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Sample records for allen county kansas

  1. Karst development in central Butler County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, B.A.

    1993-02-01

    Research was conducted to study the geology and hydrology of sinkholes, springs, and caves formed in Lower Permian, Fort Riley Limestone, located in central Butler County, Kansas. The goal was to better understand the controlling factors of these karst features and the processes that produce them in a portion of Kansas that is undergoing rapid population growth and increased groundwater usage. Research was accomplished in seven phases: literature search, locating karst features, measuring bedrock fracture joint trends, surveying major caves, estimating discharge of springs, dye tracing, and water chemistry analysis. Recognizable karst landforms within the study area were plotted onto a base map to demonstrate their geographic, geologic, and hydrologic relationships. Karst features identified were 125 sinkholes, a major cave system composed of at least three enterable cave segments, and one large spring. The karst terrain found within the study area is clearly a system of interrelated features and processes. Long-term solution of the bedrock allows karst features to form, joints and bedding planes to enlarge, and creates an efficient network of subsurface drainage. Factors that control karst development in the study area are lithology, thickness, and dip of the bedrock; presence of well defined joints and bedding planes; relatively level topography; nearby entrenched river valleys; lack of thick surficial cover; and climate. Of these influences, solutional activity at joints plays a major role in the formation of sinkholes and cave passages; however, a complex combination of all the controlling factors is responsible for the present, unique, and dynamic karst system.

  2. The Brenham, Kiowa County, Kansas meteorite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, H.

    Having seen a meteorite as a schoolgirl in Iowa, Eliza Kimberly was convinced that the heavy black stones found scattered over her homestead in Kiowa County, Kansas were meteorites. She tirelessly collected more than 2000 pounds of them, and resolutely correspondet with nearby scientists over a five year period in an unsuccessful attempt to arouse their interest. When the meteorite nature of her stones was finally confirmed in 1890, scientists flocked to Kimberley's "Meteorite Farm" to purchase specimens. Eliza proved to be a clever businesswoman, and put the money earned from meteorite sales to good practical use. In the mid 1920s, Harvey Nininger made several visits to the "Meteorite Farm". He used the specimens he purchased there to help launch his career as the first full-time, self-employed meteoriticist, and carried out the first excavation of the Haviland crater.

  3. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-04-01

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  4. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse

    SciTech Connect

    D. Egan

    2010-04-14

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  5. Quality of Streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.

    2008-01-01

    Water quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas was evaluated from October 2002 through December 2007 in a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program. Water quality at 42 stream sites, representing urban and rural basins, was characterized by evaluating benthic macroinvertebrates, water (discrete and continuous data), and/or streambed sediment. Point and nonpoint sources and transport were described for water-quality constituents including suspended sediment, dissolved solids and major ions, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), indicator bacteria, pesticides, and organic wastewater and pharmaceutical compounds. The information obtained from this study is being used by city and county officials to develop effective management plans for protecting and improving stream quality. This fact sheet summarizes important results from three comprehensive reports published as part of the study and available on the World Wide Web at http://ks.water.usgs.gov/Kansas/studies/qw/joco/ .

  6. 78 FR 20888 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 161-Sedgwick County, Kansas; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 161--Sedgwick County, Kansas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Siemens Energy, Inc., (Wind Turbine Nacelles and Hubs), Hutchinson, Kansas Siemens Energy, Inc. (SEI), an operator of FTZ...

  7. 78 FR 41911 - Foreign-Trade Zone 161-Sedgwick County, Kansas; Authorization of Production Activity; Siemens...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 161--Sedgwick County, Kansas; Authorization of Production Activity; Siemens Energy, Inc. (Wind Turbine Nacelles and Hubs); Hutchinson, Kansas On March 7,...

  8. Description of water-resource-related data compiled for Reno County, south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.V.

    1993-01-01

    Water-resource-related data for sites in Reno County, Kansas were compiled in cooperation with the Reno County Health Department as part of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment's Local Environmental Protection Program (LEPP). These data were entered into a relational data-base management system (RDBMS) to facilitate the spatial analysis required to meet the LEPP goals of developing plans for nonpoint-source management and for public- water-supply protection. The data in the RDBMS are organized into digital data sets. The data sets contain the water-resource-related data compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey for 958 wells; by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment for 3,936 wells; by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment for 51 wells, 18 public-water-supply distribution systems, and 7 streams; by the Kansas State Board of Agriculture for 643 wells and 23 streams or surface-water impoundments; and by well-drilling contractors and the Kansas Geological Survey for 96 wells. The data in these five data sets are available from the Reno County Health Department in Hutchinson, Kansas. (USGS)

  9. Hydrology of the Ogallala aquifer in Ford County, southwestern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spinazola, J.M.; Dealy, M.T.

    1983-01-01

    The rapid increase of ground-water withdrawal has caused concern over the future use of the Ogallala aquifer, the principal source of water in Ford County, in southwestern Kansas. Saturated portions of deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age--excluding the Arkansas River alluvium--form the Ogallala aquifer. Saturated thickness of the Ogallala ranged from 0 to about 350 feet on the downthrown side of the Crooked Creek-Fowler fault and from 0 to about 120 feet on the upthrown side. Ground-water withdrawal was calculated by two methods. The time-discharge method computed withdrawal of about 81,000 acre-feet during 1980 and about 58,000 acre-feet during 1981. The irrigation-requirement method computed withdrawal of about 121,000 acre-feet during 1980 and about 131,000 acre-feet during 1981. Results from the irrigation-requirement method are probably closer to the actual amount of ground-water withdrawal because of problems encountered when applying the time-dischargemethod. Water-level declines between 1939 and 1981 ranged from about 10 to 50 feet. Water withdrawal from the Ogallala aquifer depleted the volume of water in storage by about 688,000 acre-feet (8 percent) during this same period. If withdrawals continue to the point where the water table drops below the top of the bedrock surface on the upthrown side of the Crooked Creek-Fowler fault, base flow in the Arkansas River could cease. (USGS)

  10. Description of water-resource-related data compiled for Harvey County, south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.V.

    1993-01-01

    Site, construction, geologic, water-level, water- quality, water-withdrawal, and well-survey data for sites in Harvey County were compiled in cooper- ation with the Harvey County Health Department as part of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment's Local Environmental Protection Program (LEPP). These data were entered into a relational data-base management system (RDBMS) to facilitate the analysis required to meet the LEPP goals of developing plans for nonpoint-source management and for public-water-supply protection. The data in the RDBMS are organized into digital data sets. The data sets contain the water- resource-related data compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey for 668 wells; by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment for 1,636 wells, 6 public-water-supply systems, 6 streams, and 2 surface-water impoundments; by the Kansas State Board of Agriculture for 423 wells and 26 streams or impoundments; by well-drilling con- tractors and the Kansas Geological Survey for 126 wells; and by Harvey County for 89 wells. In addition, data on 761 wells and 133 sites without wells resulting from a survey of rural landowners and residents by Harvey County as a part of the LEPP are contained in another data set. The data in these 7 data sets are available from the Harvey County Health Department in Newton, Kansas. (USGS)

  11. Quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002--10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Stone, Mandy S.; Poulton, Barry C.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Stream quality in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, was assessed on the basis of land use, hydrology, stream-water and streambed-sediment chemistry, riparian and in-stream habitat, and periphyton and macroinvertebrate community data collected from 22 sites during 2002 through 2010. Stream conditions at the end of the study period are evaluated and compared to previous years, stream biological communities and physical and chemical conditions are characterized, streams are described relative to Kansas Department of Health and Environment impairment categories and water-quality standards, and environmental factors that most strongly correlate with biological stream quality are evaluated. The information is useful for improving water-quality management programs, documenting changing conditions with time, and evaluating compliance with water-quality standards, total maximum daily loads (TMDLs), National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit conditions, and other established guidelines and goals. Constituent concentrations in water during base flow varied across the study area and 2010 conditions were not markedly different from those measured in 2003, 2004, and 2007. Generally the highest specific conductance and concentrations of dissolved solids and major ions in water occurred at urban sites except the upstream Cedar Creek site, which is rural and has a large area of commercial and industrial land less than 1 mile upstream on both sides of the creek. The highest base-flow nutrient concentrations in water occurred downstream from wastewater treatment facilities. Water chemistry data represent base-flow conditions only, and do not show the variability in concentrations that occurs during stormwater runoff. Constituent concentrations in streambed sediment also varied across the study area and some notable changes occurred from previously collected data. High organic carbon and nutrient concentrations at the rural Big Bull Creek site in 2003 decreased

  12. "A Little Place Getting Smaller": Perceptions of Place and the Depopulation of Gove County, Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbreath, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Go west on Interstate 70, past Salina and Highway 81, the unofficial line of demarcation between eastern and western Kansas. Beyond Bob Dole's childhood home of Russell and the regional center of Hays you will come to Gove County. Though the highway is littered with advertisements for Colby and Goodland, towns that lie farther west, nothing…

  13. Employer Manpower Needs and Job Entry Requirements for Paralegals within Johnson County, Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatham, Elaine L.

    In order to determine whether a paralegal program could be successfully implemented at Johnson County Community College, surveys were sent to 262 local attorneys (with a 24% response rate) and to 41 members of the Kansas City Association of Legal Assistants (71% response). Emphasis was placed on determining area employment needs and the…

  14. Productive and Reproductive Work on the Family Farm: Changes Among Ethnic Groups in Ellis County, Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flora, Cornelia Butler; Stitz, John

    This report is based on data obtained from historical documents, quantitative analysis of state agricultural censuses for 1885, 1895, and 1905, and interviews with farm women of Volga and German heritages, aged 14 to 87. The participation of women in wheat-based farming systems in Ellis County, Kansas, is examined as related to the ethnic…

  15. Change in surficial water area, Quivera National Wildlife Refuge, Stafford County, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarger, H. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. MSS-7 images acquired in August, October, and December 1972 revealed changes in both the number of water pools and surficial water area of larger pools in Quivera National Wildlife Refuge (Big and Little Salt Marsh), Stafford County, Kansas.

  16. Evaluation of effects of groundwater withdrawals at the proposed Allen combined-cycle combustion turbine plant, Shelby County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugh, Connor J.

    2016-08-10

    The Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study groundwater-flow model was used to simulate the potential effects of future groundwater withdrawals at the proposed Allen combined-cycle combustion turbine plant in Shelby County, Tennessee. The scenario used in the simulation consisted of a 30-year average withdrawal period followed by a 30-day maximum withdrawal period. Effects of withdrawals at the Allen plant site on the Mississippi embayment aquifer system were evaluated by comparing the difference in simulated water levels in the aquifers at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and at the end of the scenario to a base case without the Allen combined-cycle combustion turbine plant withdrawals. Simulated potentiometric surface declines in the Memphis aquifer at the Allen plant site were about 7 feet at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and 11 feet at the end of the scenario. The affected area of the Memphis aquifer at the Allen plant site as delineated by the 4-foot potentiometric surface-decline contour was 2,590 acres at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and 11,380 acres at the end of the scenario. Simulated declines in the underlying Fort Pillow aquifer and overlying shallow aquifer were both less than 1 foot at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and the end of the scenario.

  17. Water quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    Water quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas was evaluated from October 2002 through December 2007 in a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program. Water quality at 42 stream sites, representing urban and rural basins, was characterized by evaluating benthic macroinvertebrates, water (discrete and continuous data), and/or streambed sediment. Point and nonpoint sources and transport were described for water-quality constituents including suspended sediment, dissolved solids and major ions, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), indicator bacteria, pesticides, and organic wastewater and pharmaceutical compounds. The information obtained from this study is being used by city and county officials to develop effective management plans for protecting and improving stream quality. This fact sheet summarizes important results from three comprehensive reports published as part of the study and available on the World Wide Web at http://ks.water.usgs.gov/Kansas/studies/qw/joco/. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  18. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge on stream quality in Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Foster, Guy M.

    2014-01-01

    Contaminants from point and other urban sources affect stream quality in Indian Creek, which is one of the most urban drainage basins in Johnson County, Kansas. The Johnson County Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities discharge to Indian Creek. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, during June 2004 through June 2013 were used to evaluate stream quality in Indian Creek. This fact sheet summarizes the effects of wastewater effluent discharge on physical, chemical, and biological conditions in Indian Creek downstream from the Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities.

  19. Flood-inundation maps for Indian Creek and Tomahawk Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Arin J.; Studley, Seth E.

    2016-01-25

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.4-mile upper reach of Indian Creek from College Boulevard to the confluence with Tomahawk Creek, a 3.9-mile reach of Tomahawk Creek from 127th Street to the confluence with Indian Creek, and a 1.9-mile lower reach of Indian Creek from the confluence with Tomahawk Creek to just beyond the Kansas/Missouri border at State Line Road in Johnson County, Kansas, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Overland Park, Kansas. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgages on Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas. Near real time stages at these streamgages may be obtained on the Web from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at these sites.Flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated for each reach by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the streamgages. The hydraulic models were then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; 17 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and 14 water-surface profiles for Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas, for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the next interval above the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood level (500-year recurrence interval). The

  20. Stormwater Runoff: What it is and Why it is Important in Johnson County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Schmidt, Heather C.

    2009-01-01

    Stormwater runoff is a leading contributor to pollution in streams, rivers, and lakes in Johnson County, Kansas, and nationwide. Because stormwater runoff contains pollutants from many different sources, decreasing pollution from stormwater runoff is a challenging task. It requires cooperation from residents, businesses, and municipalities. An important step in protecting streams from stormwater pollution is understanding watershed processes, stormwater characteristics, and their combined effects on streams and water quality.

  1. Biological Conditions in Streams of Johnson County, Kansas, and Nearby Missouri, 2003 and 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, Barry C.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Lee, Casey J.

    2007-01-01

    Johnson County is one of the fastest growing and most populated counties in Kansas. Urban development affects streams by altering stream hydrology, geomorphology, water chemistry, and habitat, which then can lead to adverse effects on fish and macroinvertebrate communities. In addition, increasing sources of contaminants in urbanizing streams results in public-health concerns associated with exposure to and consumption of contaminated water. Biological assessments, or surveys of organisms living in aquatic environments, are crucial components of water-quality programs because they provide an indication of how well water bodies support aquatic life. This fact sheet describes current biological conditions of Johnson County streams and characterizes stream biology relative to urban development. Biological conditions were evaluated by collecting macroinvertebrate samples from 15 stream sites in Johnson County, Kansas, in 2003 and 2004 (fig. 1). Data from seven additional sites, collected as part of a separate study with similar objectives in Kansas and Missouri (Wilkison and others, 2005), were evaluated to provide a more comprehensive assessment of watersheds that cross State boundaries. Land-use and water- and streambed-sediment-quality data also were used to evaluate factors that may affect macroinvertebrate communities. Metrics are indices used to measure, or evaluate, macroinvertebrate response to various factors such as human disturbance. Multimetric scores, which integrated 10 different metrics that measure various aspects of macroinvertebrate communities, including organism diversity, composition, tolerance, and feeding characteristics, were used to evaluate and compare biological health of Johnson County streams. This information is useful to city and county officials for defining current biological conditions, evaluating conditions relative to State biological criteria, evaluating effects of urbanization, developing effective water-quality management plans

  2. Demonstration project number 39, hot mix recycling, Gray County, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maag, R. G.; Parcells, W. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this demonstration project was to evaluate the hot mix recycling process as a method of renovating a badly cracked and otherwise deteriorated section of road mixed bituminous paving in southwestern Kansas. The equipment used on the project included a cold milling machine to reclaim the upper portion of existing pavement; a drum dryer hot mix plant modified to process the material; and other standard hot mix laydown and compaction machines. Energy consumption comparisons in equivalent gallons of fuel indicate a savings of 17.8% when the recycled method is compared to using all new aggregate. The energy savings is primarily due to less asphaltic cement required and less fuel needed to mill and reuse the existing pavement than to quarry and haul in an equivalent quantity of new aggregate.

  3. Study of the utilization of EREP data from the Wabash River Basin. [Allen County and Lake Monroe in Indiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, L. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Analysis of the digitized SL/4 S190A color IR photography proved very difficult. An area within Allen County, including Ft. Wayne, was studied. Eight segments of the study area were clustered separately and the cluster maps were then compared with the photography and maps available. The training areas for the land use classes were selected from the cluster maps. The separability measures (transformed divergence) of the classes indicated that many of the land use classes were not spectrally separable. The classification results bore this out. Visually the resulting classification map was poor, with 67 percent correct data. These results were of significantly lower quality than those obtained for the summertime SL/2 data near Lake Monroe, Indiana. Low contrast between land use classes during the wintertime and the limited spectral range and resolution are the major causes for the poor performance.

  4. Hydrogeology and ground-water-quality conditions at the Emporia- Lyon County Landfill, eastern Kansas, 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, N.C.; Bigsby, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogeology and water-quality conditions at the Emporia-Lyon County Landfill, eastern Kansas, were investigated from April 1988 through April 1989. Potentiometric-surface maps indicated groundwater movement from the northeast and northwest towards the landfill and then south through the landfill to the Cottonwood River. The maps indicate that during periods of low groundwater levels, groundwater flows northward in the north-west part of the landfill, which may have been induced by water withdrawal from wells north of the landfill or by water ponded in waste lagoons south and west of the landfill. Chemical analysis of water samples from monitoring wells upgradient and downgradient of the landfill indicate calcium bicarbonate to be the dominant water type. No inorganic or organic chemical concentrations exceeded Kansas or Federal primary drinking-water standards. Kansas secondary drinking-water standards were equaled or exceeded, however, in water from some or all wells for total hardness, dissolved solids, iron, and manganese. Water from one upgradient well contained larger concentrations of dissolved oxygen and nitrate, and smaller concentrations of bicarbonate, alkalinity, ammonia, arsenic, iron, and manganese as compared to all other monitoring wells. Results of this investigation indicate that groundwater quality downgradient of well MW-2 has increased concentrations of some inorganic and organic compounds. Due to the industrial nature of the area and the changing directions of groundwater flow, it is not clear what the source of these compounds might be. Long-term monitoring, additional wells, and access to nearby waste lagoons and waste-lagoon monitoring wells would help define the sources of increased inorganic and organic compounds. (USGS)

  5. Hydrogeology and ground-water-quality conditions at the Geary County landfill, northeast Kansas, 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, N.C.; Bigsby, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical analysis of water from monitoring wells upgradient and downgradient of the Geary County Landfill in Kansas near Junction City indicate the presence of several chemically distinct water types. For the dominant calcium bicarbonate water type, concentrations of inorganic and organic constituents indicate the presence of reducing conditions within the landfill and increased concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, sulfate, chloride, ammonia, iron, manganese, and other trace elements downgradient within a leachate plume that extends northeasterly away from the landfill. The orientation of the long axis of the leachate plume does not coincide with the August or September directions of groundwater flow, possibly due to the effect of abundant rainfall and high river stages at other times of the year or preferential flow in very transmissive zones, and thus may indicate the dominant direction of groundwater flow. None of the organic-constituent or inorganic-constituent concentrations exceeded secondary drinking-water standards. Concentrations of benzene, vinyl chloride, and 1,2-trans-dichloroethene exceeded Kansas notification levels. (USGS)

  6. Discrimination of winter wheat on irrigated land in southern Finney County, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morain, S. A. (Principal Investigator); Williams, D. L.; Barker, B.; Coiner, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Winter wheat in the large field irrigated landscape of southern Finney County, Kansas was successfully discriminated by use of 4 ERTS-1 images. These images were acquired 16 August 1972, 21 September 1972, and 2 December 1972. MSS-5 images from each date and the MSS-7 image from 2 December 1972 were used. Human interpretation of the four images resulted in a classification scheme which produced 98% correct estimation of the number of wheat fields in the training sample and 100% correct estimation in the test sample. Overall correct separation of wheat from non-wheat fields was 93% and 86%, respectively. Offsetting errors resulted in the estimation accuracy for wheat.

  7. Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

    2007-03-31

    The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier

  8. Kinematics, mechanics, and potential earthquake hazards for faults in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ohlmacher, G.C.; Berendsen, P.

    2005-01-01

    Many stable continental regions have subregions with poorly defined earthquake hazards. Analysis of minor structures (folds and faults) in these subregions can improve our understanding of the tectonics and earthquake hazards. Detailed structural mapping in Pottawatomie County has revealed a suite consisting of two uplifted blocks aligned along a northeast trend and surrounded by faults. The first uplift is located southwest of the second. The northwest and southeast sides of these uplifts are bounded by northeast-trending right-lateral faults. To the east, both uplifts are bounded by north-trending reverse faults, and the first uplift is bounded by a north-trending high-angle fault to the west. The structural suite occurs above a basement fault that is part of a series of north-northeast-trending faults that delineate the Humboldt Fault Zone of eastern Kansas, an integral part of the Midcontinent Rift System. The favored kinematic model is a contractional stepover (push-up) between echelon strike-slip faults. Mechanical modeling using the boundary element method supports the interpretation of the uplifts as contractional stepovers and indicates that an approximately east-northeast maximum compressive stress trajectory is responsible for the formation of the structural suite. This stress trajectory suggests potential activity during the Laramide Orogeny, which agrees with the age of kimberlite emplacement in adjacent Riley County. The current stress field in Kansas has a N85??W maximum compressive stress trajectory that could potentially produce earthquakes along the basement faults. Several epicenters of seismic events (

  9. JPL field measurements at the Finney County, Kansas, test site, October 1976: Meteorological variables, surface reflectivity, surface and subsurface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Schieldge, J.; Paley, H. N.

    1977-01-01

    Data collected at the Finney County, Kansas test site as part of the Joint Soil Moisture Experiment (JSME) are presented here, prior to analysis, to provide all JSME investigators with an immediate source of primary information. The ground-truth measurements were taken to verify and complement soil moisture data taken by microwave and infrared sensors during aircraft overflights. Measurements were made of meteorological variables (air speed, temperature, relative humidity, and rainfall), surface reflectivity, and temperatures at and below the surface.

  10. Determination of irrigation pumpage in parts of Kearny and Finney Counties, southwestern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Irrigation pumpage was determined for parts of Kearny and Finney Counties in Southwestern Kansas using crop-acreage data and consumptive, irrigation-water requirements. Irrigated acreages for 1974-80 were compiled for wheat, grain sorghum, corn, and alfalfa using records from the U.S. Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service. Consumptive-irrigation requirements were computed using a soil-moisture model. The model tabulated monthly soil-moisture and crop-water demand for various crops and computed the volume of irrigation water needed to maintain the available moisture at 50% for loamy soils or at 60% for sandy soils. Irrigated acres in the study area increased from 265,000 acres during 1974 to 321,000 acres during 1980. Irrigation pumpage increased from 584,000 acre-feet during 1974 to 738,000 acre-feet during 1980. Decreased consumptive-irrigation requirements during 1979 resulted in a comparatively small irrigation-pumpage estimate of 458,000 acre-feet. (USGS)

  11. Quality of Streams in Johnson County, Kansas, and Relations to Environmental Variables, 2003-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Poulton, Barry C.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    The quality of streams and relations to environmental variables in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, were evaluated using water, streambed sediment, land use, streamflow, habitat, algal periphyton (benthic algae), and benthic macroinvertebrate data. Water, streambed sediment, and macroinvertebrate samples were collected in March 2007 during base flow at 20 stream sites that represent 11 different watersheds in the county. In addition, algal periphyton samples were collected twice (spring and summer 2007) at one-half of the sites. Environmental data including water and streambed-sediment chemistry data (primarily nutrients, fecal-indicator bacteria, and organic wastewater compounds), land use, streamflow, and habitat data were used in statistical analyses to evaluate relations between biological conditions and variables that may affect them. This report includes an evaluation of water and streambed-sediment chemistry, assessment of habitat conditions, comparison of biological community attributes (such as composition, diversity, and abundance) among sampling sites, placement of sampling sites into impairment categories, evaluation of biological data relative to environmental variables, and evaluation of changes in biological communities and effects of urbanization. This evaluation is useful for understanding factors that affect stream quality, for improving water-quality management programs, and for documenting changing conditions over time. The information will become increasingly important for protecting streams in the future as urbanization continues. Results of this study indicate that the biological quality at nearly all biological sampling sites in Johnson County has some level of impairment. Periphyton taxa generally were indicative of somewhat degraded conditions with small to moderate amounts of organic enrichment. Camp Branch in the Blue River watershed was the only site that met State criteria for full support of aquatic life in 2007. Since 2003

  12. Hydrologic and related data for water-supply planning in an intensive-study area, northeastern Wichita County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kume, Jack; Dunlap, L.E.; Gutentag, E.D.; Thomas, J.G.

    1979-01-01

    Data are presented that result from an intensive geohydrologic study for water-supply planning in a 12-square-mile area in northeastern Wichita County, Kansas. These data include records of wells, test drilling, chemical analyses, ground-water levels, rainfall, soil moisture, well yield, solar radiation, crop yield , and crop acreage. Data indicate that water levels in the unconsolidated aquifer are declining at an average annual rate of about 1 to 2 feet per year (1950-78). This decline is the aquifer 's response to pumping by irrigation wells for watering corn, wheat, grain sorghum, and other crops. (Kosco-USGS)

  13. Enhanced carbonate reservoir model for an old reservoir utilizing new techniques: The Schaben Field (Mississippian), Ness County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.P.; Guy, W.J.; Franseen, E.K.; Bhattacharya, S.

    1996-12-31

    The Pennsylvanian-Mississippian unconformity is a major stratigraphic event in Kansas that truncates rocks ranging from Precambrian to Mississippian. Many of the 6,000 fields in Kansas are located immediately beneath this unconformity. One example, Schaben Field located in Ness County, Kansas, has produced approximately 9 million barrels since it was discovered in 1963. Production is from the Mississippian (Osagian) cherty dolomites beneath the inconformity. The field was initially developed on a regular forty-acre spacing, but recent drilling has demonstrated the potential for additional targeted infill drilling. To develop an enhanced reservoir model for the Schabin field modern core, log, and well data were integrated with the existing data. New techniques such as {open_quotes}Pseudoseismic{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}Super{close_quotes} Pickett plot were used to leverage the existing data and provide tools for analysis and 3D visualization. The pseudoseismic approach uses well-logs within a standard 3D seismic visualization system to provide a detailed macroscale view of karst patterns. The petrophysical analyses using the {open_quotes}Super{close_quotes} Pickett plot were used to recognize subtle trends and patterns for each of multiple reservoir intervals. Visual and petrographic examination of core from the field confirms karst development and indicates multiple stages of fracturing, brecciation, and dissolution features that were important in controlling and modifying development of reservoirs. The understanding of the reservoir heterogeneities resulting from the paleokarst model at Schaben field emphasizes the importance of integrating available data with new techniques to provide a predictive tool for discovery of additional pay within existing subunconformity fields in Kansas.

  14. Enhanced carbonate reservoir model for an old reservoir utilizing new techniques: The Schaben Field (Mississippian), Ness County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.P.; Guy, W.J.; Franseen, E.K.; Bhattacharya, S. )

    1996-01-01

    The Pennsylvanian-Mississippian unconformity is a major stratigraphic event in Kansas that truncates rocks ranging from Precambrian to Mississippian. Many of the 6,000 fields in Kansas are located immediately beneath this unconformity. One example, Schaben Field located in Ness County, Kansas, has produced approximately 9 million barrels since it was discovered in 1963. Production is from the Mississippian (Osagian) cherty dolomites beneath the inconformity. The field was initially developed on a regular forty-acre spacing, but recent drilling has demonstrated the potential for additional targeted infill drilling. To develop an enhanced reservoir model for the Schabin field modern core, log, and well data were integrated with the existing data. New techniques such as [open quotes]Pseudoseismic[close quotes] and the [open quotes]Super[close quotes] Pickett plot were used to leverage the existing data and provide tools for analysis and 3D visualization. The pseudoseismic approach uses well-logs within a standard 3D seismic visualization system to provide a detailed macroscale view of karst patterns. The petrophysical analyses using the [open quotes]Super[close quotes] Pickett plot were used to recognize subtle trends and patterns for each of multiple reservoir intervals. Visual and petrographic examination of core from the field confirms karst development and indicates multiple stages of fracturing, brecciation, and dissolution features that were important in controlling and modifying development of reservoirs. The understanding of the reservoir heterogeneities resulting from the paleokarst model at Schaben field emphasizes the importance of integrating available data with new techniques to provide a predictive tool for discovery of additional pay within existing subunconformity fields in Kansas.

  15. Hydrogeology and ground-water-quality conditions at the Linn County landfill, eastern Kansas, 1988-89

    SciTech Connect

    Falwell, R.; Bigsby, P.R.; Myers, N.C. )

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the hydrogeology and groundwater quality conditions near the Linn County Landfill, eastern Kansas was conducted from July 1988 through June 1989. The landfill is located in an unreclaimed coal strip-mine area near Prescott. Analysis of water levels from nine temporary wells and from strip-mine ponds indicated that groundwater flows southwest through the present landfill. A county road west of the landfill acts as a barrier to shallow westerly groundwater flow. Seasonal variations in the direction of groundwater flow may occur. Water samples from monitoring wells and a strip-mine pond were analyzed for inorganic and organic compounds. Iron, manganese, and dissolved-organic-carbon concentrations were good indicators of the presence of landfill leachate in the groundwater. Benzene, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1-dichloroethane, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane were also detected. None of the inorganic or organic compounds detected exceeded Kansas primary drinking-water standards. Chemical concentrations and water levels in some nested wells indicate there is a hydraulic connection between the strip-mine spoil material and the underlying limestone. Leachate-contaminated groundwater has the potential to migrate southwest corner of the landfill through either strip-mine spoil material or through the underlying Pawnee Limestone.

  16. Hispanics and Poverty in Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs, Topeka.

    Based on 1990 census figures, Hispanics have the lowest per capita income ($8,007) of all racial population groups in Kansas. Eighteen percent of Kansas Hispanics live in poverty, as do 24 percent of Hispanic children and 62 percent of Hispanic female-headed single-parent families. Hispanics in rural counties of southwestern Kansas have higher…

  17. Assessment of biological conditions at selected stream sites in Johnson County, Kansas, and Cass and Jackson Counties, Missouri, 2003 and 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, Barry C.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Lee, Casey J.

    2007-01-01

    Macroinvertebrate samples were collected at 15 stream sites representing 11 different watersheds in Johnson County, Kansas, in 2003 and 2004 to assess biological conditions in streams and relations to environmental variables. Published data from an additional seven stream sites, one in Johnson County, Kansas, and six others in adjacent Cass and Jackson Counties in Missouri also were evaluated. Multimetric scores, which integrated a combination of measures that describe various aspects of biological community abundance and diversity, were used to evaluate and compare the biological health of streams. In addition, for 15 of 16 Johnson County stream sites, environmental data (streamflow, precipitation, and land use) and water- and sediment-quality data (primarily nutrients, indicator bacteria, and organic wastewater compounds) were used in statistical analyses to evaluate relations between macroinvertebrate metrics and variables that may affect them. The information is useful for defining current conditions, evaluating conditions relative to State aquatic-life support and total maximum daily load requirements, evaluating effects of urbanization, developing effective water-quality management plans, and documenting changes in biological condition and water quality.Biological conditions in selected Johnson County streams generally reflected a gradient in the degree of human disturbances upstream from the sites, including percentage of urban and agricultural land use as well as the presence, absence, and proximity of wastewater treatment discharges. In this report, the term gradient is used to describe a continuum in the conditions (biological, environmental, or land use) observed at the study sites. Upstream Blue River sites, downstream from primarily agricultural land use, consistently scored among the sites least impacted by human disturbance, and in some metrics these sites scored higher than the State reference site (Captain Creek). The term impact, as used in this

  18. High-resolution seismic-reflection imaging 25 years of change in I-70 sinkhole, Russell County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Steeples, D.W.; Lambrecht, J.L.; Croxton, N.

    2006-01-01

    Time-lapse seismic reflection imaging improved our understanding of the consistent, gradual surface subsidence ongoing at two sinkholes in the Gorham Oilfield discovered beneath a stretch of Interstate Highway 70 through Russell and Ellis Counties in Kansas in 1966. With subsidence occurring at a rate of around 10 cm per year since discovery, monitoring has been beneficial to ensure public safety and optimize maintenance. A miniSOSIE reflection survey conducted in 1980 delineated the affected subsurface and successfully predicted development of a third sinkhole at this site. In 2004 and 2005 a high-resolution vibroseis survey was completed to ascertain current conditions of the subsurface, rate and pattern of growth since 1980, and potential for continued growth. With time and improved understanding of the salt dissolution affected subsurface in this area it appears that these features represent little risk to the public from catastrophic failure. However, from an operational perspective the Kansas Department of Transportation should expect continued subsidence, with future increases in surface area likely at a slightly reduced vertical rate. Seismic characteristics appear empirically consistent with gradual earth material compaction/settling. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  19. Natural ground-water-recharge data from three selected sites in Harvey County, south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    The cities of Wichita, Newton, and several smaller towns pump large quantities of water from the ' Equus Beds ' aquifer in south-central Kansas. The aquifer also supplies large quantities of water for irrigation at a steadily increasing rate. The Harvey County Planning and Zoning Commission entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey to collect information on natural recharge at three sites having different soils and unsaturated lithologies. Data summarized in tabular form include daily rainfall amounts, average soil moisture for selected layers, water-table levels, and neutron-measured soil moisture at 1-foot intervals. This information can be used in studying the possibility of protecting the aquifer from any development that might impede natural recharge. (USGS)

  20. Participatory Evaluation of a Community Mobilization Effort to Enroll Wyandotte County, Kansas, Residents Through the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Sepers, Charles E.; McKain, Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Successful implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) depends on the capacity of local communities to mobilize for action. Yet the literature offers few systematic investigations of what communities are doing to ensure support for enrollment. In this empirical case study, we report implementation and outcomes of Enroll Wyandotte, a community mobilization effort to facilitate enrollment through the ACA in Wyandotte County, Kansas. We describe mobilization activities during the first round of open enrollment in coverage under the ACA (October 1, 2013–March 31, 2014), including the unfolding of community and organizational changes (e.g., new enrollment sites) and services provided to assist enrollment over time. The findings show an association between implementation measures and newly created accounts under the ACA (the primary outcome). PMID:25905820

  1. Assessment of water resources in lead-zinc mined areas in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruill, T.B.

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate water-resource problems related to abandoned lead and zinc mines in Cherokee County, and adjacent areas in Oklahoma and Missouri. Discontinuities and perforations, which were produced by mining in the confining shale west of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact, have created artificial groundwater recharge and discharge areas. Abandoned wells and drill holes present the greatest contamination hazard to water supplies in the deep aquifer. There is a potential for downward movement from the shallow to the deep aquifer throughout the study area, with greatest potential in Ottawa County, Oklahoma. Principal effects of abandoned mines on groundwater quality are lowered pH and increased concentrations of sulfate and trace metals of water in the mines. No conclusive evidence of lateral migration of contaminated mine water from the mines into the water-supply wells adjacent to the mines was found. Analyses of water from the deep aquifer did not indicate trace-metal contamination. The effects of abandoned mines on streamwater quality are most severe in Short Creek and Tar Creek. Increased concentrations of zinc and manganese were observed in the Spring River below Short Creek Kansas. (USGS)

  2. IMPROVED APPROACHES TO DESIGN OF POLYMER GEL TREATMENTS IN MATURE OIL FIELDS: FIELD DEMONSTRATION IN DICKMAN FIELD, NESS COUNTY, KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Fowler

    2004-11-30

    This report describes the results of the one-year project entitled ''Improved Approaches to Design of Polymer Gel Treatments in Mature Oil Fields: Field Demonstration in Dickman Field, Ness County, Kansas''. The project was a 12-month collaboration of Grand Mesa Operating Company (a small independent), TIORCO Inc. (a company focused on improved recovery technology) and the University of Kansas. The study undertook tasks to determine an optimum polymer gel treatment design in Mississippian reservoirs, demonstrate application, and evaluate the success of the program. The project investigated geologic and engineering parameters and cost-effective technologies required for design and implementation of effective polymer gel treatment programs in the Mississippian reservoir in the Midcontinent. The majority of Mississippian production in Kansas occurs at or near the top of the Mississippian section just below the regional sub-Pennsylvanian unconformity and karst surface. Dickman Field with the extremely high water cuts and low recovery factors is typical of Mississippian reservoirs. Producibility problems in these reservoirs include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, and most significantly extremely high water cuts and low recovery factors that place continued operations at or near their economic limits. Geologic, geophysical and engineering data were integrated to provide a technical foundation for candidate selection and treatment design. Data includes core, engineering data, and 3D seismic data. Based on technical and economic considerations a well was selected for gel-polymer treatment (Grand Mesa Operating Company Tilley No.2). The treatment was not successful due to the small amount of polymer that could be injected. Data from the initial well and other candidates in the demonstration area was analyzed using geologic, geophysical and engineering data. Based on the results of the treatment and the integrated reservoir

  3. Model documentation for relations between continuous real-time and discrete water-quality constituents in Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, June 2004 through May 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Mandy L.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Johnson County is the fastest growing county in Kansas, with a population of about 560,000 people in 2012. Urban growth and development can have substantial effects on water quality, and streams in Johnson County are affected by nonpoint-source pollutants from stormwater runoff and point-source discharges such as municipal wastewater effluent. Understanding of current (2014) water-quality conditions and the effects of urbanization is critical for the protection and remediation of aquatic resources in Johnson County, Kansas and downstream reaches located elsewhere. The Indian Creek Basin is 194 square kilometers and includes parts of Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri. Approximately 86 percent of the Indian Creek Basin is located in Johnson County, Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, operated a series of six continuous real-time water-quality monitoring stations in the Indian Creek Basin during June 2011 through May 2013; one of these sites has been operating since February 2004. Five monitoring sites were located on Indian Creek and one site was located on Tomahawk Creek. The purpose of this report is to document regression models that establish relations between continuously measured water-quality properties and discretely collected water-quality constituents. Continuously measured water-quality properties include streamflow, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and nitrate. Discrete water-quality samples were collected during June 2011 through May 2013 at five new sites and June 2004 through May 2013 at a long-term site and analyzed for sediment, nutrients, bacteria, and other water-quality constituents. Regression models were developed to establish relations between discretely sampled constituent concentrations and continuously measured physical properties to estimate concentrations of those constituents of interest that are not easily measured in real time

  4. Demonstration project number 39, hot mix recycling, Gray County, Kansas. Final report Jun 78-Nov 82

    SciTech Connect

    Maag, R.G.; Parcells, W.H. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this demonstration project was to evaluate the hot-mix recycling process as a method of renovating a badly cracked and otherwise deteriorated section of road-mixed bituminous paving in southwestern Kansas. The equipment used on the project included a cold milling machine to reclaim the upper portion of existing pavement; a drum dryer hot-mix plant modified to process the material; and other standard hot-mix laydown and compaction machines. Energy consumption comparisons in equivalent gallons of fuel indicate a savings of 17.8% when the recycled method is compared to using all new aggregate. The energy saving is primarily due to less asphaltic cement required and less fuel needed to mill and reuse the existing pavement than to quarry and haul in an equivalent quantity of new aggregate.

  5. Spiculitic chert reservoir rocks: Glick Field, Kiowa and Comanche Counties, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.P.; Longman, M.W.

    1995-09-01

    Glick field, discovered in 1957, has produced more than 362 BCF of gas from Mississippian Osage chert commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Chat{close_quotes}. Other {open_quotes}Chat{close_quotes} reservoirs in Kansas and Oklahoma produce mainly from mixed chert and dolomite beneath the pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity, but Glick field`s reservoir is dominated by spiculitic chert. Glick field is a stratigraphic trap with production ending where the spiculitic facies pinches out into tight limestone to the south and west. Updip, to the northeast, the productive spiculitic facies is truncated by the unconformity. Reworked chert conglomerates overlying the spiculitic reservoir at the unconformity also produce minor amounts of gas. The spiculitic chert forming the reservoir was deposited below wavebase and grades laterally into echinoderm and brachiopod-rich skeletal wackstones and lime mudstones. Even where completely silicified, these associated limestones are tight. They form the lateral seal in the field. Thus, the reservoir is an in situ oval-shaped complex of internally brecciated sponge mats and bioherms capped in part by chert conglomerate. The spiculitic chert contains up to 50% porosity in molds after sponge spicules, matrix micropores, and vugs coupled with fracture and breccia porosity. Distribution of the sponge bioherms which form the reservoir facies was partly controlled by a subtle change on the shallow Mississippian carbonate shelf from clean skeletal limestones southward into shaly (and probable more anoxic) carbonates known locally as the {open_quotes}Cowley Facies.{close_quotes} This lithologic boundary can be mapped across southern Kansas and provides a potential exploration tool that may help in finding other stratigraphically trapped spiculitic reservoirs in the area.

  6. Geohydrology and model analysis of stream-aquifer system along the Arkansas River in Kearny and Finney Counties, southwestern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunlap, L.E.; Lindgren, Richard J.; Sauer, C.G.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made, in cooperation with the Division of Water Resources, Kansas State Board of Agriculture, to determine geohydrologic conditions in an area comprising nearly 850,000 acres along the Arkansas River valley in Kearny and Finney Counties, southwestern Kansas. The Arkansas River meanders atop and interacts hydraulically with the area's multilayered, unconsolidated aquifer system. Declines in static water levels in wells in the heavily pumped lower aquifer ranged from 20 to 80 feet during 1974-80. The river is dry in much of the area. A digital computer model was calibrated to simulate the trends of historic water levels. Simulated 1974-80 conditions depicted an average annual recharge to the unconsolidated aquifer system of 66,900 acre-feet from precipitation and 36,200 acre-feet from river and canal seepage and boundary inflow. Simulated average annual discharge consisted of 634,800 acre-feet from pumpage and boundary outflow. Simulated average annual recharge to the unconsolidated aquifer system was 531,700 acre-feet less than average annual discharge, indicating the ground-water resource is currently (1982) being mined in the study area. Simulation also indicated that there would be sufficient saturated thickness in 2005 for irrigation if 1980 hydrologic conditions continued. Seepage losses from the Arkansas River and irrigation canals are a major source of recharge to the unconsolidated aquifer system. Therefore, the amount of flow in the Arkansas River would be important in determining the rate of future water-level declines in the study area. Streamflow seepage losses could be decreased by (1) decreasing the number of wells pumping in the study area in order to reduce downward leakage from the valley aquifer, or (2) increasing streamflow discharge in order to recharge the valley aquifer. The rate and direction of flow between the river and the valley aquifer depend on the hydraulic conductivity of the streambed and the hydraulic gradient between the

  7. Assessment of water resources in lead-zinc mined areas in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruill, Timothy B.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate water-resources problems related to abandoned lead and zinc mines in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas in Missouri and Oklahoma. Past mining activities have caused changes in the hydrogeology of the area. Lead and zinc mining has caused discontinuities and perforations in the confining shale west of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact (referred to as the western area), which have created artificial ground-water recharge and discharge areas. Recharge to the shallow aquifer (rocks of Mississippian age) through collapses, shafts, and drill holes in the shale has caused the formation of a ground-water 'mound' in the vicinity of the Picher Field in Kansas and Oklahoma. Discharge of mine-contaminated ground water to Tar Creek occurs in Oklahoma from drill holes and shafts where the potentiometric surface of the shallow aquifer is above the land surface. Mining of ore in the shallow aquifer has resulted in extensive fracturing and removal of material, which has created highly transmissive zones and voids and increased ground-water storage properties of the aquifer. In the area east of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact (referred to as the eastern area), fractured rock and tailings on the land surface increased the amount of water available for infiltration to the shallow aquifer; in the western area, tailings on the impermeable shale created artificial, perched aquifer systems that slowly drain to surface streams. Pumping of the deep aquifer (rocks of Cambrian and Ordovician age) by towns and industries, which developed as a result of the mining industry, has resulted in a potential for downward movement of water from the shallow aquifer. The potential is greatest in Ottawa County, Oklahoma. Because of the large volume of water that may be transported from the shallow to the deep aquifer, open drill holes or casings present the greatest contamination hazard to water supplies in the deep aquifer. Mining

  8. Spatiotemporal variability of inorganic nutrients during wastewater effluent dominated streamflow conditions in Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, 2012–15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Guy M.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Williams, Thomas J.; King, Lindsey R.

    2016-10-31

    Nutrients, particularly nitrogen and phosphorus, are a leading cause of water-quality impairment in Kansas and the Nation. Indian Creek is one of the most urban drainage basins in Johnson County, Kansas, and environmental and biological conditions are affected by contaminants from point and other urban sources. The Johnson County Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin (hereinafter Middle Basin) wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) is the largest point-source discharge on Indian Creek. A second facility, the Tomahawk Creek WWTF, discharges into Indian Creek approximately 11.6 kilometers downstream from the Middle Basin WWTF. To better characterize the spatiotemporal variability of nutrients in Indian Creek, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment and Johnson County Wastewater, collected high-resolution spatial and temporal (a large number of samples collected over the entire reach or at single locations over a long period of time) inorganic nutrient (nitrate plus nitrite and orthophosphorus) data using a combination of discrete samples and sensor-measured data during 2012 through 2015.Nutrient patterns observed in Indian Creek along the upstream-downstream gradient during wastewater effluent dominated streamflow conditions were largely affected by the WWTFs and by travel time of the parcels of water. Nitrate plus nitrite concentrations in the Middle Basin WWTF effluent and at downstream sites varied by as much as 6 milligrams per liter over a 24-hour period. The cyclical variability in the Middle Basin WWTF effluent generated a nitrate plus nitrite pulse that could be tracked for approximately 11.5 kilometers downstream in Indian Creek, until the effect was masked by the Tomahawk Creek WWTF effluent discharge. All longitudinal surveys showed the same general patterns along the upstream-downstream gradient, though streamflows, wastewater effluent contributions to streamflow, and nutrient concentrations spanned a wide

  9. Sedimentation and Occurrence and Trends of Selected Chemical Constituents in Bottom Sediment, Empire Lake, Cherokee County, Kansas, 1905-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2006-01-01

    For about 100 years (1850-1950), the Tri-State Mining District in parts of southeast Kansas, southwest Missouri, and northeast Oklahoma was one of the primary sources of lead and zinc ore in the world. The mining activity in the Tri-State District has resulted in substantial historical and ongoing input of cadmium, lead, and zinc to the environment including Empire Lake in Cherokee County, southeast Kansas. The environmental contamination caused by the decades of mining activity resulted in southeast Cherokee County being listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Priority List as a superfund hazardous waste site in 1983. To provide some of the information needed to support efforts to restore the ecological health of Empire Lake, a 2-year study was begun by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. A combination of sediment-thickness mapping and bottom-sediment coring was used to investigate sediment deposition and the occurrence of cadmium, lead, zinc, and other selected constituents in the bottom sediment of Empire Lake. The total estimated volume and mass of bottom sediment in Empire Lake were 44 million cubic feet and 2,400 million pounds, respectively. Most of the bottom sediment was located in the main body and the Shoal Creek arm of the reservoir. Minimal sedimentation was evident in the Spring River arm of the reservoir. The total mass of cadmium, lead, and zinc in the bottom sediment of Empire Lake was estimated to be 78,000 pounds, 650,000 pounds, and 12 million pounds, respectively. In the bottom sediment of Empire Lake, cadmium concentrations ranged from 7.3 to 76 mg/kg (milligrams per kilogram) with an overall median concentration of 29 mg/kg. Compared to an estimated background concentration of 0.4 mg/kg, the historical mining activity increased the median cadmium concentration by about 7,200 percent. Lead concentrations ranged from 100 to

  10. Photocopy of a photograph (original from Kansas City Spirit, Vol. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of a photograph (original from Kansas City Spirit, Vol. III, no. 5, April 1910) View to the west toward front arcade entrance - Scarritt Building & Arcade, Ninth Street & Grand Avenue, & 819 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Jackson County, MO

  11. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-term. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; McCune, D.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1998-04-15

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. Progress is described for the Stewart field on the following tasks: design/construct waterflood plant; design/construct injection system; design/construct battery consolidation and gathering system; waterflood operations and reservoir management; and technology transfer. Progress for the Savonburg Field includes: water plant development; profile modification treatments; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; reservoir development (polymer flooding); field operations; and technology transfer.

