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Sample records for allen county kansas

  1. Karst development in central Butler County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, B.A.

    1993-02-01

    Research was conducted to study the geology and hydrology of sinkholes, springs, and caves formed in Lower Permian, Fort Riley Limestone, located in central Butler County, Kansas. The goal was to better understand the controlling factors of these karst features and the processes that produce them in a portion of Kansas that is undergoing rapid population growth and increased groundwater usage. Research was accomplished in seven phases: literature search, locating karst features, measuring bedrock fracture joint trends, surveying major caves, estimating discharge of springs, dye tracing, and water chemistry analysis. Recognizable karst landforms within the study area were plotted onto a base map to demonstrate their geographic, geologic, and hydrologic relationships. Karst features identified were 125 sinkholes, a major cave system composed of at least three enterable cave segments, and one large spring. The karst terrain found within the study area is clearly a system of interrelated features and processes. Long-term solution of the bedrock allows karst features to form, joints and bedding planes to enlarge, and creates an efficient network of subsurface drainage. Factors that control karst development in the study area are lithology, thickness, and dip of the bedrock; presence of well defined joints and bedding planes; relatively level topography; nearby entrenched river valleys; lack of thick surficial cover; and climate. Of these influences, solutional activity at joints plays a major role in the formation of sinkholes and cave passages; however, a complex combination of all the controlling factors is responsible for the present, unique, and dynamic karst system.

  2. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-04-01

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  3. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse

    SciTech Connect

    D. Egan

    2010-04-14

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  4. Quality of Streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.

    2008-01-01

    Water quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas was evaluated from October 2002 through December 2007 in a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program. Water quality at 42 stream sites, representing urban and rural basins, was characterized by evaluating benthic macroinvertebrates, water (discrete and continuous data), and/or streambed sediment. Point and nonpoint sources and transport were described for water-quality constituents including suspended sediment, dissolved solids and major ions, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), indicator bacteria, pesticides, and organic wastewater and pharmaceutical compounds. The information obtained from this study is being used by city and county officials to develop effective management plans for protecting and improving stream quality. This fact sheet summarizes important results from three comprehensive reports published as part of the study and available on the World Wide Web at http://ks.water.usgs.gov/Kansas/studies/qw/joco/ .

  5. Improving the Collection of Student Accounts at Allen County Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geffert, Barbara

    During the past several years, Allen County Community College has experienced a growing number of uncollected student accounts. In an effort to encourage timely payment of student charges, lower the number of students receiving payment deferments, increase cash flow at the beginning of each semester, and reduce the number of bad debts being…

  6. Detection of water bodies in Saline County, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, B. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A total of 2,272 water bodies were mapped in Saline County, Kansas in 1972 using ERTS-1 imagery. A topographic map of 1955 shows 1,056 water bodies in the county. The major increase took place in farm ponds. Preliminary comparison of image and maps indicates that water bodies larger than ten acres in area proved consistently detectable. Most water areas between four and ten acres are also detectable, although occasionally image context prevents detection. Water areas less than four acres in extent are sometimes detected, but the number varies greatly depending on image context and the individual interpretor.

  7. Land use map, Finney County, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morain, S. A. (Principal Investigator); Williams, D. L.; Coiner, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Methods for the mapping of land use in agricultural regions are developed and applied to preparation of a land use map of Finney County, Kanas. Six land use categories were identified from an MSS-5 image. These categories are: (1) large field irrigation; (2) small field irrigation; (3) dryland cultivation; (4) rangeland; (5) cultural features; and (6) riverine land. The map is composed of basically homogeneous regions with definable mixtures of the six categories. Each region is bounded by an ocularly evident change in land use.

  8. 78 FR 20888 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 161-Sedgwick County, Kansas; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 161--Sedgwick County, Kansas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Siemens Energy, Inc., (Wind Turbine Nacelles and Hubs), Hutchinson, Kansas Siemens Energy, Inc. (SEI), an operator of FTZ...

  9. Water supply and demand in Sedgwick County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bevans, Hugh E.

    1989-01-01

    Water supplies in Sedgwick County, Kansas, are derived from surface--and groundwater resources. During 1985, public supply, irrigation, and self-supplied industry required 38% of the 56 ,500 acre-ft of appropriated surface water and 57% of the 187 ,800 acre-ft of appropriated groundwater. If the historic (1920-80) annual population growth rate (2.8%) continues, the 126,100 acre ft of water appropriated for public-water supplies should meet demand until 2015. The quantity of potentially available water supplies was estimated by summing those resources having less than 1.00 mg/L dissolved solids. Surface water resources that meet this criterion are the Little Arkansas and Ninnescah Rivers and Cheney Reservoir. Subtracting legislated minimum streamflows for the rivers from their mean annual streamflow volumes leaves 532,000 acre-ft, which combined with the annual sustained yield of Cheney Reservoir (40,000 acre-ft) provides an estimated 572,000 acre-ft of surface water annually. Groundwater that meets the criterion was estimated by summing the annual precipitation recharge available to unconsolidated deposits in the county (78,400 acre-ft) and in the Harvey County part of the Wichita well field (13,000 acre-ft). Although more groundwater is available, withdrawals exceeding annual precipitation recharge would cause water level declines. Because less than 4% of the potentially available surface water was used for supplies in 1985 and because about 120% of the groundwater recharge was used, surface water resources have a greater potential for meeting future water use demands. (USGS)

  10. Description of water-resource-related data compiled for Reno County, south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.V.

    1993-01-01

    Water-resource-related data for sites in Reno County, Kansas were compiled in cooperation with the Reno County Health Department as part of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment's Local Environmental Protection Program (LEPP). These data were entered into a relational data-base management system (RDBMS) to facilitate the spatial analysis required to meet the LEPP goals of developing plans for nonpoint-source management and for public- water-supply protection. The data in the RDBMS are organized into digital data sets. The data sets contain the water-resource-related data compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey for 958 wells; by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment for 3,936 wells; by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment for 51 wells, 18 public-water-supply distribution systems, and 7 streams; by the Kansas State Board of Agriculture for 643 wells and 23 streams or surface-water impoundments; and by well-drilling contractors and the Kansas Geological Survey for 96 wells. The data in these five data sets are available from the Reno County Health Department in Hutchinson, Kansas. (USGS)

  11. Quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002--10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Stone, Mandy S.; Poulton, Barry C.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Stream quality in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, was assessed on the basis of land use, hydrology, stream-water and streambed-sediment chemistry, riparian and in-stream habitat, and periphyton and macroinvertebrate community data collected from 22 sites during 2002 through 2010. Stream conditions at the end of the study period are evaluated and compared to previous years, stream biological communities and physical and chemical conditions are characterized, streams are described relative to Kansas Department of Health and Environment impairment categories and water-quality standards, and environmental factors that most strongly correlate with biological stream quality are evaluated. The information is useful for improving water-quality management programs, documenting changing conditions with time, and evaluating compliance with water-quality standards, total maximum daily loads (TMDLs), National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit conditions, and other established guidelines and goals. Constituent concentrations in water during base flow varied across the study area and 2010 conditions were not markedly different from those measured in 2003, 2004, and 2007. Generally the highest specific conductance and concentrations of dissolved solids and major ions in water occurred at urban sites except the upstream Cedar Creek site, which is rural and has a large area of commercial and industrial land less than 1 mile upstream on both sides of the creek. The highest base-flow nutrient concentrations in water occurred downstream from wastewater treatment facilities. Water chemistry data represent base-flow conditions only, and do not show the variability in concentrations that occurs during stormwater runoff. Constituent concentrations in streambed sediment also varied across the study area and some notable changes occurred from previously collected data. High organic carbon and nutrient concentrations at the rural Big Bull Creek site in 2003 decreased

  12. Description of water-resource-related data compiled for Harvey County, south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.V.

    1993-01-01

    Site, construction, geologic, water-level, water- quality, water-withdrawal, and well-survey data for sites in Harvey County were compiled in cooper- ation with the Harvey County Health Department as part of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment's Local Environmental Protection Program (LEPP). These data were entered into a relational data-base management system (RDBMS) to facilitate the analysis required to meet the LEPP goals of developing plans for nonpoint-source management and for public-water-supply protection. The data in the RDBMS are organized into digital data sets. The data sets contain the water- resource-related data compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey for 668 wells; by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment for 1,636 wells, 6 public-water-supply systems, 6 streams, and 2 surface-water impoundments; by the Kansas State Board of Agriculture for 423 wells and 26 streams or impoundments; by well-drilling con- tractors and the Kansas Geological Survey for 126 wells; and by Harvey County for 89 wells. In addition, data on 761 wells and 133 sites without wells resulting from a survey of rural landowners and residents by Harvey County as a part of the LEPP are contained in another data set. The data in these 7 data sets are available from the Harvey County Health Department in Newton, Kansas. (USGS)

  13. Quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002--10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Stone, Mandy S.; Poulton, Barry C.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Stream quality in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, was assessed on the basis of land use, hydrology, stream-water and streambed-sediment chemistry, riparian and in-stream habitat, and periphyton and macroinvertebrate community data collected from 22 sites during 2002 through 2010. Stream conditions at the end of the study period are evaluated and compared to previous years, stream biological communities and physical and chemical conditions are characterized, streams are described relative to Kansas Department of Health and Environment impairment categories and water-quality standards, and environmental factors that most strongly correlate with biological stream quality are evaluated. The information is useful for improving water-quality management programs, documenting changing conditions with time, and evaluating compliance with water-quality standards, total maximum daily loads (TMDLs), National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit conditions, and other established guidelines and goals. Constituent concentrations in water during base flow varied across the study area and 2010 conditions were not markedly different from those measured in 2003, 2004, and 2007. Generally the highest specific conductance and concentrations of dissolved solids and major ions in water occurred at urban sites except the upstream Cedar Creek site, which is rural and has a large area of commercial and industrial land less than 1 mile upstream on both sides of the creek. The highest base-flow nutrient concentrations in water occurred downstream from wastewater treatment facilities. Water chemistry data represent base-flow conditions only, and do not show the variability in concentrations that occurs during stormwater runoff. Constituent concentrations in streambed sediment also varied across the study area and some notable changes occurred from previously collected data. High organic carbon and nutrient concentrations at the rural Big Bull Creek site in 2003 decreased

  14. Kansas-type cyclothems and porosity development in Middle Pennsylvanian Marmaton Group, Dirks field, Logan County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, C.D.

    1983-08-01

    Seven depositional units are recognized in the Texaco 2 Dirks core (4374 to 4419.5 ft, 1333 to 1347 m) from the upper part of the Middle Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Marmaton Group, Dirks field, Logan County, Kansas. These units make up two Kansas-type cyclothems, the Altamont and Lenapah, and record deposition in response to fluctuating sea level and differing terrigenous influx on the broad, epeiric shelf that was the northern extension of the Hugoton embayment. The units correspond to Heckel's basic, Kansas-type cyclothem members, which are (transgressive) middle limestone, (transgressive) core shale, (regressive) upper limestone, and (regressive) outside shale. The Altamont cyclothem lacks the core shale and perhaps the middle limestone, both of which are present in outcrops in eastern Kansas. The overlying Lenapah cyclothem contains all of the basic members of Heckel's Kansas-type cyclothem. The (transgressive) middle limestone of the Lenapah cyclothem is a relatively thin, locally burrowed, bioclast wackestone containing Osagia-coated bioclasts and a relatively diverse marine biota. Overlying this is calcareous, olive-gray to olive-black, fissile core shale containing phosphorite nodules and local brachiopods. Outside (regressive) shales in the Dirks 2 core are greenish to brownish gray. Porosity development in the Altamont and Lenapah cyclothems of the Dirks 2 is restricted to the upper limestone members. The Worland limestone displays intragranular, secondary moldic, solution-enlarged moldic, vuggy, and fracture porosity. Porosity and permeability are fair to good locally and are thought to reflect, for the most part, meteoric diagenesis related to subaerial exposure on a subtle Altamont high on the sea floor.

  15. Evaluation of effects of groundwater withdrawals at the proposed Allen combined-cycle combustion turbine plant, Shelby County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugh, Connor J.

    2016-08-10

    The Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study groundwater-flow model was used to simulate the potential effects of future groundwater withdrawals at the proposed Allen combined-cycle combustion turbine plant in Shelby County, Tennessee. The scenario used in the simulation consisted of a 30-year average withdrawal period followed by a 30-day maximum withdrawal period. Effects of withdrawals at the Allen plant site on the Mississippi embayment aquifer system were evaluated by comparing the difference in simulated water levels in the aquifers at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and at the end of the scenario to a base case without the Allen combined-cycle combustion turbine plant withdrawals. Simulated potentiometric surface declines in the Memphis aquifer at the Allen plant site were about 7 feet at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and 11 feet at the end of the scenario. The affected area of the Memphis aquifer at the Allen plant site as delineated by the 4-foot potentiometric surface-decline contour was 2,590 acres at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and 11,380 acres at the end of the scenario. Simulated declines in the underlying Fort Pillow aquifer and overlying shallow aquifer were both less than 1 foot at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and the end of the scenario.

  16. Evaluation of effects of groundwater withdrawals at the proposed Allen combined-cycle combustion turbine plant, Shelby County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugh, Connor J.

    2016-01-01

    The Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study groundwater-flow model was used to simulate the potential effects of future groundwater withdrawals at the proposed Allen combined-cycle combustion turbine plant in Shelby County, Tennessee. The scenario used in the simulation consisted of a 30-year average withdrawal period followed by a 30-day maximum withdrawal period. Effects of withdrawals at the Allen plant site on the Mississippi embayment aquifer system were evaluated by comparing the difference in simulated water levels in the aquifers at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and at the end of the scenario to a base case without the Allen combined-cycle combustion turbine plant withdrawals. Simulated potentiometric surface declines in the Memphis aquifer at the Allen plant site were about 7 feet at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and 11 feet at the end of the scenario. The affected area of the Memphis aquifer at the Allen plant site as delineated by the 4-foot potentiometric surface-decline contour was 2,590 acres at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and 11,380 acres at the end of the scenario. Simulated declines in the underlying Fort Pillow aquifer and overlying shallow aquifer were both less than 1 foot at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and the end of the scenario.

  17. Change in surficial water area, Quivera National Wildlife Refuge, Stafford County, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarger, H. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. MSS-7 images acquired in August, October, and December 1972 revealed changes in both the number of water pools and surficial water area of larger pools in Quivera National Wildlife Refuge (Big and Little Salt Marsh), Stafford County, Kansas.

  18. Productive and Reproductive Work on the Family Farm: Changes Among Ethnic Groups in Ellis County, Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flora, Cornelia Butler; Stitz, John

    This report is based on data obtained from historical documents, quantitative analysis of state agricultural censuses for 1885, 1895, and 1905, and interviews with farm women of Volga and German heritages, aged 14 to 87. The participation of women in wheat-based farming systems in Ellis County, Kansas, is examined as related to the ethnic…

  19. Employer Manpower Needs and Job Entry Requirements for Paralegals within Johnson County, Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatham, Elaine L.

    In order to determine whether a paralegal program could be successfully implemented at Johnson County Community College, surveys were sent to 262 local attorneys (with a 24% response rate) and to 41 members of the Kansas City Association of Legal Assistants (71% response). Emphasis was placed on determining area employment needs and the…

  20. "A Little Place Getting Smaller": Perceptions of Place and the Depopulation of Gove County, Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbreath, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Go west on Interstate 70, past Salina and Highway 81, the unofficial line of demarcation between eastern and western Kansas. Beyond Bob Dole's childhood home of Russell and the regional center of Hays you will come to Gove County. Though the highway is littered with advertisements for Colby and Goodland, towns that lie farther west, nothing…

  1. Water quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    Water quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas was evaluated from October 2002 through December 2007 in a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program. Water quality at 42 stream sites, representing urban and rural basins, was characterized by evaluating benthic macroinvertebrates, water (discrete and continuous data), and/or streambed sediment. Point and nonpoint sources and transport were described for water-quality constituents including suspended sediment, dissolved solids and major ions, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), indicator bacteria, pesticides, and organic wastewater and pharmaceutical compounds. The information obtained from this study is being used by city and county officials to develop effective management plans for protecting and improving stream quality. This fact sheet summarizes important results from three comprehensive reports published as part of the study and available on the World Wide Web at http://ks.water.usgs.gov/Kansas/studies/qw/joco/. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  2. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge on stream quality in Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Foster, Guy M.

    2014-01-01

    Contaminants from point and other urban sources affect stream quality in Indian Creek, which is one of the most urban drainage basins in Johnson County, Kansas. The Johnson County Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities discharge to Indian Creek. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, during June 2004 through June 2013 were used to evaluate stream quality in Indian Creek. This fact sheet summarizes the effects of wastewater effluent discharge on physical, chemical, and biological conditions in Indian Creek downstream from the Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities.

  3. Stormwater Runoff: What it is and Why it is Important in Johnson County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Schmidt, Heather C.

    2009-01-01

    Stormwater runoff is a leading contributor to pollution in streams, rivers, and lakes in Johnson County, Kansas, and nationwide. Because stormwater runoff contains pollutants from many different sources, decreasing pollution from stormwater runoff is a challenging task. It requires cooperation from residents, businesses, and municipalities. An important step in protecting streams from stormwater pollution is understanding watershed processes, stormwater characteristics, and their combined effects on streams and water quality.

  4. Continuous Water-Quality Monitoring of Streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Lee, Casey J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2008-01-01

    Water quality in Johnson County, Kansas was characterized on the basis of continuous, in-stream monitoring. The results summarized in this fact sheet may be used to better understand concentration and load variability during changing seasonal and streamflow conditions and to assess water-quality conditions relative to water-quality standards and management goals. The baseline information also will be useful for evaluating future changes in land use and effectiveness of implemented best management practices.

  5. Flood-inundation maps for Indian Creek and Tomahawk Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Arin J.; Studley, Seth E.

    2016-01-25

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.4-mile upper reach of Indian Creek from College Boulevard to the confluence with Tomahawk Creek, a 3.9-mile reach of Tomahawk Creek from 127th Street to the confluence with Indian Creek, and a 1.9-mile lower reach of Indian Creek from the confluence with Tomahawk Creek to just beyond the Kansas/Missouri border at State Line Road in Johnson County, Kansas, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Overland Park, Kansas. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgages on Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas. Near real time stages at these streamgages may be obtained on the Web from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at these sites.Flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated for each reach by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the streamgages. The hydraulic models were then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; 17 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and 14 water-surface profiles for Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas, for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the next interval above the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood level (500-year recurrence interval). The

  6. Biological Conditions in Streams of Johnson County, Kansas, and Nearby Missouri, 2003 and 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, Barry C.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Lee, Casey J.

    2007-01-01

    Johnson County is one of the fastest growing and most populated counties in Kansas. Urban development affects streams by altering stream hydrology, geomorphology, water chemistry, and habitat, which then can lead to adverse effects on fish and macroinvertebrate communities. In addition, increasing sources of contaminants in urbanizing streams results in public-health concerns associated with exposure to and consumption of contaminated water. Biological assessments, or surveys of organisms living in aquatic environments, are crucial components of water-quality programs because they provide an indication of how well water bodies support aquatic life. This fact sheet describes current biological conditions of Johnson County streams and characterizes stream biology relative to urban development. Biological conditions were evaluated by collecting macroinvertebrate samples from 15 stream sites in Johnson County, Kansas, in 2003 and 2004 (fig. 1). Data from seven additional sites, collected as part of a separate study with similar objectives in Kansas and Missouri (Wilkison and others, 2005), were evaluated to provide a more comprehensive assessment of watersheds that cross State boundaries. Land-use and water- and streambed-sediment-quality data also were used to evaluate factors that may affect macroinvertebrate communities. Metrics are indices used to measure, or evaluate, macroinvertebrate response to various factors such as human disturbance. Multimetric scores, which integrated 10 different metrics that measure various aspects of macroinvertebrate communities, including organism diversity, composition, tolerance, and feeding characteristics, were used to evaluate and compare biological health of Johnson County streams. This information is useful to city and county officials for defining current biological conditions, evaluating conditions relative to State biological criteria, evaluating effects of urbanization, developing effective water-quality management plans

  7. Demonstration project number 39, hot mix recycling, Gray County, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maag, R. G.; Parcells, W. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this demonstration project was to evaluate the hot mix recycling process as a method of renovating a badly cracked and otherwise deteriorated section of road mixed bituminous paving in southwestern Kansas. The equipment used on the project included a cold milling machine to reclaim the upper portion of existing pavement; a drum dryer hot mix plant modified to process the material; and other standard hot mix laydown and compaction machines. Energy consumption comparisons in equivalent gallons of fuel indicate a savings of 17.8% when the recycled method is compared to using all new aggregate. The energy savings is primarily due to less asphaltic cement required and less fuel needed to mill and reuse the existing pavement than to quarry and haul in an equivalent quantity of new aggregate.

  8. Hydrogeology and ground-water-quality conditions at the Emporia- Lyon County Landfill, eastern Kansas, 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, N.C.; Bigsby, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogeology and water-quality conditions at the Emporia-Lyon County Landfill, eastern Kansas, were investigated from April 1988 through April 1989. Potentiometric-surface maps indicated groundwater movement from the northeast and northwest towards the landfill and then south through the landfill to the Cottonwood River. The maps indicate that during periods of low groundwater levels, groundwater flows northward in the north-west part of the landfill, which may have been induced by water withdrawal from wells north of the landfill or by water ponded in waste lagoons south and west of the landfill. Chemical analysis of water samples from monitoring wells upgradient and downgradient of the landfill indicate calcium bicarbonate to be the dominant water type. No inorganic or organic chemical concentrations exceeded Kansas or Federal primary drinking-water standards. Kansas secondary drinking-water standards were equaled or exceeded, however, in water from some or all wells for total hardness, dissolved solids, iron, and manganese. Water from one upgradient well contained larger concentrations of dissolved oxygen and nitrate, and smaller concentrations of bicarbonate, alkalinity, ammonia, arsenic, iron, and manganese as compared to all other monitoring wells. Results of this investigation indicate that groundwater quality downgradient of well MW-2 has increased concentrations of some inorganic and organic compounds. Due to the industrial nature of the area and the changing directions of groundwater flow, it is not clear what the source of these compounds might be. Long-term monitoring, additional wells, and access to nearby waste lagoons and waste-lagoon monitoring wells would help define the sources of increased inorganic and organic compounds. (USGS)

  9. Hydrogeology and ground-water-quality conditions at the Geary County landfill, northeast Kansas, 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, N.C.; Bigsby, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical analysis of water from monitoring wells upgradient and downgradient of the Geary County Landfill in Kansas near Junction City indicate the presence of several chemically distinct water types. For the dominant calcium bicarbonate water type, concentrations of inorganic and organic constituents indicate the presence of reducing conditions within the landfill and increased concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, sulfate, chloride, ammonia, iron, manganese, and other trace elements downgradient within a leachate plume that extends northeasterly away from the landfill. The orientation of the long axis of the leachate plume does not coincide with the August or September directions of groundwater flow, possibly due to the effect of abundant rainfall and high river stages at other times of the year or preferential flow in very transmissive zones, and thus may indicate the dominant direction of groundwater flow. None of the organic-constituent or inorganic-constituent concentrations exceeded secondary drinking-water standards. Concentrations of benzene, vinyl chloride, and 1,2-trans-dichloroethene exceeded Kansas notification levels. (USGS)

  10. ERTS-1 data collection systems used to predict wheat disease severities. [Riley County, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemasu, E. T.; Schimmelpfenning, H.; Choy, E. C.; Eversmeyer, M. G.; Lenhert, D.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The feasibility of using the data collection system on ERTS-1 to predict wheat leaf rust severity and resulting yield loss was tested. Ground-based data collection platforms (DCP'S), placed in two commercial wheat fields in Riley County, Kansas, transmitted to the satellite such meteorological information as maximum and minimum temperature, relative humidity, and hours of free moisture. Meteorological data received from the two DCP'S from April 23 to 29 were used to estimate the disease progress curve. Values from the curve were used to predict the percentage decrease in wheat yields resulting from leaf rust. Actual decrease in yield was obtained by applying a zinc and maneb spray (5.6 kg/ha) to control leaf rust, then comparing yields of the controlled (healthy) and the noncontrolled (rusted) areas. In each field a 9% decrease in yield was predicted by the DCP-derived data; actual decreases were 12% and 9%.

  11. Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

    2007-03-31

    The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier

  12. Kinematics, mechanics, and potential earthquake hazards for faults in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ohlmacher, G.C.; Berendsen, P.

    2005-01-01

    Many stable continental regions have subregions with poorly defined earthquake hazards. Analysis of minor structures (folds and faults) in these subregions can improve our understanding of the tectonics and earthquake hazards. Detailed structural mapping in Pottawatomie County has revealed a suite consisting of two uplifted blocks aligned along a northeast trend and surrounded by faults. The first uplift is located southwest of the second. The northwest and southeast sides of these uplifts are bounded by northeast-trending right-lateral faults. To the east, both uplifts are bounded by north-trending reverse faults, and the first uplift is bounded by a north-trending high-angle fault to the west. The structural suite occurs above a basement fault that is part of a series of north-northeast-trending faults that delineate the Humboldt Fault Zone of eastern Kansas, an integral part of the Midcontinent Rift System. The favored kinematic model is a contractional stepover (push-up) between echelon strike-slip faults. Mechanical modeling using the boundary element method supports the interpretation of the uplifts as contractional stepovers and indicates that an approximately east-northeast maximum compressive stress trajectory is responsible for the formation of the structural suite. This stress trajectory suggests potential activity during the Laramide Orogeny, which agrees with the age of kimberlite emplacement in adjacent Riley County. The current stress field in Kansas has a N85??W maximum compressive stress trajectory that could potentially produce earthquakes along the basement faults. Several epicenters of seismic events (

  13. 40 CFR 81.317 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... City area is a maintenance area for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Kansas... County X Cherokee County X Cheyenne County X Clark County X Clay County X Cloud County X Coffey County X... Chautauqua County X Cherokee County X Cheyenne County X Clark County X Clay County X Cloud County X...

  14. 40 CFR 81.317 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... City area is a maintenance area for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Kansas... County X Cherokee County X Cheyenne County X Clark County X Clay County X Cloud County X Coffey County X... Chautauqua County X Cherokee County X Cheyenne County X Clark County X Clay County X Cloud County X...

  15. 40 CFR 81.317 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... City area is a maintenance area for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Kansas... County X Cherokee County X Cheyenne County X Clark County X Clay County X Cloud County X Coffey County X... Chautauqua County X Cherokee County X Cheyenne County X Clark County X Clay County X Cloud County X...

  16. 40 CFR 81.317 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... City area is a maintenance area for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Kansas... County X Cherokee County X Cheyenne County X Clark County X Clay County X Cloud County X Coffey County X... Chautauqua County X Cherokee County X Cheyenne County X Clark County X Clay County X Cloud County X...

  17. Determination of irrigation pumpage in parts of Kearny and Finney Counties, southwestern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Irrigation pumpage was determined for parts of Kearny and Finney Counties in Southwestern Kansas using crop-acreage data and consumptive, irrigation-water requirements. Irrigated acreages for 1974-80 were compiled for wheat, grain sorghum, corn, and alfalfa using records from the U.S. Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service. Consumptive-irrigation requirements were computed using a soil-moisture model. The model tabulated monthly soil-moisture and crop-water demand for various crops and computed the volume of irrigation water needed to maintain the available moisture at 50% for loamy soils or at 60% for sandy soils. Irrigated acres in the study area increased from 265,000 acres during 1974 to 321,000 acres during 1980. Irrigation pumpage increased from 584,000 acre-feet during 1974 to 738,000 acre-feet during 1980. Decreased consumptive-irrigation requirements during 1979 resulted in a comparatively small irrigation-pumpage estimate of 458,000 acre-feet. (USGS)

  18. Quality of Streams in Johnson County, Kansas, and Relations to Environmental Variables, 2003-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Poulton, Barry C.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    The quality of streams and relations to environmental variables in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, were evaluated using water, streambed sediment, land use, streamflow, habitat, algal periphyton (benthic algae), and benthic macroinvertebrate data. Water, streambed sediment, and macroinvertebrate samples were collected in March 2007 during base flow at 20 stream sites that represent 11 different watersheds in the county. In addition, algal periphyton samples were collected twice (spring and summer 2007) at one-half of the sites. Environmental data including water and streambed-sediment chemistry data (primarily nutrients, fecal-indicator bacteria, and organic wastewater compounds), land use, streamflow, and habitat data were used in statistical analyses to evaluate relations between biological conditions and variables that may affect them. This report includes an evaluation of water and streambed-sediment chemistry, assessment of habitat conditions, comparison of biological community attributes (such as composition, diversity, and abundance) among sampling sites, placement of sampling sites into impairment categories, evaluation of biological data relative to environmental variables, and evaluation of changes in biological communities and effects of urbanization. This evaluation is useful for understanding factors that affect stream quality, for improving water-quality management programs, and for documenting changing conditions over time. The information will become increasingly important for protecting streams in the future as urbanization continues. Results of this study indicate that the biological quality at nearly all biological sampling sites in Johnson County has some level of impairment. Periphyton taxa generally were indicative of somewhat degraded conditions with small to moderate amounts of organic enrichment. Camp Branch in the Blue River watershed was the only site that met State criteria for full support of aquatic life in 2007. Since 2003

  19. Hydrologic and related data for water-supply planning in an intensive-study area, northeastern Wichita County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kume, Jack; Dunlap, L.E.; Gutentag, E.D.; Thomas, J.G.

    1979-01-01

    Data are presented that result from an intensive geohydrologic study for water-supply planning in a 12-square-mile area in northeastern Wichita County, Kansas. These data include records of wells, test drilling, chemical analyses, ground-water levels, rainfall, soil moisture, well yield, solar radiation, crop yield , and crop acreage. Data indicate that water levels in the unconsolidated aquifer are declining at an average annual rate of about 1 to 2 feet per year (1950-78). This decline is the aquifer 's response to pumping by irrigation wells for watering corn, wheat, grain sorghum, and other crops. (Kosco-USGS)

  20. 78 FR 41911 - Foreign-Trade Zone 161-Sedgwick County, Kansas; Authorization of Production Activity; Siemens...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... Activity; Siemens Energy, Inc. (Wind Turbine Nacelles and Hubs); Hutchinson, Kansas On March 7, 2013... (78 FR 20888, April 8, 2013). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of the activity...

  1. Enhanced carbonate reservoir model for an old reservoir utilizing new techniques: The Schaben Field (Mississippian), Ness County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.P.; Guy, W.J.; Franseen, E.K.; Bhattacharya, S.

    1996-12-31

    The Pennsylvanian-Mississippian unconformity is a major stratigraphic event in Kansas that truncates rocks ranging from Precambrian to Mississippian. Many of the 6,000 fields in Kansas are located immediately beneath this unconformity. One example, Schaben Field located in Ness County, Kansas, has produced approximately 9 million barrels since it was discovered in 1963. Production is from the Mississippian (Osagian) cherty dolomites beneath the inconformity. The field was initially developed on a regular forty-acre spacing, but recent drilling has demonstrated the potential for additional targeted infill drilling. To develop an enhanced reservoir model for the Schabin field modern core, log, and well data were integrated with the existing data. New techniques such as {open_quotes}Pseudoseismic{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}Super{close_quotes} Pickett plot were used to leverage the existing data and provide tools for analysis and 3D visualization. The pseudoseismic approach uses well-logs within a standard 3D seismic visualization system to provide a detailed macroscale view of karst patterns. The petrophysical analyses using the {open_quotes}Super{close_quotes} Pickett plot were used to recognize subtle trends and patterns for each of multiple reservoir intervals. Visual and petrographic examination of core from the field confirms karst development and indicates multiple stages of fracturing, brecciation, and dissolution features that were important in controlling and modifying development of reservoirs. The understanding of the reservoir heterogeneities resulting from the paleokarst model at Schaben field emphasizes the importance of integrating available data with new techniques to provide a predictive tool for discovery of additional pay within existing subunconformity fields in Kansas.

  2. Enhanced carbonate reservoir model for an old reservoir utilizing new techniques: The Schaben Field (Mississippian), Ness County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.P.; Guy, W.J.; Franseen, E.K.; Bhattacharya, S. )

    1996-01-01

    The Pennsylvanian-Mississippian unconformity is a major stratigraphic event in Kansas that truncates rocks ranging from Precambrian to Mississippian. Many of the 6,000 fields in Kansas are located immediately beneath this unconformity. One example, Schaben Field located in Ness County, Kansas, has produced approximately 9 million barrels since it was discovered in 1963. Production is from the Mississippian (Osagian) cherty dolomites beneath the inconformity. The field was initially developed on a regular forty-acre spacing, but recent drilling has demonstrated the potential for additional targeted infill drilling. To develop an enhanced reservoir model for the Schabin field modern core, log, and well data were integrated with the existing data. New techniques such as [open quotes]Pseudoseismic[close quotes] and the [open quotes]Super[close quotes] Pickett plot were used to leverage the existing data and provide tools for analysis and 3D visualization. The pseudoseismic approach uses well-logs within a standard 3D seismic visualization system to provide a detailed macroscale view of karst patterns. The petrophysical analyses using the [open quotes]Super[close quotes] Pickett plot were used to recognize subtle trends and patterns for each of multiple reservoir intervals. Visual and petrographic examination of core from the field confirms karst development and indicates multiple stages of fracturing, brecciation, and dissolution features that were important in controlling and modifying development of reservoirs. The understanding of the reservoir heterogeneities resulting from the paleokarst model at Schaben field emphasizes the importance of integrating available data with new techniques to provide a predictive tool for discovery of additional pay within existing subunconformity fields in Kansas.

  3. Hydrogeology and ground-water-quality conditions at the Linn County landfill, eastern Kansas, 1988-89

    SciTech Connect

    Falwell, R.; Bigsby, P.R.; Myers, N.C. )

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the hydrogeology and groundwater quality conditions near the Linn County Landfill, eastern Kansas was conducted from July 1988 through June 1989. The landfill is located in an unreclaimed coal strip-mine area near Prescott. Analysis of water levels from nine temporary wells and from strip-mine ponds indicated that groundwater flows southwest through the present landfill. A county road west of the landfill acts as a barrier to shallow westerly groundwater flow. Seasonal variations in the direction of groundwater flow may occur. Water samples from monitoring wells and a strip-mine pond were analyzed for inorganic and organic compounds. Iron, manganese, and dissolved-organic-carbon concentrations were good indicators of the presence of landfill leachate in the groundwater. Benzene, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1-dichloroethane, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane were also detected. None of the inorganic or organic compounds detected exceeded Kansas primary drinking-water standards. Chemical concentrations and water levels in some nested wells indicate there is a hydraulic connection between the strip-mine spoil material and the underlying limestone. Leachate-contaminated groundwater has the potential to migrate southwest corner of the landfill through either strip-mine spoil material or through the underlying Pawnee Limestone.

  4. Assessment of biological conditions at selected stream sites in Johnson County, Kansas, and Cass and Jackson Counties, Missouri, 2003 and 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, Barry C.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Lee, Casey J.

    2007-01-01

    Macroinvertebrate samples were collected at 15 stream sites representing 11 different watersheds in Johnson County, Kansas, in 2003 and 2004 to assess biological conditions in streams and relations to environmental variables. Published data from an additional seven stream sites, one in Johnson County, Kansas, and six others in adjacent Cass and Jackson Counties in Missouri also were evaluated. Multimetric scores, which integrated a combination of measures that describe various aspects of biological community abundance and diversity, were used to evaluate and compare the biological health of streams. In addition, for 15 of 16 Johnson County stream sites, environmental data (streamflow, precipitation, and land use) and water- and sediment-quality data (primarily nutrients, indicator bacteria, and organic wastewater compounds) were used in statistical analyses to evaluate relations between macroinvertebrate metrics and variables that may affect them. The information is useful for defining current conditions, evaluating conditions relative to State aquatic-life support and total maximum daily load requirements, evaluating effects of urbanization, developing effective water-quality management plans, and documenting changes in biological condition and water quality.Biological conditions in selected Johnson County streams generally reflected a gradient in the degree of human disturbances upstream from the sites, including percentage of urban and agricultural land use as well as the presence, absence, and proximity of wastewater treatment discharges. In this report, the term gradient is used to describe a continuum in the conditions (biological, environmental, or land use) observed at the study sites. Upstream Blue River sites, downstream from primarily agricultural land use, consistently scored among the sites least impacted by human disturbance, and in some metrics these sites scored higher than the State reference site (Captain Creek). The term impact, as used in this

  5. Assessment of Biological Conditions at Selected Stream Sites in Johnson County, Kansas, and Cass and Jackson Counties, Missouri, 2003 and 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, Barry C.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Lee, Casey J.

    2007-01-01

    Macroinvertebrate samples were collected at 15 stream sites representing 11 different watersheds in Johnson County, Kansas, in 2003 and 2004 to assess biological conditions in streams and relations to environmental variables. Published data from an additional seven stream sites, one in Johnson County, Kansas, and six others in adjacent Cass and Jackson Counties in Missouri also were evaluated. Multimetric scores, which integrated a combination of measures that describe various aspects of biological community abundance and diversity, were used to evaluate and compare the biological health of streams. In addition, for 15 of 16 Johnson County stream sites, environmental data (streamflow, precipitation, and land use) and water- and sediment-quality data (primarily nutrients, indicator bacteria, and organic wastewater compounds) were used in statistical analyses to evaluate relations between macroinvertebrate metrics and variables that may affect them. The information is useful for defining current conditions, evaluating conditions relative to State aquatic-life support and total maximum daily load requirements, evaluating effects of urbanization, developing effective water-quality management plans, and documenting changes in biological condition and water quality. Biological conditions in selected Johnson County streams generally reflected a gradient in the degree of human disturbances upstream from the sites, including percentage of urban and agricultural land use as well as the presence, absence, and proximity of wastewater treatment discharges. In this report, the term gradient is used to describe a continuum in the conditions (biological, environmental, or land use) observed at the study sites. Upstream Blue River sites, downstream from primarily agricultural land use, consistently scored among the sites least impacted by human disturbance, and in some metrics these sites scored higher than the State reference site (Captain Creek). The term impact, as used in this

  6. The Fear of Color: "Webb v. School District No. 90 in Johnson County, Kansas," 1949

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Donna M.; Friend, Jennifer; Caruthers, Loyce

    2010-01-01

    About 50 miles east of Topeka, Kansas, in what is now the suburban town of Merriam sits South Park Elementary School. Built in 1947 for white children at a cost of $90,000, the school at that time showcased eight modern classrooms, a multi-purpose auditorium, a lunchroom, and playground. Today, the building serves as a monument to a struggle for…

  7. High-resolution seismic-reflection imaging 25 years of change in I-70 sinkhole, Russell County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Steeples, D.W.; Lambrecht, J.L.; Croxton, N.

    2006-01-01

    Time-lapse seismic reflection imaging improved our understanding of the consistent, gradual surface subsidence ongoing at two sinkholes in the Gorham Oilfield discovered beneath a stretch of Interstate Highway 70 through Russell and Ellis Counties in Kansas in 1966. With subsidence occurring at a rate of around 10 cm per year since discovery, monitoring has been beneficial to ensure public safety and optimize maintenance. A miniSOSIE reflection survey conducted in 1980 delineated the affected subsurface and successfully predicted development of a third sinkhole at this site. In 2004 and 2005 a high-resolution vibroseis survey was completed to ascertain current conditions of the subsurface, rate and pattern of growth since 1980, and potential for continued growth. With time and improved understanding of the salt dissolution affected subsurface in this area it appears that these features represent little risk to the public from catastrophic failure. However, from an operational perspective the Kansas Department of Transportation should expect continued subsidence, with future increases in surface area likely at a slightly reduced vertical rate. Seismic characteristics appear empirically consistent with gradual earth material compaction/settling. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  8. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 19 June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 19 June 1965 ICONOSTASIS AND CHANDELIER - Holy Trinity Russian & Greek Orthodox Church, 1121 North Leavitt Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  9. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 19 June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 19 June 1965 SANCTUARY FROM ENTRANCE - Holy Trinity Russian & Greek Orthodox Church, 1121 North Leavitt Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  10. Participatory Evaluation of a Community Mobilization Effort to Enroll Wyandotte County, Kansas, Residents Through the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Sepers, Charles E.; McKain, Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Successful implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) depends on the capacity of local communities to mobilize for action. Yet the literature offers few systematic investigations of what communities are doing to ensure support for enrollment. In this empirical case study, we report implementation and outcomes of Enroll Wyandotte, a community mobilization effort to facilitate enrollment through the ACA in Wyandotte County, Kansas. We describe mobilization activities during the first round of open enrollment in coverage under the ACA (October 1, 2013–March 31, 2014), including the unfolding of community and organizational changes (e.g., new enrollment sites) and services provided to assist enrollment over time. The findings show an association between implementation measures and newly created accounts under the ACA (the primary outcome). PMID:25905820

  11. Natural ground-water-recharge data from three selected sites in Harvey County, south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    The cities of Wichita, Newton, and several smaller towns pump large quantities of water from the ' Equus Beds ' aquifer in south-central Kansas. The aquifer also supplies large quantities of water for irrigation at a steadily increasing rate. The Harvey County Planning and Zoning Commission entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey to collect information on natural recharge at three sites having different soils and unsaturated lithologies. Data summarized in tabular form include daily rainfall amounts, average soil moisture for selected layers, water-table levels, and neutron-measured soil moisture at 1-foot intervals. This information can be used in studying the possibility of protecting the aquifer from any development that might impede natural recharge. (USGS)

  12. Assessment of water resources in lead-zinc mined areas in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruill, T.B.

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate water-resource problems related to abandoned lead and zinc mines in Cherokee County, and adjacent areas in Oklahoma and Missouri. Discontinuities and perforations, which were produced by mining in the confining shale west of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact, have created artificial groundwater recharge and discharge areas. Abandoned wells and drill holes present the greatest contamination hazard to water supplies in the deep aquifer. There is a potential for downward movement from the shallow to the deep aquifer throughout the study area, with greatest potential in Ottawa County, Oklahoma. Principal effects of abandoned mines on groundwater quality are lowered pH and increased concentrations of sulfate and trace metals of water in the mines. No conclusive evidence of lateral migration of contaminated mine water from the mines into the water-supply wells adjacent to the mines was found. Analyses of water from the deep aquifer did not indicate trace-metal contamination. The effects of abandoned mines on streamwater quality are most severe in Short Creek and Tar Creek. Increased concentrations of zinc and manganese were observed in the Spring River below Short Creek Kansas. (USGS)

  13. Hot bituminous pavement recycling US-56, Edwards and Pawnee counties, Kansas. Final report 1989-1993

    SciTech Connect

    Fager, G.A.; Maag, R.G.

    1993-10-01

    A study was undertaken between 1978 and 1993 to construct and monitor a hot recycle section. One hot recycle test section and one control section were completed in 1978 and monitored for cracking for approximately 12 years. This project was the first hot recycle project constructed in Kansas and one of the first in the United States. Using the experimental cost data and only cracking to determine pavement life, this hot recycle project was not economically feasible. Wheelpath rutting was not a problem throughout the life of both pavements. Opacity and particulate requirements were never met on this first hot recycle project. Due to the many unknowns, the project was considered a success.

