnetic storm to illustrate the scientific applications of such a high data density satellite constellation and therefore demonstrate that the GPS constellation is positioned to enable new insights in inner magnetospheric physics and space weather forecasting.

  4. The Global Positioning System constellation as a space weather monitor. Comparison of electron measurements with Van Allen Probes data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morley, Steven K.; Sullivan, John P.; Henderson, Michael G.; Blake, J. Bernard; Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-02-06

    Energetic electron observations in Earth's radiation belts are typically sparse, and multipoint studies often rely on serendipitous conjunctions. This paper establishes the scientific utility of the Combined X-ray Dosimeter (CXD), currently flown on 19 satellites in the Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation, by cross-calibrating energetic electron measurements against data from the Van Allen Probes. By breaking our cross calibration into two parts—one that removes any spectral assumptions from the CXD flux calculation and one that compares the energy spectra—we first validate the modeled instrument response functions, then the calculated electron fluxes. Unlike previous forward modeling of energetic electron spectra, wemore » use a combination of four distributions that together capture a wide range of observed spectral shapes. Moreover, our two-step approach allowed us to identify, and correct for, small systematic offsets between block IIR and IIF satellites. Using the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer and Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope on Van Allen Probes as a “gold standard,” here we demonstrate that the CXD instruments are well understood. A robust statistical analysis shows that CXD and Van Allen Probes fluxes are similar and the measured fluxes from CXD are typically within a factor of 2 of Van Allen Probes at energies inline image4 MeV. Our team present data from 17 CXD-equipped GPS satellites covering the 2015 “St. Patrick's Day” geomagnetic storm to illustrate the scientific applications of such a high data density satellite constellation and therefore demonstrate that the GPS constellation is positioned to enable new insights in inner magnetospheric physics and space weather forecasting.« less

  5. Precipitation of radiation belt electrons induced by obliquely propagating lightning-generated whistlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauben, D. S.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.

    2001-12-01

    A new combined ray tracing and test particle formulation is presented which calculates the spatiotemporal electron precipitation flux signatures at ionospheric altitudes induced by obliquely propagating lightning-generated whistler waves. The formulation accounts for the variation in wave characteristics (frequency-time dispersion, wave normal angle, and power density) as the whistler generated by an individual lightning discharge propagates through vast volumes of the magnetosphere in the absence of field-aligned cold plasma density enhancements, and calculates the detailed gyroresonance scattering of trapped energetic electrons into the atmospheric loss cone over a broad range of field lines (L shells) to determine the precipitation flux over extensive ionospheric regions. Results show that peak precipitation flux patches (hotspots) several tens of degrees of latitude and longitude in size develop at locations ~7° to ~20° poleward of the discharge as a consequence of propagation paths which convey wave energy from lower to higher L shells. For oblique whistler intensities matching satellite observations (10 to 30 pT) peak flux levels of several milli-ergs cm-2 s-1 are indicated, arriving as early as ~1/4 s and lasting ~1/2 s at lower observing latitudes (e.g., ~32° for North American longitudes), while being delayed to ~1 s or more and lasting up to ~2 s at higher latitudes (~47°), creating a sense of poleward hotspot motion. Summary profiles integrated over time, latitude and L shell suggest that lightning-generated oblique whistler-induced electron precipitation deposits appreciable energy to the upper atmosphere at midlatitudes and contributes significantly to the loss of energetic (>100 keV) radiation belt electrons, particularly over 2.2<=L<=3.5 where the slot region forms.

  6. Command and Data Handling Flight Software test framework: A Radiation Belt Storm Probes practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. A.; Reid, W. M.; Wortman, K. A.

    During the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission, a test framework was developed by the Embedded Applications Group in the Space Department at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). The test framework is implemented for verification of the Command and Data Handling (C& DH) Flight Software. The RBSP C& DH Flight Software consists of applications developed for use with Goddard Space Flight Center's core Flight Executive (cFE) architecture. The test framework's initial concept originated with tests developed for verification of the Autonomy rules that execute with the Autonomy Engine application of the RBSP C& DH Flight Software. The test framework was adopted and expanded for system and requirements verification of the RBSP C& DH Flight Software. During the evolution of the RBSP C& DH Flight Software test framework design, a set of script conventions and a script library were developed. The script conventions and library eased integration of system and requirements verification tests into a comprehensive automated test suite. The comprehensive test suite is currently being used to verify releases of the RBSP C& DH Flight Software. In addition to providing the details and benefits of the test framework, the discussion will include several lessons learned throughout the verification process of RBSP C& DH Flight Software. Our next mission, Solar Probe Plus (SPP), will use the cFE architecture for the C& DH Flight Software. SPP also plans to use the same ground system as RBSP. Many of the RBSP C& DH Flight Software applications are reusable on the SPP mission, therefore there is potential for test design and test framework reuse for system and requirements verification.

  7. Plasmaspheric electron densities: the importance in modelling radiation belts and in SSA operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberger, János; Jorgensen, Anders; Koronczay, Dávid; Ferencz, Csaba; Hamar, Dániel; Steinbach, Péter; Clilverd, Mark; Rodger, Craig; Juhász, Lilla; Sannikov, Dmitry; Cherneva, Nina

    2016-04-01

    The Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer Network (AWDANet, Lichtenberger et al., J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008, A12201, doi:10.1029/2008JA013467) is able to detect and analyze whistlers in quasi-realtime and can provide equatorial electron density data. The plasmaspheric electron densities are key parameters for plasmasphere models in Space Weather related investigations, particularly in modeling charged particle accelerations and losses in Radiation Belts. The global AWDANet detects millions of whistlers in a year. The network operates since early 2002 with automatic whistler detector capability and it has been recently completed with automatic analyzer capability in PLASMON (http://plasmon.elte.hu, Lichtenberger et al., Space Weather Space Clim. 3 2013, A23 DOI: 10.1051/swsc/2013045.) Eu FP7-Space project. It is based on a recently developed whistler inversion model (Lichtenberger, J. J. Geophys. Res., 114, 2009, A07222, doi:10.1029/2008JA013799), that opened the way for an automated process of whistler analysis, not only for single whistler events but for complex analysis of multiple-path propagation whistler groups. The network operates in quasi real-time mode since mid-2014, fifteen stations provide equatorial electron densities that are used as inputs for a data assimilative plasmasphere model but they can also be used directly in space weather research and models. We have started to process the archive data collected by AWDANet stations since 2002 and in this paper we present the results of quasi-real-time and off-line runs processing whistlers from quiet and disturb periods. The equatorial electron densities obtained by whistler inversion are fed into the assimilative model of the plasmasphere providing a global view of the region for processed the periods

  8. Energy dependence of relativistic electron flux variations in the outer radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ying; Xie, Lun; Li, Jinxing; Fu, Suiyan; Pu, Zuyin; Chen, Lunjin; Ni, Binbin; Li, Wen

    2015-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt, depending on the delicate competition between electron energization and loss processes. Despite the well-known "energy independent" prototype in which electron fluxes enhance after geomagnetic storms at all energies, we present observations of "energy dependent" events, i.e., post-storm electron fluxes at lower energies (0.3-2.5 MeV, measured by MEPED/POES) recover or even exceed the pre-storm level, while electron fluxes at higher energies (2.5-14 MeV, measured by PET/SAMPEX) do not restore. The statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies: ~ 82% (3%) storm events produce increased (decreased) flux for 0.3-2.5 MeV electrons, while ~ 37% (45%) storms lead to enhancements (reductions) of 2.5-14 MeV electron flux. Superposed epoch analysis suggests that "energy dependent" events preferentially occur during periods of high solar wind density along with high dynamic pressure. Previous statistical studies have shown that this kind of solar wind conditions account for significant enhancements of EMIC waves, which cause efficient precipitation of > 2 MeV electrons into atmosphere via pitch angle scattering. Two cases of "energy dependent" events are investigated in detail with evident observations of EMIC waves that can resonate effectively with >2 MeV electrons. Besides, we do not capture much differences in the chorus wave activity between those "energy dependent" and "energy independent" events. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that EMIC waves play a crucial role in the occurrences of those "energy dependent" events in the outer zone during geomagnetic storms.

  9. Data Assimilation Using a Variational Method for a 1D Radiation Belt Diffusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, R.; Degeling, A. W.; O'Donnell, S.; Rankin, R.; Kabin, K.

    2009-12-01

    A variational data assimilation algorithm has been developed to incorporate electron flux time-series data from satellites into a simple one dimensional diffusion model for the radial transport of radiation belt electrons. The model developed assumes a power law scaling for the radial diffusion coefficient with L shell. The effectiveness of this method is investigated by means of a series of identical twin numerical experiments. This involves using the diffusion model to produce synthetic observations along various satellite trajectories. These observations are in turn used to estimate time-dependent parameters input to the diffusion model, which are compared against the values initially used. The data assimilation algorithm considers the time dependent source located at the outer boundary as a function to be determined. Using synthetic satellite electron flux observations, the algorithm computes a source function that, when used as an input to the diffusion model, most closely reproduces the synthetic observations in a least-squares sense. Observational errors are taken into account, and an estimate of the uncertainty in the output source function is also produced. This uncertainty is found to consistently reflect the quality of the source function estimation during identical twin numerical experiments. Initial tests indicate that the quality of the outer boundary source estimation is strongly dependent on the satellite location, indicating that the outer boundary source estimation becomes poor as information relating to the outer boundary contained in the observations is reduced. The potential of using this data assimilation method to estimate one or more parameters that determine the radial diffusion coefficient, and the possibility of determining whether physical processes affecting the observations are missing in the dynamical model will be discussed.

  10. On the Relationship Between High Speed Solar Wind Streams and Radiation Belt Electron Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua

    2011-01-01

    Both past and recent research results indicate that solar wind speed has a close connection to radiation belt electron fluxes [e.g., Paulikas and Blake, 1979; Reeves et aI., 2011]: a higher solar wind speed is often associated with a higher level of radiation electron fluxes. But the relationship can be very complex [Reeves et aI., 2011]. The study presented here provides further corroboration of this viewpoint by emphasizing the importance of a global perspective and time history. We find that all the events during years 2010 and 2011 where the >0.8 MeV integral electron flux exceeds 10(exp 5) particles/sq cm/sr/s (pfu) at GEO orbit are associated with the high speed streams (HSS) following the onset of the Stream Interaction Region (SIR), with most of them belonging to the long-lasting Corotating Interaction Region (CIR). Our preliminary results indicate that during HSS events, a maximum speed of 700 km/s and above is a sufficient but not necessary condition for the > 0.8 MeV electron flux to reach 10(exp 5) pfu. But in the exception cases of HSS events where the electron flux level exceeds the 10(exp 5) pfu value but the maximum solar wind speed is less than 700 km/s, a prior impact can be noted either from a CME or a transient SIR within 3-4 days before the arrival of the HSS - stressing the importance of time history. Through superposed epoch analysis and studies providing comparisons with the CME events and the HSS events where the flux level fails to reach the 10(exp 5) pfu, we will present the quantitative assessment of behaviors and relationships of various quantities, such as the time it takes to reach the flux threshold value from the stream interface and its dependence on different physical parameters (e.g., duration of the HSS event, its maximum or average of the solar wind speed, IMF Bz, Kp). The ultimate goal is to apply what is derived to space weather forecasting.

  11. Evidence for dust-driven, radial plasma transport in Saturn's inner radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Andriopoulou, M.

    2016-08-01

    A survey of Cassini MIMI/LEMMS data acquired between 2004 and 2015 has led to the identification of 13 energetic electron microsignatures that can be attributed to particle losses on one of the several faint rings of the planet. Most of the signatures were detected near L-shells that map between the orbits of Mimas and Enceladus or near the G-ring. Our analysis indicates that it is very unlikely for these signatures to have originated from absorption on Mimas, Enceladus or unidentified Moons and rings, even though most were not found exactly at the L-shells of the known rings of the saturnian system (G-ring, Methone, Anthe, Pallene). The lack of additional absorbers is apparent in the L-shell distribution of MeV ions which are very sensitive for tracing the location of weakly absorbing material permanently present in Saturn's radiation belts. This sensitivity is demonstrated by the identification, for the first time, of the proton absorption signatures from the asteroid-sized Moons Pallene, Anthe and/or their rings. For this reason, we investigate the possibility that the 13 energetic electron events formed at known saturnian rings and the resulting depletions were later displaced radially by one or more magnetospheric processes. Our calculations indicate that the displacement magnitude for several of those signatures is much larger than the one that can be attributed to radial flows imposed by the recently discovered noon-to-midnight electric field in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. This observation is consistent with a mechanism where radial plasma velocities are enhanced near dusty obstacles. Several possibilities are discussed that may explain this observation, including a dust-driven magnetospheric interchange instability, mass loading by the pick-up of nanometer charged dust grains and global magnetospheric electric fields induced by perturbed orbits of charged dust due to the act of solar radiation pressure. Indirect evidence for a global scale interaction

  12. Modeling the effects of the dust rings and plasma waves on the electron radiation belts of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nénon, Quentin; Sicard-Piet, Angélica; Girard, Julien N.; Zarka, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    ONERA has been modeling radiation belts since the 90's through the 3D physical model Salammbô. The model requires a good knowledge and modeling of the interactions between the trapped particles and the inner magnetosphere environment. Here we report on the investigations that have been performed about the roles of the dust rings and plasma waves around Jupiter on the electron radiation belts. Prior to this work, the surface potential of the dust grains have been argued to deflect the electrons, so that there are no collisions between electrons and dust grains. We dismiss the previous argument, the possible surface potentials being negligible compared to the relativistic kinetic energies of the trapped electrons. The dust grain size distribution was then constrained by the normal optical depth of "large" particles measured by the Galileo NIMS experiment. We will show that this constraint and the Pioneer 11 electron flux measurements indicate that "very large" grains (radius >10mm) are not likely to exist. It leads to the conclusion that electrons with energies higher than a few MeV are not influenced by the rings. The Galileo PWS data has been used to determine representative characteristics (localization and frequency spectrum) of the plasma waves that can be encountered between the orbit of Io (6 Rj) and the numerical box limit of Salammbô (9.5 Rj). We then benefited from the experience ONERA has in modeling the effects of waves on the Earth radiation belts. In particular, the WAPI (WAve-Particle Interaction) code, that uses the quasi-linear theory to compute the pitch angle and energy diffusion coefficients, has been adapted to the Jupiter environment. Finally, Salammbô has been used to investigate the influence of each process on observation data: electron fluxes measured by the Pioneer 10, 11 and Galileo missions and synchrotron radiation images obtained by the VLA (at 5000 and 1424 MHz in May 1997) and LOFAR (127-172 MHz in November 2011).

  13. Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Geoffrey

    2007-05-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a pioneering centimeter-wavelength radio telescope that will produce science that cannot be done with any other instrument. The ATA is the first radio telescope designed for commensal observing; it will undertake the most comprehensive and sensitive SETI surveys ever done as well as the deepest and largest area continuum and spectroscopic surveys. Science operations will commence this year with a 42-element array. The ATA will ultimately comprise 350 6-meter dishes at Hat Creek in California, and will make possible large, deep radio surveys that were not previously feasible. The telescope incorporates many new design features including hydroformed antenna surfaces, a log-periodic feed covering the entire range of frequencies from 500 MHz to 11.2 GHz, low noise, wide-band amplifiers with a flat response over the entire band. The full array has the sensitivity of the Very Large Array but with a survey capability that is greater by an order of magnitude due to the wide field of view of the 6-meter dishes. Even with 42 elements, the ATA will be one of the most powerful radio survey telescopes. Science goals include the Five GHz sky survey (FiGSS) to match the 1.4-GHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey within the first year of operation with the 42 element array, and a deep all-sky survey of extragalactic hydrogen to investigate galaxy evolution and intergalactic gas accretion. Transient and variable source surveys, pulsar science, spectroscopy of new molecular species in the galaxy, large-scale mapping of galactic magnetic filaments, and wide-field imaging of comets and other solar system objects are among the other key science objectives of the ATA. SETI surveys will reach sufficient sensitivity to detect an Arecibo planetary radar from 1,000,000 stars to distances of 300 pc.

  14. Analysis of a non-storm time enhancement in outer belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Q.; Li, X.; Godinez, H. C.; Sarris, T. E.; Tu, W.; Malaspina, D.; Turner, D. L.; Blake, J. B.; Koller, J.

    2014-12-01

    A high-speed solar wind stream impacted Earth's magnetosphere on January 13th, 2013, and is associated with a large enhancement (>2.5 orders) of outer radiation belt electron fluxes despite a small Dst signature (-30 nT). Fortunately, the outer belt was well sampled by a variety of missions during the event, including the Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE). In-situ flux and phase space density observations are used from MagEIS (Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer) onboard the Van Allen Probes, REPTile (Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment) onboard CSSWE, and SST onboard THEMIS. The observations show a rapid increase in 100's keV electron fluxes, followed by a more gradual enhancement of the MeV energies. The 100's keV enhancement is associated with a substorm injection, and the futher energization to MeV energies is associated with wave activity as measured by the Van Allen Probes and THEMIS. Furthermore, the phase space density radial profiles show an acceleration region occurring between 5

  15. Analysis of plasmaspheric hiss wave amplitudes inferred from low-altitude POES electron data: Validation with conjunctive Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria-Santacruz, M.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ma, Q.; Bortnik, J.; Ni, B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-10-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss plays an important role in controlling the overall structure and dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts. The interaction of plasmaspheric hiss with radiation belt electrons is commonly evaluated using diffusion codes, which rely on statistical models of wave observations that may not accurately reproduce the instantaneous global wave distribution or the limited in situ satellite wave measurements. This paper evaluates the performance and limitations of a novel technique capable of inferring wave amplitudes from low-altitude electron flux observations from the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), which provide extensive coverage in shell and magnetic local time (MLT). We found that, within its limitations, this technique could potentially be used to build a dynamic global model of the plasmaspheric hiss wave intensity. The technique is validated by analyzing the conjunctions between the POES spacecraft and the Van Allen Probes from September 2012 to June 2014. The technique performs well for moderate-to-strong hiss activity (≥30 pT) with sufficiently high electron fluxes. The main source of these limitations is the number of counts of energetic electrons measured by the POES spacecraft capable of resonating with hiss waves. For moderate-to-strong hiss events, the results show that the wave amplitudes from the EMFISIS instruments on board the Van Allen Probes are well reproduced by the POES technique, which provides more consistent estimates than the parameterized statistical hiss wave model based on CRRES data.

  16. The proton and electron radiation belts at geosynchronous orbit: Statistics and behavior during high-speed stream-driven storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.; Cayton, Thomas E.; Denton, Michael H.; Belian, Richard D.; Christensen, Roderick A.; Ingraham, J. Charles

    2016-06-01

    The outer proton radiation belt (OPRB) and outer electron radiation belt (OERB) at geosynchronous orbit are investigated using a reanalysis of the LANL CPA (Charged Particle Analyzer) 8-satellite 2-solar cycle energetic particle data set from 1976 to 1995. Statistics of the OPRB and the OERB are calculated, including local time and solar cycle trends. The number density of the OPRB is about 10 times higher than the OERB, but the 1 MeV proton flux is about 1000 times less than the 1 MeV electron flux because the proton energy spectrum is softer than the electron spectrum. Using a collection of 94 high-speed stream-driven storms in 1976-1995, the storm time evolutions of the OPRB and OERB are studied via superposed epoch analysis. The evolution of the OERB shows the familiar sequence (1) prestorm decay of density and flux, (2) early-storm dropout of density and flux, (3) sudden recovery of density, and (4) steady storm time heating to high fluxes. The evolution of the OPRB shows a sudden enhancement of density and flux early in the storm. The absence of a proton dropout when there is an electron dropout is noted. The sudden recovery of the density of the OERB and the sudden density enhancement of the OPRB are both associated with the occurrence of a substorm during the early stage of the storm when the superdense plasma sheet produces a "strong stretching phase" of the storm. These storm time substorms are seen to inject electrons to 1 MeV and protons to beyond 1 MeV into geosynchronous orbit, directly producing a suddenly enhanced radiation belt population.

  17. Parametric Study of ULF Wave Spectra and Particle Diffusion in the Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornquist, M.; Vassiliadis, D.; Koepke, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    One of the main mechanisms thought to induce relativistic electron transport and energization in the radiation belt is radial diffusion through interaction with broadband spectra of electromagnetic wave fields. Studies by other research groups have emphasized a correlation between power spectral density and the diffusion coefficient DLL. However the main focus has been on particles interacting resonantly with stationary and ergodic fields where the internal phases are fixed. We propose an analytical function for the diffusion coefficient with an important factor being the introduction of phases that are set to be randomized at fixed time intervals. The calculated diffusion rates are verified through the use of a guiding center test particle code. For a comparison of the results between the analytical function and the test particle code simplified wave fields of m=0 are assigned into azimuthally limited sectors and randomized at fixed intervals. The electrons in the particle tracing code do interact resonantly with the specifically assigned spectra from which resulting diffusion coefficients become higher than for the analytically calculated values of non-resonant interaction. The plotted results suggest that resonant contribution is between 1.5-3.5 times larger than the non-resonant depending on reset rate and harmonic interaction. Should the rate of phase randomization exceed the drift frequency of the electrons the resonant interactions would diminish where only non-resonant diffusion still occurs. Furthermore we show the transition from narrowband to broadband spectra, as well as cases containing both. We will discuss the outcome from varied power law profiles in the spectrum, as well as the difference between using a symmetric and an asymmetric magnetic dipole field. The initial energies and radial placement of the electrons determine their adiabatic invariants which in turn affects the diffusion coefficient. For our setup, where a simplified electrostatic

  18. Significant loss of energetic electrons at the heart of the outer radiation belt during weak magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Lee, D.-Y.; Kim, K.-C.; Shin, D.-K.; Kim, J.-H.; Cho, J.-H.; Park, M.-Y.; Turner, D. L.

    2013-07-01

    For various reasons, the Earth's outer radiation belt often exhibits dramatic and sudden increases or decreases in the observed particle flux. In this paper, we report three dropout events of energetic electrons observed by multiple spacecraft while traveling across the outer radiation belt. The three events were first identified based on observations of a significant dropout in the >2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Subsequently, for each event, we analyzed the energetic electron data obtained near the magnetic equator by THEMIS spacecraft to determine the responses of the entire outer radiation belt. Our analysis is mainly based on the electron fluxes measured at energies of 52 keV, 203 keV, and 719 keV, and on the phase space densities estimated for the first adiabatic invariant μ values of 100 MeV/G, 200 MeV/G, and 300 MeV/G. The main shared feature among the three events is that while, for the lowest energy, sources from the convection and/or particle injections of plasma sheet electrons dominate over losses, the higher energies exhibit a dramatic dropout effect that penetrates deeply into L ~ 4.5 - 5. In terms of the phase space density, a similar dropout effect is clearly seen for the μ values of 200 MeV/G and 300 MeV/G, while the convection effect and/or injections dominates for μ = 100 MeV/G. What is astonishing about this dropout phenomenon is that the three events are all associated with only very weak magnetic storms with a SYM-H minimum of -40 nT or larger. This implies that a significant loss of electrons deep inside the outer radiation belt can occur even during a very weak magnetic storm. Low-altitude observations of electrons by NOAA POES satellites indicate no significant atmospheric precipitation due to strong diffusion. Our simulations with various conditions suggest that radial diffusion effect in combination with the magnetopause shadowing are responsible for the observed dropouts to a large extent for all of the three events

  19. Relationship of the magnetic and electric diffusion of energetic ions in the radiation belts of the earth

    SciTech Connect

    Goryainov, M.F.; Panasyok, M.I.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an expression for the electric diffusion coefficient on the basis of analysis of the amplitudes of the power spectra of electric fields within the equatorial radiation belts, which indicate their strong attenuation with a decrease in geocentric distance. Comparison of the obtained electric coefficient with the magnetic coefficient obtained typical of the intermediate disturbed state in the magnetosphere and with the magnetic diffusion coefficient taking into account the presence of inhomogeneities in the high-frequency part of the power spectrum of the geomagnetic field leads to the conclusion that electric diffusion can dominate at L>5 and at L<2.

  20. Van Allen probes, NOAA, GOES, and ground observations of an intense EMIC wave event extending over 12 h in magnetic local time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Lessard, M. R.; Huang, C.-L.; Spence, H. E.; Smith, C. W.; Singer, H. J.; Omura, Y.; Horne, R. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Gkioulidou, M.; Oksavik, K.; Mann, I. R.; Raita, T.; Shiokawa, K.

    2015-07-01

    Although most studies of the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on Earth's outer radiation belt have focused on events in the afternoon sector in the outer plasmasphere or plume region, strong magnetospheric compressions provide an additional stimulus for EMIC wave generation across a large range of local times and L shells. We present here observations of the effects of a wave event on 23 February 2014 that extended over 8 h in UT and over 12 h in local time, stimulated by a gradual 4 h rise and subsequent sharp increases in solar wind pressure. Large-amplitude linearly polarized hydrogen band EMIC waves (up to 25 nT p-p) appeared for over 4 h at both Van Allen Probes, from late morning through local noon, when these spacecraft were outside the plasmapause, with densities ~5-20 cm-3. Waves were also observed by ground-based induction magnetometers in Antarctica (near dawn), Finland (near local noon), Russia (in the afternoon), and in Canada (from dusk to midnight). Ten passes of NOAA-POES and METOP satellites near the northern foot point of the Van Allen Probes observed 30-80 keV subauroral proton precipitation, often over extended L shell ranges; other passes identified a narrow L shell region of precipitation over Canada. Observations of relativistic electrons by the Van Allen Probes showed that the fluxes of more field-aligned and more energetic radiation belt electrons were reduced in response to both the emission over Canada and the more spatially extended emission associated with the compression, confirming the effectiveness of EMIC-induced loss processes for this event.

  1. The radiation belt slot region: A source of energetic electron precipitation in the southern hemisphere polar vortex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, Andrew J.

    2015-04-01

    Energetic electron precipitation at mid-magnetic latitudes in the southern winter hemisphere has the potential to influence regional climate variability. The offset of the magnetic pole in the southern hemisphere means that the footprint of the radiation belt slot region crosses the polar vortex; during large geomagnetic storms the slot region can be filled by electrons, some of which precipitate into the atmosphere. Energetic electron precipitation changes the ion chemistry, generating species that impact the heat balance of the middle atmosphere and potentially influencing regional climate variability when transported in the polar vortex. Energetic precipitation also leads to increased ionization in the mesosphere, which in turn attenuates high frequency radio waves that pass through the region. We present observations of the attenuation of a transmitted signal at 1.98 MHz under the footprint of the radiation belt slot-region during large geomagnetic storms. Measurements from the polar orbiting NOAA POES satellites indicate that the slot-region is being filled by electrons at these times. These observations indicate that the slot region is a source of precipitation that has the potential to impact on the heat balance of the middle atmosphere and below.

  2. Resonant scattering of radiation belt electrons and ring current protons by EMIC waves in a hot plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X.; Ni, B.; Xiang, Z.; Zou, Z.; Gu, X.; Fu, S.; Zhou, C.; Zhao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The full kinetic linear dispersion relation in a warm, multi-ion plasma with hot ring current protons is used to calculate the linear growth rate of parallel propagating electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. Significant wave growth at relatively small wave numbers occurs for both H+-band and He+-band EMIC waves at the magnetic equator. We find that the growth of H+-band and He+-band EMIC waves remains strong when they propagate to higher latitudes (< 30 degrees). The full hot plasma dispersion relation and cold plasma dispersion relation are used individually to quantify the quasi-linear bounce-averaged pitch angle diffusion rates for radiation belt electrons and ring current protons due to H+-band and He+-band EMIC waves. The results demonstrate considerable differences in the rates of pitch angle scattering caused by He+-band EMIC waves between the use of hot and cold plasma dispersion relation. He+-band EMIC waves can also resonate with lower energies particles (electrons and protons) when the impact of hot plasma is included. In contrast, much smaller differences are seen in the resonant scattering rates for H+-band EMIC waves. Our study strongly suggests that the effect of hot plasmas should be carefully taken into account to approach improved understanding of the exact role that EMIC waves plays in driving the dynamical evolution of radiation belt electrons and ring current protons.

  3. 10 Years Evolution Of Cluster Solar Arrays And Forecasting Their Degradation After Entering The Inner Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letor, R.; Marie, J.; Sangiorgi, S.; Volpp, H. J.

    2011-10-01

    The Cluster fleet was launched in 2000 to investigate the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth magnetosphere. Originally operations were planned to end in 2003 but the mission is now approved until end 2014 provided a successful midterm review in 2012. Gravitational perturbations have reduced the perigee altitude of their highly elliptical orbit which caused the spacecraft to periodically fly into the inner radiation belt bringing about significant degradations of the silicon solar cells. Since these degradations cannot be modelled by previous mathematical approaches involving linear extrapolation, a physical model has been developed based on NASA's AP8 radiation belt data, solar cell qualification test results, and an accurate IV-curve model with temperature dependence. This paper presents design characteristics of Cluster solar generators and the evolution of their performance over the past ten years. The modelling of generated solar power is detailed and the output is compared to telemetry in order to explain the observed degradation rate variations, the unexpected power drops around perigee, and forecast available power on-board spacecraft until end 2014.

  4. Dynamics of the outer radiation belts in relation to polar substorms and hot plasma injections at geostationary altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauvaud, J. A.; Winckler, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Geostationary satellite and ground measurements of dynamic variations of the outer radiation belts and their relations with the development of auroral structures during magnetospheric substorms are analyzed. A comparison of measurements of the H or X geomagnetic field components made by seven auroral stations with ATS-6 low-energy and high-energy particle measurements during the multiple-onset substorm of Aug. 16, 1974 is presented which demonstrates that while the decrease in energetic particle fluxed ends only at the time of a strong substorm onset, rapid motions of the outer radiation belts may occur during the flux decrease. All-sky photographs of auroral phenomena taken at Fort Yukon and College, Alaska are then compared with ATS-1 energetic particle flux measurements in order to demonstrate the relation between flux decreases and increases and distinct substorm phases. Results support the hypothesis of a magnetospheric substorm precursor which appears to be an instability growing at the inner boundary of the plasma layer and approaching the earth, and underline the importance of current and magnetic field variations in charged particle dynamics.

  5. Implicit Particle-in-Cell simulations of wave-particle interactions between electrons and whistler waves in the radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporeale, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Whistler wave chorus are believed to play a crucial role in the radiation belt dynamics, possibly being responsible for the loss and acceleration of energetic electrons. For this reason, the mechanisms related to the formation and propagation of whistlers in the radiation belt have been intensively investigated during the last decade. It is now generally acknowledged, via observational and simulation studies, that the whistler waves generated close to the magnetic equator through linear temperature anisotropy instabilities undergo an amplitude amplification that is essentially regulated by nonlinear mechanisms. In this work we focus on the wave-particle interaction between electrons and whistler chorus by employing two-dimensional fully-kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations. The magnetic field is assumed to form a magnetic bottle that captures the particle bouncing motions and mimics the Earth's magnetic dipole. The code employs a semi-implicit time stepping algorithm that, in this context, is shown to be important in order to achieve accurate results with realistic parameters. We analyze and discuss the pitch-angle/energy scattering of energetic particles and comment on the applicability of the quasi-linear diffusion paradigm.

  6. Modelling the effects of plasmaspheric hiss and lightning-generated whistlers in three dimensional radiation belt models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glauert, Sarah; Horne, Richard; Meredith, Nigel

    2014-05-01

    In the Earth's radiation belts the relativistic electron flux is highly variable and can change by orders of magnitude in a few hours. Since these energetic electrons can damage satellites, understanding the causes of this variation is important. Three dimensional diffusion models of this high-energy electron population solve a Fokker-Planck equation for the phase-space density and can include the effects of radial transport, wave-particle interactions and collisions. Various different wave-particle interactions can be included in the models. We present results from the BAS Radiation Belt Model using new diffusion coefficients for plasmaspheric hiss and lightning-generated whistlers. These diffusion coefficients, based on observations of the wave properties, depend on L, energy, pitch-angle and geomagnetic activity. We show that losses due to plasmaspheric hiss depend critically on the wave-normal angle distribution and that a model where the peak of the distribution depends on latitude best reproduces the observed decay rates. Higher frequency waves (˜ 1-2 kHz) only make a significant contribution to losses for L∗ < 3 and the highest frequencies (2-5 kHz), representing lightning-generated whistlers, have a limited effect on relativistic electrons for L∗ > 2.

  7. Large Amplitude Whistler Waves and Electron Acceleration in the Earth's Radiation Belts: A Review of STEREO and Wind Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, Cynthia; Breneman, A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P.; Kersten, K.; Wygant, J.; Wilson, L. B., III; Looper, Mark D.; Blake, J. Bernard; Roth, I.

    2012-01-01

    One of the critical problems for understanding the dynamics of Earth's radiation belts is determining the physical processes that energize and scatter relativistic electrons. We review measurements from the Wind/Waves and STEREO S/Waves waveform capture instruments of large amplitude whistler-mode waves. These observations have provided strong evidence that large amplitude (100s mV/m) whistler-mode waves are common during magnetically active periods. The large amplitude whistlers have characteristics that are different from typical chorus. They are usually nondispersive and obliquely propagating, with a large longitudinal electric field and significant parallel electric field. We will also review comparisons of STEREO and Wind wave observations with SAMPEX observations of electron microbursts. Simulations show that the waves can result in energization by many MeV and/or scattering by large angles during a single wave packet encounter due to coherent, nonlinear processes including trapping. The experimental observations combined with simulations suggest that quasilinear theoretical models of electron energization and scattering via small-amplitude waves, with timescales of hours to days, may be inadequate for understanding radiation belt dynamics.

  8. Layered Model for Radiation-Induced Chemical Evolution of Icy Surface Composition on Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Hill, Matthew E.; Richardson, John D.; Sturner, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The diversity of albedos and surface colors on observed Kuiper Belt and Inner Oort Cloud objects remains to be explained in terms of competition between primordial intrinsic versus exogenic drivers of surface and near-surface evolution. Earlier models have attempted without success to attribute this diversity to the relations between surface radiolysis from cosmic ray irradiation and gardening by meteoritic impacts. A more flexible approach considers the different depth-dependent radiation profiles produced by low-energy plasma, suprathermal, and maximally penetrating charged particles of the heliospheric and local interstellar radiation environments. Generally red objects of the dynamically cold (low inclination, circular orbit) Classical Kuiper Belt might be accounted for from erosive effects of plasma ions and reddening effects of high energy cosmic ray ions, while suprathermal keV-MeV ions could alternatively produce more color neutral surfaces. The deepest layer of more pristine ice can be brought to the surface from meter to kilometer depths by larger impact events and potentially by cryovolcanic activity. The bright surfaces of some larger objects, e.g. Eris, suggest ongoing resurfacing activity. Interactions of surface irradiation, resultant chemical oxidation, and near-surface cryogenic fluid reservoirs have been proposed to account for Enceladus cryovolcanism and may have further applications to other icy irradiated bodies. The diversity of causative processes must be understood to account for observationally apparent diversities of the object surfaces.

  9. Layered Model for Radiation-Induced Chemical Evolution of Icy Surface Composition on Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, John F.; Hill, M. E.; Richardson, J. D.; Sturner, S. J.

    2010-10-01

    The diversity of albedos and surface colors on observed Kuiper Belt and Inner Oort Cloud objects remains to be explained in terms of competition between primordial intrinsic versus exogenic drivers of surface and near-surface evolution. Earlier models have attempted without success to attribute this diversity to the relations between surface radiolysis from cosmic ray irradiation and gardening by meteoritic impacts. A more flexible approach considers the different depth-dependent radiation profiles produced by low-energy plasma, suprathermal, and maximally penetrating charged particles of the heliospheric and local interstellar radiation environments. Generally red objects of the dynamically cold (low inclination, circular orbit) Classical Kuiper Belt might be accounted for from erosive effects of plasma ions and reddening effects of high energy cosmic ray ions, while suprathermal keV-MeV ions could alternatively produce more color neutral surfaces. The deepest layer of more pristine ice can be brought to the surface from meter to kilometer depths by larger impact events and potentially by cryovolcanic activity. The bright surfaces of some larger objects, e.g. Eris, suggest ongoing resurfacing activity. Interactions of surface irradiation, resultant chemical oxidation, and near-surface cryogenic fluid reservoirs have been proposed to account for Enceladus cryovolcanism (Cooper et al., Plan. Sp. Sci., 2009) and may have further applications to other icy irradiated bodies. The diversity of causative processes must be understood to account for observationally apparent diversities of the object surfaces.

  10. Whistlers Observed Outside the Plasmasphere: Correlation to Plasmaspheric/Plasmapause Features and Implications for the Scattering of Radiation-Belt Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrian, Mark L.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetospherically reflected, lightning-generated whistler waves are an important potential contributor to pitch-angle scattering loss processes of the electron radiation belts. While lightning-generated whistlers are a common feature at, and just inside, the plasmapause, they are infrequently observed outside the plasmasphere. As such, their potential contribution to outer radiation belt loss processes is more tenuous. Recently, Platino et al. [2005] has reported on whistlers observed outside the plasmasphere by Cluster. Here, we present correlative global observations of the plasmasphere, for the reported periods of Cluster-observed whistlers outside the plasmasphere, using IMAGE-EUV data. The intent of this study is to seek the underlying mechanisms that result in whistlers outside the plasmasphere and consequently the anticipated morphology and significance these waves may have on radiation belt dynamics.

  11. Recent Results From The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, Craig

    2014-05-01

    The physics of the creation, loss, and transport of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field and particle interactions are involved in this physics which are well-measured by the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft launched in 2012. An overview of recent results from the mission focusing on waves and wave-particle interactions measured by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation is presented. We show examples of automated density determination and plasmapause identification as derived from the upper hybrid resonance; low frequency ULF pulsations; EMIC waves with electrostatic harmonics and their occurrence statistics; and whistler mode waves including upper and lower band chorus as well as plasmaspheric hiss and its relation to energetic particles.

  12. Stormtime ring current and radiation belt ion transport: Simulations and interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Larry R.; Gorney, David J.; Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We use a dynamical guiding-center model to investigate the stormtime transport of ring current and radiation-belt ions. We trace the motion of representative ions' guiding centers in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field for a range of ion energies. Our simple magnetospheric model allows us to compare our numerical results quantitatively with analytical descriptions of particle transport, (e.g., with the quasilinear theory of radial diffusion). We find that 10-145-keV ions gain access to L approximately 3, where they can form the stormtime ring current, mainly from outside the (trapping) region in which particles execute closed drift paths. Conversely, the transport of higher-energy ions (approximately greater than 145 keV at L approximately 3) turns out to resemble radial diffusion. The quasilinear diffusion coefficient calculated for our model storm does not vary smoothly with particle energy, since our impulses occur at specific (although randomly determined) times. Despite the spectral irregularity, quasilinear theory provides a surprisingly accurate description of the transport process for approximately greater than 145-keV ions, even for the case of an individual storm. For 4 different realizations of our model storm, the geometric mean discrepancies between diffusion coefficients D(sup sim, sub LL) obtained from the simulations and the quasilinear diffusion coefficient D(sup ql, sub LL) amount to factors of 2.3, 2.3, 1.5, and 3.0, respectively. We have found that these discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) can be reduced slightly by invoking drift-resonance broadening to smooth out the sharp minima and maxima in D(sup ql, sub LL). The mean of the remaining discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) for the 4 different storms then amount to factors of 1.9, 2.1, 1.5, and 2.7, respectively. We find even better agreement when we reduce the impulse amplitudes systematically in

  13. Electron loss rates from the outer radiation belt caused by the filling of the outer plasmasphere: the calm before the storm

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Denton, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    Measurements from 7 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit are analyzed to determine the decay rate of the number density of the outer electron radiation belt prior to the onset of high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms. Superposed-data analysis is used wan(?) a collection of 124 storms. When there is a calm before the storm, the electron number density decays exponentially before the storm with a 3.4-day e-folding time: beginning about 4 days before storm onset, the density decreases from {approx}4x10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} to {approx}1X 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}. When there is not a calm before the storm, the number-density decay is very smalL The decay in the number density of radiation-belt electrons is believed to be caused by pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the atmospheric loss cone as the outer plasmasphere fills during the calms. While the radiation-belt electron density decreases, the temperature of the electron radiation belt holds approximately constant, indicating that the electron precipitation occurs equally at all energies. Along with the number density decay, the pressure of the outer electron radiation belt decays and the specific entropy increases. From the measured decay rates, the electron flux to the atmosphere is calculated and that flux is 3 orders of magnitude less than thermal fluxes in the magnetosphere, indicating that the radiation-belt pitch-angle scattering is 3 orders weaker than strong diffusion. Energy fluxes into the atmosphere are calculated and found to be insufficient to produce visible airglow.

  14. Allene Functionalization via Bicyclic Methylene Aziridines

    PubMed Central

    Boralsky, Luke A.; Marston, Dagmara; Grigg, R. David; Hershberger, John C.; Schomaker, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    The oxidative functionalization of olefins is a common method for the formation of vicinal carbon-heteroatom bonds. However, oxidative methods to transform allenes into synthetic motifs containing three contiguous carbon-heteroatom bonds are much less developed. This paper describes the use of bicyclic methylene aziridines (MAs), prepared via intramolecular allene aziridination, as scaffolds for functionalization of all three allene carbons. PMID:21438516

  15. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: evidence for radiative heating in Serpens MWC 297 and its influence on local star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.; Hatchell, J.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Kirk, H.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Francesco, J. Di; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Allen, L. E.; Cieza, L. A.; Dunham, M. M.; Harvey, P. M.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Bastien, P.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2015-04-01

    We present SCUBA-2 450 and 850 μm observations of the Serpens MWC 297 region, part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey of nearby star-forming regions. Simulations suggest that radiative feedback influences the star formation process and we investigate observational evidence for this by constructing temperature maps. Maps are derived from the ratio of SCUBA-2 fluxes and a two-component model of the JCMT beam for a fixed dust opacity spectral index of β = 1.8. Within 40 arcsec of the B1.5Ve Herbig star MWC 297, the submillimetre fluxes are contaminated by free-free emission with a spectral index of 1.03 ± 0.02, consistent with an ultracompact H II region and polar winds/jets. Contamination accounts for 73 ± 5 per cent and 82 ± 4 per cent of peak flux at 450 μm and 850 μm, respectively. The residual thermal disc of the star is almost undetectable at these wavelengths. Young stellar objects (YSOs) are confirmed where SCUBA-2 850 μm clumps identified by the FELLWALKER algorithm coincide with Spitzer Gould Belt Survey detections. We identify 23 objects and use Tbol to classify nine YSOs with masses 0.09 to 5.1 M⊙. We find two Class 0, one Class 0/I, three Class I and three Class II sources. The mean temperature is 15 ± 2 K for the nine YSOs and 32 ± 4 K for the 14 starless clumps. We observe a starless clump with an abnormally high mean temperature of 46 ± 2 K and conclude that it is radiatively heated by the star MWC 297. Jeans stability provides evidence that radiative heating by the star MWC 297 may be suppressing clump collapse.

  16. Apollo experience report: Protection against radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, R. A.; Benson, R. E.; Bailey, J. V.; Barnes, C. M.

    1973-01-01

    Radiation protection problems on earth and in space are discussed. Flight through the Van Allen belts and into space beyond the geomagnetic shielding was recognized as hazardous before the advent of manned space flight. Specialized dosimetry systems were developed for use on the Apollo spacecraft, and systems for solar-particle-event warning and dose projection were devised. Radiation sources of manmade origin on board the Apollo spacecraft present additional problems. Methods applied to evaluate and control or avoid the various Apollo radiation hazards are discussed.

  17. Global Distribution of Chorus Wave Intensity Directly Measured By Van Allen Probes and Themis and Inferred from Poes Electron Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Angelopoulos, V.; Green, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Whistler-mode chorus waves play a fundamental role in accelerating seed electrons to highly relativistic energies, as well as causing energetic electron precipitation into the upper atmosphere. Using newly available Van Allen Probes wave data and THEMIS high-resolution wave data, which provide extensive coverage in the entire inner magnetosphere, we construct an empirical global model of chorus wave intensity categorized by various levels of geomagnetic activity. Recently, we have developed a physics-based technique of linking chorus wave intensity and two-directional electron fluxes (30-100 keV) measured at the conjugate low altitudes by POES satellites to show that the inferred chorus wave intensity provides reasonable estimates on the averaged chorus wave intensity. We apply these two different methods, namely (1) the empirical chorus wave model dependent on geomagnetic activity, and (2) the inferred chorus wave intensity from two-directional POES electron measurements, to a few interesting events and evaluate their performance by comparing against in-situ observations of chorus wave intensity from Van Allen Probes and THEMIS. The developed global chorus wave model is critical in quantitatively evaluating the role of chorus waves in radiation belt and ring current electron dynamics.

  18. Direct comparison of transient radiation belt topology and dynamics in 1991 based on measurements onboard Mir space station and NOAA satellite.

    PubMed

    Shurshakov, V A; Huston, S L; Dachev TsP; Petrov, V M; Ivanov YuV; Semkova, J V

    1998-01-01

    In March 1991 the CRRES spacecraft measured a new transient radiation belt resulting from a solar proton event and subsequent geomagnetic disturbance. The presence of this belt was also noted by dosimeter-radiometers aboard the Mir space station (approx. 400 km, 51 degrees orbit) and by particle telescopes on the NOAA-10 spacecraft (850 km, 98 degrees). This event provides a unique opportunity to compare particle flux and dose measurements made by different instruments in different orbits under changing conditions. We present here a comparison of the measurements made by the different detectors. We discuss the topology and dynamics of the transient radiation belt over a period of more than one year. PMID:11542782

  19. Laboratory simulation of Kuiper belt object volatile ices under ionizing radiation: CO-N2 ices as a case study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y S; Zhang, F; Kaiser, R I

    2011-09-21

    The exposure of icy Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) by ionizing radiation was simulated in this case of exposing carbon monoxide-nitrogen (CO-N(2)) ices by energetic electrons. The radiation-induced chemical processing was monitored on-line and in situ via FTIR spectroscopy and quadrupole mass spectrometry. Besides the array of carbon oxides being reproduced as in neat irradiated carbon monoxide (CO) ices studied previously, the radiation exposure at 10 K resulted in the formation of nitrogen-bearing species of isocyanato radical (OCN), linear (l-NCN), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)), plus diazirinone (N(2)CO). The infrared assignments of these species were further confirmed by isotopic shifts. The temporal evolution of individual species was found to fit in first-order reaction schemes, prepping up the underlying non-equilibrium chemistry on the formation of OCN, l-NCN, and NO radicals in particular. Also unique to the binary KBO model ices and viable for the future remote detection is diazirinone (N(2)CO) at 1860 cm(-1) (2ν(5)) formed at lower radiation exposure. PMID:21687881

  20. Observational Search for >10 MeV Electrons in the Inner Magnetosphere Using the Van Allen Probes Relativistic Proton Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Looper, M. D.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Blake, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Any detection of ultra-relativistic electrons (>10 MeV) trapped in the inner magnetosphere is potentially a sensitive indicator of a unique particle acceleration process or of a unique particle source. The 24 March 1991 shock injection of >15 MeV electrons is a classic example of the former, while the latter includes measurements in low Earth orbit of >100 MeV electrons and positrons from cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. In this paper we use new instrumentation on the Van Allen Probes to survey the inner magnetosphere for signatures of ultra-relativistic electrons. The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer, designed primarily for spectroscopy of 60 to 2000 MeV protons in the inner belt, nonetheless is capable of detecting minimum-ionizing electrons in a silicon detector stack. More critical to this survey is the instrument's Cherenkov radiator subsystem whose response to incident electrons ranges from a threshold near 10 MeV and reaches light saturation above 50 MeV. Together with the silicon detector system we are able to explore an energy range that has not been routinely studied in the context of the Earth's magnetosphere. We will report on quiet-time and storm-time signatures in regions of the inner magnetosphere that heretofore have not been explored with an orbit like that of Van Allen Probes. We will also quantitatively compare our electron energy spectra, or flux limits, with other measurements from Van Allen Probes and prior glimpses of high-energy electrons from low Earth orbit.

  1. An Observational Test of the Stability of Inner Belt Protons Above 60 Mev Using Measurements Separated By 41 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Looper, M. D.; Blake, J. B.; George, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    The relative stability of protons trapped in the inner Van Allen radiation belt is a unique signature of the near-Earth radiation environment. While the outer electron belt changes its topography and intensity on timescales of less than a day, calculations indicate that protons in the deepest portions of the inner belt can remain on drift shells for centuries. The long lifetimes for equatorially mirroring protons have never been experimentally verified because few missions traverse this challenging environment, and those that have attempted to quantify the proton flux there have faced potentially large backgrounds from penetrating protons outside the instrument field of view. Today, the Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) investigation on board the Van Allen Probes offers a background-free reference and hence a unique opportunity to compare the present state of inner belt protons with prior measurements. In this study we revisit one relatively clean, and possibly the most accurate historical dataset: a Cherenkov proton spectrometer that operated in a highly inclined 132x1932 km orbit in 1971. The OV1-20P proton spectrometer covered the energy range of ~65-550 MeV (completely within the RPS energy range), had good background rejection because of a fast scintillator coincidence requirement, but operated off of a flight battery for only 10 days. The short lifetime of the OV1-20P mission is the primary reason it did not have significant impact on subsequent studies of the inner belt. At the meeting we will report on a comparison of OV1-20P and RPS fluxes at the same magnetic field coordinates. Our 41-year measurement baseline is not anywhere near a continuous record of course, but it is rare in space science that we have the opportunity to measure a trapped radiation environment on the timescale of decades.

  2. Modeling of Outer Radiation Belt Electron Scattering due to Spatial and Spectral Properties of ULF Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornquist, Mattias

    The research presented in this thesis covers wave-particle interactions for relativistic (0.5-10 MeV) electrons in Earth's outer radiation belt (r = 3-7 RE, or L-shells: L = 3-7) interacting with magnetospheric Pc-5 (ULF) waves. This dissertation focuses on ideal models for short and long term electron energy and radial position scattering caused by interactions with ULF waves. We use test particle simulations to investigate these wave-particle interactions with ideal wave and magnetic dipole fields. We demonstrate that the wave-particle phase can cause various patterns in phase space trajectories, i.e. local acceleration, and that for a global electron population, for all initial conditions accounted for, has a negligible net energy scattering. Working with GSM polar coordinates, the relevant wave field components are EL, Ephi and Bz, where we find that the maximum energy scattering is 3-10 times more effective for Ephi compared to EL in a magnetic dipole field with a realistic dayside compression amplitude. We also evaluate electron interactions with two coexisting waves for a set of small frequency separations and phases, where it is confirmed that multi-resonant transport is possible for overlapping resonances in phase space when the Chirikov criterion is met (stochasticity parameter K = 1). The electron energy scattering enhances with decreasing frequency separation, i.e. increasing K, and is also dependent on the phases of the waves. The global acceleration is non-zero, can be onset in about 1 hour and last for > 4 hours. The adiabatic wave-particle interaction discussed up to this point can be regarded as short-term scattering ( tau ˜ hours ). When the physical problem extends to longer time scales (tau ˜ days ) the process ceases to be adiabatic due to the introduction of stochastic element in the system and becomes a diffusive process. We show that any mode in a broadband spectrum can contribute to the total diffusion rate for a particular drift

  3. FIREBIRD: A Dual Satellite Mission to Examine the Spatial and Energy Coherence Scales of Radiation Belt Electron Microbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Spence, H. E.; Larsen, B. A.; Blake, J. B.; Springer, L.; Crew, A. B.; Mosleh, E.; Mashburn, K. W.

    2009-12-01

    FIREBIRD (Focused Investigations of Relativistic Electron Burst Intensity, Range, and Dynamics), a mission under NSF’s “CubeSat-based Science Missions for Space Weather and Atmospheric Research”, will address the broad scientific question: What is the role of microburst electron precipitation in radiation belt dynamics? There are four major candidate processes for losses of relativistic electrons from the outer radiation belt [Millan and Thorne, 2007]: wave-particle interactions with whistler-mode chorus, wave-particle interactions with electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) waves, outward radial diffusion to the magnetopause, and loss of adiabaticity on stretched magnetic field lines. FIREBIRD will further investigate the role of whistler-mode chorus, by examining the microburst electron precipitation phenomenon attributed to chorus. Microbursts are thought to be a hallmark of rapid radiation belt losses, possibly removing the entire pre-storm outer zone in a single day [Lorentzen 2001b; O'Brien et al., 2004], yet they are also intimately tied to in-situ acceleration mechanisms. FIREBIRD’s two 1.5U (10 x 10 x 15 cm) CubeSats, each weighing up to 2 kg, will be placed into a common high-inclination bead-on-a-string orbit. The two satellites will remain within ~500 km of one another for six to twelve months, allowing characterization over the spatial scale regime from 10 - 500 km. Each satellite will carry an identical co-aligned pair of solid-state detectors sensitive to electrons from 30 keV to ~3 MeV with 100 msec time resolution. Simultaneous dual measurements provided by the twin FIREBIRD satellites will permit, for the first time, the determination of spatial scales of single microburst events. Along with energy-resolved spectra, these measurements will provide the critically needed answers on the radiation belt loss rate attributed to microbursts. There are three critical questions about relativistic electron microbursts that FIREBIRD can answer: 1) What

  4. Role of dust direct radiative effect on the tropical rain belt over Middle East and North Africa: A high-resolution AGCM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangalath, Hamza Kunhu; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the influence of direct radiative effect of dust on the tropical summer rain belt across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), the present study utilizes the high-resolution capability of an Atmospheric General Circulation Model, the High-Resolution Atmospheric Model. Ensembles of Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project style simulations have been conducted with and without dust radiative impacts, to differentiate the influence of dust on the tropical rain belt. The analysis focuses on summer season. The results highlight the role of dust-induced responses in global- and regional-scale circulations in determining the strength and the latitudinal extent of the tropical rain belt. A significant response in the strength and position of the local Hadley circulation is predicted in response to meridionally asymmetric distribution of dust and the corresponding radiative effects. Significant responses are also found in regional circulation features such as African Easterly Jet and West African Monsoon circulation. Consistent with these dynamic responses at various scales, the tropical rain belt across MENA strengthens and shifts northward. Importantly, the summer precipitation over the semiarid strip south of Sahara, including Sahel, increases up to 20%. As this region is characterized by the "Sahel drought," the predicted precipitation sensitivity to the dust loading over this region has a wide range of socioeconomic implications. Overall, the study demonstrates the extreme importance of incorporating dust radiative effects and the corresponding circulation responses at various scales, in the simulations and future projections of this region's climate.

  5. Multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Zheng; Ni, Binbin; Zhou, Chen; Zou, Zhengyang; Gu, Xudong; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Xianguo; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Shenyi; Li, Xinlin; Zuo, Pingbing; Spence, Harlan; Reeves, Geoffrey

    2016-05-01

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts are a kind of drastic variation in the Earth's magnetosphere, understanding of which is of both scientific and societal importance. Using electron flux data from a group of 14 satellites, we report multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an event of intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse. When the pulse occurred, magnetopause and atmospheric loss could take effect concurrently contributing to the electron flux dropout. Losses through the magnetopause were observed to be efficient and significant at L ≳ 5, owing to the magnetopause intrusion into L ˜ 6 and outward radial diffusion associated with sharp negative gradient in electron phase space density. Losses to the atmosphere were directly identified from the precipitating electron flux observations, for which pitch angle scattering by plasma waves could be mainly responsible. While the convection and substorm injections strongly enhanced the energetic electron fluxes up to hundreds of keV, they could delay other than avoid the occurrence of electron flux dropout at these energies. It is demonstrated that the pulse-time radiation belt electron flux dropout depends strongly on the specific interplanetary and magnetospheric conditions and that losses through the magnetopause and to the atmosphere and enhancements of substorm injection play an essential role in combination, which should be incorporated as a whole into future simulations for comprehending the nature of radiation belt electron flux dropouts.

  6. Multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiang, Zheng; Ni, Binbin; Zhou, Chen; Zou, Zhengyang; Gu, Xudong; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Xianguo; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Shenyi; Li, Xinlin; et al

    2016-05-03

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts are a kind of drastic variation in the Earth's magnetosphere, understanding of which is of both scientific and societal importance. We report multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an event of intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse, using electron flux data from a group of 14 satellites. Moreover, when the pulse occurred, magnetopause and atmospheric loss could take effect concurrently contributing to the electron flux dropout. Losses through the magnetopause were observed to be efficient and significant at L ≳ 5, owing to the magnetopause intrusion into Lmore » ~6 and outward radial diffusion associated with sharp negative gradient in electron phase space density. Losses to the atmosphere were directly identified from the precipitating electron flux observations, for which pitch angle scattering by plasma waves could be mainly responsible. While the convection and substorm injections strongly enhanced the energetic electron fluxes up to hundreds of keV, they could delay other than avoid the occurrence of electron flux dropout at these energies. Finally, we demonstrate that the pulse-time radiation belt electron flux dropout depends strongly on the specific interplanetary and magnetospheric conditions and that losses through the magnetopause and to the atmosphere and enhancements of substorm injection play an essential role in combination, which should be incorporated as a whole into future simulations for comprehending the nature of radiation belt electron flux dropouts.« less

  7. The effects of the big storm events in the first half of 2015 on the radiation belts observed by EPT/PROBA-V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrard, V.; Lopez Rosson, G.

    2016-01-01

    With the energetic particle telescope (EPT) performing with direct electron and proton discrimination on board the ESA satellite PROBA-V, we analyze the high-resolution measurements of the charged particle radiation environment at an altitude of 820 km for the year 2015. On 17 March 2015, a big geomagnetic storm event injected unusual fluxes up to low radial distances in the radiation belts. EPT electron measurements show a deep dropout at L > 4 starting during the main phase of the storm, associated to the penetration of high energy fluxes at L < 2 completely filling the slot region. After 10 days, the formation of a new slot around L = 2.8 for electrons of 500-600 keV separates the outer belt from the belt extending at other longitudes than the South Atlantic Anomaly. Two other major events appeared in January and June 2015, again with injections of electrons in the inner belt, contrary to what was observed in 2013 and 2014. These observations open many perspectives to better understand the source and loss mechanisms, and particularly concerning the formation of three belts.

  8. Van Allen Probe Observations: Near-Earth injections of Mev Electrons Associated with Intense Substorm Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, L.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Cattell, C. A.; Kletzing, C.; Baker, D. N.; Li, X.; Malaspina, D.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Takahashi, K.; Funsten, H. O.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Angelopoulos, V.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Turner, D. L.; Thaller, S. A.; Breneman, A. W.; Kersten, K.; Tang, X.; Tao, X.

    2014-12-01

    With their unique orbit, the Van Allen Probes (RBSP) spacecraft are well suited to investigate near-Earth substorm injections that penetrate into the heart of outer radiation belts. Substorms are generally conceived to inject 10s-100s keV electrons but intense substorm electric fields have been shown capable of injecting ~MeV electrons as well at the geosynchronous altitude. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can penetrate to lower L shells and directly contribute to the relativistic electron population of the outer radiation belt. In this talk, we present RBSP observations of near-Earth substorm injection of MeV relativistic particles and associated intense dipolarization electric field at L ~5.5. The substorm injection occurred during a moderate storm (DST~-30 to -20) with steady solar wind conditions. RBSP-A observed dispersionless injection of electrons from 10s keV up to 3 MeV in the pre-mid night sector (MLT=22UT). The injection was associated with unusually large (60mV/m) dipolarization electric fields that lasted 1 minute. At about the same time, THEMIS-D observed energy-dispersive injection of electrons at energies as high as at least 720keV at L~6.8 in the pre-dawn sector. Injection of energetic protons (~1MeV) and proton drift echos were observed at RBSP-A as well. RBSP-A observed a broad spectrum of nonlinear electric field structures but no whistler waves at the injection. The properties of the observed dipolarization electric field constrain the acceleration mechanism responsible for the MeV electron injection. We will discuss the implications of these observations on the direct impact of substorms on the outer radiation belt.

  9. Modeling Loss and Rebuilding of the Earth's Outer Zone Electrons and Comparison with Van Allen Probes Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.; Li, Z.; Paral, J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the competition between radiation belt electron energization due to radial transport and loss to the magnetopause and to the atmosphere is critical to understanding the dynamic changes in outer zone radiation belt electron flux response to solar wind drivers. Plasmasheet electron injection, both due to enhanced convection and substorm dipolarization, provides a source population for generation of whistler mode chorus and seed population for local acceleration. We now have available ~22 months of unprecedented measurements in energy and pitch angle resolution of electrons spanning the energy range from injected plasmasheet to multi-MeV electrons from the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft in near-equatorial plane elliptical orbits, with apogee at 5.8 Re; and two Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation Belt Electron Losses (BARREL) campaigns during January-February 2013 and 2014, each establishing a longitudinal array of precipitation measurements extending to relativistic energies via measured Bremsstrahlung x-rays. In addition to this arsenal of data, a set of modeling tools has been developed to examine dynamics of electrons in the magnetosphere. These tools calculate electron trajectories in time-dependent magnetohydrodyanmic (MHD) fields using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD model coupled with the Rice Convection Model to determine the E and B field response to solar wind drivers. With these tools we can follow electron dynamics including response to Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves which cause radial transport and energization for inward radial gradient as well as enhanced loss to the magnetopause for outward gradient. These tools have been applied to date to the large equinoctial storms of fall 2012, spring and fall 2013, in addition to moderate storms during BARREL balloon campaigns in both winters 2013 and 2014. Isolated substorm response can clearly be identified for the latter, while plasmasheet injection of electrons during periods of strong

  10. The Radiation Environment for the LISA/Laser Interferometry Space Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.; Xapsos, Michael; Poivey, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the radiation environment for the evaluation of degradation due to total ionizing and non-ionizing dose and of single event effects (SEES) for the Laser Interferometry Space Antenna (LISA) instruments and spacecraft. The analysis took into account the radiation exposure for the nominal five-year mission at 20 degrees behind Earth's orbit of the sun, at 1 AU (astronomical unit) and assumes a launch date in 2014. The transfer trajectory out to final orbit has not yet been defined, therefore, this evaluation does not include the impact of passing through the Van Allen belts. Generally, transfer trajectories do not contribute significantly to degradation effects; however, single event effects and deep dielectric charging effects must be taken into consideration especially if critical maneuvers are planned during the van Allen belt passes.

  11. Chandra X-Ray Observatory's Radiation Environment and the AP-8/AE-8 Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virani, S. N.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Butt, Y. M.; Mueller-Mellin, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) was launched on July 23, 1999 and reached its final orbit on August 7, 1999. The CXO is in a highly elliptical orbit, approximately 140,000 km x 10,000 km, and has a period of roughly 63.5 hours (approx. 2.6 days). It transits the Earth's Van Allen belts once per orbit during which no science observations can be performed due to the high radiation environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center (CXC) currently uses the National Space Science Data Center's "near Earth" AP-8/AE-8 radiation belt model to predict the start and end times of passage through the radiation belts. However, our scheduling software only uses a simple dipole model of the Earth's magnetic field. The resulting B, L magnet coordinates, do not always give sufficiently accurate predictions of the start and end times of transit of the Van Allen belts. We show this by comparing to the data from Chandra's on-board radiation monitor, the EPHIN (Electron, Proton, Helium Instrument particle detector) instrument. We present evidence that demonstrates this mis- of the radiation belts as well as data that also demonstrate the significant variability of one radiation belt transit to the next as experienced by the CXO. We present an explanation for why the dipole implementation of the AP-8/AE-8 gives inaccurate results. We are also investigating use of the Magnetospheric Specification and Forecast Model (MSM) - a model that also accounts for radiation belt variability and geometry.

  12. LEEM: A new empirical model of radiation-belt electrons in the low-Earth-orbit region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yue; Reeves, Geoffrey; Friedel, Reiner H. W.; Thomsen, Michelle F.; Looper, Mark; Evans, David; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre

    2012-11-01

    A new empirical model of radiation-belt electrons in the low-Earth-orbit region has been developed based upon decade-long in situ observations from several low-altitude-orbiting satellites. This model—LEEM—aims to provide the electron environment conditions that a satellite would encounter in a given low Earth orbit. This model presents electron flux values for five energy ranges (0.03-2.5 MeV, 0.1-2.5 MeV, 0.3-2.5 MeV, 1.5-6 MeV, and 2.5-14 MeV) within the space below an altitude of ˜600 km. Compared to the de-facto standard empirical model of AE-8, this model not only has a better data coverage in this specific region, but also can provide statistical information on flux levels such as worst cases and occurrence percentiles instead of solely mean values. The comparison indicates that the AE-8 model not only highly overpredicts the fluxes in the inner belt region in most cases, especially for the MeV electrons, which cannot be accounted for by the widely quoted error factor of 2 for AE-8, but also is unable to reflect the observed orders of magnitude variations in electron intensities. The LEEM model is carefully validated with both in-sample and out-of-sample tests. The characteristic electron environments along the International Space Station track and other virtual orbits are given as examples and as a demonstration of the use of the model.

  13. Global Storm-Time Depletion of the Outer Electron Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sitnov, M. I.; Millan, R. M.; Kress, B. T.; Fennell, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    The outer radiation belt consists of relativistic (≳0.5 MeV) electrons trapped on closed trajectories around Earth where its magnetic field is nearly dipolar. During increased geomagnetic activity electron intensities in the belt can vary by orders of magnitude at different spatial and temporal scale. The main phase of geomagnetic storms often produces deep depletions of electron intensities over broad regions of the outer belt. Previous studies identified three possible processes that can contribute to the depletions: fully adiabatic inflation of electron drift orbits caused the ring current growth, electron loss into the atmosphere due to pitch-angle scattering by plasma waves (e.g., EMIC and whistler waves), and electron escape through the magnetopause boundary. In this paper we investigate the relative importance of the magnetopause losses to the rapid depletion of the outer belt observed at the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during the main phase of March 17, 2013 storm. The intensities of > 1 MeV electrons were depleted by more that an order of magnitude over the entire radial extent of the belt in less than 6 hours after the sudden storm commencement. For the analysis we used three-dimensional test-particle simulations of global evolution of the outer belt in the Tsyganenko-Sitnov (TS07D) magnetic field model with the inductive electric field. The comparison of the simulation results with electron measurements from the MagEIS experiment shows that the magnetopause losses in the model accounts for most of the observed depletion. The individual electron motion the process is non-adiabatic; the third invariant is violated by global variations of the inner magnetospheric fields caused by the magnetopause compressions and the buildup of ring current, while the second invariant is violated at drift orbit bifurcations. The analysis shows that the observed deep depletion of radiation belt intensities is enabled by the change in the global configuration of magnetic

  14. Hardening of MJS77 spacecraft against the Jupiter radiation belts. [Mariner Jupiter/Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Stanley, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    Results of the device characterization program to identify components of the Mariner Jupiter/Saturn spacecraft in need of radiation hardening to meet a total dose requirement of 5 trillion e/sq cm are presented. The parts to be tested, including bipolar transistors, JFETs, SCRs, CMOS devices, linear integrated circuits, Zener diodes and other radiation-sensitive parts, were identified by a worst case circuit analysis of the 20 major subsystems. The test samples were exposed to several levels of irradiation from a Dynamitron electron accelerator capable of producing a steady stream of electrons at energies up to 2.5 eV. The electrical parameters of the devices were measured immediately following irradiation to prevent annealing. CMOS devices and linear devices showed the most severe degradation in a moderate radiation environment, and significant degradation was produced at low current in bipolar transistors. Three methods used for screening a number of devices determined by circuit and shielding analyses to be unacceptable radiation-sensitive are described: diffusion and metallization lot screening; wafer lot screening; and irradiation-anneal screening.

  15. Kak Amerikantsy iskali vetra v pole, a nashli radiatsionnyj poyas i kak Russkie iskali radiatsionnyj poyas, a nashli solnechnyj veter Chast' I %t How Americans looked for "a wind in a field" but found a radiation belt, and how Russians looked for a radiation belt but found a solar wind or physical experiments on the first artificial Earth's satellites and a discovery of radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavidonov, I. V.

    The history of the most important scientific discovery of the early space era - the discovery of the inner and outer radiation belts of the Earth in 1958 is reconstructed. The paper uses archival records to bring to light the relative contributions of Soviet and American reseachers to the complex process of discovery. It also shows how misuses of science in mass-media political propaganda led to misrepresentations of the real historical portrayal of early space research.

  16. A Neural Network Approach for Identifying Relativistic Electron Pitch Angle Distributions in Van Allen Probes Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, V. M. C. E. S.; Vieira, L.; Alves, L. R.; Da Silva, L. A.; Koga, D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walsh, B.; Kanekal, S. G.; Silveira, M. D.; Medeiros, C.; Mendes, O., Jr.; Marchezi, J.; Rockenbach, M.; Jauer, P. R.; Gonzalez, W.; Baker, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    A myriad of physical phenomena occur in the inner magnetosphere, in particular at the Earth's radiation belts, which can be a result of the combination of both internal and external processes. However, the connection between physical processes occurring deep within the magnetosphere and external interplanetary drivers it is not yet well understood. In this work we investigate whether a selected set of interplanetary structures affect the local time distribution of three different classes of high energy electron pitch angle distributions (PADs), namely normal, isotropic, and butterfly. We split this work into two parts: initially we focus on the methodology used which employs a Self-Organized Feature Map (SOFM) neural network for identifying different classes of electron PAD shapes in the Van Allen Probes' Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) data. The algorithm can categorize the input data into an arbitrary number of classes from which three of them appears the most: normal, isotropic and butterfly. Other classes which are related with these three also emerge and deserve to be addressed in detail in future works. We also discuss the uncertainties of the algorithm. Then, we move to the second part where we describe in details the criteria used for selecting the interplanetary events, and also try to investigate the relation between key parameters characterizing such interplanetary structures and the local time distributions of electron PAD shapes.

  17. Evolution of chorus emissions into plasmaspheric hiss observed by Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; He, Yihua; Wygant, J. R.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.

    2016-05-01

    The two classes of whistler mode waves (chorus and hiss) play different roles in the dynamics of radiation belt energetic electrons. Chorus can efficiently accelerate energetic electrons, and hiss is responsible for the loss of energetic electrons. Previous studies have proposed that chorus is the source of plasmaspheric hiss, but this still requires an observational confirmation because the previously observed chorus and hiss emissions were not in the same frequency range in the same time. Here we report simultaneous observations form Van Allen Probes that chorus and hiss emissions occurred in the same range ˜300-1500 Hz with the peak wave power density about 10-5 nT2/Hz during a weak storm on 3 July 2014. Chorus emissions propagate in a broad region outside the plasmapause. Meanwhile, hiss emissions are confined inside the plasmasphere, with a higher intensity and a broader area at a lower frequency. A sum of bi-Maxwellian distribution is used to model the observed anisotropic electron distributions and to evaluate the instability of waves. A three-dimensional ray tracing simulation shows that a portion of chorus emission outside the plasmasphere can propagate into the plasmasphere and evolve into plasmaspheric hiss. Moreover, hiss waves below 1 kHz are more intense and propagate over a broader area than those above 1 kHz, consistent with the observation. The current results can explain distributions of the observed hiss emission and provide a further support for the mechanism of evolution of chorus into hiss emissions.

  18. ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE measurements of interplanetary oxygen injection to the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, J. D.; Manweiler, J. W.; Gerrard, A. J.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    On March 17, 2015, a significant oxygen-rich interplanetary event was measure by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument. At the same time the Van Allen Probes Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument recorded significant enhancements of oxygen in the inner magnetosphere. We present a detailed analysis of this event utilizing a new method of exploiting the EPAM Pulse Height Analyzer (PHA) data to precisely resolve helium and oxygen spectra within the 0.5 to 5 MeV/nuc range. We also present the flux, partial particle pressures, and pitch angle distributions of the ion measurements from RBSPICE. During this event, both EPAM and RBSPICE measured O:He ratios greater than 10:1. The pitch angle distributions from RBSPICE-B show a strong beam of oxygen at an L ~ 5.8 early on March 17th during orbit. The timing between the observations of the oxygen peak at ACE and the beam observed at RBSPICE-B is consistent with the travel-time required for energetic particle transport from L1 to Earth and access to the magnetosphere. We assert that the oxygen seen by RBSPICE during the initial phase of this event is the result of direct injection from the interplanetary medium of energetic ions. This poster contains the observations and detailed calculations to support this assertion.

  19. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Roeder, J. L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. M.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B. A.

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energy channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).

  20. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Roeder, J. L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. M.; Spence, H. E.; et al

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energymore » channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).« less