  12. Projected effects of ground-water withdrawals in the Arkansas River Valley, 1980-99, Hamilton and Kearny counties, southwestern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunlap, L.E.; Lindgren, Richard J.; Carr, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A study was made, in cooperation with the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, to determine the effects that additional ground-water development would have on streamflow and water levels on an area along the Arkansas River in Hamilton and Kearny Counties, southwestern Kansas. A computer model was used to simulate the changes in streamflow and water levels from 1980 through 1999. Six pumpage options were tested using variations in pumpage rate and number of wells pumping in the model area. If the full amount appropriated by water rights were pumped rather than actual 1979 conditions of pumpage, annual pumpage would be reduced 24 percent, but net annual river loss would be reduced only 1 percent. A pumpage increase of approximately 19 percent over 1979 pumpage conditions would cause an increase of net annual river loss from 5 to 9 percent. Increased pumpage, in the form of additional wells in the model area, would cause additional ground water to be removed from storage in the aquifer and an increase in net annual river loss. (USGS)

  13. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer, June, 1964 VIEW: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer, June, 1964 VIEW: EXTERIOR: WEST (CLARK STREET) AND SOUTH (JACKSON BLVD.) SIDES - U.S. Post Office, Customs House & Sub-Treasury, 218 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  14. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 24 June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 24 June 1964 GRAND STAIRWAY, FROM SECOND FLOOR HALL, SHOWING STAINED GLASS WINDOW IN WEST WALL ABOVE LANDING - Francis J. Dewes House, 503 West Wrightwood Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  15. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 STAINED GLASS WINDOW, WEST WINDOW IN SOUTH WALL, FROM BALCONY - Kehilath Anshe Ma'ariv Synagogue, 3301 South Indiana Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  16. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 24 May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 24 May 1964 (R. TO L.) MANHATTAN BLDG. (WEST FRONT AND SOUTH SIDES), OLD COLONY BLDG., FISHER BLDG., MONADNOCK BLOCK - Manhattan Building, 431 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  17. Effects of nonpoint and selected point contaminant sources on stream-water quality and relation to land use in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, October 2002 through June 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Casey J.; Mau, D.P.; Rasmussen, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    Water and sediment samples were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 12 watersheds in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, to determine the effects of nonpoint and selected point contaminant sources on stream-water quality and their relation to varying land use. The streams studied were located in urban areas of the county (Brush, Dykes Branch, Indian, Tomahawk, and Turkey Creeks), developing areas of the county (Blue River and Mill Creek), and in more rural areas of the county (Big Bull, Captain, Cedar, Kill, and Little Bull Creeks). Two base-flow synoptic surveys (73 total samples) were conducted in 11 watersheds, a minimum of three stormflow samples were collected in each of six watersheds, and 15 streambed-sediment sites were sampled in nine watersheds from October 2002 through June 2004. Discharge from seven wastewater treatment facilities (WWTFs) were sampled during base-flow synoptic surveys. Discharge from these facilities comprised greater than 50 percent of streamflow at the farthest downstream sampling site in six of the seven watersheds during base-flow conditions. Nutrients, organic wastewater-indicator compounds, and prescription and nonprescription pharmaceutical compounds generally were found in the largest concentrations during base-flow conditions at sites at, or immediately downstream from, point-source discharges from WWTFs. Downstream from WWTF discharges streamflow conditions were generally stable, whereas nutrient and wastewater-indicator compound concentrations decreased in samples from sites farther downstream. During base-flow conditions, sites upstream from WWTF discharges had significantly larger fecal coliform and Escherichia coli densities than downstream sites. Stormflow samples had the largest suspended-sediment concentrations and indicator bacteria densities. Other than in samples from sites in proximity to WWTF discharges, stormflow samples generally had the largest nutrient concentrations in Johnson County streams. Discharge

  18. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-term. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; McCune, D.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1997-01-15

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. Progress in the Stewart field project is described for the following tasks: design/construct waterflood plant; design/construct injection system; design/construct battery consolidation and gathering system; waterflood operations and reservoir management; and technology transfer. Progress in the Savonburg field project is described for the following tasks: profile modification treatments; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; reservoir development (polymer flooding); and technology transfer.

  19. KANSAS KIDS COUNT Data Book, 2000: Kansas Children at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    This KIDS COUNT Data Book provides state and county data on the well-being of Kansas' children. The statistical portrait is based on 22 indicators of well-being: (1) births to single teens; (2) children living in poverty; (3) children receiving free school meals; (4) children in families receiving economic assistance; (5) childhood deaths; (6)…

  20. Water-quality variability and constituent transport and processes in streams of Johnson County, Kansas, using continuous monitoring and regression models, 2003-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa; Gatotho, Jackline

    2014-01-01

    The population of Johnson County, Kansas increased by about 24 percent between 2000 and 2012, making it one of the most rapidly developing areas of Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program, began a comprehensive study of Johnson County streams in 2002 to evaluate and monitor changes in stream quality. The purpose of this report is to describe water-quality variability and constituent transport for streams representing the five largest watersheds in Johnson County, Kansas during 2003 through 2011. The watersheds ranged in urban development from 98.3 percent urban (Indian Creek) to 16.7 percent urban (Kill Creek). Water-quality conditions are quantified among the watersheds of similar size (50.1 square miles to 65.7 square miles) using continuous, in-stream measurements, and using regression models developed from continuous and discrete data. These data are used to quantify variability in concentrations and loads during changing streamflow and seasonal conditions, describe differences among sites, and assess water quality relative to water-quality standards and stream management goals. Water quality varied relative to streamflow conditions, urbanization in the upstream watershed, and contributions from wastewater treatment facilities and storm runoff. Generally, as percent impervious surface (a measure of urbanization) increased, streamflow yield increased. Water temperature of Indian Creek, the most urban site which is also downstream from wastewater facility discharges, was higher than the other sites about 50 percent of the time, particularly during winter months. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were less than the Kansas Department of Health and Environment minimum criterion of 5 milligrams per liter about 15 percent of the time at the Indian Creek site. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were less than the criterion about 10 percent of the time at the rural Blue River and Kill Creek sites, and less than

  1. Estimation of Constituent Concentrations, Loads, and Yields in Streams of Johnson County, Northeast Kansas, Using Continuous Water-Quality Monitoring and Regression Models, October 2002 through December 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Lee, Casey J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2008-01-01

    Johnson County is one of the most rapidly developing counties in Kansas. Population growth and expanding urban land use affect the quality of county streams, which are important for human and environmental health, water supply, recreation, and aesthetic value. This report describes estimates of streamflow and constituent concentrations, loads, and yields in relation to watershed characteristics in five Johnson County streams using continuous in-stream sensor measurements. Specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen were monitored in five watersheds from October 2002 through December 2006. These continuous data were used in conjunction with discrete water samples to develop regression models for continuously estimating concentrations of other constituents. Continuous regression-based concentrations were estimated for suspended sediment, total suspended solids, dissolved solids and selected major ions, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus species), and fecal-indicator bacteria. Continuous daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual loads were calculated from concentration estimates and streamflow. The data are used to describe differences in concentrations, loads, and yields and to explain these differences relative to watershed characteristics. Water quality at the five monitoring sites varied according to hydrologic conditions; contributing drainage area; land use (including degree of urbanization); relative contributions from point and nonpoint constituent sources; and human activity within each watershed. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations were less than the Kansas aquatic-life-support criterion of 5.0 mg/L less than 10 percent of the time at all sites except Indian Creek, which had DO concentrations less than the criterion about 15 percent of the time. Concentrations of suspended sediment, chloride (winter only), indicator bacteria, and pesticides were substantially larger during periods of increased streamflow. Suspended

  2. Data requirements for EOR surfactant-polymer process simulation and analysis of El Dorado pilot-project simulation, Butler County, Kansas. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Claridge, E.L.; Lohse, A.

    1983-01-01

    The results of computer simulation of the El Dorado surfactant-polymer EOR pilot project, Butler County, Kansas indicated that conventional data from the project and other data in the public domain were not adequate for geologic, reservoir and process characterizations in a complex numerical simulation. As used by GURC in geologic characterization, and by INTERCOMP in process characterization and input into the CFTE simulator, the collective body of field and chemical data and related assumptions necessary for simulator input was not sufficient to predict how the chemical flood would behave in the Admire 650-foot sandstone reservoir. Based upon this study, a comprehensive body of data requirements for EOR simulation is defined in detail. Geologic characterization includes descriptors for rock, interwell and intrasystem correlations; reservoir characterization includes descriptors for fluid/rock, production, and flow rate properties; process characterization includes descriptors for chemical properties, interactions and functions. Reservoir heterogeneity is a principal problem in EOR simulation. It can be overcome within reasonable economic limits by successive orders of descriptors from: microscale (rock), achieved through borehole and core analyses; to macroscale (interwell), achieved through multiple borehole correlations; to megascale (intrasystem), achieved through extrapolation of rock and correlative well data into a generic depositional model that contains a description of internal mass properties within a given external morphology. Volume II contains appendices for: flow chart for surfactant-polymer process simulation; INTERCOMP reports to GURC describing the CFTE simulator program used in this study.

  3. Data requirements for EOR surfactant-polymer process simulation and analysis of El Dorado pilot-project simulation, Butler County, Kansas. Volume I. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Claridge, E.L.; Lohse, A.

    1983-01-01

    The results of computer simulation of the El Dorado surfactant-polymer EOR pilot project, Butler County, Kansas indicated that conventional data from the project and other data in the public domain were not adequate for geologic, reservoir and process characterizations in a complex numerical simulation. As used by GURC in geologic characterization, and by INTERCOMP in process characterization and input into the CFTE simulator, the collective body of field and chemical data and related assumptions necessary for simulator input was not sufficient to predict how the chemical flood would behave in the Admire 650-foot sandstone reservoir. Based upon this study, a comprehensive body of data requirements for EOR simulation is defined in detail. Geologic characterization includes descriptors for rock, interwell and intrasystem correlations; reservoir characterization includes descriptors for fluid/rock, production, and flow rate properties; process characterization includes descriptors for chemical properties, interactions and functions. Reservoir heterogeneity is a principal problem in EOR simulation. It can be overcome within reasonable economic limits by successive orders of descriptors from: microscale (rock), achieved through borehole and core analyses; to macroscale (interwell), achieved through multiple borehole correlations; to megascale (intrasystem), achieved through extrapolation of rock and correlative well data into a generic depositional model that contains a description of internal mass properties within a given external morphology. Volume II contains appendices for: flow chart for surfactant-polymer process simulation; INTERCOMP reports to GURC describing the CFTE simulator program used in this study.

  4. The Southern Kansas Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    Historically aseismic Harper and Sumner counties in Southern Kansas experienced a dramatic increase in seismicity beginning in early 2014, coincident with the development of new oil production in the Mississippi Lime Play. In order to better understand the potential relationships between seismicity and oil development, the USGS installed a real-time telemetered seismic network in cooperation with the Kansas Geological Survey, the Kansas Corporation Commission, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Harper County, and the Oklahoma Geological Survey. The network began operation in March 2014 with an initial deployment of 5 NetQuakes accelerometers and by July 2014 had expanded to include 10 broadband sites. The network currently has 14 stations, all with accelerometers and 12 with broadband seismometers. The network has interstation spacing of 15 - 25 km and typical azimuthal gap of 80 for well-located events. Data are continuously streamed to IRIS at 200 samples per second from most sites. Earthquake locations are augmented with additional stations from the USGS National Network, Oklahoma Geological Survey Seismic Network, Kansas Seismic Monitoring Network and the Enid Oklahoma Network. Since the spring of 2014 over 7500 earthquakes have been identified with data from this network, 1400 of which have been manually timed and cataloged. Focal depths for earthquakes typically range between 2 and 7 km. The catalog is available at earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/search/ under network code 'Ismpkansas'. The network recorded the largest known earthquake in Harper County, Mw 4.3, on October 2, 2014 and in Sumner County, Mw 4.9, on November 12, 2014. Recorded ground motions at the epicenter of the October earthquake were 0.70 g (PGA) and 12 cm/s (PGV). These high ground motion values agree with near-source recordings made by other USGS temporary deployments in the U. S. midcontinent, indicating a significant shaking hazard from such shallow, moderate

  5. H. Julian Allen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    H. Julian Allen stands beside the observation window of the 8 x 7 foot test section of the NACA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. H. Julian Allen is best known for his 'Blunt Body Theory' of aerodynamics, a design technique for alleviating the severe re-entry heating problem which was then delaying the development of ballistic missiles. His findings revolutionized the fundamental design of ballistic missle re-entry shapes. Subsequently, applied research led to applications of the 'blunt' shape to ballistic missles and spacecraft which were intended to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. This application led to the design of ablative heat shields that protected the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts as their space capsules re- entered the Earth's atmosphere. 'Harvey' Allen as he was called by most, was not only a brilliant scientist and aeronautical engineer but was also admired for his kindness, thoughtfulness and sense of humor. Among his many other accomplishments, Harvey Allen served as Center Director of the NASA Ames Research Center from 1965 to 1969. He died of a heart attack on January 29, 1977 at the age of 66.

  6. Additional Reserve Recovery Using New Polymer Treatment on High Water Oil Ratio Wells in Alameda Field, Kingman County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    James Spillane

    2005-10-01

    The Chemical Flooding process, like a polymer treatment, as a tertiary (enhanced) oil recovery process can be a very good solution based on the condition of this field and its low cost compared to the drilling of new wells. It is an improved water flooding method in which high molecular-weight (macro-size molecules) and water-soluble polymers are added to the injection water to improve the mobility ratio by enhancing the viscosity of the water and by reducing permeability in invaded zones during the process. In other words, it can improve the sweep efficiency by reducing the water mobility. This polymer treatment can be performed on the same active oil producer well rather than on an injector well in the existence of strong water drive in the formation. Some parameters must be considered before any polymer job is performed such as: formation temperature, permeability, oil gravity and viscosity, location and formation thickness of the well, amount of remaining recoverable oil, fluid levels, well productivity, water oil ratio (WOR) and existence of water drive. This improved oil recovery technique has been used widely and has significant potential to extend reservoir life by increasing the oil production and decreasing the water cut. This new technology has the greatest potential in reservoirs that are moderately heterogeneous, contain moderately viscous oils, and have adverse water-oil mobility ratios. For example, many wells in Kansas's Arbuckle formation had similar treatments and we have seen very effective results. In addition, there were previous polymer treatments conducted by Texaco in Alameda Field on a number of wells throughout the Viola-Simpson formation in the early 70's. Most of the treatments proved to be very successful.

  7. Effects of urbanization, construction activity, management practices, and impoundments on suspended-sediment transport in Johnson County, northeast Kansas, February 2006 through November 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Casey J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Johnson County, Kansas, Stormwater Management Program, investigated the effects of urbanization, construction activity, management practices, and impoundments on suspended-sediment transport in Johnson County from February 2006 through November 2008. Streamgages and continuous turbidity sensors were operated at 15 sites within the urbanizing 57-square-mile Mill Creek Basin, and 4 sites downstream from the other largest basins (49 to 66 square miles) in Johnson County. The largest sediment yields in Johnson County were observed downstream from basins with increased construction activity. Sediment yields attributed to the largest (68 acre) active construction site in the study area were 9,300 tons per square mile in 2007 and 12,200 tons per square mile in 2008; 5 to 55 times larger than yields observed at other sampling sites. However, given erodible soils and steep slopes at this site, sediment yields were relatively small compared to the range in historic values from construction sites without erosion and sediment controls in the United States (2,300 to 140,000 tons per square mile). Downstream from this construction site, a sediment forebay and wetland were constructed in series upstream from Shawnee Mission Lake, a 120-acre reservoir within Shawnee Mission Park. Although the original intent of the sediment forebay and constructed wetland were unrelated to upstream construction, they were nonetheless evaluated in 2008 to characterize sediment removal before stream entry into the lake. The sediment forebay was estimated to reduce 33 percent of sediment transported to the lake, whereas the wetland did not appear to decrease downstream sediment transport. Comparisons of time-series data and relations between turbidity and sediment concentration indicate that larger silt-sized particles were deposited within the sediment forebay, whereas smaller silt and clay-sized sediments were transported through the wetland and

  8. Production data as an indicator of gas reservoir heterogenesity in the Vicksburg S sandstones (Oligocene), McAllen Ranch field, Hidalgo County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Wermund, E.G.; Langford, R.P. )

    1990-09-01

    To assess reservoir heterogeneity in low-permeability Vicksburg S sandstone reservoirs in McAllen Ranch gas field, production and pressure histories of 49 wells were analyzed; predominant well spacing is 80 acres. These histories were compared both fieldwide and in local areas defined by faults or facies. Production is through casing perforations, which commonly extend over 600 ft gross intervals within vertically stacked potential reservoir sandstones. The S reservoir comprises five sand-rich intervals that together have produced 249 bcf of gas since 1965. Cumulative production per well ranges from 39 bcf for 24 years to 0.8 bcf in 11 years. Average cumulative production is 6.3 bcf per well. To date, the largest average monthly production for a well is over 360 Mmcf; the mean for average monthly production (based on publicly available data) for all wells is 30.5 Mmcf. There is poor correlation among gross thicknesses of perforated intervals and cumulative production (R = 0.024). Wellhead shut-in pressures range from 12,500 psi on completion to 1,300 psi at abandonment. Maps of cumulative production and normalized BHP/Z show good production/pressure correlations. The slopes of regression curves for (1) monthly production decline histories and (2) periodic tests of daily production of adjacent well pairs show little influence from adjacent well completions or refracturing, even at relatively close well spacing. Monthly production in a newly completed or refractured adjacent well commonly exceeds the last production rate of a nearby older well. Production and pressure histories in adjacent well pairs suggest that limited communication occurs between S sandstone reservoirs of paired wells. This limited communication may be a consequence of limited drainage radius due to low permeability and of stratigraphic/diagenetic heterogeneity within the reservoir.

  9. Irrigation water use in Kansas, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.

    2016-03-22

    This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources, presents derivative statistics of 2013 irrigation water use in Kansas. The published regional and county-level statistics from the previous 4 years (2009–12) are shown with the 2013 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. An overall Kansas average and regional averages also are calculated and presented. Total reported irrigation water use in 2013 was 3.3 million acre-feet of water applied to 3.0 million irrigated acres.

  10. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - near - term. Technical progress report, June 17, 1994--June 17, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of water injection wells with solids as a result of poor water quality. In many instances the lack of reservoir management is due to lack of (1) data collection and organization, (2) integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, and (3) identification of optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Stewart Field (on the latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas, and was operated by Sharon Resources, Inc. and is now operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

  11. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - Near-term. Annual report, June 18, 1993--June 18, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1995-10-01

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of water injection wells with solids as a result of poor water quality. In many instances the lack of reservoir management is due to lack of (1) data collection and organization, (2) integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, and (3) identification of optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The Stewart Field (on the latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by Sharon Resources, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

  12. Improved Oil Recovery In Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near Term

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Don W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-01-14

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these types of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

  13. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated reservoirs of Kansas--near-term. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1996-11-01

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis. Results of these two field projects are discussed.

  14. Transport and Sources of Suspended Sediment in the Mill Creek Watershed, Johnson County, Northeast Kansas, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Casey J.; Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Ziegler, Andrew C.; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program, evaluated suspended-sediment transport and sources in the urbanizing, 57.4 mi2 Mill Creek watershed from February 2006 through June 2007. Sediment transport and sources were assessed spatially by continuous monitoring of streamflow and turbidity as well as sampling of suspended sediment at nine sites in the watershed. Within Mill Creek subwatersheds (2.8-16.9 mi2), sediment loads at sites downstream from increased construction activity were substantially larger (per unit area) than those at sites downstream from mature urban areas or less-developed watersheds. Sediment transport downstream from construction sites primarily was limited by transport capacity (streamflow), whereas availability of sediment supplies primarily influenced transport downstream from mature urban areas. Downstream sampling sites typically had smaller sediment loads (per unit area) than headwater sites, likely because of sediment deposition in larger, less sloping stream channels. Among similarly sized storms, those with increased precipitation intensity transported more sediment at eight of the nine monitoring sites. Storms following periods of increased sediment loading transported less sediment at two of the nine monitoring sites. In addition to monitoring performed in the Mill Creek watershed, sediment loads were computed for the four other largest watersheds (48.6-65.7 mi2) in Johnson County (Blue River, Cedar, Indian, and Kill Creeks) during the study period. In contrast with results from smaller watersheds in Mill Creek, sediment load (per unit area) from the most urbanized watershed in Johnson County (Indian Creek) was more than double that of other large watersheds. Potential sources of this sediment include legacy sediment from earlier urban construction, accelerated stream-channel erosion, or erosion from specific construction sites, such as stream-channel disturbance during bridge

  15. EPICS: Allen-Bradley hardware reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocki, G.

    1993-04-05

    This manual covers the following hardware: Allen-Bradley 6008 -- SV VMEbus I/O scanner; Allen-Bradley universal I/O chassis 1771-A1B, -A2B, -A3B, and -A4B; Allen-Bradley power supply module 1771-P4S; Allen-Bradley 1771-ASB remote I/O adapter module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IFE analog input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OFE analog output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IG(D) TTL input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OG(d) TTL output; Allen-Bradley 1771-IQ DC selectable input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OW contact output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IBD DC (10--30V) input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OBD DC (10--60V) output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IXE thermocouple/millivolt input module; and the Allen-Bradley 2705 RediPANEL push button module.

  16. State of Kansas: K-12 Enrollment Projection Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ted

    2015-01-01

    This document contains headcount enrollment projections for the State of Kansas for the 2015-16 school year through the 2019-20 school year. These projections are based on resident live births in Kansas and the headcount enrollment data for previous school years. Based on the available data related to resident live births by county and previous…

  17. Occurrence and variability of mining-related lead and zinc in the Spring River flood plain and tributary flood plains, Cherokee County, Kansas, 2009--11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2013-01-01

    Historical mining activity in the Tri-State Mining District (TSMD), located in parts of southeast Kansas, southwest Missouri, and northeast Oklahoma, has resulted in a substantial ongoing input of cadmium, lead, and zinc to the environment. To provide some of the information needed to support remediation efforts in the Cherokee County, Kansas, superfund site, a 4-year study was begun in 2009 by the U.S. Geological Survey that was requested and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A combination of surficial-soil sampling and coring was used to investigate the occurrence and variability of mining-related lead and zinc in the flood plains of the Spring River and several tributaries within the superfund site. Lead- and zinc-contaminated flood plains are a concern, in part, because they represent a long-term source of contamination to the fluvial environment. Lead and zinc contamination was assessed with reference to probable-effect concentrations (PECs), which represent the concentrations above which adverse aquatic biological effects are likely to occur. The general PECs for lead and zinc were 128 and 459 milligrams per kilogram, respectively. The TSMD-specific PECs for lead and zinc were 150 and 2,083 milligrams per kilogram, respectively. Typically, surficial soils in the Spring River flood plain had lead and zinc concentrations that were less than the general PECs. Lead and zinc concentrations in the surficial-soil samples were variable with distance downstream and with distance from the Spring River channel, and the largest lead and zinc concentrations usually were located near the channel. Lead and zinc concentrations larger than the general or TSMD-specific PECs, or both, were infrequent at depth in the Spring River flood plain. When present, such contamination typically was confined to the upper 2 feet of the core and frequently was confined to the upper 6 inches. Tributaries with few or no lead- and zinc-mined areas in the basin—Brush Creek

  18. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge and treatment facility upgrades on environmental and biological conditions of the upper Blue River, Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri, January 2003 through March 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Stone, Mandy L.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Poulton, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    The Johnson County Blue River Main Wastewater Treatment Facility discharges into the upper Blue River near the border between Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri. During 2005 through 2007 the wastewater treatment facility underwent upgrades to increase capacity and include biological nutrient removal. The effects of wastewater effluent on environmental and biological conditions of the upper Blue River were assessed by comparing an upstream site to two sites located downstream from the wastewater treatment facility. Environmental conditions were evaluated using previously and newly collected discrete and continuous data, and were compared with an assessment of biological community composition and ecosystem function along the upstream-downstream gradient. This evaluation is useful for understanding the potential effects of wastewater effluent on water quality, biological community structure, and ecosystem function. In addition, this information can be used to help achieve National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) wastewater effluent permit requirements after additional studies are conducted. The effects of wastewater effluent on the water-quality conditions of the upper Blue River were most evident during below-normal and normal streamflows (about 75 percent of the time), when wastewater effluent contributed more than 20 percent to total streamflow. The largest difference in water-quality conditions between the upstream and downstream sites was in nutrient concentrations. Total and inorganic nutrient concentrations at the downstream sites during below-normal and normal streamflows were 4 to 15 times larger than at the upstream site, even after upgrades to the wastewater treatment facility were completed. However, total nitrogen concentrations decreased in wastewater effluent and at the downstream site following wastewater treatment facility upgrades. Similar decreases in total phosphorus were not observed, likely because the biological

  19. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 TRIPLE STAINED GLASS WINDOWS AND COLUMN SUPPORTING BALCONY (EAST WINDOWS IN SOUTH WALL OF MAIN FLOOR OF AUDITORIUM) - Kehilath Anshe Ma'ariv Synagogue, 3301 South Indiana Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  20. Environmental Assessment for the Commercial Demonstration of the Low NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Finney County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    n /a

    2003-03-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide partial funding to the Sunflower Electric Power Corporation (Sunflower), to demonstrate the commercial application of Low-NO{sub x} Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve NO{sub x} emission reduction to the level of 0.15 to 0.22 pounds per million British thermal units (lb/MM Btu). The proposed project station is Sunflower's 360 MW coal-fired generation station, Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station). The station, fueled by coal from Wyoming's Powder River Basin, is located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas. The period of performance is expected to last approximately 2 years. The Holcomb Station, Sunflower LNB/SOFA integrated system would be modified in three distinct phases to demonstrate the synergistic effect of layering NO{sub x} control technologies. Once modified, the station would demonstrate that a unit equipped with an existing low-NO{sub x} burner system can be retrofitted with a new separated over-fire air (SOFA) system, coal flow measurement and control, and enhanced combustion monitoring to achieve about 45 percent reduction in nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The proposed project would demonstrate a technology alternative to Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems. While SCR does generally achieve high reductions in NO{sub x} emissions (from about 0.8 lb/MM to 0.12 lb/MM Btu), it does so at higher capital and operating cost, requires the extensive use of critical construction labor, requires longer periods of unit outage for deployment, and generally requires longer periods of time to complete shakedown and full-scale operation. Cost of the proposed project technology would be on the order of 15-25 percent of that for SCR, with consequential benefits derived from reductions in construction manpower requirements and periods of power outages. This proposed technology demonstration would generally be applicable to boilers using opposed-wall burners

  1. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for Cedar Creek, Dekalb and Allen counties, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilber, William G.; Peters, J.G.; Ayers, M.A.; Crawford, Charles G.

    1979-01-01

    A digital model calibrated to conditions in Cedar Creek was used to develop alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. The model indicates that the dissolved-oxygen concentration of the Auburn wastewater effluent and nitrification are the most significant factors affecting the dissolved-oxygen concentration in Cedar Creek during summer low flows. The observed dissolved-oxygen concentration of the Auburn wastewater effluent was low and averaged 30 percent of saturation. Projected nitrogenous biochemical-oxygen demand loads, from the Indiana State Board of Health, for the Auburn and Waterloo wastewater-treatment facilities will result in violations of the current instream dissolved-oxygen standard (5 mg/l), even with an effluent dissolved-oxygen concentration of 80 percent saturation. Natural streamflow for Cedar Creek upstream from the confluence of Willow and Little Cedar Creeks is small compared with the waste discharge, so benefits of dilution for Waterloo and Auburn are minimal. The model also indicates that, during winter low flows, ammonia toxicity, rather than dissolved oxygen, is the limiting water-quality criterion in the reach of Cedar Creek downstream from the wastewater-treatment facility at Auburn and the confluence of Garrett ditch. Ammonia-nitrogen concentrations predicted for 1978 through 2000 downstream from the Waterloo wastewater-treatment facility do not exceed Indiana water-quality standards for streams. Calculations of the stream 's assimilative capacity indicate that future waste discharge in the Cedar Creek basin will be limited to the reaches between the Auburn wastewater-treatment facility and County Road 68. (Kosco-USGS)

  2. Characterizing a Mississippian Carbonate Reservoir for CO2-EOR and Carbon Geosequestration: Applicability of Existing Rock Physics Models and Implications to Feasibility of a Time Lapse Monitoring Program in the Wellington Oil Field, Sumner County, Kansas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueck, A. J.; Raef, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    This study will focus on characterizing subsurface rock formations of the Wellington Field, in Sumner County, Kansas, for both geosequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the saline Arbuckle formation and enhanced oil recovery of a depleting Mississippian oil reservoir. Multi-scale data including lithofacies core samples, X-ray diffraction, digital rock physics scans, scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, well log data including sonic and dipole sonic, and surface 3D seismic reflection data will be integrated to establish and/or validate a new or existing rock physics model that best represents our reservoir rock types and characteristics. We will acquire compressional wave velocity and shear wave velocity data from Mississippian and Arbuckle cores by running ultrasonic tests using an Ult 100 Ultrasonic System and a 12 ton hydraulic jack located in the geophysics lab in Thompson Hall at Kansas State University. The elastic constants Young's Modulus, Bulk Modulus, Shear (Rigidity) Modulus and Poisson's Ratio will be extracted from these velocity data. Ultrasonic velocities will also be compared to sonic and dipole sonic log data from the Wellington 1-32 well. These data will be integrated to validate a lithofacies classification statistical model, which will be and partially has been applied to the largely unknown saline Arbuckle formation, with hopes for a connection, perhaps via Poisson's ratio, allowing a time-lapse seismic feasibility assessment and potentially developing a transformation of compressional wave sonic velocities to shear wave sonic for all wells, where compressional wave sonic is available. We will also be testing our rock physics model by predicting effects of changing effective (brine + CO2 +hydrocarbon) fluid composition on seismic properties and the implications on feasibility of seismic monitoring. Lessons learned from characterizing the Mississippian are essential to understanding the potential of utilizing similar workflows for the

  3. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge and treatment facility upgrades on environmental and biological conditions of Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, June 2004 through June 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Stone, Mandy L.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Foster, Guy M.; Poulton, Barry C.; Paxson, Chelsea R.; Harris, Theodore D.

    2014-01-01

    Indian Creek is one of the most urban drainage basins in Johnson County, Kansas, and environmental and biological conditions of the creek are affected by contaminants from point and other urban sources. The Johnson County Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin (hereafter referred to as the “Middle Basin”) and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities (WWTFs) discharge to Indian Creek. In summer 2010, upgrades were completed to increase capacity and include biological nutrient removal at the Middle Basin facility. There have been no recent infrastructure changes at the Tomahawk Creek facility; however, during 2009, chemically enhanced primary treatment was added to the treatment process for better process settling before disinfection and discharge with the added effect of enhanced phosphorus removal. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, assessed the effects of wastewater effluent on environmental and biological conditions of Indian Creek by comparing two upstream sites to four sites located downstream from the WWTFs using data collected during June 2004 through June 2013. Environmental conditions were evaluated using previously and newly collected discrete and continuous data and were compared with an assessment of biological community composition and ecosystem function along the upstream-downstream gradient. This study improves the understanding of the effects of wastewater effluent on stream-water and streambed sediment quality, biological community composition, and ecosystem function in urban areas. After the addition of biological nutrient removal to the Middle Basin WWTF in 2010, annual mean total nitrogen concentrations in effluent decreased by 46 percent, but still exceeded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) wastewater effluent permit concentration goal of 8.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L); however, the NPDES wastewater effluent permit total phosphorus concentration goal of 1.5 mg/L or less was

  4. SMARTE: IMPROVING REVITALIZATION DECISIONS FOR KANSAS COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Brownfields program helps local governments (city/county) and non-profit organizations appropriately assess, clean up, and reuse contaminated properties that they own or purchase. Reuse and redevelopment of abandoned, idle, o...

  5. Kansas KIDS COUNT Data Book, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    This Kids Count Data Book provides state and county trends in the well-being of Kansas' children. The statistical portrait is based on 21 indicators of well-being: (1) births to single teens; (2) children in poverty; (3) children approved for free school meals; (4) childhood deaths; (5) infant mortality; (6) births with early prenatal care; (7)…

  6. National Dam Safety Program. MO Noname 168 Dam (MO 10583), Missouri - Kansas City Basin, Clay County, Missouri. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    general condition of the dam witts respect to safety, based on available data and on visual inspection, to j determine if the dam poses hazards to...owned by the Great Midwest Corporation, 833 Northeast Underground Drive, Kansas City, Missouri 64161, Attention: Donald Woodard. f. Purpose of Dam. The...crest of the dam and the upstream and downstream slopes have only rock exposed. (7) Impervious core - unknown. (8) Cutoff - unknown. (9) Grout

  7. Selected Collective Bargaining Agreements of Kansas Two-Year Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    Collective bargaining agreements between the boards of trustees and faculty associations of eight selected community colleges in Kansas are presented, representing contracts in effect between 1989 and 1993. Contracts for the following colleges are provided: (1) Butler County Community College in El Dorado (1990-91); (2) Cowley County Community…

  8. Irrigation water use in Kansas, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Data Release represents geospatial and tabular data on irrigation water use in Kansas.  The data release was produced in compliance with open data requirements.  The dataset consists of 3 separate items with similar attributes aggregated to different geographic extents:  1.  Kansas counties; 2.  Kansas regional planning areas used in the Kansas Water Plan; and 3.  Kansas irrigation water-use analysis regions.Reported 2014 water withdrawn for irrigation, acres irrigated, and application rates along with the published application rate statistics from the previous 4 years (2010–13) are shown with the 2014 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. The 2014 annual total precipitation and the current 30-year climatic normal (based on 1981–2010) are also shown.  Other data published in this data release include the amount of water used, irrigated acres, and application rates by crop type and the amount of water used and acres irrigated are further grouped by irrigation method. Total reported irrigation water use in 2014 was 3.3 million acre-feet of water applied to 3.0 million irrigated acres.

  9. Introducing Kansas Lava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Andy; Bull, Tristan; Kimmell, Garrin; Perrins, Erik; Komp, Ed; Werling, Brett

    Kansas Lava is a domain specific language for hardware description. Though there have been a number of previous implementations of Lava, we have found the design space rich, with unexplored choices. We use a direct (Chalmers style) specification of circuits, and make significant use of Haskell overloading of standard classes, leading to concise circuit descriptions. Kansas Lava supports both simulation (inside GHCi), and execution via VHDL, by having a dual shallow and deep embedding inside our Signal type. We also have a lightweight sized-type mechanism, allowing for MATLAB style matrix based specifications to be directly expressed in Kansas Lava.

  10. Kansas Ethanol Lyons Approval

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This update August 9, 2016 letter from EPA approves, with modifications, the petition from Kansas Ethanol, LLC, Lyons facility, regarding non-grandfathered ethanol produced through a dry mill process, qualifying under the Clean Air Act for renewable fuel

  11. Reaction of oxygen with allene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Sheng-yu

    1988-07-01

    Elastic scattering studies carried out independently of the work related to the title forms the first section of the dissertation. The low-energy elastic scattering of He with Ar, Kr, Xe has been studied by molecular beam techniques. Two potential forms, exponential-spline-Morse-Morse-spline-van de Waals (ESMMSV) and Simon-Parr-Finlan-Dunham (SPFD), have been used to fit the measured differential cross section. Elastic scattering theory and experimental details are introduced. The reactive scattering of O(/sup 3/P) with allene has been studied using crossed molecular beams. Differing from the well known central-carbon-attack (CCA) mechanism in which the final products, carbon monoxide and ethylene, are obtained via a ring intermediate, a new mechanism, terminal-carbon-attack (TCA), has been observed. The production of O(/sup 3/P) atoms by radio frequency discharge is also introduced. To assist understanding of the experiments a multi-configuration self-consistent field (MCSCF) study of the reaction of O(/sup 3/P) with allene has been carried out. The key feature of the oxygen-allene potential energy surface for both CCA and TCA channels has been calculated with single-zeta (SZ), double-zeta (DZ), and double-zeta plus polarization (DZP) basis sets. Finally, an algorithm for optimizing the trial wavefunction in quantum Monte Carlo calculations has been developed. With the application of group theory, a symmetry-constrained optimization process can yield an improved trial wavefunction for the calculation of excited electronic state energies as well as the ground-state energy. Several applications are discussed. 145 refs.

  12. The Banister Allen Plantation (38AB102) and Thomas B. Clinkscales Farm: (38AB221) Data Recovery in the Richard B. Russell Multiple Resource Area Abbeville County, South Carolina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    and data recovery at four sites within the proposed Lake Hartwell Destination Park, Oconee County, South Carolina: Stage 1 investigations. Carolina...Ronald W. Anthony, and Michael A. Harmon 1979 A cultural resources inventory survey for the proposed state park on Lake Hartwell , Oconee County...Richard B. Russell Dam and Lake , Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina. Institute of Archeology/Anthropology, University of South -%’ Carolina

  13. Selected Collective Bargaining Agreements of Kansas Two-Year Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    Collective bargaining agreements between the boards of trustees and faculty associations of 10 selected community colleges in Kansas are presented, representing contracts in effect in 1987. Contracts for the following colleges are included: Butler County Community College, Dodge City Community College, Fort Scott Community College, Garden City…

  14. 75 FR 55619 - Kansas Disaster Number KS-00045

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster Number KS-00045 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... the following areas as adversely affected by the disaster. Primary Counties: Cheyenne, Decatur,...

  15. Water resources of Allen Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.; Fendick, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, approximately 29.2 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Allen Parish, Louisiana, including about 26.8 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 2.45 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Rice irrigation accounted for 74 percent (21.7 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, industrial, rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in the parish were greatest in 1960 (119 Mgal/d) and 1980 (98.7 Mgal/d). The substantial decrease in surface-water use between 1960 and 1965 is primarily attributable to rice-irrigation withdrawals declining from 61.2 to 6.74 Mgal/d. This fact sheet summarizes information on the water resources of Allen Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

  16. Geohydrology and saline ground-water discharge to the South Fork Ninnescah River in Pratt and Kingman Counties, south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillespie, Joe B.; Hargadine, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    Saline ground water discharges to the South Fork Ninnescah River in Pratt and Kingman Counties from the adjacent alluvial aquifer. Electromagnetic terrain surveys in this area indicated that the saline ground water is entering the river in intermittent reaches along the channel. The chloride concentration in the river near Murdock exceeds 250 milligrams per liter 75 percent of the time. During base flow in November 1988, stream discharge increased 67 cubic feet per second, and the chloride concentration increased 360 milligrams per liter from Pratt to the Pratt-Kingman County line. The chloride load to the river along this reach was 82 tons per day. The source of saline water probably is dissolution of salt in the Permian rocks, about 600 feet below land surface. Subsequent subsidence and collapse of Permian rocks into salt-dissolution cavities probably has caused fracturing in overlying Permian rocks. Brine moves upward through the Permian rocks and discharges into the alluvial aquifer. The brine discharge to the alluvium is about 0.7 cubic foot per second. In the area of major saline-water discharge to the river, the fluid-potential levels in the Permian rocks are higher than fluid-potential levels in the alluvial aquifer. Several methods for reducing the saline ground-water discharge to the South Fork Ninnescah River have been considered. The most effective of these methods appears to be interception of brine flow in the Permian rocks by pumping of relief wells. Brine could be disposed by injection into deeper formations, by storage in evaporation reservoirs, or by desalinization.

  17. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  18. Permian chronostratigraphy in Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Baars, D.L. )

    1990-08-01

    Correlations between the type Permian System of Russia and North American strata have been difficult for decades because of biostratigraphic and nomenclatural confusion. Consequently, a standard Permian section was established in west Texas that is widely accepted throughout North America. Series of the North American standard section are, in ascending order, Wolfcampian, Leonardian, Guadalupian, and Ochoan. This nomenclature was adopted for usage in Kansas in 1951, but was later abandoned in favor of local terminology. However, direct biostratigraphic correlations between Kansas and the west Texas standard section have now been firmly established, and local chronostratigraphic names, i.e., Big Blue, Lyon, Geary, Cimarron, and Custer, have not been widely accepted. The Kansas Geological Survey has now readopted usage of the Wolfcampian Series for rocks of the Admire, Council Grove, and Chase Groups; the Leonardian Series for rocks of the Summer and Nippewalla Groups; and the Guadalupian Series for rocks of the Whitehorse, Day Creek, and Big Basin Formations. The Wolfcampian Series in Kansas (and elsewhere in North America) contains post-Virgilian (latest Carboniferous) strata that predate the classical Permian System of the Russian type section. Consequently, the Pennsylvanian/Permian boundary will probably have to be raised stratigraphically to conform to global usage.

  19. Sexting in Kansas Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Dale R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an exploratory study about sexting, the sending of sexually explicit or illicit photos or video between cell phones, in Kansas public schools. An on-line survey asked superintendents to report if they have had an occurrence of sexting in their district. They were also asked if they felt sexting is currently a problem in their…

  20. Young Kansas Writers, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Donald, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    The items in this booklet represent the writing of Kansas authors in grades eight through 12. Entries vary in form and include descriptive paragraphs, lyric and narrative poetry, personal reflections, expository writing, and short stories. Among the variety of topics chosen for literary focus are life, shoes, a balloon, a teddy bear, loneliness,…

  1. Relationship between inferred redox potential of the depositional environment and geochemistry of the Upper Pennsylvanian (Missourian) Stark Shale Member of the Dennis Limestone, Wabaunsee County, Kansas, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, J.R.; Leventhal, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    Analyses of 21 samples collected from a core of the 52.8-cm-thick Stark Shale Member of the Dennis Limestone in Wabaunsee County, Kansas, demonstrate four cycles with two-orders-of-magnitude variations in contents of Cd, Mo, P, V and Zn, and order-of-magnitude variations in contents of organic carbon, Cr, Ni, Se and U. The observed variability in amounts and/or ratios of many metals and amounts and compositions of the organic matter appear related to the cause and degree of water-column stratification and the resulting absence/presence of dissolved O2 or H2S. High Cd, Mo, U, V, Zn and S contents, a high degree of pyritization (DOP) (0.75-0.88), and high high V (V + Ni) (0.84-0.89) indicate the presence of H2S in a strongly stratified water column. Intermediate contents of metals and S, intermediate DOP (0.67-0.75) and intermediate V (V + Ni) (054-0.82) indicate a less strongly stratified anoxic water column. Whereas, low metal contents and low V (V + Ni) (0.46-0.60) indicate a weakly stratified, dysoxic water column. High P contents at the top of the organic-matter-rich intervals within the Stark Shale Member indicate that phosphate precipitation was enhanced near the boundary between anoxic and dysoxic water compositions. Relatively abundant terrestrial organic matter in intervals deposited from the more strongly stratified H2S-bearing water column indicates a combined halocline-thermocline with the fresher near-surface water the transport mode for the terrestrial organic matter. The predominance of algal organic matter in intervals deposited from a less strongly stratified water column indicates the absence of the halocline and the presence of the more generally established thermocline. Relatively low amounts of degraded, hydrogen-poor organic matter characterize intervals deposited in a weakly stratified, dysoxic water column. The inferred variability in chemistry of the depositional environments may be related to climate variations and/or minor changes in sea

  2. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2004-06-30

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2004, 6.26 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 250 MCFD. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May. The amount of carbon dioxide produced was small during this period. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.5 B/D in May and June. Operational problems encountered during the initial stages of the flood were identified and resolved.

  3. Invest Early: Good Beginnings Last a Lifetime. Kansas Kids Count Data Book, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    This Kids Count data book provides state and county trends in the well-being of Kansas' children. The statistical portrait is based on 22 indictors in the areas of economic well-being, physical health and safety, childhood care and education, emotional well-being, and social behavior and social control. Following a state profile, county data are…

  4. Van Allen Discovery Most Important

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jastrow, R.

    1959-01-01

    The first step toward the exploration of space occurred approximately 22 months ago as a part of the International Geophysical Year. In the short interval since October, 1957, the new tools of research, the satellite and the space rocket, have produced two unexpected results of fundamental scientific importance. First, instruments placed in the Explorer satellites by James A. Van Allen have revealed the existence of layers of energetic particles in the outer atmosphere. This discovery constitutes the most significant research achievement of the IGY satellite program. The layers may provide the explanation for the aurora and other geophysical phenomena, and they will also influence the design of vehicles for manned space flight, whose occupants must be shielded against their harmful biological effects. Second, the shape of the earth has been determined very accurately with the aid of data from the first Vanguard. As a result of this investigation, we have found that our planet tends toward the shape of a pear, with its stem at the North Pole. This discovery may produce major changes in our ideas on the interior structure of the earth.

  5. Phosphine Catalysis of Allenes with Electrophiles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiming; Xu, Xingzhu; Kwon, Ohyun

    2014-01-01

    Nucleophilic phosphine catalysis of allenes with electrophiles is one of the most powerful and straightforward synthetic strategies for the generation of highly functionalized carbocycle or heterocycle structural motifs, which are present in a wide range of bioactive natural products and medicinally important substances. The reaction topologies can be controlled through judicious choice of the phosphine catalyst and the structural variations of starting materials. This Tutorial Review presents selected examples of nucleophilic phosphine catalysis using allenes and electrophiles. PMID:24663290

  6. Employment, Salary, and Placement Information Related to Career Programs at Johnson County Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    This report contains employment, salary, and placement information related to career programs at Johnson County Community College (JCCC, Kansas) as of December 1998. Employment and salary projections for the greater Kansas City area, the state of Kansas, and the nation, as well as salary and placement information for JCCC program completers, are…

  7. 40 CFR 81.317 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Hodgeman County X Jackson County X Jefferson County X Jewell County X Johnson County X Kearney County X... County X Stafford County X Stanton County X Stevens County X Sumner County X Thomas County X Trego County... County X Harper County X Harvey County X Haskell County X Hodgeman County X Jackson County X...

  8. 40 CFR 81.317 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Hodgeman County X Jackson County X Jefferson County X Jewell County X Johnson County X Kearney County X... County X Stafford County X Stanton County X Stevens County X Sumner County X Thomas County X Trego County... County X Hodgeman County X Jackson County X Jefferson County X Jewell County X Johnson County X...

  9. 40 CFR 81.317 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Hodgeman County X Jackson County X Jefferson County X Jewell County X Johnson County X Kearney County X... County X Stafford County X Stanton County X Stevens County X Sumner County X Thomas County X Trego County... County X Hodgeman County X Jackson County X Jefferson County X Jewell County X Johnson County X...

  10. 40 CFR 81.317 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Hodgeman County X Jackson County X Jefferson County X Jewell County X Johnson County X Kearney County X... County X Stafford County X Stanton County X Stevens County X Sumner County X Thomas County X Trego County... County X Hodgeman County X Jackson County X Jefferson County X Jewell County X Johnson County X...

  11. 40 CFR 81.317 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Hodgeman County X Jackson County X Jefferson County X Jewell County X Johnson County X Kearney County X... County X Stafford County X Stanton County X Stevens County X Sumner County X Thomas County X Trego County... County X Hodgeman County X Jackson County X Jefferson County X Jewell County X Johnson County X...

  12. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenbacher, Don

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  13. Kansas State University

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, T.; Carnes, K.; Needham, V.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne has fabricated the niobium resonators and some other linac components required for the superconducting accel/decel linac now in operation at Kansas State University. Several staff members from KSU spent a substantial period of time at ANL during FY 1985 in order to learn the technology, and they return occasionally to assemble and test the resonators. There is a continuing interchange of technical information between ANL and KSU related to linac operations, tuning, and resonator maintenance.

  14. Garden City, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Center pivot irrigation systems create red circles of healthy vegetation in this image of croplands near Garden City, Kansas. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on September 25, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using near infrared, red, and green wavelengths. The image has also been sharpened using the sensor's panchromatic band. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  15. Delineation of flooding within the upper Mississippi River Basin, flood of July 10 and 27, 1993, in Kansas City Missouri, and Kansas City, Kansas, and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.; Clement, Ralph W.; Studley, Seth E.

    1997-01-01

    During spring and summer 1993, record flooding inundated many of the stream and river valleys in the upper Mississippi and the Missouri River Basins. The flooding was the result of widespread and numerous intense thunderstorms that, together with saturated soils, produced large volumes of runoff. The magnitude of flooding exceeded the 100-year discharge values (1-percent chance of exceedance in any given year) at many streamflow-gaging stations in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. The flooding was unusual because of its long duration and widespread severe damage. The Mississippi and the Missouri Rivers were above flood stage for more than 1 month at several locations along their lengths. Millions of acres of agricultural and urban lands were inundated for weeks, and unofficial damage estimates exceeded $10 billion in the flooded States (Parrett and others, 1993),During summer 1993, large parts of Kansas City, Missouri, and Kansas City, Kansas, and vicinity were flooded from overflows of the Missouri and the Kansas Rivers and numerous smaller tributaries, This report provides flood-peak elevation data and delineates the arcalcktent of the 1993 floods in the Kansas City metropolitan area for July 10 and 27, 1993 (fig. 1A, sheet 1: B, sheet 2: C, sheet 3). The 1993 flood elevations and extent of flooding are compared with flood-plain boundaries defined by Flood Insurance Studies conducted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for cities and counties in the area (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1975–95).This report is one of a series of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigations that document the effects of the 1993 flooding of the upper Mississippi and the Missouri River Basins and that improve the technical base from which flood-plain management decisions can be made by other agencies.

  16. Solar Space Heating for Warehouse--Kansas City, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    New report describes warehouse/office building in Kansas City, Kansas which uses solar heating for warehouse portion and conventional heating and cooling for office portion. Building is divided into 20 equal units, each with its own solar-heating system. Modular design enables multiple units to be combined to form offices or warehouses of various sizes as required by tenants.

  17. KANSAS WIND POWERING AMERICAN STATE OUTREACH: KANSAS WIND WORKING GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMARLUND, RAY

    2010-10-27

    The Kansas Wind Working Group (WWG) is a 33-member group announced by former Governor Kathleen Sebelius on Jan. 7, 2008. Formed through Executive Order 08-01, the WWG will educate stakeholder groups with the current information on wind energy markets, technologies, economics, policies, prospects and issues. Governor Mark Parkinson serves as chair of the Kansas Wind Working Group. The group has been instrumental in focusing on the elements of government and coordinating government and private sector efforts in wind energy development. Those efforts have moved Kansas from 364 MW of wind three years ago to over 1000 MW today. Further, the Wind Working Group was instrumental in fleshing out issues such as a state RES and net metering, fundamental parts of HB 2369 that was passed and is now law in Kansas. This represents the first mandatory RES and net metering in Kansas history.

  18. 75 FR 103 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 17, Kansas City, Kansas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ...-Trade Zone 17, Kansas City, Kansas Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June... following Order: Whereas, the Greater Kansas City Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 17, submitted an application to the Board for authority to expand FTZ 17 in the Kansas City, Kansas,...

  19. Electrophilic addition and cyclization reactions of allenes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shengming

    2009-10-20

    Modern organic synthesis depends on the development of highly selective methods for the efficient construction of potentially useful target molecules. A primary goal in our laboratory is the discovery of new reactions that convert readily available starting materials to complex products with complete control of regio- and stereoselectivity. Allenes are one underused moiety in organic synthesis, because these groups are often thought to be highly reactive. However, many compounds containing the allene group, including natural products and pharmaceuticals, are fairly stable. The chemistry of allenes has been shown to have significant potential in organic synthesis. Electrophilic additions to allenes have often been considered to be synthetically less attractive due to the lack of efficient control of the regio- and stereoselectivity. However, this Account describes electrophilic reactions of allenes with defined regio- and stereoselectivity developed in our laboratory. Many substituted allenes are readily available from propargylic alcohols. Our work has involved an exploration of the reactions of these allenes with many different electrophiles: the E- or Z-halo- or seleno-hydroxylations of allenyl sulfoxides, sulfones, phosphine oxides, carboxylates, sulfides or selenides, butenolides, and arenes, and the halo- or selenolactonization reactions of allenoic acids and allenoates. These reactions have produced a host of new compounds such as stereodefined allylic alcohols, ethers, amides, thiiranes, and lactones. In all these reactions, water acts as a reactant and plays an important role in determining the reaction pathway and the stereoselectivity. The differing electronic properties of the two C=C bonds in these allenes determine the regioselectivity of these reactions. Through mechanistic studies of chirality transfer, isolation and reactivity of cyclic intermediates, (18)O-labeling, and substituent effects, we discovered that the E-stereoselectivity of some

  20. Kansas Public Television Network (KPTN).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemen, Jack A.

    The plans of the Kansas Public Television Board (KPTB) for development of the Kansas Television Network are detailed for the period extending from FY 1979 to FY 1983; the proposed system is designed to serve the needs of the communities by extending existing capabilities and resources, sharing common resources, and enriching the total system.…

  1. Annotated bibliography of the Anardarko basin area; Kansas - Oklahoma - Texas

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography contains 2888 records related to the geology of the Anadarko basin area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: coal, petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; paleontology; petrology; stratigraphy; tectonics; geologic correlations; drilling; exploration; fossils; geochemistry; geophysics; seismic surveys; geologic structures; uranium deposits; and water resources. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area. Some of the items (19) are themselves bibliographies.

  2. Measurement of irrigated acreage in Western Kansas from LANDSAT images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keene, K.M.; Conley, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    In the past four decades, irrigated acreage in western Kansas has increased rapidly. Optimum utilization of vital groundwater supplies requires implementation of long-term water-management programs. One important variable in such programs is up-to-date information on acreage under irrigation. Conventional ground survey methods of estimating irrigated acreage are too slow to be of maximum use in water-management programs. Visual interpretation of LANDSAT images permits more rapid measurement of irrigated acreage, but procedures are tedious and still relatively slow. For example, using a LANDSAT false-color composite image in areas of western Kansas with few landmarks, it is impossible to keep track of fields by examination under low-power microscope. Irrigated fields are more easily delineated on a photographically enlarged false-color composite and are traced on an overlay for measurement. Interpretation and measurement required 6 weeks for a four-county (3140 mi2, 8133 km2) test area. Video image-analysis equipment permits rapid measurement of irrigated acreage. Spectral response of irrigated summer crops in western Kansas on MSS band 5 (visible red, 0.6-0.7 ??m) images is low in contrast to high response from harvested and fallow fields and from common soil types. Therefore, irrigated acreage in western Kansas can be uniquely discriminated by video image analysis. The area of irrigated crops in a given area of view is measured directly. Sources of error are small in western Kansas. After preliminary preparation of the images, the time required to measure irrigated acreage was 1 h per county (average area, 876 ml2 or 2269 km2). ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  3. Allen Auditorium attic looking from southeast corner. Wine barrels with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Allen Auditorium attic looking from southeast corner. Wine barrels with scrap used for counterweight material for lift up walls no longer in use - Sheldon Jackson College, Richard H. Allen Memorial Hall, Lincoln Street, Sitka, Sitka Borough, AK

  4. William G. Allen: On "Orators and Oratory."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calloway-Thomas, Carolyn

    1988-01-01

    William G. Allen was an African-American professor at Central College, McGrawville, New York. His lecture, "Orators and Oratory," delivered on June 22, 1852, is the earliest recorded study by an American Black on the ancient art of oratory. The text of the lecture is provided. (BJV)

  5. Kansas coal distribution, resources, and potential for coalbed methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, L.L.

    2000-01-01

    Kansas has large amounts of bituminous coal both at the surface and in the subsurface of eastern Kansas. Preliminary studies indicate at least 53 billion tons (48 billion MT) of deep coal [>100 ft (>30 m)] determined from 32 different coal beds. Strippable coal resources at a depth < 100 ft (<30 m) total 2.8 billion tons (2.6 billion MT), and this total is determined from 17 coals. Coal beds present in the Cherokee Group (Middle Pennsylvanian) represent most of these coal resource totals. Deep coal beds with the largest resource totals include the Bevier, Mineral, "Aw" (unnamed coal bed), Riverton, and Weir-Pittsburg coals, all within the Cherokee Group. Based on chemical analyses, coals in the southeastern part of the state are generally high volatile A bituminous, whereas coals in the east-central and northeastern part of the state are high-volatile B bituminous coals. The primary concern of coal beds in Kansas for deep mining or development of coalbed methane is the thin nature [<2 ft (0.6 m)] of most coal beds. Present production of coalbed methane is centered mainly in the southern Wilson/northern Montgomery County area of southeastern Kansas where methane is produced from the Mulky, Weir-Pittsburg, and Riverton coals.

  6. Summer bird use of Kansas windbreaks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cable, T.T.; Schroeder, R.L.; Brack, V.; Cook, P.S.

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-four windbreaks in Stafford and Pawnee counties in Kansas were censused for birds during the nesting seasons of 1988-1990. Eighty-nine species of birds were found in the windbreaks with 60 species believed to be nesting. Fifteen species used the windbreaks for feeding or as singing perches but did not nest, and 14 species were spring migrants. Species representing 20 taxonomic families and 15 foraging guilds nested in the windbreaks. Fifteen species were members of the omnivore/ground forager guild. Five species considered forest interior or area sensitive were found nesting in the windbreaks. Windbreak area was important in determining which species were present. Windbreaks provide habitat for a large component of the Great Plains' avifauna, including some species whose populations are decreasing in the region.

  7. Coalbed methane production base established in Southeast Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckinger, W.T.

    1992-04-13

    This paper reports that revenue from coalbed methane gas sales is growing and currently far exceeds that of what little conventional gas is produced in southeastern Kansas. And this only 2-1/2 years after Stroud Oil Properties, Wichita, brought in the first coalbed methane well in the Sycamore Valley in Montgomery County 6 miles north of Independence. Another operator contributing to the success is Conquest Oil, Greeley, Colo. Conquest acquired a lease with 20 old wells near Sycamore, recompleted five of them in Weir coal, and has installed a compressor. It hopes to being selling a combined 300 Mcfd soon. Great Eastern Energy, Denver, reportedly can move 2 MMcfd from its Sycamore Valley holdings. The fever is spreading into Northeast Kansas, where a venture headed by Duncan Energy Co. and Farleigh Oil Properties, also of Denver, plan 12 coalbed methane wildcats. The two companies received in October 1991 from the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC) a 40 acre well spacing for seven counties and an exclusion from burdensome gas testing procedures. The test procedures are on the books but not applicable to coal gas wells.

  8. Annual Report of Monitoring at Barnes, Kansas, in 2012

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M.

    2013-06-01

    Barnes, Kansas, is a small rural community (population approximately 150) located in Washington County, in north-central Kansas (Figure 1.1). Barnes is located in Section 9, Township 4 South, Range 5 East, at approximate latitude 39°43'0'' north and longitude 96°52'25'' west (USGS 1968). The city lies in a transition zone between the Flint Hills and the glaciated region. The area’s topography consists of gently sloping hills of Pleistocene loess (< 20 ft) overlying a shale unit and interbedded shale, limestone, and siltstone of the Permian Chase Group. Groundwater for the public water supply is obtained from wells PWS2 and PWS3 at reported depths of 155 ft and 160 ft, respectively, located in the northwestern portion of the city. The water is produced from the bedrock aquifer of the Chase Group. Section 2 summarizes the hydrogeologic conceptual site model. This report summarizes findings for groundwater inspection in Barnes.

  9. Libraries in Kansas: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... 240-7973 http://iach.amedd.army.mil Garden City St. Catherine Hospital Medical Library 401 East Spruce ... City, KS 67846-5679 620-272-2172 Kansas City University of Kansas Medical Center Archie R. Dykes ...

  10. H. Julian Allen with Blunt Body Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    H. Julian Allen is best known for his 'Blunt Body Theory' of aerodynamics, a design technique for alleviating the severe re-entry heating problem which was then delaying the development of ballistic missiles. His findings revolutionized the fundamental design of ballistic missle re-entry shapes. Subsequently, applied research led to applications of the 'blunt' shape to ballistic missles and spacecraft which were intended to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. This application led to the design of ablative heat shields that protected the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts as their space capsules re- entered the Earth's atmosphere. 'Harvey' Allen as he was called by most, was not only a brilliant scientist and aeronautical engineer but was also admired for his kindness, thoughtfulness and sense of humor. Among his many other accomplishments, Harvey Allen served as Center Director of the NASA Ames Research Center from 1965 to 1969. He died of a heart attack on January 29, 1977 at the age of 66.

  11. The Farm Crisis and Decatur County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flora, Jan L.; And Others

    This case study assesses the impact of the farm sector on the economy and social organization of Decatur County (Kansas), a county which has historically depended on agriculture for its livelihood. Data were obtained from analysis of time series statistical indicators for the period between 1966 and 1984, questionnaire responses of local…

  12. Kansas Rural Villages Project, 1978-1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Edward P.; Shelley, Scott

    Aurora, a village of 147 residents in north central Kansas, was the focus of a 1978 investigation of the community development potential for Kansas rural villages. Students and staff from the University of Kansas School of Social Welfare worked with community residents to identify three programs the village wanted (a recreation program, a…

  13. University of Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, S.; Prosser, S.W.; Dummer, A.; Farrar, K.

    1995-08-01

    This past year the Kansas group achieved its objective of studying the fusion-fission mechanism for three different entrance channels populating {sup 48}Cr with the measurement of the {sup 20}Ne+{sup 28}Si reaction. Previously the group had studied the {sup 24}Mg+{sup 24}Mg reaction in a particle-only measurement and the {sup 36}Ar+{sup 12}C reaction in a particle-gamma coincidence measurement. The latest experiment was done at the ATLAS gamma-ray facility and employed a particle-particle-gamma coincidence arrangement. The {sup 20}Ne+{sup 28}Si data seem to confirm the picture that has been emerging of a population of states in the fission fragments that is largely determined by a statistical phase space. Significant discrepancies in the observed and predicted population for some excitations, however, suggest that either a different reaction mechanism may be involved in these populations, or a different spin distribution of the compound nucleus is present than is assumed for the calculations. The group is now working with the data for all three reactions in an attempt to develop an overall consistent picture.

  14. ­Is the Recent Increase in Seismicity in Southern Kansas Natural?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, J. L.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Llenos, A. L.; Walter, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes in southern Kansas were nearly unheard of until September 2013, when two M2 earthquakes occurred. Since then, the earthquake rate has risen dramatically. Between December 2013 and July 28, 2014, 14 M≥3 earthquakes were recorded in Harper and Sumner counties, the largest being a M3.8 earthquake in December 2013. Residents of the towns of Caldwell and Anthony have reported feeling even more earthquakes. In response to the surge in earthquakes, the USGS deployed a 10-station seismic network to monitor earthquakes in southeastern Harper and southwestern Sumner counties. We have identified over 200 earthquakes that occurred from mid-June to late-July, 2014. The locations of these earthquakes cluster within or near the seismic array, ranging in magnitude from 0.5 to 3.5. The earthquakes we identified are occurring within the Mississippian Lime Play, an area of rapidly expanding oil and gas development stretching from central Oklahoma to northwestern Kansas. In Kansas, new development of the play is largely in the adjoining areas of Harper and Sumner counties. Even with the new development, production in Sumner County has largely remained constant. However, in Harper County, where production was fairly stable from 1995-2010, it began increasing rapidly in 2011. In 2013 the highest yearly production volumes to date were approximately five times larger than those in 2010. The spatial and temporal correlation of the oil and gas development and seismicity in southern Kansas suggests a potential relationship between the two; some of the earthquake clusters lie within 1-2 kilometers of recent development. We examine the possibility that the earthquakes in southern Kansas are induced by wastewater injection and/or hydraulic fracturing. This involves using a refined earthquake catalog built upon cross-correlation detections and high-precision earthquake relocation techniques. We also compute first-motion focal mechanisms and compare them to the regional stress field.

  15. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfn; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2004-12-31

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of December 2004, 11.39 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 242 MCFD. Vent losses were excessive during June as ambient temperatures increased. Installation of smaller plungers in the carbon dioxide injection pump reduced the recycle and vent loss substantially. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May and in the second production well in August. No channeling of carbon dioxide was observed. The GOR has remained within the range of 3000-4000 for most the last six months. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.35 B/D for the six month period between July 1 and December 31. Cumulative oil production was 814 bbls. Neither well has experienced increased oil production rates expected from the arrival of the oil bank generated by carbon dioxide injection.

  16. Allenes and computational chemistry: from bonding situations to reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Elena; Fernández, Israel

    2014-05-07

    The present review is focused on the application of computational/theoretical methods to the wide and rich chemistry of allenes. Special emphasis is made on the interplay and synergy between experimental and computational methodologies, rather than on recent developments in methods and algorithms. Therefore, this review covers the state-of-the-art applications of computational chemistry to understand and rationalize the bonding situation and vast reactivity of allenes. Thus, the contents of this review span from the most fundamental studies on the equilibrium structure and chirality of allenes to recent advances in the study of complex reaction mechanisms involving allene derivatives in organic and organometallic chemistry.

  17. Estimation of potential runoff-contributing areas in the Kansas-Lower Republican River Basin, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    1999-01-01

    Digital soils and topographic data were used to estimate and compare potential runoff-contributing areas for 19 selected subbasins representing soil, slope, and runoff variability within the Kansas-Lower Republican (KLR) River Basin. Potential runoff-contributing areas were estimated separately and collectively for the processes of infiltration-excess and saturation-excess overland flow using a set of environmental conditions that represented high, moderate, and low potential runoff. For infiltration-excess overland flow, various rainfall intensities and soil permeabilities were used. For saturation-excess overland flow, antecedent soil-moisture conditions and a topographic wetness index were used. Results indicated that the subbasins with relatively high potential runoff are located in the central part of the KLR River Basin. These subbasins are Black Vermillion River, Clarks Creek, Delaware River upstream from Muscotah, Grasshopper Creek, Mill Creek (Wabaunsee County), Soldier Creek, Vermillion Creek (Pottawatomie County), and Wildcat Creek. The subbasins with relatively low potential runoff are located in the western one-third of the KLR River Basin, with one exception, and are Buffalo Creek, Little Blue River upstream from Barnes, Mill Creek (Washington County), Republican River between Concordia and Clay Center, Republican River upstream from Concordia, Wakarusa River downstream from Clinton Lake (exception), and White Rock Creek. The ability to distinguish the subbasins as having relatively high or low potential runoff was possible mostly due to the variability of soil permeability across the KLR River Basin.

  18. Annual Report of Monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2012

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M.

    2013-05-01

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the public water supply wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha (Figure 1.1). The population of Morrill as of the 2010 Census was approximately 230 (down from 277 in 2000). All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. This document reports the findings concerning the groundwater in Morrill.

  19. Allen's big-eared bat (Idionycteris phyllotis) documented in colorado based on recordings of its distinctive echolocation call

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, M.A.; Navo, K.W.; Bonewell, L.; Mosch, C.J.; Adams, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Allen's big-eared bat (Idionycteris phyllotis) inhabits much of the southwestern USA, but has not been documented in Colorado. We recorded echolocation calls consistent with I. phyllotis near La Sal Creek, Montrose County, Colorado. Based on characteristics of echolocation calls and flight behavior, we conclude that the echolocation calls described here were emitted by I. phyllotis and that they represent the first documentation of this species in Colorado.

  20. Kansas ground-water observation-well network, 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dague, B.J.; Stullken, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Water level measurements are made in 1,892 selected wells in 73 counties, which currently (1985) comprise the Kansas groundwater observation-well network. These measurements are made on a continuous, monthly, quarterly, or annual basis. Water level measurements have been made in observation wells since 1937 as part of a cooperative program among the Kansas Geological Survey , the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, the city of Wichita, and the U.S. Geological Survey. The objectives of the observation-well cooperative program are: (1) to provide long-term records of water level fluctuations in representative wells, (2) to facilitate the determination of possible water level trends that may indicate future availability of groundwater supplies, (3) to aid in the determination of possible changes in the base flow of streams, and (4) to provide information for use in water-resources research. This report lists for each well in the network the location, the first year of recorded water level measurement, the frequency and number of measurements, the land-surface altitude, hexagon-grid identifiers for wells in the High Plains aquifer, and the principal geologic unit(s) in which the well is completed. (USGS)

  1. Kansas City Plots Next Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Kansas City (Missouri) Public Schools is at a crossroads. The district has struggled for decades with poor academic achievement, dwindling enrollment and budget, and short-term superintendents--27 in the past 40 years. Most recently, after a two-year stint during which he helped the district get its financial house in order, closing nearly half of…

  2. Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Kansas Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity International, Washington, DC.

    Designed for middle school through high school students, this unit contains eight lesson plans that focus on Kansas state law. The state lessons correspond to lessons in the volume, "Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Drug Avoidance Lessons for Middle School & High School Students." Developed to be presented by educators, law student,…

  3. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas - near term -- Class 2. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile petroleum. Specific reservoirs targeted are the Schaben Field in Ness County and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County.

  4. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  5. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  6. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  7. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  9. Ground-water data collected in the Missouri River Basin units in Kansas during 1949

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Delmar W.

    1950-01-01

    Ground-water studies in the Missouri River Basin were begun by the United States Geological Survey during the fall of 1945 as a part of the program for development of the resources of the basin by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and other Federal Agencies. The studies of the ground-water resources in the part of Kansas that lies within the Basin have been coordinated with the cooperative program of ground-water studies already being carried on in Kansas by the Federal Geological Survey and the State Geological Survey of Kansas with the cooperation of the Division of Sanitation of the Kansas State Board of Health and the Division of Water Resources of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture. Areas in which ground-water data have been collected under the Missouri Basin program include the Almena Unit in Norton and Phillips Counties; the Bostwick Unit in Jewell, Republic, and Cloud Counties; the Cedar Bluff Unit in Ellis, Rush, and Trego Counties; the Glen Elder Unit in Mitchell County; the Webster Unit in Osborne County; and the Wilson Unit in Lincoln County. Most of the ground-water data presented in this report were collected during 1949. Most of the data collected in these areas prior to the end of 1947 were presented in a report that was mimeographed in September 1948 and most of the data collected during 1948 were presented in a report that was mimeographed in November 1949. This report is the third of a series of annual reports on ground-water data collected in the Missouri Basin units in Kansas. These annual reports are a means of more promptly releasing for administrative use the data collected each year. Data that are included in the annual reports for a given area will be assembled later in a report on the geology and hydrology of that area. An index of the data collected and presented in the 1947, 1948, and 1949 reports is given in table 1.

  10. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas -- near term -- Class 2. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian (Mississippian) dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile oil. The project addresses producibility problems in two fields: specific reservoirs target the Schaben Field in Ness County, Kansas, and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County, Kansas. The producibility problems to be addressed include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, non-optimum recovery efficiency. The results of this project will be disseminated through various technology transfer activities. General overview--progress is reported for the period from 1 April 1995 to 30 June 1995. Work in this quarter has concentrated on reservoir characterization with the initiation of technology transfer. Difficulties still remain in the drilling of the final two wells. Some preliminary work on reservoir characterization has been completed, and related technology transfer has been initiated.

  11. Allenes in Asymmetric Catalysis. Asymmetric Ring-Opening of Meso-Epoxides Catalyzed by Allene-Containing Phosphine Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Xiaotao; Qi, Xiangbing; Ready, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Unsymmetrically substituted allenes (1,2 dienes) are inherently chiral and can be prepared in optically pure form. Nonetheless, to date the allene framework has not been incorporated into ligands for asymmetric catalysis. Since allenes project functionality differently than either tetrahedral carbon or chiral biaryls, they may create complementary chiral environments. This study demonstrates that optically active C2 symmetric allene-containing bisphosphine oxides can catalyze the addition of SiCl4 to meso epoxides with high enantioselectivity. The epoxide-opening likely involves generation of a Lewis acidic, cationic (bisphosphine oxide)SiCl3 complex. The fact that high asymmetric induction is observed suggests that allenes may represent a new platform for the development of ligands and catalysts for asymmetric synthesis. PMID:19722613

  12. Assessment of Services for Retired and Senior Citizens in Labette County (A Pilot Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usera, John J.; Martin, Jack W.

    In November 1988, a study was conducted to identify factors contributing to the quality of life of retired persons in southeast Kansas. A random sample of 366 Labette County residents over 59 years of age was surveyed by mail regarding their social life, housing, income, health, and the social and economic environment in Kansas. Study findings,…

  13. Kansas Water Science Center bookmark

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2017-03-27

    The U.S. Geological Survey Kansas Water Science Center has collected and interpreted hydrologic information in Kansas since 1895. Data collected include streamflow and gage height, reservoir content, water quality and water quantity, suspended sediment, and groundwater levels. Interpretative hydrologic studies are completed on national, regional, statewide, and local levels and cooperatively funded through more than 40 partnerships with these agencies. The U.S. Geological Survey provides impartial scientific information to describe and understand the health of our ecosystems and environment; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. These collected data are in the National Water Information System https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ks/nwis/rt, and all results are documented in reports that also are online at https://ks.water.usgs.gov/. Follow the USGS Kansas Water Science Center on Twitter for the most recent updates and other information: https://twitter.com/USGS_KS.

  14. South Central Kansas Gender Equity Project. 1994-95 Annual Report, Field Trip Guide, and Library Resource Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson-Pennington, Laura S.; And Others

    Cowley County Community College established the South Central Kansas Gender Equity Educational Resource Center in 1991-92 to facilitate career awareness, exploration, and preparation by students of all ages, focusing on opportunities in non-traditional fields for both females and males. This document presents an annual report for the Center for…

  15. 76 FR 62050 - Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC for the Abengoa...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC for the Abengoa Biorefinery Project Near Hugoton, Stevens County, KS AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Loan Programs Office....

  16. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  17. 40 CFR 81.252 - Northwest Kansas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Cheyenne County, Decatur County, Ellis County, Gove County, Graham County, Logan County, Ness County..., Sheridan County, Sherman County, Smith County, Thomas County, Trego County, Wallace County....

  18. 40 CFR 81.252 - Northwest Kansas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Cheyenne County, Decatur County, Ellis County, Gove County, Graham County, Logan County, Ness County..., Sheridan County, Sherman County, Smith County, Thomas County, Trego County, Wallace County....

  19. 40 CFR 81.252 - Northwest Kansas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Cheyenne County, Decatur County, Ellis County, Gove County, Graham County, Logan County, Ness County..., Sheridan County, Sherman County, Smith County, Thomas County, Trego County, Wallace County....

  20. 40 CFR 81.252 - Northwest Kansas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Cheyenne County, Decatur County, Ellis County, Gove County, Graham County, Logan County, Ness County..., Sheridan County, Sherman County, Smith County, Thomas County, Trego County, Wallace County....

  1. 40 CFR 81.252 - Northwest Kansas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Cheyenne County, Decatur County, Ellis County, Gove County, Graham County, Logan County, Ness County..., Sheridan County, Sherman County, Smith County, Thomas County, Trego County, Wallace County....

  2. 40 CFR 131.34 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kansas. 131.34 Section 131.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.34 Kansas. (a) In addition to the State-adopted use designations, the following water...

  3. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Kansas, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Kansas for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Kansas students showed across-the-board gains--both reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and…

  4. A Kansas Integrated Commercialization Information Network (KICIN).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambler, C.; And Others

    A consortium of Kansas economic development service providers is building a web of virtual satellite offices that will demonstrate the delivery of economic development services in all areas of Kansas. These "offices" will use the Internet and a novel information delivery system to reach small and medium-sized businesses and individuals…

  5. Kansas Energy Sources: A Geological Review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merriam, D.F.; Brady, L.L.; Newell, K.D.

    2012-01-01

    Kansas produces both conventional energy (oil, gas, and coal) and nonconventional (coalbed gas, wind, hydropower, nuclear, geothermal, solar, and biofuels) and ranks the 22nd in state energy production in the U. S. Nonrenewable conventional petroleum is the most important energy source with nonrenewable, nonconventional coalbed methane gas becoming increasingly important. Many stratigraphic units produce oil and/or gas somewhere in the state with the exception of the Salina Basin in north-central Kansas. Coalbed methane is produced from shallow wells drilled into the thin coal units in southeastern Kansas. At present, only two surface coal mines are active in southeastern Kansas. Although Kansas has been a major exporter of energy in the past (it ranked first in oil production in 1916), now, it is an energy importer. ?? 2011 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  6. Rapid assessment of mosquitoes and arbovirus activity after floods in southeastern Kansas, 2007.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Bruce A; Whitt, Parker B; Roberts, Lesa F; Lehman, Jennifer A; Lindsey, Nicole P; Nasci, Roger S; Hansen, Gail R

    2009-09-01

    A rapid assessment was conducted in July-August 2007 to determine the impact of heavy rains and early summer floods on the mosquitoes and arbovirus activity in 4 southeastern Kansas counties. During 10 days and nights of collections using different types and styles of mosquito traps, a total of 10,512 adult female mosquitoes representing 29 species were collected, including a new species record for Kansas (Psorophora mathesoni). High numbers of Aedes albopictus were collected. Over 4,000 specimens of 4 Culex species in 235 species-specific pools were tested for the presence of West Nile, St. Louis, and western equine encephalitis viruses. Thirty pools representing 3 Culex species were positive for West Nile virus (WNV). No other arboviruses were detected in the samples. Infection rates of WNV in Culex pipiens complex in 2 counties (10.7/1,000 to 22.6/1,000) and in Culex salinarius in 1 county (6.0/1,000) were sufficiently high to increase the risk of transmission to humans. The infection rate of WNV in Culex erraticus was 1.9/1,000 in one county. Two focal hot spots of intense WNV transmission were identified in Montgomery and Wilson counties, where infection rates in Cx. pipiens complex were 26/ 1,000 and 19.9/1,000, respectively. Despite confirmed evidence of WNV activity in the area, there was no increase in human cases of arboviral disease documented in the 4 counties for the remainder of 2007.

  7. Substituent effects on dynamics at conical intersections: Allene and methyl allenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Simon P.; Wang, Yanmei; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E.; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    We report a joint experimental and theoretical study on the ultrafast excited state dynamics of allene and a series of its methylated analogues (1,2-butadiene, 1,1-dimethylallene, and tetramethylallene) in order to elucidate the conical intersection mediated dynamics that give rise to ultrafast relaxation to the ground electronic state. We use femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) to probe the coupled electronic-vibrational dynamics following UV excitation at 200 nm (6.2 eV). Ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulations are employed to determine the mechanistic details of two competing dynamical pathways to the ground electronic state. In all molecules, these pathways are found to involve as follows: (i) twisting about the central allenic C-C-C axis followed by pyramidalization at one of the terminal carbon atoms and (ii) bending of allene moiety. Importantly, the AIMS trajectory data were used for ab initio simulations of the TRPES, permitting direct comparison with experiment. For each molecule, the decay of the TRPES signal is characterized by short (30 fs, 52 fs, 23 fs) and long (1.8 ps, 3.5 ps, [306 fs, 18 ps]) time constants for 1,2-butadiene, 1,1-dimethylallene, and tetramethylallene, respectively. However, AIMS simulations show that these time constants are only loosely related to the evolution of electronic character and actually more closely correlate to large amplitude motions on the electronic excited state, modulating the instantaneous vertical ionization potentials. Furthermore, the fully substituted tetramethylallene is observed to undergo qualitatively different dynamics, as displacements involving the relatively massive methyl groups impede direct access to the conical intersections which give rise to the ultrafast relaxation dynamics observed in the other species. These results show that the branching between the "twisting" and "bending" pathways can be modified via the selective methylation of the terminal carbon atoms of

  8. Substituent effects on dynamics at conical intersections: Allene and methyl allenes.

    PubMed

    Neville, Simon P; Wang, Yanmei; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S

    2016-01-07

    We report a joint experimental and theoretical study on the ultrafast excited state dynamics of allene and a series of its methylated analogues (1,2-butadiene, 1,1-dimethylallene, and tetramethylallene) in order to elucidate the conical intersection mediated dynamics that give rise to ultrafast relaxation to the ground electronic state. We use femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) to probe the coupled electronic-vibrational dynamics following UV excitation at 200 nm (6.2 eV). Ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulations are employed to determine the mechanistic details of two competing dynamical pathways to the ground electronic state. In all molecules, these pathways are found to involve as follows: (i) twisting about the central allenic C-C-C axis followed by pyramidalization at one of the terminal carbon atoms and (ii) bending of allene moiety. Importantly, the AIMS trajectory data were used for ab initio simulations of the TRPES, permitting direct comparison with experiment. For each molecule, the decay of the TRPES signal is characterized by short (30 fs, 52 fs, 23 fs) and long (1.8 ps, 3.5 ps, [306 fs, 18 ps]) time constants for 1,2-butadiene, 1,1-dimethylallene, and tetramethylallene, respectively. However, AIMS simulations show that these time constants are only loosely related to the evolution of electronic character and actually more closely correlate to large amplitude motions on the electronic excited state, modulating the instantaneous vertical ionization potentials. Furthermore, the fully substituted tetramethylallene is observed to undergo qualitatively different dynamics, as displacements involving the relatively massive methyl groups impede direct access to the conical intersections which give rise to the ultrafast relaxation dynamics observed in the other species. These results show that the branching between the "twisting" and "bending" pathways can be modified via the selective methylation of the terminal carbon atoms of

  9. Substituent effects on dynamics at conical intersections: Allene and methyl allenes

    SciTech Connect

    Neville, Simon P.; Wang, Yanmei; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E.; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2016-01-07

    We report a joint experimental and theoretical study on the ultrafast excited state dynamics of allene and a series of its methylated analogues (1,2-butadiene, 1,1-dimethylallene, and tetramethylallene) in order to elucidate the conical intersection mediated dynamics that give rise to ultrafast relaxation to the ground electronic state. We use femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) to probe the coupled electronic-vibrational dynamics following UV excitation at 200 nm (6.2 eV). Ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulations are employed to determine the mechanistic details of two competing dynamical pathways to the ground electronic state. In all molecules, these pathways are found to involve as follows: (i) twisting about the central allenic C–C–C axis followed by pyramidalization at one of the terminal carbon atoms and (ii) bending of allene moiety. Importantly, the AIMS trajectory data were used for ab initio simulations of the TRPES, permitting direct comparison with experiment. For each molecule, the decay of the TRPES signal is characterized by short (30 fs, 52 fs, 23 fs) and long (1.8 ps, 3.5 ps, [306 fs, 18 ps]) time constants for 1,2-butadiene, 1,1-dimethylallene, and tetramethylallene, respectively. However, AIMS simulations show that these time constants are only loosely related to the evolution of electronic character and actually more closely correlate to large amplitude motions on the electronic excited state, modulating the instantaneous vertical ionization potentials. Furthermore, the fully substituted tetramethylallene is observed to undergo qualitatively different dynamics, as displacements involving the relatively massive methyl groups impede direct access to the conical intersections which give rise to the ultrafast relaxation dynamics observed in the other species. These results show that the branching between the “twisting” and “bending” pathways can be modified via the selective methylation of the terminal

  10. Regiodivergent and Stereoselective Hydrosilylation of 1,3-Disubstituted Allenes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Zachary D; Dorel, Ruth; Montgomery, John

    2015-07-27

    Methods for the highly stereoselective and regiodivergent hydrosilylation of 1,3-disubstituted allenes have been developed. The synthesis of E allylsilanes is accomplished with palladium NHC catalysts, and trisubstituted Z alkenylsilanes are accessed with nickel NHC catalysts. Unsymmetrically substituted allenes are well tolerated with nickel catalysis and afford Z alkenylsilanes. Evidence for a plausible mechanism was obtained through an isotopic double-labeling crossover study.

  11. Spiculitic chert reservoir in Glick Field, South-Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.P.; Longman, M.W.; Lloyd, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Glick Field, located in Kiowa and Comanche counties of southern Kansas, was discovered in 1957 and has produced more than 362 BCF from Mississippian Osage chert, commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Chat.{close_quotes} Other {open_quotes}CHAT{close_quotes} reservoirs in Kansas and Oklahoma produce mainly from mixed chert and dolomite beneath the pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity, but Glick Field`s reservoir is dominated by chert containing abundant sponge spicules. Glick Field is a stratigraphic trap with production ending where the spiculitic facies pinches out into tight limestones to the south and west which provide a lateral seal. Additionally, updip, to the northeast, the productive facies is truncated by the unconformity. Reworked chert conglomerates overlying the spiculitic reservoir at the unconformity also produce some gas. The spiculitic chert forming the reservoir was desposited below storm wavebase and grades laterally in all directions into echinoderm and brachiopod-rich skeletal wackestones and lime mudstones. Even where completely silicified, these associated limestone are tight. Thus, the reservoir is an in situ oval-shaped complex of internally brecciated sponge mats and bioherms capped in part by the chert conglomerate. The spiculitic chert contains up to 50% porosity in molds after sponge spicules, matrix micropores and vugs are connected in part by fracture and breccia porosity. Distribution of the sponge bioherms which form the reservoir facies was partly controlled by a subtle change on the shallow Mississippian carbonate shelf from clean skeletal limestones southward into shaly (and probably more anoxic) carbonates known locally as the {open_quotes}Cowley Facies.{close_quotes} The sponge bioherms formed most commonly just updip from this boundary, which can be mapped across southern Kansas. Thus, lithologic mapping provides a potential exploration tool with which to find other stratigraphically trapped spiculitic reservoirs in the area.

  12. Reactivity and Chemoselectivity of Allenes in Rh(I)-Catalyzed Intermolecular (5 + 2) Cycloadditions with Vinylcyclopropanes: Allene-Mediated Rhodacycle Formation Can Poison Rh(I)-Catalyzed Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Allenes are important 2π building blocks in organic synthesis and engage as 2-carbon components in many metal-catalyzed reactions. Wender and co-workers discovered that methyl substituents on the terminal allene double bond counterintuitively change the reactivities of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs). More sterically encumbered allenes afford higher cycloadduct yields, and such effects are also observed in other Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular cycloadditions. Through density functional theory calculations (B3LYP and M06) and experiment, we explored this enigmatic reactivity and selectivity of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with VCPs. The apparent low reactivity of terminally unsubstituted allenes is associated with a competing allene dimerization that irreversibly sequesters rhodium. With terminally substituted allenes, steric repulsion between the terminal substituents significantly increases the barrier of allene dimerization while the barrier of the (5 + 2) cycloaddition is not affected, and thus the cycloaddition prevails. Computation has also revealed the origin of chemoselectivity in (5 + 2) cycloadditions with allene-ynes. Although simple allene and acetylene have similar reaction barriers, intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions of allene-ynes occur exclusively at the terminal allene double bond. The terminal double bond is more reactive due to the enhanced d−π* backdonation. At the same time, insertion of the internal double bond of an allene-yne has a higher barrier as it would break π conjugation. Substituted alkynes are more difficult to insert compared with acetylene, because of the steric repulsion from the additional substituents. This leads to the greater reactivity of the allene double bond relative to the alkynyl group in allene-ynes. PMID:25379606

  13. Groundwater from Lower Cretaceous rocks in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keene, Katherine M.; Bayne, Charles Knight

    1976-01-01

    Sandstones in Lower Cretaceous rocks contain supplies, of water that may be adequate to meet increasing present and future demands for supplemental municipal and domestic use in central and western Kansas. An estimated 70 to 80 million acre-feet (86,000 to 99,000 cubic hectometers) of water containing less than 1,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids may be acceptable for use at the present (1976). An additional 10 to 15 million acre-feet (12,000 to 18,000 cubic hectometers) containing 1,000 to 3,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids is estimated to be available for use in the future with appropriate desalinization. Lower Cretaceous rocks crop out from Washington County on the north to Comanche County on-the south. The rocks dip from a structural high in the southwest part of the State to structural lows in the northwest and north-central part. Depth below land surface increases generally northwestward to about 2,600 feet (790 meters); thickness of the rocks increases westward, nearly zero to about 850 feet (260 meters). The rocks consist chiefly of marine to nonmarine shale and silt- stone interbedded with coastal to deltaic sandstone. The interbedded sandstone, which composes about one-third of the rocks, consists of one or more lenses that thicken westward to about 400 feet (120 meters) in the central part of western Kansas. The yield of water to individual wells is related to areal extent, thickness, and interconnection of the sand lenses and to grain size and cementation of the sand. Large amounts of water may be pumped by wells where loosely cemented sand lenses are interconnected. Wells commonly yield adequate supplies for domestic and stock use; reported yields from municipal and irrigation wells range from about 100 to 2,000 gallons per minute (6 to 125 liters per second). Recharge to the Lower Cretaceous-rocks occurs in the area of outcrop and from hydraulically connected saturated Cenozoic rocks, especially in the southern part of the State

  14. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 90-084-2219, Kansas City Kansas Police Department, Kansas City, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, R.; Almaguer, D.

    1992-05-01

    In response to a request from a management representative of the Kansas City, Kansas, Police Department (SIC-9221), an evaluation was undertaken of possible lead (7439921) exposures at the Police Department outdoor firing range. About 200,000 rounds of ammunition were fired at the range each year. Personal breathing zone and area air samples were taken for lead analysis. Surface wipe samples were taken as well along with hand lead concentrations and contamination of clothing. Air sampling revealed that the officers were exposed to 8 hour time weighted average concentrations of airborne lead ranging from nondetectable to 8 micrograms (microg) per cubic meter. The general air samples collected ranged from nondetectable to trace levels of contamination. The authors conclude that airborne lead did not exceed evaluation criteria, but dermal, surface and clothing contamination could increase the potential for lead ingestion and lead contamination of automobiles and homes. The authors recommend that efforts be made to reduce the potential spread of lead, and that medical surveillance be instituted for frequent range users and the range master.

  15. Obituary: James Alfred Van Allen, 1914-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, George H.; McIlwain, Carl Edwin

    2006-12-01

    James Alfred Van Allen, world-renowned space scientist, died 9 August 2006 at the age of ninety-one. He succumbed to heart failure after a ten-week period of declining health. Van Allen served for his entire sixty-seven-year professional career as an amazingly productive researcher, space science spokesman, inspired teacher, and valued colleague. The realization by him and his associates that charged particles are trapped by the Earth's magnetic field began a whole new field of research, magnetospheric physics. Following that initial discovery, he and his associates quickly extended their observations, first to the inner planets, and then to the rest of the planets and beyond. During his tenure at Iowa, he and his group flew instruments on more than sixty successful Earth satellites and planetary spacecraft, including the first missions to the planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Van Allen's lifetime publication list numbers more than 275, of which many are widely-cited, seminal papers. He was the sole author of more than 125 of those papers. Beyond the research laboratory, Van Allen worked energetically throughout his career in establishing space research as a new branch of human inquiry. He was among the most sought-after as a committee member and adviser, working at the highest levels of government, including the White House and Congress, and at all levels of the national and international research establishments. Many presentations in the non-scientific arena helped to bring the exciting discoveries and challenges of space research to the attention of the general public. James Van Allen (Van to his many friends and colleagues) was born on 7 September 1914 on a small farm near Mount Pleasant, Iowa, the second of four sons of Alfred Morris Van Allen and Alma Olney Van Allen. After high school in Mount Pleasant, he entered Iowa Wesleyan College, majoring in physics and graduating summa cum laude. While there, he was introduced to geophysics

  16. Compilation and analyses of aquifer performance tests in eastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, T.B.; Burnett, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Selected aquifer-test data from 36 counties in eastern Kansas were collected from numerous sources and publications in order to produce a documented compilation of aquifer tests in one report. Data were obtained chiefly from private consulting firms and from government agencies. Hydraulic properties determined included transmissivity, storage coefficient (where observation well was available), and in some cases hydraulic properties of a confining layer. The aquifers tested comprised three main types of rocks--consolidated rock deposits, glacial deposits, and alluvial deposits that include the ' Equus beds, ' an extensive alluvial deposit in south-central Kansas. The Theis recovery equation and the Cooper-Jacob modified nonequilibrium equation were the two principal solution methods used. Other methods used included the Theis nonequilibrium equation, the Hantush-Jacob equation for a leaky confined aquifer, Hantush 's modified leaky equation in which storage from a confining layer was considered, the Boulton 's delayed-yield equation. Additionally, a specific-capacity method of estimating transmissivity was used when only a single drawdown value was available. (USGS)

  17. Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-Term -- Class 2

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Timothy R.; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-07-08

    This report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  18. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS--NEAR TERM--CLASS 2

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

    1999-06-01

    This annual report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  19. Wastewater Disposal, Hydraulic Fracturing, and Seismicity in Southern Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, J. L.; Terra, F. M.; Ellsworth, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    The concurrent appearance of seismicity with the expansion of oil and gas activities in southern Kansas since September 2012 suggests that industrial operations are inducing earthquakes. These earthquakes occur in a portion of the Mississippian Lime Play, an oil and gas field stretching from central Oklahoma to northwestern Kansas. As has been seen in other areas of high-rate wastewater injection, the seismicity appears to be driven by the disposal of produced water by injection into deep sedimentary formations. We focus on an 1800 km^2 region in Harper and Sumner counties where a temporary, 14-station seismic network deployed by the USGS monitors ongoing seismicity. Regional and national networks supplement the temporary network. Earthquake locations and magnitudes are reported on a daily basis and M≥1.5 earthquakes are included in the USGS Comprehensive Catalog (ComCat) with a magnitude of completeness of ~M2.0. The clusters of earthquakes are principally in the crystalline basement, some forming lineations extending up to 10 km. Focal mechanisms indicate normal faulting, consistent with the local tectonic stress field. While some of the clusters of seismicity are located close to high-rate injection wells, others are at least 10km from large injection wells. Additionally, high-rate wells do not always appear to be associated with seismicity. In response to the increased seismicity, on March 29, 2015 the Kansas Corporation Commission placed new limits on the rate of wastewater disposal in 5 areas in southern Kansas. Since this regulation has been in place, earthquake activity has decreased by 40-50%. In the 87 days between January 1, 2015 and March 29, when the order was enacted, there were on average three M≥2 earthquakes and 0.3 M≥3 earthquakes per day in the study area. The earthquake rate in the 87 days following the change in regulations dropped to 1.8 M≥2 and 0.2 M≥3 earthquakes per day in the same region over the same amount of time. The two

  20. Cost savings of telemedicine utilization for child psychiatry in a rural Kansas community.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Ryan; Belz, Norbert; DeLurgio, Stephen; Williams, Arthur R

    2010-10-01

    The costs of pediatric telemedicine services remain underreported and understudied; however, there is evidence that telepediatric services can be cost competitive with traditional ones. For 15 years, the University of Kansas Center for Telemedicine and Telehealth has been providing telemental health outreach from the University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC). One service site is located in Crawford County, Kansas, which provides telepsychiatry services to children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine the costs of operating the Crawford County site relative to accessing services at KUMC, the likely alternative service location. The cost of travel time to parents who accompanied a dependent to either location also was estimated. Patients and parents were examined over a 6-month period in 2006. One hundred thirty-two patients received 257 telemedicine psychiatric consultations during this period. Cost estimates for using the pediatric telemedicine service were assessed for all patients; however, travel and related costs were collected from a sample of 26 patient-parent dyads. The estimated costs of services were obtained using standard cost-accounting procedures. An average cost per consultation in Crawford County was $168.61. The cost savings in travel time and other expenses to parents and patients were substantial between use of the county site and KUMC. Subtracting average savings in travel costs to patients and parents produced an average cost of a telepsychiatry consult in Crawford County of only $30.99. This study was conducted over 6 months with a small number of observations; it should be replicated over a longer study period, with more patients, and with more data that might capture marginal costs of services.

  1. Logistic and linear regression model documentation for statistical relations between continuous real-time and discrete water-quality constituents in the Kansas River, Kansas, July 2012 through June 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Guy M.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2016-04-06

    The Kansas River is a primary source of drinking water for about 800,000 people in northeastern Kansas. Source-water supplies are treated by a combination of chemical and physical processes to remove contaminants before distribution. Advanced notification of changing water-quality conditions and cyanobacteria and associated toxin and taste-and-odor compounds provides drinking-water treatment facilities time to develop and implement adequate treatment strategies. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Kansas Water Office (funded in part through the Kansas State Water Plan Fund), and the City of Lawrence, the City of Topeka, the City of Olathe, and Johnson County Water One, began a study in July 2012 to develop statistical models at two Kansas River sites located upstream from drinking-water intakes. Continuous water-quality monitors have been operated and discrete-water quality samples have been collected on the Kansas River at Wamego (USGS site number 06887500) and De Soto (USGS site number 06892350) since July 2012. Continuous and discrete water-quality data collected during July 2012 through June 2015 were used to develop statistical models for constituents of interest at the Wamego and De Soto sites. Logistic models to continuously estimate the probability of occurrence above selected thresholds were developed for cyanobacteria, microcystin, and geosmin. Linear regression models to continuously estimate constituent concentrations were developed for major ions, dissolved solids, alkalinity, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus species), suspended sediment, indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, fecal coliform, and enterococci), and actinomycetes bacteria. These models will be used to provide real-time estimates of the probability that cyanobacteria and associated compounds exceed thresholds and of the concentrations of other water-quality constituents in the Kansas River. The models documented in this report are useful for characterizing changes

  2. On the metallic nature of carbon in allenes and heterocumulenes.

    PubMed

    Alcarazo, Manuel

    2011-03-07

    The IUPAC defines allenes as organic compounds having at least two double bonds from one carbon to two others. Thus the central carbon atom is in accord with the octet rule through the formation of two σ and two π bonds. However, this perspective highlights a series of recent experimental, as well as theoretical results, suggesting that depending on the substituents, this canonical description might not be the most adequate. In fact, in a growing number of examples the bond in allenes and related heterocumulenes is better described as an inner carbon that plays the role of the central atom of a "coordination complex" and interacts with its substituents as if they were ligands of this organic complex. This interpretation of the bond in allenes is especially useful in predicting the C(0), carbene or partial carbocationic character of the central carbon atom.

  3. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2007-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By December 31, 2006, 79,072 bbls of water were injected into CO2 I-1 and 3,923 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Water injection rates into CO2 I-1, CO2 No.10 and CO2 No.18 were stabilized during this period. Oil production rates increased from 4.7 B/D to 5.5 to 6 B/D confirming the arrival of an oil bank at CO2 No.12. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver No.7, Colliver No.3 and possibly Graham A4 located on an adjacent property. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Our management plan is to continue water injection maintaining oil displacement by displacing the carbon dioxide remaining in the C zone,. If the decline rate of production from the Colliver Lease remains as estimated and the oil rate from the pilot region remains constant, we estimate that the oil production attributed to carbon dioxide injection will be about 12,000 bbl by December 31, 2007. Oil recovery would be equivalent to 12 MCF/bbl, which is consistent with field experience in

  4. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2006-06-30

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By June 30, 2006, 41,566 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,726 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. Oil rates increased from about 3.3 B/D for the period from January through March to about 4.7 B/D for the period from April through June. If the oil rate is sustained, this may be the first indication of the arrival of the oil bank mobilized by carbon dioxide injection. A sustained fluid withdrawal rate of about 200 B/D from CO2 No.12 and CO2 No.13 appears to be necessary to obtain higher oil rates. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has

  5. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2005-12-31

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By the end of December 2005, 14,115 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,091 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Continued injection of water is planned to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

  6. Pest status and distribution of the stem borer, Dectes texanus, in Kansas.

    PubMed

    Buschman, Lawrent L; Sloderbeck, Phillip E

    2010-01-01

    The Dectes stem borer, Dectes texanus LeConte (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is currently receiving increased attention as a pest of soybeans in the Great Plains of North America. Field surveys were conducted in 1999 and in 2008 to record the distribution of this pest in Kansas. These surveys documented an increase in the abundance of the pest and an expansion in the range of this insect westward and eastward. The percentage of fields with more than 50% of plants infested also increased from 4% in 1999 to 11% in 2008. The far eastern counties still had surprisingly few infested fields even though much of the Kansas soybean acreage is located in these counties. It is not clear if D. texanus simply haven't expanded into eastern Kansas yet or if there is an ecological barrier that keeps them from doing so. Field crop entomologists from across eastern North America were sent an email questionnaire and their responses indicate that this pest is now well established as a pest of soybeans in at least 14 states across eastern North America.

  7. 78 FR 50409 - Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid-Kansas Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid... Municipal Energy Agency (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against Sunflower Electric Power Corporation... that Sunflower Electric Power Corporation and Mid-Kansas Electric Company, LLC are in violation of...

  8. Development of Recommendations To Improve Minority Faculty Hiring Procedures at Kansas City Kansas Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles E.

    In response to the small number of minority faculty at Kansas City Kansas Community College (KCKCC), a study was conducted to develop a set of recommendations to improve minority faculty hiring procedures and provide information and guidelines useful to administrative staff for recruiting minority faculty members. Criteria for establishing policy…

  9. Facilitator's Manual - Aztlan en Kansas: Asistencia Tecnologica (Technological Assistance to Mexican American People in Kansas.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, J. Christian; And Others

    Primary purpose of the program, "Aztlan en Kansas: Asistencia Tecnologica", is to provide technical assistance to Mexican Americans in Kansas in developing leadership skills which could then be applied for the improvement of the whole community. The program utilized a Laubach model in that as a workshop was conducted, community leaders…

  10. Clarence Allen talks about the responsibilities in earthquake prediction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1978-01-01

    Dr. Clarence R. Allen is professor of geology and geophysics at the California Institute of Technology. He has been a member of advisory panels to the Executive Office of the President, National Academy of Sciences, National Science Foundation, U.S Geological Survey, UNESCO, California State Mining and Geology Board, and the California Department of Water Resources. Dr. Allen has been President of both the Geological Society of America and the Seismological Society of America (SSA). The title of this interview is based on his presidential address to the SSA in 1976. 

  11. Characterization and simulation of ground-water flow in the Kansas River Valley at Fort Riley, Kansas, 1990-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Nathan C.

    2000-01-01

    those in ground water from wells in the northern Camp Funston Area. In addition, comparison of observed water levels from wells CF90-06, CF97-101, and CF97-401 in the Camp Funston Area and ground-water levels simulated for these wells using floodwave-response analysis indicates that ground-water inflow from bedrock is a hydraulic stress that, in addition to the changing stage in the Kansas River, acts on the aquifer. This hydraulic stress seems to be located near the northern valley wall because the effect of this stress is greater for well CF97-101, which is the well closest to the valley wall. Ground-water flow was simulated using a modular, three-dimensional, finite-difference ground-water flow model (MODFLOW). Particle tracking, used to visualize ground-water flow paths in the alluvial aquifer, was accomplished using MODPATH. Forward-in-time particle tracking indicated that, in general, particles released near the Kansas River followed much more variable paths than particles released near the valley wall. Although particle tracking does not simulate solute transport, this increased path variability indicates that, near the river, ground-water contaminants could follow many possible paths towards the river, whereas more distant from the river, ground-water contaminants likely would follow a narrower corridor. Particle tracks in the Camp Funston Area indicate that, for the 1990-98 simulation period, contaminants from the ground-water study sites in the Camp Funston Area would be unlikely to move into the vicinity of Ogden's supply wells. Backward-in-time particle tracking indicated that the flow-path and recharge areas for model cells corresponding to Ogden's supply wells lie near the northern valley wall and extend into the northern Camp Funston Area. The flow-path and recharge areas for model cells corresponding to Morris County Rural Water District wells lie within Clarks Creek Valley and probably extend outside the model area. Three hypothetical simulations, i

  12. Kansas Protects and Restores Wetlands, Streams and Riparian Areas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Wetland Program Development Grant (WPDG) in 2007 when the Kansas State Conservation Commission began identifying team members interested in developing a framework for a comprehensive Kansas Wetland and Aquatic Resources Conservation Plan.

  13. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Kansas has final approval for the following elements submitted to EPA in Kansas' program application for... to the storage tank release trust fund; 116 & 117 insofar as it applies to the storage tank...

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Kansas City Plant (KCP), conducted March 23 through April 3, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the KCP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations performed at the KCP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the KCP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the KCP Survey. 94 refs., 39 figs., 55 tabs.

  15. Van Allen Probes Science Gateway: A Centralized Data Access Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Barnes, R. J.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sotirelis, T.; Stephens, G. K.; Kessel, R.; Potter, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Science Gateway acts a centralized interface to the instrument Science Operation Centers (SOCs), provides mission planning tools, and hosts a number of science related activities such as the mission bibliography. Most importantly, the Gateway acts as the primary site for processing and delivering the Van Allen Probes Space Weather data to users. Over the past years, the web-site has been completely redesigned with the focus on easier navigation and improvements of the existing tools such as the orbit plotter, position calculator and magnetic footprint tool. In addition, a new data plotting facility has been added. Based on HTML5, which allows users to interactively plot Van Allen Probes science and space weather data. The user can tailor the tool to display exactly the plot they wish to see and then share this with other users via either a URL or by QR code. Various types of plots can be created, including, simple time series, data plotted as a function of orbital location, and time versus L-Shell, capability of visualizing data from both probes (A & B) on the same plot. In cooperation with all Van Allen Probes Instrument SOCs, the Science Gateway will soon be able to serve higher level data products (Level 3), and to visualize them via the above mentioned HTML5 interface. Users will also be able to create customized CDF files on the fly.

  16. The Evolving Space Weather System—Van Allen Probes Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, L. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Fox, N. J.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Sotirelis, T. S.; Raouafi, N.-E.; Kessel, R. L.; Becker, H. N.

    2014-10-01

    The overarching goal and purpose of the study of space weather is clear—to understand and address the issues caused by solar disturbances on humans and technological systems. Space weather has evolved in the past few decades from a collection of concerned agencies and researchers to a critical function of the National Weather Service of NOAA. The general effects have also evolved from the well-known telegraph disruptions of the mid-1800s to modern day disturbances of the electric power grid, communications and navigation, human spaceflight and spacecraft systems. The last two items in this list, and specifically the effects of penetrating radiation, were the impetus for the space weather broadcast implemented on NASA's Van Allen Probes' twin pair of satellites, launched in August of 2012 and orbiting directly through Earth's severe radiation belts. The Van Allen Probes mission, formerly the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), was renamed soon after launch to honor the discoverer of Earth's radiation belts at the beginning of the space age, the late James Van Allen (the spacecraft themselves are still referred to as RBSP-A and RBSP-B). The Van Allen Probes are one part of NASA's Living With a Star program formulated to advance the scientific understanding of the connection between solar disturbances, the resulting heliospheric conditions, and their effects on the geospace and Earth environment.

  17. A Study of the Perceived Effectiveness of Kansas Small Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Jerry G.

    Schools for Quality Education, an organization of some 80 small Kansas schools, and the Center for Rural Education and Small Schools (College of Education, Kansas State University) in 1986-87 jointly investigated the effectiveness of representative smaller schools serving Kansas's rural areas. Phase 1 identified the most important indicators of…

  18. Kansas Educational Achievement Report Card 2015. Research Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallman, Mark; Carter, Ted

    2015-01-01

    This report includes a high-level overview of student outcome data and how Kansas measures up to the other 49 states. It is meant to complement the other reporting that the Kansas Association of School Boards has released and will be releasing related to improving student outcomes for all Kansas public schools. The following are key findings…

  19. Kansas State University: 2+2 Partnerships with Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maes, Sue; Pfortmiller, Jennifer; Sinn, Melinda; Vail, Rosanna

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on how Kansas State University (K-State) built partnerships with all 19 community colleges in Kansas and streamlined the process of providing place-bound adult students with access to complete a bachelor's degree while continuing to live, work, and serve in their home communities. Kansas State University (K-State) has been an…

  20. Water use in Kansas, 1990-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenny, Joan F.; Hansen, Cristi V.

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet compares water use in 1990, 1995, and 2000 for the 12 major river basins in Kansas. Of these 3 years, irrigation water use was largest in 1990 and smallest in 1995, largely because of differing climatic conditions. Irrigation averaged about 85 percent of total water use in Kansas each year, and ground water pumped in the western part of the State provided most of the irrigation water used. Water use for public supply, industry, and livestock increased between 1990 and 2000. Total State population increased 8 percent between 1990 and 2000, and the number of people served by public water suppliers increased 12 percent. Surface water withdrawn for public supply increased 24 percent because of population growth in the northeastern and south-central parts of the State and decreasing reliance on ground water by the city of Wichita. From 1990 to 2000, ground-water withdrawals for livestock and meat processing increased in western Kansas, and surface-water withdrawals for sand dredging increased in eastern Kansas. This fact sheet was produced as part of an ongoing cooperative program supported in part by the Kansas State Water Plan Fund.

  1. Palynological correlation of Atokan and lower desmoinesian (Pennsylvanian) strata between the Illinois basin and the Forest City basin in Eastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peppers, R.A.; Brady, L.L.

    2007-01-01

    Palynological correlation is made between Atokan and lower Desmoinesian strata in the Illinois basin an the Forest City basin in eastern Kansas. Spore data from previous studies of coals in the Illinois basin and other coal basins are compared with data from spore assemblages in coal and carbonaceous shale bands in a core drilled in Leavenworth County, Kansas. Correlations are based on first and/or last occurrences of 31 species common to the Illinois basin and eastern Kansas and on significant increases or decreases in abundance of several of those taxa. The oldest coal, which is 26 ft (8 m) above the top of the Mississippian, is early Atokan (early Westphalian B) in age and is approximately equivalent to the Bell coal bed in the Illinois basin. The Riverton coal bed at the top of the studied interval in Kansas is early Desmoinesian (early Westphalian D) and correlates with about the Lewisport coal bed in the Illinois basin. Three coal beds near the base of the Pennsylvanian in three cores drilled in Cherokee County, Kansas, which were also studied, range in age from late Atokan to early Desmoinesian. As in other coal basins, Lycospora, borne by lycopod trees, greatly dominates the lower and middle Atokan spore assemblages in coals and shale, but spores from ferns, especially tree ferns, significantly increase in abundance in the upper Atokan and lower Desmoinesian. The pattern of change of dominance among Lycosporapellucida, L. granulata, and L, micropapillata in middle Atokan (Westphalian B-C transition) that has been demonstrated earlier in the Illinois basin and eastern Kentucky and Tennessee, also occurs in eastern Kansas. At least 10 species of spores, which appeared in the middle Atokan in other parts of the equatorial coal belt, also appeared at this time in eastern Kansas. Most of these species have their affinities with the ferns, which were adapted to drier habitats than lycopods. Thus, the climate may have become a little drier in the equatorial coal

  2. REMEDIATION OF LEON WATER FLOOD, BUTLER COUNTY, KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Korphage; Kelly Kindscher; Bruce G. Langhus

    2001-11-26

    The Leon Water Flood site has undergone one season of soil amendments and growth of specialized plants meant to colonize and accelerate the remediation of the salt-impacted site. The researchers characterized the impacted soil as to chemistry, added soil amendments, and planted several species of seedlings, and seeded the scarred areas. After the first growing season, the surface soil was again characterized and groundcover was also characterized. While plant growth was quite meager across the area, soil chemistry did improve over most of the two scars.

  3. Archaeological Survey and Testing at Perry Lake, Jefferson County, Kansas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    affiliation, inferred site function , significance and National Register recommendation for sites located in the Perry Lake Survey...Executive Order 11593 "Protection and Enhancement of the Cultural Environment" dated 13 May 1971 , and Section 110 of the National Historic...the late spring and early summer usually converge with warm, moist maritime tropical (mT) air that is flowing north from the Gulf of Mexico. The

  4. Evaluation of community health assessment in Kansas.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Denice C

    2002-07-01

    This article evaluates the status of community health assessment in Kansas. It describes community characteristics associated with community health assessment completion, factors contributing to success, as well as barriers and limitations that prevented Kansas communities from initiating a community health assessment or completing the process. Survey findings show that certain community characteristics such as interagency cooperation, history of success at problem solving, and shared decision-making power are strongly associated with completion of a community health assessment. Results also indicate that factors such as lack of leadership, money, and time as well as poor functioning coalitions may hinder the completion of community health assessment.

  5. Ground-water resources of Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.C.; Lohman, S.W.; Frye, J.C.; Waite, H.A.; McLaughlin, Thad G.; Latta, Bruce

    1940-01-01

    Importance of ground-water resources.—The importance of Kansas' ground-water resources may be emphasized from various viewpoints and in different ways. More than three-fourths of the public water supplies of Kansas are obtained from wells. In 1939, only 60 out of 375 municipal water supplies in Kansas, which is 16 percent, utilized surface waters. If the water wells of the cities and those located on all privately owned land in the state were suddenly destroyed, making it necessary to go to streams, springs, lakes (which are almost all artificial), and ponds for water supply domestic, stock, and industrial use, there would be almost incalculable difficulty and expense. If one could not go to springs, or dig new wells, or use any surface water derived from underground flow, much of Kansas would become uninhabitable.  These suggested conditions seem absurd, but they emphasize our dependence on ground-water resources. Fromm a quantitative standpoint, ground-water supplies existent in Kansas far outweigh surface waters that are present in the state at any one time. No exact figures for such comparison can be given, but, taking 384 square miles as the total surface water area of the state and estimating an average water depth of five feet, the computed volume of surface waters is found to be 1/100th of that of the conservatively estimated ground-water storage in Kansas. The latter takes account only of potable fresh water and is based on an assumed mean thickness of ten feet of reservoir having an effective porosity of twenty percent. It is to be remembered, however, that most of the surface water is run-off, which soon leaves the state, stream valleys being replenished from rainfall and flow from ground-water reservoirs. Most of the ground-water supplies, on the other hand, have existed for many years with almost no appreciable movement--in fact, it is reasonably certain that some well water drawn from beneath the surface of Kansas in 1940 represents rainfall in

  6. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Inman, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-05

    In 1997, low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5 {micro}g/L) were detected in groundwater at Inman, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1997 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Inman from 1954 to 1965. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Inman is located in southwest McPherson County, approximately 10 mi southwest of the city of McPherson (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Inman is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation at Inman, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA. For this work plan, Argonne compiled historical data related to the previous investigations and grain storage operations at Inman. Through a review of documents acquired from all available sources, other potential contaminant source areas (in addition to the former CCC/USDA facility) have been identified as (1) the commercial grain storage structures northwest of Inman, along the railroad right-of-way, and (2) small former private grain storage facilities west of Main Street and near the former CCC/USDA facility at the southern edge of Inman (Figure 1.2). Previous investigations and the potential source areas are discussed in Section 2.

  7. Kansas environmental and resource study: A Great Plains model. Extraction of agricultural statistics from ERTS-1 data of Kansas. [wheat inventory and agriculture land use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morain, S. A. (Principal Investigator); Williams, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Wheat area, yield, and production statistics as derived from satellite image analysis, combined with a weather model, are presented for a ten county area in southwest Kansas. The data (representing the 1972-73 crop year) are compared for accuracy against both the USDA August estimate and its final (official) tabulation. The area estimates from imagery for both dryland and irrigated winter wheat were within 5% of the official figures for the same area, and predated them by almost one year. Yield on dryland wheat was estimated by the Thompson weather model to within 0.1% of the observed yield. A combined irrigated and dryland wheat production estimate for the ten county area was completed in July, 1973 and was within 1% of the production reported by USDA in February, 1974.

  8. Kansas-Nebraska seismicity studies using the Kansas-Nebraska microearthquake network: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, D.W.; Hildebrand, G.M.; Bennett, B.C.; Miller, R.D.; Chung, Y.; Knapp, R.W.

    1988-03-01

    The Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) operates a 15 station seismograph network with stations located in northeast Kansas and southeast Nebraska. The network is supported in part by funding from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This report discusses operation of the network and summarizes the results of research that allows a better understanding of the seismicity of the region and the link between the seismicity and the tectonic setting of the region. 29 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Methods used in estimating the ground water supply in the Wichita, Kansas well-field area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, C.C.; Lohman, S.W.

    1947-01-01

    This paper presents the methods used in studying the groundwater hydrology of an area in Harvey and Sedgwick Counties, Kansas, from which the city of Wichita derives its water supply. A summary of the data available for study is presented and several hydrologic factors are evaluated. The relationship between groundwater levels and precipitation is shown, and recharge is estimated. The effect of pumping on water levels is shown graphically, and the quantity of water withdrawn from storage is estimated from several water-table contour maps. The data are analyzed and the quantity of water available for pumping is estimated.

  10. Flood of June 15, 1981, in Great Bend and vicinity, central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clement, R.W.; Johnson, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Torrential precipitation, as much as 20 inches in 12 hours, resulted in unprecedented flooding on Dry Walnut Creek in southwestern Barton County, central Kansas. Runoff from the storm caused extensive flooding in the town of Great Bend on June 15, 1981. Estimates of total damages exceeded $42 million. Measurements of peak discharges made in the downstream part of the Dry Walnut Creek watershed were as much as 3 1/2 times the estimated magnitude of the 100-year flood and in some locations exceeded the maximum previously measured discharge for the area. (USGS)

  11. Isomer-specific combustion chemistry in allene and propyne flames

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Nils; Miller, James A.; Westmoreland, Phillip R.; Kasper, Tina; Kohse-Hoeinghaus, Katharina; Wang, Juan; Cool, Terrill A.

    2009-11-15

    A combined experimental and modeling study is performed to clarify the isomer-specific combustion chemistry in flames fueled by the C{sub 3}H{sub 4} isomers allene and propyne. To this end, mole fraction profiles of several flame species in stoichiometric allene (propyne)/O{sub 2}/Ar flames are analyzed by means of a chemical kinetic model. The premixed flames are stabilized on a flat-flame burner under a reduced pressure of 25 Torr (=33.3 mbar). Quantitative species profiles are determined by flame-sampling molecular-beam mass spectrometry, and the isomer-specific flame compositions are unraveled by employing photoionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. The temperature profiles are measured by OH laser-induced fluorescence. Experimental and modeled mole fraction profiles of selected flame species are discussed with respect to the isomer-specific combustion chemistry in both flames. The emphasis is put on main reaction pathways of fuel consumption, of allene and propyne isomerization, and of isomer-specific formation of C{sub 6} aromatic species. The present model includes the latest theoretical rate coefficients for reactions on a C{sub 3}H{sub 5} potential [J.A. Miller, J.P. Senosiain, S.J. Klippenstein, Y. Georgievskii, J. Phys. Chem. A 112 (2008) 9429-9438] and for the propargyl recombination reactions [Y. Georgievskii, S.J. Klippenstein, J.A. Miller, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 9 (2007) 4259-4268]. Larger peak mole fractions of propargyl, allyl, and benzene are observed in the allene flame than in the propyne flame. In these flames virtually all of the benzene is formed by the propargyl recombination reaction. (author)

  12. Index to selected machine-readable geohydrologic data for Precambrian through Cretaceous rocks in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spinazola, J.M.; Hansen, C.V.; Underwood, E.J.; Kenny, J.F.; Wolf, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Machine-readable geohydrologic data for Precambrian through Cretaceous rocks in Kansas were compiled as part of the USGS Central Midwest Regional Aquifer System Analysis. The geohydrologic data include log, water quality, water level, hydraulics, and water use information. The log data consist of depths to the top of selected geologic formations determined from about 275 sites with geophysical logs and formation lithologies from about 190 sites with lithologic logs. The water quality data consist of about 10,800 analyses, of which about 1 ,200 are proprietary. The water level data consist of about 4 ,480 measured water levels and about 4,175 equivalent freshwater hydraulic heads, of which about 3,745 are proprietary. The hydraulics data consist of results from about 30 specific capacity tests and about 20 aquifer tests, and interpretations of about 285 drill stem tests (of which about 60 are proprietary) and about 75 core-sample analyses. The water use data consist of estimates of freshwater withdrawals from Precambrian through Cretaceous geohydrologic units for each of the 105 counties in Kansas. Average yearly withdrawals were estimated for each decade from 1940 to 1980. All the log and water use data and the nonproprietary parts of the water quality , water level, and hydraulics data are available on magnetic tape from the USGS office in Lawrence, Kansas. (Author 's abstract)

  13. Van Allen Probes Science Gateway and Space Weather Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Fox, N. J.; Mauk, B.; Potter, M.; Kessel, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Science Gateway acts as a centralized interface to the instrument Science Operation Centers (SOCs), provides mission planning tools, and hosts a number of science related activities such as the mission bibliography. Most importantly, the Gateway acts as the primary site for processing and delivering the VAP Space Weather data to users. Over the past year, the web-site has been completely redesigned with the focus on easier navigation and improvements of the existing tools such as the orbit plotter, position calculator and magnetic footprint tool. In addition, a new data plotting facility has been added. Based on HTML5, which allows users to interactively plot Van Allen Probes summary and space weather data. The user can tailor the tool to display exactly the plot they wish to see and then share this with other users via either a URL or by QR code. Various types of plots can be created, including simple time series, data plotted as a function of orbital location, and time versus L-Shell. We discuss the new Van Allen Probes Science Gateway and the Space Weather Data Pipeline.

  14. Recent Science Highlights of the Van Allen Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr

    2016-10-01

    The morning of 30 August 2012 saw an Atlas 5 rocket launch NASA's second Living With a Star spacecraft mission, the twin Radiation Belt Storm Probes, into an elliptic orbit cutting through Earth's radiation belts. Renamed the Van Allen Probes soon after launch, the Probes are designed to determine how the highly variable populations of high-energy charged particles within the radiation belts, dangerous to astronauts and satellites, are created, respond to solar variations, and evolve in space environments. The Van Allen Probes mission extends beyond the practical considerations of the hazard's of Earth's space environment. Twentieth century observations of space and astrophysical systems throughout the solar system and out into the observable universe have shown that the processes that generate intense particle radiation within magnetized environments such as Earth's are universal. During its mission the Van Allen Probes verified and quantified previously suggested energization processes, discovered new energization mechanisms, revealed the critical importance of dynamic plasma injections into the innermost magnetosphere, and used uniquely capable instruments to reveal inner radiation belt features that were all but invisible to previous sensors. This paper gives a brief overview of the mission, presents some recent science highlights, and discusses plans for the extended mission.

  15. Reaching Goals Together: Barton County Community College Advisement Handbook, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinningham, Russ; And Others

    This handbook provides information on procedures related to advising and general administrative functions at Barton County Community College (BCCC) in Kansas, in seven parts. Part I describes the philosophy, goals, and objectives guiding academic advising at BCCC and outlines student responsibilities and confidentiality concerns. Part II details…

  16. Garen Goebel, Washington County, KS - Public Notice Document

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Garen Goebel for alleged violations of Section 301of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. § 1311 at a site located in Washington County, Kansas.

  17. Environmental Programs Information: Affecting Kansas Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This document provides a brief overview of the environmental issues that affect Kansas public schools. Specific programs that address these problems are included, along with their contact information. This document contains information on the following issues and programs: (1) Department of Health and Environment; (2) air; (3) asbestos; (4)…

  18. Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics. Volume 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fareh, Shehdeh; Yumitani, Yukihiro

    Seven original research papers by faculty and students of the Linguistics Department and other related departments of the University of Kansas are presented. The titles and authors are as follows: "Particles in Tojolabal Mayan Discourse" (Jill Brody); "One Hundred Years of Lakota Linguistics (1887-1987)" (Willem J. de Reuse);…

  19. Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics. Volume 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roby, Linda M., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This collection of papers presents the latest original research by the institutions. The papers in Number 1 are: (1) "Xhosa departments of the University of Kansas, as well as contributors from other institutions. The papers in Number 1 are: (1) "Xhosa Nominal Tonology: A Domain-Based Approach" (Mbulelo Jokweni); (2) "On the…

  20. Kansas State University Libraries' OCR Labeling Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thierer, Joyce; Bower, Merry

    This publication describes the planning and implementation of an optical character recognition (OCR) labeling project, the first stage of Kansas State University (KSU) Libraries' program of conversion from a manual to an automated circulation system. It is noted that a telephone survey of libraries with automated circulation systems and…

  1. Kansas Nursing Home Medication Aide Curriculum. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartel, Myrna J.; Fornelli, Linda K.

    This curriculum guide is designed to aid Kansas instructors in conducting a course for teaching nursing home medication aides. Covered first are various introductory topics such as the role and responsibilities of medication aides, pharmacodynamics, forms in which medication is now available, common medical abbreviations, mathematics and weights…

  2. Surface waters of Kansas, 1895-1919

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, R.C.

    1921-01-01

    The collection of long-time records of stream-flow in Kansas which is published in this volume has been prepared for the use of those who are concerned with the different phases of the utilization of water in the state.

  3. Kansas Profile: Alcohol, Tobacco & Other Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drug Strategies, Washington, DC.

    One of a series of state profiles, this report describes the dimensions of the problems caused by alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs in Kansas and the public and private initiatives to reduce these problems. It highlights positive developments and identifies areas to be strengthened. Demographic characteristics, state agency organization, and state…

  4. Surface waters of Kansas, 1919-1924

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinnison, H.B.

    1926-01-01

    From 1906 to 1916 no stream-gaging investigations were made in Kansas, and the only records available for this period are those of river stages taken by the United States Weather Bureau, at a few selected stations, for use by the river forcast service. The floods of 1908, 1909 and 1915 occurred during this period.

  5. 1977 Kansas Field Crop Insect Control Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Leroy; Gates, Dell E.

    This publication is prepared to aid producers in selecting methods of insect population management that have proved effective under Kansas conditions. Topics covered include insect control on alfalfa, soil insects attacking corn, insects attacking above-ground parts of corn, and sorghum, wheat, and soybean insect control. The insecticides…

  6. Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics. Volume 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ichihashi, Kumiko, Ed.; Linn, Mary Sarah, Ed.

    Reports of recent original research on linguistics by faculty and students of the University of Kansas are presented. Topics include: "Collaboration on Topic Change in Conversation" (Mary Howe); "Stories in Conversation" (Roberta Senner Hofer); "It's Like, 'What's Happening in the Evolution of Like?': A Theory of…

  7. KANSAS STATE PLAN FOR ADULT BASIC EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Public Instruction, Topeka.

    THE KANSAS PLAN IS DESIGNED TO HELP ESTABLISH NEW LOCAL ADULT BASIC EDUCATION PROGRAMS, AND TO EXPAND AND IMPROVE EXISTING ONES. INSTRUCTIONAL CONTENT WILL INCLUDE READING AND WRITING, SPEAKING AND LISTENING SKILLS, CITIZENSHIP, CONSUMER EDUCATION, HUMAN RELATIONS, AND FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION. EARLY STAGES OF PLANNING (TO JUNE 30, 1966) WILL STRESS…

  8. 77 FR 32708 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00064

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00064 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This...: 02/25/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  9. Kansas City Metropolitan Community Colleges. Audit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Office of the State Auditor, Jefferson City.

    This audit report reviews the employment contracts, related compensation, and other benefits provided for the chancellor and other officers of the Kansas City Metropolitan Community Colleges (KCMCC) in Missouri. The chancellor is allowed to either solicit bids or negotiate for contracted services such as architects, construction managers,…

  10. Public-supply water use in Kansas, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.; Eslick, Patrick J.

    2015-10-27

    This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Agriculture’s Division of Water Resources, presents derivative statistics of water used by Kansas public-supply systems in 2013. The published statistics from the previous 4 years (2009–12) are also shown with the 2013 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. An overall Kansas average and regional averages also are calculated and presented.

  11. Kansas energy, environment, and conservation: a geological overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merriam, Daniel F.

    2009-02-01

    The State of Kansas, as an energy-producing and agriculture-based state, faces problems in production of natural resources and potential pollution from their production. To coordinate information on the exploration, production, and use of coal, nuclear, petroleum, natural gas, hydro, wind, geothermal, coalbed methane, biofuel, solar, and other energy resources, the Kansas Energy Council and the University of Kansas Energy Research Center were created. Water, surface and subsurface, is the other important and maybe the most important natural resource in the welfare of the state. To ease the problems of contamination, situations are monitored by regulatory agencies: the Kansas Corporation Commission, Kansas Department of Health and Environment, and Division of Water Resources of the Kansas Department of Agriculture. The Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) at the University of Kansas serves as the archive for energy and natural resource data and conducts research pertinent to the exploration and exploitation of mineral resources, including energy and water. The Kansas Energy Research Center coordinates and supports energy activities. The Kansas Water Office and the staff for the Kansas Water Authority are charged with water planning and preparing reports on water problems and possible solutions. The cost of preserving the environment in a relatively pristine state really is of no concern considering the possible consequences; living conditions should be preserved to assure future generations, a suitable, sustainable, stable environment. With all the dire predictions for the future and energy-producing and pollution problems, Kansas is a model state in this modern industrial age for protecting the environment and is a leader in conservation.

  12. Floods in Kansas City, Missouri and vicinity, August 12-13, 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, L.D.; Alexander, T.W.; Waite, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    On August 12-13, 1982, a nearly stationary weather front in the vicinity of Kansas City, MO, produced intense thunderstorms. Excessive rainfall (12.6 inches in Raytown, MO) caused flash flooding during the nighttime and early daylight hours. Four deaths and damages unofficially estimated in excess of $30 million, occurred in the three-county area of Jackson, Cass, and Clay counties. Peak discharges were determined at 12 current or discontinued streamflow-gaging stations and 17 miscellaneous sites. Flood peaks and volumes at many locations exceeded estimated 100-year recurrence-interval floods and equaled or exceeded the 1977 floods in some drainage basins. Significant flooding occurred in the Blue, East Fork Little Blue, and Little Blue River basins and in the Rock, Wilkerson, Sni-A-Bar, Shoal, and Big Creek drainage basins. (USGS)

  13. New records of sylvatic plague in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cully, J.F.; Carter, L.G.; Gage, K.L.

    2000-01-01

    Sylvatic plague, or plague of wild rodents is caused by Yersinia pestis and entered California (USA) from Asia about 1899. Extensive sampling during the 1930's and 1940's documented the spread of plague to approximately its current distribution in North America. Records from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention document plague in Kansas (USA) between 1945 and 1950, but since then there has been no documentation of plague in the state. Following a die-off of a black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) colony on the Cimarron National Grassland, in the southwestern corner of Kansas (37??10???N, 101??45???W), we sampled fleas from burrows in June 1997, and tested them for Yersinia pestis. Twelve of 13 pools of Oropsyla hirsuta and one of two Pulex sp. were positive. A similar sample of fleas, from another colony where black-tailed prairie dogs were active at the time, yielded no positive fleas.

  14. Estimate of winter wheat yield from ERTS-1. [southwest Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morain, S. A.; Williams, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    A model for estimating wheat yield per acre has been applied to acreage estimates derived from ERTS-1 imagery to project the 1973 wheat yields for a ten county area in southwest Kansas. The results (41.04 million bushels) are within 3 per cent of the preharvest estimates for the same area prepared by the USDA Statistical Reporting Service (39.91 million bushels). The projection from ERTS data is based on a visual enumeration of all detectable wheat fields in the study area and was completed while the harvest was in progress. Visual identification of winter wheat is readily achieved by using a temporal sequence of images (band 5 for Sept.-Oct.; band 5 for Dec.-Jan.; and band 5 and 7 for March-April). Identification can be improved by stratifying the project area into subregions having more or less homogeneous agricultural practices and crop mixes. By doing this, small changes in the spectral appearance of wheat related to soil type, irrigation, etc. can be accounted for. The interpretation rules developed by visual analysis can be automated for rapid computer surveys.

  15. An improved method for determining the distribution of swift fox in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, Christiane C.; Sovada, Marsha A.; Sargeant, Glen A.; Roy, Christiane C.

    1999-01-01

    During 1997 and 1998 we tested a new method for determining the distribution of swift foxes (Vulpes velox) in Kansas. From a sampling frame of 30 counties in western Kansas, we selected a systematic sample of alternate townships in a checkerboard pattern. During September and October 1997 and August 1998, experienced observers delineated suitable swift fox habitat within each sample township and searched it for evidence of occupancy (tracks, dens, and the animals themselves) by swift fox and other furbearers. Each township was searched for a minimum of 30 minutes, with searches continuing until swift foxes were either detected or for 120 minutes. Of the 288 townships selected in 1997, 271 (94.1%) were searched effectively with swift fox detected in 40.5% of the townships. Adverse weather conditions prevented surveys in two northwestern counties of our sample frame. In 1998, 245 township were searched effectively. Swift fox were detected in 27 counties searched to date. We did not detect swift fox in Seward, Meade and Ford counties, where the species is thought to be uncommon or absent. Tracks were difficult to discern in areas with hard or sandy soils and were sometimes obliterated by adverse weather, vehicle traffic, and agricultural activities. To determine how frequently we failed to detect swift foxes that were present, we plan to repeat searches in 1999 in townships where swift foxes were not detected previously. Nevertheless, preliminary results suggest our method to be a practical means for conducting landscape-scale presence/absence surveys of swift fox. Restricting searches to habitat judged best for swift foxes and most favorable for track detection helped control costs and achieve high detection rates.

  16. Skylab study of water quality. [Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarger, H. L. (Principal Investigator); Mccauley, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Apparent reflectance levels in the Skylab S190A and S192 bands, from one pass over three Kansas reservoirs, exhibit good statistical correlation with suspended solids. Band ratios appear to yield the best results. The concentration of suspended solids, mostly inorganic sediment, has the most effect on the reflected energy. Dissolved solids concentrations up to 200 ppm were not detectable by the Skylab sensors.

  17. Public and private health initiatives in Kansas.

    PubMed

    Fonner, E

    1998-01-01

    This article summarizes several health initiatives in Kansas that are being forwarded by way of public/private partnerships. Consensus is being shaped on the standardization of health data and use of actionable indicators. Statewide public health improvement planning is also being pursued. A group of large employers and state agencies are creating a basis for group purchasing, consumer assessments of health plans, and coordinated public policy formulation.

  18. Regional interpretation of Kansas aeromagnetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Yarger, H.L.

    1982-01-01

    The aeromagnetic mapping techniques used in a regional aeromagnetic survey of the state are documented and a qualitative regional interpretation of the magnetic basement is presented. Geothermal gradients measured and data from oil well records indicate that geothermal resources in Kansas are of a low-grade nature. However, considerable variation in the gradient is noted statewide within the upper 500 meters of the sedimentary section; this suggests the feasibility of using groundwater for space heating by means of heat pumps.

  19. Heat flow and geothermal potential of Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, D.D.; Steele, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The plan of the US Geological Survey and Kansas Geological Survey to drill four deep hydrologic tests in Kansas prompted a geothermal study in these wells. These wells were drilled through the Arbuckle Group to within a few feet of basement and two of the holes were deepened on into the basement and core samples collected of the basement rock. Because of the depth of the four holes and because of the fact that they have been cased through most of their depth and left undisturbed to reach temperature equilibrium, it is possible to get highly accurate, stable temperature measurements through the complete sedimentary section. In addition an extensive suite of geophysical logs were obtained for each of the holes (gamma-ray, travel time, density, neutron porosity, electric, etc.) and cuttings were collected at frequent intervals. In addition 5 other holes were logged as part of this study. For these holes cutting samples and geophysical logs are not available, but the additional holes offer useful supplementary information on the temperature regime in other parts of Kansas.

  20. Sediment transport to and from small impoundments in northeast Kansas, March 2009 through September 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Guy M.; Lee, Casey J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas Water Office, investigated sediment transport to and from three small impoundments (average surface area of 0.1 to 0.8 square miles) in northeast Kansas during March 2009 through September 2011. Streamgages and continuous turbidity sensors were operated upstream and downstream from Atchison County, Banner Creek, and Centralia Lakes to study the effect of varied watershed characteristics and agricultural practices on sediment transport in small watersheds in northeast Kansas. Atchison County Lake is located in a predominantly agricultural basin of row crops, with wide riparian buffers along streams, a substantial amount of tile drainage, and numerous small impoundments (less than 0.05 square miles; hereafter referred to as “ponds”). Banner Creek Lake is a predominantly grassland basin with numerous small ponds located in the watershed, and wide riparian buffers along streams. Centralia Lake is a predominantly agricultural basin of row crops with few ponds, few riparian buffers along streams, and minimal tile drainage. Upstream from Atchison County, Banner Creek, and Centralia Lakes 24, 38, and 32 percent, respectively, of the total load was transported during less than 0.1 percent (approximately 0.9 days) of the time. Despite less streamflow in 2011, larger sediment loads during that year indicate that not all storm events transport the same amount of sediment; larger, extreme storms during the spring may transport much larger sediment loads in small Kansas watersheds. Annual sediment yields were 360, 400, and 970 tons per square mile per year at Atchison County, Banner, and Centralia Lake watersheds, respectively, which were less than estimated yields for this area of Kansas (between 2,000 and 5,000 tons per square mile per year). Although Centralia and Atchison County Lakes had similar percentages of agricultural land use, mean annual sediment yields upstream from Centralia Lake were about 2.7 times

  1. Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Kansas City Plant is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. AlliedSignal and its predecessors have been the operating contractors since 1949. The principal operation performed at the Kansas City Plant is the manufacture of non-nuclear components for nuclear weapons. This activity involves metals and plastics machining, plastics fabrication, plating, microelectronics, and electrical and mechanical assembly. No radioactive materials are machined or processed. This report presents information and data pertaining to the environmental monitoring program and compliance with environmental standards.

  2. Floods in Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas, September 12-13, 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauth, Leland D.; Carswell, William J.

    1978-01-01

    The storm of September 12-13, 1977, produced as much as 16 inches of rainfall in the Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas area, left 25 persons dead, many homeless, and over 50 million dollars in damages. Flood hydrographs taken from U.S. Geological Survey gaging-stations reflected two storms occurring within 24 hours. Measured precipitation indicated each storm event to be near a 100-year, 24-hour rainfall frequency. Peak discharges determined at selected locations in areas of greater rainfall depths exceeded those of the 100-year floods. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Neuroinformatics of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Leonard; Li, Yang; Lau, Chris; Feng, David; Bernard, Amy; Sunkin, Susan M; Zeng, Hongkui; Dang, Chinh; Hawrylycz, Michael; Ng, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a mesoscale whole brain axonal projection atlas of the C57Bl/6J mouse brain. Anatomical trajectories throughout the brain were mapped into a common 3D space using a standardized platform to generate a comprehensive and quantitative database of inter-areal and cell-type-specific projections. This connectivity atlas has several desirable features, including brain-wide coverage, validated and versatile experimental techniques, a single standardized data format, a quantifiable and integrated neuroinformatics resource, and an open-access public online database (http://connectivity.brain-map.org/). Meaningful informatics data quantification and comparison is key to effective use and interpretation of connectome data. This relies on successful definition of a high fidelity atlas template and framework, mapping precision of raw data sets into the 3D reference framework, accurate signal detection and quantitative connection strength algorithms, and effective presentation in an integrated online application. Here we describe key informatics pipeline steps in the creation of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas and include basic application use cases.

  4. Galactic Plane SETI Observations with the Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backus, P. R.; Tarter, J. C.; Davis, M. M.; Jordan, J. C.; Kilsdonk, T. N.; Shostak, G. S.; Ackerman, R.; DeBoer, D. R.; Dreher, J. W.; Harp, G. R.; Ross, J. E.; Stauduhar, R.

    2005-12-01

    In the spring of 2006, the Allen Telescope Array (ATA), a joint effort of the U.C. Berkeley Radio Astronomy Lab and the SETI Institute, will begin initial operations. Starting with 42 antennas out of a planned 350, the array will be equivalent to a single 40 meter dish. Using three phased beams, we will survey twenty square degrees around the galactic center for narrowband signals in the frequency range from 1410 to 1730 MHz (the "Water Hole"). Comparison of results from the beams will be used to eliminate signals from terrestrial and satellite sources. At these frequencies, the wide field of view of the array allows us to cover the 2 x 10 degree strip with five antenna positions. The field of view will track one of the five positions for up to five hours, while the phased beams are pointed within the field of view for 98 seconds per 20 MHz frequency band. During these SETI observations spanning approximately seven months, other radio astronomy observations of this very interesting region will run in parallel using two other independently tunable IF systems with a correlator and other phase array beams feeding other backend processors. Construction of the ATA is supported by private funding, primarily from the Paul G. Allen Foundation. The correlator for the ATA is supported by NSF Grant AST-0322309 to the UCB Radio Astronomy Lab.

  5. Annual report of monitoring at Barnes, Kansas, in 2011.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2012-07-26

    Barnes, Kansas, is a small rural community (population approximately 150) located in Washington County, in north-central Kansas (Figure 1.1). The city lies in a transition zone between the Flint Hills and the glaciated region. The area's topography consists of gently sloping hills of Pleistocene loess (< 20 ft) overlying a shale unit and interbedded shale, limestone, and siltstone of the Permian Chase Group. Groundwater for the public water supply is obtained from wells PWS2 and PWS3 at reported depths of 155 ft and 160 ft, respectively, located in the northwestern portion of the city. The water is produced from the bedrock aquifer of the Chase Group. Section 2 summarizes of the hydrogeologic conceptual site model. The findings of the monitoring events at Barnes in 2011 continued to support the following previous conclusions: (1) Measurements of groundwater levels obtained manually and through the use of automatic recorders have consistently indicated that the flow direction is strongly influenced by pumping of the public water supply wells. The results have demonstrated an apparent groundwater flow direction to the northeast when the public wells are not pumping and a northwesterly groundwater flow trend when the public wells are pumping. (2) Evaluation of manual water level measurements and carbon tetrachloride concentrations continues to suggest that three vertically distinguishable aquifer zones are present at Barnes: shallow, intermediate, and deep (Table 4.1). The highest concentration of carbon tetrachloride occurs in the intermediate zone, in wells near the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Lower concentrations have been detected in the deep aquifer zone (where the public water supply wells are screened), and no carbon tetrachloride has been detected in the shallow zone. (3) The conceptual model of the groundwater flow system at Barnes, as postulated on the basis of the accumulated results, suggests that the observed vertical hydraulic gradients and

  6. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Chapter 65, Public Health, Article 34, Kansas Storage Tank Act, Sections 108, 109 and 113. (iii) The... Department of Health and Environment, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 6991c and part 281 of this... Tank Program, Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Forbes Field, Building 740, Topeka,...

  7. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Chapter 65, Public Health, Article 34, Kansas Storage Tank Act, Sections 108, 109 and 113. (iii) The... Department of Health and Environment, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 6991c and part 281 of this... Tank Program, Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Forbes Field, Building 740, Topeka,...

  8. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Chapter 65, Public Health, Article 34, Kansas Storage Tank Act, Sections 108, 109 and 113. (iii) The... Department of Health and Environment, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 6991c and part 281 of this... Tank Program, Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Forbes Field, Building 740, Topeka,...

  9. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Chapter 65, Public Health, Article 34, Kansas Storage Tank Act, Sections 108, 109 and 113. (iii) The... Department of Health and Environment, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 6991c and part 281 of this... Tank Program, Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Forbes Field, Building 740, Topeka,...

  10. A Qualitative Assessment of Weight Control among Rural Kansas Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Andrea C.; Befort, Christie; Banitt, Angela; Gibson, Cheryl; Sullivan, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore weight control beliefs, attitudes, knowledge, and practices among rural Kansas women, and to characterize the relationship of these women with their primary-care providers around weight control. Design: Qualitative research using focus groups. Setting: Three separate communities of rural Kansas. Participants: Six focus groups…

  11. Astronauts Gardner and Allen during loading of Westar VI in payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Joseph P. Allen IV, top, hangs onto a stinger device as Astronaut Dale A. Gardner in the cargo bay of Discovery waits to assist in the berthing of the previously stranded satellite. The end effector of the remote manipulator system (RMS), controlled from inside the Discovery'S cabin, grasps a special grapple point to Allen's right.

  12. Astronaut Andrew M. Allen, mission commander, sets up systems for a television downlink on the

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 ONBOARD VIEW --- Astronaut Andrew M. Allen, mission commander, sets up systems for a television downlink on the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Columbia. Allen was joined by four other astronauts and an international payload specialist for more than 16 days of research aboard Columbia. The photograph was taken with a 70mm handheld camera.

  13. Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders: Interview with Michael W. Allen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Michael W. Allen, the Chairman and CEO of Allen Interactions, is an architect of interactive multimedia learning and is recognized for his many insights, inventions, and presentations. With over 50 years of experience in e-learning, both in academic and corporate settings, he is known for his role in creating Authorware and overseeing the work of…

  14. Allen Ivey: Pioneer in Counseling Theory and Practice, and Crusader for Multiculturalism and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago-Rivera, Azara L.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the groundbreaking work of Dr. Allen Ivey through a personal interview and conversations with Mary Bradford Ivey, including a number of colleagues and former students. Allen's enormous contribution to the counseling profession spans nearly four decades. Although best known for microcounseling skills, which is widely taught in…

  15. Meeting the Challenge of Intermolecular Gold(I)-Catalyzed Cycloadditions of Alkynes and Allenes

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Michael E; Homs, Anna; Obradors, Carla; Echavarren, Antonio M

    2014-01-01

    The development of gold(I)-catalyzed intermolecular carbo- and hetero-cycloadditions of alkynes and allenes has been more challenging than their intramolecular counterparts. Here we review, with a mechanistic perspective, the most fundamental intermolecular cycloadditions of alkynes and allenes with alkenes. PMID:25048645

  16. Kansas Kids Count Data Book, 1998. A Project of Kansas Action for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    The Kids Count Data Book examines trends in the well-being of Kansas children. The statistical portrait is based on trends in 22 indicators of child well-being, grouped into 5 areas: (1) economic well-being--births to single teens, free school meals, family economic assistance, child poverty rates; (2) physical health and safety--childhood deaths,…

  17. Kansas Kids Count Data Book, 1995. A Project of Kansas Action for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Sydney, Ed.; And Others

    This Kids Count data book presents a statistical portrait of the well being of and current conditions faced by the children of Kansas, based on key indicators. Eighteen indicators are detailed in six subject areas: (1) economic well-being; (2) physical health and safety; (3) educational achievement; (4) early childhood care and education; (5)…

  18. Leadership Development Workbook - Aztlan en Kansas: Asistencia Tecnologica. (Technical Assistance to Mexican American People in Kansas.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, J. Christian; And Others

    Purpose of the workbook is to provide the participants and facilitator in the Leadership Development Workshop a means of communication about the structure of the program "Aztlan en Kansas: Asistencia Tecnologica", and to help individualize the instructional activities conducted throughout the workshop. This workbook should be used in…

  19. 40 CFR 81.25 - Metropolitan Kansas City Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metropolitan Kansas City Interstate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.25 Metropolitan Kansas City Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Kansas City Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Missouri-Kansas) consists...

  20. 30 CFR 916.20 - Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 1982. He fully approved the Kansas plan, as amended by Kansas House Bill No. 2994 on April 14, 1982, and Kansas House Bill No. 2516 on May 2, 1983, and removed all conditions prohibiting the funding of... available at: (a) Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Surface Mining Section, 4033 Parkview...

  1. Final work plan : environmental site investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2012-07-15

    In 1998, carbon tetrachloride was found above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L in groundwater from one private livestock well at Sylvan Grove, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1998 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Sylvan Grove from 1954 to1966. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Sylvan Grove is located in western Lincoln County, approximately 60 mi west of Salina (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. This Work Plan presents historical data related to previous investigations, grain storage operations, local private wells and public water supply (PWS) wells, and local geologic and hydrogeologic conditions at Sylvan Grove. The findings from a review of all available documents are discussed in Section 2. On the basis of the analyses of historical data, the following specific technical objectives are proposed for the site investigation at Sylvan Grove: (1) Evaluate the potential source of carbon tetrachloride at the former CCC/USDA facility; (2) Determine the relationship of potential contamination (if present) at the former CCC/USDA facility to contamination identified in 1998 in groundwater samples from one private well to the west; and (3) Delineate the extent of potential contamination associated with the former CCC/USDA facility. The detailed scope of work is outlined in Section 3. The results of the proposed work will provide the basis for determining

  2. Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Everest, Kansas in 2011.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-12-19

    Everest, Kansas, is a small rural community (population approximately 300) located in the southeast corner of Brown County, in the northeastern corner of Kansas. Carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination in groundwater at Everest was initially identified in 1997 as a result of testing performed under the Commodity Credit Corporation/U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) private well sampling program conducted by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The KDHE collected samples from seven private wells in and near Everest. Carbon tetrachloride and chloroform were found in only one of the wells, the Donnie Nigh domestic well (owned at that time by Tim Gale), approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA facility. Carbon tetrachloride and chloroform were detected at 121 {mu}g/L and 4 {mu}g/L, respectively. Nitrate was found at 12.62 mg/L. The USDA subsequently connected the Nigh residence to the Everest public water supply system. The findings of the 2011 monitoring at Everest support the following conclusions: (1) Measurements of groundwater levels obtained manually during annual monitoring in 2009-2011 (and through the use of automatic recorders in 2002-2010) have consistently indicated an initial direction of groundwater flow from the former CCC/USDA facility to the north-northwest and toward the Nigh property, then west-southwest from the Nigh property toward the intermittent creek that lies west of the former CCC/USDA facility and the Nigh property. (2) At most of the monitored locations, carbon tetrachloride concentrations decreased in April 2011 relative to 2010 results. Noteworthy decreases of > 50% occurred at locations MW4, MW60, and MW88, in the most concentrated part of the plume. (3) Comparison of accumulated data demonstrates that the area of the carbon tetrachloride plume with concentrations > 200 {mu}g/L has decreased markedly over time and suggests a generally decreasing trend in contaminant levels. (4) The

  3. Chirality Transfer in Gold(I)‐Catalysed Hydroalkoxylation of 1,3‐Disubstituted Allenes

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Stacey; Sutherland, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gold(I)‐catalysed intermolecular hydroalkoxylation of enantioenriched 1,3‐disubstituted allenes was previously reported to occur with poor chirality transfer due to rapid allene racemisation. The first intermolecular hydroalkoxylation of allenes with efficient chirality transfer is reported here, exploiting conditions that suppress allene racemisation. A full substrate scope study reveals that excellent regio‐ and stereoselectivities are achieved when a σ‐withdrawing substituent is present. PMID:27862422

  4. Ion spectral structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferradas, C.; Zhang, J.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades several missions have recorded the presence of dynamic spectral features of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere. Previous studies have reported single "nose-like" structures occurring alone and simultaneous nose-like structures (up to three). These ion structures are named after the characteristic shapes of energy bands or gaps in the energy-time spectrograms of in situ measured ion fluxes. They constitute the observational signatures of ion acceleration, transport, and loss in the global magnetosphere. The HOPE mass spectrometer onboard the Van Allen Probes measures energetic hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions near the inner edge of the plasma sheet, where these ion structures are observed. We present a statistical study of nose-like structures, using 2-years measurements from the HOPE instrument. The results provide important details about the spatial distribution (dependence on geocentric distance), spectral features of the structures (differences among species), and geomagnetic conditions under which these structures occur.

  5. New Cooled Feeds for the Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Wm. J.; Fleming, Matthew; Munson, Chris; Tarter, Jill; Harp, G. R.; Spencer, Robert; Wadefalk, Niklas

    2017-04-01

    We developed a new generation of low-noise, broadband feeds for the Allen Telescope Array at the Hat Creek Observatory in Northern California. The new feeds operate over the frequency range 0.9 to 14 GHz. The noise temperatures of the feeds have been substantially improved by cooling the entire feed structure as well as the low-noise amplifiers to 70 K. To achieve this improved performance, the new feeds are mounted in glass vacuum bottles with plastic lenses that maximize the microwave transmission through the bottles. Both the cooled feeds and their low-noise amplifiers produce total system temperatures that are in the range 25–30 K from 1 GHz to 5 GHz and 40–50 K up to 12.5 GHz.

  6. Van Allen Probe Charging During the St. Patrick's Day Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Minow, J. I.

    2015-01-01

    The geomagnetic storms on and around March 17, 2015 marked the largest storms seen in the declining phase of the solar cycle to date. We use the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) mass spectrometer on board the Van Allen Probe - A and B satellites to study in detail the charging effects seen on these spacecraft during this time. Ion particle flux data provides information on the magnitude of the charging events using the ion line charging signature due to low energy ions accelerated by the spacecraft potential. Electron flux observations are used to correlate the charging environment with variations in spacecraft potential through the event. We also investigate the density and temperature of ions and electrons during the time of the charging event.

  7. Van Allen Probe Charging During the St. Patrick's Day Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L. N.; Minow, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    The geomagnetic storms on and around March 17, 2015 marked the largest storms seen in the declining phase of the solar cycle to date. We use the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) mass spectrometer on board the Van Allen Probe - A and B satellites to study in detail the charging effects seen on these spacecraft during this time. Ion particle flux data provides information on the magnitude of the charging events using the ion line charging signature due to low energy ions accelerated by the spacecraft potential. Electron flux observations are used to correlate the charging environment with variations in spacecraft potential through the event. We also investigate the density and temperature of ions and electrons during the time of the charging event.

  8. Irrigation trends in Kansas, 1991-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenny, Joan F.; Juracek, Kyle E.

    2013-01-01

    This fact sheet examines trends in total reported irrigation water use and acres irrigated as well as irrigation water use by crop type and system type in Kansas for the years 1991 through 2011. During the 21-year period, total reported irrigation water diversions varied substantially from year to year as affected primarily by climatic fluctuations. Total reported acres irrigated remained comparatively constant during this time, although acreages of irrigated corn increased and center pivots with drop nozzles became the dominant system type used for irrigation.

  9. Kansas City Plant Celebrates Safety Milestone

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A gang of motorcycle riders arrived at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant on July 1 to help celebrate a significant safety achievement - working nearly five million hours, covering a one-year period without a lost-time injury. The bikers -- some of whom are plant employees -- represent Bikers Against Child Abuse, the local nonprofit selected to receive a $5,000 donation as part of the plant's safety achievement celebration. The organization was selected because it aligns with the plant's community outreach focus on Family Safety & Security and partnership with the plant's union members.

  10. Physics Incubator at Kansas State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Chakrabarti, Amitabha

    Funded by a major private endowment, the physics department at Kansas State University has recently started a physics incubator program that provides support to research projects with a high probability of commercial application. Some examples of these projects will be discussed in this talk. In a parallel effort, undergraduate physics majors and graduate students are being encouraged to work with our business school to earn an Entrepreneurship minor and a certification in Entrepreneurship. We will discuss how these efforts are promoting a ``culture change'' in the department. We will also discuss the advantages and the difficulties in running such a program in a Midwest college town.

  11. Kansas City Plant Celebrates Safety Milestone

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-06

    A gang of motorcycle riders arrived at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant on July 1 to help celebrate a significant safety achievement - working nearly five million hours, covering a one-year period without a lost-time injury. The bikers -- some of whom are plant employees -- represent Bikers Against Child Abuse, the local nonprofit selected to receive a $5,000 donation as part of the plant's safety achievement celebration. The organization was selected because it aligns with the plant's community outreach focus on Family Safety & Security and partnership with the plant's union members.

  12. Factors Affecting Student Loan Default Rate at Johnson County Community College: A Multivariate Analysis of Student Loan Default and Repayment between Years 2006 and 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Cassandra

    2012-01-01

    This study utilized a quantitative design using archival data from Johnson County Community College (JCCC), located in Johnson County, Kansas, and the Office of Financial Aid for students who graduated, withdrew or dropped out of the college in academic years 2006, 2007 and 2008. Because this study used archival data, we can only show…

  13. Identification of "ever-cropped" land (1984-2010) using Landsat annual maximum NDVI image composites: Southwestern Kansas case study.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Susan K; Sylvester, Kenneth M

    2012-06-01

    A time series of 230 intra- and inter-annual Landsat Thematic Mapper images was used to identify land that was ever cropped during the years 1984 through 2010 for a five county region in southwestern Kansas. Annual maximum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (NDVI(ann-max)) were used to evaluate the inter-annual dynamics of cropped and non-cropped land. Three feature images were derived from the 27-year NDVI(ann-max) image time series and used in the classification: 1) maximum NDVI value that occurred over the entire 27 year time span (NDVI(max)), 2) standard deviation of the annual maximum NDVI values for all years (NDVI(sd)), and 3) standard deviation of the annual maximum NDVI values for years 1984-1986 (NDVI(sd84-86)) to improve Conservation Reserve Program land discrimination.Results of the classification were compared to three reference data sets: County-level USDA Census records (1982-2007) and two digital land cover maps (Kansas 2005 and USGS Trends Program maps (1986-2000)). Area of ever-cropped land for the five counties was on average 11.8 % higher than the area estimated from Census records. Overall agreement between the ever-cropped land map and the 2005 Kansas map was 91.9% and 97.2% for the Trends maps. Converting the intra-annual Landsat data set to a single annual maximum NDVI image composite considerably reduced the data set size, eliminated clouds and cloud-shadow affects, yet maintained information important for discriminating cropped land. Our results suggest that Landsat annual maximum NDVI image composites will be useful for characterizing land use and land cover change for many applications.

  14. Empirically Estimating the Existing Irrigation Adaptation to Future Drought Impacts in Kansas Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Lin, X.; Yang, X.

    2014-12-01

    More serious drought has been projected due to the climate change in the Kansas State of the U.S., which might threaten the local agriculture and thus require effective adaptation responses to drought, e.g. better irrigation. But the irrigation adaptation on drought at the current technology-level is poorly quantified, therefore challenges to figure out how much additional efforts are required under more aridity of climate. Here, we collect the irrigation application data for maize, soybean, sorghum and wheat in Kansas, and establish a two-stage model to quantify the crop-specific irrigation application responses to changes in climatic drivers, and further estimate the existing effectiveness of the irrigation to adapt future drought based on the IPCC AR5 ensemble PDSI prediction under RCP4.5 scenario. We find that the three summer season crops (maize, soybean and sorghum) would experience 0 - 20% yield losses depending on county due to more serious drought since 2030s, even though increased irrigation application as the response of drought had saved 0 - 10% yields. At the state level, maize receives most benefits from irrigation, whereas the beneficial effects are least for sorghum among the three crops. To wheat, irrigation adaptation is very weak since irrigation water applied is much less than the above three crops. But wheat yields were projected to have a slight increase in central and eastern regions because climate would become more moisture over the growing season of winter wheat in future. Our results highlight that the existing beneficial effects from irrigation would be surpassed by the negative impact of drought in future, which would cause overall yield reduction in Kansas especially for those summer season crops.

  15. Sampling for area estimation: A comparison of full-frame sampling with the sample segment approach. [Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixson, M. M.; Bauer, M. E.; Davis, B. J.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of sampling on the accuracy (precision and bias) of crop area estimates made from classifications of LANDSAT MSS data was investigated. Full-frame classifications of wheat and non-wheat for eighty counties in Kansas were repetitively sampled to simulate alternative sampling plants. Four sampling schemes involving different numbers of samples and different size sampling units were evaluated. The precision of the wheat area estimates increased as the segment size decreased and the number of segments was increased. Although the average bias associated with the various sampling schemes was not significantly different, the maximum absolute bias was directly related to sampling unit size.

  16. An Archeological Overview and Management Plan for the Lima Army Tank Plant, Allen County, Ohio.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-11

    American, uroamerican, and uropear. cultures; adaptations by American farmers to local environments and to regional and national economic and political...French and English trade in the area on Native American, Ruroamerican, and European cultures; (3) adaptations by American Tradition farmers to the...Harold, David Asch , Nancy Asch , Edwin Hajic, David Morgan, and Michael Spitzer. 1981. Archeological Reconnaissance of a Proposed Soyland Power

  17. What's Right with Kansas? (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Fuller, Merrian; Jackson, Nancy

    2016-07-12

    On Monday, Oct. 3 at 7 p.m. in Berkeley's Repertory Theater, the Lab presented "What's Right with Kansas," an evening of conversation with the Kansas-based Climate and Energy Project's founder and board chair, Nancy Jackson, and Berkeley Lab scientist Merrian Fuller, an electricity-market, policy and consumer behavior expert. Berkeley Lab will also debut its video "Common Ground," which showcases how CEP has become a Kansas mainstay and an inspiration to environmental organizations across the country. In a state rife with climate-change skepticism, CEP has changed behavior, and some minds, by employing rural values of thrift, independence, conservation, and friendly competition to promote energy efficiency.

  18. What's Right with Kansas? (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Merrian; Jackson, Nancy

    2011-10-03

    On Monday, Oct. 3 at 7 p.m. in Berkeley's Repertory Theater, the Lab presented "What's Right with Kansas," an evening of conversation with the Kansas-based Climate and Energy Project's founder and board chair, Nancy Jackson, and Berkeley Lab scientist Merrian Fuller, an electricity-market, policy and consumer behavior expert. Berkeley Lab will also debut its video "Common Ground," which showcases how CEP has become a Kansas mainstay and an inspiration to environmental organizations across the country. In a state rife with climate-change skepticism, CEP has changed behavior, and some minds, by employing rural values of thrift, independence, conservation, and friendly competition to promote energy efficiency.

  19. A simple approach to separate a mixture of homopropargylic and allenic alcohols.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fan; Hoang, Kim Le Mai; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2008-08-21

    A simple and practical approach to separate homopropargylic alcohol from allenic alcohol has been developed. It involves the formation of an insoluble silver acetylide species between silver nitrate and homopropargylic alcohol in aqueous acetone which can be separated from the allenic alcohol through a simple filtration. The homopropargylic alcohol can subsequently be recovered by hydrolysis with 1 N HCl. This protocol has been applied to the separation of a mixture of chiral homopropargylic and allenic alcohols in excellent yields with retention of absolute stereochemistry.

  20. Orion GNC Mitigation Efforts for Van Allen Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ellis T.; Jackson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Crew Module (CM) is NASA's next generation manned space vehicle, scheduled to return humans to lunar orbit in the coming decade. The Orion avionics and GN&C architectures have progressed through a number of project phases and are nearing completion of a major milestone. The first unmanned test mission, dubbed "Exploration Flight Test One" (EFT-1) is scheduled to launch from NASA Kennedy Space Center late next year and provides the first integrated test of all the vehicle systems, avionics and software. The EFT-1 mission will be an unmanned test flight that includes a high speed re-entry from an elliptical orbit, which will be launched on an expendable launch vehicle (ELV). The ELV will place CM and the ELV upper stage into a low Earth orbit (LEO) for one revolution. After the first LEO, the ELV upper stage will re-ignite and place the combined upper stage/CM into an elliptical orbit whose perigee results in a high energy entry to test CM response in a relatively high velocity, high heating environment. While not producing entry velocities as high as those experienced in returning from a lunar orbit, the trajectory was chosen to provide higher stresses on the thermal protection and guided entry systems, as compared against a lower energy LEO entry. However the required entry geometry with constraints on inclination and landing site result in a trajectory that lingers for many hours in the Van Allen radiation belts. This exposes the vehicle and avionics to much higher levels of high energy proton radiation than a typical LEO or lunar trajectory would encounter. As a result, Van Allen radiation poses a significant risk to the Orion avionics system, and particularly the Flight Control Module (FCM) computers that house the GN&C flight software. The measures taken by the Orion GN&C, Flight Software and Avionics teams to mitigate the risks associated with the Van Allen radiation on EFT-1 are covered in the paper. Background on the Orion avionics subsystem is

  1. Employment, Salary and Placement Information Related to Career Programs at Johnson County Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    Johnson County Community College (JCCC), in Kansas, offers formal career programs for 12 of the 20 fastest growing occupations requiring postsecondary training, and for 13 of the 30 occupations projected to be the fastest growing between 1990 and 2005. Following an introduction to general trends and data sources, this guide presents profiles of…

  2. Employment, Salary & Placement Information for Johnson County Community College Career Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    More than forty-six career programs are offered at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Kansas, in such areas as Cosmetology, Dental Assistance, and Travel and Tourism. These programs specialize in the types of industries that are currently growing at high rates, such as computer-related occupations and special education teachers. This…

  3. Employment, Salary and Placement Information for Johnson County Community College Career Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    Drawing from local, state, and national data sources, this report from Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Kansas summarizes the employment outlook in occupations corresponding to the college's career programs. The first section of the report offers 1992-2005 national employment projections, focusing on the fastest growing occupations,…

  4. High prevalence of “Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae” and apparent exclusion of Rickettsia parkeri in adult Amblyomma maculatum (Acari: Ixodidae) from Kansas and Oklahoma

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, Christopher D.; Denison, Amy M.; Dryden, Michael W.; Noden, Bruce H.; Lash, R. Ryan; Abdelghani, Sarah S.; Evans, Anna E.; Kelly, Aubree R.; Hecht, Joy A.; Karpathy, Sandor E.; Ganta, Roman R.; Little, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Amblyomma maculatum (the Gulf Coast tick), an aggressive, human-biting, Nearctic and Neotropical tick, is the principal vector of Rickettsia parkeri in the United States. This pathogenic spotted fever group Rickettsia species has been identified in 8–52% of questing adult Gulf Coast ticks in the southeastern United States. To our knowledge, R. parkeri has not been reported previously from adult specimens of A. maculatum collected in Kansas or Oklahoma. A total of 216 adult A. maculatum ticks were collected from 18 counties in Kansas and Oklahoma during 2011–2014 and evaluated by molecular methods for evidence of infection with R. parkeri. No infections with this agent were identified; however, 47% of 94 ticks collected from Kansas and 73% of 122 ticks from Oklahoma were infected with “Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae” a spotted fever group Rickettsia species of undetermined pathogenicity. These preliminary data suggest that “Ca. R. andeanae” is well-adapted to survival in populations of A. maculatum in Kansas and Oklahoma, and that its ubiquity in Gulf Coast ticks in these states may effectively exclude R. parkeri from their shared arthropod host, which could diminish markedly or preclude entirely the occurrence of R. parkeri rickettsiosis in this region of the United States. PMID:25773931

  5. The application of remote sensing to resource management and environmental quality programs in Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, B. G.; Martinko, E. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Capabilities to process data for state agencies in Kansas were upgraded through the vehicle of a low cost data processing system. Short term projects in which agencies identified areas of immediate needs, and longer terms projects, continued from previous years, are described including studies of Arkansas River irrigation; evaluation of rangeland in the Cimarron National Grassland; a model of the Walnut Creek watershed groundwater; selection of a pronghorn antelope release site; the establishment of a geographical data base for tax reassessment in Finney County; a land use/land cover inventory and hazards assessment; and applied R & D in agricultural remote sensing. The topics discussed at a short course in remote sensing and publications are listed.

  6. Region 7 States Air Quality Monitoring Plans - Kansas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) - Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska; Annual Monitoring Network Plans, Five-Year Monitoring Network Assessments, and approval documentation. Each year, states are required to submit an annual monitoring netwo

  7. RadNet Air Data From Kansas City, KS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Kansas City, KS from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  8. Gold(I)-catalysed synthesis of cyclic sulfamidates by intramolecular allene hydroamination.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Mari C M; Bebbington, Magnus W P

    2012-08-07

    Six-membered cyclic sulfamidates are prepared in high yields by treatment of allenic sulfamates with readily available gold(I) complexes. The reaction enables formation of N-substituted quaternary centres and complements existing processes for sulfamidate formation.

  9. Meniscus root refixation technique using a modified Mason-Allen stitch.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dhong Won; Jang, Suk Hwan; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Jin Goo; Ahn, Jin Hwan

    2013-03-01

    A complete posterior medial meniscus root tear results in the inability to withstand hoop stress and requires the repair of the posterior medial meniscus root. Several techniques to repair the posterior medial meniscus root have been proposed, but most techniques are based on simple stitching. A modified Mason-Allen technique, recognized as a superior stitching method to repair rotator cuff in shoulder surgery, was applied to overcome the potential weakness of those simple stitching techniques. This newly modified Mason-Allen technique reproduces the locking effect of a conventional modified Mason-Allen stitch allowing the physiological meniscal extrusion. The purpose of this article is to describe a posterior root repair technique using a modified Mason-Allen stitch with two strands consisting of a simple horizontal and a simple vertical stitch. Level of evidence V.

  10. [Book review] Green engineering: environmentally conscious design, by David T. Allen and David R. Shonnard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boustany, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    Review of: Green engineering: Environmentally conscious design / David T. Allen and David R. Shonnard / Prentice-Hall, Inc., One Lake Street, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. 2002. 552 pages. ISBN 0-13-061908-6.

  11. Wave acceleration of electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Horne, Richard B; Thorne, Richard M; Shprits, Yuri Y; Meredith, Nigel P; Glauert, Sarah A; Smith, Andy J; Kanekal, Shrikanth G; Baker, Daniel N; Engebretson, Mark J; Posch, Jennifer L; Spasojevic, Maria; Inan, Umran S; Pickett, Jolene S; Decreau, Pierrette M E

    2005-09-08

    The Van Allen radiation belts are two regions encircling the Earth in which energetic charged particles are trapped inside the Earth's magnetic field. Their properties vary according to solar activity and they represent a hazard to satellites and humans in space. An important challenge has been to explain how the charged particles within these belts are accelerated to very high energies of several million electron volts. Here we show, on the basis of the analysis of a rare event where the outer radiation belt was depleted and then re-formed closer to the Earth, that the long established theory of acceleration by radial diffusion is inadequate; the electrons are accelerated more effectively by electromagnetic waves at frequencies of a few kilohertz. Wave acceleration can increase the electron flux by more than three orders of magnitude over the observed timescale of one to two days, more than sufficient to explain the new radiation belt. Wave acceleration could also be important for Jupiter, Saturn and other astrophysical objects with magnetic fields.

  12. THE ALLEN TELESCOPE ARRAY SEARCH FOR ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGES ON MARS

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Marin M.; Siemion, Andrew P. V.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; De Pater, Imke; Barott, William C.; Delory, Gregory T.; Werthimer, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array was used to monitor Mars between 2010 March 9 and June 2, over a total of approximately 30 hr, for radio emission indicative of electrostatic discharge. The search was motivated by the report from Ruf et al. of the detection of non-thermal microwave radiation from Mars characterized by peaks in the power spectrum of the kurtosis, or kurtstrum, at 10 Hz, coinciding with a large dust storm event on 2006 June 8. For these observations, we developed a wideband signal processor at the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research. This 1024 channel spectrometer calculates the accumulated power and power-squared, from which the spectral kurtosis is calculated post-observation. Variations in the kurtosis are indicative of non-Gaussianity in the signal, which can be used to detect variable cosmic signals as well as radio frequency interference (RFI). During the three-month period of observations, dust activity occurred on Mars in the form of small-scale dust storms; however, no signals indicating lightning discharge were detected. Frequent signals in the kurtstrum that contain spectral peaks with an approximate 10 Hz fundamental were seen at both 3.2 and 8.0 GHz, but were the result of narrowband RFI with harmonics spread over a broad frequency range.

  13. Ion nose spectral structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J.-C.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B. A.; Reeves, G.; Skoug, R.; Funsten, H.

    2016-12-01

    We present a statistical study of nose-like structures observed in energetic hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions near the inner edge of the plasma sheet. Nose structures are spectral features named after the characteristic shapes of energy bands or gaps in the energy-time spectrograms of in situ measured ion fluxes. Using 22 months of observations from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron instrument onboard Van Allen Probe A, we determine the number of noses observed, and the minimum L shell reached and energy of each nose on each pass through the inner magnetosphere. We find that multiple noses occur more frequently in heavy ions than in H+ and are most often observed during quiet times. The heavy-ion noses penetrate to lower L shells than H+ noses, and there is an energy-magnetic local time (MLT) dependence in the nose locations and energies that is similar for all species. The observations are interpreted by using a steady state model of ion drift in the inner magnetosphere. The model is able to explain the energy and MLT dependence of the different types of nose structures. Different ion charge-exchange lifetimes are the main cause for the deeper penetration of heavy-ion noses. The species dependence and preferred geomagnetic conditions of multiple-nose events indicate that they must be on long drift paths, leading to strong charge-exchange effects. The results provide important insight into the spatial distribution, species dependence, and geomagnetic conditions under which nose structures occur.

  14. SETI Observations of Exoplanets with the Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, G. R.; Richards, Jon; Tarter, Jill C.; Dreher, John; Jordan, Jane; Shostak, Seth; Smolek, Ken; Kilsdonk, Tom; Wilcox, Bethany R.; Wimberly, M. K. R.; Ross, John; Barott, W. C.; Ackermann, R. F.; Blair, Samantha

    2016-12-01

    We report radio SETI observations on a large number of known exoplanets and other nearby star systems using the Allen Telescope Array (ATA). Observations were made over about 19000 hr from 2009 May to 2015 December. This search focused on narrowband radio signals from a set totaling 9293 stars, including 2015 exoplanet stars and Kepler objects of interest and an additional 65 whose planets may be close to their habitable zones. The ATA observations were made using multiple synthesized beams and an anticoincidence filter to help identify terrestrial radio interference. Stars were observed over frequencies from 1 to 9 GHz in multiple bands that avoid strong terrestrial communication frequencies. Data were processed in near-real time for narrowband (0.7-100 Hz) continuous and pulsed signals with transmitter/receiver relative accelerations from -0.3 to 0.3 m s-2. A total of 1.9 × 108 unique signals requiring immediate follow-up were detected in observations covering more than 8 × 106 star-MHz. We detected no persistent signals from extraterrestrial technology exceeding our frequency-dependent sensitivity threshold of 180-310 × 10-26 W m-2.

  15. Active and passive microwave measurements in Hurricane Allen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, V. E.; Bahn, G. S.; Grantham, W. L.; Harrington, R. F.; Jones, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center analysis of the airborne microwave remote sensing measurements of Hurricane Allen obtained on August 5 and 8, 1980 is summarized. The instruments were the C-band stepped frequency microwave radiometer and the Ku-band airborne microwave scatterometer. They were carried aboard a NOAA aircraft making storm penetrations at an altitude of 3000 m and are sensitive to rain rate, surface wind speed, and surface wind vector. The wind speed is calculated from the increase in antenna brightness temperature above the estimated calm sea value. The rain rate is obtained from the difference between antenna temperature increases measured at two frequencies, and wind vector is determined from the sea surface normalized radar cross section measured at several azimuths. Comparison wind data were provided from the inertial navigation systems aboard both the C-130 aircraft at 3000 m and a second NOAA aircraft (a P-3) operating between 500 and 1500 m. Comparison rain rate data were obtained with a rain radar aboard the P-3. Evaluation of the surface winds obtained with the two microwave instruments was limited to comparisons with each other and with the flight level winds. Two important conclusions are drawn from these comparisons: (1) the radiometer is accurate when predicting flight level wind speeds and rain; and (2) the scatterometer produces well behaved and consistent wind vectors for the rain free periods.

  16. Archaeological Survey of the Lewisville Lake Shoreline, Denton County, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    within an abandoned park that has a boat ramp, sandy ridges paralleling the Elm Fork proximal to the outhouse, concrete grills, and picnic tables...County in 1851 and settled at New Al---. This town boats sporadically serviced early settlements on the was located a short distance down Hickory...Missouri, Kansas, and Texas railroad tracks. It Is Lewisville Lake Park. A boat ramp occurs 2 m west of situated at the head of a steep draw at a point

  17. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, 2013 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Arin J.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Kansas Water Science Center (KSWSC), in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring gages in the State of Kansas. These include 195 real-time streamflow-gaging stations (herein gages) and 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations. These data and associated analysis, accumulated for many years, provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve our understanding of our water resources.

  18. Ramona, Kansas, Corrective Action Monitoring Report for 2012

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M.

    2014-04-01

    This Monitoring Report describes groundwater monitoring for the property at Ramona, Kansas, on which a grain storage facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The monitoring was implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory. Monitoring was conducted as specified in the Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2012) approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2012).

  19. Ramona, Kansas, Corrective Action Monitoring Report for 2014

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M.

    2015-06-01

    This report describes groundwater monitoring in 2014 for the property at Ramona, Kansas, on which a grain storage facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The monitoring was implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory and was conducted as specified in the Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2012) approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2012).

  20. STS-46 Pilot Allen uses cycle ergometer on OV-104's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Pilot Andrew M. Allen exercises using the cycle ergometer on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Allen, shirtless, is equipped with sensors for monitoring his biological systems during the exercise session. A communications kit assembly cable freefloats from his headset at his right and in front of the forward lockers. The open airlock hatch appears at his left and the sleep station behind him.

  1. Astronauts Gardner and Allen bringing Westar VI satellite into payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, left, and Joseph P. Allen IV work together with Dr. Anna L. Fisher (in the Discovery controlling the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm) to bring the Westar VI satellite into the Discovery's payload bay. Allen is on a mobile foot restraint, which is attached to the RMS end effector. Gardner uses the manned maneuvering unit (MMU) on the other side of the satellite. He is attempting to remove the stinger device from the now stabilized satellite.

  2. Enantioselective Terminal Addition to Allenes by Dual Chiral Primary Amine/Palladium Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; Wang, Yaning; Zhang, Long; Cai, Mao; Luo, Sanzhong

    2017-03-15

    We herein describe a synergistic chiral primary amine/achiral palladium catalyzed enantioselective terminal addition to allenes with α-branched β-ketocarbonyls and aldehydes. The reactions afford allylic adducts bearing acyclic all-carbon quaternary centers with high regio- and enantioselectivity. A wide range of allenes including those aliphatic or 1,1'-disubstituted could be employed, thus expanding the scope of typical asymmetric allylic alkylation reactions.

  3. Microwave-promoted synthesis of bicyclic azocine-β-lactams from bis(allenes).

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Benito; Almendros, Pedro; Aragoncillo, Cristina; Fernández, Israel; Gómez-Campillos, Gonzalo

    2014-08-01

    A metal-free preparation of structurally novel bicyclic azocine-β-lactams has been developed. The first examples accounting for the preparation of eight-membered rings from bis(allenes) in the absence of metals have been achieved by the thermolysis of nonconjugated 2-azetidinone-tethered bis(allenes) on application of microwave irradiation. This selective carbocyclization reaction has been studied experimentally, and additionally, its mechanism has been investigated by a DFT study.

  4. STS-46 Pilot Allen, in LES, at pilots station on OV-104's forward flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Pilot Andrew M. Allen, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), reviews descent procedural checklists while at pilots station on the forward flight deck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. The head-up display (HUD), flight mirror assembly, and forward windows appear in front of Allen. Control panels with drinking water containers and checklists are seen overhead.

  5. US hydropower resource assessment for Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Kansas.

  6. Place attachment among retirees in Greensburg, Kansas.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey S; Cartlidge, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    On 4 May 2007 an ef-5 tornado leveled 95 percent of Greensburg, Kansas. Because city leaders encouraged everyone to use “green” building techniques as they rebuilt their homes and businesses, not only has the return to normalcy been exceedingly slow, but some of the town's older residents feel that officials have overlooked their needs. These minor episodes of discord enabled us to learn what features are most important to people in retirement. The features include identifiable landmarks, a space in which to socialize, and age-specific businesses. We assert that the lessons learned in Greensburg are applicable to other communities with a sizable older population. As baby boomers rapidly enter retirement they will seek places to live that are elder friendly and enable them to effectively bond with place. As previous research attests, people who have a strong attachment to place commonly have a good quality of life.

  7. September 2007 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-05-01

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 10 monitoring wells and 6 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, September 2006, and March 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007a). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in September 2007, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b). The September 2007 sampling represents the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE.

  8. March 2007 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-06-01

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 11 monitoring wells and 5 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, and September 2006 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in March 2007, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2005b). The March 2007 sampling represents the fourth monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE. A final sampling event under this program is scheduled for September 2007.

  9. November 2007 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-02-28

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) formerly operated a grain storage facility (during most of the interval 1949-1974) at Barnes, Kansas. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to investigate this contamination. In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2007). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells at 19 distinct locations, 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels slightly exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a plume that appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigation indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2007). The present report presents the results of the November 2007 sampling event that followed the targeted investigation.

  10. The Midcontinent rift system in Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Berendsen, P. . Kansas Geological Survey)

    1993-03-01

    A sequence of rift-related mafic volcanic rocks, volcanoclastic-, and clastic sedimentary rocks are recognized in cuttings and cores from about seventy wells in Kansas. The age (1,097.5 Ma) for gabbro in the Poersch [number sign]1 well in northern Kansas, as well as the general petrographic characteristics of the sedimentary rocks throughout the area favors a correlation with established Keweenawan stratigraphy in the Lake Superior region. Rift-related northeast-trending faults and older northwest-trending faults divide the area up into a number of orthogonal fault blocks or basins. Depending upon the tectonic history of the individual basin all or part of the Keweenawan section may be preserved. It is believed that large amounts of Keweenawan clastic sedimentary rock were eroded from the nemaha uplift east of the central graben of the rift and transported in an easterly direction. Prior to deposition of Paleozoic rocks the area was peneplaned. Correlation of various stratigraphic units over any distance is complicated by tectonic activity occurring at several times during the Precambrian and Paleozoic. Stratabound or stratiform deposits can occur both in the Precambrian as well as the overlying Paleozoic rocks. The possibility of massive sulfides to occur in the mafic intrusive rocks must not be excluded. In the core from the Poersch [number sign]1 well sulfides are recognized in gabbroic sills or dikes. Dark, fissile shale, similar to the Nonesuch Shale in the [number sign]1--4 Finn well averages 0.75% organic carbon. Thermal maturation within the rift probably ranges from within the oil window to over maturity.

  11. Public-supply water use in Kansas, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer; Restrepo-Osorio, Diana

    2017-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Data Release provides derivative statistics of water used by Kansas public-supply systems in 2015. Gallons per capita per day is calculated using self-reported information in the “Part B: Monthly Water Use Summary” and “Part C: Population, Service Connections, and Water Rates” sections of the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources' (DWR) annual municipal water use report (see appendixes at http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ds964 for an example of a municipal water use report form.) Percent unaccounted for water is calculated using self-reported information in “Part B: Monthly Water Use Summary” of the DWR’s municipal water-use report. The published statistics from the previous 4 years (2011–2014) are also shown with the 2015 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. Derivative statistics of 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, and 5-year averages for gallons per capita per day (gpcd) are also provided by the Kansas Water Authority's 14 regional planning areas, and the DWR regions used for analysis of per capita water use in Kansas. An overall Kansas average (yearly and 5-year average) is also calculated. Kansas state average per capita municipal water use in 2015 was 105 gpcd.

  12. Geographical variation in bill size across bird species provides evidence for Allen's rule.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Matthew R E; Tattersall, Glenn J

    2010-08-01

    Allen's rule proposes that the appendages of endotherms are smaller, relative to body size, in colder climates, in order to reduce heat loss. Empirical support for Allen's rule is mainly derived from occasional reports of geographical clines in extremity size of individual species. Interspecific evidence is restricted to two studies of leg proportions in seabirds and shorebirds. We used phylogenetic comparative analyses of 214 bird species to examine whether bird bills, significant sites of heat exchange, conform to Allen's rule. The species comprised eight diverse taxonomic groups-toucans, African barbets, Australian parrots, estrildid finches, Canadian galliforms, penguins, gulls, and terns. Across all species, there were strongly significant relationships between bill length and both latitude and environmental temperature, with species in colder climates having significantly shorter bills. Patterns supporting Allen's rule in relation to latitudinal or altitudinal distribution held within all groups except the finches. Evidence for a direct association with temperature was found within four groups (parrots, galliforms, penguins, and gulls). Support for Allen's rule in leg elements was weaker, suggesting that bird bills may be more susceptible to thermoregulatory constraints generally. Our results provide the strongest comparative support yet published for Allen's rule and demonstrate that thermoregulation has been an important factor in shaping the evolution of bird bills.

  13. Status of Groundwater Levels and Storage Volume in the Equus Beds Aquifer Near Wichita, Kansas, January 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Cristi V.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in the 1940s, the Wichita well field was developed in the Equus Beds aquifer in southwestern Harvey County and northwestern Sedgwick County to supply water to the city of Wichita (Williams and Lohman, 1949). In addition to supplying drinking water to the largest city in Kansas, the other primary use of water from the Equus Beds aquifer is to irrigate crops in this agriculture-dominated part of south-central Kansas (Rich Eubank, Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources, oral commun., 2008). The decline of water levels in the aquifer were noted soon after the development of the Wichita well field began (Williams and Lohman, 1949). As water levels in the aquifer decline, the volume of water stored in the aquifer decreases and less water is available to supply future needs. For many years the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the city of Wichita, has monitored these changes in water levels and the resulting changes in storage volume in the Equus Beds aquifer as part of Wichita's effort to effectively manage this resource. In 2007, the city of Wichita began using Phase I of the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) project for large-scale artificial recharge of the Equus Beds aquifer. The ASR project uses water from the Little Arkansas River - either pumped from the river directly or from wells in the riverbank that obtain their water from the river by induced infiltration - as the source of artificial recharge to the Equus Beds aquifer (City of Wichita, 2009).

  14. Temperature of the plasmasphere from Van Allen Probes HOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genestreti, K. J.; Goldstein, J.; Corley, G. D.; Farner, W.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B. A.; Mouikis, C. G.; Ramnarace, C.; Skoug, R. M.; Turner, N. E.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce two novel techniques for estimating temperatures of very low energy space plasmas using, primarily, in situ data from an electrostatic analyzer mounted on a charged and moving spacecraft. The techniques are used to estimate proton temperatures during intervals where the bulk of the ion plasma is well below the energy bandpass of the analyzer. Both techniques assume that the plasma may be described by a one-dimensional E→×B→ drifting Maxwellian and that the potential field and motion of the spacecraft may be accounted for in the simplest possible manner, i.e., by a linear shift of coordinates. The first technique involves the application of a constrained theoretical fit to a measured distribution function. The second technique involves the comparison of total and partial-energy number densities. Both techniques are applied to Van Allen Probes Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) observations of the proton component of the plasmasphere during two orbits on 15 January 2013. We find that the temperatures calculated from these two order-of-magnitude-type techniques are in good agreement with typical ranges of the plasmaspheric temperature calculated using retarding potential analyzer-based measurements - generally between 0.2 and 2 eV (2000-20,000 K). We also find that the temperature is correlated with L shell and hot plasma density and is negatively correlated with the cold plasma density. We posit that the latter of these three relationships may be indicative of collisional or wave-driven heating of the plasmasphere in the ring current overlap region. We note that these techniques may be easily applied to similar data sets or used for a variety of purposes.

  15. Ion nose spectral structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    DOE PAGES

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J. -C.; Spence, H. E.; ...

    2016-11-22

    Here, we present a statistical study of nose-like structures observed in energetic hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions near the inner edge of the plasma sheet. Nose structures are spectral features named after the characteristic shapes of energy bands or gaps in the energy-time spectrograms of in situ measured ion fluxes. Using 22 months of observations from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument onboard Van Allen Probe A, we determine the number of noses observed, and the minimum L-shell reached and energy of each nose on each pass through the inner magnetosphere. We find that multiple noses occur more frequentlymore » in heavy ions than in H+, and are most often observed during quiet times. The heavy-ion noses penetrate to lower L shells than H+ noses and there is an energy-magnetic local time (MLT) dependence in the nose locations and energies that is similar for all species. The observations are interpreted using a steady-state model of ion drift in the inner magnetosphere. The model is able to explain the energy and MLT dependence of the different types of nose structures. Different ion charge exchange lifetimes are the main cause for the deeper penetration of heavy-ion noses. The species dependence and preferred geomagnetic conditions of multiple-nose events indicate that they must be on long drift paths, leading to strong charge-exchange effects. The results provide important insight into the spatial distribution, species dependence, and geomagnetic conditions under which nose structures occur.« less

  16. Ion nose spectral structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J. -C.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, Brian Arthur; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Funsten, Herbert O.

    2016-11-22

    Here, we present a statistical study of nose-like structures observed in energetic hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions near the inner edge of the plasma sheet. Nose structures are spectral features named after the characteristic shapes of energy bands or gaps in the energy-time spectrograms of in situ measured ion fluxes. Using 22 months of observations from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument onboard Van Allen Probe A, we determine the number of noses observed, and the minimum L-shell reached and energy of each nose on each pass through the inner magnetosphere. We find that multiple noses occur more frequently in heavy ions than in H+, and are most often observed during quiet times. The heavy-ion noses penetrate to lower L shells than H+ noses and there is an energy-magnetic local time (MLT) dependence in the nose locations and energies that is similar for all species. The observations are interpreted using a steady-state model of ion drift in the inner magnetosphere. The model is able to explain the energy and MLT dependence of the different types of nose structures. Different ion charge exchange lifetimes are the main cause for the deeper penetration of heavy-ion noses. The species dependence and preferred geomagnetic conditions of multiple-nose events indicate that they must be on long drift paths, leading to strong charge-exchange effects. The results provide important insight into the spatial distribution, species dependence, and geomagnetic conditions under which nose structures occur.

  17. 76 FR 36318 - Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Morgan City-Port Allen Route From Mile Marker 0 to Port Allen Lock

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... and tows from destruction, loss or injury due to hazards associated with rising flood water. DATES... the general public, levee system, vessels and tows from the hazards associated with rising flood water... hazards associated with rising flood water on the Morgan City-Port Allen Route. Basis and Purpose...

  18. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Mendon, Vrushali V.; Zhao, Mingjie; Taylor, Zachary T.; Poehlman, Eric A.

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Kansas. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Kansas.

  19. 78 FR 70580 - Apria Healthcare LLC, Billing Department, Overland Park, Kansas; Notice of Negative Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Healthcare LLC, Billing Department, Overland Park, Kansas; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding... LLC, Billing Department, Overland Park, Kansas (TA-W-82,838) requested administrative reconsideration... Adjustment Assistance (TAA), applicable to workers and former workers of Apria Healthcare LLC,...

  20. 30 CFR 916.25 - Approval of Kansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... House Bill 3009 eliminated the Kansas Mined Land Conservation and Reclamation Board and transferred its functions and staff to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. September 30, 1988 January 10,...

  1. Public-supply water use in Kansas, 1990-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenny, Joan F.

    2014-01-01

    This fact sheet describes water-use data collection and quantities of surface water and groundwater diverted for public supply in Kansas for the years 1990 through 2012. Data used in this fact sheet are from the Kansas Department of Agriculture’s Division of Water Resources and the Kansas Water Office. Water used for public supply represents about 10 percent of all reported water withdrawals in Kansas. Between 1990 and 2012, annual withdrawals for public supply ranged from a low of 121 billion gallons in 1993 to a high of 159 billion gallons in 2012. Differences in annual withdrawals were associated primarily with climatic fluctuations. Six suppliers distributed about one-half of the total water withdrawn for public supply, and nearly three-quarters of the surface water. Surface water represented between 52 and 61 percent of total annual withdrawals for public supply. The proportion of surface water obtained through contracts from Federal reservoirs increased from less than 5 percent in the 1990s to 8 percent in 2011 and 2012. More than 99 percent of the reported water withdrawn for public supply in Kansas in 2012 was metered, which was an increase from 92 percent in 1990. State population increased steadily from 2.5 million people in 1990 to 2.9 million in 2012. Recent estimates indicate that about 95 percent of the total population was served by public water supply; the remainder obtained water from other sources such as private wells. Average per capita water use as calculated for State conservation planning purposes varied by region of the State. The smallest regional average water use for the years 1990–2012 was 98 gallons per person per day in easternmost Kansas, and the largest regional average water use was 274 gallons per person per day in westernmost Kansas.

  2. March 2008 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-28

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2007). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2007). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2007) and the initial monitoring in November 2007 (Argonne 2008) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels slightly exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigation indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2007). In particular, the local school district (USD 223) handled, stored, and disposed of chemicals including carbon tetrachloride. This current report presents the results of the second quarterly monitoring event, conducted in March 2008. During this second

  3. October 2008 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-26

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2008a). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events in November 2007 (Argonne 2008b), March 2008 (Argonne 2008c), and July 2008 (Argonne 2008d) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigations indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). The former agriculture building owned by the local school district, located immediately east of well PWS3, is also a potential source of the contamination. This current report presents the results of the fourth

  4. March 2008 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-06

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 10 monitoring wells and 6 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, September 2006, March 2007, and September 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007a, 2008). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in March 2008, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b). The September 2007 sampling represented the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE. The March 2008 sampling begins an extension of the approved monitoring that is to

  5. July 2008 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-20

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2008a). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events in November 2007 (Argonne 2008b) and March 2008 (Argonne 2008c) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels slightly exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigations indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). This current report presents the results of the third monitoring event, conducted in July 2008. During this third monitoring event, low-flow sampling methods were used to purge and sample all wells. This was the second event at

  6. Recommendations for Remedial Action at Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2007-02-15

    On September 7, 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented a Scoping Memo (Argonne 2005) for preliminary consideration by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). This document suggested possible remedial options for the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Everest, Kansas. The suggested approaches were discussed by representatives of the KDHE, the CCC/USDA, and Argonne at the KDHE office in Topeka on September 8-9, 2005, along with other technical and logistic issues related to the Everest site. In response to these discussions, the KDHE recommended (KDHE 2005) evaluation of several remedial processes, either alone or in combination, as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for Everest. The primary remedial processes suggested by the KDHE included the following: (1) Hydraulic control by groundwater extraction with aboveground treatment; (2) Air sparging-soil vapor extraction (SVE) in large-diameter boreholes; and (3) Phytoremediation. As a further outcome of the 2005 meeting and as a precursor to the proposed CAS, the CCC/USDA completed the following supplemental investigations at Everest to address several specific technical concerns discussed with the KDHE: (1) Construction of interpretive cross sections at strategic locations selected by the KDHE along the main plume migration pathway, to depict the hydrogeologic characteristics affecting groundwater flow and contaminant movement (Argonne 2006a); (2) A field investigation in early 2006 (Argonne 2006c), as follows: (a) Installation and testing of a production well and associated observation points, at locations approved by the KDHE, to determine the response of the Everest aquifer to groundwater extraction near the Nigh property; (b) Groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the installation of additional permanent monitoring points at locations selected by the KDHE, to further constrain

  7. 78 FR 70934 - Trespassing on DOE Property: Kansas City Plant Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... National Nuclear Security Administration Trespassing on DOE Property: Kansas City Plant Facilities AGENCY... designation of Kansas City Plant Facilities as off- limit areas. SUMMARY: DOE hereby amends and adds to... of the Kansas City Plant of the United States Department of Energy, National Nuclear...

  8. 78 FR 56753 - License Amendment for Aptuit, LLC, Kansas City, Missouri

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... COMMISSION License Amendment for Aptuit, LLC, Kansas City, Missouri AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission..., Kansas City, Missouri to make it suitable for unrestricted use in accordance with the NRC requirements... approved the licensee's Kansas City, Missouri facility as a location of use for radioactive...

  9. 75 FR 68755 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Kansas Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... Doc No: 2010-28221] COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Kansas....S. Commission on Civil Rights (Commission), and the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), that a... Civil Rights, 400 State Avenue, Suite 908, Kansas City, Kansas 66101. Comments may be e-mailed...

  10. Allen Brain Atlas: an integrated spatio-temporal portal for exploring the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Sunkin, Susan M.; Ng, Lydia; Lau, Chris; Dolbeare, Tim; Gilbert, Terri L.; Thompson, Carol L.; Hawrylycz, Michael; Dang, Chinh

    2013-01-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas (http://www.brain-map.org) provides a unique online public resource integrating extensive gene expression data, connectivity data and neuroanatomical information with powerful search and viewing tools for the adult and developing brain in mouse, human and non-human primate. Here, we review the resources available at the Allen Brain Atlas, describing each product and data type [such as in situ hybridization (ISH) and supporting histology, microarray, RNA sequencing, reference atlases, projection mapping and magnetic resonance imaging]. In addition, standardized and unique features in the web applications are described that enable users to search and mine the various data sets. Features include both simple and sophisticated methods for gene searches, colorimetric and fluorescent ISH image viewers, graphical displays of ISH, microarray and RNA sequencing data, Brain Explorer software for 3D navigation of anatomy and gene expression, and an interactive reference atlas viewer. In addition, cross data set searches enable users to query multiple Allen Brain Atlas data sets simultaneously. All of the Allen Brain Atlas resources can be accessed through the Allen Brain Atlas data portal. PMID:23193282

  11. Allen Brain Atlas: an integrated spatio-temporal portal for exploring the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sunkin, Susan M; Ng, Lydia; Lau, Chris; Dolbeare, Tim; Gilbert, Terri L; Thompson, Carol L; Hawrylycz, Michael; Dang, Chinh

    2013-01-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas (http://www.brain-map.org) provides a unique online public resource integrating extensive gene expression data, connectivity data and neuroanatomical information with powerful search and viewing tools for the adult and developing brain in mouse, human and non-human primate. Here, we review the resources available at the Allen Brain Atlas, describing each product and data type [such as in situ hybridization (ISH) and supporting histology, microarray, RNA sequencing, reference atlases, projection mapping and magnetic resonance imaging]. In addition, standardized and unique features in the web applications are described that enable users to search and mine the various data sets. Features include both simple and sophisticated methods for gene searches, colorimetric and fluorescent ISH image viewers, graphical displays of ISH, microarray and RNA sequencing data, Brain Explorer software for 3D navigation of anatomy and gene expression, and an interactive reference atlas viewer. In addition, cross data set searches enable users to query multiple Allen Brain Atlas data sets simultaneously. All of the Allen Brain Atlas resources can be accessed through the Allen Brain Atlas data portal.

  12. Helping Newspapers Become More Responsive to Community Concerns: An In-Depth Interview Research Project with Sedgwick County Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huxman, Susan Schultz; Iorio, Sharon Hartin

    Noting that the trend in the newspaper industry from the predictive-control model to the explanative-naturalistic model mirrors a trend in the communication discipline toward qualitative research and more meaningful connections between industry and academia, a study investigated Sedgwick County, Kansas residents' concerns regarding politics and…

  13. Skylab study of water quality. [Kansas reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarger, H. L. (Principal Investigator); Mccauley, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Analysis of S-190A imagery from 1 EREP pass over 3 reservoirs in Kansas establishes a strong linear correlation between the red/green radiance ratio and suspended solids. This result compares quite favorably to ERTS MSS CCT results. The linear fits RMS for Skylab is 6 ppm as compared to 12 ppm for ERTS. All of the ERTS satellite passes yielded fairly linear results with typical RMS values of 12 ppm. However, a few of the individual passes did yield RMS values of 5 or 6 ppm which is comparable to the one Skylab pass analyzed. In view of the cloudy conditions in the Skylab photos, yet good results, the indications are that S-190A may do somewhat better than the ERTS MSS in determining suspended load. More S-190A data is needed to confirm this. As was the case with the ERTS MSS, the Skylab S-190A showed no strong correlation with other water quality parameters. S-190B photos because of their high resolution can provide much first look information regarding relative degrees of turbidity within various parts of large lakes and among smaller bodies of water.

  14. Hydrologic Conditions in Kansas, water year 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Madison R.

    2016-03-31

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring sites in Kansas. In 2015, the network included about 200 real-time streamgages (hereafter referred to as “gages”), 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations, and 30 groundwater-level monitoring wells. These data and associated analyses provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve the understanding of Kansas’s water resources.Real-time data are verified by the USGS throughout the year with regular measurements of streamflow, lake levels, and groundwater levels. These data are used in protecting life and property; and managing water resources for agricultural, industrial, public supply, ecological, and recreational purposes. Yearly hydrologic conditions are characterized by comparing statistical analyses of current and historical water year (WY) data for the period of record. A WY is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the year in which it ends.

  15. Routine environment audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri. During this audit the activities the audit team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted October 24-November 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  16. Surface water-quality assessment of the lower Kansas River basin, Kansas and Nebraska; project description

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Jordan, P.R.; Engberg, R.A.; Dugan, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    In 1986 the U.S. Geological Survey began a National Water-Quality Assessment Program to: (1) provide nationally consistent descriptions of the current status of water quality for a large, diverse, and geographically distributed part of the Nation 's surface water resources; (2) where possible, define trends in water quality; and (3) identify and describe the relation between water quality and natural and land use factors. This report describes the pilot study of the lower Kansas River basin, which is one of four surface water pilot studies that will be used to test, and modify as necessary, assessment concepts and approaches in preparation for future full implementation of the national program. Water quality issues in the lower Kansas River basin are dominated by possible nonpoint sources of contamination from agricultural land, with issues including: (1) large sediment discharge in the streams and sediment deposition in the reservoirs caused by intensive cultivation of row crops and subsequent erosion; (2) occurrence of pesticides in streams and reservoirs that could impair the suitability of water for aquatic life and has the potential for impairing the water 's suitability for public supply; (3) bacterial contamination caused by runoff from pastureland and feedlot operations and municipal wastewater discharges; and (4) nutrient enrichment of reservoirs. Data from fixed stations will be used to determine frequency distributions of constituent concentrations and mass balances of constituents between stations. Subbasin or river reach studies will provide a better understanding of the origin, movement, and fate of potential contaminants. (Lantz-PTT)

  17. Effects of pumping municipal wells at Manhattan, Kansas, on streamflow in the Big Blue and Kansas Rivers, Northeast Kansas, 1992-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jian, Xiaodong; Myers, N.C.; Hargadine, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    A ground-water flow model was developed to simulate the effects of municipal well pumping on streamflow in the Big Blue and Kansas Rivers near Manhattan, Kansas, from 1992 through 1994.Model simulations of the effects of municipal well pumping on streamflow in the Big Blue and Kansas Rivers indicate that well pumping decreases streamflow. Simulations of May 1993 conditions indicate that well pumping decreased simulated streamflow in the Big Blue and Kansas Rivers by 5.28 ft3/s (cubic feet per second) for the month, of which 3.22 ft3/s were contributed from the streams (induced infiltration) and 2.06 ft3/s werecontributed from ground water that would have seeped to the streams if the wells had not been pumping (intercepted base flow). Of the total 414acre-feet pumped by municipal wells during May 1993, about 48 percent was from induced infiltration, and about 31 percent was from intercepted base flow. Simulations of October 16 through November 14, 1994, conditions indicate that well pumping decreased simulated streamflow in the Big Blue and Kansas Rivers by 6.67 ft3/s for the period, of which 6.51 ft3/s was from induced infiltration and 0.61 ft3/s was from intercepted base flow. Of the 506 acre-feet pumped by municipal wells during October 16 through November 14, 1994, about 76 percent was induced from infiltration, and about 2 percent was from intercepted base flow. Steady-state simulations of hypothetical conditions were conducted to develop relations among average and minimum ground- water altitudes in the Manhattan municipal well field and precipitation, pumping, and streamflow rates.

  18. Outbreak of cryptosporidiosis among responders to a rollover of a truck carrying calves - Kansas, April 2013.

    PubMed

    Webb, Lindsey Martin; Tubach, Sheri A; Hunt, D Charles

    2014-12-19

    In April 2013, the Thomas County Health Department notified the Kansas Department of Health and Environment's Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Response section (KDHE) of two cases of cryptosporidiosis among emergency responders to a tractor-trailer rollover. The truck was carrying approximately 350 preweaned Holstein calves. An outbreak investigation was led by KDHE with assistance from the county health department; six cases of cryptosporidiosis were identified among the 15 emergency responders. No additional primary cases with this exposure or secondary cases were identified. Disease was associated with carrying calves (relative risk [RR] = 3.0) and contact with fecal matter (RR = 4.5). The calves were aged <10 days and reportedly suffered from scours (diarrheal disease), which is often caused by Cryptosporidium spp., a chlorine-tolerant protozoan parasite. Because of the age of the calves and the conditions at the rollover scene, a high potential existed for fecal contamination and subsequent transmission of Cryptosporidium. This outbreak is the first report of both law enforcement and volunteer emergency responders contracting cryptosporidiosis, with transmission of Cryptosporidium attributed solely to direct contact with animals and their feces. Human illness resulting from contact with animals during an emergency response might be minimized if 1) all responders are aware of the potential for zoonotic transmission, 2) education is provided on proper animal handling including the use of appropriate personal protective equipment, and 3) responders practice thorough hand hygiene and decontaminate clothing and equipment following contact with feces.

  19. Conjugate observations of quasiperiodic emissions by the Cluster, Van Allen Probes, and THEMIS spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, F.; Hospodarsky, G.; Pickett, J. S.; Santolík, O.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C.

    2016-08-01

    We present results of a detailed analysis of two electromagnetic wave events observed in the inner magnetosphere at frequencies of a few kilohertz, which exhibit a quasiperiodic (QP) time modulation of the wave intensity. The events were observed by the Cluster and Van Allen Probes spacecraft and in one event also by the THEMIS E spacecraft. The spacecraft were significantly separated in magnetic local time, demonstrating a huge azimuthal extent of the events. Geomagnetic conditions at the times of the observations were very quiet, and the events occurred inside the plasmasphere. The modulation period observed by the Van Allen Probes and THEMIS E spacecraft (duskside) was in both events about twice larger than the modulation period observed by the Cluster spacecraft (dawnside). Moreover, individual QP elements occur about 15 s earlier on THEMIS E than on Van Allen Probes, which might be related to a finite propagation speed of a modulating ULF wave.

  20. Recent Results from the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) onboard the Van Allen Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Elkington, S. R.; Hoxie, V. C.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.

    2013-05-01

    We describe recent results from the REPT instruments on board Van Allen Probes mission launched on 30 August 2012. The twin spacecraft comprising the Van Allen probes mission are identically instrumented and carry a comprehensive suite of sensors characterizing magnetospheric charged particle populations, electric and magnetic fields and plasma waves. The REPT instruments comprise a well-shielded silicon solid state detector stack, with a state of the art electronics and measure electrons of ~1.5 to > 20 MeV and protons of ~17 to > 100 MeV. The instruments were commissioned 3 days after launch and continue to provide high quality measurements. We describe the Van Allen probes and the REPT instrument and report on the new and unexpected features of the outer zone electron populations observed by REPT.

  1. Space Weather data processing and Science Gateway for the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Fox, N. J.; Mauk, B.; Potter, M.; Kessel, R.

    2013-12-01

    A near real-time data processing pipeline for the Space Weather broadcast data from the Van Allen Probes is presented. The Van Allen Probes broadcasts a sub-set of the science data in real-time when not downlinking the principal science data. This broadcast is received by several ground stations and relayed to APL in near real time to be ingested into the space weather processing pipeline. This pipeline processes the available level zero space weather data into higher level science data products. These products are made available to the public via the Van Allen Probes Science Gateway website (http://athena.jhuapl.edu). The website acts as pivotal point though which all other instrument SOC's can be accessed. Several other data products (e.g KP/DST indices) and tools (e.g orbit calculator) are made also available to the general public.

  2. An interspecific test of allen's rule: evolutionary implications for endothermic species.

    PubMed

    Nudds, R L; Oswald, S A

    2007-12-01

    Ecogeographical rules provide potential to describe how organisms are morphologically constrained to climatic conditions. Allen's rule (relatively shorter appendages in colder environments) remains largely unsupported and there remains much controversy whether reduced surface area of appendages provides energetic savings sufficient to make this morphological trend truly adaptive. By showing for the first time that Allen's rule holds for closely related endothermic species, we provide persuasive support of the adaptive significance of this trend for multiple species. Our results indicate that reduction of thermoregulatory cost during the coldest part of the breeding season is the most likely mechanism driving Allen's rule for these species. Because for 54% of seabird species examined, rise in seasonal maximum temperature over 100 years will exceed that for minimum temperatures, an evolutionary mismatch will arise between selection for limb length reduction and ability to accommodate heat stress.

  3. A Century after Van Allen's Birth: Conclusion of Reconnaissance of Radiation Belts in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    On May 1, 1958 in the Great Hall of the US National Academy of Sciences, James A. Van Allen, having instrumented Explorer-1 and follow-on satellites with radiation detectors, announced the discovery of intense radiation at high altitudes above Earth. The press dubbed the doughnut-shaped structures "Van Allen Belts" (VAB). Soon thereafter, the search began for VAB at nearby planets. Mariner 2 flew by Venus in 1962 at a distance of 41,000 km, but no radiation was detected. The Mariner 4 mission to Mars did not observe planet-associated increase in radiation, but scaling arguments with Earth's magnetosphere yielded an upper limit to the ratio of magnetic moments of MM/ME < 0.001 (Van Allen et al, 1965). Similarly, the Mariner 5 flyby closer to Venus resulted in a ratio of magnetic moments < 0.001 (Van Allen et al, 1967), dealing a blow to the expectation that all planetary bodies must possess significant VAB. The flyby of Mercury in 1974 by Mariner 10 revealed a weak magnetic field, but the presence of durably trapped higher energy particles remained controversial until MESSENGER in 2011.The first flybys of Jupiter by Pioneers 10, 11 in 1973 and 1974, respectively, measured a plethora of energetic particles in Jupiter's magnetosphere and established the fact that their intensities were rotationally modulated. Later flybys of Jupiter and Saturn by the two Voyagers in 1979 and 1981 revealed that those magnetospheres possessed their own internal plasma source(s) and radiation belts. Subsequent discoveries of Van Allen belts at Uranus and Neptune by Voyager 2 demonstrated that VAB are the rule rather than the exception in planetary environments. We now know from the Voyagers and through Energetic Neutral Atom images from Cassini and IBEX that an immense energetic particle population surrounds the heliosphere itself. Thus, the reconnaissance of radiation belts of our solar system has been completed, some 56 years after the discovery of the Van Allen Belts at Earth.

  4. AmeriFlux US-KFS Kansas Field Station

    SciTech Connect

    Brunsell, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-KFS Kansas Field Station. Site Description - The study is an abandoned grassland at the Kansas Field Station and Ecological Reserves. The site is located within the tallgrass prairie-deciduous forest ecotonal area. The site was subjected to intensive agriculture from the 1940s through the late 1960s. In the mid-1970s, the site was planted with the cool-season grass Bromus inermis and used as a hay meadow until 1987. Then, mowing and burning approximately every five years maintained it as a grassland until 2007, when the eddy flux tower was installed.

  5. Quantitative water quality with ERTS-1. [Kansas water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarger, H. L.; Mccauley, J. R.; James, G. W.; Magnuson, L. M.; Marzolf, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    Analyses of ERTS-1 MSS computer compatible tapes of reservoir scenes in Kansas along with ground truth show that MSS bands and band ratios can be used for reliable prediction of suspended loads up to at least 900 ppm. The major reservoirs in Kansas, as well as in other Great Plains states, are playing increasingly important roles in flood control, recreation, agriculture, and urban water supply. Satellite imagery is proving useful for acquiring timely low cost water quality data required for optimum management of these fresh water resources.

  6. Annual Report of Groundwater Monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2012

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M.

    2013-06-01

    Periodic sampling is performed at Centralia, Kansas, on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) by Argonne National Laboratory. The sampling is currently (2009-2012) conducted in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2009). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater sitewide (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a), as well as the response to the interim measure (IM) pilot test that is in progress (Argonne 2007b). This report provides a summary of the findings for groundwater inspection in Centralia.

  7. Final Report: Results of Environmental Site Investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M

    2014-09-01

    Sylvan Grove is located in western Lincoln County, approximately 60 mi west of Salina, Kansas (Figure 1.1). From 1954 to 1966, the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of Sylvan Grove. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use to preserve grain in storage. In 1998, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) found carbon tetrachloride above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 μg/L in groundwater from one private well used for livestock and lawn and garden watering. The 1998 KDHE sampling at Sylvan Grove was conducted under the USDA private well sampling program. To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA proposed to conduct an environmental site investigation, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. Argonne National Laboratory, on behalf of the CCC/USDA, developed a work plan (Argonne 2012) for the site investigation and a supplemental work plan for indoor and ambient air sampling (Appendix A). The proposed work was approved by the KDHE (2012a, 2013). The investigations were performed by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory, on behalf of the CCC/USDA. The main activities for the site investigation were conducted in June 2012, and indoor and ambient air sampling was performed in February 2013. This report presents the findings of the investigations at Sylvan Grove.

  8. Experiments in no-impact control of dingoes: comment on Allen et al. 2013.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher N; Crowther, Mathew S; Dickman, Chris R; Letnic, Michael I; Newsome, Thomas M; Nimmo, Dale G; Ritchie, Euan G; Wallach, Arian D

    2014-02-22

    There has been much recent debate in Australia over whether lethal control of dingoes incurs environmental costs, particularly by allowing increase of populations of mesopredators such as red foxes and feral cats. Allen et al. (2013) claim to show in their recent study that suppression of dingo activity by poison baiting does not lead to mesopredator release, because mesopredators are also suppressed by poisoning. We show that this claim is not supported by the data and analysis reported in Allen et al.'s paper.

  9. Replacement of two amino acids of 9R-dioxygenase-allene oxide synthase of Aspergillus niger inverts the chirality of the hydroperoxide and the allene oxide.

    PubMed

    Sooman, Linda; Wennman, Anneli; Hamberg, Mats; Hoffmann, Inga; Oliw, Ernst H

    2016-02-01

    The genome of Aspergillus niger codes for a fusion protein (EHA25900), which can be aligned with ~50% sequence identity to 9S-dioxygenase (DOX)-allene oxide synthase (AOS) of Fusarium oxysporum, homologues of the Fusarium and Colletotrichum complexes and with over 62% sequence identity to homologues of Aspergilli, including (DOX)-9R-AOS of Aspergillus terreus. The aims were to characterize the enzymatic activities of EHA25900 and to identify crucial amino acids for the stereospecificity. Recombinant EHA25900 oxidized 18:2n-6 sequentially to 9R-hydroperoxy-10(E),12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid (9R-HPODE) and to a 9R(10)-allene oxide. 9S- and 9R-DOX-AOS catalyze abstraction of the pro-R hydrogen at C-11, but the direction of oxygen insertion differs. A comparison between twelve 9-DOX domains of 9S- and 9R-DOX-AOS revealed conserved amino acid differences, which could contribute to the chirality of products. The Gly616Ile replacement of 9R-DOX-AOS (A. niger) increased the biosynthesis of 9S-HPODE and the 9S(10)-allene oxide, whereas the Phe627Leu replacement led to biosynthesis of 9S-HPODE and the 9S(10)-allene oxide as main products. The double mutant (Gly616Ile, Phe627Leu) formed over 90% of the 9S stereoisomer of HPODE. 9S-HPODE was formed by antarafacial hydrogen abstraction and oxygen insertion, i.e., the original H-abstraction was retained but the product chirality was altered. We conclude that 9R-DOX-AOS can be altered to 9S-DOX-AOS by replacement of two amino acids (Gly616Ile, Phe627Leu) in the DOX domain.

  10. October 2008 monitoring results for Morrill, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-03-10

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2005), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). This report provides results for the most recent monitoring event, in October 2008. Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), groundwater was initially sampled twice yearly for a period of two years (in fall 2005, in spring and fall 2006, and in spring and fall 2007). The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. During the two-year period, the originally approved scope of the monitoring was expanded to include vegetation sampling (initiated in October 2006) and surface water and stream bed sediment sampling (initiated in March 2007, after a visual reconnaissance along Terrapin Creek [Argonne 2007a]). The analytical results for groundwater sampling events at Morrill in September 2005, March and September 2006, March and October 2007, and April 2008 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007b, 2008a,c). Those results consistently demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (5.0 {micro}g/L) for this compound, in a groundwater plume extending generally south-southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, toward Terrapin Creek at the south edge of the town. Low levels ({le} 1.3 {micro}g/L) of carbon

  11. October 2007 monitoring results for Morrill, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-03-26

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. On the basis of available information, the CCC/USDA believes that one or more third parties operated this facility after termination of the CCC/USDA's lease in 1971. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater has been sampled twice yearly for a recommended period of two years. The samples are analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 12 monitoring wells and 3 private wells (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE. The scope of the originally approved monitoring has been expanded to include vegetation sampling (initiated in October 2006) and surface water and stream bed sediment sampling (initiated in March 2007). The analytical results for groundwater sampling events at Morrill in September 2005, March 2006, September 2006, and March 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a, 2007c,e). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (5.0 {micro}g/L) for this compound, in a groundwater plume extending generally south-southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, toward Terrapin Creek at the south edge of the town. Little clear

  12. Sitewide monitoring at Agra, Kansas, June 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-01-14

    In 1985, carbon tetrachloride was discovered in the groundwater at Agra, Kansas, during routine sampling of public water supply wells. Two of Agra's four public water supply wells contained low but detectable levels of carbon tetrachloride; the concentrations in wells PWS-3 and PWS-4 exceeded the maximum contaminant level. These wells were removed from service in 1986, although they remain available for uses other than drinking water. Other public wells, outside the area of contamination, supply drinking water for the city of Agra. In 1987-2005, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) and the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) conducted investigations to delineate the contaminant plume and to identify source areas for the contamination - which results from the past use of grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride. Source areas were identified on the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility property and on the Producers Agricultural Marketing Association, Inc., property located to the south (Argonne 2006). The contaminant plume extends to the southeast, toward well PWS-3, from the identified source areas. Both the CCC/USDA and Pro-Ag Marketing are currently implementing KDHE-approved interim measures (IMs). To address the contamination identified on its former property, the CCC/USDA is implementing a source control IM consisting of large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) coupled with soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparging (AS). Pro-Ag Marketing plans to use groundwater extraction to address the downgradient plume. The CCC/USDA and Pro-Ag completed installation of the two interim measures in May 2009 and August 2009, respectively. The performance and assessments of the effectiveness of the IMs are being reported separately by the responsible entities. As part of the IM process, the KDHE (2008) requested the development of a joint sitewide groundwater monitoring plan to allow periodic assessment of the

  13. September 2008 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-24

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under a KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling in September 2007 represented the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the two-year twice yearly monitoring program (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007a, 2008a). The results from the two-year monitoring program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was taking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC in situ chemical reduction technology, that was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the proposed interim measure occurred in December 2007

  14. Identification of “ever-cropped” land (1984–2010) using Landsat annual maximum NDVI image composites: Southwestern Kansas case study

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Susan K.; Sylvester, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    A time series of 230 intra- and inter-annual Landsat Thematic Mapper images was used to identify land that was ever cropped during the years 1984 through 2010 for a five county region in southwestern Kansas. Annual maximum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (NDVIann-max) were used to evaluate the inter-annual dynamics of cropped and non-cropped land. Three feature images were derived from the 27-year NDVIann-max image time series and used in the classification: 1) maximum NDVI value that occurred over the entire 27 year time span (NDVImax), 2) standard deviation of the annual maximum NDVI values for all years (NDVIsd), and 3) standard deviation of the annual maximum NDVI values for years 1984–1986 (NDVIsd84-86) to improve Conservation Reserve Program land discrimination. Results of the classification were compared to three reference data sets: County-level USDA Census records (1982–2007) and two digital land cover maps (Kansas 2005 and USGS Trends Program maps (1986–2000)). Area of ever-cropped land for the five counties was on average 11.8 % higher than the area estimated from Census records. Overall agreement between the ever-cropped land map and the 2005 Kansas map was 91.9% and 97.2% for the Trends maps. Converting the intra-annual Landsat data set to a single annual maximum NDVI image composite considerably reduced the data set size, eliminated clouds and cloud-shadow affects, yet maintained information important for discriminating cropped land. Our results suggest that Landsat annual maximum NDVI image composites will be useful for characterizing land use and land cover change for many applications. PMID:22423150

  15. A Critique of Mark D. Allen's "The Preservation of Verb Subcategory Knowledge in a Spoken Language Comprehension Deficit"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemmerer, David

    2008-01-01

    Allen [Allen, M. (2005). "The preservation of verb subcategory knowledge in a spoken language comprehension deficit." "Brain and Language, 95", 255-264.] reports a single patient, WBN, who, during spoken language comprehension, is still able to access some of the syntactic properties of verbs despite being unable to access some of their semantic…

  16. Floods in Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas, September 12-13, 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauth, L.D.; Carswell, W.J.; Chin, E.H.

    1981-01-01

    The storms of Sept. 12-13, 1977, delivered as much as 16 in. of rain, with average rainfall exceeding 10 in. in the Kansas City metropolitan area. Twenty-five lives were lost, many were left homeless, and damages exceeded $80 million. Data obtained by the National Weather Service and the U.S. Geological Survey indicate that two record-setting rainstorms occurred within 24 hours. The first storm, in the early morning, thoroughly soaked the local drainage basins. The second storm, centered along the Brush and Round Grove Creek basins, resulted in a devastating flash flood. Peak discharges were determined during and after this major flood at gaging stations and selected miscellaneous locations. Streamflows and flood volumes in many locations far exceeded estimated values for the 100-year flood. (USGS)

  17. Computer-produced tables, maps, and diagrams as tools in the interpretation of brine data from southeastern Kansas (U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNellis, J.M.; Morgan, C.O.; Lowell, B.H.

    1969-01-01

    The applicability of computer-oriented techniques to assist in the interpretation of brine data is demonstrated by the use of six programs on data from two example areas. These programs include a data tabling routine; routines for producing Stiff, Piper, and Ropes diagrams; programs for calculating ionic ratios; and programs for plotting maps of chemical data. The examples illustrate: (1) the range in water quality and contamination of potable water by brines in Stafford, Pratt, and Barber Counties, and (2) the change in water quality in the Arbuckle Group from southeast to south-central Kansas. ?? 1969.

  18. Kansas environmental and resource study: A Great Plains model. [land use, image enhancement, winter wheat, agriculture, water resources, and pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Morain, S. A.; Yarger, H. L.; Ulaby, F. T.; Davis, J. C. (Principal Investigator); Bosley, R. J.; Williams, D. L.; Mccauley, J. R.; Mcnaughton, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Improvement in the land use classification accuracy of ERTS-1 MSS multi-images over Kansas can be made using two distances between neighboring grey tone N-tuples instead of one distance. Much more information is contained texturally than spectrally on the Kansas image. Ground truth measurements indicate that reflectance ratios of the 545 and 655 nm wavebands provide an index of plant development and possibly physiological stress. Preliminary analysis of MSS 4 and 5 channels substantiate the ground truth interpretation. Results of the land use mapping experiment indicate that ERTS-1 imagery has major potential in regionalization. The ways in which land is utilized within these regions may then be studied more effectively than if no adequate regionalization is available. A model for estimating wheat yield per acre has been applied to acreage estimates derived from ERTS-1 imagery to project the 1973 wheat yields for a ten county area in southwest Kansas. The results are within 3% of the preharvest estimates for the same area prepared by the USDA. Visual identification of winter wheat is readily achieved by using a temporal sequence of images. Identification can be improve by stratifying the project area into subregions having more or less homogeneous agricultural practices and crop mixes.

  19. Community Education in Kansas, a Challenge to Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killacky, Cecil James; Rippetoe, Joseph K.

    1976-01-01

    An educational outreach project is described that was conducted during 1974 and 1975 by University for Man (UFM), a free university based in Manhattan, Kansas, that offers educational programs to the state. The major objective of the project was to serve adult educational needs with programs examining public issues through a humanistic…

  20. Statistical and Financial Information of Kansas Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Education, Topeka.

    This report provides statistical and financial data about the 19 community colleges in Kansas, based on information submitted to the State Department of Education by the community colleges. The nine sections of the report present: (1) actual revenues and expenditures by institution with state totals for 1985-86; (2) 1986-87 adopted general,…

  1. "With One Mighty Pull": Interracial Town Boosting in Nicodemus, Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Claire

    1996-01-01

    Describes the cooperative and egalitarian race relations in Nicodemus, Kansas--a town founded by former slaves in 1877--and the town's "boom" period in the 1880s. The white leaders who found common cause with their black counterparts were not abolitionists or social agitators, but common settlers who demonstrated that different choices…

  2. Collection Development Policy for the University of Kansas Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Ted, Ed.; And Others

    This policy reflects developmental patterns governing the evolution of collections in the University of Kansas Libraries. Policy statements, written by bibliographers, are provided for 54 subject areas: African studies; anthropology; applied English; architecture and urban design; art; astronomy and physics; biological sciences; business…

  3. Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 15, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, In, Ed.; Schiefelbein, Scott, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This serial is intended as a forum for the presentation, in print, of the latest original research by the faculty and students of the Department of Linguistics and other related departments at the University of Kansas. Papers include the following: "Inferentials: The Story of a Forgotton Evidential" (Gerald Delahunty); "Knowledge of…

  4. Education Performance Measures Track Kansas School Improvement. Focus On...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Association of School Boards (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Kansas Association of School Boards (KASB) staff created an index of educational outcomes to compare results from state to state. This report is an analysis of that study. A list of the overall rankings is included on the back page of this report. The index is based on a combination of objective qualitative measures. The data comes from national…

  5. Evaluation of classification procedures for estimating wheat acreage in Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, L. M.; Register, D. T.

    1976-01-01

    This report presents the results of experiments which were performed to evaluate procedures for estimating wheat acreage in intensive test sites (ITS's) in Kansas. An analyst/interpreter (AI) selected and labeled fields from Landsat-1 satellite imagery. Statistics were generated for each selected ITS, and the imagery was classified using a maximum likelihood classifier. Various components of the classification process were tested.

  6. Final work plan for targeted sampling at Webber, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-05-01

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for targeted sampling at Webber, Kansas (Figure 1.1). This activity is being conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). Data obtained in this sampling event will be used to (1) evaluate the current status of previously detected contamination at Webber and (2) determine whether the site requires further action. This work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Argonne has issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan, approved by the KDHE, contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. This document should be consulted for complete details of the technical activities proposed at the former CCC/USDA facility in Webber.

  7. Environmental Benefits of Restoring Sediment Continuity to the Kansas River

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    quality and ecological effects of reservoir aging by sediment accumulation. The section titled “Downstream Channel Effects” cites specific ecological ...tons/year (National Research Council 2011). This technical note documents water quality and ecological effects of reservoir aging by sediment...accumulation, specific ecological effects from unnaturally low turbidity levels in the Kansas River, and natural (without reservoir) quantity and timing of

  8. Section 504/ADA: Guidelines for Educators in Kansas. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joan; Bieker, Rod; Copenhaver, John

    This document presents the Kansas State Department of Education's guidelines to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The guidelines specifically address Subparts A, B, C, and D of the regulations for Section 504 which deal with general provisions, employment practices, accessibility and education. An…

  9. Racial and Religious Tensions on Selected Kansas College Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

    A fact-finding meeting on racial and religious tensions on college campuses in Kansas was held, with participation by community leaders, college and university officials and instructors, law enforcement officials, college students, and community relations experts. Topics covered were the extent of the tensions; likely causes of the problem; and…

  10. The Best Little Teacher Education Program in Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demski, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Many undergraduate teacher education programs still treat technology as an elective, instead of an integral and inseparable part of the curriculum. So when "T.H.E. Journal" set out to find the best program for training tomorrow's teachers, it found one at a K-12 school district in Kansas. The Blue Valley School District in Overland Park,…

  11. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Kansas. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  12. Concentrations of particulate matter in large cattle feedlots in Kansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air quality in communities surrounding cattle feedlots is a growing public concern. Our objective was to quantify emission patterns and weather effects on particulate matter (PM) transport upwind and downwind from two large cattle feedlots (KS1, KS2) in Kansas. The concentrations of PM2.5 (particles...

  13. Portrait of the Future: 1994 Kansas Kids Count Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Sydney, Ed.; And Others

    This Kids Count data book presents a statistical portrait of the well-being of and conditions faced by the children of Kansas, based on key indicators. Nineteen indicators are detailed in five subject areas: (1) economic well-being; (2) physical health and safety; (3) educational achievement; (4) emotional well-being; and (5) social behavior and…

  14. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This secondary horticulture curriculum guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in thirteen sections: (1) Orientation and Careers, (2) Leadership and Future Farmers of America, (3) Supervised Occupational Experience Program, (4) Plant…

  15. Kansas Early Childhood Research Institute on Transitions: Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Mabel L.; O'Brien, Marion

    This executive summary reviews activities over the past 5 years of the Kansas Early Childhood Research Institute (KECRI). The Institute has addressed transition issues faced by infants and young children (and their families) who have a disability or are at risk for developmental delay. KECRI goals are stated and the importance and impact of the…

  16. A Study Reexamining Alcohol Use among University of Kansas Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, Edward J.; And Others

    This 1992 survey of alcohol use of university students conducted at the University of Kansas used identical sampling procedures and contained many of the same items as a previous survey conducted in 1988. A total of 493 questionnaires were returned. A total of 49 students or 9.9% claimed to not have had an alcoholic beverage or to have had one…

  17. Notification: Evaluation of Cherryvale, Kansas National Zinc Company site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    July 12, 2012. The purpose of this memorandum is to notify you that the OIG plans to conduct a review ofthe process followed by EPA Region 7 in the handling of site related contamination at the Cherryvale, Kansas National Zinc Company site.

  18. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This second horticulture guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in eight sections: (1) Leadership, (2) Supervised Occupational Experience, (3) Plant Propagation, (4) Soil and Plant Growth Media, (5) Fertilizers, (6) Greenhouse, (7) Plant…

  19. Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, S.

    2010-05-01

    This report provides an overview of a technical report on an assessment NREL conducted in Greensburg, Kansas, to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region. See NREL/TP-7A2-45843 for the Executive Summary of this report.

  20. Building Teacher Quality in the Kansas City, Missouri School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corso, Aileen; Franck, Valerie; Kelliher, Kate; McCorry, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    This study looks at the policies and practices shaping teacher quality in the Kansas City, Missouri School District (KCMSD). It is part of a series of analyses by the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) in school districts across the nation. Framing this analysis are five policy goals for improving teacher quality: (1) Staffing. Teacher…

  1. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Univ., Manhattan.

    This secondary vocational agricultural curriculum guide is one of a set of four designated as the basic core of instruction for vocational agriculture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in six sections: (1) Orientation and Careers, (2) Leadership, (3) Supervised Experience Programs, (4) Animal Science, (5) Plant and Soil…

  2. Public Library Standards for Kansas, Measurements of Quality. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Library, Topeka.

    The periodic review and development of public library standards are undertaken by the Kansas State Library to best serve the public interest by insuring the quality of the state's public libraries. Standards are defined for the structure and governance of libraries. Service objectives and standards for automation and technology are defined.…

  3. Teaching Kansas History: The State of the State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isern, Thomas D.

    1990-01-01

    Provides a history of debate concerning issue of teaching Kansas state history in public schools as mandated by law. Studies show the failure to comply was a result of nonavailability of textbooks and lack of teacher preparation. Contends that State Department of Education did not support the law because state history is not taught in many Kansas…

  4. Sociology, Psychology, and Theoretical Legacy of the Kansas City Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Victor W.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical impact of Kansas City Studies stems from issues ignored as much as from those addressed. Studies advanced search for "normal" aging, although diversity was not adequately addressed initially. Also adopted and furthered a highly individualistic understanding of aging, whereas the sociological analyses lacked adequate…

  5. Green Infrastructure for CSO Control in Kansas City, Missouri

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kansas City Water Services Department (WSD) conducted extensive modeling and economic studies of its combined sewer system over the last 5 years, for submittal of its long term control plan to EPA. These studies and recent funding opportunities have provided the impetus for sele...

  6. Sediment oxygen demand in eastern Kansas streams, 2014 and 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Guy M.; King, Lindsey R.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2016-08-29

    Dissolved oxygen concentrations in streams are affected by physical, chemical, and biological factors in the water column and streambed, and are an important factor for the survival of aquatic organisms. Sediment oxygen demand (SOD) rates in Kansas streams are not well understood. During 2014 and 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, measured SOD at eight stream sites in eastern Kansas to quantify SOD rates and variability with respect to season, land use, and bottom-sediment characteristics. Sediment oxygen demand rates (SODT) ranged from 0.01 to 3.15 grams per square meter per day at the ambient temperature of the measurements. The summer mean SOD rate was 3.0-times larger than the late fall mean rate, likely because of increased biological activity at warm water temperatures. Given the substantial amount of variability in SOD rates possible within sites, heterogeneity of substrate type is an important consideration when designing SOD studies and interpreting the results. Sediment oxygen demand in eastern Kansas streams was correlated with land use and streambed-sediment characteristics, though the strength of relations varied seasonally. The small number of study sites precluded a more detailed analysis. The effect of basin land use and streambed sediment characteristics on SOD is currently (2016) not well understood, and there may be many contributing factors including basin influences on water quality that affect biogeochemical cycles and the biological communities supported by the stream.

  7. Regioselective Allene Hydrosilylation Catalyzed by NHC Complexes of Nickel and Palladium

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Zachary D.; Li, Wei; Belderrain, Tomás R.; Montgomery, John

    2013-01-01

    Regioselective methods for allene hydrosilylation have been developed, with regioselectivity being governed primarily by choice of metal. Alkenylsilanes are produced via nickel catalysis with larger N-heterocyclic carbene ligands, and allylsilanes are produced via palladium catalysis with smaller N-heterocyclic carbene ligands. These complementary methods allow either regioisomeric product to be obtained with exceptional regiocontrol. PMID:24079389

  8. Phosphorus-Containing Bis-allenes: Synthesis and Heterocyclization Reactions Mediated by Iodine or Copper Dibromide.

    PubMed

    Essid, I; Laborde, C; Legros, F; Sevrain, N; Touil, S; Rolland, M; Ayad, T; Volle, J-N; Pirat, J-L; Virieux, D

    2017-03-30

    Bisphosphorylallenes were easily obtained in multigram scale from the Wittig-type rearrangement of bispropargyl alcohols. Unlike other conjugated bis-allenes, these reagents underwent a double cyclization mediated by iodine or copper dibromide leading to the formation of bis-1,2-oxaphospholenes.

  9. No Radio Flaring Detected from Cygnus X-3 at 3 GHz by Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. K. G.; Bower, G. C.; Tomsick, J. A.; Bodaghee, A.; Corbet, R. H. D.

    2011-01-01

    Following the announcement of a 98 GHz flare from the microquasar Cygnus X-3 (ATel #3130), we observed it with the Allen Telescope Array (Welch et al., 2009 Proc. IEEE 97 1438 for 2.5 hours beginning at 2011 January 28.848 UT (MJD 55589.848), about 4.0 hours after the 98 GHz observations concluded.

  10. Astronauts Gardner and Allen on the RMS after recapture of Westar VI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, left, holds a 'For Sale' sign, making light reference to the status of the recaptured communications satellite. Astronaut Joseph P. ALlen IV stands on the mobile foot restraint (MFR), which in tandem with the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm served as a cherry-picker for capture efforts.

  11. Astronauts Gardner and Allen during loading of Palapa B-2 in payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Joseph P. Allen IV, left, tethered to the orbiting Discovery, holds onto the Palapa B-2 satellite with his right hand while Astronaut Dale A. Gardner returns the used 'stinger' device to its stowage area. The payload bay is open, showing the area where the satellite will be stowed for the return to Earth.

  12. All Together Now: Valerie Allen--U.S. Department of Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    When Valerie Allen decided she did not want to be a Montessori teacher any longer, she began work on her MLIS. Immediately she learned concepts she could apply to her new job as information specialist for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN. While the LIS…

  13. Free Pulp Transfer for Fingertip Reconstruction—The Algorithm for Complicated Allen Fingertip Defect

    PubMed Central

    Spyropoulou, Georgia-Alexandra; Shih, Hsiang-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: We present a review of all the cases of free toe pulp transfer and an algorithm for application of free pulp transfer in complicated Allen fingertip defect. Methods: Seventeen patients underwent free toe pulp transfer for fingertip reconstruction by the senior author. Twelve cases were Allen type II with oblique pulp defect, 4 were Allen type III, and 1 patient had 2 fingertip injuries classified both as type IV. According to the algorithm presented, for the type III defects where the germinal matrix is still preserved, we use free pulp transfer and nail bed graft to preserve the nail growth instead of toe to hand transfer. For the type IV injuries with multiple defects, a combination of web flap from both big toe and second toe is possible for 1-stage reconstruction. Results: All pulp flaps survived completely. Static 2-point discrimination ranged from 6 to 15 mm (mean: 10.5 mm). No patient presented dysesthesia, hyperesthesia, pain at rest, or cold intolerance. The donor site did not present any nuisances apart from partial skin graft loss in 3 cases. Conclusions: We tried to classify and modify the defects’ reconstruction according to Allen classification. Free toe pulp transfer is a “like with like” reconstruction that provides sensate, glabrous skin with good color and texture match for fingertip trauma, and minimal donor site morbidity compared with traditional toe to hand transfer. PMID:26894009

  14. Astronauts Joseph Allen rides cherry picker over stowage area/work station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Joseph P. Allen rides a cherry picker over to a stowage area/work station to wrap up extravehicular activity (EVA) duties above Earth. The cherry picker is a union of the mobile foot restraint and the remote manipulator system (RMS), controlled from inside Discovery's cabin. The Westar VI/PAM-D satellite is pictured secured in Discovery's cargo bay.

  15. Precipitation of relativistic electrons of the Van Allen belts into the proton aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K; Miyoshi, Y; Sakaguchi, K; Shiokawa, K; Evans, D S; Connors, M

    2008-01-01

    The Van Allen electron belts consist of two regions encircling the earth in which relativistic electrons are trapped in the earth's magnetic field. Populations of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts vary greatly with geomagnetic disturbance and they are a major source of damage to space vehicles. In order to know when and by how much these populations of relativistic electrons increase, it is important to elucidate not only the cause of acceleration of relativistic electrons but also the cause of their loss from the Van Allen belts. Here we show the first evidence that left-hand polarized electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere, on the basis of results of an excellent set of ground and satellite observations showing coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The proton aurora was produced by precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV due to EMIC waves near the plasma pause, which is a manifestation of wave-particle interactions. These observations clarify that ions with energies of tens of keV affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts via parasitic resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  16. Assessing future drought impacts on yields based on historical irrigation reaction to drought for four major crops in Kansas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyi; Lin, Xiaomao

    2016-04-15

    Evaluation of how historical irrigation reactions can adapt to future drought is indispensable to irrigation policy, however, such reactions are poorly quantified. In this paper, county-level irrigation data for maize, soybean, grain sorghum, and wheat crops in Kansas were compiled. Statistical models were developed to quantify changes of irrigation and yields in response to drought for each crop. These were then used to evaluate the ability of current irrigation to cope with future drought impacts on each crop based on an ensemble Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) prediction under the Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 scenario. Results indicate that irrigation in response to drought varies by crop; approximately 10 to 13% additional irrigation was applied when PDSI was reduced by one unit for maize, soybean, and grain sorghum. However, the irrigation reaction for wheat exhibits a large uncertainty, indicating a weaker irrigation reaction. Analysis of future climate conditions indicates that maize, soybean, and grain sorghum yields would decrease 2.2-12.4% at the state level despite additional irrigation application induced by drought (which was expected to increase 5.1-19.0%), suggesting that future drought will exceed the range that historical irrigation reactions can adapt to. In contrast, a lower reduction (-0.99 to -0.63%) was estimated for wheat yields because wetter climate was projected in the central section of the study area. Expanding wheat areas may be helpful in avoiding future drought risks for Kansas agriculture.

  17. New Results About the Earth’s Van Allen Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The first great scientific discovery of the Space Age was that the Earth is enshrouded in toroids, or 'belts', of very high-energy magnetically trapped charged particles. Early observations of the radiation environment clearly indicated that the Van Allen belts could be delineated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons in the energy range 100 keV < E< 1 MeV often populated both the inner and outer zones with a pronounced 'slot' region relatively devoid of energetic electrons existing between them. This two-belt structure for the Van Allen moderate-energy electron component was explained as being due to strong interactions of electrons with electromagnetic waves just inside the cold plasma (plasmapause) boundary. The energy distribution, spatial extent and particle species makeup of the Van Allen belts has been subsequently explored by several space missions. However, recent observations by the NASA dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission have revealed wholly unexpected properties of the radiation belts, especially at highly relativistic (E > 2 MeV) and ultra-relativistic (E > 5 MeV) kinetic energies. In this presentation we show using high spatial and temporal resolution data from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) experiment on board the Van Allen Probes that multiple belts can exist concurrently and that an exceedingly sharp inner boundary exists for ultra-relativistic electrons. Using additionally available Van Allen Probes data, we demonstrate that these remarkable features of energetic electrons are not due to a physical boundary within Earth's intrinsic magnetic field. Neither is it likely that human-generated electromagnetic transmitter wave fields might produce such effects. Rather, we conclude from these unique measurements that slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle

  18. The Evolution of Groundwater Management Paradigms in Kansas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sophocleous, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to trace the evolution of key water-related laws and management practices in Kansas, from the enactment of the Kansas Water Resources Appropriation Act of 1945 to the present, in order to highlight the state's efforts to create a more sustainable water future and in hopes that others will benefit from Kansas' experience. The 1945 Act provides the basic framework of water law (prior appropriation) in Kansas. Progression of groundwater management in the state encompasses local ground-water management districts (GMDs) and their water-management programs, minimum-streamflow and TMDL standards, water-use reporting and water metering programs, use of modified safe-yield policies in some GMDs, the subbasin water-resources-management program, the integrated resource planning/Aquifer Storage and Recovery project of the City of Wichita, the Central Kansas Water Bank, enhanced aquifer subunits management, and various water conservation programs. While these have all contributed to the slowing down of declines in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer and in associated ecosystems, they have not yet succeeded in halting those declines. Based on the assumption that the different management approaches have to operate easily within the prevailing water rights and law framework to succeed, a number of steps are suggested here that may help further halt the declines of the High Plains aquifer. These include eliminating the "use it or lose it" maxim in the prior-appropriation framework, broadening the definition of "beneficial use," regulating domestic and other "exempt" wells, encouraging voluntary "sharing the shortage" agreements, and determining to what extent water rights may be regulated in the public interest without a compensable "taking." Further necessary measures include determining to what extent water-rights holders might be subjected to reasonable dictates without having the security of their rights altered.

  19. Rural Postsecondary Education. Proceedings of the National Invitational Meeting (Kansas City, Kansas, June 29-July 1, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Richard J.

    At the first National Invitational Meeting on Rural Postsecondary Education (also known as the Kansas City Initiative), 28 rural specialists in lifelong learning produced an 8-item Bill of Rights and an 11-item rural postsecondary action agenda. Participants discussed organizational deficiencies in rural adult education, the sense of isolation all…

  20. April 2008 monitoring report for Morrill, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-04

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). This report provides results for the most recent monitoring event, in April 2008. Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), groundwater was initially sampled twice yearly for a recommended period of two years (in fall 2005, in spring and fall 2006, and in spring and fall 2007). The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. During the recommended two-year period, the originally approved scope of the monitoring was expanded to include vegetation sampling (initiated in October 2006) and surface water and stream bed sediment sampling (initiated in March 2007, after a visual reconnaissance along Terrapin Creek [Argonne 2007a]). The analytical results for groundwater sampling events at Morrill in September 2005, March 2006, September 2006, March 2007, and October 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007b, 2008). Those results consistently demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (5.0 {micro}g/L) for this compound, in a groundwater plume extending generally south-southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, toward Terrapin Creek at the south edge of the town. The results of those five monitoring

  1. Annual report of monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-06-27

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha. The population of Morrill as of the 2000 census was approximately 277. All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. Starting in 1922, eight different public wells formerly served the Morrill municipal system at some time. Because of poor water quality, including high nitrate levels attributed to numerous animal feeding operations in the vicinity and application of fertilizer on agricultural lands, use of the local groundwater from any public well for municipal supply purposes was terminated in 1991 in favor of obtaining water from the Sabetha municipal water system. Investigations of the carbon tetrachloride and nitrate contamination by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in 1989, 1994, and 1996 (KDHE 1989; GeoCore 1994a-e, 1996) identified a localized plume of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater extending downgradient from a grain storage facility located in the northwestern section of Morrill. The facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), from 1950 to 1971. Since termination of the CCC/USDA grain storage operations in 1971, the property and existing grain bins have been used for private grain storage up to the present time. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants were commonly used by the CCC/USDA, as well as private and commercial grain storage operations, to preserve grain. Because the identified carbon tetrachloride contamination could in part be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride

  2. Significant Findings from a Water-Quality Study on Prairie Band Potawatomi Reservation, Northeastern Kansas, June 1996 through August 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, Heidi E.; Schmidt, Heather C. Ross; Pope, Larry M.

    2007-01-01

    Water-quality samples were collected from surface- (stream-) and ground-water sites on and near the Prairie Band Potawatomi Reservation in northeastern Kansas (fig. 1) from June 1996 through August 2006 as part of a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (Schmidt and others, 2007). Surface- and ground-water quality were evaluated using applicable drinking-water standards to consider whether these resources can be used in the future to supply drinking water for the reservation. Presently (2007), drinking water on the reservation is purchased from Rural Water District #3 in Jackson County (Sharon Bosse, Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation Department of Planning and Environmental Protection, oral commun., 2007). Results of water-quality analyses are summarized in the following sections. Water-quality activities for this study are documented in several reports (Trombley, 1999, 2001; Schmidt, 2004; Schmidt and others, 2007).

  3. Chaetetid buildups in a Westphalian (Desmoinesian) Cyclothem in Southeastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suchy, D.R.; West, R.R.

    2001-01-01

    Small buildups of chaetetids and associated biota in the Higginsville Limestone Member of the Fort Scott Formation (Desmoinesian, Middle Pennsylvanian) are well exposed in three dimensions in an abandoned quarry in Crawford County, Kansas, Regional studies indicate that the buildups were deposited during a relative sea-level highstand, but within normal wave-base, on the southern flank of the Bourbon Arch. The chaetetid facies consists of a fusulinid wackestone to packstone that encloses the chaetetids. In the lower part of the chaetetid interval, chaetetids are small and tabular, but gradually upsection they grade into larger domical forms that sometimes form tall, ragged columns. These, in turn, coalesce upward to form large masses (boundstone) up to 6 m across. At the top of the bed, the chaetetid masses and surrounding matrix are covered by intertidal to supratidal, coastal, and /or terrigenous facies, indicating a shallowing of sea level to the point that chaetetid growth was terminated. Attachment surfaces for individual chaetetids initially involved partially lithified sediment or shell fragments, whereas within the columns they attached to underlying chaetetids, Multithecopora or algal overgrowths on underlying chaetetids, or thin sediment layers that define growth interruptions within the columns. Apparent maximum relief of chaetetids relative to the seafloor during growth was from 30 to 45 cm. Cross laminations in the matrix and some toppling of chaetetids indicate a moderately high-energy paleoenvironment. Ragged margins of the chaetetids accompanied by overlying thin sediment layers, and periodic overgrowths by the tabulate coral Multithecopora and encrusting algae, indicate growth interruptions instigated by periodic influxes of sediment or other environmental factors. Abundant fossils are present on and among the chaetetids, including brachiopods, bryozoans, rugose corals, crinoids, echinoids, gastropods, encrusting algae, ostracodes, and

  4. Annual report of monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2011.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2012-07-03

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha (Figure 1.1). The population of Morrill as of the 2010 Census was approximately 230 (down from 277 in 2000). All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. The findings of the April 2011 and October 2011 monitoring events at Morrill support the following conclusions: (1) Groundwater flow during the 2011 review period (as in prior years) was predominantly to the south, from the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility toward Terrapin Creek. Automatic water level monitoring data suggest that spring precipitation and recharge represent the predominant factors affecting the local groundwater level patterns. (2) No significant changes were observed in the concentration or distribution of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater during the spring and fall 2011 monitoring events versus the spring and fall 2010 monitoring events. In October 2011, a maximum carbon tetrachloride concentration of 49 {micro}g/L was identified in groundwater at well MW3S on the former CCC/USDA facility, with concentrations decreasing downgradient toward Terrapin Creek. (3) Since 2004, the accumulated results of 15 sampling events have demonstrated a significant decline in the maximum detected concentration of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater. In 1995, the contaminant was detected at the former CCC/USDA facility at 390 {micro}g/L, while the current maximum levels are < 50 {micro}g/L. The residual contaminant plume extending from the former CCC/USDA facility southward toward Terrapin Creek is well-defined and slowly declining in concentration naturally

  5. Enantioselective Synthesis of 5,7-Bicyclic Ring Systems from Axially Chiral Allenes Using a Rh(I)-Catalyzed Cyclocarbonylation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Grillet, Francois; Brummond, Kay M.

    2013-01-01

    A transfer of chirality in an intramolecular Rh(I)-catalyzed allenic Pauson-Khand reaction (APKR) to access tetrahydroazulenones, tetrahydrocyclopenta[c]azepinones and dihydrocyclopenta[c]oxepinones enantioselectively (22 – 99% ee) is described. The substitution pattern of the allene affected the transfer of chiral information. Complete transfer of chirality was obtained for all trisubstituted allenes, but loss of chiral information was observed for disubstituted allenes. This work constitutes the first demonstration of a transfer of chiral information from an allene to the 5-position of a cyclopentenone using a cyclocarbonylation reaction. The absolute configuration of the corresponding cyclocarbonylation product was also established, something that is rarely done. PMID:23485149

  6. Investigation of contaminant sources at Navarre, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-05

    The results of the 2006 investigation of contaminant sources at Navarre, Kansas, clearly demonstrate the following: {sm_bullet} Sources of carbon tetrachloride contamination were found on the Navarre Co-op property. These sources are the locations of the highest concentrations of carbon tetrachloride found in soil and groundwater at Navarre. The ongoing groundwater contamination at Navarre originates from these sources. {sm_bullet} The sources on the Co-op property are in locations where the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) never conducted grain storage operations. {sm_bullet} No definitive sources of carbon tetrachloride were identified on the portion of the current Co-op property formerly used by the CCC/USDA. {sm_bullet} The source areas on the Co-op property are consistent with the locations of the most intense Co-op operations, both historically and at present. The Co-op historically stored carbon tetrachloride for retail sale and used it as a grain fumigant in these locations. {sm_bullet} The distribution patterns of other contaminants (tetrachloroethene and nitrate) originating from sources on the Co-op property mimic the carbon tetrachloride plume. These other contaminants are not associated with CCC/USDA operations. {sm_bullet} The distribution of carbon tetrachloride at the Co-op source areas, particularly the absence of contamination in soils at depths less than 20 ft below ground level, is consistent with vertical migration into the subsurface through a conduit (well Co-op 2), with subsequent lateral migration through the subsurface. {sm_bullet} The groundwater flow direction, which is toward the west-northwest, is not consistent with migration of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater from the former CCC/USDA property to the source areas on the Co-op property. {sm_bullet} The absence of soil and groundwater contamination along surface drainage pathways on the former CCC/USDA property is not consistent with

  7. Hemoglobin Kansas as a Rare Cause of Cyanosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Nagayama, Yoshikuni; Yoshida, Minoru; Kohyama, Tadashi; Matsui, Katsuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) Kansas is an inherited Hb variant with a low oxygen affinity that is associated with low oxygen saturation on pulse oximetry (SpO2). It leads to asymptomatic cyanosis. Patients with Hb Kansas do not require any specific treatment and the prognosis is good. In patients with unexplained cyanosis, we should thus consider Hb variants, including Hb Kansas and avoid unnecessary investigations and managements. We herein report the case of 65-year-old woman with Hb Kansas and review five other cases (three lineages) that have been reported in Japan. PMID:28090054

  8. Kansas State University DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.; Maier, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    This concludes the sixth quarter that Kansas State University has been under contract to the US Department of Energy and the Kansas Electric Utility Research Program to demonstrate electric vehicle technology. The G-Van continues to perform within acceptable limits, although the batteries and the charger have caused some problems. Dave Harris, Chloride, has been working with K-State to correct these problems. It may very well be that the limited mileage (less than 25 miles) can be increased by extending the charge cycle (overcharging) the batteries. Soleq Corp. has failed to deliver contracted vehicles. A dual shaft electric propulsion minivan, built by Eaton Corp. in 1987, will be shipped here. On the infrastructure side, EHV Corp. is developing curbside and home charging stations.

  9. Northeast Kansas well tests oil, gas possibilities in Precambrian rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merriam, D.F.; Newell, K.D.; Doveton, J.H.; Magnuson, L.M.; Lollar, B.S.; Waggoner, W.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tests for oil and gas prospects in Precambrian rocks in Northeast Kansas is currently being undertaken by WTW Operating LLC. It drilled in late 2005 the no.1 Wilson well with a depth of 5,772ft, 1,826ft into the Precambrian basement on a venture testing the possibility of oil and gas in the crystalline rocks. The basin extends northeast into Nebraska and Iowa and is a shallow cratonic basin filled with Paleozoic segments. The rocks have been previously though as not a potential for oil and gas due to the rocks' crystalline and nonporous character with the exception of the Midcontinent rift system (MRS). Later, though, small quantities of oil have been produced on the Central Kansas uplift from granite wash while the wells also produced low-Btu with swabbing operations. The recovered gas contained considerable nonflammable components of nitrogen, carbon dioxide and helium which equates to a low btu content of 283.

  10. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, water year 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robison, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Kansas Water Science Center, in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring gages in the State of Kansas. These include 206 real-time streamgages, 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations, and 32 groundwater monitoring wells. These data and associated analyses, accumulated over time, provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve our understanding of Kansas’s water resources. Yearly hydrologic conditions are determined by comparing statistical analyses of current and historical water year data for the period of record. These data are used in protecting life and property, and managing water resources for agricultural, industrial, public supply, ecological, and recreational purposes.

  11. Catastrophic sinkhole formation in Kansas: A case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambrecht, J.L.; Miller, R.D.

    2006-01-01

    Sinkholes represent a hazard to property and human safety in a wide variety of geologic settings across the globe. In most cases, the subsidence rate of a sinkhole represents the most significant potential impact and risk to public safety. Since 1979, the Kansas Geological Survey has studied numerous sinkholes using high-resolution seismic reflection in an attempt to better understand the mechanisms that control their formation. Most sinkholes in central Kansas form as a result of dissolution of the Permian Hutchinson salt (Figure 1). The fluid source and associated pathway responsible for leaching these bedded evaporites have been natural, anthropogenic, and a combination of both. Sinkholes have been a part of the landscape in the North American midcontinent long before modern oil, gas, and mineral exploration, but clearly the activities of man have played a significant role in both increasing the number of sinkholes and affecting their subsidence rates.

  12. Continuous real-time water information: an important Kansas resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loving, Brian L.; Putnam, James E.; Turk, Donita M.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous real-time information on streams, lakes, and groundwater is an important Kansas resource that can safeguard lives and property, and ensure adequate water resources for a healthy State economy. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates approximately 230 water-monitoring stations at Kansas streams, lakes, and groundwater sites. Most of these stations are funded cooperatively in partnerships with local, tribal, State, or other Federal agencies. The USGS real-time water-monitoring network provides long-term, accurate, and objective information that meets the needs of many customers. Whether the customer is a water-management or water-quality agency, an emergency planner, a power or navigational official, a farmer, a canoeist, or a fisherman, all can benefit from the continuous real-time water information gathered by the USGS.

  13. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, water year 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Louen, Justin M.

    2017-04-06

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring sites in Kansas. Real-time data are collected at 216 streamgage sites and are verified throughout the year with regular measurements of streamflow made by USGS personnel. Annual assessments of hydrologic conditions are made by comparing statistical analyses of current and historical water year (WY) data for the period of record. A WY is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the calendar year in which the period ends. Long-term monitoring of hydrologic conditions in Kansas provides critical information for water-supply management, flood forecasting, reservoir operations, irrigation scheduling, bridge and culvert design, ecological monitoring, and many other uses.

  14. Monitoring artificially stimulated fluid movement in the Cretaceous Dakota aquifer, western Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macfarlane, P.A.; Forster, A.; Merriam, D.F.; Schrotter, J.; Healey, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Aquifer properties can be evaluated by monitoring artificially stimulated fluid movements between wells, if the fluid is heated. Changes in the temperature profile recorded in observation wells indicate the flow path of the heated fluid, which in effect acts as a tracer. A fluid-flow experiment in the Cretaceous Dakota Formation at the Hodgeman County site, west-central Kansas, demonstrated the advantage of using the distributed optical-fiber temperature sensing method for monitoring transient temperature conditions in his hydrological application. The fluid flow in the aquifer was increased by producing water from a pumping well and injecting heated water in an injection well 13 m (43 ft) distant from the pumping well. The time-temperature series data obtained and compared with results from previous pumping tests point to interwell heterogeneity of the aquifer and to a zone in the sandstone aquifer of high hydraulic conductivity. However, the experiment would have allowed further clarification of aquifer heterogeneity and thermal properties if at least one observation well had been present between the injection and production wells.

  15. Occurrence of organic wastewater compounds in effluent-dominated streams in Northeastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, C.J.; Rasmussen, T.J.

    2006-01-01

    Fifty-nine stream-water samples and 14 municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) discharge samples in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, were analyzed for 55 compounds collectively described as organic wastewater compounds (OWCs). Stream-water samples were collected upstream, in, and downstream from WWTF discharges in urban and rural areas during base-flow conditions. The effect of secondary treatment processes on OWC occurrence was evaluated by collecting eight samples from WWTF discharges using activated sludge and six from WWTFs samples using trickling filter treatment processes. Samples collected directly from WWTF discharges contained the largest concentrations of most OWCs in this study. Samples from trickling filter discharges had significantly larger concentrations of many OWCs (p-value < 0.05) compared to samples collected from activated sludge discharges. OWC concentrations decreased significantly in samples from WWTF discharges compared to stream-water samples collected from sites greater than 2000??m downstream. Upstream from WWTF discharges, base-flow samples collected in streams draining predominantly urban watersheds had significantly larger concentrations of cumulative OWCs (p-value = 0.03), caffeine (p-value = 0.01), and tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (p-value < 0.01) than those collected downstream from more rural watersheds.

  16. Physical and hydrologic environments of the Mulberry coal reserves in eastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenny, J.F.; Bevans, H.E.; Diaz, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Strippable reserves of Mulberry coal underlie an area of approximately 300 square miles of Miami, Linn, and Bourbon Counties of eastern Kansas. Although subject to State reclamation law, current and projected strip mining of this relatively thin coal seam could alter and hydrologic environment of the study area. Drained by the Marais des Cygnes and Little Osage Rivers and their tributaries, this area is characterized by low relief and moderately impermeable soils. Streamflows are poorly sustained by ground-water discharge and fluctuate widely due to climatic extremes and usage of surface-water supplies. Because ground-water supplies are generally unreliable in quantity and quality, surface water is used to meet most water requirements in the study area. Primary used of surface waters are for domestic supplies, maintenance of wildlife and recreational areas, and cooling needs at LaCygne Power Plant. The prevailing chemical type of the natural streamflow is calcium bicarbonate, with concentrations of dissolved solids generally less than 500 milligrams per liter and pH near neutral. Additional streamflow and water-quality data are needed to evaluate the premining characteristics of and the anticipated changes in the hydrologic environment as strip mining proceeds within the study area. A network of data-collection stations and a sampling scheme have been established to acquire this additional information. (USGS)

  17. Hydrologic responses of streams to mining of the Mulberry coal reserves in eastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bevans, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey investigated the hydrologic responses of streams with respect to coal-mining activities in the Mulberry coal reserves of Miami, Linn, and Bourbon Counties, eastern Kansas. Results of a low-flow water-quality reconnaissance showed that small streams draining previously coal-mined areas generally have relatively large concentrations of sulfate. Large streams in the study area have been relatively unaffected by coal mining. A comparison of two small drainage basins showed that the basin affected by an active strip mine had less high flow and more low flow because of the regulating effects of sediment ponds. Effluent pumped from the strip mine increased the load of sulfate by 244 percent, the load of dissolved solids by 41 percent, and occasionally transported relatively large concentrations of iron, lead, manganese, and zinc to the receiving stream. Accelerated erosion caused by the exposure and disturbance of soil during clearing and excavation increased the sediment load of the receiving stream by 25 percent even though sediment ponds were installed. (USGS)

  18. Source, extent, and degradation of herbicides in a shallow aquifer near Hesston, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, metolachlor, and metribuzin were detected in water from a domestic well completed in a shallow aquifer underlying the Harvey County Experiment Field near Hesston, Kansas. The study described in this report investigated the source, extent, and degradation of these five herbicides. Hydrogeologic analysis of the site enabled estimation of the degradation half-lives of the herbicides in the saturated zone. The most probable source of the contamination was back- siphonage or spillage of herbicides from a sprayer tank into a trench backfilled with sand. The herbicides moved downgradient to the domestic well and then moved into the aquifer via the annular space in the well. Once in the aquifer, the contaminants remained nearly stationary with very little lateral movement away from the point of injection. Decreases in herbicide concentrations were caused mainly by degradation of the parent compounds and to a lesser degree, by extensive pumping of the well. Estimated herbicide degradation half-lives in the saturated environment were 1,000 days for atrazine, 400 days for alachlor, 250 days for cyanazine, 350 days for metolachlor, and 350 days for metribuzin. The herbicides will likely be eliminated from the soil and groundwater at the experiment field by continued natural degradation at the land surface and by degradation in and continued pumping of water from the aquifer. Pumping will remove any degradation products as well as the remaining parent compounds. (USGS)

  19. Simulated water-level declines near Marienthal, west-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunlap, Lloyd E.

    1980-01-01

    Intensive study in an area of 12-square miles in northeastern Wichita County, Kansas, has shown a decrease of 30 to 50% in saturated thickness of the Ogallala Formation since the development of irrigation. Projections from a digital model indicated the additional water-level declines that might occur from 1978 to 1989 if the pumpage in the model area was assumed to be one-half, equal to, or double the 1977 rate. The additional declines would range from 5 to 15 feet, 15 to 30 feet , and 25 to 40 feet, respectively. If pumpage only in the intensive-study area were assumed to be one-half or double the 1977 rate, water-level declines would range from 10 to 20 feet and from 20 to 25 feet, respectively. Reducing pumpage only in the intensive-study area could reduce the water-level declines locally. However, declines would be greatest near the edge of the area as a result of continued pumpage by wells outside the area. The digital model was more sensitive to changes in pumpage than to changes in hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, or recharge.

  20. Electron acceleration in the heart of the Van Allen radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Reeves, G D; Spence, H E; Henderson, M G; Morley, S K; Friedel, R H W; Funsten, H O; Baker, D N; Kanekal, S G; Blake, J B; Fennell, J F; Claudepierre, S G; Thorne, R M; Turner, D L; Kletzing, C A; Kurth, W S; Larsen, B A; Niehof, J T

    2013-08-30

    The Van Allen radiation belts contain ultrarelativistic electrons trapped in Earth's magnetic field. Since their discovery in 1958, a fundamental unanswered question has been how electrons can be accelerated to such high energies. Two classes of processes have been proposed: transport and acceleration of electrons from a source population located outside the radiation belts (radial acceleration) or acceleration of lower-energy electrons to relativistic energies in situ in the heart of the radiation belts (local acceleration). We report measurements from NASA's Van Allen Radiation Belt Storm Probes that clearly distinguish between the two types of acceleration. The observed radial profiles of phase space density are characteristic of local acceleration in the heart of the radiation belts and are inconsistent with a predominantly radial acceleration process.

  1. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Kurth, William; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, f_{uhr}, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  2. Cycloaddition reactions of allenes with N-phenylmaleimide. A two-step, diradical-intermediate process

    SciTech Connect

    Pasto, D.J.; Heid, P.F.; Warren, S.E.

    1982-06-30

    The stereoselectivities, chemoselectivities, relative reactivities, and kinetic isotope effects have been determined in the cycloaddition reactions of substituted allenes with N-phenylmaleimide. The comparison of these results with those derived from the studies of the cycloaddition of 1,1-dichloro-2,2-difluoroethene and the radical-chain addition of benzenethiol to allenes strongly indicates that the cycloadditions with N-phenylmaleimide occur via a two-step, diradical-intermediate process. The stereochemical features controlling the formation of the stereoisomeric diradical intermediates and their ring closures are discussed. In addition to the cycloaddition processes, competitive ene reactions occur to produce intermediate dienes, which react further to produce 1:2 adducts or nonreactive alkyne-containing 1:1 adducts. These ene reactions also appear to proceed via diradical intermediates.

  3. Final work plan : groundwater monitoring at Morrill, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-01-27

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for a program of twice yearly groundwater monitoring at Morrill, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The purposes of this monitoring program are to follow changes in plume dynamics and to collect data necessary to evaluate the suitability of monitored natural attenuation as a remedial option, under the requirements of Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy No.BER-RS-042. This monitoring program is planned for a minimum of 2 yr. The planned monitoring activity is part of an investigation at Morrill being performed on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Details and background for this Work Plan were presented previously (Argonne 2004, 2005). Argonne has also issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan (approved by the KDHE) contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. These documents must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Morrill.

  4. Coalbed gas play emerges in eastern Kansas basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newell, K.D.; Brady, L.L.; Lange, J.P.; Carr, T.R.

    2002-01-01

    Coalbed gas from Middle Pennsylvanian rocks in eastern Kansas is an emerging new energy play. Many of the critical geological parameters that will prove to be the major controls on the production fairways of this potential new resource have yet to be determined. Nevertheless, preliminary analyses indicate that recent leasing and exploration may translate into long-term production of new gas resources in what was hitherto considered a supermature petroleum province.

  5. Revising the Dust Bowl: High Above the Kansas Grasslands.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Kenneth M; Rupley, Eric S A

    2012-07-01

    This article reconstructs land cover patterns in Depressionera Kansas from historical aerial photos and compares the locations of crop fields to areas of submarginal land identified in modern digital soil survey maps. The analysis argues that New Deal land retirement programs overestimated the degree of bad land use because they lacked the basic science to make comprehensive assessments. The findings demonstrate that the misuse of land unfit for cultivation was relatively rare across the central plains but especially in the Dust Bowl region.

  6. Archeological Investigations at Big Hill Lake, Southeastern Kansas, 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    remains in eastern Kansas, due to the climate and the acidic soils. However, two bone hoes made from bison scapulae have been found or interpreted from...treatment consists of smoothing and/or simple stamping, and a variety of bone tools including bison scapula hoes with the distal articulation surface...34 - ... -45- medial ridges extending the length of the artifact (i.e., endscrapers with triangular transverse cross-sections) are referred to as

  7. Kansas State University electric vehicle site operator program

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

    1991-01-01

    K-State is presently working with Grumman Allied and Unique Mobility to establish a working agreement for the research and development of a pure electric postal vehicle. K-State has worked on the design of this vehicle for the past year and is working to establish the appropriate consortium to bring this vehicle to commercial realization. K-State is working to establish infrastructure support for electric vehicles. Presently, a Kansas company is working with K-State to bring its patented low-cost vehicle metering product to market. An anticipated second year DOE project would provide 100 electric metering stations to Southern California for a large scale electric vehicle infrastructure demonstration project. This project would allow a parking lot(s) to be made EV ready. K-State's Site Operator Program continues to get the word-out'' about electric vehicles. From a personal visit by Senator Bob Dole, to Corporate Board of Director Meetings, to school classrooms, to shopping mall demonstrations; K-State Employees are increasing public access and awareness about the electric vehicle industry. As has been shown in this report, K-State's G-Van has logged an average eighteen miles per day while maintaining a full schedule of public relations tours within the state of Kansas and Missouri. K-State has now been contacted by companies in Nebraska and Iowa requesting information and involvement in this program. Kansas and Kansas State will continue its work to contribute to the Site Operator Program effort. With the purchase of two additional electric vehicles and the pending request to purchase two more electric vehicles during the next contractual year, K-states's program will grow. When vehicle development plans and infrastructure requirements are solidified, K-State's program will be ready to participate and be a major contributor to the development and introduction of this technology.

  8. Ruthenium Catalyzed Reductive Coupling of Paraformaldehyde to Trifluoromethyl Allenes: CF3-Bearing All-Carbon Quaternary Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sam, Brannon; Montgomery, T. Patrick; Krische, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Trifluoromethyl substituted allenes engage in ruthenium catalyzed reductive couplings with paraformaldehyde to form products of hydrohydroxymethylation as single regioisomers. This method enables generation of CF3-bearing all-carbon quaternary stereocenters. PMID:23841678

  9. A critique of Mark D. Allen's "the preservation of verb subcategory knowledge in a spoken language comprehension deficit".

    PubMed

    Kemmerer, David

    2008-07-01

    Allen [Allen, M. (2005). The preservation of verb subcategory knowledge in a spoken language comprehension deficit. Brain and Language, 95, 255-264.] reports a single patient, WBN, who, during spoken language comprehension, is still able to access some of the syntactic properties of verbs despite being unable to access some of their semantic properties. Allen claims that these findings challenge linguistic theories which assume that much of the syntactic behavior of verbs can be predicted from their meanings. I argue, however, that this conclusion is not supported by the data for two reasons: first, Allen focuses on aspects of verb syntax that are not claimed to be influenced by verb semantics; and second, he ignores aspects of verb syntax that are claimed to be influenced by verb semantics.

  10. Enantioselective and Regiodivergent Addition of Purines to Terminal Allenes: Synthesis of Abacavir.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Niels; Breit, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    The rhodium-catalyzed atom-economic asymmetric N-selective intermolecular addition of purine derivatives to terminal allenes is reported. Branched allylic purines were obtained in high yields, regioselectivity and outstanding enantioselectivity utilizing a Rh/Josiphos catalyst. Conversely, linear selective allylation of purines could be realized in good to excellent regio- and E/Z-selectivity with a Pd/dppf catalyst system. Furthermore, the new methodology was applied to a straightforward asymmetric synthesis of carbocyclic nucleoside abacavir.

  11. Van Allen Probes observations of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves triggered by enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J.-H.; Lee, D.-Y.; Noh, S.-J.; Shin, D.-K.; Hwang, J.; Kim, K.-C.; Lee, J. J.; Choi, C. R.; Thaller, S.; Skoug, R.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetospheric compression due to impact of enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure Pdyn has long been considered as one of the generation mechanisms of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. With the Van Allen Probe-A observations, we identify three EMIC wave events that are triggered by Pdyn enhancements under prolonged northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) quiet time preconditions. They are in contrast to one another in a few aspects. Event 1 occurs in the middle of continuously increasing Pdyn while Van Allen Probe-A is located outside the plasmapause at postmidnight and near the equator (magnetic latitude (MLAT) -3°). Event 2 occurs by a sharp Pdyn pulse impact while Van Allen Probe-A is located inside the plasmapause in the dawn sector and rather away from the equator (MLAT 12°). Event 3 is characterized by amplification of a preexisting EMIC wave by a sharp Pdyn pulse impact while Van Allen Probe-A is located outside the plasmapause at noon and rather away from the equator (MLAT -15°). These three events represent various situations where EMIC waves can be triggered by Pdyn increases. Several common features are also found among the three events. (i) The strongest wave is found just above the He+ gyrofrequency. (ii) The waves are nearly linearly polarized with a rather oblique propagation direction ( 28° to 39° on average). (iii) The proton fluxes increase in immediate response to the Pdyn impact, most significantly in tens of keV energy, corresponding to the proton resonant energy. (iv) The temperature anisotropy with T⊥ > T|| is seen in the resonant energy for all the events, although its increase by the Pdyn impact is not necessarily always significant. The last two points (iii) and (iv) may imply that in addition to the temperature anisotropy, the increase of the resonant protons must have played a critical role in triggering the EMIC waves by the enhanced Pdyn impact.

  12. Astronauts Gardner and Allen during loading of Palapa B-2 in payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Joseph P. Allen, in this frame, is the sole anchor for the top portion (and most of) the captured Palapa B-2 satellite. Astronaut Dale A. Gardner is on the other end as they load it into the payload bay. Note the difference between the two stinger devices stowed on the Challenger's port side (right side of frame). The one nearer the spacecraft's vertical stabilizer is spent. The one nearer the camera is still awaiting use.

  13. Whistler-Mode Waves inside Density Ducts Observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosborough, S.; Bengtson, M.; Stein, R. L.; Streltsov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes satellites launched by NASA in 2012 are currently orbiting in Earth's radiation belts collecting data about electromagnetic waves and charged particles in the near-earth space environment. Whistler-mode waves are naturally occurring right-hand polarized, very-low frequency waves (< 30 kHz), that can efficiently interact with the energetic electrons in the earth's radiation belts magnetosphere and remediate them from the magnetosphere by precipitating these particles into the atmosphere. The important property of the whistler-mode waves is that they can be guided by density inhomogeneities extended along the ambient magnetic field and localized in the direction perpendicular to the field. Such density channels can be formed by the density enhancement or depletion and they are called ducts. The primary goal of our research is to find density duct and whistler waves in the data recorded by the Van Allen Probes satellites in the magnetosphere, and to reproduce these data with numerical simulations of time-dependent, two-dimensional electron MHD model. In this paper, we present results from our analysis of the observations performed by the Van Allen Probes satellites on 15 October 2014. Data from the probes show the electric and magnetic fields and plasma density. In this event whistler-mode waves were observed from 01:42 to 01:54 UT inside the localized density enhancement coincided with the flux of energetic electrons. Short time intervals, high concentrated electron density, and electron flux gradient activity make this event very interesting for the investigation. Numerical simulations of the electron MHD model revels reasonable quantitative agreement between numerical results and satellite observations, suggesting that the electromagnetic disturbances recorded by the Van Allen Probes satellites, are the whistler-mode waves indeed.

  14. Allene as the parent substrate in zinc-mediated biomimetic hydration reactions of cumulenes.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Burkhard O; Eger, Wilhelm A; Anders, Ernst

    2008-11-07

    The aim of our present investigation is to unravel the general mode of biomimetic activation of a wide variety of cumulenes by carbonic anhydrase (CA) models. Carbonic anhydrases allow the specific recognition, activation and transfer not only of CO2 but also of heteroallenes X=C=Y such as the polar or polarizable examples COS, CS2, H2CCO, and RNCS. Therefore, this enzyme class fulfils the requirements of excellent catalysts with a wide variety of important applications. Can this be extended to the isoelectronic but less reactive allene molecule, H2C=C=CH2 and extremely simplified models as mimetic concept for active center of the carbonic anhydrase? Allene is a waste product in the refinery, i.e. the C3-cut of the naphtha distillation; therefore, any addition product that can be obtained from allene in high yields will be of significant value. We investigated the complete catalytic cycle of a very simple model reaction, the hydration of allene, using density functional theory. Additionally, calculations were performed for the uncatalyzed reaction. There are two possible ways for the nucleophilic attack leading to different products. The zinc hydroxide complex and the water molecule can react at the central or the terminal carbon atoms (positional selectivity), the resulting products are 2-propen-1-ol and propen-2-ol, respectively, acetone. The calculations indicate a significant lower energy barrier for the rate determining step of the formation of propen-2-ol and therefore a well-expressed regioselectivity for the addition of such small molecules. The zinc complex has a pronounced catalytic effect and lowers the activation barrier from 262.5 to 123.9 kJ/mol compared with the uncatalyzed reaction. This work suggests the most probable paths for this reaction and discloses the necessity for the development of novel catalysts.

  15. Palladium-Catalyzed Formal (5 + 2) Annulation between ortho-Alkenylanilides and Allenes.

    PubMed

    Cendón, Borja; Casanova, Noelia; Comanescu, Cezar; García-Fandiño, Rebeca; Seoane, Andrés; Gulías, Moisés; Mascareñas, José L

    2017-04-07

    2-Alkenyltriflylanilides react with allenes upon treatment with catalytic amounts of Pd(OAc)2 and Cu(II) to give highly valuable 2,3-dihydro-1H-benzo[b]azepines, in good yields, and with very high regio- and diastereoselectivities. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that the C-H activation of the alkenylanilide involves a classical concerted metalation-deprotonation (CMD) mechanism.

  16. Estimation of peak streamflows for unregulated rural streams in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Perry, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Peak streamflows were estimated at selected recurrence intervals (frequencies) ranging from 2 to 200 years using log-Pearson Type III distributions for 253 streamflow-gaging stations in Kansas. The annual peak-streamflow data, through the 1997 water year, were from streamflow-gaging stations with unregulated flow in mostly rural basins. A weighted least-squares regression model was used to generalize the coefficients of station skewness. The resulting generalized skewness equation provides more reliable estimates than the previously developed equation for Kansas. A generalized least-squares regression model then was used to develop equations for estimating peak streamflows for sites without stream gages for selected frequencies from selected physical and climatic basin characteristics for sites without stream gages. The equations can be used to estimate peak streamflows for selected frequencies using contributing-drainage area, mean annual precipitation, soil permeability, and slope of the main channel for ungaged sites in Kansas with a contributing-drainage area greater than 0.17 and less than 9,100 square miles. The errors of prediction for the generalized least-squares-generated equations range from 31 to 62 percent.

  17. Cigarette Consumption and Cigarette Smoking Prevalence Among Adults in Kansas

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Sue Min

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recent tobacco prevention and cessation activities have focused on nonsmoking ordinances and behavioral changes, and in Kansas, the overall prevalence of cigarette smoking among adults has decreased. The objective of this study was to determine whether overall cigarette consumption (mean annual number of cigarettes smoked) in Kansas also decreased. Methods Data on cigarette smoking prevalence for 91,465 adult Kansans were obtained from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey for 1999 through 2010. Data on annual cigarette consumption were obtained from the 2002 and 2006 Kansas Adult Tobacco Survey and analyzed by totals, by sex, and by smoking some days or smoking every day. Linear regression was used to evaluate rate changes over time. Results Among men, but not women, cigarette smoking prevalence decreased significantly over time. The prevalence of smoking every day decreased significantly among both men and women, whereas the prevalence of smoking on some days increased significantly for women but not men. For current smokers, the mean annual number of cigarettes consumed remained the same. Conclusion The decline in overall smoking prevalence coupled with the lack of change in mean annual cigarette consumption may have resulted in a more intense exposure to cigarettes for the smoking population. The significant increase in some day use among women indicates a need for additional prevention and education activities; the impact on future lung cancer incidence rates needs further investigation. PMID:26068414

  18. Nonlinear wave-particle interactions in the outer radiation belts: Van Allen Probes results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mozer, Forrest; Artemyev, Anton; Drake, James; Vasko, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    Huge numbers of different nonlinear structures (double layers, electron holes, non-linear whistlers, etc. referred to as Time Domain Structures - TDS) have been observed by the electric field experiment on board the Van Allen Probes. A large part of the observed non-linear structures are associated with whistler waves and some of them can be directly driven by whistlers. Observations of electron velocity distributions and chorus waves by the Van Allen Probe B provided long-lasting signatures of electron Landau resonant interactions with oblique chorus waves in the outer radiation belt. In the inhomogeneous geomagnetic field, such resonant interactions then lead to the formation of a plateau in the parallel (with respect to the geomagnetic field) velocity distribution due to trapping of electrons into the wave effective potential. The feedback from trapped particles provides steepening of parallel electric field and development of TDS seeded from initial whistler structure (well explained in terms of Particle-In-Cell model). The decoupling of the whistler wave and the nonlinear electrostatic component is shown in PIC simulation in the inhomogeneous magnetic field system and are observed by the Van Allen Probes in the radiation belts.

  19. Observation of plasma depletions in outer radiation belt by Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Kim, K.; Lee, E.; Kim, Y.; Park, Y.; Parks, G. K.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Van Allen Probes (RBSP) observed plasma fine structures in the outer radiation belt during storm time on 14 November 2012. Five plasma depletion regions are clearly identified by VAP_A and VAP_B from 02:00UT to 04:45UT by particle instrument suite that can measure electrons and ions in a wide energy range, from 20 eV to 10 MeV. The plasma flux density dramatically decreases about 2 - 3 orders of magnitude in the depletion regions regardless of energy and particle species. Our analysis shows the plasma cavities are formed at the boundary of trapped and injected particle current. The total plasma pressures inside the depletion regions are much smaller than outside, implying unstable structures. It seems that this structures appear unusually only for storm main phase. During strong storm event, geomagnetic field is stretched and low plasma density region (lobe) moves to low latitude, this event could be analyzed by lobe region crossing of spacecraft. However, to explain temporal sequences of this event, we should assume large fluctuation of lobe boundary. Another possible analysis is plasma bubble generated in the tail region. The bubble model proposed to explain plasma transportation form tail to near Earth region in 1980s. While the bubble model reasonably explain the spatial and temporal structures observed by Van Allen probes, we cannot completely rule out the lobe region crossing model. In this presentation, we shall discuss about the characteristics of the plasma density cavities first observed by Van Allen Probes.

  20. Radition belt dynamics : Recent results from van Allen Probes and future observations from CeREs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, Shrikanth; O'Brien, Paul; Baker, Daniel N.; Ogasawara, Keiichi; Fennell, Joseph; Christian, Eric; Claudepierre, Seth; Livi, Stefano; Desai, Mihir; Li, Xinlin; Jaynes, Allison; Turner, Drew; Jones, Ashley; Schiller, Quintin

    2016-07-01

    We describe recent observations of the Earth's radiation belts made by instruments on board the Van Allen Probes mission, particularly the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion spectrometer (MagEIS). These observations have significantly advanced our understanding of terrestrial radiation belt dynamics. The Van Allen Probes mission comprises two identically instrumented spacecraft which were launched 31 August, 2012 into low-inclination lapping equatorial orbits. The orbit periods are about 9 hours, with perigees and apogees of of ~600 km and 5.8 RE respectively. We discuss the new scientific findings of the Van Allen Probes mission regarding the physics of energization and loss of relativistic electrons and their implications for future low-cost missions, especially CubeSats. We describe the CeREs (a Compact Radiation belt Explorer) CubeSat mission currently being built at the Goddard Space Flight Center, and carrying on board, an innovative instrument, the Miniaturized Electron Proton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT is a compact low-mass low-power instrument measuring electrons from a few keV to tens of MeV in multiple differential channels. MERiT is optimized to measure electron microbursts with a high time resolution of a few milliseconds. We present and discuss possible future scientific contributions from CeREs.

  1. Unravelling the Complexities of the Earth's Radiation Belts: Findings from the Van Allen Probes mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, Barry; Fox, Nicola; Kessel, Ramona; Sibeck, David; Kanekal, Shri

    2014-05-01

    Within the first year of Van Allen Probe operations, team members made a series of highly publicized decisive discoveries concerning the structure and evolution of the Earth's radiation belts, the processes that energize particles there, and the locations where they operate. Nevertheless, much more extensive and less publicized findings from the Van Allen Probes suggest that Earth's radiation belts regions remain a highly complex and puzzling place. Although the relation between magnetic storm and radiation belt enhancements and loss has been emphasized, dynamics during non-storm periods has occasionally been shown to be dramatic. While emphasis has been placed on new findings regarding local non-adiabatic energization mechanisms, adiabatic mechanisms have also been shown to be important. Furthermore, the interplay between, and relative importance of, these and other energization processes remain uncertain. The role of seed populations has been highlighted, with some studies pointing to localized mechanisms and others pointing to the role of substorms in transporting and injecting such populations. Here we review some of the less publicized findings and future objectives of the Van Allen Probes mission to get a broader and in-depth view of present understanding of Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  2. A neural network approach for identifying particle pitch angle distributions in Van Allen Probes data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, V. M.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Medeiros, C.; Da Silva, L. A.; Alves, L. R.; Koga, D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walsh, B. M.; Kanekal, S. G.; Jauer, P. R.; Rockenbach, M.; Dal Lago, A.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Marchezi, J. P.; Mendes, O.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Baker, D. N.

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of particle pitch angle distributions (PADs) has been used as a means to comprehend a multitude of different physical mechanisms that lead to flux variations in the Van Allen belts and also to particle precipitation into the upper atmosphere. In this work we developed a neural network-based data clustering methodology that automatically identifies distinct PAD types in an unsupervised way using particle flux data. One can promptly identify and locate three well-known PAD types in both time and radial distance, namely, 90° peaked, butterfly, and flattop distributions. In order to illustrate the applicability of our methodology, we used relativistic electron flux data from the whole month of November 2014, acquired from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope instrument on board the Van Allen Probes, but it is emphasized that our approach can also be used with multiplatform spacecraft data. Our PAD classification results are in reasonably good agreement with those obtained by standard statistical fitting algorithms. The proposed methodology has a potential use for Van Allen belt's monitoring.

  3. Gradual Diffusion and Punctuated Phase Space Density Enhancements of Highly Relativistic Electrons: Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Henderson, M. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Hudson, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission has provided a new window into mega electron volt (MeV) particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. Observations (up to E (is) approximately 10MeV) show clearly the behavior of the outer electron radiation belt at different timescales: months-long periods of gradual inward radial diffusive transport and weak loss being punctuated by dramatic flux changes driven by strong solar wind transient events. We present analysis of multi-MeV electron flux and phase space density (PSD) changes during March 2013 in the context of the first year of Van Allen Probes operation. This March period demonstrates the classic signatures both of inward radial diffusive energization and abrupt localized acceleration deep within the outer Van Allen zone (L (is) approximately 4.0 +/- 0.5). This reveals graphically that both 'competing' mechanisms of multi-MeV electron energization are at play in the radiation belts, often acting almost concurrently or at least in rapid succession.

  4. Allen Brain Atlas-Driven Visualizations: a web-based gene expression energy visualization tool.

    PubMed

    Zaldivar, Andrew; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas-Driven Visualizations (ABADV) is a publicly accessible web-based tool created to retrieve and visualize expression energy data from the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) across multiple genes and brain structures. Though the ABA offers their own search engine and software for researchers to view their growing collection of online public data sets, including extensive gene expression and neuroanatomical data from human and mouse brain, many of their tools limit the amount of genes and brain structures researchers can view at once. To complement their work, ABADV generates multiple pie charts, bar charts and heat maps of expression energy values for any given set of genes and brain structures. Such a suite of free and easy-to-understand visualizations allows for easy comparison of gene expression across multiple brain areas. In addition, each visualization links back to the ABA so researchers may view a summary of the experimental detail. ABADV is currently supported on modern web browsers and is compatible with expression energy data from the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. By creating this web application, researchers can immediately obtain and survey numerous amounts of expression energy data from the ABA, which they can then use to supplement their work or perform meta-analysis. In the future, we hope to enable ABADV across multiple data resources.

  5. Spacecraft surface charging within geosynchronous orbit observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno-Smith, Lois K.; Larsen, Brian A.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Liemohn, Michael W.; Breneman, Aaron; Wygant, John R.; Thomsen, Michelle F.

    2016-02-01

    Using the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) and Electric Field and Waves (EFW) instruments from the Van Allen Probes, we explored the relationship between electron energy fluxes in the eV and keV ranges and spacecraft surface charging. We present statistical results on spacecraft charging within geosynchronous orbit by L and MLT. An algorithm to extract the H+ charging line in the HOPE instrument data was developed to better explore intense charging events. Also, this study explored how spacecraft potential relates to electron number density, electron pressure, electron temperature, thermal electron current, and low-energy ion density between 1 and 210 eV. It is demonstrated that it is imperative to use both EFW potential measurements and the HOPE instrument ion charging line for examining times of extreme spacecraft charging of the Van Allen Probes. The results of this study show that elevated electron energy fluxes and high-electron pressures are present during times of spacecraft charging but these same conditions may also occur during noncharging times. We also show noneclipse significant negative charging events on the Van Allen Probes.

  6. Trends in peak flows of selected streams in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, T.J.; Perry, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of a systematic change in flood potential led to an investigation of trends in the magnitude of annual peak flows in Kansas. Efficient design of highway bridges and other flood-plain structures depends on accurate understanding of flood characteristics. The Kendall's tau test was used to identify trends at 40 stream-gaging stations during the 40-year period 1958-97. Records from 13 (32 percent) of the stations showed significant trends at the 95-percent confidence level. Only three of the records (8 percent) analyzed had increasing trends, whereas 10 records (25 percent) had decreasing trends, all of which were for stations located in the western one-half of the State. An analysis of flow volume using mean annual discharge at 29 stations in Kansas resulted in 6 stations (21 percent) with significant trends in flow volumes. All six trends were decreasing and occurred in the western one-half of the State. The Kendall's tau test also was used to identify peak-flow trends over the entire period of record for 54 stream-gaging stations in Kansas. Of the 23 records (43 percent) showing significant trends, 16 (30 percent) were decreasing, and 7 (13 percent) were increasing. The trend test then was applied to 30-year periods moving in 5-year increments to identify time periods within each station record when trends were occurring. Systematic changes in precipitation patterns and long-term declines in ground-water levels in some stream basins may be contributing to peak-flow trends. To help explain the cause of the streamflow trends, the Kendall's tau test was applied to total annual precipitation and ground-water levels in Kansas. In western Kansas, the lack of precipitation and presence of decreasing trends in ground-water levels indicated that declining water tables are contributing to decreasing trends in peak streamflow. Declining water tables are caused by ground-water withdrawals and other factors such as construction of ponds and terraces. Peak

  7. [A study on Horace N. Allen's medicine and recognition of Korean body].

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ah

    2011-12-31

    Je Jung Won was the first modern-style Government hospital built by the Korean King Ko-Jong in April 1885, and it was the medical missionary Horace Newton Allen(1858~1932) who made one of the greatest contributions to the establishment of the hospital. Allen was an American missionary. He graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a degree in theology in 1881, and completed one-yearcourse at Miami Medical College. In Korea and America he worked as a physician, a missionary, an American diplomatic minister to Korea and a Korean minister's secretary to America. While acting as a mediator between Korea and America, he knew and recorded the domestic and foreign situation of Korea during Gaehwagi(the civilized and enlightened age). Thus to study him is to understand Korea's Gaehwagi as well as to research American medical missionaries. During his stay in Korea(1884~1905), Allen steadily wrote diaries and letters about Korean politics, diplomacy, society, culture, and medicine. Thus his public/private record through diaries and letters(the quantity of these materials amounts to several thousands) supplements the Korean early modern era's historical record. However, until now these materials have received little scholarly attention from researchers except for a few historians of missionary work between Korea and America, or of Korean modern medicine. I intended to use these materials to suggest a new perspective on the study of Korean Gaehwagi. Allen, along with John W. Heron, who came to Seoul on June 21st 1885, treated about 10,460 Korean patients in the first year of the opening of JeJungWon. They made "the first annual report of the Korean Government Hospital". This report explained how Allen and Heron regarded and treated Korean patients. Allen's diaries, letters and other writings offer a realistic view of how the western people actually recognized the Korean people at that time. As a western doctor, Allen had an ambivalent attitude toward Korean medical concepts

  8. The Economic Impact of Higher Education on the Kansas City Metropolitan Area 1988-1989. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas City Regional Council for Higher Education, MO.

    A study was formally requested by the Kansas City Regional Council for Higher Education Institutional Research Directors' Group in the spring of 1990, to examine the economic impact of higher education on the Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas, metropolitan area. An economic impact model was used which includes the four major components of direct…

  9. The Benefits and Characteristics of Adult Learning in Kansas. A Survey of Participants in Non-Credit Learning Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oaklief, Charles R.; Oaklief, Margery M.

    A survey was conducted to determine the characteristics of adult non-credit students in Kansas, and the perceived benefits of their learning experiences. A total of 1,179 participants in Kansas non-credit adult learning experiences were identified from four distinct organizational groups representing Kansas adult basic education centers, business…

  10. 78 FR 11804 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas; Idle Reduction of Heavy-Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ...EPA is proposing to approve the State Implementation Plan (SIP) submitted by the State of Kansas on July 27, 2010, to add two new rules which implement restrictions on the idling of heavy duty diesel vehicles and reduce nitrogen oxide (NOX) emissions at stationary sources in the Kansas portion of the Kansas City Maintenance Area for ozone. EPA is approving this revision because the......

  11. Contingency interim measure for the public water supply at Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-07-09

    This document presents a conceptual design for a contingency interim measure (IM) for treatment of the public water supply system at Barnes, Kansas, should this become necessary. The aquifer that serves the public water supply system at Barnes has been affected by trace to low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride and its degradation product, chloroform. Investigations conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne 2008a) have demonstrated that groundwater at the Barnes site is contaminated with carbon tetrachloride at concentrations exceeding the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) formerly operated a grain storage facility in Barnes, approximately 800 ft east-southeast of the public water supply wells. Carbon tetrachloride was used in the treatment of grain. Another potential source identified in an investigation conducted for the KDHE (PRC 1996) is the site of a former agriculture building owned by the local school district (USD 223). This building is located immediately east of well PWS3. The potential contingency IM options evaluated in this report include the treatment of groundwater at the public water supply wellheads and the provision of an alternate water supply via Washington County Rural Water District No.2 (RWD 2). This document was developed in accordance with KDHE Bureau of Environmental Remediation (BER) Policy No.BER-RS-029 (Revised) (KDHE 2006a), supplemented by guidance from the KDHE project manager. Upon the approval of this contingency IM conceptual design by the KDHE, the CCC/USDA will prepare a treatment system design document that will contain the following elements: (1) Description of the approved contingency IM treatment method; (2) Drawings and/or schematics provided by the contractor and/or manufacturer of the approved technology; (3) A

  12. Along the Yellow-Brick Road: Things Are Fine Down Kansas Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killacky, Jim; And Others

    University for Man (UFM) has developed into a major national organization, impacting the worlds of lifelong learning, alternative education, and rural and community resource development. It was founded in 1968 when Manhattan, Kansas, residents secured several hundred dollars from the Kansas State University student government to organize seven…

  13. Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 17, Numbers 1 and 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Mary Sarah, Ed.; Oliverio, Giulia R. M., Ed.

    "Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics" is intended as a forum for the presentation of the latest original research by the faculty and students of the Department of Linguistics and other related departments of the University of Kansas. Papers in this volume include: "Some Issues in Japanese Accent" (Kenneth Miner);…

  14. Characteristics of Child Abuse Homicides in the State of Kansas from 1994 to 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kajese, Tanyaradzwa M.; Nguyen, Linh T.; Pham, Giao Q.; Pham, Van K.; Melhorn, Katherine; Kallail, K. James

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study described the epidemiology of child abuse homicides in the state of Kansas from 1994 to 2007. It focused on obtaining significant details on all recorded child abuse homicides in Kansas during this time frame to provide critical information that can be used for future preventive measures. Methods: A retrospective case review…

  15. Quest for Excellence: The Future of Early Child Care in Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    Noting the increasing recognition of the importance of quality early child care in Kansas, this report examines the status of child care in Kansas and efforts to improve quality. The report discusses the need for quality care, focusing on the increase in the number of working families, the importance of the early years for brain development, and…

  16. Kansas School District Leaders' Handbook for Maximizing Nontraditional Donations and Grant Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekarek, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to research, develop, and validate a handbook of effective strategies that Kansas school district leaders can use to increase their ability to maximize their school districts' nontraditional funding. Kansas School District Leaders' Handbook for Maximizing Nontraditional Donations and Grant Funding was developed using…

  17. Evaluation Brief: Implementation and Outcomes of Kansas Multi-Tier System of Supports: 2011-2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reedy, Kristen; Lacireno-Paquet, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    States, school districts, and schools across the country are increasingly implementing multi-tier systems of support (MTSS) to improve outcomes for all students. Kansas is no exception. The Kansas MTSS is designed to improve outcomes for all students by instituting system-level change across the classroom, school, district, and state. Such…

  18. Architivity: Union Station. An Interdisciplinary Guide to Kansas City's Most Monumental Landmark.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Ginny, Ed.

    The American Institute of Architects, locally and nationally, is active in supporting environmental education efforts in the schools. Because of its "endangered" status, Union Station in Kansas City, Missouri, was chosen by the Kansas City chapter as the second focus landmark in the their series. This interdisciplinary field guide serves…

  19. PERFORMANCE OF CONVENTIONAL REMEDIAL TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATMENT OF MTBE AND BENZENE AT UST SITES IN KANSAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water at most UST spills sites in Kansas contains both MTBE and benzene, and both contaminants must be effectively treated to close the sites. Soil vacuum extraction, air sparging, and excavation are the most common treatment technologies in Kansas. To compare the relati...

  20. Dr. North and the Kansas City Newspaper War: Public Health Advocacy Collides with Main Street Respectability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovarik, Bill

    A case study examined a 1920 controversy between two newspapers. One of the last vestiges of the era of "yellow journalism" was the editorial "war" between the Kansas City "Star" and the Kansas City "Post" which culminated in a 1921 showdown. The "Star," a champion of main street interests and…

  1. Exploring Location in Introductory Human Geography: The Case of Kansas Towns and Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Bimal Kanti

    2007-01-01

    The author examined the way students enrolled in the Introductory Human Geography course at Kansas State University described their hometowns using the location theme of geography. Participants completed this task as a required take-home assignment. Because the majority of students were from Kansas, the author presents results from locations of…

  2. Definitions and Outline of Basic Operational Procedures of the Kansas Professional Teaching Practices Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Education, Topeka.

    The purpose of this publication is to acquaint educators with the Professional Teaching Practices Commission of Kansas, which was created by the Teachers Practices Act of 1969. The commission serves in an advisory function to the Kansas State Board of Education with responsibility, power, and authority to investigate problems relating to the…

  3. Mammal Silhouettes No. 1, The Kansas School Naturalist, Volume 19 Number 1, October, 1972

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Robert J., Ed.

    1972-01-01

    An insert in this issue of Nature Study,'' this quarterly periodical ( The Kansas School Naturalist'') is free of charge to Kansas school personnel, conservationists, youth leaders, and other adults interested in nature education. This issue focuses on mammals and contains general information about the moose, elk, muskox, camel, walrus, etc. (LK)

  4. Participation in Kansas Noncredit Adult Education. A Survey of Seven Participant Groups. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oaklief, Charles R.; Oaklief, Margery M.

    This project studied participation and benefits of noncredit adult education in Kansas. It was geared to determine appropriate roles for the state of Kansas in delivering educational services for adults through lifelong learning and noncredit educational programs. The population included 1,334 participants in noncredit adult learning experiences…

  5. Imagining Kansas: Place, Promotion, and Western Stereotypes in the Art of Henry Worrall (1825-1902)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bres, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In May of 1876 three men took a private Santa Fe railroad car from Topeka, Kansas, to the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition. One was the Santa Fe land commissioner and the director of the railroad's exhibit, another was secretary of state for the Kansas Board of Agriculture, and the third was a self-trained artist in the railroad's employ and the…

  6. Invest in Kids, Invest in Kansas: Maintaining Our Commitment to Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    This pamphlet presents the concerns of child advocates related to the use of Kansas' portion of the Master Tobacco Settlement for improving the health and well-being of children and youth as legislated in 1999. This state legislation created the Kansas Endowment for Youth Fund (KEY) to receive the tobacco monies, the Children's Initiative Fund…

  7. Waving "A Bough of Challenge": Forestry on the Kansas Grasslands, 1868-1915

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Brian Allen

    2003-01-01

    Kansas is legendary for geographical monotony, for a landscape allegedly so absent of trees and relief that the state has become the butt of national jokes and a cultural synonym for flat. U.S. Forest Service researchers noted in 1999 that forests covered slightly less than 3 percent of the state. So prevalent is the idea of a treeless Kansas that…

  8. Kansas Hears from Critics of Evolution: Foes Dominate Sessions before State Board Panel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2005-01-01

    The theory of evolution was subjected to the first of several courtroom-style hearings in Kansas, an occasion colored by detailed testimony, forceful cross-examinations, and quarrels over biological events that occurred millions of years ago. A three-member subcommittee of the Kansas state board of education is staging the hearings to consider…

  9. Outdoor Recreation and Tourism in Kansas; A Survey of Participation and Demand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smythe, Patrick E.

    The purpose of the survey reported in this document was to gather information on participation and demand for outdoor recreation and tourism in Kansas to serve as a guide for public or private groups and persons interested in providing outdoor recreation and tourist facilities and services. Nonresident travelers in the western half of Kansas were…

  10. Report of the Legislative Educational Planning Committee to the 1999 Kansas Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Legislative Research Dept., Topeka.

    This report provide commentary and recommendations by the Kansas State Legislative Educational Planning Committee in regard to several areas of postsecondary education. It recommends the introduction of legislation to change the professional scholarship programs administered by the Kansas Board of Regents to make them more consistent; supports the…

  11. 76 FR 17599 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... Radiation, Asbestos & Right to Know Section. With respect to funding, the Kansas Legislature annually... establish annual emissions fees. Fees from the construction permits and approvals are deposited into the Kansas state treasury, while emissions fees are deposited into an air quality fee fund. Moneys in the...

  12. A Longitudinal Study of Microcomputer Usage at the Community College Level in Kansas, Spring/94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leite, Pedro T.

    As part of a longitudinal project to inventory computer equipment and identify current instructional use of microcomputers in Kansas community colleges, surveys were sent to the 19 community colleges in Kansas in spring 1994. The surveys solicited data on student enrollment, which subject areas utilized microcomputers, types of hardware available,…

  13. Ground-water data collected in the Missouri River Basin units in Kansas during 1954

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, B.J.; Loye, Linda

    1955-01-01

    Ground water studies in the Missouri River basin were begun by the United States Geological Survey during the fall of 1945 as a part of a program for the development of the resources of the basin by the United States Bureau of  Reclamation and other federal agencies. The studies of ground-water resources in the part of Kansas that lies within the Missouri River basin have been coordinated with the cooperative program of ground-water studies which were already being made in Kansas by the U.S Geological Survey, the Kansas State Geological Survey, the Division of Sanitation of the Kansas Board of Health and the Division of Water Resources of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture.  

  14. Diffusion theory and telemedicine adoption by Kansas health-care providers: critical factors in telemedicine adoption for improved patient access.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Ryan J; Russo, Tracy; Cook, David J; Doolittle, Gary C

    2005-01-01

    Twenty counties in Kansas were randomly selected from those designated as rural on the basis of their populations. A sample of 356 physicians and physicians' assistants in these counties was chosen. A postal survey was sent to the identified providers up to three times. One hundred and eighty-six of the questionnaires were returned (a response rate of 52%). In all, 76% of the respondents were physicians, 76% were men and 42% were family practitioners. Practitioners were classified as adopters or non-adopters of telemedicine, based on their report of whether they had ever referred one or more patients for a health-care consultation via telemedicine. Of the 167 participants who marked this item, 30 (18%) were adopters and 137 (82%) were non-adopters. Among the adopters, 16 (53%) said that they expected to use telemedicine with about the same frequency or more often in the future. In contrast, 61 (45%) non-adopters reported that they did not expect to refer patients by telemedicine in the future and 51 (37%) were unsure. Neither age (r = 0.16, P = 0.44) nor gender (chi2 = 2.35, P = 0.13) was related to the adoption variable or the number of referrals made to telemedicine clinics. The results suggest that adopters and non-adopters of telemedicine perceive its value very differently, and that an opportunity exists to promote the concept to non-adopters more effectively.

  15. Streamflow and water-quality characteristics of the Ottawa River and selected tributaries in Allen, Hardin, and Putnam Counties, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaffer, Kimberly

    2003-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality measurements were made on the Ottawa River and selected tributaries between 1999 to 2002. Ten sets of streamflow measurements were made at an index station on the Auglaize River at Fort Jennings (station 04186500) and at 19 other sites along the Ottawa River and selected tributaries. These data were collected to relate daily mean streamflow at the Auglaize River at Fort Jennings and the instantaneous streamflow at each of the other 19 sites. Two sets of water-quality samples were collected and 4 or 5 dissolved-oxygen measurements were made at the 19 sites. Water samples were collected during periods of potential stress on the aquatic communities, once during low flow and once during a runoff event that occurred after recent land application of pesticides. The first set of water-quality samples was analyzed for groups of nutrients, major ions and trace elements, and physical properties, whereas the second set was analyzed for nutrients, pesticides, and physical properties. With regard to nutrients and physical properties, median values of specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, and orthophosphate were higher during low flow than during the runoff event. In contrast, the median concentrations of total phosphorus, ammonia nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, and ammonia plus organic nitrogen were higher during the runoff event than during low flow. Orthophosphate, total phosphorus, and dissolved-oxygen concentrations all had wider ranges during the low-flow sampling than the runoff-event sampling. Of the 25 major ions and trace elements analyzed for, 15 were detected in all 18 samples, and 10 were detected infrequently or not detected at all. The runoff samples were analyzed for 48 pesticides, 18 of which were detected in one or more samples and 30 of which were not detected. Of the 18 pesticides detected, 13 were detected in 5 or more samples. Five pesticides?acetochlor, atrazine, deethylatrazine, metolachlor, and simazine?were detected in all the samples.

  16. Intensive Archaeological Survey for the Proposed Fort Wayne Flood Control Project at Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    unglazed small tile fragment possibly representing bathroom or kitchen -type tiling. Both examples were located in segment C5-6. Segment C6-7 produced a...civilI! C Flock Ant E Otter r-i.mt ill Earthworks Meetinghouse Government 10 Deposits Present (See No. 53.t C Midden Ca urials ~ Features see

  17. 40 CFR 81.336 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .../Attainment Columbus Franklin County Unclassifiable/Attainment Adams County Unclassifiable/Attainment Allen... Trumbull County Attainment Adams County Unclassifiable/Attainment Allen County Unclassifiable/Attainment... Designation a Date 1 Type Adams County Unclassifiable/Attainment. Allen County...

  18. 40 CFR 81.336 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .../Attainment Columbus Franklin County Unclassifiable/Attainment Adams County Unclassifiable/Attainment Allen... Trumbull County Attainment Adams County Unclassifiable/Attainment Allen County Unclassifiable/Attainment... Designation a Date 1 Type Adams County Unclassifiable/Attainment. Allen County...

  19. 40 CFR 81.336 - Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .../Attainment Columbus Franklin County Unclassifiable/Attainment Adams County Unclassifiable/Attainment Allen... Trumbull County Attainment Adams County Unclassifiable/Attainment Allen County Unclassifiable/Attainment... Designation a Date 1 Type Adams County Unclassifiable/Attainment. Allen County...

  20. Final report : site reclassification investigation for Courtland, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Dennis, C. B.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated a grain storage facility in Courtland, Kansas. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the grain industry to preserve stored grain. In 1999, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) identified the former CCC/USDA operation as the likely source of carbon tetrachloride found in groundwater east of the former CCC/USDA facility in Courtland. Sampling by the KDHE in April 1998 had found carbon tetrachloride in the Garman residence lawn and garden well at a concentration of 2.1 {micro}g/L and in the Hoard residence lawn and garden well at a concentration of 0.5 {micro}g/L. Subsequent soil and groundwater sampling by the KDHE at the former CCC/USDA facility found no indication of a continuing source, and subsequent sampling of the affected wells showed generally declining contaminant levels. At the request of the KDHE and the CCC/USDA, Argonne National Laboratory prepared a Work Plan for Groundwater Sampling for Potential Site Reclassification, Courtland, Kansas (Argonne 2004). The objective of the proposed work was to conduct a single groundwater monitoring event and collect information necessary to update the status of the previously detected groundwater contamination, in support of an evaluation of appropriate actions for reclassification of the status of this site from active to resolved, under the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the USDA's Farm Service Agency (FSA). The reclassification would be in accordance with the KDHE's Reclassification Plan (Policy No. BERRS-024, online at http://www.kdhe.state.ks.us/pdf/ber/scp/reclass.pdf). The KDHE approved the Work Plan on August 8, 2005. Sampling was conducted on September 7, 2005.

  1. Clarification and changes in Permian stratigraphic nomenclature in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sawin, R.S.; Franseen, E.K.; West, R.R.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Watney, W.L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines Permian nomenclature changes to Zeller (1968) that have been adopted by the Kansas Geological Survey. The Permian System/ Period, Cisuralian Series/Epoch, and Asselian Stage/Age are established at the base of the Bennett Shale Member of the Red Eagle Limestone. Series/epoch names Wolfcampian, Leonardian, and Guadalupian are retained and usage of Gearyan, Cimarronian, and Custerian is abandoned. The repositioned Carboniferous-Permian boundary divides the Council Grove Group into Carboniferous (Upper Pennsylvanian Series/Epoch; Virgilian Stage/Age) and Permian (Wolfcampian Series Epoch) segments.

  2. Relationships between geology and geothermal gradients in Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Stavnes, S.A.; Steeples, D.W.; Ruscetta, C.A.

    1982-07-01

    Bottom hole temperature values from existing oil and gas wells and thermal logging data from geothermal wells are used to determine the factors responsible for geographic variation in the subsurface temperature distribution in Kansas. Geothermal gradient data range from 25/sup 0/C/km to 55/sup 0/C/km in the upper 300 m. The geologic factors proposed to explain this variation are: (1) topography of the crystalline basement surface; (2) variation in rates of heat production in the crystalline basement; (3) variation in thermal conductivity in the sedimentary section; and (4) possible convection upward and eastward from the Denver-Julesberg Basin. (MJF)

  3. Revising the Dust Bowl: High Above the Kansas Grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, Kenneth M.; Rupley, Eric S.A.

    2014-01-01

    This article reconstructs land cover patterns in Depressionera Kansas from historical aerial photos and compares the locations of crop fields to areas of submarginal land identified in modern digital soil survey maps. The analysis argues that New Deal land retirement programs overestimated the degree of bad land use because they lacked the basic science to make comprehensive assessments. The findings demonstrate that the misuse of land unfit for cultivation was relatively rare across the central plains but especially in the Dust Bowl region. PMID:25288873

  4. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: La Junta Quadrangle, Colorado and Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    McCarn, D.W.; Johnson, V.C.; Theis, N.J.

    1982-09-01

    No environments favorable for uranium deposits occur within 1500 m (5000 ft) of the surface in the La Junta Quadrangle, Colorado and Kansas. The Triassic Dockum Group, the Jurassic Morrison Formation, and the Cretaceous Lytle Sandstone Member were studied in detail; if they exhibited favorable characteristics, they might be hosts for sandstone-type uranium deposits. However, hydrogeochemical and airborne radiometric data, the geologic literature, field examination, gamma-ray logs, and the four known occurrences do not indicate favorability. Other units in the surface and subsurface are also unfavorable. The Precambrian rocks, Pennsylvanian Morrow Formation, the Pennsylvanian and Permian Sangre de Cristo Formation, and the Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone are unevaluated.

  5. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Joplin Quadrangle, Missouri and Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Derby, J.R.; Upshaw, L.P.; Carter, E.O.; Roach, L.F.; Roach, D.G.

    1982-08-01

    Reconnaissance and detailed geologic and radiometric investigations were conducted throughout the Joplin Quadrangle, Missouri and Kansas, to evaluate the uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface studies were augmented by aerial radiometric surveys and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. Results of the investigations indicate that black shales of Desmoinesian and Missourian (Pennsylvanian) age are environments favorable for the deposition of uranium. The uranium is concentrated in phosphate nodules within these black shales. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits are fluvial placers, coals, limestones, all sandstones, peridotite, granites, the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian unconformity, and vein-type deposits in sedimentary rocks.

  6. Geohydrology of the High Plains Aquifer, western Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stullken, L.E.; Watts, K.R.; Lindgren, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer underlies 174,050 sq mi of eight states (Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming) and contains approximately 3.3 billion acre-ft of water in storage. Saturated thicknesses within the aquifer are as great as 600 ft near the southern border of southwest Kansas. The aquifer is replenished primarily by infiltration from precipitation. Average precipitation at the Garden City Experiment Station is 18.93 in/yr. Groundwater flow is generally from west to east under unconfined conditions. Hydraulic connection with subcropping consolidated aquifers allows ground water to flow vertically in minor quantities. The aquifer is depleted primarily by irrigation. Hydraulic conductivity estimates from 1,612 lithologic logs had an average value of 75 ft/day, with a standard deviation of 35 ft/day. Specific yields estimated from the same lithologic logs had a mean of 0.17 and a standard deviation of 0.047. Water from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas generally is suitable for human and animal consumption and irrigation of crops. Typically, it is a calcium bicarbonate type water, with concentrations of total dissolved solids ranging from 250 to 500 mg/L. The quality of water in the aquifer deteriorates toward the east due to mixing with recharge water containing dissolved minerals leached from the overlying soil and unsaturated zones and mineralized water from adjacent bedrock units. The simulated water budget for the steady state model of predevelopment (pre-1950) conditions in the High Plains aquifer in northwest Kansas showed that annual recharge to the aquifer from infiltration of precipitation was 87,000 acre-ft/yr and from boundary inflow, 21,000 acre-ft/yr. Annual discharge from the aquifer was 108,000 acre-ft/yr, including 81,000 acre-ft/yr from leakage to streams, 23,000 acre-ft from outflow at the boundaries of the aquifer, and 4,000 acre-ft from municipal and industrial pumpage. (Lantz-PTT)

  7. Effect of the orbital debris environment on the high-energy Van Allen proton belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konradi, Andrei

    1988-01-01

    The lifetimes of high-energy (greater than 55 MeV) protons in the Van Allen radiation belt are calculated, assuming that in time the protons will collide with and be absorbed by particulate orbiting material. The calculations are based on the NASA/DoD Civil Needs Database for orbital debris (Gaines, 1966) and moderate assumptions of future space traffic. It is found that the lifetimes of high-energy protons below 1500 km will decrease, leading to a noticeable redution in their fluxes.

  8. Cognition About the Creative Process – Interview With Dr Andrew P. Allen

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew P.; Loughnane, Lynda

    2016-01-01

    What is the relationship between the creative process and cognition and perception? Lynda Loughnane, a master’s student in Art and Process in Crawford College of Art and Design, Cork, Ireland interviewed Dr Andrew P. Allen about the subject. Areas covered include mindfulness, Type 1 and Type 2 thinking, stage theories of creativity, engagement with the art process and the artwork, phenomenology and consciousness with and without self report. The interview was constructed to cover a wide range of subject matter, so as to gather as much information as possible in layman's language about the cognitive process in relation to creativity and interaction with art. PMID:27872674

  9. Evaluation of Single Board Computers for the Antenna Controller at the Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Gerald R.

    2002-12-01

    We review a variety off-the-shelf single board computers being considered for application in the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) for antenna control. The evaluation process used the following procedure: we developed an equivalent small program on each computer. This program communicates over a local area network (Ethernet) to a remote host, and makes some simple tests of the network bandwidth. The controllers are evaluated according to 1) the measured performance and 2) the time it takes to develop the software. Based on these tests we rate each controller and choose one based on the Ajile aJ-100 processor for application at the ATA.

  10. Science Highlights from the RBSP-ECT Particle Instrument Suite on NASA's Van Allen Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Harlan

    2014-05-01

    The NASA Van Allen Probes mission includes an instrument suite known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) - Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) suite. RBSP-ECT contains a well-proven complement of particle instruments to ensure the highest quality measurements ever made in the radiation belts and the inner magnetosphere. The coordinated RBSP-ECT particle measurements, analyzed in combination with fields and waves observations and state of-the-art theory and modeling, provide new understanding on the acceleration, global distribution, and variability of radiation belt electrons and ions, key science objectives of NASA's Living With a Star program and the Van Allen Probes mission. The RBSP-ECT suite consists of three highly-coordinated instruments: the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) spectrometer, the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), and the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT). Collectively these three instrument types cover comprehensively the full electron and ion spectra from one eV to 10's of MeV with sufficient energy resolution, pitch angle coverage and resolution, and with composition measurements in the critical energy range up to 50 keV and also from a few to 50 MeV/nucleon. All three instruments are based on measurement techniques proven in the radiation belts, then optimized to provide unambiguous separation of ions and electrons and clean energy responses even in the presence of extreme penetrating background environments. In this presentation, we summarize overall ECT science goals and then show scientific results derived from the ECT suite on the dual Van Allen Probes spacecraft to date. Mission operations began only in late October 2012, and we have now achieved significant results. Results presented here will include substantial progress toward resolving primary Van Allen Probes science targets, such as: the relative role of localized acceleration versus transport-generated particle acceleration

  11. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas near term Class 2. Annual report, September 18, 1994--March 15, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1998-04-01

    This annual report describes progress during the second year of the project entitled {open_quotes}Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas{close_quotes}. This project funded under the Department of Energy`s Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. As part of the project, several tools and techniques for reservoir description and management were developed, modified and demonstrated. These include: (1) a new approach to subsurface visualization using electric logs ({open_quotes}Pseudoseismic{open_quotes}); (2) a low-cost easy-to-use spreadsheet log analysis software (PfEFFER); and (3) an extension of the BOAST-3 computer program for full field reservoir simulation. The world-wide-web was used to provide rapid and flexible dissemination of the project results through the Internet. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). These results include an outline of the reservoir description based on available and newly acquired data and reservoir simulation results. Detailed information is available on-line through the Internet. Based on the reservoir simulation, three infill wells will be drilled to validate the reservoir description and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed reservoir management strategies. The demonstration phase of the project has just begun and will be presented in the next annual report.

  12. Archaeological Investigation at El Dorado Lake, Butler County, Kansas. Phase III.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    distinctive artifacts useful for inferring activities performed at the site. Test Excavations Test excavations consisting of two, 1 meter wide ...than chipped stone were too poorly represented in XUlO0 to allow discussion of their distribution. A careful search of collections from the 1974...are taken on the flake sample which allow inferences concerning raw material selection, manufacture, use , and maintenance activities. Ratio scaled

  13. Statistical Characteristics of Xenoliths in the Antioch Kimberlite Pipe, Marshall County, Northeastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kotov, S.; Berendsen, P.

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical characteristics of xenoliths in the Antioch kimberlite pipe have been considered in statistical terms. A method of conversion of 2D intersections to 3D dimensions was used. It has been shown that the Rosin-Rammler distribution of mass leads to the Weibull distribution of sizes, whereas a fractal distribution of sizes can be expressed as the Pareto distribution. Lognormal, Weibull, and Pareto distributions have been tested as model distributions. The Pareto distribution could be the most appropriate model for the distribution of xenoliths. This conclusion is in agreement with the general concept that the xenoliths formed as a result of an underground explosion without additional breakage occurring during magma transport. The final distribution maybe shifted from the initial model as a result of processes of redistribution and sorting of xenoliths in liquid-crystalline flows. ?? 2002 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  14. SUMMER MIGRANT PROJECT, UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT NUMBER 467, WICHITA COUNTY, LEOTI, KANSAS. EVALUATION REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HARRIS, ALTON E.

    THE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 3467 CONDUCTED A SUMMER REMEDIAL PROGRAM FOR 121 MIGRANTS AND 19 NON-MIGRANTS IN CO-OPERATION WITH THE LEOTI COMMUNITY SERVICES AND THE LOCAL OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY. THE PROJECT OFFERED A HEALTH AND FOOD SERVICE IN ADDITION TO THE EDUCATIONAL CURRICULUM. THE CURRICULUM FOR GRADES KINDERGARTEN THROUGH 6 WAS…

  15. Preliminary data from Arbuckle test wells, Miami, Douglas, Saline, and Labette counties, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gogel, Tony

    1981-01-01

    Formation data from drill-stem tests are presented for use in calculating transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, and hydraulic head. Complete analyses of water samples from wells at sites 2, 3, and 4, and a partial analysis at site 1, are presented to indicate water quality in the aquifers.

  16. Phase IV Archaeological Investigations at El Dorado Lake, Butler County, Kansas, Summer 1980,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    41 43 46 47 52 53 55 Surface PITS AMBER 1 1 2 I AMETHYST AQUA 1 10 CLEAR 1 2 1 1 4 10 GREEN 2 TINT MILK GLASS RED TURQUOISE 3 136 000 N 60 000 E-4 - w...cut square nail fragment 78. Bar 24. -/white ironstone 79a Light Amethyst bottle glass 25. White glazed ironstone 79b Coal slag 26. White glazed...tinted flat glass 90. Wire nail fragment 40. Clear bottle glass 91. Light amethyst bottle glass * 41. Green tinted bottle glass 92. Chisel 148 Table 2.6

  17. Sediment Transport from Urban, Urbanizing, and Rural Areas in Johnson County, Kansas, 2006-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Casey J.

    2013-01-01

    1. Studies have commonly illustrated that erosion and sediment transport from construction sites is extensive, typically 10-100X that of background levels. 2. However, to our knowledge, the affects of construction and urbanization have rarely been assessed (1) since erosion and sediment controls have been required at construction sites, and (2) at watershed (5-65 mi2) scales. This is primarily because of difficulty characterizing sediment loads in small basins. Studies (such as that illustrated from Timble, 1999) illustrated how large changes in surface erosion may not result in substantive changes in downstream sediment loads (b/c of sediment deposition on land-surfaces, floodplains, and in stream channels). 3. Improved technology (in-situ turbidity) sensors provide a good application b/c they provide an independent surrogate of sediment concentration that is more accurate at estimating sediment concentrations and loads that instantaneous streamflow.

  18. Groundwater Contamination Study. Forbes Field, Air National Guard Base, Shawnee County, Kansas. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-20

    for chemical analysis. o A floating layer of fuel 0.20 feet thick was found in shallow monitor well SW-5. o The presence of oil and grease in deep...Formations. Glacial drift forms a thin veneer over the bedrock in some portions of the area. A thin layer (5-20 feet) of unconsolidated sediments composed of...BonayofPoe poured into the annular space around the well screen to a height of at least one foot above the top of the screened interval. A one foot thick layer

  19. Water as Rural Heritage: Reworking Modernity through Resource Conflict in Edwards County, Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solis, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Conflicts over changing uses of natural resources are familiar within communities of the Western US and are usually resolved through legal processes. This paper analyzes resource conflict through juxtaposing impact analyses often used in their juridical resolution with discourse analyses of affected rural communities. The purchase of property by a…

  20. March-April 2007 monitoring results for Morrill, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-05

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly for a recommended period of two years. The samples are analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 12 monitoring wells and 3 private wells (Argonne 2006a; Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE.