Science.gov

Sample records for allen radiation belts

  1. Wave acceleration of electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Horne, Richard B; Thorne, Richard M; Shprits, Yuri Y; Meredith, Nigel P; Glauert, Sarah A; Smith, Andy J; Kanekal, Shrikanth G; Baker, Daniel N; Engebretson, Mark J; Posch, Jennifer L; Spasojevic, Maria; Inan, Umran S; Pickett, Jolene S; Decreau, Pierrette M E

    2005-09-08

    The Van Allen radiation belts are two regions encircling the Earth in which energetic charged particles are trapped inside the Earth's magnetic field. Their properties vary according to solar activity and they represent a hazard to satellites and humans in space. An important challenge has been to explain how the charged particles within these belts are accelerated to very high energies of several million electron volts. Here we show, on the basis of the analysis of a rare event where the outer radiation belt was depleted and then re-formed closer to the Earth, that the long established theory of acceleration by radial diffusion is inadequate; the electrons are accelerated more effectively by electromagnetic waves at frequencies of a few kilohertz. Wave acceleration can increase the electron flux by more than three orders of magnitude over the observed timescale of one to two days, more than sufficient to explain the new radiation belt. Wave acceleration could also be important for Jupiter, Saturn and other astrophysical objects with magnetic fields.

  2. Electron acceleration in the heart of the Van Allen radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Reeves, G D; Spence, H E; Henderson, M G; Morley, S K; Friedel, R H W; Funsten, H O; Baker, D N; Kanekal, S G; Blake, J B; Fennell, J F; Claudepierre, S G; Thorne, R M; Turner, D L; Kletzing, C A; Kurth, W S; Larsen, B A; Niehof, J T

    2013-08-30

    The Van Allen radiation belts contain ultrarelativistic electrons trapped in Earth's magnetic field. Since their discovery in 1958, a fundamental unanswered question has been how electrons can be accelerated to such high energies. Two classes of processes have been proposed: transport and acceleration of electrons from a source population located outside the radiation belts (radial acceleration) or acceleration of lower-energy electrons to relativistic energies in situ in the heart of the radiation belts (local acceleration). We report measurements from NASA's Van Allen Radiation Belt Storm Probes that clearly distinguish between the two types of acceleration. The observed radial profiles of phase space density are characteristic of local acceleration in the heart of the radiation belts and are inconsistent with a predominantly radial acceleration process.

  3. Explaining occurrences of auroral kilometric radiation in Van Allen radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zhou, Qinghua; Su, Zhenpeng; He, Zhaoguo; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; He, Yihua; Gao, Zhonglei

    2016-12-01

    Auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) is a strong terrestrial radio emission and dominates at higher latitudes because of reflection in vicinities of the source cavity and plasmapause. Recently, Van Allen Probes have observed occurrences of AKR emission in the equatorial region of Earth's radiation belts but its origin still remains an open question. Equatorial AKR can produce efficient acceleration of radiation belt electrons and is a risk to space weather. Here we report high-resolution observations during two small storm periods 4-6 April and 18-20 May 2013 and show, using a 3-D ray tracing simulation, that AKR can propagate downward all the way into the equatorial plane in the radiation belts under appropriate conditions. The simulated results can successfully explain the observed AKR's spatial distribution and frequency range, and the current results have a wide application to all other magnetized astrophysical objects in the universe.

  4. A Century after Van Allen's Birth: Conclusion of Reconnaissance of Radiation Belts in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    On May 1, 1958 in the Great Hall of the US National Academy of Sciences, James A. Van Allen, having instrumented Explorer-1 and follow-on satellites with radiation detectors, announced the discovery of intense radiation at high altitudes above Earth. The press dubbed the doughnut-shaped structures "Van Allen Belts" (VAB). Soon thereafter, the search began for VAB at nearby planets. Mariner 2 flew by Venus in 1962 at a distance of 41,000 km, but no radiation was detected. The Mariner 4 mission to Mars did not observe planet-associated increase in radiation, but scaling arguments with Earth's magnetosphere yielded an upper limit to the ratio of magnetic moments of MM/ME < 0.001 (Van Allen et al, 1965). Similarly, the Mariner 5 flyby closer to Venus resulted in a ratio of magnetic moments < 0.001 (Van Allen et al, 1967), dealing a blow to the expectation that all planetary bodies must possess significant VAB. The flyby of Mercury in 1974 by Mariner 10 revealed a weak magnetic field, but the presence of durably trapped higher energy particles remained controversial until MESSENGER in 2011.The first flybys of Jupiter by Pioneers 10, 11 in 1973 and 1974, respectively, measured a plethora of energetic particles in Jupiter's magnetosphere and established the fact that their intensities were rotationally modulated. Later flybys of Jupiter and Saturn by the two Voyagers in 1979 and 1981 revealed that those magnetospheres possessed their own internal plasma source(s) and radiation belts. Subsequent discoveries of Van Allen belts at Uranus and Neptune by Voyager 2 demonstrated that VAB are the rule rather than the exception in planetary environments. We now know from the Voyagers and through Energetic Neutral Atom images from Cassini and IBEX that an immense energetic particle population surrounds the heliosphere itself. Thus, the reconnaissance of radiation belts of our solar system has been completed, some 56 years after the discovery of the Van Allen Belts at Earth.

  5. New Results About the Earth’s Van Allen Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The first great scientific discovery of the Space Age was that the Earth is enshrouded in toroids, or 'belts', of very high-energy magnetically trapped charged particles. Early observations of the radiation environment clearly indicated that the Van Allen belts could be delineated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons in the energy range 100 keV < E< 1 MeV often populated both the inner and outer zones with a pronounced 'slot' region relatively devoid of energetic electrons existing between them. This two-belt structure for the Van Allen moderate-energy electron component was explained as being due to strong interactions of electrons with electromagnetic waves just inside the cold plasma (plasmapause) boundary. The energy distribution, spatial extent and particle species makeup of the Van Allen belts has been subsequently explored by several space missions. However, recent observations by the NASA dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission have revealed wholly unexpected properties of the radiation belts, especially at highly relativistic (E > 2 MeV) and ultra-relativistic (E > 5 MeV) kinetic energies. In this presentation we show using high spatial and temporal resolution data from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) experiment on board the Van Allen Probes that multiple belts can exist concurrently and that an exceedingly sharp inner boundary exists for ultra-relativistic electrons. Using additionally available Van Allen Probes data, we demonstrate that these remarkable features of energetic electrons are not due to a physical boundary within Earth's intrinsic magnetic field. Neither is it likely that human-generated electromagnetic transmitter wave fields might produce such effects. Rather, we conclude from these unique measurements that slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle

  6. Unravelling the Complexities of the Earth's Radiation Belts: Findings from the Van Allen Probes mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, Barry; Fox, Nicola; Kessel, Ramona; Sibeck, David; Kanekal, Shri

    2014-05-01

    Within the first year of Van Allen Probe operations, team members made a series of highly publicized decisive discoveries concerning the structure and evolution of the Earth's radiation belts, the processes that energize particles there, and the locations where they operate. Nevertheless, much more extensive and less publicized findings from the Van Allen Probes suggest that Earth's radiation belts regions remain a highly complex and puzzling place. Although the relation between magnetic storm and radiation belt enhancements and loss has been emphasized, dynamics during non-storm periods has occasionally been shown to be dramatic. While emphasis has been placed on new findings regarding local non-adiabatic energization mechanisms, adiabatic mechanisms have also been shown to be important. Furthermore, the interplay between, and relative importance of, these and other energization processes remain uncertain. The role of seed populations has been highlighted, with some studies pointing to localized mechanisms and others pointing to the role of substorms in transporting and injecting such populations. Here we review some of the less publicized findings and future objectives of the Van Allen Probes mission to get a broader and in-depth view of present understanding of Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  7. Explaining the dynamics of the ultra-relativistic third Van Allen radiation belt

    DOE PAGES

    Mann, I. R.; Ozeke, L. G.; Murphy, K. R.; ...

    2016-06-20

    Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts over 50 years ago, an explanation for their complete dynamics has remained elusive. Especially challenging is understanding the recently discovered ultra-relativistic third electron radiation belt. Current theory asserts that loss in the heart of the outer belt, essential to the formation of the third belt, must be controlled by high-frequency plasma wave–particle scattering into the atmosphere, via whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, or electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. However, this has failed to accurately reproduce the third belt. In this paper, using a data-driven, time-dependent specification of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves we showmore » for the first time how the third radiation belt is established as a simple, elegant consequence of storm-time extremely fast outward ULF wave transport. High-frequency wave–particle scattering loss into the atmosphere is not needed in this case. Finally, when rapid ULF wave transport coupled to a dynamic boundary is accurately specified, the sensitive dynamics controlling the enigmatic ultra-relativistic third radiation belt are naturally explained.« less

  8. Explaining the dynamics of the ultra-relativistic third Van Allen radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, I. R.; Ozeke, L. G.; Murphy, K. R.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Turner, D. L.; Baker, D. N.; Rae, I. J.; Kale, A.; Milling, D. K.; Boyd, A. J.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Singer, H. J.; Dimitrakoudis, S.; Daglis, I. A.; Honary, F.

    2016-06-20

    Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts over 50 years ago, an explanation for their complete dynamics has remained elusive. Especially challenging is understanding the recently discovered ultra-relativistic third electron radiation belt. Current theory asserts that loss in the heart of the outer belt, essential to the formation of the third belt, must be controlled by high-frequency plasma wave–particle scattering into the atmosphere, via whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, or electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. However, this has failed to accurately reproduce the third belt. In this paper, using a data-driven, time-dependent specification of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves we show for the first time how the third radiation belt is established as a simple, elegant consequence of storm-time extremely fast outward ULF wave transport. High-frequency wave–particle scattering loss into the atmosphere is not needed in this case. Finally, when rapid ULF wave transport coupled to a dynamic boundary is accurately specified, the sensitive dynamics controlling the enigmatic ultra-relativistic third radiation belt are naturally explained.

  9. Explaining the dynamics of the ultra-relativistic third Van Allen radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, I. R.; Ozeke, L. G.; Murphy, K. R.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Turner, D. L.; Baker, D. N.; Rae, I. J.; Kale, A.; Milling, D. K.; Boyd, A. J.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Singer, H. J.; Dimitrakoudis, S.; Daglis, I. A.; Honary, F.

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts over 50 years ago, an explanation for their complete dynamics has remained elusive. Especially challenging is understanding the recently discovered ultra-relativistic third electron radiation belt. Current theory asserts that loss in the heart of the outer belt, essential to the formation of the third belt, must be controlled by high-frequency plasma wave-particle scattering into the atmosphere, via whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, or electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. However, this has failed to accurately reproduce the third belt. Using a data-driven, time-dependent specification of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves we show for the first time how the third radiation belt is established as a simple, elegant consequence of storm-time extremely fast outward ULF wave transport. High-frequency wave-particle scattering loss into the atmosphere is not needed in this case. When rapid ULF wave transport coupled to a dynamic boundary is accurately specified, the sensitive dynamics controlling the enigmatic ultra-relativistic third radiation belt are naturally explained.

  10. An impenetrable barrier to ultrarelativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Jaynes, A N; Hoxie, V C; Thorne, R M; Foster, J C; Li, X; Fennell, J F; Wygant, J R; Kanekal, S G; Erickson, P J; Kurth, W; Li, W; Ma, Q; Schiller, Q; Blum, L; Malaspina, D M; Gerrard, A; Lanzerotti, L J

    2014-11-27

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts could be separated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons of moderate energy (less than about one megaelectronvolt) often populate both zones, with a deep 'slot' region largely devoid of particles between them. There is a region of dense cold plasma around the Earth known as the plasmasphere, the outer boundary of which is called the plasmapause. The two-belt radiation structure was explained as arising from strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary, with the inner edge of the outer radiation zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location. Recent observations have revealed unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultrarelativistic kinetic energies (more than five megaelectronvolts). Here we analyse an extended data set that reveals an exceedingly sharp inner boundary for the ultrarelativistic electrons. Additional, concurrently measured data reveal that this barrier to inward electron radial transport does not arise because of a physical boundary within the Earth's intrinsic magnetic field, and that inward radial diffusion is unlikely to be inhibited by scattering by electromagnetic transmitter wave fields. Rather, we suggest that exceptionally slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere can combine to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate.

  11. Nonlinear wave-particle interactions in the outer radiation belts: Van Allen Probes results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mozer, Forrest; Artemyev, Anton; Drake, James; Vasko, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    Huge numbers of different nonlinear structures (double layers, electron holes, non-linear whistlers, etc. referred to as Time Domain Structures - TDS) have been observed by the electric field experiment on board the Van Allen Probes. A large part of the observed non-linear structures are associated with whistler waves and some of them can be directly driven by whistlers. Observations of electron velocity distributions and chorus waves by the Van Allen Probe B provided long-lasting signatures of electron Landau resonant interactions with oblique chorus waves in the outer radiation belt. In the inhomogeneous geomagnetic field, such resonant interactions then lead to the formation of a plateau in the parallel (with respect to the geomagnetic field) velocity distribution due to trapping of electrons into the wave effective potential. The feedback from trapped particles provides steepening of parallel electric field and development of TDS seeded from initial whistler structure (well explained in terms of Particle-In-Cell model). The decoupling of the whistler wave and the nonlinear electrostatic component is shown in PIC simulation in the inhomogeneous magnetic field system and are observed by the Van Allen Probes in the radiation belts.

  12. On the generation of large amplitude spiky solitons by ultralow frequency earthquake emission in the Van Allen radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Mofiz, U. A.

    2006-08-15

    The parametric coupling between earthquake emitted circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation and ponderomotively driven ion-acoustic perturbations in the Van Allen radiation belt is considered. A cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation for the modulated radiation envelope is derived, and then solved analytically. For ultralow frequency earthquake emissions large amplitude spiky supersonic bright solitons or subsonic dark solitons are found to be generated in the Van Allen radiation belt, detection of which can be a tool for the prediction of a massive earthquake may be followed later.

  13. From the IGY to the IHY: A Changing View of the Van Allen Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.

    2006-12-01

    Discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts by instrumentation flown on Explorer 1 in 1958 was the first major discovery of the Space Age. A view of the belts as static inner and outer zones of energetic particles with different sources, a double-doughnut encircling the Earth, became iconic to the point that their dynamic behavior and solar connection receded from public awareness and apparent scientific import. Then the Cycle 23 maximum in solar activity arrived in 1989-1991, the first approaching the activity level of the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58, when the Van Allen belts were first discovered. Delay in launch of the NASA-Air Force Combined Radiation Release and Effects Satellite, following the Challenger accident in 1986, led to having the right instruments in the right orbit at the right time to detect prompt injection of outer belt electrons and solar energetic protons into the `slot region' between the inner and outer belts, forming new trapped populations which lasted for years in an otherwise benign location. This event in March 1991, along with the great geomagnetic storm of March 1989, and our increased dependence on space technology since the early Explorer days, led to a resurgence of interest in the Van Allen radiation belts and understanding of their connectivity to the Sun. Additional instrumentation from NASA's International Solar Terrestrial Physics Program, the Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) and IMAGE spacecraft from the Explorer program, NOAA and DOD spacecraft, and improved worldwide linkages of groundbased measurements have contributed much since 1991 to our understanding of the dynamic characteristics of the Van Allen belts. Further, the presence of continuous solar wind measurements beginning with the launch of WIND in 1994, and SOHO images of Coronal Mass Ejections and coronal hole sources of high speed solar wind flow have filled in the connection with solar activity qualitatively anticipated

  14. Innermost Van Allen Radiation Belt for High Energy Protons at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The high energy proton radiation belts of Saturn are energetically dominated by the source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND), trapping of protons from beta decay of neutrons emitted from galactic cosmic ray nuclear interactions with the main rings. These belts were originally discovered in wide gaps between the A-ring, Janus/Epimetheus, Mimas, and Enceladus. The narrow F and G rings significant affected the CRAND protons but did not produce total depletion. Voyager 2 measurements subsequently revealed an outermost CRAND proton belt beyond Enceladus. Although the source rate is small, the trapping times limited by radial magnetospheric diffusion are very long, about ten years at peak measured flux inwards of the G ring, so large fluxes can accumulate unless otherwise limited in the trapping region by neutral gas, dust, and ring body interactions. One proposed final extension of the Cassini Orbiter mission would place perikrone in a 3000-km gap between the inner D ring and the upper atmosphere of Saturn. Experience with CRAND in the Earth's inner Van Allen proton belt suggests that a similar innermost belt might be found in this comparably wide region at Saturn. Radial dependence of magnetospheric diffusion, proximity to the ring neutron source, and northward magnetic offset of Saturn's magnetic equator from the ring plane could potentially produce peak fluxes several orders of magnitude higher than previously measured outside the main rings. Even brief passes through such an intense environment of highly penetrating protons would be a significant concern for spacecraft operations and science observations. Actual fluxes are limited by losses in Saturn's exospheric gas and in a dust environment likely comparable to that of the known CRAND proton belts. The first numerical model of this unexplored radiation belt is presented to determine limits on peak magnitude and radial profile of the proton flux distribution.

  15. Observation of plasma depletions in outer radiation belt by Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Kim, K.; Lee, E.; Kim, Y.; Park, Y.; Parks, G. K.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Van Allen Probes (RBSP) observed plasma fine structures in the outer radiation belt during storm time on 14 November 2012. Five plasma depletion regions are clearly identified by VAP_A and VAP_B from 02:00UT to 04:45UT by particle instrument suite that can measure electrons and ions in a wide energy range, from 20 eV to 10 MeV. The plasma flux density dramatically decreases about 2 - 3 orders of magnitude in the depletion regions regardless of energy and particle species. Our analysis shows the plasma cavities are formed at the boundary of trapped and injected particle current. The total plasma pressures inside the depletion regions are much smaller than outside, implying unstable structures. It seems that this structures appear unusually only for storm main phase. During strong storm event, geomagnetic field is stretched and low plasma density region (lobe) moves to low latitude, this event could be analyzed by lobe region crossing of spacecraft. However, to explain temporal sequences of this event, we should assume large fluctuation of lobe boundary. Another possible analysis is plasma bubble generated in the tail region. The bubble model proposed to explain plasma transportation form tail to near Earth region in 1980s. While the bubble model reasonably explain the spatial and temporal structures observed by Van Allen probes, we cannot completely rule out the lobe region crossing model. In this presentation, we shall discuss about the characteristics of the plasma density cavities first observed by Van Allen Probes.

  16. Understanding Earth's radiation belt electron dynamics: Van Allen Probes observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; Ma, Qianli; Thorne, Richard; Bortnik, Jacob; Zhang, Xiaojia

    2016-10-01

    Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during geomagnetic storms using a 3D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the electron evolution observed by Van Allen Probes and simulation, we found that whistler-mode chorus waves play a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV through efficient energy diffusion. By only including radial diffusion driven by ultra-low-frequency waves, the simulation underestimates the observed electron acceleration, while radial diffusion plays an important role in redistributing electrons. Although an additional loss process is required to fully explain the overestimated electron fluxes at multi-MeV, the combined physical processes of radial diffusion and scattering by whistler-mode waves reproduce the observed electron dynamics remarkably well, suggesting that quasi-linear diffusion theory is reasonable to evaluate radiation belt electron dynamics, and the importance of nonlinear wave-particle interaction may still remain as an open question. We would like to acknowledge AFOSR Award FA9550-15-1-0158, NASA Grants NNX15AI96G, NNX15AF61G, and the NSF Grant AGS 1564510 for supporting this research.

  17. Estimates of trapped radiation encountered on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, I. M.

    1973-01-01

    Estimates were made of the number of trapped protons and electrons encountered by vehicles on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts. The estimates serve as a first step in assessing whether these radiations present a problem to on-board sensitive components and payload. The integrated proton spectra and electron spectra are presented for the case of a trajectory described by a vehicle with a constant-thrust acceleration A sub c equal to 0.001 meter/sq sec. This value of acceleration corresponds to a trip time of about 54 days from low earth orbit to synchronous orbit. It is shown that the time spent in the belts and hence the radiation encountered vary nearly inversely with the value of thrust acceleration. Thus, the integrated spectral values presented for the case of A sub c = 0.001 meter/sq sec can be generalized for any other value of thrust acceleration by multiplying them by the factor 0.001/A sub c.

  18. Variation of energetic electron flux in Earth's radiation belts based on Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongxin; Zhong, Zhihong; Yu, Deyin

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's radiation belts have been an important research topic of solar-terrestrial physics from 1958. In 2012, Van Allen Probes (VAP) were launched into near-equatorial orbit and provide very good in-situ observations of energetic particles in inner magnetosphere. Since magnetospheric substorm can cause the severe disturbance of the Earth's megnetospheric environment, here we focus on the characteristics of energetic electron fluxes in the radiation belts during substorm time and non-storm time. Energetic electron data observed by the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) and Energetic Particle Composition and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT) of VAP during 2012 to 2014 are carefully analyzed. We select portions of energetic electron data from substorm onset phase, growth phase, recovery phase, and quiet time, and make a comparisons with theoretical computations. We find that the electron differential fluxes present E-1 shape at lower energies (<1MeV), and have a sharp transition with steeper slopes at high energies for large L-shells, which are in coincidence with Mauk's model [Mauk et al., 2010].

  19. How quickly, how deeply, and how strongly can dynamical outer boundary conditions impact Van Allen radiation belt morphology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian R.; Ozeke, Louis G.

    2016-06-01

    Here we examine the speed, strength, and depth of the coupling between dynamical variations of ultrarelativistic electron flux at the outer boundary and that in the heart of the outer radiation belt. Using ULF wave radial diffusion as an exemplar, we show how changing boundary conditions can completely change belt morphology even under conditions of identical wave power. In the case of ULF wave radial diffusion, the temporal dynamics of a new source population or a sink of electron flux at the outer plasma sheet boundary can generate a completely opposite response which reaches deep into the belt under identical ULF wave conditions. Very significantly, here we show that such coupling can occur on timescales much faster than previously thought. We show that even on timescales ~1 h, changes in the outer boundary electron population can dramatically alter the radiation belt flux in the heart of the belt. Importantly, these flux changes can at times occur on timescales much faster than the L shell revisit time obtained from elliptically orbiting satellites such as the Van Allen Probes. We underline the importance of such boundary condition effects when seeking to identify the physical processes which explain the dominant behavior of the Van Allen belts. Overall, we argue in general that the importance of temporal changes in the boundary conditions is sometimes overlooked in comparison to the pursuit of (ever) increasingly accurate estimates of wave power and other wave properties used in empirical representations of wave transport and diffusion rates.

  20. Revealing the generation of extremely low frequency chorus in Van Allen radiation belts

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Fuliang; Liu, Si; Tao, Xin; ...

    2017-03-02

    Recent studies have shown that chorus can efficiently accelerate the outer radiation belt electrons to relativistic energies. Chorus, previously often observed above 0.1 equatorial electron gyrofrequency fce, was generated by energetic electrons originating from Earth's plasmasheet. Chorus below 0.1 fce has seldom been reported until the recent data from Van Allen Probes but its origin has not been revealed so far. Because electron resonant energy can approach the relativistic level at extremely low frequency relativistic effects should be considered in the formula for whistler-mode wave growth rate. Here we report high-resolution observations during the 14 October 2014 small storm andmore » firstly demonstrate, using a fully relativistic simulation, that electrons with the high energy tail population and relativistic pitch angle anisotropy can provide free energy sufficient for generating chorus below 0.1 fce. The simulated wave growth displays a very similar pattern to the observations. Finally, the current results can be applied to Jupiter, Saturn and other magnetized planets.« less

  1. Van Allen Probes Mission Space Academy: Educating middle school students about Earth's mysterious radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, L.; Turney, D.; Matiella Novak, A.; Smith, D.; Simon, M.

    2013-12-01

    How's the weather in space? Why on Earth did NASA send two satellites above Earth to study radiation belts and space weather? To learn the answer to questions about NASA's Van Allen Probes mission, 450 students and their teachers from Maryland middle schools attended Space Academy events highlighting the Van Allen Probes mission. Sponsored by the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and Discovery Education, the events are held at the APL campus in Laurel, MD. Space Academies take students and teachers on behind-the-scenes exploration of how spacecraft are built, what they are designed to study, and introduces them to the many professionals that work together to create some of NASA's most exciting projects. Moderated by a public relations representative in the format of an official NASA press conference, the daylong event includes a student press conference with students as reporters and mission experts as panelists. Lunch with mission team members gives students a chance to ask more questions. After lunch, students don souvenir clean room suits, enjoy interactive science demonstrations, and tour APL facilities where the Van Allen Probes were built and tested before launch. Students may even have an opportunity to peek inside a clean room to view spacecraft being assembled. Prior to the event, teachers are provided with classroom activities, lesson plans, and videos developed by APL and Discovery Education to help prepare students for the featured mission. The activities are aligned to National Science Education Standards and appropriate for use in the classroom. Following their visit, student journalists are encouraged to write a short article about their field trip; selections are posted on the Space Academy web site. Designed to engage, inspire, and influence attitudes about space science and STEM careers, Space Academies provide an opportunity to attract underserved populations and emphasize that space science is for everyone. Exposing students to a diverse group of

  2. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Shprits, Yuri Y; Drozdov, Alexander Y; Spasojevic, Maria; Kellerman, Adam C; Usanova, Maria E; Engebretson, Mark J; Agapitov, Oleksiy V; Zhelavskaya, Irina S; Raita, Tero J; Spence, Harlan E; Baker, Daniel N; Zhu, Hui; Aseev, Nikita A

    2016-09-28

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) distribution of electrons up to ultra-relativistic energies. Here we show that although relativistic electrons are enhanced, ultra-relativistic electrons become depleted and distributions of particles show very clear telltale signatures of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-induced loss. Comparisons between observations and modelling of the evolution of the electron flux and pitch angle show that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves provide the dominant loss mechanism at ultra-relativistic energies and produce a profound dropout of the ultra-relativistic radiation belt fluxes.

  3. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; Spasojevic, Maria; Kellerman, Adam C.; Usanova, Maria E.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Agapitov, Oleksiy V.; Zhelavskaya, Irina S.; Raita, Tero J.; Spence, Harlan E.; Baker, Daniel N.; Zhu, Hui; Aseev, Nikita A.

    2016-09-01

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) distribution of electrons up to ultra-relativistic energies. Here we show that although relativistic electrons are enhanced, ultra-relativistic electrons become depleted and distributions of particles show very clear telltale signatures of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-induced loss. Comparisons between observations and modelling of the evolution of the electron flux and pitch angle show that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves provide the dominant loss mechanism at ultra-relativistic energies and produce a profound dropout of the ultra-relativistic radiation belt fluxes.

  4. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts

    PubMed Central

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; Spasojevic, Maria; Kellerman, Adam C.; Usanova, Maria E.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Agapitov, Oleksiy V.; Zhelavskaya, Irina S.; Raita, Tero J.; Spence, Harlan E.; Baker, Daniel N.; Zhu, Hui; Aseev, Nikita A.

    2016-01-01

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) distribution of electrons up to ultra-relativistic energies. Here we show that although relativistic electrons are enhanced, ultra-relativistic electrons become depleted and distributions of particles show very clear telltale signatures of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-induced loss. Comparisons between observations and modelling of the evolution of the electron flux and pitch angle show that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves provide the dominant loss mechanism at ultra-relativistic energies and produce a profound dropout of the ultra-relativistic radiation belt fluxes. PMID:27678050

  5. Van Allen Probes observations of prompt MeV radiation belt electron acceleration in nonlinear interactions with VLF chorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Omura, Y.; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Prompt recovery of MeV (millions of electron Volts) electron populations in the poststorm core of the outer terrestrial radiation belt involves local acceleration of a seed population of energetic electrons in interactions with VLF chorus waves. Electron interactions during the generation of VLF rising tones are strongly nonlinear, such that a fraction of the relativistic electrons at resonant energies are trapped by waves, leading to significant nonadiabatic energy exchange. Through detailed examination of VLF chorus and electron fluxes observed by Van Allen Probes, we investigate the efficiency of nonlinear processes for acceleration of electrons to MeV energies. We find through subpacket analysis of chorus waveforms that electrons with initial energy of hundreds of keV to 3 MeV can be accelerated by 50 keV-200 keV in resonant interactions with a single VLF rising tone on a time scale of 10-100 ms.

  6. Comparison of Van Allen Probes radiation belt proton data with test particle simulation for the 17 March 2015 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, M. A.; Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Selesnick, R. S.

    2016-11-01

    The loss of protons in the outer part of the inner radiation belt (L = 2 to 3) during the 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm was investigated using test particle simulations that follow full Lorentz trajectories with both magnetic and electric fields calculated from an empirical model. The simulation results presented here are compared with proton pitch angle measurements from the Van Allen Probe satellites Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) instrument before and after the coronal mass ejection-shock-driven storm of 17-18 March 2015, with minimum Dst =- 223 nT, the strongest storm of Solar Cycle 24, for four different energy ranges with 30, 38, 50, and 66 MeV mean energies. Two simulations have been run, one with an inductive electric field and one without. All four energy channels show good agreement with the Van Allen Probes REPT measurements for low L (L < 2.4) in both simulations but diverge for higher L values. The inclusion of the inductive electric field, calculated from the time-changing magnetic field, significantly improves the agreement between simulation and REPT measurements at L > 2.4. A previous study using the Highly Elliptical Orbiter 3 spacecraft also showed improved agreement when including the inductive electric field but was unable to compare effects on the pitch angle distributions.

  7. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission (RBSP) will explore the Van Allen Radiation Belts in the Earth's magnetosphere. The charge particles in these regions can be hazardous to both spacecraft and ...

  8. Intense low-frequency chorus waves observed by Van Allen Probes: Fine structures and potential effect on radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhonglei; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chao; Wang, Shui

    2016-02-01

    Frequency distribution is a vital factor in determining the contribution of whistler mode chorus to radiation belt electron dynamics. Chorus is usually considered to occur in the frequency range 0.1-0.8fce_eq (with the equatorial electron gyrofrequency fce_eq). We here report an event of intense low-frequency chorus with nearly half of wave power distributed below 0.1fce_eq observed by Van Allen Probe A on 27 August 2014. This emission propagated quasi-parallel to the magnetic field and exhibited hiss-like signatures most of the time. The low-frequency chorus can produce the rapid loss of low-energy (˜0.1 MeV) electrons, different from the normal chorus. For high-energy (≥0.5 MeV) electrons, the low-frequency chorus can yield comparable momentum diffusion to that of the normal chorus but much stronger (up to 2 orders of magnitude) pitch angle diffusion near the loss cone.

  9. On the Control of Van Allen Radiation Belt Morphology by Coupling to the Plasmasheet: How Quickly, How Deeply, and How Strongly?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Ozeke, Louis

    2016-07-01

    Here we examine the speed, strength and depth of the coupling between dynamical variations of the electron flux at the outer boundary and that in the heart of the radiation belts. Using ULF wave radial diffusion as an exemplar, we show how changing boundary conditions can completely change belt morphology even under conditions of identical wave power. In the case of ULF wave radial diffusion, whether there is a new source population or a sink of electron flux at the outer plasmasheet boundary can generate a completely opposite response which reaches deep into the belt even under identical ULF wave conditions. Very significantly, here we show that such coupling can occur on timescales much faster than previously thought, being as short as one hour or less between the outer boundary and L-shells in the heart of the belts at L˜4 and significantly less than the L-shell revisit time obtained from elliptically orbiting satellites such as the Van Allen Probes. We underline the importance of such boundary condition effects when seeking to identify the physical processes which explain the dominant behaviour of the Van Allen belts. We further examine implications for reaching science closure in identifying causality in radiation belt wave-particle dynamics, and in relation to observational requirements for accurate radiation belt forecasting. Overall we argue in general that the importance of boundary conditions is sometimes overlooked in comparison to the pursuit of (ever) increasingly accurate estimates of wave power and other wave properties used in empirical representations of wave transport and diffusion rates.

  10. Estimates of Total Radiation Belt Electron Content (TRBEC) and its Time Evolution using the RBSP-ECT Instrument Suite on the Van Allen Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, H.; Boyd, A. J.; Huang, C.; Smith, S. S.; Henderson, M. G.; Friedel, R. H.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Blake, J. B.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    Using measurements from the two-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission we estimate the total radiation belt electron content (TRBEC) as a simple, global quantitative measure of radiation belt intensity. The two identically-instrumented spacecraft provide comprehensive energy and pitch angle coverage of radiation belt electrons near the magnetic equator throughout the inner magnetosphere, an advantage over earlier studies by Baker et al. (2004) and Selesnick and Kanekal (2009) that estimated similar quantities in LEO or in high-altitude polar orbits. We use electron measurements from the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) suite to identify both the electron seed populations (a few 10's to a few 100's keV) as well as radiation belt electron populations (> ~ 500 keV) with the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) and the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) sensors. MagEIS provides the electron seed population measurements; MagEIS and REPT together provide the core radiation belt and ultra-relativistic electron populations. Using energy-resolved, locally-measured pitch angle distributions of electrons as a function of L, we estimate the equatorial distribution and then integrate the electrons over energy and pitch angle throughout the spatial volume to establish the TRBEC for both the electron seed and the core populations. Finally, we show how TRBEC varies as a function of time over the course of the mission, compare these variations to other quantitative measures of inner magnetospheric dynamism (e.g., Dst) and solar wind drivers, compare the seed to core TRBEC values and its time evolution, as well as compare to prior quantitative estimates of radiation belt electron content.

  11. Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission Trailer

    NASA Video Gallery

    With launch scheduled for 2012, the Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) are two identical spacecraft that will investigate the doughnut shaped Van Allen radiation belts, the first discovery of the sp...

  12. Previously Undetected Radiation Belt Revealed

    NASA Video Gallery

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth'€™s Van Allen radiation belts have been considered to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. Observations f...

  13. Science Goals and Overview of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) Suite on NASA's Van Allen Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Bolton, M.; Bourdarie, S.; Chan, A. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Clemmons, J. H.; Cravens, J. P.; Elkington, S. R.; Fennell, J. F.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Funsten, H. O.; Goldstein, J.; Green, J. C.; Guthrie, A.; Henderson, M. G.; Horne, R. B.; Hudson, M. K.; Jahn, J.-M.; Jordanova, V. K.; Kanekal, S. G.; Klatt, B. W.; Larsen, B. A.; Li, X.; MacDonald, E. A.; Mann, I. R.; Niehof, J.; O'Brien, T. P.; Onsager, T. G.; Salvaggio, D.; Skoug, R. M.; Smith, S. S.; Suther, L. L.; Thomsen, M. F.; Thorne, R. M.

    2013-11-01

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP)-Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) suite contains an innovative complement of particle instruments to ensure the highest quality measurements ever made in the inner magnetosphere and radiation belts. The coordinated RBSP-ECT particle measurements, analyzed in combination with fields and waves observations and state-of-the-art theory and modeling, are necessary for understanding the acceleration, global distribution, and variability of radiation belt electrons and ions, key science objectives of NASA's Living With a Star program and the Van Allen Probes mission. The RBSP-ECT suite consists of three highly-coordinated instruments: the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) sensor, and the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT). Collectively they cover, continuously, the full electron and ion spectra from one eV to 10's of MeV with sufficient energy resolution, pitch angle coverage and resolution, and with composition measurements in the critical energy range up to 50 keV and also from a few to 50 MeV/nucleon. All three instruments are based on measurement techniques proven in the radiation belts. The instruments use those proven techniques along with innovative new designs, optimized for operation in the most extreme conditions in order to provide unambiguous separation of ions and electrons and clean energy responses even in the presence of extreme penetrating background environments. The design, fabrication and operation of ECT spaceflight instrumentation in the harsh radiation belt environment ensure that particle measurements have the fidelity needed for closure in answering key mission science questions. ECT instrument details are provided in companion papers in this same issue. In this paper, we describe the science objectives of the RBSP-ECT instrument suite on the Van Allen Probe spacecraft within the context of the overall mission objectives

  14. A Comparison of Van Allen Belt Radiation Environment Modeling Programs: AE8/AP8 Legacy, AE9/AP9, and SPENVIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Evan; Pellish, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In the space surrounding Earth there exists an active radiation environment consisting mostly of electrons and protons that have been trapped by Earths magnetic field. This radiation, also known as the Van Allen Belts, has the potential to damage man-made satellites in orbit; thus, proper precautions must be taken to shield NASA assets from this phenomenon. Data on the Van Allen Belts has been collected continuously by a multitude of space-based instruments since the beginning of space exploration. Subsequently, using theory to fill in the gaps in the collected data, computer models have been developed that take in the orbital information of a hypothetical mission and output the expected particle fluence and flux for that orbit. However, as new versions of the modeling system are released, users are left wondering how the new version differs from the old. Therefore, we performed a comparison of three different editions of the modeling system: AE8/AP8 (legacy), which is included in the model 9 graphical user interface as an option for ones calculations, AE9/AP9, and the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS), which is an online-based form of AE8/AP8 developed by NASA and the European Space Agency that changed the code to allow the program to extrapolate data to predict fluence and flux at higher energies. Although this evaluation is still ongoing, it is predicted that the model 8 (legacy) and SPENVIS version will have identical outputs with the exception of the extended energy levels from SPENVIS, while model 9 will provide different fluences than model 8 based on additional magnetic field descriptions and on-orbit data.

  15. Field-Aligned Electron Events Observed in the Radiation Belts by the HOPE Instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejosne, S.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.

    2015-12-01

    Field-aligned electron events (FAEs) are defined as events having the ratio of field-aligned to perpendicular flux greater than three. Time Domain Structures (TDS) are known to produce FAEs. Whistler and ECH waves are other possible candidates. Our objective is to derive the general features of the FAEs, to identify their driving mechanisms and to evaluate the importance of the different mechanisms. More than two years of measurements by the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron mass spectrometer and the Electric Field and Waves experiment are analyzed to identify low-energy (100eV-50keV) FAEs and to quantify the concurrent electric and magnetic wave components. We also peek at the observable waveforms with bursts of high-time resolution measurements. From statistical analysis and case studies, we suggest in particular that TDS cause field-alignment of ~300eV electrons in the pre-midnight sector while chorus waves cause field-alignment of electrons of ~10keV in the morning sector of the outer belt.

  16. Ultra-fast Electrons Explain Third Radiation Belt

    NASA Video Gallery

    In September 2012, NASA's Van Allen Probes observed the radiation belts around Earth had settled into a new configuration, separating into three belts instead of two. Scientists think the unusual p...

  17. An extreme distortion of the Van Allen belt arising from the 'Hallowe'en' solar storm in 2003.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Kanekal, S G; Li, X; Monk, S P; Goldstein, J; Burch, J L

    2004-12-16

    The Earth's radiation belts--also known as the Van Allen belts--contain high-energy electrons trapped on magnetic field lines. The centre of the outer belt is usually 20,000-25,000 km from Earth. The region between the belts is normally devoid of particles, and is accordingly favoured as a location for spacecraft operation because of the benign environment. Here we report that the outer Van Allen belt was compressed dramatically by a solar storm known as the 'Hallowe'en storm' of 2003. From 1 to 10 November, the outer belt had its centre only approximately 10,000 km from Earth's equatorial surface, and the plasmasphere was similarly displaced inwards. The region between the belts became the location of high particle radiation intensity. This remarkable deformation of the entire magnetosphere implies surprisingly powerful acceleration and loss processes deep within the magnetosphere.

  18. Applications of radiation belt research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2011-10-01

    When Arthur Clark and John Pierce proposed geosynchronous and low-Earth-orbiting (GEO and LEO) communications satellites, respectively, they did not envision that the environment in which their concepts would fly would be anything but benign. Discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts in 1958 fundamentally altered understanding of Earth's near-space environment and its impacts on technologies. Indeed, the first commercial telecommunications satellite, Telstar 1, in LEO, failed some 6 months after launch (10 July 1962) due to trapped radiation that had been enhanced from the Starfish Prime high-altitude nuclear test on the day prior to launch. Today radiation trapped in the geomagnetic field, as well as solar energetic particles that can access the magnetosphere, forms critical constraints on the design and operations of satellite systems. These considerations were important factors in the planning of the AGU Chapman Conference on radiation belts that was hosted in July 2011 by the Memorial University of Newfoundland in St. John's, Canada (see "Chapman Conference on Radiation Belts and the Inner Magnetosphere," page 4). The conference presentations, discussions, and hallway conversations illuminated current understanding of Earth's radiation belts and critical issues remaining. Certainly, fundamental understanding of radiation belt origins remains elusive. The relative roles of adiabatic processes, geomagnetic storm injections, and wave heating, among other considerations, are central topics of intense debate and of competing modeling regimes by numerous active groups.

  19. Three dimensional data-assimilative VERB-code simulations of the Earth's radiation belts: Reanalysis during the Van Allen Probe era, and operational forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, Adam; Shprits, Yuri; Podladchikova, Tatiana; Kondrashov, Dmitri

    2016-04-01

    The Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code 2.0 models the dynamics of radiation-belt electron phase space density (PSD) in Earth's magnetosphere. Recently, a data-assimilative version of this code has been developed, which utilizes a split-operator Kalman-filtering approach to solve for electron PSD in terms of adiabatic invariants. A new dataset based on the TS07d magnetic field model is presented, which may be utilized for analysis of past geomagnetic storms, and for initial and boundary conditions in running simulations. Further, a data-assimilative forecast model is introduced, which has the capability to forecast electron PSD several days into the future, given a forecast Kp index. The model assimilates an empirical model capable of forecasting the conditions at geosynchronous orbit. The model currently runs in real time and a forecast is available to view online http://rbm.epss.ucla.edu.

  20. Remarkable new results for high-energy protons and electrons in the inner Van Allen belt regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-04-01

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts could be separated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons of moderate energy (less than about one megaelectronvolt) often populate both zones, with a deep 'slot' region largely devoid of particles between them. The two-belt radiation structure was explained as arising from strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary with the inner edge of the outer radiation zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location.. Recent Van Allen Probes observations have revealed an unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultrarelativistic kinetic energies (more than several megaelectronvolts). The data show an exceedingly sharp inner boundary for the ultrarelativistic electrons right at L=2.8. Additional, concurrently measured data reveal that this barrier to inward electron radial transport is likely due to scattering by powerful human electromagnetic transmitter (VLF) wave fields. We show that weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere due to manmade signals can act to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate. Inside of this distance, the Van Allen Probes data show that high energy (20 -100 MeV) protons have a double belt structure with a stable peak of flux at L~1.5 and a much more variable belt peaking at L~2.3.

  1. Radition belt dynamics : Recent results from van Allen Probes and future observations from CeREs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, Shrikanth; O'Brien, Paul; Baker, Daniel N.; Ogasawara, Keiichi; Fennell, Joseph; Christian, Eric; Claudepierre, Seth; Livi, Stefano; Desai, Mihir; Li, Xinlin; Jaynes, Allison; Turner, Drew; Jones, Ashley; Schiller, Quintin

    2016-07-01

    We describe recent observations of the Earth's radiation belts made by instruments on board the Van Allen Probes mission, particularly the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion spectrometer (MagEIS). These observations have significantly advanced our understanding of terrestrial radiation belt dynamics. The Van Allen Probes mission comprises two identically instrumented spacecraft which were launched 31 August, 2012 into low-inclination lapping equatorial orbits. The orbit periods are about 9 hours, with perigees and apogees of of ~600 km and 5.8 RE respectively. We discuss the new scientific findings of the Van Allen Probes mission regarding the physics of energization and loss of relativistic electrons and their implications for future low-cost missions, especially CubeSats. We describe the CeREs (a Compact Radiation belt Explorer) CubeSat mission currently being built at the Goddard Space Flight Center, and carrying on board, an innovative instrument, the Miniaturized Electron Proton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT is a compact low-mass low-power instrument measuring electrons from a few keV to tens of MeV in multiple differential channels. MERiT is optimized to measure electron microbursts with a high time resolution of a few milliseconds. We present and discuss possible future scientific contributions from CeREs.

  2. Wave-wave and wave-particle interactions in the inner magnetosphere measured with Van Allen Probes: cross coupling between wave modes and its effect on radiation belt dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpitts, C. A.; Cattell, C. A.; Broughton, M.; Engebretson, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We will show observations of waveform bursts using the Electric Field and Waves (EFW) burst data on the Van Allen Probes satellites with intermediate frequency waves such as whistler mode, magnetosonic and lower hybrid. These observations show very strong modulation of these waves by lower frequency waves such as EMIC or ULF. We are analyzing the burst data and cross coupling between wave modes to determine how prevalent the cross coupling between wave modes is and under what conditions it occurs. To supplement the EFW data, each satellite is also equipped with a full complement of particle instruments, including the HOPE instrument measuring lower energy (1 eV - 50 keV) particles and MagEIS instruments measuring higher energy (20 keV - 5 MeV) particles. The energy and angular resolution of these detectors are sufficient to resolve the scattering and energization arising from the distinct wave modes, using the signatures in the trapped electron populations predicted by theory for the various mechanisms. Comparison of the burst waveform data with the electron data from HOPE and MagEIS, for times with and without coupling between the wave modes, will allow us to identify how the cross coupling affects electron dynamics in the radiation belts. The significance of wave-particle interactions in the formation and depletion of the radiation belts has long been established, but is still not completely understood. Specifically, pitch angle scattering from waves such as plasmaspheric hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron [EMIC] waves near the duskside plasmapause is known to contribute to electron loss from the radiation belts, primarily through precipitation into the atmosphere. Higher frequency waves such as whistler mode chorus and magnetosonic waves observed near the equator in the lower hybrid frequency range are widely believed to be primary means for electron energization. However, these and other competing processes often occur simultaneously, and an accurate model

  3. Calculated limits for particle fluxes in Jupiter's Van Allen belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haffner, J.

    1972-01-01

    Electron and proton fluxes in Jupiter's radiation belts are calculated, along with the envelopes of dose rates. The following assumptions are made: the particles in the Jupiter belts are influenced only by the magnetic field of the planet; the particles act correspondingly to the particles in the Earth's belts and the Earth's belts can be used as a model; the magnetic field of Jupiter is essentially a dipole; the radiation of a decimetric nature received from Jupiter is synchrotron radiation due to the electrons, and to a first approximation it is emitted isotropically; and the strength of the emission in the decimetric wavelength range gives an upper bound considering how strong the field can be and how many electrons there are. The point dose rates for tissue and 0.1 gram/cm aluminum shielding at about 3 Jupiter radii are 10000 rads/hr for electrons and 1000 rads/hr for protons.

  4. Impacts of intense inward and outward ULF wave radial diffusion on the Van Allen belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Ozeke, Louis; Rae, I. Jonathan; Murphy, Kyle

    2016-07-01

    During geomagnetic storms, the power in ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves can be orders of magnitude larger than that predicted by statistics determined from an entire solar cycle. This is especially true during the main phase and early recovery phase. These periods of enhanced storm-time ULF wave power can have significant impacts on the morphology and structure of the Van Allen belts. Either fast inward or outward radial diffusion can result, depending on the profiles of the electron phase space density and the outer boundary condition at the edge of the belts. Small changes in the time sequence of powerful ULF waves, and the time sequence of any magnetopause shadowing or the recovery of plamasheet sources relative to the ULF wave occurrence, have a remarkable impact on the resulting structure of the belts. The overall impact of the enhanced ULF wave power is profound, but the response can be very different depending on the available source flux in the plasmasheet. We review these impacts by examining ultra-relativistic electron dynamics during seemingly different storms during the Van Allen Probe era, including during the Baker et al. third radiation belt, and show the observed behaviour can be largely explained by differences in the time sequence of events described above.

  5. Effect of the orbital debris environment on the high-energy Van Allen proton belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konradi, Andrei

    1988-01-01

    The lifetimes of high-energy (greater than 55 MeV) protons in the Van Allen radiation belt are calculated, assuming that in time the protons will collide with and be absorbed by particulate orbiting material. The calculations are based on the NASA/DoD Civil Needs Database for orbital debris (Gaines, 1966) and moderate assumptions of future space traffic. It is found that the lifetimes of high-energy protons below 1500 km will decrease, leading to a noticeable redution in their fluxes.

  6. Using Jupiter's Synchrotron Radiation as a Probe into Jupiter's Inner Radiation Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, S. J.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M. J.; Thorne, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    The Jovian decimetric emission is caused by the combined emission of synchrotron radiation originating from the relativistic electrons trapped in Jupiter's 'Van Allen radiation belts' and thermal emission from the planet's atmosphere. Synchrotron radiation characteristics and variations (which provides insight into the physical properties of Jupiter's inner radiation belts) will be amplified and discussed.

  7. Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Fox, N.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Mauk, B. H.

    2009-01-01

    Scheduled to launch in May 2012, NASA's dual spacecraft Living With a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission carries the field and particle instrumentation needed to determine the processes that produce enhancements in radiation belt ion and electron fluxes, the dominant mechanisms that cause the loss of relativistic electrons, and the manner by which the ring current and other geomagnetic phenomena affect radiation belt behavior. The two spacecraft will operate in low-inclination elliptical lapping orbits around the Earth, within and immediately exterior to the Van Allen radiation belts. During course of their two year primary mission, they will cover the full range of local times, measuring both AC and DC electric and magnetic fields to 10kHz, as well as ions from 50 eV to 1 GeV and electrons with energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 MeV.

  8. A long-lived refilling event of the slot region between the Van Allen radiation belts from Nov 2004 to Jan 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.

    2015-12-01

    A powerful relativistic electron enhancement in the slot region between the inner and outer radiation belts is investigated by multi-satellites measurements. The measurement from Space Particle Component Detectors (SPCDs) aboard Fengyun-1 indicates that the relativistic electron (>1.6MeV) flux began to enhance obviously on early 10 November with the flux peak fixed at L~3.0. In the next day, the relativistic electron populations increased dramatically. Subsequently, the flux had been enhancing slowly, but unceasingly, until 17 November, and the maximum flux reached up to 7.8×104 cm-2·sr-1·s-1 at last. The flux peak fixed at L~3.0 and the very slow decay rate in this event make it to be an unusual long-lived slot region refilling event. We trace the cause of the event back to the interplanetary environment and find that there were two evident magnetic cloud constructions: dramatically enhanced magnetic field strength and long and smooth rotation of field vector from late 7 to 8 November and from late 9 to 10 November, respectively; solar wind speed increased in 'step-like' fashion on late 7 November and persisted the level of high speed >560 km·s-1 for about 124 hours. Owed to the interplanetary disturbances, very strong magnetic storms and substorms occurred in the magnetosphere. Responding to the extraordinarily magnetic perturbations, the plasmasphere shrank sharply. The location of plasmapause inferred from Dst indicates that the plasmapause shrank inward to as low as L~2.5. On account of these magnetospheric conditions, strong chorus emissions are expected near the earth. In fact, the STAFF on Cluster mission measured intensive whistler mode chorus emissions on 10 and 12 November, corresponding to the period of the remarkable enhancement of relativistic electron. Furthermore, we investigate the radial profile of phase space density (PSD) by electron flux from multi-satellites, and the evolution of the phase space density profile reveals that the local

  9. Typical values of the electric drift E × B/B2 in the inner radiation belt and slot region as determined from Van Allen Probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejosne, Solène; Mozer, F. S.

    2016-12-01

    The electric drift E × B/B2 plays a fundamental role for the description of plasma flow and particle acceleration. Yet it is not well-known in the inner belt and slot region because of a lack of reliable in situ measurements. In this article, we present an analysis of the electric drifts measured below L 3 by both Van Allen Probes A and B from September 2012 to December 2014. The objective is to determine the typical components of the equatorial electric drift in both radial and azimuthal directions. The dependences of the components on radial distance, magnetic local time, and geographic longitude are examined. The results from Van Allen Probe A agree with Van Allen Probe B. They show, among other things, a typical corotation lag of the order of 5 to 10% below L 2.6, as well as a slight radial transport of the order of 20 m s-1. The magnetic local time dependence of the electric drift is consistent with that of the ionosphere wind dynamo below L 2 and with that of a solar wind-driven convection electric field above L 2. A secondary longitudinal dependence of the electric field is also found. Therefore, this work also demonstrates that the instruments on board Van Allen Probes are able to perform accurate measurements of the electric drift below L 3.

  10. Radiation belts of jupiter.

    PubMed

    Stansberry, K G; White, R S

    1973-12-07

    Predictions of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts are based mainly on decimeter observations of 1966 and 1968. Extensive calculations modeling radial diffusion of particles inward from the solar wind and electron synchrotron radiation are used to relate the predictions and observations.

  11. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-10-05

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day–night asymmetry in Earth’s magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. In conclusion, simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. Finally, the current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons.

  12. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D N; Spence, H E; Funsten, H O; Blake, J B

    2015-10-05

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day-night asymmetry in Earth's magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. Simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. The current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons.

  13. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-10-01

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day-night asymmetry in Earth's magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. Simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. The current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons.

  14. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day–night asymmetry in Earth's magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. Simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. The current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons. PMID:26436770

  15. Radiation belts of jupiter.

    PubMed

    Fillius, R W; McIlwain, C E

    1974-01-25

    Pioneer 10 counted relativistic electrons throughout the magnetosphere of Jupiter, with the greatest fluxes being inside 20 Jupiter radii. The peak flux of electrons with energy greater than 50 million electron volts was 1.3 x 10(7) per square centimeter per second at the innermost penetration of the radiation belts.

  16. Jupiter's radiation belts.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, N.; Mcdonough, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    A model for the production and loss of energetic electrons in Jupiter's radiation belt is presented. It is postulated that the electrons originate in the solar wind and are diffused in toward the planet by perturbations which violate the particles' third adiabatic invariant. At large distances, magnetic perturbations, electric fields associated with magnetospheric convection, or interchange instabilities driven by thermal plasma gradients may drive the diffusion. Inside about 10 Jupiter radii, the diffusion is probably driven by electric fields associated with the upper atmosphere dynamo which is driven by neutral winds in the ionosphere. The diurnal component of the dynamo wind fields produces a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the decimetric radiation from the electrons in the belts, and the lack of obvious measured asymmetries in the decimetric radiation measurements provides estimates of upper limits for these Jovian ionospheric neutral winds.

  17. Moving Belt Radiator technology issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. Alan, III

    1988-01-01

    Development of the Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) as an advanced space radiator concept is discussed. The relative merits of Solid Belt (SBR) Liquid Belt (LBR), and Hybrid Belt (HBR) Radiators are described. Analytical and experimental efforts related to the dynamics of a rotating belt in microgravity are reviewed. The development of methods for transferring heat to the moving belt is discussed, and the results from several experimental investigations are summarized. Limited efforts related to the belt deployment and stowage, and to fabrication of a hybrid belt, are also discussed. Life limiting factors such as seal wear and micrometeroid resistance are identified. The results from various MBR point design studies for several power levels are compared with advanced Heat Pipe Radiator technology. MBR designs are shown to compare favorable at both 300 and 1000 K temperature levels. However, additional effort will be required to resolve critical technology issues and to demonstrate the advantage of MBR systems.

  18. Moving belt radiator development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. Alan

    1988-01-01

    Development of the Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) as an advanced space radiator concept is discussed. The ralative merits of Solid Belt (SBR), Liquid Belt (LBR), and Hybrid Belt (HBR) Radiators are described. Analytical and experimental efforts related to the dynamics of a rotating belt in microgravity are reviewed. The development of methods for transferring heat to the moving belt is discussed, and the results from several experimental investigations are summarized. Limited efforts related to the belt deployment and stowage, and to fabrication of a hybrid belt, are also discussed. Life limiting factors such as seal wear and micrometeroid resistance are identified. The results from various MBR point design studies for several power levels are compared with advanced Heat Pipe Radiator technology. MBR designs are shown to compare favorable at both 300 and 1000 K temperature levels. However, additional effort will be required to resolve critical technology issues and to demonstrate the advantage of MBR systems.

  19. Precipitation of relativistic electrons of the Van Allen belts into the proton aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K; Miyoshi, Y; Sakaguchi, K; Shiokawa, K; Evans, D S; Connors, M

    2008-01-01

    The Van Allen electron belts consist of two regions encircling the earth in which relativistic electrons are trapped in the earth's magnetic field. Populations of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts vary greatly with geomagnetic disturbance and they are a major source of damage to space vehicles. In order to know when and by how much these populations of relativistic electrons increase, it is important to elucidate not only the cause of acceleration of relativistic electrons but also the cause of their loss from the Van Allen belts. Here we show the first evidence that left-hand polarized electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere, on the basis of results of an excellent set of ground and satellite observations showing coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The proton aurora was produced by precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV due to EMIC waves near the plasma pause, which is a manifestation of wave-particle interactions. These observations clarify that ions with energies of tens of keV affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts via parasitic resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  20. EMIC Waves in the Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanova, M.; Mann, I. R.; Drozdov, A.; Orlova, K.; Shprits, Y.; Darrouzet, F.; Ergun, R.

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are believed to be important for influencing the dynamics of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere - both ring current ions and radiation belt electrons - causing particle precipitation into the atmosphere. EMIC waves are generated from unstable ion distributions as a result of ion temperature anisotropy, with the ion dynamics being modified self-consistently by the growth of the EMIC instability. EMIC waves are also thought to influence higher energy electrons in the Van Allen belts through a Doppler shifted cyclotron resonance, including changes in electron pitch-angle distributions and electron scattering loss into the atmosphere. We will present some of the latest results addressing EMIC wave distribution, solar wind and magnetospheric conditions favorable for their generation and their role in energetic particle loss in the inner magnetosphere. We will focus on results from recent satellite missions including THEMIS and Cluster, as well as some of the latest results from the Van Allen Probes. We will also highlight the value of data from networks of modern ground-based magnetometers in providing continuous monitoring over global scales, especially in conjunction with in-situ measurements from satellites. Such coordinated ground-satellite conjunction studies represent a powerful tool for understanding the self-consistent and cross-energy coupling in the inner magnetosphere between ring current ions and radiation belt electrons via the intermediary of EMIC waves.

  1. Radiation Belt Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-27

    is unlimited. 15 DISTRIBUTION LIST DTIC/OCP 8725 John J. Kingman Rd, Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117... AFRL -RV-PS- AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2016-0007 TR-2016-0007 RADIATION BELT DYNAMICS Jay M. Albert, et al. 27 December 2015 Final Report APPROVED FOR... KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, NM 87117-5776 DTIC COPY NOTICE AND SIGNATURE PAGE Using Government drawings, specifications, or other data included in this

  2. Orion GNC Mitigation Efforts for Van Allen Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ellis T.; Jackson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Crew Module (CM) is NASA's next generation manned space vehicle, scheduled to return humans to lunar orbit in the coming decade. The Orion avionics and GN&C architectures have progressed through a number of project phases and are nearing completion of a major milestone. The first unmanned test mission, dubbed "Exploration Flight Test One" (EFT-1) is scheduled to launch from NASA Kennedy Space Center late next year and provides the first integrated test of all the vehicle systems, avionics and software. The EFT-1 mission will be an unmanned test flight that includes a high speed re-entry from an elliptical orbit, which will be launched on an expendable launch vehicle (ELV). The ELV will place CM and the ELV upper stage into a low Earth orbit (LEO) for one revolution. After the first LEO, the ELV upper stage will re-ignite and place the combined upper stage/CM into an elliptical orbit whose perigee results in a high energy entry to test CM response in a relatively high velocity, high heating environment. While not producing entry velocities as high as those experienced in returning from a lunar orbit, the trajectory was chosen to provide higher stresses on the thermal protection and guided entry systems, as compared against a lower energy LEO entry. However the required entry geometry with constraints on inclination and landing site result in a trajectory that lingers for many hours in the Van Allen radiation belts. This exposes the vehicle and avionics to much higher levels of high energy proton radiation than a typical LEO or lunar trajectory would encounter. As a result, Van Allen radiation poses a significant risk to the Orion avionics system, and particularly the Flight Control Module (FCM) computers that house the GN&C flight software. The measures taken by the Orion GN&C, Flight Software and Avionics teams to mitigate the risks associated with the Van Allen radiation on EFT-1 are covered in the paper. Background on the Orion avionics subsystem is

  3. Visualization of Radiation Belts from REPT Data

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization, created using actual data from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescopes (REPT) on NASA’s Van Allen Probes, clearly shows the emergence of new third belt and second slot reg...

  4. Electron Flux of Radiation Belts Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows meridional (from north-south) plane projections of the REPT-A and REPT-B electron flux values. The animation first shows the expected two-belt Van Allen zone structure; from Se...

  5. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; ...

    2015-10-05

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day–night asymmetry in Earth’s magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28more » June 2013 geomagnetic storm. In conclusion, simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. Finally, the current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons.« less

  6. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's outer Van Allen belt.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Kanekal, S G; Hoxie, V C; Henderson, M G; Li, X; Spence, H E; Elkington, S R; Friedel, R H W; Goldstein, J; Hudson, M K; Reeves, G D; Thorne, R M; Kletzing, C A; Claudepierre, S G

    2013-04-12

    Since their discovery more than 50 years ago, Earth's Van Allen radiation belts have been considered to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is composed predominantly of megaelectron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days, depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. The spatially separated inner zone is composed of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations reveal an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (>2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for more than 4 weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.

  7. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen belt

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; ...

    2013-02-28

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts are thought to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is comprised predominantly of mega-electron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. Thus, the spatially separated inner zone is comprised of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations revealmore » an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (E > 2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for over four weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.« less

  8. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen belt

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.; Elkington, S. R.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Goldstein, J.; Hudson, M. K.; Reeves, G. D.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2013-02-28

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts are thought to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is comprised predominantly of mega-electron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. Thus, the spatially separated inner zone is comprised of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations reveal an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (E > 2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for over four weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.

  9. NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David G.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) mission, comprising two identically-instrumented spacecraft, is scheduled for launch in May 2012. In addition to identifying and quantifying the processes responsible for energizing, transporting, and removing energetic particles from the Earth's Van Allen radiation, the mission will determine the characteristics of the ring current and its effect upon the magnetosphere as a whole. The distances separating the two RBSP spacecraft will vary as they move along their 1000 km altitude x 5.8 RE geocentric orbits in order to enable the spacecraft to separate spatial from temporal effects, measure gradients that help identify particle sources, and determine the spatial extent of a wide array of phenomena. This talk explores the scientific objectives of the mission and the manner by which the mission has been tailored to achieve them.

  10. Investigation of solar wind driver effects on electron acceleration and loss in the outer Van Allen belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsavrias, Christos; Li, Wen; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Georgiou, Marina; Dimitrakoudis, Stavros

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the response of the outer Van Allen belt electrons to various types of solar wind and internal magnetospheric forcing - in particular to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), to High Speed Streams (HSS), to geospace magnetic storms of different intensities and to intense magnetospheric substorms. We have employed multi-point particle and field observations in the inner magnetosphere (both in-situ and through ground-based remote sensing), including the Cluster, THEMIS, Van Allen Probes and GOES constellations, the XMM and INTEGRAL spacecraft, and the CARISMA and IMAGE ground magnetometer arrays. The data provide a broad range of particle energies and a wide radial and azimuthal spatial coverage. Observations show that losses of equatorially mirroring electrons are primarily caused by magnetopause shadowing which in turn is achieved by outward diffusion driven by Pc5 ULF waves. Chorus wave activity, on the other hand, seems to be responsible for electron enhancements in the outer radiation belt even in the presence of pronounced outward diffusion.

  11. The role of EMIC waves in radiation belt dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanova, Maria; Drozdov, Alexander; Mann, Ian; Orlova, Ksenia; Shprits, Yuri; Ergun, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are believed to be important for influencing the dynamics of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt through a Doppler shifted cyclotron resonance, including changes in electron pitch-angle distributions and electron scattering loss into the atmosphere. Theory predicts that regions of enhanced cold dense plasma density embedded in relatively low background magnetic field (such as the outer plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plumes) should aid EMIC wave growth. Also, enhanced plasma density lowers the energy threshold for electrons that can resonantly interact with EMIC waves down to less than 1 MeV and can be potentially important for loss of radiation belt electrons. However, so far there has been limited direct experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis. Our recent observations on the Van Allen Probes in conjunction with numerical modeling of electron pitch-angle distributions showed that EMIC waves do interact with radiation belt electrons, however this interaction is limited to very energetic (~ several MeV) particles and does not affect the core distribution. Up to this point, the relative importance of EMIC waves in the dynamics of the radiation belts remains unresolved and their properties, especially in the inner magnetosphere need further experimental and theoretical examination. In this talk, we will focus on these Van Allen Probes results and will address outstanding questions related to EMIC wave role in relativistic electron loss in the outer radiation belt.

  12. Investigation of solar wind and magnetospheric forcing effects on the outer Van Allen belt through multi-point measurements in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I. A.; Katsavrias, C.; Georgiou, M.; Turner, D. L.; Sandberg, I.; Balasis, G.; Papadimitriou, K.

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the response of the outer Van Allen belt electrons to various types of solar wind and internal magnetospheric forcing - in particular to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), to geospace magnetic storms of different intensities and to intense magnetospheric substorms. We have employed multi-point particle and field observations in the inner magnetosphere (both in-situ and through ground-based remote sensing), including the Cluster, THEMIS, Van Allen Probes and GOES constellations, the XMM and INTEGRAL spacecraft, and the CARISMA and IMAGE ground magnetometer arrays. The data provide a broad range of particle energies and a wide radial and azimuthal spatial coverage. This work has received support from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-2011-1) under grant agreement no. 284520 for the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analysing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project.

  13. Dynamics of Radiation Belt Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sitnov, M. I.

    2013-11-01

    This paper reviews basic concepts of particle dynamics underlying theoretical aspect of radiation belt modeling and data analysis. We outline the theory of adiabatic invariants of quasiperiodic Hamiltonian systems and derive the invariants of particle motion trapped in the radiation belts. We discuss how the nonlinearity of resonant interaction of particles with small-amplitude plasma waves, ubiquitous across the inner magnetosphere, can make particle motion stochastic. Long-term evolution of a stochastic system can be described by the Fokker-Plank (diffusion) equation. We derive the kinetic equation of particle diffusion in the invariant space and discuss its limitations and associated challenges which need to be addressed in forthcoming radiation belt models and data analysis.

  14. Rapid flattening of butterfly pitch angle distributions of radiation belt electrons by whistler-mode chorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Funsten, H. O.

    2016-08-01

    Van Allen radiation belt electrons exhibit complex dynamics during geomagnetically active periods. Investigation of electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) can provide important information on the dominant physical mechanisms controlling radiation belt behaviors. Here we report a storm time radiation belt event where energetic electron PADs changed from butterfly distributions to normal or flattop distributions within several hours. Van Allen Probes observations showed that the flattening of butterfly PADs was closely related to the occurrence of whistler-mode chorus waves. Two-dimensional quasi-linear STEERB simulations demonstrate that the observed chorus can resonantly accelerate the near-equatorially trapped electrons and rapidly flatten the corresponding electron butterfly PADs. These results provide a new insight on how chorus waves affect the dynamic evolution of radiation belt electrons.

  15. The Foundations of Radiation Belt Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, G. H.

    2008-12-01

    phenomenon. It also provided the first hint that there were two distinct radiation belts, although that conclusion was not reached until later. Although that new information was quickly announced, the results of the high altitude nuclear detonations were kept secret until well into 1959. They clearly revealed the charged particle shells created by the Argos nuclear detonations. The next major step in mapping and understanding the high-intensity radiation involved the launch of deep space probes Pioneers III and IV in December 1958 and March 1959. Although both launches fell short in their primary objective, to reach the moon, they traveled far enough from the Earth to fully meet the needs of the scientific experiment. They very clearly showed the two-radiation belt structure, and mapped its extent. They also showed the probable effect of a magnetic storm on 25 February, thus indicating the direct influence of solar activity on the outer belt. By the end of 1959, the existence of the Van Allen Radiation Belts and their general structure were solidly established, early information about the composition of the radiation was appearing in print, and energetic work was under way to understand the physics of the processes involved.

  16. "Nonempty" Gap Between Radiation Belts: The First Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, Mikhail

    2013-12-01

    The first space experiments carried out in 1958 by the scientific groups of James Van Allen (United States) on board the first Explorer satellites and Sergey Vernov (Soviet Union) on board the satellite Sputnik 3 led to the discovery of the Earth's radiation belts—the particles (mainly protons and electrons) captured by the magnetic field of the Earth. Two scientific groups independently came to the conclusion that the electrons in the geomagnetic trapping region fill two areas, inner and outer radiation belts, unlike the protons, which fill the whole trapping region [see, e.g., Lemaire, 2000].

  17. Ring current and radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Studies performed during 1983-1986 on the ring current, the injection boundary model, and the radiation belts are discussed. The results of these studies yielded the first observations on the composition and charge state of the ring current throughout the ring-current energy range, and strong observational support for an injection-boundary model accounting for the origins of radiation-belt particles, the ring current, and substorm particles observed at R less than about 7 earth radii. In addition, the results have demonstrated that the detection of energetic neutral atoms generated by charge-exchange interactions between the ring current and the hydrogen geocorona can provide global images of the earth's ring current and its spatial and temporal evolution.

  18. Observations and Simulations of Whistler Waves in Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, R. L.; Bengtson, M.; Rosborough, S.; Streltsov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    In late 2014, a cluster of whistler waves localized within prominent density enhancements was observed by the Van Allen Probes in the nightside magnetosphere. The most powerful waves lasted approximately thirteen minutes, occurred thirty minutes apart, and were accompanied by increased particle acceleration throughout the region. In order to properly simulate the waves we first establish their characteristics using data from the Van Allen Probes, primarily from the EMFISIS instrument. Next, we incorporate the conditions and location in which the waves occurred into a mathematical model, that in turn is used to provide an accurate simulation. Such simulations will allow a closer and more analytical study of how whistler waves become trapped in density ducts. This research will also advance our understanding of how we can use these waves to remove energetic particles from Earth's radiation belts.

  19. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Q. -G.; Zhou, X. -Z.; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Hao, Y. -X.; Gao, Zhonglei; He, Zhaoguo; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Blake, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-12-22

    The Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. So, our results demonstrate that the ULF waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fluxes by up to one order of magnitude near the slot region within about 10 h, providing strong evidence for the radial diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.

  20. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons

    DOE PAGES

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; ...

    2015-12-22

    The Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. So, our results demonstrate that the ULFmore » waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fluxes by up to one order of magnitude near the slot region within about 10 h, providing strong evidence for the radial diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.« less

  1. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Hao, Y.-X.; Gao, Zhonglei; He, Zhaoguo; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Blake, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. Our results demonstrate that the ULF waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fluxes by up to one order of magnitude near the slot region within about 10 h, providing strong evidence for the radial diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons. PMID:26690250

  2. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Q-G; Zhou, X-Z; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Hao, Y-X; Gao, Zhonglei; He, Zhaoguo; Baker, D N; Spence, H E; Reeves, G D; Blake, J B; Wygant, J R

    2015-12-22

    Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. Our results demonstrate that the ULF waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fluxes by up to one order of magnitude near the slot region within about 10 h, providing strong evidence for the radial diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.

  3. Liquid belt radiator design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teagan, W. P.; Fitzgerald, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    The Liquid Belt Radiator (LBR) is an advanced concept developed to meet the needs of anticipated future space missions. A previous study documented the advantages of this concept as a lightweight, easily deployable alternative to present day space heat rejection systems. The technical efforts associated with this study concentrate on refining the concept of the LBR as well as examining the issues of belt dynamics and potential application of the LBR to intermediate and high temperature heat rejection applications. A low temperature point design developed in previous work is updated assuming the use of diffusion pump oil, Santovac-6, as the heat transfer media. Additional analytical and design effort is directed toward determining the impact of interface heat exchanger, fluid bath sealing, and belt drive mechanism designs on system performance and mass. The updated design supports the earlier result by indicating a significant reduction in system specific system mass as compared to heat pipe or pumped fluid radiator concepts currently under consideration (1.3 kg/sq m versus 5 kg/sq m).

  4. Nonlinear Whistler Wave Physics in the Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, Chris

    2016-10-01

    Wave particle interactions between electrons and whistler waves are a dominant mechanism for controlling the dynamics of energetic electrons in the radiation belts. They are responsible for loss, via pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the loss cone, and energization to millions of electron volts. It has previously been theorized that large amplitude waves on the whistler branch may scatter their wave-vector nonlinearly via nonlinear Landau damping leading to important consequences for the global distribution of whistler wave energy density and hence the energetic electrons. It can dramatically reduce the lifetime of energetic electrons in the radiation belts by increasing the pitch angle scattering rate. The fundamental building block of this theory has now been confirmed through laboratory experiments. Here we report on in situ observations of wave electro-magnetic fields from the EMFISIS instrument on board NASA's Van Allen Probes that show the signatures of nonlinear scattering of whistler waves in the inner radiation belts. In the outer radiation belts, whistler mode chorus is believed to be responsible for the energization of electrons from 10s of Kev to MeV energies. Chorus is characterized by bursty large amplitude whistler mode waves with frequencies that change as a function of time on timescales corresponding to their growth. Theories explaining the chirping have been developed for decades based on electron trapping dynamics in a coherent wave. New high time resolution wave data from the Van Allen probes and advanced spectral techniques are revealing that the wave dynamics is highly structured, with sub-elements consisting of multiple chirping waves with discrete frequency hops between sub-elements. Laboratory experiments with energetic electron beams are currently reproducing the complex frequency vs time dynamics of whistler waves and in addition revealing signatures of wave-wave and beat-wave nonlinear wave-particle interactions. These new data

  5. Unraveling the drivers of the storm time radiation belt response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpua, E. K. J.; Hietala, H.; Turner, D. L.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Reeves, G. D.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-05-01

    We present a new framework to study the time evolution and dynamics of the outer Van Allen belt electron fluxes. The framework is entirely based on the large-scale solar wind storm drivers and their substructures. The Van Allen Probe observations, revealing the electron flux behavior throughout the outer belt, are combined with continuous, long-term (over 1.5 solar cycles) geosynchronous orbit data set from GOES and solar wind measurements A superposed epoch analysis, where we normalize the timescales for each substructure (sheath, ejecta, and interface region) allows us to avoid smearing effects and to distinguish the electron flux evolution during various driver structures. We show that the radiation belt response is not random: The electron flux variations are determined by the combined effect of the structured solar wind driver and prestorm electron flux levels. In particular, we find that loss mechanisms dominate during stream interface regions, coronal mass ejection (CME) ejecta, and sheaths while enhancements occur during fast streams trailing the stream interface or the CME.

  6. Effect of the orbital debris environment on the high-energy van allen proton belt.

    PubMed

    Konradi, A

    1988-12-02

    Orbital debris in the near-Earth environment has reached a number density sufficient for a significant collisional interaction with some of the long-lived high-energy protons in the radiation belt. As a result of a continuing buildup of a shell of man-made debris, the lifetimes of high-energy protons whose trajectories remain below 1500 kilometers will decrease to the point where in the next decades we can expect a noticeable reduction in their fluxes.

  7. The seasonal dependence of relativistic electron fluxes in the Earth's outer van Allen Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; McPherron, R.

    2007-12-01

    It is well known that geomagnetic activity shows a marked seasonal dependence. This effect has been attributed to the seasonal variation of the Earth's dipole tilt angle exposing the magnetosphere to an increased southward component of the interplanetary field (the Russell-McPherron effect) or an increased solar wind velocity (the axial/equinoctial effect). We examine the seasonal dependence of relativistic electron fluxes in the Earth's outer Van Allen belt. An earlier investigation by Baker et. al., (1999) found that the relativistic electron fluxes do show a strong seasonal dependence with the equinoctial electron fluxes being almost three times higher than the solstitial fluxes. We extend this previous investigation using data obtained by sensors onboard SAMPEX. This study of the seasonal dependence is based on data with a higher time resolution as compared to the earlier study. The results of our analysis show that the peak electron fluxes are shifted in time from the nominal equinoctial times. We discuss some possible implications of our observations in the context of electron energization in the Earth's magnetosphere. Baker, D.N., S.G. Kanekal, T.I. Pulkkinen, and J.B. Blake, Equinoctial and solstitial averages of magnetospheric relativistic electrons: A strong semiannual modulation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 26, No. 20, 3193-3196, 1999.

  8. Jupiter's radiation belts and atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pater, I.; Dames, H. A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Maps and stripscans of the radio emission from Jupiter were made during the Pioneer 10 flyby in December 1973 at wavelengths of 6 cm, 21 cm, and 50 cm using the Westerbork telescope in the Netherlands. With this instrument the disk of the planet was resolved at 6 and 21 cm. The pictures are averaged over 15 deg of Jovian longitude. At 21 cm the stripscans clearly show the existence of a 'hot region' in the radiation belts at a System III longitude (1965.0) of 255 + or - 10 deg. Its flux is about 9% of the total nonthermal flux, and it has a volume emissivity enhanced by a factor of about 1.6 with respect to the general radiation belts. The temperature of the thermal disk at 21 cm appears to be 290 + or - 20 K. This is likely due to a high ammonia mixing ratio in the atmosphere, a factor of 4-5 larger than the expected solar value of 0.00015.

  9. Upcoming observations of whistler-mode waves in the outer Van Allen belt: multicomponent wave analyzer ELMAVAN for the Resonance mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santolik, Ondrej; Korepanov, Valery; Chugunin, Dmitriy; Kolmasova, Ivana; Uhlir, Ludek; Pronenko, Vira; Mogilevsky, Mikhail; Lan, Radek; Boychev, Boycho

    The instrument ELMAVAN is being prepared at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Prague in the frame of the Russian Resonance project with international participation. The aim of this four-spacecraft mission is to investigate properties of wave-particle interactions and plasma dynamics in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth with the focus on phenomena occurring within the same flux tube of the Earth's magnetic field. The wave emissions attract increasing attention because of their influence on the dynamics of the Earth’s radiation belts. The Resonance project therefore represents an excellent opportunity for the magnetospheric research, and together with the recently launched two-spacecraft US mission Van Allen Probes, it will contribute to our understanding of the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts and the inner magnetosphere. ELMAVAN will measure intensity, polarization, coherence, and propagation properties of waves in magnetospheric plasmas. Three orthogonal magnetic search coil antennas and four electric monopoles will be used for the measurements. The instrument will measure fluctuations of the electric and magnetic field in the frequency range 10 Hz - 20 kHz. The scientific motivation is to investigate properties of whistler-mode chorus and hiss, and both equatorial and auroral emissions. Nonlinear wave-particle interactions will be the main target of these measurements. The input signals of ELMAVAN will consist of 3 analog signals from orthogonal magnetic search coil antennas and 4 analog signals from electric monopoles. The instrument ELMAVAN uses the state of the art electronics and mechanical design taking into account specific requirements for the orbit inside the radiation belts. From this point of view this instrument will also be important as a technological experiment. Engineering model of the analyzer was developed and tested in 2012-2013. Qualification model and the flight models are under preparation.

  10. Investigation of Moving Belt Radiator Technology Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teagan, W. Peter; Aguilar, Jerry L.

    1994-01-01

    The development of an advanced spacecraft radiator technology is reported. The moving belt radiator is a thermal radiator concept with the promise of lower specific mass (per kW rejected) than that afforded by existing technologies. The results of a parametric study to estimate radiator mass for future space power systems is presented. It is shown that this technology can be scaled up to 200 MW for higher rejection temperatures. Several aspects of the design concept are discussed, including the dynamics of a large rotating belt in microgravity. The results of a computer code developed to model the belt dynamics are presented. A series of one-g experiments to investigate the dynamics of small belts is described. A comprehensive test program to investigate belt dynamics in microgravity aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft is discussed. It was found that the desired circular shape can readily be achieved in microgravity. It is also shown that a rotating belt is stable when subjected to simulated attitude control maneuvers. Heat exchanger design is also investigated. Several sealing concepts were examined experimentally, and are discussed. Overall heat transfer coefficients to the rotating belt are presented. Material properties for various belt materials, including screen meshes, are also presented. The results presented in this report indicate that the moving belt radiator concept is technically feasible.

  11. Decay rate of the second radiation belt.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Robbins, D E

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  12. Decay rate of the second radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  13. Extreme enhancements and depletions of relativistic electrons in Earth's radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. L.; Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Morley, S.; Geoffrey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's electron radiation belts consist of toroidal zones in near-Earth space characterized by intense levels of relativistic electrons with distinct energy-dependent boundaries. It has been known for decades that the outer electron radiation belt is highly variable, with electron intensities varying by orders of magnitude on timescales ranging from minutes to years. Now, we are gaining much insight into the nature of this extreme variability thanks to the unprecedented number of observatories capable of measuring radiation belt electrons, the most recent of which is NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. In this presentation, we analyze and review several of the most extreme events observed in Earth's outer radiation belt. We begin with very sudden and strong enhancements of the outer radiation belt that can result in several orders of magnitude enhancements of electron intensities up to several MeV that sometimes occur in less than one day. We compare and contrast two of the most extreme cases of sudden and strong enhancements from the Van Allen Probes era, 08-09 October 2012 and 17-18 March 2015, and review evidence of the dominant acceleration mechanism in each event. Sudden enhancements of the radiation belts can also occur from injections by interplanetary shocks impacting the magnetosphere, such as occurred on 24 March 1991. We compare shock characteristics from previous injection events to those from the Van Allen Probes era to investigate why none of the interplanetary shocks since September 2012 have caused MeV electron injections into the slot region and inner radiation belt, which has surprisingly been devoid of measurable quantities of >~1 MeV electrons throughout the Van Allen Probes era. Our last topic concerns loss processes. We discuss drastic loss events, known as "flux dropouts", and present evidence that these loss events can eliminate the vast majority of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt on time scales of only a few hours. We

  14. Jupiter's radiation belts: Can Pioneer 10 survive?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, W. N.; Birmingham, T. J.; Mead, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  15. Jupiter's Radiation Belts: Can Pioneer 10 Survive?

    PubMed

    Hess, W N; Birmingham, T J; Mead, G D

    1973-12-07

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  16. Jupiter's magnetosphere and radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1979-01-01

    Radioastronomy and Pioneer data reveal the Jovian magnetosphere as a rotating magnetized source of relativistic particles and radio emission, comparable to astrophysical cosmic ray and radio sources, such as pulsars. According to Pioneer data, the magnetic field in the outer magnetosphere is radially extended into a highly time variable disk-shaped configuration which differs fundamentally from the earth's magnetosphere. The outer disk region, and the energetic particles confined in it, are modulated by Jupiter's 10 hr rotation period. The entire outer magnetosphere appears to change drastically on time scales of a few days to a week. In addition to its known modulation of the Jovian decametric radio bursts, Io was found to absorb some radiation belt particles and to accelerate others, and most importantly, to be a source of neutral atoms, and by inference, a heavy ion plasma which may significantly affect the hydrodynamic flow in the magnetosphere. Another important Pioneer finding is that the Jovian outer magnetosphere generates, or permits to escape, fluxes of relativistic electrons of such intensities that Jupiter may be regarded as the dominant source of 1 to 30 MeV cosmic ray electrons in the heliosphere.

  17. Radiation Belt and Plasma Model Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Radiation belt and plasma model environment. Environment hazards for systems and humans. Need for new models. How models are used. Model requirements. How can space weather community help?

  18. Inner Radiation Belt Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, Timothy; Selesnick, Richard; Mazur, Joseph

    We present preliminary results of inner belt proton data assimilation using an augmented ver-sion of the Selesnick et al., [2007] model. The physics-based model computes inner belt proton intensities as a function of time and of the three adiabatic invariants M, K, and L according to a comprehensive list of inner belt source and loss processes. We modify the model solution based on in-situ proton observations and according to a data-assimilation method which exploits the non-Gaussian nature of inner belt proton intensities and Poisson or Gaussian counting statistics of the observations, as appropriate. We demonstrate the method by presenting data-assimilated inner belt proton intensities during a solar particle injection.

  19. Inner Radiation Belt Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, T. P.

    2011-12-01

    We present preliminary results of inner belt proton data assimilation using an augmented version of the Selesnick Inner Zone Model (SIZM). The physics-based model computes inner belt proton intensities as a function of time and of the three adiabatic invariants M, K, and L according to a comprehensive list of inner belt source and loss processes. We modify the model solution based on in-situ proton observations from SAMPEX/PET and HEO orbit and according to a data-assimilation method which exploits the non-Gaussian nature of inner belt proton intensities and Poisson or Gaussian counting statistics of the observations, as appropriate. We demonstrate the method by presenting data-assimilated inner belt proton intensities during a solar particle injection.

  20. Inner Radiation Belt Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, T. P.; Mazur, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    We present preliminary results of inner belt proton data assimilation using an augmented version of the Selesnick et al., [2007] model. The physics-based model computes inner belt proton intensities as a function of time and of the three adiabatic invariants M, K, and L according to a comprehensive list of inner belt source and loss processes. We modify the model solution based on in-situ proton observations and according to a data-assimilation method which exploits the non-Gaussian nature of inner belt proton intensities and Poisson or Gaussian counting statistics of the observations, as appropriate. We demonstrate the method by presenting data-assimilated inner belt proton intensities during a solar particle injection.

  1. Ionospheric heating for radiation belt control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, William J.; Villalon, Elena

    1990-10-01

    Pitch-angle scattering interactions of electromagnetic waves in the ELF/VLF bands with trapped electrons describe the dynamics of the freshly filled radiation belts flux tubes. The natural existence of a 'slot' region with electron fluxes below the Kennel-Petschek limit requires non-local wave sources. A set of planned, active experiments is described in which VLF radiation is injected from ground and space band transmitters in conjunction with the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite in the radiation belts. These experiments can measure the intensity if waves driving pitch-angle diffusion and the electron energies in gyroresonance with the waves.

  2. Nonlinear evolution of oblique whistler waves in radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, R. P.; Nandal, P.; Yadav, N.; Sharma, Swati

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic power spectrum and formation of coherent structures have been investigated in the present work applicable to Van Allen radiation belt. The nonlinear interaction of high frequency oblique whistler wave and low frequency magnetosonic wave has been investigated. Simulation was performed of the coupled equation of these two waves. The nonlinear interaction of these waves leads to the formation of the localized structures. These resulting localized structures are of complex nature. The associated magnetic power spectrum has also been studied. Dispersive nonlinear processes account for the high frequency part of the spectrum. The resulting magnetic power spectrum shows a scaling of k^{ - 4.5}. The energy transfer process from injection scales to smaller scales is explained by the results.

  3. Chapman Conference on the Earth's radiation belts and inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; Summers, Danny; Mann, Ian R.

    2011-10-01

    Late in the evening on 31 January 1958, a Juno (Jupiter-C) rocket blasted into space, lofting the first U.S. artificial Earth satellite into orbit. This spacecraft, dubbed Explorer 1, joined in space one other satellite, Sputnik 2, which had been launched on 3 November 1957 by the Soviet Union. The Explorer 1 mission was groundbreaking, for it carried a small scientific payload prepared at the University of Iowa by a team of researchers led by James A. Van Allen. The instrumentation on Explorer 1 (and on the subsequently successful Explorer 3) would make the first truly revolutionary discovery of the space age, namely, that Earth is enshrouded in toroids, or belts, of extraordinarily high energy, high-intensity radiation.

  4. Radiation belt dynamics during solar minimum

    SciTech Connect

    Gussenhoven, M.S.; Mullen, E.G. ); Holeman, E. )

    1989-12-01

    Two types of temporal variation in the radiation belts are studied using low altitude data taken onboard the DMSP F7 satellite: those associated with the solar cycle and those associated with large magnetic storm effects. Over a three-year period from 1984 to 1987 and encompassing solar minimum, the protons in the heart of the inner belt increased at a rate of approximately 6% per year. Over the same period, outer zone electron enhancements declined both in number and peak intensity. During the large magnetic storm of February 1986, following the period of peak ring current intensity, a second proton belt with energies up to 50 MeV was found at magnetic latitudes between 45{degrees} and 55{degrees}. The belt lasted for more than 100 days. The slot region between the inner and outer electron belts collapsed by the merging of the two populations and did not reform for 40 days.

  5. Nonstorm time dropout of radiation belt electron fluxes on 24 September 2013

    DOE PAGES

    Su, Zhenpeng; Gao, Zhonglei; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; ...

    2016-07-01

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts during the main phase of geomagnetic storms have received increasing attention in recent years. Here we focus on a rarely reported nonstorm time dropout event observed by Van Allen Probes on 24 September 2013. Within several hours, the radiation belt electron fluxes exhibited a significant (up to 2 orders of magnitude) depletion over a wide range of radial distances (L > 4.5), energies (~500 keV to several MeV) and equatorial pitch angles (0° ≤ αe ≤ 180°). STEERB simulations show that the relativistic electron loss in the region L = 4.5–6.0 was primarily caused bymore » the pitch angle scattering of observed plasmaspheric hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. Furthermore, our results emphasize the complexity of radiation belt dynamics and the importance of wave-driven precipitation loss even during nonstorm times.« less

  6. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Green, J. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outer radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.

  7. Nonstorm time dropout of radiation belt electron fluxes on 24 September 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Zhenpeng; Gao, Zhonglei; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Zhu, Hui; Li, Wen; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-07-01

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts during the main phase of geomagnetic storms have received increasing attention in recent years. Here we focus on a rarely reported nonstorm time dropout event observed by Van Allen Probes on 24 September 2013. Within several hours, the radiation belt electron fluxes exhibited a significant (up to 2 orders of magnitude) depletion over a wide range of radial distances (L > 4.5), energies (~500 keV to several MeV) and equatorial pitch angles (0° ≤ αe ≤ 180°). STEERB simulations show that the relativistic electron loss in the region L = 4.5–6.0 was primarily caused by the pitch angle scattering of observed plasmaspheric hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. Furthermore, our results emphasize the complexity of radiation belt dynamics and the importance of wave-driven precipitation loss even during nonstorm times.

  8. Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Education and Public Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turney, D.; Matiella Novak, A.; Beisser, K.; Fox, N.

    2013-11-01

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program serves as a pipeline of activities to inspire and educate a broad audience about Heliophysics and the Sun-Earth system, specifically the Van Allen Radiation Belts. The program is comprised of a variety of formal, informal and public outreach activities that all align with the NASA Education Portfolio Strategic Framework outcomes. These include lesson plans and curriculum for use in the classroom, teacher workshops, internship opportunities, activities that target underserved populations, collaboration with science centers and NASA visitors' centers and partnerships with experts in the Heliophysics and education disciplines. This paper will detail the activities that make up the RBSP E/PO program, their intended audiences, and an explanation as to how they align with the NASA education outcomes. Additionally, discussions on why these activities are necessary as part of a NASA mission are included. Finally, examples of how the RBSP E/PO team has carried out some of these activities will be discussed throughout.

  9. Radiation Belts Throughout the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B. H.

    2008-12-01

    The several preceding decades of deep space missions have demonstrated that the generation of planetary radiation belts is a universal phenomenon. All strongly magnetized planets show well developed radiation regions, specifically Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The similarities occur despite the tremendous differences between the planets in size, levels of magnetization, external environments, and most importantly, in the fundamental processes that power them. Some planets like Jupiter are powered overwhelmingly by planetary rotation, much like astrophysical pulsars, whereas others, like Earth and probably Uranus, are powered externally by the interplanetary environment. Uranus is a particularly interesting case in that despite the peculiarities engendered by its ecliptic equatorial spin axis orientation, its magnetosphere shows dynamical behavior similar to that of Earth as well as radiation belt populations and associated wave emissions that are perhaps more intense than expected based on Earth-derived theories. Here I review the similarities and differences between the radiation regions of radiation belts throughout the solar system. I discuss the value of the comparative approach to radiation belt physics as one that allows critical factors to be evaluated in environments that are divorced from the special complex conditions that prevail in any one environment, such as those at Earth.

  10. The Impenetrable Barrier Revisited - Anthroprogenic Effects on Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. C.; Baker, D. N.; Erickson, P. J.; Albert, J.; Fennell, J. F.; Mishin, E. V.; Starks, M. J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes are contributing significantly to the understanding of processes effecting Earth's radiation belts. It has been noted that the earthward extent of the outer zone highly-relativistic electrons encounters a nearly impenetrable barrier at a radial distance (L) near 2.8 RE inside of which they are not observed. Modeling suggests that this is the result of a balance between slow inward diffusion and hiss-induced precipitation. The large storm of 17 March 2015 afforded an excellent opportunity to investigate the impenetrable barrier using the full complement of sensors carried by the Van Allen Probes. The storm was marked by the rapid reappearance of strong fluxes of MeV electrons directly outside the barrier with the formation of very steep MeV flux gradients. In spite of the strong rapid recovery of MeV electron fluxes immediately outside the barrier, the sharpness and constancy of the gradient at the barrier is strongly suggestive of a previously unrecognized fast-acting and spatially localized mechanism responsible for the formation of such a well-defined feature during these dramatic circumstances. The Van Allen Probes regularly observe a magnetically confined bubble of VLF emissions of terrestrial origin filling the inner magnetosphere. Strongest signals are from US Navy VLF transmitters used for one-way communication to submarines. These signals largely are confined to the region of L space where their frequency is < ½ fce. The strong signal from station NAA at 24 kHz is confined to L < 2.8 where it encounters the ½ fce limit. During the event, the flux of MeV electrons decreased by 1000x across 0.5 RE outside L = 2.8 simultaneous with a 6 order of magnitude increase in the VLF wave intensity as the Probes entered the VLF bubble. The VLF transmitter frequencies are amplified at the point where they overlap natural chorus band near ½ fce suggestive of transmitter-induced triggered emissions. MeV radiation belt electrons encounter this

  11. Peculiar pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons in the inner radiation belt and slot region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Malaspina, D. M.; Kanekal, S. G.

    2014-04-01

    The relativistic electrons in the inner radiation belt have received little attention in the past due to sparse measurements and unforgiving contamination from the inner belt protons. The high-quality measurements of the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer instrument onboard Van Allen Probes provide a great opportunity to investigate the dynamics of relativistic electrons in the low L region. In this letter, we report the newly unveiled pitch angle distribution (PAD) of the energetic electrons with minima at 90° near the magnetic equator in the inner belt and slot region. Such a PAD is persistently present throughout the inner belt and appears in the slot region during storms. One hypothesis for 90° minimum PADs is that off 90° electrons are preferentially heated by chorus waves just outside the plasmapause (which can be at very low L during storms) and/or fast magnetosonic waves which exist both inside and outside the plasmasphere.

  12. Explaining the "Impenetrable Barrier" to Ultra-relativistic Electrons in the Van Allen Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, I. R.; Ozeke, L.; Murphy, K. R.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Rae, J.; Milling, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    In recent observations, Baker et al. (Nature, 2014) reported the observation of an "impenetrable barrier" to the inner edge of the ultra-relativistic electron radiation belt. These authors demonstrated that this barrier location was not co-incident with the location of the plasmapause nor any other identifiable magnetospheric boundary; nor could it be explained by spatial structure resulting from the impacts of ground-based VLF transmitters. Here we show how the location of the "impenetrable barrier" can be explained as the location where there is a balance between inwards ULF wave radial diffusion and loss from lower band chorus and/or plasmaspheric hiss. Using recently derived data-driven ULF wave radial diffusion rates based on observations of ground-based ULF wave power characterised upto Kp=9 we can estimate the inward transport rates across a wide range of extreme activity levels. Contrary to the suggestion by Baker et al., there does not appear to be any need for active local wave particle acceleration between the plasmapause and the edge of the barrier at L*~2.8 since the radial diffusion rates appear to be sufficient to transport particles there during the most active times. The "impenetrable barrier" is explained as being defining as the locus where the rate of drift averaged loss matches the rate of inwards ULF wave radial diffusion. During more active times the location where loss is dominant moves inwards but reaches a limit of closest approach at L*~2.8 during the most active geomagnetic conditions (except during very short exceptional periods where interplanetary shocks and other shorter timescale processes can cause temporary filling of the slot). Overall, the "impenetrable barrier" is explained as a simple and natural consequence of the activity-dependent rates of ULF wave transport balanced by slow wave-particle scattering losses to the atmosphere closer to the Earth.

  13. Wave Distribution Functions of Plasmaspheric Hiss and their Effects on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santolik, O.; Ripoll, J. F.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is formed by whistler-mode waves which play an important role in the dynamics the Earth's radiation belts, specifically in connection with the slot region between the inner and outer Van Allen belts. The origin of plasmaspheric hiss is still a subject of discussions and these waves are known for their complex propagation properties. They are often far from a single plane wave approximation, forming a continuous distribution of the wave energy density with respect to the wave vector direction (wave distribution function). Analysis of polarization and propagation parameters of these waves provides us with inputs for modeling of radiation belt dynamics. We use the data of the Waves instrument of Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) onboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft, to analyze simultaneous measurements of all electric and magnetic field components, together with measurements of the plasma density based on the determination of the upper hybrid resonance frequency. Using this unique data set we estimate the wave distribution functions of plasmaspheric hiss and we model the effects of these waves on the decay rates of radiation belt electrons through quasilinear pitch angle diffusion.

  14. A Maximum Likelihood Ensemble Data Assimilation Method Tailored to the Inner Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Mazur, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth's radiation belts are composed of energetic protons and electrons whose fluxes span many orders of magnitude, whose distributions are log-normal, and where data-model differences can be large and also log-normal. This physical system thus challenges standard data assimilation methods relying on underlying assumptions of Gaussian distributions of measurements and data-model differences, where innovations to the model are small. We have therefore developed a data assimilation method tailored to these properties of the inner radiation belt, analogous to the ensemble Kalman filter but for the unique cases of non-Gaussian model and measurement errors, and non-linear model and measurement distributions. We apply this method to the inner radiation belt proton populations, using the SIZM inner belt model [Selesnick et al., 2007] and SAMPEX/PET and HEO proton observations to select the most likely ensemble members contributing to the state of the inner belt. We will describe the algorithm, the method of generating ensemble members, our choice of minimizing the difference between instrument counts not phase space densities, and demonstrate the method with our reanalysis of the inner radiation belt throughout solar cycle 23. We will report on progress to continue our assimilation into solar cycle 24 using the Van Allen Probes/RPS observations.

  15. "Inner electron" radiation belt: problems of model creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnyi, V.

    The contents of intensive fluxes of trapped electrons J_e with energies E_e>40 keV in center of the inner terrestrial radiation belt is remains uncertain in model Vette AE-8, 1991. It is explained by methodical difficulties of discrete measurements of electrons by narrow-angle spectrometers with background from omnidirectional penetrating protons with energies E_p>40 MeV and electrons with E_e>1 MeV after STARFISH burst. The results of integral measurements of trapped electrons by 2 groups: Krassovsky V.I. on III Soviet satellite (May 1958) and J. Van Allen on EXPLORER-IV (July-August 1958) and on INJUN-1 (1961) heave given a performances concerning electron energy fluxes I_e(E_e>20 keV) ˜ (20-100) erg cm-2 c-1 into inner radiation belt. Improved integral measurements of electrons by Krassovsky group on satellites KOSMOS-3,-5 and ELECTRON-1,-3 (1962-1964) allow to determine the distributions of their intensities in the whole inner belt. They can add the central part of inner belt of AE-8 model (see report Bolunova et al., COSPAR-1965, publ. in SPACE RESEARCH VI, 1967, p. 649-661). From these data a maximum of trapped electrons J_e(E_e>40 keV)=2\\cdot10^9 cm-2 c-1 is placed on L=1,6, B/B_0=1. Intensities up to 2\\cdot10^7 cm-2 c-1 are determined only by coordinates (L, B). For smaller intensities become essential dependence from longitude along a drift shell. So, in the center of the inner radiation belt the energy fluxes I_e(E_e>40 keV) reach 500 erg cm-2 c-1 and density n_e=0,2 cm-3 while for trapped protons I_p(E_p>40 MeV) is less than 3 erg cm-2 c-1 and n_p< 5\\cdot10-6 cm-3. It forces to search a more powerful sources trapped electron than beta-decay of neutrons albedo of cosmic rays.

  16. Study the Precipitation of Radiation Belt Electrons during the Rapid Dropout Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Li, X.; Chen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    During the main phase of storms, the relativistic electron flux in the radiation belt can drop by orders of magnitude on timescales of a few hours. Where do the electrons go? This is one of the most important outstanding questions in radiation belt studies. Radiation belt electrons can be lost either by transport across the magnetopause into interplanetary space or by precipitation into the atmosphere. In this work we first conduct a survey of the MeV electron dropouts using the Van Allen Probes data in conjunction with the low-altitude measurements of precipitating electrons by 6 NOAA/POES satellites. The dropout events are categorized into three types: precipitation-loss dominant, outward radial diffusion dominant, or with contributions from both mechanisms. The survey results suggest the relative importance of precipitation and outward radial diffusion to the fast dropouts of radiation belt electrons, and their extent in L-shell and electron energy. Then, for specific events identified as dominated by precipitation loss, we use the Drift-Diffusion model, which includes the effects of azimuthal drift and pitch angle diffusion, to simulate both the electron dropout observed by Van Allen Probes and the distributions of drift-loss-cone electrons observed by multiple low-earth-orbit satellites (6 POES and the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment). The model quantifies the electron precipitation loss and pitch angle diffusion coefficient, Dxx, with high temporal and spatial resolution. Finally, by comparing the Dxx derived from the model with those estimated from the quasi-linear theory using wave data from Van Allen Probes and other event-specific wave models, we are able to test the validity of quasi-linear theory and seek direct evidence of the wave-particle interactions during the dropouts.

  17. Inner Radiation Belt Data / Model Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, Timothy; O'Brien, Paul; Selesnick, Richard

    We present detailed comparisons of a time-dependent inner radiation belt model with proton observations made by a variety of in-situ spacecraft during solar cycle 23. The recently-developed model (Selesnick et al., 2007) computes proton intensities as a function of time and of the three adiabatic invariants in the inner belt, which we convert to the observable count rate at the location of the satellite by using a nominal instrument response function. These comparisons and initial data-assimilation efforts suggest that the model performance can be improved especially during intervals containing unmodeled processes such as trapped proton losses during geomagnetic storms.

  18. Inner Radiation Belt Data / Model Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, T. P.; Selesnick, R.; Looper, M.

    2008-12-01

    We present detailed comparisons of a time-dependent inner radiation belt model with in-situ proton observations made by a variety of spacecraft during solar cycle 23. The recently-developed model (Selesnick et al., 2007) computes proton intensities as a function of time and of the three adiabatic invariants in the inner belt, which we convert to the observable count rate in a detector at the location of the satellite by using instrument response functions. These comparisons and initial data-assimilation efforts suggest that the model performance can be improved especially during injections of solar protons, and at L-shells above 2.

  19. CubeSat-Associated Radiation Belt Research: Recent and Upcoming Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Lauren; Li, Xinlin; Schiller, Quintin

    2016-07-01

    Interest in CubeSats has grown dramatically in the past decade within the space physics community. While CubeSats are generally accepted now to be useful tools for education and technology development/demonstration, their ability to provide scientific value is often still questioned. Radiation belt physics, however, is one area in which the scientific utility of these small platforms has been demonstrated and continues to offer great promise. The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, designed, built, tested, and operated by students at University of Colorado with mentoring from LASP professionals, was one of the first of now a long line of CubeSats designed to study radiation belt dynamics. Launched in September 2012, just a few weeks after NASA's Van Allen Probes, CSSWE provided valuable measurements of energetic electrons and protons from low-Earth orbit for two years, well beyond its nominal 3-month mission lifetime. The status of and results from CSSWE will be presented, with an emphasis on how these measurements have been combined with those from balloons and larger satellite missions to better understand radiation belt electron acceleration and loss processes. Some highlights from other radiation belt-related CubeSats will also be presented, along with upcoming missions. Radiation belt studies are a prime example of how small inexpensive CubeSats can be used to provide valuable scientific measurements and complement larger missions.

  20. Source and seed populations for relativistic electrons: Their roles in radiation belt changes

    DOE PAGES

    Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Singer, H. J.; ...

    2015-09-09

    Strong enhancements of outer Van Allen belt electrons have been shown to have a clear dependence on solar wind speed and on the duration of southward interplanetary magnetic field. However, individual case study analyses also have demonstrated that many geomagnetic storms produce little in the way of outer belt enhancements and, in fact, may produce substantial losses of relativistic electrons. In this study, focused upon a key period in August–September 2014, we use GOES geostationary orbit electron flux data and Van Allen Probes particle and fields data to study the process of radiation belt electron acceleration. One particular interval, 13–22more » September, initiated by a short-lived geomagnetic storm and characterized by a long period of primarily northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), showed strong depletion of relativistic electrons (including an unprecedented observation of long-lasting depletion at geostationary orbit) while an immediately preceding, and another immediately subsequent, storm showed strong radiation belt enhancement. We demonstrate with these data that two distinct electron populations resulting from magnetospheric substorm activity are crucial elements in the ultimate acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the outer belt: the source population (tens of keV) that give rise to VLF wave growth and the seed population (hundreds of keV) that are, in turn, accelerated through VLF wave interactions to much higher energies. ULF waves may also play a role by either inhibiting or enhancing this process through radial diffusion effects. Furthermore, if any components of the inner magnetospheric accelerator happen to be absent, the relativistic radiation belt enhancement fails to materialize.« less

  1. Source and seed populations for relativistic electrons: Their roles in radiation belt changes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Singer, H. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Loto'aniu, T. M.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-09-09

    Strong enhancements of outer Van Allen belt electrons have been shown to have a clear dependence on solar wind speed and on the duration of southward interplanetary magnetic field. However, individual case study analyses also have demonstrated that many geomagnetic storms produce little in the way of outer belt enhancements and, in fact, may produce substantial losses of relativistic electrons. In this study, focused upon a key period in August–September 2014, we use GOES geostationary orbit electron flux data and Van Allen Probes particle and fields data to study the process of radiation belt electron acceleration. One particular interval, 13–22 September, initiated by a short-lived geomagnetic storm and characterized by a long period of primarily northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), showed strong depletion of relativistic electrons (including an unprecedented observation of long-lasting depletion at geostationary orbit) while an immediately preceding, and another immediately subsequent, storm showed strong radiation belt enhancement. We demonstrate with these data that two distinct electron populations resulting from magnetospheric substorm activity are crucial elements in the ultimate acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the outer belt: the source population (tens of keV) that give rise to VLF wave growth and the seed population (hundreds of keV) that are, in turn, accelerated through VLF wave interactions to much higher energies. ULF waves may also play a role by either inhibiting or enhancing this process through radial diffusion effects. Furthermore, if any components of the inner magnetospheric accelerator happen to be absent, the relativistic radiation belt enhancement fails to materialize.

  2. Rapid Rebuilding of the Outer Radiation Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, A.; Fok, M.-C.; Nagai, T.; Toth, G.; Guild, T.; Bkake, J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations by the radiation monitor (RDM) on the spacecraft Akebono have shown several cases of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. Similar enhancements are also seen in detectors on board the NOAA/POES and TWINS 1 satellites. These intervals are shorter than typical radial diffusion or wave-particle interactions can account for. We choose two so-called "rapid rebuilding" events that occur during high speed streams (4 September 2008 and 22 July 2009) and simulated them with the Space Weather Modeling Framework configured with global magnetosphere, radiation belt, ring current, and ionosphere electrodynamics model. Our simulations produce a weaker and delayed dipolarization as compared to observations, but the associated inductive electric field in the simulations is still strong enough to rapidly transport and accelerate MeV electrons resulting in an energetic electron flux enhancement that is somewhat weaker than is observed. Nevertheless, the calculated flux enhancement and dipolarization is found to be qualitatively consistent with the observations. Taken together, the modeling results and observations support the conclusion that storm-time dipolarization events in the magnetospheric magnetic field result in strong radial transport and energization of radiation belt electrons.

  3. Jupiters radiation belts and their effects on spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. H.; Divita, E. L.; Gigas, G.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of electron and proton radiation on spacecraft which will operate in the trapped radiation belts of the planet Jupiter are described, and the techniques and results of the testing and simulation used in the radiation effects program are discussed. Available data from the Pioneer 10 encounter of Jupiter are compared with pre-encounter models of the Jupiter radiation belts. The implications that the measured Jovian radiation belts have for future missions are considered.

  4. Imaging Jupiter Radiation Belts At Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Zarka, P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sault, R.; Hess, S.; Cecconi, B.; Fender, R.; Pewg, Lofar

    2014-04-01

    The ultra-relativistic electrons, trapped in the inner radiation belts of Jupiter, generates a strong synchrotron radio emission (historically known as the jovian decimeter radiation (DIM)) which is beamed, polarized (~20% linear, ~1% circular) and broadband. It has been extensively observed by radio telescopes/ probes and imaged by radio interferometers over a wide frequency spectrum (from >300 MHz up to 22 GHz). This extended emission presents two main emission peaks constantly located on both sides of the planet close to the magnetic plane. High latitude emissions were also regularly observed at particular frequencies, times and in particular observational configurations. This region of the magnetosphere is "frozen" due to the strong magnetic field (~4.2 G as the equator) and therefore is forced to rotate at the planetary period (T≈9h55m). Due to the tilt (~ 10o) between the spin axis of the planet and the magnetic axis (which can be seen as dipolar in first approximation), the belts and the associated radio emission wobble around the planet center. The analysis of the flux at different frequencies highlighted spatial, temporal and spectral variabilities which origins are now partly understood. The emission varies at different time scales (short-time variations of hours to long-term variation over decades) due to the combination of visibility effect (wobbling, beaming, position of the observer in the magnetic rotating reference frame) [1], [2] and intrinsic local variations (interaction between relativistic electrons and satellites/dust, delayed effect of the solar wind ram pressure, impacts events) [3], [4], [5]. A complete framework is necessary to fully understand the source, loss and transport processes of the electrons originating from outside the belt, migrating by inward diffusion and populating the inner region of the magnetosphere. Only a few and unresolved measurements were made below 300 MHz and the nonsystematic observation of this radio emission

  5. Earth’s Radiation Belts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-28

    provided by ion-composition studies. GEOS observations reported by Geiss et al. [1978] and Balsiger et al. [1980] typically show the presence of 0+ (along...This means that He+ or 0+ might dominate 1+ in the ring-current compo- sition studies of Balsiger et al. [1960] by virtue of their greater surviva...radiation zone?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 6, 531-534, 1979. Balsiger , H., P. Eberhardt, J. Geiss, and D. T. Young, Magnetic storm injection of 0. 9- to

  6. Ionic composition of the earth's radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1983-01-01

    Several different ion species have been positively identified in the earth's radiation belts. Besides protons, there are substantial fluxes of helium, carbon and oxygen ions, and there are measurable quantities of even heavier ions. European, American and Soviet space experimenters have reported ion composition measurements over wide ranges of energies: at tens of keV (ring-current energies) and below, and at hundreds of keV and above. There is still a gap in the energy coverage from several tens to several hundreds of keV where little observational data are available. In this review emphasis is placed on the radiation belt ionic structure above 100 keV. Both quiet time conditions and geomagnetic storm periods are considered, and comparison of the available space observations is made with theoretical analysis of geomagnetically trapped ion spatial, energy and charge state distributions.

  7. High-energy proton radiation belt.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The experiments and theories to explain the high-energy protons trapped in the earth's radiation belt are reviewed. The theory of cosmic ray albedo neutron decay injection of protons into the radiation belt is discussed. Radial diffusion and change in the earth's dipole moment are considered along with losses of protons by ionization and nuclear collision. It is found that the measured albedo neutron escape current is sufficient to supply trapped protons above 30 MeV. The theoretical calculations of the trapped protons are in agreement with the measurements for L less than or equal to 1.7 both on and off the equator. For L greater than or equal to 1.7, additional trapped proton differential energy measurements should be made before the theory can be adequately tested. It appears that an additional loss mechanism such as pitch angle scattering may be required.

  8. Controlled Precipitation of Radiation Belt Particles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-23

    in support of the Air Force’s TIPER program, as well AFRL/NRL’s Injected whistler Precipitating HAARP facility in Gakona,waves Electrons Alaska. The...does LEP play in the losses of >100 keV radiation belt particles? (I A II II. Amplitude Data for 28- Mar -2001 47 N A A -LV t 9.." - 9.52" ---(b) -- SA

  9. Upper limit on the inner radiation belt MeV electron intensity

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Selesnick, RS; Baker, DN; Jaynes, AN; Kanekal, SG; Schiller, Q; Blum, L; Fennell, J; Blake, JB

    2015-01-01

    No instruments in the inner radiation belt are immune from the unforgiving penetration of the highly energetic protons (tens of MeV to GeV). The inner belt proton flux level, however, is relatively stable; thus, for any given instrument, the proton contamination often leads to a certain background noise. Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment on board Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment CubeSat, in a low Earth orbit, clearly demonstrate that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt because their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background, while higher-energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Detailed analysis of high-quality measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope on board Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, provides, for the first time, quantified upper limits on MeV electron fluxes in various energy ranges in the inner belt. These upper limits are rather different from flux levels in the AE8 and AE9 models, which were developed based on older data sources. For 1.7, 2.5, and 3.3 MeV electrons, the upper limits are about 1 order of magnitude lower than predicted model fluxes. The implication of this difference is profound in that unless there are extreme solar wind conditions, which have not happened yet since the launch of Van Allen Probes, significant enhancements of MeV electrons do not occur in the inner belt even though such enhancements are commonly seen in the outer belt. Key Points Quantified upper limit of MeV electrons in the inner belt Actual MeV electron intensity likely much lower than the upper limit More detailed understanding of relativistic electrons in the magnetosphere PMID:26167446

  10. Optimization of measurements of the Earth's radiation belt particle fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, M. I.; Podzolko, M. V.; Kovtyukh, A. S.; Brilkov, I. A.; Vlasova, N. A.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Osedlo, V. I.; Tulupov, V. I.; Yashin, I. V.

    2017-03-01

    The Earth's radiation belts discovered at the end of the 1950s have great scientific and practical interest. Their main characteristics in magnetically quiet periods are well known. However, the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts during magnetic storms and substorms, particularly the dynamics of relativistic electrons of the outer belt, when Earth's radiation belt particle fluxes undergo significant time variations, is studied insufficiently. At present, principally new experiments have been performed and planned with the intention to better study the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts and to operationally control the space-energy distributions of the Earth's radiation belt particle fluxes. In this paper, for spacecraft designed to measure the fluxes of electrons and protons of the Earth's radiation belts at altitudes of 0.5-10000 km, the optimal versions for detector orientation and orbital parameters have been considered and selected.

  11. The Role of ULF Driven Radial Transport in Rebuilding the Earth's Outer Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Paral, J.; Selesnick, R.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    An outstanding question addressed by recent studies of the Earth's radiation belts is, what are the physical processes responsible rapid recovery of MeV electrons in the outer belt during geomagnetic storms? Rapid rebuilding of the ~1 MeV electron population near geosynchronous during periods of strongly southward IMF BZ is well modeled by computing test-particle trajectories in MHD magnetospheric model fields. The build up of ~2 MeV electrons at lower L, observed by the Van Allen Probes, is also reproduced in the test-particle model. It is not known however to what extent adiabatic transport is sufficient to produce the observed multi-MeV flux enhancements in the outer belt. By comparing observations with model results, we can determine the inward extent and high energy limit of radiation belt rebuilding due to ULF driven radial transport alone. Results from case studies of several recent geomagnetic storms occurring in conjunction with recovery of the outer radiation belts will be presented.

  12. A non-storm time enhancement of outer radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Q.; Li, X.; Blum, L. W.; Jaynes, A. N.; Malaspina, D.; Tu, W.; Turner, D. L.; Blake, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    On January 13th, 2013, a high-speed solar wind stream impacted Earth's magnetosphere, resulting in low geomagnetic activity (Real-Time Dst minimum of -30 nT). However, the relativistic electron population was enhanced by over two orders of magnitude in the outer radiation belt. Fortunately, during the event, the outer belt was well sampled by a variety of missions, including the Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, GOES, and the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE). The energetic electrons are measured in-situ using flux and phase space density observations from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) onboard the Van Allen Probes, the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) onboard CSSWE, and SST onboard THEMIS. These measured electron populations are the net result of the balance between concurrent loss and acceleration processes. Precipitation loss is quantified using REPTile measurements at low altitudes, while the energization mechanisms, namely interactions with whistler-mode chorus and Pc5 ULF waves, are investigated using Van Allen Probes' MagEIS and Electric Fields and Waves Suite (EFW), THEMIS' EFI and SCM instrument suites, and GOES magnetometers. The quantity and quality of measurements during this event provide a rare opportunity to address outstanding science questions; such as, whether the energetic electrons originate from inward injections associated with substorms or are accelerated via local heating, as well as what the energy dependence of the enhancement is during a period of such low geomagnetic activity.

  13. Variations of energetic electrons associated with solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement in the outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Lee, E.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, J.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's outer radiation belt varies dynamically under the variations of the solar wind. In this study, we investigated the variations of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt caused by an enhancement of the solar wind dynamic pressure associated with an interplanetary shock using the measurements from the Van Allen Probes (VAP) satellites. The enhanced dynamic pressure lasted for about 24 hours, but magnetic storm was not occurred. The impact of the interplanetary shock on 13 April 2013 produced dipolarization of the magnetic field for a few minutes, which was simultaneously observed by VAP A and B moving in the nightside region. The enhancement of the electron fluxes with E < ~600 keV coincidentally occurred during the dipolarization. Later, drift echoes with energy dispersion and ULF-like modulations were observed. By comparing the measurements from VAP A and B we will discuss spatial and temporal characteristics of the enhancement of the energetic electron fluxes.

  14. Volterra network modeling of the nonlinear finite-impulse reponse of the radiation belt flux

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Vassiliadis, D.

    2011-01-04

    We show how a general class of spatio-temporal nonlinear impulse-response forecast networks (Volterra networks) can be constructed from a taxonomy of nonlinear autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous inputs (NAR-MAX) input-output equations, and used to model the evolution of energetic particle f uxes in the Van Allen radiation belts. We present initial results for the nonlinear response of the radiation belts to conditions a month earlier. The essential features of spatio-temporal observations are recovered with the model echoing the results of state space models and linear f nite impulse-response models whereby the strongest coupling peak occurs in the preceding 1-2 days. It appears that such networks hold promise for the development of accurate and fully data-driven space weather modelling, monitoring and forecast tools.

  15. Energization of outer radiation belt electrons during storm recovery phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Asif; Waters, C. L.; Sciffer, M. D.; Menk, F. W.

    2016-11-01

    We use test particle simulations incorporating an MHD model of ULF wave propagation in the magnetosphere with realistic ionosphere boundary conditions to study electron energization in the dayside outer Van Allen radiation belt, referenced to in situ particle and wave observations. On 7 January 2011 the THEMIS spacecraft detected 3 and 4-5 mHz waves simultaneous with flux enhancement of >10 keV electrons during the early recovery phase of a moderate geomagnetic storm. We find that internal energization of equatorially mirroring electrons via nonresonant ULF wave-particle interactions can explain these observations. The wave poloidal components cause radial drift of electrons, increasing (decreasing) their kinetic energy as they move inward (outward). Electrons with initial kinetic energies of a few keV can be energized to double these values within an hour by interaction with the 3 mHz waves. The energization rate is somewhat less for the 4-5 mHz waves. An increase in the ionospheric conductance decreases the power of the fast mode wave, reducing radial drift velocities and hence decreasing the rate of energization. The fast mode poloidal field varies with radial distance and longitude, and this also affects energization. Electrons which drift outward encounter a region where the toroidal field due to the field line resonance becomes dominant and produces strong azimuthal drift. These electrons become trapped in an L-shell range just outward of the resonance region and are not energized.

  16. Reanalysis and forecasting killer electrons in Earth's radiation belts using the VERB code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, Adam; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Shprits, Yuri; Podladchikova, Tatiana; Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The Van Allen radiation belts are torii-shaped regions of trapped energetic particles, that in recent years, have become a principle focus for satellite operators and engineers. During geomagnetic storms, electrons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies, where they may penetrate spacecraft shielding and damage electrical systems, causing permanent damage or loss of spacecraft. Data-assimilation provides an optimal way to combine observations of the radiation belts with a physics-based model in order to more accurately specify the global state of the Earth's radiation belts. We present recent advances to the data-assimilative version of the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, including more sophisticated error analysis, and incorporation of realistic field-models to more accurately specify fluxes at a given MLT or along a spacecraft trajectory. The effect of recent stream-interaction-region (SIR) driven enhancements are investigated using the improved model. We also present a real-time forecast model based on the data-assimilative VERB code, and discuss the forecast performance over the past 12 months.

  17. Understanding the Dynamical Evolution of the Earth Radiation Belt and Ring Current Coupled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Yuri; Usanova, Maria; Kellerman, Adam; Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Modeling and understanding the ring current and radiation belt-coupled system has been a grand challenge since the beginning of the space age. In this study we show long-term simulations with a 3D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code of modeling the radiation belts with boundary conditions derived from observations around geosynchronous orbit. Simulations can reproduce long term variations of the electron radiation belt fluxes and show the importance of local acceleration, radial diffusion, loss to the atmosphere and loss to the magnetopause. We also present 4D VERB simulations that include convective transport, radial diffusion, pitch angle scattering and local acceleration. VERB simulations show that the lower energy inward transport is dominated by the convection and higher energy transport is dominated by the diffusive radial transport. We also show that at energies of 100s of keV, a number of processes work simultaneously, including convective transport, radial diffusion, local acceleration, loss to the loss cone and loss to the magnetopause. The results of the simulation of the March 2013 storm are compared with Van Allen Probes observations.

  18. Upper limit on the inner radiation belt MeV electron intensity.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Selesnick, R S; Baker, D N; Jaynes, A N; Kanekal, S G; Schiller, Q; Blum, L; Fennell, J; Blake, J B

    2015-02-01

    No instruments in the inner radiation belt are immune from the unforgiving penetration of the highly energetic protons (tens of MeV to GeV). The inner belt proton flux level, however, is relatively stable; thus, for any given instrument, the proton contamination often leads to a certain background noise. Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment on board Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment CubeSat, in a low Earth orbit, clearly demonstrate that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt because their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background, while higher-energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Detailed analysis of high-quality measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope on board Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, provides, for the first time, quantified upper limits on MeV electron fluxes in various energy ranges in the inner belt. These upper limits are rather different from flux levels in the AE8 and AE9 models, which were developed based on older data sources. For 1.7, 2.5, and 3.3 MeV electrons, the upper limits are about 1 order of magnitude lower than predicted model fluxes. The implication of this difference is profound in that unless there are extreme solar wind conditions, which have not happened yet since the launch of Van Allen Probes, significant enhancements of MeV electrons do not occur in the inner belt even though such enhancements are commonly seen in the outer belt.

  19. What have we learned about the energetic particle dynamics in the inner belt and slot region from Van Allen Probes and CSSWE missions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinlin; Baker, Daniel N.; Kanekal, Shrikanth; Fennell, Joseph; Selesnick, Richard; Claudepierre, Seth; Blake, Bernard; Zhao, Hong; Jaynes, Allison

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive measurements of energetic protons (10s of MeV) in the inner belt (L<2) and slot region (2Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, revealed new features of these energetic protons in terms of their spectrum distribution, spatial distribution, pitch angle distribution, and their different source populations. Concurrent measurements from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, in a highly inclined low Earth orbit, demonstrated that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt and their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background associated with the inner belt protons, while higher energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Analysis on sub-MeV electrons data in the inner belt and slot region from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) on board Van Allen Probes revealed rather complicated pitch angle distribution of these energetic electrons, with the 90 deg-minimum (butterfly) pitch angle distribution dominating near the magnetic equator. These are part of a summary of the most recent measurements and understanding of the dynamics of energetic particles in the inner zone and slot region to be exhibited and discussed in this presentation.

  20. Solar Neutrons and the Earth's Radiation Belts.

    PubMed

    Lingenfelter, R E; Flamm, E J

    1964-04-17

    The intensity and spectrum of solar neutrons in the vicinity of the earth are calculated on the assumption that the low-energy protons recently detected in balloon and satellite flights are products of solar neutron decay. The solar-neutron flux thus obtained exceeds the global average cosmic-ray neutron leakage above 10 Mev, indicating that it may be an important source of both the inner and outer radiation belts. Neutron measurements in the atmosphere are reviewed and several features of the data are found to be consistent with the estimated solar neutron spectrum.

  1. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission: Advancing Our Understanding of the Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David; Kanekal, Shrikanth; Kessel, Ramona; Fox, Nicola; Mauk, Barry

    2012-01-01

    We describe NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) mission, whose primary science objective is to understand, ideally to the point of predictability, the dynamics of relativistic electrons and penetrating ions in the Earth's radiation belts resulting from variable solar activity. The overarching scientific questions addressed include: 1. the physical processes that produce radiation belt enhancement events, 2. the dominant mechanisms for relativistic electron loss, and 3. how the ring current and other geomagnetic processes affect radiation belt behavior. The RBSP mission comprises two spacecraft which will be launched during Fall 2012 into low inclination lapping equatorial orbits. The orbit periods are about 9 hours, with perigee altitudes and apogee radial distances of 600 km and 5.8 RE respectively. During the two-year primary mission, the spacecraft orbits precess once around the Earth and lap each other twice in each local time quadrant. The spacecraft are each equipped with identical comprehensive instrumentation packages to measure, electrons, ions and wave electric and magnetic fields. We provide an overview of the RBSP mission, onboard instrumentation and science prospects and invite scientific collaboration.

  2. Survey of current situation in radiation belt modeling.

    PubMed

    Fung, Shing F

    2004-01-01

    The study of Earth's radiation belts is one of the oldest subjects in space physics. Despite the tremendous progress made in the last four decades, we still lack a complete understanding of the radiation belts in terms of their configurations, dynamics, and detailed physical accounts of their sources and sinks. The static nature of early empirical trapped radiation models, for examples, the NASA AP-8 and AE-8 models, renders those models inappropriate for predicting short-term radiation belt behaviors associated with geomagnetic storms and substorms. Due to incomplete data coverage, these models are also inaccurate at low altitudes (e.g., <1000 km) where many robotic and human space flights occur. The availability of radiation data from modern space missions and advancement in physical modeling and data management techniques have now allowed the development of new empirical and physical radiation belt models. In this paper, we will review the status of modern radiation belt modeling.

  3. Prediction of MeV electron fluxes throughout the outer radiation belt using multivariate autoregressive models

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Kaori; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.

    2015-12-22

    The Van Allen radiation belts surrounding the Earth are filled with MeV-energy electrons. This region poses ionizing radiation risks for spacecraft that operate within it, including those in geostationary orbit (GEO) and medium Earth orbit. In order to provide alerts of electron flux enhancements, 16 prediction models of the electron log-flux variation throughout the equatorial outer radiation belt as a function of the McIlwain L parameter were developed using the multivariate autoregressive model and Kalman filter. Measurements of omnidirectional 2.3 MeV electron flux from the Van Allen Probes mission as well as >2 MeV electrons from the GOES 15 spacecraft were used as the predictors. Furthermore, we selected model explanatory parameters from solar wind parameters, the electron log-flux at GEO, and geomagnetic indices. For the innermost region of the outer radiation belt, the electron flux is best predicted by using the Dst index as the sole input parameter. For the central to outermost regions, at L≥4.8 and L ≥5.6, the electron flux is predicted most accurately by including also the solar wind velocity and then the dynamic pressure, respectively. The Dst index is the best overall single parameter for predicting at 3 ≤ L ≤ 6, while for the GEO flux prediction, the KP index is better than Dst. Finally, a test calculation demonstrates that the model successfully predicts the timing and location of the flux maximum as much as 2 days in advance and that the electron flux decreases faster with time at higher L values, both model features consistent with the actually observed behavior.

  4. Prediction of MeV electron fluxes throughout the outer radiation belt using multivariate autoregressive models

    DOE PAGES

    Sakaguchi, Kaori; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; ...

    2015-12-22

    The Van Allen radiation belts surrounding the Earth are filled with MeV-energy electrons. This region poses ionizing radiation risks for spacecraft that operate within it, including those in geostationary orbit (GEO) and medium Earth orbit. In order to provide alerts of electron flux enhancements, 16 prediction models of the electron log-flux variation throughout the equatorial outer radiation belt as a function of the McIlwain L parameter were developed using the multivariate autoregressive model and Kalman filter. Measurements of omnidirectional 2.3 MeV electron flux from the Van Allen Probes mission as well as >2 MeV electrons from the GOES 15 spacecraftmore » were used as the predictors. Furthermore, we selected model explanatory parameters from solar wind parameters, the electron log-flux at GEO, and geomagnetic indices. For the innermost region of the outer radiation belt, the electron flux is best predicted by using the Dst index as the sole input parameter. For the central to outermost regions, at L≥4.8 and L ≥5.6, the electron flux is predicted most accurately by including also the solar wind velocity and then the dynamic pressure, respectively. The Dst index is the best overall single parameter for predicting at 3 ≤ L ≤ 6, while for the GEO flux prediction, the KP index is better than Dst. Finally, a test calculation demonstrates that the model successfully predicts the timing and location of the flux maximum as much as 2 days in advance and that the electron flux decreases faster with time at higher L values, both model features consistent with the actually observed behavior.« less

  5. Prediction of MeV electron fluxes throughout the outer radiation belt using multivariate autoregressive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Kaori; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen radiation belts surrounding the Earth are filled with MeV-energy electrons. This region poses ionizing radiation risks for spacecraft that operate within it, including those in geostationary orbit (GEO) and medium Earth orbit. To provide alerts of electron flux enhancements, 16 prediction models of the electron log-flux variation throughout the equatorial outer radiation belt as a function of the McIlwain L parameter were developed using the multivariate autoregressive model and Kalman filter. Measurements of omnidirectional 2.3 MeV electron flux from the Van Allen Probes mission as well as >2 MeV electrons from the GOES 15 spacecraft were used as the predictors. Model explanatory parameters were selected from solar wind parameters, the electron log-flux at GEO, and geomagnetic indices. For the innermost region of the outer radiation belt, the electron flux is best predicted by using the Dst index as the sole input parameter. For the central to outermost regions, at L ≧ 4.8 and L ≧ 5.6, the electron flux is predicted most accurately by including also the solar wind velocity and then the dynamic pressure, respectively. The Dst index is the best overall single parameter for predicting at 3 ≦ L ≦ 6, while for the GEO flux prediction, the KP index is better than Dst. A test calculation demonstrates that the model successfully predicts the timing and location of the flux maximum as much as 2 days in advance and that the electron flux decreases faster with time at higher L values, both model features consistent with the actually observed behavior.

  6. The Living with a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission and Related Missions of Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David G.; Mauk, Barry H.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Fox, Nicola J.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Living With a Star (LWS) Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission in the context of the broader Geospace program. Missions to Geospace offer an opportunity to observe in situ the fundamental processes that operate throughout the solar system and in particular those that generate hazardous space weather effects in the vicinity of Earth. The recently selected investigations on NASA's LWS program's RBSP will provide the measurements needed to characterize and quantify the processes that supply and remove energetic particles from the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. Instruments on the RBSP spacecraft will observe charged particles that comprise the Earth's radiation belts over the full energy range from 1 eV to more than 10 MeV (including composition), the plasma waves which energize them, the electric fields which transport them, and the magnetic fields which guide their motion. The two-point measurements by the RBSP spacecraft will enable researchers to discriminate between spatial and temporal effects, and therefore between the various proposed mechanisms for particle acceleration and loss. The measurements taken by the RBSP spacecraft will be used in data modeling projects in order to improve the understanding of these fundamental processes and allow better predictions to be made. NASA's LWS program has also recently selected three teams to study concepts for Missions of Opportunity that will augment the RBSP program, by (1) providing an instrument for a Canadian spacecraft in the Earth's radiation belts, (2) quantifying the flux of particles precipitating into the Earth's atmosphere from the Earth's radiation belts, and (3) remotely sensing both spatial and temporal variations in the Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere.

  7. Implementation of Localized Ensemble Assimilation for a Three-Dimensional Radiation Belt Model (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez, H. C.; Chen, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.; Subbotin, D.; Shprits, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's outer radiation belt is very dynamic and energetic electrons therein undergo constant changes due to acceleration, loss, and trans- port processes. In this work we improve the accuracy of simulated electron phase space density (PSD) of the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, a three-dimensional radiation belt model, by implementing the localized ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) assimilation method. Assimilation methods based on Kalman filtering have been successfully applied to one-dimensional radial diffusion radiation belt models, where it has been shown to greatly improve the model estimation of electron phase space density (PSD). This work expands upon previous research by implementing the LETKF method to assimilate observed electron density into VERB, a three-dimensional radiation belt model. In particular, the LETKF will perform the assimilation locally, where the size of the local region is defined by the diffusion of electrons in the model. This will enable the optimal assimilation of data throughout the model consistently with the flow of electrons. Two sets of assimilation experiments are presented. The first is an identical-twin experiment, where artificial data is generated from the same model, with the purpose of verifying the assimilation method. In the second set of experiments, real PSD observational data from missions such as CRRES and/or the Van Allen Probes are assimilated into VERB. The results show that data assimilation significantly improves the accuracy of the VERB model by efficiently including the available observations at the appropriate pitch angles, energy levels, and L-shell regions throughout the model.

  8. Very energetic protons in Saturn's radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, W.; Mcilwain, C.

    1980-01-01

    Very energetic protons are trapped in the inner Saturnian radiation belt. The University of California at San Diego instrument on Pioneer 11 has definitely identified protons of energy greater than 80 MeV on channel M3 and has tentatively detected protons of energy greater than 600 MeV on channel C3. The spatial distribution of the protons is distinct from that of the trapped electrons, the main difference being that the protons are strongly absorbed by the innermost moons and that the electrons are not. The source strength for injecting protons by the decay of cosmic ray albedo neutrons generated in the rings of Saturn has been estimated. The required proton lifetime is approximately 20 years.

  9. Three-dimensional data assimilation and reanalysis of radiation belt electrons: Observations over two solar cycles, and operational forecasting.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, A. C.; Shprits, Y.; Kondrashov, D. A.; Podladchikova, T.; Drozdov, A.; Subbotin, D.; Makarevich, R. A.; Donovan, E.; Nagai, T.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding of the dynamics in Earth's radiation belts is critical to accurate modeling and forecasting of space weather conditions, both which are important for design, and protection of our space-borne assets. In the current study, we utilize the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, multi-spacecraft measurements, and a split-operator Kalman filter to recontructe the global state of the radiation belt system in the CRRES era and the current era. The reanalysis has revealed a never before seen 4-belt structure in the radiation belts during the March 1991 superstorm, and highlights several important aspects in regards to the the competition between the source, acceleration, loss, and transport of particles. In addition to the above, performing reanalysis in adiabatic coordinates relies on specification of the Earth's magnetic field, and associated observational, and model errors. We determine the observational errors for the Kalman filter directly from cross-spacecraft phase-space density (PSD) conjunctions, and obtain the error in VERB by comparison with reanalysis over a long time period. Specification of errors associated with several magnetic field models provides an important insight into the applicability of such models for radiation belt research. The comparison of CRRES area reanalysis with Van Allen Probe era reanalysis allows us to perform a global comparison of the dynamics of the radiation belts during different parts of the solar cycle and during different solar cycles. The data assimilative model is presently used to perform operational forecasts of the radiation belts (http://rbm.epss.ucla.edu/realtime-forecast/).

  10. Trapped radiation belts of Saturn - First look

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, W.; Ip, W. H.; Mcilwain, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Data on the magnetosphere of Saturn obtained with the trapped radiation detector package on board the Pioneer 11 spacecraft is reported. Radiation belt profiles determined by the trapped radiation detectors on Pioneer 10 and 11 indicate that Saturn's magnetosphere is intermediate in size between those of the earth and Jupiter, with particle intensities similar to those of the earth. The outer region of the Saturn magnetosphere is found to contain particles of lower energy than the outer region, being strongly influenced by the time-varying solar wind. The moons and rings of Saturn are observed to be effective absorbers of trapped particles, confirming the discoveries of the F ring, the Pioneer ring division and the moon 1979 S 2. Particle diffusion rates are used to estimate a cross-sectional area of greater than 7 x 10 to the 13th sq cm and an opacity greater than 0.00001 for the F ring. It is suggested that cosmic-ray albedo neutron decay be studied as a possible source of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn.

  11. Trapped radiation belts of saturn: first look.

    PubMed

    Fillius, W; Ip, W H; McIlwain, C E

    1980-01-25

    Pioneer 11 has made the first exploration of the magnetosphere and trapped radiation belts of Saturn. Saturn's magnetosphere is intermediate in size between Earth's and Jupiter's, with trapped particle intensities comparable to Earth's. The outer region of Saturn's magnetosphere contains lower energy radiation and is variable with time; the inner region contains higher energy particles. The pitch angle distributions show a remarkable variety of field-aligned and locally mirroring configurations. The moons and especially the rings of Saturn are effective absorbers of trapped particles; underneath the rings, the trapped radiation is completely absorbed. We confirm the discovery of a new ring, called the F ring, a new division, the Pioneer division, and a moon, called 1979 S 2. The latter has probably been seen from Earth. There may be evidence for more bodies like 1979 S 2, but at this stage the interpretation of the data is ambiguous. Using particle diffusion rates, we estimate that the cross-sectional area of the F ring is > 7 x 10(13) square centimeters and that the opacity is > 10(-5). Cosmic-ray albedo neutron decay should be looked into as a source of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn.

  12. Radiation Belt Storm Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr Y.; Mauk, Barry H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Sibeck, David G.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.

  13. On the threshold energization of radiation belt electrons by double layers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, A. P.; Osmane, A.; Pulkkinen, T. I.

    2014-12-01

    Recent in situ electric field measurements by the Van Allen Probes in the radiation belts have revealed the existence and ubiquitous presence of double layers [Mozer et al. Phys. Rev. Lett., 2013]. Encounters with double layers during 1 minute burst mode intervals were both common and indicative of large cumulative potential drops. With electric fields averaging 20 mV/m, and sometimes reaching as high as 100 mV/m, observed double layers have been suggested as possible accelerators of radiation belt electrons and generators of a seed population of 100 keV. Using a Hamiltonian approach we quantify the energization threshold of electrons interacting with radiation belts' double layers analytically and numerically. We find that double layers with electric field amplitude δE ranging between 10-100 mV/m and spatial scales of the order of few Debye lengths are very efficient in energizing electrons with initial velocities v ≤ vthermal≈3000 km/s to 1 keV levels, but are unable to energize electrons with energies E ≥ 10 keV. Our results therefore indicate that the localized electric field associated with the double layers are unlikely to generate a seed population of 100 keV necessary for a plethora of relativistic acceleration mechanisms and additional transport to higher energetic levels.

  14. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; ...

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outermore » radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.« less

  15. On the Connection Between Microbursts and Nonlinear Electronic Structures in Planetary Radiation Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osmane, Adnane; Wilson, Lynn B., III; Blum, Lauren; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a dynamical-system approach, we have investigated the efficiency of large-amplitude whistler waves for causing microburst precipitation in planetary radiation belts by modeling the microburst energy and particle fluxes produced as a result of nonlinear wave-particle interactions. We show that wave parameters, consistent with large amplitude oblique whistlers, can commonly generate microbursts of electrons with hundreds of keV-energies as a result of Landau trapping. Relativistic microbursts (greater than 1 MeV) can also be generated by a similar mechanism, but require waves with large propagation angles Theta (sub k)B greater than 50 degrees and phase-speeds v(sub phi) greater than or equal to c/9. Using our result for precipitating density and energy fluxes, we argue that holes in the distribution function of electrons near the magnetic mirror point can result in the generation of double layers and electron solitary holes consistent in scales (of the order of Debye lengths) to nonlinear structures observed in the radiation belts by the Van Allen Probes. Our results indicate a relationship between nonlinear electrostatic and electromagnetic structures in the dynamics of planetary radiation belts and their role in the cyclical production of energetic electrons (E greater than or equal to 100 keV) on kinetic timescales, which is much faster than previously inferred.

  16. Investigating the source of near-relativistic and relativistic electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, Drew Lawson; O'Brien, T. P.; Fennell, J. F.; ...

    2017-01-30

    Using observations from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we study the role of sudden particle enhancements at low L shells (SPELLS) as a source of inner radiation belt electrons. SPELLS events are characterized by electron intensity enhancements of approximately an order of magnitude or more in less than 1 day at L < 3. During quiet and average geomagnetic conditions, the phase space density radial distributions for fixed first and second adiabatic invariants are peaked at 2 < L < 3 for electrons ranging in energy from ~50 keV to ~1 MeV, indicating that slow inward radial diffusion is not themore » dominant source of inner belt electrons under quiet/average conditions. During SPELLS events, the evolution of electron distributions reveals an enhancement of phase space density that can exceed 3 orders of magnitude in the slot region and continues into the inner radiation belt, which is evidence that these events are an important—and potentially dominant—source of inner belt electrons. Electron fluxes from September 2012 through February 2016 reveal that SPELLS occur frequently (~2.5/month at 200 keV), but the number of observed events decreases exponentially with increasing electron energy for ≥100 keV. After SPELLS events, the slot region reforms due to slow energy-dependent decay over several day time scales, consistent with losses due to interactions with plasmaspheric hiss. Altogether, these results indicate that the peaked phase space density distributions in the inner electron radiation belt result from an “on/off,” geomagnetic-activity-dependent source from higher radial distances.« less

  17. Investigating the source of near-relativistic and relativistic electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. L.; O'Brien, T. P.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S.; Gkioulidou, M.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.

    2017-01-01

    Using observations from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we study the role of sudden particle enhancements at low L shells (SPELLS) as a source of inner radiation belt electrons. SPELLS events are characterized by electron intensity enhancements of approximately an order of magnitude or more in less than 1 day at L < 3. During quiet and average geomagnetic conditions, the phase space density radial distributions for fixed first and second adiabatic invariants are peaked at 2 < L < 3 for electrons ranging in energy from 50 keV to 1 MeV, indicating that slow inward radial diffusion is not the dominant source of inner belt electrons under quiet/average conditions. During SPELLS events, the evolution of electron distributions reveals an enhancement of phase space density that can exceed 3 orders of magnitude in the slot region and continues into the inner radiation belt, which is evidence that these events are an important - and potentially dominant - source of inner belt electrons. Electron fluxes from September 2012 through February 2016 reveal that SPELLS occur frequently ( 2.5/month at 200 keV), but the number of observed events decreases exponentially with increasing electron energy for ≥100 keV. After SPELLS events, the slot region reforms due to slow energy-dependent decay over several day time scales, consistent with losses due to interactions with plasmaspheric hiss. Combined, these results indicate that the peaked phase space density distributions in the inner electron radiation belt result from an "on/off," geomagnetic-activity-dependent source from higher radial distances.

  18. NASA's Van Allen Probes RBSP-ECT Data Products and Access to Them: An Insider's Outlook on the Inner and Outer Belts (and We Don't Mean the Nation's Beltway...)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. S.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    In this poster, we present a summary of access to the data products of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes - Energetic Particle Composition, and Thermal plasma (RBSP-ECT) suite of NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. The RBSP-ECT science investigation (http://rbsp-ect.sr.unh.edu) measures comprehensively the near-Earth charged particle environment in order to understand the processes that control the acceleration, global distribution, and variability of radiation belt electrons and ions. RBSP-ECT data products derive from the three instrument elements that comprise the suite, which collectively covers the broad energies that define the source and seed populations, the core radiation belts, and also their highest energy ultra-relativistic extensions. These RBSP-ECT instruments include, from lowest to highest energies: the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) sensor, the Magnetic Electron and Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), and the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT). We provide a brief overview of their principles of operation, as well as a description of the Level 1-3 data products that the HOPE, MagEIS, and REPT instruments produce, both separately and together. We provide a summary of how to access these RBSP-ECT data products at our Science Operation Center and Science Data Center (http://www.rbsp-ect.lanl.gov/rbsp_ect.php ) as well as caveats for their use. Finally, in the spirit of efficiently and effectively promoting and encouraging new collaborations, we present a summary of past publications, current studies, and opportunities for your future participation in RBSP-ECT science analyses.

  19. The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Friesen, L.; Lin, A.; Mabry, D.; Katz, N.; Dotan, Y.; George, J. S.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Redding, M.; O'Brien, P. P.; Cha, J.; Birkitt, A.; Carranza, P.; Lalic, M.; Fuentes, F.; Galvan, R.; McNab, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft is a particle spectrometer designed to measure the flux, angular distribution, and energy spectrum of protons from ~60 MeV to ~2000 MeV. RPS will investigate decades-old questions about the inner Van Allen belt proton environment: a nearby region of space that is relatively unexplored because of the hazards of spacecraft operation there and the difficulties in obtaining accurate proton measurements in an intense penetrating background. RPS is designed to provide the accuracy needed to answer questions about the sources and losses of the inner belt protons and to obtain the measurements required for the next-generation models of trapped protons in the magnetosphere. In addition to detailed information for individual protons, RPS features count rates at a 1-second timescale, internal radiation dosimetry, and information about electrostatic discharge events on the RBSP spacecraft that together will provide new information about space environmental hazards in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  20. The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J.; Friesen, L.; Lin, A.; Mabry, D.; Katz, N.; Dotan, Y.; George, J.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M.; Redding, M.; O'Brien, T. P.; Cha, J.; Birkitt, A.; Carranza, P.; Lalic, M.; Fuentes, F.; Galvan, R.; McNab, M.

    2013-11-01

    The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft is a particle spectrometer designed to measure the flux, angular distribution, and energy spectrum of protons from ˜60 MeV to ˜2000 MeV. RPS will investigate decades-old questions about the inner Van Allen belt proton environment: a nearby region of space that is relatively unexplored because of the hazards of spacecraft operation there and the difficulties in obtaining accurate proton measurements in an intense penetrating background. RPS is designed to provide the accuracy needed to answer questions about the sources and losses of the inner belt protons and to obtain the measurements required for the next-generation models of trapped protons in the magnetosphere. In addition to detailed information for individual protons, RPS features count rates at a 1-second timescale, internal radiation dosimetry, and information about electrostatic discharge events on the RBSP spacecraft that together will provide new information about space environmental hazards in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  1. Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics: Modeling Atmospheric Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    The first year of work on this project has been completed. This report provides a summary of the progress made and the plan for the coming year. Also included with this report is a preprint of an article that was accepted for publication in Journal of Geophysical Research and describes in detail most of the results from the first year of effort. The goal for the first year was to develop a radiation belt electron model for fitting to data from the SAMPEX and Polar satellites that would provide an empirical description of the electron losses into the upper atmosphere. This was largely accomplished according to the original plan (with one exception being that, for reasons described below, the inclusion of the loss cone electrons in the model was deferred). The main concerns at the start were to accurately represent the balance between pitch angle diffusion and eastward drift that determines the dominant features of the low altitude data, and then to accurately convert the model into simulated data based on the characteristics of the particular electron detectors. Considerable effort was devoted to achieving these ends. Once the model was providing accurate results it was applied to data sets selected from appropriate periods in 1997, 1998, and 1999. For each interval of -30 to 60 days, the model parameters were calculated daily, thus providing good short and long term temporal resolution, and for a range of radial locations from L = 2.7 to 3.9. .

  2. Jupiter's radiation belt ions - A comparison of theory and observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Danny; Thorne, Richard M.; Mei, YI

    1989-01-01

    Radial profiles are constructed for the Jovian radiation belt flux-tube content Y-asterisk from the reported phase-space density of energetic particles obtained from Voyager 1 data over the range L = 6 to L = 9. These experimental profiles are compared with theoretical solutions for Y-asterisk from an interchange-diffusion model of the coupled radiation belt and Iogenic ion populations. Subject to certain limitations of the Voyager 1 data, the model solutions are found to be consistent with the data for a variety of input parameters. Model solutions are also found corresponding to radiation belt ions that are expected to be mainly responsible for the auroral energy input. Comparison of the present theoretical profiles with the data implies that the energetic radiation belt ions should have a peak loss rate within a factor of three of that for strong diffusion scattering.

  3. Forecasting the Radiation Belts for Satellites Undergoing Electric-Orbit Raising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, R. B.; Glauert, S. A.; Meredith, N. P.; Kersten, T.; Heynderickx, D.; Maget, V.; Li, W.; Pitchford, D. A.; Wade, D.

    2015-12-01

    The introduction of commercial satellites with all-electric propulsion systems is nothing less than a revolution in the quest for low-cost access to space. As a consequence, it can take as long as 200 - 400 days to raise the perigee of the satellite to final geostationary orbit. During this time the satellites are exposed to the most intense part of the van Allen radiation belts where the electron radiation environment can vary by orders of magnitude as a result of changes in the solar wind. Here we describe briefly this new method of launch and discuss the importance of radiation protection, the need for real-time data on orbit and how physics based models can help supply this need. We describe the forecasting system that was developed in the European SPACECAST project, and is now continued in the SPACESTORM project, and how we use physics based models to forecast the electron flux throughout the outer radiation belt in real-time, updated hourly. We show that forecasts are much improved when the physics of wave-particle interactions is included, and show comparisons between models using different wave models for plasmaspheric hiss and chorus waves. The results emphasise the importance of chorus wave amplitudes. Finally, we discuss some areas of research needed to improve the forecasts, such as the need to understand electron flux drop-outs and their relation to distortions of the geomagnetic field in the tail region, and the need for additional wave models.

  4. Low-Altitude Distribution of Radiation Belt Electrons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-10

    ELEMENT NUMBER 62601F 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER R. S. Selesnick *, M. D. Looper* and 1010 Jay M. Albert 5e. TASK NUMBER RS 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER Al 7...VOL. 109, A11209, doi:10.1029/2004JA010611, 2004 Low-altitude distribution of radiation belt electrons R. S. Selesnick and M. D. Looper The...Magnetospheric Physics: Plasma waves and instabilities; KEYWORDS: radiation belt, electrons, diffusion, atmospheric scattering Citation: Selesnick , R. S., M. D

  5. Inner Radiation Belt Dynamics and Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, P. P.; Looper, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    We present preliminary results of inner belt proton data assimilation using an augmented version of the Selesnick et al. Inner Zone Model (SIZM). By varying modeled physics parameters and solar particle injection parameters to generate many ensembles of the inner belt, then optimizing the ensemble weights according to inner belt observations from SAMPEX/PET at LEO and HEO/DOS at high altitude, we obtain the best-fit state of the inner belt. We need to fully sample the range of solar proton injection sources among the ensemble members to ensure reasonable agreement between the model ensembles and observations. Once this is accomplished, we find the method is fairly robust. We will demonstrate the data assimilation by presenting an extended interval of solar proton injections and losses, illustrating how these short-term dynamics dominate long-term inner belt climatology.

  6. Radial transport in the Earth's radiation belts (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Hudson, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    For over forty years the standard approach to modeling the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts has been based on a diffusion equation, which can be derived from the Vlasov equation using a quasilinear approximation. The radiation belt diffusion equation describes the evolution of a particle distribution function in a space of one or several of the three adiabatic invariants associated with the motions of a charged particle in a dipole magnetic field. Increasingly, observations and theoretical studies suggest that fully nonlinear transport, not modeled by quasilinear diffusion, plays an important role in radiation belt dynamics, e.g., the shock-drift mechanism modeled by Li et al. [1993]. This presentation will focus on radiation belt particle transport across magnetic L-shells (loosely called radial transport). Radial transport is thought to be one of the primary drivers of radiation belt dynamics. A comprehensive review of the known mechanisms of radial transport and some of their effects will be given, including those that can be modeled with a diffusion equation and those requiring a fully nonlinear treatment. Li, X., I. Roth, M. Temerin, J. R. Wygant, M. K. Hudson, and J. B. Blake, (1993), Simulations of the prompt energization and transport of radiation belt particles during the March 24, 1991 SSC, Geophys. Res. Lett., 20, 2423.

  7. Radiation Belts Storage Ring : What the Cluster-CIS data can tell us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I. S.; Ganushkina, N.; Amariutei, O. A.; Reme, H.

    2013-12-01

    Following the launch by NASA of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) twin spacecraft, now named the Van Allen Probes, the discovery of a storage ring was announced: Baker et al., Science, 2013. This transient feature was observed during September 2012, following the arrival of an interplanetary shock, was located between L=3.0 and L=3.5 and consisted of about 4 to 6 MeV electrons. During that period the Cluster spacecraft had a high-inclination orbit, with a perigee just above 2 Re. The CIS experiment onboard Cluster is sensitive to penetrating energetic electrons (E > 2 MeV), which produce background counts and thus allow to localize the boundaries of the outer and inner radiation belts (Ganushkina et al., JGR, 2011). A search was undertaken in the September 2012 CIS data for eventual signatures of the storage ring, and indeed a small increase of the instrument background was observed between L=3.0 and L=3.5. This is clearly separated from the main outer radiation belt, which presents a much stronger background due to higher fluxes of relativistic electrons. A mono-energetic ion drift band was also observed by CIS inside the storage ring, at about 5 keV for He+ and O+ ions. This result provides an independent confirmation for the storage ring. In addition, it allows also to examine Cluster and Double Star data from earlier years, covering a full solar cycle, for other such signatures of a transient storage ring. It results that this 3-belt structure is seen several times.

  8. Survey of current situation in radiation belt modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.

    2004-01-01

    The study of Earth's radiation belts is one of the oldest subjects in space physics. Despite the tremendous progress made in the last four decades, we still lack a complete understanding of the radiation belts in terms of their configurations, dynamics, and detailed physical accounts of their sources and sinks. The static nature of early empirical trapped radiation models, for examples, the NASA AP-8 and AE-8 models, renders those models inappropriate for predicting short-term radiation belt behaviors associated with geomagnetic storms and substorms. Due to incomplete data coverage, these models are also inaccurate at low altitudes (e.g., <1000 km) where many robotic and human space flights occur. The availability of radiation data from modern space missions and advancement in physical modeling and data management techniques have now allowed the development of new empirical and physical radiation belt models. In this paper, we will review the status of modern radiation belt modeling. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  9. The Evolving Space Weather System—Van Allen Probes Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, L. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Fox, N. J.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Sotirelis, T. S.; Raouafi, N.-E.; Kessel, R. L.; Becker, H. N.

    2014-10-01

    The overarching goal and purpose of the study of space weather is clear—to understand and address the issues caused by solar disturbances on humans and technological systems. Space weather has evolved in the past few decades from a collection of concerned agencies and researchers to a critical function of the National Weather Service of NOAA. The general effects have also evolved from the well-known telegraph disruptions of the mid-1800s to modern day disturbances of the electric power grid, communications and navigation, human spaceflight and spacecraft systems. The last two items in this list, and specifically the effects of penetrating radiation, were the impetus for the space weather broadcast implemented on NASA's Van Allen Probes' twin pair of satellites, launched in August of 2012 and orbiting directly through Earth's severe radiation belts. The Van Allen Probes mission, formerly the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), was renamed soon after launch to honor the discoverer of Earth's radiation belts at the beginning of the space age, the late James Van Allen (the spacecraft themselves are still referred to as RBSP-A and RBSP-B). The Van Allen Probes are one part of NASA's Living With a Star program formulated to advance the scientific understanding of the connection between solar disturbances, the resulting heliospheric conditions, and their effects on the geospace and Earth environment.

  10. A Physical Model of Electron Radiation Belts of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzato, L.; Sicard-Piet, A.; Bourdarie, S.

    2012-04-01

    Radiation belts causes irreversible damages on on-board instruments materials. That's why for two decades, ONERA proposes studies about radiation belts of magnetized planets. First, in the 90's, the development of a physical model, named Salammbô, carried out a model of the radiation belts of the Earth. Then, for few years, analysis of the magnetosphere of Jupiter and in-situ data (Pioneer, Voyager, Galileo) allow to build a physical model of the radiation belts of Jupiter. Enrolling on the Cassini age and thanks to all information collected, this study permits to adapt Salammbô jovian radiation belts model to the case of Saturn environment. Indeed, some physical processes present in the kronian magnetosphere are similar to those present in the magnetosphere of Jupiter (radial diffusion; interaction of energetic electrons with rings, moons, atmosphere; synchrotron emission). However, some physical processes have to be added to the kronian model (compared to the jovian model) because of the particularity of the magnetosphere of Saturn: interaction of energetic electrons with neutral particles from Enceladus, and wave-particle interaction. This last physical process has been studied in details with the analysis of CASSINI/RPWS (Radio and Plasma Waves Science) data. The major importance of the wave particles interaction is now well known in the case of the radiation belts of the Earth but it is important to investigate on its role in the case of Saturn. So, importance of each physical process has been studied and analysis of Cassini MIMI-LEMMS and CAPS data allows to build a model boundary condition (at L = 6). Finally, results of this study lead to a kronian electrons radiation belts model including radial diffusion, interactions of energetic electrons with rings, moons and neutrals particles and wave-particle interaction (interactions of electrons with atmosphere particles and synchrotron emission are too weak to be taken into account in this model). Then, to

  11. Radiation Belt Environment Model: Application to Space Weather and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics and variability of the radiation belts are of great scientific and space weather significance. A physics-based Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model has been developed to simulate and predict the radiation particle intensities. The RBE model considers the influences from the solar wind, ring current and plasmasphere. It takes into account the particle drift in realistic, time-varying magnetic and electric field, and includes diffusive effects of wave-particle interactions with various wave modes in the magnetosphere. The RBE model has been used to perform event studies and real-time prediction of energetic electron fluxes. In this talk, we will describe the RBE model equation, inputs and capabilities. Recent advancement in space weather application and artificial radiation belt study will be discussed as well.

  12. Recent Developments in the Radiation Belt Environment Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Glocer, A.; Zheng, Q.; Horne, R. B.; Meredith, N. P.; Albert, J. M.; Nagai, T.

    2010-01-01

    The fluxes of energetic particles in the radiation belts are found to be strongly controlled by the solar wind conditions. In order to understand and predict the radiation particle intensities, we have developed a physics-based Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model that considers the influences from the solar wind, ring current and plasmasphere. Recently, an improved calculation of wave-particle interactions has been incorporated. In particular, the model now includes cross diffusion in energy and pitch-angle. We find that the exclusion of cross diffusion could cause significant overestimation of electron flux enhancement during storm recovery. The RBE model is also connected to MHD fields so that the response of the radiation belts to fast variations in the global magnetosphere can be studied.Weare able to reproduce the rapid flux increase during a substorm dipolarization on 4 September 2008. The timing is much shorter than the time scale of wave associated acceleration.

  13. Recent Science Highlights of the Van Allen Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr

    2016-10-01

    The morning of 30 August 2012 saw an Atlas 5 rocket launch NASA's second Living With a Star spacecraft mission, the twin Radiation Belt Storm Probes, into an elliptic orbit cutting through Earth's radiation belts. Renamed the Van Allen Probes soon after launch, the Probes are designed to determine how the highly variable populations of high-energy charged particles within the radiation belts, dangerous to astronauts and satellites, are created, respond to solar variations, and evolve in space environments. The Van Allen Probes mission extends beyond the practical considerations of the hazard's of Earth's space environment. Twentieth century observations of space and astrophysical systems throughout the solar system and out into the observable universe have shown that the processes that generate intense particle radiation within magnetized environments such as Earth's are universal. During its mission the Van Allen Probes verified and quantified previously suggested energization processes, discovered new energization mechanisms, revealed the critical importance of dynamic plasma injections into the innermost magnetosphere, and used uniquely capable instruments to reveal inner radiation belt features that were all but invisible to previous sensors. This paper gives a brief overview of the mission, presents some recent science highlights, and discusses plans for the extended mission.

  14. Characterizing radiation belt electron precipitation losses using BARREL (Balloon Array for RBSP Relativistic Electron Losses) data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, G. S.; Smith, D. M.; Millan, R. M.; Sample, J. G.; McCarthy, M.; Woodger, L. A.; Halford, A. J.; Liang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation loss is a process whereby charged particles trapped in the radiation belts scatter into the Earth's atmosphere and are removed from the belt population. Balloon-borne x-ray detectors and satellites like SAMPEX have generally observed precipitation losses of three types, here characterized by their MLT distribution and related e-folding energy of the inferred precipitating electron energy spectrum, the third characterized by its burstiness and brief duration: soft (isotropic in MLT with e-folding for balloons between 50-100 keV, for SAMPEX between 100-300 keV), hard (concentrated in the dusk-to-midnight sector with e-folding for balloons > 200 keV, for SAMPEX > 400 keV), and microbursts (concentrated in the dawn-to-noon sector, bursty and very short temporal structure < 1s). Soft precipitation occurs much more often than the others, but has received less attention in the literature even though recent analysis of observed SAMPEX losses has shown that soft precipitation may account for the greatest electron loss from the quiet time radiation belts. The goal of this project is to compare/reconcile the different spectral characterizations of soft precipitation observed by BARREL and SAMPEX, and seek to understand the wave scattering mechanisms responsible for these losses.For this work we will present the 2013/2014 observed BARREL precipitation events cataloged according to type, (soft, hard, microburst), MLT and L distribution, and geomagnetic/space weather conditions. In particular, we will use Van Allen Probe data to define the state of the belts and the position of the balloon relative to the plasmapause and trapping boundary before and after precipitation events.

  15. On the Cross-Energy Cross-Pitch-Angle Coherence of Electrons in the Outer Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Reeves, G. D.; Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Henderson, M. G.; Kletzing, C.; Redmon, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Relativistic electrons, mainly trapped in the Earth's outer radiation belt, present a highly hazardous radiation environment for electronic hardware on board satellites and spacecraft. Thus developing a predictive capability for MeV electron levels as well as understanding the physics have been deemed critical for both space research and industry communities. In this work, we first demonstrate that a high cross-energy cross-pitch-angle coherence exists between the trapped ~MeV electrons and precipitating ~100s KeV electrons—observed respectively by Van Allen Probes and NOAA POES satellites in different orbits—by conducting a correlation survey on measurements from both high- and low-altitudes. Then, based upon the results, we further test the possibility of using a linear prediction filter model, driven by POES observations from low-Earth-orbits, to predict the energization of MeV electrons after geomagnetic storms, as well as the evolving distributions of MeV electrons in real time. Finally, to account for this high coherence, we provide our hypothesis based upon theoretical calculations and numerical simulations for individual events using diffusion codes with realistic particle and wave inputs from missions including Van Allen Probes. Results from this study unveil new knowledge on radiation belt dynamics, add new science significance to a long existing space infrastructure, and provide practical and useful tools to the whole space community.

  16. Structure and evolution of electron "zebra stripes" in the inner radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Foster, J. C.; Rankin, R.

    2016-05-01

    "Zebra stripes" are newly found energetic electron energy-spatial (L shell) distributed structure with an energy between tens to a few hundreds keV in the inner radiation belt. Using high-quality measurements of electron fluxes from Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) on board the twin Van Allen Probes, we carry out case and statistical studies from April 2013 to April 2014 to study the structural and evolutionary characteristics of zebra stripes below L = 3. It is revealed that the zebra stripes can be transformed into evenly spaced patterns in the electron drift frequency coordinate: the detrended logarithmic fluxes in each L shell region can be well described by sinusoidal functions of drift frequency. The "wave number" of this sinusoidal function, which corresponds to the reciprocal of the gap between two adjacent peaks in the drift frequency coordinate, increases in proportion to real time. Further, these structural and evolutionary characteristics of zebra stripes can be reproduced by an analytic model of the evolution of the particle distribution under a single monochromatic or static azimuthal electric field. It is shown that the essential ingredient for the formation of multiple zebra stripes is the periodic drift of particles. The amplitude of the zebra stripes shows a good positive correlation with Kp index, which indicates that the generation mechanism of zebra stripes should be related to geomagnetic activities.

  17. The Living with a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Mauk, B. H.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Fox, N. J.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Living With a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission is to understand, ideally to the point of predictability, how populations of relativistic electrons and ions in space form or change in response to the variable inputs of energy from the Sun. The investigations selected for this 2-spacecraft mission scheduled for launch in early 2012 address this task by making extensive observations of the plasma waves, thermal, ring current, and relativistic particle populations, and DC electric and magnetic fields within the Earth's inner and outer radiation belts. We first describe the current mission concept within the scope of NASA's strategic plan and the Vision for Exploration, and then consider how its observations will be used to define and quantify the processes that accelerate, transport, and remove particles in the Earth's radiation belts.

  18. A plan to clear energetic protons from the radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-11-01

    The Earth's radiation belts have been a known hazard to satellites since at least 1962, when an American high-altitude nuclear weapons test named Starfish Prime produced an artificial belt that disabled the first commercial communications satellite, TelStar 1. In the years since the Cold War, thousands of satellites have been put into orbit, and surface charging, high-energy protons, high-energy electrons known as "killer electrons," and other hazards of the inner magnetosphere have continued to take their toll. Satellites can be hardened against these radiation hazards, but some researchers have recently floated a more radical idea: If specially designed transmitters are put into space and set to emit tightly tuned waves, known as electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, they could potentially push the highly energetic protons out of the Earth's inner radiation belt, clearing the satellite's path.

  19. Power-Line Harmonic Radiation: Can It Significantly Affect the Earth's Radiation Belts?

    PubMed

    Thorne, R M; Tsurutani, B T

    1979-05-25

    It has been suggested that harmonic radiation from the earth's 50- and 60-hertz power transmission lines might significantly influence the distribution of electrons in the radiation belts. On the basis of observations presented here, it seems advisable to accept such a hypothesis with caution. New evidence suggests that power-line radiation does not play any major role in the nonadiabatic dynamics of radiation belt electrons.

  20. Power-line harmonic radiation - Can it significantly affect the earth's radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, R. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    It has been suggested that harmonic radiation from the earth's 50- and 60-hertz power transmission lines might significantly influence the distribution of electrons in the radiation belts. On the basis of observations presented here, it seems advisable to accept such a hypothesis with caution. New evidence suggests that power-line radiation does not play any major role in the nonadiabatic dynamics of radiation belt electrons.

  1. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A.; Shprits, Y.; Subbotin, D.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Resonant interactions between Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves and relativistic electrons may violate the third adiabatic invariant of motion, which produces radial diffusion in the electron radiation belts. This process plays an important role in the formation and structure of the outer electron radiation belt and is important for electron acceleration and losses in that region. Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interaction of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate their relative effect on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes quiet time and storm time geomagnetic activity and is compared to data based on satellite observations. Our calculations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. We show that the results of the 3D diffusion simulations depend on the assumed parametrization of waves. The differences between the simulations and potential missing physical mechanisms are discussed. References Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  2. Reproducing the observed energy-dependent structure of Earth's electron radiation belts during storm recovery with an event-specific diffusion model

    DOE PAGES

    Ripoll, J. -F.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Cunningham, Gregory Scott; ...

    2016-06-11

    Here, we present dynamic simulations of energy-dependent losses in the radiation belt “slot region” and the formation of the two-belt structure for the quiet days after the 1 March storm. The simulations combine radial diffusion with a realistic scattering model, based data-driven spatially and temporally resolved whistler-mode hiss wave observations from the Van Allen Probes satellites. The simulations reproduce Van Allen Probes observations for all energies and L shells (2–6) including (a) the strong energy dependence to the radiation belt dynamics (b) an energy-dependent outer boundary to the inner zone that extends to higher L shells at lower energies andmore » (c) an “S-shaped” energy-dependent inner boundary to the outer zone that results from the competition between diffusive radial transport and losses. We find that the characteristic energy-dependent structure of the radiation belts and slot region is dynamic and can be formed gradually in ~15 days, although the “S shape” can also be reproduced by assuming equilibrium conditions. The highest-energy electrons (E > 300 keV) of the inner region of the outer belt (L ~ 4–5) also constantly decay, demonstrating that hiss wave scattering affects the outer belt during times of extended plasmasphere. Through these simulations, we explain the full structure in energy and L shell of the belts and the slot formation by hiss scattering during storm recovery. We show the power and complexity of looking dynamically at the effects over all energies and L shells and the need for using data-driven and event-specific conditions.« less

  3. Reproducing the observed energy-dependent structure of Earth's electron radiation belts during storm recovery with an event-specific diffusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Ripoll, J. -F.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Cunningham, Gregory Scott; Loridan, V.; Denton, M.; Santolik, O.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C. A.; Turner, D. L.; Henderson, M. G.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.

    2016-06-11

    Here, we present dynamic simulations of energy-dependent losses in the radiation belt “slot region” and the formation of the two-belt structure for the quiet days after the 1 March storm. The simulations combine radial diffusion with a realistic scattering model, based data-driven spatially and temporally resolved whistler-mode hiss wave observations from the Van Allen Probes satellites. The simulations reproduce Van Allen Probes observations for all energies and L shells (2–6) including (a) the strong energy dependence to the radiation belt dynamics (b) an energy-dependent outer boundary to the inner zone that extends to higher L shells at lower energies and (c) an “S-shaped” energy-dependent inner boundary to the outer zone that results from the competition between diffusive radial transport and losses. We find that the characteristic energy-dependent structure of the radiation belts and slot region is dynamic and can be formed gradually in ~15 days, although the “S shape” can also be reproduced by assuming equilibrium conditions. The highest-energy electrons (E > 300 keV) of the inner region of the outer belt (L ~ 4–5) also constantly decay, demonstrating that hiss wave scattering affects the outer belt during times of extended plasmasphere. Through these simulations, we explain the full structure in energy and L shell of the belts and the slot formation by hiss scattering during storm recovery. We show the power and complexity of looking dynamically at the effects over all energies and L shells and the need for using data-driven and event-specific conditions.

  4. Radiation Belt Transport Driven by Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mueller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The creation of the Earth's outer zone radiation belts is attributed to earthward transport and adiabatic acceleration of electrons by drift-resonant interactions with electromagnetic fluctuations in the magnetosphere. Three types of radial transport driven by solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations that have been identified are: (1) radial diffusion [Falthammer, 1965], (2) significant changes in the phase space density radial profile due to a single or few ULF drift-resonant interactions [Ukhorskiy et al., 2006; Degeling et al., 2008], and (3) shock associated injections of radiation belt electrons occurring in less than a drift period [Li et al., 1993]. A progress report will be given on work to fully characterize different forms of radial transport and their effect on the Earth's radiation belts. The work is being carried out by computing test-particle trajectories in electric and magnetic fields from a simple analytic ULF field model and from global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere. Degeling, A. W., L. G. Ozeke, R. Rankin, I. R. Mann, and K. Kabin (2008), Drift resonant generation of peaked relativistic electron distributions by Pc 5 ULF waves, textit{J. Geophys. Res., 113}, A02208, doi:10.1029/2007JA012411. Fälthammar, C.-G. (1965), Effects of Time-Dependent Electric Fields on Geomagnetically Trapped Radiation, J. Geophys. Res., 70(11), 2503-2516, doi:10.1029/JZ070i011p02503. Li, X., I. Roth, M. Temerin, J. R. Wygant, M. K. Hudson, and J. B. Blake (1993), Simulation of the prompt energization and transport of radiation belt particles during the March 24, 1991 SSC, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 20}(22), 2423-2426, doi:10.1029/93GL02701. Ukhorskiy, A. Y., B. J. Anderson, K. Takahashi, and N. A. Tsyganenko (2006), Impact of ULF oscillations in solar wind dynamic pressure on the outer radiation belt electrons, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 33}(6), L06111, doi:10.1029/2005GL024380.

  5. Dynamics of the low altitude secondary proton radiation belt.

    PubMed

    Gusev, A A; Kohno, T; Spjeldvik, W N; Martin, I M; Pugacheva, G I; Turtelli, A

    1998-01-01

    At the interface between the upper atmosphere and the radiation belt region, there exists a secondary radiation belt consisting mainly of energetic ions that have become neutralized in the ring current and the main radiation belt and then re-ionized by collisions in the inner exosphere. The time history of the proton fluxes in the 0.64-35 MeV energy range was traced in the equatorial region beneath the main radiation belts during the three year period from 21 February 1984 to 26 March 1987 using data obtained with the HEP experiment on board the Japanese OHZORA satellite. During most of this period a fairly small proton flux of -1.2 cm-2 S-1 sr-1 was detected on geomagnetic field lines in the range 1.05 < L < 1.15. We report a few surprisingly deep and rapid flux decreases (flux reduction by typically two orders of magnitude). These flux decreases were also long in duration (lasting up to three months). We also registered abrupt flux increases where the magnitude of the proton flux enhancements could reach three orders of magnitude with an enhancement duration of 1-3 days. Possible reasons for these unexpected phenomena are discussed.

  6. Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Payload Safety Introduction Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, Chuck; Lampert, Dianna; Herrburger, Eric; Smith, Clay; Hill, Stuart; VonMehlem, Judi

    2008-01-01

    Mission of the Geospace Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) is: Gain s cientific understanding (to the point of predictability) of how populations of relativistic electrons and ions in space form or change in response to changes in solar activity and the solar wind.

  7. Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Loss and Energization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I. A.; Bourdarie, S.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Santolik, O.; Horne, R.; Mann, I.; Turner, D.

    2012-04-01

    We present the concept, objectives and expected impact of the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Loss and Energization) project, which is being implemented by a consortium of seven institutions (five European, one Canadian and one US) with support from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme. The MAARBLE project employs multi-spacecraft monitoring of the geospace environment, complemented by ground-based monitoring, in order to analyze and assess the physical mechanisms leading to radiation belt particle energization and loss. Particular attention is paid to the role of ULF/VLF waves. A database containing properties of the waves is being created and will be made available to the scientific community. Based on the wave database, a statistical model of the wave activity dependent on the level of geomagnetic activity, solar wind forcing, and magnetospheric region will be developed. Multi-spacecraft particle measurements will be incorporated into data assimilation tools, leading to new understanding of the causal relationships between ULF/VLF waves and radiation belt dynamics. Data assimilation techniques have been proven as a valuable tool in the field of radiation belts, able to guide 'the best' estimate of the state of a complex system. (The members of the MAARBLE team are: I. A. Daglis, S. Bourdarie, Y. Khotyaintsev, O. Santolik, R. Horne, I. Mann, D. Turner, A. Anastasiadis, V. Angelopoulos, G. Balasis, E. Chatzichristou, C. Cully, M. Georgiou, S. Glauert, B. Grison, I. Kolmasova, D. Lazaro, E. Macusova, V. Maget, C. Papadimitriou, G. Ropokis, I. Sandberg, M. Usanova.)

  8. Generation of Nonlinear Electric Field Bursts in the Outer Radiation Belt through Electrons Trapping by Oblique Whistler Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Drake, James; Mozer, Forrest

    2016-04-01

    Huge numbers of different nonlinear structures (double layers, electron holes, non-linear whistlers, etc. referred to as Time Domain Structures - TDS) have been observed by the electric field experiment on board the Van Allen Probes. A large part of the observed non-linear structures are associated with whistler waves and some of them can be directly driven by whistlers. The parameters favorable for the generation of TDS were studied experimentally as well as making use of 2-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for the system with inhomogeneous magnetic field. It is shown that an outward propagating front of whistlers and hot electrons amplifies oblique whistlers which collapse into regions of intense parallel electric field with properties consistent with recent observations of TDS from the Van Allen Probe satellites. Oblique whistlers seed the parallel electric fields that are driven by the beams. The resulting parallel electric fields trap and heat the precipitating electrons. These electrons drive spikes of intense parallel electric field with characteristics similar to the TDSs seen in the VAP data. The decoupling of the whistler wave and the nonlinear electrostatic component is shown in PIC simulation in the inhomogeneous magnetic field system. These effects are observed by the Van Allen Probes in the radiation belts. The precipitating hot electrons propagate away from the source region in intense bunches rather than as a smooth flux.

  9. Generation of Nonlinear Electric Field Bursts in the Outer Radiation Belt through Electrons Trapping by Oblique Whistler Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapitov, O. V.; Drake, J. F.; Mozer, F.

    2015-12-01

    Huge numbers of different nonlinear structures (double layers, electron holes, non-linear whistlers, etc. referred to as Time Domain Structures - TDS) have been observed by the electric field experiment on board the Van Allen Probes. A large part of the observed non-linear structures are associated with whistler waves and some of them can be directly driven by whistlers. The parameters favorable for the generation of TDS were studied experimentally as well as making use of 2-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for the system with inhomogeneous magnetic field. It is shown that an outward propagating front of whistlers and hot electrons amplifies oblique whistlers which collapse into regions of intense parallel electric field with properties consistent with recent observations of TDS from the Van Allen Probe satellites. Oblique whistlers seed the parallel electric fields that are driven by the beams. The resulting parallel electric fields trap and heat the precipitating electrons. These electrons drive spikes of intense parallel electric field with characteristics similar to the TDSs seen in the VAP data. The decoupling of the whistler wave and the nonlinear electrostatic component is shown in PIC simulation in the inhomogeneous magnetic field system. These effects are observed by the Van Allen Probes in the radiation belts. The precipitating hot electrons propagate away from the source region in intense bunches rather than as a smooth flux.

  10. A New Perspective on Trapped Radiation Belts in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, A.; Lodhi, M. A. K.; Wilson, T. L.

    2005-01-01

    The charged particle fluxes trapped in the magnetic dipole fields of certain planets in our Solar System are interesting signatures of planetary properties in space physics. They also represent a source of potentially hazardous radiation to spacecraft during planetary and interplanetary exploration. The Earth s trapped radiation belts have been studied for years and the physical mechanisms by which primary radiation from the Sun and Galaxy is captured is well understood. The higher-energy particles collide with molecules in the planetary atmosphere and initiate large cascades of secondary radiation which itself becomes trapped by the magnetic dipole field of the planet. Some of it is even backscattered as albedo neutrons.

  11. Highly Relativistic Radiation Belt Electron Acceleration, Transport, and Loss: Large Solar Storm Events of March and June 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Foster, J.C.; Erickson, P. J.; Fennell, Joseph; Blake, J. B.; Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G.; Spence, H.; Kletzing, C. A.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Two of the largest geomagnetic storms of the last decade were witnessed in 2015. On 17 March 2015, a coronal mass ejection-driven event occurred with a Dst (Disturbance Storm Time Ring Current Index) value reaching 223 nanoteslas. On 22 June 2015 another strong storm (Dst reaching 204 nanoteslas) was recorded. These two storms each produced almost total loss of radiation belt high-energy (E (Energy) greater than or approximately equal to 1 millielectronvolt) electron fluxes. Following the dropouts of radiation belt fluxes there were complex and rather remarkable recoveries of the electrons extending up to nearly 10 millielectronvolts in kinetic energy. The energized outer zone electrons showed a rich variety of pitch angle features including strong butterfly distributions with deep minima in flux at alpha equals 90 degrees. However, despite strong driving of outer zone earthward radial diffusion in these storms, the previously reported impenetrable barrier at L (L-shell magnetic field line value) approximately equal to 2.8 was pushed inward, but not significantly breached, and no E (Energy) greater than or approximately equal to 2.0 millielectronvolts electrons were seen to pass through the radiation belt slot region to reach the inner Van Allen zone. Overall, these intense storms show a wealth of novel features of acceleration, transport, and loss that are demonstrated in the present detailed analysis.

  12. Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Daniel N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; ...

    2016-07-01

    Two of the largest geomagnetic storms of the last decade were witnessed in 2015. On 17 March 2015, a coronal mass ejection-driven event occurred with a Dst (storm time ring current index) value reaching –223 nT. On 22 June 2015 another strong storm (Dst reaching –204 nT) was recorded. These two storms each produced almost total loss of radiation belt high-energy (E ≳ 1 MeV) electron fluxes. Following the dropouts of radiation belt fluxes there were complex and rather remarkable recoveries of the electrons extending up to nearly 10 MeV in kinetic energy. The energized outer zone electrons showed amore » rich variety of pitch angle features including strong “butterfly” distributions with deep minima in flux at α = 90°. However, despite strong driving of outer zone earthward radial diffusion in these storms, the previously reported “impenetrable barrier” at L ≈ 2.8 was pushed inward, but not significantly breached, and no E ≳ 2.0 MeV electrons were seen to pass through the radiation belt slot region to reach the inner Van Allen zone. Altogether, these intense storms show a wealth of novel features of acceleration, transport, and loss that are demonstrated in the present detailed analysis.« less

  13. Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015

    PubMed Central

    Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Two of the largest geomagnetic storms of the last decade were witnessed in 2015. On 17 March 2015, a coronal mass ejection‐driven event occurred with a Dst (storm time ring current index) value reaching −223 nT. On 22 June 2015 another strong storm (Dst reaching −204 nT) was recorded. These two storms each produced almost total loss of radiation belt high‐energy (E ≳ 1 MeV) electron fluxes. Following the dropouts of radiation belt fluxes there were complex and rather remarkable recoveries of the electrons extending up to nearly 10 MeV in kinetic energy. The energized outer zone electrons showed a rich variety of pitch angle features including strong “butterfly” distributions with deep minima in flux at α = 90°. However, despite strong driving of outer zone earthward radial diffusion in these storms, the previously reported “impenetrable barrier” at L ≈ 2.8 was pushed inward, but not significantly breached, and no E ≳ 2.0 MeV electrons were seen to pass through the radiation belt slot region to reach the inner Van Allen zone. Overall, these intense storms show a wealth of novel features of acceleration, transport, and loss that are demonstrated in the present detailed analysis. PMID:27867796

  14. Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Daniel N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; Henderson, Michael Gerard; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-07-01

    Two of the largest geomagnetic storms of the last decade were witnessed in 2015. On 17 March 2015, a coronal mass ejection-driven event occurred with a Dst (storm time ring current index) value reaching –223 nT. On 22 June 2015 another strong storm (Dst reaching –204 nT) was recorded. These two storms each produced almost total loss of radiation belt high-energy (E ≳ 1 MeV) electron fluxes. Following the dropouts of radiation belt fluxes there were complex and rather remarkable recoveries of the electrons extending up to nearly 10 MeV in kinetic energy. The energized outer zone electrons showed a rich variety of pitch angle features including strong “butterfly” distributions with deep minima in flux at α = 90°. However, despite strong driving of outer zone earthward radial diffusion in these storms, the previously reported “impenetrable barrier” at L ≈ 2.8 was pushed inward, but not significantly breached, and no E ≳ 2.0 MeV electrons were seen to pass through the radiation belt slot region to reach the inner Van Allen zone. Altogether, these intense storms show a wealth of novel features of acceleration, transport, and loss that are demonstrated in the present detailed analysis.

  15. Effects of ULF wave power on relativistic radiation belt electrons: 8-9 October 2012 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhotelov, D.; Rae, I. J.; Murphy, K. R.; Mann, I. R.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic ultralow-frequency (ULF) waves are known to play a substantial role in radial transport, acceleration, and loss of relativistic particles trapped in the Earth's outer radiation belt. Using in situ observations by multiple spacecraft operating in the vicinity of outer radiation belts, we analyze the temporal and spatial behavior of ULF waves throughout the geomagnetic storm of 8-9 October 2012 and compare with the dynamics of relativistic electron fluxes on board the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft. The analysis shows that the relativistic electron fluxes reduce from their prestorm levels during the first phase of the storm and rapidly increase during the second phase of the storm. We demonstrate that the behavior of ULF wave power changes throughout the storm, from ULF oscillations being a mixture of compressional and shear magnetic components during the first phase of the storm to ULF oscillations being dominated by transverse (shear) components during the second phase. We analyze the parameters of ULF-driven radial diffusion throughout the storm and compare the observed diffusion coefficients with their statistical averages. We demonstrate that the observed diffusion coefficients are strong enough to impact the redistribution of relativistic electron fluxes from and to the outer boundary of radiation belts and the diffusion might influence the effects of any local electron acceleration by transporting fluxes inward or outward according to phase space density gradients.

  16. Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Jaynes, A N; Kanekal, S G; Foster, J C; Erickson, P J; Fennell, J F; Blake, J B; Zhao, H; Li, X; Elkington, S R; Henderson, M G; Reeves, G D; Spence, H E; Kletzing, C A; Wygant, J R

    2016-07-01

    Two of the largest geomagnetic storms of the last decade were witnessed in 2015. On 17 March 2015, a coronal mass ejection-driven event occurred with a Dst (storm time ring current index) value reaching -223 nT. On 22 June 2015 another strong storm (Dst reaching -204 nT) was recorded. These two storms each produced almost total loss of radiation belt high-energy (E ≳ 1 MeV) electron fluxes. Following the dropouts of radiation belt fluxes there were complex and rather remarkable recoveries of the electrons extending up to nearly 10 MeV in kinetic energy. The energized outer zone electrons showed a rich variety of pitch angle features including strong "butterfly" distributions with deep minima in flux at α = 90°. However, despite strong driving of outer zone earthward radial diffusion in these storms, the previously reported "impenetrable barrier" at L ≈ 2.8 was pushed inward, but not significantly breached, and no E ≳ 2.0 MeV electrons were seen to pass through the radiation belt slot region to reach the inner Van Allen zone. Overall, these intense storms show a wealth of novel features of acceleration, transport, and loss that are demonstrated in the present detailed analysis.

  17. Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-07-01

    Two of the largest geomagnetic storms of the last decade were witnessed in 2015. On 17 March 2015, a coronal mass ejection-driven event occurred with a Dst (storm time ring current index) value reaching -223 nT. On 22 June 2015 another strong storm (Dst reaching -204 nT) was recorded. These two storms each produced almost total loss of radiation belt high-energy (E ≳ 1 MeV) electron fluxes. Following the dropouts of radiation belt fluxes there were complex and rather remarkable recoveries of the electrons extending up to nearly 10 MeV in kinetic energy. The energized outer zone electrons showed a rich variety of pitch angle features including strong "butterfly" distributions with deep minima in flux at α = 90°. However, despite strong driving of outer zone earthward radial diffusion in these storms, the previously reported "impenetrable barrier" at L ≈ 2.8 was pushed inward, but not significantly breached, and no E ≳ 2.0 MeV electrons were seen to pass through the radiation belt slot region to reach the inner Van Allen zone. Overall, these intense storms show a wealth of novel features of acceleration, transport, and loss that are demonstrated in the present detailed analysis.

  18. On the time needed to reach an equilibrium structure of the radiation belts

    DOE PAGES

    Ripoll, J. -F.; Loran, V.; Cunningham, Gregory Scott; ...

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we complement the notion of equilibrium states of the radiation belts with a discussion on the dynamics and time needed to reach equilibrium. We solve for the equilibrium states obtained using 1D radial diffusion with recently developed hiss and chorus lifetimes at constant values of Kp = 1, 3 and 6. We find that the equilibrium states at moderately low Kp, when plotted vs L-shell (L) and energy (E), display the same interesting S-shape for the inner edge of the outer belt as recently observed by the Van Allen Probes. The S-shape is also produced as themore » radiation belts dynamically evolve toward the equilibrium state when initialized to simulate the buildup after a massive dropout or to simulate loss due to outward diffusion from a saturated state. Physically, this shape, intimately linked with the slot structure, is due to the dependence of electron loss rate (originating from wave-particle interactions) on both energy and L-shell. Equilibrium electron flux profiles are governed by the Biot number (τDiffusion/τloss), with large Biot number corresponding to low fluxes and low Biot number to large fluxes. The time it takes for the flux at a specific (L, E) to reach the value associated with the equilibrium state, starting from these different initial states, is governed by the initial state of the belts, the property of the dynamics (diffusion coefficients), and the size of the domain of computation. Its structure shows a rather complex scissor form in the (L, E) plane. The equilibrium value (phase space density or flux) is practically reachable only for selected regions in (L, E) and geomagnetic activity. Convergence to equilibrium requires hundreds of days in the inner belt for E > 300 keV and moderate Kp (≤3). It takes less time to reach equilibrium during disturbed geomagnetic conditions (Kp ≥ 3), when the system evolves faster. Restricting our interest to the slot region, below L = 4, we find that only small regions in (L, E) space

  19. On the time needed to reach an equilibrium structure of the radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Ripoll, J. -F.; Loran, V.; Cunningham, Gregory Scott; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Shprits, Y. Y.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we complement the notion of equilibrium states of the radiation belts with a discussion on the dynamics and time needed to reach equilibrium. We solve for the equilibrium states obtained using 1D radial diffusion with recently developed hiss and chorus lifetimes at constant values of Kp = 1, 3 and 6. We find that the equilibrium states at moderately low Kp, when plotted vs L-shell (L) and energy (E), display the same interesting S-shape for the inner edge of the outer belt as recently observed by the Van Allen Probes. The S-shape is also produced as the radiation belts dynamically evolve toward the equilibrium state when initialized to simulate the buildup after a massive dropout or to simulate loss due to outward diffusion from a saturated state. Physically, this shape, intimately linked with the slot structure, is due to the dependence of electron loss rate (originating from wave-particle interactions) on both energy and L-shell. Equilibrium electron flux profiles are governed by the Biot number (τDiffusionloss), with large Biot number corresponding to low fluxes and low Biot number to large fluxes. The time it takes for the flux at a specific (L, E) to reach the value associated with the equilibrium state, starting from these different initial states, is governed by the initial state of the belts, the property of the dynamics (diffusion coefficients), and the size of the domain of computation. Its structure shows a rather complex scissor form in the (L, E) plane. The equilibrium value (phase space density or flux) is practically reachable only for selected regions in (L, E) and geomagnetic activity. Convergence to equilibrium requires hundreds of days in the inner belt for E > 300 keV and moderate Kp (≤3). It takes less time to reach equilibrium during disturbed geomagnetic conditions (Kp ≥ 3), when the system evolves faster. Restricting our interest to the slot region, below L = 4, we find that only small regions in

  20. On the propagation of uncertainties in radiation belt simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporeale, Enrico; Shprits, Yuri; Chandorkar, Mandar; Drozdov, Alexander; Wing, Simon

    2016-11-01

    We present the first study of the uncertainties associated with radiation belt simulations, performed in the standard quasi-linear diffusion framework. In particular, we estimate how uncertainties of some input parameters propagate through the nonlinear simulation, producing a distribution of outputs that can be quite broad. Here we restrict our focus on two-dimensional simulations (in energy and pitch angle space) of parallel-propagating chorus waves only, and we study as stochastic input parameters the geomagnetic index Kp (that characterizes the time dependency of an idealized storm), the latitudinal extent of waves, and the average electron density. We employ a collocation method, thus performing an ensemble of simulations. The results of this work point to the necessity of shifting to a probabilistic interpretation of radiation belt simulation results and suggest that an accurate specification of a time-dependent density model is crucial for modeling the radiation environment.

  1. Large enhancement of highly energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt and its transport into the inner radiation belt inferred from MDS-1 satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, T.; Matsumoto, H.

    2016-03-01

    We have examined a large increase of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt and its penetration into the inner radiation belt over slot region using the MDS-1 satellite observations. Result of analyses demonstrates that a large increase took place in the spring and autumn seasons, and we have newly confirmed that the penetration of outer belt electrons to the inner radiation zone took place during the big magnetic storms by examining a pitch angle distribution of the penetrating electrons.

  2. Summary of types of radiation belt electron precipitation observed by BARREL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halford, Alexa

    2016-07-01

    The Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation belt Electron Loss (BARREL) was able to infer precipitation of radiation belt electrons on multiple time scales and due to multiple loss mechanisms. One storm will be specifically highlighted which occurred on 26 January 2013 when a solar wind shock hit the Earth. Although MeV electrons were observed to be lost due to an EMIC wave event [Zhang et al in prep], and multiple periods of electron loss during substorms were observed [Rae et al submitted JGR, Mann et al in prep], we will consider an event period where loss associated with multiple time scales, and thus possibly different loss mechanisms was observed from 1000 - 1200 UT on 26 January 2013. At about 1005 UT on 26 January 2013 an injection of radiation belt electrons followed by drift echoes for energies of ˜80 - 400 keV. BARREL observed X-rays with energies less than 180 keV associated with multiple temporal structures during the drift echo event period. The Van Allen Probes were at similar L-values but upwards of 2 hours away in MLT. Upper band chorus and ULF waves were observed during the event period. Throughout the beginning of the event period, microbursts were clearly observed. During this time lower band chorus waves as well as time domain structures were observed at Van Allen Probe A located upwards of 2 hours away in MLT. This large difference in MLT meant that neither potential loss mechanism was able to be clearly associated with the microbursts. As the lower band chorus and time domain structures were observed to recede, the microbursts were also observed to subside. ULF time scale modulation of the X-rays was also observed throughout most of the event period. We will examine if the ULF waves are the cause of the precipitation themselves, or are modulating the loss of particles from a secondary loss mechanism [Brito et al 2015 JGR, Rae et al Submitted JGR]. Although the 100s ms and ULF time scales are clearly observed, there is an ˜20 minute

  3. Characterization of radiation belt electron energy spectra from CRRES observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, W. R.; Lindstrom, C. D.; Ginet, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    Energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt and the slot region exhibit a wide variety of energy spectral forms, more so than radiation belt protons. We characterize the spatial and temporal dependence of these forms using observations from the CRRES satellite Medium Electron Sensor A (MEA) and High-Energy Electron Fluxmeter (HEEF) instruments, together covering an energy range 0.15-8 MeV. Spectra were classified with two independent methods, data clustering and curve-fitting analyses, in each case defining categories represented by power law, exponential, and bump-on-tail (BOT) or other complex shapes. Both methods yielded similar results, with BOT, exponential, and power law spectra respectively dominating in the slot region, outer belt, and regions just beyond the outer belt. The transition from exponential to power law spectra occurs at higher L for lower magnetic latitude. The location of the transition from exponential to BOT spectra is highly correlated with the location of the plasmapause. In the slot region during the days following storm events, electron spectra were observed to evolve from exponential to BOT yielding differential flux minima at 350-650 keV and maxima at 1.5-2 MeV; such evolution has been attributed to energy-dependent losses from scattering by whistler hiss.

  4. Post-workshop models of Jupiter's radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, N.

    1972-01-01

    Models for the charged particle populations of Jupiter's trapped radiation belts were derived at the Jupiter Radiation Belt Workshop on the basis of several assumptions which represented a consensus of opinion. It was possible to improve the models on the basis of work performed after the workshop concluded. These improvements affect the models in two ways. The effects of special relativity on the particle energy and flux dependences in the magnetosphere were included in a derivation based on L-shell diffusion with conservation of the magnetic moment. Quantitative conclusions are available for the limit which ion cyclotron instability places on the proton population. A set of models which incorporates these developments in a way consistent with the original workshop assumptions and conclusions is described.

  5. Jupiter's radiation belts and the sweeping effect of its satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, G. D.; Hess, W. N.

    1973-01-01

    Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts are analyzed, with particular reference to the sweeping effect of its five inner satellites, located deep within its magnetosphere. The characteristics of trapped electrons and protons with a magnetic moment of 50 MeV/G, considered typical at Jupiter, are calculated. The assumption is then made that a particle would be removed from the radiation belt if, in its normal motion, it would happen to impact a satellite. The mean absorption time before impact is calculated for particles located at the radial distance of each of the satellites. This average lifetime is found to be of the order of a few days. A characteristic diffusion time near each satellite was calculated, assuming violation of the third invariant due to magnetic fluctuations associated with fluctuations in the solar wind.

  6. Energetic radiation belt electron precipitation showing ULF modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, T. V.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2012-12-01

    The energization and loss processes for energetic radiation belt electrons are not yet well understood. Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves have been correlated with both enhancement in outer zone radiation belt electron flux and modulation of precipitation loss to the atmosphere. This study considers the effects of ULF waves in the Pc-4 to Pc-5 range on electron loss to the atmosphere on a time scale of several minutes. Global simulations using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model fields as drivers provide a valuable tool for studying the dynamics of these ˜MeV energetic particles. ACE satellite measurements of the MHD solar wind parameters are used as the upstream boundary condition for the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) 3D MHD code calculation of fields, used to drive electrons in a 3D test particle simulation that keeps track of attributes like energy, pitch-angle and L-shell. The simulation results are compared with balloon observations obtained during the January 21, 2005 CME-shock event. Rapid loss of 20~keV to 1.5~MeV electrons was detected by balloon-borne measurements of Bremsstrahlung X-rays during the MINIS balloon campaign following the shock arrival at Earth. The global response of the radiation belts to this particular CME-shock driven storm was investigated focusing on precipitation mechanisms by which ULF waves, seen both in the simulations and observations influence the radiation belt population. A primary cause for the precipitation modulation seen in both the simulation and the MINIS campaign is suggested based on the lowering of mirror points due to compressional magnetic field oscillations.

  7. Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics Driven by Large-Amplitude Whistlers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Tel'nikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration of radiation belt electrons driven by oblique large-amplitude whistler waves is studied. We show analytically and numerically that this is a stochastic process; the intensity of which depends on the wave power modified by Bessel functions. The type of this dependence is determined by the character of the nonlinear interaction due to coupling between action and phase. The results show that physically significant quantities have a relatively weak dependence on the wave power.

  8. The Earth’s Radiation Belts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-20

    release of chemical substances, injection of Y -, metallic powders , and electromagnetic wave energy production. The effects of some ,)f these modification...gvrofrequency H2=J J1 (5. 24’) m 0c Y " one can express the instantaneous vector gyroradius as S c (5. 25) 0 qB d p c p d d = ldt = -q dt.- q13 24I .4 * -.--. 9...Fundamentals of Radiology, -. . Perganion Press, New York. 107. l)esrosier, N. W., and Rosenstock, H. Al. (1960) Radiation Technology in Eood

  9. Megavolt Parallel Potentials Arising from Double-Layer Streams in the Earth's Outer Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozer, F. S.; Bale, S. D.; Bonnell, J. W.; Chaston, C. C.; Roth, I.; Wygant, J.

    2013-12-01

    Huge numbers of double layers carrying electric fields parallel to the local magnetic field line have been observed on the Van Allen probes in connection with in situ relativistic electron acceleration in the Earth’s outer radiation belt. For one case with adequate high time resolution data, 7000 double layers were observed in an interval of 1 min to produce a 230 000 V net parallel potential drop crossing the spacecraft. Lower resolution data show that this event lasted for 6 min and that more than 1 000 000 volts of net parallel potential crossed the spacecraft during this time. A double layer traverses the length of a magnetic field line in about 15 s and the orbital motion of the spacecraft perpendicular to the magnetic field was about 700 km during this 6 min interval. Thus, the instantaneous parallel potential along a single magnetic field line was the order of tens of kilovolts. Electrons on the field line might experience many such potential steps in their lifetimes to accelerate them to energies where they serve as the seed population for relativistic acceleration by coherent, large amplitude whistler mode waves. Because the double-layer speed of 3100km/s is the order of the electron acoustic speed (and not the ion acoustic speed) of a 25 eV plasma, the double layers may result from a new electron acoustic mode. Acceleration mechanisms involving double layers may also be important in planetary radiation belts such as Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, in the solar corona during flares, and in astrophysical objects.

  10. Megavolt parallel potentials arising from double-layer streams in the Earth's outer radiation belt.

    PubMed

    Mozer, F S; Bale, S D; Bonnell, J W; Chaston, C C; Roth, I; Wygant, J

    2013-12-06

    Huge numbers of double layers carrying electric fields parallel to the local magnetic field line have been observed on the Van Allen probes in connection with in situ relativistic electron acceleration in the Earth's outer radiation belt. For one case with adequate high time resolution data, 7000 double layers were observed in an interval of 1 min to produce a 230,000 V net parallel potential drop crossing the spacecraft. Lower resolution data show that this event lasted for 6 min and that more than 1,000,000 volts of net parallel potential crossed the spacecraft during this time. A double layer traverses the length of a magnetic field line in about 15 s and the orbital motion of the spacecraft perpendicular to the magnetic field was about 700 km during this 6 min interval. Thus, the instantaneous parallel potential along a single magnetic field line was the order of tens of kilovolts. Electrons on the field line might experience many such potential steps in their lifetimes to accelerate them to energies where they serve as the seed population for relativistic acceleration by coherent, large amplitude whistler mode waves. Because the double-layer speed of 3100  km/s is the order of the electron acoustic speed (and not the ion acoustic speed) of a 25 eV plasma, the double layers may result from a new electron acoustic mode. Acceleration mechanisms involving double layers may also be important in planetary radiation belts such as Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, in the solar corona during flares, and in astrophysical objects.

  11. Radiation belt electron acceleration during the 17 March 2015 geomagnetic storm: Observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Zhang, X.-J.; Li, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Kanekal, S. G.; Angelopoulos, V.; Green, J. C.; Goldstein, J.

    2016-06-01

    Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. During the largest storm over the past decade (17 March 2015), relativistic electrons experienced fairly rapid acceleration up to ~7 MeV within 2 days after an initial substantial dropout, as observed by Van Allen Probes. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during the recovery phase of this large storm using a 3-D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the observed and simulated electron evolution, we found that chorus plays a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV near the developing peak location and produces characteristic flat-top pitch angle distributions. By only including radial diffusion, the simulation underestimates the observed electron acceleration, while radial diffusion plays an important role in redistributing electrons and potentially accelerates them to even higher energies. Moreover, plasmaspheric hiss is found to provide efficient pitch angle scattering losses for hundreds of keV electrons, while its scattering effect on > 1 MeV electrons is relatively slow. Although an additional loss process is required to fully explain the overestimated electron fluxes at multi-MeV, the combined physical processes of radial diffusion and pitch angle and energy diffusion by chorus and hiss reproduce the observed electron dynamics remarkably well, suggesting that quasi-linear diffusion theory is reasonable to evaluate radiation belt electron dynamics during this big storm.

  12. Modeling the Inner Magnetosphere: Radiation Belts, Ring Current, and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The space environment is a complex system defined by regions of differing length scales, characteristic energies, and physical processes. It is often difficult, or impossible, to treat all aspects of the space environment relative to a particular problem with a single model. In our studies, we utilize several models working in tandem to examine this highly interconnected system. The methodology and results will be presented for three focused topics: 1) Rapid radiation belt electron enhancements, 2) Ring current study of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), Dst, and plasma composition, and 3) Examination of the outflow of ionospheric ions. In the first study, we use a coupled MHD magnetosphere - kinetic radiation belt model to explain recent Akebono/RDM observations of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. In the second study, we present initial results of a ring current study using a newly coupled kinetic ring current model with an MHD magnetosphere model. Results of a dst study for four geomagnetic events are shown. Moreover, direct comparison with TWINS ENA images are used to infer the role that composition plays in the ring current. In the final study, we directly model the transport of plasma from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. We especially focus on the role of photoelectrons and and wave-particle interactions. The modeling methodology for each of these studies will be detailed along with the results.

  13. Shield Optimization Program, Part 2: Effects of Van Allen Belt Radiation on SDI Weapon Platforms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    104 KV2 109 -110 -111 KV2 110 -111 KV2 111 KV2 112 -108 KV3 113 -114 KV3 114 KV3 115 -113 -116 KV3 116 KV3 117 -115 -118 KV3 118 KV3 119 -117...120 KV3 120 -121 -122 KV3 121 -122 KV3 122 -123 KV3 123 -124 -119 KV3 124 -125 -126 KV3 125 -126 KV3 126 KV3 127 -123 KV4 128 -129 KV4 129

  14. The radiation belt origin of Uranus' nightside radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. A.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of the location of the source field lines of the smooth nightside component of Uranus kilometric radiation, the most likely free energy source is the outer radiation belts. As the terminator sweeps over the magnetic north polar region, precipitation of electrons generated by solar heating of the upper atmosphere and submergence of the electron mirror points deeper in the atmosphere will create a backscattered electron distribution with an enhanced population at large pitch angles. The clocklike radio emission turns out to be a direct consequence of the terminator's control of the emission process.

  15. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-03-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV-even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp.

  16. Role of ULF Waves in Radiation Belt and Ring Current Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, I. R.; Murphy, K. R.; Rae, I. J.; Ozeke, L.; Milling, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    combination of data from ground arrays such as CARISMA and the contemporaneous operation of the NASA Van Allen Probes (VAP) mission offers an excellent basis for understanding this cross-energy plasma coupling which spans more than 6 orders of magnitude in energy. Explaining the casual connections between plasmas in the plasmasphere (eV), ring current (keV), and radiation belt (MeV), via the intermediaries of plasma waves, is key to understanding inner magnetosphere dynamics. This work has received funding from the European Union under the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-Space) under grant agreement n 284520 for the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project.

  17. Lighting-induced Electron Precipitation (LEP) Events versus Geomagnetic Activity: A Probe Tool to Re-Evaluate the Electron Radiation Belt Loss Mechanisms (P16)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, J. H.; Raulin, J.-P.; Correia, E.; Brum, C. G. M.

    2006-11-01

    We present the first results of an incipient attempt to re-model the Van Allen electron radiation belts equilibrium mechanisms. During the 23rd cycle solar minimum period (1995-1997) the Lightning- induced Electron Precipitation (LEP) events (electron precipitation from the geo-space to the upper Earth atmosphere) occurrence at the Antarctica Peninsula region was collected and studied. With statistical techniques we have reproduced the pattern of the events incidence during that period. The year 1998 was also analyzed and two well-defined geomagnetic storms (01-07 May and 26-31 Aug) were studied in association with the Trimpi events data. We have confirmed the narrow relationship between events occurrence rate and geomagnetic activity. The next step, in order to carry on the model, will be the modeling of the solar maximum LEP occurrence and to compute these results in the present radiation belts population models.

  18. Understanding the Dynamics of the Coupled Ring Current Radiation Belt System Using 4D VERB Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.; Drozdov, A.; Orlova, K.; Spasojevic, M.

    2014-12-01

    Predicting and understanding the non-linear response of different electron populations in the inner magnetosphere, including ring current and higher energy radiation belts, has been a grand challenge since the beginning of the space age. During this past decade, there have been a number of long-term simulations that used lower energy boundary condition observations around geosynchronous orbit. In this study, we set up observations at around 15 RE and study how the combined convective-diffusive transport can result in the acceleration of keV to relativistic and ultra-relativistic energies. We show that while lower energy radial transport is dominated by the convection, higher energy transport is dominated by the diffusive radial transport. MLT dependent diffusion confidents allow us to study how difference in wave properties at different MLT can influence the dynamics of the particles. Inclusion of adiabatic changes also allows us to study the radial transport that results from pitch-angle scattering and adiabatic changes. We also show that there exists an intermediate range of energies for electrons for which both processes work simultaneously. We show the comparison of the 4D VERB simulations with the Van Allen Probes measurements.

  19. Control of the innermost electron radiation belt by large-scale electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Su, Y.-J.; Blake, J. B.

    2016-09-01

    Electron measurements from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer instruments on Van Allen Probes, for kinetic energies ˜100 to 400 keV, show characteristic dynamical features of the innermost (L≲1.3) radiation belt: rapid injections, slow decay, and structured energy spectra. There are also periods of steady or slowly increasing intensity and of fast decay following injections. Local time asymmetry, with higher intensity near dawn, is interpreted as evidence for drift shell distortion by a convection electric field of magnitude ˜0.4 mV/m during geomagnetically quiet times. Fast fluctuations in the electric field, on the drift time scale, cause inward diffusion. Assuming that they are proportional to changes in Kp, the resulting diffusion coefficient is sufficient to replenish trapped electrons lost by atmospheric scattering. Major electric field increases cause injections by inward electron transport. An injection associated with the June 2015 magnetic storm is consistent with an enhanced field magnitude ˜5 mV/m. Subsequent drift echoes cause spectral structure.

  20. Canadian radiation belt science in the ILWS era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, I. R.

    The Outer Radiation Belt Injection, Transport, Acceleration, and Loss Satellite (ORBITALS) is a Canadian Space Agency small satellite mission proposed as a Canadian contribution to the satellite infrastructure for the International Living With a Star (ILWS) program. Planned to operate contemporaneously with the NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), the ORBITALS will monitor the energetic electron and ion populations in the inner magnetosphere across a wide range of energies (keV to tens of MeV) as well as the dynamic electric and magnetic fields, waves, and cold plasma environment which govern the injection, transport, acceleration and loss of these energetic and space weather critical particle populations in the inner magnetosphere. Currently in Phase A Design Study, the ORBITALS will be launched into a low-inclination GTO-like orbit which every second orbit maximizes the long lasting apogee-pass conjunctions with both the ground-based instruments of the Canadian Geospace Monitoring (CGSM) array as well as with the GOES East and West and geosynchronous communications satellites in the North American sector. In a twelve-hour orbit, every second apogee will conjunct with instrumentation 180 degree in longitude away in the Asian sector. Specifically, the ORBITALS will make the measurements necessary to reach reveal fundamental new understanding of the relative importance of different physical processes (for example VLF verses ULF waves) which shape the energetic particle populations in the inner magnetosphere, as well as providing the raw radiation measurements at MEO altitudes necessary for the development of the next-generation of radiation belt specification models. On-board experiments will also monitor the dose, single event upset, and deep-dielectric charging responses of electronic components on-orbit. Supporting ground-based measurements of ULF and higher frequency wave fields from the Canadian CARISMA (www.carisma.ca) magnetometer array, as well as from

  1. Characteristics of pitch angle distributions of hundreds of keV electrons in the slot region and inner radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Malaspina, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The pitch angle distribution (PAD) of energetic electrons in the slot region and inner radiation belt received little attention in the past decades due to the lack of quality measurements. Using the state-of-the-art pitch angle-resolved data from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer instrument onboard the Van Allen Probes, a detailed analysis of hundreds of keV electron PADs below L = 4 is performed, in which the PADs are categorized into three types: normal (flux peaking at 90°), cap (exceedingly peaking narrowly around 90°), and 90° minimum (lower flux at 90°) PADs. By examining the characteristics of the PADs of ˜460 keV electrons for over a year, we find that the 90° minimum PADs are generally present in the inner belt (L<2), while normal PADs dominate at L˜3.5-4. In the region between, 90° minimum PADs dominate during injection times and normal PADs dominate during quiet times. Cap PADs appear mostly at the decay phase of storms in the slot region and are likely caused by the pitch angle scattering of hiss waves. Fitting the normal PADs into sinnα form, the parameter n is much higher below L = 3 than that in the outer belt and relatively constant in the inner belt but changes significantly in the slot region (2 < L < 3) during injection times. As for the 90° minimum PADs, by performing a detailed case study, we find in the slot region this type of PAD is likely caused by chorus wave heating, but this mechanism can hardly explain the formation of 90° minimum PADs at the center of inner belt.

  2. Electron and proton flux models for Jupiter's radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopp, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Estimates of the energetic particle distribution in Jupiter's radiation belts are presented and are compared with previous estimates. Mathematical expressions are developed for the equatorial electron and proton fluxes, shielded electron and proton dose rates, and radiation lifetimes of electronic circuits. It is calculated that a 1 g/sq cm aluminum shield will screen out all protons of energy less than 27.5 MeV, and a 2 g/sq cm shield will screen out protons less than 40.6 MeV. The radiation lifetimes are based on a maximum permissible dose value of 10 million rads, a value 1/2 to 1/3 of the flux at which electronic circuits begin to fail. Estimated increases in lifetimes by using a 3 x 50 orbit instead of a 3 x 3 orbit, and going from 1 to 2 g/sq cm are given.

  3. Energetic radiation belt electron precipitation showing ULF modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, T.; Woodger, L.; Hudson, M.; Millan, R.

    2012-11-01

    The energization and loss processes for energetic radiation belt electrons are not yet well understood. Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves have been correlated with both enhancement in outer zone radiation belt electron flux and modulation of precipitation loss to the atmosphere. This study considers the effects of ULF waves in the Pc-4 to Pc-5 period range (45 s-600 s) on electron loss to the atmosphere on a time scale of several minutes. Global simulations using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model fields as drivers provide a valuable tool for studying the dynamics of these ˜MeV energetic particles. ACE satellite measurements of the MHD solar wind parameters are used as the upstream boundary condition for the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) 3D MHD code calculation of fields, used to drive electrons in a 3D test particle simulation that keeps track of attributes like energy, pitch-angle and L-shell. The simulation results are compared with balloon observations obtained during the January 21, 2005 CME-shock event. Rapid loss of 20 keV to 1.5 MeV electrons was detected by balloon-borne measurements of bremsstrahlung X-rays during the MINIS campaign following the shock arrival at Earth. The global precipitation response of the radiation belts to this CME-shock driven storm was investigated focusing on their interaction with ULF waves. A primary cause for the precipitation modulation seen in both the simulation and the MINIS campaign is suggested based on the lowering of mirror points due to compressional magnetic field oscillations.

  4. Galactic Cosmic Rays impact on Saturn innermost radiation belt formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, A.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Dandouras, I.

    2014-04-01

    Rely on Cassini observations of ENAs during the orbital insertion in 2004, Krimigis et al. pointed out possible existence of the innermost radiation belt between Saturn 's atmosphere and D-ring (1). In the end of mission in 2017, Cassini is going to come again to this enigmatic and various region and pass directly through this narrow gap between planet and its rings. In our study we would like to simulate possible sources and losses for energetic particles population there and model the environment, which Cassini will meet during these last orbits. As a main possible sources for the innermost radiation belt we assume the interaction of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) with the Saturn's atmosphere and rings, which due to CRAND process can produce the keV-MeV ions or electrons in the region and the double charge exchange of the ENAs, coming from the middle magnetosphere, what can bring the keV ions to the region of our interest. Both of these possible sources are possible to evaluate using the charged particle tracer, which we developed in our group. It works in different modes (Newton-Lorentz full equation of motion, guiding centre or bounce averaged approximations), and allows use of different magnetic field models (from simple dipole magnetic field till complex realistic magnetic field model like Khurana model of Saturn's magnetosphere) for both forward and backward tracing simulations. This charged particle tracer was validated using the comparison of the simulation results and observations during several flybys of Cassini by icy moons of Saturn. Through the backward-tracing of GCRs around the planet we evaluate how the ring shadow filters the GCR spectrum that hits the Saturn's atmosphere and how non-dipolar effects change the Strömer cutoff rigidities of GCRs, especially for the high-latitude atmosphere that maps magnetically in the outer magnetosphere. Also we estimate the production of secondaries (and from the multiple impacts of these secondaries on the

  5. Jupiter's radiation belts and the sweeping effect of its satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, G. D.; Hess, W. N.

    1972-01-01

    Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts were analyzed, with particular reference to the effect of its five inner satellites, located within its magnetosphere. The characteristics of trapped electrons and protons with a magnetic moment of 50 MeV/gauss, considered typical at Jupiter, were calculated. The mean absorption time before impact was calculated for particles located at the radial distance of each of the satellites. A characteristic diffusion time near each satellite was calculated, assuming violation of the third invariant due to magnetic fluctuations associated with fluctuations in the solar wind. This diffusion time was found to be long compared with the absorption lifetimes at Europa and Amalthea.

  6. Solar wind, radiation belt electrons and atmospheric vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova, Irina; Tinsley, Brian; Zhou, Limin

    The association of atmospheric vorticity changes with solar wind sector structure explored by John Wilcox and Walter Orr Roberts in the 1970s is examined in terms of the sector related minima in solar wind speed, and associated minima in relativistic electron precipitation from the outer radiation belt. Stronger correlations of atmospheric vorticity with the relativistic electron flux are found than with either solar wind speed or the passage of magnetic sector boundaries over the Earth. This is consistent with changes in the ionosphere-earth current density affecting cloud microphysics, with the ionization from the Bremsstrahlung X-rays from the relativistic electron precipitation increasing the conductivity of the stratosphere.

  7. Energy transfer from lower energy to higher-energy electrons mediated by whistler waves in the radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyar, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    We study the problem of energy exchange between waves and particles, which leads to energization of the latter, in an unstable plasma typical of the radiation belts. The ongoing Van Allen Probes space mission brought this problem among the most discussed in space physics. A free energy which is present in an unstable plasma provides the indispensable condition for energy transfer from lower energy particles to higher-energy particles via resonant wave-particle interaction. This process is studied in detail by the example of electron interactions with whistler mode wave packets originated from lightning-induced emission. We emphasize that in an unstable plasma, the energy source for electron energization is the energy of other particles, rather than the wave energy as is often assumed. The way by which the energy is transferred from lower energy to higher-energy particles includes two processes that operate concurrently, in the same space-time domain, or sequentially, in different space-time domains, in which a given wave packet is located. In the first process, one group of resonant particles gives the energy to the wave. The second process consists in wave absorption by another group of resonant particles, whose energy therefore increases. We argue that this mechanism represents an efficient means of electron energization in the radiation belts.

  8. Development of a new Global RAdiation Belt model: GRAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard-Piet, Angelica; Lazaro, Didier; Maget, Vincent; Rolland, Guy; Ecoffet, Robert; Bourdarie, Sébastien; Boscher, Daniel; Standarovski, Denis

    2016-07-01

    The well known AP8 and AE8 NASA models are commonly used in the industry to specify the radiation belt environment. Unfortunately, there are some limitations in the use of these models, first due to the covered energy range, but also because in some regions of space, there are discrepancies between the predicted average values and the measurements. Therefore, our aim is to develop a radiation belt model, covering a large region of space and energy, from LEO altitudes to GEO and above, and from plasma to relativistic particles. The aim for the first version is to correct the AP8 and AE8 models where they are deficient or not defined. At geostationary, we developed ten years ago for electrons the IGE-2006 model which was proven to be more accurate than AE8, and used commonly in the industry, covering a broad energy range, from 1keV to 5MeV. From then, a proton model for geostationary orbit was also developed for material applications, followed by the OZONE model covering a narrower energy range but the whole outer electron belt, a SLOT model to asses average electron values for 2Radiation Belt model. We will present first beta version during this conference.

  9. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV—even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Key Points Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presented The coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m value The electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic PMID:26167440

  10. Ultra-relativistic electrons in Jupiter's radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Bolton, S J; Janssen, M; Thorne, R; Levin, S; Klein, M; Gulkis, S; Bastian, T; Sault, R; Elachi, C; Hofstadter, M; Bunker, A; Dulk, G; Gudim, E; Hamilton, G; Johnson, W T K; Leblanc, Y; Liepack, O; McLeod, R; Roller, J; Roth, L; West, R

    2002-02-28

    Ground-based observations have shown that Jupiter is a two-component source of microwave radio emission: thermal atmospheric emission and synchrotron emission from energetic electrons spiralling in Jupiter's magnetic field. Later in situ measurements confirmed the existence of Jupiter's high-energy electron-radiation belts, with evidence for electrons at energies up to 20[?]MeV. Although most radiation belt models predict electrons at higher energies, adiabatic diffusion theory can account only for energies up to around 20[?]MeV. Unambiguous evidence for more energetic electrons is lacking. Here we report observations of 13.8[?]GHz synchrotron emission that confirm the presence of electrons with energies up to 50[?]MeV; the data were collected during the Cassini fly-by of Jupiter. These energetic electrons may be repeatedly accelerated through an interaction with plasma waves, which can transfer energy into the electrons. Preliminary comparison of our data with model results suggests that electrons with energies of less than 20[?]MeV are more numerous than previously believed.

  11. Novel Techniques for Exploring the Physics of the Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2012-10-01

    The plasma physics of the Radiation Belts (RB) is a premier scientific topic with important technological implications. A new mission the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) will be launched in August, 2012, fully instrumented to explore the RB Physics with emphasis on particle interactions with low frequency plasma waves that control the rates of energetic particle precipitation, acceleration and transport. An important difficulty with passive observation, such as the RBSP, is the ``chicken & egg'' problem. Namely particles drive waves while waves precipitate, accelerate and transport particles. It is a complex, non-linear interaction with multiple feedbacks. The two-satellite coverage provided by RBSP and similar missions does not allow for uniquely identifying cause and effect. A new technology recently developed using ionospheric heaters -- powerful HF transmitters or phased arrays - that allow controlled heating of the ionosphere provides us with means for injecting low frequency waves in the ULF/ELF/VLF range into the RB and using the satellites overflying the heater magnetic flux tubes to diagnose the wave particle interactions. The paper will provide a comprehensive planning of experiments that use the HAARP, Arecibo and SURA heaters in conjunction with RBSP and other satellite missions, such as the Air Force DSX and the Russian RESONANCE, to provide new inroads into the RB physics.

  12. Short-Term Forecasting of Radiation Belt and Ring Current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements a mathematical model of the radiation-belt and ring-current plasmas resulting from interactions between the solar wind and the Earth s magnetic field, for the purpose of predicting fluxes of energetic electrons (10 keV to 5 MeV) and protons (10 keV to 1 MeV), which are hazardous to humans and spacecraft. Given solar-wind and interplanetary-magnetic-field data as inputs, the program solves the convection-diffusion equations of plasma distribution functions in the range of 2 to 10 Earth radii. Phenomena represented in the model include particle drifts resulting from the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field; electric fields associated with the rotation of the Earth, convection, and temporal variation of the magnetic field; and losses along particle-drift paths. The model can readily accommodate new magnetic- and electric-field submodels and new information regarding physical processes that drive the radiation-belt and ring-current plasmas. Despite the complexity of the model, the program can be run in real time on ordinary computers. At present, the program can calculate present electron and proton fluxes; after further development, it should be able to predict the fluxes 24 hours in advance

  13. Internal Charging Design Environments for the Earths Radiation Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Edwards, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Relativistic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts are a widely recognized threat to spacecraft because they penetrate lightly shielded vehicle hulls and deep into insulating materials where they accumulate to sufficient levels to produce electrostatic discharges. Strategies for evaluating the magnitude of the relativistic electron flux environment and its potential for producing ESD events are varied. Simple "rule of thumb" estimates such as the widely used 10(exp 10) e-/sq cm fluence within 10 hour threshold for the onset of pulsing in dielectric materials provide a quick estimate of when to expect charging issues. More sophisticated strategies based on models of the trapped electron flux within the Earth s magnetic field provide time dependent estimates of electron flux along spacecraft orbits and orbit integrate electron flux. Finally, measurements of electron flux can be used to demonstrate mean and extreme relativistic electron environments. This presentation will evaluate strategies used to specify energetic electron flux and fluence environments along spacecraft trajectories in the Earth s radiation belts.

  14. The Importance of Electron Source Population to the Remarkable Enhancement of Radiation belt Electrons during the October 2012 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Reeves, G. D.; Chen, Y.; Henderson, M. G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2013-12-01

    During the October 8-9 2012 storm, the MeV electron fluxes in the heart of the outer radiation belt are first wiped out then exhibit a three-orders-of-magnitude increase on the timescale of hours, as observed by the MagEIS and REPT instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes. There is strong observational evidence that the remarkable enhancement is due to local acceleration by chorus waves, as shown in the recent Science paper by Reeves et al.1. However, the importance of the dynamic electron source population transported in from the plasma sheet, to the observed remarkable enhancement, has not been studied. We illustrate the importance of the source population with our simulation of the event using the DREAM 3D diffusion model. Three new modifications have been implemented in the model: 1) incorporating a realistic and time-dependent low-energy boundary condition at 100 keV obtained from the MagEIS data; 2) utilizing event-specific chorus wave distributions derived from the low-energy electron precipitation observed by POES and validated against the in situ wave data from EMFISIS; 3) using an ';open' boundary condition at L*=11 and implementing electron lifetimes on the order of the drift period outside the solar-wind driven last closed drift shell. The model quantitatively reproduces the MeV electron dynamics during this event, including the fast dropout at the start of Oct. 8th, low electron flux during the first Dst dip, and the remarkable enhancement peaked at L*=4.2 during the second Dst dip. By comparing the model results with realistic source population against those with constant low-energy boundary (see figure), we find that the realistic electron source population is critical to reproduce the observed fast and significant increase of MeV electrons. 1Reeves, G. D., et al. (2013), Electron Acceleration in the Heart of the Van Allen Radiation Belts, Science, DOI:10.1126/science.1237743. Comparison between data and model results during the October 2012 storm for

  15. Combined Effect of EMIC Waves and Magnetosonic Waves on Rapid Loss of MeV Electrons in Outer Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Y.; Chen, L.; Xie, L.; Pu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can cause rapid loss of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt by pitch angle scattering, especially for >2 MeV electrons. The rapid pitch angle scattering is limited to the low pitch angle electrons and cannot affect ~90 degree electrons. However, normal pitch angle distribution (PAD) of electron flux with peaks at 90 degree pitch angle is generally observed in the outer radiation belt. Magnetosonic (MS) waves in the outer radiation belt can scatter ~90 degree pitch angle electrons to lower pitch angles and lead to the formation of electron's butterfly PAD. This paper studies the combined effect of EMIC waves and MS waves on the loss of the outer belt relativistic electrons during a minor storm on 16 November 2013 by combining Van Allen Probe measurements with test particle simulations. During the pre-storm period strong MS waves were observed by Probe A. Meanwhile normal PAD of 2.1 MeV electrons was measured by relativistic electron and proton telescope (REPT) on Probe A. When Probe B orbit was passing through the same area during the storm main phase, MS waves still existed but with weak intensity, while strong EMIC wave with ~1 nT amplitude were observed. Butterfly pitch angle distribution of 2.1 MeV electrons was seen to be formed at L = ~5-6. Four hours later, stronger EMIC waves were measured by Probe A and the fluxes of 2.1 MeV electrons at L=~5-6 showed great losses at all pitch angle sectors. The computed pitch angle diffusion rates show that the MS waves can produce the observed butterfly pitch angle distributions (flux peaks at 50-60 degree) for 2.1 MeV electrons. This indicates that ~90 degree pitch angle electrons are scattered to lower pitch angle by MS waves to form the butterfly PAD, and the observed strong EMIC waves then can resonate effectively with these butterfly distributed electrons and cause the electron loss in ~hours. Therefore, we suggest that although MS waves themselves cannot

  16. Data From HANE-Generated Radiation Belts and the Origin of Diffusion Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, Dan

    2012-07-16

    In this presentation we briefly review some of the published data regarding the artificial radiation belts produced by the Starfish and R2 high altitude nuclear explosions in 1962. The data showed slow temporal variations of the belts in altitude (L) and pitch angle ({alpha}) that could be modeled as a diffusion process. That early work formed the basis for more complex radiation belt diffusion models that are in use at present.

  17. Recent Advances in Understanding Radiation Belt Dynamics in the Earth's Inner Zone and Slot Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.

    2015-12-01

    Comprehensive measurements of the inner belt protons from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) onboard Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, revealed new features of inner belt protons in terms of their spectrum distribution, spatial distribution, pitch angle distribution, and their different source populations. Concurrent measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, in a highly inclined low Earth orbit, and REPT demonstrated that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt and their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background associated with the inner belt protons, while higher energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Analysis on sub-MeV electrons data in the inner belt and slot region from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) on board Van Allen Probes revealed rather complicated pitch angle distribution of these energetic electrons, with the 90 deg-minimum (butterfly) pitch angle distribution dominating near the magnetic equator. Furthermore, it is clearly shown from MagEIS measurements that 10s - 100s keV electrons are commonly seen penetrating into the inner belt region during geomagnetic active times while protons of similar energies are hardly seen there. These are part of a summary of the most recent measurements and understanding of the dynamics of energetic particles in the inner zone and slot region to be exhibited and discussed in this presentation.

  18. The "zebra stripes": An effect of F region zonal plasma drifts on the longitudinal distribution of radiation belt particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejosne, Solène; Roederer, Juan G.

    2016-01-01

    We examine a characteristic effect, namely, the ubiquitous appearance of structured peaks and valleys called zebra stripes in the spectrograms of energetic electrons and ions trapped in the inner belt below L ~ 3. We propose an explanation of this phenomenon as a purely kinematic consequence of particle drift velocity modulation caused by F region zonal plasma drifts in the ionosphere. In other words, we amend the traditional assumption that the electric field associated with ionospheric plasma drives trapped particle distributions into rigid corotation with the Earth. An equation based on a simple first-order model is set up to determine quantitatively the appearance of zebra stripes as a function of magnetic time. Our numerical predictions are in agreement with measurements by the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment detector onboard Van Allen Probes, namely: (1) the central energy of any peak identified in the spectrum on the dayside is the central energy of a spectral valley on the night side, and vice versa; (2) there is also an approximate peak-to-valley inversion when comparing the spectrum of trapped electrons with that of trapped ions in the same place; and (3) the actual energy separation between two consecutive peaks (or number of stripes) in the spectrogram of a trapped population is an indicator of the time spent by the particles drifting under quiet conditions.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of a liquid belt radiator for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teagan, W. P.; Fitzgerald, K.

    1984-01-01

    The liquid belt radiator (LBR) is discussed. The LBR system operates either in the sensible heat mode or in the latent heat mode. Parametric analysis shows that the LBR may reduce the mass of heat pipe radiators by 70 to 90% when the LBR surface has a total emissivity in excess of 0.3. It is indicated that the diffusion pump oils easily meet this criteria with emissivities greater than 0.8. Measurements on gallium indicate that its emissivity is probably in excess of 0.3 in the solid state when small amounts of impurities are on the surface. The point design exhibits a characteristic mass of 3.1 kg/kW of power dissipation, a mass per unit prime radiating area of approximately 0.9 kg/sq ms and a total package volume of approximately 2.50 cubic m. This compares favorably with conventional technologies which have weights on the order of 4 kg/sq m.

  20. Electron holes in the outer radiation belt: Characteristics and their role in electron energization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F. S.; Artemyev, A. V.; Drake, J. F.; Kuzichev, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    Van Allen Probes have detected electron holes (EHs) around injection fronts in the outer radiation belt. Presumably generated near equator, EHs propagate to higher latitudes potentially resulting in energization of electrons trapped within EHs. This process has been recently shown to provide electrons with energies up to several tens of keV and requires EH propagation up to rather high latitudes. We have analyzed more than 100 EHs observed around a particular injection to determine their kinetic structure and potential energy sources supporting the energization of trapped electrons. EHs propagate with velocities from 1000 to 20,000 km/s (a few times larger than the thermal velocity of the coldest background electron population). The parallel scale of observed EHs is from 0.3 to 3 km that is of the order of hundred Debye lengths. The perpendicular to parallel scale ratio is larger than one in a qualitative agreement with the theoretical scaling relation. The amplitudes of EH electrostatic potentials are generally below 100 V. We determine the properties of the electron population trapped within EHs by making use of the Bernstein-Green-Kruskal analysis and via analysis of EH magnetic field signatures. The density of the trapped electron population is on average 20% of the background electron density. The perpendicular temperature of the trapped population is on average 300 eV and is larger for faster EHs. We show that energy losses of untrapped electrons scattered by EHs in the inhomogeneous background magnetic field may balance the energization of trapped electrons.

  1. Simulation of energy-dependent electron diffusion processes in the Earth's outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Nishimura, Y.; Zhang, X.-J.; Reeves, G. D.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Henderson, M. G.; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-05-01

    The radial and local diffusion processes induced by various plasma waves govern the highly energetic electron dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts, causing distinct characteristics in electron distributions at various energies. In this study, we present our simulation results of the energetic electron evolution during a geomagnetic storm using the University of California, Los Angeles 3-D diffusion code. Following the plasma sheet electron injections, the electrons at different energy bands detected by the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) instruments on board the Van Allen Probes exhibit a rapid enhancement followed by a slow diffusive movement in differential energy fluxes, and the radial extent to which electrons can penetrate into depends on energy with closer penetration toward the Earth at lower energies than higher energies. We incorporate radial diffusion, local acceleration, and loss processes due to whistler mode wave observations to perform a 3-D diffusion simulation. Our simulation results demonstrate that chorus waves cause electron flux increase by more than 1 order of magnitude during the first 18 h, and the subsequent radial extents of the energetic electrons during the storm recovery phase are determined by the coupled radial diffusion and the pitch angle scattering by EMIC waves and plasmaspheric hiss. The radial diffusion caused by ULF waves and local plasma wave scattering are energy dependent, which lead to the observed electron flux variations with energy dependences. This study suggests that plasma wave distributions in the inner magnetosphere are crucial for the energy-dependent intrusions of several hundred keV to several MeV electrons.

  2. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, Larry R.; Gorney, David J.

    1993-01-01

    A dynamical guiding-center simulation model is used to study the stormtime ion transport which leads to the formation of the ring current and diffusion in the radiation belts. Representative ions guiding-center motion in response to model storm-associated impulses in the convection electric field is traced for a range of ion mu values. The present numerical results are compared with previously formulated limiting idealization of particle transport in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For ions having drift periods that exceed the duration of the main phase of the storm, their inward transport to form the stormtime ring current is appropriately described as direct convective access. For ions having drift periods comparable to the duration of the main phase of the storm, there is a transition between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. Lower-energy ring-current ions at L of about 3 are freshly injected there from open adiabatic trajectories, whereas the higher-energy ring-current population consists of a mixture of freshly injected and previously trapped ions.

  3. Radiation belt measurements strategy for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdarie, Sebastien; Maget, Vincent; Lazaro, Didier; Daglis, Yannis; Sandberg, Ingmar

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the EU-FP7 MAARBLE project, the Salammbô code and an ensemble Kalman filter is being used to reproduce the electron radiation belt dynamics during storms. One of the most widely used and reliable methods of assessing a data assimilation scheme is that of the twin experiments. The identical-twin experiments consist in a numerical procedure where synthetic data can be generated by the model to which data assimilation is applied, subject to a specified stochastic forcing term. The data with assigned errors are then evaluated for their effectiveness in obtaining optimal state estimates. The convergence of the unassimilated model fields from the second run towards those of the first run ("true" state) can then be measured. This set up is used here to define what is the minimum data required and along which orbits to still ensure a good estimate of the true state. The number of data being assimilated (cadence as well as distinct orbits) will be considered as a parameter such as to check data assimilation tool performance in each case. This analysis will be very useful in the case of optimizing a space surveillance system for ionizing particles. MAARBLE has received fundings from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-.2010-1, SP1 Cooperation, Collaborative project) under grant agreement n284520. This paper reflects only the authors' views and the European Union is not liable for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

  4. Diffusion of radiation belt protons by whistler waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalon, Elena; Burke, William J.

    1994-11-01

    Whistler waves propagating near the quasi-electrostatic limit can interact with energetic protons (approximately 80 - 500 keV) that are transported into the radiation belts. The waves may be launched from either the ground or generated in the magnetosphere as a result of the resonant interactions with trapped electrons. The wave frequencies are significant fractions of the equatorial electron gyrofrequency, and they propagate obliquely to the geomagnetic field. A finite spectrum of waves compensates for the inhomogeneity of the geomagnetic field allowing the protons to stay in gyroresonance with the waves over long distances along magnetic field lines. The Fokker-Planck equation is intergrated along the flux tube considering the contributions of multiple-resonance crossings. The quasi-linear diffusion coefficients in energy, cross energy/ pitch angle, and pitch angle are obtained for second-order resonant interactions. They are sown to be proportional to the electric fields amplitudes. Numerical calculations for the second-order interactions show that diffusion dominates near the edge of the loss cone. For small pitch angles the largest diffusion coefficient is in energy, although the cross energy/ pitch angle term is also important. This may explain the induced proton precipitation observed in active space experiments.

  5. Comment on ``Unraveling the Causes of Radiation Belt Enhancements''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Wallace H.

    2008-09-01

    The excellent article by M. W. Liemohn and A. A. Chan on the radiation belts (see Eos, 88(42), 16 October 2007) is misleading in its implication that the disturbance storm-time (Dst) index is an indicator of a magnetospheric ring current. That index is formed from an average of magnetic data from three or four low-latitude stations that have been fallaciously ``adjusted'' to a magnetic equatorial location under the 1960's assumption [Sugiura, 1964] that the fields arrive from the growth and decay of a giant ring of current in the magnetosphere. In truth, the index has a negative lognormal form [Campbell, 1996; Yago and Kamide, 2003] as a result of its composition from numerous negative ionospheric and magnetospheric disturbance field sources, each having normal field amplitude distributions [Campbell, 2004]. Some partial ring currents [Lui et al., 1987] and their associated field-aligned currents, as well as major ionospheric currents flowing from the auroral zone to equatorial latitudes, are the main contributors to the Dst index. No full magnetospheric ring of currents is involved, despite its false name (``Equatorial Dst Ring Current Index'') given by the index suppliers, the Geomagnetism Laboratory at Kyoto University, Japan.

  6. The Magnetic and Shielding Effects of Ring Current on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching

    2012-01-01

    The ring current plays many key roles in controlling magnetospheric dynamics. A well-known example is the magnetic depression produced by the ring current, which alters the drift paths of radiation belt electrons and may cause significant electron flux dropout. Little attention is paid to the ring current shielding effect on radiation belt dynamics. A recent simulation study that combines the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) with the Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model has revealed that the ring current-associated shielding field directly and/or indirectly weakens the relativistic electron flux increase during magnetic storms. In this talk, we will discuss how ring current magnetic field and electric shielding moderate the radiation belt enhancement.

  7. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes.

    PubMed

    Pakhotin, I P; Drozdov, A Y; Shprits, Y Y; Boynton, R J; Subbotin, D A; Balikhin, M A

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system has been tested for three extended time periods totalling several weeks of observations. The time periods involved periods of quiet, moderate, and strong geomagnetic activity and captured a range of dynamics typical of the radiation belts. The model has successfully simulated energetic electron fluxes for various magnetospheric conditions. Physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the discrepancies between the model results and observations are discussed.

  8. Radiation Belt Modeling for Spacecraft Design: Model Comparisons for Common Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, J.-M.; Barth, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    We present the current status of radiation belt modeling, providing model details and comparisons with AP-8 and AE-8 for commonly used orbits. Improved modeling of the particle environment enables smarter space system design.

  9. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes

    PubMed Central

    Pakhotin, I P; Drozdov, A Y; Shprits, Y Y; Boynton, R J; Subbotin, D A; Balikhin, M A

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system has been tested for three extended time periods totalling several weeks of observations. The time periods involved periods of quiet, moderate, and strong geomagnetic activity and captured a range of dynamics typical of the radiation belts. The model has successfully simulated energetic electron fluxes for various magnetospheric conditions. Physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the discrepancies between the model results and observations are discussed. PMID:26167432

  10. Halloween 2003 Solar Storm and the Effects on Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Video Gallery

    This scientific visualization relies on data from the SAMPEX mission, which observed particles in the Radiation Belts during a large solar storm in October 2003. The movie clearly shows just how mu...

  11. Science Highlights from the RBSP-ECT Particle Instrument Suite on NASA's Van Allen Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Harlan

    2014-05-01

    The NASA Van Allen Probes mission includes an instrument suite known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) - Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) suite. RBSP-ECT contains a well-proven complement of particle instruments to ensure the highest quality measurements ever made in the radiation belts and the inner magnetosphere. The coordinated RBSP-ECT particle measurements, analyzed in combination with fields and waves observations and state of-the-art theory and modeling, provide new understanding on the acceleration, global distribution, and variability of radiation belt electrons and ions, key science objectives of NASA's Living With a Star program and the Van Allen Probes mission. The RBSP-ECT suite consists of three highly-coordinated instruments: the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) spectrometer, the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), and the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT). Collectively these three instrument types cover comprehensively the full electron and ion spectra from one eV to 10's of MeV with sufficient energy resolution, pitch angle coverage and resolution, and with composition measurements in the critical energy range up to 50 keV and also from a few to 50 MeV/nucleon. All three instruments are based on measurement techniques proven in the radiation belts, then optimized to provide unambiguous separation of ions and electrons and clean energy responses even in the presence of extreme penetrating background environments. In this presentation, we summarize overall ECT science goals and then show scientific results derived from the ECT suite on the dual Van Allen Probes spacecraft to date. Mission operations began only in late October 2012, and we have now achieved significant results. Results presented here will include substantial progress toward resolving primary Van Allen Probes science targets, such as: the relative role of localized acceleration versus transport-generated particle acceleration

  12. Effectiveness of an albedo neutron source of radiation-belt particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, V. V.; Teltsov, M. V.

    1980-06-01

    Dragt, Austin, and White (1966) have demonstrated the dependence of the injection coefficient on latitudinal behavior of neutron-flux anisotropy. With respect to the radiation belts, however, the information is insufficiently complete and their computations require all too many hours of computer time. In the present paper, a simpler solution for the description of the radiation belts is proposed. It is based on the transition from the albedo neutron distribution at the atmospheric boundary to the neutron concentration in the terrestrial space.

  13. Gradual Diffusion and Punctuated Phase Space Density Enhancements of Highly Relativistic Electrons: Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Henderson, M. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Hudson, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission has provided a new window into mega electron volt (MeV) particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. Observations (up to E (is) approximately 10MeV) show clearly the behavior of the outer electron radiation belt at different timescales: months-long periods of gradual inward radial diffusive transport and weak loss being punctuated by dramatic flux changes driven by strong solar wind transient events. We present analysis of multi-MeV electron flux and phase space density (PSD) changes during March 2013 in the context of the first year of Van Allen Probes operation. This March period demonstrates the classic signatures both of inward radial diffusive energization and abrupt localized acceleration deep within the outer Van Allen zone (L (is) approximately 4.0 +/- 0.5). This reveals graphically that both 'competing' mechanisms of multi-MeV electron energization are at play in the radiation belts, often acting almost concurrently or at least in rapid succession.

  14. Jupiter's Decametric Radio Emission and the Radiation Belts of Its Galilean Satellites.

    PubMed

    Burns, J A

    1968-03-01

    Many of the observed properties of Jupiter's decametric radiation may be explained by postulation that the inner Galilean satellites of Jupiter have magnetic properties that strongly distort Jupiter's magnetic field in the region of each satellite. Charged particles from Jupiter's radiation belts are trapped by these distorted fields and emit synchrotron radiation.

  15. The Roles of Transport and Wave-Particle Interactions on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua

    2011-01-01

    Particle fluxes in the radiation belts can vary dramatically during geomagnetic active periods. Transport and wave-particle interactions are believed to be the two main types of mechanisms that control the radiation belt dynamics. Major transport processes include substorm dipolarization and injection, radial diffusion, convection, adiabatic acceleration and deceleration, and magnetopause shadowing. Energetic electrons and ions are also subjected to pitch-angle and energy diffusion when interact with plasma waves in the radiation belts. Important wave modes include whistler mode chorus waves, plasmaspheric hiss, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and magnetosonic waves. We investigate the relative roles of transport and wave associated processes in radiation belt variations. Energetic electron fluxes during several storms are simulated using our Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model. The model includes important transport and wave processes such as substorm dipolarization in global MHD fields, chorus waves, and plasmaspheric hiss. We discuss the effects of these competing processes at different phases of the storms and validate the results by comparison with satellite and ground-based observations. Keywords: Radiation Belts, Space Weather, Wave-Particle Interaction, Storm and Substorm

  16. Prompt enhancement of the Earth's outer radiation belt due to substorm electron injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. L.; Zhang, J.-C.; Reeves, G. D.; Su, Z. P.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    We present multipoint simultaneous observations of the near-Earth magnetotail and outer radiation belt during the substorm electron injection event on 16 August 2013. Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms A in the near-Earth magnetotail observed flux-enhanced electrons of 300 keV during the magnetic field dipolarization. Geosynchronous orbit satellites also observed the intensive electron injections. Located in the outer radiation belt, RBSP-A observed enhancements of MeV electrons accompanied by substorm dipolarization. The phase space density (PSD) of MeV electrons at L* 5.4 increased by 1 order of magnitude in 1 h, resulting in a local PSD peak of MeV electrons, which was caused by the direct effect of substorm injections. Enhanced MeV electrons in the heart of the outer radiation belt were also detected within 2 h, which may be associated with intensive substorm electron injections and subsequent local acceleration by chorus waves. Multipoint observations have shown that substorm electron injections not only can be the external source of MeV electrons at the outer edge of the outer radiation belt (L* 5.4) but also can provide the intensive seed populations in the outer radiation belt. These initial higher-energy electrons from injection can reach relativistic energy much faster. The observations also provide evidence that enhanced substorm electron injections can explain rapid enhancements of MeV electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  17. System identification of the radiation belts: How to model, forecast and understand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, Richard

    System identification is a black box modelling technique that is able to determine a mathematical model from the input and output data. In the case of modelling the radiation belts, electron flux data is used as the output. However, the exact inputs to the highly complex radiation belt system is unknown. Many variables can possibly effect the radiation belts in some way, such as solar wind parameters or geomagnetic indices, but identifying which are the main control parameters can be problematic. Here, the Error Reduction Ratio (ERR) is employed to automatically determine these control parameters from the many possible combinations of variables, which could potentially effect the radiation belts. Models, and thus control parameters, were obtained for a range of electron flux energies from 24 keV to 3.5 MeV. Two of these models provide a real time forecast for the one day ahead electron fluxes at GEO, which can be found on the University of Sheffield Space Weather website. These are shown to provide a reliable forecast with excellent prediction efficiency. These models were then inspected, in some sense reverse engineered, to obtain some knowledge of the underlying radiation belt mechanisms and the processes involved. It is shown how the models helped illuminate the acceleration processes of the electrons in the radiation belts by revealing a relationship between the energy and velocity delay. Also, for 1.8-3.5 MeV electrons, density increases are shown to be an important factor in the loss of electrons.

  18. Global-scale coherence modulation of radiation-belt electron loss from plasmaspheric hiss.

    PubMed

    Breneman, A W; Halford, A; Millan, R; McCarthy, M; Fennell, J; Sample, J; Woodger, L; Hospodarsky, G; Wygant, J R; Cattell, C A; Goldstein, J; Malaspina, D; Kletzing, C A

    2015-07-09

    Over 40 years ago it was suggested that electron loss in the region of the radiation belts that overlaps with the region of high plasma density called the plasmasphere, within four to five Earth radii, arises largely from interaction with an electromagnetic plasma wave called plasmaspheric hiss. This interaction strongly influences the evolution of the radiation belts during a geomagnetic storm, and over the course of many hours to days helps to return the radiation-belt structure to its 'quiet' pre-storm configuration. Observations have shown that the long-term electron-loss rate is consistent with this theory but the temporal and spatial dynamics of the loss process remain to be directly verified. Here we report simultaneous measurements of structured radiation-belt electron losses and the hiss phenomenon that causes the losses. Losses were observed in the form of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by hiss-scattered electrons colliding with the Earth's atmosphere after removal from the radiation belts. Our results show that changes of up to an order of magnitude in the dynamics of electron loss arising from hiss occur on timescales as short as one to twenty minutes, in association with modulations in plasma density and magnetic field. Furthermore, these loss dynamics are coherent with hiss dynamics on spatial scales comparable to the size of the plasmasphere. This nearly global-scale coherence was not predicted and may affect the short-term evolution of the radiation belts during active times.

  19. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, L. R.; Gorney, David J.

    1993-01-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. Our method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants mu) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. We compare our simulation results qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For mu approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of our model storm, and we find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For mu approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For mu approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion. By computing the mean and mean-square cumulative changes in 1/L among (in this case) 12 representative

  20. Outer radiation belt dynamics following the arrival of an interplanetary shock : What the Cluster-CIS and Double Star-HIA data can tell us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, Iannis; Ganushkina, Natalia; Rème, Henri

    2014-05-01

    Following the launch by NASA of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) twin spacecraft, now named the Van Allen Probes, the discovery of a storage ring was announced: Baker et al., Science, 2013. This transient feature was observed during September 2012, following the arrival of an interplanetary shock, was located between L=3.0 and L=3.5 and consisted of about 4 to 6 MeV electrons. During that period the Cluster spacecraft had a high-inclination orbit, with a perigee just above 2 Re. The CIS experiment onboard Cluster is sensitive to penetrating energetic electrons (E > 2 MeV), which produce background counts and thus allow to localise the boundaries of the outer and inner radiation belts (Ganushkina et al., JGR, 2011). A search was undertaken in the September 2012 CIS data for eventual signatures of the storage ring, and indeed a small increase of the instrument background was observed between L=3.0 and L=3.5. This is clearly separated from the main outer radiation belt, which presents a much stronger background due to higher fluxes of relativistic electrons. A mono-energetic ion drift band was also observed by CIS inside the storage ring, at about 5 keV for He+ and O+ ions. This result provides an independent confirmation for the storage ring. In addition, it allows also to examine Cluster and Double Star data from earlier years, covering a solar cycle, for other such signatures of a transient storage ring. It results that this 3-belt structure is seen several times, following the arrival of an interplanetary shock and if the orbital configuration is suitable.

  1. Penetration of Solar Wind Driven ULF Waves into the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: Role in Radiation Belt and Ring Current Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Murphy, Kyle; Rae, Jonathan; Ozeke, Louis; Milling, David

    2013-04-01

    combination of data from ground arrays such as CARISMA and the contemporaneous operation of the NASA Van Allen Probes (VAP) mission offers an excellent basis for understanding this cross-energy plasma coupling which spans more than 6 orders of magnitude in energy. Explaining the casual connections between plasmas in the plasmasphere (eV), ring current (keV), and radiation belt (MeV), via the intermediaries of plasma waves, is key to understanding inner magnetosphere dynamics. This work has received funding from the European Union under the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-Space) under grant agreement n 284520 for the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project.

  2. Combined scattering loss of radiation belt relativistic electrons by simultaneous three-band EMIC waves: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fengming; Cao, Xing; Ni, Binbin; Xiang, Zheng; Zhou, Chen; Gu, Xudong; Zhao, Zhengyu; Shi, Run; Wang, Qi

    2016-05-01

    Multiband electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can drive efficient scattering loss of radiation belt relativistic electrons. However, it is statistically uncommon to capture the three bands of EMIC waves concurrently. Utilizing data from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science magnetometer onboard Van Allen Probe A, we report the simultaneous presence of three (H+, He+, and O+) emission bands in an EMIC wave event, which provides an opportunity to look into the combined scattering effect of all EMIC emissions and the relative roles of each band in diffusing radiation belt relativistic electrons under realistic circumstances. Our quantitative results, obtained by quasi-linear diffusion rate computations and 1-D pure pitch angle diffusion simulations, demonstrate that the combined resonant scattering by the simultaneous three-band EMIC waves is overall dominated by He+ band wave diffusion, mainly due to its dominance over the wave power (the mean wave amplitudes are approximately 0.4 nT, 1.6 nT, and 0.15 nT for H+, He+, and O+ bands, respectively). Near the loss cone, while 2-3 MeV electrons undergo pitch angle scattering at a rate of the order of 10-6-10-5 s-1, 5-10 MeV electrons can be diffused more efficiently at a rate of the order of 10-3-10-2 s-1, which approaches the strong diffusion level and results in a moderately or heavily filled loss cone for the atmospheric loss. The corresponding electron loss timescales (i.e., lifetimes) vary from several days at the energies of ~2 MeV to less than 1 h at ~10 MeV. This case study indicates the leading contribution of He+ band waves to radiation belt relativistic electron losses during the coexistence of three EMIC wave bands and suggests that the roles of different EMIC wave bands in the relativistic electron dynamics should be carefully incorporated in future modeling efforts.

  3. Convection Electric Field Observations by THEMIS and the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Bonnell, J. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Malaspina, D.; Hartinger, M.; Thaller, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present direct electric field measurements made by THEMIS and the Van Allen Probes in the inner magnetosphere, focusing on the large-scale, near-DC convection electric field. The convection electric field drives plasma Earthward from the tail into the inner magnetosphere, playing a critical role in forming the ring current. Although it is normally shielded deep inside the magnetosphere, during storm times this large-scale electric field can penetrate to low L values (L < 3), eroding the plasmasphere and also providing a mechanism for ~100 keV electron injection into the slot region and inner radiation belt. The relationship of the convection electric field with the plasmasphere is also important for understanding the dynamic outer radiation belt, as the plasmapause boundary has been strongly correlated with the dynamic variation of the outer radiation belt electrons.

  4. Thermal electron acceleration by electric field spikes in the outer radiation belt: generation of field-aligned pitch angle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, I.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.; Artemyev, A.

    2015-12-01

    Van Allen Probes observations in the outer radiation belt have demonstrated an abundance non-linear electrostatic stucture called Time Domain Structures (TDS). One of the type of TDS is electrostatic electron-acoustic double layers (DL). Observed DLs are frequently accompanied by field-aligned (bi-directional) pitch angle distributions (PAD) of electrons with energies from hundred eVs up to several keV (rarely up to tens of keV). We perform numerical simulations of the DL interaction with thermal electrons making use of the test particle approach. DL parameters assumed in the simulations are adopted from observations. We show that DLs accelerate thermal electrons parallel to the magnetic field via the electrostatic Fermi mechanism, i.e. due to reflections from DL potential humps. Due to this interaction some fraction of electrons is scattered into the loss cone. The electron energy gain is larger for larger DL scalar potential amplitudes and higher propagation velocities. In addition to the Fermi mechanism electrons can be trapped by DLs in their generation region and accelerated due to transport to higher latitudes. Both mechanisms result in formation of field-aligned PADs for electrons with energies comparable to those found in observations. The Fermi mechanism provides field-aligned PADs for <1 keV electrons, while the trapping mechanism extends field-aligned PADs to higher energy electrons.

  5. Thermal electron acceleration by electric field spikes in the outer radiation belt: Generation of field-aligned pitch angle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F. S.; Artemyev, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    Van Allen Probes observations in the outer radiation belt have demonstrated an abundance of electrostatic electron-acoustic double layers (DL). DLs are frequently accompanied by field-aligned (bidirectional) pitch angle distributions (PAD) of electrons with energies from hundred eVs up to several keV. We perform numerical simulations of the DL interaction with thermal electrons making use of the test particle approach. DL parameters assumed in the simulations are adopted from observations. We show that DLs accelerate thermal electrons parallel to the magnetic field via the electrostatic Fermi mechanism, i.e., due to reflections from DL potential humps. The electron energy gain is larger for larger DL scalar potential amplitudes and higher propagation velocities. In addition to the Fermi mechanism, electrons can be trapped by DLs in their generation region and accelerated due to transport to higher latitudes. Both mechanisms result in formation of field-aligned PADs for electrons with energies comparable to those found in observations. The Fermi mechanism provides field-aligned PADs for <1 keV electrons, while the trapping mechanism extends field-aligned PADs to higher-energy electrons. It is shown that the Fermi mechanism can result in scattering into the loss cone of up to several tenths of percent of electrons with flux peaking at energies up to several hundred eVs.

  6. DREAM: An integrated space radiation nowcast system for natural and nuclear radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, G.

    2011-09-01

    The natural space environment continues to surprise us. We recently witnessed the quietest solar minimum in the past 100 years, casting huge uncertainties on our expectations for approach to Solar Maximum. The overall space environment is made up of many related but independent parts. The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) focuses on the spacecraft charging environment. DREAM-RB (Radiation Belt) covers the internal charging (penetrating radiation) environment and DREAM-RC (Ring Current) covers the external, surface charging environment. A third component of DREAM is an electron source model (ESM) that calculates the trapped electron environment produced by high altitude nuclear explosions (HANE). All three major components of DREAM have undergone accelerated development over the past 18 months and now comprise an integrated code system for realtime “nowcasting”, for retrospective analysis of events, and for assessing threats from nuclear scenarios. DREAMESM has many similarities to the legacy SNRTACS code system but was developed to give us a modern code architecture with well-understood physics that could be integrated into the full DREAM system. The core of that system is the radiation belt model that uses data assimilation from geosynchronous, GPS, and other radiation measuring platforms to provide a highly accurate nowcast of the penetrating electron environment. DREAM includes codes that implement spacecraft tracking using the space catalog to calculate the specific internal charging and dose rate conditions at a specific satellite of interest. Targeted applications include alerts/warnings, anomaly resolution for more reliable operations, and attack/anomaly assessment for space situational awareness. The DREAM system is written to be fully compliant with Service Oriented Architecture standards and even has an iDREAM Space Weather app for the publicly-available space weather services.

  7. Obituary: James Alfred Van Allen, 1914-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, George H.; McIlwain, Carl Edwin

    2006-12-01

    successful field expeditions from 1952 through 1957. As the prospect for launching Earth satellites began to materialize, Van Allen became an enthusiastic participant in planning and executing the U.S. program. After gaining a spot on the short list of initial experiments for the Vanguard satellite program, development of the cosmic ray instrument that he had proposed became a high laboratory priority. That instrument was launched in abbreviated form by an Army Jupiter C vehicle as Explorer I on 31 January 1958, and the full version was launched less than two months later as Explorer III. The two satellites resulted in what Van Allen considered the crowning event of his long and distinguished career — the discovery, with his university associates, of the bands of intense radiation that surround the Earth, now known as the "Van Allen Radiation Belts." Van Allen continued to take a leading role in extending space research beyond Earth's orbit. His group sent instruments to the Moon, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and throughout interplanetary space. During his outstandingly productive career, Van Allen served as principal investigator on more than twenty-five space science missions. James Van Allen was the consummate teacher and mentor. Years ago, when asked how he would most like to be remembered, he replied simply, "As a teacher." He supervised the preparation of forty-eight master's and thirty-four doctor's theses by sixty different individuals. He gave those graduate students extraordinary freedom and responsibility in the conduct of their projects. He always treated his students, both undergraduate and graduate, with respect, listening to them, learning from them, and guiding them with wisdom and kindness. The folksy, pipe-smoking scientist worked from 1951 until 1964 in a modest office on the second floor of the old Physics and Mathematics building. He maintained his own private laboratory, where he continued to spend many hours with hands-on work at the bench. When the

  8. What effect do substorms have on the content of the radiation belts?

    PubMed Central

    Rae, I. J.; Murphy, K. R.; Freeman, M. P.; Huang, C.‐L.; Spence, H. E.; Boyd, A. J.; Coxon, J. C.; Jackman, C. M.; Kalmoni, N. M. E.; Watt, C. E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Substorms are fundamental and dynamic processes in the magnetosphere, converting captured solar wind magnetic energy into plasma energy. These substorms have been suggested to be a key driver of energetic electron enhancements in the outer radiation belts. Substorms inject a keV “seed” population into the inner magnetosphere which is subsequently energized through wave‐particle interactions up to relativistic energies; however, the extent to which substorms enhance the radiation belts, either directly or indirectly, has never before been quantified. In this study, we examine increases and decreases in the total radiation belt electron content (TRBEC) following substorms and geomagnetically quiet intervals. Our results show that the radiation belts are inherently lossy, shown by a negative median change in TRBEC at all intervals following substorms and quiet intervals. However, there are up to 3 times as many increases in TRBEC following substorm intervals. There is a lag of 1–3 days between the substorm or quiet intervals and their greatest effect on radiation belt content, shown in the difference between the occurrence of increases and losses in TRBEC following substorms and quiet intervals, the mean change in TRBEC following substorms or quiet intervals, and the cross correlation between SuperMAG AL (SML) and TRBEC. However, there is a statistically significant effect on the occurrence of increases and decreases in TRBEC up to a lag of 6 days. Increases in radiation belt content show a significant correlation with SML and SYM‐H, but decreases in the radiation belt show no apparent link with magnetospheric activity levels. PMID:27656336

  9. What effect do substorms have on the content of the radiation belts?

    PubMed

    Forsyth, C; Rae, I J; Murphy, K R; Freeman, M P; Huang, C-L; Spence, H E; Boyd, A J; Coxon, J C; Jackman, C M; Kalmoni, N M E; Watt, C E J

    2016-07-01

    Substorms are fundamental and dynamic processes in the magnetosphere, converting captured solar wind magnetic energy into plasma energy. These substorms have been suggested to be a key driver of energetic electron enhancements in the outer radiation belts. Substorms inject a keV "seed" population into the inner magnetosphere which is subsequently energized through wave-particle interactions up to relativistic energies; however, the extent to which substorms enhance the radiation belts, either directly or indirectly, has never before been quantified. In this study, we examine increases and decreases in the total radiation belt electron content (TRBEC) following substorms and geomagnetically quiet intervals. Our results show that the radiation belts are inherently lossy, shown by a negative median change in TRBEC at all intervals following substorms and quiet intervals. However, there are up to 3 times as many increases in TRBEC following substorm intervals. There is a lag of 1-3 days between the substorm or quiet intervals and their greatest effect on radiation belt content, shown in the difference between the occurrence of increases and losses in TRBEC following substorms and quiet intervals, the mean change in TRBEC following substorms or quiet intervals, and the cross correlation between SuperMAG AL (SML) and TRBEC. However, there is a statistically significant effect on the occurrence of increases and decreases in TRBEC up to a lag of 6 days. Increases in radiation belt content show a significant correlation with SML and SYM-H, but decreases in the radiation belt show no apparent link with magnetospheric activity levels.

  10. Conceptual design of a Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) shuttle-attached experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Jerry L.

    1990-01-01

    The conceptual design of a shuttle-attached Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) experiment is presented. The MBR is an advanced radiator concept in which a rotating belt is used to radiate thermal energy to space. The experiment is developed with the primary focus being the verification of the dynamic characteristics of a rotating belt with a secondary objective of proving the thermal and sealing aspects in a reduced gravity, vacuum environment. The mechanical design, selection of the belt material and working fluid, a preliminary test plan, and program plan are presented. The strategy used for selecting the basic sizes and materials of the components are discussed. Shuttle and crew member requirements are presented with some options for increasing or decreasing the demands on the STS. An STS carrier and the criteria used in the selection process are presented. The proposed carrier for the Moving Belt Radiator experiment is the Hitchhiker-M. Safety issues are also listed with possible results. This experiment is designed so that a belt can be deployed, run at steady state conditions, run with dynamic perturbations imposed, verify the operation of the interface heat exchanger and seals, and finally be retracted into a stowed position for transport back to earth.

  11. TSUBASA (MDS-1) observations of energetic electrons and magnetic field variations in outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.; Matsuoka, H.; Liu, H.; Koshiishi, H.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Goka, T.

    2002-12-01

    We have investigated variations of energetic electrons (> 0.4 MeV) and magnetic field in the radiation belt obtained from the Standard DOse Monitor (SDOM) and the MAgnetoMeter (MAM) of the Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA) onboard TSUBASA (the Mission Demonstration Test Satellite (MDS)-1) launched on February 4, 2002. Since TSUBASA is operated in the geostationary transfer orbit, it has provided rare opportunities of directly observing near-equatorial radiation belt plasma particles and magnetic field, having already included several large magnetic storms. The energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt are contributors to the total radiation dose deposited in lightly shielded spacecraft electronics for high altitude orbits and are known to have a drastic variability associated with geomagnetic storm and high speed solar wind streams. The abrupt energetic electron flux decreases in the outside of outer radiation belt show characteristic variations of in situ magnetic field. These observations have implications for the possible mechanisms of the depletion and the following recovery and/or buildup of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  12. Characteristics of Pitch Angle Distributions of 100s Kev Electrons in the Slot Region and Inner Radiation Belt­­­­­­­­

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Malaspina, D.

    2014-12-01

    The pitch angle distribution (PAD) of energetic electrons in the slot region and inner radiation belt received little attention in the past decades due to the lack of quality measurements. Using the state-of-art pitch-angle-resolved data from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument onboard the Van Allen Probes, a detailed analysis of 100s keV electron PADs below L =4 is performed, in which the PADs is categorized into three types: normal (flux peaking at 90°), cap (exceedingly peaking narrowly around 90°) and 90°-minimum (lower flux at 90°) PADs. By examining the characteristics of the PADs of 460 keV electrons for over a year, we find that the 90°-minimum PADs are generally present in the inner belt (L<2), while normal PADs dominate at L~3.5-4. In the region between, 90°-minimum PADs dominate during injection times and normal PADs dominate during quiet times. Cap PADs appear mostly at the decay phase of storms in the slot region and are likely caused by the pitch angle scattering of hiss waves. Fitting the normal PADs into sinnα form, the parameter n is much higher below L=3 than that in the outer belt and relatively constant in the inner belt but changes significantly in the slot region (2belt. These new and compelling observations, made possible by the high-quality measurements of MagEIS, present a challenge for the wave modelers, and future work is still needed to fully understand them.

  13. Conceptual design of a moving belt radiator shuttle-attached experiments: Technical requirement Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Jerry L.

    1989-01-01

    The technical requirements for a shuttle-attached Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) experiment are defined. The MBR is an advanced radiator concept in which a rotating belt radiates thermal energy to space. The requirements for integrating the MBR experiment in the shuttle bay are discussed. Requirements for the belt material and working fluid are outlined along with some possible options. The proposed size and relationship to a full scale Moving Belt Radiator are defined. The experiment is defined with the primary goal of dynamic testing and a secondary goal of demonstrating the sealing and heat transfer characteristics. A perturbation system which will simulate a docking maneuver or other type of short term acceleration is proposed for inclusion in the experimental apparatus. A deployment and retraction capability which will aid in evaluating the dynamics of a belt during such a maneuver is also described. The proposed test sequence for the experiment is presented. Details of the conceptual design are not presented herein, but rather in a separate Final Report.

  14. On the relation between radiation belt electrons and solar wind parameters/geomagnetic indices: Dependence on the first adiabatic invariant and L*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Boyd, A. J.; Huang, C.-L.; Forsyth, C.

    2017-02-01

    The relation between radiation belt electrons and solar wind/magnetospheric processes is of particular interest due to both scientific and practical needs. Though many studies have focused on this topic, electron data from Van Allen Probes with wide L shell coverage and fine energy resolution, for the first time, enabled this statistical study on the relation between radiation belt electrons and solar wind parameters/geomagnetic indices as a function of first adiabatic invariant μ and L*. Good correlations between electron phase space density (PSD) and solar wind speed, southward IMF Bz, SYM-H, and AL indices are found over wide μ and L* ranges, with higher correlation coefficients and shorter time lags for low-μ electrons than high-μ electrons; the anticorrelation between electron PSD and solar wind proton density is limited to high-μ electrons at high L*. The solar wind dynamic pressure has dominantly positive correlation with low-μ electrons and negative correlation with high-μ electrons at different L*. In addition, electron PSD enhancements also correlate well with various solar wind/geomagnetic parameters, and for most parameters this correlation is even better than that of electron PSD while the time lag is also much shorter. Among all parameters investigated, AL index is shown to correlate the best with electron PSD enhancements, with correlation coefficients up to 0.8 for low-μ electrons (time lag 0 day) and 0.7 for high-μ electrons (time lag 1-2 days), suggesting the importance of seed and source populations provided by substorms in radiation belt electron PSD enhancements.

  15. Theory for charge states of energetic oxygen ions in the earth's radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Fluxes of geomagnetically trapped energetic oxygen ions have been studied in detail. Ion distributions in radial locations below the geostationary orbit, energy spectra between 1 keV and 100 MeV, and the distribution over charge states have been computed for equatorially mirroring ions. Both ionospheric and solar wind oxygen ion sources have been considered, and it is found that the charge state distributions in the interior of the radiation belts are largely independent of the charge state characteristics of the sources. In the MeV range, oxygen ions prove to be a more sensitive probe for radiation belt dynamics than helium ions and protons.

  16. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Baker, Daniel N.; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interactions of electrons with ultra-low frequency waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2014] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate the effect of changing a diffusion coefficient on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes geomagnetically quiet and active time. The simulations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion.

  17. Contribution of Neutron Beta Decay to Radiation Belt Pumping from High Altitude Nuclear Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R

    2002-11-13

    In 1962, several satellites were lost following high altitude nuclear tests by the United States and the Soviet Union. These satellite failures were caused by energetic electrons injected into the earth's radiation belts from the beta decay of bomb produced fission fragments and neutrons. It has been 40 years since the last high altitude nuclear test; there are now many more satellites in orbit, and it is important to understand their vulnerability to radiation belt pumping from nuclear explosions at high altitude or in space. This report presents the results of a calculation of the contribution of neutron beta decay to artificial belt pumping. For most high altitude nuclear explosions, neutrons are expected to make a smaller contribution than fission products to the total trapped electron inventory, and their contribution is usually neglected. However, the neutron contribution may dominate in cases where the fission product contribution is suppressed due to the altitude or geomagnetic latitude of the nuclear explosion, and for regions of the radiation belts with field lines far from the detonation point. In any case, an accurate model of belt pumping from high altitude nuclear explosions, and a self-consistent explanation of the 1962 data, require inclusion of the neutron contribution. One recent analysis of satellite measurements of electron flux from the 1962 tests found that a better fit to the data is obtained if the neutron contribution to the trapped electron inventory was larger than that of the fission products [l]. Belt pumping from high altitude nuclear explosions is a complicated process. Fission fragments are dispersed as part of the ionized bomb debris, which is constrained and guided by the earth's magnetic field. Those fission products that beta decay before being lost to the earth's atmosphere can contribute trapped energetic electrons to the earth's radiation belts. There has been a large effort to develop computer models for the contribution of

  18. Observation of chorus waves by the Van Allen Probes: Dependence on solar wind parameters and scale size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryan, Homayon; Sibeck, David; Balikhin, Michael; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Kletzing, Craig

    2016-08-01

    Highly energetic electrons in the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts can cause serious damage to spacecraft electronic systems and affect the atmospheric composition if they precipitate into the upper atmosphere. Whistler mode chorus waves have attracted significant attention in recent decades for their crucial role in the acceleration and loss of energetic electrons that ultimately change the dynamics of the radiation belts. The distribution of these waves in the inner magnetosphere is commonly presented as a function of geomagnetic activity. However, geomagnetic indices are nonspecific parameters that are compiled from imperfectly covered ground based measurements. The present study uses wave data from the two Van Allen Probes to present the distribution of lower band chorus waves not only as functions of single geomagnetic index and solar wind parameters but also as functions of combined parameters. Also the current study takes advantage of the unique equatorial orbit of the Van Allen Probes to estimate the average scale size of chorus wave packets, during close separations between the two spacecraft, as a function of radial distance, magnetic latitude, and geomagnetic activity, respectively. Results show that the average scale size of chorus wave packets is approximately 1300-2300 km. The results also show that the inclusion of combined parameters can provide better representation of the chorus wave distributions in the inner magnetosphere and therefore can further improve our knowledge of the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons.

  19. Discovering Earth's Radiation Belts: Remembering Explorer 1 and 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Frank; Naugle, John E.

    2008-09-01

    On 31 January 1958, at 10:48 P.M. eastern standard time, the United States launched its first satellite, Explorer 1, on a modified Jupiter-C rocket. Later, at about 1:30 A.M., after confirming that it was indeed in orbit, three men triumphantly held aloft a full-scale model of Explorer 1 at a crowded press conference in the Great Hall of the National Academy of Sciences (Figure 1). In the center stood James A. Van Allen, head of the physics department at the University of Iowa and the scientist responsible for the scientific experiment. Flanking him were Wernher von Braun, director of development operations for the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA), which was responsible for constructing the Jupiter-C, and William H. Pickering, director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), which provided the Explorer spacecraft, the solid-fueled upper stages, and the guidance and control system. The United States had just successfully entered the race to explore, understand, and utilize space.

  20. Middle atmosphere NO/x/ production due to ion propulsion induced radiation belt proton precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.; Jackman, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The suggestion that keV Ar(+) resulting from ion propulsion operations during solar power satellite construction could cause energetic proton precipitation from the inner radiation belt is examined to determine if such precipitation could cause significant increases in middle atmosphere nitric oxide concentrations thereby adversely affecting stratospheric ozone. It is found that the initial production rate of NO (mole/cu cm-sec) at 50 km is 130 times that due to nitrous oxide reacting with excited oxygen. However, since the time required to empty the inner belt of protons is about 1 sec and short compared to the replenishment time due to neutron decay, precipitation of inner radiation belt protons will have no adverse atmospheric environmental effect.

  1. The Engineering Radiation Monitor for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsten, J. O.; Maurer, R. H.; Peplowski, P. N.; Holmes-Siedle, A. G.; Herrmann, C. C.; Mauk, B. H.

    2013-11-01

    An Engineering Radiation Monitor (ERM) has been developed as a supplementary spacecraft subsystem for NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission. The ERM will monitor total dose and deep dielectric charging at each RBSP spacecraft in real time. Configured to take the place of spacecraft balance mass, the ERM contains an array of eight dosimeters and two buried conductive plates. The dosimeters are mounted under covers of varying shielding thickness to obtain a dose-depth curve and characterize the electron and proton contributions to total dose. A 3-min readout cadence coupled with an initial sensitivity of ˜0.01 krad should enable dynamic measurements of dose rate throughout the 9-hr RBSP orbit. The dosimeters are Radiation-sensing Field Effect Transistors (RadFETs) and operate at zero bias to preserve their response even when powered off. The range of the RadFETs extends above 1000 krad to avoid saturation over the expected duration of the mission. Two large-area (˜10 cm2) charge monitor plates set behind different thickness covers will measure the dynamic currents of weakly-penetrating electrons that can be potentially hazardous to sensitive electronic components within the spacecraft. The charge monitors can handle large events without saturating (˜3000 fA/cm2) and provide sufficient sensitivity (˜0.1 fA/cm2) to gauge quiescent conditions. High time-resolution (5 s) monitoring allows detection of rapid changes in flux and enables correlation of spacecraft anomalies with local space weather conditions. Although primarily intended as an engineering subsystem to monitor spacecraft radiation levels, real-time data from the ERM may also prove useful or interesting to a larger community.

  2. Nonlinear effects associated with quasi-electrostatic whistler waves relevant to that in radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, R.; Sharma, R. P.; Kumar, S.

    2017-01-01

    A model is proposed to study the dynamics of high-amplitude quasi-electrostatic whistler waves propagating near resonance cone angle and their interaction with low-frequency kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) in Earth's radiation belts. The wave dynamics clearly indicates the whistlers having quasi-electrostatic character when propagating close to resonance cone angle. A high-amplitude whistler wave packet is obtained using the present analysis which has also been observed by S/WAVES (STEREO/WAVES) instrument onboard STEREO (Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory). A numerical simulation technique has been employed to study the localization of quasi-electrostatic whistler waves in radiation belts. The ponderomotive force of pump quasi-electrostatic whistlers (high frequency) is used to excite low-frequency waves (KAWs). The turbulent spectrum obtained using the analysis suggests the presence of quasi-electrostatic whistlers and density fluctuations associated with KAW in radiation belts plasma. The wave localization and steeper spectra could be responsible for particle energization or heating in radiation belts.

  3. HEO and CORONAS-F Electron and Proton Radiation Belt Data Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, N.; Kuznetsov, S.; Fennell, J.; Heynderickx, D.; Myagkova, I.; Yushkov, B.

    World-wide attention was focussed on the October and November 2003 solar events due to the majestic nature of both the solar flares and the coronal mass ejections that were involved. These events especially caused technical problems for various spacecraft in geostationary orbit due to the fact that very large enhancements of energetic particles in the Earth's radiation belts occurred as an aftermath of the solar disturbances. To better understand how these solar events influenced the radiation belts it is important to compare radiation belt observations performed at different energies and locations in space. Here we present a comparison between observations performed by the HEO 1997-068 (HEO-3) spacecraft that has a highly elliptical orbit with an ˜67^o inclination and the CORONAS-F satellite with a circular high inclination (˜83^o) orbit with an altitude of 500 km. The HEO and CORONAS-F spacecraft provide both electron and proton radiation belt data in comparable energy ranges. Solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices are also used in this study.

  4. Science Objectives and Rationale for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B.H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Kanekal, S. G.; Kessel, R. L.; Sibek, D. G.; Ukhorskiy, A.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission addresses how populationsof high energy charged particles are created, vary, and evolve in space environments,and specifically within Earths magnetically trapped radiation belts. RBSP, with a nominallaunch date of August 2012, comprises two spacecraft making in situ measurements for atleast 2 years in nearly the same highly elliptical, low inclination orbits (1.1 5.8 RE, 10).The orbits are slightly different so that 1 spacecraft laps the other spacecraft about every2.5 months, allowing separation of spatial from temporal effects over spatial scales rangingfrom 0.1 to 5 RE. The uniquely comprehensive suite of instruments, identical on the twospacecraft, measures all of the particle (electrons, ions, ion composition), fields (E and B),and wave distributions (dE and dB) that are needed to resolve the most critical science questions.Here we summarize the high level science objectives for the RBSP mission, providehistorical background on studies of Earth and planetary radiation belts, present examples ofthe most compelling scientific mysteries of the radiation belts, present the mission design ofthe RBSP mission that targets these mysteries and objectives, present the observation andmeasurement requirements for the mission, and introduce the instrumentation that will deliverthese measurements. This paper references and is followed by a number of companionpapers that describe the details of the RBSP mission, spacecraft, and instruments.

  5. Science Objectives and Rationale for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Fox, N. J.; Kanekal, S. G.; Kessel, R. L.; Sibeck, D. G.; Ukhorskiy, A.

    2013-11-01

    The NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission addresses how populations of high energy charged particles are created, vary, and evolve in space environments, and specifically within Earth's magnetically trapped radiation belts. RBSP, with a nominal launch date of August 2012, comprises two spacecraft making in situ measurements for at least 2 years in nearly the same highly elliptical, low inclination orbits (1.1×5.8 RE, 10∘). The orbits are slightly different so that 1 spacecraft laps the other spacecraft about every 2.5 months, allowing separation of spatial from temporal effects over spatial scales ranging from ˜0.1 to 5 RE. The uniquely comprehensive suite of instruments, identical on the two spacecraft, measures all of the particle (electrons, ions, ion composition), fields ( E and B), and wave distributions ( d E and d B) that are needed to resolve the most critical science questions. Here we summarize the high level science objectives for the RBSP mission, provide historical background on studies of Earth and planetary radiation belts, present examples of the most compelling scientific mysteries of the radiation belts, present the mission design of the RBSP mission that targets these mysteries and objectives, present the observation and measurement requirements for the mission, and introduce the instrumentation that will deliver these measurements. This paper references and is followed by a number of companion papers that describe the details of the RBSP mission, spacecraft, and instruments.

  6. Successful large-scale use of CMOS devices on spacecraft traveling through intense radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, G. J.; Ohanian, R. S.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the environmental models of the radiation belts and computational techniques which have been developed for predicting the radiation hazards for spacecraft. These data and techniques are then applied to the Atmosphere Explorer 51 spacecraft to explain its successful survival for more than 18 months in a severe environment. In particular, the results of the analysis are used to explain the performance of some 2400 CMOS devices, and consequently, they demonstrate the reliability of this device technology in spacecraft systems.

  7. Mechanisms of the outer radiation belt electron flux variation during magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.; Obara, T.; Koshiishi, H.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Goka, T.

    2003-12-01

    We have investigated variations of the energetic electron flux (> 0.4 MeV) and the magnetic field in the outer radiation belt obtained from the Standard DOse Monitor (SDOM) and the MAgnetoMeter (MAM) of the Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA) onboard Tsubasa (Mission Demonstration Test Satellite (MDS)-1). Since Tsubasa operates in geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) with an orbital period of 10 hours and an inclination of 28.5 degrees, it has provided a rare opportunity for directly observing near-equatorial radiation belt plasma particles and the magnetic field during magnetic storms. The decreases of the energetic electron flux during the main phase of the magnetic storms, and the subsequent recoveries and enhancements during the recovery phase in the outer radiation belt are linked respectively to typical variations of the magnetic field. At the moment that the outer radiation belt flux sharply drops during the main phase of the 17 April 2002 magnetic storm, the butterfly distribution is observed at L=5 and the magnetic equator where the magnitude of magnetic field is much smaller than the IGRF model. Calculating the drift motions of the energetic electrons in the Tyganenko 2001 magnetospheric magnetic field model, shows that the drift-shell splitting mechanism could generate the butterfly distribution due to loss of the near-equatorially mirroring electrons through dayside magnetopause boundary. We evaluate roles and contributions of the other possible mechanisms to explain the flux decreases. We discuss the three-dimensional field configuration in the magnetopause to compare with the low earth orbital observation of the outer radiation belt flux.

  8. Implementation of Ensemble Data Assimilation for a Three-Dimensional Radiation Belt Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez, H. C.; Chen, Y.; Shprits, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.; Subbotin, D.

    2013-05-01

    Earth's outer radiation belt is very dynamic and undergoes constant changes due to acceleration, loss, and transport processes of the energetic electrons. In this work the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) assimilation method is applied to the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, a three-dimensional radiation belt model developed at the University of California Los Angeles. The VERB model includes radial, pitch angle, and energy diffusion caused by low-latitude and high-latitude chorus, plasma- spheric hiss, and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. Assimi- lation methods based on Kalman filtering have been successfully applied to one-dimensional radial diffusion radiation belt models, where it has been shown that assimilating real observational data into the radiation belt models greatly improves the accuracy of electron PSD estimation. In our work we implement the EnKF for assimilation of real electron PSD data into the VERB model. In particular the assimilation is performed locally along the direction of the dominant diffusion of electrons in the model. This will enable the correct assimilation of data to be consistent with the flow of electrons throughout the model. Two set of assimila- tion experiments are presented. The first is an identical-twin experiment, where artificial data is generated from the same model, with the purpose of validating the assimilation method. In the second set of experiments, real PSD observational data from CRRES are assimilated into VERB in order to improve the model estimation of the electron PSD distribution. The results show that data assimilation significantly improves the accu- racy of the VERB model by efficiently including observations to correct the model PSD estimation.

  9. A radiation belt disturbance study from the space weather point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochel, S.; Boscher, D.; Benacquista, R.; Roussel, J. F.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation belts are a key region located close to the Earth, where the satellites travel. They are located in the centre of the magnetosphere and constitute a region sensitive to the variations of magnetosphere activity. The magnetosphere is in equilibrium in the solar wind. If the solar wind parameters change, then, the magnetospheric balance is upset. Using several processes, particles and energy from the solar wind can enter it, disturbing the magnetosphere and the radiation belts. In this paper, the am index has been used to define a new parameter named Cm, which is indicative of the energy level in the magnetosphere. The impact of CIRs (Corotating Interaction region) and of CMEs (Coronal Mass Ejection) on the magnetosphere has been studied from the Cm point of view, as well as the reaction of the radiation belts to a solar wind disturbance. The results show that the Cm parameter provides a new perspective in space weather studies as it clearly shows that the energy level can be higher for a CIR than for a CME. It also demonstrates that the events with several solar wind structures are much more effective to increase the energy level in the magnetosphere than single ones. Finally, Cm correlates better with the radiation belts fluxes, showing again that Cm is a good indicator of the inner magnetosphere activity. Nevertheless, the energy level in the radiation belts is maximised and the energy level in this population cannot go above a given value which depends on the altitude. The particles coming from the plasmasheet also push the particles from the highest altitudes to the lower ones, allowing the slot filling for Cm> .

  10. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; ...

    2016-07-28

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancakemore » distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.« less

  11. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-28

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  12. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-01

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < -2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00-18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00-06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. These variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  13. A statistical study of proton pitch angle distributions measured by the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run; Summers, Danny; Ni, Binbin; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Mitchell, Donald G.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2016-06-01

    A statistical study of ring current-energy proton pitch angle distributions (PADs) in Earth's inner magnetosphere is reported here. The data are from the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) on board the Van Allen Probe B spacecraft from 1 January 2013 to 15 April 2015. By fitting the data to the functional form sinnα, where α is the proton pitch angle, we examine proton PADs at the energies 50, 100, 180, 328, and 488 keV in the L shell range from L = 2.5 to L = 6. Three PAD types are classified: trapped (90° peaked), butterfly, and isotropic. The proton PAD dependence on the particle energy, magnetic local time (MLT), L shell, and geomagnetic activity are analyzed in detail. The results show a strong dependence of the proton PADs on MLT. On the nightside, the n values outside the plasmapause are clearly lower than those inside the plasmapause. At higher energies and during intense magnetic activity, nightside butterfly PADs can be observed at L shells down to the vicinity of the plasmapause. The averaged n values on the dayside are larger than on the nightside. A maximum of the averaged n values occurs around L = 4.5 in the postnoon sector (12-16 MLT). The averaged n values show a dawn-dusk asymmetry with lower values on the dawnside at high L shells, which is consistent with previous studies of butterfly PADs. The MLT dependence of the proton PADs becomes more distinct with increasing particle energy. These features suggest that drift shell splitting coupled with a radial flux gradient play an important role in the formation of PADs, particularly at L > ~ 4.5.

  14. Control of the energetic proton flux in the inner radiation belt by artificial means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Papadopoulos, K.; Sharma, A. S.

    2009-07-01

    Earth's inner radiation belt located inside L = 2 is dominated by a relatively stable flux of trapped protons with energy from a few to over 100 MeV. Radiation effects in spacecraft electronics caused by the inner radiation belt protons are the major cause of performance anomalies and lifetime of Low Earth Orbit satellites. For electronic components with large feature size, of the order of a micron, anomalies occur mainly when crossing the South Atlantic Anomaly. However, current and future commercial electronic systems are incorporating components with submicron size features. Such systems cannot function in the presence of the trapped 30-100 MeV protons, as hardening against such high-energy protons is essentially impractical. The paper discusses the basic physics of the interaction of high-energy protons with low-frequency Shear Alfven Wave (SAW) under conditions prevailing in the radiation belts. Such waves are observed mainly in the outer belt, and it is believed that they are excited by an Alfven Ion Cyclotron instability driven by anisotropic equatorially trapped energetic protons. The paper derives the bounce and drift-averaged diffusion coefficients and uses them to determine the proton lifetime as a function of the spectrum and amplitude of the volume-averaged SAW resonant with the trapped energetic protons. The theory is applied to the outer and inner radiation belts. It is found that the resonant interaction of observed SAW with nT amplitude in the outer belt results in low flux of trapped protons by restricting their lifetime to periods shorter than days. A similar analysis for the inner radiation belt indicates that broadband SAW in the 1-10 Hz frequency range and average amplitude of 25 pT would reduce the trapped energetic proton flux by more than an order of magnitude within 2 to 3 years. In the absence of naturally occurring SAW waves, such reduction can be achieved by injecting such waves from ground-based transmitters. The analysis indicates

  15. Dawn-dusk asymmetry and adiabatic dynamic of the radiation belt electrons during magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazutin, Leonid L.

    2016-09-01

    The changes of the latitudinal profiles of outer belt energetic electrons during magnetic storms are mostly explained by the precipitation into the loss cone caused by VLF and EMIC waves or by the scattering into the magnetopause. In present work, energetic electron dynamics during magnetic storm of August 29-30, 2004 we attributed at most to the adiabatic transformation of the magnetic drift trajectories and Dst effect. This conclusion was based on the analysis of dawn-dusk asymmetry of the electron latitudinal profiles measured by low altitude polar orbiter SERVIS-1 and on the coincidence of pre-storm and after-storm profiles of radiation belt electrons and protons.

  16. Investigation on the internal acceleration process of the outer radiation belt using the particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, H.; Miyoshi, Y.; Ueno, G.; Koshiishi, H.; Matsumoto, H.; Shiokawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    It is known that high energy electrons in the radiation belts often cause satellite anomalies and malfunctions. Thus, a forecast of the time variation of the energetic electrons is necessary to protect satellites in the radiation belts. Time variations of the radiation belt electrons have been modeled with the Fokker-Plank equation. Performance of the forecast using the Fokker-Planck equation depends on the parameters used in the model, so that improvement of the parameters is important for the space weather forecast. We performed data assimilation using the particle filter by a code which was developed by Miyoshi et al.[2006]. We prepare 1000 particles used for the calculation. In this study, phase space density, the diffusion coefficient, and wave amplitude, and the source amplitude of the internal acceleration compose the state vector. The observation vector consists of the differential flux measured by the Tsubasa satellite. We also apply the particle smoother to estimate the smoothed distribution. While there were several discrepancies between the simulation without the data assimilation and the observations, the data assimilation improves the simulation result, and captures the typical flux variations of the outer belt during magnetic storms. We also discuss the internal acceleration process on the basis of the source amplitude estimated through the data assimilation.

  17. Recent space shuttle observations of the South Atlantic anomaly and the radiation belt models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konradi, A.; Badhwar, G. D.; Braby, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Active ingredients consisting of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) and a Proton and Heavy Ion Detector (PHIDE) have been carried on a number of Space Shuttle flights. These instruments have allowed us to map out parts of the South Atlantic Particle Anomaly (SAA) and to compare some of it's features with predictions of the AP-8 energetic proton flux models. We have observed that consistent with the generally observed westward drift of the surface features of the terrestial magnetic field of the SAA has moved west by about 6.9 degrees longitude between the epoch year 1970 of the AP-8 solar maximum model and the Space Shuttle observations made twenty years later. However, calculations indicate that except for relatively brief periods following very large magnetic storms the SAA seems to occupy the same position in L-space as in 1970. After the great storm of 24 March 1991 reconfiguration of the inner radiation belt and/or proton injection into the inner belt, a second energetic proton belt was observed to form at approximately equal to 2. As confirmed by a subsequent flight observations, this belt was shown to persist at least for six months. Our measurements also indicate an upward shift in the L location of the primary belt from L = 1.4 to L = 1.5. In addition we confirm through direct real time observations the existence and the approximate magnitude of the East-West effect. If the need exists for improved and updated radiation belt models in the Space Station era, these observations point out the specific features that should be considered and incorporated when this task is undertaken.

  18. Saturn Neutron Exosphere as Source for Inner and Innermost Radiation Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John; Lipatov, Alexander; Sittler, Edward; Sturner, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Energetic proton and electron measurements by the ongoing Cassini orbiter mission are expanding our knowledge of the highest energy components of the Saturn magnetosphere in the inner radiation belt region after the initial discoveries of these belts by the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 missions. Saturn has a neutron exosphere that extends throughout the magnetosphere from the cosmic ray albedo neutron source at the planetary main rings and atmosphere. The neutrons emitted from these sources at energies respectively above 4 and 8 eV escape the Saturn system, while those at lower energies are gravitationally bound. The neutrons undergo beta decay in average times of about 1000 seconds to provide distributed sources of protons and electrons throughout Saturn's magnetosphere with highest injection rates close to the Saturn and ring sources. The competing radiation belt source for energetic electrons is rapid inward diffusion and acceleration of electrons from the middle magnetosphere and beyond. Minimal losses during diffusive transport across the moon orbits, e.g. of Mimas and Enceladus, and local time asymmetries in electron intensity, suggest that drift resonance effects preferentially boost the diffusion rates of electrons from both sources. Energy dependences of longitudinal gradient-curvature drift speeds relative to the icy moons are likely responsible for hemispheric differences (e.g., Mimas, Tethys) in composition and thermal properties as at least partly produced by radiolytic processes. A continuing mystery is the similar radial profiles of lower energy (<10 MeV) protons in the inner belt region. Either the source of these lower energy protons is also neutron decay, but perhaps alternatively from atmospheric albedo, or else all protons from diverse distributed sources are similarly affected by losses at the moon' orbits, e.g. because the proton diffusion rates are extremely low. Enceladus cryovolcanism, and radiolytic processing elsewhere on the icy moon and

  19. The effect of the earth's radiation belts on an optical system.

    PubMed

    Wolff, C

    1966-11-01

    A photoelectric optical imaging system has survived one year in the earth's radiation belts with no measurable (<20%) change in sensitivity. The system passes through all of the radiation belts twice every 64 hr, and experiences a noise level equivalent to 400 photons/sec when in their most intense regions. While this noise is far less than that of other photoelectric systems operating in the belts because of the small effective area of the photocathode, the noise per unit cathode area is 1.3 x 10(5) photons/sec-cm(2), and is similar to the best of the other systems. The number and energy distribution of incident particles is calculated and then combined with shielding estimates to give the total energy absorbed in the optical elements. Radiation damage reports in the literature are shown to be consistent with the lack of a sensitivity change in this orbiting optical system. The effects of particle radiation on optical systems in general is briefly summarized, with emphasis on recent work of others.

  20. Measurement of Radiation Belt Partcles by MDS-1 Onboard SEDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Koshiishi, H.; Goka, T.

    The Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment (SEDA) is on board the Mission Demonstration Test Satellite-1 (MDS-1) to measure the radiation environment, which was launched into geo-stationary transfer orbit (GTO) on February 4, 2002 with an apogee of about 35,700km, a perigee of about 500 km and an inclination of about 28.5 degrees. SEDA consists of the four instruments. Standard Dose Monitor monitors the electron and proton flux. Dosimeter measures the integrated radiation dose at fifty-six points of the satellite. Heavy Ion Telescope monitors the flux of heavy ions from He to Fe. Magnetometer measures the magnetic field in the magnetosphere. In this paper are described first results and comparison with the ISO standard model for the space environment

  1. Radiation belt electron reanalysis over two solar cycles: Comparitive modeling and analysis of several geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, Adam; Turner, Drew; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Shprits, Yuri; Podladchikova, Tatiana; Drozdov, Alexander

    Earth’s electron radiation belts are a dynamic system, coupled to the solar wind and to the ionosphere. Understanding the observed dynamics requires consideration of the coupling between the three systems. Remote sensing and in situ observations provide information on the current state of the radiation belt system, and together with careful modeling may be used to resolve the physical processes at work. The Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) model solves the Fokker-Planck diffusion equation in three dimensional invariant coordinates, which allows one to more effectively separate adiabatic and non-adiabatic changes in the radiation belt electron population. The model includes geomagnetic storm intensity dependent parameterizations of the following dominant magnetospheric waves: day- and night-side chorus, plasmaspheric hiss (in the inner magnetosphere and inside the plume region), lightning and anthropogenic generated waves, and electro-magnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, also inside of plasmaspheric plumes. The model is used to forecast the future state of the radiation belt electron population, while real-time data may be used to update the current state of the belts through assimilation with the model. The Kalman filter provides a computationally inexpensive method to assimilate data with a model, while taking into account the errors associated with each. A split-operator Kalman filter approach is applied in this study, which provides a fast and effective way to assimilate data over very long time periods. Data error estimates are derived through the intercalibration, while model error estimates are adjusted dynamically based on the model forecast performance. In the current study, a set of geomagnetic storms are investigated comparatively using solar wind data, and reanalysis of electron phase space density from several different spacecraft missions. The storms occurred during periods that span over two solar cycles, and include CME and CIR driven

  2. Observation of Relativistic Electron Microbursts in Conjunction with Intense Radiation Belt Whistler-Mode Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kersten, K.; Cattell, C. A.; Breneman, A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Wilson, L. B., III; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Roth, I.

    2011-01-01

    We present multi-satellite observations of large amplitude radiation belt whistler-mode waves and relativistic electron precipitation. On separate occasions during the Wind petal orbits and STEREO phasing orbits, Wind and STEREO recorded intense whistler-mode waves in the outer nightside equatorial radiation belt with peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 300 mV/m. During these intervals of intense wave activity, SAMPEX recorded relativistic electron microbursts in near magnetic conjunction with Wind and STEREO. This evidence of microburst precipitation occurring at the same time and at nearly the same magnetic local time and L-shell with a bursty temporal structure similar to that of the observed large amplitude wave packets suggests a causal connection between the two phenomena. Simulation studies corroborate this idea, showing that nonlinear wave.particle interactions may result in rapid energization and scattering on timescales comparable to those of the impulsive relativistic electron precipitation.

  3. Enhanced radial transport and energization of radiation belt electrons due to drift orbit bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Millan, R M; Kress, B T; Smith, D C

    2014-01-01

    [1]Relativistic electron intensities in Earth's outer radiation belt can vary by multiple orders of magnitude on the time scales ranging from minutes to days. One fundamental process contributing to dynamic variability of radiation belt intensities is the radial transport of relativistic electrons across their drift shells. In this paper we analyze the properties of three-dimensional radial transport in a global magnetic field model driven by variations in the solar wind dynamic pressure. We use a test particle approach which captures anomalous effects such as drift orbit bifurcations. We show that the bifurcations lead to an order of magnitude increase in radial transport rates and enhance the energization at large equatorial pitch angles. Even at quiet time fluctuations in dynamic pressure, radial transport at large pitch angles exhibits strong deviations from the diffusion approximation. The radial transport rates are much lower at small pitch angle values which results in a better agreement with the diffusion approximation.

  4. Earth's magnetosphere and outer radiation belt under sub-Alfvénic solar wind.

    PubMed

    Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles J; Huang, Chia-Lin; Winslow, Reka M; Spence, Harlan E; Schwadron, Nathan A

    2016-10-03

    The interaction between Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind results in the formation of a collisionless bow shock 60,000-100,000 km upstream of our planet, as long as the solar wind fast magnetosonic Mach (hereafter Mach) number exceeds unity. Here, we present one of those extremely rare instances, when the solar wind Mach number reached steady values <1 for several hours on 17 January 2013. Simultaneous measurements by more than ten spacecraft in the near-Earth environment reveal the evanescence of the bow shock, the sunward motion of the magnetopause and the extremely rapid and intense loss of electrons in the outer radiation belt. This study allows us to directly observe the state of the inner magnetosphere, including the radiation belts during a type of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling which is unusual for planets in our solar system but may be common for close-in extrasolar planets.

  5. Earth's magnetosphere and outer radiation belt under sub-Alfvénic solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles J.; Huang, Chia-Lin; Winslow, Reka M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind results in the formation of a collisionless bow shock 60,000-100,000 km upstream of our planet, as long as the solar wind fast magnetosonic Mach (hereafter Mach) number exceeds unity. Here, we present one of those extremely rare instances, when the solar wind Mach number reached steady values <1 for several hours on 17 January 2013. Simultaneous measurements by more than ten spacecraft in the near-Earth environment reveal the evanescence of the bow shock, the sunward motion of the magnetopause and the extremely rapid and intense loss of electrons in the outer radiation belt. This study allows us to directly observe the state of the inner magnetosphere, including the radiation belts during a type of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling which is unusual for planets in our solar system but may be common for close-in extrasolar planets.

  6. Radiation belt electron acceleration induced by gyroresonant interaction with magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chang; Zhang, Lewei; He, Yihua; Liu, Si; Zhou, Qinghua

    2014-10-01

    Using Cluster 4 satellite data, we examine activities of fast magnetosonic (MS) waves in the outer radiation belt near the location L=4.2 on 28 May 2005. We adopt a Gaussian distribution to fit the observed power spectral density of MS waves and find the fitting wave strength to be 245 pT. We then calculate the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients and show that these diffusion coefficients are pronounced within a region of pitch angles about 25°-70°. By solving a 2D Fokker-Planck diffusion equation, we simulate the dynamic evolution of the electron phase space density (PSD), and demonstrate that significant increases in electron PSDs at energies of MeVs occur mainly within the aforementioned pitch-angle range over a time scale of several hours. The current results suggest that the interaction between MS waves and electrons could be an important mechanism of electron acceleration in the radiation belt.

  7. Earth's magnetosphere and outer radiation belt under sub-Alfvénic solar wind

    PubMed Central

    Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles J.; Huang, Chia-Lin; Winslow, Reka M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind results in the formation of a collisionless bow shock 60,000–100,000 km upstream of our planet, as long as the solar wind fast magnetosonic Mach (hereafter Mach) number exceeds unity. Here, we present one of those extremely rare instances, when the solar wind Mach number reached steady values <1 for several hours on 17 January 2013. Simultaneous measurements by more than ten spacecraft in the near-Earth environment reveal the evanescence of the bow shock, the sunward motion of the magnetopause and the extremely rapid and intense loss of electrons in the outer radiation belt. This study allows us to directly observe the state of the inner magnetosphere, including the radiation belts during a type of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling which is unusual for planets in our solar system but may be common for close-in extrasolar planets. PMID:27694887

  8. Solar Modulation of Inner Trapped Belt Radiation Flux as a Function of Atmospheric Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2005-01-01

    No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose.

  9. EMIC wave scale size in the inner magnetosphere: Observations from the dual Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, L. W.; Bonnell, J. W.; Agapitov, O.; Paulson, K.; Kletzing, C.

    2017-02-01

    Estimating the spatial scales of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is critical for quantifying their overall scattering efficiency and effects on thermal plasma, ring current, and radiation belt particles. Using measurements from the dual Van Allen Probes in 2013-2014, we characterize the spatial and temporal extents of regions of EMIC wave activity and how these depend on local time and radial distance within the inner magnetosphere. Observations are categorized into three types—waves observed by only one spacecraft, waves measured by both spacecraft simultaneously, and waves observed by both spacecraft with some time lag. Analysis reveals that dayside (and H+ band) EMIC waves more frequently span larger spatial areas, while nightside (and He+ band) waves are more often localized but can persist many hours. These investigations give insight into the nature of EMIC wave generation and support more accurate quantification of their effects on the ring current and outer radiation belt.

  10. Whistler-Mode Waves inside Density Ducts Observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosborough, S.; Bengtson, M.; Stein, R. L.; Streltsov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes satellites launched by NASA in 2012 are currently orbiting in Earth's radiation belts collecting data about electromagnetic waves and charged particles in the near-earth space environment. Whistler-mode waves are naturally occurring right-hand polarized, very-low frequency waves (< 30 kHz), that can efficiently interact with the energetic electrons in the earth's radiation belts magnetosphere and remediate them from the magnetosphere by precipitating these particles into the atmosphere. The important property of the whistler-mode waves is that they can be guided by density inhomogeneities extended along the ambient magnetic field and localized in the direction perpendicular to the field. Such density channels can be formed by the density enhancement or depletion and they are called ducts. The primary goal of our research is to find density duct and whistler waves in the data recorded by the Van Allen Probes satellites in the magnetosphere, and to reproduce these data with numerical simulations of time-dependent, two-dimensional electron MHD model. In this paper, we present results from our analysis of the observations performed by the Van Allen Probes satellites on 15 October 2014. Data from the probes show the electric and magnetic fields and plasma density. In this event whistler-mode waves were observed from 01:42 to 01:54 UT inside the localized density enhancement coincided with the flux of energetic electrons. Short time intervals, high concentrated electron density, and electron flux gradient activity make this event very interesting for the investigation. Numerical simulations of the electron MHD model revels reasonable quantitative agreement between numerical results and satellite observations, suggesting that the electromagnetic disturbances recorded by the Van Allen Probes satellites, are the whistler-mode waves indeed.

  11. Evaluation of the new radiation belt AE9/AP9/SPM model for a cislunar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Walker, Steven A.; Santos Koos, Lindsey M.

    2014-09-01

    Space mission planners continue to experience challenges associated with human space flight. Concerned with the omnipresence of harmful ionizing radiation in space, at the mission design stage, mission planners must evaluate the amount of exposure the crew of a spacecraft is subjected to during the transit trajectory from low Earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO) and beyond (free space). The Earth's geomagnetic field is located within the domain of LEO-GEO and, depending on latitude, extends out some 40,000-60,000 km. This field contains the Van Allen trapped electrons, protons, and low-energy plasmas, such as the nuclei of hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and to a lesser degree other atoms. In addition, there exist the geomagnetically attenuated energetic galactic cosmic rays (GCR). These particles are potentially harmful to improperly shielded crew members and onboard subsystems. Mitigation strategies to limit the exposure due to free space GCR and sporadic solar energetic particles (SEP) such as flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) must also be exercised beyond the trapped field. Presented in this work is the exposure analysis for a multi-vehicle mission planned for the epoch of February 2020 from LEO to the Earth-moon Lagrange-point two (L2), located approximately 63,000 km beyond the orbit of the Earth-moon binary system. Space operation at L2 provides a gravitationally stable orbit for a vehicle and partially eliminates the need for periodic thrust-vectoring to maintain orbital stability. In the cislunar (Earth-moon) space of L2, the mission trajectory and timeline in this work call for a cargo vehicle to rendezvous with a crew vehicle. This is followed by 15 days of space activities at L2 while the cargo and crew vehicles are docked after which the crew returns to Earth. The mission epoch of 2020 is specifically chosen as it is anticipated that the next solar minimum (i.e. end of cycle 24) in the Sun's approximate 11 years cycle will take place around

  12. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Cayton, Thomas E; Denton, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  13. Charged particle diffusion and acceleration in Saturn's radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckibben, R. B.; Simpson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, an attempt is made to determine, from the observed intensity profiles for protons and electrons in the region of L smaller than 4, whether population of Saturn's innermost trapped radiation zones from an external source is possible. It is found that if diffusion proceeds in an episodic rather than a steady-state manner (long periods of quiescence interrupted by brief periods of rapid diffusion), the basic features of the observed phase space density profiles are qualitatively reproduced for both the trapped protons and electrons.

  14. Study of deuteron spectra under radiation belt with PAMELA instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldobskiy, S. A.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. A.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A. A.; Malakhov, V. V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Merge', M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements of proton and deuteron fluxes of albedo radiation in the Earth vicinity, obtained in the PAMELA experiment. PAMELA is an international experiment meant to study cosmic rays. PAMELA is carried out on board the satellite Resurs-DK1. High-precision equipment of the experiment allows registration and identification of cosmic ray particles of different varieties in a wide energy range. The albedo deuteron spectrum and albedo deuteron-to-proton fluxes ratio in the energy range 70 - 600 MeV/nucleon at altitude of 350 - 600 km for different geomagnetic latitudes is presented.

  15. Formation of the inner electron radiation belt by enhanced large-scale electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yi-Jiun; Selesnick, Richard S.; Blake, J. B.

    2016-09-01

    A two-dimensional bounce-averaged test particle code was developed to examine trapped electron trajectories during geomagnetic storms with the assumption of conservation of the first and second adiabatic invariants. The March 2013 storm was selected as an example because the geomagnetic activity Kp index sharply increased from 2 + to 7- at 6:00 UT on 17 March. Electron measurements with energies between 37 and 460 keV from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument onboard Van Allen Probes (VAP) are used as initial conditions prior to the storm onset and served to validate test particle simulations during the storm. Simulation results help to interpret the observed electron injection as nondiffusive radial transport over a short distance in the inner belt and slot region based on various electric field models, although the quantitative comparisons are not precise. We show that electron drift trajectories are sensitive to the selection of electric field models. Moreover, our simulation results suggest that the actual field strength of penetration electric fields during this storm is stronger than any existing electric field model, particularly for L ≤ 2.

  16. Degradation of Akebono solar cell panels and variation of proton radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, H.; Miyake, W.; Matsuoka, A.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze long-term variation of electric current generated by Akebono solar cell panels (SCPI) and investigate how solar cell panels have been affected by space radiation. SCPI decreased slowly to about 7A in 2009 from 13A in 1989. The long-term decrease is probably due to various space radiations (Total Dose Effect). Therefore, we compare the decrease of solar cell output with solar proton flux measured by GOES satellites on GEO and with flux of trapped radiation from NASA's models (AP8 and AE8). We find a fair correlation between the decrease rate of solar cell output and trapped proton flux (above 10MeV) from the radiation model. However, we also find a few intervals of poor correlation, for an example, after a large geomagnetic storm occurred in March 1991, which suggests that stable proton radiation belt can be changed drastically for some special occasions.

  17. Bounce resonance scattering of radiation belt electrons by H+ band EMIC waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xing; Ni, Binbin; Summers, Danny; Bortnik, Jacob; Tao, Xin; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Lou, Yuequn; Gu, Xudong; Fu, Song; Shi, Run; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi

    2017-02-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of bounce-resonant pitch angle scattering of radiation belt electrons due to electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. It is found that EMIC waves can resonate with near-equatorially mirroring electrons over a wide range of L shells and energies. H+ band EMIC waves efficiently scatter radiation belt electrons of energy >100 keV from near 90° pitch angles to lower pitch angles where the cyclotron resonance mechanism can take over to further diffuse electrons into the loss cone. Bounce-resonant electron pitch angle scattering rates show a strong dependence on L shell, wave normal angle distribution, and wave spectral properties. We find distinct quantitative differences between EMIC wave-induced bounce-resonant and cyclotron-resonant diffusion coefficients. Cyclotron-resonant electron scattering by EMIC waves has been well studied and found to be a potentially crucial electron scattering mechanism. The new investigation here demonstrates that bounce-resonant electron scattering may also be very important. We conclude that bounce resonance scattering by EMIC waves should be incorporated into future modeling efforts of radiation belt electron dynamics.

  18. Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Denton, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

  19. High-resolution maps of the 1.5 GHz emission from Jupiter's disk and radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. A.; Berge, G. L.; Bignell, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    VLA maps of four different faces of Jupiter made with a resolution of about 0.3 Jovian radius show new features of the radiation belt emission. A synchrotron model which reproduces these features serves to define the major characteristics of the relativistic electrons in the radiation belt. The observations provide the best determination to date of the atmospheric emission at 1.5 GHz and yield a disk brightness temperature of 425 + or - 100 K.

  20. Modeling of electron time variations in the radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. W.; Teague, M. J.; Schofield, N. J.; Vette, J. I.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the temporal variation in the trapped electron population of the inner and outer radiation zones is presented. Techniques presently used for modeling these zones are discussed and their deficiencies identified. An intermediate region is indicated between the zones in which the present modeling techniques are inadequate due to the magnitude and frequency of magnetic storms. Future trends are examined, and it is suggested that modeling of individual magnetic storms may be required in certain L bands. An analysis of seven magnetic storms is presented, establishing the independence of the depletion time of the storm flux and the storm magnitude. Provisional correlation between the storm magnitude and the Dst index is demonstrated.

  1. Prompt precipitation and energization of relativistic radiation belt electrons induced by ULF oscillations in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, T.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2011-12-01

    The energization and loss processes for energetic radiation belt electrons are not yet well understood. Global simulations using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model fields as drivers provide a valuable tool to study the dynamics of these ~MeV energetic particles. We use satellite measurements of the solar wind as the boundary condition for the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) 3D MHD code calculation of fields which then drive electrons in a 3D test particle simulation that keeps track of attributes like energy, pitch-angle and L-shell. Wave-particle interaction can cause both energization and pitch-angle scattering loss. Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves resolved by the MHD code have been correlated with both enhancement in outer zone radiation belt electron flux1 and modulation of precipitation loss to the atmosphere2. The time scales seen in several studies linking ULF waves with radiation belt flux increases are usually several hours to a few days1,3, but few studies consider the effects of ULF waves in the Pc-4 to Pc-5 range on electron loss to the atmosphere on a time scale of tens of minutes. We investigate such rapid loss, using measured solar wind input to MHD-test particle simulations for a CME-shock event that occurred on January 21, 2005. We focus on mechanisms by which ULF waves, seen both in the simulations and observations, especially ones driven by pressure variations in the solar wind, influence the radiation belts. ULF modulation was seen in precipitation detected by the MINIS balloon campaign measurements of atmospheric Bremsstrahlung from MeV electron precipitation4. We propose a coherent energization and precipitation mechanism due to trapped electron drift resonance with azimuthally propagating poloidal mode ULF waves during the CME-shock compression of the magnetosphere4; depending on the drift phase, some electrons are energized by the azimuthal electric field pulse and some are de-energized in the perpendicular direction causing them to pitch

  2. Identifying Loss Mechanisms Responsible for the Rapid Depletion of Outer Radiation Belt Electron Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. C.; Onsager, T. G.; O'Brien, T.; Fraser, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    Since the discovery of earth's radiation belts researchers have sought to explain and predict the changing relativistic electron flux levels in the outer belt. This goal has proved a perplexing challenge because, surprisingly, flux levels do not always rise as energy input from the solar wind increases during active periods such as geomagnetic storms [Reeves et al., 2003;O'Brien et al., 2001]. The erratic response of the radiation belt electrons to geomagnetic activity suggests that flux levels are set by a teetering struggle between acceleration and loss. Thus, to predict flux variations, both processes must be understood. Some acceleration mechanisms have been proposed and tested resulting in incremental progress, but still little is known about how relativistic electrons are removed from the magnetosphere. We investigate how relativistic electrons are lost from the outer radiation belt using a superposed epoch analysis of electron flux decrease events identified in multi-satellite data [Onsager et al., 2002; Green et al., 2004]. More specifically, we test three mechanisms proposed to explain the flux reductions: adiabatic motion in response to a changing magnetic field topology, drift out the magnetopause boundary, and scattering into the atmosphere. The superposed study shows that the magnetic field becomes temporarily stretched at dusk suggesting that adiabatic electron motion might contribute to the initial flux reduction; however, the electron flux does not recover when the magnetic field recovers, indicating that true loss from the magnetosphere occurs. Magnetopause encounters should similarly affect both high energy protons and electrons; however, no concurrent reduction of proton flux is observed implying that this mechanism is not active. Low altitude observations show increased electron flux in the loss cone suggesting that scattering to the atmosphere is the cause the flux depletions. We investigate possible causes of the increased scattering including

  3. Characterizing magnetopause shadowing effects in the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, D.; Maget, V. F.; Sicard-Piet, A.

    2016-10-01

    Relativistic electrons dynamics is still challenging to predict during the main phase of a storm. In particular, three dimensions radiation belt models, for which temporal resolution is limited, fail in predicting their behavior, especially when dropouts occur. In this paper we present a new model of magnetopause shadowing losses to be incorporated into the ONERA Salammbô code in order to improve the model accuracy. We show in this paper that above a few hundred keVs, magnetopause shadowing is the first contribution to losses in the outer electron belt during dropout events. Global variations of Earth-magnetopause distance and relativistic electron flux have been analyzed to establish the correlation between the magnetopause shadowing and dropouts on the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms. To that purpose, a Superposed Epoch Analysis has been done using NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite 15 measurements. First, a list of 67 Stream Interfaces has been used to validate the method, and then the Superposed Epoch Analysis has been run over more than one solar cycle. Our results show that the model of magnetopause location we have developed fits well with a Superposed Epoch Analysis performed and that we are able to define a criteria based on it that detect intense dropouts. Finally, we have included this model in the Salammbô code, and we present here the improvements obtained as well as the validation made.

  4. Multi-Spacecraft Data Assimilation and Reanalysis During the THEMIS and Van Allen Probes Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, A. C.; Shprits, Y.; Kondrashov, D. A.; Podladchikova, T.; Drozdov, A.; Subbotin, D.

    2013-12-01

    consideration of the innovation vector may lead to a new physical understanding of the radiation belt system, which can later be used to improve our model forecasts. In the current study, we explore the radiation belt dynamics of the current era including data from the THEMIS, Van Allen Probes, GPS satellites, Akebono, NOAA and Cluster spacecraft. Intercalibration is performed between spacecraft on an individual energy channel basis, and in invariant coordinates. The global reanalysis allows an unprecedented analysis of the source-acceleration-transport-loss relationship in Earth's radiation belts. This analysis is used to refine our model capabilities, and to prepare the 3-D reanalysis for real-time data. The global 3-D reanalysis is an important step towards full-scale modeling and operational forecasting of this dynamic region of space.

  5. Radio maps of Jupiter's radiation belts and planetary disk at lambda 6 cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pater, I.

    1981-01-01

    Two-dimensional maps of Jupiter's radio emission were made in April 1978 at a frequency of 4885 MHz (6 cm) using the Westerbork telescope in the Netherlands. Pictures in the Stokes parameters I, Q and U have been obtained every 15 deg in longitude, each smeared over 20 deg of the planet's rotation. The half power beam width was approximately 1/6 of the disk diameter in right ascension and approximately 1/2 in declination. The planetary disk shows little or no limb darkening at this wavelength and has a temperature of 220 + or - 8 K. The radiation belts clearly show a kind of plateau or flattening in intensity in the outer part of the belt. A comparison with 21 and 50 cm maps indicate no difference in the width and form of the emission regions with wavelength.

  6. Energy ranges and pitch angles of outer radiation belt electrons depleted by an intense dayside hydrogen band EMIC wave event on February 23, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Huang, C. L.; Kanekal, S. G.; Fok, M. C. H.; Rodger, C. J.; Smith, C. W.; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Although most studies of the effect of EMIC waves on relativistic electrons have focused on wave events in the afternoon sector in the outer plasmasphere or plume region, strong magnetospheric compressions provide an additional stimulus for EMIC wave generation across a large range of local times and L shells. We present here observations of the effects of an intense, long-duration hydrogen band EMIC wave event on February 23, 2014 that was stimulated by a gradual 4-hour rise and subsequent sharp increases in solar wind pressure. Large-amplitude linearly polarized hydrogen band EMIC waves (up to 25 nT p-p) that included triggered emissions appeared for over 4 hours at both Van Allen Probes while these spacecraft were outside the plasmapause, in a region with densities ~5-20 cm-3, as they passed near apogee from late morning through local noon. Observations of radiation belt electrons by the REPT and MagEIS instruments on these spacecraft showed that these waves caused significant depletions of more field-aligned electrons at ultrarelativistic energies from 5.2 MeV down to ~2 MeV, and some depletions at energies down to below 1 MeV as well.

  7. Resonant wave-particle interaction in the radiation belts: quasi-linear scattering vs. nonlinear acceleration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, Anton; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Mourenas, Didier; Vasiliev, Alexei

    Wave-particle resonant interaction is the main mechanism responsible for electron acceleration and scattering in the radiation belts. There are two approaches describing this interaction - quasi-linear theory describes particle diffusion in momentum space, while nonlinear trapping of particles by high-amplitude waves can describe fast particle acceleration. The diffusion approach is more developed and widely used now. However, many modern observations in the radiation belts suggest the presence of significant population of large amplitude waves which can be responsible for nonlinear wave-particle interaction. We show that such nonlinear wave-particle resonant interaction corresponds to the fast transport of particles in phase space. We show that the general approach for the description of the evolution of the particle velocity distribution based on the Fokker-Plank equation can be modified to consider the process of nonlinear wave-particle interaction, including particle trapping. Such a modification consists in one additional operator describing fast particle jumps in phase space. The proposed approach is illustrated by considering the acceleration of relativistic electrons by strongly oblique whistler waves. We determine the typical variation of electron phase-density due to nonlinear wave-particle interaction and compare this variation with pitch-angle/energy diffusion due to quasi-linear electron scattering. We show that relation between nonlinear and quasi-linear effects is controlled by the distribution of wave-amplitudes. When this distribution has a heavy tail, nonlinear effects can become dominant in the formation of the electron energy distribution. We compare effectiveness of quasi-linear diffusion and nonlinear trapping for conditions typical for Earth radiation belts.

  8. Simulation of Radiation Belt Precipitation During the March 17, 2013 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, T. V.; Hudson, M. K.; Paral, J.

    2014-12-01

    Balloon-borne instruments detecting radiation belt precipitation frequently observe oscillations in the mHZ frequency range. Several balloon missions measuring electron precipitation near the poles in the 100 keV to 2.5 MeV energy range, including the MAXIS, MINIS, and most recently the BARREL campaign, have observed this modulation at ULF wave frequencies (Clilverd et al., 2007; Millan et al., 2011). However, ULF waves in the magnetosphere, commonly associated with oscillations in solar wind dynamic pressure on the dayside and with Kelvin-Helmhotz instabilities in the flanks, are seldom directly linked to increases in electron precipitation since their oscillation periods are much larger than the gyroperiod and the bounce period of radiation belt electrons. It has been conjectured that ULF oscillations in the magnetosphere may modulate EMIC wave growth rates. EMIC waves, in turn, have long been associated with energetic electron precipitation, since they can cause pitch angle scattering of these particles, thus lowering their mirror points (Miyoshi et al., 2008; Carson et al., 2013). This would explain the ULF modulation of MeV electrons seen by the balloon instruments. However, test particle simulations show that another hypothesis is possible (Brito et al., 2012). 3D simulations of radiation belt electrons were performed to investigate the effect of ULF waves on precipitation. The simulations track the behavior of energetic electrons near the loss cone, using guiding center techniques, coupled with an MHD simulation of the magnetosphere, using the LFM code, during a CME-shock event on March 17, 2013. Results indicate that ULF modulation of precipitation occurs even without the presence of VLF-type waves, which are not resolved in the MHD simulation.

  9. Radial dependence of ionization losses of protons of the Earth's radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtyukh, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Coulomb losses and charge exchange of protons are considered in detail. On the basis of modern models of the plasmasphere and the exosphere, the radial dependences of the rates of ionization losses of protons, with μ from 0.3 to 10 keV nT-1, of the Earth's radiation belts near the equatorial plane are calculated for quiet periods. For calculation of Coulomb losses of protons we used data of ISEE-1 satellite (protons with energy from 24 to 2081 keV) on L from 3 to 9, data of Explorer-45 satellite (protons with energy from 78.6 to 872 keV) on L from 3 to 5 and data of CRRES satellite (protons with energy from 1 to 100 MeV) on L ≤ 3 (L is the McIlwain parameter). It is shown that with decreasing L the rate of ionization losses of protons of the radiation belts is reduced; for protons with μ > 1.2 keV nT-1 in a narrow region (ΔL ˜ 0.5) in the district of plasmapause in this dependence may form a local minimum of the rate. We found that the dependence from μ of the boundary on L between Coulomb losses and charge exchange of the trapped protons with hydrogen atoms is well approximated by the function Lb = 4.71μ0.32, where [μ] = keV nT-1. Coulomb losses dominate at L < Lb(μ), and at L > Lb(μ) dominates charge exchange of protons. We found the effect of subtracting the Coulomb losses from the charge exchange of protons of the radiation belts at low μ and L, which can simulate a local source of particles.

  10. Effects of magnetic drift shell splitting on electron diffusion in the radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liheng; Chan, A. A.; O'Brien, T. P.; Tu, W.; Cunningham, G. S.; Albert, J. M.; Elkington, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    Drift shell splitting in the presence of pitch angle scattering breaks all three adiabatic invariants of radiation belt electron motion and produces new diffusion terms that fully populate the diffusion tensor in the Fokker-Planck equation. The Radbelt Electron Model (REM) solves such a Fokker-Planck equation and is used to investigate the phase space density sources. Our simulation results and theoretical arguments suggest that drift shell splitting changes the phase space location of the source to smaller L shells, which typically reduces outer zone phase space density enhancements, and this reduction has a limit corresponding to two-dimensional local diffusion on a curved surface in the phase space.

  11. Energetic ionized helium in the quiet time radiation belts - Theory and comparison with observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of helium ion distributions in the inner magnetosphere are compared to observations made by ATS-6 and Explorer-45. Coupled transport equations for equatorially mirroring singly and doubly ionized helium ions in the steady state limit with an outer boundary of L = 7 are solved. Radial profiles and energy spectra are computed at all lower L values. Theoretical quiet time predictions are compared to satellite observations of energetic helium ions in the lower MeV range. It is found that the theory adequately represents the principal characteristics of the radiation belt helium ion population.

  12. Conjugate In-situ and Incoherent Scatter Radar Observations of Radiation Belt Loss Mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaeppler, S. R.; Jaynes, A. N.; Sanchez, E. R.; Nicolls, M. J.; Varney, R. H.; Marshall, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from conjugate observations between the Radiation Belt Storms Probe (RBSP) and the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) of energetic radiation belt precipitation. A key objective of the RBSP mission is to understand loss mechanisms of energetic particles from the radiation belt. The relative contribution from plasma waves (e.g., EMIC, hiss, chorus, and etc.) that pitch angle scatter particles into the loss cone remains an open scientific question. Rigorous experimental validation of these mechanisms is difficult to achieve because nearly simultaneous conjugate observations of in-situ pitch angle scattering and precipitation into the atmosphere are required. One ground-based signature of energetic precipitation is enhanced ionization and electron density at D-region altitudes. Incoherent scatter radar is a powerful remote sensing technique that is sensitive to electron density enhancements. By measuring the altitude profiles of ionization we infer the flux of particles precipitating into the atmosphere. PFISR observations show frequent occurrence of D-region ionization during both quiet-time and storm-time conditions. We present results from two events when the foot-points of the RBSP satellite were within 500 km of PFISR: a quiet-time event on January 13, 2015, and a storm-time event on April 16, 2015. PFISR observations of the D-region ionization signatures are presented, along with simultaneous conjugate RBSP observations of the magnetic field, electric field, and electron flux. Plasma waves are identified using the electric and magnetic field data, and evaluated as possible pitch angle scattering mechanisms. A direct comparison between the measured fluxes and loss cone fluxes predicted by theoretical wave-particle diffusion rates into the loss cone is used to test the validity of particle loss mechanisms predicted by the different theories. Preliminary results are presented of PFISR inversions of the D-region ionization to quantify the

  13. Wave-particle interactions in the radiation belts: effect of wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, Dimitris; Tornquist, Mattias; Koepke, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Particle acceleration in Earth's radiation belts is often explain in terms of radial diffusion theory. Some of the most important contributions to diffusive transport are stochastic as well as resonant interactions with low-frequency (Alfven/magnetosonic) waves. While spectra of such waves are traditionally assumed to be broadband and spectrally white, a number of recent studies [Rae et al., 2012; Ozeke et al., 2012] indicate that the spectra of ground geomagnetic pulsations are significantly more complex. We examine power-law spectra in particle simulations in a realistic magnetospheric field configuration and report on their effect on the transport and energization of the pre-storm electron population.

  14. Alternatives to accuracy and bias metrics based on percentage errors for radiation belt modeling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, Steven Karl

    2016-07-01

    This report reviews existing literature describing forecast accuracy metrics, concentrating on those based on relative errors and percentage errors. We then review how the most common of these metrics, the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), has been applied in recent radiation belt modeling literature. Finally, we describe metrics based on the ratios of predicted to observed values (the accuracy ratio) that address the drawbacks inherent in using MAPE. Specifically, we define and recommend the median log accuracy ratio as a measure of bias and the median symmetric accuracy as a measure of accuracy.

  15. Using the RBSP Science Data Portal to unlock Mysteries in the Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, M.; Fox, N. J.; Barnes, R. J.; Mauk, B. H.

    2010-12-01

    The RBSP Science Data Portal is a web-based interface that provides a common point of entry of specific interest to RBSP scientists as well as the general public. The portal will leverage off the Virtual Observatories and provide ancillary services, tools, models, data and links that benefit the RBSP project and public. In addition, the Science Data Portal will be retrieving Space Weather Broadcast data and making space weather data products available for public access. In this presentation we will discuss how the RBSP Science Data Portal can facilitate radiation belt physics and show the features of the portal.

  16. High-energy electrons in the inner radiation belt of the earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilova, R. N.; Gusev, A. A.; Pugacheva, G. I.; Titenkov, A. F.

    1982-08-01

    Measurements of electron fluxes with energies greater than 40 MeV obtained by Kosmos 490, Salut 6, and Interkosmos 17 satellites at heights of 270-500 km in the Brazilian anomaly region are discussed. The observed electron flux is explained in terms of the decomposition of pi meson, produced by the interaction between high-energy protons (0.35-1 GeV) of the inner radiation belt and atoms of the residual atmosphere. A formula describing the electron flux is presented.

  17. Observations and Simulations of Whistler-mode Waves Detected by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtson, M.; Rosborough, S.; Stein, R. L.; Streltsov, A. V.; Matheny, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    In March of 2014, Van Allen Probe A observed several packets of whistler-mode waves while passing through the apogee of an orbit on the dayside magnetosphere. These waves were localized in regions of strong density inhomogeneity. For one observed wave, the wave maximum occurred within the center of the channel formed by a density enhancement. The other two waves were observed on either side of strong density depletion. We first determine the wave characteristics using data from Van Allen Probe A. Then, we use the observations to specify parameters in an electron MHD simulation to model the propagation of whistler-mode waves inside density structures. These observations and simulations demonstrate how whistler-mode waves can become trapped inside density structures, a phenomenon known as ducting. The density ducts serve to guide the whistler-mode waves into the earth's radiation belt while minimizing damping effects. The purpose of this research is to understand the role of density ducts in guiding whistler-mode waves, which will have important applications for remediation of energetic particles from the radiation belt.

  18. Review of modeling of losses and sources of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt I: Radial transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Elkington, Scot R.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Subbotin, Dmitriy A.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we focus on the modeling of radial transport in the Earth's outer radiation belt. A historical overview of the first observations of the radiation belts is presented, followed by a brief description of radial diffusion. We describe how resonant interactions with poloidal and toroidal components of the ULF waves can change the electron's energy and provide radial displacements. We also present radial diffusion and guiding center simulations that show the importance of radial transport in redistributing relativistic electron fluxes and also in accelerating and decelerating radiation belt electrons. We conclude by presenting guiding center simulations of the coupled particle tracing and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes and by discussing the origin of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit. Local acceleration and losses and 3D simulations of the dynamics of the radiation belt fluxes are discussed in the companion paper [Shprits, Y.Y., Subbotin, D.A., Meredith, N.P., Elkington, S.R., 2008. Review of modeling of losses and sources of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt II: Local acceleration and loss. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, this issue. doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2008.06.014].

  19. Evolution of relativistic outer belt electrons during extended quiescent period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Schiller, Q.; Blum, L. W.; Tu, W.; Malaspina, D.; Turner, D.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    To effectively study loss due to precipitation of relativistic electron fluxes in the radiation belt, it is necessary to isolate this loss from the Dst effect and magnetopause shadowing by studying loss during a time of relatively quiet geomagnetic activity. We present a study of the slow decay of 200 keV - 2 MeV electron populations in the outer radiation belt during an extended quiescent period from ~15 Dec 2012 - 10 Jan 2013, wherein Dst never extended below -25 nT. We incorporate particle measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) onboard the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat with measurements from the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) on the Van Allen Probes twin spacecraft to understand the evolution of the electron populations across pitch angle and energy. First, we present REPTile measurements of the precipitating populations (along with trapped & quasi-trapped) at a low-earth orbit, offering a view into the loss cone that is not as easily resolved using only the Van Allen Probes. Electron loss to the atmosphere during this event is quantified through use of a precipitation loss model, using the REPTile measurements. Additionally, phase space densities are derived using pitch-angle-resolved flux data from the REPT and MagEIS instruments, as well as from THEMIS SST data. Finally, we present the net loss effect on the outer radiation belt content during this time, by incorporating the modeled precipitation loss (from REPTile measurements) with Van Allen Probes electron flux data. Hiss and chorus wave data, along with approximate plasmapause location, from Van Allen Probes' Electric Field and Waves Suite (EFW) completes the picture by suggesting mechanisms for the precipitation loss of relativistic electrons during quiet time.

  20. Cross-scale observations of the 2015 St. Patrick's day storm: THEMIS, Van Allen Probes, and TWINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; De Pascuale, S.; Funsten, H. O.; Kurth, W. S.; LLera, K.; McComas, D. J.; Perez, J. D.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Thaller, S. A.; Valek, P. W.; Wygant, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    We present cross-scale magnetospheric observations of the 17 March 2015 (St. Patrick's Day) storm, by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes), and Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS), plus upstream ACE/Wind solar wind data. THEMIS crossed the bow shock or magnetopause 22 times and observed the magnetospheric compression that initiated the storm. Empirical models reproduce these boundary locations within 0.7 RE. Van Allen Probes crossed the plasmapause 13 times; test particle simulations reproduce these encounters within 0.5 RE. Before the storm, Van Allen Probes measured quiet double-nose proton spectra in the region of corotating cold plasma. About 15 min after a 0605 UT dayside southward turning, Van Allen Probes captured the onset of inner magnetospheric convection, as a density decrease at the moving corotation-convection boundary (CCB) and a steep increase in ring current (RC) proton flux. During the first several hours of the storm, Van Allen Probes measured highly dynamic ion signatures (numerous injections and multiple spectral peaks). Sustained convection after ˜1200 UT initiated a major buildup of the midnight-sector ring current (measured by RBSP A), with much weaker duskside fluxes (measured by RBSP B, THEMIS a and THEMIS d). A close conjunction of THEMIS d, RBSP A, and TWINS 1 at 1631 UT shows good three-way agreement in the shapes of two-peak spectra from the center of the partial RC. A midstorm injection, observed by Van Allen Probes and TWINS at 1740 UT, brought in fresh ions with lower average energies (leading to globally less energetic spectra in precipitating ions) but increased the total pressure. The cross-scale measurements of 17 March 2015 contain significant spatial, spectral, and temporal structure.

  1. Integration of the Radiation Belt Environment Model Into the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, A.; Toth, G.; Fok, M.; Gombosi, T.; Liemohn, M.

    2009-01-01

    We have integrated the Fok radiation belt environment (RBE) model into the space weather modeling framework (SWMF). RBE is coupled to the global magnetohydrodynamics component (represented by the Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar-wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme, BATS-R-US, code) and the Ionosphere Electrodynamics component of the SWMF, following initial results using the Weimer empirical model for the ionospheric potential. The radiation belt (RB) model solves the convection-diffusion equation of the plasma in the energy range of 10 keV to a few MeV. In stand-alone mode RBE uses Tsyganenko's empirical models for the magnetic field, and Weimer's empirical model for the ionospheric potential. In the SWMF the BATS-R-US model provides the time dependent magnetic field by efficiently tracing the closed magnetic field-lines and passing the geometrical and field strength information to RBE at a regular cadence. The ionosphere electrodynamics component uses a two-dimensional vertical potential solver to provide new potential maps to the RBE model at regular intervals. We discuss the coupling algorithm and show some preliminary results with the coupled code. We run our newly coupled model for periods of steady solar wind conditions and compare our results to the RB model using an empirical magnetic field and potential model. We also simulate the RB for an active time period and find that there are substantial differences in the RB model results when changing either the magnetic field or the electric field, including the creation of an outer belt enhancement via rapid inward transport on the time scale of tens of minutes.

  2. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V; Agapitov, O V; Mourenas, D; Krasnoselskikh, V V; Mozer, F S

    2015-05-15

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave-particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity.

  3. Simulation of proton radiation belt formation during the March 24, 1991 SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kotelnikov, A. D.; Li, X.; Roth, I.; Temerin, M.; Wygant, J.; Blake, J. B.; Gussenhoven, M. S.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid formation of a new proton radiation belt at L approximately = 2.5 following the March 24, 1991 Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) observed at the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) satellite is modeled using a relativistic guiding center test particle code. The SSC is modeled by a bipolar electric field and associated compression and relaxation in the magnetic field, superimposed on a dipole magnetic field. The source population consists of both solar and trapped inner zone protons. The simulations show that while both populations contribute to drift echoes in the 20-80 MeV range, primary conditions is from the solar protons. Proton acceleration by the SSC differs from relativistic electron acceleration in that different source populations contribute and nonrelativistic conservation of the first adiabatic invariation leads to greater energization of protons for a given decrease in L. Model drift echoes and flux distribution in L at the time of injection compare well with CRRES observations.

  4. Prompt Recovery and Enhancement of the Earth's Outer Radiation Belt due to Relativistic Electron Injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. L.; Zhang, J.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    We present multipoint observations (RBSP, GEOS and THEMIS) of the substorm electron injections during the substorm event on 16 August 2013. RBSP-A detected the MeV electron phase space density increased by an order of magnitude in about one hour at L* > 5.0. At L* = 4.4, the injected MeV electrons were also detected. It is suggested that the magnetic field dipolarization associated with the substorm injections alone can explain that the prompt recovery and enhancements of the relativistic electron (~ MeV) fluxes in the outer radiation belt. The observations of THEMIS-A also first presented that the near-Earth magnetotail at substorm onset is important in the MeV electron injection event: the enhanced fluxes of ~200 keV electrons are the source population and intense electromagnetic pulses are the driving source of MeV injected electrons. The pulse model is used to explain the dispersionless MeV injected electrons in the outer radiation belt observed by GEOS-13 and RBSP-A.

  5. Operational Realities: Obtaining adequate drivers and inputs for radiation belt models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, R. H. W.; Chen, Y.; Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Reeves, G. D.; Lichtenberger, J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in 3D diffusion codes for the high energy electron radiation belt have shown that the model representation of microphysical processes in terms of diffusion coefficients, capturing radial, energy and pitch-angle diffusion (including mixed diffusion terms) is quite capable of capturing the dynamics and physics of the radiation belt system, while remaining computationally tractable; making these codes an ideal candidate for operational application. However, we hold that the major obstacle to a realistic application of such codes for now- or forecasting is our insufficient knowledge of drivers and inputs to these codes - rather than any additional improved physics in the codes. These include the specification of the initial conditions, knowledge of the background plasma distribution, the global distribution of waves, the low-energy boundary condition and the outer boundary condition. In this talk we will discuss realistic and affordable strategies of specifying these inputs through the use of proxies, ground based measurement techniques and data assimilative methods; present examples of where this is already possible (outer boundary and global chorus wave and plasma density specification), and outline where additional effort is needed. Finally we present an example of using such realistic model drivers in a state-of-the-art 3D diffusion code which demonstrates a remarkable ability of such codes to reproduce the observed dynamics - by simply using the existing physics in the code but providing the "correct" drivers and boundary conditions.

  6. Stormtime Dynamics of the Relativistic Electron Flux in Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, D.

    2011-01-01

    A state-vector representation is a powerful technique for describing complex plasma systems. Its framework can be adapted for classification methods which can be used to analyze the system's history and for prediction methods which can serve to forecast its future activity. A state-vector description is developed for the electron flux dynamics in Earth's radiation belts, based on an 11-year (1993-2003) dataset of high-cadence flux measurements from a low-Earth (SAMPEX) orbit over a wide L range and at a fixed energy (2-6 MeV). A clustering algorithm is used to divide the state space into regions, or clusters of vectors, and it becomes evident that flux intensifications during storms correspond to characteristic transitions in state space following geoeffective interplanetary disturbances (such as interplanetary coronal mass ejections and high-speed streams). Examples are discussed to show that the classification is valid for medium-term (several-days) and long-term (solar-cycle-phase) timescales. The state-vector representation is then used as the basis of a predictive model of the flux distribution given upstream solar wind measurements. It is found that model accuracy of storm prediction is maximized if the model is tuned at a highly nonlinear regime. The relation to earlier state representations and models of the radiation belt flux is discussed.

  7. New Galileo and VLA/DSN observations of Jupiter's radiation belts near the vicinity of Amalthea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, S. J.; Galileo; Vla/Dsn Team

    2003-04-01

    On November 5, 2002, the Galileo spacecraft trajectory provided a close flyby of Amalthea, one of Jupiter's inner most moons (~2.4 RJ). During this pass, Galileo entered into a region rarely explored by spacecraft, the inner radiation belts of Jupiter. This region also contains the outer rings of Jupiter, known as the Gossamer rings. We present VLA/DSN observations of Jupiter's synchrotron emission obtained simultaneously with Galileo's flyby of Amalthea. We compare in-situ measurements from Galileo's Energetic Particle Detector, Plasma Wave Subsystem and Plasma Subsystem with model results based on the synchrotron emission maps at 6 and 20 cm wavelengths. We will also include data from the Galileo dust detector as an additional constraint for the model analysis. The total measurement set provides new constraints for the high-energy electron distribution functions near Amalthea and the role of plasma waves in maintaining the particle distribution in the vicinity of Amalthea. These observations represent the first opportunity for direct comparison of Jupiter's radiation belts by both in-situ and remote observations near Amalthea.

  8. Accurately characterizing the importance of wave-particle interactions in radiation belt dynamics: The pitfalls of statistical wave representations.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kyle R; Mann, Ian R; Rae, I Jonathan; Sibeck, David G; Watt, Clare E J

    2016-08-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energetic particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. However, the relative importance of different wave modes in these dynamics is poorly understood. Typically, this is assessed during geomagnetic storms using statistically averaged empirical wave models as a function of geomagnetic activity in advanced radiation belt simulations. However, statistical averages poorly characterize extreme events such as geomagnetic storms in that storm-time ultralow frequency wave power is typically larger than that derived over a solar cycle and Kp is a poor proxy for storm-time wave power.

  9. Accurately characterizing the importance of wave‐particle interactions in radiation belt dynamics: The pitfalls of statistical wave representations

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Ian R.; Rae, I. Jonathan; Sibeck, David G.; Watt, Clare E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Wave‐particle interactions play a crucial role in energetic particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. However, the relative importance of different wave modes in these dynamics is poorly understood. Typically, this is assessed during geomagnetic storms using statistically averaged empirical wave models as a function of geomagnetic activity in advanced radiation belt simulations. However, statistical averages poorly characterize extreme events such as geomagnetic storms in that storm‐time ultralow frequency wave power is typically larger than that derived over a solar cycle and Kp is a poor proxy for storm‐time wave power. PMID:27867798

  10. Accurately characterizing the importance of wave-particle interactions in radiation belt dynamics: The pitfalls of statistical wave representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kyle R.; Mann, Ian R.; Rae, I. Jonathan; Sibeck, David G.; Watt, Clare E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energetic particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. However, the relative importance of different wave modes in these dynamics is poorly understood. Typically, this is assessed during geomagnetic storms using statistically averaged empirical wave models as a function of geomagnetic activity in advanced radiation belt simulations. However, statistical averages poorly characterize extreme events such as geomagnetic storms in that storm-time ultralow frequency wave power is typically larger than that derived over a solar cycle and Kp is a poor proxy for storm-time wave power.

  11. H. Julian Allen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    H. Julian Allen stands beside the observation window of the 8 x 7 foot test section of the NACA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. H. Julian Allen is best known for his 'Blunt Body Theory' of aerodynamics, a design technique for alleviating the severe re-entry heating problem which was then delaying the development of ballistic missiles. His findings revolutionized the fundamental design of ballistic missle re-entry shapes. Subsequently, applied research led to applications of the 'blunt' shape to ballistic missles and spacecraft which were intended to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. This application led to the design of ablative heat shields that protected the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts as their space capsules re- entered the Earth's atmosphere. 'Harvey' Allen as he was called by most, was not only a brilliant scientist and aeronautical engineer but was also admired for his kindness, thoughtfulness and sense of humor. Among his many other accomplishments, Harvey Allen served as Center Director of the NASA Ames Research Center from 1965 to 1969. He died of a heart attack on January 29, 1977 at the age of 66.

  12. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  13. Study on geomagnetic storms driving motion of 0.1-2 MeV radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenxia; Li, Xinqiao

    2016-08-01

    Using more than five years' worth of data observed by the Instrument for the Detection of Particles (IDP) spectrometer onboard the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite, we studied the motion characteristics of energetic electrons in different regions, i.e., the inner radiation belt, the outer radiation belt, and the slot region in geomagnetic storms. We investigated the flux change of 0.1-2.4 MeV electrons and the energy change of 0.1-1.0 MeV electrons in these different regions. By cross correlation analysis, we came to the following conclusions. First, when Dst < -50, the correlation coefficient (c.c.) of the electron flux and Dst index ranges from -0.63 to -0.86, and the enhancement of the electron flux generally occurs during the storm's main and recovery phases. Second, the storms greatly influence the lower energy region of the electron energy spectrum in the inner radiation belt, while the enhancement in the higher energy region is more significant in the outer radiation belt and the slot region. Third, the effects of geomagnetic storms on electrons are not distinguished significantly between in the day and night, and independent of the timing of the events. For storms with -50 < Dst < -30, there is a negative correlation of -0.51 to -0.57 between the Dst index and the electron flux in the outer radiation belt. Our analysis suggests that strong storms cause energetic electron ejections across a wide range, and the ejection level is affected by the storm intensity. Furthermore, the electron energy region influenced by the strong geomagnetic storms is opposite in the inner and outer radiation belts. The proportion of electrons accelerated to relativistic energies is greater in the outer radiation and slot regions, while the ejection energetic electrons are more concentrated in the low energy region of the inner radiation belt. This phenomenon reflects the different electron injection mechanisms and

  14. Reanalysis of Radiation Belt Electron Phase Space Density using the UCLA 1-D VERB code and Kalman filtering: Correlation between the inner edge of the outer radiation belt phase space density and the plasmapause location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy, P. J.; Daae, M.; Shprits, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The correlation between the inner edge of the outer radiation belt phase space density (PSD) and the plasmapause location (Lpp) using reanalysis is investigated. A large data set is applied for the statistical analysis, using data from 1990-1991 from the CRRES satellite, GEO 1989, GPS-ns18 and Akebono. These data are incorporated into reanalysis by means of a Kalman filter with the UCLA 1-D VERB code. The result is a continuous radial and temporal distribution of the PSD from L*=3 to L*=7. The innovation vector of the reconstructed PSD can give us information about regions where local loss or source processes are dominating. We analyze both the PSD and the innovation vector by binning them into slots of Dst and Kp values. This has been done by finding the time for when the Dst (Kp) is within each bin-size of 20 nT (1) from 10 nT to -130 nT (1 to 8). The PSD and innovation vector was then averaged over each of those times. The result shows a good correlation between the location of the inner edge of the outer radiation belt in the PSD and the location of the plasmapause, which is consistent with previous observations. The boundary between the inner edge of the radiation belt and the Lpp becomes sharper, and the radiation belt becomes thinner, during times of high geomagnetic activity. The innovation vector shows that the inner edge of the source region also lines up well with the Lpp, and further showing a battle between losses and sources during active times. This study also illustrates how data assimilation in the radiation belts can be used to understand the underlining processes of acceleration and loss in the inner magnetosphere.

  15. Outer Radiation Belt Dropout Dynamics Following the Arrival of Two Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alves, L. R.; Da Silva, L. A.; Souza, V. M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Jauer, P. R.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Walsh, B. M.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Marchezi, J. P.; Rockenbach, M.; Del Lago, A.; Mendes, O.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Koga, D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetopause shadowing and wave-particle interactions are recognized as the two primary mechanisms for losses of electrons from the outer radiation belt. We investigate these mechanisms, sing satellite observations both in interplanetary space and within the magnetosphere and particle drift modeling. Two interplanetary shocks sheaths impinged upon the magnetopause causing a relativistic electron flux dropout. The magnetic cloud (C) and interplanetary structure sunward of the MC had primarily northward magnetic field, perhaps leading to a concomitant lack of substorm activity and a 10 day long quiescent period. The arrival of two shocks caused an unusual electron flux dropout. Test-particle simulations have shown 2 to 5 MeV energy, equatorially mirroring electrons with initial values of L 5.5can be lost to the magnetosheath via magnetopause shadowing alone. For electron losses at lower L-shells, coherent chorus wave-driven pitch angle scattering and ULF wave-driven radial transport have been shownto be viable mechanisms.

  16. Simultaneous equatorial measurements of waves and precipitating electrons in the outer radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhof, W. L.; Robinson, R. M.; Collin, H. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Anderson, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous wave and precipitating electron measurements near the equator in the outer radiation belt have been made from the CRRES satellite. The electron data of principal concern here were acquired in and about the loss cone with narrow angular resolution spectrometers covering the energy range 340 eV to 5 MeV. The wave data included electric field measurements spanning frequencies from 5 Hz to 400 kHz and magnetic field measurements from 5 Hz to 10 kHz. This paper presents examples in which the variations in electron fluxes in the loss cone and the wave intensities were correlated. These variations in electron flux were confined to pitch angles less than about 30 deg. The association between the flux enhancements and the waves is consistent with wave-induced pitch angle diffusion processes.

  17. A radiation belt monitor for the High Energy Transient Experiment Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, D. H.; Wenzel, K. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prigozhin, G. Y.; Doty, J.; Ricker, G.

    1993-01-01

    A Radiation Belt Monitor (RBM) sensitive to protons and electrons with energy approximately greater than 0.5 MeV has been designed for the High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE) satellite in order to: first, control the on-off configuration of the experiments (i.e. those susceptible to proton damage); and second, to indicate the presence of proton and/or electron events that could masquerade as legitimate high energy photon events. One of the two RBM channels has an enhanced sensitivity to electrons. Each channel of the RBM, based on a PIN silicon diode, requires a typical power of 6 milliwatts. Tests have been performed with protons with energies from approximately 0.1 to 2.5 MeV (generated by a Cockcroft-Walton linear accelerator via the d(d,p)t reaction), and with electrons with energies up to 1 MeV (from a 1.0 microcurie Bi-207 source).

  18. Propagation and linear mode conversion of magnetosonic and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2016-10-01

    Magnetosonic waves and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are important for electron acceleration and loss from the radiation belts. It is generally understood that these waves are generated by unstable ion distributions that form during geomagnetically disturbed times. Here we show that magnetosonic waves could be a source of EMIC waves as a result of propagation and a process of linear mode conversion. The converse is also possible. We present ray tracing to show how magnetosonic (EMIC) waves launched with large (small) wave normal angles can reach a location where the wave normal angle is zero and the wave frequency equals the so-called crossover frequency whereupon energy can be converted from one mode to another without attenuation. While EMIC waves could be a source of magnetosonic waves below the crossover frequency, magnetosonic waves could be a source of hydrogen band waves but not helium band waves.

  19. Long-Term Variations of the Electron Slot Region and Global Radiation Belt Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Shao, Xi; Tan, Lun C.

    2005-01-01

    We report the observations of changes of the nominal position of the quiet-time radiation belt slot over the solar cycles. It has been found that the slot region, believed to be a result of enhanced precipitation losses of energetic electrons due to their interactions with VLF waves in the magnetosphere, tends to shift to higher L (approximately 3) during a solar maximum compared to its canonical L value of approximately 2.5, which is more typical of a solar minimum. The solar-cycle migration of the slot can be understood in terms of the solar-cycle changes in ionospheric densities, which may cause the optimal wave-particle interaction region during higher solar activity periods to move to higher altitudes and higher latitudes, thus higher L. Our analysis also suggests that the primary wave-particle interaction processes that result in the slot formation are located off of the magnetic equator.

  20. Evidence for solar wind origin of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of data from our energetic ion composition experiment on ISEE-1 has revealed the presence of substantial fluxes of carbon, oxygen, and heavier ions above 400 keV/nucleon at L values between approximately 2.5 and 4 earth radii. The measured C/O ratio varies systematically from 1.3 at 450 keV/nucleon to 4.1 at 1.3 MeV/nucleon, and no iron is observed above 200 keV/nucleon. These results provide strong evidence for a solar wind origin for energetic ions in the outer radiation belt. The absence of iron and the increase of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio with energy suggest that the condition for the validity of the first adiabatic invariant may have a strong influence on the trapping of these particles.

  1. Source and loss processes of protons of the inner radiation belt.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, T. A.; Walt, M.

    1971-01-01

    The adequacy of the known source and loss processes to populate the inner radiation belt with protons is examined by calculating the equilibrium trapped-proton distribution, which would result from decay of albedo neutrons, energy-loss collisions, and radial diffusion by changes in the third adiabatic invariant. The strength of the neutron source and the rates of atmospheric energy loss are obtained from available theoretical and experimental data, and the radial-diffusion coefficient is adjusted to give agreement between theory and experiment for equatorially trapped protons with first invariants between 200 and 3000 MeV gauss. The flux intensities, energy spectrums, and radial distributions obtained by the theory are in good agreement with observations, and the radial diffusion coefficient required is consistent with dif*usion coefficients derived by a variety of other methods.-

  2. New Galileo and VLA Observations of Jupiter's Radiation Belts near the vicinty of Amalthea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, S. J.; Thorne, R. M.; Levin, S.; Michael, K.

    2002-12-01

    In November, 2002, the Galileo spacecraft is scheduled to flyby Amalthea, one of Jupiter's inner most moons (~2.4 RJ). We present VLA observations of Jupiter's synchrotron emission obtained simultaneously with Galileo's flyby of Amalthea. If available, in-situ measurements from Galileo's Energetic Particle Detector and Plasma Wave Subsystem will be compared with the synchrotron emission maps at 6 and 20 cm wavelengths. The total measurement set will provide constraints on the high energy electron distribution functions near Amalthea and the types of waves affecting the particle population in the vicinity of Amalthea. These observations represent the first opportunity for direct comparison of Jupiter's radiation belts by both in-situ and remote observations near Amalthea.

  3. CeREs, A Compact Radiation Belt Explorer to study charged particle dynamics in geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Summerlin, E. J.; Christian, E. R.; Crum, G.; Desai, M. I.; Evans, A.; Dumonthier, J.; Jamison, T.; Jones, A. D.; Livi, S. A.; Ogasawara, K.; Paschalidis, N.; Suarez, G.; Patel, D.

    2015-12-01

    The CeREs 3U CubeSat, set to be launched in mid-2016, will study the physics of the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons, particularly loss due to electron microbursts. CeRES will also observe solar electrons and protons entering the magnetosphere via the open field-line polar caps. CeREs is expected to be in a low earth high inclination orbit and carries onboard the Miniaturized Electron pRoton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT instrument measures electrons and protons ranging in energy from 5 keV to >10 MeV with high time resolution of ~5ms in multiple differential energy channels. MERiT is particle telescope using a stack of solid-state detectors and space-facing avalanche photo diodes.We will describe the CeRES spacecraft, science goals and the MERiT instrument.

  4. Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by EMIC waves, observed from ground and space

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K; Miyoski, Y; Sakaguchi, K; Shiokawa, K; Evans, D S; Albert, Jay; Connors, M

    2008-01-01

    We show evidence that left-hand polarised electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere. Our unique set of ground and satellite observations shows coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keY and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The coincident precipitation was produced by wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves near the plasmapause. The estimation of pitch angle diffusion coefficients supports that the observed EMIC waves caused coincident precipitation ofboth ions and relativistic electrons. This study clarifies that ions with energies of tens of ke V affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts via cyclotron resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  5. Hiss induced radiation belt electron loss timescales in the plasmasphere based on ray tracings of wave propagation angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Ni, B.; Li, W.; Bortnik, J.; Gu, X.; Zhao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss plays an important role in driving resonant scattering losses of radiation belt electrons and thereby largely controls the lifetimes of electrons in the plasmasphere. Besides the spectral information of waves, an accurate investigation of hiss induced radiation belt electron loss timescales requires the details of wave normal angle distribution during propagation along the field line, which however is difficult to obtain directly from in situ measurements but can be reasonably evaluated from ray tracing of hiss propagation on basis of reasonable setups of background field and plasma density. By assuming a nominal and suitable plasmapause location at L = 4.5, we report the ray tracing results of hiss wave propagation angles for various hiss wave frequencies at various L-shells in the plasmasphere. Subsequently, we construct the improved model of hiss wave normal angle distribution with dependence on both wave frequency, magnetic latitude and L-shell, which is used to compute the quasi-linear bounce-averaged rates of electron scattering due to plasmaspheric hiss and perform the pure pitch angle diffusion simulations. Hiss induced radiation belt electron loss timescales are then determined from the simulated temporal evolution of electron fluxes after reaching the equilibrium state, as a function of electron kinetic energy and L-shell, which is of importance for incorporation into future simulations of the radiation belt electron dynamics under various geomagnetic conditions to comprehend the exact contribution of plasmaspheric hiss.

  6. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients for relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Mann, Ian; Baker, Daniel N.; Subbotin, Dmitriy; Ozeke, Louis; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam

    Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interactions of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate the effect of changing a diffusion coefficient on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes geomagnetically quiet and active time. The simulations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. 1. Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 2. Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  7. Wave Science with the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounds, S. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Acuna, M. H.; Torbert, R. B.; Thorne, R.; Jordanova, V.; Smith, C.; Santolik, O.; Pfaff, R.; Rpwlamd, D.; Hospodarsky, G.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Puhl-Quinn, P.

    2008-12-01

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields of waves which mediate these processes. A large range of field regimes are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to 400 kHz. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts. We discuss of the key scientific goals of the EMFISIS investigation with particular attention to the wave physics of the radiation belts.

  8. Modeling of the Origin and Energization of the Inner Radiation Belt Electrons and Phenomena That Mediates It

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-19

    Description of a singular appearance seen in the Sun on Speterber 1, 1859, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., XX, 13 (1859). Eddy, J. A. The Maunder Minimum ...1964 and 1965, J. Geophys. Res. 72(7), 2011- 2020 (1967). Schulz, M. & Lanzerotti, L. J. Particle Diffusion in the Radiation Belts (Springer, New

  9. Non-diffusive resonant acceleration of electrons in the radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, A. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Rolland, G.

    2012-12-15

    We describe a mechanism of resonant electron acceleration by oblique high-amplitude whistler waves under conditions typical for the Earth radiation belts. We use statistics of spacecraft observations of whistlers in the Earth radiation belts to obtain the dependence of the angle {theta} between the wave-normal and the background magnetic field on magnetic latitude {lambda}. According to this statistics, the angle {theta} already approaches the resonance cone at {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign and remains close to it up to {lambda}{approx}30 Degree-Sign -40 Degree-Sign on the dayside. The parallel component of the electrostatic field of whistler waves often increases around {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign up to one hundred of mV/m. We show that due to this increase of the electric field, the whistler waves can trap electrons into the potential well via wave particle resonant interaction corresponding to Landau resonance. Trapped electrons then move with the wave to higher latitudes where they escape from the resonance. Strong acceleration is favored by adiabatic invariance along the increasing magnetic field, which continuously transfers the parallel energy gained to perpendicular energy, allowing resonance to be reached and maintained. The concomitant increase of the wave phase velocity allows for even stronger relative acceleration at low energy <50keV. Each trapping-escape event of electrons of {approx}10keV to 100 keV results in an energy gain of up to 100 keV in the inhomogeneous magnetic field of the Earth dipole. For electrons with initial energy below 100 keV, such rapid acceleration should hasten their drop into the loss-cone and their precipitation into the atmosphere. We discuss the role of the considered mechanism in the eventual formation of a trapped distribution of relativistic electrons for initial energies larger than 100 keV and in microbursts precipitations of lower energy particles.

  10. The problem of the acceleration of electrons of the outer radiation belt and magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, E. E.; Stepanova, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    Predicting of the location of the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes filling a new radiation belt is an endeavor being carried out by physicists studying the magnetosphere. We analyzed the data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites and ground-based magnetometers obtained during geomagnetic storm on 8-9 October 2012. The minimum value of the disturbance storm time (Dst) was -111 nT, and the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes that appeared during the recovery phase was observed at L = 4 Re. At the same time, we analyzed the motion of the auroral oval toward lower latitudes and related substorm activity using the data of the low-orbiting DMSP satellites and the IMAGE magnetic meridian network. It was found from the DMSP satellites' measurements that the maximum of the energy density of precipitating ions, the maximum of the plasma pressure, and the most equatorial part of the westward auroral electrojet are all located at the 60° geomagnetic latitude. This value corresponds to L = 4 Re, i.e., it coincides with the location of the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes. This L-value also agrees with the predictions of the Tverskaya relation between the minimum in Dst variation and the location of the maximum of the energetic electron fluxes, filling a new radiation belt. The obtained results show that the location of this maximum could be predicted solely from the data of the auroral particle precipitations and/or ground-based magnetic observations.

  11. A statistical approach to determining energetic outer radiation belt electron precipitation fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon Wedlund, Mea; Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.; Cresswell-Moorcock, Kathy; Cobbett, Neil; Breen, Paul; Danskin, Donald; Spanswick, Emma; Rodriguez, Juan V.

    2014-05-01

    Subionospheric radio wave data from an Antarctic-Arctic Radiation-Belt (Dynamic) Deposition VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortia (AARDDVARK) receiver located in Churchill, Canada, is analyzed to determine the characteristics of electron precipitation into the atmosphere over the range 3 < L < 7. The study advances previous work by combining signals from two U.S. transmitters from 20 July to 20 August 2010, allowing error estimates of derived electron precipitation fluxes to be calculated, including the application of time-varying electron energy spectral gradients. Electron precipitation observations from the NOAA POES satellites and a ground-based riometer provide intercomparison and context for the AARDDVARK measurements. AARDDVARK radiowave propagation data showed responses suggesting energetic electron precipitation from the outer radiation belt starting 27 July 2010 and lasting ~20 days. The uncertainty in >30 keV precipitation flux determined by the AARDDVARK technique was found to be ±10%. Peak >30 keV precipitation fluxes of AARDDVARK-derived precipitation flux during the main and recovery phase of the largest geomagnetic storm, which started on 4 August 2010, were >105 el cm-2 s-1 sr-1. The largest fluxes observed by AARDDVARK occurred on the dayside and were delayed by several days from the start of the geomagnetic disturbance. During the main phase of the disturbances, nightside fluxes were dominant. Significant differences in flux estimates between POES, AARDDVARK, and the riometer were found after the main phase of the largest disturbance, with evidence provided to suggest that >700 keV electron precipitation was occurring. Currently the presence of such relativistic electron precipitation introduces some uncertainty in the analysis of AARDDVARK data, given the assumption of a power law electron precipitation spectrum.

  12. Survival of bacterial isolates exposed to simulated Jovian trapped radiation belt electrons and solar wind protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, D. M.; Hagen, C. A.; Renninger, G. M.; Simko, G. J.; Smith, C. D.; Yelinek, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    With missions to Jupiter, the spacecraft will be exposed for extended duration to solar wind radiation and the Jovian trapped radiation belt. This study is designed to determine the effect of these radiation environments on spacecraft bacterial isolates. The information can be used in the probability of contamination analysis for these missions. A bacterial subpopulation from Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft (nine sporeforming and three nonsporeforming isolates) plus two comparative organisms, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 17917 and a strain of Bacillus subtilis var. niger, were exposed to 2-, 12-, and 25-MeV electrons at different doses with simultaneous exposure to a vacuum of 0.0013 N/sqm at 20 and -20 C. The radioresistance of the subpopulation was dependent on the isolate, dose, and energy of electrons. Temperature affected the radioresistance of only the sporeforming isolates. Survival data indicated that spores were reduced approximately 1 log/1500 J/kg, while nonsporeforming isolates (micrococci) were reduced 1.5 to 2 logs/1500 J/kg with the exception of an apparent radioresistant isolate whose resistance approached that of the spores. The subpopulation was found to be less resistant to lower energy than to higher energy electrons.

  13. Generation of VLF Waves to Provide Efficient Interaction with Energetic Electrons in a Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Caplinger, J.; Kim, T.; Mishin, E.; Gershenzon, N.; Main, D.

    2016-10-01

    Whistler waves interact with radiation belt (RB) electrons via cyclotron resonance. This interaction leads to enhanced pitch angle diffusion and shifting energetic electrons towards the loss cone. In order for this interaction to be efficient it is necessary to create curtain level of finite amplitude VLF electromagnetic whistler waves in the interaction region. We will examine different sources for VLF whistler wave excitation including conventional loop antennas and parametric antennas. In the case of conventional sources a great deal of the source power is radiated not as a whistler wave but as a quasi-electrostatic low oblique resonance (LOR) mode which does not propagate on great distances from the source region. Only a small percentage of the power is radiated as the electromagnetic whistler wave. We present results on parametric interaction of LOR waves with ion acoustic (IA) waves and extremely low frequency (ELF) waves to demonstrate the possibility to overcome this difficulty. Additionally, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, which demonstrate the excitation and spatial structure of VLF waves excited by conventional and parametric antennas are presented.

  14. High Altitude Balloons as a Platform for Space Radiation Belt Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzino, L.; Buttenschoen, A.; Farr, Q.; Hodgson, C.; Johnson, W.; Mann, I. R.; Rae, J.; University of Alberta High Altitude Balloons (UA-HAB)

    2011-12-01

    The goals of the University of Alberta High Altitude Balloons Program (UA-HAB) are to i) use low cost balloons to address space radiation science, and ii) to utilise the excitement of "space mission" involvement to promote and facilitate the recruitment of undergraduate and graduate students in physics, engineering, and atmospheric sciences to pursue careers in space science and engineering. The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloons (UA-HAB) is a unique opportunity for University of Alberta students (undergraduate and graduate) to engage in the hands-on design, development, build, test and flight of a payload to operate on a high altitude balloon at around 30km altitude. The program development, including formal design and acceptance tests, reports and reviews, mirror those required in the development of an orbital satellite mission. This enables the students to gain a unique insight into how space missions are flown. UA-HAB is a one and half year program that offers a gateway into a high-altitude balloon mission through hands on experience, and builds skills for students who may be attracted to participate in future space missions in their careers. This early education will provide students with the experience necessary to better assess opportunities for pursuing a career in space science. Balloons offer a low-cost alternative to other suborbital platforms which can be used to address radiation belt science goals. In particular, the participants of this program have written grant proposal to secure funds for this project, have launched several 'weather balloon missions', and have designed, built, tested, and launched their particle detector called "Maple Leaf Particle Detector". This detector was focussed on monitoring cosmic rays and space radiation using shielded Geiger tubes, and was flown as one of the payloads from the institutions participating in the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP), organized by the Louisiana State University and the Louisiana

  15. EPICS: Allen-Bradley hardware reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocki, G.

    1993-04-05

    This manual covers the following hardware: Allen-Bradley 6008 -- SV VMEbus I/O scanner; Allen-Bradley universal I/O chassis 1771-A1B, -A2B, -A3B, and -A4B; Allen-Bradley power supply module 1771-P4S; Allen-Bradley 1771-ASB remote I/O adapter module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IFE analog input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OFE analog output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IG(D) TTL input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OG(d) TTL output; Allen-Bradley 1771-IQ DC selectable input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OW contact output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IBD DC (10--30V) input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OBD DC (10--60V) output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IXE thermocouple/millivolt input module; and the Allen-Bradley 2705 RediPANEL push button module.

  16. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy

    PubMed Central

    Artemyev, A.V.; Agapitov, O.V.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V.V.; Mozer, F.S.

    2015-01-01

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave–particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity. PMID:25975615

  17. Effect of EMIC Waves on the Lifetime of Energetic Electrons in the Earth's Inner Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Papadopoulos, K.; Sharma, A. S.; Demekhov, A.

    2008-12-01

    The stably trapped electrons in the inner radiation belt have lifetimes of years and energies higher than a few hundred keV. These energetic electrons can have serious effects on the way spacecrafts and satellites operate and cause significant hazards to low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites. For mitigating these hazards it is necessary to investigate ways for reducing the electron life times, for example, through pitch angle scattering by waves. For these waves, the gyro-resoance condition yields the minimum wavelength requirement for given particle energy and local magnetic field. For example, at the magnetic equator at L = 2 the waves resonant with 1 MeV electrons should have wavelengths less than 10 km. Low frequency Electromagnetic Ion-Cyclotron (EMIC) waves occur in three bands with frequencies below the hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ion gyro-frequencies, respectively. At frequencies close to the ion gyro-frequencies, the EMIC waves can have wavelength short enough to gyro-resonate with energetic electrons, which can lead to significant changes in the lifetimes of electrons in the inner ration belt. However at these altitudes the amplitudes of naturally excited EMIC waves do not yield significant scattering of the energetic electrons and artificial sources are needed. In order to define the characteristics of such sources we investigated the lifetime of inner belt energetic electrons subject to pitch angle scattering with EMIC waves. The resonant wave characteristics are obtained using the global core plasma model (GCPM). The lifetimes of the electrons in the presence of these waves are computed using the pitch angle diffusion coefficient for broadband waves. For several hundred Watts of broadband EMIC waves in the shell volume enclosed by magnetic field lines at L = 2.0 with width dL = 0.1, the lifetime of 1 MeV electrons can be reduced to a few months. This is a considerable reduction compared to the average life times of about years and have important

  18. ICME-driven sheath regions deplete the outer radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, H.; Kilpua, E. K.; Turner, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    It is an outstanding question in space weather and solar wind-magnetosphere interaction studies, why some storms result in an increase of the outer radiation belt electron fluxes, while others deplete them or produce no change. One approach to this problem is to look at differences in the storm drivers. Traditionally drivers have been classified to Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs) and Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). However, an 'ICME event' is a complex structure: The core is a magnetic cloud (MC; a clear flux rope structure). If the mass ejection is fast enough, it can drive a shock in front of it. This leads to the formation of a sheath region between the interplanetary shock and the leading edge of the MC. While both the sheath and the MC feature elevated solar wind speed, their other properties are very different. For instance, the sheath region has typically a much higher dynamic pressure than the magnetic cloud. Moreover, the sheath region has a high power in magnetic field and dynamic pressure Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) range fluctuations, while the MC is characterised by an extremely smooth magnetic field. Magnetic clouds have been recognised as important drivers magnetospheric activity since they can comprise long periods of very large southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). Nevertheless, previous studies have shown that sheath regions can also act as storm drivers. In this study, we analyse the effects of ICME-driven sheath regions on the relativistic electron fluxes observed by GOES satellites on the geostationary orbit. We perform a superposed epoch analysis of 31 sheath regions from solar cycle 23. Our results show that the sheaths cause an approximately one order of magnitude decrease in the 24h-averaged electron fluxes. Typically the fluxes also stay below the pre-event level for more than two days. Further analysis reveals that the decrease does not depend on, e.g., whether the sheath interval contains predominantly northward

  19. The role of the convection electric field in filling the slot region between the inner and outer radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Zhao, H.; Kellerman, A.; Sarris, T. E.; Jaynes, A.; Malaspina, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    The Van Allen Probes have reported frequent flux enhancements of 100s keV electrons in the slot region, with lower energy electrons exhibiting more dynamic behavior at lower L shells. Also, in situ electric field measurements from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), and the Van Allen Probes have provided evidence for large-scale electric fields at low L shells during active times. We study an event on 19 February 2014 where hundreds of keV electron fluxes were enhanced by orders of magnitude in the slot region and electric fields of 1-2 mV/m were observed below L = 3. Using a 2-D guiding center particle tracer and a simple large-scale convection electric field model, we demonstrate that the measured electric fields can account for energization of electrons up to at least 500 keV in the slot region through inward radial transport.

  20. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  1. On the possibility to use semiconductive hybrid pixel detectors for study of radiation belt of the Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guskov, A.; Shelkov, G.; Smolyanskiy, P.; Zhemchugov, A.

    2016-02-01

    The scientific apparatus GAMMA-400 designed for study of electromagnetic and hadron components of cosmic rays will be launched to an elliptic orbit with the apogee of about 300 000 km and the perigee of about 500 km. Such a configuration of the orbit allows it to cross periodically the radiation belt and the outer part of magnetosphere. We discuss the possibility to use hybrid pixel detecters based on the Timepix chip and semiconductive sensors on board the GAMMA-400 apparatus. Due to high granularity of the sensor (pixel size is 55 mum) and possibility to measure independently an energy deposition in each pixel, such compact and lightweight detector could be a unique instrument for study of spatial, energy and time structure of electron and proton components of the radiation belt.

  2. Pitch-angle diffusion of electrons through growing and propagating along a magnetic field electromagnetic wave in Earth's radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, C.-R. Dokgo, K.; Min, K.-W.; Woo, M.-H.; Choi, E.-J.; Hwang, J.; Park, Y.-D.; Lee, D.-Y.

    2015-06-15

    The diffusion of electrons via a linearly polarized, growing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagating along a uniform magnetic field is investigated. The diffusion of electrons that interact with the growing EM wave is investigated through the autocorrelation function of the parallel electron acceleration in several tens of electron gyration timescales, which is a relatively short time compared with the bounce time of electrons between two mirror points in Earth's radiation belts. Furthermore, the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient is derived for the resonant and non-resonant electrons, and the effect of the wave growth on the electron diffusion is discussed. The results can be applied to other problems related to local acceleration or the heating of electrons in space plasmas, such as in the radiation belts.

  3. Relativistic electron acceleration and decay time scales in the inner and outer radiation belts: SAMPEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Callis, L. B.; Cummings, J. R.; Hovestadt, D.; Kanekal, S.; Klecker, B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    High-energy electrons have been measured systematically in a low-altitude (520 x 675 km), nearly polar (inclination = 82 deg) orbit by sensitive instruments onboard the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX). Count rate channels with electron energy thresholds ranging from 0.4 MeV to 3.5 MeV in three different instruments have been used to examine relativistic electron variations as a function of L-shell parameter and time. A long run of essentially continuous data (July 1992 - July 1993) shows substantial acceleration of energetic electrons throughout much of the magnetosphere on rapid time scales. This acceleration appears to be due to solar wind velocity enhancements and is surprisingly large in that the radiation belt 'slot' region often is filled temporarily and electron fluxes are strongly enhanced even at very low L-values (L aprroximately 2). A superposed epoch analysis shows that electron fluxes rise rapidly for 2.5 is approximately less than L is approximately less than 5. These increases occur on a time scale of order 1-2 days and are most abrupt for L-values near 3. The temporal decay rate of the fluxes is dependent on energy and L-value and may be described by J = Ke-t/to with t(sub o) approximately equals 5-10 days. Thus, these results suggest that the Earth's magnetosphere is a cosmic electron accelerator of substantial strength and efficiency.

  4. Observations of energetic helium ions in the earth's radiation belts during a sequence of geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of energetic (MeV) helium ions made with Explorer 45 during a sequence of magnetic storms during June through December of 1972 are presented. It is noted that the first of these storms started on June 17 and had a Dst index excursion to -190 gamma and that the MeV helium ions were perturbed primarily beyond 3 earth radii in the equatorial radiation belts with a typical flux increase of an order of magnitude at L equal to 4. The second storm period was in August and was associated with very major solar flare activity. While the Dst extremum was at best 35 gamma less than the June storm, this period can be characterized as irregular (or multi-storm) with strong compression of the magnetosphere and very large (order of magnitude) MeV helium ion flux enhancements down to L approximately equal to 2. After this injection, the trapped helium ion fluxes showed positive spherical slope with the peak beyond 3.15 MeV at L equal to 2.5; at the lowest observable L shells, little flux decay was seen during the remainder of the year.

  5. Evaluation of Radiation Belt Space Weather Forecasts for Internal Charging Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Coffey, Victoria N.; Jun, Insoo; Garrett, Henry B.

    2007-01-01

    A variety of static electron radiation belt models, space weather prediction tools, and energetic electron datasets are used by spacecraft designers and operations support personnel as internal charging code inputs to evaluate electrostatic discharge risks in space systems due to exposure to relativistic electron environments. Evaluating the environment inputs is often accomplished by comparing whether the data set or forecast tool reliability predicts measured electron flux (or fluence over a given period) for some chosen period. While this technique is useful as a model metric, it does not provide the information necessary to evaluate whether short term deviances of the predicted flux is important in the charging evaluations. In this paper, we use a 1-D internal charging model to compute electric fields generated in insulating materials as a function of time when exposed to relativistic electrons in the Earth's magnetosphere. The resulting fields are assumed to represent the "true" electric fields and are compared with electric field values computed from relativistic electron environments derived from a variety of space environment and forecast tools. Deviances in predicted fields compared to the "true" fields which depend on insulator charging time constants will be evaluated as a potential metric for determining the importance of predicted and measured relativistic electron flux deviations over a range of time scales.

  6. Modeling the Earth's radiation belts. A review of quantitative data based electron and proton models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vette, J. I.; Teague, M. J.; Sawyer, D. M.; Chan, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of quantitative models of the trapped radiation belts is traced to show how the knowledge of the various features has developed, or been clarified, by performing the required analysis and synthesis. The Starfish electron injection introduced problems in the time behavior of the inner zone, but this residue decayed away, and a good model of this depletion now exists. The outer zone electrons were handled statistically by a log normal distribution such that above 5 Earth radii there are no long term changes over the solar cycle. The transition region between the two zones presents the most difficulty, therefore the behavior of individual substorms as well as long term changes must be studied. The latest corrections to the electron environment based on new data are outlined. The proton models have evolved to the point where the solar cycle effect at low altitudes is included. Trends for new models are discussed; the feasibility of predicting substorm injections and solar wind high-speed streams make the modeling of individual events a topical activity.

  7. Fast transport in phase space due to nonlinear wave-particle interaction in the radiation belts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, Anton; Vasiliev, Alexii; Mourenas, Didier; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Boscher, Daniel; Rolland, Guy

    2014-05-01

    We present an analytical, simplified formulation accounting for the fast transport of particles in phase space, in the presence of nonlinear wave-particle resonant interactions in an inhomogeneous magnetic field representative of the radiation belts. We show that the general approach for the description of the evolution of the particle velocity distribution based on the Fokker-Plank equation can be modified to consider the process of nonlinear wave-particle interaction, including particle trapping. Such a modification consists in one additional operator describing fast particle jumps in phase space. The proposed approach is illustrated by considering the acceleration of relativistic electrons by strongly oblique whistler waves. We determine the typical variation of electron phase-density due to nonlinear wave-particle interaction and compare this variation with pitch-angle/energy diffusion due to quasi-linear electron scattering. We show that relation between nonlinear and quasi-linear effects is controlled by the distribution of wave-amplitudes. When this distribution has a heavy tail, nonlinear effects can become dominant in the formation of the electron energy distribution.

  8. Data-driven approach for radiation-belt modeling and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, Dmitri; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam

    Motivated by recent successes of Empirical Mode Reduction (EMR) in understanding and predicting atmospheric, oceanic and climate processes, here we will present results from EMR application to Earth’s Radiation Belts (RB). The EMR framework aims to construct a hierarchy of predictive dynamical models that describe the statistics of the underlying dataset within a given class of (non)-linear stochastic dynamics. EMR obtains a low-order (non)-linear system of prognostic equations driven by stochastic forcing, and estimates both the dynamical operator and the properties of the multi-level additive driving noise directly from observations or from a high-order model's simulation. Presented EMR-RB model is derived on the basis of daily geosynchronous relativistic electron fluxes and is externally forced by solar wind parameters; the missing data in the gaps of the latter are filled in by singular spectrum analysis. EMR-RB model's predictive performance is assessed over several solar cycles and compared to other empirical methods.

  9. Multi-MeV electron loss in the heart of the radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Kellerman, Adam; Aseev, Nikita; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; Michaelis, Ingo

    2017-02-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in understanding acceleration mechanisms in the Earth's radiation belts. In particular, a number of studies demonstrated the importance of the local acceleration by analyzing the radial profiles of phase space density (PSD) and observing building up peaks in PSD. In this study, we focus on understanding of the local loss using very similar tools. The profiles of PSD for various values of the first adiabatic invariants during the previously studied 17 January 2013 storm are presented and discussed. The profiles of PSD show clear deepening minimums consistent with the scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. Long-term evolution shows that local minimums in PSD can persist for relatively long times. During considered interval of time the deepening minimums were observed around L* = 4 during 17 January 2013 storm and around L* = 3.5 during 1 March 2013 storm. This study shows a new method that can help identify the location, magnitude, and time of the local loss and will help quantify local loss in the future. This study also provides additional clear and definitive evidence that local loss plays a major role for the dynamics of the multi-MeV electrons.

  10. A BATSE investigation of radiation belt electrons precipitated by VLF waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, Dayton W.

    1995-01-01

    The Compton Observatory commonly encounters fluxes of energetic electrons which have been scattered from the inner radiation belt to the path of the satellite by resonant interactions with VLF waves from powerful man-made transmitters. The present investigation was motivated by the fact that in the Fall of 1993, the Gamma Ray Observatory was boosted from a 650 km altitude circular orbit to a 750 km altitude circular orbit. This was an opportunity, for the first time, to make observations at two different altitudes using the same instrument. We have examined DISCLA data from the Burst & Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) experiment from 1 Sep. 1993 to 29 Jan. 1994. During the period of study we identified 48 instances of the satellite encountering a cloud of energetic electrons which had been scattered by VLF transmitters. We find that boosting the altitude of the circular orbit from 650 km to 750 km increased the intensity of cyclotron resonance scattered electrons by a factor of two. To search for long term changes in the cyclotron resonance precipitation, we have compared the approx. 750 km altitude data from 106 days at the end of 1993 with data at the same altitudes and time of year in 1991. The cyclotron resonance events in 1991 were three times more frequent and 25% of those cases were more intense than any seen in the 1993 data. We attribute this difference to increased level of geomagnetic activity in 1991 near the Solar Maximum.

  11. Dependence of radiation belt enhancements on the radial extent of Pc5 waves and the plasmapause location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Zesta, E.; Balasis, G.; Katsavrias, C.; Mann, I. R.; Tsinganos, K.

    2014-12-01

    Low-energy electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies through different mechanisms, transporting them across their drift shells to the outer radiation belt. Among the different acceleration mechanisms, radial diffusion describes the result of ULF magnetic field pulsations resonantly interacting with radiation belt electrons. In this paper, the radial positioning of the relativistic electron population during 39 intense and moderate magnetic storms is examined against that of ULF Pc5 wave power and the plasmapause location. The relativistic electron population of the outer radiation belt appeared enhanced in the 2 - 6 MeV electron flux data from SAMPEX and in > 2 MeV electron flux data from the geosynchronous GOES satellites following 27 of the magnetic storms. We compared relativistic electrons observations with concurrent radial distribution of wave power enhancements at Pc5 frequencies as detected by the IMAGE and CARISMA magnetometer arrays, as well as by additional magnetic stations collaborating in SuperMAG. We discuss the growth and decay characteristics of Pc5 waves in association with the plasmapause location, determined from IMAGE EUV observations, as the controlling factor for wave power penetration deep into the magnetosphere. We show that, during magnetic storms characterized by increased post-storm fluxes, Pc5 wave power penetrates to L shells of 4 and lower. On the other hand, magnetic storms which were characterised by loss of electrons were related to low Pc5 wave activity, which was not intensified at low L shells. These observations provide support for the hypothesis that enhanced Pc5 wave activity deep into the magnetosphere during the main and recovery phase can discriminate between storms that result in increases of electron fluxes from those that do not. The work leading to this paper has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-2011-1) under grant agreement no. 284520 for the MAARBLE

  12. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W.; Acuna, M.; Torbert, R.; Thorne, R.; Jordanova, V.; Bounds, S.; Smith, C.; Santolik, O.; Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Hospodarsky, G.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Puhl-Quinn, P.

    2006-12-01

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field dynamics and time scales are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to MHz frequencies. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. The instruments are integrated through a Central Data Processor Unit (CDPU) which provides for flexible instrument operations in both burst and survey telemetry modes that can be optimized to address the specific physics of the many radiation belt processes. The EMFISIS multi-institution team comprises a group of knowledgeable space physics investigators, both experimental and theoretical, with the requisite capability, desire, and experience to accomplish the goals of the RBSP mission to further our nation's space weather capability. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts.

  13. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, Craig

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field regimes are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to 400 kHz. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. The instruments are integrated through a Central Data Processor Unit (CDPU) which provides for flexible instrument operations in both burst and survey telemetry modes that can be optimized to address the specific physics of the many radiation belt processes. The EMFISIS multi-institution team comprises a group of knowledgeable space physics investigators, both experimental and theoretical with the requisite capability, desire, and experience to accomplish the goals of the RBSP mission to further space weather capability. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts.

  14. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: evidence for radiative heating and contamination in the W40 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.; Hatchell, J.; Pattle, K.; Kirk, H.; Wilson, T.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Francesco, J. Di; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present SCUBA-2 450 μm and 850 μm observations of the W40 complex in the Serpens-Aquila region as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey (GBS) of nearby star-forming regions. We investigate radiative heating by constructing temperature maps from the ratio of SCUBA-2 fluxes using a fixed dust opacity spectral index, β = 1.8, and a beam convolution kernel to achieve a common 14.8 arcsec resolution. We identify 82 clumps ranging between 10 and 36 K with a mean temperature of 20 ± 3 K. Clump temperature is strongly correlated with proximity to the external OB association and there is no evidence that the embedded protostars significantly heat the dust. We identify 31 clumps that have cores with densities greater than 105cm-3. 13 of these cores contain embedded Class 0/I protostars. Many cores are associated with bright-rimmed clouds seen in Herschel 70 μm images. From JCMT HARP observations of the 12CO 3-2 line, we find contamination of the 850 μm band of up to 20 per cent. We investigate the free-free contribution to SCUBA-2 bands from large-scale and ultracompact H II regions using archival VLA data and find the contribution is limited to individual stars, accounting for 9 per cent of flux per beam at 450 μm or 12 per cent at 850 μm in these cases. We conclude that radiative heating has potentially influenced the formation of stars in the Dust Arc sub-region, favouring Jeans stable clouds in the warm east and fragmentation in the cool west.

  15. Statistical distribution of EMIC wave spectra: Observations from Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.-J.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bortnik, J.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2016-12-01

    It has been known that electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can precipitate ultrarelativistic electrons through cyclotron resonant scattering. However, the overall effectiveness of this mechanism has yet to be quantified, because it is difficult to obtain the global distribution of EMIC waves that usually exhibit limited spatial presence. We construct a statistical distribution of EMIC wave frequency spectra and their intensities based on Van Allen Probes measurements from September 2012 to December 2015. Our results show that as the ratio of plasma frequency over electron gyrofrequency increases, EMIC wave power becomes progressively dominated by the helium band. There is a pronounced dawn-dusk asymmetry in the wave amplitude and the frequency spectrum. The frequency spectrum does not follow the commonly used single-peak Gaussian function. Incorporating these realistic EMIC wave frequency spectra into radiation belt models is expected to improve the quantification of EMIC wave scattering effects in ultrarelativistic electron dynamics.

  16. Van Allen Probes observations of oxygen cyclotron harmonic waves in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanova, M. E.; Malaspina, D. M.; Jaynes, A. N.; Bruder, R. J.; Mann, I. R.; Wygant, J. R.; Ergun, R. E.

    2016-09-01

    Waves with frequencies in the vicinity of the oxygen cyclotron frequency and its harmonics have been regularly observed on the Van Allen Probes satellites during geomagnetic storms. We focus on properties of these waves and present events from the main phase of two storms on 1 November 2012 and 17 March 2013 and associated dropouts of a few MeV electron fluxes. They are electromagnetic, in the frequency range ~0.5 to several Hz, and amplitude ~0.1 to a few nT in magnetic and ~0.1 to a few mV/m in electric field, with both the wave velocity and the Poynting vector directed almost parallel to the background magnetic field. These properties are very similar to those of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, which are believed to contribute to loss of ring current ions and radiation belt electrons and therefore can be also important for inner magnetosphere dynamics.

  17. New results from the Colorado CubeSat and comparison with Van Allen Probes data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.

    2013-05-01

    The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) is a 3-unit (10cm x 10cm x 30cm) CubeSat mission funded by the NSF, launched into a highly inclined (650) low-Earth (490km x 790km) orbit on 09/13/12 as a secondary payload under NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program. CSSWE contains a single science payload, the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile), which is a simplified and miniaturized version of the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) built at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) of University of Colorado for NASA/Van Allen Probes mission, which consists of two identical spacecraft, launched on 08/30/12, that traverse the heart of the radiation belts in a low inclination (100) orbit. REPTile is designed to measure the directional differential flux of protons ranging from 9 to 40 MeV and electrons from 0.5 to >3.3 MeV. Three-month science mission (full success) was completed on 1/05/13. We are now into the extended mission phase, focusing on data analysis and modeling. REPTile measures a fraction of the total population that has small enough equatorial pitch angles to reach the altitude of CSSWE, thus measuring the precipitating population as well as the trapped population. These measurements are critical for understanding the loss of outer radiation belt electrons. New results from CSSWE and comparison with Van Allen Probes data will be presented. The CSSWE is also an ideal class project, involving over 65 graduate and undergraduate students and providing training for the next generation of engineers and scientists over the full life-cycle of a satellite project.

  18. Direct comparison of transient radiation belt topology and dynamics in 1991 based on measurements onboard Mir space station and NOAA satellite.

    PubMed

    Shurshakov, V A; Huston, S L; Dachev TsP; Petrov, V M; Ivanov YuV; Semkova, J V

    1998-01-01

    In March 1991 the CRRES spacecraft measured a new transient radiation belt resulting from a solar proton event and subsequent geomagnetic disturbance. The presence of this belt was also noted by dosimeter-radiometers aboard the Mir space station (approx. 400 km, 51 degrees orbit) and by particle telescopes on the NOAA-10 spacecraft (850 km, 98 degrees). This event provides a unique opportunity to compare particle flux and dose measurements made by different instruments in different orbits under changing conditions. We present here a comparison of the measurements made by the different detectors. We discuss the topology and dynamics of the transient radiation belt over a period of more than one year.

  19. Survival of bacterial isolates exposed to simulated Jovian trapped radiation belt electrons and solar wind protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, D. M.; Hagen, C. A.; Renninger, G. M.; Simko, G. J.; Smith, C. D.; Yelinek, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    With missions to Jupiter, the spacecraft will be exposed for extended durations to solar wind radiation and the Jovian trapped radiation belt. This study is designed to determine the effect of these radiation environments on spacecraft bacterial isolates. The information can be used in the probability of contamination analysis for these missions. A bacterial subpopulation from Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft (nine spore-forming and three non-spore-forming isolates) plus two comparative organisms, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 17917 and a strain of Bacillus subtilis var. niger, were exposed to 2, 12, and 25 MeV electrons at different doses with simultaneous exposure to a vacuum of 1.3 x 10(-4) N m-2 at 20 and -20 degrees C. The radioresistance of the subpopulation was dependent on the isolate, dose and energy of electrons. Temperature affected the radioresistance of only the spore-forming isolates. Survival data indicated that spores were reduced approximately 1 log/1500 J kg-1 (10 J kg-1=1 krad), while non-spore-forming isolates (micrococci) were reduced 1.5-2 logs/1500 J kg-1 with the exception of an apparent radioresistant isolate whose resistance approached that of the spores. The subpopulation was found to be less resistant to lower energy than to higher energy electrons. The bacterial isolates were exposed to 3 keV protons under the same conditions as the electrons with a total fluence of 1.5 x 10(13) p cm-2 and a dose rate of 8.6 x 10(9) p cm-2 s-1. The results showed that only 20% of S. epidermidis and 45% of B. subtilis populations survived exposure to the 3 keV protons, while the mean survival of the spacecraft subpopulation was 45% with a range from 31.8% (non-spore-former) to 64.8% (non-spore-former). No significant difference existed between spore-forming and non-spore-forming isolates.

  20. Survival of bacterial isolates exposed to simulated Jovian trapped radiation belt electrons and solar wind protons.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D M; Hagen, C A; Renninger, G M; Simko, G J; Smith, C D; Yelinek, J A

    1973-01-01

    With missions to Jupiter, the spacecraft will be exposed for extended durations to solar wind radiation and the Jovian trapped radiation belt. This study is designed to determine the effect of these radiation environments on spacecraft bacterial isolates. The information can be used in the probability of contamination analysis for these missions. A bacterial subpopulation from Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft (nine spore-forming and three non-spore-forming isolates) plus two comparative organisms, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 17917 and a strain of Bacillus subtilis var. niger, were exposed to 2, 12, and 25 MeV electrons at different doses with simultaneous exposure to a vacuum of 1.3 x 10(-4) N m-2 at 20 and -20 degrees C. The radioresistance of the subpopulation was dependent on the isolate, dose and energy of electrons. Temperature affected the radioresistance of only the spore-forming isolates. Survival data indicated that spores were reduced approximately 1 log/1500 J kg-1 (10 J kg-1=1 krad), while non-spore-forming isolates (micrococci) were reduced 1.5-2 logs/1500 J kg-1 with the exception of an apparent radioresistant isolate whose resistance approached that of the spores. The subpopulation was found to be less resistant to lower energy than to higher energy electrons. The bacterial isolates were exposed to 3 keV protons under the same conditions as the electrons with a total fluence of 1.5 x 10(13) p cm-2 and a dose rate of 8.6 x 10(9) p cm-2 s-1. The results showed that only 20% of S. epidermidis and 45% of B. subtilis populations survived exposure to the 3 keV protons, while the mean survival of the spacecraft subpopulation was 45% with a range from 31.8% (non-spore-former) to 64.8% (non-spore-former). No significant difference existed between spore-forming and non-spore-forming isolates.

  1. Near-earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; ...

    2015-08-10

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L~5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ~40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ~3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front.more » Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.« less

  2. Near-earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J. Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Turner, Drew L.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Spence, Harlan E.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Fruehauff, Dennis; Chen, Lunjin; Thaller, Scott; Breneman, Aaron; Tang, Xiangwei

    2015-08-10

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L~5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ~40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ~3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.

  3. Near-Earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R; Cattell, Cynthia A; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Turner, Drew L; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Funsten, Herbert O; Spence, Harlan E; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Fruehauff, Dennis; Chen, Lunjin; Thaller, Scott; Breneman, Aaron; Tang, Xiangwei

    2015-08-16

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeVelectron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L ∼ 5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ∼40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ∼3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.

  4. Plasmaspheric electron densities: the importance in modelling radiation belts and in SSA operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberger, János; Jorgensen, Anders; Koronczay, Dávid; Ferencz, Csaba; Hamar, Dániel; Steinbach, Péter; Clilverd, Mark; Rodger, Craig; Juhász, Lilla; Sannikov, Dmitry; Cherneva, Nina

    2016-04-01

    The Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer Network (AWDANet, Lichtenberger et al., J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008, A12201, doi:10.1029/2008JA013467) is able to detect and analyze whistlers in quasi-realtime and can provide equatorial electron density data. The plasmaspheric electron densities are key parameters for plasmasphere models in Space Weather related investigations, particularly in modeling charged particle accelerations and losses in Radiation Belts. The global AWDANet detects millions of whistlers in a year. The network operates since early 2002 with automatic whistler detector capability and it has been recently completed with automatic analyzer capability in PLASMON (http://plasmon.elte.hu, Lichtenberger et al., Space Weather Space Clim. 3 2013, A23 DOI: 10.1051/swsc/2013045.) Eu FP7-Space project. It is based on a recently developed whistler inversion model (Lichtenberger, J. J. Geophys. Res., 114, 2009, A07222, doi:10.1029/2008JA013799), that opened the way for an automated process of whistler analysis, not only for single whistler events but for complex analysis of multiple-path propagation whistler groups. The network operates in quasi real-time mode since mid-2014, fifteen stations provide equatorial electron densities that are used as inputs for a data assimilative plasmasphere model but they can also be used directly in space weather research and models. We have started to process the archive data collected by AWDANet stations since 2002 and in this paper we present the results of quasi-real-time and off-line runs processing whistlers from quiet and disturb periods. The equatorial electron densities obtained by whistler inversion are fed into the assimilative model of the plasmasphere providing a global view of the region for processed the periods

  5. Modes of response of the ring current and radiation belts to interplanetary drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, D.; Shao, X.; Liemohn, M. W.; Tornquist, M.; Koepke, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    It is often mentioned that the dynamic regimes of magnetic storms are difficult to categorize, with each storm being a distinct response to solar wind driving of the magnetosphere. We report on the ring current response to interplanetary drivers and compare with the known modes of response of the energetic electron flux. The Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) model is used to reproduce 20 storms driven by high-speed streams (HSS) and 20 storms driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). Observations of energetic electrons at 2 MeV during those storms are available from the SAMPEX and POLAR missions. While the ring current is driven by slowly-varying convective electric fields in the tail, the energetic electrons of the radiation belts respond to faster drivers such as impulses and waves. We use principal component analysis and filter techniques to compare the ion phase-space density and energetic electron flux dynamics. We find that the modes of response (P0, P1, and V1) of the electron flux are related to spatial and temporal modes of the ring current. The V1 mode corresponds to the intensification of the ring current during the main phase, and the P0 and P1 peak fluxes correspond to ion dynamic effects below and above the plasmapause respectively. The mechanisms present in HEIDI are ion energization (via wave-particle interaction) and loss (via wave-particle interactions, charge exchange, and Coulomb collisions). Finally the ICME-driven storms have spatiotemporal features related to all three electron-flux peaks while most HSS-driven storms display only two modes (P1 and V1) above the plasmapause.

  6. On the Relationship Between High Speed Solar Wind Streams and Radiation Belt Electron Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua

    2011-01-01

    Both past and recent research results indicate that solar wind speed has a close connection to radiation belt electron fluxes [e.g., Paulikas and Blake, 1979; Reeves et aI., 2011]: a higher solar wind speed is often associated with a higher level of radiation electron fluxes. But the relationship can be very complex [Reeves et aI., 2011]. The study presented here provides further corroboration of this viewpoint by emphasizing the importance of a global perspective and time history. We find that all the events during years 2010 and 2011 where the >0.8 MeV integral electron flux exceeds 10(exp 5) particles/sq cm/sr/s (pfu) at GEO orbit are associated with the high speed streams (HSS) following the onset of the Stream Interaction Region (SIR), with most of them belonging to the long-lasting Corotating Interaction Region (CIR). Our preliminary results indicate that during HSS events, a maximum speed of 700 km/s and above is a sufficient but not necessary condition for the > 0.8 MeV electron flux to reach 10(exp 5) pfu. But in the exception cases of HSS events where the electron flux level exceeds the 10(exp 5) pfu value but the maximum solar wind speed is less than 700 km/s, a prior impact can be noted either from a CME or a transient SIR within 3-4 days before the arrival of the HSS - stressing the importance of time history. Through superposed epoch analysis and studies providing comparisons with the CME events and the HSS events where the flux level fails to reach the 10(exp 5) pfu, we will present the quantitative assessment of behaviors and relationships of various quantities, such as the time it takes to reach the flux threshold value from the stream interface and its dependence on different physical parameters (e.g., duration of the HSS event, its maximum or average of the solar wind speed, IMF Bz, Kp). The ultimate goal is to apply what is derived to space weather forecasting.

  7. Evidence for dust-driven, radial plasma transport in Saturn's inner radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Andriopoulou, M.

    2016-08-01

    A survey of Cassini MIMI/LEMMS data acquired between 2004 and 2015 has led to the identification of 13 energetic electron microsignatures that can be attributed to particle losses on one of the several faint rings of the planet. Most of the signatures were detected near L-shells that map between the orbits of Mimas and Enceladus or near the G-ring. Our analysis indicates that it is very unlikely for these signatures to have originated from absorption on Mimas, Enceladus or unidentified Moons and rings, even though most were not found exactly at the L-shells of the known rings of the saturnian system (G-ring, Methone, Anthe, Pallene). The lack of additional absorbers is apparent in the L-shell distribution of MeV ions which are very sensitive for tracing the location of weakly absorbing material permanently present in Saturn's radiation belts. This sensitivity is demonstrated by the identification, for the first time, of the proton absorption signatures from the asteroid-sized Moons Pallene, Anthe and/or their rings. For this reason, we investigate the possibility that the 13 energetic electron events formed at known saturnian rings and the resulting depletions were later displaced radially by one or more magnetospheric processes. Our calculations indicate that the displacement magnitude for several of those signatures is much larger than the one that can be attributed to radial flows imposed by the recently discovered noon-to-midnight electric field in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. This observation is consistent with a mechanism where radial plasma velocities are enhanced near dusty obstacles. Several possibilities are discussed that may explain this observation, including a dust-driven magnetospheric interchange instability, mass loading by the pick-up of nanometer charged dust grains and global magnetospheric electric fields induced by perturbed orbits of charged dust due to the act of solar radiation pressure. Indirect evidence for a global scale interaction

  8. Radiation Belt Dynamic and Quasi-Static Modeling Based on CRRES Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    Short-Term Responses of Outer-Belt Relativistic Electrons to Dst Variations Michael Schulz, Michael A. Rinaldi, Richard W. Nightingale, and Y.T. Chiu...1994 23 Short-Term Responses of Outer-Belt Relativistic Electrons to Dst Variations Michael Schulz, Michael A. Rinaldi, Richard W. Nightingale, and Y...this finding is that Kp should be a leading indicator (although not by as much as several days) for Dst . (Enhanced Kp accompanies enhanced transport of

  9. Van Allen Probes ECT/MagEIS Background Corrected Electron Flux Measurements: Methods and Initial Findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J.; Looper, M. D.; Clemmons, J. H.; Roeder, J. L.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument, part ofthe Energetic Composition and Thermal Plasma (ECT) Suite, onboard the NASA Van AllenProbes spacecraft. The ECT/MagEIS instrument measures radiation belt electrons in the ~20-4000 keV energy range and protons in the ~60-1000 keV energy range, with high resolution inboth energy and pitch-angle. In addition, the MagEIS electron measurement technique allowsfor a full quantification of the source(s) of background contamination in the measurement.MagEIS is thus able to make clean, reliable electron flux observations in the presence of strongpenetrating backgrounds, for example, contamination from relativistic protons in the inner zoneand inner slot region. We summarize our background correction algorithm, describe the varioussources of background contamination, and present an overview of our initial findings using thebackground corrected data set. Understanding the causes and effects of backgroundcontamination in the MagEIS electron data set is crucial for the interpretation and proper use ofsuch data. The techniques described will facilitate new investigations into the dynamics of theEarth's electron radiation belts, which have thus far not been possible.

  10. The Global Positioning System constellation as a space weather monitor. Comparison of electron measurements with Van Allen Probes data

    DOE PAGES

    Morley, Steven K.; Sullivan, John P.; Henderson, Michael G.; ...

    2016-02-06

    Energetic electron observations in Earth's radiation belts are typically sparse, and multipoint studies often rely on serendipitous conjunctions. This paper establishes the scientific utility of the Combined X-ray Dosimeter (CXD), currently flown on 19 satellites in the Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation, by cross-calibrating energetic electron measurements against data from the Van Allen Probes. By breaking our cross calibration into two parts—one that removes any spectral assumptions from the CXD flux calculation and one that compares the energy spectra—we first validate the modeled instrument response functions, then the calculated electron fluxes. Unlike previous forward modeling of energetic electron spectra, wemore » use a combination of four distributions that together capture a wide range of observed spectral shapes. Moreover, our two-step approach allowed us to identify, and correct for, small systematic offsets between block IIR and IIF satellites. Using the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer and Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope on Van Allen Probes as a “gold standard,” here we demonstrate that the CXD instruments are well understood. A robust statistical analysis shows that CXD and Van Allen Probes fluxes are similar and the measured fluxes from CXD are typically within a factor of 2 of Van Allen Probes at energies inline image4 MeV. Our team present data from 17 CXD-equipped GPS satellites covering the 2015 “St. Patrick's Day” geomagnetic storm to illustrate the scientific applications of such a high data density satellite constellation and therefore demonstrate that the GPS constellation is positioned to enable new insights in inner magnetospheric physics and space weather forecasting.« less

  11. The Global Positioning System constellation as a space weather monitor. Comparison of electron measurements with Van Allen Probes data

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, Steven K.; Sullivan, John P.; Henderson, Michael G.; Blake, J. Bernard; Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-02-06

    Energetic electron observations in Earth's radiation belts are typically sparse, and multipoint studies often rely on serendipitous conjunctions. This paper establishes the scientific utility of the Combined X-ray Dosimeter (CXD), currently flown on 19 satellites in the Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation, by cross-calibrating energetic electron measurements against data from the Van Allen Probes. By breaking our cross calibration into two parts—one that removes any spectral assumptions from the CXD flux calculation and one that compares the energy spectra—we first validate the modeled instrument response functions, then the calculated electron fluxes. Unlike previous forward modeling of energetic electron spectra, we use a combination of four distributions that together capture a wide range of observed spectral shapes. Moreover, our two-step approach allowed us to identify, and correct for, small systematic offsets between block IIR and IIF satellites. Using the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer and Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope on Van Allen Probes as a “gold standard,” here we demonstrate that the CXD instruments are well understood. A robust statistical analysis shows that CXD and Van Allen Probes fluxes are similar and the measured fluxes from CXD are typically within a factor of 2 of Van Allen Probes at energies inline image4 MeV. Our team present data from 17 CXD-equipped GPS satellites covering the 2015 “St. Patrick's Day” geomagnetic storm to illustrate the scientific applications of such a high data density satellite constellation and therefore demonstrate that the GPS constellation is positioned to enable new insights in inner magnetospheric physics and space weather forecasting.

  12. Resonant scattering of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt by HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shanshan; Zhu, Zhengping; Ni, Binbin; Cao, Xing; Luo, Weihua

    2016-10-01

    Several extremely low-frequency (ELF)/very low-frequency (VLF) wave generation experiments have been performed successfully at High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) heating facility and the artificial ELF/VLF signals can leak into the outer radiation belt and contribute to resonant interactions with energetic electrons. Based on the artificial wave properties revealed by many of in situ observations, we implement test particle simulations to evaluate the effects of energetic electron resonant scattering driven by the HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves. The results indicate that for both single-frequency/monotonic wave and multi-frequency/broadband waves, the behavior of each electron is stochastic while the averaged diffusion effect exhibits temporal linearity in the wave-particle interaction process. The computed local diffusion coefficients show that, the local pitch-angle scattering due to HARRP-induced single-frequency ELF/VLF whistlers with an amplitude of ∼10 pT can be intense near the loss cone with a rate of ∼10-2 rad2 s-1, suggesting the feasibility of HAARP-induced ELF/VLF waves for removal of outer radiation belt energetic electrons. In contrast, the energy diffusion of energetic electrons is relatively weak, which confirms that pitch-angle scattering by artificial ELF/VLF waves can dominantly lead to the precipitation of energetic electrons. Moreover, diffusion rates of the discrete, broadband waves, with the same amplitude of each discrete frequency as the monotonic waves, can be much larger, which suggests that it is feasible to trigger a reasonable broadband wave instead of the monotonic wave to achieve better performance of controlled precipitation of energetic electrons. Moreover, our test particle scattering simulation show good agreement with the predictions of the quasi-linear theory, confirming that both methods are applied to evaluate the effects of resonant interactions between radiation belt electrons and artificially generated

  13. The proton and electron radiation belts at geosynchronous orbit: Statistics and behavior during high-speed stream-driven storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.; Cayton, Thomas E.; Denton, Michael H.; Belian, Richard D.; Christensen, Roderick A.; Ingraham, J. Charles

    2016-06-01

    The outer proton radiation belt (OPRB) and outer electron radiation belt (OERB) at geosynchronous orbit are investigated using a reanalysis of the LANL CPA (Charged Particle Analyzer) 8-satellite 2-solar cycle energetic particle data set from 1976 to 1995. Statistics of the OPRB and the OERB are calculated, including local time and solar cycle trends. The number density of the OPRB is about 10 times higher than the OERB, but the 1 MeV proton flux is about 1000 times less than the 1 MeV electron flux because the proton energy spectrum is softer than the electron spectrum. Using a collection of 94 high-speed stream-driven storms in 1976-1995, the storm time evolutions of the OPRB and OERB are studied via superposed epoch analysis. The evolution of the OERB shows the familiar sequence (1) prestorm decay of density and flux, (2) early-storm dropout of density and flux, (3) sudden recovery of density, and (4) steady storm time heating to high fluxes. The evolution of the OPRB shows a sudden enhancement of density and flux early in the storm. The absence of a proton dropout when there is an electron dropout is noted. The sudden recovery of the density of the OERB and the sudden density enhancement of the OPRB are both associated with the occurrence of a substorm during the early stage of the storm when the superdense plasma sheet produces a "strong stretching phase" of the storm. These storm time substorms are seen to inject electrons to 1 MeV and protons to beyond 1 MeV into geosynchronous orbit, directly producing a suddenly enhanced radiation belt population.

  14. Radial Diffusion as a Potential Source and Loss Mechanism of Relativistic Electrons in the Outer Radiation Belt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-15

    Radiation Belt 15 February 2006 Prepared by Y. Y. SHPRITS, 𔃼 R. M. THORNE,’ R. FRIEDEL ,2 G. D. REEVES, 2 J. FENNELL,3 D. N. BAKER,4 and S. G. KANEKAL...000I Y. Y. Shprits, R. M. Thorne, R. Friedel , G. D. Reeves, 5e. TASK NUMBER ,1. Fennoll, 0.,N. Baker. and S. G. Kanekal 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...there is an inward radial gradient (more particles at lower L-values), the space- craft will measure an increase in electron fluxes. The magnitude of the

  15. Comparison of the 3D VERB Code Simulations of the Dynamic Evolution of the Outer and Inner Radiation Belts With the Reanalysis Obtained from Observations on Multiple Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Y.; Subbotin, D.; Ni, B.; Daae, M.; Kondrashov, D. A.; Hartinger, M.; Kim, K.; Orlova, K.; Nagai, T.; Friedel, R. H.; Chen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    In this study we present simulations of the inner and outer radiation belts using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) accounting for radial, pitch-angle, energy, and mixed diffusion. Qusi-linear diffusion coefficients are computed using the Full Diffusion Code (FDC) due to day-side and night-side chorus waves, magneto-sonic waves, phasmaspheric hiss waves, EMIC and hiss waves in the regions of plumes, lightning generated whistlers and anthropogenic whistlers. Sensitivity simulations show that the knowledge of wave spectral properties and spacial distribution of waves is crucially important for reproducing long term observations. The 3D VERB code simulations are compared to 3D reanalysis of the radiation belt fluxes obtained by blending the predictive model with observations from LANL GEO, CRRES, Akebono, and GPS. We also discuss the initial results of coupled RCM-VERB simulations. Finally, we present a statistical analysis of radiation belt phase space density obtained from reanalysis to explore sudden drop outs of the radiation belt fluxes and location of peaks in phase space density. The application of the developed tools to future measurements on board RBSP is discussed.

  16. Apollo experience report: Protection against radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, R. A.; Benson, R. E.; Bailey, J. V.; Barnes, C. M.

    1973-01-01

    Radiation protection problems on earth and in space are discussed. Flight through the Van Allen belts and into space beyond the geomagnetic shielding was recognized as hazardous before the advent of manned space flight. Specialized dosimetry systems were developed for use on the Apollo spacecraft, and systems for solar-particle-event warning and dose projection were devised. Radiation sources of manmade origin on board the Apollo spacecraft present additional problems. Methods applied to evaluate and control or avoid the various Apollo radiation hazards are discussed.

  17. Dynamics of the outer radiation belts in relation to polar substorms and hot plasma injections at geostationary altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauvaud, J. A.; Winckler, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Geostationary satellite and ground measurements of dynamic variations of the outer radiation belts and their relations with the development of auroral structures during magnetospheric substorms are analyzed. A comparison of measurements of the H or X geomagnetic field components made by seven auroral stations with ATS-6 low-energy and high-energy particle measurements during the multiple-onset substorm of Aug. 16, 1974 is presented which demonstrates that while the decrease in energetic particle fluxed ends only at the time of a strong substorm onset, rapid motions of the outer radiation belts may occur during the flux decrease. All-sky photographs of auroral phenomena taken at Fort Yukon and College, Alaska are then compared with ATS-1 energetic particle flux measurements in order to demonstrate the relation between flux decreases and increases and distinct substorm phases. Results support the hypothesis of a magnetospheric substorm precursor which appears to be an instability growing at the inner boundary of the plasma layer and approaching the earth, and underline the importance of current and magnetic field variations in charged particle dynamics.

  18. Layered Model for Radiation-Induced Chemical Evolution of Icy Surface Composition on Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Hill, Matthew E.; Richardson, John D.; Sturner, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The diversity of albedos and surface colors on observed Kuiper Belt and Inner Oort Cloud objects remains to be explained in terms of competition between primordial intrinsic versus exogenic drivers of surface and near-surface evolution. Earlier models have attempted without success to attribute this diversity to the relations between surface radiolysis from cosmic ray irradiation and gardening by meteoritic impacts. A more flexible approach considers the different depth-dependent radiation profiles produced by low-energy plasma, suprathermal, and maximally penetrating charged particles of the heliospheric and local interstellar radiation environments. Generally red objects of the dynamically cold (low inclination, circular orbit) Classical Kuiper Belt might be accounted for from erosive effects of plasma ions and reddening effects of high energy cosmic ray ions, while suprathermal keV-MeV ions could alternatively produce more color neutral surfaces. The deepest layer of more pristine ice can be brought to the surface from meter to kilometer depths by larger impact events and potentially by cryovolcanic activity. The bright surfaces of some larger objects, e.g. Eris, suggest ongoing resurfacing activity. Interactions of surface irradiation, resultant chemical oxidation, and near-surface cryogenic fluid reservoirs have been proposed to account for Enceladus cryovolcanism and may have further applications to other icy irradiated bodies. The diversity of causative processes must be understood to account for observationally apparent diversities of the object surfaces.

  19. Nonlinear fundamental and harmonic cyclotron resonant scattering of radiation belt ultrarelativistic electrons by oblique monochromatic EMIC waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Geng; Su, Zhenpeng; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Min; Wang, Shui

    2017-02-01

    Cyclotron resonant scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves has been considered to be responsible for the rapid loss of radiation belt high-energy electrons. For parallel-propagating EMIC waves, the nonlinear character of cyclotron resonance has been revealed in recent studies. Here we present the first study on the nonlinear fundamental and harmonic cyclotron resonant scattering of radiation belt ultrarelativistic electrons by oblique EMIC waves on the basis of test particle simulations. Higher wave obliquity produces stronger nonlinearity of harmonic resonances but weaker nonlinearity of fundamental resonance. Compared to the quasi-linear prediction, these nonlinear resonances yield a more rapid loss of electrons over a wider pitch angle range. In the quasi-linear regime, the ultrarelativistic electrons are lost in the equatorial pitch angle range αeq<75°, nearly independent of wave normal angle ψ. In contrast, the upper pitch angle cutoff of nonlinear losses tends to increase with the wave normal angle increasing, which is about αeq=82° at ψ = 0° and αeq>87.5° at ψ = 20° and 40°. At the resonant pitch angles αeq<75°, the difference between quasi-linear and nonlinear loss timescales tends to decrease with the wave normal angle increasing. At ψ = 0° and 20°, the nonlinear electron loss timescale is 10% shorter than the quasi-linear prediction; at ψ = 40°, the difference in loss timescales is reduced to <5%.

  20. Large Amplitude Whistler Waves and Electron Acceleration in the Earth's Radiation Belts: A Review of STEREO and Wind Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, Cynthia; Breneman, A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P.; Kersten, K.; Wygant, J.; Wilson, L. B., III; Looper, Mark D.; Blake, J. Bernard; Roth, I.

    2012-01-01

    One of the critical problems for understanding the dynamics of Earth's radiation belts is determining the physical processes that energize and scatter relativistic electrons. We review measurements from the Wind/Waves and STEREO S/Waves waveform capture instruments of large amplitude whistler-mode waves. These observations have provided strong evidence that large amplitude (100s mV/m) whistler-mode waves are common during magnetically active periods. The large amplitude whistlers have characteristics that are different from typical chorus. They are usually nondispersive and obliquely propagating, with a large longitudinal electric field and significant parallel electric field. We will also review comparisons of STEREO and Wind wave observations with SAMPEX observations of electron microbursts. Simulations show that the waves can result in energization by many MeV and/or scattering by large angles during a single wave packet encounter due to coherent, nonlinear processes including trapping. The experimental observations combined with simulations suggest that quasilinear theoretical models of electron energization and scattering via small-amplitude waves, with timescales of hours to days, may be inadequate for understanding radiation belt dynamics.

  1. Whistlers Observed Outside the Plasmasphere: Correlation to Plasmaspheric/Plasmapause Features and Implications for the Scattering of Radiation-Belt Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrian, Mark L.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetospherically reflected, lightning-generated whistler waves are an important potential contributor to pitch-angle scattering loss processes of the electron radiation belts. While lightning-generated whistlers are a common feature at, and just inside, the plasmapause, they are infrequently observed outside the plasmasphere. As such, their potential contribution to outer radiation belt loss processes is more tenuous. Recently, Platino et al. [2005] has reported on whistlers observed outside the plasmasphere by Cluster. Here, we present correlative global observations of the plasmasphere, for the reported periods of Cluster-observed whistlers outside the plasmasphere, using IMAGE-EUV data. The intent of this study is to seek the underlying mechanisms that result in whistlers outside the plasmasphere and consequently the anticipated morphology and significance these waves may have on radiation belt dynamics.

  2. Electron loss rates from the outer radiation belt caused by the filling of the outer plasmasphere: the calm before the storm

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Denton, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    Measurements from 7 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit are analyzed to determine the decay rate of the number density of the outer electron radiation belt prior to the onset of high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms. Superposed-data analysis is used wan(?) a collection of 124 storms. When there is a calm before the storm, the electron number density decays exponentially before the storm with a 3.4-day e-folding time: beginning about 4 days before storm onset, the density decreases from {approx}4x10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} to {approx}1X 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}. When there is not a calm before the storm, the number-density decay is very smalL The decay in the number density of radiation-belt electrons is believed to be caused by pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the atmospheric loss cone as the outer plasmasphere fills during the calms. While the radiation-belt electron density decreases, the temperature of the electron radiation belt holds approximately constant, indicating that the electron precipitation occurs equally at all energies. Along with the number density decay, the pressure of the outer electron radiation belt decays and the specific entropy increases. From the measured decay rates, the electron flux to the atmosphere is calculated and that flux is 3 orders of magnitude less than thermal fluxes in the magnetosphere, indicating that the radiation-belt pitch-angle scattering is 3 orders weaker than strong diffusion. Energy fluxes into the atmosphere are calculated and found to be insufficient to produce visible airglow.

  3. Stormtime ring current and radiation belt ion transport: Simulations and interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Larry R.; Gorney, David J.; Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We use a dynamical guiding-center model to investigate the stormtime transport of ring current and radiation-belt ions. We trace the motion of representative ions' guiding centers in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field for a range of ion energies. Our simple magnetospheric model allows us to compare our numerical results quantitatively with analytical descriptions of particle transport, (e.g., with the quasilinear theory of radial diffusion). We find that 10-145-keV ions gain access to L approximately 3, where they can form the stormtime ring current, mainly from outside the (trapping) region in which particles execute closed drift paths. Conversely, the transport of higher-energy ions (approximately greater than 145 keV at L approximately 3) turns out to resemble radial diffusion. The quasilinear diffusion coefficient calculated for our model storm does not vary smoothly with particle energy, since our impulses occur at specific (although randomly determined) times. Despite the spectral irregularity, quasilinear theory provides a surprisingly accurate description of the transport process for approximately greater than 145-keV ions, even for the case of an individual storm. For 4 different realizations of our model storm, the geometric mean discrepancies between diffusion coefficients D(sup sim, sub LL) obtained from the simulations and the quasilinear diffusion coefficient D(sup ql, sub LL) amount to factors of 2.3, 2.3, 1.5, and 3.0, respectively. We have found that these discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) can be reduced slightly by invoking drift-resonance broadening to smooth out the sharp minima and maxima in D(sup ql, sub LL). The mean of the remaining discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) for the 4 different storms then amount to factors of 1.9, 2.1, 1.5, and 2.7, respectively. We find even better agreement when we reduce the impulse amplitudes systematically in

  4. Analysis of a non-storm time enhancement in outer belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Q.; Li, X.; Godinez, H. C.; Sarris, T. E.; Tu, W.; Malaspina, D.; Turner, D. L.; Blake, J. B.; Koller, J.

    2014-12-01

    A high-speed solar wind stream impacted Earth's magnetosphere on January 13th, 2013, and is associated with a large enhancement (>2.5 orders) of outer radiation belt electron fluxes despite a small Dst signature (-30 nT). Fortunately, the outer belt was well sampled by a variety of missions during the event, including the Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE). In-situ flux and phase space density observations are used from MagEIS (Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer) onboard the Van Allen Probes, REPTile (Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment) onboard CSSWE, and SST onboard THEMIS. The observations show a rapid increase in 100's keV electron fluxes, followed by a more gradual enhancement of the MeV energies. The 100's keV enhancement is associated with a substorm injection, and the futher energization to MeV energies is associated with wave activity as measured by the Van Allen Probes and THEMIS. Furthermore, the phase space density radial profiles show an acceleration region occurring between 5

  5. The Relative Deep Penetrations of Energetic Electrons and Ions into the Slot Region and Inner Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic electrons in the inner magnetosphere are distributed into two regions: the inner radiation belt and the outer radiation belt, with the slot region in between separating the two belts. Though many studies have focused on the outer belt dynamics, the energetic electrons in the slot region and especially inner belt did not receive much attention until recently. A number of new features regarding electrons in the low L region have been reported lately, including the abundance of 10s-100s of keV electrons in the inner belt, the frequent deep injections of 100s of keV electrons, and 90°-minimum pitch angle distributions of 100s of keV electrons in the inner belt and slot region. In this presentation, we focus on the relative deep injections into the slot region and inner belt of energetic electrons and ions using observations from HOPE and MagEIS instruments on the Van Allen Probes. It is shown that while 10s - 100s of keV electrons penetrate commonly deep into the low L region and are persistent in the inner belt, the deep injections of ions with similar energies occur rarely, possibly due to the fast loss of ions in the low L region. The energy spectra and pitch angle distributions of electrons and ions during injections are also very different, indicating the existence of different physical mechanisms acting on them. In addition, some intriguing similarities between lower energy ions and higher energy electrons will also be discussed.

  6. Kalman Filtering and Smoothing of the Van Allen Probes Observations to Estimate the Radial, Energy and Pitch Angle Diffusion Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikova, T.; Shprits, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Kalman filter technique combines the strengths of new physical models of the Earth's radiation belts with long-term spacecraft observations of electron fluxes and therefore provide an extremely useful method for the analysis of the state and evolution of the electron radiation belts. However, to get the reliable data assimilation output, the Kalman filter application is confronted with a set of fundamental problems. E.g., satellite measurements are usually limited to a single location in space, which confines the reconstruction of the global evolution of the radiation environment. The uncertainties arise from the imperfect description of the process dynamics and the presence of observation errors, which may cause the failure of data assimilation solution. The development of adaptive Kalman filter that combines the Van Allen Probes data and 3-D VERB code, its accurate customizations in the reconstruction of model describing the phase space density (PSD) evolution, extension of the possibilities to use measurement information, and the model adjustment by developing the identification techniques of model and measurement errors allowed us to reveal hidden and implicit regularities of the PSD dynamics and obtain quantitative and qualitative estimates of radial, energy and pitch angle diffusion characteristics from satellite observations. In this study we propose an approach to estimate radial, energy and pitch angle diffusion rates, as well as the direction of their propagation.

  7. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: evidence for radiative heating in Serpens MWC 297 and its influence on local star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.; Hatchell, J.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Kirk, H.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Francesco, J. Di; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Allen, L. E.; Cieza, L. A.; Dunham, M. M.; Harvey, P. M.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Bastien, P.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2015-04-01

    We present SCUBA-2 450 and 850 μm observations of the Serpens MWC 297 region, part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey of nearby star-forming regions. Simulations suggest that radiative feedback influences the star formation process and we investigate observational evidence for this by constructing temperature maps. Maps are derived from the ratio of SCUBA-2 fluxes and a two-component model of the JCMT beam for a fixed dust opacity spectral index of β = 1.8. Within 40 arcsec of the B1.5Ve Herbig star MWC 297, the submillimetre fluxes are contaminated by free-free emission with a spectral index of 1.03 ± 0.02, consistent with an ultracompact H II region and polar winds/jets. Contamination accounts for 73 ± 5 per cent and 82 ± 4 per cent of peak flux at 450 μm and 850 μm, respectively. The residual thermal disc of the star is almost undetectable at these wavelengths. Young stellar objects (YSOs) are confirmed where SCUBA-2 850 μm clumps identified by the FELLWALKER algorithm coincide with Spitzer Gould Belt Survey detections. We identify 23 objects and use Tbol to classify nine YSOs with masses 0.09 to 5.1 M⊙. We find two Class 0, one Class 0/I, three Class I and three Class II sources. The mean temperature is 15 ± 2 K for the nine YSOs and 32 ± 4 K for the 14 starless clumps. We observe a starless clump with an abnormally high mean temperature of 46 ± 2 K and conclude that it is radiatively heated by the star MWC 297. Jeans stability provides evidence that radiative heating by the star MWC 297 may be suppressing clump collapse.

  8. Laboratory simulation of Kuiper belt object volatile ices under ionizing radiation: CO-N2 ices as a case study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y S; Zhang, F; Kaiser, R I

    2011-09-21

    The exposure of icy Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) by ionizing radiation was simulated in this case of exposing carbon monoxide-nitrogen (CO-N(2)) ices by energetic electrons. The radiation-induced chemical processing was monitored on-line and in situ via FTIR spectroscopy and quadrupole mass spectrometry. Besides the array of carbon oxides being reproduced as in neat irradiated carbon monoxide (CO) ices studied previously, the radiation exposure at 10 K resulted in the formation of nitrogen-bearing species of isocyanato radical (OCN), linear (l-NCN), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)), plus diazirinone (N(2)CO). The infrared assignments of these species were further confirmed by isotopic shifts. The temporal evolution of individual species was found to fit in first-order reaction schemes, prepping up the underlying non-equilibrium chemistry on the formation of OCN, l-NCN, and NO radicals in particular. Also unique to the binary KBO model ices and viable for the future remote detection is diazirinone (N(2)CO) at 1860 cm(-1) (2ν(5)) formed at lower radiation exposure.

  9. Modeling of Outer Radiation Belt Electron Scattering due to Spatial and Spectral Properties of ULF Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornquist, Mattias

    The research presented in this thesis covers wave-particle interactions for relativistic (0.5-10 MeV) electrons in Earth's outer radiation belt (r = 3-7 RE, or L-shells: L = 3-7) interacting with magnetospheric Pc-5 (ULF) waves. This dissertation focuses on ideal models for short and long term electron energy and radial position scattering caused by interactions with ULF waves. We use test particle simulations to investigate these wave-particle interactions with ideal wave and magnetic dipole fields. We demonstrate that the wave-particle phase can cause various patterns in phase space trajectories, i.e. local acceleration, and that for a global electron population, for all initial conditions accounted for, has a negligible net energy scattering. Working with GSM polar coordinates, the relevant wave field components are EL, Ephi and Bz, where we find that the maximum energy scattering is 3-10 times more effective for Ephi compared to EL in a magnetic dipole field with a realistic dayside compression amplitude. We also evaluate electron interactions with two coexisting waves for a set of small frequency separations and phases, where it is confirmed that multi-resonant transport is possible for overlapping resonances in phase space when the Chirikov criterion is met (stochasticity parameter K = 1). The electron energy scattering enhances with decreasing frequency separation, i.e. increasing K, and is also dependent on the phases of the waves. The global acceleration is non-zero, can be onset in about 1 hour and last for > 4 hours. The adiabatic wave-particle interaction discussed up to this point can be regarded as short-term scattering ( tau ˜ hours ). When the physical problem extends to longer time scales (tau ˜ days ) the process ceases to be adiabatic due to the introduction of stochastic element in the system and becomes a diffusive process. We show that any mode in a broadband spectrum can contribute to the total diffusion rate for a particular drift

  10. Quiet time observations of equatorially trapped megaelectronvolt radiation belt ions with nuclear charge Z greater than or equal to 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Data from the equatorial satellite Explorer 45 were used to study ion fluxes during the geomagnetically quiescent period June 1-15, 1972. A heavy-ion solid-state ion detector system obtained count rates close to the equatorial plane in the energy passband 1.82-4.8 MeV per ion during a single satellite pass through the radiation belts. Fluxes of these ions are interpreted as oxygen ions and are found to maximize in the L shell range 3-3.5 with peak equatorially mirroring flux of 0.38 ions/(sq cm s sr keV). This peak is not as sharply confined in L shell as is the helium ion peak.

  11. FIREBIRD: A Dual Satellite Mission to Examine the Spatial and Energy Coherence Scales of Radiation Belt Electron Microbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Spence, H. E.; Larsen, B. A.; Blake, J. B.; Springer, L.; Crew, A. B.; Mosleh, E.; Mashburn, K. W.

    2009-12-01

    FIREBIRD (Focused Investigations of Relativistic Electron Burst Intensity, Range, and Dynamics), a mission under NSF’s “CubeSat-based Science Missions for Space Weather and Atmospheric Research”, will address the broad scientific question: What is the role of microburst electron precipitation in radiation belt dynamics? There are four major candidate processes for losses of relativistic electrons from the outer radiation belt [Millan and Thorne, 2007]: wave-particle interactions with whistler-mode chorus, wave-particle interactions with electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) waves, outward radial diffusion to the magnetopause, and loss of adiabaticity on stretched magnetic field lines. FIREBIRD will further investigate the role of whistler-mode chorus, by examining the microburst electron precipitation phenomenon attributed to chorus. Microbursts are thought to be a hallmark of rapid radiation belt losses, possibly removing the entire pre-storm outer zone in a single day [Lorentzen 2001b; O'Brien et al., 2004], yet they are also intimately tied to in-situ acceleration mechanisms. FIREBIRD’s two 1.5U (10 x 10 x 15 cm) CubeSats, each weighing up to 2 kg, will be placed into a common high-inclination bead-on-a-string orbit. The two satellites will remain within ~500 km of one another for six to twelve months, allowing characterization over the spatial scale regime from 10 - 500 km. Each satellite will carry an identical co-aligned pair of solid-state detectors sensitive to electrons from 30 keV to ~3 MeV with 100 msec time resolution. Simultaneous dual measurements provided by the twin FIREBIRD satellites will permit, for the first time, the determination of spatial scales of single microburst events. Along with energy-resolved spectra, these measurements will provide the critically needed answers on the radiation belt loss rate attributed to microbursts. There are three critical questions about relativistic electron microbursts that FIREBIRD can answer: 1) What

  12. Multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Zheng; Ni, Binbin; Zhou, Chen; Zou, Zhengyang; Gu, Xudong; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Xianguo; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Shenyi; Li, Xinlin; Zuo, Pingbing; Spence, Harlan; Reeves, Geoffrey

    2016-05-03

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts are a kind of drastic variation in the Earth's magnetosphere, understanding of which is of both scientific and societal importance. We report multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an event of intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse, using electron flux data from a group of 14 satellites. Moreover, when the pulse occurred, magnetopause and atmospheric loss could take effect concurrently contributing to the electron flux dropout. Losses through the magnetopause were observed to be efficient and significant at L ≳ 5, owing to the magnetopause intrusion into L ~6 and outward radial diffusion associated with sharp negative gradient in electron phase space density. Losses to the atmosphere were directly identified from the precipitating electron flux observations, for which pitch angle scattering by plasma waves could be mainly responsible. While the convection and substorm injections strongly enhanced the energetic electron fluxes up to hundreds of keV, they could delay other than avoid the occurrence of electron flux dropout at these energies. Finally, we demonstrate that the pulse-time radiation belt electron flux dropout depends strongly on the specific interplanetary and magnetospheric conditions and that losses through the magnetopause and to the atmosphere and enhancements of substorm injection play an essential role in combination, which should be incorporated as a whole into future simulations for comprehending the nature of radiation belt electron flux dropouts.

  13. Multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse

    DOE PAGES

    Xiang, Zheng; Ni, Binbin; Zhou, Chen; ...

    2016-05-03

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts are a kind of drastic variation in the Earth's magnetosphere, understanding of which is of both scientific and societal importance. We report multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an event of intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse, using electron flux data from a group of 14 satellites. Moreover, when the pulse occurred, magnetopause and atmospheric loss could take effect concurrently contributing to the electron flux dropout. Losses through the magnetopause were observed to be efficient and significant at L ≳ 5, owing to the magnetopause intrusion into Lmore » ~6 and outward radial diffusion associated with sharp negative gradient in electron phase space density. Losses to the atmosphere were directly identified from the precipitating electron flux observations, for which pitch angle scattering by plasma waves could be mainly responsible. While the convection and substorm injections strongly enhanced the energetic electron fluxes up to hundreds of keV, they could delay other than avoid the occurrence of electron flux dropout at these energies. Finally, we demonstrate that the pulse-time radiation belt electron flux dropout depends strongly on the specific interplanetary and magnetospheric conditions and that losses through the magnetopause and to the atmosphere and enhancements of substorm injection play an essential role in combination, which should be incorporated as a whole into future simulations for comprehending the nature of radiation belt electron flux dropouts.« less

  14. Role of dust direct radiative effect on the tropical rain belt over Middle East and North Africa: A high-resolution AGCM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangalath, Hamza Kunhu; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the influence of direct radiative effect of dust on the tropical summer rain belt across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), the present study utilizes the high-resolution capability of an Atmospheric General Circulation Model, the High-Resolution Atmospheric Model. Ensembles of Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project style simulations have been conducted with and without dust radiative impacts, to differentiate the influence of dust on the tropical rain belt. The analysis focuses on summer season. The results highlight the role of dust-induced responses in global- and regional-scale circulations in determining the strength and the latitudinal extent of the tropical rain belt. A significant response in the strength and position of the local Hadley circulation is predicted in response to meridionally asymmetric distribution of dust and the corresponding radiative effects. Significant responses are also found in regional circulation features such as African Easterly Jet and West African Monsoon circulation. Consistent with these dynamic responses at various scales, the tropical rain belt across MENA strengthens and shifts northward. Importantly, the summer precipitation over the semiarid strip south of Sahara, including Sahel, increases up to 20%. As this region is characterized by the "Sahel drought," the predicted precipitation sensitivity to the dust loading over this region has a wide range of socioeconomic implications. Overall, the study demonstrates the extreme importance of incorporating dust radiative effects and the corresponding circulation responses at various scales, in the simulations and future projections of this region's climate.

  15. The Detection of a Striking Increase in the Microwave Emission from Jupiter's Radiation Belts in June and July 2003.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M. J.; Bolton, S. J.; Levin, S. M.; Mac Laren, D.

    2004-12-01

    Synchrotron emission from energetic electrons in Jupiter's radiation belts has been routinely measured by ground-based radio telescopes for three decades. The NASA-JPL Jupiter Patrol, using NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas at Goldstone, CA., has reported significant (5 %-to-30 %) variations in Jupiter's flux density near 13-cm wavelength with timescales from a few days to several months. In this paper we report observations of an unusually sudden increase in flux density from 3.8 to 4.3 Jy that occurred between 20 June and 15 July 2003. The rate of increase (approximately 0.6 percent per day) is the steepest increase that we have detected with the exception of the increase in 1994 following the impacts of fragments from comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. More than half of the reported observations were conducted by middle- and high school students from classrooms across the nation. The students and their teachers are participants in the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) science education project, which is a partnership involving NASA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Lewis Center for Educational Research (LCER) in Apple Valley, CA. Working with the Lewis Center over the Internet, GAVRT students conduct remotely controlled radio astronomy observations using 34-m antennas at Goldstone. We also report preliminary results from a special GAVRT observing campaign conducted in the fall of 2003 before, during and after the controlled impact of the Galileo spacecraft into the Jovian atmosphere. Simultaneous observations were made at 3.5 and 13 cm wavelengths three-to-four days per week. These data are being incorporated into synchrotron emission studies of the state of the radiation belts during the last weeks of the Galileo mission. The JPL contribution to this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Prompt injections of highly relativistic electrons induced by interplanetary shocks: A statistical study of Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Q.; Kanekal, S. G.; Jian, L. K.; Li, X.; Jones, A.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A.; Spence, H. E.

    2016-12-01

    We conduct a statistical study on the sudden response of outer radiation belt electrons due to interplanetary (IP) shocks during the Van Allen Probes era, i.e., 2012 to 2015. Data from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope instrument on board Van Allen Probes are used to investigate the highly relativistic electron response (E > 1.8 MeV) within the first few minutes after shock impact. We investigate the relationship of IP shock parameters, such as Mach number, with the highly relativistic electron response, including spectral properties and radial location of the shock-induced injection. We find that the driving solar wind structure of the shock does not affect occurrence for enhancement events, 25% of IP shocks are associated with prompt energization, and 14% are associated with MeV electron depletion. Parameters that represent IP shock strength are found to correlate best with highest levels of energization, suggesting that shock strength may play a key role in the severity of the enhancements. However, not every shock results in an enhancement, indicating that magnetospheric preconditioning may be required.

  17. Results from the magnetic electron ion spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennell, Joseph; O'Brien, Paul; Roeder, James; Reeves, Geoffrey; Claudepierre, Seth; Clemmons, James; Spence, Harlan; Blake, Bernard

    The Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft (formerly RBSP) measure electrons and ions in the Earth's inner and outer radiation belts. The MagEIS instruments are part of the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT), which also includes the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) analyzer. MagEIS consists of four magnetic electron spectrometers aboard each of the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft that measure the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of electrons from 20 keV to 4 MeV. The MagEIS suite also contains a silicon-detector telescope that measures the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of protons from 60 keV to 20 MeV, and helium and oxygen ions above a hundred keV/AMU. We briefly describe the instrument design and measurement technique and present a set of results from the MagEIS observations, including ultra-low frequency (ULF) modulations of energetic electron flux, and observations of electron flux enhancements associated with the recent BARREL x-ray observations.

  18. The Radiation Environment for the LISA/Laser Interferometry Space Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.; Xapsos, Michael; Poivey, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the radiation environment for the evaluation of degradation due to total ionizing and non-ionizing dose and of single event effects (SEES) for the Laser Interferometry Space Antenna (LISA) instruments and spacecraft. The analysis took into account the radiation exposure for the nominal five-year mission at 20 degrees behind Earth's orbit of the sun, at 1 AU (astronomical unit) and assumes a launch date in 2014. The transfer trajectory out to final orbit has not yet been defined, therefore, this evaluation does not include the impact of passing through the Van Allen belts. Generally, transfer trajectories do not contribute significantly to degradation effects; however, single event effects and deep dielectric charging effects must be taken into consideration especially if critical maneuvers are planned during the van Allen belt passes.

  19. Van Allen Probes observations of unusually low frequency whistler mode waves observed in association with moderate magnetic storms: Statistical study

    PubMed Central

    Breneman, A. W.; Thaller, S. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We show the first evidence for locally excited chorus at frequencies below 0.1 f ce (electron cyclotron frequency) in the outer radiation belt. A statistical study of chorus during geomagnetic storms observed by the Van Allen Probes found that frequencies are often dramatically lower than expected. The frequency at peak power suddenly stops tracking the equatorial 0.5 f ce and f/f ce decreases rapidly, often to frequencies well below 0.1 f ce (in situ and mapped to equator). These very low frequency waves are observed both when the satellites are close to the equatorial plane and at higher magnetic latitudes. Poynting flux is consistent with generation at the equator. Wave amplitudes can be up to 20 to 40 mV/m and 2 to 4 nT. We conclude that conditions during moderate to large storms can excite unusually low frequency chorus, which is resonant with more energetic electrons than typical chorus, with critical implications for understanding radiation belt evolution. PMID:27667871

  20. Variations in Jupiter's Radiation Belts and Synchrotron Radiation as a Result of the Impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy/9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, S.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M.; Thorne, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    Changes to Jupiter's synchrotron radiation following the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy/9 are reported. Also, the consequences are reported for three possible mechanisms that might have caused those changes.

  1. Modeling Loss and Rebuilding of the Earth's Outer Zone Electrons and Comparison with Van Allen Probes Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.; Li, Z.; Paral, J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the competition between radiation belt electron energization due to radial transport and loss to the magnetopause and to the atmosphere is critical to understanding the dynamic changes in outer zone radiation belt electron flux response to solar wind drivers. Plasmasheet electron injection, both due to enhanced convection and substorm dipolarization, provides a source population for generation of whistler mode chorus and seed population for local acceleration. We now have available ~22 months of unprecedented measurements in energy and pitch angle resolution of electrons spanning the energy range from injected plasmasheet to multi-MeV electrons from the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft in near-equatorial plane elliptical orbits, with apogee at 5.8 Re; and two Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation Belt Electron Losses (BARREL) campaigns during January-February 2013 and 2014, each establishing a longitudinal array of precipitation measurements extending to relativistic energies via measured Bremsstrahlung x-rays. In addition to this arsenal of data, a set of modeling tools has been developed to examine dynamics of electrons in the magnetosphere. These tools calculate electron trajectories in time-dependent magnetohydrodyanmic (MHD) fields using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD model coupled with the Rice Convection Model to determine the E and B field response to solar wind drivers. With these tools we can follow electron dynamics including response to Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves which cause radial transport and energization for inward radial gradient as well as enhanced loss to the magnetopause for outward gradient. These tools have been applied to date to the large equinoctial storms of fall 2012, spring and fall 2013, in addition to moderate storms during BARREL balloon campaigns in both winters 2013 and 2014. Isolated substorm response can clearly be identified for the latter, while plasmasheet injection of electrons during periods of strong

  2. Simulation of the prompt energization and transport of radiation belt particles during the March 24, 1991 SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xinlin; Roth, I.; Temerin, M.; Wygant, J. R.; Hudson, M. K.; Blake, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    We model the rapid (about 1 min) formation of a new electron radiation belt at L about or = 2.5 that resulted from the Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) of March 24, 1991 as observed by the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) satellite. Guided by the observed electric and magnetic fields, we represent the time-dependent magnetospheric electric field during the SSC by an asymmetric bipolar pulse that is associated with the compression and relaxation of the Earth's magnetic field. We follow the electrons using a relativistic guiding center code. The test-particle simulations show that electrons with energies of a few MeV at L greater than 6 were energized up to 40 MeV and transported to L about or = 2.5 during a fraction of their drift period. The energization process conserves the first adiabatic invariant and is enhanced due to resonance of the electron drift motion with the time-varying electric field. Our simulation results, with an initial W(exp -8) energy flux spectra, reproduce the observed electron drift echoes and show that the interplanetary shock impacted the magnetosphere between 1500 and 1800 MLT.

  3. Drifting Quasi-Periodic Modulation of the Fast Magnetosonic Mode: Van Allen Probe Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardsen, S. A.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Kurth, W. S.; Wygant, J. R.; MacDonald, E.

    2014-12-01

    The fast magnetosonic mode is one of the dominant wave modes in the Earth's radiation belts. These waves influence the ring current by scattering ions in energy in the 10's of keV range, and are believed to be a heat source for radiation belt electrons. The fast magnetosonic mode observed around the Earth's inner equatorial magnetosphere sometimes exhibits quasi-periodic modulation as detected by the Van Allen probes. During each modulation the wave frequency exhibits a strong drifting (dispersive) signature characterized by a rising tone. Each tone is composed of harmonics with spacing close to the proton cyclotron frequency. The tones are band limited in frequency and mainly observed above the 20th harmonic of the local proton cyclotron frequency. We observe this modulation mainly outside the plasmapause, but it has also been observed to penetrate down to 1.5 RE. The modulation is observed up to magnetic latitudes of ±17º, at all magnetic local times, but its signatures are more pronounced on the dayside. For events where lower frequency ULF waves are detected, the period of the ULF wave is about twice the modulation period of the fast magnetosonic mode, suggesting strong wave-wave interactions. The modulation period varies from 50 to 200 s and its duration ranges from 0.2 to 3 h, with the maximum duration limited by the spacecraft orbit. We hypothesize that the rising tone is produced by changing Alfven velocities created by steepened density fluctuations due to plasma modification by an underlying ULF wave.

  4. Dynamic responses of the Earth's radiation belts during periods of solar wind dynamic pressure pulse based on normalized superposed epoch analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Binbin; Xiang, Zheng; Gu, Xudong; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Xianguo; Zuo, Pingbing

    2016-09-01

    Using the electron flux measurements obtained from five satellites (GOES 15 and POES 15, 16, 18, and 19), we investigate the flux variations of radiation belt electrons during forty solar wind dynamic pressure pulses identified between September 2012 and December 2014. By utilizing the mean duration of the pressure pulses as the epoch timeline and stretching or compressing the time phases of individual events to normalize the duration by means of linear interpolation, we have performed normalized superposed epoch analysis to evaluate the dynamic responses of radiation belt energetic electrons corresponding to various groups of solar wind and magnetospheric conditions in association with solar wind dynamic pressure pulses. Our results indicate that by adopting the timeline normalization we can reproduce the typical response of the electron radiation belts to pressure pulses. Radiation belt electron fluxes exhibit large depletions right after the Pdyn peak during the periods of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz and are more likely to occur during the Pdyn pulse under southward IMF Bz conditions. For the pulse events with large negative values of (Dst)min, radiation belt electrons respond in a manner similar to those with southward IMF Bz, and the corresponding postpulse recovery can extend to L 3 and exceed the prepulse flux levels. Triggered by the solar wind pressure enhancements, deeper earthward magnetopause erosion provides favorable conditions for the prompt electron flux dropouts that extend down to L 5, and the pressure pulses with longer duration tend to produce quicker and stronger electron flux decay. In addition, the events with high electron fluxes before the Pdyn pulse tend to experience more severe electron flux dropouts during the course of the pulse, while the largest rate of electron flux increase before and after the pulse occurs under the preconditioned low electron fluxes. These new results help us understand how electron fluxes

  5. On spatial distribution of proton radiation belt from solar cell degradation of Akebono satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, W.; Miyoshi, Y.; Matsuoka, A.

    2013-12-01

    Solar cells on any satellite degrade gradually due to severe space radiation environment. We found a fair correlation between the decrease rate of solar cell output current of Akebono satellite orbiting in the inner magnetosphere and trapped proton flux from AP8 model between 1989 and 1992. After 1993, presumably as a result of long-term degradation, variation of solar cell output seems more susceptible to other causes such as high temperature effect, and simple monthly averaged data show no significant relation between them. One of possible causes for the temperature variation of the solar cells is terrestrial heat radiation with changing orientation of solar cell panels towards the earth and another is solar radiation varied with eccentric earth's orbit around the sun. In order to remove the possible temperature effect, we sort the data expected to be least affected by the terrestrial heat radiation from the orbit conditions, and also analyze difference of the output current for a month from that for the same month in the previous year. The analysis method leads us to successfully track a continuous correlation between the decease rate of solar cell output and energetic trapped proton flux up to 1996. We also discuss the best-fitted spatial distribution of energetic protons from comparison with model calculations.

  6. Hardening of MJS77 spacecraft against the Jupiter radiation belts. [Mariner Jupiter/Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Stanley, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    Results of the device characterization program to identify components of the Mariner Jupiter/Saturn spacecraft in need of radiation hardening to meet a total dose requirement of 5 trillion e/sq cm are presented. The parts to be tested, including bipolar transistors, JFETs, SCRs, CMOS devices, linear integrated circuits, Zener diodes and other radiation-sensitive parts, were identified by a worst case circuit analysis of the 20 major subsystems. The test samples were exposed to several levels of irradiation from a Dynamitron electron accelerator capable of producing a steady stream of electrons at energies up to 2.5 eV. The electrical parameters of the devices were measured immediately following irradiation to prevent annealing. CMOS devices and linear devices showed the most severe degradation in a moderate radiation environment, and significant degradation was produced at low current in bipolar transistors. Three methods used for screening a number of devices determined by circuit and shielding analyses to be unacceptable radiation-sensitive are described: diffusion and metallization lot screening; wafer lot screening; and irradiation-anneal screening.

  7. Comparison of species-resolved energy spectra from ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, J.; Manweiler, J. W.; Armstrong, T. P.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Gerrard, A. J.; Gkioulidou, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a comparison between energy spectra measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument and the Van Allen Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) for two significant and distinct events in early 2013. The first is an impulsive solar particle event on March 17th. While intense, this event presented no significant surprises in terms of its composition or anisotropy characteristics, thus providing a good baseline for response of the trapped radiation belts as observed by the Van Allen Probes. The second solar event occurred late May 22nd and early May 23rd. This event has a much greater concentration of medium and heavy ions than the St. Patrick's Day event, as well as having very peculiar energy spectra with evidence of two distinct populations. During the St. Patrick's Day Event, the energy spectra for helium, carbon, oxygen, neon, silicon, and iron all show the same spectral power law slope -3.1. The event shows strong anisotropy with intensities differing by a factor of four for both protons and Z>1 ions. The late May event also has strong anisotropy, and in the same directions as the St. Patrick's Day Event, but with very different composition and energy spectra. The spectra are much harder with power law spectral slopes of -0.5. Additionally, there is a significant spectral bump at 3 MeV/nuc for helium that is not present in the spectra of the heavier ions. The intensities of the heavier ions, however, show an increase that is an order of magnitude greater than the increase seen for helium. The March 17 RBSPICE observations show multiple injection events lasting for less than an hour each during the Van Allen Probes B apogees. These injections are seen in protons as well as Helium and only somewhat observed in Oxygen. Spectral slopes for the observations range from approximately -5 during quiet times to double peaked events with a spectral slope of approximately -2 at the beginning of the injection

  8. Reaction of oxygen with allene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Sheng-yu

    1988-07-01

    Elastic scattering studies carried out independently of the work related to the title forms the first section of the dissertation. The low-energy elastic scattering of He with Ar, Kr, Xe has been studied by molecular beam techniques. Two potential forms, exponential-spline-Morse-Morse-spline-van de Waals (ESMMSV) and Simon-Parr-Finlan-Dunham (SPFD), have been used to fit the measured differential cross section. Elastic scattering theory and experimental details are introduced. The reactive scattering of O(/sup 3/P) with allene has been studied using crossed molecular beams. Differing from the well known central-carbon-attack (CCA) mechanism in which the final products, carbon monoxide and ethylene, are obtained via a ring intermediate, a new mechanism, terminal-carbon-attack (TCA), has been observed. The production of O(/sup 3/P) atoms by radio frequency discharge is also introduced. To assist understanding of the experiments a multi-configuration self-consistent field (MCSCF) study of the reaction of O(/sup 3/P) with allene has been carried out. The key feature of the oxygen-allene potential energy surface for both CCA and TCA channels has been calculated with single-zeta (SZ), double-zeta (DZ), and double-zeta plus polarization (DZP) basis sets. Finally, an algorithm for optimizing the trial wavefunction in quantum Monte Carlo calculations has been developed. With the application of group theory, a symmetry-constrained optimization process can yield an improved trial wavefunction for the calculation of excited electronic state energies as well as the ground-state energy. Several applications are discussed. 145 refs.

  9. Kak Amerikantsy iskali vetra v pole, a nashli radiatsionnyj poyas i kak Russkie iskali radiatsionnyj poyas, a nashli solnechnyj veter Chast' I %t How Americans looked for "a wind in a field" but found a radiation belt, and how Russians looked for a radiation belt but found a solar wind or physical experiments on the first artificial Earth's satellites and a discovery of radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavidonov, I. V.

    The history of the most important scientific discovery of the early space era - the discovery of the inner and outer radiation belts of the Earth in 1958 is reconstructed. The paper uses archival records to bring to light the relative contributions of Soviet and American reseachers to the complex process of discovery. It also shows how misuses of science in mass-media political propaganda led to misrepresentations of the real historical portrayal of early space research.

  10. Water resources of Allen Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.; Fendick, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, approximately 29.2 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Allen Parish, Louisiana, including about 26.8 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 2.45 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Rice irrigation accounted for 74 percent (21.7 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, industrial, rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in the parish were greatest in 1960 (119 Mgal/d) and 1980 (98.7 Mgal/d). The substantial decrease in surface-water use between 1960 and 1965 is primarily attributable to rice-irrigation withdrawals declining from 61.2 to 6.74 Mgal/d. This fact sheet summarizes information on the water resources of Allen Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

  11. Direct observation of radiation-belt electron acceleration from electron-volt energies to megavolts by nonlinear whistlers.

    PubMed

    Mozer, F S; Agapitov, O; Krasnoselskikh, V; Lejosne, S; Reeves, G D; Roth, I

    2014-07-18

    The mechanisms for accelerating electrons from thermal to relativistic energies in the terrestrial magnetosphere, on the sun, and in many astrophysical environments have never been verified. We present the first direct observation of two processes that, in a chain, cause this acceleration in Earth's outer radiation belt. The two processes are parallel acceleration from electron-volt to kilovolt energies by parallel electric fields in time-domain structures (TDS), after which the parallel electron velocity becomes sufficiently large for Doppler-shifted upper band whistler frequencies to be in resonance with the electron gyration frequency, even though the electron energies are kilovolts and not hundreds of kilovolts. The electrons are then accelerated by the whistler perpendicular electric field to relativistic energies in several resonant interactions. TDS are packets of electric field spikes, each spike having duration of a few hundred microseconds and containing a local parallel electric field. The TDS of interest resulted from nonlinearity of the parallel electric field component in oblique whistlers and consisted of ∼ 0.1 msec pulses superposed on the whistler waveform with each such spike containing a net parallel potential the order of 50 V. Local magnetic field compression from remote activity provided the free energy to drive the two processes. The expected temporal correlations between the compressed magnetic field, the nonlinear whistlers with their parallel electric field spikes, the electron flux and the electron pitch angle distributions were all observed.

  12. Discovery of ions with nuclear charge Z greater than or equal to 9 stability trapped in the earth's radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of MeV heavy ions obtained by Explorer 45 in an equatorial earth orbit during a 7 month period in 1972 are presented, including data from four major magnetic storms. The spacecraft contained a heavy ion detector telescope and heavy ion discriminator electronics. Heavy ions were distinguished from protons and electrons, and He ions and ions heavier than F were recorded on separate data channels. The L equals 2.25 to L equals 4 zones were probed, and it was found that the relative enhancement in heavy ion fluxes in the radiation belts over the prestorm ion flux intensities tends to increase with increasing ion mass and/or increasing ion energy in the MeV range. The radial profiles of ions with nucleon number greater than nine peak at L equals 2.9, and MeV ions in this class decay on time scales from 23 days at L equals 3.25 to 55 days at L equals 2.25. Indirect evidence indicated a solar source for the very heavy ions in the magnetosphere.

  13. Interaction of ring current and radiation belt protons with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. 1: Diffusion coefficients and timescales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Miller, R. H.; Lyons, L. R.

    1994-01-01

    Protons that are convected into the inner magnetosphere in response to enhanced magnetic activity can resonate with ducted plasmaspheric hiss in the outer plasmasphere via an anomalous Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance. Plasmaspheric hiss is a right-hand-polarized electromagnetic emission that is observed to fill the plasmasphere on a routine basis. When plasmaspheric hiss is confined within field-aligned ducts or guided along density gradients, wave normal angles remain largely below 45 deg. This allows resonant interactions with ions at typical ring current and radiation belt energies to take place. Such field-aligned ducts have been observed both within the plasmasphere and in regions outside of the plasmasphere. Wave intensities are estimated using statistical information from studies of detached plasma regions. Diffusion coefficients are presented for a range of L shells and proton energies for a fixed wave distribution. Harmonic resonances in the range N = +/-100 are considered in order to include interactions between hiss at 100 Hz to 2 kHz frequencies, and protons in the energy range between approximately 10 keV and 1000 keV. Diffusion timescales are estimated to be of the order of tens of days and comparable to or shorter than lifetimes for Coulomb decay and charge exchange losses over most of the energy and spatial ranges of interest.

  14. Prediction of relativistic electron flux in the Earth's outer radiation belt at geostationary orbit by adaptive methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkova, I. N.; Dolenko, S. A.; Efitorov, A. O.; Shirokii, V. R.; Sentemova, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates the possibilities of the prediction of the time series of the flux of relativistic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt by parameters of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field measured at the libration point and by the values of the geomagnetic indices. Different adaptive methods are used (namely, artificial neural networks, group method of data handling, and projection to latent structures). The comparison of quality indicators of predictions with a horizon of 1-12 h between each other and with the trivial model prediction has shown that the best result is obtained for the average value of the responses of three neural networks that have been trained with different sets of initial weights. The prediction result of the group method of data handling is close to the result of neural networks, and the projection to latent structures is much worse. It is shown that an increase in the prediction horizon from 1 to 12 h reduces its quality but not dramatically, which makes it possible to use these methods for medium-term prediction.

  15. Rapid precipitation of radiation belt electrons induced by EMIC rising tone emissions localized in longitude inside and outside the plasmapause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Yuko; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2017-01-01

    By performing test particle simulations of relativistic electrons scattered by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) rising tone emissions, we find a nonlinear scattering process named SLPA (Scattering at Low Pitch Angle) totally different from the nonlinear wave trapping. The nonlinear wave trapping, occurring for high pitch angles away from the loss cone, scatters some of resonant electrons to lower pitch angles, and a fraction of the electrons is further transported into the loss cone by SLPA after being released from the wave trapping. SLPA as well as the nonlinear wave trapping can work in any cases with proton band or helium band and inside or outside the plasmapause. We clarify that the combined scattering process causes significant depletion of the outer radiation belt. In the time evolution of an electron distribution observed locally in longitude, we find echoes of the electron depletion by the localized EMIC emissions. Monitoring fluxes of electrons being lost into the atmosphere in the wave generation region, we also find that efficient relativistic electron precipitation in several seconds. The characteristics of the precipitating electron flux as a function of kinetic energy vary significantly depending on the wave frequency range and the plasma density.

  16. Simultaneous quiet time observations of energetic radiation belt protons and helium ions - The equatorial alpha/p ratio near 1 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, T. A.; Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of energetic helium ions and protons in the earth's radiation belts has been conducted with Explorer 45 in the immediate vicinity of the equatorial plane. Protons were measured from less than 1 keV to 1.6 MeV and also above 3.3 MeV in a channel responsive up to 22 MeV; helium ions were monitored in three passbands: 910 keV to 3.15 MeV, 590 to 910 keV, and 2.0 to 3.99 MeV. Alpha/proton flux ratios were found to vary significantly with energy and location in the radiation belts. At equal energy per nucleon a range of variability for alpha/p from 0.0001 to well above 0.001 was found, and at equal energy per ion the corresponding variability was from 0.001 to above 10. The latter findings emphasize the relative importance of the very energetic helium ions in the overall radiation belt ion populations.

  17. Improved outer boundary conditions for outer radiation belt data assimilation using THEMIS-SST data and the Salammbo-EnKF code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maget, V.; Sicard-Piet, A.; Bourdarie, S.; Lazaro, D.; Turner, D. L.; Daglis, I. A.; Sandberg, I.

    2015-07-01

    Over the last decade, efforts have been made in the radiation belt community to develop data assimilation tools in order to improve the accuracy of radiation belts models. In this paper we present a new method to correctly take into account the outer boundary conditions at L* = 8 in such an enhanced model of the radiation belts. To do that we based our work on the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms/Solid State Telescope data set. Statistics are developed to define a consistent electron distribution at L* = 8 (in both equatorial pitch angle and energy), and a variance-covariance matrix is estimated in order to more realistically drive the Monte Carlo sampling required by the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF). Data processing is first described as well as caveats avoided, and then the use of these information in a machinery such as the EnKF is described. It is shown that the way the Monte Carlo simulations are performed is of great importance to realistically reproduced outer boundary distribution needed by the physic-based Salammbô model. Finally, EnKF simulations are performed and compared during September 2011 in order to analyze the improvements gained using this new method of defining outer boundary conditions. In particular, we highlight in this study that such a method provides great improvement in the reconstruction of the dynamics observed at geosynchronous orbit, both during quiet and active magnetic conditions.

  18. Comparison between Low and High Latitude Lightning VLF Wave Propagation Using WWLLN and Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Holzworth, R. H., II; Brundell, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Mozer, F.; Jacobson, A. R.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Lightning produces strong broadband radio waves, called "sferics", which propagate in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and are detected thousands of kilometers away from their source. Global real-time detection of lightning strokes including their time, location and energy, is conducted with the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). In the ionosphere, these sferics couple into very low frequency (VLF) whistler waves which propagate obliquely to the Earth's magnetic field. Possible one-to-one coincidence between lightning and VLF whistler wave is already found by the conjunction work between WWLLN and Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP)). The previous global study showed a good match between WWLLN sferics and RBSP VLF whistlers at low L shell region (L < 3). In this summer, we started obtaining high sampling mode data from RBSP near the apogee. Initial results indicate many one-to-one coincidences at high L shell region (L>4). The whistlers observed at high L shell region are often nose whistlers. In our work, we will show the statistics results between WWLLN sferics and RBSP VLF whistlers at high L shell region. This talk will also explore the difference between low and high latitude lightning VLF wave propagation.

  19. Statistical Features of EMIC Waves Observed on Van Allen Probes in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. Y.; Roh, S. J.; Cho, J.; Shin, D. K.; Hwang, J.; Kim, K. C.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are one of the key plasma waves that can affect charged particle dynamics in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. Knowledge of global distribution of the EMIC waves is critical for accurately assessing the significance of its interaction with charged particles. With the Van Allen Probes EMFISIS observations, we have surveyed EMIC events for ~2.5 years period. We have identified well-defined, banded wave activities only, as distinguished from broad band wave activities. We have obtained global distribution of occurrence of the identified waves with distinction between H- and He-bands. We compare it with previous observations such as THEMIS and CRRES. For the identified events we have drawn all the basic wave properties including wave frequency, polarization, wave normal angle. In addition, we have distinguished the EMIC events that occur inside the plasmasphere and at the plasmapause from those outside the plasmasphere. Finally, we have tested solar wind and geomagnetic dependence of the wave events. We give discussions about implications of these observations on wave generation mechanism and interaction with radiation belt electrons.

  20. Study of lightning whistler waves observed at high L-shells on Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Holzworth, R.; Brundell, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Mozer, F.; Jacobson, A. R.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Lightning produces strong broadband radio waves, called "sferics", which propagate in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and are detected thousands of kilometers away from their source. Global real-time detection of lightning strokes including their time, location and energy, is conducted with the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). In the ionosphere, these sferics couple into very low frequency (VLF) whistler waves which propagate obliquely to the Earth's magnetic field. In our previous work, one-to-one coincidence between lightning and whistler waves is already found by the conjunction work between WWLLN and Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP)). The previous global study showed a good match between WWLLN sferics and RBSP lightning whistlers at low L-shell region (L < 3). More case studies indicated that this kind of one-to-one coincidence can be extended to a high L-shell region. Since September 2012 to now (July 2015), EMFISIS instrument has already recorded 3-D waveform data with 35 ksamples/s for 527,279 and 542,346 of 6-second snapshots, respectively for RBSP-A and RBSP-B. 461,572 and 478,510 of snapshots with L-shell value larger than 3 are used in our work. In our work, we will show the distribution of lightning whistler waves at high L-shells. This talk will also explore the upper cutoff frequency of lightning whistler waves at high L-shells.

  1. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Roeder, J. L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. M.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B. A.

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energy channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).

  2. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; ...

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energymore » channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).« less

  3. ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE measurements of interplanetary oxygen injection to the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, J. D.; Manweiler, J. W.; Gerrard, A. J.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    On March 17, 2015, a significant oxygen-rich interplanetary event was measure by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument. At the same time the Van Allen Probes Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument recorded significant enhancements of oxygen in the inner magnetosphere. We present a detailed analysis of this event utilizing a new method of exploiting the EPAM Pulse Height Analyzer (PHA) data to precisely resolve helium and oxygen spectra within the 0.5 to 5 MeV/nuc range. We also present the flux, partial particle pressures, and pitch angle distributions of the ion measurements from RBSPICE. During this event, both EPAM and RBSPICE measured O:He ratios greater than 10:1. The pitch angle distributions from RBSPICE-B show a strong beam of oxygen at an L ~ 5.8 early on March 17th during orbit. The timing between the observations of the oxygen peak at ACE and the beam observed at RBSPICE-B is consistent with the travel-time required for energetic particle transport from L1 to Earth and access to the magnetosphere. We assert that the oxygen seen by RBSPICE during the initial phase of this event is the result of direct injection from the interplanetary medium of energetic ions. This poster contains the observations and detailed calculations to support this assertion.

  4. A Neural Network Approach for Identifying Relativistic Electron Pitch Angle Distributions in Van Allen Probes Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, V. M. C. E. S.; Vieira, L.; Alves, L. R.; Da Silva, L. A.; Koga, D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walsh, B.; Kanekal, S. G.; Silveira, M. D.; Medeiros, C.; Mendes, O., Jr.; Marchezi, J.; Rockenbach, M.; Jauer, P. R.; Gonzalez, W.; Baker, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    A myriad of physical phenomena occur in the inner magnetosphere, in particular at the Earth's radiation belts, which can be a result of the combination of both internal and external processes. However, the connection between physical processes occurring deep within the magnetosphere and external interplanetary drivers it is not yet well understood. In this work we investigate whether a selected set of interplanetary structures affect the local time distribution of three different classes of high energy electron pitch angle distributions (PADs), namely normal, isotropic, and butterfly. We split this work into two parts: initially we focus on the methodology used which employs a Self-Organized Feature Map (SOFM) neural network for identifying different classes of electron PAD shapes in the Van Allen Probes' Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) data. The algorithm can categorize the input data into an arbitrary number of classes from which three of them appears the most: normal, isotropic and butterfly. Other classes which are related with these three also emerge and deserve to be addressed in detail in future works. We also discuss the uncertainties of the algorithm. Then, we move to the second part where we describe in details the criteria used for selecting the interplanetary events, and also try to investigate the relation between key parameters characterizing such interplanetary structures and the local time distributions of electron PAD shapes.

  5. A Revised Model of Jupiter's Inner Electron Belts: Updating the Divine Radiation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Levin, Steven M.; Bolton, Scott J.; Evans, Robin W.; Bhattacharya, Bidushi

    2005-01-01

    In 1983, Divine presented a comprehensive model of the Jovian charged particle environment that has long served as a reference for missions to Jupiter. However, in situ observations by Galileo and synchrotron observations from Earth indicate the need to update the model in the inner radiation zone. Specifically, a review of the model for 1 MeV < E < 100 MeV trapped electrons suggests that, based on the new synchrotron observations, the pitch angle distributions within L < 4 need to be updated by introducing two additional components: one near the Jovian magnetic equator and one at high magnetic latitudes. We report modifications to the model that reproduce these observations. The new model improves the fit to synchrotron emission observations and remains consistent with the original fit to the in situ Pioneer and Voyager data. Further modifications incorporating observations from the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft will be reported in the future.

  6. The role of EUV/X-ray solar activity and electron precipitations from radiation belts in the climate changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakyan, Sergey; Voronin, Nikolai; Baranova, Lubov

    The authors associate the recently observed climate warming and carbon dioxide concentration growth in lower atmospheric layers with variations of the solar-geomagnetic activity contribution to global cloud formation and with significant decrease of carbon dioxide accumulation in forests in the process of photosynthesis. The contribution of the greenhouse effect of carbon-bearing gases to global warming turns out to be insignificant. We consider the impact of microwave emissions of the ionosphere disturbed by solar flares and magnetic storms on the troposphere and suggest the radio-optical trigger mechanism of the solar influence on weather and climate of the Earth, which consists of the following three stages: - the ionosphere absorbs the ionizing solar radiation and corpuscles from the radiation belts and transforms these into microwaves through the excitation of Rydberg states by electron impact (ionospheric photoelectron, secondary and Auger electrons); - the rates of formation and destruction of water cluster ions in the troposphere are regulated by the microwave radiation; - the clusters contribute to formation of clouds, which affects the energy flux of solar radiation through the troposphere and the flux of outgoing heat from the underlying surface. All stages of the proposed mechanism were strictly confirmed: amplification of ionospheric microwave radiation during solar flares and magnetic storms was detected; the regulation of humidity at altitude above 2 km by solar microwave emission during solar flares was registered; an influence of solar flares and magnetic storms on the cloudiness is distinctly registered at least in some geographic areas; a direct influence of solar-geomagnetic activity on the global total cloud cover in latest maximum of secular variability (in 1985 - in electromagnetic solar activity, and in 2003 - in geomagnetic activity) was discovered. Basing on analysis of satellite data on global cloud cover and radiation balance the

  7. Simultaneous measurements of waves and precipitating electrons near the equator in the outer radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhof, W. L.; Robinson, R. M.; Collin, H. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Anderson, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    An investigation of wave-particle interactions is made using several simultaneous electron and wave measurements performed at near-equatorial positions from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) satellite. Bursts of electron precipitation were observed, most frequently at local times near dawn. Examples of bursts are presented in which the fluxes of the precipitating electrons and the wave intensities are correlated with coefficients as high as 0.7. During bursts the frequencies of the enhanced waves spanned a wide range from 311 Hz to 3.11 kHz, and the energies of the enhanced electrons were in the range 1.7 keV to 288 keV. The changes of the precipitating fluxes were generally less pronounced at the lowest energies. On the basis of electron-cyclotron resonant calculations using the cold plasma densities and ambient magnetic fields taken from the CRRES measurements it was found that the wave frequencies and precipitating electron energies were generally consistent with those expected from electron resonance with parallel propagating whistler waves. The electron data of principal concern here were acquired in and about the loss cone with narrow angular resolution spectrometers covering the energy range 340 eV to 5 MeV. The wave data included electric field measurements spanning frequencies from 5 Hz to 400 kHz and magnetic field measurements from 5 Hz to 10 kHz.

  8. Global Storm-Time Depletion of the Outer Electron Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sitnov, M. I.; Millan, R. M.; Kress, B. T.; Fennell, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    The outer radiation belt consists of relativistic (≳0.5 MeV) electrons trapped on closed trajectories around Earth where its magnetic field is nearly dipolar. During increased geomagnetic activity electron intensities in the belt can vary by orders of magnitude at different spatial and temporal scale. The main phase of geomagnetic storms often produces deep depletions of electron intensities over broad regions of the outer belt. Previous studies identified three possible processes that can contribute to the depletions: fully adiabatic inflation of electron drift orbits caused the ring current growth, electron loss into the atmosphere due to pitch-angle scattering by plasma waves (e.g., EMIC and whistler waves), and electron escape through the magnetopause boundary. In this paper we investigate the relative importance of the magnetopause losses to the rapid depletion of the outer belt observed at the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during the main phase of March 17, 2013 storm. The intensities of > 1 MeV electrons were depleted by more that an order of magnitude over the entire radial extent of the belt in less than 6 hours after the sudden storm commencement. For the analysis we used three-dimensional test-particle simulations of global evolution of the outer belt in the Tsyganenko-Sitnov (TS07D) magnetic field model with the inductive electric field. The comparison of the simulation results with electron measurements from the MagEIS experiment shows that the magnetopause losses in the model accounts for most of the observed depletion. The individual electron motion the process is non-adiabatic; the third invariant is violated by global variations of the inner magnetospheric fields caused by the magnetopause compressions and the buildup of ring current, while the second invariant is violated at drift orbit bifurcations. The analysis shows that the observed deep depletion of radiation belt intensities is enabled by the change in the global configuration of magnetic

  9. Radiation Environment Inside Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Patrick O'Neill, NASA Johnson Space Center, will present a detailed description of the radiation environment inside spacecraft. The free space (outside) solar and galactic cosmic ray and trapped Van Allen belt proton spectra are significantly modified as these ions propagate through various thicknesses of spacecraft structure and shielding material. In addition to energy loss, secondary ions are created as the ions interact with the structure materials. Nuclear interaction codes (FLUKA, GEANT4, HZTRAN, MCNPX, CEM03, and PHITS) transport free space spectra through different thicknesses of various materials. These "inside" energy spectra are then converted to Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra and dose rate - that's what's needed by electronics systems designers. Model predictions are compared to radiation measurements made by instruments such as the Intra-Vehicular Charged Particle Directional Spectrometer (IV-CPDS) used inside the Space Station, Orion, and Space Shuttle.

  10. Comparison of LFM-test particle simulations and radial diffusion models of radiation belt electron injection into the slot region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, F.; Hudson, M.; Kress, B.

    2008-12-01

    The physics-based Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) code simulates Earth's magnetospheric topology and dynamics by solving the equations of ideal MHD using input solar wind parameters at the upstream boundary. Comparison with electron phase space density evolution during storms using a radial diffusion code, as well as spacecraft measurements where available, will tell us when diffusion is insufficiently accurate for radiation belt simulation, for example, during CME-shock injection events like March 24, 1991, which occurred on MeV electron drift time scales of minutes (Li et al., 1993). The 2004 July and 2004 November storms, comparable in depth of penetration into the slot region to the Halloween 2003 storm, have been modeled with both approaches. The November 8, 2004 storm was preceded by a Storm Sudden Commencement produced by a CME-shock followed by minimum Dst = -373 nT, while the July 23 to July 28 storm interval had milder consecutive drops in Dst, corresponding to multiple CME sh