  14. IMPROVED APPROACHES TO DESIGN OF POLYMER GEL TREATMENTS IN MATURE OIL FIELDS: FIELD DEMONSTRATION IN DICKMAN FIELD, NESS COUNTY, KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Fowler

    2004-11-30

    This report describes the results of the one-year project entitled ''Improved Approaches to Design of Polymer Gel Treatments in Mature Oil Fields: Field Demonstration in Dickman Field, Ness County, Kansas''. The project was a 12-month collaboration of Grand Mesa Operating Company (a small independent), TIORCO Inc. (a company focused on improved recovery technology) and the University of Kansas. The study undertook tasks to determine an optimum polymer gel treatment design in Mississippian reservoirs, demonstrate application, and evaluate the success of the program. The project investigated geologic and engineering parameters and cost-effective technologies required for design and implementation of effective polymer gel treatment programs in the Mississippian reservoir in the Midcontinent. The majority of Mississippian production in Kansas occurs at or near the top of the Mississippian section just below the regional sub-Pennsylvanian unconformity and karst surface. Dickman Field with the extremely high water cuts and low recovery factors is typical of Mississippian reservoirs. Producibility problems in these reservoirs include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, and most significantly extremely high water cuts and low recovery factors that place continued operations at or near their economic limits. Geologic, geophysical and engineering data were integrated to provide a technical foundation for candidate selection and treatment design. Data includes core, engineering data, and 3D seismic data. Based on technical and economic considerations a well was selected for gel-polymer treatment (Grand Mesa Operating Company Tilley No.2). The treatment was not successful due to the small amount of polymer that could be injected. Data from the initial well and other candidates in the demonstration area was analyzed using geologic, geophysical and engineering data. Based on the results of the treatment and the integrated reservoir

  15. Model documentation for relations between continuous real-time and discrete water-quality constituents in Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, June 2004 through May 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Mandy L.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Johnson County is the fastest growing county in Kansas, with a population of about 560,000 people in 2012. Urban growth and development can have substantial effects on water quality, and streams in Johnson County are affected by nonpoint-source pollutants from stormwater runoff and point-source discharges such as municipal wastewater effluent. Understanding of current (2014) water-quality conditions and the effects of urbanization is critical for the protection and remediation of aquatic resources in Johnson County, Kansas and downstream reaches located elsewhere. The Indian Creek Basin is 194 square kilometers and includes parts of Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri. Approximately 86 percent of the Indian Creek Basin is located in Johnson County, Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, operated a series of six continuous real-time water-quality monitoring stations in the Indian Creek Basin during June 2011 through May 2013; one of these sites has been operating since February 2004. Five monitoring sites were located on Indian Creek and one site was located on Tomahawk Creek. The purpose of this report is to document regression models that establish relations between continuously measured water-quality properties and discretely collected water-quality constituents. Continuously measured water-quality properties include streamflow, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and nitrate. Discrete water-quality samples were collected during June 2011 through May 2013 at five new sites and June 2004 through May 2013 at a long-term site and analyzed for sediment, nutrients, bacteria, and other water-quality constituents. Regression models were developed to establish relations between discretely sampled constituent concentrations and continuously measured physical properties to estimate concentrations of those constituents of interest that are not easily measured in real time

  16. Quality-of-water data and statistical summary for selected coal-mined strip pits in Crawford and Cherokee counties, southeastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, Larry M.; Diaz, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Quality-of-water data, collected October 21-23, 1980, and a statistical summary are presented for 42 coal-mined strip pits in Crawford and Cherokee Counties, Southeastern Kansas. The statistical summary includes minimum and maximum observed values , mean, and standard deviation. Simple linear regression equations relating specific conductance, dissolved solids, and acidity to concentrations of dissolved solids, sulfate, calcium, and magnesium, potassium, aluminum, and iron are also presented. (USGS)

  17. Diagenesis and cement fabric of gas reservoirs in the Oligocene Vicksburg Formation, McAllen Ranch Field, Hidalgo County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, R.P.; Lynch, F.L. )

    1990-09-01

    McAllen Ranch field produces natural gas from 12 deep, overpressured sandstone packages, each interpreted to be the deposit of a prograding shelf-edge delta. One hundred and sixty thin sections from 350 ft of core were petrographically described. The sandstones are feldspathic litharenites containing subequal proportions of volcanic rock fragments (VRF), feldspar, and quartz grains. Grain size ranges from very fine to coarse sand. Porosity is mostly secondary, having formed through dissolution of VRF and feldspar grains. There are four major diagenetic facies (portions of core that can be grouped by the predominance of one diagenetic cement and similar appearance in hand specimen): (1) calcite cemented; (2) chlorite cemented, tight; (3) chlorite cemented, porous; and (4) quartz overgrowths, porous. The calcite-cemented facies predominates in very fine grained sandstones and siltstones and encroaches into adjoining sandstones irrespective of grain size. Sparry calcite filled all available pores and replaced some feldspar. Core permeabilities are generally less than 0.01 md, and porosities range from 7 to 15%. Authigenic clay (predominantly chlorite) generally cements sands intermediate in grain size between those cemented by calcite and those cemented by quartz. Two types of diagenetic clay fabric are interbedded, forming distinct alternating bands 0.1 in. to 3 ft thick. Gray, tightly chlorite-cemented bands are macroscopically and microscopically distinct from green, porous chlorite-cemented bands. In the tightly chlorite-cemented facies, permeabilities are less than 0.3 md, and porosities range from 8 to 16%. Small plates of chlorite fill interparticle pores, and secondary pores are rare. In the porous chlorite-cemented facies, dissolution of framework grains and chlorite cement increased porosity, and a second chlorite cement was precipitated. Core permeability ranges from 0.1 to 1 md, and porosities range from 15 to 20%.

  18. 40 CFR 81.317 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... City area is a maintenance area for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Kansas..., see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... County X Cherokee County X Cheyenne County X Clark County X Clay County X Cloud County X Coffey County...

  19. Spiculitic chert reservoir rocks: Glick Field, Kiowa and Comanche Counties, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.P.; Longman, M.W.

    1995-09-01

    Glick field, discovered in 1957, has produced more than 362 BCF of gas from Mississippian Osage chert commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Chat{close_quotes}. Other {open_quotes}Chat{close_quotes} reservoirs in Kansas and Oklahoma produce mainly from mixed chert and dolomite beneath the pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity, but Glick field`s reservoir is dominated by spiculitic chert. Glick field is a stratigraphic trap with production ending where the spiculitic facies pinches out into tight limestone to the south and west. Updip, to the northeast, the productive spiculitic facies is truncated by the unconformity. Reworked chert conglomerates overlying the spiculitic reservoir at the unconformity also produce minor amounts of gas. The spiculitic chert forming the reservoir was deposited below wavebase and grades laterally into echinoderm and brachiopod-rich skeletal wackstones and lime mudstones. Even where completely silicified, these associated limestones are tight. They form the lateral seal in the field. Thus, the reservoir is an in situ oval-shaped complex of internally brecciated sponge mats and bioherms capped in part by chert conglomerate. The spiculitic chert contains up to 50% porosity in molds after sponge spicules, matrix micropores, and vugs coupled with fracture and breccia porosity. Distribution of the sponge bioherms which form the reservoir facies was partly controlled by a subtle change on the shallow Mississippian carbonate shelf from clean skeletal limestones southward into shaly (and probable more anoxic) carbonates known locally as the {open_quotes}Cowley Facies.{close_quotes} This lithologic boundary can be mapped across southern Kansas and provides a potential exploration tool that may help in finding other stratigraphically trapped spiculitic reservoirs in the area.

  20. Geohydrology and model analysis of stream-aquifer system along the Arkansas River in Kearny and Finney Counties, southwestern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunlap, L.E.; Lindgren, Richard J.; Sauer, C.G.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made, in cooperation with the Division of Water Resources, Kansas State Board of Agriculture, to determine geohydrologic conditions in an area comprising nearly 850,000 acres along the Arkansas River valley in Kearny and Finney Counties, southwestern Kansas. The Arkansas River meanders atop and interacts hydraulically with the area's multilayered, unconsolidated aquifer system. Declines in static water levels in wells in the heavily pumped lower aquifer ranged from 20 to 80 feet during 1974-80. The river is dry in much of the area. A digital computer model was calibrated to simulate the trends of historic water levels. Simulated 1974-80 conditions depicted an average annual recharge to the unconsolidated aquifer system of 66,900 acre-feet from precipitation and 36,200 acre-feet from river and canal seepage and boundary inflow. Simulated average annual discharge consisted of 634,800 acre-feet from pumpage and boundary outflow. Simulated average annual recharge to the unconsolidated aquifer system was 531,700 acre-feet less than average annual discharge, indicating the ground-water resource is currently (1982) being mined in the study area. Simulation also indicated that there would be sufficient saturated thickness in 2005 for irrigation if 1980 hydrologic conditions continued. Seepage losses from the Arkansas River and irrigation canals are a major source of recharge to the unconsolidated aquifer system. Therefore, the amount of flow in the Arkansas River would be important in determining the rate of future water-level declines in the study area. Streamflow seepage losses could be decreased by (1) decreasing the number of wells pumping in the study area in order to reduce downward leakage from the valley aquifer, or (2) increasing streamflow discharge in order to recharge the valley aquifer. The rate and direction of flow between the river and the valley aquifer depend on the hydraulic conductivity of the streambed and the hydraulic gradient between the

  1. Education Profile of Kansas Hispanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Human Resources, Topeka.

    The education and employment of Kansas Hispanics in public, elementary and secondary schools were examined, utilizing 1980 data from the U.S. Census Bureau and 1979 data from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Data pertained to 18 counties located in western, central, and eastern Kansas: Finney, Ford, Grant, Seward, Sherman, Harvey,…

  2. Assessment of water resources in lead-zinc mined areas in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruill, Timothy B.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate water-resources problems related to abandoned lead and zinc mines in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas in Missouri and Oklahoma. Past mining activities have caused changes in the hydrogeology of the area. Lead and zinc mining has caused discontinuities and perforations in the confining shale west of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact (referred to as the western area), which have created artificial ground-water recharge and discharge areas. Recharge to the shallow aquifer (rocks of Mississippian age) through collapses, shafts, and drill holes in the shale has caused the formation of a ground-water 'mound' in the vicinity of the Picher Field in Kansas and Oklahoma. Discharge of mine-contaminated ground water to Tar Creek occurs in Oklahoma from drill holes and shafts where the potentiometric surface of the shallow aquifer is above the land surface. Mining of ore in the shallow aquifer has resulted in extensive fracturing and removal of material, which has created highly transmissive zones and voids and increased ground-water storage properties of the aquifer. In the area east of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact (referred to as the eastern area), fractured rock and tailings on the land surface increased the amount of water available for infiltration to the shallow aquifer; in the western area, tailings on the impermeable shale created artificial, perched aquifer systems that slowly drain to surface streams. Pumping of the deep aquifer (rocks of Cambrian and Ordovician age) by towns and industries, which developed as a result of the mining industry, has resulted in a potential for downward movement of water from the shallow aquifer. The potential is greatest in Ottawa County, Oklahoma. Because of the large volume of water that may be transported from the shallow to the deep aquifer, open drill holes or casings present the greatest contamination hazard to water supplies in the deep aquifer. Mining

  3. Concentrations of triazine herbicides in the unsaturated zone in western Harvey County, Kansas, spring and fall 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    1994-01-01

    To assess the potential transport of triazine herbicides into the Equus Beds aquifer, soil samples were collected from the unsaturated zone at 27 dryland and 30 irrigated sites in western Harvey County, Kansas. All sites were sampled at a depth of 4 to 6 feet (that is, immediately below the root zone) during March and October-November 1992 and March and October-November 1993. During the October-November 1992 and March 1993 sampling periods, five sites also were sampled at depths of 0 to 4 and 6 to 10 feet. All samples were analyzed for total triazine concentrations using a 20-gram extraction, immunoassay technique with a 0.02 microgram per kilogram detection level. Additionally, 20 samples from each sampling period were analyzed specifically for atrazine and two atrazine metabolites (deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine) using a 20-gram extraction, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry procedure with a 0.5 microgram per kilogram detection level. Total triazine concentrations at the 4- to 6-foot depth, with one exception, were less than 1.0 microgram per kilogram, with the majority of the concen- trations less than 0.10 microgram per kilogram. Triazine concentrations at the O- to 4-foot depth ranged from 0.51 to 12.20 micrograms per kilogram. Triazine concentrations at the 6- to 10-foot depth ranged from less than 0.02 to 0.33 microgram per kilogram. The atrazine metabolite deethylatrazine was detected in three samples, with concentrations of 0.63, 1.44, and 1.48 micrograms per kilogram. The atrazine metabolite deisopropylatrazine was not detected in any of the soil samples analyzed. Because the 1992 and 1993 growing seasons included periods of above-normal rainfall, the concentrations of triazine herbicides and metabolites measured during this study may not be indicative of average conditions.

  4. Spatiotemporal variability of inorganic nutrients during wastewater effluent dominated streamflow conditions in Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, 2012–15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Guy M.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Williams, Thomas J.; King, Lindsey R.

    2016-10-31

    Nutrients, particularly nitrogen and phosphorus, are a leading cause of water-quality impairment in Kansas and the Nation. Indian Creek is one of the most urban drainage basins in Johnson County, Kansas, and environmental and biological conditions are affected by contaminants from point and other urban sources. The Johnson County Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin (hereinafter Middle Basin) wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) is the largest point-source discharge on Indian Creek. A second facility, the Tomahawk Creek WWTF, discharges into Indian Creek approximately 11.6 kilometers downstream from the Middle Basin WWTF. To better characterize the spatiotemporal variability of nutrients in Indian Creek, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment and Johnson County Wastewater, collected high-resolution spatial and temporal (a large number of samples collected over the entire reach or at single locations over a long period of time) inorganic nutrient (nitrate plus nitrite and orthophosphorus) data using a combination of discrete samples and sensor-measured data during 2012 through 2015.Nutrient patterns observed in Indian Creek along the upstream-downstream gradient during wastewater effluent dominated streamflow conditions were largely affected by the WWTFs and by travel time of the parcels of water. Nitrate plus nitrite concentrations in the Middle Basin WWTF effluent and at downstream sites varied by as much as 6 milligrams per liter over a 24-hour period. The cyclical variability in the Middle Basin WWTF effluent generated a nitrate plus nitrite pulse that could be tracked for approximately 11.5 kilometers downstream in Indian Creek, until the effect was masked by the Tomahawk Creek WWTF effluent discharge. All longitudinal surveys showed the same general patterns along the upstream-downstream gradient, though streamflows, wastewater effluent contributions to streamflow, and nutrient concentrations spanned a wide

  5. Sedimentation and Occurrence and Trends of Selected Chemical Constituents in Bottom Sediment, Empire Lake, Cherokee County, Kansas, 1905-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2006-01-01

    For about 100 years (1850-1950), the Tri-State Mining District in parts of southeast Kansas, southwest Missouri, and northeast Oklahoma was one of the primary sources of lead and zinc ore in the world. The mining activity in the Tri-State District has resulted in substantial historical and ongoing input of cadmium, lead, and zinc to the environment including Empire Lake in Cherokee County, southeast Kansas. The environmental contamination caused by the decades of mining activity resulted in southeast Cherokee County being listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Priority List as a superfund hazardous waste site in 1983. To provide some of the information needed to support efforts to restore the ecological health of Empire Lake, a 2-year study was begun by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. A combination of sediment-thickness mapping and bottom-sediment coring was used to investigate sediment deposition and the occurrence of cadmium, lead, zinc, and other selected constituents in the bottom sediment of Empire Lake. The total estimated volume and mass of bottom sediment in Empire Lake were 44 million cubic feet and 2,400 million pounds, respectively. Most of the bottom sediment was located in the main body and the Shoal Creek arm of the reservoir. Minimal sedimentation was evident in the Spring River arm of the reservoir. The total mass of cadmium, lead, and zinc in the bottom sediment of Empire Lake was estimated to be 78,000 pounds, 650,000 pounds, and 12 million pounds, respectively. In the bottom sediment of Empire Lake, cadmium concentrations ranged from 7.3 to 76 mg/kg (milligrams per kilogram) with an overall median concentration of 29 mg/kg. Compared to an estimated background concentration of 0.4 mg/kg, the historical mining activity increased the median cadmium concentration by about 7,200 percent. Lead concentrations ranged from 100 to

  6. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 24 June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 24 June 1964 HALL AND MAIN STAIR, LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM ENTRANCE VESTIBULE - Edward E. Ayer House, 2 East Banks Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  7. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Allen L. Hubbard, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Allen L. Hubbard, Photographer May 5, 1936 DINING ROOM 1ST FLOOR (west wall) - Holmes-Sayward House, West side of U.S. Route 202 (State Route 4), Alfred, York County, ME

  8. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Allen L. Hubbard, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Allen L. Hubbard, Photographer May 5, 1936 NORTHEAST ROOM (1st floor south wall) - Holmes-Sayward House, West side of U.S. Route 202 (State Route 4), Alfred, York County, ME

  9. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Allen L. Hubbard, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Allen L. Hubbard, Photographer May 5, 1936 NORTHEAST ROOM (west wall) - Holmes-Sayward House, West side of U.S. Route 202 (State Route 4), Alfred, York County, ME

  10. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 STAINED GLASS WINDOW, WEST WINDOW IN SOUTH WALL, FROM BALCONY - Kehilath Anshe Ma'ariv Synagogue, 3301 South Indiana Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  11. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 24 June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 24 June 1964 GRAND STAIRWAY, FROM SECOND FLOOR HALL, SHOWING STAINED GLASS WINDOW IN WEST WALL ABOVE LANDING - Francis J. Dewes House, 503 West Wrightwood Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  12. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 3 May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 3 May 1965 ENTRANCE CANOPY FROM SOUTHWEST - Holy Trinity Russian & Greek Orthodox Church, 1121 North Leavitt Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 31 May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 31 May 1964 WEST (NORMAL AVE.) AND SOUTHEAST (CANALPORT AVE.) ELEVATIONS - Schoenhofen Brewing Company, Powerhouse, 1770 Canalport Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  14. Water-quality variability and constituent transport and processes in streams of Johnson County, Kansas, using continuous monitoring and regression models, 2003-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa; Gatotho, Jackline

    2014-01-01

    The population of Johnson County, Kansas increased by about 24 percent between 2000 and 2012, making it one of the most rapidly developing areas of Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program, began a comprehensive study of Johnson County streams in 2002 to evaluate and monitor changes in stream quality. The purpose of this report is to describe water-quality variability and constituent transport for streams representing the five largest watersheds in Johnson County, Kansas during 2003 through 2011. The watersheds ranged in urban development from 98.3 percent urban (Indian Creek) to 16.7 percent urban (Kill Creek). Water-quality conditions are quantified among the watersheds of similar size (50.1 square miles to 65.7 square miles) using continuous, in-stream measurements, and using regression models developed from continuous and discrete data. These data are used to quantify variability in concentrations and loads during changing streamflow and seasonal conditions, describe differences among sites, and assess water quality relative to water-quality standards and stream management goals. Water quality varied relative to streamflow conditions, urbanization in the upstream watershed, and contributions from wastewater treatment facilities and storm runoff. Generally, as percent impervious surface (a measure of urbanization) increased, streamflow yield increased. Water temperature of Indian Creek, the most urban site which is also downstream from wastewater facility discharges, was higher than the other sites about 50 percent of the time, particularly during winter months. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were less than the Kansas Department of Health and Environment minimum criterion of 5 milligrams per liter about 15 percent of the time at the Indian Creek site. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were less than the criterion about 10 percent of the time at the rural Blue River and Kill Creek sites, and less than

  15. Effects of nonpoint and selected point contaminant sources on stream-water quality and relation to land use in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, October 2002 through June 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Casey J.; Mau, D.P.; Rasmussen, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    Water and sediment samples were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 12 watersheds in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, to determine the effects of nonpoint and selected point contaminant sources on stream-water quality and their relation to varying land use. The streams studied were located in urban areas of the county (Brush, Dykes Branch, Indian, Tomahawk, and Turkey Creeks), developing areas of the county (Blue River and Mill Creek), and in more rural areas of the county (Big Bull, Captain, Cedar, Kill, and Little Bull Creeks). Two base-flow synoptic surveys (73 total samples) were conducted in 11 watersheds, a minimum of three stormflow samples were collected in each of six watersheds, and 15 streambed-sediment sites were sampled in nine watersheds from October 2002 through June 2004. Discharge from seven wastewater treatment facilities (WWTFs) were sampled during base-flow synoptic surveys. Discharge from these facilities comprised greater than 50 percent of streamflow at the farthest downstream sampling site in six of the seven watersheds during base-flow conditions. Nutrients, organic wastewater-indicator compounds, and prescription and nonprescription pharmaceutical compounds generally were found in the largest concentrations during base-flow conditions at sites at, or immediately downstream from, point-source discharges from WWTFs. Downstream from WWTF discharges streamflow conditions were generally stable, whereas nutrient and wastewater-indicator compound concentrations decreased in samples from sites farther downstream. During base-flow conditions, sites upstream from WWTF discharges had significantly larger fecal coliform and Escherichia coli densities than downstream sites. Stormflow samples had the largest suspended-sediment concentrations and indicator bacteria densities. Other than in samples from sites in proximity to WWTF discharges, stormflow samples generally had the largest nutrient concentrations in Johnson County streams. Discharge

  16. Shale mineralogy and burial diagenesis of Frio and Vicksburg Formations in two geopressured wells, McAllen Ranch area, Hidalgo County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-six shale samples ranging in depth from 1454 ft to 13,430 ft from Shell Oil Company No. 1 Dixie Mortage Loan well and 33 shale samples ranging in depth from 2183 ft to 13,632 ft from Shell Oil/Delhi-Taylor Oil Corporation No. 3 A.A. McAllen well were examined by x-ray techniques to determine the mineralogical parameters of the geopressured zone in the Vicksburg Fairway. Both wells have the same weight-percent trends with depth for the mineralogy: quartz, calcite, total clay, and potassium feldspar are constant; plagioclase feldspar gradually increases; kaolinite increases; discrete illite decreases; total mixed-layer illite-smectite (I/S) decreases; illite in mixed layer I/S increases; and smectite in mixed-layer I/S decreases. Chlorite is found only in the geopressured zone of each well. The Boles and Franks model is compatible with a steady supply of original mixed-layer I/S during the depositional history of the McAllen Ranch area. The constant content with depth of calcite, quartz, and potassium feldspar indicates that limited material, if any, is supplied by the shales to surrounding sands. The ions generated by changes within the clay minerals are involved in further clay mineral reactions as outlined above. In addition, magnesium and iron are involved in forming chlorite within the shales.

  17. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-term. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; McCune, D.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1997-01-15

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. Progress in the Stewart field project is described for the following tasks: design/construct waterflood plant; design/construct injection system; design/construct battery consolidation and gathering system; waterflood operations and reservoir management; and technology transfer. Progress in the Savonburg field project is described for the following tasks: profile modification treatments; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; reservoir development (polymer flooding); and technology transfer.

  18. Shale mineralogy and burial diagenesis of Frio and Vicksburg Formations in two geopressured wells, McAllen Ranch area, Hidalgo County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-six shale samples ranging in depth from 1454 ft to 13,430 ft from Shell Oil Company No. 1 Dixie Mortgage Loan well and 33 shale samples ranging in depth from 2183 ft to 13,632 ft from Shell Oil/Delhi-Taylor Oil Corporation No. 3 A.A. McAllen well were examined by x-ray techniques to determine the mineralogical parameters of the geopressured zone in the Vicksburg Fairway. Both wells have the same weight-percent trends with depth for the mineralogy: quartz, calcite, total clay, and potassium feldspar are constant; plagioclase feldspar gradually increases; kaolinite increases; discrete illite decreases; total mixed-layer illite-smectite (I/S) decreases; illite in mixed-layer I/S increases; and smectite in mixed-layer I/S decreases. Chlorite is found only in the geopressured zone of each well.

  19. Water-quality conditions of inflow, outflow, and impounded water at Rathbun Reservoir, Iowa, Clinton and Pomona Lakes, Kansas, and Harlan County Reservoir, Nebraska, May through August 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ziegler, A.C.; Rasmussen, P.P.; Carlson, M.D.; Hargadine, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    During May through August 1993, water-quality samples were collected twice from selected sites in Rathbun Reservoir, Iowa, Clinton and Pomona Lakes, Kansas, and Harlan County Reservoir, Nebraska. Samples were analyzed for selected physical and chemical properties, bacteria, major ions, nutrients, selected metals, total organic carbon, selected herbicides, and chlorophyll-a and -b. During May through August 1993, precipitation at all four reservoirs exceeded mean precipitation at nearby long-term precipitation gages; precipitation ranged from 7.76 inches above the long-term mean at Pomona Lake to 12.62 inches above the long-term mean at Rathbun Reservoir. Reservoir water-surface elevations exceeded flood-pool elevation by 4 feet in Clinton Lake, by 19 feet in Pomona Lake, and by 2 feet in Harlan County Reservoir in July. Thermal stratification of water occurred at one site in Rathbun Reservoir in August, at two sites in Clinton Lake in May, at one site in Pomona Lake in June, and at one site in Harlan County Reservoir in June. Total triazine herbicide concentrations in water samples from all four reservoirs ranged from 0.2 to 19 micrograms per liter and were largest water samples from Rathbun Reservoir in June. Concen- trations of atrazine exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Contaminant Level of 3.0 micrograms per liter for drinking water in at least one sample each from Rathbun Reservoir, Clinton Lake, and Pomona Lake. Concentrations of cyanazine exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Contaminant Level of 1.0 microgram per liter in water samples from Rathbun Reservoir.

  20. Effects of Jefferson Road stormwater-detention basin on loads and concentrations of selected chemical constituents in East Branch of Allen Creek at Pittsford, Monroe County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    Discharge and water-quality data collection at East Branch Allen Creek from 1990 through 2000 provide a basis for estimating the effect of the Jefferson Road detention basin on loads and concentrations of chemical constituents downstream from the basin. Mean monthly flow for the 5 years prior to construction of the detention basin (8.71 ft3/s) was slightly lower than after (9.08 ft3/s). The slightly higher mean monthly flow after basin construction may have been influenced by the peak flow for the period of record that occurred in July 1998 or variations in flow diverted from the canal. No statistically significant difference in average monthly mean flow before and after basin installation was indicated. Total phosphorus was the only constituent to show no months with significant differences in load after basin construction. Several constituents showed months with significantly smaller loads after basin construction than before, whereas some constituents showed certain months with smaller and some months with greater loads, after basin construction. Statistical analysis of the 'mean monthly load' for all months before and all months after construction of the detention basin showed only one constituent (ammonia + organic nitrogen) with a significantly lower load after construction and none with higher loads. Median concentrations of ammonia + organic nitrogen showed a statistically significant decrease (from 0.78 mg/L to 0.60 mg/L) after basin installation, as did nitrite + nitrate (from 1.50 mg/L to 0.96 mg/L); in contrast, the median concentration of dissolved chloride increased from 95.5 mg/L before basin installation to 109 mg/L thereafter. A trend analysis of constituent concentrations before and after installation of the detention basin showed that total phosphorus had a downward trend after installation. Analysis of the data collected at East Branch Allen Creek indicates that the Jefferson Road detention basin, in some cases, provides an improvement

  1. Water-quality variability and constituent transport and processes in streams of Johnson County, Kansas, using continuous monitoring and regression models, 2003-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa; Gatotho, Jackline

    2014-01-01

    The population of Johnson County, Kansas increased by about 24 percent between 2000 and 2012, making it one of the most rapidly developing areas of Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program, began a comprehensive study of Johnson County streams in 2002 to evaluate and monitor changes in stream quality. The purpose of this report is to describe water-quality variability and constituent transport for streams representing the five largest watersheds in Johnson County, Kansas during 2003 through 2011. The watersheds ranged in urban development from 98.3 percent urban (Indian Creek) to 16.7 percent urban (Kill Creek). Water-quality conditions are quantified among the watersheds of similar size (50.1 square miles to 65.7 square miles) using continuous, in-stream measurements, and using regression models developed from continuous and discrete data. These data are used to quantify variability in concentrations and loads during changing streamflow and seasonal conditions, describe differences among sites, and assess water quality relative to water-quality standards and stream management goals. Water quality varied relative to streamflow conditions, urbanization in the upstream watershed, and contributions from wastewater treatment facilities and storm runoff. Generally, as percent impervious surface (a measure of urbanization) increased, streamflow yield increased. Water temperature of Indian Creek, the most urban site which is also downstream from wastewater facility discharges, was higher than the other sites about 50 percent of the time, particularly during winter months. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were less than the Kansas Department of Health and Environment minimum criterion of 5 milligrams per liter about 15 percent of the time at the Indian Creek site. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were less than the criterion about 10 percent of the time at the rural Blue River and Kill Creek sites, and less than

  2. H. Julian Allen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    H. Julian Allen stands beside the observation window of the 8 x 7 foot test section of the NACA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. H. Julian Allen is best known for his 'Blunt Body Theory' of aerodynamics, a design technique for alleviating the severe re-entry heating problem which was then delaying the development of ballistic missiles. His findings revolutionized the fundamental design of ballistic missle re-entry shapes. Subsequently, applied research led to applications of the 'blunt' shape to ballistic missles and spacecraft which were intended to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. This application led to the design of ablative heat shields that protected the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts as their space capsules re- entered the Earth's atmosphere. 'Harvey' Allen as he was called by most, was not only a brilliant scientist and aeronautical engineer but was also admired for his kindness, thoughtfulness and sense of humor. Among his many other accomplishments, Harvey Allen served as Center Director of the NASA Ames Research Center from 1965 to 1969. He died of a heart attack on January 29, 1977 at the age of 66.

  3. Estimation of Constituent Concentrations, Loads, and Yields in Streams of Johnson County, Northeast Kansas, Using Continuous Water-Quality Monitoring and Regression Models, October 2002 through December 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Lee, Casey J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2008-01-01

    Johnson County is one of the most rapidly developing counties in Kansas. Population growth and expanding urban land use affect the quality of county streams, which are important for human and environmental health, water supply, recreation, and aesthetic value. This report describes estimates of streamflow and constituent concentrations, loads, and yields in relation to watershed characteristics in five Johnson County streams using continuous in-stream sensor measurements. Specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen were monitored in five watersheds from October 2002 through December 2006. These continuous data were used in conjunction with discrete water samples to develop regression models for continuously estimating concentrations of other constituents. Continuous regression-based concentrations were estimated for suspended sediment, total suspended solids, dissolved solids and selected major ions, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus species), and fecal-indicator bacteria. Continuous daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual loads were calculated from concentration estimates and streamflow. The data are used to describe differences in concentrations, loads, and yields and to explain these differences relative to watershed characteristics. Water quality at the five monitoring sites varied according to hydrologic conditions; contributing drainage area; land use (including degree of urbanization); relative contributions from point and nonpoint constituent sources; and human activity within each watershed. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations were less than the Kansas aquatic-life-support criterion of 5.0 mg/L less than 10 percent of the time at all sites except Indian Creek, which had DO concentrations less than the criterion about 15 percent of the time. Concentrations of suspended sediment, chloride (winter only), indicator bacteria, and pesticides were substantially larger during periods of increased streamflow. Suspended

  4. The Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deboer, David; Ackermann, Rob; Blitz, Leo; Bock, Douglas; Bower, Geoffrey; Davis, Michael; Dreher, John; Engargiola, Greg; Fleming, Matt; Keleta, Girmay; Harp, Gerry; Lugten, John; Tarter, Jill; Thornton, Doug; Wadefalk, Niklas; Weinreb, Sander; Welch, William J.

    2004-06-01

    The Allen Telescope Array, a joint project between the SETI Institute and the Radio Astronomy Laboratory at the University of California Berkeley, is currently under development and construction at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory in northern California. It will consist of 350 6.1-m offset Gregorian antennas in a fairly densely packed configuration, with minimum baselines of less than 10 m and a maximum baseline of about 900 m. The dual-polarization frequency range spans from about 500 MHz to 11 GHz, both polarizations of which are transported back from each antenna. The first generation processor will provide 32 synthesized beams of 104 MHz bandwidth, eight at each of four tunings, as well as outputs for a full-polarization correlator at two of the tunings at the same bandwidth. This paper provides a general description of the Allen Telescope Array.

  5. EPICS: Allen-Bradley hardware reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocki, G.

    1993-04-05

    This manual covers the following hardware: Allen-Bradley 6008 -- SV VMEbus I/O scanner; Allen-Bradley universal I/O chassis 1771-A1B, -A2B, -A3B, and -A4B; Allen-Bradley power supply module 1771-P4S; Allen-Bradley 1771-ASB remote I/O adapter module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IFE analog input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OFE analog output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IG(D) TTL input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OG(d) TTL output; Allen-Bradley 1771-IQ DC selectable input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OW contact output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IBD DC (10--30V) input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OBD DC (10--60V) output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IXE thermocouple/millivolt input module; and the Allen-Bradley 2705 RediPANEL push button module.

  6. Effects of urbanization, construction activity, management practices, and impoundments on suspended-sediment transport in Johnson County, northeast Kansas, February 2006 through November 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Casey J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Johnson County, Kansas, Stormwater Management Program, investigated the effects of urbanization, construction activity, management practices, and impoundments on suspended-sediment transport in Johnson County from February 2006 through November 2008. Streamgages and continuous turbidity sensors were operated at 15 sites within the urbanizing 57-square-mile Mill Creek Basin, and 4 sites downstream from the other largest basins (49 to 66 square miles) in Johnson County. The largest sediment yields in Johnson County were observed downstream from basins with increased construction activity. Sediment yields attributed to the largest (68 acre) active construction site in the study area were 9,300 tons per square mile in 2007 and 12,200 tons per square mile in 2008; 5 to 55 times larger than yields observed at other sampling sites. However, given erodible soils and steep slopes at this site, sediment yields were relatively small compared to the range in historic values from construction sites without erosion and sediment controls in the United States (2,300 to 140,000 tons per square mile). Downstream from this construction site, a sediment forebay and wetland were constructed in series upstream from Shawnee Mission Lake, a 120-acre reservoir within Shawnee Mission Park. Although the original intent of the sediment forebay and constructed wetland were unrelated to upstream construction, they were nonetheless evaluated in 2008 to characterize sediment removal before stream entry into the lake. The sediment forebay was estimated to reduce 33 percent of sediment transported to the lake, whereas the wetland did not appear to decrease downstream sediment transport. Comparisons of time-series data and relations between turbidity and sediment concentration indicate that larger silt-sized particles were deposited within the sediment forebay, whereas smaller silt and clay-sized sediments were transported through the wetland and

  7. Additional Reserve Recovery Using New Polymer Treatment on High Water Oil Ratio Wells in Alameda Field, Kingman County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    James Spillane

    2005-10-01

    The Chemical Flooding process, like a polymer treatment, as a tertiary (enhanced) oil recovery process can be a very good solution based on the condition of this field and its low cost compared to the drilling of new wells. It is an improved water flooding method in which high molecular-weight (macro-size molecules) and water-soluble polymers are added to the injection water to improve the mobility ratio by enhancing the viscosity of the water and by reducing permeability in invaded zones during the process. In other words, it can improve the sweep efficiency by reducing the water mobility. This polymer treatment can be performed on the same active oil producer well rather than on an injector well in the existence of strong water drive in the formation. Some parameters must be considered before any polymer job is performed such as: formation temperature, permeability, oil gravity and viscosity, location and formation thickness of the well, amount of remaining recoverable oil, fluid levels, well productivity, water oil ratio (WOR) and existence of water drive. This improved oil recovery technique has been used widely and has significant potential to extend reservoir life by increasing the oil production and decreasing the water cut. This new technology has the greatest potential in reservoirs that are moderately heterogeneous, contain moderately viscous oils, and have adverse water-oil mobility ratios. For example, many wells in Kansas's Arbuckle formation had similar treatments and we have seen very effective results. In addition, there were previous polymer treatments conducted by Texaco in Alameda Field on a number of wells throughout the Viola-Simpson formation in the early 70's. Most of the treatments proved to be very successful.

  8. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - Near-term. Annual report, June 18, 1993--June 18, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1995-10-01

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of water injection wells with solids as a result of poor water quality. In many instances the lack of reservoir management is due to lack of (1) data collection and organization, (2) integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, and (3) identification of optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The Stewart Field (on the latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by Sharon Resources, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

  9. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - near - term. Technical progress report, June 17, 1994--June 17, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of water injection wells with solids as a result of poor water quality. In many instances the lack of reservoir management is due to lack of (1) data collection and organization, (2) integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, and (3) identification of optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Stewart Field (on the latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas, and was operated by Sharon Resources, Inc. and is now operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

  10. The Southern Kansas Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    Historically aseismic Harper and Sumner counties in Southern Kansas experienced a dramatic increase in seismicity beginning in early 2014, coincident with the development of new oil production in the Mississippi Lime Play. In order to better understand the potential relationships between seismicity and oil development, the USGS installed a real-time telemetered seismic network in cooperation with the Kansas Geological Survey, the Kansas Corporation Commission, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Harper County, and the Oklahoma Geological Survey. The network began operation in March 2014 with an initial deployment of 5 NetQuakes accelerometers and by July 2014 had expanded to include 10 broadband sites. The network currently has 14 stations, all with accelerometers and 12 with broadband seismometers. The network has interstation spacing of 15 - 25 km and typical azimuthal gap of 80 for well-located events. Data are continuously streamed to IRIS at 200 samples per second from most sites. Earthquake locations are augmented with additional stations from the USGS National Network, Oklahoma Geological Survey Seismic Network, Kansas Seismic Monitoring Network and the Enid Oklahoma Network. Since the spring of 2014 over 7500 earthquakes have been identified with data from this network, 1400 of which have been manually timed and cataloged. Focal depths for earthquakes typically range between 2 and 7 km. The catalog is available at earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/search/ under network code 'Ismpkansas'. The network recorded the largest known earthquake in Harper County, Mw 4.3, on October 2, 2014 and in Sumner County, Mw 4.9, on November 12, 2014. Recorded ground motions at the epicenter of the October earthquake were 0.70 g (PGA) and 12 cm/s (PGV). These high ground motion values agree with near-source recordings made by other USGS temporary deployments in the U. S. midcontinent, indicating a significant shaking hazard from such shallow, moderate

  11. Improved Oil Recovery In Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near Term

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Don W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-01-14

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these types of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

  12. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated reservoirs of Kansas--near-term. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1996-11-01

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis. Results of these two field projects are discussed.

  13. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 TRIPLE STAINED GLASS WINDOWS AND COLUMN SUPPORTING BALCONY (EAST WINDOWS IN SOUTH WALL OF MAIN FLOOR OF AUDITORIUM) - Kehilath Anshe Ma'ariv Synagogue, 3301 South Indiana Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  14. 18. VIEW SHOWING, LEFT TO RIGHT, H. J. LAWSON, ALLEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW SHOWING, LEFT TO RIGHT, H. J. LAWSON, ALLEN MATTISON, SENATOR CARL HAYDEN, LIN B. ORME, PAUL ROCA, AND J. A. FRAPS. THE UPSTREAM FACE AND SPILLWAY GATES ARE VISIBLE IN THE BACKGROUND. October 1938 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  15. Transport and Sources of Suspended Sediment in the Mill Creek Watershed, Johnson County, Northeast Kansas, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Casey J.; Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Ziegler, Andrew C.; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program, evaluated suspended-sediment transport and sources in the urbanizing, 57.4 mi2 Mill Creek watershed from February 2006 through June 2007. Sediment transport and sources were assessed spatially by continuous monitoring of streamflow and turbidity as well as sampling of suspended sediment at nine sites in the watershed. Within Mill Creek subwatersheds (2.8-16.9 mi2), sediment loads at sites downstream from increased construction activity were substantially larger (per unit area) than those at sites downstream from mature urban areas or less-developed watersheds. Sediment transport downstream from construction sites primarily was limited by transport capacity (streamflow), whereas availability of sediment supplies primarily influenced transport downstream from mature urban areas. Downstream sampling sites typically had smaller sediment loads (per unit area) than headwater sites, likely because of sediment deposition in larger, less sloping stream channels. Among similarly sized storms, those with increased precipitation intensity transported more sediment at eight of the nine monitoring sites. Storms following periods of increased sediment loading transported less sediment at two of the nine monitoring sites. In addition to monitoring performed in the Mill Creek watershed, sediment loads were computed for the four other largest watersheds (48.6-65.7 mi2) in Johnson County (Blue River, Cedar, Indian, and Kill Creeks) during the study period. In contrast with results from smaller watersheds in Mill Creek, sediment load (per unit area) from the most urbanized watershed in Johnson County (Indian Creek) was more than double that of other large watersheds. Potential sources of this sediment include legacy sediment from earlier urban construction, accelerated stream-channel erosion, or erosion from specific construction sites, such as stream-channel disturbance during bridge

  16. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for Cedar Creek, Dekalb and Allen counties, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilber, William G.; Peters, J.G.; Ayers, M.A.; Crawford, Charles G.

    1979-01-01

    A digital model calibrated to conditions in Cedar Creek was used to develop alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. The model indicates that the dissolved-oxygen concentration of the Auburn wastewater effluent and nitrification are the most significant factors affecting the dissolved-oxygen concentration in Cedar Creek during summer low flows. The observed dissolved-oxygen concentration of the Auburn wastewater effluent was low and averaged 30 percent of saturation. Projected nitrogenous biochemical-oxygen demand loads, from the Indiana State Board of Health, for the Auburn and Waterloo wastewater-treatment facilities will result in violations of the current instream dissolved-oxygen standard (5 mg/l), even with an effluent dissolved-oxygen concentration of 80 percent saturation. Natural streamflow for Cedar Creek upstream from the confluence of Willow and Little Cedar Creeks is small compared with the waste discharge, so benefits of dilution for Waterloo and Auburn are minimal. The model also indicates that, during winter low flows, ammonia toxicity, rather than dissolved oxygen, is the limiting water-quality criterion in the reach of Cedar Creek downstream from the wastewater-treatment facility at Auburn and the confluence of Garrett ditch. Ammonia-nitrogen concentrations predicted for 1978 through 2000 downstream from the Waterloo wastewater-treatment facility do not exceed Indiana water-quality standards for streams. Calculations of the stream 's assimilative capacity indicate that future waste discharge in the Cedar Creek basin will be limited to the reaches between the Auburn wastewater-treatment facility and County Road 68. (Kosco-USGS)

  17. Irrigation water use in Kansas, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.

    2016-03-22

    This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources, presents derivative statistics of 2013 irrigation water use in Kansas. The published regional and county-level statistics from the previous 4 years (2009–12) are shown with the 2013 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. An overall Kansas average and regional averages also are calculated and presented. Total reported irrigation water use in 2013 was 3.3 million acre-feet of water applied to 3.0 million irrigated acres.

  18. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge and treatment facility upgrades on environmental and biological conditions of the upper Blue River, Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri, January 2003 through March 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Stone, Mandy L.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Poulton, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    The Johnson County Blue River Main Wastewater Treatment Facility discharges into the upper Blue River near the border between Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri. During 2005 through 2007 the wastewater treatment facility underwent upgrades to increase capacity and include biological nutrient removal. The effects of wastewater effluent on environmental and biological conditions of the upper Blue River were assessed by comparing an upstream site to two sites located downstream from the wastewater treatment facility. Environmental conditions were evaluated using previously and newly collected discrete and continuous data, and were compared with an assessment of biological community composition and ecosystem function along the upstream-downstream gradient. This evaluation is useful for understanding the potential effects of wastewater effluent on water quality, biological community structure, and ecosystem function. In addition, this information can be used to help achieve National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) wastewater effluent permit requirements after additional studies are conducted. The effects of wastewater effluent on the water-quality conditions of the upper Blue River were most evident during below-normal and normal streamflows (about 75 percent of the time), when wastewater effluent contributed more than 20 percent to total streamflow. The largest difference in water-quality conditions between the upstream and downstream sites was in nutrient concentrations. Total and inorganic nutrient concentrations at the downstream sites during below-normal and normal streamflows were 4 to 15 times larger than at the upstream site, even after upgrades to the wastewater treatment facility were completed. However, total nitrogen concentrations decreased in wastewater effluent and at the downstream site following wastewater treatment facility upgrades. Similar decreases in total phosphorus were not observed, likely because the biological

  19. Occurrence and variability of mining-related lead and zinc in the Spring River flood plain and tributary flood plains, Cherokee County, Kansas, 2009--11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2013-01-01

    Historical mining activity in the Tri-State Mining District (TSMD), located in parts of southeast Kansas, southwest Missouri, and northeast Oklahoma, has resulted in a substantial ongoing input of cadmium, lead, and zinc to the environment. To provide some of the information needed to support remediation efforts in the Cherokee County, Kansas, superfund site, a 4-year study was begun in 2009 by the U.S. Geological Survey that was requested and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A combination of surficial-soil sampling and coring was used to investigate the occurrence and variability of mining-related lead and zinc in the flood plains of the Spring River and several tributaries within the superfund site. Lead- and zinc-contaminated flood plains are a concern, in part, because they represent a long-term source of contamination to the fluvial environment. Lead and zinc contamination was assessed with reference to probable-effect concentrations (PECs), which represent the concentrations above which adverse aquatic biological effects are likely to occur. The general PECs for lead and zinc were 128 and 459 milligrams per kilogram, respectively. The TSMD-specific PECs for lead and zinc were 150 and 2,083 milligrams per kilogram, respectively. Typically, surficial soils in the Spring River flood plain had lead and zinc concentrations that were less than the general PECs. Lead and zinc concentrations in the surficial-soil samples were variable with distance downstream and with distance from the Spring River channel, and the largest lead and zinc concentrations usually were located near the channel. Lead and zinc concentrations larger than the general or TSMD-specific PECs, or both, were infrequent at depth in the Spring River flood plain. When present, such contamination typically was confined to the upper 2 feet of the core and frequently was confined to the upper 6 inches. Tributaries with few or no lead- and zinc-mined areas in the basin—Brush Creek

  20. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge and treatment facility upgrades on environmental and biological conditions of Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, June 2004 through June 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Stone, Mandy L.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Foster, Guy M.; Poulton, Barry C.; Paxson, Chelsea R.; Harris, Theodore D.

    2014-01-01

    Indian Creek is one of the most urban drainage basins in Johnson County, Kansas, and environmental and biological conditions of the creek are affected by contaminants from point and other urban sources. The Johnson County Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin (hereafter referred to as the “Middle Basin”) and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities (WWTFs) discharge to Indian Creek. In summer 2010, upgrades were completed to increase capacity and include biological nutrient removal at the Middle Basin facility. There have been no recent infrastructure changes at the Tomahawk Creek facility; however, during 2009, chemically enhanced primary treatment was added to the treatment process for better process settling before disinfection and discharge with the added effect of enhanced phosphorus removal. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, assessed the effects of wastewater effluent on environmental and biological conditions of Indian Creek by comparing two upstream sites to four sites located downstream from the WWTFs using data collected during June 2004 through June 2013. Environmental conditions were evaluated using previously and newly collected discrete and continuous data and were compared with an assessment of biological community composition and ecosystem function along the upstream-downstream gradient. This study improves the understanding of the effects of wastewater effluent on stream-water and streambed sediment quality, biological community composition, and ecosystem function in urban areas. After the addition of biological nutrient removal to the Middle Basin WWTF in 2010, annual mean total nitrogen concentrations in effluent decreased by 46 percent, but still exceeded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) wastewater effluent permit concentration goal of 8.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L); however, the NPDES wastewater effluent permit total phosphorus concentration goal of 1.5 mg/L or less was

  1. A REPORT ON HEALTH AND DAY CARE SERVICES FOR CHILDREN OF MIGRANT WORKERS, KANSAS - 1963.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Health, Topeka.

    THE SPREAD OF HEALTH AND DAY CARE SERVICES FOR MIGRANT CHILDREN IN KANSAS IN 1963 WAS DESCRIBED. IN ADDITION TO A GENERAL TREATMENT OF THE SUBJECT, PROGRAMS IN EACH COUNTY WERE DESCRIBED SEPARATELY BECAUSE OF LOCAL VARIATION, ALTHOUGH THEY WERE ALL VERY SIMILAR. MONEY WAS APPROPRIATED BY THE KANSAS LEGISLATURE IN 1963 TO THE KANSAS STATE…

  2. Environmental Assessment for the Commercial Demonstration of the Low NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Finney County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    n /a

    2003-03-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide partial funding to the Sunflower Electric Power Corporation (Sunflower), to demonstrate the commercial application of Low-NO{sub x} Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve NO{sub x} emission reduction to the level of 0.15 to 0.22 pounds per million British thermal units (lb/MM Btu). The proposed project station is Sunflower's 360 MW coal-fired generation station, Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station). The station, fueled by coal from Wyoming's Powder River Basin, is located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas. The period of performance is expected to last approximately 2 years. The Holcomb Station, Sunflower LNB/SOFA integrated system would be modified in three distinct phases to demonstrate the synergistic effect of layering NO{sub x} control technologies. Once modified, the station would demonstrate that a unit equipped with an existing low-NO{sub x} burner system can be retrofitted with a new separated over-fire air (SOFA) system, coal flow measurement and control, and enhanced combustion monitoring to achieve about 45 percent reduction in nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The proposed project would demonstrate a technology alternative to Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems. While SCR does generally achieve high reductions in NO{sub x} emissions (from about 0.8 lb/MM to 0.12 lb/MM Btu), it does so at higher capital and operating cost, requires the extensive use of critical construction labor, requires longer periods of unit outage for deployment, and generally requires longer periods of time to complete shakedown and full-scale operation. Cost of the proposed project technology would be on the order of 15-25 percent of that for SCR, with consequential benefits derived from reductions in construction manpower requirements and periods of power outages. This proposed technology demonstration would generally be applicable to boilers using opposed-wall burners

  3. State of Kansas: K-12 Enrollment Projection Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ted

    2015-01-01

    This document contains headcount enrollment projections for the State of Kansas for the 2015-16 school year through the 2019-20 school year. These projections are based on resident live births in Kansas and the headcount enrollment data for previous school years. Based on the available data related to resident live births by county and previous…

  4. Intramolecular ketene-allene cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    McCaleb, K L; Halcomb, R L

    2000-08-24

    [reaction: see text]This report describes intramolecular thermal [2 + 2] cycloadditions between ketenes and allenes. The formation of ketenes and the subsequent cycloadditions occurred under a variety of conditions, affording 7-methylidinebicyclo[3.2.0]heptanones and 7-methylidinebicyclo[3.1.1]heptanones in 45-78% yields. The regioselectivity of the cycloaddition varied with the substitution of the allene, and the yield of cyclized products varied with reaction conditions.

  5. Characterizing a Mississippian Carbonate Reservoir for CO2-EOR and Carbon Geosequestration: Applicability of Existing Rock Physics Models and Implications to Feasibility of a Time Lapse Monitoring Program in the Wellington Oil Field, Sumner County, Kansas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueck, A. J.; Raef, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    This study will focus on characterizing subsurface rock formations of the Wellington Field, in Sumner County, Kansas, for both geosequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the saline Arbuckle formation and enhanced oil recovery of a depleting Mississippian oil reservoir. Multi-scale data including lithofacies core samples, X-ray diffraction, digital rock physics scans, scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, well log data including sonic and dipole sonic, and surface 3D seismic reflection data will be integrated to establish and/or validate a new or existing rock physics model that best represents our reservoir rock types and characteristics. We will acquire compressional wave velocity and shear wave velocity data from Mississippian and Arbuckle cores by running ultrasonic tests using an Ult 100 Ultrasonic System and a 12 ton hydraulic jack located in the geophysics lab in Thompson Hall at Kansas State University. The elastic constants Young's Modulus, Bulk Modulus, Shear (Rigidity) Modulus and Poisson's Ratio will be extracted from these velocity data. Ultrasonic velocities will also be compared to sonic and dipole sonic log data from the Wellington 1-32 well. These data will be integrated to validate a lithofacies classification statistical model, which will be and partially has been applied to the largely unknown saline Arbuckle formation, with hopes for a connection, perhaps via Poisson's ratio, allowing a time-lapse seismic feasibility assessment and potentially developing a transformation of compressional wave sonic velocities to shear wave sonic for all wells, where compressional wave sonic is available. We will also be testing our rock physics model by predicting effects of changing effective (brine + CO2 +hydrocarbon) fluid composition on seismic properties and the implications on feasibility of seismic monitoring. Lessons learned from characterizing the Mississippian are essential to understanding the potential of utilizing similar workflows for the

  6. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge and treatment facility upgrades on environmental and biological conditions of Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, June 2004 through June 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Stone, Mandy L.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Foster, Guy M.; Poulton, Barry C.; Paxson, Chelsea R.; Harris, Theodore D.

    2014-01-01

    Indian Creek is one of the most urban drainage basins in Johnson County, Kansas, and environmental and biological conditions of the creek are affected by contaminants from point and other urban sources. The Johnson County Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin (hereafter referred to as the “Middle Basin”) and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities (WWTFs) discharge to Indian Creek. In summer 2010, upgrades were completed to increase capacity and include biological nutrient removal at the Middle Basin facility. There have been no recent infrastructure changes at the Tomahawk Creek facility; however, during 2009, chemically enhanced primary treatment was added to the treatment process for better process settling before disinfection and discharge with the added effect of enhanced phosphorus removal. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, assessed the effects of wastewater effluent on environmental and biological conditions of Indian Creek by comparing two upstream sites to four sites located downstream from the WWTFs using data collected during June 2004 through June 2013. Environmental conditions were evaluated using previously and newly collected discrete and continuous data and were compared with an assessment of biological community composition and ecosystem function along the upstream-downstream gradient. This study improves the understanding of the effects of wastewater effluent on stream-water and streambed sediment quality, biological community composition, and ecosystem function in urban areas. After the addition of biological nutrient removal to the Middle Basin WWTF in 2010, annual mean total nitrogen concentrations in effluent decreased by 46 percent, but still exceeded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) wastewater effluent permit concentration goal of 8.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L); however, the NPDES wastewater effluent permit total phosphorus concentration goal of 1.5 mg/L or less was

  7. The Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, David R.; Welch, William J.; Dreher, John; Tarter, Jill; Blitz, Leo; Davis, Michael; Fleming, Matt; Bock, Douglas; Bower, Geoffrey; Lugten, John; Girmay-Keleta, G.; D'Addario, Larry R.; Harp, Gerry R.; Ackermann, Rob; Weinreb, Sander; Engargiola, Greg; Thornton, Doug; Wadefalk, Niklas

    2004-10-01

    The Allen Telescope Array, originally called the One Hectare Telescope (1hT) [1] will be a large array radio telescope whose novel characteristics will be a wide field of view (3.5 deg-GHz HPBW), continuous frequency coverage of 0.5 - 11 GHz, four dual-linear polarization output bands of 100 MHz each, four beams in each band, two 100 MHz spectral correlators for two of the bands, and hardware for RFI mitigation built in. Its scientific motivation is for deep SETI searches and, at the same time, a variety of other radio astronomy projects, including transient (e.g. pulsar) studies, HI mapping of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, Zeeman studies of the galactic magnetic field in a number of transitions, mapping of long chain molecules in molecular clouds, mapping of the decrement in the cosmic background radiation toward galaxy clusters, and observation of HI absorption toward quasars at redshifts up to z=2. The array is planned for 350 6.1-meter dishes giving a physical collecting area of about 10,000 square meters. The large number of components reduces the price with economies of scale. The front end receiver is a single cryogenically cooled MIMIC Low Noise Amplifier covering the whole band. The feed is a wide-band log periodic feed of novel design, and the reflector system is an offset Gregorian for minimum sidelobes and spillover. All preliminary and critical design reviews have been completed. Three complete antennas with feeds and receivers are under test, and an array of 33 antennas is under construction at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory for the end of 2004. The present plan is to have a total of about 200 antennas completed by the summer of 2006 and the balance of the array finished before the end of the decade.

  8. Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Geoffrey

    2007-05-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a pioneering centimeter-wavelength radio telescope that will produce science that cannot be done with any other instrument. The ATA is the first radio telescope designed for commensal observing; it will undertake the most comprehensive and sensitive SETI surveys ever done as well as the deepest and largest area continuum and spectroscopic surveys. Science operations will commence this year with a 42-element array. The ATA will ultimately comprise 350 6-meter dishes at Hat Creek in California, and will make possible large, deep radio surveys that were not previously feasible. The telescope incorporates many new design features including hydroformed antenna surfaces, a log-periodic feed covering the entire range of frequencies from 500 MHz to 11.2 GHz, low noise, wide-band amplifiers with a flat response over the entire band. The full array has the sensitivity of the Very Large Array but with a survey capability that is greater by an order of magnitude due to the wide field of view of the 6-meter dishes. Even with 42 elements, the ATA will be one of the most powerful radio survey telescopes. Science goals include the Five GHz sky survey (FiGSS) to match the 1.4-GHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey within the first year of operation with the 42 element array, and a deep all-sky survey of extragalactic hydrogen to investigate galaxy evolution and intergalactic gas accretion. Transient and variable source surveys, pulsar science, spectroscopy of new molecular species in the galaxy, large-scale mapping of galactic magnetic filaments, and wide-field imaging of comets and other solar system objects are among the other key science objectives of the ATA. SETI surveys will reach sufficient sensitivity to detect an Arecibo planetary radar from 1,000,000 stars to distances of 300 pc.

  9. Short-range vertical variation in organic carbon, carbonate carbon, total sulfur contents and Munsell color values in a core from the Upper Pennsylvanian Stark Shale Member of the Dennis Limestone, Wabaunsee County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, M.R.; Leventhal, Joel S.; Hatch, Joseph R.

    1983-01-01

    Organic carbon, total sulfur, carbonate carbon and Munsell color value were determined for 21 successive samples from a 53-cm-thick section of drill core. These samples are from the Stark Shale Member of the Dennis Limestone of Upper Pennsylvanian age, Wabaunsee County, Kansas. The data confirm previous results (Hosterman and Whitlow, 1981) which showed that a limited relationship of color value to organic carbon exists for shales containing about 7 percent or less organic carbon. For samples with 7 percent or more organic carbon, color values are nearly all the same. The color value is useful in screening samples before trace element analysis and in estimating the organic carbon content and metal potential of the shale (Leventhal and others, 1982).

  10. Kansas KIDS COUNT Data Book, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    This Kids Count Data Book provides state and county trends in the well-being of Kansas' children. The statistical portrait is based on 21 indicators of well-being: (1) births to single teens; (2) children in poverty; (3) children approved for free school meals; (4) childhood deaths; (5) infant mortality; (6) births with early prenatal care; (7)…

  11. Kansas Kids Count Data Book, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    This 1996 Kids Count data book presents data on 20 indicators of child well-being in Kansas, grouped into 6 areas: economic well-being, physical health and safety, educational achievement, early childhood care and education, emotional well-being, and social behavior and social control. The data are grouped by county for each indicator, by…

  12. SMARTE: IMPROVING REVITALIZATION DECISIONS FOR KANSAS COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Brownfields program helps local governments (city/county) and non-profit organizations appropriately assess, clean up, and reuse contaminated properties that they own or purchase. Reuse and redevelopment of abandoned, idle, o...

  13. Geophysics in Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, D.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a collection of articles by geophysicists. Topics include seismic exploration case histories, seismic-reflection surveys of central Kansas sinkholes, gravity and magnetic studies, and heat flow and geothermal investigations. Among the 16 articles are The utility of single-point seismic data, Suitability of high-resolution seismic method to identifying petroleum reservoirs in Kansas, Seismic exploration for the Morrow trend, and Major magnetic features in Kansas and their possible geologic significance.

  14. Recent Advances in the Reactions of 1,2-Allenic Ketones and α-Allenic Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuesen; He, Yan; Zhang, Xinying

    2016-06-01

    This Personal Account summarizes our recent efforts in searching for novel synthetic strategies for a number of organic molecules by using allene derivatives as valuable substrates. It starts with a concise description of the background of allene-related synthetic chemistry. The second part deals with the reactions of 1,2-allenic ketones, including the reactions of 1,2-allenic ketones with various nucleophiles to afford functionalized benzenes, heterocycles, and fluoroenones, and those of allenic ketones as nucleophiles under the promotion of bases to provide 1,3,4'-triones or functionalized furans. The third part of this account focuses on the reactions of α-allenic alcohols. In this section, multicomponent reactions involving α-allenic alcohols, and cascade reactions of α-allenic alcohols promoted by Brønsted acid or iodine, are presented. PMID:27230525

  15. Water resources of Allen Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.; Fendick, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, approximately 29.2 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Allen Parish, Louisiana, including about 26.8 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 2.45 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Rice irrigation accounted for 74 percent (21.7 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, industrial, rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in the parish were greatest in 1960 (119 Mgal/d) and 1980 (98.7 Mgal/d). The substantial decrease in surface-water use between 1960 and 1965 is primarily attributable to rice-irrigation withdrawals declining from 61.2 to 6.74 Mgal/d. This fact sheet summarizes information on the water resources of Allen Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

  16. Kansas v. Hendricks.

    PubMed

    Grudzinskas, A J; Henry, M G

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court considered an appeal by the State of Kansas that arose from the Kansas Supreme Court's invalidation of the Kansas Sexually Violent Predator Act. The Act establishes procedures for the civil commitment of persons who, due to a "mental abnormality" or "personality disorder," are likely to engage in "predatory acts of sexual violence." The Supreme Court held that the Act's definition of "mental abnormality" satisfies substantive due process requirements. The Court further held that since the Act does not establish criminal proceedings, it does not violate the Constitution's double jeopardy prohibitions or its ban on ex post facto lawmaking. The Court's holding and its implications are discussed.

  17. Kansas urban conservation handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The contents are: the problem in Kansas; policies and procedures; urban conservation planning; stormwater management, erosion, and sediment control; control measure characteristics; site planning process; determine erosion and sedimentation control measures; procedure for input process of subdivision plans.

  18. Geohydrology and saline ground-water discharge to the South Fork Ninnescah River in Pratt and Kingman Counties, south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillespie, Joe B.; Hargadine, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    Saline ground water discharges to the South Fork Ninnescah River in Pratt and Kingman Counties from the adjacent alluvial aquifer. Electromagnetic terrain surveys in this area indicated that the saline ground water is entering the river in intermittent reaches along the channel. The chloride concentration in the river near Murdock exceeds 250 milligrams per liter 75 percent of the time. During base flow in November 1988, stream discharge increased 67 cubic feet per second, and the chloride concentration increased 360 milligrams per liter from Pratt to the Pratt-Kingman County line. The chloride load to the river along this reach was 82 tons per day. The source of saline water probably is dissolution of salt in the Permian rocks, about 600 feet below land surface. Subsequent subsidence and collapse of Permian rocks into salt-dissolution cavities probably has caused fracturing in overlying Permian rocks. Brine moves upward through the Permian rocks and discharges into the alluvial aquifer. The brine discharge to the alluvium is about 0.7 cubic foot per second. In the area of major saline-water discharge to the river, the fluid-potential levels in the Permian rocks are higher than fluid-potential levels in the alluvial aquifer. Several methods for reducing the saline ground-water discharge to the South Fork Ninnescah River have been considered. The most effective of these methods appears to be interception of brine flow in the Permian rocks by pumping of relief wells. Brine could be disposed by injection into deeper formations, by storage in evaporation reservoirs, or by desalinization.

  19. Kansas Agents Study Grain Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoeff, Robert W.

    1973-01-01

    Author is an extension specialist in feed and grain marketing for Kansas State University. He describes a tour set up to educate members of the Kansas Grain and Feed Dealers' Association in the area of grain marketing and exporting. (GB)

  20. Phosphine Catalysis of Allenes with Electrophiles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiming; Xu, Xingzhu; Kwon, Ohyun

    2014-01-01

    Nucleophilic phosphine catalysis of allenes with electrophiles is one of the most powerful and straightforward synthetic strategies for the generation of highly functionalized carbocycle or heterocycle structural motifs, which are present in a wide range of bioactive natural products and medicinally important substances. The reaction topologies can be controlled through judicious choice of the phosphine catalyst and the structural variations of starting materials. This Tutorial Review presents selected examples of nucleophilic phosphine catalysis using allenes and electrophiles. PMID:24663290

  1. Van Allen Discovery Most Important

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jastrow, R.

    1959-01-01

    The first step toward the exploration of space occurred approximately 22 months ago as a part of the International Geophysical Year. In the short interval since October, 1957, the new tools of research, the satellite and the space rocket, have produced two unexpected results of fundamental scientific importance. First, instruments placed in the Explorer satellites by James A. Van Allen have revealed the existence of layers of energetic particles in the outer atmosphere. This discovery constitutes the most significant research achievement of the IGY satellite program. The layers may provide the explanation for the aurora and other geophysical phenomena, and they will also influence the design of vehicles for manned space flight, whose occupants must be shielded against their harmful biological effects. Second, the shape of the earth has been determined very accurately with the aid of data from the first Vanguard. As a result of this investigation, we have found that our planet tends toward the shape of a pear, with its stem at the North Pole. This discovery may produce major changes in our ideas on the interior structure of the earth.

  2. Relationship between inferred redox potential of the depositional environment and geochemistry of the Upper Pennsylvanian (Missourian) Stark Shale Member of the Dennis Limestone, Wabaunsee County, Kansas, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, J.R.; Leventhal, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    Analyses of 21 samples collected from a core of the 52.8-cm-thick Stark Shale Member of the Dennis Limestone in Wabaunsee County, Kansas, demonstrate four cycles with two-orders-of-magnitude variations in contents of Cd, Mo, P, V and Zn, and order-of-magnitude variations in contents of organic carbon, Cr, Ni, Se and U. The observed variability in amounts and/or ratios of many metals and amounts and compositions of the organic matter appear related to the cause and degree of water-column stratification and the resulting absence/presence of dissolved O2 or H2S. High Cd, Mo, U, V, Zn and S contents, a high degree of pyritization (DOP) (0.75-0.88), and high high V (V + Ni) (0.84-0.89) indicate the presence of H2S in a strongly stratified water column. Intermediate contents of metals and S, intermediate DOP (0.67-0.75) and intermediate V (V + Ni) (054-0.82) indicate a less strongly stratified anoxic water column. Whereas, low metal contents and low V (V + Ni) (0.46-0.60) indicate a weakly stratified, dysoxic water column. High P contents at the top of the organic-matter-rich intervals within the Stark Shale Member indicate that phosphate precipitation was enhanced near the boundary between anoxic and dysoxic water compositions. Relatively abundant terrestrial organic matter in intervals deposited from the more strongly stratified H2S-bearing water column indicates a combined halocline-thermocline with the fresher near-surface water the transport mode for the terrestrial organic matter. The predominance of algal organic matter in intervals deposited from a less strongly stratified water column indicates the absence of the halocline and the presence of the more generally established thermocline. Relatively low amounts of degraded, hydrogen-poor organic matter characterize intervals deposited in a weakly stratified, dysoxic water column. The inferred variability in chemistry of the depositional environments may be related to climate variations and/or minor changes in sea

  3. Employment, Salary, and Placement Information Related to Career Programs at Johnson County Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    This report contains employment, salary, and placement information related to career programs at Johnson County Community College (JCCC, Kansas) as of December 1998. Employment and salary projections for the greater Kansas City area, the state of Kansas, and the nation, as well as salary and placement information for JCCC program completers, are…

  4. Diversity in Kansas Adult Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Dianne

    2007-01-01

    Kansas is not typically considered a state with a great deal of diversity. In the past few years, however, Kansas has become more ethnically diverse. Kansas adult education programs could serve as a bellwether for diversity across Kansas. This article discusses the diversity in Kansas adult education programs. The author stresses the need to…

  5. Electrophilic addition and cyclization reactions of allenes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shengming

    2009-10-20

    Modern organic synthesis depends on the development of highly selective methods for the efficient construction of potentially useful target molecules. A primary goal in our laboratory is the discovery of new reactions that convert readily available starting materials to complex products with complete control of regio- and stereoselectivity. Allenes are one underused moiety in organic synthesis, because these groups are often thought to be highly reactive. However, many compounds containing the allene group, including natural products and pharmaceuticals, are fairly stable. The chemistry of allenes has been shown to have significant potential in organic synthesis. Electrophilic additions to allenes have often been considered to be synthetically less attractive due to the lack of efficient control of the regio- and stereoselectivity. However, this Account describes electrophilic reactions of allenes with defined regio- and stereoselectivity developed in our laboratory. Many substituted allenes are readily available from propargylic alcohols. Our work has involved an exploration of the reactions of these allenes with many different electrophiles: the E- or Z-halo- or seleno-hydroxylations of allenyl sulfoxides, sulfones, phosphine oxides, carboxylates, sulfides or selenides, butenolides, and arenes, and the halo- or selenolactonization reactions of allenoic acids and allenoates. These reactions have produced a host of new compounds such as stereodefined allylic alcohols, ethers, amides, thiiranes, and lactones. In all these reactions, water acts as a reactant and plays an important role in determining the reaction pathway and the stereoselectivity. The differing electronic properties of the two C=C bonds in these allenes determine the regioselectivity of these reactions. Through mechanistic studies of chirality transfer, isolation and reactivity of cyclic intermediates, (18)O-labeling, and substituent effects, we discovered that the E-stereoselectivity of some

  6. Invest Early: Good Beginnings Last a Lifetime. Kansas Kids Count Data Book, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    This Kids Count data book provides state and county trends in the well-being of Kansas' children. The statistical portrait is based on 22 indictors in the areas of economic well-being, physical health and safety, childhood care and education, emotional well-being, and social behavior and social control. Following a state profile, county data are…

  7. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  8. Permian chronostratigraphy in Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Baars, D.L. )

    1990-08-01

    Correlations between the type Permian System of Russia and North American strata have been difficult for decades because of biostratigraphic and nomenclatural confusion. Consequently, a standard Permian section was established in west Texas that is widely accepted throughout North America. Series of the North American standard section are, in ascending order, Wolfcampian, Leonardian, Guadalupian, and Ochoan. This nomenclature was adopted for usage in Kansas in 1951, but was later abandoned in favor of local terminology. However, direct biostratigraphic correlations between Kansas and the west Texas standard section have now been firmly established, and local chronostratigraphic names, i.e., Big Blue, Lyon, Geary, Cimarron, and Custer, have not been widely accepted. The Kansas Geological Survey has now readopted usage of the Wolfcampian Series for rocks of the Admire, Council Grove, and Chase Groups; the Leonardian Series for rocks of the Summer and Nippewalla Groups; and the Guadalupian Series for rocks of the Whitehorse, Day Creek, and Big Basin Formations. The Wolfcampian Series in Kansas (and elsewhere in North America) contains post-Virgilian (latest Carboniferous) strata that predate the classical Permian System of the Russian type section. Consequently, the Pennsylvanian/Permian boundary will probably have to be raised stratigraphically to conform to global usage.

  9. Sexting in Kansas Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Dale R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an exploratory study about sexting, the sending of sexually explicit or illicit photos or video between cell phones, in Kansas public schools. An on-line survey asked superintendents to report if they have had an occurrence of sexting in their district. They were also asked if they felt sexting is currently a problem in their…

  10. Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-Term -- Class

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Timothy R.; Green,Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-10-29

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian (Mississippian) dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile oil. The project addresses producibility problems in two fields: Specific reservoirs target the Schaben Field in Ness County, Kansas, and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County, Kansas. The producibility problems to be addressed include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, non-optimum recovery efficiency. The results of this project will be disseminated through various technology transfer activities. At the Schaben demonstration site, the Kansas team will conduct a field project to demonstrate better approaches to identify bypassed oil within and between reservoir units.

  11. Preparation of allenic sulfones and allenes from the selenosulfonation of acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Back, T.G.; Krishna, M.V.; Muralidharan, K.R. )

    1989-08-18

    {beta}-(phenylseleno)vinyl sulfones 2 are readily obtained from the free-radical selenosulfonation of acetylenes. Compounds 2 isomerize to allyl sulfones 4 under base-catalyzed conditions in nearly quantitative yield, with high stereoselectivity favoring the Z configuration. Allyl sulfones 4 afford generally high yields of allenic sulfones 1 when subjected to oxidation with m-chloroperbenzoic acid or tert-butyl hydroperoxide, followed by selenoxide syn-elimination. The sulfone-stabilized anion intermediates in the isomerizations of 2 to 4 can be alkylated, deuterated, or silylated in the {alpha}-position prior to oxidation, providing allenic sulfones with an additional {alpha}-substituent. In some cases, spontaneous elimination of the phenylseleno group occurred, producing the allenic sulfone without the need for an oxidation step. Desulfonylation of allyl sulfones 4f, 4c, and 25 with sodium amalgam afforded vinyl selenides that were converted to allenes in moderate to good yields by oxidation-elimination. The copper-catalyzed coupling of allyl sulfones 4 with Grignard reagents comprises an alternative route to vinyl selenide precursors of allenes. These procedures permit the synthesis of various {alpha}- and {gamma}-substituted allenic sulfones and allenes from acetylenes.

  12. Mechanisms of allene stereoinversion by imidozirconium complexes.

    PubMed

    Michael, Forrest E; Duncan, Andrew P; Sweeney, Zachary K; Bergman, Robert G

    2003-06-18

    The zirconium-mediated stereoinversion of allenes has been investigated by studying the stereochemical behavior of metallacycles derived from [2 + 2] cycloaddition of enantioenriched allenes with chiral and achiral imidozirconocene complexes. Relative rates of metallacycle racemization were measured by circular dichroism, and intermediates in the selective stereoinversion of diphenylallene with a chiral imidozirconium complex were observed by NMR spectroscopy. Metallacycles derived from dialkylallenes are proposed to racemize via reversible beta-hydride elimination. Stereoinversion of diarylallene-derived metallacycles proceeds much more slowly and is thought to proceed through an eta4-azatrimethylenemethane transition state.

  13. Recent developments in allene-based synthetic methods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hiyun; Williams, Lawrence J

    2008-11-01

    Presented is a review of the advances in synthetic methodology that make use of the allene functional group, with emphasis on catalytic asymmetric transformations and new mechanistic insights. The review covers the period from January 2007 to May 2008 and focuses on intra- and intermolecular cycloaddition, carbocycle cycloisomerization, heterocycle synthesis, epoxidation, addition and miscellaneous transformations. A brief discussion of allenes as transition metal ligands, the use of allenes in total synthesis and potential medicinal agents that contain the allene functionality is also presented.

  14. Water resources of Sedgwick County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bevans, H.E.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrologic data from streams, impoundments, and wells are interpreted to: (1) document water resources characteristics; (2) describe causes and extent of changes in water resources characteristics; and (3) evaluate water resources as sources of supply. During 1985, about 134,200 acre-ft of water (84% groundwater) were used for public (42%), irrigation, (40%), industrial (14%), and domestic (4%) supplies. Streamflow and groundwater levels are related directly to precipitation, and major rivers are sustained by groundwater inflow. Significant groundwater level declines have occurred only in the Wichita well field. The Arkansas and Ninnescah Rivers have sodium chloride type water; the Little Arkansas River, calcium bicarbonate type water. Water quality characteristics of water in small streams and wells depend primarily on local geology. The Wellington Formation commonly yields calcium sulfate type water; Ninnescah Shale and unconsolidated deposits generally yield calcium bicarbonate type water. Sodium chloride and calcium sulfate type water in the area often have dissolved-solids concentrations exceeding 1,000 mg/L. Water contamination by treated sewage effluent was detected inparts of the Arkansas River, Little Arkansas River, and Cowskin Creek. Nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen contamination was detected in 11 of 101 wells; oilfield brine was detected in the Wichita-Valley Center Floodway, Prairie Creek, Whitewater Creek, and 16 of 101 wells; and agricultural pesticides were detected in 8 of 14 impoundments and 5 of 19 wells. Generally, the water is acceptable for most uses. (USGS)

  15. Delineation of flooding within the upper Mississippi River Basin, flood of July 10 and 27, 1993, in Kansas City Missouri, and Kansas City, Kansas, and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.; Clement, Ralph W.; Studley, Seth E.

    1997-01-01

    During spring and summer 1993, record flooding inundated many of the stream and river valleys in the upper Mississippi and the Missouri River Basins. The flooding was the result of widespread and numerous intense thunderstorms that, together with saturated soils, produced large volumes of runoff. The magnitude of flooding exceeded the 100-year discharge values (1-percent chance of exceedance in any given year) at many streamflow-gaging stations in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. The flooding was unusual because of its long duration and widespread severe damage. The Mississippi and the Missouri Rivers were above flood stage for more than 1 month at several locations along their lengths. Millions of acres of agricultural and urban lands were inundated for weeks, and unofficial damage estimates exceeded $10 billion in the flooded States (Parrett and others, 1993),During summer 1993, large parts of Kansas City, Missouri, and Kansas City, Kansas, and vicinity were flooded from overflows of the Missouri and the Kansas Rivers and numerous smaller tributaries, This report provides flood-peak elevation data and delineates the arcalcktent of the 1993 floods in the Kansas City metropolitan area for July 10 and 27, 1993 (fig. 1A, sheet 1: B, sheet 2: C, sheet 3). The 1993 flood elevations and extent of flooding are compared with flood-plain boundaries defined by Flood Insurance Studies conducted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for cities and counties in the area (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1975–95).This report is one of a series of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigations that document the effects of the 1993 flooding of the upper Mississippi and the Missouri River Basins and that improve the technical base from which flood-plain management decisions can be made by other agencies.

  16. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenbacher, Don

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  17. Kansas State University

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, T.; Carnes, K.; Needham, V.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne has fabricated the niobium resonators and some other linac components required for the superconducting accel/decel linac now in operation at Kansas State University. Several staff members from KSU spent a substantial period of time at ANL during FY 1985 in order to learn the technology, and they return occasionally to assemble and test the resonators. There is a continuing interchange of technical information between ANL and KSU related to linac operations, tuning, and resonator maintenance.

  18. Garden City, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Center pivot irrigation systems create red circles of healthy vegetation in this image of croplands near Garden City, Kansas. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on September 25, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using near infrared, red, and green wavelengths. The image has also been sharpened using the sensor's panchromatic band. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  19. Solar Space Heating for Warehouse--Kansas City, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    New report describes warehouse/office building in Kansas City, Kansas which uses solar heating for warehouse portion and conventional heating and cooling for office portion. Building is divided into 20 equal units, each with its own solar-heating system. Modular design enables multiple units to be combined to form offices or warehouses of various sizes as required by tenants.

  20. KANSAS WIND POWERING AMERICAN STATE OUTREACH: KANSAS WIND WORKING GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMARLUND, RAY

    2010-10-27

    The Kansas Wind Working Group (WWG) is a 33-member group announced by former Governor Kathleen Sebelius on Jan. 7, 2008. Formed through Executive Order 08-01, the WWG will educate stakeholder groups with the current information on wind energy markets, technologies, economics, policies, prospects and issues. Governor Mark Parkinson serves as chair of the Kansas Wind Working Group. The group has been instrumental in focusing on the elements of government and coordinating government and private sector efforts in wind energy development. Those efforts have moved Kansas from 364 MW of wind three years ago to over 1000 MW today. Further, the Wind Working Group was instrumental in fleshing out issues such as a state RES and net metering, fundamental parts of HB 2369 that was passed and is now law in Kansas. This represents the first mandatory RES and net metering in Kansas history.

  1. Annotated bibliography of the Anardarko basin area; Kansas - Oklahoma - Texas

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography contains 2888 records related to the geology of the Anadarko basin area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: coal, petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; paleontology; petrology; stratigraphy; tectonics; geologic correlations; drilling; exploration; fossils; geochemistry; geophysics; seismic surveys; geologic structures; uranium deposits; and water resources. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area. Some of the items (19) are themselves bibliographies.

  2. Measurement of irrigated acreage in Western Kansas from LANDSAT images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keene, K.M.; Conley, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    In the past four decades, irrigated acreage in western Kansas has increased rapidly. Optimum utilization of vital groundwater supplies requires implementation of long-term water-management programs. One important variable in such programs is up-to-date information on acreage under irrigation. Conventional ground survey methods of estimating irrigated acreage are too slow to be of maximum use in water-management programs. Visual interpretation of LANDSAT images permits more rapid measurement of irrigated acreage, but procedures are tedious and still relatively slow. For example, using a LANDSAT false-color composite image in areas of western Kansas with few landmarks, it is impossible to keep track of fields by examination under low-power microscope. Irrigated fields are more easily delineated on a photographically enlarged false-color composite and are traced on an overlay for measurement. Interpretation and measurement required 6 weeks for a four-county (3140 mi2, 8133 km2) test area. Video image-analysis equipment permits rapid measurement of irrigated acreage. Spectral response of irrigated summer crops in western Kansas on MSS band 5 (visible red, 0.6-0.7 ??m) images is low in contrast to high response from harvested and fallow fields and from common soil types. Therefore, irrigated acreage in western Kansas can be uniquely discriminated by video image analysis. The area of irrigated crops in a given area of view is measured directly. Sources of error are small in western Kansas. After preliminary preparation of the images, the time required to measure irrigated acreage was 1 h per county (average area, 876 ml2 or 2269 km2). ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  3. H. Julian Allen with Blunt Body Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    H. Julian Allen is best known for his 'Blunt Body Theory' of aerodynamics, a design technique for alleviating the severe re-entry heating problem which was then delaying the development of ballistic missiles. His findings revolutionized the fundamental design of ballistic missle re-entry shapes. Subsequently, applied research led to applications of the 'blunt' shape to ballistic missles and spacecraft which were intended to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. This application led to the design of ablative heat shields that protected the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts as their space capsules re- entered the Earth's atmosphere. 'Harvey' Allen as he was called by most, was not only a brilliant scientist and aeronautical engineer but was also admired for his kindness, thoughtfulness and sense of humor. Among his many other accomplishments, Harvey Allen served as Center Director of the NASA Ames Research Center from 1965 to 1969. He died of a heart attack on January 29, 1977 at the age of 66.

  4. Kansas coal distribution, resources, and potential for coalbed methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, L.L.

    2000-01-01

    Kansas has large amounts of bituminous coal both at the surface and in the subsurface of eastern Kansas. Preliminary studies indicate at least 53 billion tons (48 billion MT) of deep coal [>100 ft (>30 m)] determined from 32 different coal beds. Strippable coal resources at a depth < 100 ft (<30 m) total 2.8 billion tons (2.6 billion MT), and this total is determined from 17 coals. Coal beds present in the Cherokee Group (Middle Pennsylvanian) represent most of these coal resource totals. Deep coal beds with the largest resource totals include the Bevier, Mineral, "Aw" (unnamed coal bed), Riverton, and Weir-Pittsburg coals, all within the Cherokee Group. Based on chemical analyses, coals in the southeastern part of the state are generally high volatile A bituminous, whereas coals in the east-central and northeastern part of the state are high-volatile B bituminous coals. The primary concern of coal beds in Kansas for deep mining or development of coalbed methane is the thin nature [<2 ft (0.6 m)] of most coal beds. Present production of coalbed methane is centered mainly in the southern Wilson/northern Montgomery County area of southeastern Kansas where methane is produced from the Mulky, Weir-Pittsburg, and Riverton coals.

  5. The Farm Crisis and Decatur County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flora, Jan L.; And Others

    This case study assesses the impact of the farm sector on the economy and social organization of Decatur County (Kansas), a county which has historically depended on agriculture for its livelihood. Data were obtained from analysis of time series statistical indicators for the period between 1966 and 1984, questionnaire responses of local…

  6. Maximal tractable subclasses of Allen`s interval algebra: Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Drakengren, T.; Jonsson, P.

    1996-12-31

    This paper continues Nebel and Burckert`s investigation of Allen`s interval algebra by presenting nine more maximal tractable subclasses of the algebra (provided that P {ne} NP), in addition to their previously reported ORD-Horn subclass. Furthermore, twelve tractable subclasses are identified, whose maximality is riot decided. Four of these can express the notion of sequentiality between intervals, which is not possible in the ORD-Horn algebra. The satisfiability algorithm, which is common for all the algebras, is shown to be linear.

  7. Summer bird use of Kansas windbreaks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cable, T.T.; Schroeder, R.L.; Brack, V.; Cook, P.S.

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-four windbreaks in Stafford and Pawnee counties in Kansas were censused for birds during the nesting seasons of 1988-1990. Eighty-nine species of birds were found in the windbreaks with 60 species believed to be nesting. Fifteen species used the windbreaks for feeding or as singing perches but did not nest, and 14 species were spring migrants. Species representing 20 taxonomic families and 15 foraging guilds nested in the windbreaks. Fifteen species were members of the omnivore/ground forager guild. Five species considered forest interior or area sensitive were found nesting in the windbreaks. Windbreak area was important in determining which species were present. Windbreaks provide habitat for a large component of the Great Plains' avifauna, including some species whose populations are decreasing in the region.

  8. Cross-coupling/cyclization reactions of two different allenic moieties.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Benito; Almendros, Pedro; Martínez del Campo, Teresa

    2010-05-25

    The allene moiety represents an excellent building block for allene cross-coupling cyclization reactions, affording heterocyclic skeletons in a single step. This strategy is of particular interest when two different allene derivatives are involved in a series of metal-catalyzed cross-coupling heterocyclization processes. This Concept article is focused on the Pd-catalyzed union of two different allenic moieties, with cyclization of at least one of them by intramolecular cyclometalation. These new, versatile, and highly effective transformations are complex multistep processes leading to potential privileged structures that could find wide applications in related medicinal chemistry.

  9. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas, near term, Class 2. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1997-02-04

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian (Mississippian) dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile oil. The project addresses producibility problems in two fields: Specific reservoirs target the Schaben Field in Ness County, Kansas, and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County, Kansas. The producibility problems to be addressed include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, non-optimum recovery efficiency. The results of this project will be disseminated through various technology transfer activities. Work in this quarter has continued to concentrate on Task 1.2 reservoir characterization and Task 1.3 technology transfer.

  10. Allen's big-eared bat (Idionycteris phyllotis) documented in colorado based on recordings of its distinctive echolocation call

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, M.A.; Navo, K.W.; Bonewell, L.; Mosch, C.J.; Adams, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Allen's big-eared bat (Idionycteris phyllotis) inhabits much of the southwestern USA, but has not been documented in Colorado. We recorded echolocation calls consistent with I. phyllotis near La Sal Creek, Montrose County, Colorado. Based on characteristics of echolocation calls and flight behavior, we conclude that the echolocation calls described here were emitted by I. phyllotis and that they represent the first documentation of this species in Colorado.

  11. 33 CFR 165.T08-0432 - Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Morgan City-Port Allen Route from Mile Marker 0 to Port Allen Lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Morgan City-Port Allen Route from Mile Marker 0 to Port Allen Lock. 165.T08-0432 Section 165.T08-0432...-Port Allen Route from Mile Marker 0 to Port Allen Lock. (a) Location. Waters of the Gulf...

  12. Economic Impact of the Metropolitan Community Colleges on the Kansas City Region. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Sherry

    This study assesses the economic impact of the Metropolitan Community Colleges (MCC) on the four-county region of metropolitan Kansas City, Missouri. The total economic impact is composed of a network of interactive cash flows between the colleges, business, government, and individuals, and may be derived by adding three distinct components:…

  13. Bonanza Club: 35 Years of Maximum Crop Production and Extension Education in Southwestern Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henson, D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes the success of a county extension crops program, the Bonanza Club, in providing timely and useful information regarding new and successful agronomic practices. The program is cited for its beneficial influence on changing crop-production practices in southwestern Kansas. (MCO)

  14. Recent Developments in Financing Public Libraries in Kansas. Special Report Series, Number 132.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, James W.

    Kansas has a large number of small city-supported public libraries. In many cases because the cities are unable to provide adequate financial support for their libraries, limited services are offered. Because of the need for greater tax bases for libraries, a number of county libraries and one regional library have been formed. However, many of…

  15. SETI Surveys on the Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backus, Peter R.; Kilsdonk, T. N.; ATA Team

    2009-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA-42) is a centimeter-wave array of 42 six-meter dishes that allows simultaneous SETI and other radio astronomy projects. In this paper we report on initial SETI observations using several observation and RFI mitigation strategies. We conducted both "targeted” observations of selected stars and "sky survey” observations of areas of the sky. Some observations were done with the SETI project directing the pointing of the array and others were "commensal,” in a direction selected by another project. In both modes, SETI observations used an independent RF tuning and two synthesized beams pointing at stars or positions in the field of view and tuned to the same frequency band. Results of the two SETI observations were compared and used to excise interference. In some observations, each beam had a null positioned at the center of the other beam. In the long term, we plan to observe one million target stars and survey large sections of the galactic plane over the frequency range from 1 GHz to 10 GHz. Much of this work may be done in parallel with other large-scale surveys. The first phase of the ATA was funded through generous grants from the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation. UC Berkeley, the SETI Institute, the National Science Foundation (Grant No. 0540599), Sun Microsystems, Xilinx, Nathan Myhrvold, Greg Papadopoulos, and other corporations and individual donors contributed additional funding.

  16. Macular pseudohaemorrhage secondary to Allen Dot artefact.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Luke; Alexander, Philip; Newsom, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old highly myopic (-11.00 D) woman presented to eye clinic with a 3 day history of right eye paracentral blurring. Visual acuities were 6/6 bilaterally. Clinical examination was normal. Fundus photography showed the classic appearance of a macular haemorrhage. This is a recognised complication of high myopia and would have accounted for the patient's symptoms. However, further photography showed that the haemorrhage seemed to 'jump' around the fundus and was even present in the fellow eye. The apparent haemorrhage was revealed to be an imaging artefact. The 'Allen Dot' is a 6 mm black mask incorporated into retinal cameras to reduce reflection. Rarely, in highly myopic eyes, optical artefact can result. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first in the literature to report artefacts from the Allen Dot masquerading as ophthalmic disease. This case re-iterates the importance of clinical examination, especially in high myopes, given the current trend towards virtual clinics. PMID:25564595

  17. Kansas Tree Program Aids Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullins, William S.

    1973-01-01

    Since State and Extension Forestry at Kansas State University received specific funding from the U.S. Forest Service for community forestry programs, the university has received requests for assistance from more than 200 Kansas towns. (GB)

  18. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  3. Mission Specialist (MS) Allen experiments with beverage on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Mission Specialist (MS) Allen, using beverage container and drinking straw, experiments with microgravity chararcteristics of orange juice on middeck in front of the Development Flight Instrument (DFI) unit and forward lockers. Allen laughes as he watches the results of his experimentation.

  4. Bi(OTf)3-catalyzed cycloisomerization of aryl-allenes.

    PubMed

    Lemière, Gilles; Cacciuttolo, Bastien; Belhassen, Emilie; Duñach, Elisabet

    2012-06-01

    Intramolecular hydroarylation of allenes was achieved under very mild conditions using bismuth(III) triflate as the catalyst. Efficient functionalization of activated and nonactivated aromatic nuclei led to C-C bond formation through a formal Ar-H activation. A tandem bis-hydroarylation of the allene moiety was also developed giving access to various interesting polycyclic structures. PMID:22578075

  5. Phase-transfer-catalysed asymmetric synthesis of tetrasubstituted allenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Sakata, Kazuki; Tamakuni, Fumiko; Dutton, Mark J.; Maruoka, Keiji

    2013-03-01

    Allenes are molecules based on three carbons connected by two cumulated carbon-carbon double bonds. Given their axially chiral nature and unique reactivity, substituted allenes have a variety of applications in organic chemistry as key synthetic intermediates and directly as part of biologically active compounds. Although the demands for these motivated many endeavours to make axially chiral, substituted allenes by exercising asymmetric catalysis, the catalytic asymmetric synthesis of fully substituted ones (tetrasubstituted allenes) remained largely an unsolved issue. The fundamental obstacle to solving this conundrum is the lack of a simple synthetic transformation that provides tetrasubstituted allenes in the action of catalysis. We report herein a strategy to overcome this issue by the use of a phase-transfer-catalysed asymmetric functionalization of 1-alkylallene-1,3-dicarboxylates with N-arylsulfonyl imines and benzylic and allylic bromides.

  6. Kansas Rural Villages Project, 1978-1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Edward P.; Shelley, Scott

    Aurora, a village of 147 residents in north central Kansas, was the focus of a 1978 investigation of the community development potential for Kansas rural villages. Students and staff from the University of Kansas School of Social Welfare worked with community residents to identify three programs the village wanted (a recreation program, a…

  7. ­Is the Recent Increase in Seismicity in Southern Kansas Natural?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, J. L.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Llenos, A. L.; Walter, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes in southern Kansas were nearly unheard of until September 2013, when two M2 earthquakes occurred. Since then, the earthquake rate has risen dramatically. Between December 2013 and July 28, 2014, 14 M≥3 earthquakes were recorded in Harper and Sumner counties, the largest being a M3.8 earthquake in December 2013. Residents of the towns of Caldwell and Anthony have reported feeling even more earthquakes. In response to the surge in earthquakes, the USGS deployed a 10-station seismic network to monitor earthquakes in southeastern Harper and southwestern Sumner counties. We have identified over 200 earthquakes that occurred from mid-June to late-July, 2014. The locations of these earthquakes cluster within or near the seismic array, ranging in magnitude from 0.5 to 3.5. The earthquakes we identified are occurring within the Mississippian Lime Play, an area of rapidly expanding oil and gas development stretching from central Oklahoma to northwestern Kansas. In Kansas, new development of the play is largely in the adjoining areas of Harper and Sumner counties. Even with the new development, production in Sumner County has largely remained constant. However, in Harper County, where production was fairly stable from 1995-2010, it began increasing rapidly in 2011. In 2013 the highest yearly production volumes to date were approximately five times larger than those in 2010. The spatial and temporal correlation of the oil and gas development and seismicity in southern Kansas suggests a potential relationship between the two; some of the earthquake clusters lie within 1-2 kilometers of recent development. We examine the possibility that the earthquakes in southern Kansas are induced by wastewater injection and/or hydraulic fracturing. This involves using a refined earthquake catalog built upon cross-correlation detections and high-precision earthquake relocation techniques. We also compute first-motion focal mechanisms and compare them to the regional stress field.

  8. University of Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, S.; Prosser, S.W.; Dummer, A.; Farrar, K.

    1995-08-01

    This past year the Kansas group achieved its objective of studying the fusion-fission mechanism for three different entrance channels populating {sup 48}Cr with the measurement of the {sup 20}Ne+{sup 28}Si reaction. Previously the group had studied the {sup 24}Mg+{sup 24}Mg reaction in a particle-only measurement and the {sup 36}Ar+{sup 12}C reaction in a particle-gamma coincidence measurement. The latest experiment was done at the ATLAS gamma-ray facility and employed a particle-particle-gamma coincidence arrangement. The {sup 20}Ne+{sup 28}Si data seem to confirm the picture that has been emerging of a population of states in the fission fragments that is largely determined by a statistical phase space. Significant discrepancies in the observed and predicted population for some excitations, however, suggest that either a different reaction mechanism may be involved in these populations, or a different spin distribution of the compound nucleus is present than is assumed for the calculations. The group is now working with the data for all three reactions in an attempt to develop an overall consistent picture.

  9. Freeman Allen: Boston's pioneering physician anesthetist.

    PubMed

    Morris, Samuel D; Morris, Alina J; Rockoff, Mark A

    2014-11-01

    On October 16, 1846 dentist William T. G. Morton successfully demonstrated at the Massachusetts General Hospital that ether could prevent the pain of surgery. For decades afterwards, the administration of anesthesia in the United States was generally relegated to dentists, medical students, junior surgical trainees, or even nonmedical personnel. It was not until the end of the 19th century that a few pioneering physicians began devoting their careers to administering anesthesia to patients, studying ways to make it safer and more effective, and teaching others about its use. One of these individuals was Freeman Allen, who was appointed the first physician anesthetist to the medical staff at the Massachusetts General Hospital and several other major hospitals in Boston. We describe this remarkable man, his contributions to the early development of anesthesiology as a medical specialty, and the true cause of his untimely death. PMID:25329027

  10. Estimation of potential runoff-contributing areas in the Kansas-Lower Republican River Basin, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    1999-01-01

    Digital soils and topographic data were used to estimate and compare potential runoff-contributing areas for 19 selected subbasins representing soil, slope, and runoff variability within the Kansas-Lower Republican (KLR) River Basin. Potential runoff-contributing areas were estimated separately and collectively for the processes of infiltration-excess and saturation-excess overland flow using a set of environmental conditions that represented high, moderate, and low potential runoff. For infiltration-excess overland flow, various rainfall intensities and soil permeabilities were used. For saturation-excess overland flow, antecedent soil-moisture conditions and a topographic wetness index were used. Results indicated that the subbasins with relatively high potential runoff are located in the central part of the KLR River Basin. These subbasins are Black Vermillion River, Clarks Creek, Delaware River upstream from Muscotah, Grasshopper Creek, Mill Creek (Wabaunsee County), Soldier Creek, Vermillion Creek (Pottawatomie County), and Wildcat Creek. The subbasins with relatively low potential runoff are located in the western one-third of the KLR River Basin, with one exception, and are Buffalo Creek, Little Blue River upstream from Barnes, Mill Creek (Washington County), Republican River between Concordia and Clay Center, Republican River upstream from Concordia, Wakarusa River downstream from Clinton Lake (exception), and White Rock Creek. The ability to distinguish the subbasins as having relatively high or low potential runoff was possible mostly due to the variability of soil permeability across the KLR River Basin.

  11. Differentiation of pleistocene deposits in northeastern Kansas by clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tien, P.-L.

    1968-01-01

    Seventy-four samples from eight stratigraphic sections of lower Pleistocene glacial and glaciofluvial deposits in Doniphan County, extreme northeastern Kansas, were analyzed using X-ray diffraction techniques. Clay-mineral assemblages of the <2 ?? fraction of these deposits are nearly identical, consisting of a mixed-layer clay mineral associated with minor amounts of kaolinite and illite. An attempt was made to differentiate units of till and nontill deposits by using the relative intensities of 001 reflections of "mixed-layer mineral," kaolinite, and illite. At least two tills were recognizable. Associated nontill deposits, could not be differentiated from one another, although the nontills are easily distinguished from tills. ?? 1968.

  12. Assessment of Services for Retired and Senior Citizens in Labette County (A Pilot Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usera, John J.; Martin, Jack W.

    In November 1988, a study was conducted to identify factors contributing to the quality of life of retired persons in southeast Kansas. A random sample of 366 Labette County residents over 59 years of age was surveyed by mail regarding their social life, housing, income, health, and the social and economic environment in Kansas. Study findings,…

  13. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas - near term -- Class 2. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile petroleum. Specific reservoirs targeted are the Schaben Field in Ness County and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County.

  14. Kansas: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Kansas Early Head Start (KEHS) provides comprehensive services following federal Head Start Program Performance Standards for pregnant women and eligible families with children from birth to age 4. KEHS was implemented in 1998 using Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) quality set-aside dollars augmented by a transfer of federal…

  15. Kansas City Plots Next Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Kansas City (Missouri) Public Schools is at a crossroads. The district has struggled for decades with poor academic achievement, dwindling enrollment and budget, and short-term superintendents--27 in the past 40 years. Most recently, after a two-year stint during which he helped the district get its financial house in order, closing nearly half of…

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 12 allenic aromatic ethers.

    PubMed

    Wang, San-Yong; Mao, Wei-Wei; She, Zhi-Gang; Li, Chun-Rong; Yang, Ding-Qiao; Lin, Yong-Cheng; Fu, Li-Wu

    2007-05-15

    Twelve allenic aromatic ethers, some of them are natural products isolated from the mangrove fungus Xylaria sp. 2508 in the South China Sea, were synthesized. Their antitumor activities against KB and KBv200 cells were determined. All these compounds demonstrated cytotoxic potential, ranging from weak to strong activity. The analysis of structure-activity relationships suggested that the introduction of allenic moiety could generate or enhance cytotoxicity of these phenol compounds.

  17. Voices: A Conversation with Allen J. Wilcox.

    PubMed

    Jukic, Anne Marie Z

    2016-09-01

    Allen James Wilcox was born on 30 September 1946 in Columbus, OH. He studied medicine at the University of Michigan, graduated in 1973, and after a rotating internship, he completed a master's degree in maternal and child health (1976) and a PhD in epidemiology (1979) at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. After graduation, he went to work at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS, one of the US National Institutes of Health) in Durham, NC, where he has spent his career. He developed a research program in reproductive and perinatal epidemiology, a relatively unexplored area at the time. His studies include the early pregnancy study, which documented the extent of subclinical pregnancy loss in humans and established the fertile days of a woman's menstrual cycle. He served as the Chief of the Epidemiology Branch from 1991 to 2001, and as Editor-in-Chief of the journal EPIDEMIOLOGY from 2001 to 2014. His textbook, Fertility and Pregnancy-An Epidemiologic Perspective, was published by Oxford University Press in 2010. He was elected to the American Epidemiological Society in 1989, and served as its president in 2003. He also served as president of the Society of Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiological Research (1996) and the president of the Society of Epidemiological Research (1998). He holds adjunct teaching appointments at the University of North Carolina, Harvard University, and the University of Bergen (Norway), which awarded him an honorary doctoral degree in 2008. PMID:27482869

  18. Ground-water data collected in the Missouri River Basin units in Kansas during 1949

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Delmar W.

    1950-01-01

    Ground-water studies in the Missouri River Basin were begun by the United States Geological Survey during the fall of 1945 as a part of the program for development of the resources of the basin by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and other Federal Agencies. The studies of the ground-water resources in the part of Kansas that lies within the Basin have been coordinated with the cooperative program of ground-water studies already being carried on in Kansas by the Federal Geological Survey and the State Geological Survey of Kansas with the cooperation of the Division of Sanitation of the Kansas State Board of Health and the Division of Water Resources of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture. Areas in which ground-water data have been collected under the Missouri Basin program include the Almena Unit in Norton and Phillips Counties; the Bostwick Unit in Jewell, Republic, and Cloud Counties; the Cedar Bluff Unit in Ellis, Rush, and Trego Counties; the Glen Elder Unit in Mitchell County; the Webster Unit in Osborne County; and the Wilson Unit in Lincoln County. Most of the ground-water data presented in this report were collected during 1949. Most of the data collected in these areas prior to the end of 1947 were presented in a report that was mimeographed in September 1948 and most of the data collected during 1948 were presented in a report that was mimeographed in November 1949. This report is the third of a series of annual reports on ground-water data collected in the Missouri Basin units in Kansas. These annual reports are a means of more promptly releasing for administrative use the data collected each year. Data that are included in the annual reports for a given area will be assembled later in a report on the geology and hydrology of that area. An index of the data collected and presented in the 1947, 1948, and 1949 reports is given in table 1.

  19. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Brownsville-McAllen NTMS Quadrangles, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-30

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Brownsville-McAllen Quadrangles, Texas are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 427 groundwater and 171 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. Pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwater data indicate the most promising area for potential uranium mineralization occurs in the northwestern section of the quadrangles (Jim Hogg, Starr, and Zapata Counties), where waters are derived from the Catahoula Formation. These groundwaters have high concentrations of uranium, uranium associated elements, and low values for specific conductance. Another area with high uranium concentrations is in the southeastern portion of the survey area (Hidalgo, Cameron, and Willacy Counties). Shallow wells <10 m (30 ft) are numerous in this area and high specific conductance values may indicate contamination from extensive fertilization. Stream sediment data for the survey does not indicate an area favorable for uranium mineralization. Anomalous acid soluble uranium values in the southeastern area (Hidalgo, Cameron, and Willacy Counties) can be attributed to phosphate fertilizer contamination. Four samples in the western part of the area (western Starr County) have anomalously high total uranium values and low acid soluble uranium values, indicating the uranium may be contained in resistate minerals.

  20. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas -- near term -- Class 2. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian (Mississippian) dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile oil. The project addresses producibility problems in two fields: specific reservoirs target the Schaben Field in Ness County, Kansas, and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County, Kansas. The producibility problems to be addressed include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, non-optimum recovery efficiency. The results of this project will be disseminated through various technology transfer activities. General overview--progress is reported for the period from 1 April 1995 to 30 June 1995. Work in this quarter has concentrated on reservoir characterization with the initiation of technology transfer. Difficulties still remain in the drilling of the final two wells. Some preliminary work on reservoir characterization has been completed, and related technology transfer has been initiated.

  1. Reactivity and Chemoselectivity of Allenes in Rh(I)-Catalyzed Intermolecular (5 + 2) Cycloadditions with Vinylcyclopropanes: Allene-Mediated Rhodacycle Formation Can Poison Rh(I)-Catalyzed Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Allenes are important 2π building blocks in organic synthesis and engage as 2-carbon components in many metal-catalyzed reactions. Wender and co-workers discovered that methyl substituents on the terminal allene double bond counterintuitively change the reactivities of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs). More sterically encumbered allenes afford higher cycloadduct yields, and such effects are also observed in other Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular cycloadditions. Through density functional theory calculations (B3LYP and M06) and experiment, we explored this enigmatic reactivity and selectivity of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with VCPs. The apparent low reactivity of terminally unsubstituted allenes is associated with a competing allene dimerization that irreversibly sequesters rhodium. With terminally substituted allenes, steric repulsion between the terminal substituents significantly increases the barrier of allene dimerization while the barrier of the (5 + 2) cycloaddition is not affected, and thus the cycloaddition prevails. Computation has also revealed the origin of chemoselectivity in (5 + 2) cycloadditions with allene-ynes. Although simple allene and acetylene have similar reaction barriers, intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions of allene-ynes occur exclusively at the terminal allene double bond. The terminal double bond is more reactive due to the enhanced d−π* backdonation. At the same time, insertion of the internal double bond of an allene-yne has a higher barrier as it would break π conjugation. Substituted alkynes are more difficult to insert compared with acetylene, because of the steric repulsion from the additional substituents. This leads to the greater reactivity of the allene double bond relative to the alkynyl group in allene-ynes. PMID:25379606

  2. Reactivity and chemoselectivity of allenes in Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with vinylcyclopropanes: allene-mediated rhodacycle formation can poison Rh(I)-catalyzed cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xin; Stevens, Matthew C; Liu, Peng; Wender, Paul A; Houk, K N

    2014-12-10

    Allenes are important 2π building blocks in organic synthesis and engage as 2-carbon components in many metal-catalyzed reactions. Wender and co-workers discovered that methyl substituents on the terminal allene double bond counterintuitively change the reactivities of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs). More sterically encumbered allenes afford higher cycloadduct yields, and such effects are also observed in other Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular cycloadditions. Through density functional theory calculations (B3LYP and M06) and experiment, we explored this enigmatic reactivity and selectivity of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with VCPs. The apparent low reactivity of terminally unsubstituted allenes is associated with a competing allene dimerization that irreversibly sequesters rhodium. With terminally substituted allenes, steric repulsion between the terminal substituents significantly increases the barrier of allene dimerization while the barrier of the (5 + 2) cycloaddition is not affected, and thus the cycloaddition prevails. Computation has also revealed the origin of chemoselectivity in (5 + 2) cycloadditions with allene-ynes. Although simple allene and acetylene have similar reaction barriers, intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions of allene-ynes occur exclusively at the terminal allene double bond. The terminal double bond is more reactive due to the enhanced d-π* backdonation. At the same time, insertion of the internal double bond of an allene-yne has a higher barrier as it would break π conjugation. Substituted alkynes are more difficult to insert compared with acetylene, because of the steric repulsion from the additional substituents. This leads to the greater reactivity of the allene double bond relative to the alkynyl group in allene-ynes.

  3. 40 CFR 81.252 - Northwest Kansas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Cheyenne County, Decatur County, Ellis County, Gove County, Graham County, Logan County, Ness County..., Sheridan County, Sherman County, Smith County, Thomas County, Trego County, Wallace County....

  4. 40 CFR 81.252 - Northwest Kansas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Cheyenne County, Decatur County, Ellis County, Gove County, Graham County, Logan County, Ness County..., Sheridan County, Sherman County, Smith County, Thomas County, Trego County, Wallace County....

  5. 40 CFR 81.252 - Northwest Kansas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Cheyenne County, Decatur County, Ellis County, Gove County, Graham County, Logan County, Ness County..., Sheridan County, Sherman County, Smith County, Thomas County, Trego County, Wallace County....

  6. 40 CFR 81.252 - Northwest Kansas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Cheyenne County, Decatur County, Ellis County, Gove County, Graham County, Logan County, Ness County..., Sheridan County, Sherman County, Smith County, Thomas County, Trego County, Wallace County....

  7. 40 CFR 81.252 - Northwest Kansas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Cheyenne County, Decatur County, Ellis County, Gove County, Graham County, Logan County, Ness County..., Sheridan County, Sherman County, Smith County, Thomas County, Trego County, Wallace County....

  8. Obituary: James Alfred Van Allen, 1914-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, George H.; McIlwain, Carl Edwin

    2006-12-01

    James Alfred Van Allen, world-renowned space scientist, died 9 August 2006 at the age of ninety-one. He succumbed to heart failure after a ten-week period of declining health. Van Allen served for his entire sixty-seven-year professional career as an amazingly productive researcher, space science spokesman, inspired teacher, and valued colleague. The realization by him and his associates that charged particles are trapped by the Earth's magnetic field began a whole new field of research, magnetospheric physics. Following that initial discovery, he and his associates quickly extended their observations, first to the inner planets, and then to the rest of the planets and beyond. During his tenure at Iowa, he and his group flew instruments on more than sixty successful Earth satellites and planetary spacecraft, including the first missions to the planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Van Allen's lifetime publication list numbers more than 275, of which many are widely-cited, seminal papers. He was the sole author of more than 125 of those papers. Beyond the research laboratory, Van Allen worked energetically throughout his career in establishing space research as a new branch of human inquiry. He was among the most sought-after as a committee member and adviser, working at the highest levels of government, including the White House and Congress, and at all levels of the national and international research establishments. Many presentations in the non-scientific arena helped to bring the exciting discoveries and challenges of space research to the attention of the general public. James Van Allen (Van to his many friends and colleagues) was born on 7 September 1914 on a small farm near Mount Pleasant, Iowa, the second of four sons of Alfred Morris Van Allen and Alma Olney Van Allen. After high school in Mount Pleasant, he entered Iowa Wesleyan College, majoring in physics and graduating summa cum laude. While there, he was introduced to geophysics

  9. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  10. Preliminary survey of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitizing wild turkeys (Aves: Phasianidae) in eastern Kansas.

    PubMed

    Mock, D E; Applegate, R D; Fox, L B

    2001-01-01

    During the spring and fall turkey hunting seasons of 1999, hunters and Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks field personnel examined wild turkeys, Meleagris gallopavo L., for ticks and submitted them to us for identification. From springtime hunting, we received 113 ticks from 12 turkeys killed in nine counties, all in the eastern one-third of Kansas. Collectors reported examining three additional wild turkeys on which no ticks were found. All ticks were nymphal lone star ticks, Amblyomma americanum (L.). Of 11 wild turkeys examined in seven counties during October, one was parasitized by 30 A. americanum larvae. Data from this study and accounts from the published literature suggest that parasitism of wild turkeys by immature lone star ticks is commonplace wherever this host and ectoparasite are sympatric. Our study suggests that M. gallopavo may be an important host that supports lone star tick populations.

  11. An Evaluation of a Family Crisis Counseling Center's Impact on Detained Status Offenders in Sedgwick County, KS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, George

    This report is an evaluation of the Youth Crisis Center program run by the Wichita, Kansas Children's Service League to provide crisis counseling services to status offenders. Two major objective of the program were to reduce the number of adjudicated status offenders in Sedgwick County, Kansas; and to reduce placement of such youth in locked…

  12. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Kansas, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Kansas for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Kansas students showed across-the-board gains--both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and…

  13. Kansas State Board Primaries Find Republicans Divided

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonn, Jessica L.

    2006-01-01

    The fractured nature of the Kansas Republican Party is on display in the primary campaigns for the state board, in which Republicans of all stripes are scrambling to woo voters before they choose their candidates Aug. 1, 2006. The divisions in Kansas may also reflect the dynamics in other state and federal races this year, when the midterm…

  14. 40 CFR 131.34 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.34 Kansas. (a) In addition to the State-adopted use designations, the following water body segment in Kansas is designated for an expected aquatic life use:...

  15. 40 CFR 131.34 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.34 Kansas. (a) In addition to the State-adopted use designations, the following water body segment in Kansas is designated for an expected aquatic life use:...

  16. 40 CFR 131.34 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.34 Kansas. (a) In addition to the State-adopted use designations, the following water body segment in Kansas is designated for an expected aquatic life use:...

  17. 40 CFR 131.34 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.34 Kansas. (a) In addition to the State-adopted use designations, the following water body segment in Kansas is designated for an expected aquatic life use:...

  18. 40 CFR 131.34 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.34 Kansas. (a) In addition to the State-adopted use designations, the following water body segment in Kansas is designated for an expected aquatic life use:...

  19. 77 FR 16314 - Kansas Disaster # KS-00062

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00062 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Kansas dated 03/12/2012... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  20. My Kansas Library on the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreland, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author, a technology consultant for the Northeast Kansas Library System (NEKLS), shares the story of how the Kansas Library on the Web (KLOW) program was created. KLOW's story begins with the initial startup fund finding and the enthusiasm of the six pilot libraries. The middle of the story has to do with building a flexible,…

  1. Exploiting [2+2] cycloaddition chemistry: achievements with allenes.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Benito; Almendros, Pedro; Aragoncillo, Cristina

    2010-02-01

    The allene moiety represents an excellent partner for the [2+2] cycloaddition with alkenes and alkynes, affording the cyclobutane and cyclobutene skeletons in a single step. This strategy has been widely studied under thermal, photochemical and microwave induced conditions. More recently, the use of transition metal catalysis has been introduced as an alternative relying on the activation of the allenic component. On the other hand, the intramolecular version has attracted much attention as a strategy for the synthesis of polycyclic compounds in a regio- and stereoselective fashion. This critical review focuses on the most recently developed [2+2] cycloadditions on allenes along with remarkable early works accounting for the mechanism, the regio- and diastereoselectivity of the cycloadducts formed (103 references).

  2. Kansas Energy Sources: A Geological Review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merriam, D.F.; Brady, L.L.; Newell, K.D.

    2012-01-01

    Kansas produces both conventional energy (oil, gas, and coal) and nonconventional (coalbed gas, wind, hydropower, nuclear, geothermal, solar, and biofuels) and ranks the 22nd in state energy production in the U. S. Nonrenewable conventional petroleum is the most important energy source with nonrenewable, nonconventional coalbed methane gas becoming increasingly important. Many stratigraphic units produce oil and/or gas somewhere in the state with the exception of the Salina Basin in north-central Kansas. Coalbed methane is produced from shallow wells drilled into the thin coal units in southeastern Kansas. At present, only two surface coal mines are active in southeastern Kansas. Although Kansas has been a major exporter of energy in the past (it ranked first in oil production in 1916), now, it is an energy importer. ?? 2011 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  3. Kansas Energy Sources: A Geological Review

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, Daniel F.; Brady, Lawrence L.; Newell, K. David

    2012-03-15

    Kansas produces both conventional energy (oil, gas, and coal) and nonconventional (coalbed gas, wind, hydropower, nuclear, geothermal, solar, and biofuels) and ranks the 22nd in state energy production in the U.S. Nonrenewable conventional petroleum is the most important energy source with nonrenewable, nonconventional coalbed methane gas becoming increasingly important. Many stratigraphic units produce oil and/or gas somewhere in the state with the exception of the Salina Basin in north-central Kansas. Coalbed methane is produced from shallow wells drilled into the thin coal units in southeastern Kansas. At present, only two surface coal mines are active in southeastern Kansas. Although Kansas has been a major exporter of energy in the past (it ranked first in oil production in 1916), now, it is an energy importer.

  4. Spiculitic chert reservoir in Glick Field, South-Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.P.; Longman, M.W.; Lloyd, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Glick Field, located in Kiowa and Comanche counties of southern Kansas, was discovered in 1957 and has produced more than 362 BCF from Mississippian Osage chert, commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Chat.{close_quotes} Other {open_quotes}CHAT{close_quotes} reservoirs in Kansas and Oklahoma produce mainly from mixed chert and dolomite beneath the pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity, but Glick Field`s reservoir is dominated by chert containing abundant sponge spicules. Glick Field is a stratigraphic trap with production ending where the spiculitic facies pinches out into tight limestones to the south and west which provide a lateral seal. Additionally, updip, to the northeast, the productive facies is truncated by the unconformity. Reworked chert conglomerates overlying the spiculitic reservoir at the unconformity also produce some gas. The spiculitic chert forming the reservoir was desposited below storm wavebase and grades laterally in all directions into echinoderm and brachiopod-rich skeletal wackestones and lime mudstones. Even where completely silicified, these associated limestone are tight. Thus, the reservoir is an in situ oval-shaped complex of internally brecciated sponge mats and bioherms capped in part by the chert conglomerate. The spiculitic chert contains up to 50% porosity in molds after sponge spicules, matrix micropores and vugs are connected in part by fracture and breccia porosity. Distribution of the sponge bioherms which form the reservoir facies was partly controlled by a subtle change on the shallow Mississippian carbonate shelf from clean skeletal limestones southward into shaly (and probably more anoxic) carbonates known locally as the {open_quotes}Cowley Facies.{close_quotes} The sponge bioherms formed most commonly just updip from this boundary, which can be mapped across southern Kansas. Thus, lithologic mapping provides a potential exploration tool with which to find other stratigraphically trapped spiculitic reservoirs in the area.

  5. Groundwater from Lower Cretaceous rocks in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keene, Katherine M.; Bayne, Charles Knight

    1976-01-01

    Sandstones in Lower Cretaceous rocks contain supplies, of water that may be adequate to meet increasing present and future demands for supplemental municipal and domestic use in central and western Kansas. An estimated 70 to 80 million acre-feet (86,000 to 99,000 cubic hectometers) of water containing less than 1,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids may be acceptable for use at the present (1976). An additional 10 to 15 million acre-feet (12,000 to 18,000 cubic hectometers) containing 1,000 to 3,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids is estimated to be available for use in the future with appropriate desalinization. Lower Cretaceous rocks crop out from Washington County on the north to Comanche County on-the south. The rocks dip from a structural high in the southwest part of the State to structural lows in the northwest and north-central part. Depth below land surface increases generally northwestward to about 2,600 feet (790 meters); thickness of the rocks increases westward, nearly zero to about 850 feet (260 meters). The rocks consist chiefly of marine to nonmarine shale and silt- stone interbedded with coastal to deltaic sandstone. The interbedded sandstone, which composes about one-third of the rocks, consists of one or more lenses that thicken westward to about 400 feet (120 meters) in the central part of western Kansas. The yield of water to individual wells is related to areal extent, thickness, and interconnection of the sand lenses and to grain size and cementation of the sand. Large amounts of water may be pumped by wells where loosely cemented sand lenses are interconnected. Wells commonly yield adequate supplies for domestic and stock use; reported yields from municipal and irrigation wells range from about 100 to 2,000 gallons per minute (6 to 125 liters per second). Recharge to the Lower Cretaceous-rocks occurs in the area of outcrop and from hydraulically connected saturated Cenozoic rocks, especially in the southern part of the State

  6. Van Allen Probes Science Gateway: A Centralized Data Access Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Barnes, R. J.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sotirelis, T.; Stephens, G. K.; Kessel, R.; Potter, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Science Gateway acts a centralized interface to the instrument Science Operation Centers (SOCs), provides mission planning tools, and hosts a number of science related activities such as the mission bibliography. Most importantly, the Gateway acts as the primary site for processing and delivering the Van Allen Probes Space Weather data to users. Over the past years, the web-site has been completely redesigned with the focus on easier navigation and improvements of the existing tools such as the orbit plotter, position calculator and magnetic footprint tool. In addition, a new data plotting facility has been added. Based on HTML5, which allows users to interactively plot Van Allen Probes science and space weather data. The user can tailor the tool to display exactly the plot they wish to see and then share this with other users via either a URL or by QR code. Various types of plots can be created, including, simple time series, data plotted as a function of orbital location, and time versus L-Shell, capability of visualizing data from both probes (A & B) on the same plot. In cooperation with all Van Allen Probes Instrument SOCs, the Science Gateway will soon be able to serve higher level data products (Level 3), and to visualize them via the above mentioned HTML5 interface. Users will also be able to create customized CDF files on the fly.

  7. James Van Allen and His Namesake NASA Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Hoxie, V. C.; Jaynes, A.; Kale, A.; Kanekal, S. G.; Li, X.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2013-12-01

    In many ways, James A. Van Allen defined and "invented" modern space research. His example showed the way for government-university partners to pursue basic research that also served important national and international goals. He was a tireless advocate for space exploration and for the role of space science in the spectrum of national priorities.

  8. Regioselective intramolecular [3+2] annulation of allene-nitrones.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Kobayashi, Harumi; Mukai, Chisato

    2012-01-01

    The regioselective intramolecular 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of the phenylsulfonylallene-nitrone derivatives has been developed. This reaction showed that the distal double bond of the allene exclusively reacted with the nitrone group to produce the bicyclic isoxazolidine derivatives regardless of the substitution pattern on the allenyl moiety.

  9. Thermal induced intramolecular [2 + 2] cycloaddition of allene-ACPs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Sun, Run; Xu, Qin; Wei, Yin; Shi, Min

    2013-06-28

    A facile synthetic method for preparation of bicyclo[4.2.0] nitrogen heterocycles has been developed via a thermal induced intramolecular [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of allene-ACPs. The DFT calculations indicate that this intramolecular cycloaddition proceeds in a concerted manner and a strained small ring is essential.

  10. The Evolving Space Weather System—Van Allen Probes Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, L. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Fox, N. J.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Sotirelis, T. S.; Raouafi, N.-E.; Kessel, R. L.; Becker, H. N.

    2014-10-01

    The overarching goal and purpose of the study of space weather is clear—to understand and address the issues caused by solar disturbances on humans and technological systems. Space weather has evolved in the past few decades from a collection of concerned agencies and researchers to a critical function of the National Weather Service of NOAA. The general effects have also evolved from the well-known telegraph disruptions of the mid-1800s to modern day disturbances of the electric power grid, communications and navigation, human spaceflight and spacecraft systems. The last two items in this list, and specifically the effects of penetrating radiation, were the impetus for the space weather broadcast implemented on NASA's Van Allen Probes' twin pair of satellites, launched in August of 2012 and orbiting directly through Earth's severe radiation belts. The Van Allen Probes mission, formerly the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), was renamed soon after launch to honor the discoverer of Earth's radiation belts at the beginning of the space age, the late James Van Allen (the spacecraft themselves are still referred to as RBSP-A and RBSP-B). The Van Allen Probes are one part of NASA's Living With a Star program formulated to advance the scientific understanding of the connection between solar disturbances, the resulting heliospheric conditions, and their effects on the geospace and Earth environment.

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 90-084-2219, Kansas City Kansas Police Department, Kansas City, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, R.; Almaguer, D.

    1992-05-01

    In response to a request from a management representative of the Kansas City, Kansas, Police Department (SIC-9221), an evaluation was undertaken of possible lead (7439921) exposures at the Police Department outdoor firing range. About 200,000 rounds of ammunition were fired at the range each year. Personal breathing zone and area air samples were taken for lead analysis. Surface wipe samples were taken as well along with hand lead concentrations and contamination of clothing. Air sampling revealed that the officers were exposed to 8 hour time weighted average concentrations of airborne lead ranging from nondetectable to 8 micrograms (microg) per cubic meter. The general air samples collected ranged from nondetectable to trace levels of contamination. The authors conclude that airborne lead did not exceed evaluation criteria, but dermal, surface and clothing contamination could increase the potential for lead ingestion and lead contamination of automobiles and homes. The authors recommend that efforts be made to reduce the potential spread of lead, and that medical surveillance be instituted for frequent range users and the range master.

  12. Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-Term -- Class 2

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Timothy R.; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-07-08

    This report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  13. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS--NEAR TERM--CLASS 2

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

    1999-06-01

    This annual report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  14. Cost savings of telemedicine utilization for child psychiatry in a rural Kansas community.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Ryan; Belz, Norbert; DeLurgio, Stephen; Williams, Arthur R

    2010-10-01

    The costs of pediatric telemedicine services remain underreported and understudied; however, there is evidence that telepediatric services can be cost competitive with traditional ones. For 15 years, the University of Kansas Center for Telemedicine and Telehealth has been providing telemental health outreach from the University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC). One service site is located in Crawford County, Kansas, which provides telepsychiatry services to children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine the costs of operating the Crawford County site relative to accessing services at KUMC, the likely alternative service location. The cost of travel time to parents who accompanied a dependent to either location also was estimated. Patients and parents were examined over a 6-month period in 2006. One hundred thirty-two patients received 257 telemedicine psychiatric consultations during this period. Cost estimates for using the pediatric telemedicine service were assessed for all patients; however, travel and related costs were collected from a sample of 26 patient-parent dyads. The estimated costs of services were obtained using standard cost-accounting procedures. An average cost per consultation in Crawford County was $168.61. The cost savings in travel time and other expenses to parents and patients were substantial between use of the county site and KUMC. Subtracting average savings in travel costs to patients and parents produced an average cost of a telepsychiatry consult in Crawford County of only $30.99. This study was conducted over 6 months with a small number of observations; it should be replicated over a longer study period, with more patients, and with more data that might capture marginal costs of services.

  15. Wastewater Disposal, Hydraulic Fracturing, and Seismicity in Southern Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, J. L.; Terra, F. M.; Ellsworth, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    The concurrent appearance of seismicity with the expansion of oil and gas activities in southern Kansas since September 2012 suggests that industrial operations are inducing earthquakes. These earthquakes occur in a portion of the Mississippian Lime Play, an oil and gas field stretching from central Oklahoma to northwestern Kansas. As has been seen in other areas of high-rate wastewater injection, the seismicity appears to be driven by the disposal of produced water by injection into deep sedimentary formations. We focus on an 1800 km^2 region in Harper and Sumner counties where a temporary, 14-station seismic network deployed by the USGS monitors ongoing seismicity. Regional and national networks supplement the temporary network. Earthquake locations and magnitudes are reported on a daily basis and M≥1.5 earthquakes are included in the USGS Comprehensive Catalog (ComCat) with a magnitude of completeness of ~M2.0. The clusters of earthquakes are principally in the crystalline basement, some forming lineations extending up to 10 km. Focal mechanisms indicate normal faulting, consistent with the local tectonic stress field. While some of the clusters of seismicity are located close to high-rate injection wells, others are at least 10km from large injection wells. Additionally, high-rate wells do not always appear to be associated with seismicity. In response to the increased seismicity, on March 29, 2015 the Kansas Corporation Commission placed new limits on the rate of wastewater disposal in 5 areas in southern Kansas. Since this regulation has been in place, earthquake activity has decreased by 40-50%. In the 87 days between January 1, 2015 and March 29, when the order was enacted, there were on average three M≥2 earthquakes and 0.3 M≥3 earthquakes per day in the study area. The earthquake rate in the 87 days following the change in regulations dropped to 1.8 M≥2 and 0.2 M≥3 earthquakes per day in the same region over the same amount of time. The two

  16. Propargyltrimethylsilanes as allene equivalents in transition metal-catalyzed [5 + 2] cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Wender, Paul A; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Pfaffenbach, Magnus; Stevens, Matthew C

    2014-06-01

    Conventional allenes have not been effective π-reactive 2-carbon components in many intermolecular cycloadditions including metal-catalyzed [5 + 2] cycloadditions. We report herein that rhodium-catalyzed [5 + 2] cycloadditions of propargyltrimethylsilanes and vinylcyclopropanes provide, after in situ protodesilylation, a highly efficient route to formal allene cycloadducts. Propargyltrimethylsilanes function as safe, easily handled synthetic equivalents of gaseous allenes and hard-to-access monosubstituted allenes. In this one-flask procedure, they provide cycloadducts of what is formally addition to the more sterically encumbered allene double bond.

  17. Propargyltrimethylsilanes as Allene Equivalents in Transition Metal-Catalyzed [5 + 2] Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conventional allenes have not been effective π-reactive 2-carbon components in many intermolecular cycloadditions including metal-catalyzed [5 + 2] cycloadditions. We report herein that rhodium-catalyzed [5 + 2] cycloadditions of propargyltrimethylsilanes and vinylcyclopropanes provide, after in situ protodesilylation, a highly efficient route to formal allene cycloadducts. Propargyltrimethylsilanes function as safe, easily handled synthetic equivalents of gaseous allenes and hard-to-access monosubstituted allenes. In this one-flask procedure, they provide cycloadducts of what is formally addition to the more sterically encumbered allene double bond. PMID:24819093

  18. Logistic and linear regression model documentation for statistical relations between continuous real-time and discrete water-quality constituents in the Kansas River, Kansas, July 2012 through June 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Guy M.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2016-04-06

    The Kansas River is a primary source of drinking water for about 800,000 people in northeastern Kansas. Source-water supplies are treated by a combination of chemical and physical processes to remove contaminants before distribution. Advanced notification of changing water-quality conditions and cyanobacteria and associated toxin and taste-and-odor compounds provides drinking-water treatment facilities time to develop and implement adequate treatment strategies. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Kansas Water Office (funded in part through the Kansas State Water Plan Fund), and the City of Lawrence, the City of Topeka, the City of Olathe, and Johnson County Water One, began a study in July 2012 to develop statistical models at two Kansas River sites located upstream from drinking-water intakes. Continuous water-quality monitors have been operated and discrete-water quality samples have been collected on the Kansas River at Wamego (USGS site number 06887500) and De Soto (USGS site number 06892350) since July 2012. Continuous and discrete water-quality data collected during July 2012 through June 2015 were used to develop statistical models for constituents of interest at the Wamego and De Soto sites. Logistic models to continuously estimate the probability of occurrence above selected thresholds were developed for cyanobacteria, microcystin, and geosmin. Linear regression models to continuously estimate constituent concentrations were developed for major ions, dissolved solids, alkalinity, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus species), suspended sediment, indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, fecal coliform, and enterococci), and actinomycetes bacteria. These models will be used to provide real-time estimates of the probability that cyanobacteria and associated compounds exceed thresholds and of the concentrations of other water-quality constituents in the Kansas River. The models documented in this report are useful for characterizing changes

  19. Calibration intervals at Bendix Kansas City

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    The calibration interval evaluation methods and control in each calibrating department of the Bendix Corp., Kansas City Division is described, and a more detailed description of those employed in metrology is provided.

  20. Pest Status and Distribution of the Stem Borer, Dectes texanus, in Kansas

    PubMed Central

    Buschman, Lawrent L.; Sloderbeck, Phillip E.

    2010-01-01

    The Dectes stem borer, Dectes texanus LeConte (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is currently receiving increased attention as a pest of soybeans in the Great Plains of North America. Field surveys were conducted in 1999 and in 2008 to record the distribution of this pest in Kansas. These surveys documented an increase in the abundance of the pest and an expansion in the range of this insect westward and eastward. The percentage of fields with more than 50% of plants infested also increased from 4% in 1999 to 11% in 2008. The far eastern counties still had surprisingly few infested fields even though much of the Kansas soybean acreage is located in these counties. It is not clear if D. texanus simply haven't expanded into eastern Kansas yet or if there is an ecological barrier that keeps them from doing so. Field crop entomologists from across eastern North America were sent an email questionnaire and their responses indicate that this pest is now well established as a pest of soybeans in at least 14 states across eastern North America. PMID:21268702

  1. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2005-12-31

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By the end of December 2005, 14,115 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,091 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Continued injection of water is planned to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

  2. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2006-06-30

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By June 30, 2006, 41,566 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,726 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. Oil rates increased from about 3.3 B/D for the period from January through March to about 4.7 B/D for the period from April through June. If the oil rate is sustained, this may be the first indication of the arrival of the oil bank mobilized by carbon dioxide injection. A sustained fluid withdrawal rate of about 200 B/D from CO2 No.12 and CO2 No.13 appears to be necessary to obtain higher oil rates. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has

  3. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2007-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By December 31, 2006, 79,072 bbls of water were injected into CO2 I-1 and 3,923 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Water injection rates into CO2 I-1, CO2 No.10 and CO2 No.18 were stabilized during this period. Oil production rates increased from 4.7 B/D to 5.5 to 6 B/D confirming the arrival of an oil bank at CO2 No.12. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver No.7, Colliver No.3 and possibly Graham A4 located on an adjacent property. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Our management plan is to continue water injection maintaining oil displacement by displacing the carbon dioxide remaining in the C zone,. If the decline rate of production from the Colliver Lease remains as estimated and the oil rate from the pilot region remains constant, we estimate that the oil production attributed to carbon dioxide injection will be about 12,000 bbl by December 31, 2007. Oil recovery would be equivalent to 12 MCF/bbl, which is consistent with field experience in

  4. Obituary: James Alfred Van Allen, 1914-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, George H.; McIlwain, Carl Edwin

    2006-12-01

    James Alfred Van Allen, world-renowned space scientist, died 9 August 2006 at the age of ninety-one. He succumbed to heart failure after a ten-week period of declining health. Van Allen served for his entire sixty-seven-year professional career as an amazingly productive researcher, space science spokesman, inspired teacher, and valued colleague. The realization by him and his associates that charged particles are trapped by the Earth's magnetic field began a whole new field of research, magnetospheric physics. Following that initial discovery, he and his associates quickly extended their observations, first to the inner planets, and then to the rest of the planets and beyond. During his tenure at Iowa, he and his group flew instruments on more than sixty successful Earth satellites and planetary spacecraft, including the first missions to the planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Van Allen's lifetime publication list numbers more than 275, of which many are widely-cited, seminal papers. He was the sole author of more than 125 of those papers. Beyond the research laboratory, Van Allen worked energetically throughout his career in establishing space research as a new branch of human inquiry. He was among the most sought-after as a committee member and adviser, working at the highest levels of government, including the White House and Congress, and at all levels of the national and international research establishments. Many presentations in the non-scientific arena helped to bring the exciting discoveries and challenges of space research to the attention of the general public. James Van Allen (Van to his many friends and colleagues) was born on 7 September 1914 on a small farm near Mount Pleasant, Iowa, the second of four sons of Alfred Morris Van Allen and Alma Olney Van Allen. After high school in Mount Pleasant, he entered Iowa Wesleyan College, majoring in physics and graduating summa cum laude. While there, he was introduced to geophysics

  5. 78 FR 50409 - Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid-Kansas Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid... Municipal Energy Agency (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against Sunflower Electric Power Corporation... that Sunflower Electric Power Corporation and Mid-Kansas Electric Company, LLC are in violation of...

  6. Facilitator's Manual - Aztlan en Kansas: Asistencia Tecnologica (Technological Assistance to Mexican American People in Kansas.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, J. Christian; And Others

    Primary purpose of the program, "Aztlan en Kansas: Asistencia Tecnologica", is to provide technical assistance to Mexican Americans in Kansas in developing leadership skills which could then be applied for the improvement of the whole community. The program utilized a Laubach model in that as a workshop was conducted, community leaders were…

  7. Development of Recommendations To Improve Minority Faculty Hiring Procedures at Kansas City Kansas Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles E.

    In response to the small number of minority faculty at Kansas City Kansas Community College (KCKCC), a study was conducted to develop a set of recommendations to improve minority faculty hiring procedures and provide information and guidelines useful to administrative staff for recruiting minority faculty members. Criteria for establishing policy…

  8. A History of Music Education in the Black Community of Kansas City, Kansas, 1905-1954.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Reginald T.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a historical study of music education in the segregated Black schools of Kansas City, Kansas, between 1904-1954. The discussion covers the educational leadership, organization, music curriculum, and activities in the public schools and at Western University. Black private music instructors and outstanding students of the period are…

  9. 75 FR 103 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 17, Kansas City, Kansas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... been given in the Federal Register (74 FR 17953-17954, 4/20/2009) and the application has been... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Order No. 1655 Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 17, Kansas City, Kansas...

  10. Characterization and simulation of ground-water flow in the Kansas River Valley at Fort Riley, Kansas, 1990-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Nathan C.

    2000-01-01

    those in ground water from wells in the northern Camp Funston Area. In addition, comparison of observed water levels from wells CF90-06, CF97-101, and CF97-401 in the Camp Funston Area and ground-water levels simulated for these wells using floodwave-response analysis indicates that ground-water inflow from bedrock is a hydraulic stress that, in addition to the changing stage in the Kansas River, acts on the aquifer. This hydraulic stress seems to be located near the northern valley wall because the effect of this stress is greater for well CF97-101, which is the well closest to the valley wall. Ground-water flow was simulated using a modular, three-dimensional, finite-difference ground-water flow model (MODFLOW). Particle tracking, used to visualize ground-water flow paths in the alluvial aquifer, was accomplished using MODPATH. Forward-in-time particle tracking indicated that, in general, particles released near the Kansas River followed much more variable paths than particles released near the valley wall. Although particle tracking does not simulate solute transport, this increased path variability indicates that, near the river, ground-water contaminants could follow many possible paths towards the river, whereas more distant from the river, ground-water contaminants likely would follow a narrower corridor. Particle tracks in the Camp Funston Area indicate that, for the 1990-98 simulation period, contaminants from the ground-water study sites in the Camp Funston Area would be unlikely to move into the vicinity of Ogden's supply wells. Backward-in-time particle tracking indicated that the flow-path and recharge areas for model cells corresponding to Ogden's supply wells lie near the northern valley wall and extend into the northern Camp Funston Area. The flow-path and recharge areas for model cells corresponding to Morris County Rural Water District wells lie within Clarks Creek Valley and probably extend outside the model area. Three hypothetical simulations, i

  11. Van Allen Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr; Sibeck, David; Fox, Nicola; Mauk, Barry; Kessel, Ramona

    The Van Allen Probes twin spacecraft were launched on 30 August 2012 into nearly identical, 1.1 x 5.8 Re elliptical, low inclination (10°) Earth orbits with one of the two spacecraft lapping the other about every 2.5 months. The goal of the mission is to provide understanding of how populations of relativistic electrons and penetrating ions in space form or change in response to variable inputs of energy from the Sun. In this paper we overview the new understanding and discoveries of the Van Allen Probes science investigations since the operational mission began on 1 November 2012, which include formation of multiple coherently ordered structures within the outer electron belt and new persistent “zebra stripes” in the inner electron belt.

  12. JCCC's Environmental Scan: Results of Focus Groups Conducted with Johnson County Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    This report presents questions and typical responses from focus group discussions conducted at Johnson County Community College (JCCC, Kansas) in March 1999. A total of 23 individuals of varying ages from all geographic regions in Johnson County participated in three focus groups, designed as a follow-up to a phone survey about constituency…

  13. Isomer-specific combustion chemistry in allene and propyne flames

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Nils; Miller, James A.; Westmoreland, Phillip R.; Kasper, Tina; Kohse-Hoeinghaus, Katharina; Wang, Juan; Cool, Terrill A.

    2009-11-15

    A combined experimental and modeling study is performed to clarify the isomer-specific combustion chemistry in flames fueled by the C{sub 3}H{sub 4} isomers allene and propyne. To this end, mole fraction profiles of several flame species in stoichiometric allene (propyne)/O{sub 2}/Ar flames are analyzed by means of a chemical kinetic model. The premixed flames are stabilized on a flat-flame burner under a reduced pressure of 25 Torr (=33.3 mbar). Quantitative species profiles are determined by flame-sampling molecular-beam mass spectrometry, and the isomer-specific flame compositions are unraveled by employing photoionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. The temperature profiles are measured by OH laser-induced fluorescence. Experimental and modeled mole fraction profiles of selected flame species are discussed with respect to the isomer-specific combustion chemistry in both flames. The emphasis is put on main reaction pathways of fuel consumption, of allene and propyne isomerization, and of isomer-specific formation of C{sub 6} aromatic species. The present model includes the latest theoretical rate coefficients for reactions on a C{sub 3}H{sub 5} potential [J.A. Miller, J.P. Senosiain, S.J. Klippenstein, Y. Georgievskii, J. Phys. Chem. A 112 (2008) 9429-9438] and for the propargyl recombination reactions [Y. Georgievskii, S.J. Klippenstein, J.A. Miller, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 9 (2007) 4259-4268]. Larger peak mole fractions of propargyl, allyl, and benzene are observed in the allene flame than in the propyne flame. In these flames virtually all of the benzene is formed by the propargyl recombination reaction. (author)

  14. Van Allen Probes Science Gateway and Space Weather Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Fox, N. J.; Mauk, B.; Potter, M.; Kessel, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Science Gateway acts as a centralized interface to the instrument Science Operation Centers (SOCs), provides mission planning tools, and hosts a number of science related activities such as the mission bibliography. Most importantly, the Gateway acts as the primary site for processing and delivering the VAP Space Weather data to users. Over the past year, the web-site has been completely redesigned with the focus on easier navigation and improvements of the existing tools such as the orbit plotter, position calculator and magnetic footprint tool. In addition, a new data plotting facility has been added. Based on HTML5, which allows users to interactively plot Van Allen Probes summary and space weather data. The user can tailor the tool to display exactly the plot they wish to see and then share this with other users via either a URL or by QR code. Various types of plots can be created, including simple time series, data plotted as a function of orbital location, and time versus L-Shell. We discuss the new Van Allen Probes Science Gateway and the Space Weather Data Pipeline.

  15. REMEDIATION OF LEON WATER FLOOD, BUTLER COUNTY, KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Korphage; Kelly Kindscher; Bruce G. Langhus

    2001-11-26

    The Leon Water Flood site has undergone one season of soil amendments and growth of specialized plants meant to colonize and accelerate the remediation of the salt-impacted site. The researchers characterized the impacted soil as to chemistry, added soil amendments, and planted several species of seedlings, and seeded the scarred areas. After the first growing season, the surface soil was again characterized and groundcover was also characterized. While plant growth was quite meager across the area, soil chemistry did improve over most of the two scars.

  16. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Kansas City Plant (KCP), conducted March 23 through April 3, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the KCP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations performed at the KCP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the KCP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the KCP Survey. 94 refs., 39 figs., 55 tabs.

  17. Johnson County Community College and Burlington Northern Railroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radakovich, Dan; Lindsay, Susan; Osborn, Bill

    In order to serve the educational needs of the business community and generate revenues, Johnson County Community College (Kansas) formed a partnership with Burlington Northern Railroad in which the railroad's training facility would be relocated on the college's campus. This report documents the development of that relationship, its purpose, and…

  18. Kansas Educational Achievement Report Card 2015. Research Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallman, Mark; Carter, Ted

    2015-01-01

    This report includes a high-level overview of student outcome data and how Kansas measures up to the other 49 states. It is meant to complement the other reporting that the Kansas Association of School Boards has released and will be releasing related to improving student outcomes for all Kansas public schools. The following are key findings…

  19. Kansas Community Colleges: Populism is Alive and Well.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Rodney

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Kansas Community Colleges which have never been unified under a statewide system. Also notes that Kansas colleges receive only 28% of their funding from the state, the lowest in the country, and that the colleges are currently confronted with a funding crisis. Suggests that Kansas colleges develop a statewide system. (JDI)

  20. Kansas State University: 2+2 Partnerships with Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maes, Sue; Pfortmiller, Jennifer; Sinn, Melinda; Vail, Rosanna

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on how Kansas State University (K-State) built partnerships with all 19 community colleges in Kansas and streamlined the process of providing place-bound adult students with access to complete a bachelor's degree while continuing to live, work, and serve in their home communities. Kansas State University (K-State) has been an…

  1. Palynological correlation of Atokan and lower desmoinesian (Pennsylvanian) strata between the Illinois basin and the Forest City basin in Eastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peppers, R.A.; Brady, L.L.

    2007-01-01

    Palynological correlation is made between Atokan and lower Desmoinesian strata in the Illinois basin an the Forest City basin in eastern Kansas. Spore data from previous studies of coals in the Illinois basin and other coal basins are compared with data from spore assemblages in coal and carbonaceous shale bands in a core drilled in Leavenworth County, Kansas. Correlations are based on first and/or last occurrences of 31 species common to the Illinois basin and eastern Kansas and on significant increases or decreases in abundance of several of those taxa. The oldest coal, which is 26 ft (8 m) above the top of the Mississippian, is early Atokan (early Westphalian B) in age and is approximately equivalent to the Bell coal bed in the Illinois basin. The Riverton coal bed at the top of the studied interval in Kansas is early Desmoinesian (early Westphalian D) and correlates with about the Lewisport coal bed in the Illinois basin. Three coal beds near the base of the Pennsylvanian in three cores drilled in Cherokee County, Kansas, which were also studied, range in age from late Atokan to early Desmoinesian. As in other coal basins, Lycospora, borne by lycopod trees, greatly dominates the lower and middle Atokan spore assemblages in coals and shale, but spores from ferns, especially tree ferns, significantly increase in abundance in the upper Atokan and lower Desmoinesian. The pattern of change of dominance among Lycosporapellucida, L. granulata, and L, micropapillata in middle Atokan (Westphalian B-C transition) that has been demonstrated earlier in the Illinois basin and eastern Kentucky and Tennessee, also occurs in eastern Kansas. At least 10 species of spores, which appeared in the middle Atokan in other parts of the equatorial coal belt, also appeared at this time in eastern Kansas. Most of these species have their affinities with the ferns, which were adapted to drier habitats than lycopods. Thus, the climate may have become a little drier in the equatorial coal

  2. Water use in Kansas, 1990-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenny, Joan F.; Hansen, Cristi V.

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet compares water use in 1990, 1995, and 2000 for the 12 major river basins in Kansas. Of these 3 years, irrigation water use was largest in 1990 and smallest in 1995, largely because of differing climatic conditions. Irrigation averaged about 85 percent of total water use in Kansas each year, and ground water pumped in the western part of the State provided most of the irrigation water used. Water use for public supply, industry, and livestock increased between 1990 and 2000. Total State population increased 8 percent between 1990 and 2000, and the number of people served by public water suppliers increased 12 percent. Surface water withdrawn for public supply increased 24 percent because of population growth in the northeastern and south-central parts of the State and decreasing reliance on ground water by the city of Wichita. From 1990 to 2000, ground-water withdrawals for livestock and meat processing increased in western Kansas, and surface-water withdrawals for sand dredging increased in eastern Kansas. This fact sheet was produced as part of an ongoing cooperative program supported in part by the Kansas State Water Plan Fund.

  3. Irrigation mapping in western Kansas using Landsat. I - Key parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poracsky, J.

    1980-01-01

    The procedure used in the identification and mapping of irrigated lands in six counties of western Kansas is presented and key considerations for the identification of irrigated lands during the project are discussed. The procedure involved the compilation of a field-by-field map of irrigated lands on the basis of multi-date Landsat band 5 imagery, the entry of map data into a computer, and the retrieval of the data in the form of maps, tables and statistics. Comparison of the positional results of the image interpretation with statistical data for a single county was used to verify the mapping procedure, as accuracies of from 80-100% were obtained, depending on the type of crop. Considerations relevant to the identification of irrigated land on the basis of remote sensing data include the form of the final data, irrigation practices in the area, the soil moisture budget, the number and kinds of crops, the crop calendar, and the availability of usable imagery.

  4. Stereoselective rhodium-catalysed [2+2+2] cycloaddition of linear allene-ene/yne-allene substrates: reactivity and theoretical mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Haraburda, Ewelina; Torres, Óscar; Parella, Teodor; Solà, Miquel; Pla-Quintana, Anna

    2014-04-22

    Allene-ene-allene (2 and 5) and allene-yne-allene (3 and 7) N-tosyl and O-linked substrates were satisfactorily synthesised. The [2+2+2] cycloaddition reaction catalysed by the Wilkinson catalyst [RhCl(PPh3 )3 ] was evaluated. Substrates 2 and 5, which bear a double bond in the central position, gave a tricyclic structure in a reaction in which four contiguous stereogenic centres were formed as a single diastereomer. The reaction of substrates 3 and 7, which bear a triple bond in the central position, gave a tricyclic structure with a cyclohexenic ring core, again in a diastereoselective manner. All cycloadducts were formed by a regioselective reaction of the inner allene double bond and, therefore, feature an exocyclic diene motif. A Diels-Alder reaction on N-tosyl linked cycloadducts 8 and 10 allowed pentacyclic scaffolds to be diastereoselectively constructed. The reactivity of the allenes on [2+2+2] cycloaddition reactions was studied for the first time by density functional theory calculations. This mechanistic study rationalizes the order in which the unsaturations take part in the catalytic cycle, the reactivity of the two double bonds of the allene towards the [2+2+2] cycloaddition reaction, and the diastereoselectivity of the reaction.

  5. Kansas environmental and resource study: A Great Plains model. Extraction of agricultural statistics from ERTS-1 data of Kansas. [wheat inventory and agriculture land use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morain, S. A. (Principal Investigator); Williams, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Wheat area, yield, and production statistics as derived from satellite image analysis, combined with a weather model, are presented for a ten county area in southwest Kansas. The data (representing the 1972-73 crop year) are compared for accuracy against both the USDA August estimate and its final (official) tabulation. The area estimates from imagery for both dryland and irrigated winter wheat were within 5% of the official figures for the same area, and predated them by almost one year. Yield on dryland wheat was estimated by the Thompson weather model to within 0.1% of the observed yield. A combined irrigated and dryland wheat production estimate for the ten county area was completed in July, 1973 and was within 1% of the production reported by USDA in February, 1974.

  6. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Inman, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-05

    In 1997, low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5 {micro}g/L) were detected in groundwater at Inman, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1997 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Inman from 1954 to 1965. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Inman is located in southwest McPherson County, approximately 10 mi southwest of the city of McPherson (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Inman is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation at Inman, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA. For this work plan, Argonne compiled historical data related to the previous investigations and grain storage operations at Inman. Through a review of documents acquired from all available sources, other potential contaminant source areas (in addition to the former CCC/USDA facility) have been identified as (1) the commercial grain storage structures northwest of Inman, along the railroad right-of-way, and (2) small former private grain storage facilities west of Main Street and near the former CCC/USDA facility at the southern edge of Inman (Figure 1.2). Previous investigations and the potential source areas are discussed in Section 2.

  7. Ground-water resources of Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.C.; Lohman, S.W.; Frye, J.C.; Waite, H.A.; McLaughlin, Thad G.; Latta, Bruce

    1940-01-01

    Importance of ground-water resources.—The importance of Kansas' ground-water resources may be emphasized from various viewpoints and in different ways. More than three-fourths of the public water supplies of Kansas are obtained from wells. In 1939, only 60 out of 375 municipal water supplies in Kansas, which is 16 percent, utilized surface waters. If the water wells of the cities and those located on all privately owned land in the state were suddenly destroyed, making it necessary to go to streams, springs, lakes (which are almost all artificial), and ponds for water supply domestic, stock, and industrial use, there would be almost incalculable difficulty and expense. If one could not go to springs, or dig new wells, or use any surface water derived from underground flow, much of Kansas would become uninhabitable.  These suggested conditions seem absurd, but they emphasize our dependence on ground-water resources. Fromm a quantitative standpoint, ground-water supplies existent in Kansas far outweigh surface waters that are present in the state at any one time. No exact figures for such comparison can be given, but, taking 384 square miles as the total surface water area of the state and estimating an average water depth of five feet, the computed volume of surface waters is found to be 1/100th of that of the conservatively estimated ground-water storage in Kansas. The latter takes account only of potable fresh water and is based on an assumed mean thickness of ten feet of reservoir having an effective porosity of twenty percent. It is to be remembered, however, that most of the surface water is run-off, which soon leaves the state, stream valleys being replenished from rainfall and flow from ground-water reservoirs. Most of the ground-water supplies, on the other hand, have existed for many years with almost no appreciable movement--in fact, it is reasonably certain that some well water drawn from beneath the surface of Kansas in 1940 represents rainfall in

  8. Flood of June 15, 1981, in Great Bend and vicinity, central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clement, R.W.; Johnson, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Torrential precipitation, as much as 20 inches in 12 hours, resulted in unprecedented flooding on Dry Walnut Creek in southwestern Barton County, central Kansas. Runoff from the storm caused extensive flooding in the town of Great Bend on June 15, 1981. Estimates of total damages exceeded $42 million. Measurements of peak discharges made in the downstream part of the Dry Walnut Creek watershed were as much as 3 1/2 times the estimated magnitude of the 100-year flood and in some locations exceeded the maximum previously measured discharge for the area. (USGS)

  9. Enteric helminths of juvenile and adult wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in eastern Kansas.

    PubMed

    McJunkin, Jared W; Applegate, Roger D; Zelmer, Derek A

    2003-01-01

    Viscera of 49 wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) collected in the spring of 2001 and 23 wild turkeys collected in the fall and winter of 2001-02 from 12 counties in eastern Kansas were examined for enteric helminths. Four cestode species, two trematode species, one nematode species, and one acanthocephalan species were identified. Two cestode and two trematode species present in the spring sample also were present in the fall and winter sample. Parasite prevalence was similar to previous studies of enteric helminths of wild turkeys except for the low numbers of nematode species and individuals recovered in the present study.

  10. Methods used in estimating the ground water supply in the Wichita, Kansas well-field area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, C.C.; Lohman, S.W.

    1947-01-01

    This paper presents the methods used in studying the groundwater hydrology of an area in Harvey and Sedgwick Counties, Kansas, from which the city of Wichita derives its water supply. A summary of the data available for study is presented and several hydrologic factors are evaluated. The relationship between groundwater levels and precipitation is shown, and recharge is estimated. The effect of pumping on water levels is shown graphically, and the quantity of water withdrawn from storage is estimated from several water-table contour maps. The data are analyzed and the quantity of water available for pumping is estimated.

  11. Index to selected machine-readable geohydrologic data for Precambrian through Cretaceous rocks in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spinazola, J.M.; Hansen, C.V.; Underwood, E.J.; Kenny, J.F.; Wolf, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Machine-readable geohydrologic data for Precambrian through Cretaceous rocks in Kansas were compiled as part of the USGS Central Midwest Regional Aquifer System Analysis. The geohydrologic data include log, water quality, water level, hydraulics, and water use information. The log data consist of depths to the top of selected geologic formations determined from about 275 sites with geophysical logs and formation lithologies from about 190 sites with lithologic logs. The water quality data consist of about 10,800 analyses, of which about 1 ,200 are proprietary. The water level data consist of about 4 ,480 measured water levels and about 4,175 equivalent freshwater hydraulic heads, of which about 3,745 are proprietary. The hydraulics data consist of results from about 30 specific capacity tests and about 20 aquifer tests, and interpretations of about 285 drill stem tests (of which about 60 are proprietary) and about 75 core-sample analyses. The water use data consist of estimates of freshwater withdrawals from Precambrian through Cretaceous geohydrologic units for each of the 105 counties in Kansas. Average yearly withdrawals were estimated for each decade from 1940 to 1980. All the log and water use data and the nonproprietary parts of the water quality , water level, and hydraulics data are available on magnetic tape from the USGS office in Lawrence, Kansas. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Hovering and forward flight energetics in Anna's and Allen's hummingbirds.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher James; Dudley, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Aerodynamic theory predicts that the mechanical costs of flight are lowest at intermediate flight speeds; metabolic costs of flight should trend similarly if muscle efficiency is constant. We measured metabolic rates for nine Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) and two male Allen's hummingbirds (Selasphorus sasin) feeding during flight from a free-standing mask over a range of airspeeds. Ten of 11 birds exhibited higher metabolic costs during hovering than during flight at intermediate airspeeds, whereas one individual exhibited comparable costs at hovering and during forward flight up to speeds of approximately 7 m s(-1). Flight costs of all hummingbirds increased at higher airspeeds. Relative to Anna's hummingbirds, Allen's hummingbirds exhibited deeper minima in the power curve, possibly due to higher wing loadings and greater associated costs of induced drag. Although feeding at a mask in an airstream may reduce body drag and, thus, the contributions of parasite power to overall metabolic expenditure, these results suggest that hummingbird power curves are characterized by energetic minima at intermediate speeds relative to hovering costs. PMID:20455711

  13. Hovering and forward flight energetics in Anna's and Allen's hummingbirds.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher James; Dudley, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Aerodynamic theory predicts that the mechanical costs of flight are lowest at intermediate flight speeds; metabolic costs of flight should trend similarly if muscle efficiency is constant. We measured metabolic rates for nine Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) and two male Allen's hummingbirds (Selasphorus sasin) feeding during flight from a free-standing mask over a range of airspeeds. Ten of 11 birds exhibited higher metabolic costs during hovering than during flight at intermediate airspeeds, whereas one individual exhibited comparable costs at hovering and during forward flight up to speeds of approximately 7 m s(-1). Flight costs of all hummingbirds increased at higher airspeeds. Relative to Anna's hummingbirds, Allen's hummingbirds exhibited deeper minima in the power curve, possibly due to higher wing loadings and greater associated costs of induced drag. Although feeding at a mask in an airstream may reduce body drag and, thus, the contributions of parasite power to overall metabolic expenditure, these results suggest that hummingbird power curves are characterized by energetic minima at intermediate speeds relative to hovering costs.

  14. Observations of Whistler-Mode Chorus with Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, William; Hospodarsky, George; Santolik, Ondrej; Kletzing, Craig; Bounds, Scott

    2014-10-01

    The Van Allen Probes mission provides an excellent opportunity to observe whistler-mode chorus and its role in the radiation belts. The plasma wave instrument on the two probes, called Waves, includes six identical waveform receivers covering the frequency range from 10 Hz to 12 kHz. The instrument measures three orthogonal magnetic field components and three orthogonal electric field components of waves. This complement supports wave-normal and Poynting flux analyses of chorus as well as other wave modes that interact with radiation belt particles. Extensive use of burst modes provides multicomponent waveforms enabling the study of individual chorus elements, including their substructure. The early-mission publications confirm the importance of chorus to the local acceleration of electrons in the outer radiation belts. The orbital precession of the twin Van Allen Probes through a complete range of local times now allows for a new survey of the distribution of chorus emissions. Hence, we now have the tools to study chorus from the nonlinear growth in chorus element substructures through synoptic studies of the near-equatorial occurrence of chorus out to a distance of approximately 5.8 Earth radii.

  15. Neuroinformatics of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Leonard; Li, Yang; Lau, Chris; Feng, David; Bernard, Amy; Sunkin, Susan M; Zeng, Hongkui; Dang, Chinh; Hawrylycz, Michael; Ng, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a mesoscale whole brain axonal projection atlas of the C57Bl/6J mouse brain. Anatomical trajectories throughout the brain were mapped into a common 3D space using a standardized platform to generate a comprehensive and quantitative database of inter-areal and cell-type-specific projections. This connectivity atlas has several desirable features, including brain-wide coverage, validated and versatile experimental techniques, a single standardized data format, a quantifiable and integrated neuroinformatics resource, and an open-access public online database (http://connectivity.brain-map.org/). Meaningful informatics data quantification and comparison is key to effective use and interpretation of connectome data. This relies on successful definition of a high fidelity atlas template and framework, mapping precision of raw data sets into the 3D reference framework, accurate signal detection and quantitative connection strength algorithms, and effective presentation in an integrated online application. Here we describe key informatics pipeline steps in the creation of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas and include basic application use cases.

  16. Environmental Programs Information: Affecting Kansas Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This document provides a brief overview of the environmental issues that affect Kansas public schools. Specific programs that address these problems are included, along with their contact information. This document contains information on the following issues and programs: (1) Department of Health and Environment; (2) air; (3) asbestos; (4)…

  17. Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics. Volume 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ichihashi, Kumiko, Ed.; Linn, Mary Sarah, Ed.

    Reports of recent original research on linguistics by faculty and students of the University of Kansas are presented. Topics include: "Collaboration on Topic Change in Conversation" (Mary Howe); "Stories in Conversation" (Roberta Senner Hofer); "It's Like, 'What's Happening in the Evolution of Like?': A Theory of Grammaticalization" (Teresa…

  18. Deaf Education in Kansas Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luetke-Stahlman, Barbara

    A 1991 survey of Directors of Special Education in Kansas indicated a shortage of deaf education teachers and problems with retention of deaf education teachers in rural areas. In addition, 15 of 22 respondents documented an increase in the number of deaf and hard-of-hearing (D/HH) children in their districts. Project Rural Education is a program…

  19. Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics. Volume 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fareh, Shehdeh; Yumitani, Yukihiro

    Seven original research papers by faculty and students of the Linguistics Department and other related departments of the University of Kansas are presented. The titles and authors are as follows: "Particles in Tojolabal Mayan Discourse" (Jill Brody); "One Hundred Years of Lakota Linguistics (1887-1987)" (Willem J. de Reuse); "Lexical and Phrasal…

  20. Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics. Volume 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Ali, Beth, Ed.; Bruch, Julie, Ed.

    Fourteen original research papers by faculty and students of the Linguistics Department and other related departments of the University of Kansas are presented. The titles and authors are as follows: "A Kinesic Approach to Understanding Communication and Context in Japanese" (Bruch); "Correlations between the Three Level Tones and Vowel Durations…

  1. Surface waters of Kansas, 1895-1919

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, R.C.

    1921-01-01

    The collection of long-time records of stream-flow in Kansas which is published in this volume has been prepared for the use of those who are concerned with the different phases of the utilization of water in the state.

  2. 76 FR 61775 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00059

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00059 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  3. 77 FR 32708 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00064

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00064 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  4. 78 FR 26679 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00073

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00073 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  5. 76 FR 47637 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00055

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00055 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street,...

  6. 1977 Kansas Field Crop Insect Control Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Leroy; Gates, Dell E.

    This publication is prepared to aid producers in selecting methods of insect population management that have proved effective under Kansas conditions. Topics covered include insect control on alfalfa, soil insects attacking corn, insects attacking above-ground parts of corn, and sorghum, wheat, and soybean insect control. The insecticides…

  7. Kansas City Metropolitan Community Colleges. Audit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Office of the State Auditor, Jefferson City.

    This audit report reviews the employment contracts, related compensation, and other benefits provided for the chancellor and other officers of the Kansas City Metropolitan Community Colleges (KCMCC) in Missouri. The chancellor is allowed to either solicit bids or negotiate for contracted services such as architects, construction managers,…

  8. Kansas State University Libraries' OCR Labeling Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thierer, Joyce; Bower, Merry

    This publication describes the planning and implementation of an optical character recognition (OCR) labeling project, the first stage of Kansas State University (KSU) Libraries' program of conversion from a manual to an automated circulation system. It is noted that a telephone survey of libraries with automated circulation systems and…

  9. Kansas Nursing Home Medication Aide Curriculum. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartel, Myrna J.; Fornelli, Linda K.

    This curriculum guide is designed to aid Kansas instructors in conducting a course for teaching nursing home medication aides. Covered first are various introductory topics such as the role and responsibilities of medication aides, pharmacodynamics, forms in which medication is now available, common medical abbreviations, mathematics and weights…

  10. Kansas Students Enjoy Summertime "Mountain Ventures"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Highfill, Kenneth M.

    1974-01-01

    Describes an elective biology program offered at Lawrence High School (Kansas) that emphasizes basic field biology, ecology, conservation, camping, first aid, mountaineering, and map reading. Groups of students spend two weeks in the Rocky Mountains developing knowledge and skills in these areas. (JR)

  11. Kansas Profile: Alcohol, Tobacco & Other Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drug Strategies, Washington, DC.

    One of a series of state profiles, this report describes the dimensions of the problems caused by alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs in Kansas and the public and private initiatives to reduce these problems. It highlights positive developments and identifies areas to be strengthened. Demographic characteristics, state agency organization, and state…

  12. Surface waters of Kansas, 1919-1924

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinnison, H.B.

    1926-01-01

    From 1906 to 1916 no stream-gaging investigations were made in Kansas, and the only records available for this period are those of river stages taken by the United States Weather Bureau, at a few selected stations, for use by the river forcast service. The floods of 1908, 1909 and 1915 occurred during this period.

  13. Astronaut Andrew M. Allen, mission commander, sets up systems for a television downlink on the

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 ONBOARD VIEW --- Astronaut Andrew M. Allen, mission commander, sets up systems for a television downlink on the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Columbia. Allen was joined by four other astronauts and an international payload specialist for more than 16 days of research aboard Columbia. The photograph was taken with a 70mm handheld camera.

  14. Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders: Interview with Michael W. Allen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Michael W. Allen, the Chairman and CEO of Allen Interactions, is an architect of interactive multimedia learning and is recognized for his many insights, inventions, and presentations. With over 50 years of experience in e-learning, both in academic and corporate settings, he is known for his role in creating Authorware and overseeing the work of…

  15. Highly Regioselective Radical Amination of Allenes: Direct Synthesis of Allenamides and Tetrasubstituted Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ge; Xiong, Tao; Wang, Zining; Xu, Guoxing; Wang, Xuedan; Zhang, Qian

    2015-10-19

    The first controllable, regioselective radical amination of allenes with N-fluoroarylsulfonimide is described to proceed under very mild reaction conditions. With this methodology, a general and straightforward route for the synthesis of both allenamides and fluorinated tetrasubstituted alkenes was realized from a wide range of terminal and internal allenes.

  16. Meeting the Challenge of Intermolecular Gold(I)-Catalyzed Cycloadditions of Alkynes and Allenes

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Michael E; Homs, Anna; Obradors, Carla; Echavarren, Antonio M

    2014-01-01

    The development of gold(I)-catalyzed intermolecular carbo- and hetero-cycloadditions of alkynes and allenes has been more challenging than their intramolecular counterparts. Here we review, with a mechanistic perspective, the most fundamental intermolecular cycloadditions of alkynes and allenes with alkenes. PMID:25048645

  17. Ugi/Himbert Arene/Allene Diels-Alder Cycloaddition to Synthesize Strained Polycyclic Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guangsheng; He, Xiang; Tian, Lumin; Chen, Jiawen; Li, Chunju; Jia, Xueshun; Li, Jian

    2015-11-01

    The present work disclosed an efficient multicomponent reaction of isocyanide, allenic acid, aldehyde (ketone), and aniline. This protocol undergoes Ugi reaction followed by an intramolecular arene/allene Diels-Alder sequence, thus providing a rapid access to synthesize strained polycyclic skeletons.

  18. Geomagnetic Storms and EMIC waves: Van Allen Probe observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Yuan, Z.; Yu, X.; Deng, X.; Zhou, M.; Huang, S.; Li, H.

    2015-12-01

    EMIC waves are believed to play an important role in the dynamics of ring current ions and radiation belt electrons, especially during geomagnetic storms. But, in which phase of the storm do the EMIC waves occur more is still under debate. Ground and some low altitude satellite observations demonstrate that EMIC waves are observed more frequently during the recovery phase, rather than during the main phase. Halford et al. 2010 looked at the occurrences of EMIC waves during 119 storms occurring throughout the CRRES mission. They found that 49 of the 119 (41%) storms observed EMIC waves and the majority, 56.25%, of storm time EMIC waves occurring during the main phase, while 35.57% in the recovery phase. One shortcoming of the CRRES mission is that the apogee of it did not covered the dawn to noon sector during its life time. Therefore, some dayside EMIC waves caused by the compression of magnetosphere may not be included in Halford et al 2010, as they mentioned. The apogee of Van Allen Probes covered all the MLT sectors from their launch to April 2014. Utilizing the data from magnetometer instrument on board the Van Allen Probe A, Wang et al. 2015 studied the occurrence rate of H-band and He-band EMIC waves in different MLT sectors, and Yu et al 2015 reported the O-band EMIC wave observations. In this work, we analysis the occurrence of EMIC waves during storms. According to the criteria of storm in Halford et al. 2010, we find 76 storms in our interested period, 8 September 2012 to 30 April 2014, when the apogee of Van Allen Probe A covered all the MLT sectors. To identify the onset of geomagnetic storm more accurately, we corrected the Sym-H index referred to Zhao and Zong (2011), which is helpful to demonstrate the activity of ring current. 50 of the 76 storms (66%) observed 124 EMIC wave events, in which 80 (64.5%) EMIC wave events are found in the recovery phase, more than the EMIC wave events in the main phase (35, 28.2%). The remaining 9 (7.3%) EMIC wave

  19. Floods in Kansas City, Missouri and vicinity, August 12-13, 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, L.D.; Alexander, T.W.; Waite, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    On August 12-13, 1982, a nearly stationary weather front in the vicinity of Kansas City, MO, produced intense thunderstorms. Excessive rainfall (12.6 inches in Raytown, MO) caused flash flooding during the nighttime and early daylight hours. Four deaths and damages unofficially estimated in excess of $30 million, occurred in the three-county area of Jackson, Cass, and Clay counties. Peak discharges were determined at 12 current or discontinued streamflow-gaging stations and 17 miscellaneous sites. Flood peaks and volumes at many locations exceeded estimated 100-year recurrence-interval floods and equaled or exceeded the 1977 floods in some drainage basins. Significant flooding occurred in the Blue, East Fork Little Blue, and Little Blue River basins and in the Rock, Wilkerson, Sni-A-Bar, Shoal, and Big Creek drainage basins. (USGS)

  20. (Hetero)aromatics from dienynes, enediynes and enyne-allenes.

    PubMed

    Raviola, Carlotta; Protti, Stefano; Ravelli, Davide; Fagnoni, Maurizio

    2016-08-01

    The construction of aromatic rings has become a key objective for organic chemists. While several strategies have been developed for the functionalization of pre-formed aromatic rings, the direct construction of an aromatic core starting from polyunsaturated systems is yet a less explored field. The potential of such reactions in the formation of aromatics increased at a regular pace in the last few years. Nowadays, there are reliable and well-established procedures to prepare polyenic derivatives, such as dienynes, enediynes, enyne-allenes and hetero-analogues. This has stimulated their use in the development of innovative cycloaromatizations. Different examples have recently emerged, suggesting large potential of this strategy in the preparation of (hetero)aromatics. Accordingly, this review highlights the recent advancements in this field and describes the different conditions exploited to trigger the process, including thermal and photochemical activation, as well as the use of transition metal catalysis and the addition of electrophiles/nucleophiles or radical species.

  1. Ion spectral structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferradas, C.; Zhang, J.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades several missions have recorded the presence of dynamic spectral features of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere. Previous studies have reported single "nose-like" structures occurring alone and simultaneous nose-like structures (up to three). These ion structures are named after the characteristic shapes of energy bands or gaps in the energy-time spectrograms of in situ measured ion fluxes. They constitute the observational signatures of ion acceleration, transport, and loss in the global magnetosphere. The HOPE mass spectrometer onboard the Van Allen Probes measures energetic hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions near the inner edge of the plasma sheet, where these ion structures are observed. We present a statistical study of nose-like structures, using 2-years measurements from the HOPE instrument. The results provide important details about the spatial distribution (dependence on geocentric distance), spectral features of the structures (differences among species), and geomagnetic conditions under which these structures occur.

  2. Van Allen Probe Charging During the St. Patrick's Day Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Minow, J. I.

    2015-01-01

    The geomagnetic storms on and around March 17, 2015 marked the largest storms seen in the declining phase of the solar cycle to date. We use the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) mass spectrometer on board the Van Allen Probe - A and B satellites to study in detail the charging effects seen on these spacecraft during this time. Ion particle flux data provides information on the magnitude of the charging events using the ion line charging signature due to low energy ions accelerated by the spacecraft potential. Electron flux observations are used to correlate the charging environment with variations in spacecraft potential through the event. We also investigate the density and temperature of ions and electrons during the time of the charging event.

  3. The Allen telescope array: Commensal and efficient SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deboer, David R.

    2006-12-01

    The Allen telescope array (ATA) currently under construction affords the possibility of a dedicated and highly efficient SETI program that may be done commensally with other radio astronomy programs. This symbiosis is important in order to maintain and sustain the long-term effort that may be required in order to achieve success as a positive or null result. The technology that is being exploited is the construction of many small elements that allow large fields-of-view at high sensitivity, the use of ultra-wideband front-ends, and the use of flexible digital “intermediate frequency (IF)” systems. The project is under construction in phases, with the first 32 antennas expected to be functional in the fall of 2004, the next 173 dishes operational early 2006, with plans for 350 antennas total within this decade.

  4. Kansas energy, environment, and conservation: a geological overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merriam, Daniel F.

    2009-02-01

    The State of Kansas, as an energy-producing and agriculture-based state, faces problems in production of natural resources and potential pollution from their production. To coordinate information on the exploration, production, and use of coal, nuclear, petroleum, natural gas, hydro, wind, geothermal, coalbed methane, biofuel, solar, and other energy resources, the Kansas Energy Council and the University of Kansas Energy Research Center were created. Water, surface and subsurface, is the other important and maybe the most important natural resource in the welfare of the state. To ease the problems of contamination, situations are monitored by regulatory agencies: the Kansas Corporation Commission, Kansas Department of Health and Environment, and Division of Water Resources of the Kansas Department of Agriculture. The Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) at the University of Kansas serves as the archive for energy and natural resource data and conducts research pertinent to the exploration and exploitation of mineral resources, including energy and water. The Kansas Energy Research Center coordinates and supports energy activities. The Kansas Water Office and the staff for the Kansas Water Authority are charged with water planning and preparing reports on water problems and possible solutions. The cost of preserving the environment in a relatively pristine state really is of no concern considering the possible consequences; living conditions should be preserved to assure future generations, a suitable, sustainable, stable environment. With all the dire predictions for the future and energy-producing and pollution problems, Kansas is a model state in this modern industrial age for protecting the environment and is a leader in conservation.

  5. Public-supply water use in Kansas, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.; Eslick, Patrick J.

    2015-10-27

    This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Agriculture’s Division of Water Resources, presents derivative statistics of water used by Kansas public-supply systems in 2013. The published statistics from the previous 4 years (2009–12) are also shown with the 2013 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. An overall Kansas average and regional averages also are calculated and presented.

  6. An improved method for determining the distribution of swift fox in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, Christiane C.; Sovada, Marsha A.; Sargeant, Glen A.; Roy, Christiane C.

    1999-01-01

    During 1997 and 1998 we tested a new method for determining the distribution of swift foxes (Vulpes velox) in Kansas. From a sampling frame of 30 counties in western Kansas, we selected a systematic sample of alternate townships in a checkerboard pattern. During September and October 1997 and August 1998, experienced observers delineated suitable swift fox habitat within each sample township and searched it for evidence of occupancy (tracks, dens, and the animals themselves) by swift fox and other furbearers. Each township was searched for a minimum of 30 minutes, with searches continuing until swift foxes were either detected or for 120 minutes. Of the 288 townships selected in 1997, 271 (94.1%) were searched effectively with swift fox detected in 40.5% of the townships. Adverse weather conditions prevented surveys in two northwestern counties of our sample frame. In 1998, 245 township were searched effectively. Swift fox were detected in 27 counties searched to date. We did not detect swift fox in Seward, Meade and Ford counties, where the species is thought to be uncommon or absent. Tracks were difficult to discern in areas with hard or sandy soils and were sometimes obliterated by adverse weather, vehicle traffic, and agricultural activities. To determine how frequently we failed to detect swift foxes that were present, we plan to repeat searches in 1999 in townships where swift foxes were not detected previously. Nevertheless, preliminary results suggest our method to be a practical means for conducting landscape-scale presence/absence surveys of swift fox. Restricting searches to habitat judged best for swift foxes and most favorable for track detection helped control costs and achieve high detection rates.

  7. Estimate of winter wheat yield from ERTS-1. [southwest Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morain, S. A.; Williams, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    A model for estimating wheat yield per acre has been applied to acreage estimates derived from ERTS-1 imagery to project the 1973 wheat yields for a ten county area in southwest Kansas. The results (41.04 million bushels) are within 3 per cent of the preharvest estimates for the same area prepared by the USDA Statistical Reporting Service (39.91 million bushels). The projection from ERTS data is based on a visual enumeration of all detectable wheat fields in the study area and was completed while the harvest was in progress. Visual identification of winter wheat is readily achieved by using a temporal sequence of images (band 5 for Sept.-Oct.; band 5 for Dec.-Jan.; and band 5 and 7 for March-April). Identification can be improved by stratifying the project area into subregions having more or less homogeneous agricultural practices and crop mixes. By doing this, small changes in the spectral appearance of wheat related to soil type, irrigation, etc. can be accounted for. The interpretation rules developed by visual analysis can be automated for rapid computer surveys.

  8. Sediment transport to and from small impoundments in northeast Kansas, March 2009 through September 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Guy M.; Lee, Casey J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas Water Office, investigated sediment transport to and from three small impoundments (average surface area of 0.1 to 0.8 square miles) in northeast Kansas during March 2009 through September 2011. Streamgages and continuous turbidity sensors were operated upstream and downstream from Atchison County, Banner Creek, and Centralia Lakes to study the effect of varied watershed characteristics and agricultural practices on sediment transport in small watersheds in northeast Kansas. Atchison County Lake is located in a predominantly agricultural basin of row crops, with wide riparian buffers along streams, a substantial amount of tile drainage, and numerous small impoundments (less than 0.05 square miles; hereafter referred to as “ponds”). Banner Creek Lake is a predominantly grassland basin with numerous small ponds located in the watershed, and wide riparian buffers along streams. Centralia Lake is a predominantly agricultural basin of row crops with few ponds, few riparian buffers along streams, and minimal tile drainage. Upstream from Atchison County, Banner Creek, and Centralia Lakes 24, 38, and 32 percent, respectively, of the total load was transported during less than 0.1 percent (approximately 0.9 days) of the time. Despite less streamflow in 2011, larger sediment loads during that year indicate that not all storm events transport the same amount of sediment; larger, extreme storms during the spring may transport much larger sediment loads in small Kansas watersheds. Annual sediment yields were 360, 400, and 970 tons per square mile per year at Atchison County, Banner, and Centralia Lake watersheds, respectively, which were less than estimated yields for this area of Kansas (between 2,000 and 5,000 tons per square mile per year). Although Centralia and Atchison County Lakes had similar percentages of agricultural land use, mean annual sediment yields upstream from Centralia Lake were about 2.7 times

  9. New records of sylvatic plague in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cully, J.F.; Carter, L.G.; Gage, K.L.

    2000-01-01

    Sylvatic plague, or plague of wild rodents is caused by Yersinia pestis and entered California (USA) from Asia about 1899. Extensive sampling during the 1930's and 1940's documented the spread of plague to approximately its current distribution in North America. Records from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention document plague in Kansas (USA) between 1945 and 1950, but since then there has been no documentation of plague in the state. Following a die-off of a black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) colony on the Cimarron National Grassland, in the southwestern corner of Kansas (37??10???N, 101??45???W), we sampled fleas from burrows in June 1997, and tested them for Yersinia pestis. Twelve of 13 pools of Oropsyla hirsuta and one of two Pulex sp. were positive. A similar sample of fleas, from another colony where black-tailed prairie dogs were active at the time, yielded no positive fleas.

  10. Water demands in Kansas, 1944-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenny, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The State of Kansas has administered water rights according to an appropriations doctrine since 1945. Water rights are issued by the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources, for eight categories of beneficial use. Water rights data and limited information on reported water use are stored on a computerized State data base; the U.S. Geological Survey cooperates with the State on maintenance of this system. This report analyzes trends in appropriations from 1944-84 for surface and groundwater for three major categories of use: irrigation, public supply, and industry. Demands for water, represented by these appropriations, are compared for three geographic areas within the State. These areas correspond to general patterns of water availability, population, and enterprises. As of 1984, 87% of the water appropriated for the three major types of use was for irrigation; most of this demand was for groundwater in the western one-third of the State. Seventy-five percent of the water demands in the central one-third of Kansas were met by groundwater; appropriations for irrigation represent the largest demand on water supplies in this area but must compete with appropriations for public supply and industry. Demands for surface water have increased substantially only in the eastern part of the State for industrial use and public supplies. The most prominent trends in water rights permit activity were related to climatic fluctuations, particularly the drought of the 1950's, legislative changes in the 1970 's requiring permits, and growth of urban populations in the central and eastern areas of the State. Analysis of trends in water appropriations can be useful in understanding the water issues facing Kansas in the future. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Regional interpretation of Kansas aeromagnetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Yarger, H.L.

    1982-01-01

    The aeromagnetic mapping techniques used in a regional aeromagnetic survey of the state are documented and a qualitative regional interpretation of the magnetic basement is presented. Geothermal gradients measured and data from oil well records indicate that geothermal resources in Kansas are of a low-grade nature. However, considerable variation in the gradient is noted statewide within the upper 500 meters of the sedimentary section; this suggests the feasibility of using groundwater for space heating by means of heat pumps.

  12. Skylab study of water quality. [Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarger, H. L. (Principal Investigator); Mccauley, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Apparent reflectance levels in the Skylab S190A and S192 bands, from one pass over three Kansas reservoirs, exhibit good statistical correlation with suspended solids. Band ratios appear to yield the best results. The concentration of suspended solids, mostly inorganic sediment, has the most effect on the reflected energy. Dissolved solids concentrations up to 200 ppm were not detectable by the Skylab sensors.

  13. Heat flow and geothermal potential of Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, D.D.; Steele, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The plan of the US Geological Survey and Kansas Geological Survey to drill four deep hydrologic tests in Kansas prompted a geothermal study in these wells. These wells were drilled through the Arbuckle Group to within a few feet of basement and two of the holes were deepened on into the basement and core samples collected of the basement rock. Because of the depth of the four holes and because of the fact that they have been cased through most of their depth and left undisturbed to reach temperature equilibrium, it is possible to get highly accurate, stable temperature measurements through the complete sedimentary section. In addition an extensive suite of geophysical logs were obtained for each of the holes (gamma-ray, travel time, density, neutron porosity, electric, etc.) and cuttings were collected at frequent intervals. In addition 5 other holes were logged as part of this study. For these holes cutting samples and geophysical logs are not available, but the additional holes offer useful supplementary information on the temperature regime in other parts of Kansas.

  14. Revealing the Link Between Solar Activity and Satellite Anomalies: Career Recollections From Joe Allen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-08-01

    Beginning his career on the heels of the 1957-1958 International Geophysical Year and the dawn of the satellite era, Joe H. Allen entered the service of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey in 1963. Earning a master's of science in engineering from the University of California at Berkeley while working for the Geodetic Survey, Allen advanced within a department that evolved into the National Geophysical Data Center, a branch of NOAA. Allen earned a Department of Commerce award in 1978 and in 1981 became the chief of the Solar and Terrestrial Physics Division of the National Geophysical Data Center, a position from which he retired in 1994.

  15. Floods in Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas, September 12-13, 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauth, Leland D.; Carswell, William J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The storm of September 12-13, 1977, produced as much as 16 inches of rainfall in the Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas area, left 25 persons dead, many homeless, and over 50 million dollars in damages. Flood hydrographs taken from U.S. Geological Survey gaging-stations reflected two storms occurring within 24 hours. Measured precipitation indicated each storm event to be near a 100-year, 24-hour rainfall frequency. Peak discharges determined at selected locations in areas of greater rainfall depths exceeded those of the 100-year floods. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Kansas City Plant is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. AlliedSignal and its predecessors have been the operating contractors since 1949. The principal operation performed at the Kansas City Plant is the manufacture of non-nuclear components for nuclear weapons. This activity involves metals and plastics machining, plastics fabrication, plating, microelectronics, and electrical and mechanical assembly. No radioactive materials are machined or processed. This report presents information and data pertaining to the environmental monitoring program and compliance with environmental standards.

  17. Annual report of monitoring at Barnes, Kansas, in 2011.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2012-07-26

    Barnes, Kansas, is a small rural community (population approximately 150) located in Washington County, in north-central Kansas (Figure 1.1). The city lies in a transition zone between the Flint Hills and the glaciated region. The area's topography consists of gently sloping hills of Pleistocene loess (< 20 ft) overlying a shale unit and interbedded shale, limestone, and siltstone of the Permian Chase Group. Groundwater for the public water supply is obtained from wells PWS2 and PWS3 at reported depths of 155 ft and 160 ft, respectively, located in the northwestern portion of the city. The water is produced from the bedrock aquifer of the Chase Group. Section 2 summarizes of the hydrogeologic conceptual site model. The findings of the monitoring events at Barnes in 2011 continued to support the following previous conclusions: (1) Measurements of groundwater levels obtained manually and through the use of automatic recorders have consistently indicated that the flow direction is strongly influenced by pumping of the public water supply wells. The results have demonstrated an apparent groundwater flow direction to the northeast when the public wells are not pumping and a northwesterly groundwater flow trend when the public wells are pumping. (2) Evaluation of manual water level measurements and carbon tetrachloride concentrations continues to suggest that three vertically distinguishable aquifer zones are present at Barnes: shallow, intermediate, and deep (Table 4.1). The highest concentration of carbon tetrachloride occurs in the intermediate zone, in wells near the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Lower concentrations have been detected in the deep aquifer zone (where the public water supply wells are screened), and no carbon tetrachloride has been detected in the shallow zone. (3) The conceptual model of the groundwater flow system at Barnes, as postulated on the basis of the accumulated results, suggests that the observed vertical hydraulic gradients and

  18. Orion GNC Mitigation Efforts for Van Allen Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ellis T.; Jackson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Crew Module (CM) is NASA's next generation manned space vehicle, scheduled to return humans to lunar orbit in the coming decade. The Orion avionics and GN&C architectures have progressed through a number of project phases and are nearing completion of a major milestone. The first unmanned test mission, dubbed "Exploration Flight Test One" (EFT-1) is scheduled to launch from NASA Kennedy Space Center late next year and provides the first integrated test of all the vehicle systems, avionics and software. The EFT-1 mission will be an unmanned test flight that includes a high speed re-entry from an elliptical orbit, which will be launched on an expendable launch vehicle (ELV). The ELV will place CM and the ELV upper stage into a low Earth orbit (LEO) for one revolution. After the first LEO, the ELV upper stage will re-ignite and place the combined upper stage/CM into an elliptical orbit whose perigee results in a high energy entry to test CM response in a relatively high velocity, high heating environment. While not producing entry velocities as high as those experienced in returning from a lunar orbit, the trajectory was chosen to provide higher stresses on the thermal protection and guided entry systems, as compared against a lower energy LEO entry. However the required entry geometry with constraints on inclination and landing site result in a trajectory that lingers for many hours in the Van Allen radiation belts. This exposes the vehicle and avionics to much higher levels of high energy proton radiation than a typical LEO or lunar trajectory would encounter. As a result, Van Allen radiation poses a significant risk to the Orion avionics system, and particularly the Flight Control Module (FCM) computers that house the GN&C flight software. The measures taken by the Orion GN&C, Flight Software and Avionics teams to mitigate the risks associated with the Van Allen radiation on EFT-1 are covered in the paper. Background on the Orion avionics subsystem is

  19. Branching Out: Rhodium-Catalyzed Allylation with Alkynes and Allenes.

    PubMed

    Koschker, Philipp; Breit, Bernhard

    2016-08-16

    We present a new and efficient strategy for the atom-economic transformation of both alkynes and allenes to allylic functionalized structures via a Rh-catalyzed isomerization/addition reaction which has been developed in our working group. Our methodology thus grants access to an important structural class valued in modern organic chemistry for both its versatility for further functionalization and the potential for asymmetric synthesis with the construction of a new stereogenic center. This new methodology, inspired by mechanistic investigations by Werner in the late 1980s and based on preliminary work by Yamamoto and Trost, offers an attractive alternative to other established methods for allylic functionalization such as allylic substitution or allylic oxidation. The main advantage of our methodology consists of the inherent atom economy in comparison to allylic oxidation or substitution, which both produce stoichiometric amounts of waste and, in case of the substitution reaction, require prefunctionalization of the starting material. Starting out with the discovery of a highly branched-selective coupling reaction of carboxylic acids with terminal alkynes using a Rh(I)/DPEphos complex as the catalyst system, over the past 5 years we were able to continuously expand upon this chemistry, introducing various (pro)nucleophiles for the selective C-O, C-S, C-N, and C-C functionalization of both alkynes and the double-bond isomeric allenes by choosing the appropriate rhodium/bidentate phosphine catalyst. Thus, valuable compounds such as branched allylic ethers, sulfones, amines, or γ,δ-unsaturated ketones were successfully synthesized in high yields and with a broad substrate scope. Beyond the branched selectivity inherent to rhodium, many of the presented methodologies display additional degrees of selectivity in regard to regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselective transformations, with one example even proceeding via a dynamic kinetic resolution. Many advances

  20. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Kansas obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The State's program, as administered by the Kansas... subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and regulatory...

  1. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Kansas obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The State's program, as administered by the Kansas... subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and regulatory...

  2. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Kansas obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The State's program, as administered by the Kansas... subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and regulatory...

  3. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Kansas obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The State's program, as administered by the Kansas... subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and regulatory...

  4. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Kansas obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The State's program, as administered by the Kansas... subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and regulatory...

  5. 76 FR 44026 - Kansas; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Kansas; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of the Presidential declaration of an emergency for the State of Kansas (FEMA-3324-EM), dated June 25, 2011, and...

  6. Choice--Kansas City Style: Addressing Equity from Multiple Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Johnnie

    1995-01-01

    Highlights case studies of three elementary schools in the Kansas City (Missouri) System of Choice program that resulted from a court order to erase all vestiges of segregation in the Kansas City school district. The possible effects of these choices of school programs on educational equity are summarized. (GR)

  7. The Best Little Teacher Education Program in Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demski, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Many undergraduate teacher education programs still treat technology as an elective, instead of an integral and inseparable part of the curriculum. So when "T.H.E. Journal" set out to find the best program for training tomorrow's teachers, it found one at a K-12 school district in Kansas. The Blue Valley School District in Overland Park, Kansas,…

  8. Kansas Mathematics Curriculum Standards. Mathematical Power for All Kansans. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gattis, Kim, Ed.

    The mathematics standards contained in this document represent a continuation of the Kansas State Board of Education efforts to set high performance expectation levels for the learning of all Kansas students. The guide lists 15 mathematics curriculum outcomes: number sense, number properties, number systems, number operations, patterns, functions,…

  9. Iron‐catalyzed Cross‐Coupling of Propargyl Carboxylates and Grignard Reagents: Synthesis of Substituted Allenes

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Simon N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Presented herein is a mild, facile, and efficient iron‐catalyzed synthesis of substituted allenes from propargyl carboxylates and Grignard reagents. Only 1–5 mol % of the inexpensive and environmentally benign [Fe(acac)3] at −20 °C was sufficient to afford a broad range of substituted allenes in excellent yields. The method tolerates a variety of functional groups. PMID:26890161

  10. Copper-catalyzed regio- and stereoselective intermolecular three-component oxyarylation of allenes.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Taisuke; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2014-05-16

    A copper(II)-catalyzed intermolecular three-component oxyarylation of allenes using arylboronic acids as a carbon source and TEMPO as an oxygen source is described. The reaction proceeded under mild conditions with high regio- and stereoselectivity and functional group tolerance. A plausible reaction mechanism is proposed, involving carbocupration of allenes, homolysis of the intervening allylcopper(II), and a radical TEMPO trap. PMID:24766635

  11. Diastereoselective Synthesis of the Aminocyclitol Core of Jogyamycin via an Allene Aziridination Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Gerstner, Nels C.; Adams, Christopher S.; Grigg, R. David; Tretbar, Maik; Rigoli, Jared W.; Schomaker, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative allene amination provides rapid access to densely functionalized amine-containing stereotriads through highly reactive bicyclic methyleneaziridine intermediates. This strategy has been demonstrated as a viable approach for the construction of the densely functionalized aminocyclitol core of jogyamycin, a natural product with potent antiprotozoal activity. Importantly, the flexibility of oxidative allene amination will enable the syntheses of modified aminocyclitol analogues of the jogyamycin core. PMID:26741730

  12. Probable identity of Goltz syndrome and Van Allen-Myhre syndrome: evidence from phenotypic evolution.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Susan; Pryde, Peter; Fong, Christine; Brazy, Jane E; Stewart, Katharina; Favour, Amy; Pauli, Richard M

    2002-07-15

    We describe a girl who was diagnosed with split foot-split hand anomaly prenatally, in whom at birth the diagnosis of Van Allen-Myhre syndrome was made, and who at 8 months of age was recognized to have Goltz syndrome. Based on the evolution of clinical features in this infant, we suggest that our case, as well as that reported by Van Allen and Myhre, is an example of unusually severe Goltz syndrome.

  13. STS-46 Pilot Allen uses cycle ergometer on OV-104's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Pilot Andrew M. Allen exercises using the cycle ergometer on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Allen, shirtless, is equipped with sensors for monitoring his biological systems during the exercise session. A communications kit assembly cable freefloats from his headset at his right and in front of the forward lockers. The open airlock hatch appears at his left and the sleep station behind him.

  14. Stereoselective nickel-catalyzed [2+2] cycloadditions of ene-allenes.

    PubMed

    Noucti, Njamkou N; Alexanian, Erik J

    2015-04-27

    A stereoselective nickel-catalyzed [2+2] cycloaddition of ene-allenes is reported. This transformation encompasses a broad range of ene-allene substrates, thus providing efficient access to fused cyclobutanes from easily accessed π-components. A simple and inexpensive first-row catalytic system comprised of [Ni(cod)2 ] and dppf was used in this process, thus constituting an attractive approach to synthetically challenging cyclobutane frameworks under mild reaction conditions.

  15. Kansas Kids Count Data Book, 1999. A Project of Kansas Action for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    The Kids Count Data Book examines trends in the well-being of Kansas children. This statistical portrait is based on trends in 22 indicators of child well-being, grouped into 5 areas: (1) economic well-being--births to single teens, child poverty rates, free school meals, and family economic assistance; (2) physical health and safety--childhood…

  16. Kansas Kids Count Data Book, 1998. A Project of Kansas Action for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    The Kids Count Data Book examines trends in the well-being of Kansas children. The statistical portrait is based on trends in 22 indicators of child well-being, grouped into 5 areas: (1) economic well-being--births to single teens, free school meals, family economic assistance, child poverty rates; (2) physical health and safety--childhood deaths,…

  17. Leadership Development Workbook - Aztlan en Kansas: Asistencia Tecnologica. (Technical Assistance to Mexican American People in Kansas.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, J. Christian; And Others

    Purpose of the workbook is to provide the participants and facilitator in the Leadership Development Workshop a means of communication about the structure of the program "Aztlan en Kansas: Asistencia Tecnologica", and to help individualize the instructional activities conducted throughout the workshop. This workbook should be used in conjunction…

  18. Kansas Kids Count Data Book, 1995. A Project of Kansas Action for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Sydney, Ed.; And Others

    This Kids Count data book presents a statistical portrait of the well being of and current conditions faced by the children of Kansas, based on key indicators. Eighteen indicators are detailed in six subject areas: (1) economic well-being; (2) physical health and safety; (3) educational achievement; (4) early childhood care and education; (5)…

  19. Final work plan : environmental site investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2012-07-15

    In 1998, carbon tetrachloride was found above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L in groundwater from one private livestock well at Sylvan Grove, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1998 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Sylvan Grove from 1954 to1966. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Sylvan Grove is located in western Lincoln County, approximately 60 mi west of Salina (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. This Work Plan presents historical data related to previous investigations, grain storage operations, local private wells and public water supply (PWS) wells, and local geologic and hydrogeologic conditions at Sylvan Grove. The findings from a review of all available documents are discussed in Section 2. On the basis of the analyses of historical data, the following specific technical objectives are proposed for the site investigation at Sylvan Grove: (1) Evaluate the potential source of carbon tetrachloride at the former CCC/USDA facility; (2) Determine the relationship of potential contamination (if present) at the former CCC/USDA facility to contamination identified in 1998 in groundwater samples from one private well to the west; and (3) Delineate the extent of potential contamination associated with the former CCC/USDA facility. The detailed scope of work is outlined in Section 3. The results of the proposed work will provide the basis for determining

  20. Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Everest, Kansas in 2011.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-12-19

    Everest, Kansas, is a small rural community (population approximately 300) located in the southeast corner of Brown County, in the northeastern corner of Kansas. Carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination in groundwater at Everest was initially identified in 1997 as a result of testing performed under the Commodity Credit Corporation/U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) private well sampling program conducted by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The KDHE collected samples from seven private wells in and near Everest. Carbon tetrachloride and chloroform were found in only one of the wells, the Donnie Nigh domestic well (owned at that time by Tim Gale), approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA facility. Carbon tetrachloride and chloroform were detected at 121 {mu}g/L and 4 {mu}g/L, respectively. Nitrate was found at 12.62 mg/L. The USDA subsequently connected the Nigh residence to the Everest public water supply system. The findings of the 2011 monitoring at Everest support the following conclusions: (1) Measurements of groundwater levels obtained manually during annual monitoring in 2009-2011 (and through the use of automatic recorders in 2002-2010) have consistently indicated an initial direction of groundwater flow from the former CCC/USDA facility to the north-northwest and toward the Nigh property, then west-southwest from the Nigh property toward the intermittent creek that lies west of the former CCC/USDA facility and the Nigh property. (2) At most of the monitored locations, carbon tetrachloride concentrations decreased in April 2011 relative to 2010 results. Noteworthy decreases of > 50% occurred at locations MW4, MW60, and MW88, in the most concentrated part of the plume. (3) Comparison of accumulated data demonstrates that the area of the carbon tetrachloride plume with concentrations > 200 {mu}g/L has decreased markedly over time and suggests a generally decreasing trend in contaminant levels. (4) The

  1. 30 CFR 916.25 - Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land... STATE KANSAS § 916.25 Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The following.... House Bill 3009 eliminated the Kansas Mined Land Conservation and Reclamation Board and transferred...

  2. 30 CFR 916.25 - Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land... STATE KANSAS § 916.25 Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The following.... House Bill 3009 eliminated the Kansas Mined Land Conservation and Reclamation Board and transferred...

  3. 30 CFR 916.25 - Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land... STATE KANSAS § 916.25 Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The following.... House Bill 3009 eliminated the Kansas Mined Land Conservation and Reclamation Board and transferred...

  4. 30 CFR 916.25 - Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land... STATE KANSAS § 916.25 Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The following.... House Bill 3009 eliminated the Kansas Mined Land Conservation and Reclamation Board and transferred...

  5. THE ALLEN TELESCOPE ARRAY SEARCH FOR ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGES ON MARS

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Marin M.; Siemion, Andrew P. V.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; De Pater, Imke; Barott, William C.; Delory, Gregory T.; Werthimer, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array was used to monitor Mars between 2010 March 9 and June 2, over a total of approximately 30 hr, for radio emission indicative of electrostatic discharge. The search was motivated by the report from Ruf et al. of the detection of non-thermal microwave radiation from Mars characterized by peaks in the power spectrum of the kurtosis, or kurtstrum, at 10 Hz, coinciding with a large dust storm event on 2006 June 8. For these observations, we developed a wideband signal processor at the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research. This 1024 channel spectrometer calculates the accumulated power and power-squared, from which the spectral kurtosis is calculated post-observation. Variations in the kurtosis are indicative of non-Gaussianity in the signal, which can be used to detect variable cosmic signals as well as radio frequency interference (RFI). During the three-month period of observations, dust activity occurred on Mars in the form of small-scale dust storms; however, no signals indicating lightning discharge were detected. Frequent signals in the kurtstrum that contain spectral peaks with an approximate 10 Hz fundamental were seen at both 3.2 and 8.0 GHz, but were the result of narrowband RFI with harmonics spread over a broad frequency range.

  6. The Allen Telescope Array as Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2007-12-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a new radio interferometer that has begun scientific operations in 2007. Many of the technologies, techniques, and observing modes developed for the ATA are directly applicable to the Square Kilometer Array (SKA). The ATA is a pioneer of the LNSD, which refers to a large number (LN) of small diameter (SD) dishes to create the array. This concept underlies nearly all SKA designs. Other relevant technologies are the offset Gregorian ATA antenna, the ATA wideband log periodic feed, transport of broadband data over fiber optic cables, and flexible digital signal processing electronics. The small dishes of the ATA gives it extraordinary wide-field imaging and survey capability but also require new solutions for calibration and imaging. Real time imaging, rapid response to transients, and thinking telescope technology are also under development. Finally, the ATA is developing commensal observing modes, which enable multiple simultaneous science programs, such as SETI, transient surveys, and HI surveys. Opportunities exist for community members to perform scientific investigations as well as develop techniques and technology for the SKA through use of the ATA.

  7. The Benton-Van Allen faces: a lateralized tachistoscopic study.

    PubMed

    Püschel, J; Zaidel, E

    1994-03-01

    The Benton-Van Allen Facial Recognition Test (FRT) was adapted to a lateralized same-different task. The lateralized same targets were either physically identical to the central upright faces or had the same face identity but were transformed (3/4-views or shadowed faces). Faces were also modified to include or exclude external features. There was a left hemifield (right hemisphere) advantage only for the most difficult, shadowed faces. The absence of a left hemifield advantage for the matching of upright faces to identical or 3/4-view faces shows bilateral competence for face processing, both by physical and by face identity, and confirms previous observations that the FRT does not discriminate left from right hemisphere-damaged patients. Removal of external features affected performance in the right but not the left visual field, suggesting that the left hemisphere uses a less feature-dependent mechanism than the right hemisphere. This effect was only present in females, who were more lateralized than males.

  8. Wave acceleration of electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Horne, Richard B; Thorne, Richard M; Shprits, Yuri Y; Meredith, Nigel P; Glauert, Sarah A; Smith, Andy J; Kanekal, Shrikanth G; Baker, Daniel N; Engebretson, Mark J; Posch, Jennifer L; Spasojevic, Maria; Inan, Umran S; Pickett, Jolene S; Decreau, Pierrette M E

    2005-09-01

    The Van Allen radiation belts are two regions encircling the Earth in which energetic charged particles are trapped inside the Earth's magnetic field. Their properties vary according to solar activity and they represent a hazard to satellites and humans in space. An important challenge has been to explain how the charged particles within these belts are accelerated to very high energies of several million electron volts. Here we show, on the basis of the analysis of a rare event where the outer radiation belt was depleted and then re-formed closer to the Earth, that the long established theory of acceleration by radial diffusion is inadequate; the electrons are accelerated more effectively by electromagnetic waves at frequencies of a few kilohertz. Wave acceleration can increase the electron flux by more than three orders of magnitude over the observed timescale of one to two days, more than sufficient to explain the new radiation belt. Wave acceleration could also be important for Jupiter, Saturn and other astrophysical objects with magnetic fields.

  9. Geographical variation in bill size across bird species provides evidence for Allen's rule.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Matthew R E; Tattersall, Glenn J

    2010-08-01

    Allen's rule proposes that the appendages of endotherms are smaller, relative to body size, in colder climates, in order to reduce heat loss. Empirical support for Allen's rule is mainly derived from occasional reports of geographical clines in extremity size of individual species. Interspecific evidence is restricted to two studies of leg proportions in seabirds and shorebirds. We used phylogenetic comparative analyses of 214 bird species to examine whether bird bills, significant sites of heat exchange, conform to Allen's rule. The species comprised eight diverse taxonomic groups-toucans, African barbets, Australian parrots, estrildid finches, Canadian galliforms, penguins, gulls, and terns. Across all species, there were strongly significant relationships between bill length and both latitude and environmental temperature, with species in colder climates having significantly shorter bills. Patterns supporting Allen's rule in relation to latitudinal or altitudinal distribution held within all groups except the finches. Evidence for a direct association with temperature was found within four groups (parrots, galliforms, penguins, and gulls). Support for Allen's rule in leg elements was weaker, suggesting that bird bills may be more susceptible to thermoregulatory constraints generally. Our results provide the strongest comparative support yet published for Allen's rule and demonstrate that thermoregulation has been an important factor in shaping the evolution of bird bills. PMID:20545560

  10. Geographical variation in bill size across bird species provides evidence for Allen's rule.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Matthew R E; Tattersall, Glenn J

    2010-08-01

    Allen's rule proposes that the appendages of endotherms are smaller, relative to body size, in colder climates, in order to reduce heat loss. Empirical support for Allen's rule is mainly derived from occasional reports of geographical clines in extremity size of individual species. Interspecific evidence is restricted to two studies of leg proportions in seabirds and shorebirds. We used phylogenetic comparative analyses of 214 bird species to examine whether bird bills, significant sites of heat exchange, conform to Allen's rule. The species comprised eight diverse taxonomic groups-toucans, African barbets, Australian parrots, estrildid finches, Canadian galliforms, penguins, gulls, and terns. Across all species, there were strongly significant relationships between bill length and both latitude and environmental temperature, with species in colder climates having significantly shorter bills. Patterns supporting Allen's rule in relation to latitudinal or altitudinal distribution held within all groups except the finches. Evidence for a direct association with temperature was found within four groups (parrots, galliforms, penguins, and gulls). Support for Allen's rule in leg elements was weaker, suggesting that bird bills may be more susceptible to thermoregulatory constraints generally. Our results provide the strongest comparative support yet published for Allen's rule and demonstrate that thermoregulation has been an important factor in shaping the evolution of bird bills.

  11. Employment, Salary & Placement Information for Johnson County Community College Career Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    More than forty-six career programs are offered at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Kansas, in such areas as Cosmetology, Dental Assistance, and Travel and Tourism. These programs specialize in the types of industries that are currently growing at high rates, such as computer-related occupations and special education teachers. This…

  12. Employment, Salary and Placement Information for Johnson County Community College Career Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    Drawing from local, state, and national data sources, this report from Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Kansas summarizes the employment outlook in occupations corresponding to the college's career programs. The first section of the report offers 1992-2005 national employment projections, focusing on the fastest growing occupations,…

  13. Employment, Salary and Placement Information Related to Career Programs at Johnson County Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    Johnson County Community College (JCCC), in Kansas, offers formal career programs for 12 of the 20 fastest growing occupations requiring postsecondary training, and for 13 of the 30 occupations projected to be the fastest growing between 1990 and 2005. Following an introduction to general trends and data sources, this guide presents profiles of…

  14. Business and Industry Employer Requirements and Job Prospects for Labette and Cherokee Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usera, John J.

    A study was conducted to assess the job prospects and personnel requirements of business, industry, and service agencies in Labette and Cherokee Counties (Kansas). Data were obtained from the 65 employers who replied to a survey mailed to a selected sample of 135 companies and organizations that represent a nonretail cross-section of the two…

  15. Identification of "ever-cropped" land (1984-2010) using Landsat annual maximum NDVI image composites: Southwestern Kansas case study.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Susan K; Sylvester, Kenneth M

    2012-06-01

    A time series of 230 intra- and inter-annual Landsat Thematic Mapper images was used to identify land that was ever cropped during the years 1984 through 2010 for a five county region in southwestern Kansas. Annual maximum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (NDVI(ann-max)) were used to evaluate the inter-annual dynamics of cropped and non-cropped land. Three feature images were derived from the 27-year NDVI(ann-max) image time series and used in the classification: 1) maximum NDVI value that occurred over the entire 27 year time span (NDVI(max)), 2) standard deviation of the annual maximum NDVI values for all years (NDVI(sd)), and 3) standard deviation of the annual maximum NDVI values for years 1984-1986 (NDVI(sd84-86)) to improve Conservation Reserve Program land discrimination.Results of the classification were compared to three reference data sets: County-level USDA Census records (1982-2007) and two digital land cover maps (Kansas 2005 and USGS Trends Program maps (1986-2000)). Area of ever-cropped land for the five counties was on average 11.8 % higher than the area estimated from Census records. Overall agreement between the ever-cropped land map and the 2005 Kansas map was 91.9% and 97.2% for the Trends maps. Converting the intra-annual Landsat data set to a single annual maximum NDVI image composite considerably reduced the data set size, eliminated clouds and cloud-shadow affects, yet maintained information important for discriminating cropped land. Our results suggest that Landsat annual maximum NDVI image composites will be useful for characterizing land use and land cover change for many applications.

  16. Irrigation trends in Kansas, 1991-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenny, Joan F.; Juracek, Kyle E.

    2013-01-01

    This fact sheet examines trends in total reported irrigation water use and acres irrigated as well as irrigation water use by crop type and system type in Kansas for the years 1991 through 2011. During the 21-year period, total reported irrigation water diversions varied substantially from year to year as affected primarily by climatic fluctuations. Total reported acres irrigated remained comparatively constant during this time, although acreages of irrigated corn increased and center pivots with drop nozzles became the dominant system type used for irrigation.

  17. Physics Incubator at Kansas State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Chakrabarti, Amitabha

    Funded by a major private endowment, the physics department at Kansas State University has recently started a physics incubator program that provides support to research projects with a high probability of commercial application. Some examples of these projects will be discussed in this talk. In a parallel effort, undergraduate physics majors and graduate students are being encouraged to work with our business school to earn an Entrepreneurship minor and a certification in Entrepreneurship. We will discuss how these efforts are promoting a ``culture change'' in the department. We will also discuss the advantages and the difficulties in running such a program in a Midwest college town.

  18. Kansas City Plant Celebrates Safety Milestone

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A gang of motorcycle riders arrived at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant on July 1 to help celebrate a significant safety achievement - working nearly five million hours, covering a one-year period without a lost-time injury. The bikers -- some of whom are plant employees -- represent Bikers Against Child Abuse, the local nonprofit selected to receive a $5,000 donation as part of the plant's safety achievement celebration. The organization was selected because it aligns with the plant's community outreach focus on Family Safety & Security and partnership with the plant's union members.

  19. Kansas City Plant Celebrates Safety Milestone

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-06

    A gang of motorcycle riders arrived at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant on July 1 to help celebrate a significant safety achievement - working nearly five million hours, covering a one-year period without a lost-time injury. The bikers -- some of whom are plant employees -- represent Bikers Against Child Abuse, the local nonprofit selected to receive a $5,000 donation as part of the plant's safety achievement celebration. The organization was selected because it aligns with the plant's community outreach focus on Family Safety & Security and partnership with the plant's union members.

  20. Empirically Estimating the Existing Irrigation Adaptation to Future Drought Impacts in Kansas Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Lin, X.; Yang, X.

    2014-12-01

    More serious drought has been projected due to the climate change in the Kansas State of the U.S., which might threaten the local agriculture and thus require effective adaptation responses to drought, e.g. better irrigation. But the irrigation adaptation on drought at the current technology-level is poorly quantified, therefore challenges to figure out how much additional efforts are required under more aridity of climate. Here, we collect the irrigation application data for maize, soybean, sorghum and wheat in Kansas, and establish a two-stage model to quantify the crop-specific irrigation application responses to changes in climatic drivers, and further estimate the existing effectiveness of the irrigation to adapt future drought based on the IPCC AR5 ensemble PDSI prediction under RCP4.5 scenario. We find that the three summer season crops (maize, soybean and sorghum) would experience 0 - 20% yield losses depending on county due to more serious drought since 2030s, even though increased irrigation application as the response of drought had saved 0 - 10% yields. At the state level, maize receives most benefits from irrigation, whereas the beneficial effects are least for sorghum among the three crops. To wheat, irrigation adaptation is very weak since irrigation water applied is much less than the above three crops. But wheat yields were projected to have a slight increase in central and eastern regions because climate would become more moisture over the growing season of winter wheat in future. Our results highlight that the existing beneficial effects from irrigation would be surpassed by the negative impact of drought in future, which would cause overall yield reduction in Kansas especially for those summer season crops.

  1. Chiral nonracemic alpha-alkylidene and alpha-silylidene cyclopentenones from chiral allenes using an intramolecular allenic Pauson-Khand-type cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Brummond, Kay M; Kerekes, Angela D; Wan, Honghe

    2002-07-26

    We have successfully effected a transfer of chirality from a chiral nonracemic allene to an alpha-alkylidene and an alpha-silylidene cyclopentenone. The molybdenum-mediated examples possessing a silyl group on the terminus of the allene show good facial selectivities, but isomerization of the (E)-silylidene cyclopentenone to the (Z)-silylidene cyclopentenone occurs upon purification of these products. Alternatively, an alkyl group on the terminus of the allene undergoes cycloaddition with moderate selectivities but gives products that undergo an isomerization of the (Z)-alkylidene cyclopentenone to the (E)-alkylidene cyclopentenone when exposed to acidic conditions. Thus, erosion of the enantiomeric excesses is observed for one of the two products as a result of this isomerization. The allenic Pauson-Khand-type cycloaddition has also been effected by first isolation the (eta(6)-arene)molybdenum tricarbonyl complex, demonstrating for the first time that this is most likely the active complex in the molybdenum-mediated reactions. Attempts to increase the facial selectivity by increasing the size of the arene moiety resulted in a marginal increase in the selectivity at the expense of the yield. Based upon these results, we have concluded that altering the approach for the preparation of nonracemic alpha-alkylidene cyclopentenones is necessary in order to obtain synthetically useful levels of stereocontrol.

  2. Campylobacter jejuni infection associated with unpasteurized milk and cheese--Kansas, 2007.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    On October 26, 2007, a family health clinic nurse informed the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) that Campylobacter jejuni had been isolated from two ill persons from different families who were members of a closed community in a rural Kansas county. By October 29, 17 additional members of the community had reported gastrointestinal illness and visited the clinic within a week. All 19 persons reported consuming fresh cheese* on October 20 that was made the same day at a community fair from unpasteurized milk obtained from a local dairy. This report summarizes the findings of an investigation by KDHE and the local health department to determine the source and extent of the outbreak. Eating fresh cheese at the fair was the only exposure associated with illness (relative risk [RR] = 13.9). Of 101 persons who ate the cheese, 67 (66%) became ill. C. jejuni isolates from two ill persons had indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, and the isolate from a third ill person was nearly identical to the other two. Although all samples of cheese tested negative for Campylobacter, results of the epidemiologic investigation found an association between illness and consumption of fresh cheese made from unpasteurized milk. To minimize the risk for illness associated with milkborne pathogens, unpasteurized milk and milk products should not be consumed.

  3. Rhodium-catalyzed dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformations of racemic allenes by the [3+2] annulation of aryl ketimines.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duc N; Cramer, Nicolai

    2013-09-27

    Racemization required: Rhodium(I)-catalyzed C-H activation directed by unprotected ketimines initiates selective [3+2] cycloaddition with allenes, providing access to highly substituted indenylamines. The reaction proceeds through the dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation of racemic allenes. The catalyst controls the enantio- and diastereoselectivity, the regioselectivities of the C-H activation and allene incorporation, as well as the E/Z ratio.

  4. What's Right with Kansas? (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Merrian; Jackson, Nancy

    2011-10-03

    On Monday, Oct. 3 at 7 p.m. in Berkeley's Repertory Theater, the Lab presented "What's Right with Kansas," an evening of conversation with the Kansas-based Climate and Energy Project's founder and board chair, Nancy Jackson, and Berkeley Lab scientist Merrian Fuller, an electricity-market, policy and consumer behavior expert. Berkeley Lab will also debut its video "Common Ground," which showcases how CEP has become a Kansas mainstay and an inspiration to environmental organizations across the country. In a state rife with climate-change skepticism, CEP has changed behavior, and some minds, by employing rural values of thrift, independence, conservation, and friendly competition to promote energy efficiency.

  5. What's Right with Kansas? (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Fuller, Merrian; Jackson, Nancy

    2016-07-12

    On Monday, Oct. 3 at 7 p.m. in Berkeley's Repertory Theater, the Lab presented "What's Right with Kansas," an evening of conversation with the Kansas-based Climate and Energy Project's founder and board chair, Nancy Jackson, and Berkeley Lab scientist Merrian Fuller, an electricity-market, policy and consumer behavior expert. Berkeley Lab will also debut its video "Common Ground," which showcases how CEP has become a Kansas mainstay and an inspiration to environmental organizations across the country. In a state rife with climate-change skepticism, CEP has changed behavior, and some minds, by employing rural values of thrift, independence, conservation, and friendly competition to promote energy efficiency.

  6. High prevalence of "Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae" and apparent exclusion of Rickettsia parkeri in adult Amblyomma maculatum (Acari: Ixodidae) from Kansas and Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Christopher D; Denison, Amy M; Dryden, Michael W; Noden, Bruce H; Lash, R Ryan; Abdelghani, Sarah S; Evans, Anna E; Kelly, Aubree R; Hecht, Joy A; Karpathy, Sandor E; Ganta, Roman R; Little, Susan E

    2015-04-01

    Amblyomma maculatum (the Gulf Coast tick), an aggressive, human-biting, Nearctic and Neotropical tick, is the principal vector of Rickettsia parkeri in the United States. This pathogenic spotted fever group Rickettsia species has been identified in 8-52% of questing adult Gulf Coast ticks in the southeastern United States. To our knowledge, R. parkeri has not been reported previously from adult specimens of A. maculatum collected in Kansas or Oklahoma. A total of 216 adult A. maculatum ticks were collected from 18 counties in Kansas and Oklahoma during 2011-2014 and evaluated by molecular methods for evidence of infection with R. parkeri. No infections with this agent were identified; however, 47% of 94 ticks collected from Kansas and 73% of 122 ticks from Oklahoma were infected with "Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae" a spotted fever group Rickettsia species of undetermined pathogenicity. These preliminary data suggest that "Ca. R. andeanae" is well-adapted to survival in populations of A. maculatum in Kansas and Oklahoma, and that its ubiquity in Gulf Coast ticks in these states may effectively exclude R. parkeri from their shared arthropod host, which could diminish markedly or preclude entirely the occurrence of R. parkeri rickettsiosis in this region of the United States. PMID:25773931

  7. High prevalence of "Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae" and apparent exclusion of Rickettsia parkeri in adult Amblyomma maculatum (Acari: Ixodidae) from Kansas and Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Christopher D; Denison, Amy M; Dryden, Michael W; Noden, Bruce H; Lash, R Ryan; Abdelghani, Sarah S; Evans, Anna E; Kelly, Aubree R; Hecht, Joy A; Karpathy, Sandor E; Ganta, Roman R; Little, Susan E

    2015-04-01

    Amblyomma maculatum (the Gulf Coast tick), an aggressive, human-biting, Nearctic and Neotropical tick, is the principal vector of Rickettsia parkeri in the United States. This pathogenic spotted fever group Rickettsia species has been identified in 8-52% of questing adult Gulf Coast ticks in the southeastern United States. To our knowledge, R. parkeri has not been reported previously from adult specimens of A. maculatum collected in Kansas or Oklahoma. A total of 216 adult A. maculatum ticks were collected from 18 counties in Kansas and Oklahoma during 2011-2014 and evaluated by molecular methods for evidence of infection with R. parkeri. No infections with this agent were identified; however, 47% of 94 ticks collected from Kansas and 73% of 122 ticks from Oklahoma were infected with "Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae" a spotted fever group Rickettsia species of undetermined pathogenicity. These preliminary data suggest that "Ca. R. andeanae" is well-adapted to survival in populations of A. maculatum in Kansas and Oklahoma, and that its ubiquity in Gulf Coast ticks in these states may effectively exclude R. parkeri from their shared arthropod host, which could diminish markedly or preclude entirely the occurrence of R. parkeri rickettsiosis in this region of the United States.

  8. Allen Brain Atlas: an integrated spatio-temporal portal for exploring the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sunkin, Susan M; Ng, Lydia; Lau, Chris; Dolbeare, Tim; Gilbert, Terri L; Thompson, Carol L; Hawrylycz, Michael; Dang, Chinh

    2013-01-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas (http://www.brain-map.org) provides a unique online public resource integrating extensive gene expression data, connectivity data and neuroanatomical information with powerful search and viewing tools for the adult and developing brain in mouse, human and non-human primate. Here, we review the resources available at the Allen Brain Atlas, describing each product and data type [such as in situ hybridization (ISH) and supporting histology, microarray, RNA sequencing, reference atlases, projection mapping and magnetic resonance imaging]. In addition, standardized and unique features in the web applications are described that enable users to search and mine the various data sets. Features include both simple and sophisticated methods for gene searches, colorimetric and fluorescent ISH image viewers, graphical displays of ISH, microarray and RNA sequencing data, Brain Explorer software for 3D navigation of anatomy and gene expression, and an interactive reference atlas viewer. In addition, cross data set searches enable users to query multiple Allen Brain Atlas data sets simultaneously. All of the Allen Brain Atlas resources can be accessed through the Allen Brain Atlas data portal.

  9. The application of remote sensing to resource management and environmental quality programs in Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, B. G.; Martinko, E. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Capabilities to process data for state agencies in Kansas were upgraded through the vehicle of a low cost data processing system. Short term projects in which agencies identified areas of immediate needs, and longer terms projects, continued from previous years, are described including studies of Arkansas River irrigation; evaluation of rangeland in the Cimarron National Grassland; a model of the Walnut Creek watershed groundwater; selection of a pronghorn antelope release site; the establishment of a geographical data base for tax reassessment in Finney County; a land use/land cover inventory and hazards assessment; and applied R & D in agricultural remote sensing. The topics discussed at a short course in remote sensing and publications are listed.

  10. Floodflow characteristics at proposed bridge site for State Highway 99, Kansas River at Wamego, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medina, K.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Kansas Department of Transportation has proposed replacing a bridge over the Kansas River on State Highway 99, at Wamego, Kansas. The ability of the main channel along with the existing agricultural levee to contain the flow of the Kansas River, the effect of overflow structures under the highway south of the bridge, and the effect of an island upstream from the proposed bridge are discussed. The design of the proposed new bridge is adequate for passage of a 100-yr flood of 155,000 cu ft/sec; however, the existing levee along the right bank of the river upstream of the proposed bridge will not confine the flow to the main channel because parts of the levee have been broken or removed. The present overflow structures would allow a discharge of 26,000 cu ft/sec to occur in the bypass reach with a maximum depth of flow over the highway of 1.3 ft. If the structures were removed but the highway grade maintained, the discharge would increase to about 30,000 cu ft/sec with a depth of flow over the highway of 1.5 ft. If the overflow structures were removed and the elevated sections of the highway grade leveled, the discharge would increase to about 31,500 cu ft/sec, with a maximum depth of flow over the highway of 1.3 ft. The velocity of flow through four 30-in diameter concrete culverts located at overflow structure sites would be 8.6 ft/sec. Foreseeable changes in the island upstream from the proposed bridge would not interfere with the flow capacity of the new bridge. (Author 's abstract)

  11. 76 FR 53927 - Kansas; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Kansas; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY...: Barton, Clay, Cloud, Hamilton, Jewell, Lincoln, Logan, Lyon, Marion, Mitchell, Morton, Osage,...

  12. 78 FR 67383 - Kansas; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Kansas; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY..., Clark, Clay, Cloud, Coffey, Comanche, Cowley, Crawford, Dickinson, Edwards, Elk, Ellsworth, Ford,...

  13. Depth-weighted, mean soil permeability in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2000-01-01

    This digital spatial data set provides information on the magnitude and spatial pattern of depth-weighted, mean soil permeability throughout the State of Kansas. The data set was assembled using 1:24,000-scale cartographic and attribute information on the spatial distribution and characteristics of Kansas soils. The data set is in grid (raster) format with a grid-cell size of 10,000 square meters.

  14. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, 2013 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Arin J.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Kansas Water Science Center (KSWSC), in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring gages in the State of Kansas. These include 195 real-time streamflow-gaging stations (herein gages) and 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations. These data and associated analysis, accumulated for many years, provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve our understanding of our water resources.

  15. Ramona, Kansas, Corrective Action Monitoring Report for 2014

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M.

    2015-06-01

    This report describes groundwater monitoring in 2014 for the property at Ramona, Kansas, on which a grain storage facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The monitoring was implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory and was conducted as specified in the Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2012) approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2012).

  16. Space Weather data processing and Science Gateway for the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Fox, N. J.; Mauk, B.; Potter, M.; Kessel, R.

    2013-12-01

    A near real-time data processing pipeline for the Space Weather broadcast data from the Van Allen Probes is presented. The Van Allen Probes broadcasts a sub-set of the science data in real-time when not downlinking the principal science data. This broadcast is received by several ground stations and relayed to APL in near real time to be ingested into the space weather processing pipeline. This pipeline processes the available level zero space weather data into higher level science data products. These products are made available to the public via the Van Allen Probes Science Gateway website (http://athena.jhuapl.edu). The website acts as pivotal point though which all other instrument SOC's can be accessed. Several other data products (e.g KP/DST indices) and tools (e.g orbit calculator) are made also available to the general public.

  17. Conjugate observations of quasiperiodic emissions by the Cluster, Van Allen Probes, and THEMIS spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, F.; Hospodarsky, G.; Pickett, J. S.; Santolík, O.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C.

    2016-08-01

    We present results of a detailed analysis of two electromagnetic wave events observed in the inner magnetosphere at frequencies of a few kilohertz, which exhibit a quasiperiodic (QP) time modulation of the wave intensity. The events were observed by the Cluster and Van Allen Probes spacecraft and in one event also by the THEMIS E spacecraft. The spacecraft were significantly separated in magnetic local time, demonstrating a huge azimuthal extent of the events. Geomagnetic conditions at the times of the observations were very quiet, and the events occurred inside the plasmasphere. The modulation period observed by the Van Allen Probes and THEMIS E spacecraft (duskside) was in both events about twice larger than the modulation period observed by the Cluster spacecraft (dawnside). Moreover, individual QP elements occur about 15 s earlier on THEMIS E than on Van Allen Probes, which might be related to a finite propagation speed of a modulating ULF wave.

  18. A C–H bond activation-based catalytic approach to tetrasubstituted chiral allenes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shangze; Huang, Xin; Wu, Wangteng; Li, Pengbin; Fu, Chunling; Ma, Shengming

    2015-01-01

    Enantioselective synthesis of fully substituted allenes has been a challenge due to the non-rigid nature of the axial chirality, which spreads over three carbon atoms. Here we show the commercially available simple Rh complex may catalyse the CMD (concerted metalation/deprotonation)-based reaction of the readily available arenes with sterically congested tertiary propargylic carbonates at ambient temperature affording fully substituted allenes. It is confirmed that the excellent designed regioselectivity for the C–C triple bond insertion is induced by the coordination of the carbonyl group in the directing carbonate group as well as the steric effect of the tertiary O-linked carbon atom. When an optically active carbonate was used, surprisingly high efficiency of chirality transfer was realized, affording fully substituted allenes in excellent enantiomeric excess (ee). PMID:26246391

  19. Status of Groundwater Levels and Storage Volume in the Equus Beds Aquifer Near Wichita, Kansas, January 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Cristi V.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in the 1940s, the Wichita well field was developed in the Equus Beds aquifer in southwestern Harvey County and northwestern Sedgwick County to supply water to the city of Wichita (Williams and Lohman, 1949). In addition to supplying drinking water to the largest city in Kansas, the other primary use of water from the Equus Beds aquifer is to irrigate crops in this agriculture-dominated part of south-central Kansas (Rich Eubank, Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources, oral commun., 2008). The decline of water levels in the aquifer were noted soon after the development of the Wichita well field began (Williams and Lohman, 1949). As water levels in the aquifer decline, the volume of water stored in the aquifer decreases and less water is available to supply future needs. For many years the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the city of Wichita, has monitored these changes in water levels and the resulting changes in storage volume in the Equus Beds aquifer as part of Wichita's effort to effectively manage this resource. In 2007, the city of Wichita began using Phase I of the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) project for large-scale artificial recharge of the Equus Beds aquifer. The ASR project uses water from the Little Arkansas River - either pumped from the river directly or from wells in the riverbank that obtain their water from the river by induced infiltration - as the source of artificial recharge to the Equus Beds aquifer (City of Wichita, 2009).

  20. Place attachment among retirees in Greensburg, Kansas.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey S; Cartlidge, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    On 4 May 2007 an ef-5 tornado leveled 95 percent of Greensburg, Kansas. Because city leaders encouraged everyone to use “green” building techniques as they rebuilt their homes and businesses, not only has the return to normalcy been exceedingly slow, but some of the town's older residents feel that officials have overlooked their needs. These minor episodes of discord enabled us to learn what features are most important to people in retirement. The features include identifiable landmarks, a space in which to socialize, and age-specific businesses. We assert that the lessons learned in Greensburg are applicable to other communities with a sizable older population. As baby boomers rapidly enter retirement they will seek places to live that are elder friendly and enable them to effectively bond with place. As previous research attests, people who have a strong attachment to place commonly have a good quality of life. PMID:22319811

  1. Hydrologic data for Soldier Creek Basin, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, William J.

    1978-01-01

    Selected hydrologic data collected in the Soldier Creek basin in northeastern Kansas are available on magnetic tape in card-image format. Data on the tape include water discharge in fifteen-minute and daily time intervals; rainfall in fifteen-minute and daily time intervals; concentrations and particle sizes of suspended sediment; particle sizes of bed material; ground-water levels; and chemical quality of water in concentrations of selected constituents. The data-collection system includes: (1) 7 recording streamflow stations; (2) 5 recording rainfall stations; (3) 51 nonrecording rainfall stations located within and adjacent to the basin; (4) 31 ground-water observation wells (two recording); and (5) intermittent chemical quality of water and sediment sampling sites. Examples of the information on magnetic tape for each type of data collected are presented in computer-printout format. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. Place attachment among retirees in Greensburg, Kansas.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey S; Cartlidge, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    On 4 May 2007 an ef-5 tornado leveled 95 percent of Greensburg, Kansas. Because city leaders encouraged everyone to use “green” building techniques as they rebuilt their homes and businesses, not only has the return to normalcy been exceedingly slow, but some of the town's older residents feel that officials have overlooked their needs. These minor episodes of discord enabled us to learn what features are most important to people in retirement. The features include identifiable landmarks, a space in which to socialize, and age-specific businesses. We assert that the lessons learned in Greensburg are applicable to other communities with a sizable older population. As baby boomers rapidly enter retirement they will seek places to live that are elder friendly and enable them to effectively bond with place. As previous research attests, people who have a strong attachment to place commonly have a good quality of life.

  3. US hydropower resource assessment for Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Kansas.

  4. Potential runoff-contributing areas in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2000-01-01

    This digital spatial data set provides information on the spatial distribution of potential runoff-contributing areas in the State of Kansas. Potential runoff-contributing areas were estimated collectively for the processes of infiltration-excess overland flow and saturation-excess overland flow. For infiltration-excess overland flow, various rainfall-intensity and soil-permeability values were used. For saturation-excess overland flow, antecedent soil-moisture conditions and a topographic wetness index were used. The digital data sets used in the analysis included 1:24,000-scale soils data and a 100-meter-resolution digital elevation model. The data set of potential runoff-contributing areas is in grid (raster) format with a grid-cell size of 10,000 square meters.

  5. Spacecraft-level verification of the Van Allen Probes' RF communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowne, M. J.; Srinivasan, D.; Royster, D.; Weaver, G.; Matlin, D.; Mosavi, N.

    This paper presents the verification process, lessons learned, and selected test results of the radio frequency (RF) communication system of the Van Allen Probes, formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). The Van Allen Probes mission is investigating the doughnut-shaped regions of space known as the Van Allen radiation belts where the Sun interacts with charged particles trapped in Earth's magnetic field. Understanding this dynamic area that surrounds our planet is important to improving our ability to design spacecraft and missions for reliability and astronaut safety. The Van Allen Probes mission features two nearly identical spacecraft designed, built, and operated by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The RF communication system features the JHU/APL Frontier Radio. The Frontier Radio is a software-defined radio (SDR) designed for spaceborne communications, navigation, radio science, and sensor applications. This mission marks the first spaceflight usage of the Frontier Radio. RF ground support equipment (RF GSE) was developed using a ground station receiver similar to what will be used in flight and whose capabilities provided clarity into RF system performance that was previously not obtained until compatibility testing with the ground segments. The Van Allen Probes underwent EMC, acoustic, vibration, and thermal vacuum testing at the environmental test facilities at APL. During this time the RF communication system was rigorously tested to ensure optimal performance, including system-level testing down to threshold power levels. Compatibility tests were performed with the JHU/APL Satellite Communication Facility (SCF), the Universal Space Network (USN), and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Successful completion of this program as described in this paper validated the design of the system and demonstrated that it will be able to me

  6. A Century after Van Allen's Birth: Conclusion of Reconnaissance of Radiation Belts in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    On May 1, 1958 in the Great Hall of the US National Academy of Sciences, James A. Van Allen, having instrumented Explorer-1 and follow-on satellites with radiation detectors, announced the discovery of intense radiation at high altitudes above Earth. The press dubbed the doughnut-shaped structures "Van Allen Belts" (VAB). Soon thereafter, the search began for VAB at nearby planets. Mariner 2 flew by Venus in 1962 at a distance of 41,000 km, but no radiation was detected. The Mariner 4 mission to Mars did not observe planet-associated increase in radiation, but scaling arguments with Earth's magnetosphere yielded an upper limit to the ratio of magnetic moments of MM/ME < 0.001 (Van Allen et al, 1965). Similarly, the Mariner 5 flyby closer to Venus resulted in a ratio of magnetic moments < 0.001 (Van Allen et al, 1967), dealing a blow to the expectation that all planetary bodies must possess significant VAB. The flyby of Mercury in 1974 by Mariner 10 revealed a weak magnetic field, but the presence of durably trapped higher energy particles remained controversial until MESSENGER in 2011.The first flybys of Jupiter by Pioneers 10, 11 in 1973 and 1974, respectively, measured a plethora of energetic particles in Jupiter's magnetosphere and established the fact that their intensities were rotationally modulated. Later flybys of Jupiter and Saturn by the two Voyagers in 1979 and 1981 revealed that those magnetospheres possessed their own internal plasma source(s) and radiation belts. Subsequent discoveries of Van Allen belts at Uranus and Neptune by Voyager 2 demonstrated that VAB are the rule rather than the exception in planetary environments. We now know from the Voyagers and through Energetic Neutral Atom images from Cassini and IBEX that an immense energetic particle population surrounds the heliosphere itself. Thus, the reconnaissance of radiation belts of our solar system has been completed, some 56 years after the discovery of the Van Allen Belts at Earth.

  7. Hydrologic Droughts in Kansas - Are They Becoming Worse?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Putnam, James E.; Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-year droughts have been a recurrent feature of the climate and hydrology of Kansas since at least the 1930s. Streamflow records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) indicate that water years 2000 to 2006 (October 1, 1999, through September 30, 2006) represent the sixth hydrologic drought during the past eight decades, and that corresponding streamflow levels in some parts of Kansas were lower than those during historic droughts of the 1930s and 1950s, even though the precipitation deficit was not as severe. Record-low streamflows in water year 2006 were recorded at USGS streamgages on the Republican, Smoky Hill, Solomon, Saline, upper Kansas, middle Arkansas, and Little Arkansas Rivers, as well as many tributary sites, and one tributary site of the Neosho River (fig. 1, table 1). Low streamflows during the hydrologic drought also resulted in record low levels at three Federal reservoirs in Kansas (fig. 1, table 2). An unprecedented number of administrative decisions were made by the Division of Water Resources, Kansas Department of Agriculture to curtail water diversions from rivers to maintain minimum desirable streamflows, and low flows on the lower Republican River in Kansas created concerns that Colorado and Nebraska were not complying with the terms of the 1943 Republican River Compact.

  8. November 2007 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-02-28

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) formerly operated a grain storage facility (during most of the interval 1949-1974) at Barnes, Kansas. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to investigate this contamination. In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2007). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells at 19 distinct locations, 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels slightly exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a plume that appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigation indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2007). The present report presents the results of the November 2007 sampling event that followed the targeted investigation.

  9. The Midcontinent rift system in Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Berendsen, P. . Kansas Geological Survey)

    1993-03-01

    A sequence of rift-related mafic volcanic rocks, volcanoclastic-, and clastic sedimentary rocks are recognized in cuttings and cores from about seventy wells in Kansas. The age (1,097.5 Ma) for gabbro in the Poersch [number sign]1 well in northern Kansas, as well as the general petrographic characteristics of the sedimentary rocks throughout the area favors a correlation with established Keweenawan stratigraphy in the Lake Superior region. Rift-related northeast-trending faults and older northwest-trending faults divide the area up into a number of orthogonal fault blocks or basins. Depending upon the tectonic history of the individual basin all or part of the Keweenawan section may be preserved. It is believed that large amounts of Keweenawan clastic sedimentary rock were eroded from the nemaha uplift east of the central graben of the rift and transported in an easterly direction. Prior to deposition of Paleozoic rocks the area was peneplaned. Correlation of various stratigraphic units over any distance is complicated by tectonic activity occurring at several times during the Precambrian and Paleozoic. Stratabound or stratiform deposits can occur both in the Precambrian as well as the overlying Paleozoic rocks. The possibility of massive sulfides to occur in the mafic intrusive rocks must not be excluded. In the core from the Poersch [number sign]1 well sulfides are recognized in gabbroic sills or dikes. Dark, fissile shale, similar to the Nonesuch Shale in the [number sign]1--4 Finn well averages 0.75% organic carbon. Thermal maturation within the rift probably ranges from within the oil window to over maturity.

  10. March 2007 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-06-01

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 11 monitoring wells and 5 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, and September 2006 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in March 2007, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2005b). The March 2007 sampling represents the fourth monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE. A final sampling event under this program is scheduled for September 2007.

  11. September 2007 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-05-01

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 10 monitoring wells and 6 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, September 2006, and March 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007a). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in September 2007, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b). The September 2007 sampling represents the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE.

  12. Regiodivergent Intermolecular [3+2] Cycloadditions of Vinyl Aziridines and Allenes: Stereospecific Synthesis of Chiral Pyrrolidines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao-Yan; Zhu, Chao-Ze; Zhang, Peichao; Wang, Yidong; Wu, Hai-Hong; Feng, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Junliang

    2016-08-26

    The first rhodium-catalyzed intermolecular [3+2] cycloaddition reaction of vinyl aziridines and allenes for the synthesis of enantioenriched functionalized pyrrolidines was realized. [3+2] cycloaddition with the proximal C=C bond of N-allenamides gave 3-methylene-pyrrolidines in high regio- and diastereoselectivity, whereas, 2-methylene-pyrrolidines were obtained as the major products by the cycloadditions of vinyl aziridines with the distal C=C bond of allenes. Use of readily available starting materials, a broad substrate scope, high selectivity, mild reaction conditions, as well as versatile functionalization of the cycloadducts make this approach very practical and attractive. PMID:27485044

  13. Experiments in no-impact control of dingoes: comment on Allen et al. 2013.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher N; Crowther, Mathew S; Dickman, Chris R; Letnic, Michael I; Newsome, Thomas M; Nimmo, Dale G; Ritchie, Euan G; Wallach, Arian D

    2014-01-01

    There has been much recent debate in Australia over whether lethal control of dingoes incurs environmental costs, particularly by allowing increase of populations of mesopredators such as red foxes and feral cats. Allen et al. (2013) claim to show in their recent study that suppression of dingo activity by poison baiting does not lead to mesopredator release, because mesopredators are also suppressed by poisoning. We show that this claim is not supported by the data and analysis reported in Allen et al.'s paper. PMID:24558973

  14. Diels–Alder Reactions of Allene with Benzene and Butadiene: Concerted, Stepwise, and Ambimodal Transition States

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multiconfigurational complete active space methods (CASSCF and CASPT2) have been used to investigate the (4 + 2) cycloadditions of allene with butadiene and with benzene. Both concerted and stepwise radical pathways were examined to determine the mechanism of the Diels–Alder reactions with an allene dienophile. Reaction with butadiene occurs via a single ambimodal transition state that can lead to either the concerted or stepwise trajectories along the potential energy surface, while reaction with benzene involves two separate transition states and favors the concerted mechanism relative to the stepwise mechanism via a diradical intermediate. PMID:25216056

  15. Diels-Alder reactions of allene with benzene and butadiene: concerted, stepwise, and ambimodal transition states.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung V; Houk, K N

    2014-10-01

    Multiconfigurational complete active space methods (CASSCF and CASPT2) have been used to investigate the (4 + 2) cycloadditions of allene with butadiene and with benzene. Both concerted and stepwise radical pathways were examined to determine the mechanism of the Diels-Alder reactions with an allene dienophile. Reaction with butadiene occurs via a single ambimodal transition state that can lead to either the concerted or stepwise trajectories along the potential energy surface, while reaction with benzene involves two separate transition states and favors the concerted mechanism relative to the stepwise mechanism via a diradical intermediate.

  16. Differentiating mechanistic possibilities for the thermal, intramolecular [2 + 2] cycloaddition of allene-ynes.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Matthew R; Osbourn, Joshua M; Brummond, Kay M; Tantillo, Dean J

    2010-09-01

    Intramolecular [2 + 2] cycloaddition reactions of allene-ynes offer a quick and efficient route to fused bicyclic ring structures. Insights into the mechanism and regiochemical preferences of this reaction are provided herein on the basis of the results of quantum chemical calculations (B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p)) and select experiments; both indicate that the reaction likely proceeds through a stepwise diradical pathway where one radical center is stabilized through allylic delocalization. The influences of the length of the tether connecting the alkyne and allene and substituent effects are also discussed.

  17. Copper-catalyzed regiodivergent silacarboxylation of allenes with carbon dioxide and a silylborane.

    PubMed

    Tani, Yosuke; Fujihara, Tetsuaki; Terao, Jun; Tsuji, Yasushi

    2014-12-24

    A regiodivergent silacarboxylation of allenes under a CO2 atmosphere with PhMe2Si-B(pin) as a silicon source in the presence of a copper catalyst at 70 °C has been developed. The regioselectivity of the reaction is successfully reversed by the proper choice of ligand; carboxylated vinylsilanes are obtained with rac-Me-DuPhos as the ligand, whereas the use of PCy3 affords carboxylated allylsilanes. Thus, two different carboxylated silanes can be selectively and regiodivergently synthesized from a single allene substrate. PMID:25469703

  18. Helping Newspapers Become More Responsive to Community Concerns: An In-Depth Interview Research Project with Sedgwick County Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huxman, Susan Schultz; Iorio, Sharon Hartin

    Noting that the trend in the newspaper industry from the predictive-control model to the explanative-naturalistic model mirrors a trend in the communication discipline toward qualitative research and more meaningful connections between industry and academia, a study investigated Sedgwick County, Kansas residents' concerns regarding politics and…

  19. Intermolecular sequential [4 + 2]-cycloaddition-aromatization reaction of aryl-substituted allenes with DMAD affording phenanthrene and naphthalene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuefeng; Kong, Wangqing; Chen, Jie; Ma, Shengming

    2008-10-01

    An efficient entry to phenanthrene and naphthalene derivatives through intermolecular sequential [4 + 2]-cycloaddition-aromatization reactions of aryl-substituted allenes with DMAD in the absence of any catalyst was discovered. In this reaction the aromatic ring and the adjacent carbon-carbon double bond of the allene unit acted as the 1,3-diene.

  20. A Critique of Mark D. Allen's "The Preservation of Verb Subcategory Knowledge in a Spoken Language Comprehension Deficit"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemmerer, David

    2008-01-01

    Allen [Allen, M. (2005). "The preservation of verb subcategory knowledge in a spoken language comprehension deficit." "Brain and Language, 95", 255-264.] reports a single patient, WBN, who, during spoken language comprehension, is still able to access some of the syntactic properties of verbs despite being unable to access some of their semantic…

  1. Public-supply water use in Kansas, 1990-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenny, Joan F.

    2014-01-01

    This fact sheet describes water-use data collection and quantities of surface water and groundwater diverted for public supply in Kansas for the years 1990 through 2012. Data used in this fact sheet are from the Kansas Department of Agriculture’s Division of Water Resources and the Kansas Water Office. Water used for public supply represents about 10 percent of all reported water withdrawals in Kansas. Between 1990 and 2012, annual withdrawals for public supply ranged from a low of 121 billion gallons in 1993 to a high of 159 billion gallons in 2012. Differences in annual withdrawals were associated primarily with climatic fluctuations. Six suppliers distributed about one-half of the total water withdrawn for public supply, and nearly three-quarters of the surface water. Surface water represented between 52 and 61 percent of total annual withdrawals for public supply. The proportion of surface water obtained through contracts from Federal reservoirs increased from less than 5 percent in the 1990s to 8 percent in 2011 and 2012. More than 99 percent of the reported water withdrawn for public supply in Kansas in 2012 was metered, which was an increase from 92 percent in 1990. State population increased steadily from 2.5 million people in 1990 to 2.9 million in 2012. Recent estimates indicate that about 95 percent of the total population was served by public water supply; the remainder obtained water from other sources such as private wells. Average per capita water use as calculated for State conservation planning purposes varied by region of the State. The smallest regional average water use for the years 1990–2012 was 98 gallons per person per day in easternmost Kansas, and the largest regional average water use was 274 gallons per person per day in westernmost Kansas.

  2. Cobalt/rhodium heterobimetallic nanoparticle-catalyzed carbonylative [2+2+1] cycloaddition of allenes and bisallenes to Pauson-Khand-type reaction products.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Eunha; Kim, Hyeong-Mook; Choi, Soo Young; Chung, Young Keun

    2008-05-28

    The first catalytic intra- and intermolecular [2+2+1] cocyclization reactions of allenes and carbon monoxide have been developed. In the Co(2)Rh(2) heterobimetallic nanoparticle-catalyzed carbonylative [2+2+1] cycloaddition of allenes and carbon monoxide, the allenes formally serve both as an excellent alkene- and alkyne-like moiety within a Pauson-Khand-type process.

  3. Homoallylic amines by reductive inter- and intramolecular coupling of allenes and nitriles

    PubMed Central

    Manojlovic, Marija D

    2011-01-01

    Summary The one-pot hydrozirconation of allenes and nitriles followed by an in situ transmetalation of the allylzirconocene with dimethylzinc or zinc chloride provides functionalized homoallylic amines. An intramolecular version of this process leads to 3-aminotetrahydrofurans and 3-aminotetrahydropyrans. PMID:21804878

  4. The Native Speaker, the Student, and Woody Allen: Examining Traditional Roles in the Foreign Language Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finger, Anke

    This paper uses a language classroom role-playing scene from a Woody Allen movie to examine the language student who has traditionally been asked to emulate and copy the native speaker and to discuss roles that teachers ask students to play. It also presents the changing paradigm of the native speaker and his or her role inside and outside the…

  5. Rotationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopic study of the Jahn-Teller effect in allene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulenburg, A. M.; Merkt, F.

    2009-01-01

    The pulsed-field-ionization zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron spectra of allene (C3H4) and perdeuterated allene have been recorded from the first adiabatic ionization energy up to 2200 cm-1 of internal energy in the cations at a resolution sufficient to observe the full rotational structure. The intensity distributions in the spectra are dominated by vibrational progressions in the torsional mode, which were analyzed in the realm of a two-dimensional model of the E ⊗(b1⊕b2) Jahn-Teller effect in the allene cation [C. Woywod and W. Domcke, Chem. Phys. 162, 349 (1992)]. Whereas the rotational structure of the transitions to the lowest torsional levels (00 and 41) are regular and can be qualitatively analyzed in terms of a simple orbital ionization model, the rotational structure of the spectra of the 42 and 43 levels are strongly perturbed. The photoelectron spectrum of C3H4 also reveals several weak vibrational bands in the immediate vicinity of these levels that are indicative of (ro)vibronic perturbations. A slight broadening of the transitions to the 41 levels compared to that of the vibronic ground state and the increase of the number of sharp features in the rotational structure of the spectrum of the 42 level point at the importance of large-amplitude motions not considered in previous treatments of the Jahn-Teller effect in the allene cation.

  6. Astronauts Joseph Allen rides cherry picker over stowage area/work station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Joseph P. Allen rides a cherry picker over to a stowage area/work station to wrap up extravehicular activity (EVA) duties above Earth. The cherry picker is a union of the mobile foot restraint and the remote manipulator system (RMS), controlled from inside Discovery's cabin. The Westar VI/PAM-D satellite is pictured secured in Discovery's cargo bay.

  7. Regioselective Allene Hydrosilylation Catalyzed by NHC Complexes of Nickel and Palladium

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Zachary D.; Li, Wei; Belderrain, Tomás R.; Montgomery, John

    2013-01-01

    Regioselective methods for allene hydrosilylation have been developed, with regioselectivity being governed primarily by choice of metal. Alkenylsilanes are produced via nickel catalysis with larger N-heterocyclic carbene ligands, and allylsilanes are produced via palladium catalysis with smaller N-heterocyclic carbene ligands. These complementary methods allow either regioisomeric product to be obtained with exceptional regiocontrol. PMID:24079389

  8. Nathaniel Topliff Allen, Early Professional and 19th Century Risk Taker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadwallader, Lynn

    Nathaniel T. Allen's life (1823-1903) offers insights into 19th century professionalization of education in the United States. His independent political views set him apart as a strong-willed and dauntless supporter of equal education opportunity. Appointed by Horace Mann as principal of a model school connected with the first public normal school…

  9. An Interview with Dr. Roach van Allen (Leaders in Reading Research and Instruction).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searfoss, Lyndon; Jerrolds, Bob W.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an interview with Dr. Roach van Allen in which he describes how he became involved in education, who influenced him professionally, his proudest accomplishments (a theoretical model for a language experience program), what he sees as the current problems in reading education, and what he sees in the future. (RS)

  10. A Call to Action: JoBeth Allen, NCTE's 2012 Outstanding Educator in the Language Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisdale, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    This article is a tribute to JoBeth Allen, recipient of the Elementary Section's 2012 award for Outstanding Educator in the English Language Arts. Each year, this award recognizes a distinguished educator who has made major contributions to the field of language arts in elementary education. This article was written by second-grade teacher and…

  11. All Together Now: Valerie Allen--U.S. Department of Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    When Valerie Allen decided she did not want to be a Montessori teacher any longer, she began work on her MLIS. Immediately she learned concepts she could apply to her new job as information specialist for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN. While the LIS…

  12. Precipitation of relativistic electrons of the Van Allen belts into the proton aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K; Miyoshi, Y; Sakaguchi, K; Shiokawa, K; Evans, D S; Connors, M

    2008-01-01

    The Van Allen electron belts consist of two regions encircling the earth in which relativistic electrons are trapped in the earth's magnetic field. Populations of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts vary greatly with geomagnetic disturbance and they are a major source of damage to space vehicles. In order to know when and by how much these populations of relativistic electrons increase, it is important to elucidate not only the cause of acceleration of relativistic electrons but also the cause of their loss from the Van Allen belts. Here we show the first evidence that left-hand polarized electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere, on the basis of results of an excellent set of ground and satellite observations showing coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The proton aurora was produced by precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV due to EMIC waves near the plasma pause, which is a manifestation of wave-particle interactions. These observations clarify that ions with energies of tens of keV affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts via parasitic resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  13. Rh(I)-Catalyzed Insertion of Allenes into C-C Bonds of Benzocyclobutenols.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunliang; Liu, Li-Chuan; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Chenran; Zhang, Qing-Wei; He, Wei

    2016-01-15

    Herein we report a Rh(I)-catalyzed two carbon insertion into C-C bonds of benzocyclobutenols by employing symmetrical and unsymmetrical allenes. This reaction provides rapid access to alkylidene tetralins bearing two adjacent stereogenic centers in good yields and diasteroselectivities.

  14. No Radio Flaring Detected from Cygnus X-3 at 3 GHz by Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. K. G.; Bower, G. C.; Tomsick, J. A.; Bodaghee, A.; Corbet, R. H. D.

    2011-01-01

    Following the announcement of a 98 GHz flare from the microquasar Cygnus X-3 (ATel #3130), we observed it with the Allen Telescope Array (Welch et al., 2009 Proc. IEEE 97 1438 for 2.5 hours beginning at 2011 January 28.848 UT (MJD 55589.848), about 4.0 hours after the 98 GHz observations concluded.

  15. Complex polycyclic scaffolds by metathesis rearrangement of Himbert arene/allene cycloadducts.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jonathan K; Schmidt, Yvonne; Vanderwal, Christopher D

    2012-11-01

    The intramolecular arene/allene cycloaddition first described 30 years ago by Himbert and Henn permits rapid access to strained polycyclic compounds. Alkene metathesis processes cleanly rearrange appropriately substituted cycloadducts into complex, functional-group-rich polycyclic lactams of potential utility for natural product synthesis and medicinal chemistry.

  16. Highly selective cobalt-mediated [6 + 2] cycloaddition of cycloheptatriene and allenes.

    PubMed

    Clavier, Hervé; Le Jeune, Karel; de Riggi, Innocenzo; Tenaglia, Alphonse; Buono, Gérard

    2011-01-21

    [6 + 2] Cycloadditions between cycloheptatrienes with allenes have been investigated. Cobalt salts were found to promote this transformation efficiently. Moreover, this reaction was found to be highly selective since only one regioisomer was obtained with an excellent E/Z-selectivity.

  17. Studies on Lewis acid-mediated intramolecular cyclization reactions of allene-ene systems.

    PubMed

    Hiroi, K; Watanabe, T; Tsukui, A

    2000-03-01

    The Lewis acid-mediated reactions of allene-ene compounds, derived from 3-methylcitronellal or dimethyl malonate, were carried out using various Lewis acids such as ethylaluminum dichloride, diethylaluminum chloride, titanium chloride, zinc chloride etherate, or boron trifluoride etherate, affording unexpectedly intramolecular [2+2]cycloaddition products under some particular reaction conditions without any formation of intramolecular ene reaction products.

  18. Gold(I)-catalyzed enantioselective [4 + 2]-cycloaddition of allene-dienes.

    PubMed

    González, Ana Z; Toste, F Dean

    2010-01-01

    An enantioselective gold(I)-catalyzed intramolecular [4 + 2]-cycloaddition of allenes and dienes is reported. The reactions allow for the asymmetric synthesis of trans-hexahydroindenes and pyrrolidine products using C(3)-symmetric phosphitegold(I) and ortho-arylphosphoramiditegold(I) complexes as catalysts, respectively.

  19. Enantioselective [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of isocyanates and allenes catalyzed by nickel.

    PubMed

    Miura, Tomoya; Morimoto, Masao; Murakami, Masahiro

    2010-11-17

    The enantioselective intermolecular [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of two molecules of isocyanate and one molecule of allene is catalyzed by a nickel(0)/(S,S)-i-Pr-FOXAP complex, providing an efficient access to enantiomerically enriched dihydropyrimidine-2,4-diones.

  20. Gold-catalyzed stereocontrolled oxacyclization/[4+2]-cycloaddition cascade of ketone-allene substrates.

    PubMed

    Teng, Tse-Min; Liu, Rai-Shung

    2010-07-14

    We report the first success on the Au-catalyzed tandem oxacyclization/[4+2]-cycloaddition cascade using ketone-allene substrates to give highly substituted oxacyclics with excellent stereocontrol. In contrast to oxo-alkyne substrates, the resulting cycloadducts are isolable and efficiently produced from a reasonable scope of enol ethers.

  1. Gold(I)-catalyzed enantioselective [4 + 2]-cycloaddition of allene-dienes.

    PubMed

    González, Ana Z; Toste, F Dean

    2010-01-01

    An enantioselective gold(I)-catalyzed intramolecular [4 + 2]-cycloaddition of allenes and dienes is reported. The reactions allow for the asymmetric synthesis of trans-hexahydroindenes and pyrrolidine products using C(3)-symmetric phosphitegold(I) and ortho-arylphosphoramiditegold(I) complexes as catalysts, respectively. PMID:19961192

  2. New Results About the Earth’s Van Allen Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The first great scientific discovery of the Space Age was that the Earth is enshrouded in toroids, or 'belts', of very high-energy magnetically trapped charged particles. Early observations of the radiation environment clearly indicated that the Van Allen belts could be delineated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons in the energy range 100 keV < E< 1 MeV often populated both the inner and outer zones with a pronounced 'slot' region relatively devoid of energetic electrons existing between them. This two-belt structure for the Van Allen moderate-energy electron component was explained as being due to strong interactions of electrons with electromagnetic waves just inside the cold plasma (plasmapause) boundary. The energy distribution, spatial extent and particle species makeup of the Van Allen belts has been subsequently explored by several space missions. However, recent observations by the NASA dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission have revealed wholly unexpected properties of the radiation belts, especially at highly relativistic (E > 2 MeV) and ultra-relativistic (E > 5 MeV) kinetic energies. In this presentation we show using high spatial and temporal resolution data from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) experiment on board the Van Allen Probes that multiple belts can exist concurrently and that an exceedingly sharp inner boundary exists for ultra-relativistic electrons. Using additionally available Van Allen Probes data, we demonstrate that these remarkable features of energetic electrons are not due to a physical boundary within Earth's intrinsic magnetic field. Neither is it likely that human-generated electromagnetic transmitter wave fields might produce such effects. Rather, we conclude from these unique measurements that slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle

  3. July 2008 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-20

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2008a). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events in November 2007 (Argonne 2008b) and March 2008 (Argonne 2008c) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels slightly exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigations indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). This current report presents the results of the third monitoring event, conducted in July 2008. During this third monitoring event, low-flow sampling methods were used to purge and sample all wells. This was the second event at

  4. March 2008 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-28

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2007). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2007). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2007) and the initial monitoring in November 2007 (Argonne 2008) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels slightly exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigation indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2007). In particular, the local school district (USD 223) handled, stored, and disposed of chemicals including carbon tetrachloride. This current report presents the results of the second quarterly monitoring event, conducted in March 2008. During this second

  5. Recommendations for Remedial Action at Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2007-02-15

    On September 7, 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented a Scoping Memo (Argonne 2005) for preliminary consideration by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). This document suggested possible remedial options for the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Everest, Kansas. The suggested approaches were discussed by representatives of the KDHE, the CCC/USDA, and Argonne at the KDHE office in Topeka on September 8-9, 2005, along with other technical and logistic issues related to the Everest site. In response to these discussions, the KDHE recommended (KDHE 2005) evaluation of several remedial processes, either alone or in combination, as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for Everest. The primary remedial processes suggested by the KDHE included the following: (1) Hydraulic control by groundwater extraction with aboveground treatment; (2) Air sparging-soil vapor extraction (SVE) in large-diameter boreholes; and (3) Phytoremediation. As a further outcome of the 2005 meeting and as a precursor to the proposed CAS, the CCC/USDA completed the following supplemental investigations at Everest to address several specific technical concerns discussed with the KDHE: (1) Construction of interpretive cross sections at strategic locations selected by the KDHE along the main plume migration pathway, to depict the hydrogeologic characteristics affecting groundwater flow and contaminant movement (Argonne 2006a); (2) A field investigation in early 2006 (Argonne 2006c), as follows: (a) Installation and testing of a production well and associated observation points, at locations approved by the KDHE, to determine the response of the Everest aquifer to groundwater extraction near the Nigh property; (b) Groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the installation of additional permanent monitoring points at locations selected by the KDHE, to further constrain

  6. March 2008 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-06

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 10 monitoring wells and 6 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, September 2006, March 2007, and September 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007a, 2008). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in March 2008, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b). The September 2007 sampling represented the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE. The March 2008 sampling begins an extension of the approved monitoring that is to

  7. October 2008 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-26

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2008a). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events in November 2007 (Argonne 2008b), March 2008 (Argonne 2008c), and July 2008 (Argonne 2008d) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigations indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). The former agriculture building owned by the local school district, located immediately east of well PWS3, is also a potential source of the contamination. This current report presents the results of the fourth

  8. Continuing Education Needs and Interests of Kansas Adults. A Statewide Survey. Winter 1979/80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Central Research Corp., Topeka, KS.

    A study examined the continuing education needs and interests of Kansas adults. Using a stratified and systematic questionnaire, researchers interviewed 998 Kansas adults. Based on data obtained from the respondents, the researchers concluded that 46 percent of adults in Kansas feel that they will probably become involved in adult education within…

  9. 30 CFR 916.20 - Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land... § 916.20 Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary conditionally approved the Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan, as submitted on October 1, 1981, effective February...

  10. 30 CFR 916.20 - Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land... § 916.20 Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary conditionally approved the Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan, as submitted on October 1, 1981, effective February...

  11. 30 CFR 916.20 - Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land... § 916.20 Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary conditionally approved the Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan, as submitted on October 1, 1981, effective February...

  12. 30 CFR 916.20 - Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land... § 916.20 Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary conditionally approved the Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan, as submitted on October 1, 1981, effective February...

  13. 30 CFR 916.20 - Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 916.20 Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary conditionally approved the Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan, as submitted on October 1, 1981, effective February 1... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Approval of Kansas abandoned mine...

  14. 30 CFR 916.25 - Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... STATE KANSAS § 916.25 Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The following... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 916.25 Section 916.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION...

  15. Contaminants evaluation of Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge in Kansas and Missouri, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, George T.; Nash, Tom J.; Janes, David E.

    1995-05-01

    At the new Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge in Linn County, Kansas, and Bates County, Missouri, USA, we evaluated long-lived contaminants before acquisition of the land for the refuge. We sampled sediments at 16 locations and fish at seven locations. The samples were analyzed for metals and for chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds. Selected sediment samples also were analyzed for aliphatic hydrocarbons. Arsenic concentrations in sediment samples from six locations were elevated compared to US norms, but arsenic was not detected in any fish composite. Mercury concentrations in largemouth bass from two locations were comparable to the 85th percentile concentrations in nationwide fish collections. Most sediment concentrations of other metals were unlikely to have detrimental effects on biota. No chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected in any sediment sample. Chlordane compound concentrations in fish composites from two sites at the eastern end of the sampling area were 0.127 and 0.228 μg/g wet weight, respectively, which are high enough to cause concern. Most aliphatic hydrocarbons detected were found at low concentrations and probably were natural in origin. We concluded that there are no serious contaminants concerns within the project area, but past use of arsenical pesticides may mean a legacy of elevated soil arsenic levels in parts of the area and some use of banned pesticides such as chlordane and DDT likely is still occurring near the refuge.

  16. Outbreak of cryptosporidiosis among responders to a rollover of a truck carrying calves - Kansas, April 2013.

    PubMed

    Webb, Lindsey Martin; Tubach, Sheri A; Hunt, D Charles

    2014-12-19

    In April 2013, the Thomas County Health Department notified the Kansas Department of Health and Environment's Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Response section (KDHE) of two cases of cryptosporidiosis among emergency responders to a tractor-trailer rollover. The truck was carrying approximately 350 preweaned Holstein calves. An outbreak investigation was led by KDHE with assistance from the county health department; six cases of cryptosporidiosis were identified among the 15 emergency responders. No additional primary cases with this exposure or secondary cases were identified. Disease was associated with carrying calves (relative risk [RR] = 3.0) and contact with fecal matter (RR = 4.5). The calves were aged <10 days and reportedly suffered from scours (diarrheal disease), which is often caused by Cryptosporidium spp., a chlorine-tolerant protozoan parasite. Because of the age of the calves and the conditions at the rollover scene, a high potential existed for fecal contamination and subsequent transmission of Cryptosporidium. This outbreak is the first report of both law enforcement and volunteer emergency responders contracting cryptosporidiosis, with transmission of Cryptosporidium attributed solely to direct contact with animals and their feces. Human illness resulting from contact with animals during an emergency response might be minimized if 1) all responders are aware of the potential for zoonotic transmission, 2) education is provided on proper animal handling including the use of appropriate personal protective equipment, and 3) responders practice thorough hand hygiene and decontaminate clothing and equipment following contact with feces. PMID:25522085

  17. Outbreak of cryptosporidiosis among responders to a rollover of a truck carrying calves - Kansas, April 2013.

    PubMed

    Webb, Lindsey Martin; Tubach, Sheri A; Hunt, D Charles

    2014-12-19

    In April 2013, the Thomas County Health Department notified the Kansas Department of Health and Environment's Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Response section (KDHE) of two cases of cryptosporidiosis among emergency responders to a tractor-trailer rollover. The truck was carrying approximately 350 preweaned Holstein calves. An outbreak investigation was led by KDHE with assistance from the county health department; six cases of cryptosporidiosis were identified among the 15 emergency responders. No additional primary cases with this exposure or secondary cases were identified. Disease was associated with carrying calves (relative risk [RR] = 3.0) and contact with fecal matter (RR = 4.5). The calves were aged <10 days and reportedly suffered from scours (diarrheal disease), which is often caused by Cryptosporidium spp., a chlorine-tolerant protozoan parasite. Because of the age of the calves and the conditions at the rollover scene, a high potential existed for fecal contamination and subsequent transmission of Cryptosporidium. This outbreak is the first report of both law enforcement and volunteer emergency responders contracting cryptosporidiosis, with transmission of Cryptosporidium attributed solely to direct contact with animals and their feces. Human illness resulting from contact with animals during an emergency response might be minimized if 1) all responders are aware of the potential for zoonotic transmission, 2) education is provided on proper animal handling including the use of appropriate personal protective equipment, and 3) responders practice thorough hand hygiene and decontaminate clothing and equipment following contact with feces.

  18. Hydrologic Conditions in Kansas, water year 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Madison R.

    2016-03-31

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring sites in Kansas. In 2015, the network included about 200 real-time streamgages (hereafter referred to as “gages”), 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations, and 30 groundwater-level monitoring wells. These data and associated analyses provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve the understanding of Kansas’s water resources.Real-time data are verified by the USGS throughout the year with regular measurements of streamflow, lake levels, and groundwater levels. These data are used in protecting life and property; and managing water resources for agricultural, industrial, public supply, ecological, and recreational purposes. Yearly hydrologic conditions are characterized by comparing statistical analyses of current and historical water year (WY) data for the period of record. A WY is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the year in which it ends.

  19. Surface water-quality assessment of the lower Kansas River basin, Kansas and Nebraska; project description

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Jordan, P.R.; Engberg, R.A.; Dugan, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    In 1986 the U.S. Geological Survey began a National Water-Quality Assessment Program to: (1) provide nationally consistent descriptions of the current status of water quality for a large, diverse, and geographically distributed part of the Nation 's surface water resources; (2) where possible, define trends in water quality; and (3) identify and describe the relation between water quality and natural and land use factors. This report describes the pilot study of the lower Kansas River basin, which is one of four surface water pilot studies that will be used to test, and modify as necessary, assessment concepts and approaches in preparation for future full implementation of the national program. Water quality issues in the lower Kansas River basin are dominated by possible nonpoint sources of contamination from agricultural land, with issues including: (1) large sediment discharge in the streams and sediment deposition in the reservoirs caused by intensive cultivation of row crops and subsequent erosion; (2) occurrence of pesticides in streams and reservoirs that could impair the suitability of water for aquatic life and has the potential for impairing the water 's suitability for public supply; (3) bacterial contamination caused by runoff from pastureland and feedlot operations and municipal wastewater discharges; and (4) nutrient enrichment of reservoirs. Data from fixed stations will be used to determine frequency distributions of constituent concentrations and mass balances of constituents between stations. Subbasin or river reach studies will provide a better understanding of the origin, movement, and fate of potential contaminants. (Lantz-PTT)

  20. Routine environment audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri. During this audit the activities the audit team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted October 24-November 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  1. Race and medical practice in Kansas City's Free Dispensary.

    PubMed

    Crenner, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Patient records from the Kansas City Free Dispensary, 1906-1912, provide material for a case study of race in early twentieth-century medicine. The dispensary was a free, racially integrated medical clinic operated for educational purposes by the University of Kansas. Little historical work has been done examining the role of race in routine medical practice. Medical records give insight to the development of durable clinical habits and rules of thumb. Practitioners at the Kansas City Free Dispensary showed clear racial inequities in their care, for example in the treatment of pain, but they did not acknowledge or explain their practices, although the necessary rhetoric and justifications lay close at hand. The author speculates that the disavowal of scientific racism in medicine in decades to follow may have done little to dislodge habits that became embedded in informal clinical judgments.

  2. Palladium-catalyzed synthesis of endocyclic allenes and their application in stereoselective [2 + 2]cycloaddition with ketenes.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Masamichi; Okada, Atsushi; Nakajima, Kiyohiko; Takahashi, Tamotsu

    2009-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed reactions of various 2-bromo-3-exo-methylenecycloalkenes with a stabilized nucleophile were examined. When the carbocycles were nine-membered or larger, the corresponding endocyclic allenes were isolated in excellent yields. In a reaction of the eight-membered cyclic substrate, initial formation of a cycloocta-1,2-diene derivative was detected; however, it dimerized slowly. The seven-membered carbocycle was inert to the reaction. Using a chiral Pd-catalyst, an axially chiral endocyclic allene was obtained in 65% ee. The cyclic allenes were applied to [2 + 2]cycloaddition with ketenes, and the stereoselectivity was studied.

  3. Identification of “ever-cropped” land (1984–2010) using Landsat annual maximum NDVI image composites: Southwestern Kansas case study

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Susan K.; Sylvester, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    A time series of 230 intra- and inter-annual Landsat Thematic Mapper images was used to identify land that was ever cropped during the years 1984 through 2010 for a five county region in southwestern Kansas. Annual maximum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (NDVIann-max) were used to evaluate the inter-annual dynamics of cropped and non-cropped land. Three feature images were derived from the 27-year NDVIann-max image time series and used in the classification: 1) maximum NDVI value that occurred over the entire 27 year time span (NDVImax), 2) standard deviation of the annual maximum NDVI values for all years (NDVIsd), and 3) standard deviation of the annual maximum NDVI values for years 1984–1986 (NDVIsd84-86) to improve Conservation Reserve Program land discrimination. Results of the classification were compared to three reference data sets: County-level USDA Census records (1982–2007) and two digital land cover maps (Kansas 2005 and USGS Trends Program maps (1986–2000)). Area of ever-cropped land for the five counties was on average 11.8 % higher than the area estimated from Census records. Overall agreement between the ever-cropped land map and the 2005 Kansas map was 91.9% and 97.2% for the Trends maps. Converting the intra-annual Landsat data set to a single annual maximum NDVI image composite considerably reduced the data set size, eliminated clouds and cloud-shadow affects, yet maintained information important for discriminating cropped land. Our results suggest that Landsat annual maximum NDVI image composites will be useful for characterizing land use and land cover change for many applications. PMID:22423150

  4. Quantitative water quality with ERTS-1. [Kansas water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarger, H. L.; Mccauley, J. R.; James, G. W.; Magnuson, L. M.; Marzolf, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    Analyses of ERTS-1 MSS computer compatible tapes of reservoir scenes in Kansas along with ground truth show that MSS bands and band ratios can be used for reliable prediction of suspended loads up to at least 900 ppm. The major reservoirs in Kansas, as well as in other Great Plains states, are playing increasingly important roles in flood control, recreation, agriculture, and urban water supply. Satellite imagery is proving useful for acquiring timely low cost water quality data required for optimum management of these fresh water resources.

  5. AmeriFlux US-KFS Kansas Field Station

    SciTech Connect

    Brunsell, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-KFS Kansas Field Station. Site Description - The study is an abandoned grassland at the Kansas Field Station and Ecological Reserves. The site is located within the tallgrass prairie-deciduous forest ecotonal area. The site was subjected to intensive agriculture from the 1940s through the late 1960s. In the mid-1970s, the site was planted with the cool-season grass Bromus inermis and used as a hay meadow until 1987. Then, mowing and burning approximately every five years maintained it as a grassland until 2007, when the eddy flux tower was installed.

  6. Sitewide monitoring at Agra, Kansas, June 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-01-14

    In 1985, carbon tetrachloride was discovered in the groundwater at Agra, Kansas, during routine sampling of public water supply wells. Two of Agra's four public water supply wells contained low but detectable levels of carbon tetrachloride; the concentrations in wells PWS-3 and PWS-4 exceeded the maximum contaminant level. These wells were removed from service in 1986, although they remain available for uses other than drinking water. Other public wells, outside the area of contamination, supply drinking water for the city of Agra. In 1987-2005, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) and the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) conducted investigations to delineate the contaminant plume and to identify source areas for the contamination - which results from the past use of grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride. Source areas were identified on the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility property and on the Producers Agricultural Marketing Association, Inc., property located to the south (Argonne 2006). The contaminant plume extends to the southeast, toward well PWS-3, from the identified source areas. Both the CCC/USDA and Pro-Ag Marketing are currently implementing KDHE-approved interim measures (IMs). To address the contamination identified on its former property, the CCC/USDA is implementing a source control IM consisting of large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) coupled with soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparging (AS). Pro-Ag Marketing plans to use groundwater extraction to address the downgradient plume. The CCC/USDA and Pro-Ag completed installation of the two interim measures in May 2009 and August 2009, respectively. The performance and assessments of the effectiveness of the IMs are being reported separately by the responsible entities. As part of the IM process, the KDHE (2008) requested the development of a joint sitewide groundwater monitoring plan to allow periodic assessment of the

  7. October 2008 monitoring results for Morrill, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-03-10

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2005), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). This report provides results for the most recent monitoring event, in October 2008. Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), groundwater was initially sampled twice yearly for a period of two years (in fall 2005, in spring and fall 2006, and in spring and fall 2007). The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. During the two-year period, the originally approved scope of the monitoring was expanded to include vegetation sampling (initiated in October 2006) and surface water and stream bed sediment sampling (initiated in March 2007, after a visual reconnaissance along Terrapin Creek [Argonne 2007a]). The analytical results for groundwater sampling events at Morrill in September 2005, March and September 2006, March and October 2007, and April 2008 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007b, 2008a,c). Those results consistently demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (5.0 {micro}g/L) for this compound, in a groundwater plume extending generally south-southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, toward Terrapin Creek at the south edge of the town. Low levels ({le} 1.3 {micro}g/L) of carbon

  8. September 2008 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-24

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under a KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling in September 2007 represented the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the two-year twice yearly monitoring program (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007a, 2008a). The results from the two-year monitoring program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was taking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC in situ chemical reduction technology, that was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the proposed interim measure occurred in December 2007

  9. October 2007 monitoring results for Morrill, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-03-26

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. On the basis of available information, the CCC/USDA believes that one or more third parties operated this facility after termination of the CCC/USDA's lease in 1971. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater has been sampled twice yearly for a recommended period of two years. The samples are analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 12 monitoring wells and 3 private wells (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE. The scope of the originally approved monitoring has been expanded to include vegetation sampling (initiated in October 2006) and surface water and stream bed sediment sampling (initiated in March 2007). The analytical results for groundwater sampling events at Morrill in September 2005, March 2006, September 2006, and March 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a, 2007c,e). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (5.0 {micro}g/L) for this compound, in a groundwater plume extending generally south-southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, toward Terrapin Creek at the south edge of the town. Little clear

  10. Expression of concern: A unifying mechanism for the rearrangement of vinyl allene oxide geometric isomers to cyclopentenones.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Richard

    2015-12-21

    Expression of concern for 'A unifying mechanism for the rearrangement of vinyl allene oxide geometric isomers to cyclopentenones' by Adán B. González-Pérez et al., Org. Biomol. Chem., 2014, 12, 7694-7701.

  11. A Versatile Room-Temperature Route to Di- and Trisubstituted Allenes Using Flow-Generated Diazo Compounds.

    PubMed

    Poh, Jian-Siang; Tran, Duc N; Battilocchio, Claudio; Hawkins, Joel M; Ley, Steven V

    2015-06-26

    A copper-catalyzed coupling reaction between flow-generated unstabilized diazo compounds and terminal alkynes provides di- and trisubstituted allenes. This extremely mild and rapid transformation is highly tolerant of several functional groups.

  12. Novel synthesis of fused isoxazolidines via a palladium catalysed allene insertion-intramoleculer 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition cascade reaction.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Tajassas; Grigg, Ronald; Ladlow, Mark; Sridharan, Visuvanathar; Thornton-Pett, Mark

    2002-08-21

    A one pot, three component palladium catalysed allenation of aryl iodides, in combination with a nitrone cycloaddition, leads to formation of fused isoxazolidines, creating two rings, two stereocentres and one tetrasubstituted carbon centre.

  13. Nickel-iminophosphine-catalyzed [4+2] cycloaddition of enones with allenes: synthesis of highly substituted dihydropyrans.

    PubMed

    Sako, Saori; Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2011-06-01

    Enones were found to react with allenes intermolecularly in the presence of a catalytic amount of a nickel-iminophosphine complex to provide dihydropyrans via oxidative cyclization of an enone and Ni(0).

  14. Rh(I)-catalyzed intramolecular [3 + 2] cycloaddition reactions of 1-ene-, 1-yne- and 1-allene-vinylcyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Lei; Lin, Mu; Yu, Zhi-Xiang

    2010-02-21

    New Rh(I)-catalyzed intramolecular [3 + 2] cycloaddition reactions of 1-ene-, 1-yne and 1-allene-vinylcyclopropanes have been developed, affording an efficient and versatile synthesis of cyclopentane- and cyclopentene-embedded bicyclic structures.

  15. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Kurth, William; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, f_{uhr}, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  16. Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Fixation Using a Modified Mason-Allen Stitch

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Ha, Jeong Ku; Ra, Ho Jong; Kim, Jin Goo

    2016-01-01

    A complete radial tear of the meniscus posterior root, which can effectively cause a state of total meniscectomy via loss of hoop tension, requires that the torn root be repaired. Several methods have been used to repair medial meniscus posterior root tears, most of which are based on a simple stitch technique that is known to have stitch-holding strength. We applied a modified version of the Mason-Allen stitch technique, which is recognized as a method for rotator cuff repair surgery because its locking effect overcomes the potential weakness of simple stitches. This article introduces the medial meniscus posterior root tears repair procedure based on a modified Mason-Allen stitch technique in which 2 strands (i.e., 1 simple horizontal and 1 simple vertical stitch) are used. PMID:27073778

  17. Automated Determination of Electron Density from Electric Field Measurements on the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri; Kurth, William

    2016-04-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurement made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, fuhr, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detection. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  18. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, I. S.; Spasojevic, M.; Shprits, Y. Y.; Kurth, W. S.

    2016-05-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made on board NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, fuhr, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  19. Van Allen Probe Spacecraft Potential Fluctuations and Electromagnetic Waves: A Parameter Space Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturner, A. P.; Ergun, R.; Malaspina, D.

    2013-12-01

    The study of chorus waves, an important mechanism for the energization and loss of particles in the radiation belts and inner magnetosphere, has been significantly aided by observations of fluctuations in a spacecraft's potential, which have been shown to be correlated with plasma density structures. However, recent analysis of Van Allen Probe data suggests that the oscillatory electromagnetic fields of chorus waves may also induce spacecraft potential fluctuations via enhanced photoelectron escape, calling into question our understanding of chorus waves. We use a fully 3D particle tracing simulation to study the equilibrium potential of a model Van Allen Probe spacecraft under various plasma conditions, varying thermal temperature, electric and magnetic field strength, plasma density, etc., to better understand the parameter space under which enhanced photoelectron escape becomes important.

  20. Electron acceleration in the heart of the Van Allen radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Reeves, G D; Spence, H E; Henderson, M G; Morley, S K; Friedel, R H W; Funsten, H O; Baker, D N; Kanekal, S G; Blake, J B; Fennell, J F; Claudepierre, S G; Thorne, R M; Turner, D L; Kletzing, C A; Kurth, W S; Larsen, B A; Niehof, J T

    2013-08-30

    The Van Allen radiation belts contain ultrarelativistic electrons trapped in Earth's magnetic field. Since their discovery in 1958, a fundamental unanswered question has been how electrons can be accelerated to such high energies. Two classes of processes have been proposed: transport and acceleration of electrons from a source population located outside the radiation belts (radial acceleration) or acceleration of lower-energy electrons to relativistic energies in situ in the heart of the radiation belts (local acceleration). We report measurements from NASA's Van Allen Radiation Belt Storm Probes that clearly distinguish between the two types of acceleration. The observed radial profiles of phase space density are characteristic of local acceleration in the heart of the radiation belts and are inconsistent with a predominantly radial acceleration process.

  1. Portrait of an instrument-maker:Wenceslaus Hollar's engraving of Elias Allen.

    PubMed

    Higton, Hester

    2004-06-01

    Among the many engravings of landscapes, buildings, portraits and other illustrations produced by the seventeenth-century artist Wenceslaus Hollar, there are a small number of images of contemporary men of science. Of particular interest is the portrait of the instrument-maker Elias Allen, both because portraits of men of his social status were extremely uncommon at this time, and also because the cluttered mass of instruments shown in the image presents a picture wholly unlike other portraits of the period. The first part of this paper explores the position of portraiture as inherently linked to nobility, and seeks to present an explanation as to why the original oil painting of Allen (made by Hendrik van der Borcht and no longer extant) might have been made. The second part looks at the image itself, and discusses possible reasons for Hollar's production of the engraving some twenty years after the original.

  2. Gold-catalyzed intramolecular [3+2] cycloadditions of 1-aryl-1-allene-6-enes.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rupsha; Liao, Hsin-Yi; Liu, Rai-Shung

    2009-09-01

    Treatment of 1-aryl-1-allen-6-enes with [PPh(3)AuCl]/AgSbF(6) (5 mol %) in CH(2)Cl(2) at 25 degrees C led to intramolecular [3+2] cycloadditions, giving cis-fused dihydrobenzo[a]fluorene products efficiently and selectively. The reactions proceeded with initial formation of trans/cis mixtures of 2-alkyl-1-isopropyl-2-phenyl-1,2-dihydronaphthalene cations B, which were convertible into the desired cis-fused cycloadducts through the combined action of a gold catalyst and a Brønsted acid. Theoretic calculation supports the participation of the trans-B cation as reaction intermediate. Although HOTf showed similar activity towards several 1-aryl-1-allen-6-enes, it lacks generality for this cycloaddition reaction.

  3. Cycloaddition reactions of allenes with N-phenylmaleimide. A two-step, diradical-intermediate process

    SciTech Connect

    Pasto, D.J.; Heid, P.F.; Warren, S.E.

    1982-06-30

    The stereoselectivities, chemoselectivities, relative reactivities, and kinetic isotope effects have been determined in the cycloaddition reactions of substituted allenes with N-phenylmaleimide. The comparison of these results with those derived from the studies of the cycloaddition of 1,1-dichloro-2,2-difluoroethene and the radical-chain addition of benzenethiol to allenes strongly indicates that the cycloadditions with N-phenylmaleimide occur via a two-step, diradical-intermediate process. The stereochemical features controlling the formation of the stereoisomeric diradical intermediates and their ring closures are discussed. In addition to the cycloaddition processes, competitive ene reactions occur to produce intermediate dienes, which react further to produce 1:2 adducts or nonreactive alkyne-containing 1:1 adducts. These ene reactions also appear to proceed via diradical intermediates.

  4. National uranium resource evaluation: McAllen and Brownsville Quadrangles, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Charepon, A J; Stauber, A J

    1982-06-01

    The McAllen and Brownsville Quadrangles, Texas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m to identify geologic environments and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. The environments were selected according to criteria established for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Surface studies included investigations of uranium occurrences described in the literature, of locations of aerial radiometric anomalies, of surface exposures, and of locations of anomalous hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance data and collation of information on uranium exploration. Subsurface evaluation of selected geologic units was accomplished by using electric and gamma-ray well logs to construct maps and construct maps and cross sections. In the McAllen Quadrangle, an environment favorable for Texas roll-type sandstone uranium deposits is identified in 36 areas in the Goliad, Fleming-Oakville, Catahoula-Frio, and Whitsett Formations. All other units in both quadrangles are considered unfavorable.

  5. Kansas environmental and resource study: A Great Plains model. [land use, image enhancement, winter wheat, agriculture, water resources, and pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Morain, S. A.; Yarger, H. L.; Ulaby, F. T.; Davis, J. C. (Principal Investigator); Bosley, R. J.; Williams, D. L.; Mccauley, J. R.; Mcnaughton, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Improvement in the land use classification accuracy of ERTS-1 MSS multi-images over Kansas can be made using two distances between neighboring grey tone N-tuples instead of one distance. Much more information is contained texturally than spectrally on the Kansas image. Ground truth measurements indicate that reflectance ratios of the 545 and 655 nm wavebands provide an index of plant development and possibly physiological stress. Preliminary analysis of MSS 4 and 5 channels substantiate the ground truth interpretation. Results of the land use mapping experiment indicate that ERTS-1 imagery has major potential in regionalization. The ways in which land is utilized within these regions may then be studied more effectively than if no adequate regionalization is available. A model for estimating wheat yield per acre has been applied to acreage estimates derived from ERTS-1 imagery to project the 1973 wheat yields for a ten county area in southwest Kansas. The results are within 3% of the preharvest estimates for the same area prepared by the USDA. Visual identification of winter wheat is readily achieved by using a temporal sequence of images. Identification can be improve by stratifying the project area into subregions having more or less homogeneous agricultural practices and crop mixes.

  6. Floods in Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas, September 12-13, 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauth, L.D.; Carswell, W.J., Jr.; Chin, E.H.

    1981-01-01

    The storms of Sept. 12-13, 1977, delivered as much as 16 in. of rain, with average rainfall exceeding 10 in. in the Kansas City metropolitan area. Twenty-five lives were lost, many were left homeless, and damages exceeded $80 million. Data obtained by the National Weather Service and the U.S. Geological Survey indicate that two record-setting rainstorms occurred within 24 hours. The first storm, in the early morning, thoroughly soaked the local drainage basins. The second storm, centered along the Brush and Round Grove Creek basins, resulted in a devastating flash flood. Peak discharges were determined during and after this major flood at gaging stations and selected miscellaneous locations. Streamflows and flood volumes in many locations far exceeded estimated values for the 100-year flood. (USGS)

  7. Reactions of two-coordinate phosphines with acetylenes: Synthesis of new allenic and acetylenic phosphines

    SciTech Connect

    Angelov, C.M.; Neilson, R.H. )

    1993-02-03

    The two-coordinate phosphines (Me[sub 3]Si)[sub 2]NP[double bond]ESiMe[sub 3] (1, E = N; 2, E = CH) reacted smoothly with 2-butyne via an ene process (instead of the expected cycloaddition reaction) to give the novel allenic phosphines H[sub 2]C[double bond]C[double bond]C(CH[sub 3])P[E(H)SiMe[sub 3

  8. Cooperative, highly enantioselective phosphinothiourea catalysis of imine-allene [3 + 2] cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan-Qing; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2008-04-30

    A new family of phosphinthiourea catalysts was developed for the highly enantioselective synthesis of 2-aryl-2,5-hydropyrroles via a [3 + 2] cycloaddition of an electron-deficient allene with aryl and heteroaryl diphenylphosphinoylimines. The presence of both H2O and Et3N as additives was found to be important for achieving optimal rates. Dual activation of both nucleophile and electrophile by the bifunctional catalyst is invoked to account for the observed high reactivity and enantioselectivity.

  9. The rα structure of allene: a study of solvent effects in NMR of oriented molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, P.; Baraldi, C.; Kellerhals, M.; Wasser, R.

    1987-11-01

    NMR spectra of partially oriented allene in 14 different liquid crystal solvents have been analyzed. The resulting direct couplings corrected for harmonic vibrations were used to determine the rα-structures. Considerable solvent effects were detected which disappeared, if the data were corrected also for the correlated molecule deformation. A solvent independent rα-structure which agreed well with IR results, and the interaction parameters of the CH and CC bonds of allene for all the solvents were determined.

  10. Assessing future drought impacts on yields based on historical irrigation reaction to drought for four major crops in Kansas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyi; Lin, Xiaomao

    2016-04-15

    Evaluation of how historical irrigation reactions can adapt to future drought is indispensable to irrigation policy, however, such reactions are poorly quantified. In this paper, county-level irrigation data for maize, soybean, grain sorghum, and wheat crops in Kansas were compiled. Statistical models were developed to quantify changes of irrigation and yields in response to drought for each crop. These were then used to evaluate the ability of current irrigation to cope with future drought impacts on each crop based on an ensemble Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) prediction under the Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 scenario. Results indicate that irrigation in response to drought varies by crop; approximately 10 to 13% additional irrigation was applied when PDSI was reduced by one unit for maize, soybean, and grain sorghum. However, the irrigation reaction for wheat exhibits a large uncertainty, indicating a weaker irrigation reaction. Analysis of future climate conditions indicates that maize, soybean, and grain sorghum yields would decrease 2.2-12.4% at the state level despite additional irrigation application induced by drought (which was expected to increase 5.1-19.0%), suggesting that future drought will exceed the range that historical irrigation reactions can adapt to. In contrast, a lower reduction (-0.99 to -0.63%) was estimated for wheat yields because wetter climate was projected in the central section of the study area. Expanding wheat areas may be helpful in avoiding future drought risks for Kansas agriculture.

  11. Gradual Diffusion and Punctuated Phase Space Density Enhancements of Highly Relativistic Electrons: Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Henderson, M. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Hudson, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission has provided a new window into mega electron volt (MeV) particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. Observations (up to E (is) approximately 10MeV) show clearly the behavior of the outer electron radiation belt at different timescales: months-long periods of gradual inward radial diffusive transport and weak loss being punctuated by dramatic flux changes driven by strong solar wind transient events. We present analysis of multi-MeV electron flux and phase space density (PSD) changes during March 2013 in the context of the first year of Van Allen Probes operation. This March period demonstrates the classic signatures both of inward radial diffusive energization and abrupt localized acceleration deep within the outer Van Allen zone (L (is) approximately 4.0 +/- 0.5). This reveals graphically that both 'competing' mechanisms of multi-MeV electron energization are at play in the radiation belts, often acting almost concurrently or at least in rapid succession.

  12. Van Allen Probes: Successful launch campaign and early operations exploring Earth's radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, K.; Stratton, J.

    The twin Van Allen Probe observatories developed at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory for NASA's Heliophysics Division completed final observatory integration and environmental test activities and were successfully launched into orbit around the Earth on August 30, 2012. As the science operations phase begins, the mission is providing exciting new information about the impact of radiation belt activity on the earth. The on-board boom mounted magnetometers and other instruments are the most sensitive sensors of their type that have ever flown in the Van Allen radiation belts. The observatories are producing near-Earth space weather information that can be used to provide warnings of potential power grid interruptions or satellite damaging storms. The Van Allen Probes are operating in a challenging high radiation environment, and at the same time they are designed to make an insubstantial electric and magnetic field contribution to their surroundings. This paper will describe the challenges associated with observatory integration and test activities and observatory on-orbit checkout and commissioning. The lessons learned can be applied to other observatories and payloads that will be exposed to similar environments.

  13. Three acoustic forms of Allen's galagos (primates; Galagonidae) in the Central African region.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Lesley

    2003-01-01

    This study identifies populations currently classified as Allen's galago (Galago alleni) at ten locations in Gabon, Cameroon and Bioko Island. Morphological diversity was evident both within and between populations. Attention to the loud calls revealed three distinct vocal profiles which are consistent within biogeographical regions. This work is based on the Recognition Concept of Species which refers to a Specific Mate Recognition System. Galagos rely less on visual signals than diurnal primates and recognise each other principally by means of auditory and olfactory signals. Galagos possess repertoires of loud calls relating to contact and alarm which are thought to be species-specific. Other studies of nocturnal prosimians (galagos, tarsiers) have demonstrated that the unique loud call repertoires are reliable indicators of species boundaries; whereas characters such as body size and pelage coloration are highly variable, even within populations. The vocal data in this study provide evidence of at least three acoustic forms of galago within the Allen's group which are predicted to represent three distinct species: the Allen's form on Bioko Island and south-west Cameroon, the Gabon form in southern Cameroon and northern Gabon and the Makandé form in Gabon south of the Ogooué river. Some populations may be vulnerable to extinction due to limited distributions and habitat destruction.

  14. Radition belt dynamics : Recent results from van Allen Probes and future observations from CeREs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, Shrikanth; O'Brien, Paul; Baker, Daniel N.; Ogasawara, Keiichi; Fennell, Joseph; Christian, Eric; Claudepierre, Seth; Livi, Stefano; Desai, Mihir; Li, Xinlin; Jaynes, Allison; Turner, Drew; Jones, Ashley; Schiller, Quintin

    2016-07-01

    We describe recent observations of the Earth's radiation belts made by instruments on board the Van Allen Probes mission, particularly the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion spectrometer (MagEIS). These observations have significantly advanced our understanding of terrestrial radiation belt dynamics. The Van Allen Probes mission comprises two identically instrumented spacecraft which were launched 31 August, 2012 into low-inclination lapping equatorial orbits. The orbit periods are about 9 hours, with perigees and apogees of of ~600 km and 5.8 RE respectively. We discuss the new scientific findings of the Van Allen Probes mission regarding the physics of energization and loss of relativistic electrons and their implications for future low-cost missions, especially CubeSats. We describe the CeREs (a Compact Radiation belt Explorer) CubeSat mission currently being built at the Goddard Space Flight Center, and carrying on board, an innovative instrument, the Miniaturized Electron Proton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT is a compact low-mass low-power instrument measuring electrons from a few keV to tens of MeV in multiple differential channels. MERiT is optimized to measure electron microbursts with a high time resolution of a few milliseconds. We present and discuss possible future scientific contributions from CeREs.

  15. New Insight Into the Nightside Magnetosphere Ion Plasma Regimes With the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, J.; Goldstein, J.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2013-12-01

    The recent successful launch of the twin Van Allen spacecraft (formerly known as RBSP) provides a new and unprecedented window into the structure and dynamics of inner magnetospheric plasma content and dynamics. The equatorially orbiting Van Allen spacecraft are returning clean, high resolution, very low background ion composition and electron plasma data throughout the radiation belt and ring current region inside geosynchronous orbit. Since both Van Allen spacecraft are positioned in near-identical chase orbits, lapping each other continuously throughout the mission, we are able to study both spatial and temporal variability in the inner magnetosphere with unprecedented resolution on a range of time and length scales. In this paper we present initial results from plasma composition measurements in the nightside of Earth's magnetosphere, focusing on plasma fractional plasma composition of H+, He+, and O+ in the plasmasphere through lower ring current energies (< 50 keV). Early results indicate a remarkable spatial and temporal variability in plasma ion composition in the inner magnetosphere. We detect frequent occurrences of multiple peak energy distributions in this energy range occurring in ring current, plasmasphere and plasma sheet. We observe distinct differences between the three ion species in these spectra. Energy spectra with 5 peaks for a single species have been observed repeatedly. We discuss possible explanations for these observations, and possible ramifications for the evolution of the outer radiation belt.

  16. The Van Allen Probes first year of discovery and understanding (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B.; Fox, N. J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Kessel, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes twin spacecraft were launched on 30 August 2012 and inserted into nearly identical, 1.1 x 5.8 RE elliptical, low inclination (10°), 9-hour period Earth orbits with one of the two spacecraft lapping the other about every 2.5 months. The discoveries and understandings achieved by the Van Allen Probes science investigations since the operational mission began on 1 November 2012 are all that we had hoped. The probes are discovering new and unanticipated behaviors of the radiation belts, for example coherently ordered multiple structures, and are revealing quantitatively how and why those behaviors occur. The probes are answering definitely outstanding important questions regarding Earth's inner magnetosphere, for example, the extent to which and the processes by which local acceleration contributes to creation of the belts. With its close 2-month coordination with the BARREL mission of opportunity array of Antarctic balloons, the Probes are contributing greatly to our understanding of the causes of radiation belt loss and the relationship between high and low altitude radiation belt phenomena. In this overview presentation we assess the discoveries and findings of the Van Allen Probes mission following its first year of operation, and provide a guide to the activities and achievements anticipated over the next year.

  17. New Insight into the Inner Magnetosphere Plasma Regimes with the van Allen Probes (RBSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Joerg-Micha; Denton, Richard E.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Reeves, Geoff; Spence, Harlan E.

    2013-04-01

    The recent successful launch of the twin van Allen spacecraft (formerly known as RBSP) provides a new and unprecedented window into the structure and dynamics of inner magnetospheric plasma content and dynamics. The equatorially orbiting van Allen spacecraft are returning clean high resolution, very low background ion composition and electron plasma data throughout the radiation belt and ring current region inside geosynchronous orbit. Since both van Allen spacecraft are positioned in near-identical chase orbits, lapping each other continuously throughout the mission, we are able to study both spatial and temporal variability in the inner magnetosphere with unprecedented resolution on a range of time and length scales. In this paper we are presenting initial results from plasma composition measurements in the nightside of Earth's magnetosphere, focussing on plasma fractional plasma composition of H+, He+, and O+ in the plasmasphere through lower ring current energies (< 50 keV). Early results do not only indicate a remarkable spatial and temporal variability in plasma ion composition in the inner magnetosphere, they also show frequent occurrences of multiple peak energy distributions in this energy range. Multi-peaked energy distributions with several peaks occurring in ring current, plasmasphere and (less often) plasma sheet are frequently observed, with distinct differences between the three ion species. Energy spectra with 5-6 peaks for a single species have been observed repeatedly.

  18. Enhancements and Losses of Radiation Belt Particles: Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    The dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission has provided a new window into megaelectron Volt (MeV) particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. Observations (up to E ~10 MeV) show clearly the behavior of the outer electron radiation belt at different time scales: months-long periods of gradual inward radial diffusive transport and weak loss being punctuated by dramatic flux changes driven by strong solar wind transient events. Analysis of multi-MeV electron flux and phase space density (PSD) changes during key intervals in March 2013 and March 2015 are presented in the context of the first three years of Van Allen Probes operation. These March periods demonstrate the classic signatures both of inward radial diffusive energization as well as abrupt localized acceleration deep within the outer Van Allen zone (L ~4.0±0.5). Such results reveal graphically that both "competing" mechanisms of multi-MeV electron energization are at play in the radiation belts, often acting almost concurrently or at least in very rapid succession. They also show in remarkable ways how the coldest plasmas in the magnetosphere intimately control the most highly energetic particles.

  19. Observation of plasma depletions in outer radiation belt by Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Kim, K.; Lee, E.; Kim, Y.; Park, Y.; Parks, G. K.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Van Allen Probes (RBSP) observed plasma fine structures in the outer radiation belt during storm time on 14 November 2012. Five plasma depletion regions are clearly identified by VAP_A and VAP_B from 02:00UT to 04:45UT by particle instrument suite that can measure electrons and ions in a wide energy range, from 20 eV to 10 MeV. The plasma flux density dramatically decreases about 2 - 3 orders of magnitude in the depletion regions regardless of energy and particle species. Our analysis shows the plasma cavities are formed at the boundary of trapped and injected particle current. The total plasma pressures inside the depletion regions are much smaller than outside, implying unstable structures. It seems that this structures appear unusually only for storm main phase. During strong storm event, geomagnetic field is stretched and low plasma density region (lobe) moves to low latitude, this event could be analyzed by lobe region crossing of spacecraft. However, to explain temporal sequences of this event, we should assume large fluctuation of lobe boundary. Another possible analysis is plasma bubble generated in the tail region. The bubble model proposed to explain plasma transportation form tail to near Earth region in 1980s. While the bubble model reasonably explain the spatial and temporal structures observed by Van Allen probes, we cannot completely rule out the lobe region crossing model. In this presentation, we shall discuss about the characteristics of the plasma density cavities first observed by Van Allen Probes.

  20. A neural network approach for identifying particle pitch angle distributions in Van Allen Probes data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, V. M.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Medeiros, C.; Da Silva, L. A.; Alves, L. R.; Koga, D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walsh, B. M.; Kanekal, S. G.; Jauer, P. R.; Rockenbach, M.; Dal Lago, A.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Marchezi, J. P.; Mendes, O.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Baker, D. N.

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of particle pitch angle distributions (PADs) has been used as a means to comprehend a multitude of different physical mechanisms that lead to flux variations in the Van Allen belts and also to particle precipitation into the upper atmosphere. In this work we developed a neural network-based data clustering methodology that automatically identifies distinct PAD types in an unsupervised way using particle flux data. One can promptly identify and locate three well-known PAD types in both time and radial distance, namely, 90° peaked, butterfly, and flattop distributions. In order to illustrate the applicability of our methodology, we used relativistic electron flux data from the whole month of November 2014, acquired from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope instrument on board the Van Allen Probes, but it is emphasized that our approach can also be used with multiplatform spacecraft data. Our PAD classification results are in reasonably good agreement with those obtained by standard statistical fitting algorithms. The proposed methodology has a potential use for Van Allen belt's monitoring.

  1. Functional analysis of allene oxide cyclase, MpAOC, in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ohshika, Jun; Takahashi, Tomohiro; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Matusuura, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Kosaku

    2015-08-01

    12-Oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) is an intermediate in jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis. OPDA exerts JA-dependent and JA-independent biological effects; therefore, it is considered a signaling molecule in flowering plants. OPDA is induced by bacterial infection and wounding and inhibits growth in the moss Physcomitrella patens. The functions of OPDA and allene oxide cyclase (AOC) in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha were explored, which represents the most basal lineage of extant land plants. The analysis of OPDA showed that it is present in M. polymorpha and is increased by wounding. OPDA has been suggested to be involved in the response to environmental stresses. Moreover, OPDA showed growth inhibitory activity in M. polymorpha. Nonetheless JA in M. polymorpha was not found in this study. AOC synthesizes OPDA from an unstable allene oxide. A database search of the M. polymorpha genome identified only a putative gene encoding allene oxide cyclase (MpAOC). Recombinant MpAOC showed AOC activity similar to that in flowering plants. MpAOC was localized to chloroplasts, as in flowering plants. Expression of MpAOC was induced by wounding and OPDA treatment, and positive feedback regulation of OPDA was demonstrated in M. polymorpha. Overexpression of MpAOC increased the endogenous OPDA level and suppressed growth in M. polymorpha. These results indicate the role of OPDA as a signaling molecule regulating growth and the response to wounding in the liverwort M. polymorpha. PMID:25892411

  2. Allen Brain Atlas-Driven Visualizations: a web-based gene expression energy visualization tool.

    PubMed

    Zaldivar, Andrew; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas-Driven Visualizations (ABADV) is a publicly accessible web-based tool created to retrieve and visualize expression energy data from the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) across multiple genes and brain structures. Though the ABA offers their own search engine and software for researchers to view their growing collection of online public data sets, including extensive gene expression and neuroanatomical data from human and mouse brain, many of their tools limit the amount of genes and brain structures researchers can view at once. To complement their work, ABADV generates multiple pie charts, bar charts and heat maps of expression energy values for any given set of genes and brain structures. Such a suite of free and easy-to-understand visualizations allows for easy comparison of gene expression across multiple brain areas. In addition, each visualization links back to the ABA so researchers may view a summary of the experimental detail. ABADV is currently supported on modern web browsers and is compatible with expression energy data from the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. By creating this web application, researchers can immediately obtain and survey numerous amounts of expression energy data from the ABA, which they can then use to supplement their work or perform meta-analysis. In the future, we hope to enable ABADV across multiple data resources.

  3. An Impenetrable Barrier to Ultra-Relativistic Electrons in the Van Allen Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen belts could be delineated into an inner zone dominated by high energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that moderate-energy electrons (E≲1 MeV) often populate both zones with a deep "slot" region between them. This two-belt structure was explained as being due to strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary with the inner edge of the outer zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location. Recent Van Allen Probes observations have revealed unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultra-relativistic (E > 5 MeV) kinetic energies. Here we discuss an exceedingly sharp inner boundary exists for ultra-relativistic electrons. Concurrent data reveal that this barrier for inward electron radial transport is not due to a physical boundary within Earth's intrinsic magnetic field nor is it likely that scattering by human-generated electromagnetic transmitter wave fields would inhibit inward radial diffusion. Rather, we suggest that exceptionally slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere can conspire to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate.

  4. Long Distance Education at the University of Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luetke-Stahlman, Barbara

    Since 1993, the University of Kansas (KU) has used distance learning options to serve rural graduate students seeking teacher certification in deaf education (DE). Telecommunications technologies used by DE courses include interactive/compressed video and the World Wide Web. Following an explanation of the technologies used and their advantages…

  5. Collection Development Policy for the University of Kansas Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Ted, Ed.; And Others

    This policy reflects developmental patterns governing the evolution of collections in the University of Kansas Libraries. Policy statements, written by bibliographers, are provided for 54 subject areas: African studies; anthropology; applied English; architecture and urban design; art; astronomy and physics; biological sciences; business…

  6. Why Kansas Is Developing Standards for Its Adult Education Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacharakis, Jeff; Glass, Dianne S.

    2010-01-01

    In Kansas, local and state adult education leaders realized that leadership standards cannot be ignored if adult education is to be perceived as a professional discipline within the state's larger educational community. The perfect opportunity to study and develop leadership standards for adult education directors and coordinators presented itself…

  7. Guide for Implementing Career Education in Kansas Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Education, Topeka.

    Seven phases are outlined for implementing career education in Kansas school districts, with suggested steps included under each phase. For example, Phase I: Pre-Commitment, consists of the following steps: Discuss concept of career education with board, introduce concept to staff and students, and obtain commitment decision from board. The rest…

  8. The Changing Fabric of Adult Basic Education in Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacharakis, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the changing cultural fabric in Kansas. The author sees this change as an opportunity to strengthen and expand the Adult Basic Education and English as a Second Language programming. By taking this approach, adult education will appeal not only to best practices where authentic community-based approaches are indeed more…

  9. Labette Community College, Parsons, Kansas. PLATO Evaluation Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brush, Thomas

    Labette Community College (LCC), Parsons, Kansas, a public comprehensive community college, received a 5-year Title III grant from the U.S. Department of Education to strengthen their academic programs through the implementation of computer-assisted basic skills instruction coupled with a comprehensive retention program. To study the progress…

  10. Using Sports to Teach Geography: Examples from Kansas City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeChano, Lisa M.; Shelley, Fred M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper illustrates how sports can be used to teach geographic concepts, using illustrative examples from the Kansas City area. Given the global popularity of sport and its impacts and links to environment, economy, and culture, it is surprising that more attention has not been paid to sport as a vehicle for the conceptualization and teaching…

  11. State Programs for Migrant Children. Kansas Annual Evaluation Report, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlstrom, Clyde J., Comp.

    Ten individual reports from the 1971 summer migrant educational programs in Kansas are summarized and evaluated. The goals of these programs were to (1) help children develop oral language and expression; (2) provide arts and crafts for personal expression; (3) provide swimming and other types of recreation for physical development and…

  12. Community Education in Kansas, a Challenge to Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killacky, Cecil James; Rippetoe, Joseph K.

    1976-01-01

    An educational outreach project is described that was conducted during 1974 and 1975 by University for Man (UFM), a free university based in Manhattan, Kansas, that offers educational programs to the state. The major objective of the project was to serve adult educational needs with programs examining public issues through a humanistic…

  13. Energy research and resource development in Kansas, FY 79

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    In FY 79 about 2 million dollars was spent on energy research and resource development; of the total, 51% was Federally funded, 39% was state funded, and the rest was funded through other resources. Most of the research was done at three institutions: Kansas State University, University of Kansas, and the Kansas Geological Survey. These institutions represent 92% of the total energy research funds. Nonrenewable energy research accounted for 56% of all funds. Renewable accounted for 12% and conservation accounted for 27%. The remaining 5% was for a project to forecast energy demand and supply, which was more or less in its own category. Eighty-two percent of state funds were dedicated to nonrenewable research, with the rest split between renewable and conservation. In contrast, Federal monies showed more balance. Nonrenewable research accounted for 40%, renewable 12%, conservation 38% and unclassified the remaining 10%. Private-sector funds (foundations, not-for-profit agencies, corporations, etc.) were distributed along similar proportions as Federal funds. In sum, energy research and resource development in Kansas in fiscal year 1979 was modest. While the nonrenewable energy resources were well represented, efforts were very limited in solar, wind, and biomass alternate energy strategies. Conservation research, while faring better than renewable research, was nonetheless also small.

  14. Evaluation of Identification and Preassessment Procedures in Kansas. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Education, Topeka. Special Education Administration Section.

    The research evaluation project attempted to assess the effectiveness of new state (Kansas) guidelines for determining eligibility and placement of students in the areas of learning disabilities (LD), behavioral disorders (BD), and speech/language; and to assess the effectiveness of preassessment instructional programming options and screening…

  15. Kansas Early Childhood Research Institute on Transitions. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Mabel L.; O'Brien, Marion

    This final report describes research projects and other activities of the Kansas Early Childhood Research Institute (KECRI), a multi-investigator, cross-disciplinary Institute focusing on successful transitions for young (birth to age 8) children with disabilities or developmental delays. Interventions were developed, evaluated, and disseminated…

  16. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Kansas. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  17. Final work plan for targeted sampling at Webber, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-05-01

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for targeted sampling at Webber, Kansas (Figure 1.1). This activity is being conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). Data obtained in this sampling event will be used to (1) evaluate the current status of previously detected contamination at Webber and (2) determine whether the site requires further action. This work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Argonne has issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan, approved by the KDHE, contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. This document should be consulted for complete details of the technical activities proposed at the former CCC/USDA facility in Webber.

  18. Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, S.

    2010-05-01

    This report provides an overview of a technical report on an assessment NREL conducted in Greensburg, Kansas, to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region. See NREL/TP-7A2-45843 for the Executive Summary of this report.

  19. Decade One + Four: Profile of the Kansas Trustee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Paul; Parker, Patrick W.

    A study was undertaken to gather a body of comprehensive data concerning the trustees serving the 19 Kansas community college districts that are governed by local boards. A 22-item questionnaire elicited information on characteristics such as sex, age, ethnic origin, occupation, educational level, years of service as a board member, length of…

  20. Public health response to metallic mercury spills in Kansas.

    PubMed

    Monroe, C T; Pezzino, G; Knoche, L L; Henning, L; Belt, P

    1999-11-01

    Local and state public health officials are called on to respond to environmental public health hazards just as they historically have been called on to respond to communicable disease outbreaks. Recent experience with metallic mercury spills in Kansas suggests that neither the legal authority nor the scientific knowledgebase is as well developed for response to environmental hazards as for communicable disease threats. PMID:10662059

  1. Section 504/ADA: Guidelines for Educators in Kansas. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joan; Bieker, Rod; Copenhaver, John

    This document presents the Kansas State Department of Education's guidelines to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The guidelines specifically address Subparts A, B, C, and D of the regulations for Section 504 which deal with general provisions, employment practices, accessibility and education. An…

  2. Kansas Early Childhood Research Institute on Transitions: Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Mabel L.; O'Brien, Marion

    This executive summary reviews activities over the past 5 years of the Kansas Early Childhood Research Institute (KECRI). The Institute has addressed transition issues faced by infants and young children (and their families) who have a disability or are at risk for developmental delay. KECRI goals are stated and the importance and impact of the…

  3. Serologic incidence of some diseases in Kansas wild turkeys.

    PubMed

    Veatch, J K; Applegate, R D; Osborne, S J

    1998-01-01

    Wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo, n = 1164) were tested for Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma meleagridis, Mycoplasma synoviae, and Salmonella pullorum from 1990 to 1997. Although 3.3% of the turkeys were suspect for one or more diseases, only 0.9% were serologically positive for M. gallisepticum. These 11 positives were all from one country in south-central Kansas.

  4. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This secondary horticulture curriculum guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in thirteen sections: (1) Orientation and Careers, (2) Leadership and Future Farmers of America, (3) Supervised Occupational Experience Program, (4) Plant…

  5. Report on the Greater Kansas City Hispanic Needs Assessment, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Francisco H.; And Others

    The Greater Kansas City Community Foundation conducted a formal, comprehensive needs assessment designed to address what the Hispanic community sees as its important needs. Data were gathered by surveying 100 residents of Hispanic neighborhoods, 53 Hispanic and non-Hispanic community leaders city-wide, and 28 heads of agencies located in the…

  6. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This second horticulture guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in eight sections: (1) Leadership, (2) Supervised Occupational Experience, (3) Plant Propagation, (4) Soil and Plant Growth Media, (5) Fertilizers, (6) Greenhouse, (7) Plant…

  7. Portrait of the Future: 1994 Kansas Kids Count Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Sydney, Ed.; And Others

    This Kids Count data book presents a statistical portrait of the well-being of and conditions faced by the children of Kansas, based on key indicators. Nineteen indicators are detailed in five subject areas: (1) economic well-being; (2) physical health and safety; (3) educational achievement; (4) emotional well-being; and (5) social behavior and…

  8. 75 FR 55619 - Kansas Disaster Number KS-00045

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster Number KS-00045 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1.... (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate...

  9. Sediment oxygen demand in eastern Kansas streams, 2014 and 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Guy M.; King, Lindsey R.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2016-08-29

    Dissolved oxygen concentrations in streams are affected by physical, chemical, and biological factors in the water column and streambed, and are an important factor for the survival of aquatic organisms. Sediment oxygen demand (SOD) rates in Kansas streams are not well understood. During 2014 and 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, measured SOD at eight stream sites in eastern Kansas to quantify SOD rates and variability with respect to season, land use, and bottom-sediment characteristics. Sediment oxygen demand rates (SODT) ranged from 0.01 to 3.15 grams per square meter per day at the ambient temperature of the measurements. The summer mean SOD rate was 3.0-times larger than the late fall mean rate, likely because of increased biological activity at warm water temperatures. Given the substantial amount of variability in SOD rates possible within sites, heterogeneity of substrate type is an important consideration when designing SOD studies and interpreting the results. Sediment oxygen demand in eastern Kansas streams was correlated with land use and streambed-sediment characteristics, though the strength of relations varied seasonally. The small number of study sites precluded a more detailed analysis. The effect of basin land use and streambed sediment characteristics on SOD is currently (2016) not well understood, and there may be many contributing factors including basin influences on water quality that affect biogeochemical cycles and the biological communities supported by the stream.

  10. Building Teacher Quality in the Kansas City, Missouri School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corso, Aileen; Franck, Valerie; Kelliher, Kate; McCorry, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    This study looks at the policies and practices shaping teacher quality in the Kansas City, Missouri School District (KCMSD). It is part of a series of analyses by the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) in school districts across the nation. Framing this analysis are five policy goals for improving teacher quality: (1) Staffing. Teacher…

  11. Green Infrastructure for CSO Control in Kansas City, Missouri

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kansas City Water Services Department (WSD) conducted extensive modeling and economic studies of its combined sewer system over the last 5 years, for submittal of its long term control plan to EPA. These studies and recent funding opportunities have provided the impetus for sele...

  12. 75 FR 26815 - Kansas Disaster Number KS-00041

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... Assistance Only for the State of Kansas (FEMA-1885-DR), dated 03/09/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storms and Snowstorm. Incident Period: 12/22/2009 through 01/08/2010. DATES: Effective Date: 05/04/2010. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 05/10/2010. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date:...

  13. Kansas Energy 2000. Inventory of energy related assets, Research area summary -- Kansas State University, University of Kansas, Wichita State University: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Legg, J.; Nellis, D.; Simons, G.

    1992-03-01

    The Inventory of Energy Related Assets: Research Area Summary is a compilation of resume-type information on energy researchers in the state of Kansas. Researchers are placed in one of four categories: Fossil Energy Research, Alternative Energy Sources, Electric Power Generation and Usage, and Other Energy Research. Each research biography includes a synopsis of recent research, sources of support, and areas of research emphasis.

  14. The Evolution of Groundwater Management Paradigms in Kansas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sophocleous, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to trace the evolution of key water-related laws and management practices in Kansas, from the enactment of the Kansas Water Resources Appropriation Act of 1945 to the present, in order to highlight the state's efforts to create a more sustainable water future and in hopes that others will benefit from Kansas' experience. The 1945 Act provides the basic framework of water law (prior appropriation) in Kansas. Progression of groundwater management in the state encompasses local ground-water management districts (GMDs) and their water-management programs, minimum-streamflow and TMDL standards, water-use reporting and water metering programs, use of modified safe-yield policies in some GMDs, the subbasin water-resources-management program, the integrated resource planning/Aquifer Storage and Recovery project of the City of Wichita, the Central Kansas Water Bank, enhanced aquifer subunits management, and various water conservation programs. While these have all contributed to the slowing down of declines in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer and in associated ecosystems, they have not yet succeeded in halting those declines. Based on the assumption that the different management approaches have to operate easily within the prevailing water rights and law framework to succeed, a number of steps are suggested here that may help further halt the declines of the High Plains aquifer. These include eliminating the "use it or lose it" maxim in the prior-appropriation framework, broadening the definition of "beneficial use," regulating domestic and other "exempt" wells, encouraging voluntary "sharing the shortage" agreements, and determining to what extent water rights may be regulated in the public interest without a compensable "taking." Further necessary measures include determining to what extent water-rights holders might be subjected to reasonable dictates without having the security of their rights altered.

  15. Significant Findings from a Water-Quality Study on Prairie Band Potawatomi Reservation, Northeastern Kansas, June 1996 through August 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, Heidi E.; Schmidt, Heather C. Ross; Pope, Larry M.

    2007-01-01

    Water-quality samples were collected from surface- (stream-) and ground-water sites on and near the Prairie Band Potawatomi Reservation in northeastern Kansas (fig. 1) from June 1996 through August 2006 as part of a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (Schmidt and others, 2007). Surface- and ground-water quality were evaluated using applicable drinking-water standards to consider whether these resources can be used in the future to supply drinking water for the reservation. Presently (2007), drinking water on the reservation is purchased from Rural Water District #3 in Jackson County (Sharon Bosse, Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation Department of Planning and Environmental Protection, oral commun., 2007). Results of water-quality analyses are summarized in the following sections. Water-quality activities for this study are documented in several reports (Trombley, 1999, 2001; Schmidt, 2004; Schmidt and others, 2007).

  16. Rural Postsecondary Education. Proceedings of the National Invitational Meeting (Kansas City, Kansas, June 29-July 1, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Richard J.

    At the first National Invitational Meeting on Rural Postsecondary Education (also known as the Kansas City Initiative), 28 rural specialists in lifelong learning produced an 8-item Bill of Rights and an 11-item rural postsecondary action agenda. Participants discussed organizational deficiencies in rural adult education, the sense of isolation all…

  17. [A study on Horace N. Allen's medicine and recognition of Korean body].

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ah

    2011-12-31

    Je Jung Won was the first modern-style Government hospital built by the Korean King Ko-Jong in April 1885, and it was the medical missionary Horace Newton Allen(1858~1932) who made one of the greatest contributions to the establishment of the hospital. Allen was an American missionary. He graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a degree in theology in 1881, and completed one-yearcourse at Miami Medical College. In Korea and America he worked as a physician, a missionary, an American diplomatic minister to Korea and a Korean minister's secretary to America. While acting as a mediator between Korea and America, he knew and recorded the domestic and foreign situation of Korea during Gaehwagi(the civilized and enlightened age). Thus to study him is to understand Korea's Gaehwagi as well as to research American medical missionaries. During his stay in Korea(1884~1905), Allen steadily wrote diaries and letters about Korean politics, diplomacy, society, culture, and medicine. Thus his public/private record through diaries and letters(the quantity of these materials amounts to several thousands) supplements the Korean early modern era's historical record. However, until now these materials have received little scholarly attention from researchers except for a few historians of missionary work between Korea and America, or of Korean modern medicine. I intended to use these materials to suggest a new perspective on the study of Korean Gaehwagi. Allen, along with John W. Heron, who came to Seoul on June 21st 1885, treated about 10,460 Korean patients in the first year of the opening of JeJungWon. They made "the first annual report of the Korean Government Hospital". This report explained how Allen and Heron regarded and treated Korean patients. Allen's diaries, letters and other writings offer a realistic view of how the western people actually recognized the Korean people at that time. As a western doctor, Allen had an ambivalent attitude toward Korean medical concepts

  18. [A study on Horace N. Allen's medicine and recognition of Korean body].

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ah

    2011-12-31

    Je Jung Won was the first modern-style Government hospital built by the Korean King Ko-Jong in April 1885, and it was the medical missionary Horace Newton Allen(1858~1932) who made one of the greatest contributions to the establishment of the hospital. Allen was an American missionary. He graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a degree in theology in 1881, and completed one-yearcourse at Miami Medical College. In Korea and America he worked as a physician, a missionary, an American diplomatic minister to Korea and a Korean minister's secretary to America. While acting as a mediator between Korea and America, he knew and recorded the domestic and foreign situation of Korea during Gaehwagi(the civilized and enlightened age). Thus to study him is to understand Korea's Gaehwagi as well as to research American medical missionaries. During his stay in Korea(1884~1905), Allen steadily wrote diaries and letters about Korean politics, diplomacy, society, culture, and medicine. Thus his public/private record through diaries and letters(the quantity of these materials amounts to several thousands) supplements the Korean early modern era's historical record. However, until now these materials have received little scholarly attention from researchers except for a few historians of missionary work between Korea and America, or of Korean modern medicine. I intended to use these materials to suggest a new perspective on the study of Korean Gaehwagi. Allen, along with John W. Heron, who came to Seoul on June 21st 1885, treated about 10,460 Korean patients in the first year of the opening of JeJungWon. They made "the first annual report of the Korean Government Hospital". This report explained how Allen and Heron regarded and treated Korean patients. Allen's diaries, letters and other writings offer a realistic view of how the western people actually recognized the Korean people at that time. As a western doctor, Allen had an ambivalent attitude toward Korean medical concepts

  19. April 2008 monitoring report for Morrill, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-04

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). This report provides results for the most recent monitoring event, in April 2008. Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), groundwater was initially sampled twice yearly for a recommended period of two years (in fall 2005, in spring and fall 2006, and in spring and fall 2007). The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. During the recommended two-year period, the originally approved scope of the monitoring was expanded to include vegetation sampling (initiated in October 2006) and surface water and stream bed sediment sampling (initiated in March 2007, after a visual reconnaissance along Terrapin Creek [Argonne 2007a]). The analytical results for groundwater sampling events at Morrill in September 2005, March 2006, September 2006, March 2007, and October 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007b, 2008). Those results consistently demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (5.0 {micro}g/L) for this compound, in a groundwater plume extending generally south-southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, toward Terrapin Creek at the south edge of the town. The results of those five monitoring

  20. Annual report of monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-06-27

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha. The population of Morrill as of the 2000 census was approximately 277. All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. Starting in 1922, eight different public wells formerly served the Morrill municipal system at some time. Because of poor water quality, including high nitrate levels attributed to numerous animal feeding operations in the vicinity and application of fertilizer on agricultural lands, use of the local groundwater from any public well for municipal supply purposes was terminated in 1991 in favor of obtaining water from the Sabetha municipal water system. Investigations of the carbon tetrachloride and nitrate contamination by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in 1989, 1994, and 1996 (KDHE 1989; GeoCore 1994a-e, 1996) identified a localized plume of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater extending downgradient from a grain storage facility located in the northwestern section of Morrill. The facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), from 1950 to 1971. Since termination of the CCC/USDA grain storage operations in 1971, the property and existing grain bins have been used for private grain storage up to the present time. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants were commonly used by the CCC/USDA, as well as private and commercial grain storage operations, to preserve grain. Because the identified carbon tetrachloride contamination could in part be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride