Science.gov

Sample records for allergen inhalation challenge

  1. Allergen Challenge Chamber: an innovative solution in allergic rhinitis diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Jerzy; Wojas, Oksana; Piekarska, Barbara; Sybilski, Adam; Samoliński, Bolesław

    2015-01-01

    The Allergen Challenge Chamber (ACC) is definitely a serious challenge on the one hand and an innovative solution in allergic rhinitis diagnosis on the other. The gradual validation of the chamber (according to the test protocol) will allow for standardisation, which is a process undertaken by centres worldwide. The process of designing a consistent system that allows for creating conditions as those in the case of natural inhalation took into account all the aspects (technical specification) necessary to ensure appropriate inhalation. PMID:26755904

  2. Allergen challenge and deposition of nedocromil sodium in asthma.

    PubMed

    Laube, Beth L; Lin, Ta-Chun; Valleteau, Anne; Dalby, Richard N; Diemer, Fiona B; Togias, Alkis G

    2002-01-01

    We examined whether the acute protective effect of nedocromil sodium aerosol could be enhanced by increasing the deposition uniformity of the drug in the lungs of adult patients with allergic asthma. Ten patients with mild-to-moderate asthma were challenged with the same doses of allergen on two occasions in a randomized manner. Thirty minutes before these challenges, patients inhaled 4 mg nedocromil sodium, admixed with the radioisotope (99m)technetium. Radiolabeled drug was inhaled during slow (25.4 +/- 4.6 L/min) and faster (58.0 +/- 7.3 L/min) inhalations from a 700 ml holding chamber. Percent changes in FEV(1) at the same top dose of allergen on the two treatment visits were compared. Lung deposition fraction (LDF) and indices of distribution uniformity, quantified from gamma camera images, were also compared. Acute protection against allergen challenge was similar and complete after slow or faster inspiration of nedocromil sodium. Mean (+/- SD) allergen-induced changes in FEV(1) were -1.05 +/- 2.78% and -0.39 +/- 2.80%, respectively, compared to -26.30 +/- 8.49% on a screening challenge (no drug). Mean LDF was also similar on the two visits, averaging 16.4 +/- 4.6% and 16.1 +/- 7.2% of administered drug, respectively. Distribution of nedocromil sodium was most uniform after slow inspiration, but increased uniformity was not related to enhanced protection. Complete protection against acute bronchoconstriction induced by inhaled allergen can be obtained with 4 mg of nedocromil sodium aerosol, inhaled from a large volume holding chamber, 30 min before the exposure, and at inspiratory flow rates between approximately 20-60 L/min. Protection does not appear to be enhanced by increased uniformity of drug distribution within the lungs.

  3. Inhalation challenge with ragweed pollen in ragweed-sensitive asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, G L; Rosenthal, R R; Norman, P S

    1983-03-01

    We reexamined the ability of inhaled ragweed pollen to induce bronchoconstriction in ragweed-sensitive asthmatic patients using a turbo-inhaler to administer pollen quantitatively. Adult subjects were selected for study on the basis of fall season asthmatic attacks, positive skin test, histamine release, RAST, and bronchial challenge responses to ragweed extract. Not one of 12 such subjects had any bronchial response to oral inhalation of whole pollen grains even when the dose was increased to 7640 pollen grains (more than the estimated maximum daily exposure in season), whereas nasal challenge by the same method produced brisk hay fever responses without bronchospasm. On the other hand, when the pollen was ground to fragments with a size range of 1 to 8 micrometers, oral inhalation produced a 35% fall in airways conductance in six of seven subjects in doses ranging from 59 to 20,000 pollen grain equivalents. Atropine pretreatment did not modify the response to pollen fragments, making an irritant response unlikely. These data, coupled with earlier observations that no more than a few pollen grains penetrate further than the larynx, raise further questions about the role of whole ragweed pollen in fall asthma in allergic patients. In addition, ragweed-allergic asthmatics appear not to have their symptoms at the time of maximum pollen load in the air. We believe that small-particle allergens other than ragweed pollen should be considered in most cases of fall seasonal asthma.

  4. House Dust Mite Allergy in Korea: The Most Important Inhalant Allergen in Current and Future

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Park, Jung-Won

    2012-01-01

    The house-dust mite (HDM), commonly found in human dwellings, is an important source of inhalant and contact allergens. In this report, the importance of HDM allergy in Korea and the characteristics of allergens from dust mite are reviewed with an emphasis on investigations performed in Korea. In Korea, Dermatophagoides farinae is the dominant species of HDM, followed by D. pteronyssinus. Tyrophagus putrescentiae is also found in Korea, but its role in respiratory allergic disease in Korea is controversial. The relatively low densities of mite populations and concentrations of mite major allergens in dust samples from Korean homes, compared to westernized countries, are thought to reflect not only different climatic conditions, but also cultural differences, such as the use of 'ondol' under-floor heating systems in Korean houses. HDM are found in more than 90% of Korean houses, and the level of exposure to HDM is clinically significant. About 40%-60% of Korean patients suffering from respiratory allergies, and more than 40% of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis, are sensitized to HDM. Mite allergens can be summarized according to their inherent auto-adjuvant activities and/or their binding affinities to the adjuvant-like substances: proteolytic enzymes, lipid binding proteins, chitin binding proteins, and allergens not associated with adjuvant-like activity. In general, allergens with a strong adjuvant-like activity or adjuvant-binding activity elicit potent IgE reactivity. In Korea, Der f 2 is the most potent allergen, followed by Der f 1. Immune responses are modulated by the properties of the allergen itself and by the adjuvant-like substances that are concomitantly administered with the antigens. Characterization of allergenic molecules and elucidation of mechanisms by which adjuvant-like molecules modulate allergic reactions, not only in Korea but also worldwide, will provide valuable information on allergic diseases, and are necessary for the

  5. Exposure to inhalable dust, wheat flour and alpha-amylase allergens in industrial and traditional bakeries.

    PubMed

    Bulat, Petar; Myny, Katrien; Braeckman, Lutgart; van Sprundel, Marc; Kusters, Edouard; Doekes, Gert; Pössel, Kerstin; Droste, Jos; Vanhoorne, Michel

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to characterize exposure to inhalable dust, wheat flour and alpha-amylase allergens in industrial and traditional bakeries. The study included 70 bakeries from the northern part of Belgium. Based on the degree of automation and a clear division of individual job tasks, four bakeries were identified as industrial and the remaining 66 were identified as traditional ones. Personal, as well as stationary, samples of inhalable dust were collected during full shift periods, usually 5-7 h. The portable pumps aspirated 2 l/min through Teflon personal dust samplers (Millipore, pore size 1.0 microm) mounted in PAS-6 sampling heads. In the collected samples the inhalable dust, wheat flour and alpha-amylase allergens were determined. Wheat flour allergens were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition and an antiwheat IgG4 serum pool. The alpha-amylase allergens were measured using a sandwich enzyme immunoassay with affinity-purified polyclonal rabbit IgG antibodies. In total, 440 samples (300 personal and 140 stationary) were processed. The highest inhalable dust exposure was observed in traditional bakeries among bread [geometric mean (GM) 2.10 mg/m3] and bread and pastry workers (GM 1.80 mg/m3). In industrial bakeries the highest dust exposure was measured in bread-producing workers (GM 1.06 mg/m3). Similar relations were observed for wheat flour and alpha-amylase allergens. Bread baking workers in traditional bakeries had the highest exposure to both allergens (wheat flour GM 22.33 microg/m(3), alpha-amylase GM 0.61 ng/m3). The exposure to wheat flour and alpha-amylase allergens in industrial bakeries was higher in bread baking workers (wheat flour GM 6.15 microg/m3, alpha-amylase GM 0.47 ng/m3) than in bread packing workers (wheat flour GM 2.79 microg/m3, alpha-amylase GM 0.15 ng/m3). The data presented suggest that, on average, exposure in the Belgium bakeries studied-industrial as well as traditional-is lower than or similar to

  6. Inhallation of e-Cigarette Cartridge Solution Aggravates Allergen-induced Airway Inflammation and Hyper-responsiveness in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are becoming increasingly popular worldwide and their cellular effects warrant further evaluation. In this study, we investigated the effects of an e-cigarette cartridge solution on allergen related asthmatic airway inflammation (AI) and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), when it is delivered by intratracheal route in mice. Asthmatic AI and AHR were induced by systemic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) followed by intratracheal, intraperitoneal, and aerosol allergen challenges in BALB/c mice. The cartridge solution of e-cigarette (containing 16 mg/ml nicotine) was diluted 50 times and 100 μl of the diluted solution was intratracheally instilled to OVA-sensitized (OVA-S) mice two times a week for 10 weeks. Long-term e-cigarette inhalation elicited no remarkable changes in the activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase enzymes in serum, however, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells including eosinophils, into airways from blood, aggravated the asthmatic AI and AHR, and stimulated the production of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13, and OVA-specific IgE production. Our data suggest that the inhalation of e-cigarette solutions can function as an important factor to exacerbate the allergy-induced asthma symptoms. Further studies are needed to address the effects of e-cigarette solutions on human health. PMID:24795794

  7. Identification of Two Metallothioneins as Novel Inhalative Coffee Allergens Cof a 2 and Cof a 3

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ulrike; Frenzel, Karsten; Brettschneider, Reinhold; Oldenburg, Marcus; Bittner, Cordula

    2015-01-01

    Background Dust of green coffee beans is known to be a relevant cause for occupational allergic disorders in coffee industry workers. Recently, we described the first coffee allergen (Cof a 1) establishing an allergenic potential of green coffee dust. Objective Our aim was to identify allergenic components of green coffee in order to enhance inhalative coffee allergy diagnosis. Methods A Coffea arabica pJuFo cDNA phage display library was created and screened for IgE binding with sera from allergic coffee workers. Two further coffee allergens were identified by sequence analysis, expressed in E. coli, and evaluated by Western blots. The prevalence of sensitization to recombinant Cof a 1, Cof a 2, and Cof a 3 and to commercially available extract was investigated by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) respectively CAP (capacity test) screening in 18 sera of symptomatic coffee workers. Results In addition to the previously described chitinase Cof a 1, two Coffea arabica cysteine-rich metallothioneins of 9 and 7 kDa were identified and included in the IUIS Allergen Nomenclature as Cof a 2 and Cof a 3. Serum IgE antibodies to at least one of the recombinant allergens were found in 8 out of 18 symptomatic coffee workers (44%). Only 2 of the analysed sera (11%) had reacted previously to the commercial allergy test. Conclusions In addition to the previously described Cof a 1 we have identified two further coffee proteins to be type I coffee allergens (Cof a 2 and Cof a 3) which may have a relevant potential for the specific diagnosis and/or therapy of coffee allergy. PMID:25962169

  8. [House dust mite-crustaceans-molluscs syndrome. A rare variant of food allergy in primary sensitization to inhaled allergens].

    PubMed

    Kütting, B; Brehler, R

    2001-08-01

    80% of all cases in food allergy in adults are preceded by a clinical or subclinical sensitisation to inhalative allergens. Food allergy is caused by cross-reactions between ingested food and inhaled particles. We report a patient suffering from the house-dust mite-crustaceans-molluscs-syndrome. Here, house-dust mite is the sensitising agent, therefore even first ingestion of invertebrates such as snails, shrimps, mussels or oysters can lead to severe anaphylaxis.

  9. Plasma histamine after methacholine, allergen, and aspirin challenges.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, M; Salari, H; Chan, H; Tse, K S; Chan-Yeung, M

    1987-01-01

    Plasma histamine levels were measured by radio-enzymatic technique in seven patients following 10 challenges: five methacholine challenge tests, four antigen inhalation challenge tests, and one oral aspirin challenge test. Baseline plasma histamine was the same in all patients except in the aspirin-challenged patient, who had a higher baseline histamine level. There was no statistical change in the level of histamine throughout the test in either the methacholine-challenged or the antigen-challenged patients, whereas there was a marked increase in histamine levels in the aspirin challenged patient. A possible explanation is that methacholine and antigen are inhaled and therefore have primarily local effects on the lung, whereas oral aspirin has a systemic effect with consequently systemic changes in histamine which are detectable as changes in plasma level.

  10. Repeated allergen challenge as a new research model for studying allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    de Bruin-Weller, M S; Weller, F R; De Monchy, J G

    1999-02-01

    Repeated allergen challenge might be a more relevant model for studying symptomatic disease, because it gives more information on the patient's handling of chronic allergen exposure. Thus, this experimental model has more resemblance to the situation of natural allergen exposure, and the allergen load can be standardized. However, the response to repeated allergen challenge in individual patients can show a large variation, that is from a strongly enhanced response to complete diminution of the response. Successful allergen immunotherapy can change the response pattern of repeated allergen challenge in the skin into down-regulation of the late reaction. Chronic or repeated allergen exposure may result in an enhanced allergen-specific allergic response, involving allergen-specific T-cell activation. Different subsets of T cells can exert either activating or suppressive effects on inflammatory cells involved in subsequent allergic reactions. CD8+ T cells might exert suppressive effects, because they seem to be associated with a subsequent down-regulation of the late skin reaction after repeated allergen challenge (Fig. 4). Further studies are needed to compare the responses to repeated allergen challenge with the response to natural seasonal allergen exposure in the same patients and to explore possible underlying mechanisms using, for example, nasal biopsies.

  11. Effect of inhaled dust mite allergen on regional particle deposition and mucociliary clearance in allergic asthmatics**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background Acute exacerbations in allergic asthmatics may lead to impaired ability to clear mucus from the airways, a key factor in asthma morbidity. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inhaled house dust mite challenge on the regional deposition of...

  12. Specific Inhalation Challenge in Persulfate Asthma.

    PubMed

    Hagemeyer, O; Marek, E; van Kampen, V; Sander, I; Raulf, M; Merget, R; Brüning, T

    2015-01-01

    Specific inhalation challenge (SIC) may be considered the 'gold standard' for the diagnosis of occupational asthma due to persulfate salts. The aim of the study was to develop a safe SIC protocol. Between 2003 and 2014, eight patients with suspected occupational asthma due to persulfate salts were examined (7 females, all hair-dressers). SIC was done with a dosimeter and a nebulizer using ammonium persulfate dissolved in phosphate buffer. Until 2009, a four-step-protocol (doses: 0.0004, 0.0045, 0.045, 0.45 mg; cumulative: 0.5 mg) was used, afterwards a six-step-protocol (doses: 0.0004, 0.0018, 0.007, 0.028, 0.113, 0.45 mg; cumulative: 0.6 mg). With each SIC protocol, four subjects were tested. Skin prick tests with ammonium persulfate (20 mg/mL) were performed in all and patch tests in four subjects. In total, four subjects showed a positive SIC, two with each protocol. All subjects showed an isolated late reaction. The greatest decrease of volume in 1 s was 35 % about 3.5 h after the last inhalation (four-step-protocol). Skin prick test with ammonium persulfate was positive in one SIC positive (2 mm wheal) and in two SIC negative patients (3 and 4 mm wheal). All four subjects tested with patch tests showed a positive reaction; three of them were SICpos. We recommend to include patch-testing in the diagnosis of suspected occupational asthma due to persulfate salts. Isolated late asthmatic reactions may occur after SIC. The proposed six-step SIC protocol was safe in this limited number of subjects. PMID:26022895

  13. Sensitization pattern of inhalant allergens in children with asthma who are living different altitudes in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkaya, Emin; Sogut, Ayhan; Küçükkoç, Mehmet; Eres, Mustafa; Acemoglu, Hamit; Yuksel, Hasan; Murat, Naci

    2015-11-01

    Variability in children's allergic sensitization has been detected not only among different countries but also among cities within the same nation but yet different climatic areas. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitization pattern of asthmatic children who lived in different altitude areas: the two largest Turkish cities, Istanbul (sea level) and Erzurum (high altitude). Five hundred and twelve asthmatic children (6-15 years old) from Istanbul (western Turkey, at sea level) and 609 from Erzurum (eastern Turkey, at an altitude of 1800 m) were included in the study. All participants underwent skin testing with common inhalant allergens, spirometry, total IgE level, and clinical examination. The positive sensitization ratio to aeroallergens in children with asthma living at sea level was statistically higher than that in children living in the high altitude group [ p = 0.001, OR (odds ratio) 4.9 (confidence interval (CI) 3.67-6.459)]. However, pollen sensitization in asthmatic children living in high altitudes was significantly higher than that in children living at sea level [ p = 0.00, OR 2.6 (CI 1.79-3.87)]. Children with asthma who live at high altitudes are characterized by higher pollen but lower mite sensitization rates than those living at sea level in Turkey. Different climatic conditions and altitudes may affect aeroallergen sensitization in children with asthma.

  14. Sensitization pattern of inhalant allergens in children with asthma who are living different altitudes in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Emin; Sogut, Ayhan; Küçükkoç, Mehmet; Eres, Mustafa; Acemoglu, Hamit; Yuksel, Hasan; Murat, Naci

    2015-11-01

    Variability in children's allergic sensitization has been detected not only among different countries but also among cities within the same nation but yet different climatic areas. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitization pattern of asthmatic children who lived in different altitude areas: the two largest Turkish cities, Istanbul (sea level) and Erzurum (high altitude). Five hundred and twelve asthmatic children (6-15 years old) from Istanbul (western Turkey, at sea level) and 609 from Erzurum (eastern Turkey, at an altitude of 1800 m) were included in the study. All participants underwent skin testing with common inhalant allergens, spirometry, total IgE level, and clinical examination. The positive sensitization ratio to aeroallergens in children with asthma living at sea level was statistically higher than that in children living in the high altitude group [p = 0.001, OR (odds ratio) 4.9 (confidence interval (CI) 3.67-6.459)]. However, pollen sensitization in asthmatic children living in high altitudes was significantly higher than that in children living at sea level [p = 0.00, OR 2.6 (CI 1.79-3.87)]. Children with asthma who live at high altitudes are characterized by higher pollen but lower mite sensitization rates than those living at sea level in Turkey. Different climatic conditions and altitudes may affect aeroallergen sensitization in children with asthma.

  15. Effects of adjuvants on the immune response to allergens in a murine model of allergen inhalation: cholera toxin induces a Th1-like response to Bet v 1, the major birch pollen allergen.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, U; Jahn-Schmid, B; Fritsch, R; Bauer, L; Renz, H; Kraft, D; Ebner, C

    1998-01-01

    Based on the fact that type I allergies are frequently elicited by inhalant allergens, we have established a model of aerosol inhalation leading to allergic sensitization in BALB/c mice. Using this model we studied the effects of aluminium hydroxide (Al(OH)3), known to enhance IgE antibody responses, compared with cholera toxin (CT), a potent mucosal adjuvant, on the immune response to birch pollen (BP) and its major allergen Bet v 1. Two groups of BALB/c mice were either systemically immunized with recombinant Bet v 1 in Al(OH)3 and subsequently aerosol exposed to BP allergen, or aerosolized with BP and CT. IgE-mediated skin reactions were only elicited in the mice which had received Bet v 1/Al(OH)3. Allergen-specific serum IgE and IgG1 antibodies dominated in the Al(OH)3 group, IgG2a antibody levels to BP and rBet v 1 were markedly higher in the sera of mice exposed to CT with the allergen. IgA antibodies were only detected in the bronchial lavage of the CT-treated group. Moreover, the latter group displayed consistently higher T cell proliferative responses to BP and interferon-gamma production in vitro. Thus, the systemic immunization with rBet v 1 in Al(OH)3 before inhalation of the BP extract promoted a Th2-like immune response, while CT mixed with the aerosolized BP extract rather induced a Th1-like immune response. In an attempt to reverse these ongoing immune responses we could achieve a shift towards a Th0 response. Immunization with BP extract without adjuvant treatment led to undetectable antibody or cellular immune responses. We conclude from the present study that the induction of an immune response to BP allergen after aerosol inhalation can be directed towards a Th1- or a Th2-like response. Once established, the immune response can be modulated.

  16. Disposition and safety of inhaled biodegradable nanomedicines: Opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Haque, Shadabul; Whittaker, Michael R; McIntosh, Michelle P; Pouton, Colin W; Kaminskas, Lisa M

    2016-08-01

    The inhaled delivery of nanomedicines can provide a novel, non-invasive therapeutic strategy for the more localised treatment of lung-resident diseases and potentially also enable the systemic delivery of therapeutics that are otherwise administered via injection alone. However, the clinical translation of inhalable nanomedicine is being hampered by our lack of understanding about their disposition and clearance from the lungs. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the biodegradable nanomaterials that are currently being explored as inhalable drug delivery systems and our current understanding of their disposition within, and clearance from the lungs. The safety of biodegradable nanomaterials in the lungs is discussed and latest updates are provided on the impact of inflammation on the pulmonary pharmacokinetics of inhaled nanomaterials. Overall, the review provides an in-depth and critical assessment of the lung clearance mechanisms for inhaled biodegradable nanomedicines and highlights the opportunities and challenges for their translation into the clinic.

  17. Validation of specific inhalation challenge for the diagnosis of occupational asthma due to persulphate salts

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, X; Cruz, M; Orriols, R; Torres, F; Espuga, M; Morell, F

    2004-01-01

    Background: The significant value of tests used to certify the diagnosis of occupational asthma due to persulphate salts remains uncertain. Aims: To validate the specific inhalation challenge (SIC) test for the diagnosis of occupational asthma. Methods: Eight patients with occupational asthma due to persulphate salts, eight patients with bronchial asthma who were never exposed to persulphate salts, and ten healthy subjects were studied. Clinical history taking, spirometry, bronchial challenge with methacholine, skin prick testing to common inhalant allergens and persulphate salts, total IgE levels, and SIC to potassium persulphate were carried out in all subjects. The SIC used increasing concentrations of potassium persulphate (5, 10, 15, and 30 g) mixed with 150 g of lactose. Patients tipped the mixture from one tray to another at a distance of 30 cm from the face for 10 minutes in a challenge booth. Results: The SIC was positive in all subjects with persulphate induced asthma and in one patient with bronchial asthma who had never been exposed to persulphate salts. Sensitivity was 100% (95% CI 67.6 to 100) and specificity was 87.5% (95% CI 52.9–97.8) when patients with occupational asthma due to persulphate salts were compared with those with bronchial asthma never exposed to persulphate salts. Conclusions: SIC to persulphate salts performed according to the protocol described appears to be useful for the diagnosis of occupational asthma secondary to inhalation of this substance. PMID:15377773

  18. Translating reference doses into allergen management practice: challenges for stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Crevel, René W R; Baumert, Joseph L; Luccioli, Stefano; Baka, Athanasia; Hattersley, Sue; Hourihane, Jonathan O'B; Ronsmans, Stefan; Timmermans, Frans; Ward, Rachel; Chung, Yong-joo

    2014-05-01

    Risk assessment describes the impact of a particular hazard as a function of dose and exposure. It forms the foundation of risk management and contributes to the overall decision-making process, but is not its endpoint. This paper outlines a risk analysis framework to underpin decision-making in the area of allergen cross-contact. Specifically, it identifies challenges relevant to each component of the risk analysis: risk assessment (data gaps and output interpretation); risk management (clear and realistic objectives); and risk communication (clear articulation of risk and benefit). Translation of the outputs from risk assessment models into risk management measures must be informed by a clear understanding of the model outputs and their limitations. This will lead to feasible and achievable risk management objectives, grounded in a level of risk accepted by the different stakeholders, thereby avoiding potential unintended detrimental consequences. Clear, consistent and trustworthy communications actively involving all stakeholders underpin these objectives. The conclusions, integrating the perspectives of different stakeholders, offer a vision where clear, science-based benchmarks form the basis of allergen management and labelling, cutting through the current confusion and uncertainty. Finally, the paper recognises that the proposed framework must be adaptable to new and emerging evidence. PMID:24491260

  19. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Peanut Allergens in Food Ingredients Used for Oral Food Challenges.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Philip E; Sayers, Rebekah L; Gethings, Lee A; Balasundaram, Anuradha; Marsh, Justin T; Langridge, James I; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-06-01

    Profiling allergens in complex food ingredients used in oral food challenges and immunotherapy is crucial for regulatory acceptance. Mass spectrometry based analysis employing data-independent acquisition coupled with ion mobility mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (DIA-IM-MS) was used to investigate the allergen composition of raw peanuts and roasted peanut flour ingredients used in challenge meals. This comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analysis using label-free approaches identified and quantified 123 unique protein accessions. Semiquantitative analysis indicated that allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 3 were the most abundant proteins and present in approximately equal amounts and were extracted in reduced amounts from roasted peanut flours. The clinically significant allergens Ara h 2 and 6 were less abundant, but relative quantification was unaffected by roasting. Ara h 5 was undetectable in any peanut sample, while the Bet v 1 homologue Ara h 8 and the lipid transfer protein allergen, Ara h 9, were detected in low abundance. The oleosin allergens, Ara h 10 and 11, were moderately abundant in the raw peanuts but were 100-fold less abundant in the defatted roasted peanut flour than the major allergens Ara h 1, 3, 2, and 6. Certain isoforms of the major allergens dominated the profile. The relative quantitation of the major peanut allergens showed little variation between different batches of roasted peanut flour. These data will support future development of targeted approaches for absolute quantification of peanut allergens which can be applied to both food ingredients used in clinical studies and extracts used for skin testing and to identify trace levels of allergens in foods. PMID:27064171

  20. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Peanut Allergens in Food Ingredients Used for Oral Food Challenges.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Philip E; Sayers, Rebekah L; Gethings, Lee A; Balasundaram, Anuradha; Marsh, Justin T; Langridge, James I; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-06-01

    Profiling allergens in complex food ingredients used in oral food challenges and immunotherapy is crucial for regulatory acceptance. Mass spectrometry based analysis employing data-independent acquisition coupled with ion mobility mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (DIA-IM-MS) was used to investigate the allergen composition of raw peanuts and roasted peanut flour ingredients used in challenge meals. This comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analysis using label-free approaches identified and quantified 123 unique protein accessions. Semiquantitative analysis indicated that allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 3 were the most abundant proteins and present in approximately equal amounts and were extracted in reduced amounts from roasted peanut flours. The clinically significant allergens Ara h 2 and 6 were less abundant, but relative quantification was unaffected by roasting. Ara h 5 was undetectable in any peanut sample, while the Bet v 1 homologue Ara h 8 and the lipid transfer protein allergen, Ara h 9, were detected in low abundance. The oleosin allergens, Ara h 10 and 11, were moderately abundant in the raw peanuts but were 100-fold less abundant in the defatted roasted peanut flour than the major allergens Ara h 1, 3, 2, and 6. Certain isoforms of the major allergens dominated the profile. The relative quantitation of the major peanut allergens showed little variation between different batches of roasted peanut flour. These data will support future development of targeted approaches for absolute quantification of peanut allergens which can be applied to both food ingredients used in clinical studies and extracts used for skin testing and to identify trace levels of allergens in foods.

  1. House Dust Mite-Derived Chitin Enhances Th2 Cell Response to Inhaled Allergens, Mainly via a TNF-α-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun-Pyo; Lee, Sang-Min; Choi, Hyun-Il; Kim, Min-Hye; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Jang, Myoung Ho; Jee, Young-Koo; Yang, Sanghwa; Cho, Young-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Chitin is a potent adjuvant in the development of immune response to inhaled allergens in the airways. According to other studies, chitin is known as multi-faced adjuvants which can induce Th2 responses. Recently, we found that TNF-α is a key mediator in the development of Th2 cell response to inhaled allergens. Here, we evaluated the immunologic mechanisms in the development of airway hypersensitivity to inhaled allergens, enhanced by house dust mite (HDM)-derived chitin. Methods The role of TNF-α and TLRs was evaluated in an airway hypersensitivity mouse model induced by a sensitization with an allergen (ovalbumin, OVA) and HDM-derived chitin using mice with the null mutation of target genes. Results The present study showed that airway sensitization with HDM-derived chitin plus OVA enhanced OVA-induced airway inflammation v. OVA alone. This phenotype was associated with the increased expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines and also with the enhanced production of OVA-specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a. As for T cell responses, OVA-specific Th2 cell response, enhanced by chitin, was abolished by the treatment of chitinase, whereas Th1 and Th17 cell responses enhanced by this treatment. Moreover, the null mutation of the TNF-α gene revealed similar effects as the chitinase treatment. In contrast, all the OVA-specific T cell responses, enhanced by chitin, were blocked by the absence of TLR2, but not of TLR1, TLR4, or TLR6. Conclusions In conclusion, these data suggest that HDM-derived chitin may enhance airway hypersensitivity to inhaled allergens, via the TLR2-dependent pathway, and that chitin-induced TNF-α can be a key mediator in the development of Th2 cell response to inhaled allergens. PMID:27126730

  2. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  3. Food allergen detection methods and the challenge to protect food-allergic consumers.

    PubMed

    van Hengel, Arjon J

    2007-09-01

    The detection of allergenic ingredients in food products has received increased attention from the food industry and legislative and regulatory agencies over recent years. This has resulted in the improvement of measures aimed at the protection of food-allergic consumers. The controlled production of food products and control activities executed by food inspection agencies rely on the availability of methods capable of detecting traces of allergenic ingredients. The development of such methods faces a multitude of analytical challenges. Those challenges will be identified and discussed in this review. Furthermore, future developments and trends in analytical methodology as applied to the detection of food allergens are reported.

  4. The effects of inhaled corticosteroids on intrinsic responsiveness and histology of airways from infant monkeys exposed to house dust mite allergen and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Plopper, Charles G.; Peake, Janice L.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2008-01-15

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are recommended to treat infants with asthma, some with intermittent asthma. We previously showed that exposing infant monkeys to allergen/ozone resulted in asthma-like characteristics of their airways. We evaluated the effects of ICS on histology and intrinsic responsiveness of allergen/ozone-exposed and normal infant primate airways. Infant monkeys were exposed by inhalation to (1) filtered air and saline, (2) house dust mite allergen (HDMA) + ozone and saline, (3) filtered air and ICS (budesonide) or (4) HDMA + ozone and ICS. Allergen/ozone exposures started at 1 month and ICS at 3 months of age. At 6 months of age, methacholine-induced changes in luminal area of airways in proximal and distal lung slices were determined using videomicrometry, followed by histology of the same slices. Proximal airway responsiveness was increased by allergen/ozone and by ICS. Eosinophil profiles were increased by allergen/ozone in both proximal and distal airways, an effect that was decreased by ICS in distal airways. In both allergen/ozone- and air-exposed monkeys, ICS increased the number of alveolar attachments in distal airways, decreased mucin in proximal airways and decreased epithelial volume in both airways. ICS increased smooth muscle in air-exposed animals while decreasing it in allergen/ozone-exposed animals in both airways. In proximal airways, there was a small but significant positive correlation between smooth muscle and airway responsiveness, as well as between alveolar attachments and responsiveness. ICS change morphology and function in normal airways as well as allergen/ozone-exposed airways, suggesting that they should be reserved for infants with active symptoms.

  5. Workshop proceedings: challenges and opportunities in evaluating protein allergenicity across biotechnology industries.

    PubMed

    Stagg, Nicola J; Ghantous, Hanan N; Ladics, Gregory S; House, Robert V; Gendel, Steven M; Hastings, Kenneth L

    2013-01-01

    A workshop entitled "Challenges and Opportunities in Evaluating Protein Allergenicity across Biotechnology Industries" was held at the 51st Annual Meeting of the Society of Toxicology (SOT) in San Francisco, California. The workshop was sponsored by the Biotechnology Specialty Section of SOT and was designed to present the science-based approaches used in biotechnology industries to evaluate and regulate protein allergenicity. A panel of experts from industry and government highlighted the allergenicity testing requirements and research in the agricultural, pharmaceutical/biopharma, and vaccine biotechnology industries and addressed challenges and opportunities for advancing the science of protein allergenicity. The main learning from the workshop was that immunoglobulin E-mediated allergenicity of biotechnology-derived products is difficult to assess without human data. The approaches currently being used to evaluate potential for allergenicity across biotechnology industries are very different and range from bioinformatics, in vitro serology, in vivo animal testing, in vitro and in vivo functional assays, and "biosimilar" assessments (ie, biotherapeutic equivalents to innovator products). The challenge remains with regard to the different or lack of regulatory requirements for allergenicity testing across industries, but the novel approaches being used with bioinformatics and biosimilars may lead to opportunities in the future to collaborate across biotechnology industries.

  6. Peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Jappe, Uta

    2014-01-01

    The earliest known evidence of peanut farming dates back 7,600 years. With a prevalence of roughly 1%, peanut allergy is a diagnostic and treatment challenge, but is also a very good model for studying all aspects of food allergy, including its molecular basis and pathomechanisms. Therefore, the very starting point for elucidating all these aspects is the identification of peanut allergens with subsequent clearing of their structure and their preparation as pure recombinant and/or natural allergens. This is the basis for in vitro diagnostic tests as well as the development of immunotherapeutic drugs. With regard to class I food allergy, peanut allergy affects by far the largest group of patients. In peanuts, 12 allergens have been identified and their molecular characteristics are described herein. Ara h 1, Ara h 3.01 and Ara h 3.02 (the former Ara h 4) belong to the cupin superfamily. The conglutins Ara h 2, Ara h 6 and Ara h 7, and the non-specific lipid transfer protein Ara h 9 belong to the prolamin superfamily. Ara h 5 (profilin) and Ara h 8 (Bet v 1-homologous protein) cause class II food allergies and are associated with inhalation allergy to pollen via the sequential and/or conformational similarity of molecules. Two peanut oleosins are listed as Ara h 10 and Ara h 11 and two defensins as Ara h 12 and Ara h 13 by the WHO/IUIS Allergen Nomenclature Subcommittee. The effect of the above-specified allergens has to be considered in the context of their matrix, which is influenced by processing factors and the individual's immune system. PMID:24925406

  7. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  8. Airway uric acid is a sensor of inhaled protease allergens and initiates type 2 immune responses in respiratory mucosa1

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Kenichiro; Iijima, Koji; Elias, Martha K.; Seno, Satoshi; Tojima, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Kephart, Gail M.; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    While type 2 immune responses to environmental antigens are thought to play pivotal roles in asthma and allergic airway diseases, the immunological mechanisms that initiate the responses are largely unknown. Many allergens have biologic activities, including enzymatic activities and abilities to engage innate pattern-recognition receptors such as TLR4. Here we report that IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) were produced quickly in the lungs of naïve mice exposed to cysteine proteases, such as bromelain and papain, as a model for allergens. IL-33 and TSLP sensitized naïve animals to an innocuous airway antigen OVA, which resulted in production of type 2 cytokines and IgE antibody and eosinophilic airway inflammation when mice were challenged with the same antigen. Importantly, upon exposure to proteases, uric acid (UA) was rapidly released into the airway lumen, and removal of this endogenous UA by uricase prevented type 2 immune responses. UA promoted secretion of IL-33 by airway epithelial cells in vitro, and administration of UA into the airways of naïve animals induced extracellular release of IL-33, followed by both innate and adaptive type 2 immune responses in vivo. Finally, a potent UA synthesis inhibitor, febuxostat, mitigated asthma phenotypes that were caused by repeated exposure to natural airborne allergens. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the development of type 2 immunity to airborne allergens and recognize airway UA as a key player that regulates the process in respiratory mucosa. PMID:24663677

  9. Current challenges facing the assessment of the allergenic capacity of food allergens in animal models.

    PubMed

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; van Bilsen, Jolanda; Głogowski, Robert; López-Expósito, Iván; Bouchaud, Grégory; Blanchard, Carine; Bodinier, Marie; Smit, Joost; Pieters, Raymond; Bastiaan-Net, Shanna; de Wit, Nicole; Untersmayr, Eva; Adel-Patient, Karine; Knippels, Leon; Epstein, Michelle M; Noti, Mario; Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Kimber, Ian; Verhoeckx, Kitty; O'Mahony, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is a major health problem of increasing concern. The insufficiency of protein sources for human nutrition in a world with a growing population is also a significant problem. The introduction of new protein sources into the diet, such as newly developed innovative foods or foods produced using new technologies and production processes, insects, algae, duckweed, or agricultural products from third countries, creates the opportunity for development of new food allergies, and this in turn has driven the need to develop test methods capable of characterizing the allergenic potential of novel food proteins. There is no doubt that robust and reliable animal models for the identification and characterization of food allergens would be valuable tools for safety assessment. However, although various animal models have been proposed for this purpose, to date, none have been formally validated as predictive and none are currently suitable to test the allergenic potential of new foods. Here, the design of various animal models are reviewed, including among others considerations of species and strain, diet, route of administration, dose and formulation of the test protein, relevant controls and endpoints measured. PMID:27313841

  10. LOW-DOSE AIRBORNE ENDOTOXIN EXPOSURE ENHANCES BRONCHIAL RESPONSIVENESS TO INHALED ALLERGEN IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endotoxin exposure has been associated with both protection against development of TH2-immune responses during childhood and exacerbation of asthma in persons who already have allergic airway inflammation.1 Occupational and experimental inhalation exposures to endotoxin have been...

  11. Setting Occupational Exposure Limits for Chemical Allergens--Understanding the Challenges.

    PubMed

    Dotson, G S; Maier, A; Siegel, P D; Anderson, S E; Green, B J; Stefaniak, A B; Codispoti, C D; Kimber, I

    2015-01-01

    Chemical allergens represent a significant health burden in the workplace. Exposures to such chemicals can cause the onset of a diverse group of adverse health effects triggered by immune-mediated responses. Common responses associated with workplace exposures to low molecular weight (LMW) chemical allergens range from allergic contact dermatitis to life-threatening cases of asthma. Establishing occupational exposure limits (OELs) for chemical allergens presents numerous difficulties for occupational hygiene professionals. Few OELs have been developed for LMW allergens because of the unique biological mechanisms that govern the immune-mediated responses. The purpose of this article is to explore the primary challenges confronting the establishment of OELs for LMW allergens. Specific topics include: (1) understanding the biology of LMW chemical allergies as it applies to setting OELs; (2) selecting the appropriate immune-mediated response (i.e., sensitization versus elicitation); (3) characterizing the dose (concentration)-response relationship of immune-mediated responses; (4) determining the impact of temporal exposure patterns (i.e., cumulative versus acute exposures); and (5) understanding the role of individual susceptibility and exposure route. Additional information is presented on the importance of using alternative exposure recommendations and risk management practices, including medical surveillance, to aid in protecting workers from exposures to LMW allergens when OELs cannot be established.

  12. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Facts Chat Day: Inhalants Drug Facts Chat Day: Inhalants Print Can you get high off of ... Cool Order Free Materials National Drugs & Alcohol Chat Day Newsletter Sign up to receive National Drug & Alcohol ...

  13. Allergen challenge during halothane compared to isoflurane anesthesia induces a more potent peripheral lung response.

    PubMed

    Borges, Marcos C; Marchica, Cinzia L; Narayanan, Venkatesan; Ludwig, Mara S

    2013-10-01

    Allergen instillation in anaesthetized vs. awake animals results in increased distribution of allergen in the lung. Halothane is a more potent bronchodilator of the small airways than isoflurane. As small airways contribute to asthma pathogenesis, we questioned whether intranasal challenge under halothane vs. isoflurane anesthesia would lead to an increase in allergen deposition in the lung periphery and, consequently, an enhanced allergic response. C57Bl/6 mice were sensitized twice and repeatedly challenged with ovalbumin (OA) under halothane or isoflurane anesthesia. After OA-challenge, in vivo lung function was measured and BAL performed. Peribronchial and peripheral inflammation, cytokine mRNA production and collagen deposition were assessed. Airway hyperresponsiveness, BAL eosinophilia, peripheral lung inflammation, IL-5 mRNA production and collagen deposition were significantly increased in halothane OA-challenged compared to isoflurane OA-challenged mice. Airway challenge induced a higher level of airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation and remodeling under halothane than isoflurane anesthesia in a murine model of asthma. These differences may be due to increased allergen deposition in the small airways. PMID:23876740

  14. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  15. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... Notes Articles Adolescent Cigarette, Alcohol Use Declines as Marijuana Use Rises ( February 2013 ) Program Helps Troubled Boys ...

  16. Exploring the context of the lung proteome within the airway mucosa following allergen challenge.

    PubMed

    Fehniger, Thomas E; Sato-Folatre, José-Gabriel; Malmström, Johan; Berglund, Magnus; Lindberg, Claes; Brange, Charlotte; Lindberg, Henrik; Marko-Varga, György

    2004-01-01

    The lung proteome is a dynamic collection of specialized proteins related to pulmonary function. Many cells of different derivations, activation states, and levels of maturity contribute to the changing environment, which produces the lung proteome. Inflammatory cells reacting to environmental challenge, for example from allergens, produce and secrete proteins which have profound effects on both resident and nonresident cells located in airways, alveoli, and the vascular tree which provides blood cells to the parenchyma alveolar bed for gas exchange. In an experimental model of allergic airway inflammation, we have compared control and allergen challenged lung compartments to determine global protein expression patterns using 2D-gel electrophoresis and subsequent spot identification by MS/MS mass spectrometry. We have then specifically isolated the epithelial mucosal layer, which lines conducting airways, from control and allergen challenged lungs, using laser capture technology and performed proteome identification on these selected cell samples. A central component of our investigations has been to contextually relate the histological features of the dynamic pulmonary environment to the changes in protein expression observed following challenge. Our results provide new information of the complexity of the submucosa/epithelium interface and the mechanisms behind the transformation of airway epithelium from normal steady states to functionally activated states. PMID:15113108

  17. Personal Exposure to Inhalable Dust and the Specific Latex Aero-Allergen, Hev b6.02, in Latex Glove Manufacturing in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Sanguanchaiyakrit, Nuthchyawach; Povey, Andrew C.; de Vocht, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Latex product manufacturing is an important industry in south-east Asia but has the potential for considerable occupational exposure of workers to latex allergens. Although exposure to latex allergens can result in adverse health reactions, few studies to characterize this exposure have been conducted to date. This study therefore aimed to characterize current airborne inhalable dust and the specific allergen, Hev b 6.02, exposures in this industry in Thailand. Methods: Workers were recruited from three factories in the southern part of Thailand. Full-shift inhalable dust personal air sampling was conducted using IOM sampling heads equipped with polytetrafluoroethylene filters at a 2.0 l min−1 flowrate. After weighing to determine inhalable dust levels, filters were extracted and analysed for Hev b 6.02 using an enzyme immunometric assay. Results: Two hundred and seventy-five workers agreed to participate, resulting in a total of 292 measurements. Geometric mean (GM) personal exposure to inhalable dust was 0.88mg m–3, but individual exposures up to 12.34mg m–3 were measured. The pattern of exposure was similar across factories, with highest exposures in the stripping (GM 2.08–4.05mg m–3 for the 3 factories) and tumbling departments (1.11–2.17mg m–3). Within-worker (day-to-day) variability contributed 92% to total variability. The Hev b 6.02 exposure pattern was similar with time-weighted average GM exposure levels in the oldest factory ranging from 8.7mg m–3 in the laboratory to 30.2mg m–3 in the stripping department. In contrast to inhalable dust exposure, total exposure variability was primary driven by variability between workers (67%). Conclusions: Workers in these latex product factories get routinely exposed to measurable Hev b 6.02 levels, which may give rise to increased incidence of allergic symptoms and occupational asthma. Also, in this measurement campaign a 10mg m–3, but not 15mg m–3, occupational exposure limit for

  18. Assessing mucus and airway morphology in response to a segmental allergen challenge using OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Asthma affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, and the prevalence of the disease appears to be increasing. One of the most important aspects of asthma is the excessive bronchoconstriction that results in many of the symptoms experienced by asthma sufferers, but the relationship between bronchoconstriction and airway morphology is not clearly established. We present the imaging results of a study involving a segmental allergen challenge given to both allergic asthmatic (n = 12) and allergic non-asthmatic (n = 19) human volunteers. Using OCT, we have imaged and assessed baseline morphology in a right upper lobe (RUL) airway, serving as the control, and a right middle lobe (RML) airway, in which the allergen was to be administered. After a period of 24 hours had elapsed following the administration of the allergen, both airways were again imaged and the response morphology assessed. A number of airway parameters were measured and compared, including epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness and buckling, lumen area, and mucus content. We found that at baseline epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness, and mucosal buckling were greater in AAs than ANAs. We also observed statistically significant increases in these values 24 hours after the allergen had been administered for both the ANA and AA sets. In comparison, the control airway which received a diluent showed no statistically significant change.

  19. Effects of nasal allergen challenge on dynamic viscoelasticity of nasal mucus.

    PubMed

    Hattori, M; Majima, Y; Ukai, K; Sakakura, Y

    1993-04-01

    The effects of nasal provocation on the rheologic properties of nasal mucus were investigated in patients with allergic rhinitis provoked by house dust. The elastic modulus (G') and the dynamic viscosity (eta') of nasal mucus were determined by an oscillating sphere magnetic rheometer. Before and after the allergen challenge, G' increased, whereas eta' decreased with increasing oscillatory frequency; these findings indicate that the nasal mucus under these conditions is a non-newtonian fluid and has the cross-linked gel-like nature typical of mucus. Both G' and eta' values after nasal provocation were significantly lower than before. The values of G' and eta' after allergen challenge were in the optimal viscoelasticity range for mucociliary transport. PMID:8476173

  20. Development of asthmatic inflammation in mice following early-life exposure to ambient environmental particulates and chronic allergen challenge

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Cristan; Siegle, Jessica S.; Shadie, Alexander M.; Nikolaysen, Stina; Garthwaite, Linda; Hansbro, Nicole G.; Foster, Paul S.; Kumar, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Childhood exposure to environmental particulates increases the risk of development of asthma. The underlying mechanisms might include oxidant injury to airway epithelial cells (AEC). We investigated the ability of ambient environmental particulates to contribute to sensitization via the airways, and thus to the pathogenesis of childhood asthma. To do so, we devised a novel model in which weanling BALB/c mice were exposed to both ambient particulate pollutants and ovalbumin for sensitization via the respiratory tract, followed by chronic inhalational challenge with a low mass concentration of the antigen. We also examined whether these particulates caused oxidant injury and activation of AEC in vitro. Furthermore, we assessed the potential benefit of minimizing oxidative stress to AEC through the period of sensitization and challenge by dietary intervention. We found that characteristic features of asthmatic inflammation developed only in animals that received particulates at the same time as respiratory sensitization, and were then chronically challenged with allergen. However, these animals did not develop airway hyper-responsiveness. Ambient particulates induced epithelial injury in vitro, with evidence of oxidative stress and production of both pro-inflammatory cytokines and Th2-promoting cytokines such as IL-33. Treatment of AEC with an antioxidant in vitro inhibited the pro-inflammatory cytokine response to these particulates. Ambient particulates also induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression following administration to weanling mice. However, early-life dietary supplementation with antioxidants did not prevent the development of an asthmatic inflammatory response in animals that were exposed to particulates, sensitized and challenged. We conclude that injury to airway epithelium by ambient environmental particulates in early life is capable of promoting the development of an asthmatic inflammatory response in sensitized and antigen-challenged mice

  1. Comparative responses to nasal allergen challenge in allergic rhinitic subjects with or without asthma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nasal allergen challenge (NAC) is useful to study the pathophysiology of rhinitis, and multiple challenges may more adequately approximate natural exposure. Objective To determine the effect of 4 consecutive daily NAC, on clinical and inflammatory parameters in rhinitics with or without asthma. Methods Rhinitic subjects were recruited: 19 with mild asthma and 13 without asthma. Subjects underwent a control challenge (normal saline) followed by 4 consecutive daily NAC. Allergen challenge consisted of spraying the chosen allergen extract into each nostril until a positive nasal response occurred. Symptoms were recorded on a Likert scale, and oral peak expiratory and nasal peak inspiratory flows allowed assessment of a nasal blockage index (NBI), for a period of 7 hours. Induced sputum and nasal lavage were performed on control day and after 1 and 4 days of NAC. Results Compared with the control day, there was a significant increase in symptom scores and NBI 10 minutes after each last daily NAC in both groups (p < 0.05). Symptom scores and NBI were similar for the 2 groups, except for nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea, which were more marked in subjects with asthma and rhinitis, respectively. Nasal lavage eosinophils were increased after 4 days of challenges in both groups, but there was no change in sputum eosinophils. No cumulative effect or any late response were observed in any of the groups over the challenge period. Conclusion Multiple NAC may be a useful tool to study the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis or its relationships with asthma. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01286129 PMID:21507261

  2. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... or LSD. But you may not realize the dangers of substances in your own home. Household products such as glues, hair sprays, paints and lighter fluid can be drugs for kids in search of a quick high. Many young people ... need to know the dangers. Even inhaling once can disrupt heart rhythms and ...

  3. Combined Inhaled Diesel Exhaust Particles and Allergen Exposure Alter Methylation of T Helper Genes and IgE Production In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinming; Ballaney, Manisha; Al-alem, Umaima; Quan, Chunli; Jin, Ximei; Perera, Frederica; Chen, Lung-Chi; Miller, Rachel L.

    2008-01-01

    Changes in methylation of CpG sites at the interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-γ promoters are associated with T helper (Th) 2 polarization in vitro. No previous studies have examined whether air pollution or allergen exposure alters methylation of these two genes in vivo. We hypothesized that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) would induce hypermethylation of the IFN-γ promoter and hypomethylation of IL-4 in CD4+ T cells among mice sensitized to the fungus allergen Aspergillus fumigatus.We also hypothesized that DEP-induced methylation changes would affect immunoglobulin (Ig) E regulation. BALB/c mice were exposed to a 3-week course of inhaled DEP exposure while undergoing intranasal sensitization to A. fumigatus. Purified DNA from splenic CD4+ cells underwent bisulfite treatment, PCR amplification, and pyrosequencing. Sera IgE levels were compared with methylation levels at several CpG sites in the IL-4 and IFN-γ promoter. Total IgE production was increased following intranasal sensitization A. fumigatus. IgE production was augmented further following combined exposure to A. fumigatus and DEP exposure. Inhaled DEP exposure and intranasal A. fumigatus induced hypermethylation at CpG−45, CpG−53, CpG−205 sites of the IFN-γ promoter and hypomethylation at CpG−408 of the IL-4 promoter. Altered methylation of promoters of both genes was correlated significantly with changes in IgE levels. This study is the first to demonstrate that inhaled environmental exposures influence methylation of Th genes in vivo, supporting a new paradigm in asthma pathogenesis. PMID:18042818

  4. High Fat Diet Inhibits Dendritic Cell and T Cell Response to Allergens but Does Not Impair Inhalational Respiratory Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pizzolla, Angela; Oh, Ding Yuan; Luong, Suzanne; Prickett, Sara R; Henstridge, Darren C; Febbraio, Mark A; O'Hehir, Robyn E; Rolland, Jennifer M; Hardy, Charles L

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obesity has risen to epidemic proportions in recent decades, most commonly attributed to an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, and a 'western' diet high in fat and low in fibre. Although non-allergic asthma is a well-established co-morbidity of obesity, the influence of obesity on allergic asthma is still under debate. Allergic asthma is thought to result from impaired tolerance to airborne antigens, so-called respiratory tolerance. We sought to investigate whether a diet high in fats affects the development of respiratory tolerance. Mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks showed weight gain, metabolic disease, and alteration in gut microbiota, metabolites and glucose metabolism compared to age-matched mice fed normal chow diet (ND). Respiratory tolerance was induced by repeated intranasal (i.n.) administration of ovalbumin (OVA), prior to induction of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) by sensitization with OVA in alum i.p. and subsequent i.n. OVA challenge. Surprisingly, respiratory tolerance was induced equally well in HFD and ND mice, as evidenced by decreased lung eosinophilia and serum OVA-specific IgE production. However, in a pilot study, HFD mice showed a tendency for impaired activation of airway dendritic cells and regulatory T cells compared with ND mice after induction of respiratory tolerance. Moreover, the capacity of lymph node cells to produce IL-5 and IL-13 after AAI was drastically diminished in HFD mice compared to ND mice. These results indicate that HFD does not affect the inflammatory or B cell response to an allergen, but inhibits priming of Th2 cells and possibly dendritic cell and regulatory T cell activation. PMID:27483441

  5. High Fat Diet Inhibits Dendritic Cell and T Cell Response to Allergens but Does Not Impair Inhalational Respiratory Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Pizzolla, Angela; Oh, Ding Yuan; Luong, Suzanne; Prickett, Sara R.; Henstridge, Darren C.; Febbraio, Mark A.; O’Hehir, Robyn E.; Rolland, Jennifer M.; Hardy, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obesity has risen to epidemic proportions in recent decades, most commonly attributed to an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, and a ‘western’ diet high in fat and low in fibre. Although non-allergic asthma is a well-established co-morbidity of obesity, the influence of obesity on allergic asthma is still under debate. Allergic asthma is thought to result from impaired tolerance to airborne antigens, so-called respiratory tolerance. We sought to investigate whether a diet high in fats affects the development of respiratory tolerance. Mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks showed weight gain, metabolic disease, and alteration in gut microbiota, metabolites and glucose metabolism compared to age-matched mice fed normal chow diet (ND). Respiratory tolerance was induced by repeated intranasal (i.n.) administration of ovalbumin (OVA), prior to induction of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) by sensitization with OVA in alum i.p. and subsequent i.n. OVA challenge. Surprisingly, respiratory tolerance was induced equally well in HFD and ND mice, as evidenced by decreased lung eosinophilia and serum OVA-specific IgE production. However, in a pilot study, HFD mice showed a tendency for impaired activation of airway dendritic cells and regulatory T cells compared with ND mice after induction of respiratory tolerance. Moreover, the capacity of lymph node cells to produce IL-5 and IL-13 after AAI was drastically diminished in HFD mice compared to ND mice. These results indicate that HFD does not affect the inflammatory or B cell response to an allergen, but inhibits priming of Th2 cells and possibly dendritic cell and regulatory T cell activation. PMID:27483441

  6. Randomised, double blind, crossover challenge study of allergenicity of peanut oils in subjects allergic to peanuts.

    PubMed Central

    Hourihane, J. O.; Bedwani, S. J.; Dean, T. P.; Warner, J. O.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the in vivo allergenicity of two grades of peanut oil for a large group of subjects with proved allergy to peanuts. DESIGN: Double blind, crossover food challenge with crude peanut oil and refined peanut oil. SETTING: Dedicated clinical investigation unit in a university hospital. SUBJECTS: 60 subjects allergic to peanuts; allergy was confirmed by challenge tests. OUTCOME MEASURES: Allergic reaction to the tested peanut oils. RESULTS: None of the 60 subjects reacted to the refined oil; six (10%) reacted to the crude oil. Supervised peanut challenge caused considerably less severe reactions than subjects had reported previously. CONCLUSIONS: Crude peanut oil caused allergic reactions in 10% of allergic subjects studied and should continue to be avoided. Refined peanut oil did not pose a risk to any of the subjects. It would be reasonable to recommend a change in labelling to distinguish refined from crude peanut oil. PMID:9133891

  7. Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.

    PubMed

    Panda, R; Ariyarathna, H; Amnuaycheewa, P; Tetteh, A; Pramod, S N; Taylor, S L; Ballmer-Weber, B K; Goodman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. The potential that a newly expressed protein might become an allergen is evaluated based on resistance to digestion in pepsin and abundance in food fractions. If the modified plant is a common allergenic source (e.g. soybean), regulatory guidelines suggest testing for increases in the expression of endogenous allergens. Some regulators request evaluating endogenous allergens for rarely allergenic plants (e.g. maize and rice). Since allergic individuals must avoid foods containing their allergen (e.g. peanut, soybean, maize, or rice), the relevance of the tests is unclear. Furthermore, no acceptance criteria are established and little is known about the natural variation in allergen concentrations in these crops. Our results demonstrate a 15-fold difference in the major maize allergen, lipid transfer protein between nine varieties, and complex variation in IgE binding to various soybean varieties. We question the value of evaluating endogenous allergens in GM plants unless the intent of the modification was production of a hypoallergenic crop. PMID:23205714

  8. Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.

    PubMed

    Panda, R; Ariyarathna, H; Amnuaycheewa, P; Tetteh, A; Pramod, S N; Taylor, S L; Ballmer-Weber, B K; Goodman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. The potential that a newly expressed protein might become an allergen is evaluated based on resistance to digestion in pepsin and abundance in food fractions. If the modified plant is a common allergenic source (e.g. soybean), regulatory guidelines suggest testing for increases in the expression of endogenous allergens. Some regulators request evaluating endogenous allergens for rarely allergenic plants (e.g. maize and rice). Since allergic individuals must avoid foods containing their allergen (e.g. peanut, soybean, maize, or rice), the relevance of the tests is unclear. Furthermore, no acceptance criteria are established and little is known about the natural variation in allergen concentrations in these crops. Our results demonstrate a 15-fold difference in the major maize allergen, lipid transfer protein between nine varieties, and complex variation in IgE binding to various soybean varieties. We question the value of evaluating endogenous allergens in GM plants unless the intent of the modification was production of a hypoallergenic crop.

  9. Automated detection of perturbed cardiac physiology during oral food allergen challenge in children.

    PubMed

    Twomey, N; Temko, A; Hourihane, J O'B; Marnane, W P

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the fully automated computer-based detection of allergic reaction in oral food challenges using pediatric ECG signals. Nonallergic background is modeled using a mixture of Gaussians during oral food challenges, and the model likelihoods are used to determine whether a subject is allergic to a food type. The system performance is assessed on the dataset of 24 children (15 allergic and 9 nonallergic) totaling 34 h of data. The proposed detector correctly classified all nonallergic subjects (100% specificity) and 12 allergic subjects (80% sensitivity) and is capable of detecting allergy on average 17 min earlier than trained clinicians during oral food challenges, the gold standard of allergy diagnosis. Inclusion of the developed allergy classification platform during oral food challenges recorded would result in a 30% reduction of doses administered to allergic subjects. The results of study introduce the possibility to halt challenges earlier which can safely advance the state of clinical art of allergy diagnosis by reducing the overall exposure to the allergens.

  10. Soft-X-Ray-Enhanced Electrostatic Precipitation for Protection against Inhalable Allergens, Ultrafine Particles, and Microbial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kettleson, Eric M.; Schriewer, Jill M.; Buller, R. Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Protection of the human lung from infectious agents, allergens, and ultrafine particles is difficult with current technologies. High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters remove airborne particles of >0.3 μm with 99.97% efficiency, but they are expensive to maintain. Electrostatic precipitation has been used as an inexpensive approach to remove large particles from airflows, but it has a collection efficiency minimum in the submicrometer size range, allowing for a penetration window for some allergens and ultrafine particles. Incorporating soft X-ray irradiation as an in situ component of the electrostatic precipitation process greatly improves capture efficiency of ultrafine particles. Here we demonstrate the removal and inactivation capabilities of soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation technology targeting infectious agents (Bacillus anthracis, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and poxviruses), allergens, and ultrafine particles. Incorporation of in situ soft X-ray irradiation at low-intensity corona conditions resulted in (i) 2-fold to 9-fold increase in capture efficiency of 200- to 600-nm particles and (ii) a considerable delay in the mean day of death as well as lower overall mortality rates in ectromelia virus (ECTV) cohorts. At the high-intensity corona conditions, nearly complete protection from viral and bacterial respiratory infection was afforded to the murine models for all biological agents tested. When optimized for combined efficient particle removal with limited ozone production, this technology could be incorporated into stand-alone indoor air cleaners or scaled for installation in aircraft cabin, office, and residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. PMID:23263945

  11. Soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation for protection against inhalable allergens, ultrafine particles, and microbial infections.

    PubMed

    Kettleson, Eric M; Schriewer, Jill M; Buller, R Mark L; Biswas, Pratim

    2013-02-01

    Protection of the human lung from infectious agents, allergens, and ultrafine particles is difficult with current technologies. High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters remove airborne particles of >0.3 μm with 99.97% efficiency, but they are expensive to maintain. Electrostatic precipitation has been used as an inexpensive approach to remove large particles from airflows, but it has a collection efficiency minimum in the submicrometer size range, allowing for a penetration window for some allergens and ultrafine particles. Incorporating soft X-ray irradiation as an in situ component of the electrostatic precipitation process greatly improves capture efficiency of ultrafine particles. Here we demonstrate the removal and inactivation capabilities of soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation technology targeting infectious agents (Bacillus anthracis, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and poxviruses), allergens, and ultrafine particles. Incorporation of in situ soft X-ray irradiation at low-intensity corona conditions resulted in (i) 2-fold to 9-fold increase in capture efficiency of 200- to 600-nm particles and (ii) a considerable delay in the mean day of death as well as lower overall mortality rates in ectromelia virus (ECTV) cohorts. At the high-intensity corona conditions, nearly complete protection from viral and bacterial respiratory infection was afforded to the murine models for all biological agents tested. When optimized for combined efficient particle removal with limited ozone production, this technology could be incorporated into stand-alone indoor air cleaners or scaled for installation in aircraft cabin, office, and residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. PMID:23263945

  12. Plethysmography Phenotype QTL in Mice Before and After Allergen Sensitization and Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kelada, Samir N. P.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is common airway disease that is characterized in part by enhanced airway constriction in response to nonspecific stimuli. Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple loci associated with asthma risk in humans, but these studies have not accounted for gene–environment interactions, which are thought to be important factors in asthma. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that regulate responses to a common human allergen, we applied a house dust mite mouse (HDM) model of allergic airway disease (AAD) to 146 incipient lines of the Collaborative Cross (CC) and the CC founder strains. We employed a longitudinal study design in which mice were phenotyped for response to the bronchoconstrictor methacholine both before and after HDM sensitization and challenge using whole body plethysmography (WBP). There was significant variation in methacholine responsiveness due to both strain and HDM treatment, as reflected by changes in the WBP parameter enhanced pause. We also found that distinct QTL regulate baseline [chromosome (Chr) 18] and post-HDM (Chr 19) methacholine responsiveness and that post-HDM airway responsiveness was correlated with other features of AAD. Finally, using invasive measurements of airway mechanics, we tested whether the Chr 19 QTL affects lung resistance per se using C57BL/6J mice and a consomic strain but found that QTL haplotype did not affect lung resistance. We conclude that aspects of baseline and allergen-induced methacholine responsiveness are associated with genetic variation, and that robust detection of airway resistance QTL in genetically diverse mice will be facilitated by direct measurement of airway mechanics. PMID:27449512

  13. [Food hypersensibility: inhalation reactions are different from ingestion reactions].

    PubMed

    Baranes, T; Bidat, E

    2008-06-01

    Eight children, aged from 3 to 9 years, presented to inhaled peanut an immediate allergic reaction. All were sensitized to peanut but none had already ingested it overtly. A strict avoidance diet was prescribed concerning this food allergen. An oral provocation challenge was realized to determine the eliciting dose (ED) to ingestion. The ED was high enough to allow all the children a less restrictive diet. Inhaled allergic reaction to peanut does not always justify a strict avoidance diet.

  14. [Food hypersensibility: inhalation reactions are different from ingestion reactions].

    PubMed

    Baranes, T; Bidat, E

    2008-06-01

    Eight children, aged from 3 to 9 years, presented to inhaled peanut an immediate allergic reaction. All were sensitized to peanut but none had already ingested it overtly. A strict avoidance diet was prescribed concerning this food allergen. An oral provocation challenge was realized to determine the eliciting dose (ED) to ingestion. The ED was high enough to allow all the children a less restrictive diet. Inhaled allergic reaction to peanut does not always justify a strict avoidance diet. PMID:18456474

  15. Sputum RNA signature in allergic asthmatics following allergen bronchoprovocation test

    PubMed Central

    Zuiker, Rob G.J.A.; Tribouley, Catherine; Diamant, Zuzana; Boot, J. Diderik; Cohen, Adam F.; Van Dyck, K.; De Lepeleire, I.; Rivas, Veronica M.; Malkov, Vladislav A.; Burggraaf, Jacobus; Ruddy, Marcella K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Inhaled allergen challenge is a validated disease model of allergic asthma offering useful pharmacodynamic assessment of pharmacotherapeutic effects in a limited number of subjects. Objectives To evaluate whether an RNA signature can be identified from induced sputum following an inhaled allergen challenge, whether a RNA signature could be modulated by limited doses of inhaled fluticasone, and whether these gene expression profiles would correlate with the clinical endpoints measured in this study. Methods Thirteen non-smoking, allergic subjects with mild-to-moderate asthma participated in a randomised, placebo-controlled, 2-period cross-over study following a single-blind placebo run-in period. Each period consisted of three consecutive days, separated by a wash-out period of at least 3 weeks. Subjects randomly received inhaled fluticasone ((FP) MDI; 500 mcg BID×5 doses in total) or placebo. On day 2, house dust mite extract was inhaled and airway response was measured by FEV1 at predefined time points until 7 h post-allergen. Sputum was induced by NaCl 4.5%, processed and analysed at 24 h pre-allergen and 7 and 24 h post-allergen. RNA was isolated from eligible sputum cell pellets (<80% squamous of 500 cells), amplified according to NuGEN technology, and profiled on Affymetrix arrays. Gene expression changes from baseline and fluticasone treatment effects were evaluated using a mixed effects ANCOVA model at 7 and at 24 h post-allergen challenge. Results Inhaled allergen-induced statistically significant gene expression changes in sputum, which were effectively blunted by fluticasone (adjusted p<0.025). Forty-seven RNA signatures were selected from these responses for correlation analyses and further validation. This included Th2 mRNA levels for cytokines, chemokines, high-affinity IgE receptor FCER1A, histamine receptor HRH4, and enzymes and receptors in the arachidonic pathway. Individual messengers from the 47 RNA signatures correlated significantly

  16. Dimerization of lipocalin allergens

    PubMed Central

    Niemi, Merja H.; Rytkönen-Nissinen, Marja; Miettinen, Ilja; Jänis, Janne; Virtanen, Tuomas; Rouvinen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalins are one of the most important groups of inhalant animal allergens. The analysis of structural features of these proteins is important to get insights into their allergenicity. We have determined two different dimeric crystal structures for bovine dander lipocalin Bos d 2, which was earlier described as a monomeric allergen. The crystal structure analysis of all other determined lipocalin allergens also revealed oligomeric structures which broadly utilize inherent structural features of the β-sheet in dimer formation. According to the moderate size of monomer-monomer interfaces, most of these dimers would be transient in solution. Native mass spectrometry was employed to characterize quantitatively transient dimerization of two lipocalin allergens, Bos d 2 and Bos d 5, in solution. PMID:26346541

  17. Levodropropizine (LD) activity in allergic asthmatic patients, challenged with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water, metacholine and allergen-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Bossi, R; Banfi, P; Filipazzi, V; Castelli, C; Braga, P C

    1994-04-01

    The antitussive compound Levodropropizine (LD) is active in animal bronchoconstriction induced by histamine and capsaicin and in man protects from bronchoconstriction induced by capsaicin. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanism of action of LD given at 60 mg t.i.d. as oral drops, for 8 days by means of specific bronchial challenges (allergens) and of aspecific challenges acting via different receptors and fibers (i.e. metacholine via cholinergic receptors and ultrasonically nebulized distilled water (UNDW) via histamine and neuropeptide release). The study design is randomized, double-blind, cross-over versus placebo in 30 allergic asthmatic patients. Baseline bronchial tone and bronchoconstrictor response to metacholine (MCh) were not modified by active treatment nor by placebo. On the contrary, in airway responsiveness to UNDW, the active treatment showed an antagonist effect against induced bronchoconstriction of 59% [activity ratio (AR) as antilog = 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.35-0.54; p < or = 0.05] in comparison to no effect for placebo. Similarly, in airway responsiveness to specific allergen, active treatment antagonized the bronchoconstrictor effect of grass pollen by 83% and of various allergens (dermatophagoides and grass pollen) by 72%, i.e. AR of 0.17 (95% confidence interval 0.045-0.65; p < 0.01) and of 0.28 (95% confidence interval 0.07-1.04; p < 0.05), respectively. No antagonist effect was evident with placebo at all times. Besides inhibiting cough, LD is also partially effective in inhibiting bronchial hyperreactive response against specific allergen and UNDW bronchoconstriction. Hence, LD might act by partly inhibiting histamine and neuropeptide release.

  18. Levodropropizine (LD) activity in allergic asthmatic patients, challenged with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water, metacholine and allergen-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Bossi, R; Banfi, P; Filipazzi, V; Castelli, C; Braga, P C

    1994-04-01

    The antitussive compound Levodropropizine (LD) is active in animal bronchoconstriction induced by histamine and capsaicin and in man protects from bronchoconstriction induced by capsaicin. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanism of action of LD given at 60 mg t.i.d. as oral drops, for 8 days by means of specific bronchial challenges (allergens) and of aspecific challenges acting via different receptors and fibers (i.e. metacholine via cholinergic receptors and ultrasonically nebulized distilled water (UNDW) via histamine and neuropeptide release). The study design is randomized, double-blind, cross-over versus placebo in 30 allergic asthmatic patients. Baseline bronchial tone and bronchoconstrictor response to metacholine (MCh) were not modified by active treatment nor by placebo. On the contrary, in airway responsiveness to UNDW, the active treatment showed an antagonist effect against induced bronchoconstriction of 59% [activity ratio (AR) as antilog = 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.35-0.54; p < or = 0.05] in comparison to no effect for placebo. Similarly, in airway responsiveness to specific allergen, active treatment antagonized the bronchoconstrictor effect of grass pollen by 83% and of various allergens (dermatophagoides and grass pollen) by 72%, i.e. AR of 0.17 (95% confidence interval 0.045-0.65; p < 0.01) and of 0.28 (95% confidence interval 0.07-1.04; p < 0.05), respectively. No antagonist effect was evident with placebo at all times. Besides inhibiting cough, LD is also partially effective in inhibiting bronchial hyperreactive response against specific allergen and UNDW bronchoconstriction. Hence, LD might act by partly inhibiting histamine and neuropeptide release. PMID:10184318

  19. Exposure chamber for allergen challenge. The development and validation of a new concept.

    PubMed

    Rønborg, S M; Mosbech, H; Johnsen, C R; Poulsen, L K

    1996-02-01

    Exposure chambers have proven to be valuable tools in studying allergic diseases. The chamber provides a controlled environment and maintains conditions for measuring the amount of allergen inducing symptoms in allergic subjects. The aim of the present study was to develop and test an exposure chamber. The chamber was constructed as an airtight tent, made of transparent polyethylene, easy to adapt to the shape of an existing room, easy to clean, and providing exact allergen-dosage control. Airflow to the interior of the tent was controlled by a variable inlet ventilator fitted with a micropore filter and balanced by a variable high-volume air-sampler on the outlet side. Trace material and allergen were administered as aerosols with a nebulizer connected to the inlet pipe. Samples were obtained from interior surfaces and filters at the outlet. Two different methods were used to test the concept. One method used a colored, neutral trace substance (phenol red indicator) measured photometrically on extracts from filters. Secondly, house-dust mite allergen (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) was applied, with samples analyzed by an ELISA technique. The results demonstrated the ability of the system to administer and sample allergen with a high degree of reproducibility. A clinical pilot trial proved the capability of the system to initiate symptoms in allergic subjects. PMID:8738512

  20. Clinical and Laboratory Studies of the Fate of Intranasal Allergen

    PubMed Central

    Rimmer, Janet; Santos, Conceição; Yli-Panula, Eija; Noronha, Virginia; Viander, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Background The precise way in which allergen is handled by the nose is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine recovery of Der p 1 allergen following nasal administration and to determine whether Der p 1 can be detected in nasal biopsies after natural exposure and nasal challenge to allergen. Methods (1) 20 nonatopic non-rhinitics were challenged with Der p 1 and recovery was measured by ELISA in the nasal wash, nasal mucus and induced sputum up to 30 minutes. Particulate charcoal (<40 μm) served as control. (2) In 8 subjects (5 atopics), 30 to 60 minutes after challenge histological localisation of Der p 1 in the nasal mucosal epithelium, subepithelial mucous glands and lamina propria was performed. Co-localisation of Der p 1 with macrophages and IgE-positive cells was undertaken. Results (1) Less than 25% of total allergen was retrievable after aqueous or particulate challenge, most from the nasal mucus during 1-5 min after the challenge. The median of carbon particles recovered was 9%. (2) Prechallenge Der p 1 staining was associated with the epithelium and subepithelial mucous glands. After challenge there was a trend for greater Der p 1 deposition in atopics, but both atopics and nonatopics showed increases in the number of Der p 1 stained cells and stained tissue compartments. In atopics, increased eosinophils, macrophages and IgE positive cells co-localized with Der p 1 staining. Conclusions Der p 1 allergen is detected in nasal tissue independent of atopic status after natural exposure. After challenge the nose effectively retains allergen, which remains mucosally associated; in atopics there is greater Der p 1 deposition and inflammatory response than in nonatopics. These results support the hypothesis that nasal mucus and tissue act as a reservoir for the inhaled Der p 1 allergen leading to a persistent allergic inflammatory response in susceptible individuals. PMID:25969994

  1. Adenosine dry powder inhalation for bronchial challenge testing, part 2: proof of concept in asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Lexmond, Anne J; van der Wiel, Erica; Hagedoorn, Paul; Bult, Wouter; Frijlink, Henderik W; ten Hacken, Nick H T; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-09-01

    Adenosine is an indirect stimulus to assess bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR(2)) in asthma. Bronchial challenge tests are usually performed with nebulised solutions of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP(3)). The nebulised AMP test has several disadvantages, like long administration times and a restrictive maximum concentration that does not result in BHR in all patients. In this study, we investigated the applicability of dry powder adenosine for assessment of BHR in comparison to nebulised AMP. Dry powder adenosine was prepared in doubling doses (0.01-80 mg) derived from the nebulised AMP test with addition of two higher doses. Five asthmatic subjects performed two bronchial challenge tests, one with nebulised AMP following the 2-min tidal breathing method; the second with dry powder adenosine administered with an investigational inhaler and single slow inhalations (inspiratory flow rate 30-40 L/min). All subjects reached a 20% fall in FEV₁(4) with the new adenosine test (PD20(5)) compared to four subjects with the AMP test (PC₂₀(6)). Dry powder adenosine was well tolerated by all subjects and better appreciated than nebulised AMP. In conclusion, this new bronchial challenge test appears to be a safe and convenient alternative to the nebulised AMP test to assess BHR in asthmatic subjects.

  2. Allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Harold S; Norman, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy was introduced for the treatment of grass pollen-induced hay fever in 1911. The treatment was soon extended to other pollens as well as perennial allergens, and to the treatment of bronchial asthma. Definitive studies of its efficacy for both rhinitis and asthma came only many decades later. Understanding gradually emerged of the underlying immunologic mechanisms that include the generation of regulatory T lymphocytes, immune deviation from allergen-specific Th2 to Th1 responses, and a shift in allergen-specific antibody production from immunoglobulin (Ig) E to IgG4. Along with understanding of the immune basis came an appreciation that immunotherapy modifies allergic disease expression, producing protection against disease progression and symptomatic improvement that persists for years after the treatment is discontinued. Recent new directions for immunotherapy include sublingual administration of inhalant allergens and use of the oral route to treat food allergy.

  3. Allergen nomenclature*

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The revised nomenclature for allergens is presented together with proposed nomenclatures for (a) allergen genes, mRNAs and cDNAs, and (b) recombinant and synthetic peptides of allergenic interest. PMID:7955031

  4. [Allergenicity of lupin flour].

    PubMed

    Leduc, V; Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Guérin, L

    2002-06-01

    Lupin flour is used in human food for its high quality nutritional and functional qualities. The frequency of crossed allergy between lupin flour and peanuts, both members of the family of Leguminosae, is strong, since 68% of patients who are allergic to peanut have shown positive reactions to lupin flour when tested by TPO-DA. Cases of isolated allergy to lupin flour without pre-existence of peanut allergy as well as workplace asthma by inhalation are also rarely seen. The specific allergens of lupin and those that participate in crosses with peanut have been studied by SDS-PAGE and immunoblot. The diversity of allergens contained in different lupin flour has also been studied. Further, the detection of lupin flour in a "pizza" flour which induced a strong allergic reaction exposed its eventual implication as a masked allergen.

  5. Mammalian airborne allergens.

    PubMed

    Aalberse, Rob C

    2014-01-01

    Historically, horse dandruff was a favorite allergen source material. Today, however, allergic symptoms due to airborne mammalian allergens are mostly a result of indoor exposure, be it at home, at work or even at school. The relevance of mammalian allergens in relation to the allergenic activity of house dust extract is briefly discussed in the historical context of two other proposed sources of house dust allergenic activity: mites and Maillard-type lysine-sugar conjugates. Mammalian proteins involved in allergic reactions to airborne dust are largely found in only 2 protein families: lipocalins and secretoglobins (Fel d 1-like proteins), with a relatively minor contribution of serum albumins, cystatins and latherins. Both the lipocalin and the secretoglobin family are very complex. In some instances this results in a blurred separation between important and less important allergenic family members. The past 50 years have provided us with much detailed information on the genomic organization and protein structure of many of these allergens. However, the complex family relations, combined with the wide range of post-translational enzymatic and non-enzymatic modifications, make a proper qualitative and quantitative description of the important mammalian indoor airborne allergens still a significant proteomic challenge. PMID:24925404

  6. Current challenges in detecting food allergens by shotgun and targeted proteomic approaches: a case study on traces of peanut allergens in baked cookies.

    PubMed

    Pedreschi, Romina; Nørgaard, Jørgen; Maquet, Alain

    2012-02-01

    There is a need for selective and sensitive methods to detect the presence of food allergens at trace levels in highly processed food products. In this work, a combination of non-targeted and targeted proteomics approaches are used to illustrate the difficulties encountered in the detection of the major peanut allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3 from a representative processed food matrix. Shotgun proteomics was employed for selection of the proteotypic peptides for targeted approaches via selective reaction monitoring. Peanut presence through detection of the proteotypic Ara h 3/4 peptides AHVQVVDSNGNR (m/z 432.5, 3+) and SPDIYNPQAGSLK (m/z 695.4, 2+) was confirmed and the developed method was able to detect peanut presence at trace levels (≥10 μg peanut g(-1) matrix) in baked cookies.

  7. Current challenges in detecting food allergens by shotgun and targeted proteomic approaches: a case study on traces of peanut allergens in baked cookies.

    PubMed

    Pedreschi, Romina; Nørgaard, Jørgen; Maquet, Alain

    2012-02-01

    There is a need for selective and sensitive methods to detect the presence of food allergens at trace levels in highly processed food products. In this work, a combination of non-targeted and targeted proteomics approaches are used to illustrate the difficulties encountered in the detection of the major peanut allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3 from a representative processed food matrix. Shotgun proteomics was employed for selection of the proteotypic peptides for targeted approaches via selective reaction monitoring. Peanut presence through detection of the proteotypic Ara h 3/4 peptides AHVQVVDSNGNR (m/z 432.5, 3+) and SPDIYNPQAGSLK (m/z 695.4, 2+) was confirmed and the developed method was able to detect peanut presence at trace levels (≥10 μg peanut g(-1) matrix) in baked cookies. PMID:22413066

  8. Allergy Work-Up Including Component-Resolved Diagnosis: How to Make Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy More Specific.

    PubMed

    Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Matricardi, Paolo M; Hamilton, Robert G

    2016-02-01

    Symptoms are recorded by obtaining a clinical history. Allergen sensitization is demonstrated by skin prick test or allergen-specific IgE serology. IgE sensitizations to allergen sources can be identified knowing the relationship between major aeroallergens and homologous allergen families. Some develop allergic sensitization to pan-allergens. Allergen extracts do not allow definitive separation of the sources. IgE antibody analysis of the major allergenic molecules facilitates differentiation of sensitizing allergen sources. IgE sensitizations to inhalant allergens are only relevant in the case of corresponding symptoms. In questionable cases, conjunctival or nasal provocation tests help induce confirmatory symptoms and identify relevant allergens for immunotherapy.

  9. A proprietary blend of quail egg for the attenuation of nasal provocation with a standardized allergenic challenge: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Benichou, Annie-Claude; Armanet, Marion; Bussière, Anthony; Chevreau, Nathalie; Cardot, Jean-Michel; Tétard, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Occasional rhinitis symptoms caused by exposure to pollution or allergens is a growing concern. Based first on empirical observation of a lesser occurrence of allergies in quail farmers and then scientific works on ovomucoids properties, we developed a dietary supplement for the relief of such occasional rhinitis symptoms. The objective of the study was to determine whether one acute oral dose of the study product attenuates nasal provocation and other allergy-related symptoms after exposure to a standardized allergenic challenge as compared to placebo. Healthy subjects were recruited to participate in a randomized, double-blind, two-arm crossover, placebo-controlled, clinical trial. One acute dose of either the active study product (proprietary blend of quail egg) or placebo was given concomitantly to the standardized allergenic challenge. The primary endpoint was peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) measurement and the secondary endpoints were subjects' perceived feelings of well-being based on Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores for allergy-related symptoms, as well as immunoglobulin E count. Forty-three healthy subjects were enrolled and evaluable in a per protocol analysis. A gradual increase in PNIF from nadir up to Time 120 reflected the normal, gradual recovery from nasal obstruction induced by allergenic challenge for both the active and the placebo groups. At all postchallenge time points, the active group had higher PNIF values compared to the placebo group, indicating that the active product was associated with fewer symptoms and reduced intensity of these symptoms. The active product resulted also in statistically significant improvements of most of the subjects' perceived feelings of well-being based on VAS scores. No adverse events occurred during the study. In conclusion, the dietary supplement consisting of proprietary blend made of quail eggs provides fast and efficient relief of allergic rhinitis symptoms caused by the most common outdoor and indoor

  10. The Discovery of Potent, Selective, and Reversible Inhibitors of the House Dust Mite Peptidase Allergen Der p 1: An Innovative Approach to the Treatment of Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Blocking the bioactivity of allergens is conceptually attractive as a small-molecule therapy for allergic diseases but has not been attempted previously. Group 1 allergens of house dust mites (HDM) are meaningful targets in this quest because they are globally prevalent and clinically important triggers of allergic asthma. Group 1 HDM allergens are cysteine peptidases whose proteolytic activity triggers essential steps in the allergy cascade. Using the HDM allergen Der p 1 as an archetype for structure-based drug discovery, we have identified a series of novel, reversible inhibitors. Potency and selectivity were manipulated by optimizing drug interactions with enzyme binding pockets, while variation of terminal groups conferred the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic attributes required for inhaled delivery. Studies in animals challenged with the gamut of HDM allergens showed an attenuation of allergic responses by targeting just a single component, namely, Der p 1. Our findings suggest that these inhibitors may be used as novel therapies for allergic asthma. PMID:25365789

  11. Peanut Allergen Threshold Study (PATS): validation of eliciting doses using a novel single-dose challenge protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eliciting dose (ED) for a peanut allergic reaction in 5% of the peanut allergic population, the ED05, is 1.5 mg of peanut protein. This ED05 was derived from oral food challenges (OFC) that use graded, incremental doses administered at fixed time intervals. Individual patients’ threshold doses were used to generate population dose-distribution curves using probability distributions from which the ED05 was then determined. It is important to clinically validate that this dose is predictive of the allergenic response in a further unselected group of peanut-allergic individuals. Methods/Aims This is a multi-centre study involving three national level referral and teaching centres. (Cork University Hospital, Ireland, Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, Australia and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, U.S.A.) The study is now in process and will continue to run until all centres have recruited 125 participates in each respective centre. A total of 375 participants, aged 1–18 years will be recruited during routine Allergy appointments in the centres. The aim is to assess the precision of the predicted ED05 using a single dose (6 mg peanut = 1.5 mg of peanut protein) in the form of a cookie. Validated Food Allergy related Quality of Life Questionnaires-(FAQLQ) will be self-administered prior to OFC and 1 month after challenge to assess the impact of a single dose OFC on FAQL. Serological and cell based in vitro studies will be performed. Conclusion The validation of the ED05 threshold for allergic reactions in peanut allergic subjects has potential value for public health measures. The single dose OFC, based upon the statistical dose-distribution analysis of past challenge trials, promises an efficient approach to identify the most highly sensitive patients within any given food-allergic population. PMID:24028324

  12. Bronchial biopsy evidence for leukocyte infiltration and upregulation of leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion molecules 6 hours after local allergen challenge of sensitized asthmatic airways.

    PubMed Central

    Montefort, S; Gratziou, C; Goulding, D; Polosa, R; Haskard, D O; Howarth, P H; Holgate, S T; Carroll, M P

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the mucosal changes occurring in bronchial biopsies from six atopic asthmatics 5-6 h after local endobronchial allergen challenge and compared them with biopsies from saline-challenged segments from the same subjects at the same time point. All the subjects developed localized bronchoconstriction in the allergen-challenged segment and had a decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) (P < 0.01) and a decrease in their methacholine provocative concentration of agonist required to reduce FEV1 from baseline by 20% (P < 0.05) 24 h postchallenge. At 6 h we observed an increase in neutrophils (P = 0.03), eosinophils (P = 0.025), mast cells (P = 0.03), and CD3+ lymphocytes (P = 0.025), but not in CD4+ or CD8+ lymphocyte counts. We also detected an increase in endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (P < 0.05) and E-selectin (P < 0.005), but not vascular cell adhesion molecule type 1 expression with a correlative increase in submucosal and epithelial LFA+ leucocytes (P < 0.01). Thus, in sensitized asthmatics, local endobronchial allergen instillation leads to an increased inflammatory cell infiltrate of the airway mucosa that involves upregulation of specific adhesion molecules expressed on the microvasculature. Images PMID:7512980

  13. The role of the methacholine inhalation challenge in adult patients presenting with chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Wongtim, S; Mogmeud, S; Limthongkul, S; Chareonlap, P; Udompanich, V; Nuchprayoon, C; Chochaipanichnont, L

    1997-03-01

    One hundred and twenty two patients who were presenting with chronic persistent cough for more than 3-4 weeks were studied. Using anatomical and stepwise approach, we could identify the cause of chronic cough in 96% of the patients. The most common causes were due to postnasal drip syndrome (PND) (45%) and bronchial asthma (26%). We also demonstrated the important role of methacholine inhalation challenge in the diagnostic work up. The procedure could identify the patients who had bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) in 52% of the cases. The severity degree of the BHR was classified into three levels. Mild or nonspecific BHR was defined as PC20 16-25 mg/ml. This could be found in many diseases such as PND and bronchiectasis. Moderate degree of BHR (PC20 8-16 mg/ml) was found in patients with PND and asthma. PC20 of less than 8 mg/ml was considered to be the most severe degree and it seemed to be specific for the diagnosis of asthma (positive predictive value 100%). Other condition that caused chronic cough were drug-induced, especially angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, subgottic cancer and idiopathic cough. These conditions may require invasive diagnostic work up, such as fiberoptic bronchoscopy and tissue biopsy. The treatment of chronic cough was according to the etiology. Thus, the patients presenting with chronic cough should be investigated to identify the cause, and it was not just only the administration of cough suppressant drugs in these patients. PMID:9251842

  14. Airway reactivity to inhaled spasmogens 18-24 h after antigen-challenge in sensitized anaesthetized guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A; Broadley, K J

    1997-11-01

    The anaesthetized allergic guinea-pig was used to assess changes in airway reactivity to four different inhaled spasmogens: methacholine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), histamine and the thromboxane A2 mimetic, 9,11-dideoxy-9 alpha,11 alpha-methano-epoxy-PGF2 alpha (U-46619). Reactivity was determined 18 to 24 h after challenge of ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs with inhaled ovalbumin. This time coincides with the appearance of a late-phase bronchoconstriction in these animals. Sensitivity to the spasmogen was assessed from the concentration-response curve for the increase in pulmonary inflation pressure (PIP) in ovalbumin- and saline-challenged sensitized animals. When methacholine, 5-HT or histamine were the spasmogens there was no hyper-reactivity. The geometric mean EC50 values (i.e. the concentrations inducing half the maximum effect) obtained from the dose-response curves for methacholine (73 (42-129) and 94 (66-134) micrograms mL-1), 5-HT (1.5 (0.81-3.03) and 1.1 (0.51-2.24 micrograms mL-1) and histamine (39 (21-75) and 72 (32-162) micrograms mL-1) did not differ significantly (P > 0.05) between saline- and ovalbumin-challenged animals, respectively. However, when U-46619 was the spasmogen, ovalbumin-induced airway hyper-reactivity was observed as a leftwards shift of the concentration-response curve and the EC50 value for ovalbumin-challenged animals (8.1 (5.1-13) ng mL-1) was significantly (P < 0.05) less than the value for control animals (39 (21-75) ng mL-1). Our findings suggest that airway hyper-reactivity is not 'non-specific', but instead depends on the chosen spasmogen. The absence of hyper-reactivity with certain spasmogens was not a result of poor delivery, because all spasmogens caused a bronchoconstriction by the inhaled route. It was also not associated with the model because ozone has been shown to induce hyper-reactivity to inhaled methacholine and 5-HT. Because airway hyper-reactivity to both inhaled histamine and agonists at muscarinic

  15. Morphometric changes during the early airway response to allergen challenge in the rat.

    PubMed

    Du, T; Xu, L J; Lei, M; Wang, N S; Eidelman, D H; Ghezzo, H; Martin, J G

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative contributions of airway wall edema and smooth muscle contraction to the early response (ER) of allergic bronchoconstriction. Brown Norway rats, 6 to 7 wk old, were sensitized with ovalbumin (OA). Anesthetized rats were challenged with either OA or saline 2 wk later. Pulmonary resistance (RL) was measured every minute until either it increased to 150% of the baseline, defined as a significant ER, or until 15 min elapsed. Eight OA-challenged test rats with a significant ER and eight saline-challenged control rats were used for morphometric studies. The lungs were quick-frozen with liquid nitrogen, processed with freeze substitution, and sagittal sections (5 microns) were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The airway lumen subtended by the epithelial basement membrane (LuB) and cross sectional airway wall area (AW) of all airways were measured by camera lucida and digitization. The LuB and AW of each airway was standardized for size by dividing by the ideal airway lumen (LuBideal), which was calculated from the length of basement membrane, assuming a perfect circle in the unconstricted state. The cumulative frequency distribution of the LuB/LuBideal for the airways from test rats was shifted to the left compared with the control rats (p less than 0.01), indicating airway narrowing after challenge. Airway narrowing increased as a function of airway size. Cumulative frequency distributions of AW/LuBideal showed that there was a significant increase in the wall thickness of only the small airways of test animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1416393

  16. [Food allergens].

    PubMed

    Bonneau, J C

    1997-07-01

    Perhaps more than any other kind of allergen, search for a food allergen seems to be difficult. There should be no bias about the usual allergens found in our food, that are a source of pathology that is less spectacular than shocks or giant urticaria that are provoked by easily recognised causes. Crossed allergies must be recognised in their overall features. This may give decisive aid in the etiological approach by facilitating understanding of the symptoms and the discovery of potential triggering allergens which are systematically sought.

  17. Repeated allergen exposure enhances excitatory nonadrenergic noncholinergic nerve-mediated bronchoconstriction in sensitized guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, N; Ichinose, M; Igarashi, A; Miura, M; Yamauchi, H; Sasaki, Y; Ishikawa, J; Tomaki, M; Shirato, K

    1996-07-01

    The effect of repeated allergen inhalation challenge on the airway excitatory nonadrenergic noncholinergic (e-NANC) nerve-mediated bronchoconstrictor response was studied in ovalbumin (OA) sensitized guinea-pigs. Three weeks after sensitization, OA inhalation, 0.03% for 3 min (challenged group), or saline inhalation (control group) was repeated every day for 4 weeks. The e-NANC nerve function was examined in vitro by means of isometric tension measurement of main bronchi. After pretreatment with atropine (10(-6) M) and propranolol (10(-6) M), we performed electrical field stimulation (EFS) or exogenous neurokinin A (NKA) administration. In the challenged group, EFS-induced main bronchial contraction was significantly greater than that of the control group (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01), but exogenous NKA-mediated responses were almost the same in both groups. The e-NANC-induced main bronchial contractions after EFS were enhanced by pretreatment with the neutral endopeptidase inhibitor, phosphoramidon, to the same degree in the control and challenged groups, indicating that the peptide degradation mechanisms were not impaired even in the challenged group. Substance P immunoreactivities in the lung of the challenged group were significantly higher than those of the control group. These results suggest that chronic airway inflammation after repeated allergen challenge increases excitatory nonadrenergic noncholinergic nerve function, possibly by enhancing sensory neuropeptide production and/or release. PMID:8836656

  18. Challenges in changing to non-chlorofluorocarbon inhalers in the treatment of asthma.

    PubMed

    Walley, T; Bundred, P; Rannard, A; Bogg, J

    1999-12-01

    The chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-based metered dose inhaler, which has been the mainstay of the management of obstructive lung diseases, will soon be phased out world wide and replaced by CFC-free devices. Patients will have to be changed to the devices in a co-ordinated manner to avoid any risk to their health and safety. The different shapes and aerosol delivery characteristics of the new inhalers, as well as their distinctive taste, could add to the levels of poor drug use already experienced in asthma. From previous change scenarios in disease management, the potential for unstable asthma control is a real possibility with all the attendant costs. By using the time available before CFC-based inhalers are withdrawn, there is an opportunity to enhance asthma management during this period of change.

  19. Allergen challenge induces Ifng dependent GTPases in the lungs as part of a Th1 transcriptome response in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Dharajiya, Nilesh; Vaidya, Swapnil; Sinha, Mala; Luxon, Bruce; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2009-01-01

    According to the current paradigm, allergic airway inflammation is mediated by Th2 cytokines and pro-inflammatory chemokines. Since allergic inflammation is self-limited, we hypothesized that allergen challenge simultaneously induces anti-inflammatory genes to counter-balance the effects of Th2 cytokines and chemokines. To identify these putative anti-inflammatory genes, we compared the gene expression profile in the lungs of ragweed-sensitized mice four hours after challenge with either PBS or ragweed extract (RWE) using a micro-array platform. Consistent with our hypothesis, RWE challenge concurrently upregulated Th1-associated early target genes of the Il12/Stat4 pathway, such as p47 and p65 GTPases (Iigp, Tgtp and Gbp1), Socs1, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Gadd45g with the Th2 genes Il4, Il5, Ccl2 and Ccl7. These Th1-associated genes remain upregulated longer than the Th2 genes. Augmentation of the local Th1 milieu by administration of Il12 or CpG prior to RWE challenge further upregulated these Th1 genes. Abolition of the Th1 response by disrupting the Ifng gene increased allergic airway inflammation and abrogated RWE challenge-induced upregulation of GTPases, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Socs1, but not Gadd45g. Our data demonstrate that allergen challenge induces two sets of Th1-associated genes in the lungs: 1) Ifng-dependent genes such as p47 and p65 GTPases, Socs1, Cxcl9 and Cxcl10 and 2) Ifng-independent Th1-inducing genes like Gadd45g. We propose that allergen-induced airway inflammation is regulated by simultaneous upregulation of Th1 and Th2 genes, and that persistent unopposed upregulation of Th1 genes resolves allergic inflammation. PMID:20027288

  20. Allergic reactions to foods by inhalation.

    PubMed

    James, John M; Crespo, Jesús Fernández

    2007-06-01

    Although allergic reactions to foods occur most commonly after ingestion, inhalation of foods can also be an underlying cause of these reactions. For example, published reports have highlighted the inhalation of allergens from fish, shellfish, seeds, soybeans, cereal grains, hen's egg, cow's milk, and many other foods in allergic reactions. Symptoms have typically included respiratory manifestations such as rhinoconjunctivitis, coughing, wheezing, dyspnea, and asthma. In some cases, anaphylaxis has been observed. In addition, there have been many investigations of occupational asthma following the inhalation of relevant food allergens. This report reviews the current literature focusing on allergic reactions to foods by inhalation.

  1. Sputum Inflammatory Profile Before and After Specific Inhalation Challenge in Individuals with Suspected Occupational Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Vidaurre, Sara; Cruz, María-Jesús; Gómez-Ollés, Susana; Morell, Ferran; Muñoz, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to establish the sputum inflammatory profile and changes in levels of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and a panel of Th1/Th2 cytokines in subjects with suspected occupational asthma (OA) following specific inhalation challenge (SIC) to high-molecular-weight (HMW) and low-molecular-weight (LMW) agents. Material and Methods Fifty-one consecutive subjects undergoing SIC for suspected OA were enrolled. Sputum induction was performed the day before and 24 h after exposure to the offending agent. Total and differential cell counts were assessed. LTB4 and a 10 Th1/Th2 cytokines were measured in sputum supernatant. Results Thirty-four patients tested positive to SIC and were diagnosed with OA (in 10 due to HMW agents and in 24 to LMW agents). SIC was negative in 17 subjects. As compared to baseline an increase was found in the percentage of sputum eosinophils and neutrophils, and in IL-10 concentration after SIC (p = 0.0078, p = 0.0195, and p = 0.046, respectively), and a decrease was seen in LTB4 level (p = 0.0078) in patients with OA due to HMW agents. An increase in the percentage of sputum neutrophils after SIC (p = 0.0040) was observed in subjects without OA exposed to LMW agents. IL-8 levels after SIC were higher in patients without OA compared with patients with OA (p = 0.0146). Conclusion When conducting airway inflammation studies in OA, patients should be divided according to the causal agent (HMW or LMW). In OA patients exposed to HMW agents, an increase in the number of neutrophils can be found in parallel to the increase of eosinophils, although this does not contradict an IgE-mediated mechanism. Exposure to LMW agents can result in increased neutrophilic inflammation in patients with airway diseases unrelated to OA. There is variability in the responses observed in patients with OA exposed to LMW agents. PMID:24236015

  2. Food allergens.

    PubMed

    Burks, W; Helm, R; Stanley, S; Bannon, G A

    2001-06-01

    A number of advances in the scientific knowledge concerning adverse food reactions have been made in the past few years. Understanding about the nature of the food allergen itself, the molecular characterization of the epitopes on these allergens, the pathophysiology of the clinical reaction, and the diagnostic methods have all been significantly enhanced.

  3. Food allergens: molecular and immunological aspects, allergen databases and cross-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Anne-Regine; Scheurer, Stephan; Vieths, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The currently known food allergens are assigned to a relatively small number of protein families. Food allergens grouped into protein families share common functional and structural features that can be attributed to the allergenic potency and potential cross-reactivity of certain proteins. Molecular data, in terms of structural information, biochemical characteristics and clinical relevance for each known allergen, including isoforms and variants, are mainly compiled into four open-access databases. Allergens are designated according to defined criteria by the World Health Organization and the International Union of Immunological Societies Allergen Nomenclature Sub-committee. Food allergies are caused by primary sensitisation to the disease-eliciting food allergens (class I food allergen), or they can be elicited as a consequence of a primary sensitisation to inhalant allergens and subsequent IgE cross-reaction to homologous proteins in food (class II food allergens). Class I and class II allergens display different clinical significance in children and adults and are characterised by different molecular features. In line with this, high stability when exposed to gastrointestinal digestion and heat treatment is attributed to many class I food allergens that frequently induce severe reactions. The stability of a food allergen is determined by its molecular characteristics and can be influenced by structural (chemical) modifications due to thermal processing. Moreover, the immunogenicity and allergenicity of food allergens further depends on specific T cell and B cell epitopes. Although the T cell epitope pattern can be highly diverse for individual patients, several immuno-prominent T cell epitopes have been identified. Such conserved T cell epitopes and IgE cross-reactive B cell epitopes contribute to cross-reactivity between food allergens of the same family and to clinical cross-reactivity, similar to the birch pollen-food syndrome. PMID:26022861

  4. Lung function and ventilation inhomogeneity in rat lungs after allergen challenge.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cifuentes, M V; Rubio, M L; Ortega, M; Peces-Barba, G; Paiva, M; Verbanck, S; Mangado, N G

    2000-03-01

    We studied the early response to ovalbumin challenge in sensitized Brown-Norway rats through its effect on N(2), He, and SF(6) phase III slopes of the single-breath washout and on indexes of lung function. Sensitized rats showed varying degrees of response in terms of pulmonary pressure (PL), with increases ranging between 125 and 225% of baseline. The sensitized rats presented decreased quasistatic compliance, forced vital capacity, and end-expiratory flow, with all three lung function indexes showing a significant negative correlation with corresponding PL values. They also showed significant positive correlations of PL with the N(2), He, and SF(6) phase III slopes, reflecting diffusion-convection-dependent inhomogeneities generated by conformation changes throughout the entire rat lung. In addition, the rats showing the most marked PL increases (>150% baseline PL) also revealed a reversal of the SF(6)-He slope difference because of a more marked SF(6) than He slope increase. This latter finding suggests that the degree of structural heterogeneity during early response is even more marked in the most peripheral rat lung generations.

  5. Fungal allergens.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, W E; Helbling, A; Salvaggio, J E; Lehrer, S B

    1995-01-01

    Airborne fungal spores occur widely and often in far greater concentrations than pollen grains. Immunoglobulin E-specific antigens (allergens) on airborne fungal spores induce type I hypersensitivity (allergic) respiratory reactions in sensitized atopic subjects, causing rhinitis and/or asthma. The prevalence of respiratory allergy to fungi is imprecisely known but is estimated at 20 to 30% of atopic (allergy-predisposed) individuals or up to 6% of the general population. Diagnosis and immunotherapy of allergy to fungi require well-characterized or standardized extracts that contain the relevant allergen(s) of the appropriate fungus. Production of standardized extracts is difficult since fungal extracts are complex mixtures and a variety of fungi are allergenic. Thus, the currently available extracts are largely nonstandardized, even uncharacterized, crude extracts. Recent significant progress in isolating and characterizing relevant fungal allergens is summarized in the present review. Particularly, some allergens from the genera Alternaria, Aspergillus, and Cladosporium are now thoroughly characterized, and allergens from several other genera, including some basidiomycetes, have also been purified. The availability of these extracts will facilitate definitive studies of fungal allergy prevalence and immunotherapy efficacy as well as enhance both the diagnosis and therapy of fungal allergy. PMID:7621398

  6. Influenza A Virus Challenge Models in Cynomolgus Macaques Using the Authentic Inhaled Aerosol and Intra-Nasal Routes of Infection.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Anthony C; Dennis, Mike; Kane, Jennifer A; Gooch, Karen E; Hatch, Graham; Sharpe, Sally; Prevosto, Claudia; Leeming, Gail; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; Staples, Karl J; Hall, Graham; Ryan, Kathryn A; Bate, Simon; Moyo, Nathifa; Whittaker, Catherine J; Hallis, Bassam; Silman, Nigel J; Lalvani, Ajit; Wilkinson, Tom M; Hiscox, Julian A; Stewart, James P; Carroll, Miles W

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates are the animals closest to humans for use in influenza A virus challenge studies, in terms of their phylogenetic relatedness, physiology and immune systems. Previous studies have shown that cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are permissive for infection with H1N1pdm influenza virus. These studies have typically used combined challenge routes, with the majority being intra-tracheal delivery, and high doses of virus (> 107 infectious units). This paper describes the outcome of novel challenge routes (inhaled aerosol, intra-nasal instillation) and low to moderate doses (103 to 106 plaque forming units) of H1N1pdm virus in cynomolgus macaques. Evidence of virus replication and sero-conversion were detected in all four challenge groups, although the disease was sub-clinical. Intra-nasal challenge led to an infection confined to the nasal cavity. A low dose (103 plaque forming units) did not lead to detectable infectious virus shedding, but a 1000-fold higher dose led to virus shedding in all intra-nasal challenged animals. In contrast, aerosol and intra-tracheal challenge routes led to infections throughout the respiratory tract, although shedding from the nasal cavity was less reproducible between animals compared to the high-dose intra-nasal challenge group. Intra-tracheal and aerosol challenges induced a transient lymphopaenia, similar to that observed in influenza-infected humans, and greater virus-specific cellular immune responses in the blood were observed in these groups in comparison to the intra-nasal challenge groups. Activation of lung macrophages and innate immune response genes was detected at days 5 to 7 post-challenge. The kinetics of infection, both virological and immunological, were broadly in line with human influenza A virus infections. These more authentic infection models will be valuable in the determination of anti-influenza efficacy of novel entities against less severe (and thus more common) influenza infections. PMID

  7. Influenza A Virus Challenge Models in Cynomolgus Macaques Using the Authentic Inhaled Aerosol and Intra-Nasal Routes of Infection.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Anthony C; Dennis, Mike; Kane, Jennifer A; Gooch, Karen E; Hatch, Graham; Sharpe, Sally; Prevosto, Claudia; Leeming, Gail; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; Staples, Karl J; Hall, Graham; Ryan, Kathryn A; Bate, Simon; Moyo, Nathifa; Whittaker, Catherine J; Hallis, Bassam; Silman, Nigel J; Lalvani, Ajit; Wilkinson, Tom M; Hiscox, Julian A; Stewart, James P; Carroll, Miles W

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates are the animals closest to humans for use in influenza A virus challenge studies, in terms of their phylogenetic relatedness, physiology and immune systems. Previous studies have shown that cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are permissive for infection with H1N1pdm influenza virus. These studies have typically used combined challenge routes, with the majority being intra-tracheal delivery, and high doses of virus (> 107 infectious units). This paper describes the outcome of novel challenge routes (inhaled aerosol, intra-nasal instillation) and low to moderate doses (103 to 106 plaque forming units) of H1N1pdm virus in cynomolgus macaques. Evidence of virus replication and sero-conversion were detected in all four challenge groups, although the disease was sub-clinical. Intra-nasal challenge led to an infection confined to the nasal cavity. A low dose (103 plaque forming units) did not lead to detectable infectious virus shedding, but a 1000-fold higher dose led to virus shedding in all intra-nasal challenged animals. In contrast, aerosol and intra-tracheal challenge routes led to infections throughout the respiratory tract, although shedding from the nasal cavity was less reproducible between animals compared to the high-dose intra-nasal challenge group. Intra-tracheal and aerosol challenges induced a transient lymphopaenia, similar to that observed in influenza-infected humans, and greater virus-specific cellular immune responses in the blood were observed in these groups in comparison to the intra-nasal challenge groups. Activation of lung macrophages and innate immune response genes was detected at days 5 to 7 post-challenge. The kinetics of infection, both virological and immunological, were broadly in line with human influenza A virus infections. These more authentic infection models will be valuable in the determination of anti-influenza efficacy of novel entities against less severe (and thus more common) influenza infections.

  8. Influenza A Virus Challenge Models in Cynomolgus Macaques Using the Authentic Inhaled Aerosol and Intra-Nasal Routes of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Anthony C.; Dennis, Mike; Kane, Jennifer A.; Gooch, Karen E.; Hatch, Graham; Sharpe, Sally; Prevosto, Claudia; Leeming, Gail; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; Staples, Karl J.; Hall, Graham; Ryan, Kathryn A.; Bate, Simon; Moyo, Nathifa; Whittaker, Catherine J.; Hallis, Bassam; Silman, Nigel J.; Lalvani, Ajit; Wilkinson, Tom M.; Hiscox, Julian A.; Stewart, James P.; Carroll, Miles W.

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates are the animals closest to humans for use in influenza A virus challenge studies, in terms of their phylogenetic relatedness, physiology and immune systems. Previous studies have shown that cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are permissive for infection with H1N1pdm influenza virus. These studies have typically used combined challenge routes, with the majority being intra-tracheal delivery, and high doses of virus (> 107 infectious units). This paper describes the outcome of novel challenge routes (inhaled aerosol, intra-nasal instillation) and low to moderate doses (103 to 106 plaque forming units) of H1N1pdm virus in cynomolgus macaques. Evidence of virus replication and sero-conversion were detected in all four challenge groups, although the disease was sub-clinical. Intra-nasal challenge led to an infection confined to the nasal cavity. A low dose (103 plaque forming units) did not lead to detectable infectious virus shedding, but a 1000-fold higher dose led to virus shedding in all intra-nasal challenged animals. In contrast, aerosol and intra-tracheal challenge routes led to infections throughout the respiratory tract, although shedding from the nasal cavity was less reproducible between animals compared to the high-dose intra-nasal challenge group. Intra-tracheal and aerosol challenges induced a transient lymphopaenia, similar to that observed in influenza-infected humans, and greater virus-specific cellular immune responses in the blood were observed in these groups in comparison to the intra-nasal challenge groups. Activation of lung macrophages and innate immune response genes was detected at days 5 to 7 post-challenge. The kinetics of infection, both virological and immunological, were broadly in line with human influenza A virus infections. These more authentic infection models will be valuable in the determination of anti-influenza efficacy of novel entities against less severe (and thus more common) influenza infections. PMID

  9. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on gas exchange after methacholine challenge and isoprenaline inhalation in the dog.

    PubMed

    Ueno, O; Lee, L N; Wagner, P D

    1989-03-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has antioxidant and possibly mucolytic properties. To determine whether NAC could be of benefit in acute bronchoconstriction induced by methacholine, 12 of 24 anaesthetized dogs (group 1) received NAC i.v. (loading dose 150 mg.kg-1, then 20 mg.kg-1.hr-1). The other 12 (group 2) received diluent. Nebulized methacholine (1%) was then inhaled until arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) fell to a mean of 5.5 kPa, after which isoprenaline 0.5% was inhaled in six dogs of each group to reverse bronchoconstriction. Over the next 3 h we measured total lung resistance, functional residual capacity (FRC), haemodynamic variables, and pulmonary gas exchange for respiratory and inert gases. After methacholine challenge, lung resistance increased and then fell similarly for both groups, but PaO2 was higher in the NAC group (by 0.6-1.9 kPa) throughout the observation period. The ventilation-perfusion distribution measured by inert gas elimination also showed less abnormality in the NAC treated dogs over this time. Mucus was visible during post-mortem in the large airways in about half of the dogs in both groups, with no significant differences between them. These results show that NAC produces a measurable improvement in gas exchange following methacholine challenge (both with and without subsequent isoprenaline therapy) by mechanisms that remain to be determined. PMID:2659384

  10. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on gas exchange after methacholine challenge and isoprenaline inhalation in the dog.

    PubMed

    Ueno, O; Lee, L N; Wagner, P D

    1989-03-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has antioxidant and possibly mucolytic properties. To determine whether NAC could be of benefit in acute bronchoconstriction induced by methacholine, 12 of 24 anaesthetized dogs (group 1) received NAC i.v. (loading dose 150 mg.kg-1, then 20 mg.kg-1.hr-1). The other 12 (group 2) received diluent. Nebulized methacholine (1%) was then inhaled until arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) fell to a mean of 5.5 kPa, after which isoprenaline 0.5% was inhaled in six dogs of each group to reverse bronchoconstriction. Over the next 3 h we measured total lung resistance, functional residual capacity (FRC), haemodynamic variables, and pulmonary gas exchange for respiratory and inert gases. After methacholine challenge, lung resistance increased and then fell similarly for both groups, but PaO2 was higher in the NAC group (by 0.6-1.9 kPa) throughout the observation period. The ventilation-perfusion distribution measured by inert gas elimination also showed less abnormality in the NAC treated dogs over this time. Mucus was visible during post-mortem in the large airways in about half of the dogs in both groups, with no significant differences between them. These results show that NAC produces a measurable improvement in gas exchange following methacholine challenge (both with and without subsequent isoprenaline therapy) by mechanisms that remain to be determined.

  11. Outdoor allergens.

    PubMed Central

    Burge, H A; Rogers, C A

    2000-01-01

    Outdoor allergens are an important part of the exposures that lead to allergic disease. Understanding the role of outdoor allergens requires a knowledge of the nature of outdoor allergen-bearing particles, the distributions of their source, and the nature of the aerosols (particle types, sizes, dynamics of concentrations). Primary sources for outdoor allergens include vascular plants (pollen, fern spores, soy dust), and fungi (spores, hyphae). Nonvascular plants, algae, and arthropods contribute small numbers of allergen-bearing particles. Particles are released from sources into the air by wind, rain, mechanical disturbance, or active discharge mechanisms. Once airborne, they follow the physical laws that apply to all airborne particles. Although some outdoor allergens penetrate indoor spaces, exposure occurs mostly outdoors. Even short-term peak outdoor exposures can be important in eliciting acute symptoms. Monitoring of airborne biological particles is usually by particle impaction and microscopic examination. Centrally located monitoring stations give regional-scale measurements for aeroallergen levels. Evidence for the role of outdoor allergens in allergic rhinitis is strong and is rapidly increasing for a role in asthma. Pollen and fungal spore exposures have both been implicated in acute exacerbations of asthma, and sensitivity to some fungal spores predicts the existence of asthma. Synergism and/or antagonism probably occurs with other outdoor air particles and gases. Control involves avoidance of exposure (staying indoors, preventing entry of outdoor aerosols) as well as immunotherapy, which is effective for pollen but of limited effect for spores. Outdoor allergens have been the subject of only limited studies with respect to the epidemiology of asthma. Much remains to be studied with respect to prevalence patterns, exposure and disease relationships, and control. PMID:10931783

  12. Allergen databases and allergen semantics.

    PubMed

    Gendel, Steven M

    2009-08-01

    The efficacy of any specific bioinformatic analysis of the potential allergenicity of new food proteins depends directly on the nature and content of the databases that are used in the analysis. A number of different allergen-related databases have been developed, each designed to meet a different need. These databases differ in content, organization, and accessibility. These differences create barriers for users and prevent data sharing and integration. The development and application of appropriate semantic web technologies, (for example, a food allergen ontology) could help to overcome these barriers and promote the development of more advanced analytic capabilities.

  13. Vagotomy Reverses Established Allergen-Induced Airway Hyperreactivity to Methacholine in the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the role of vagal reflexes in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Mice were actively sensitized to ovalbumin then exposed to the allergen via inhalation. Prior to ovalbumin inhalation, mice also received intratracheally-instilled particulate ma...

  14. Inhalable Antimicrobials for Treatment of Bacterial Biofilm-Associated Sinusitis in Cystic Fibrosis Patients: Challenges and Drug Delivery Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kłodzińska, Sylvia Natalie; Priemel, Petra Alexandra; Rades, Thomas; Mørck Nielsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm-associated chronic sinusitis in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and the lack of available treatments for such infections constitute a critical aspect of CF disease management. Currently, inhalation therapies to combat P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients are focused mainly on the delivery of antimicrobials to the lower respiratory tract, disregarding the sinuses. However, the sinuses constitute a reservoir for P. aeruginosa growth, leading to re-infection of the lungs, even after clearing an initial lung infection. Eradication of P. aeruginosa from the respiratory tract after a first infection has been shown to delay chronic pulmonary infection with the bacteria for up to two years. The challenges with providing a suitable treatment for bacterial sinusitis include: (i) identifying a suitable antimicrobial compound; (ii) selecting a suitable device to deliver the drug to the sinuses and nasal cavities; and (iii) applying a formulation design, which will mediate delivery of a high dose of the antimicrobial directly to the site of infection. This review highlights currently available inhalable antimicrobial formulations for treatment and management of biofilm infections caused by P. aeruginosa and discusses critical issues related to novel antimicrobial drug formulation design approaches. PMID:27735846

  15. Investigation on possible allergenicity of 19 different commercial enzymes used in the food industry.

    PubMed

    Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Skov, Per Stahl; Roggen, Erwin L; Hvass, Peter; Brinch, Ditte Sidelmann

    2006-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the safety to allergic patients of 19 commercially available and authority-approved enzymes used in the food industry. Enzymes produced by genetically modified organisms were included. Four hundred consecutive adult patients with a diagnosed allergy to inhalation allergens, food allergens, bee or wasp were included. All had at least one positive skin prick test to the above allergens. Skin prick testing with the 19 enzymes was performed on the forearm and if positive (in 13 patients), in vitro histamine release from blood basophils were performed. Patients with positive results in skin prick test were subsequently reinvestigated with further purified enzymes and finally challenged orally with the enzymes in a double-blind, placebo-controlled protocol. Only one reaction to a placebo challenge was seen. In some instances a positive skin prick test result or a positive histamine release was seen elicited by the enzymes, but since none of the patients were positive to any of the commercial enzymes in the subsequent oral challenges using exaggerated dosages of the enzymes compared to normal daily intake, the findings are without clinical relevance. A wide variety of enzyme classes and origins was included in the study. Because there were no allergenic findings of clinical relevance it is concluded that ingestion of food enzymes in general is not considered to be a concern with regard to food allergy.

  16. Allergen Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rael, Efren

    2016-09-01

    Allergies affect a large proportion of the population. Allergies can adversely affect productivity, sleep, and quality of life and can lead to life-threatening reactions. Allergies can spread to affect multiple organ systems. Allergen immunotherapy is the only therapy that can change the natural history of allergic disease. PMID:27545737

  17. Efficacy and safety of olopatadine hydrochloride 0.77% in patients with allergic conjunctivitis using a conjunctival allergen-challenge model

    PubMed Central

    Torkildsen, Gail; Narvekar, Abhijit; Bergmann, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptom relief for the duration of 24 hours after treatment would benefit patients with allergic conjunctivitis. Objective To compare the safety and efficacy of olopatadine 0.77% with vehicle or olopatadine 0.2% in patients with allergic conjunctivitis in a conjunctival allergen-challenge clinical study. Patients and methods In this Phase III, multicenter, double-masked, parallel-group, randomized trial, patients with allergic conjunctivitis received olopatadine 0.77%, its vehicle, or olopatadine 0.2%, administered once at visits 3A (day 0), 4A (day 14 ±2), and 5 (day 21 +3). Allergic conjunctivitis-associated sign and symptom assessments included ocular itching, conjunctival redness, total redness, chemosis, and tearing scores. Adverse events and ocular safety parameters were also assessed. Results A total of 202 qualifying patients were randomized. Olopatadine 0.77% was superior (P<0.001) to vehicle for treatment of ocular itching at 3, 5, and 7 minutes postchallenge at onset of action and 16- and 24-hour duration of action. Conjunctival redness mean scores were significantly lower for olopatadine 0.77% versus vehicle at all three post-conjunctival allergen-challenge time points: onset (−1.52 to −1.48; P<0.001), 16 hours (−1.50 to −1.38; P<0.01), and 24 hours (−1.58 to −1.38; P<0.05). At 24 hours, olopatadine 0.77% was superior to olopatadine 0.2% at all three postchallenge time points for ocular itching (P<0.05), conjunctival redness (P<0.05), and total redness (P<0.05). No clinically relevant differences in safety parameters or adverse events were observed between the treatment groups. Conclusion Olopatadine 0.77% is superior to both its vehicle and olopatadine 0.2% for the treatment of allergen-mediated ocular itching and conjunctival redness. Ocular itching symptom relief is maintained over 24 hours, supporting once-daily dosing and demonstrating a comparable safety profile to olopatadine 0.2%. PMID:26392751

  18. Inhalant Abuse and Dextromethorphan.

    PubMed

    Storck, Michael; Black, Laura; Liddell, Morgan

    2016-07-01

    Inhalant abuse is the intentional inhalation of a volatile substance for the purpose of achieving an altered mental state. As an important, yet underrecognized form of substance abuse, inhalant abuse crosses all demographic, ethnic, and socioeconomic boundaries, causing significant morbidity and mortality in school-aged and older children. This review presents current perspectives on epidemiology, detection, and clinical challenges of inhalant abuse and offers advice regarding the medical and mental health providers' roles in the prevention and management of this substance abuse problem. Also discussed is the misuse of a specific "over-the-counter" dissociative, dextromethorphan. PMID:27338970

  19. [Allergen analysis].

    PubMed

    Röder, Martin; Weber, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental requirement when testing for and ensuring compliance with legally required labelling regulations is the reliable analysis of food allergens. This can be carried out by means of either DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) or protein detection. Protein detection has the advantage of directly detecting the allergenic component and can currently be carried out using immunological (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA])/lateral flow devices [LFD]) or mass spectrometry-based techniques. DNA detection is indirect, but allows the presence of food allergens to be validated through the use of another marker. Each method has its pros and cons, which have to be considered on a case-by-case basis. ELISA is quantitative, quick and easy to carry out and has high sensitivity. LFD testing is ideal for industrial applications, as the tests can be carried out on-site. Both antibody-based tests may have problems with processed foods and false positive results. Mass-spectrometric techniques show a lot of promise, but are currently still time-consuming and complex to carry out. They also run into problems with processed foods and their degree of sensitivity is matrix and parameter dependent. For these reasons, this technique is only occasionally used. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provides the highest specificity and, depending on the target sequence, a very good to good level of sensitivity. Despite the high stability of DNA, PCR is still subject to the influence of processing and matrix related factors. Due to natural variation and production-related changes in the structures relevant in the process of detection, all methods exhibit a relatively high level of uncertainty of measurement. At present, there is no method which provides the absolute correct quantification. However, by means of laboratory-based analyses it is possible to calibrate for the allergen in question and thus be able to make reliable measurements using methods that are already available. PMID

  20. Allergenic tropomyosins and their cross-reactivities.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Hong, Chein-Soo; Yong, Tai-Soon

    2006-01-01

    The ingestion or inhalation of some proteins may lead to adverse immune reactions. Allergens may trigger allergic reactions in genetically predisposed individuals when they are absorbed through the skin or make contact with mucous membranes. An allergic disease often deteriorates the quality of life and may sometimes be life-threatening due to anaphylactic shock. A number of allergens have been characterized from various multicellular organisms to date. It is thought to be reasonable to pay a special attention to the substance which is highly cross-reactive and which causes adverse responses in the molecules that are not sensitized but similar to the sensitized allergen. Tropomyosin has been described as an important food allergen in shrimp, lobster, crab, oysters, squid, and other invertebrates. Allergic reactions to shellfish and mollusks are often cross-reactive, which may be explained by the highly conserved amino acid sequences of tropomyosins among invertebrates, but vertebrate tropomyosins are not known to be allergenic. Several tropomyosins from domestic arthropods have been reported to be allergenic. Recently, it was suggested that an infection of helminthic parasites might lead to sensitization to tropomyosin and elicit allergic reactions to other invertebrates. Much effort has been made to characterize these allergenic tropomyosins from various sources. We will discuss the physicochemical characteristics and the potential application of tropomyosin for the diagnosis and therapeutics of allergic disorders.

  1. Prevalence of sensitization to food allergens and challenge proven food allergy in patients visiting allergy centers in Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Inam, Muhammad; Shafique, Rubaba Hamid; Roohi, Nabila; Irfan, Muhammad; Abbas, Shahid; Ismail, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we estimated the prevalence of food allergy in the adult allergic patients of Rawalpindi and Islamabad , Pakistan, based on self-report, skin prick test (SPT) and oral food challenge test (OFC). SPT was used for the estimation of sensitization to wheat, egg, milk, beef, chicken, mutton, fish, corn, lentils, rice, soya, peanut and banana. Among 689 patients, 39.19 % showed sensitivity to one or more foods, where, sensitization to wheat (156; 22.6 %) was highest, followed by egg (148; 21.48 %) and milk (138; 20.03 %). Sensitization to various proteins ranged between 15.53-15.97 %, while lentils, corn, rice, soya and peanut sensitization was 15.4, 16, 12.5, 12 and 11.5 % respectively. Only 7.1 % patients were SPT positive for banana allergen. SPT was performed in patients with self-reported food allergy (341/689) and also with no self-reported history of food allergy (348/689). SPT results were positive in 69.8 % of the self-report group, whereas, in the patients with no self-reported food allergy 9.2 % were found sensitized to one or more tested food allergens. 101 patients were recruited for OFC, 61 % of these were confirmed of food allergy. The prevalence of food allergy in the study population was 9 %. Food specific OFC results show that wheat allergy is affecting 1.6 % (95 % CI 0.9-2.84 %) of the total allergy patients, followed by egg allergy 1.31 % (95 % CI 0.70-2.47 %). Furthermore, corn allergy, rice allergy and peanut allergy were 1.02, 0.87 and 0.73 %, respectively. In conclusion, wheat allergy is the most prevalent, followed by egg, chicken, beef and fish allergy, respectively. PMID:27563525

  2. Exposure to airborne allergens: a review of sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Renström, Anne

    2002-10-01

    A number of methods are used to assess exposure to high-molecular weight allergens. In the occupational setting, airborne dust is often collected on filters using pumps, the filters are eluted and allergen content in the eluate analysed using immunoassays. Collecting inhalable dust using person-carried pumps may be considered the gold standard. Other allergen sampling methods are available. Recently, a method that collects nasally inhaled dust on adhesive surfaces within nasal samplers has been developed. Allergen content can be analysed in eluates using sensitive enzyme immunoassays, or allergen-bearing particles can be immunostained using antibodies, and studied under the microscope. Settling airborne dust can be collected in petri dishes, a cheap and simple method that has been utilised in large-scale exposure studies. Collection of reservoir dust from surfaces using vacuum cleaners with a dust collector is commonly used to measure pet or mite allergens in homes. The sampling methods differ in properties and relevance to personal allergen exposure. Since methods for all steps from sampling to analysis differ between laboratories, determining occupational exposure limits for protein allergens is today unfeasible. A general standardisation of methods is needed.

  3. Interference of a short-term exposure to nitrogen dioxide with allergic airways responses to allergenic challenges in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed Central

    Proust, Barbara; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Robidel, Franck; Marliere, Maryse; Lecomte, Anthony; Vargaftig, B Boris

    2002-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) is a common indoor and outdoor air pollutant whose role in the induction of asthma is unclear. We investigated the effects of NO(2) on the development of asthma-like responses to allergenic challenge in BALB/c mice. Ovalbumin (OVA)-immunized mice were intranasally challenged with OVA or saline solution just before starting a 3 h exposure to 5 or 20 ppm NO(2) or air. Twenty parts per million of NO(2) induced a significant increase of bronchopulmonary hyperreactivity in OVA-challenged mice and of permeability according to the fibronectin content of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) 24 h after exposure, as compared with air or 5 ppm NO(2). Eosinophilia (cell counts in the BALF and eosinophil peroxidase of lung tissue) was detected at 24 and 72 h with similar levels for air and 20 ppm NO(2), whereas a marked reduction was unexpectedly observed for 5 ppm NO(2). At 24 h, interleukin-5 in the BALF was markedly reduced at 5 ppm compared with 20 ppm NO(2) and was also more intense for 20 ppm NO(2) than for the air group. In contrast to specific IgG1 titers, anti-OVA IgE titers and interleukin-4 in the BALF were not affected by NO(2) exposure. Irrespective of the concentration of NO(2), OVA-challenged mice did not develop late mucosal metaplasia compared with those exposed to OVA-air. These results indicate that a short exposure to NO(2) can exacerbate or inhibit some features of the development of allergic disease in mice and may depend on the concentration of pollutant. PMID:12396477

  4. Evidence for an atypical receptor mediating the augmented bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine induced by allergen challenge in actively sensitized Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Hannon, J P; Tigani, B; Wolber, C; Williams, I; Mazzoni, L; Howes, C; Fozard, J R

    2002-02-01

    The bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine is markedly and selectively increased following ovalbumin (OA) challenge in actively sensitized, Brown Norway rats. We present a pharmacological analysis of the receptor mediating this response. Like adenosine, the broad-spectrum adenosine receptor agonist, NECA, induced dose-related bronchoconstriction in actively sensitized, OA-challenged animals. In contrast, CPA, CGS 21680 and 2-Cl-IB-MECA, agonists selective for A(1) A(2A) and A(3) receptors, respectively, induced no, or minimal, bronchoconstriction. Neither the selective A(1) receptor antagonist, DPCPX, nor the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, ZM 241385, blocked the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine. MRS 1754, which has similar affinity for rat A(2B) and A(1) receptors, failed to block the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine despite blockade of the A(1) receptor-mediated bradycardia induced by NECA. 8-SPT and CGS 15943, antagonists at A(1), A(2A), and A(2B) but not A(3) receptors, inhibited the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine. However, the degree of blockade (approximately 3 fold) did not reflect the plasma concentrations, which were 139 and 21 times greater than the K(B) value at the rat A(2B) receptor, respectively. Adenosine and NECA, but not CPA, CGS 21680 or 2-Cl-IB-MECA, induced contraction of parenchymal strip preparations from actively sensitized OA-challenged animals. Responses to adenosine could not be antagonized by 8-SPT or MRS 1754 at concentrations >50 times their affinities at the rat A(2B) receptor. The receptor mediating the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine augmented following allergen challenge in actively sensitized BN rats cannot be categorized as one of the four recognized adenosine receptor subtypes.

  5. Vagotomy reverses established allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity to methacholine in the mouse✩

    PubMed Central

    McAlexander, M. Allen; Gavett, Stephen H.; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the role of vagal reflexes in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Mice were actively sensitized to ovalbumin then exposed to the allergen via inhalation. Prior to ovalbumin inhalation, mice also received intratracheally-instilled particulate matter in order to boost the allergic response. In control mice, methacholine (i.v.) caused a dose-dependent increase in respiratory tract resistance (RT) that only modestly decreased if the vagi were severed bilaterally just prior to the methacholine challenge. Sensitized and challenged mice, however, manifested an airway reactivity increase that was abolished by severing the vagi prior to methacholine challenge. In an innervated ex vivo mouse lung model, methacholine selectively evoked action potential discharge in a subset of distension-sensitive A-fibers. These data support the hypothesis that the major component of the increased airway reactivity in inflamed mice is due to a vagal reflex initiated by activation of afferent fibers, even in response to a direct (i.e., smooth muscle)-acting muscarinic agonist. PMID:25842220

  6. Anaphylaxis induced by lentil inhalation.

    PubMed

    Ayşenur, Kaya; Akan, Ayşegül; Mustafa, Erkoçoğlu; Müge, Toyran; Kocabaş, Can Naci

    2012-06-01

    Anaphylaxis is a rapid onset serious allergic reaction which may be fatal. Foods are the most common allergens leading to anaphylaxis especially for childhood. Most of the food-induced anaphylactic reactions take place after ingestion of the allergic food and only a few cases exist with anaphylactic reactions induced by inhalation of foods such as peanut, soybean and lupine. The case we present is unusual in that an 8 1/2-year-old boy developed anaphylaxis with the inhalation of steam from boiling lentils.

  7. High pressure effects on allergen food proteins.

    PubMed

    Somkuti, Judit; Smeller, László

    2013-12-15

    There are several proteins, which can cause allergic reaction if they are inhaled or ingested. Our everyday food can also contain such proteins. Food allergy is an IgE-mediated immune disorder, a growing health problem of great public concern. High pressure is known to affect the structure of proteins; typically few hundred MPa pressure can lead to denaturation. That is why several trials have been performed to alter the structure of the allergen proteins by high pressure, in order to reduce its allergenicity. Studies have been performed both on simple protein solutions and on complex food systems. Here we review those allergens which have been investigated under or after high pressure treatment by methods capable of detecting changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of the proteins. We focus on those allergenic proteins, whose structural changes were investigated by spectroscopic methods under pressure in correlation with the observed allergenicity (IgE binding) changes. According to this criterion we selected the following allergen proteins: Mal d 1 and Mal d 3 (apple), Bos d 5 (milk), Dau c 1 (carrot), Gal d 2 (egg), Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 (peanut), and Gad m 1 (cod).

  8. Seasonal and allergenic predictors of bronchial responsiveness to distilled water.

    PubMed

    Studnicka, M J; Frischer, T; Weiss, S T; Dockery, D W; Speizer, F E; Neumann, M G

    1993-12-01

    To evaluate a possible seasonal change in bronchial responsiveness and the relation of such change to atopy, we administered 2,537 bronchial challenge tests in winter and spring to a dynamic population cohort of children 7 to 10 yr of age. The bronchial challenge test consisted of 10 min of tidal inhalation of an aerosol of ultrasonically nebulized distilled water; the resulting percentage decrease in FEV1 (dFEV1%) was recorded. Atopy was determined on the basis of skin-test positivity (any wheal with a diameter greater than that obtained with a positive control) to seven allergens (cat dander, dog dander, house-dust mite, birch, raygrass, orchard grass, and Alternaria). Greater bronchial responsiveness in winter was independently and significantly predicted by a physician's diagnosis of asthma (difference in dFEV1%, 5.6; 95% confidence intervals [95% CI], 2.8 to 8.5; p = 0.0001) and by shortness of breath (difference in dFEV1%, 4.2; 95% CI, 2.1 to 6.3; p = 0.0001). These factors were also predictive of greater responsiveness in the spring, as was atopy (difference in dFEV1%, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.8 to 4.6; p = 0.0001). Analysis of specific allergens further revealed that reactivity to perennial allergens (house-dust mite, cat dander) was predictive of bronchial responsiveness in both winter and spring. However, the change in responsiveness between seasons was most significantly predicted by allergy to seasonal grass pollen, i.e., ragweed or orchard grass (change in dFEV1%, 2.6; 95% CI, 0.6 to 4.5; p = 0.01). In summary, our study demonstrates increased bronchial responsiveness in spring among children allergic to grass pollen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  10. Quality Control of Biomedicinal Allergen Products – Highly Complex Isoallergen Composition Challenges Standard MS Database Search and Requires Manual Data Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Spiric, Jelena; Engin, Anna M.; Karas, Michael; Reuter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Allergy against birch pollen is among the most common causes of spring pollinosis in Europe and is diagnosed and treated using extracts from natural sources. Quality control is crucial for safe and effective diagnosis and treatment. However, current methods are very difficult to standardize and do not address individual allergen or isoallergen composition. MS provides information regarding selected proteins or the entire proteome and could overcome the aforementioned limitations. We studied the proteome of birch pollen, focusing on allergens and isoallergens, to clarify which of the 93 published sequence variants of the major allergen, Bet v 1, are expressed as proteins within one source material in parallel. The unexpectedly complex Bet v 1 isoallergen composition required manual data interpretation and a specific design of databases, as current database search engines fail to unambiguously assign spectra to highly homologous, partially identical proteins. We identified 47 non-allergenic proteins and all 5 known birch pollen allergens, and unambiguously proved the existence of 18 Bet v 1 isoallergens and variants by manual data analysis. This highly complex isoallergen composition raises questions whether isoallergens can be ignored or must be included for the quality control of allergen products, and which data analysis strategies are to be applied. PMID:26561299

  11. Immunological aspects of the immune response induced by mosquito allergens.

    PubMed

    Cantillo, José Fernando; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique; Puerta, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Allergies caused by mosquito bites may produce local or systemic reactions. The inhalation of mosquito allergens may also cause asthma and/or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in sensitized individuals. The mechanisms implicated in the development of these immune responses involve IgE antibodies, different subtypes of IgG and proinflammatory cytokines as well as basophils, eosinophils and mast cells. Several allergenic components have been identified in the saliva and bodies of mosquitoes and some of these are present in different mosquito species. The most common species implicated in allergic reactions belong to the genera Aedes, Culex and Anopheles. Several Aedes aegypti allergens have been cloned and sequenced. The recombinant molecules show IgE reactivity similar to that of the native allergens, making them good candidates for the diagnosis of mosquito allergies. Allergen-specific immunotherapy with mosquito extracts induces a protective response characterized by a decreased production of IgE antibodies, increased IgG levels, a reduction in the severity of cutaneous and respiratory symptoms and the need for medication. The aims of this review are to summarize the progress made in the characterization of mosquito allergens and discuss the types of immune responses induced by mosquito bites and the inhalation of mosquito allergens in atopic individuals.

  12. Characterization of the allergenic potential of proteins: an assessment of the kiwifruit allergen actinidin.

    PubMed

    Dearman, Rebecca J; Beresford, Lorna; Foster, Emily S; McClain, Scott; Kimber, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Assessment of the potential allergenicity (IgE-inducing properties) of novel proteins is an important challenge in the overall safety assessment of foods. Resistance to digestion with pepsin is commonly measured to characterize allergenicity, although the association is not absolute. We have previously shown that specific IgE antibody production induced by systemic [intraperitoneal (i.p.)] exposure of BALB/c strain mice to a range of proteins correlates with allergenic potential for known allergens. The purpose of the present study was to explore further the utility of these approaches using the food allergen, actinidin. Recently, kiwifruit has become an important allergenic foodstuff, coincident with its increased consumption, particularly as a weaning food. The ability of the kiwifruit allergen actinidin to stimulate antibody responses has been compared with the reference allergen ovalbumin, and with the non-allergen bovine haemoglobin. Haemoglobin was rapidly digested by pepsin whereas actinidin was resistant unless subjected to prior chemical reduction (reflecting intracellular digestion conditions). Haemoglobin stimulated detectable IgG antibody production at relatively high doses (10%), but failed to provoke detectable IgE. In contrast, actinidin was both immunogenic and allergenic at relatively low doses (0.25% to 1%). Vigorous IgG and IgG1 antibody and high titre IgE antibody responses were recorded, similar to those provoked by ovalbumin. Thus, actinidin displays a marked ability to provoke IgE, consistent with allergenic potential. These data provide further encouragement that in tandem with analysis of pepsin stability, the induction of IgE after systemic exposure of BALB/c strain mice provides a useful approach for the prospective identification of protein allergens.

  13. Allergen structures and epitopes.

    PubMed

    Meno, K H

    2011-07-01

    Human type 1 hypersensitivity diseases such as allergic rhinoconjunctivitis are characterized by allergen-specific IgE antibodies produced in allergic individuals after allergen exposure. IgE antibodies bound to receptors on the surface of effector cells trigger an allergic response by interacting with three-dimensional (conformational) epitopes on the allergen surface. Crystal structures are available for complexes of antibody specifically bound to five allergens, from birch pollen, bee venom, cockroach, cow's milk and timothy grass pollen. The details of the antibody-allergen interaction extending all the way to atomic resolution are available from such complexes. In vitro investigations using recombinant monoclonal antibodies and human basophils show that binding affinity is a key to triggering the allergic response. Continued molecular characterization of antibody-allergen interactions is paving the way for the use of recombinant allergens in allergen-specific diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:21668845

  14. New tree nut allergens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 7S vicilin and 11S legumin seed storage globulins belong to the cupin protein superfamily and are major food allergens in many of the “big eight” food allergen groups. Korean pine vicilin and pecan vicilin are thus predicted to be food allergens. Recombinant vicilins were expressed in E. coli an...

  15. [Cross reactivity of food allergens and its clinical relevance].

    PubMed

    Moneret-Vautrin, Denise Anne

    2005-10-01

    Cross-reactions between food allergens and other allergens are a major focus of interest. They include cross-allergies between Betulaceae and Compositae pollen, and also between fruits and vegetables (Prunoideae and Apiaceae). Cross-allergies between animal allergens include mites, cockroaches and crustaceans, milk and meat, animal epithelia, meat and egg. Cross-reactivity results from homology between protein sequences, and is highly likely when this homology reaches about 70%. Phylogenetically similar proteins occur in all species and are known as pan allergens. Profilins, Bet v1 homologues, and lipid transfer proteins have varying degrees of clinical relevance. The involvement of cross-reactivity in the persistence of sensitization and in allergic disorders is unclear. The consequences of cross-reactivity during specific immunotherapy with total allergenic extracts are random. Interpretation of biological tests of IgE binding is also biased by cross-reactivity. The use of panels of major recombinant allergens should help to identify specific sensitization profiles as well as clinically relevant sensitization. Cross-reactivity between epitopes of inhalants and of food allergens may perpetuate and intensify allergic disorders. The consequences of cross-reactivity between allergens and autologous proteins are unknown. PMID:16669147

  16. The evaluation of allergens and allergic diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Lee, C S; Tang, R B; Chung, R L

    2000-12-01

    Knowing the incidence of allergic diseases and their relationship with allergens is a crucial requirement for therapeutic judgment. We present our experience on the incidence, clinical features and allergens of the allergic diseases detected by multiple allergosorbent chemiluminescent assay (MAST-CLA) in children from 1997 to 1999 at the Taipei Veterans General Hospital. The incidence of bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis are significantly different when stratified by age groups. Among the enrolled 2008 patients, 980 (48.8%) patients have positive MAST-CLA results. Of these, 562 (57.3%) are male and 418 (42.7%) are female. A significant increase among patients with positive allergens is also found when stratified by age group. Inhalant allergen is the major allergen detected in our patients. House dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Df), cockroaches, feathers, and dog dander show the highest incidence in the 7- to 12-year-old group. In the fungal group, Aspergillus and Penicillium also show a significant difference in the incidence among different age groups. Pollen allergens, on a whole, show significant difference in incidence among different age groups. The food allergen group shows variable significant difference in incidence. Crab, milk, and egg white show the highest significant incidence in the 2- to 6-year-old group. These results suggest that the incidence of allergens detected in allergic diseases varies among different age groups. PMID:11269366

  17. Peanut allergens: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Montealegre, Cristina; Marina, Maria Luisa; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Peanut is recognized as a potent food allergen producing one of the most frequent food allergies. This fact has originated the publication of an elevated number of scientific reports dealing with peanut allergens and, especially, the prevalence of peanut allergy. For this reason, the information available on peanut allergens is increasing and the debate about peanut allergy is always renewed. This article reviews the information currently available on peanut allergens and on the techniques used for their chemical characterization. Moreover, a general overview on the current biotechnological approaches used to reduce or eliminate peanut allergens is also provided. PMID:23638932

  18. Allergens in veterinary medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, R. S.; Janda, J.; Jensen-Jarolim, E.; Rhyner, C.; Marti, E.

    2015-01-01

    Allergic diseases in animals are increasingly gaining importance in veterinary practice and as research models. For intradermal testing and allergen immunotherapy, a good knowledge of relevant allergens for the individual species is of great importance. Currently, the knowledge about relevant veterinary allergens is based on sensitization rates identified by intradermal testing or serum testing for allergen-specific IgE; crude extracts are the basis for most evaluations. Only a few studies provide evidence about the molecular structure of (particularly) dust mite, insect and mould allergens in dogs and horses, respectively. In those species, some major allergens differ from those in humans. This position paper summarizes the current knowledge about relevant allergens in dogs, cats and horses. PMID:26280544

  19. [Proteolytic enzymes: potential allergens for the skin and respiratory tract?].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B

    1985-03-01

    Proteolytic enzymes of animal, bacterial, mould or plant origin are used in many industrial processes, e.g. in the detergent, food and pharmaceutical industries as well as in medicine. The allergenic potency of these enzymes should not be underestimated, for they cause, in particular, IgE-mediated respiratory allergies. The risk of sensitization to enzymes due to inhalation as a result of occupational exposure is very high (up to 50%), and therapeutic applications are also not without risk. Therefore, the utmost care should be taken in the production and handling of pulverized enzymes and their inhalation should be avoided. Papain and Bromelain are used as tenderizers of meat and to clarify beer. Therefore, these enzymes are also potential ingestive allergens and may represent an unrecognized cause of an allergic reaction following a meal. As contact allergens the enzymes play a minor role; biodetergents in particular present no increased risk of skin damage for the user. PMID:3888919

  20. [The clinical picture is the most important reason to screen for the presence of allergen-specific IgE in children].

    PubMed

    Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C A F M

    2007-10-13

    The presence of allergen-specific IgE in serum is associated with sensitization, but the clinical relevance depends on the patient's history. It supports the diagnosis of an acute allergic response to inhalation or food allergens. The presence of allergen-specific IgE in the serum is not necessary for the diagnosis of asthma, perennial rhinitis or eczema; since allergen avoidance has no beneficial effect in these chronic allergic diseases, one should be critical about the relevance of testing for allergen-specific serum IgE. Screening tests for the presence of allergen-specific serum IgE are frequently used in children; a screening test consists of either 5 inhalant or 5 food allergens and if the test is positive, the laboratory will determine the specific IgE for each of the 5 allergens present in the test. This carries the risk of over-diagnosis if the clinical indication is not clear-cut. Furthermore, in children sensitized to grass pollen, the panel of inhalation and food allergens present in screening tests may lead to serological cross-reactivity with wheat; this increases the number of positive screening tests for food allergens without having clinical relevance. In conclusion, the use of screening tests for the presence of allergen-specific serum IgE should be looked at critically since it may unnecessarily increase the number of allergen-specific IgE tests.

  1. Inhalant Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk of being hurt in a fall, a fire or a car crash (for example, if your child tries to drive while he or she is high on an inhalant). Inhalants block oxygen flow to the brain and every other organ ...

  2. Inhalation of the reactive aldehyde acrolein promotes antigen sensitization to ovalbumin and enhances neutrophilic inflammation.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Edmund; Spiess, Page C; Habibovic, Aida; Hristova, Milena; Bauer, Robert A; Randall, Matthew J; Poynter, Matthew E; van der Vliet, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acrolein (ACR), an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde and a major component of tobacco smoke, is a highly reactive electrophilic respiratory irritant implicated in asthma pathogenesis and severity. However, few studies have directly investigated the influence of ACR exposure on allergen sensitization and pulmonary inflammation. The present study was designed to examine the impact of ACR inhalation on allergic sensitization to the inhaled antigen ovalbumin (OVA), as well as pulmonary inflammation during subsequent OVA challenge. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to inhaled OVA (1%, 30 min/day, 4 days/week) and/or ACR (5 ppm, 4 h/day, 4 days/week) over 2 weeks and subsequently challenged with aerosolized OVA (1%, 30 min/day) over three consecutive days. Serum anti-OVA IgG1 levels were increased significantly in animals exposed to both OVA and ACR, compared to animals exposed to either OVA or ACR alone. In addition, differential cell counts and histological analysis revealed an increase in BAL neutrophils in animals exposed to both OVA and ACR. However, exposure to both OVA and ACR did not influence mRNA expression of the cytokines il5, il10, il13 or tnfa, but significantly increased mRNA expression of ccl20. Moreover, ACR exposure enhanced lung mRNA levels of il17f and tgfb1, suggesting development of enhanced inhalation tolerance to OVA. Overall, the findings indicate that ACR inhalation can promote airway-mediated sensitization to otherwise innocuous inhaled antigens, such as OVA, but also enhances immune tolerance, thereby favoring neutrophilic airway inflammation.

  3. Platelet function: aggregation by PAF or sequestration in lung is not modified during immediate or late allergen-induced bronchospasm in man.

    PubMed

    Hemmendinger, S; Pauli, G; Tenabene, A; Pujol, J L; Bessot, J C; Eber, M; Cazenave, J P

    1989-05-01

    Among the mediators involved in the pathophysiologic mechanisms that underly the reactions of the acute and delayed phases of bronchospasm induced by allergens in man, platelet-activating factor (PAF) could play an important role, in particular by its effects on platelets. In animals, inhalation or injection of PAF causes a platelet-dependent bronchoconstriction that is blocked by prior administration of an antiplatelet antiserum and accompanied by platelet accumulation in the pulmonary vessels. In man, inhalation of PAF causes a bronchospasm and induces a bronchial hyperreactivity. Abnormalities of platelet aggregation and the secretion into plasma of platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin have been described in patients with asthma during induced bronchospasm. Platelet functions have been studied in 15 patients with asthma before and after allergen bronchial provocation tests. There was no difference between platelet counts, plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin, and platelet aggregation induced by several agonists (adrenaline, arachidonic acid, or PAF) before and immediately after the allergen bronchial provocation test. There was no platelet pulmonary sequestration as studied with 111Indium-labeled platelets during 24 hours after the antigen challenge, and the life span of circulating platelets was normal. Our results do not support an important direct role for PAF in the pathophysiology of asthma. It is still possible that the current methodology is too insensitive to detect amounts of PAF in the circulation or that PAF is acting locally. PMID:2523922

  4. New Trends in Food Allergens Detection: Toward Biosensing Strategies.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rita C; Barroso, M Fátima; González-García, María Begoña; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2016-10-25

    Food allergens are a real threat to sensitized individuals. Although food labeling is crucial to provide information to consumers with food allergies, accidental exposure to allergenic proteins may result from undeclared allergenic substances by means of food adulteration, fraud or uncontrolled cross-contamination. Allergens detection in foodstuffs can be a very hard task, due to their presence usually in trace amounts, together with the natural interference of the matrix. Methods for allergens analysis can be mainly divided in two large groups: the immunological assays and the DNA-based ones. Mass spectrometry has also been used as a confirmatory tool. Recently, biosensors appeared as innovative, sensitive, selective, environmentally friendly, cheaper and fast techniques (especially when automated and/or miniaturized), able to effectively replace the classical methodologies. In this review, we present the advances in the field of food allergens detection toward the biosensing strategies and discuss the challenges and future perspectives of this technology.

  5. Food processing and allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Verhoeckx, Kitty C M; Vissers, Yvonne M; Baumert, Joseph L; Faludi, Roland; Feys, Marcel; Flanagan, Simon; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Holzhauser, Thomas; Shimojo, Ryo; van der Bolt, Nieke; Wichers, Harry; Kimber, Ian

    2015-06-01

    Food processing can have many beneficial effects. However, processing may also alter the allergenic properties of food proteins. A wide variety of processing methods is available and their use depends largely on the food to be processed. In this review the impact of processing (heat and non-heat treatment) on the allergenic potential of proteins, and on the antigenic (IgG-binding) and allergenic (IgE-binding) properties of proteins has been considered. A variety of allergenic foods (peanuts, tree nuts, cows' milk, hens' eggs, soy, wheat and mustard) have been reviewed. The overall conclusion drawn is that processing does not completely abolish the allergenic potential of allergens. Currently, only fermentation and hydrolysis may have potential to reduce allergenicity to such an extent that symptoms will not be elicited, while other methods might be promising but need more data. Literature on the effect of processing on allergenic potential and the ability to induce sensitisation is scarce. This is an important issue since processing may impact on the ability of proteins to cause the acquisition of allergic sensitisation, and the subject should be a focus of future research. Also, there remains a need to develop robust and integrated methods for the risk assessment of food allergenicity.

  6. Asthma Inhalers

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce the release of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) into the atmosphere when taking certain asthma medications. Until recently, most ... hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) inhalers, that do not rob the atmosphere of ozone. “The FDA [Food and Drug Administration] ...

  7. Living with food allergy: allergen avoidance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jennifer S; Sicherer, Scott H

    2011-04-01

    The primary treatment of food allergy is to avoid the culprit foods. This is a complex undertaking that requires education about reading the labels of manufactured products, understanding how to avoid cross-contact with allergens during food preparation, and communicating effectively with persons who are providing allergen-safe meals including relatives and restaurant personnel. Successful avoidance also requires a knowledge of nuances such as appropriate cleaning practices, an understanding of the risks of ingestion compared to skin contact or inhalation, that exposure could occur through unanticipated means such as through sharing utensils or passionate kissing, and that food may be a component of substances that are not ingested such as cosmetics, bath products, vaccines and medications. The authors review the necessary tools of avoidance that physicians and medical practitioners can use to guide their patients through the complexities of food avoidance.

  8. Allergenic characteristics of a modified peanut allergen.

    PubMed

    King, Nina; Helm, Ricki; Stanley, J Steven; Vieths, Stefan; Lüttkopf, Dirk; Hatahet, Lina; Sampson, Hugh; Pons, Laurent; Burks, Wesley; Bannon, Gary A

    2005-10-01

    Attempts to treat peanut allergy using traditional methods of allergen desensitization are accompanied by a high risk of anaphylaxis. The aim of this study was to determine if modifications to the IgE-binding epitopes of a major peanut allergen would result in a safer immunotherapeutic agent for the treatment of peanut-allergic patients. IgE-binding epitopes on the Ara h 2 allergen were modified, and modified Ara h 2 (mAra h 2) protein was produced. Wild-type (wAra h 2) and mAra h 2 proteins were analyzed for their ability to interact with T-cells, their ability to bind IgE, and their ability to release mediators from a passively sensitized RBL-2H3 cell line. Multiple T-cell epitopes were identified on the major peanut allergen, Ara h 2. Ara h 2 amino acid regions 11-35, 86-125, and 121-155 contained the majority of peptides that interact with T-cells from most patients. The wAra h 2 and mAra h 2 proteins stimulated proliferation of T-cells from peanut-allergic patients to similar levels. In contrast, the mAra h 2 protein exhibited greatly reduced IgE-binding capacity compared to the wild-type allergen. In addition, the modified allergen released significantly lower amounts of beta-hexosaminidase, a marker for IgE-mediated RBL-2H3 degranulation, compared to the wild-type allergen.

  9. Vaccine development for allergen-specific immunotherapy based on recombinant allergens and synthetic allergen peptides: Lessons from the past and novel mechanisms of action for the future.

    PubMed

    Valenta, Rudolf; Campana, Raffaela; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Niederberger, Verena

    2016-02-01

    In the past, the development of more effective, safe, convenient, broadly applicable, and easy to manufacture vaccines for allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been limited by the poor quality of natural allergen extracts. Progress made in the field of molecular allergen characterization has now made it possible to produce defined vaccines for AIT and eventually for preventive allergy vaccination based on recombinant DNA technology and synthetic peptide chemistry. Here we review the characteristics of recombinant and synthetic allergy vaccines that have reached clinical evaluation and discuss how molecular vaccine approaches can make AIT more safe and effective and thus more convenient. Furthermore, we discuss how new technologies can facilitate the reproducible manufacturing of vaccines of pharmaceutical grade for inhalant, food, and venom allergens. Allergy vaccines in clinical trials based on recombinant allergens, recombinant allergen derivatives, and synthetic peptides allow us to target selectively different immune mechanisms, and certain of those show features that might make them applicable not only for therapeutic but also for prophylactic vaccination.

  10. Vaccine development for allergen-specific immunotherapy based on recombinant allergens and synthetic allergen peptides: Lessons from the past and novel mechanisms of action for the future

    PubMed Central

    Valenta, Rudolf; Campana, Raffaela; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Niederberger, Verena

    2016-01-01

    In the past, the development of more effective, safe, convenient, broadly applicable, and easy to manufacture vaccines for allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been limited by the poor quality of natural allergen extracts. Progress made in the field of molecular allergen characterization has now made it possible to produce defined vaccines for AIT and eventually for preventive allergy vaccination based on recombinant DNA technology and synthetic peptide chemistry. Here we review the characteristics of recombinant and synthetic allergy vaccines that have reached clinical evaluation and discuss how molecular vaccine approaches can make AIT more safe and effective and thus more convenient. Furthermore, we discuss how new technologies can facilitate the reproducible manufacturing of vaccines of pharmaceutical grade for inhalant, food, and venom allergens. Allergy vaccines in clinical trials based on recombinant allergens, recombinant allergen derivatives, and synthetic peptides allow us to target selectively different immune mechanisms, and certain of those show features that might make them applicable not only for therapeutic but also for prophylactic vaccination. PMID:26853127

  11. Roles of 5-lipoxygenase and cysteinyl-leukotriene type 1 receptors in the hematological response to allergen challenge and its prevention by diethylcarbamazine in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Masid-de-Brito, Daniela; Queto, Túlio; Gaspar-Elsas, Maria Ignez C; Xavier-Elsas, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Diethylcarbamazine (DEC), which blocks leukotriene production, abolishes the challenge-induced increase in eosinopoiesis in bone-marrow from ovalbumin- (OVA-) sensitized mice, suggesting that 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products contribute to the hematological responses in experimental asthma models. We explored the relationship between 5-LO, central and peripheral eosinophilia, and effectiveness of DEC, using PAS or BALB/c mice and 5-LO-deficient mutants. We quantified eosinophil numbers in freshly harvested or cultured bone-marrow, peritoneal lavage fluid, and spleen, with or without administration of leukotriene generation inhibitors (DEC and MK886) and cisteinyl-leukotriene type I receptor antagonist (montelukast). The increase in eosinophil numbers in bone-marrow, observed in sensitized/challenged wild-type mice, was abolished by MK886 and DEC pretreatment. In ALOX mutants, by contrast, there was no increase in bone-marrow eosinophil counts, nor in eosinophil production in culture, in response to sensitization/challenge. In sensitized/challenged ALOX mice, challenge-induced migration of eosinophils to the peritoneal cavity was significantly reduced relative to the wild-type PAS controls. DEC was ineffective in ALOX mice, as expected from a mechanism of action dependent on 5-LO. In BALB/c mice, challenge significantly increased spleen eosinophil numbers and DEC treatment prevented this increase. Overall, 5-LO appears as indispensable to the systemic hematological response to allergen challenge, as well as to the effectiveness of DEC. PMID:25477712

  12. Detection of respiratory allergies caused by environmental chemical allergen via measures of hyper-activation and degranulation of mast cells in lungs of NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Risako; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Watanabe, Yuko; Kurosawa, Yoshimi; Koasaka, Tadashi; Harada, Takanori

    2016-09-01

    Respiratory allergy triggered by exposure to environmental chemical allergen is a serious problem in many Asian countries and has the potential to cause severe health problems. Here, we aimed to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of this disease and develop an in vivo detection method for respiratory allergy induced by environmental chemical allergen. Both BALB/c and NC/Nga mice were sensitized topically for 3 weeks and were then subjected to inhalation challenge with pulverized trimellitic anhydride into particles measuring 2-μm in diameter. On the day after the final challenge, all mice were sacrificed, and IgE levels, immunocyte counts, and cytokine levels in the serum, hilar lymph nodes, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were measured. We also monitored the expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung. We found that all endpoints were significantly increased in mice of both strains subjected to trimellitic anhydride inhalation as compared with the respective control groups. However, worsening of respiratory status was noted only in NC/Nga mice. Interestingly, type 2 helper T-cell reactions were significantly increased in BALB/c mice compared with that in NC/Nga mice. In contrast, the number of mast cells, levels of mast cell-related cytokine/chemokines, and production of histamine in NC/Nga mice were significantly higher than those in BALB/c mice. Thus, environmental chemical allergen induced respiratory allergy in NC/Nga mice in terms of functional and inflammatory symptoms. Furthermore, mast cells may be involved in the aggravation of airway allergic symptoms induced by environmental chemical allergens. PMID:27404449

  13. Lipocalins as allergens.

    PubMed

    Mäntyjärvi, R; Rautiainen, J; Virtanen, T

    2000-10-18

    The term allergy refers to clinical conditions caused by an inappropriate immune response to innocuous proteins in genetically predisposed persons. Allergens of animal origin are responsible for a significant proportion of allergies. In recent years, it has become evident that practically all respiratory animal allergens characterized at the molecular level belong to the lipocalin family of proteins. The current list comprises the major allergens of horse, cow, dog, mouse, rat and cockroach as well as beta-lactoglobulin of cow's milk. While the molecular structure of all these allergens is known, far less information is available regarding their immunological characteristics. Knowing the way the immune system recognizes these allergens and reacts to them might, however, be the key for discovering the common denominator of the allergenicity of lipocalins. The human body contains numerous endogenous lipocalins, and the immune system has to adapt to their presence. We have proposed that under these conditions the immune response against the lipocalin allergens which are structurally related to endogenous lipocalins might be the pathway to allergy in genetically predisposed persons. The same might well apply also to other allergens with homologous endogenous counterparts. PMID:11058771

  14. Comparative nasal absorption of allergens in atopic and nonatopic subjects.

    PubMed

    Kontou-Karakitsos, K; Salvaggio, J E; Mathews, K P

    1975-04-01

    Based on sensitization following intranasal antigen administration, previous investigations have suggested greater absorption of allergens through the nasal mucous membranes of atopic than of nonatopic subjects. In this study mucosal absorption was assessed more directly by determining the capacity of allergens applied intranasally to elicit cutaneous Prausnitz-Küstner (P-K) reactions in nonatopic persons as compared with asymptomatic atopic subjects sensitive to other allergens. Two series of reaginic human serum dilutions were injected intracutaneously in recipients backs, and 48 hours later one series was challenged intracutaneously with test allergen. After the responses had been recorded, concentrated allergenic extract was sprayed into the nose and the second series of P-K sites observed for reactivity. Sometimes these P-K sites were rechallenged intracutaneously the following day to determine passive transfer neutralization. Two allergens were studied: bovine ribonuclease (RNase) and peanut extract. Two sera containing peanut reagins and one with RNase antibodies were each used in 10 to 11 atopic and 9 to 11 nonatopic recipients. The atopic group failed to show greater or more rapid absorption of either allergen through the nose based on the highest serum dilution reacting after nasal challenge. the speed of the reaction, the ratio of the titer by nasal challenge to the intracutaneous titer, or passive transfer neutralization. Controls showed that the results were not influenced by systemic absorption of allergen employed for intracutaneous tests. Drinking the amount of peanut extract applied intranasally did not elicit P-K reactions.

  15. Socioeconomic predictors of high allergen levels in homes in the greater Boston area.

    PubMed Central

    Kitch, B T; Chew, G; Burge, H A; Muilenberg, M L; Weiss, S T; Platts-Mills, T A; O'Connor, G; Gold, D R

    2000-01-01

    In the United States, childhood asthma morbidity and prevalence rates are the highest in less affluent urban minority communities. More than 80% of childhood asthmatics are allergic to one or more inhalant allergens. We evaluated whether socioeconomic status was associated with a differential in the levels and types of indoor home allergens. Dust samples for an ELISA allergen assay were collected from the homes of 499 families as part of a metropolitan Boston, Massachusetts, longitudinal birth cohort study of home allergens and asthma in children with a parental history of asthma or allergy. The proportion of homes with maximum home allergen levels in the highest category was 42% for dust mite allergen (> or = 10 microg/g Der p 1 or Der f 1), 13% for cockroach allergen (> or = 2 U/g Bla g 1 or Bla g 2), 26% for cat allergen (> or = 8 microg/g Fel d 1), and 20% for dog allergen (> or = 10 microg/g Can f 1). Homes in the high-poverty area (> 20% of the population below the poverty level) were more likely to have high cockroach allergen levels than homes in the low-poverty area [51 vs. 3%; OR, 33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 12-90], but less likely to have high levels of dust mite allergen (16 vs. 53%; OR, 0.2; CI, 0.1-0.4). Lower family income, less maternal education, and race/ethnicity (black or Hispanic vs. white) were also associated with a lower risk of high dust mite levels and a greater risk of high cockroach allergen levels. Within a single U.S. metropolitan area we found marked between-community differences in the types of allergens present in the home, but not necessarily in the overall burden of allergen exposure. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10753087

  16. Tree nut allergens.

    PubMed

    Roux, Kenneth H; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2003-08-01

    Allergic reactions to tree nuts can be serious and life threatening. Considerable research has been conducted in recent years in an attempt to characterize those allergens that are most responsible for allergy sensitization and triggering. Both native and recombinant nut allergens have been identified and characterized and, for some, the IgE-reactive epitopes described. Some allergens, such as lipid transfer proteins, profilins, and members of the Bet v 1-related family, represent minor constituents in tree nuts. These allergens are frequently cross-reactive with other food and pollen homologues, and are considered panallergens. Others, such as legumins, vicilins, and 2S albumins, represent major seed storage protein constituents of the nuts. The allergenic tree nuts discussed in this review include those most commonly responsible for allergic reactions such as hazelnut, walnut, cashew, and almond as well as those less frequently associated with allergies including pecan, chestnut, Brazil nut, pine nut, macadamia nut, pistachio, coconut, Nangai nut, and acorn.

  17. Tree nut allergens.

    PubMed

    Roux, Kenneth H; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2003-08-01

    Allergic reactions to tree nuts can be serious and life threatening. Considerable research has been conducted in recent years in an attempt to characterize those allergens that are most responsible for allergy sensitization and triggering. Both native and recombinant nut allergens have been identified and characterized and, for some, the IgE-reactive epitopes described. Some allergens, such as lipid transfer proteins, profilins, and members of the Bet v 1-related family, represent minor constituents in tree nuts. These allergens are frequently cross-reactive with other food and pollen homologues, and are considered panallergens. Others, such as legumins, vicilins, and 2S albumins, represent major seed storage protein constituents of the nuts. The allergenic tree nuts discussed in this review include those most commonly responsible for allergic reactions such as hazelnut, walnut, cashew, and almond as well as those less frequently associated with allergies including pecan, chestnut, Brazil nut, pine nut, macadamia nut, pistachio, coconut, Nangai nut, and acorn. PMID:12915766

  18. An Autonomic Link Between Inhaled Diesel Exhaust and Impaired Cardiac Performance: Insight From Treadmill and Dobutamine Challenges in Heart Failure–Prone Rats

    PubMed Central

    Farraj, Aimen K.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac disease exacerbation is associated with short-term exposure to vehicular emissions. Diesel exhaust (DE) might impair cardiac performance in part through perturbing efferent sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic nervous system (ANS) input to the heart. We hypothesized that acute changes in ANS balance mediate decreased cardiac performance upon DE inhalation. Young adult heart failure–prone rats were implanted with radiotelemeters to measure heart rate (HR), HR variability (HRV), blood pressure (BP), core body temperature, and pre-ejection period (PEP, a contractility index). Animals pretreated with sympathetic antagonist (atenolol), parasympathetic antagonist (atropine), or saline were exposed to DE (500 µg/m3 fine particulate matter, 4h) or filtered air and then treadmill exercise challenged. At 1 day postexposure, separate rats were catheterized for left ventricular pressure (LVP), contractility, and lusitropy and assessed for autonomic influence using the sympathoagonist dobutamine and surgical vagotomy. During DE exposure, atenolol inhibited increases in HR, BP, and contractility, but not body temperature, suggesting a role for sympathetic dominance. During treadmill recovery at 4h post-DE exposure, HR and HRV indicated parasympathetic dominance in saline- and atenolol-pretreated groups that atropine inhibited. Conversely, at treadmill recovery 21h post-DE exposure, HRV and PEP indicated sympathetic dominance and subsequently diminished contractility that only atenolol inhibited. LVP at 1 day postexposure indicated that DE impaired contractility and lusitropy while abolishing parasympathetic-regulated cardiac responses to dobutamine. This is the first evidence that air pollutant inhalation both causes time-dependent oscillations between sympathetic and parasympathetic dominance and decreases cardiac performance via aberrant sympathetic dominance. PMID:23872579

  19. Quantitation of latex allergens.

    PubMed

    Palosuo, Timo; Alenius, Harri; Turjanmaa, Kristiina

    2002-05-01

    Minimizing allergen concentration in latex goods to prevent sensitization to natural rubber latex (NRL) and thereby the development of clinical allergy is acknowledged as of mutual interest for rubber manufacturers and regulatory health authorities. However, measuring total protein, the principal currently available method, cannot be deemed a satisfactory regulatory measure to control allergen content. Specific methods based on human IgE-containing reagents, such as radioallergosorbent test (RAST) inhibition, have been available in certain laboratories for demonstrating NRL allergens in rubber products but the methods lack standardization. Currently, one commercial test has become available for measuring individual NRL allergens by capture ELISA-based assays using monoclonal antibodies and purified or recombinant allergens. Such methods are specific, they can be properly standardized, and they are of sufficient sensitivity and reproducibility. Results from medical gloves collected in two national market surveys in Finland in 1995 and 1999, respectively, show that Hev b 6.02 and Hev b 5, the two major allergens for NRL-allergic adults, are the most abundant allergens regularly detectable in high- and moderate-allergen gloves. In addition, Hev b 3 and Hev b 1, the two major allergens for children with spina bifida, are also commonly found. In general, when the sum of the four allergens exceeded 1 microg/g, most NRL-allergic patients showed positive skin prick test reactions against them. Using these new methods assessment of threshold levels that could in due course become guidelines for the rubber industry and regulatory health authorities is becoming possible. Eventually, this progress is expected to lead to a declining incidence of latex allergy. PMID:12079417

  20. Structural and functional localization of airway effects from episodic exposure of infant monkeys to allergen and/or ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. . E-mail: jesse.joad@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Peake, Janice L.; Plopper, Charles G.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2006-08-01

    Both allergen and ozone exposure increase asthma symptoms and airway responsiveness in children. Little is known about how these inhalants may differentially modify airway responsiveness in large proximal as compared to small distal airways. We evaluated whether bronchi and respiratory bronchioles from infant monkeys exposed episodically to allergen and/or ozone differentially develop intrinsic hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and whether eosinophils and/or pulmonary neuroendocrine cells play a role. Infant monkeys were exposed episodically for 5 months to: (1) filtered air, (2) aerosolized house dust mite allergen, (3) ozone 0.5 ppm, or (4) house dust mite allergen + ozone. Studying the function/structure relationship of the same lung slices, we evaluated methacholine airway responsiveness and histology of bronchi and respiratory bronchioles. In bronchi, intrinsic responsiveness was increased by allergen exposure, an effect reduced by bombesin antagonist. In respiratory bronchioles, intrinsic airway responsiveness was increased by allergen + ozone exposure. Eosinophils were increased by allergen and allergen + ozone exposure in bronchi and by allergen exposure in respiratory bronchioles. In both airways, exposure to allergen + ozone resulted in fewer tissue eosinophils than did allergen exposure alone. In bronchi, but not in respiratory bronchioles, the number of eosinophils and neuroendocrine cells correlated with airway responsiveness. We conclude that episodically exposing infant monkeys to house dust mite allergen with or without ozone increased intrinsic airway responsiveness to methacholine in bronchi differently than in respiratory bronchioles. In bronchi, eosinophils and neuroendocrine cells may play a role in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.

  1. Protein- and DNA-based anthrax toxin vaccines confer protection in guinea pigs against inhalational challenge with Bacillus cereus G9241.

    PubMed

    Palmer, John; Bell, Matt; Darko, Christian; Barnewall, Roy; Keane-Myers, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    In the past decade, several Bacillus cereus strains have been isolated from otherwise healthy individuals who succumbed to bacterial pneumonia presenting symptoms resembling inhalational anthrax. One strain was indistinguishable from B. cereus G9241, previously cultured from an individual who survived a similar pneumonia-like illness and which was shown to possess a complete set of plasmid-borne anthrax toxin-encoding homologs. The finding that B. cereus G9241 pathogenesis in mice is dependent on pagA1-derived protective antigen (PA) synthesis suggests that an anthrax toxin-based vaccine may be effective against this toxin-encoding B. cereus strain. Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs were immunized with protein- and DNA-based anthrax toxin-based vaccines, immune responses were evaluated and survival rates were calculated after lethal aerosol exposure with B. cereus G9241 spores. Each vaccine induced seroconversion with the protein immunization regimen eliciting significantly higher serum levels of antigen-specific antibodies at the prechallenge time-point compared with the DNA-protein prime-boost immunization schedule. Complete protection against lethal challenge was observed in all groups with a detectable prechallenge serum titer of toxin neutralizing antibodies. For the first time, we demonstrated that the efficacy of fully defined anthrax toxin-based vaccines was protective against lethal B. cereus G9241 aerosol challenge in the guinea pig animal model.

  2. Indacaterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a powder-filled capsule to inhale by mouth using a special inhaler. It is usually inhaled ... stop the pieces of capsule from reaching your mouth as you inhale the medication. Very tiny pieces ...

  3. Inhaled Asthma Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... metered – dose inhaler (MDI), which uses a chemical propellant to push the medication out of the inhaler. ... powder inhalers (DPIs) deliver medication without using chemical propellants, but they require a strong and fast inhalation. ...

  4. Fragrance sensitisers: Is inhalation an allergy risk?

    PubMed

    Basketter, David; Kimber, Ian

    2015-12-01

    It is well established that some fragrance substances have the potential to cause skin sensitisation associated with the development of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Fragrances are invariably relatively volatile leading to the consideration that inhalation of fragrances might be a relevant route for either the induction of allergic sensitisation or the elicitation of allergic reactions. Moreover, there has been increasing recognition that allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract can be induced by topical exposure to certain chemical allergens. Here the central question addressed is whether inhalation exposure to fragrance allergens has the potential to cause skin and/or respiratory sensitisation via the respiratory tract, or elicit allergic symptoms in those already sensitised. In addressing those questions, the underlying immunobiology of skin and respiratory sensitisation to chemicals has been reviewed briefly, and the relevant experimental and clinical evidence considered. The essential mechanistic differences between skin and respiratory allergy appear consistent with other sources of information, including the phenomenon of ACD that can arise from topical exposure to airborne allergens, but in the absence of accompanying respiratory effects. The conclusion is that, in contrast to topical exposure (including topical exposure to airborne material), inhalation of fragrance sensitisers does not represent a health risk with respect to allergy.

  5. Effects of a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, flurbiprofen, and an H1 histamine receptor antagonist, terfenadine, alone and in combination on allergen induced immediate bronchoconstriction in man.

    PubMed Central

    Curzen, N; Rafferty, P; Holgate, S T

    1987-01-01

    The effect of flurbiprofen, a potent cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, on histamine and methacholine reactivity was assessed in seven atopic subjects with asthma. Flurbiprofen 150 mg daily for three days displaced the histamine-FEV1 concentration-response curve to the right by 1.5 doubling doses, whereas no effect was observed on the response to methacholine. Subsequently the effects of flurbiprofen and terfenadine, a specific H1 histamine receptor antagonist, on allergen induced bronchoconstriction were studied in seven atopic but non-asthmatic subjects. The subjects inhaled the concentration of grass pollen allergen that had previously been shown to produce a 20% fall in FEV1 on separate occasions after prior treatment with placebo, flurbiprofen 150 mg daily for three days, terfenadine 180 mg three hours before challenge, and the combination of flurbiprofen and terfenadine. After placebo, allergen challenge caused a mean (SEM) maximum fall in FEV1 of 37.6% (2.6%) after 20 (3.7) minutes, followed by a gradual recovery to within 15% of baseline at 60 minutes. Terfenadine reduced the maximum allergen provoked fall in FEV1 to 21.5% (2.2%) and reduced the area under the time-response curve (AUC) by 50% (6%). Flurbiprofen alone reduced the mean maximum fall in FEV1 to 29.6% (3.2%) and reduced the AUC by 26%. The effect of the combination of flurbiprofen and terfenadine did not differ significantly from that of terfenadine alone. We conclude that histamine and prostaglandins contribute to immediate allergen induced bronchoconstriction and that a complex interaction occurs between the two classes of mediators. PMID:2894081

  6. Allergen composition analysis and allergenicity assessment of Chinese peanut cultivars.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhihua; Zhou, Ningling; Xiong, Faqian; Li, Xin; Yang, Anshu; Tong, Ping; Tang, Ronghua; Chen, Hongbing

    2016-04-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is among the eight major food allergens in the world. Several attempts have been made to decrease or eliminate the allergenicity of peanut. Systemic screening of thousands of peanut cultivars may identify peanut with low allergenicity. In this study, the allergen compositions of 53 Chinese peanut cultivars were characterized, and their allergenicity to sera IgE of Chinese patients and in a mouse model was assessed. Contents of total protein and allergens were quantified by SDS-PAGE and densitometry analysis on gel. Although the contents of allergens broadly varied among cultivars, they were related to one another. The IgE binding capacity of cultivars was tested by ELISA, and their allergenicity was further evaluated in a mouse model by oral sensitization. Results showed that the allergenicity of peanut was affected by allergen composition rather than a single allergen. Peanut cultivars with low allergenicity may contain more Ara h 3/4 (24 kDa), Ara h 2 and less Ara h 3/4 (43, 38, and 36 kDa), Ara h 6. Screening based on allergen composition would facilitate the identification of low-allergenic peanut. PMID:26593515

  7. Allergen composition analysis and allergenicity assessment of Chinese peanut cultivars.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhihua; Zhou, Ningling; Xiong, Faqian; Li, Xin; Yang, Anshu; Tong, Ping; Tang, Ronghua; Chen, Hongbing

    2016-04-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is among the eight major food allergens in the world. Several attempts have been made to decrease or eliminate the allergenicity of peanut. Systemic screening of thousands of peanut cultivars may identify peanut with low allergenicity. In this study, the allergen compositions of 53 Chinese peanut cultivars were characterized, and their allergenicity to sera IgE of Chinese patients and in a mouse model was assessed. Contents of total protein and allergens were quantified by SDS-PAGE and densitometry analysis on gel. Although the contents of allergens broadly varied among cultivars, they were related to one another. The IgE binding capacity of cultivars was tested by ELISA, and their allergenicity was further evaluated in a mouse model by oral sensitization. Results showed that the allergenicity of peanut was affected by allergen composition rather than a single allergen. Peanut cultivars with low allergenicity may contain more Ara h 3/4 (24 kDa), Ara h 2 and less Ara h 3/4 (43, 38, and 36 kDa), Ara h 6. Screening based on allergen composition would facilitate the identification of low-allergenic peanut.

  8. Allergens in the Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Thomas M.

    1987-01-01

    Points out the health and legal implications related to laboratory substances that could cause allergic reactions. Presents a list of potential cosmetic allergens and irritants. Includes precautionary measures dealing with allergy situations. (ML)

  9. Allergens and thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Shuaib M; Pulimood, Thomas B

    2009-09-01

    Thunderstorm-related asthma is increasingly recognized in many parts of the world. This review focuses on important advances in the understanding of the mechanism of the role of allergens, in particular fungal spores such as Alternaria, in asthma epidemics associated with thunderstorms. From our observations, we have proposed that the prerequisites for this phenomenon are as follows: 1) a sensitized, atopic, asthmatic individual; 2) prior airway hyperresponsiveness before a sudden, large allergen exposure; 3) a large-scale thunderstorm with cold outflow occurring at a time and location during an allergen season in which large numbers of asthmatics are outdoors; and 4) sudden release of large amounts of respirable allergenic fragments, particularly fungal spores such as Alternaria. PMID:19671382

  10. Allergens and thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Shuaib M; Pulimood, Thomas B

    2009-09-01

    Thunderstorm-related asthma is increasingly recognized in many parts of the world. This review focuses on important advances in the understanding of the mechanism of the role of allergens, in particular fungal spores such as Alternaria, in asthma epidemics associated with thunderstorms. From our observations, we have proposed that the prerequisites for this phenomenon are as follows: 1) a sensitized, atopic, asthmatic individual; 2) prior airway hyperresponsiveness before a sudden, large allergen exposure; 3) a large-scale thunderstorm with cold outflow occurring at a time and location during an allergen season in which large numbers of asthmatics are outdoors; and 4) sudden release of large amounts of respirable allergenic fragments, particularly fungal spores such as Alternaria.

  11. Lyral: a fragrance allergen.

    PubMed

    Militello, Giuseppe; James, William

    2005-03-01

    Fragrances are a common cause of contact dermatitis and account for a large percentage of reactions to cosmetic products. Novel fragrance compounds that may not be detected by the common fragrance screening agents (including balsam of Peru and fragrance mix) are continually being produced. Lyral is one of those allergens found in many cosmetic and household products. This review will discuss the recent literature and the significance of this allergen to allergic contact dermatitis.

  12. Monitoring for airborne allergens

    SciTech Connect

    Burge, H.A. )

    1992-07-01

    Monitoring for allergens can provide some information on the kinds and levels of exposure experienced by local patient populations, providing volumetric methods are used for sample collection and analysis is accurate and consistent. Such data can also be used to develop standards for the specific environment and to begin to develop predictive models. Comparing outdoor allergen aerosols between different monitoring sites requires identical collection and analysis methods and some kind of rational standard, whether arbitrary, or based on recognized health effects.32 references.

  13. Mining Novel Allergens from Coconut Pollen Employing Manual De Novo Sequencing and Homology-Driven Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Saha, Bodhisattwa; Sircar, Gaurab; Pandey, Naren; Gupta Bhattacharya, Swati

    2015-11-01

    Coconut pollen, one of the major palm pollen grains is an important constituent among vectors of inhalant allergens in India and a major sensitizer for respiratory allergy in susceptible patients. To gain insight into its allergenic components, pollen proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, immunoblotted with coconut pollen sensitive patient sera, followed by mass spectrometry of IgE reactive proteins. Coconut being largely unsequenced, a proteomic workflow has been devised that combines the conventional database-dependent analysis of tandem mass spectral data and manual de novo sequencing followed by a homology-based search for identifying the allergenic proteins. N-terminal acetylation helped to distinguish "b" ions from others, facilitating reliable sequencing. This led to the identification of 12 allergenic proteins. Cluster analysis with individual patient sera recognized vicilin-like protein as a major allergen, which was purified to assess its in vitro allergenicity and then partially sequenced. Other IgE-sensitive spots showed significant homology with well-known allergenic proteins such as 11S globulin, enolase, and isoflavone reductase along with a few which are reported as novel allergens. The allergens identified can be used as potential candidates to develop hypoallergenic vaccines, to design specific immunotherapy trials, and to enrich the repertoire of existing IgE reactive proteins.

  14. Mining Novel Allergens from Coconut Pollen Employing Manual De Novo Sequencing and Homology-Driven Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Saha, Bodhisattwa; Sircar, Gaurab; Pandey, Naren; Gupta Bhattacharya, Swati

    2015-11-01

    Coconut pollen, one of the major palm pollen grains is an important constituent among vectors of inhalant allergens in India and a major sensitizer for respiratory allergy in susceptible patients. To gain insight into its allergenic components, pollen proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, immunoblotted with coconut pollen sensitive patient sera, followed by mass spectrometry of IgE reactive proteins. Coconut being largely unsequenced, a proteomic workflow has been devised that combines the conventional database-dependent analysis of tandem mass spectral data and manual de novo sequencing followed by a homology-based search for identifying the allergenic proteins. N-terminal acetylation helped to distinguish "b" ions from others, facilitating reliable sequencing. This led to the identification of 12 allergenic proteins. Cluster analysis with individual patient sera recognized vicilin-like protein as a major allergen, which was purified to assess its in vitro allergenicity and then partially sequenced. Other IgE-sensitive spots showed significant homology with well-known allergenic proteins such as 11S globulin, enolase, and isoflavone reductase along with a few which are reported as novel allergens. The allergens identified can be used as potential candidates to develop hypoallergenic vaccines, to design specific immunotherapy trials, and to enrich the repertoire of existing IgE reactive proteins. PMID:26426307

  15. Effect of cyclosporin A on the allergen-induced late asthmatic reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sihra, B. S.; Kon, O. M.; Durham, S. R.; Walker, S.; Barnes, N. C.; Kay, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The allergen-induced late asthmatic reaction (LAR) is associated with mucosal inflammation involving several cell types including activated T lymphocytes and eosinophils. In contrast, the early asthmatic reaction (EAR) is considered to results from rapid allergen-induced release of bronchoconstrictor mediators from IgE sensitised mast cells. Cyclosporin A has efficacy in chronic severe corticosteroid-dependent asthma and is believed to act principally by inhibiting cytokine mRNA transcription in T lymphocytes. However, it has effects on other cell types in vitro, including the inhibition of exocytosis/degranulation events in mast cells. It was therefore hypothesised that cyclosporin A would attenuate both the EAR and LAR in subjects with mild asthma. METHODS: Twelve sensitised atopic asthmatic subjects with documented dual asthmatic responses were studied in a double blind, placebo controlled, crossover trial. On two separate study visits subjects received two oral doses of either cyclosporin A or matched placebo before inhaled allergen challenges. The forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was measured half hourly for eight hours and blood eosinophil counts were analysed three, six, and 24 hours after the challenge. Treatment effects on blood eosinophil counts as well as the EAR and LAR, respectively defined as the areas under the curve (AUC) of FEV1 changes from baseline between 0-1 and 4-8 hours after challenge, were compared by non-parametric crossover analysis. RESULTS: Cyclosporin A reduced both the LAR (median AUC -41.9 1.h (interquartile range -82.7 to -12.4) for cyclosporin A and -84.5 1.h (-248.9 to -39.1) for placebo; p = 0.007) and the late increase in blood eosinophils (median 0.2 x 10(9)/1 (0.15 to 0.4) for cyclosporin A and 0.4 x 10(9)/1 (0.25 to 0.55) for placebo; p = 0.024) but had no effect on the EAR. The reduction of the LAR by cyclosporin A correlated significantly with prechallenge blood concentrations of cyclosporin A (r

  16. Recombinant allergens for allergen-specific immunotherapy: 10 years anniversary of immunotherapy with recombinant allergens.

    PubMed

    Valenta, Rudolf; Linhart, B; Swoboda, I; Niederberger, V

    2011-06-01

    The broad applicability of allergen-specific immunotherapy for the treatment and eventually prevention of IgE-mediated allergy is limited by the poor quality and allergenic activity of natural allergen extracts that are used for the production of current allergy vaccines. Today, the genetic code of the most important allergens has been deciphered; recombinant allergens equalling their natural counterparts have been produced for diagnosis and immunotherapy, and a large panel of genetically modified allergens with reduced allergenic activity has been characterized to improve safety of immunotherapy and explore allergen-specific prevention strategies. Successful immunotherapy studies have been performed with recombinant allergens and hypoallergenic allergen derivatives and will lead to the registration of the first recombinant allergen-based vaccines in the near future. There is no doubt that recombinant allergen-based vaccination strategies will be generally applicable to most allergen sources, including respiratory, food and venom allergens and allow to produce safe allergy vaccines for the treatment of the most common forms of IgE-mediated allergies.

  17. Inhaled Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the most effective controllers of asthma. They suppress inflammation mainly by switching off multiple activated inflammatory genes through reversing histone acetylation via the recruitment of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2). Through suppression of airway inflammation ICS reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and control asthma symptoms. ICS are now first-line therapy for all patients with persistent asthma, controlling asthma symptoms and preventing exacerbations. Inhaled long-acting β2-agonists added to ICS further improve asthma control and are commonly given as combination inhalers, which improve compliance and control asthma at lower doses of corticosteroids. By contrast, ICS provide much less clinical benefit in COPD and the inflammation is resistant to the action of corticosteroids. This appears to be due to a reduction in HDAC2 activity and expression as a result of oxidative stress. ICS are added to bronchodilators in patients with severe COPD to reduce exacerbations. ICS, which are absorbed from the lungs into the systemic circulation, have negligible systemic side effects at the doses most patients require, although the high doses used in COPD has some systemic side effects and increases the risk of developing pneumonia.

  18. [Current contact allergens].

    PubMed

    Geier, J; Uter, W; Lessmann, H; Schnuch, A

    2011-10-01

    Ever-changing exposure to contact allergens, partly due to statutory directives (e.g. nickel, chromate, methyldibromo glutaronitrile) or recommendations from industrial associations (e.g. hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde), requires on-going epidemiologic surveillance of contact allergy. In this paper, the current state with special focus in fragrances and preservatives is described on the basis of data of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK) of the year 2010. In 2010, 12,574 patients were patch tested in the dermatology departments belonging to the IVDK. Nickel is still the most frequent contact allergen. However the continuously improved EU nickel directive already has some beneficial effect; sensitization frequency in young women is dropping. In Germany, chromate-reduced cement has been in use now for several years, leading to a decline in chromate sensitization in brick-layers. Two fragrance mixes are part of the German baseline series; they are still relevant. The most important fragrances in these mixes still are oak moss absolute and hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde. However, in relation to these leading allergens, sensitization frequency to other fragrances contained in the mixes seems to be increasing. Among the preservatives, MCI/MI has not lost its importance as contact allergen, in contrast to MDBGN. Sources of MCI/MI sensitization obviously are increasingly found in occupational context. Methylisothiazolinone is a significant allergen in occupational settings, and less frequently in body care products.

  19. Two new types of allergens from the cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Fang, Y; Long, C; Bai, X; Liu, W; Rong, M; Lai, R; An, S

    2015-12-01

    Periplaneta americana cockroach is an important source of inhalant indoor allergen resource, and there are more than twenty IgE-binding components identified in P. americana, but only nine allergens were characterized. Our knowledge about cockroach allergens remains poor. In this work, two novel allergen proteins Per a 11 (alpha-amylase) and Per a 12 (chitinase) with molecular weight around 55 and 45 kDa, respectively, were purified and characterized from the midgut of cockroaches. Their primary sequences were determined by Edman degradation, mass spectrometry, and cDNA cloning. Sera from 39 and 30 of 47 (83.0% and 63.8%) patients reacted to Per a 11 and Per a 12 on immunoblots, respectively. The allergenicity of Per a 11 and Per a 12 was further confirmed by competitive ELISA, basophil activation test (BAT), and skin prick test (SPT). They appear to be of importance for the allergic reactions induced by cockroach and have a potential for component-based diagnosis of allergy. PMID:26361742

  20. Clinical effects of nedocromil sodium on allergen-related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bleecker, E R; Mason, P L; Moore, W C

    1996-11-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the ability of nedocromil sodium to block the acute response to allergen in persons who are sensitive to allergen. One study with subjects sensitive to ragweed showed a significant protective effect after a single 4 mg dose of nedocromil sodium, with no further protection achieved at higher doses. Numerous studies have also shown the ability of the drug to reduce or abolish the late asthmatic response in sensitive subjects when it was given before allergen challenge. Nedocromil sodium has also been shown to prevent the subsequent development of bronchial hyperresponsiveness. In addition, nedocromil sodium prevented the late asthmatic response when given after allergen challenge and an intact early response. These findings suggest that nedocromil sodium may be preventing the inflammatory events initiated by mast cell mediator and cytokine release.

  1. Selection of a 2-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-based alpha4beta1 integrin antagonist as an inhaled anti-asthmatic agent.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Edward C; Santulli, Rosemary J; Dyatkin, Alexey B; Ballentine, Scott A; Abraham, William M; Rudman, Sandra; Page, Clive P; de Garavilla, Lawrence; Damiano, Bruce P; Kinney, William A; Maryanoff, Bruce E

    2006-06-15

    The alpha4beta1 integrin, expressed on eosinophils and neutrophils, induces inflammation in the lung by facilitating cellular infiltration and activation. From a number of potent alpha4beta1 antagonists that we evaluated for safety and efficacy, 1 was selected as a lead candidate for anti-asthma therapy by the inhalation route. We devised an optimized stereoselective synthesis to facilitate the preparation of a sufficiently large quantity of 1 for assessment in vivo. Administration of 1 to allergen-sensitive sheep by inhalation blocked the late-phase response of asthma and abolished airway hyper-responsiveness at 24h following the antigen challenge. Additionally, the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the lungs was inhibited. Administration of 1 to ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs intraperitoneally blocked airway resistance and inhibited the recruitment of inflammatory cells.

  2. Mechanisms and characteristics of airway sensitization to indoor allergens.

    PubMed

    Liccardi, G; Cazzola, M; Russo, M; Gilder, J A; D'Amato, M; D'Amato, G

    2001-02-01

    The increasing prevalence of allergic respiratory diseases, and particularly of bronchial asthma, has been linked to changes induced by human activities in outdoor and indoor environments. People living in industrialized countries spend most of their time indoors: in private homes, offices and means of transport. Indoor environments are not a refuge from outdoor air pollution. Modern systems for energy saving such as insulated windows and doors reduce the indoor natural ventilation and consequently increase the rate of indoor humidity. These conditions may determine an increase in the level of indoor pollutants (tobacco smoke, gases produced by cooling processes etc.) and of allergens derived from mites, domestic animals and cockroaches. Upholstered furniture, wall-to-wall carpets, central heating systems and/or humidifiers may also contribute to the growth of mite populations. The increasing levels of exposure to pollutants and allergens in indoor environments represents a risk factor for the development of airway sensitization, especially if these materials are inhaled early in life. The major cat allergen Fel d 1 is considered an ubiquitous allergen, since it has been found in many indoor environments where a cat has never been kept. The clothing of cat owners seems to help spread Fel d 1 in cat-free environments. Sensitization to cockroach allergens is very common in patients living in urban areas where unhygenic conditions may favour the growth of cockroach populations. Monitoring of the levels of allergens and strategies of allergen and pollutant avoidance in indoor environments are the main ways to reduce the prevalence of respiratory allergies induced by these materials.

  3. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA) sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187) induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells. PMID:22439792

  4. Redefining the major peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yonghua; Dreskin, Stephen C

    2013-03-01

    Food allergy has become a major public health concern in westernized countries, and allergic reactions to peanuts are particularly common and severe. Allergens are defined as antigens that elicit an IgE response, and most allergenic materials (e.g., pollens, danders, and foods) contain multiple allergenic proteins. This has led to the concept that there are "major" allergens and allergens of less importance. "Major allergens" have been defined as allergens that bind a large amount of IgE from the majority of patients and have biologic activity. However, the ability of an allergen to cross-link complexes of IgE and its high-affinity receptor FcεRI (IgE/FcεRI), which we have termed its allergic effector activity, does not correlate well with assays of IgE binding. To identify the proteins that are the most active allergens in peanuts, we and others have employed in vitro model assays of allergen-mediated cross-linking of IgE/FcεRI complexes and have demonstrated that the most potent allergens are not necessarily those that bind the most IgE. The importance of a specific allergen can be determined by measuring the allergic effector activity of that allergen following purification under non-denaturing conditions and by specifically removing the allergen from a complex allergenic extract either by chromatography or by specific immunodepletion. In our studies of peanut allergens, our laboratory has found that two related allergens, Ara h 2 and Ara h 6, together account for the majority of the effector activity in a crude peanut extract. Furthermore, murine studies demonstrated that Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 are not only the major elicitors of anaphylaxis in this system, but also can effectively desensitize peanut-allergic mice. As a result of these observations, we propose that the definition of a major allergen should be based on the potency of that allergen in assays of allergic effector activity and demonstration that removal of that allergen from an extract results in

  5. [Shrimp as an allergen source].

    PubMed

    Múnera, Marlon; Gómez, Luis; Puerta, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Allergy to shellfish is one of the most prevalent food allergies in several countries, especially the one induced by consuming or having contact with shrimp. Several shrimp species are known to induce allergy diseases. However, the whole spectrum of allergens they contain is unknown and few of them have been completely characterized. This study was done in order to know the recent advances in the characterization of shrimp allergens and its relationship with allergens from other arthropods of importance in allergic diseases. We emphasize the species Litopenaeus vannamei , the most consumed shrimp in Colombia. Well characterized shrimp allergens are named following an official classification; nevertheless, they are better known according to the biological function associated with them. Tropomiosin, the main and most studied allergen in different shrimp species, is involved in crossreactivity among shrimp and other arthropods like domestic mites. The other characterized allergens seem to have a minor participation in this cross-reactivity. The allergenic potential of L. vannamei is not well known and few of its allergens have been characterized, whilst others that were recently identified such as the hemocyanin and the fatty acid binding proteins are beginning to be studied. Preliminary results suggest that these allergens are involved in the cross-reactivity between shrimp and domestic mites, which deserves further evaluation. The molecular and immunological characterization of all allergens present in shrimp would help understanding its allergenic role.

  6. The dispersion behaviour of dry powder inhalation formulations cannot be assessed at a single inhalation flow rate.

    PubMed

    Grasmeijer, Floris; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-04-25

    The dispersion performances of inhalation powders are often tested at only one inhalation flow rate in mechanistic formulation studies. This limited approach is challenged by studies showing that interactions exist between inhalation flow rate and the effects on dispersion performance of several formulation variables. In this note we explain that such interactions with inhalation flow rate are, in fact, always to be expected. Because these interactions may greatly affect conclusions concerning the effects of formulation variables and their underlying mechanisms, the utility of future dry powder inhalation formulation studies may benefit from an approach in which dispersion performance is by default tested over a range of inhalation flow rates.

  7. Allergenic pollen and pollen allergy in Europe.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Cecchi, L; Bonini, S; Nunes, C; Annesi-Maesano, I; Behrendt, H; Liccardi, G; Popov, T; van Cauwenberge, P

    2007-09-01

    The allergenic content of the atmosphere varies according to climate, geography and vegetation. Data on the presence and prevalence of allergenic airborne pollens, obtained from both aerobiological studies and allergological investigations, make it possible to design pollen calendars with the approximate flowering period of the plants in the sampling area. In this way, even though pollen production and dispersal from year to year depend on the patterns of preseason weather and on the conditions prevailing at the time of anthesis, it is usually possible to forecast the chances of encountering high atmospheric allergenic pollen concentrations in different areas. Aerobiological and allergological studies show that the pollen map of Europe is changing also as a result of cultural factors (for example, importation of plants such as birch and cypress for urban parklands), greater international travel (e.g. colonization by ragweed in France, northern Italy, Austria, Hungary etc.) and climate change. In this regard, the higher frequency of weather extremes, like thunderstorms, and increasing episodes of long range transport of allergenic pollen represent new challenges for researchers. Furthermore, in the last few years, experimental data on pollen and subpollen-particles structure, the pathogenetic role of pollen and the interaction between pollen and air pollutants, gave new insights into the mechanisms of respiratory allergic diseases. PMID:17521313

  8. Sensitization Rates for Various Allergens in Children with Allergic Rhinitis in Qingdao, China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hang; Lin, Rongjun; Li, Na

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sensitization to common allergens in children with allergic rhinitis (AR) living in Qingdao, China. We conducted a retrospective analysis for AR cases, who underwent skin prick tests (SPT) in Qingdao. A total of 2841 children with AR qualified for the inclusion criteria (Age 3–5 years: 1500 children; Age 6–12 years: 1341 children). The most common inhaled allergens to which the AR children were sensitive were Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (69.3%), Dermatophagoides farinae (66.2%) and mould 1 (Penicillium notatum 38.9%); while the corresponding ingested allergens were mussel (39.2%), shrimp (36.3%) and carp (36.5%). The prevalence of sensitization to inhaled allergens and food allergens was higher in children >6 years of age as compared to that in children 3–5 years of age (all p < 0.05). Children >6 years old were more sensitive to dust mite as compared to children 3–5 years old (p < 0.05). Sensitization to dust mite was more common in males than in females (p = 0.05). In this study, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae were the most common allergens causing AR in children in Qingdao, China. Older children with AR, particularly males, were found to be more sensitive to dust mite. PMID:26371014

  9. Sensitization Rates for Various Allergens in Children with Allergic Rhinitis in Qingdao, China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hang; Lin, Rongjun; Li, Na

    2015-09-07

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sensitization to common allergens in children with allergic rhinitis (AR) living in Qingdao, China. We conducted a retrospective analysis for AR cases, who underwent skin prick tests (SPT) in Qingdao. A total of 2841 children with AR qualified for the inclusion criteria (Age 3-5 years: 1500 children; Age 6-12 years: 1341 children). The most common inhaled allergens to which the AR children were sensitive were Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (69.3%), Dermatophagoides farinae (66.2%) and mould 1 (Penicillium notatum 38.9%); while the corresponding ingested allergens were mussel (39.2%), shrimp (36.3%) and carp (36.5%). The prevalence of sensitization to inhaled allergens and food allergens was higher in children >6 years of age as compared to that in children 3-5 years of age (all p < 0.05). Children >6 years old were more sensitive to dust mite as compared to children 3-5 years old (p < 0.05). Sensitization to dust mite was more common in males than in females (p = 0.05). In this study, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae were the most common allergens causing AR in children in Qingdao, China. Older children with AR, particularly males, were found to be more sensitive to dust mite.

  10. Allergenicity of processed food.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food allergies have become a major public health issue in many countries. In the U.S. it is estimated that approximately 150 individuals die each year from accidental ingestion of an allergic food. As a result, the federal government recently passed the food allergen labeling law which went into ef...

  11. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  12. Allergens are not pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Richard; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Thalhamer, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination against infectious diseases has been one of the major breakthroughs in human medical history, saving the lives of millions of people each year. More recently, prophylactic vaccination against non-infectious diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and type I allergy is being investigated. Particularly in case of IgE-driven allergic disorders, which afflict almost a quarter of the population in highly developed countries, preventative measures would represent a major improvement for patients’ health as well as an economic relief for public health services. As an alternative to allergen-specific immunotherapy, prophylactic vaccination against type I allergic diseases could slow down or even stop the progress of the allergy pandemic. Allergen-encoding gene-based vaccines, i.e., plasmid DNA and mRNA vaccines, provide the advantage of purity over crude allergen extracts, which involve the risk of de novo sensitizations. Furthermore, these formulations have been demonstrated to induce T helper 1 as well as T regulatory immune responses—a pre-requisite for prophylactic intervention against allergies. However, prophylactic vaccines against environmental allergens strikingly differ from conventional vaccines against infectious diseases or therapeutic approaches concerning the underlying immunological mechanisms. PMID:24280693

  13. Inhalational anthrax.

    PubMed

    Cuneo, Brian M

    2004-03-01

    Anthrax remains a real threat. In a spore form, it is highly infectious and dispersible. The initial symptoms are similar to those of influenza, and the early stage of inhalational anthrax may not be recognized. Early antibiotic treatment is important to achieving a good outcome. Contrary to historical experience. many patients with even advanced anthrax can be saved with aggressive medical care. Prevention of anthrax infections requires vigilant infection control methods as well as a rational prophylactic plan. All health care providers should be familiar with the symptoms and treatment of this disease. It is hoped that future research will clarify tests for early diagnosis, the best methods of prophylaxis, and the most effective treatments. Unfortunately the threat of bioterrorism, and anthrax in particular, is unlikely to go away. PMID:15062228

  14. Contact allergens for armpits--allergenic fragrances specified on deodorants.

    PubMed

    Klaschka, Ursula

    2012-11-01

    According to the so-called "26 allergens rule" 26 supposedly allergenic fragrances must be specified on the containers of cosmetic products if they are present above 0.001% in leave-on products and, 0.01% in rinse-off products. This declaration is meant to inform the consumers of potential risks of skin sensitizers in the products. As many consumers of deodorants suffer from allergic or irritant contact dermatitis in the axillae, the presence of allergens in deodorants deserves special attention. The objective of this study was to find answers to the following questions: Does compulsory labeling lead to omission of strong allergenic fragrances in deodorants? Is there a difference in the use patterns of strong and weak allergens? What is the quantitative exposure to fragrances by deodorants? Is the situation in Germany different from other European countries? Is there a difference between deodorants for men and for women? I tested the implementation of the "26 allergens rule" and compiled which allergenic fragrances are specified on the containers of deodorants. Three market studies were conducted in Germany in 2008, 2010 and 2011. The labels of a total number of 374 deodorants were analyzed as to whether any of the "26 allergens" were listed. The frequency of each allergen in the deodorants was compared with results from previous studies by other authors. It was found that up to 83% of the deodorants contain at least one of the "26 allergens" and that up to 30% of all products contain strong allergens above the threshold for labeling (0.001% in the product). The most frequently listed allergens are medium or weak allergens. In comparison with other authors, the frequency of the "26 allergens" in products is slightly smaller in these recent studies for the German market. There is no significant difference between deodorants for men and women, as far as the labeling of the "26 allergens" is concerned. The results show that the mandatory labeling procedure as designed

  15. Contact allergens for armpits--allergenic fragrances specified on deodorants.

    PubMed

    Klaschka, Ursula

    2012-11-01

    According to the so-called "26 allergens rule" 26 supposedly allergenic fragrances must be specified on the containers of cosmetic products if they are present above 0.001% in leave-on products and, 0.01% in rinse-off products. This declaration is meant to inform the consumers of potential risks of skin sensitizers in the products. As many consumers of deodorants suffer from allergic or irritant contact dermatitis in the axillae, the presence of allergens in deodorants deserves special attention. The objective of this study was to find answers to the following questions: Does compulsory labeling lead to omission of strong allergenic fragrances in deodorants? Is there a difference in the use patterns of strong and weak allergens? What is the quantitative exposure to fragrances by deodorants? Is the situation in Germany different from other European countries? Is there a difference between deodorants for men and for women? I tested the implementation of the "26 allergens rule" and compiled which allergenic fragrances are specified on the containers of deodorants. Three market studies were conducted in Germany in 2008, 2010 and 2011. The labels of a total number of 374 deodorants were analyzed as to whether any of the "26 allergens" were listed. The frequency of each allergen in the deodorants was compared with results from previous studies by other authors. It was found that up to 83% of the deodorants contain at least one of the "26 allergens" and that up to 30% of all products contain strong allergens above the threshold for labeling (0.001% in the product). The most frequently listed allergens are medium or weak allergens. In comparison with other authors, the frequency of the "26 allergens" in products is slightly smaller in these recent studies for the German market. There is no significant difference between deodorants for men and women, as far as the labeling of the "26 allergens" is concerned. The results show that the mandatory labeling procedure as designed

  16. Conference report: 2nd Medicon Valley Inhalation Symposium.

    PubMed

    Lastow, Orest

    2014-02-01

    2nd Medicon Valley Inhalation Symposium 16 October 2013, Lund, Sweden The 2nd Medicon Valley Inhalation Symposium was arranged by the Medicon Valley Inhalation Consortium. It was held at the Medicon Village, which is the former AstraZeneca site in Lund, Sweden. It was a 1 day symposium focused on inhaled drug delivery and inhalation product development. 120 delegates listened to 11 speakers. The program was organized to follow the value chain of an inhalation product development. This year there was a focus on inhaled biomolecules. The inhaled delivery of insulin was covered by two presentations and a panel discussion. The future of inhaled drug delivery was discussed together with an overview of the current market situation. Two of the inhalation platforms, capsule inhalers and metered-dose inhalers, were discussed in terms of the present situation and the future opportunities. Much focus was on the regulatory and intellectual aspects of developing inhalation products. The manufacturing of a dry powder inhaler requires precision filling of powder, and the various techniques were presented. The benefits of nebulization and nasal delivery were illustrated with some case studies and examples. The eternal challenge of poor compliance was addressed from an industrial design perspective and some new approaches were introduced.

  17. New strategies for allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Carnés, Jerónimo; Robinson, Douglas S

    2008-06-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy, consisting in the administration of increasing amounts of offending allergens into sensitive patients was first used nearly one hundred years ago and remains in use worldwide for treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma. It has been recognised as the only effective treatment for type I allergic diseases when the appropriate quantities of allergens are used. The immunological mechanisms by which specific immunotherapy is effective include the modulation of T cells and the response of B-cells and is accompanied by significant decreases of specific IgE and increases in allergen specific IgG antibodies, mainly IgG4. While specific allergen injection immunotherapy is highly effective and the most common way of administration other routes such as oral or intranasal ways have been considered as and alternative to subcutaneous injections. During the last century, allergenic vaccines have been prepared using individual allergens adsorbed to different adjuvant substances. These vaccines have demonstrated efficacy and good results in different clinical trials. However, many novel approaches to allergen immunotherapy have been developed in the last years in order to increase the safety and efficacy of allergenic vaccines. In that way, different and modern vaccines have been prepared including more purified products such as depigmented allergen extracts; allergoids, consisting on big molecules of thousands of kDa, which contain all the individual allergens and show a significant decrease in severe adverse reactions; peptides or small aminoacid sequences; recombinant allergens; hypoallergenic vaccines where the IgE binding sites have been modified; or allergen-CpG fusion molecules. New presentations are under study and new treatments will be developed in the near future with the objective that the prevention of allergic disease may become a reality. The review article also discuss recent patent related to the field. PMID:19075996

  18. Allergen and irritant control: importance and implementation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, H S

    1998-01-01

    The Expert Panel Report 2. Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma (1) begins its section on controlling factors that precipitate or worsen asthma with the statement: "For successful long-term asthma management, it is essential to identify and reduce exposures to relevant allergens and irritants and to control other factors that have been shown to increase asthma symptoms and/or precipitate asthma exacerbations." The presence of allergy to indoor allergens and certain seasonal fungal spores has been found to be a risk factor for asthma in epidemiologic studies around the world. Generally between 70% and 85% of asthmatic populations studied have been reported to have positive skin-prick tests. Exposure of allergic patients to inhalant allergens increases airway inflammation, airway hyper-responsiveness, asthma symptoms, need for medication, severe attacks, and even death due to asthma. Environmental tobacco smoke exposure has been shown to increase the prevalence of childhood asthma and to increase asthma symptoms and bronchial hyperresponsiveness while reducing pulmonary function in children chronically exposed. Exposure to other indoor irritants, largely products of unvented combustion, has also been found to increase asthma symptoms. Outdoor air pollution increases asthma symptoms; levels of specific pollutants correlate with emergency room visits and hospitalization for asthma. Rhinitis/sinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux are commonly associated with asthma, and treatment of these conditions has been shown to improve asthma. In patients sensitive to aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or metabisulfites, exposure to these agents can precipitate severe attacks of asthma. Viral infections are common causes for exacerbations of asthma. Infections with Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae contribute to acute exacerbations and perhaps to long-term morbidity, as well. This chapter will discuss preventive and therapeutic measures

  19. New treatments for allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Mübeccel

    2014-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) represents the only curative and specific way for the treatment of allergic diseases, which have reached a pandemic dimension in industrial countries affecting up to 20-30% of the population. Although applied for 100 years to cure allergy, SIT still faces several problems related to side effects and limited efficacy. Currently, allergen-SIT is performed with vaccines based on allergen extracts that can cause severe, often life threatening, anaphylactic reactions as well as new IgE sensitization to other allergens present in the extract. Low patient adherence and high costs due to long duration (3 to 5 years) of treatment have been commonly reported. Several strategies have been developed to tackle these issues and it became possible to produce recombinant allergen-SIT vaccines with reduced allergenic activity.

  20. New treatments for allergen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) represents the only curative and specific way for the treatment of allergic diseases, which have reached a pandemic dimension in industrial countries affecting up to 20-30% of the population. Although applied for 100 years to cure allergy, SIT still faces several problems related to side effects and limited efficacy. Currently, allergen-SIT is performed with vaccines based on allergen extracts that can cause severe, often life threatening, anaphylactic reactions as well as new IgE sensitization to other allergens present in the extract. Low patient adherence and high costs due to long duration (3 to 5 years) of treatment have been commonly reported. Several strategies have been developed to tackle these issues and it became possible to produce recombinant allergen-SIT vaccines with reduced allergenic activity. PMID:25258656

  1. Eosinophils generate brominating oxidants in allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weijia; Samoszuk, Michael K.; Comhair, Suzy A.A.; Thomassen, Mary Jane; Farver, Carol F.; Dweik, Raed A.; Kavuru, Mani S.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2000-01-01

    Eosinophils promote tissue injury and contribute to the pathogenesis of allergen-triggered diseases like asthma, but the chemical basis of damage to eosinophil targets is unknown. We now demonstrate that eosinophil activation in vivo results in oxidative damage of proteins through bromination of tyrosine residues, a heretofore unrecognized pathway for covalent modification of biologic targets in human tissues. Mass spectrometric studies demonstrated that 3-bromotyrosine serves as a specific “molecular fingerprint” for proteins modified through the eosinophil peroxidase-H2O2 system in the presence of plasma levels of halides. We applied a localized allergen challenge to model the effects of eosinophils and brominating oxidants in human lung injury. Endobronchial biopsy specimens from allergen-challenged lung segments of asthmatic, but not healthy control, subjects demonstrated significant enrichments in eosinophils and eosinophil peroxidase. Baseline levels of 3-bromotyrosine in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) proteins from mildly allergic asthmatic individuals were modestly but not statistically significantly elevated over those in control subjects. After exposure to segmental allergen challenge, lung segments of asthmatics, but not healthy control subjects, exhibited a >10-fold increase in BAL 3-bromotyrosine content, but only two- to threefold increases in 3-chlorotyrosine, a specific oxidation product formed by neutrophil- and monocyte-derived myeloperoxidase. These results identify reactive brominating species produced by eosinophils as a distinct class of oxidants formed in vivo. They also reveal eosinophil peroxidase as a potential therapeutic target for allergen-triggered inflammatory tissue injury in humans. PMID:10811853

  2. The indoor air and asthma: the role of cat allergens

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Libby A.; Erwin, Elizabeth A.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review The objective is to discuss recent progress in our understanding of the role of the indoor environment in asthma, focusing on the special role of cat allergens. Recent findings Sensitization to Fel d 1 is the dominant event in inhalant responses to cat; however, there are also IgE responses to the lipocalin (Fel d 4), to cat albumin (Fel d 2), and to the oligosaccharide galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) on cat IgA (Fel d 5w) and other molecules. The dose response and routes of sensitization for these allergens are now thought to be diverse. It is important to remember that exposure outside a house with a cat is sufficient to cause sensitization. Furthermore, the only solid evidence about a role in asthma relates to Fel d 1. Recently, it has been shown that tolerance associated with early exposure to cats can persist to age 18 and that IgE to alpha-gal (on cat IgA) is not related to asthma. In addition, a recent study of anti-IgE reinforces the evidence that IgE antibodies to indoor allergens make a major contribution to asthma severity. Summary Exposure to Fel d 1 in a home with a cat is far higher than the levels necessary to induce an allergic (IgE antibody) response. In keeping with that, children may develop tolerance, which can be long-lived. In addition, there is increasing evidence that IgE antibodies to an inhalant allergen, such as Fel d 1, dust mite, or cockroach, are causally related to lung inflammation and asthma. PMID:22081090

  3. Mometasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... or she watches.The dose counter on the base of your mometasone inhaler tells you how many ... Hold the inhaler straight up with the colored base on the bottom. Twist the white cap counterclockwise ...

  4. Budesonide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... 6 years of age and older. Budesonide suspension (liquid) for oral inhalation (Pulmicort Respules) is used in ... of inhalations even if it still contains some liquid and continues to release a spray when it ...

  5. Subcutaneous Allergic Sensitization to Protease Allergen Is Dependent on Mast Cells but Not IL-33: Distinct Mechanisms between Subcutaneous and Intranasal Routes.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Seiji; Suzuki, Mayu; Hara, Mutsuko; Shimura, Sakiko; Ochi, Hirono; Maruyama, Natsuko; Matsuda, Akira; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Ichikawa, Saori; Ikeda, Shigaku; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2016-05-01

    Protease activity of papain, a plant-derived occupational allergen homologous to mite major allergens, is essential to IgE/IgG1 production and lung eosinophilia induced by intranasal papain administration in mice, and IL-33 contributes to these responses. In this work, we investigate skin and Ab responses induced by s.c. papain administration into ear lobes and responses induced by subsequent airway challenge with papain. Subcutaneous papain injection induced swelling associated with increased epidermal thickness, dermal inflammation, serum IgE/IgG1 responses, and Th2 cytokine production in draining lymph node cells restimulated in vitro. These responses were markedly less upon s.c. administration of protease inhibitor-treated papain. Results obtained by using mast cell-deficient mice and reconstitution of tissue mast cells suggested the contribution of mast cells to papain-specific IgE/IgG1 responses and eosinophil infiltration. The responses were equivalent between wild-type and IL-33(-/-) mice. After the subsequent airway challenge, the s.c. presensitized wild-type mice showed more severe lung eosinophilia than those without the presensitization. The presensitized IL-33(-/-) mice showed modest lung eosinophilia, which was absent without the presensitization, but its severity and IgE boost by the airway challenge were markedly less than the presensitized wild-type mice, in which protease activity of inhaled papain contributed to the responses. The results suggest that mechanisms for the protease-dependent sensitization differ between skin and airway and that cooperation of mast cell-dependent, IL-33-independent initial sensitization via skin and protease-induced, IL-33-mediated mechanism in re-exposure via airway to protease allergens maximizes the magnitude of the transition from skin inflammation to asthma in natural history of progression of allergic diseases. PMID:27001956

  6. Stability of patch test allergens.

    PubMed

    Joy, Nicole Marie; Rice, Kristen R; Atwater, Amber Reck

    2013-01-01

    Patch testing is widely used in evaluating suspected contact dermatitis. One major component of a quality patch test result is a dependable, predictable allergen supply. The allergen needs to be present at a sufficient concentration to elicit a reaction in an allergic patient. To better understand the stability of patch-test allergens, we completed a systematic review of the literature. We found that there is variability in stability among patch-test allergens and that although a few have been shown to be stable, many degrade when in storage. In most cases, expiration dates should be honored. In addition, allergen panels should be prepared as close to the time of patch test application as is possible.

  7. Structural aspects of fungal allergens.

    PubMed

    Crameri, Reto

    2015-03-01

    Despite the increasing number of solved crystal structures of allergens, the key question why some proteins are allergenic and the vast majority is not remains unanswered. The situation is not different for fungal allergens which cover a wide variety of proteins with different chemical properties and biological functions. They cover enzymes, cell wall, secreted, and intracellular proteins which, except cross-reactive allergens, does not show any evidence for structural similarities at least at the three-dimensional level. However, from a diagnostic point of view, pure allergens biotechnologically produced by recombinant technology can provide us, in contrast to fungal extracts which are hardly producible as standardized reagents, with highly pure perfectly standardized diagnostic reagents.

  8. Stability of patch test allergens.

    PubMed

    Joy, Nicole Marie; Rice, Kristen R; Atwater, Amber Reck

    2013-01-01

    Patch testing is widely used in evaluating suspected contact dermatitis. One major component of a quality patch test result is a dependable, predictable allergen supply. The allergen needs to be present at a sufficient concentration to elicit a reaction in an allergic patient. To better understand the stability of patch-test allergens, we completed a systematic review of the literature. We found that there is variability in stability among patch-test allergens and that although a few have been shown to be stable, many degrade when in storage. In most cases, expiration dates should be honored. In addition, allergen panels should be prepared as close to the time of patch test application as is possible. PMID:24030367

  9. Allergen-free probiotics.

    PubMed

    Mogna, Giovanni; Strozzi, Gian Paolo; Mogna, Luca

    2008-09-01

    Food sensitivities are constantly increasing in "westernized" countries and may pose serious health risks to sensitized individuals. Severe allergy episodes have also been reported after the intake of probiotic products containing milk protein residues, especially in children. The need for safe and effective probiotic strains and food supplements, which contain them, is now emerging clearly. The present work describes the way of achieving this aim by the avoidance of any kind of raw materials at risk, both in probiotic strain industrial manufacturing and finished product formulation. Allergen-free probiotics represent, without any doubt, an innovative and safe tool for human health.

  10. Beclomethasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... with water and spit. Do not swallow the water. Keep the inhaler clean and dry with the cover tightly in place ... all times. To clean your inhaler, use a clean, dry tissue or cloth. Do not wash or put any part of your inhaler in water.

  11. Buckwheat anaphylaxis: an unusual allergen in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsung-Chi; Shyur, Shyh-Dar; Wen, Da-Chin; Kao, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Li-Hsin

    2006-01-01

    IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to buckwheat is common in Korea, Japan, and some other Asian countries. However, buckwheat is not a common allergen in Taiwan. We report a woman with asthma who had anaphylactic shock, generalized urticaria, and an acute exacerbation of asthma five minutes after ingesting buckwheat. The patient underwent skin prick and Pharmacia CAP testing (Uppsala, Sweden) for specific IgE to buckwheat, white sesame and soybean as well as other common allergens in Taiwan including Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp), D. farinae (Df), cat and dog dander, cockroach, egg white, cow milk and codfish. The patient had a strongly positive skin prick test response to buckwheat and positive reactions to Dp and latex. Specific IgE results were class 6 for buckwheat, class 4 for Dp and Df, and class 2 for dog dander, wheat, sesame and soybean. Results of an open food challenge with white sesame and soybean were negative. Although buckwheat is a rare allergen in Taiwan, it can cause extremely serious reactions and should be considered in patients presenting with anaphylaxis after exposure to buckwheat. PMID:17136883

  12. Cross-reactivity between aeroallergens and food allergens.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Florin-Dan

    2015-06-26

    In patients with respiratory allergy, cross-reactivity between aeroallergens and foods may induce food allergy, symptoms ranging from oral allergy syndrome to severe anaphylaxis. Clinical entities due to IgE sensitization to cross-reactive aeroallergen and food allergen components are described for many sources of plant origin (pollen-food syndromes and associations, such as birch-apple, cypress-peach and celery-mugwort-spice syndromes, and mugwort-peach, mugwort-chamomile, mugwort-mustard, ragweed-melon-banana, goosefoot-melon associations), fungal origin (Alternaria-spinach syndrome), and invertebrate, mammalian or avian origin (mite-shrimp, cat-pork, and bird-egg syndromes). Clinical cases of allergic reactions to ingestion of food products containing pollen grains of specific plants, in patients with respiratory allergy to Asteraceae pollen, especially mugwort and ragweed, are also mentioned, for honey, royal jelly and bee polen dietary supplements, along with allergic reactions to foods contaminated with mites or fungi in patients with respiratory allergy to these aeroallergens. Medical history and diagnosis approach may be guided by the knowledge about the diverse cross-reacting allergens involved, and by the understanding of these clinical entities which may vary significantly or may be overlapping. The association between primary IgE sensitization with respiratory symptoms to inhaled allergens and food allergy due to cross-reactive allergen components is important to assess in allergy practice. The use of molecular-based diagnosis improves the understanding of clinically relevant IgE sensitization to cross-reactive allergen components from aeroallergen sources and foods. PMID:26140270

  13. Biochemical and molecular biological aspects of silverfish allergens.

    PubMed

    Barletta, Bianca; Di Felice, Gabriella; Pini, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Insects and insect-derived materials have been implicated as a risk factor for sensitization and subsequent elicitation of allergic rhinitis and allergic bronchial asthma. During the last decades, insects other than those known as allergenic, were investigated for their potential role in inducing and triggering an IgE immune response. Among these, the silverfish, an insect belonging to the Thysanura order, appeared to be of particular interest. Silverfish (Lepisma saccharina) is the most primitive living insect, and represents a descendent of the ancestral wingless insects. They are 3-12 mm long, have three tail feelers and are covered with shiny scales. They shun light and need a humid environment and their diet consists of carbohydrate materials such as paper and book-binding glue, crumbs of bread and flour. Because of these features, silverfish finds an optimal habitat both in dwellings and workplaces and in spite of its antiquity, silverfish has succeeded in exploiting the new opportunity created by man. Although its importance significantly increased when it has been demonstrated that house dust contains significant silverfish levels even in houses where the inhabitants were unaware of its presence, no silverfish extract for diagnosis of allergic diseases is commercially available yet. Identification of optimal extraction conditions and characterization of allergenic extracts are the first steps to obtain an effective allergen preparation suitable for diagnosis and therapy, and will be useful as a reference preparation for assessing silverfish exposure in different indoor environments. It has been cloned and characterized a silverfish tropomyosin, named Lep s 1, which represents the first allergen identified in silverfish extract and can be regarded as a molecule cross-reactive among inhalant and edible invertebrates allergenic sources. rLep s 1 displayed biological activity, suggesting that it could be regarded as a useful tool to study the role of silverfish

  14. Cross-reactivity between aeroallergens and food allergens

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Florin-Dan

    2015-01-01

    In patients with respiratory allergy, cross-reactivity between aeroallergens and foods may induce food allergy, symptoms ranging from oral allergy syndrome to severe anaphylaxis. Clinical entities due to IgE sensitization to cross-reactive aeroallergen and food allergen components are described for many sources of plant origin (pollen-food syndromes and associations, such as birch-apple, cypress-peach and celery-mugwort-spice syndromes, and mugwort-peach, mugwort-chamomile, mugwort-mustard, ragweed-melon-banana, goosefoot-melon associations), fungal origin (Alternaria-spinach syndrome), and invertebrate, mammalian or avian origin (mite-shrimp, cat-pork, and bird-egg syndromes). Clinical cases of allergic reactions to ingestion of food products containing pollen grains of specific plants, in patients with respiratory allergy to Asteraceae pollen, especially mugwort and ragweed, are also mentioned, for honey, royal jelly and bee polen dietary supplements, along with allergic reactions to foods contaminated with mites or fungi in patients with respiratory allergy to these aeroallergens. Medical history and diagnosis approach may be guided by the knowledge about the diverse cross-reacting allergens involved, and by the understanding of these clinical entities which may vary significantly or may be overlapping. The association between primary IgE sensitization with respiratory symptoms to inhaled allergens and food allergy due to cross-reactive allergen components is important to assess in allergy practice. The use of molecular-based diagnosis improves the understanding of clinically relevant IgE sensitization to cross-reactive allergen components from aeroallergen sources and foods. PMID:26140270

  15. [Comparative immunological characteristics of Daphnia allergens].

    PubMed

    Berzhets, V M; Mochalov, A A; Sipitsyna, N E; Petrova, N S; Kanchurin, A Kh

    1986-08-01

    Materials on the study of Daphnia allergens are presented. Daphnia allergens have been shown to possess considerable sensitizing properties. The optimum method for the preparation of the allergen has been selected. The method of measuring the electrophoretic mobility of cells with a view to the evaluation of the specific activity of Daphnia allergen is proposed. PMID:2429484

  16. Taxonomy of Allergenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Levetin, Estelle; Horner, W Elliott; Scott, James A

    2016-01-01

    The Kingdom Fungi contains diverse eukaryotic organisms including yeasts, molds, mushrooms, bracket fungi, plant rusts, smuts, and puffballs. Fungi have a complex metabolism that differs from animals and plants. They secrete enzymes into their surroundings and absorb the breakdown products of enzyme action. Some of these enzymes are well-known allergens. The phylogenetic relationships among fungi were unclear until recently because classification was based on the sexual state morphology. Fungi lacking an obvious sexual stage were assigned to the artificial, now-obsolete category, "Deuteromycetes" or "Fungi Imperfecti." During the last 20 years, DNA sequencing has resolved 8 fungal phyla, 3 of which contain most genera associated with important aeroallergens: Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota. Advances in fungal classification have required name changes for some familiar taxa. Because of regulatory constraints, many fungal allergen extracts retain obsolete names. A major benefit from this reorganization is that specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in individuals sensitized to fungi appear to closely match fungal phylogenetic relationships. This close relationship between molecular fungal systematics and IgE sensitization provides an opportunity to systematically look at cross-reactivity and permits representatives from each taxon to serve as a proxy for IgE to the group. PMID:26725152

  17. Taxonomy of Allergenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Levetin, Estelle; Horner, W Elliott; Scott, James A

    2016-01-01

    The Kingdom Fungi contains diverse eukaryotic organisms including yeasts, molds, mushrooms, bracket fungi, plant rusts, smuts, and puffballs. Fungi have a complex metabolism that differs from animals and plants. They secrete enzymes into their surroundings and absorb the breakdown products of enzyme action. Some of these enzymes are well-known allergens. The phylogenetic relationships among fungi were unclear until recently because classification was based on the sexual state morphology. Fungi lacking an obvious sexual stage were assigned to the artificial, now-obsolete category, "Deuteromycetes" or "Fungi Imperfecti." During the last 20 years, DNA sequencing has resolved 8 fungal phyla, 3 of which contain most genera associated with important aeroallergens: Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota. Advances in fungal classification have required name changes for some familiar taxa. Because of regulatory constraints, many fungal allergen extracts retain obsolete names. A major benefit from this reorganization is that specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in individuals sensitized to fungi appear to closely match fungal phylogenetic relationships. This close relationship between molecular fungal systematics and IgE sensitization provides an opportunity to systematically look at cross-reactivity and permits representatives from each taxon to serve as a proxy for IgE to the group.

  18. Variability of Corylus avellana, L. CorA and profilin pollen allergens expression.

    PubMed

    Ražná, Katarína; Bežo, Milan; Nikolaieva, Natalia; Garkava, Katerina; Brindza, Ján; Ziarovská, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Corylus avellana is the source of inhalant allergies induced by hazel pollen as well as food allergies induced after ingestion of hazelnuts. In this study, real-time PCR approach was used to analyse expression of hazel pollen allergens on the molecular level. Relative quantity of hazelnut allergens Corylus avellana, L. CorA and Corylus avellana, L. pollen profiling in samples from different Ukraine areas were determining and comparing. Differences among the levels of both analysed allergen transcripts were found for hazel CorA and profillin. In both cases, the expression within the urbanized growth conditions was higher when compared to the sample from village area. The average expression for CorA was 0.84 times higher than for profilin and the results are very variable depending on the place of growth. Expression levels here were within the range of 2.957 up to the 52.936. Profilin expression was the highest in the sample from the polluted place of growth-cement plant area with the value of 52 times higher when compared to the sample from the village area. In this study, comparison of expression levels of hazel CorA and profiling pollen allergens was performed for the first time. Real-time PCR assay developed in this study proved the sensitivity for detection of the changes of the hazel pollen allergens expression levels and could benefit labs by fast and reproducible detection method of these allergens.

  19. Sensitization to fungal allergens: Resolved and unresolved issues.

    PubMed

    Fukutomi, Yuma; Taniguchi, Masami

    2015-10-01

    Exposure and sensitization to fungal allergens can promote the development and worsening of allergic diseases. Although numerous species of fungi have been associated with allergic diseases in the literature, the significance of fungi from the genera Alternaria, Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Malassezia has been well documented. However, it should be emphasized that the contribution of different fungal allergens to allergic diseases is not identical, but species-specific. Alternaria and Cladosporium species are considered to be important outdoor allergens, and sensitization and exposure to species of these genera is related to the development of asthma and rhinitis, as well as epidemics of asthma exacerbation, including life-threatening asthma exacerbation. In contrast, xerophilic species of Penicillium and Aspergillus, excluding Aspergillus fumigatus, are implicated in allergic diseases as indoor allergens. A. fumigatus has a high capacity to colonize the bronchial tract of asthmatic patients, causing severe persistent asthma and low lung function, and sometimes leading to allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Malassezia are common commensals of healthy skin, although they are also associated with atopic dermatitis, especially on the head and neck, but not with respiratory allergies. Despite its importance in the management of allergic diseases, precise recognition of species-specific IgE sensitization to fungal allergens is often challenging because the majority of fungal extracts exhibit broad cross-reactivity with taxonomically unrelated fungi. Recent progress in gene technology has contributed to the identification of specific and cross-reactive allergen components from different fungal sources. However, data demonstrating the clinical relevance of IgE reactivity to these allergen components are still insufficient. PMID:26433528

  20. Inhalation exposure technology, dosimetry, and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Dorato, M A; Wolff, R K

    1991-01-01

    Inhalation toxicology technology has provided the scientific community with important advances in studies of inhaled toxicants. These advances include new and more efficient exposure systems (e.g., flow-past nose-only exposure systems), and improved approaches to inhalation chamber environmental control (e.g., temperature, humidity, air quality). Practical problems and approaches to testing and operating inhalation exposure systems and the advantages and disadvantages of the major inhalation exposure types (e.g., whole-body, nose-only) are discussed. Important aspects of study design, such as high level particulate exposures resulting in large lung burdens (e.g., greater than or equal to 2 mg/g of lung), slowed pulmonary clearance rates, and nonspecific toxicity are considered, along with practical issues of comparative dosimetry. Regulatory guidelines have continued to present challenges in designing and conducting acute, subchronic, and chronic inhalation studies. The important regulatory issue of performing acute inhalation toxicity studies at high aerosol concentrations and "respirable" particle size distribution is discussed. PMID:1813983

  1. The allergens in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    de Groot, A C; Bruynzeel, D P; Bos, J D; van der Meeren, H L; van Joost, T; Jagtman, B A; Weyland, J W

    1988-10-01

    The ingredients responsible for allergy to cosmetics were determined in 119 patients suffering from cosmetic-related contact dermatitis. Most reactions (56.3%) were caused by skin care products, followed by nail cosmetics (13.4%), perfumes (8.4%), and hair cosmetics (5.9%). Preservatives were most frequently implicated (32.0%), followed by fragrances (26.5%) and emulsifiers (14.3%). By far the most important cosmetic allergen was Kathon CG, (a preservative system containing, as active ingredients, a mixture of methylisothiazolinone and methyl chloroisothiazolinone) reacting in 33 patients (27.7%). Other frequent causes of cosmetic-related contact allergic reactions were toluenesulfonamide/formaldehyde resin in nail hardener and/or nail lacquer (15 patients [12.6%]), and oleamidopropyl dimethylamine, an emulsifier in baby body lotion (13 patients [10.9%]).

  2. Grass Pollen Allergens

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Rosa; Hayward, Barbara J.

    1962-01-01

    Cocksfoot and Timothy pollen extracts are each found to contain at least fifteen components antigenic in rabbits. Most of these can also be allergens for man, but only a few are regularly so. These `principal' allergens have now been isolated in highly purified form. Procedures are given for a simple method of preparing extracts for clinical purposes and for the partial separation, concentration and purification of the allergens by means of differential extractions of the pollens and by means of ultrafiltration, isoelectric precipitation and salt fractionations (at acid and neutral pH) of the extracts. Isoelectric precipitations gave highly pigmented acid complexes, two of which moved as single sharp peaks at pH 7.4 in free electrophoresis, but proved to be hardly active by skin tests. Acid NaCl fractionation of the remainder resulted for Cocksfoot and Timothy in the isolation of a nearly white powder (T21.111121112 = T21B) which was weight for weight 1000–10,000 times as active as the pollen from which it had been derived. The powders have retained their activity for 7 years. By gel diffusion tests, they were found to contain two antigens (one in each preparation) which were immunologically partially related, but the Timothy preparation contained in addition the `innermost' `twin' antigens specific for Timothy that we had discovered previously in the crude extracts by gel diffusion methods. Skin reactions could be elicited in hay-fever subjects by prick tests with concentrations of 10-9–10-8 g./ml., which is equivalent to intradermal injections of 10-11–10-10 mg. and represents a 300-fold purification with respect to the concentrates of crude pollen extracts prepared by ultrafiltration and dialysis. Fractionation on DEAE-cellulose of one of the highly purified Timothy preparations (T21.11112112 = T21A) and other, crude Timothy and Cocksfoot extracts resulted in considerable and reproducible separation of the various antigens, with no indication of the

  3. Pollen Allergens for Molecular Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pablos, Isabel; Wildner, Sabrina; Asam, Claudia; Wallner, Michael; Gadermaier, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    Pollen allergens are one of the main causes of type I allergies affecting up to 30% of the population in industrialized countries. Climatic changes affect the duration and intensity of pollen seasons and may together with pollution contribute to increased incidences of respiratory allergy and asthma. Allergenic grasses, trees, and weeds often present similar habitats and flowering periods compromising clinical anamnesis. Molecule-based approaches enable distinction between genuine sensitization and clinically mostly irrelevant IgE cross-reactivity due to, e. g., panallergens or carbohydrate determinants. In addition, sensitivity as well as specificity can be improved and lead to identification of the primary sensitizing source which is particularly beneficial regarding polysensitized patients. This review gives an overview on relevant pollen allergens and their usefulness in daily practice. Appropriate allergy diagnosis is directly influencing decisions for therapeutic interventions, and thus, reliable biomarkers are pivotal when considering allergen immunotherapy in the context of precision medicine.

  4. Are specific allergen sensitivities inherited?

    PubMed

    Misiak, Rana Tawil; Wegienka, Ganesa; Zoratti, Edward

    2010-09-01

    A family history of an allergic condition is a well-accepted risk factor for the development of an allergic condition in an individual, particularly for allergic disorders such as asthma, eczema, and allergic rhinitis. However, the question of whether specific allergen sensitization is inherited requires a complicated answer, as environmental exposure plays an important role in the development of allergen-specific IgE. This article summarizes the findings of recent studies in the literature regarding what is known about the inheritance of specific allergens. Overall, properly collected and analyzed data appear to both support and refute the hypothesis that specific allergen sensitization is inherited, even when attempting to account for the complexities of varying study methodologies and the evaluation of diverse populations and communities. PMID:20574668

  5. Association of pediatric asthma severity with exposure to common household dust allergens

    SciTech Connect

    Gent, Janneane F.; Belanger, Kathleen; Triche, Elizabeth W.; Beckett, William S.; Leaderer, Brian P.

    2009-08-15

    Background: Reducing exposure to household dust inhalant allergens has been proposed as one strategy to reduce asthma. Objective: To examine the dose-response relationships and health impact of five common household dust allergens on disease severity, quantified using both symptom frequency and medication use, in atopic and non-atopic asthmatic children. Methods: Asthmatic children (N=300) aged 4-12 years were followed for 1 year. Household dust samples from two indoor locations were analyzed for allergens including dust mite (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1), cockroach (Bla g 1). Daily symptoms and medication use were collected in monthly telephone interviews. Annual disease severity was examined in models including allergens, specific IgE sensitivity and adjusted for age, gender, atopy, ethnicity, and mother's education. Results: Der p 1 house dust mite allergen concentration of 2.0 {mu}g/g or more from the main room and the child's bed was related to increased asthma severity independent of allergic status (respectively, OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.37, 6.30 for 2.0-10.0 {mu}g/g and OR 2.55 95% CI 1.13, 5.73 for {>=}10.0 {mu}g/g). Higher pet allergen levels were associated with greater asthma severity, but only for those sensitized (cat OR 2.41 95% CI 1.19, 4.89; dog OR 2.06 95% CI 1.01, 4.22). Conclusion: Higher levels of Der p 1 and pet allergens were associated with asthma severity, but Der p 1 remained an independent risk factor after accounting for pet allergens and regardless of Der p 1 specific IgE status.

  6. [Inhaled therapy in asthma].

    PubMed

    Plaza Moral, Vicente; Giner Donaire, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Because of its advantages, inhaled administration of aerosolized drugs is the administration route of choice for the treatment of asthma and COPD. Numerous technological advances in the devices used in inhaled therapy in recent decades have boosted the appearance of multiple inhalers and aerosolized drugs. However, this variety also requires that the prescribing physician is aware of their characteristics. The main objective of the present review is to summarize the current state of knowledge on inhalers and inhaled drugs commonly used in the treatment of asthma. The review ranges from theoretical aspects (fundamentals and available devices and drugs) to practical and relevant aspects for asthma care in the clinical setting (therapeutic strategies, education, and adherence to inhalers). PMID:26683076

  7. Fungi: the neglected allergenic sources.

    PubMed

    Crameri, R; Garbani, M; Rhyner, C; Huitema, C

    2014-02-01

    Allergic diseases are considered the epidemics of the twentieth century estimated to affect more than 30% of the population in industrialized countries with a still increasing incidence. During the past two decades, the application of molecular biology allowed cloning, production and characterization of hundreds of recombinant allergens. In turn, knowledge about molecular, chemical and biologically relevant allergens contributed to increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying IgE-mediated type I hypersensitivity reactions. It has been largely demonstrated that fungi are potent sources of allergenic molecules covering a vast variety of molecular structures including enzymes, toxins, cell wall components and phylogenetically highly conserved cross-reactive proteins. Despite the large knowledge accumulated and the compelling evidence for an involvement of fungal allergens in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases, fungi as a prominent source of allergens are still largely neglected in basic research as well as in clinical practice. This review aims to highlight the impact of fungal allergens with focus on asthma and atopic dermatitis.

  8. Identification of Aspergillus (A. flavus and A. niger) Allergens and Heterogeneity of Allergic Patients' IgE Response.

    PubMed

    Vermani, Maansi; Vijayan, Vannan Kandi; Agarwal, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Aspergillus species (A. flavus and A. niger) are important sources of inhalant allergens. Current diagnostic modalities employ crude Aspergillus extracts which only indicate the source to which the patient has been sensitized, without identifying the number and type of allergens in crude extracts. We report a study on the identification of major and minor allergens of the two common airborne Aspergillus species and heterogeneity of patients' IgE response to them. Skin prick tests were performed on 300 patients of bronchial asthma and/or allergic rhinitis and 20 healthy volunteers. Allergen specific IgE in patients' sera was estimated by enzyme allergosorbent test (EAST). Immunoblots were performed to identify major/minor allergens of Aspergillus extracts and to study heterogeneity of patients'IgE response to them. Positive cutaneous responses were observed in 17% and 14.7% of patients with A. flavus and A. niger extracts, respectively. Corresponding EAST positivity was 69.2% and 68.7%. In immunoblots, 5 allergenic proteins were identified in A. niger extract, major allergens being 49, 55.4 and 81.5 kDa. Twelve proteins bound patients' IgE in A. flavus extract, three being major allergens (13.3, 34 and 37 kDa). The position and slopes of EAST binding and inhibition curves obtained with individual sera varied from patient to patient. The number and molecular weight of IgE-binding proteins in both the Aspergillus extracts varied among patients. These results gave evidence of heterogeneity of patients' IgE response to major/minor Aspergillus allergens. This approach will be helpful to identify disease eliciting molecules in the individual patients (component resolved diagnosis) and may improve allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  9. Pattern of sensitization to common environmental allergens amongst atopic Singapore children in the first 3 years of life.

    PubMed

    Khoo, J; Shek, L P; Shek, L; Khor, E S; Wang, D Y; Lee, B W

    2001-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the sensitization pattern to a range of common allergens in young Singaporean children. A cross-sectional study involving 75 children aged below 3 years was carried out. They presented between December 1995 and April 2000 with symptoms of asthma, rhinitis, eczema, or food allergy. Their levels of allergen-specific serum IgE to a panel of foods (egg white, milk, soy protein, shrimp, wheat and peanut), pet dander, dust mites and cockroaches were measured with Pharmacia CAP System radioallergosorbent test kits. Serum IgE levels greater than 0.35 kU/l represented a positive result. Four children could not be tested with the complete panel because of insufficient serum. The prevalence of sensitization was highest for cow's milk (45.9%) followed by egg white (38.7%), dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (31.4%) and Blomia tropicalis (25.5%). Sensitization to ingested allergens was significantly more prevalent in children aged 1 year or younger than in the older children (70.4% of those below 1 year, and 50% of those aged 1-3 years; p < 0.02). Sensitization to inhaled allergens, such as dust mites, was more likely to manifest as respiratory symptoms (allergic rhinitis and asthma), while ingested allergens were associated with gastrointestinal symptoms and eczema (p < 0.001). It was concluded that infants and young children are at high risk of sensitization to common environmental substances. Allergen avoidance is therefore important even in the very young. The prevalence of sensitization to food allergens is higher compared to inhalant allergens in young children. PMID:12009071

  10. The effect of marimastat, a metalloprotease inhibitor, on allergen-induced asthmatic hyper-reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, Colleen; Thomas, Paul S. . E-mail: paul.thomas@unsw.edu.au

    2005-06-01

    This pilot study was designed to assess whether a synthetic matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor has anti-inflammatory properties in mild asthma. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha}) has been shown to be an important cytokine in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammatory responses, and its release can be inhibited by MMP inhibitors. Twelve atopic asthmatic subjects received the MMP inhibitor marimastat (5 mg) or placebo, twice daily for 3 weeks, separated by a 6-week washout period in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over manner. All subjects underwent an allergen inhalation provocation test to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus before and after each study phase. Spirometry, exhaled NO (eNO) levels, differential sputum cell counts, an asthma symptom questionnaire, peak flow, and {beta}{sub 2}-agonist usage were measured. Nine subjects completed the study, and, when compared with placebo, marimastat reduced bronchial hyper-responsiveness to inhaled allergen in these subjects from an allergen PC{sub 20} of 22.2 AU/ml (95%CI 11.7-32.6) to 17.0 AU/ml (95%CI 7.6-26.4, P = 0.02). The marimastat phase showed a nonsignificant fall in sputum inflammatory cells. Marimastat did not modify eNO, FEV{sub 1}, asthma symptoms, or albuterol usage. In conclusion, airway responsiveness to allergen may be modified by a MMP inhibitor, perhaps via TNF{alpha} playing a role in airway inflammation and remodeling.

  11. Determination of storage conditions for shrimp extracts: analysis of specific IgE-allergen profiles.

    PubMed

    Piboonpocanun, Surapon; Boonchoo, Siribangon; Pariyaprasert, Wipada; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai

    2010-03-01

    The consumption of shrimp is a common cause of food hypersensitivity reactions. Shrimp allergy is diagnosed using a skin prick test (SPT) as well as by food challenges. Due to the lack of a wide variety of commercial shrimp extracts for SPTs, we selected various shrimp species for the preparation of local shrimp extracts. However, optimal storage conditions for the shrimp extracts which also maintains allergenic potency has not yet been identified. The objective of the present study was to determine the potency of the shrimp extracts under different storage conditions and durations. Specific IgE-allergen profiles of eight shrimp-allergic patients were investigated by using sera incubated with extracts prepared from lyophilized raw or boiled shrimp, which were stored at 4 degress C or -20 degress C for up to 4 weeks. When stored at -20 degress C, most allergens were preserved after 4 weeks. However, storage at 4 degress C results in few allergens remaining after 2 weeks. Boiled-shrimp extracts stored at 4 degree C and -20 degress C contained higher amounts of IgE-allergen complexes than raw-shrimp extracts. Moreover, in both raw and boiled shrimp extracts, the IgE bound 36-40 kDa allergens constituted the major proteins since they were observed in all IgE-allergen profiles. In conclusion, we recommend that shrimp extracts are stored at -20 degress C for 4 weeks to prevent the loss of allergens.

  12. The effects of an epithelial barrier protective cationic aerosol on allergen-induced airway inflammation in asthma: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Nair, P; Denis, S; Cancelliere, L; Radford, K; Efthimiadis, A; Rosano, M; Hanrahan, J

    2014-09-01

    Inhaled cationic airway lining modulator (iCALM) is a cationic aerosol therapy comprised of 1.29% calcium chloride dissolved in 0.9% isotonic saline that enhances the biophysical barrier function of the airway lining fluid and primes the host defense response. It's ability to attenuate bronchitis caused by inhaled particles was investigated using an allergen-inhalation model in a proof-of-concept study. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial of 6 mild atopic steroid-naïve asthmatic subjects, 3 doses of iCALM were well tolerated and they attenuated allergen-induced increase in sputum eosinophils, and levels of IL-5, MCP-1 and eotaxin. This study provides an opportunity to investigate the role of enhancing epithelial barrier to decrease airway inflammation provoked by inhaled particles in a variety of airway diseases.

  13. Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeutic dose delivered by inhaled pharmacological drugs. Howeve...

  14. Crystal structure of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) allergen Ara h 5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Profilins from numerous species are known to be allergens, including food allergens, such as peanut (Arachis hypogaea) allergen Ara h 5, and pollen allergens, such as birch allergen Bet v 2. Patients with pollen allergy can also cross-react to peanut. Structural characterization of allergens will al...

  15. Recombinant allergens: what does the future hold?

    PubMed

    Valenta, Rudolf; Niespodziana, Katarzyna; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Marth, Katharina; Huber, Hans; Neubauer, Angela; Niederberger, Verena

    2011-04-01

    This year we are celebrating not only the centenary of allergen-specific immunotherapy but also the 10-year anniversary of the first administration of recombinant allergen-based vaccines to allergic patients. By using recombinant DNA technology, defined and safe allergy vaccines can be produced that allow us to overcome many, if not all, of the problems associated with the use of natural allergen extracts, such as insufficient quality, allergenic activity, and poor immunogenicity. Here we provide an update of clinical studies with recombinant allergen-based vaccines, showing that some of these vaccines have undergone successful clinical evaluation up to phase III studies. Furthermore, we introduce a strategy for allergen-specific immunotherapy based on recombinant fusion proteins consisting of viral carrier proteins and allergen-derived peptides without allergenic activity, which holds the promise of being free of side effects and eventually being useful for prophylactic vaccination.

  16. Household Arthropod Allergens in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong

    2009-01-01

    Arthropods are important in human health, which can transmit pathogens to humans, parasitize, or produce important allergens. Allergy prevalence becomes higher in Korea recently as well as other developed countries in contrast to a decrease of infectious diseases. Allergic diseases caused by household arthropods have increased dramatically during the last few decades since human beings spend more their time for indoor activities in modernized life style. Household arthropods are one of the most common causes of allergic diseases. Biological characterization of household arthropods and researches on their allergens will provide better understanding of the pathogenesis of allergic diseases and suggest new therapeutic ways. Therefore, studies on arthropods of allergenic importance can be considered one of the major research areas in medical arthropodology and parasitology. Here, the biology of several household arthropods, including house dust mites and cockroaches, the 2 most well known arthropods living indoor together with humans worldwide, and characteristics of their allergens, especially the research activities on these allergens performed in Korea, are summarized. PMID:19885330

  17. Analysis to support allergen risk management: Which way to go?

    PubMed

    Cucu, Tatiana; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2013-06-19

    Food allergy represents an important food safety issue because of the potential lethal effects; the only effective treatment is the complete removal of the allergen involved from the diet. However, due to the growing complexity of food formulations and food processing, foods may be unintentionally contaminated via allergen-containing ingredients or cross-contamination. This affects not only consumers' well-being but also food producers and competent authorities involved in inspecting and auditing food companies. To address these issues, the food industry and control agencies rely on available analytical methods to quantify the amount of a particular allergic commodity in a food and thus to decide upon its safety. However, no "gold standard methods" exist for the quantitative detection of food allergens. Nowadays mostly receptor-based methods and in particular commercial kits are used in routine analysis. However, upon evaluation of their performances, commercial assays proved often to be unreliable in processed foods, attributed to the chemical changes in proteins that affect the molecular recognition with the receptor used. Unfortunately, the analytical outcome of other methods, among which are chromatographic combined with mass spectrometric techniques as well as DNA-based methods, seem to be affected in a comparable way by food processing. Several strategies can be employed to improve the quantitative analysis of allergens in foods. Nevertheless, issues related to extractability and matrix effects remain a permanent challenge. In view of the presented results, it is clear that the food industry needs to continue to make extra efforts to provide accurate labeling and to reduce the contamination with allergens to an acceptable level through the use of allergen risk management on a company level, which needs to be supported inevitably by a tailor-validated extraction and detection method.

  18. Inhalants in Peru.

    PubMed

    Lerner, R; Ferrando, D

    1995-01-01

    In Peru, the prevalence and consequences of inhalant abuse appear to be low in the general population and high among marginalized children. Inhalant use ranks third in lifetime prevalence after alcohol and tobacco. Most of the use appears to be infrequent. Among marginalized children, that is, children working in the streets but living at home or children living in the street, the problem of inhalant abuse is a serious problem. Among children working in the streets but living at home, the lifetime prevalence rate for inhalant abuse is high, ranging from 15 to 45 percent depending on the study being cited. For children living in the streets, the use of inhalant is even more severe. As mentioned earlier in this chapter, most of these street children use inhalants on a daily basis. The lack of research on the problem of inhalant abuse is a serious impediment to development of intervention programs and strategies to address this problem in Peru. Epidemiologic and ethnographic research on the nature and extent of inhalant abuse are obvious prerequisites to targeted treatment and preventive intervention programs. The urgent need for current and valid data is underscored by the unique vulnerability of the youthful population at risk and the undisputed harm that results from chronic abuse of inhalants. Nonetheless, it is important to mention several programs that work with street children. Some, such as the Information and Education Center for the Prevention of Drug Abuse, Generation, and Centro Integracion de Menores en Abandono have shelters where street children are offered transition to a less marginal lifestyle. Teams of street educators provide the children with practical solutions and gain their confidence, as well as offer them alternative socialization experiences to help them survive the streets and avoid the often repressive and counterproductive environments typical of many institutions. Most of the children who go through these programs tend to abandon

  19. Removing peanut allergens by tannic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tannic acid (TA) is known to bind and form insoluble complexes with proteins, including peanut allergens; however, whether such complexes would dissociate and release the allergens at pH 2 and 8 (i.e., gastric and intestinal pH) is not clear. Release of the allergens in the gut could lead to absorpt...

  20. Biology of weed pollen allergens.

    PubMed

    Gadermaier, Gabriele; Dedic, Azra; Obermeyer, Gerhard; Frank, Susanne; Himly, Martin; Ferreira, Fatima

    2004-09-01

    Weeds represent a heterogeneous group of plants, usually defined by no commercial or aesthetic value. Important allergenic weeds belong to the plant families Asteraceae, Amaranthaceae, Urticaceae, Euphorbiaceae, and Plantaginaceae. Major allergens from ragweed, mugwort, feverfew, pellitory, goosefoot, Russian thistle, plantain, and Mercurialis pollen have been characterized to varying degrees. Four major families of proteins seem to be the major cause of allergic reactions to weed pollen: the ragweed Amb a 1 family of pectate lyases; the defensin-like Art v 1 family from mugwort, feverfew, and probably also from sunflower; the Ole e 1-like allergens Pla l 1 from plantain and Che a 1 from goosefoot; and the nonspecific lipid transfer proteins Par j 1 and Par j 2 from pellitory. As described for other pollens, weed pollen also contains the panallergens profilin and calcium-binding proteins, which are responsible for extensive cross-reactivity among pollen-sensitized patients.

  1. Inhalant abuse: youth at risk.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Nancy R; Falsafi, Nasrin

    2013-08-01

    Inhalant abuse is a significant problem affecting many people, particularly youth. The easy availability of products containing volatile substances (e.g., aerosol sprays, cleaning products, paint) provides opportunity for mind-altering experiences. Unfortunately, serious complications such as brain, cardiovascular, liver, and renal damage or even death may ensue. Adolescents perceive the risk as low, and parents may be unaware of the risks. Health care providers, particularly psychiatric nurses, should undertake strategies of prevention, assessment, and treatment of this challenging problem. PMID:23786241

  2. Fish Allergens at a Glance: Variable Allergenicity of Parvalbumins, the Major Fish Allergens

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Annette; Swoboda, Ines; Arumugam, Karthik; Hilger, Christiane; Hentges, François

    2014-01-01

    Fish is a common trigger of severe, food-allergic reactions. Only a limited number of proteins induce specific IgE-mediated immune reactions. The major fish allergens are the parvalbumins. They are members of the calcium-binding EF-hand protein family characterized by a conserved protein structure. They represent highly cross-reactive allergens for patients with specific IgE to conserved epitopes. These patients might experience clinical reactions with various fish species. On the other hand, some individuals have IgE antibodies directed against unique, species-specific parvalbumin epitopes, and these patients show clinical symptoms only with certain fish species. Furthermore, different parvalbumin isoforms and isoallergens are present in the same fish and might display variable allergenicity. This was shown for salmon homologs, where only a single parvalbumin (beta-1) isoform was identified as allergen in specific patients. In addition to the parvalbumins, several other fish proteins, enolases, aldolases, and fish gelatin, seem to be important allergens. New clinical and molecular insights advanced the knowledge and understanding of fish allergy in the last years. These findings were useful for the advancement of the IgE-based diagnosis and also for the management of fish allergies consisting of advice and treatment of fish-allergic patients. PMID:24795722

  3. Laboratory approach for diagnosis of toluene-based inhalant abuse in a clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Raka; Verma, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    The steady increase of inhalant abuse is a great challenge for analytical toxicologists. This review describes an overview of inhalant abuse including the extent of the problem, types of products abused, modes of administration, pharmacology and effects of inhalants, the role of laboratory, interpretation of laboratory results and clinical considerations. Regular laboratory screening for inhalant abuse as well as other substance abuse and health risk behaviors must be a part of standard clinical care. PMID:26957863

  4. Emergent and unusual allergens in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, David; Moreau, Linda; Sasseville, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis from cosmetics is a common problem that is occasionally caused by new or rare allergens. When a patient has a positive patch test to a cosmetic product but to none of the common or commercially available allergens, it is important to further patch-test this patient to the ingredients of the product. Thorough testing with the breakdown of ingredients, usually obtained through cooperation with the manufacturer, often allows identification of the culprit allergen in the cosmetic product. In this article, we discuss emerging or rare allergens discovered by this method, including nail lacquer and lipstick allergens, copolymers, shellac, alkyl glucosides, glycols, protein derivatives, idebenone, and octocrylene. PMID:20487655

  5. [Soybean allergens and hypoallergenic germplasm enhancement].

    PubMed

    Fang, Xu-Qian; Zhu, You-Lin; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2006-08-01

    Food allergy is a public sanitary problem which has received attention worldwide. It is becoming an increasingly interesting problem to decrease the concentration of allergens for improvement of the food security. Soybean allergens in seeds are composing of storage proteins, structure proteins, and disease-related proteins. Among them, Gly m Bd 28K, Gly m Bd 30K and Gly m Bd 60K are the major allergens located in 7S conglycinin fragments. By recognizing allergens' physicochemical property, hypersensitivity and gene structure, certain progresses had been made to reduce the concentration of allergens in soybean through food processing, traditional breeding and genetic engineering. The paper reviewed the sorts and characters of soybean allergens, the physicochemical property of the three immunodominant allergens and their gene structures. Progress in developing hypoallergenic cultivars was also discussed.

  6. Enzymatic hydrolysis: a method in alleviating legume allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Kasera, Ramkrashan; Singh, A B; Lavasa, S; Prasad, Komarla Nagendra; Arora, Naveen

    2015-02-01

    Legumes are involved in IgE mediated food allergy in many countries. Avoidance of allergenic food is the only way to avoid symptomatic reaction. The present study investigated the effect of enzymatic hydrolysis on the allergenicity of three legumes - kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), black gram (Vigna mungo) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea). Soluble protein extracts of the study legumes were sequentially treated by Alcalase(®) and Flavourzyme(®). Allergenicity of hydrolysates was then determined by ELISA, immunoblot, stripped basophil histamine release and skin prick test (SPT). Hydrolysis resulted in the loss of all IgE binding fractions determined by immunoblot in the three legumes. Specific IgE binding in ELISA was reduced by 62.2 ± 7.7%, 87.1 ± 9.6% and 91.8 ± 7.2% in the hydrolysates of kidney bean, black gram and peanut, respectively (p < 0.01). The release of histamine was decreased significantly when sensitized basophils were challenged with hydrolysates as compared to raw extracts. Significant reduction in the biopotency of hydrolysates was also observed in SPT where only 1/10 kidney bean-sensitive individuals, 2/6 black gram-sensitive individuals and 1/7 peanut-sensitive individuals were found positive to their respective hydrolysates. In conclusion, enzymatic hydrolysis is effective in attenuating allergenicity of legume proteins and may be employed for preparing hypoallergenic food extracts.

  7. Assessment of protein allergenicity: studies in brown norway rats.

    PubMed

    Knippels, Léon M J; Penninks, André H

    2002-05-01

    For the safety evaluation of genetically engineered crops, the potential allergenicity of the newly introduced protein(s) has become an important issue. There is, however, no universal and reliable test system for the evaluation of the allergic sensitizing ability of food proteins. Therefore, there is a growing interest in the development of animal models. This paper summarizes the results of a promising food allergy model developed in Brown Norway (BN) rats. The results demonstrate that BN rats can be sensitized via the relevant oral route of exposure. Daily gavage dosing of the animals with several food proteins, without the use of adjuvants, resulted in significant antigen-specific IgE responses. In addition, the profile of allergens recognized by the immune system of the BN rat, appeared comparable to the profile of allergens recognized by allergic humans. Besides oral sensitization, local and systemic immune-mediated effects, such as increased gastrointestinal permeability, decreased breathing frequency, and decreased blood pressure, could also be observed in the sensitized animals after an oral challenge. All together, these observations suggest that this BN rat model might provide a suitable animal model to study the allergenicity of food proteins in humans.

  8. Levalbuterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... inhaler or nebulizer. Ask your doctor, pharmacist, or respiratory therapist to show you how to use it. ... propranolol (Inderal); digoxin (Digitek, Lanoxin); diuretics ('water pills'); epinephrine (Epipen, Primatene Mist); medications for colds; and other ...

  9. Albuterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the bottom and the inhaler pointing upwards, load the dose by opening the protective dust cap ... or face mask. Connect the nebulizer to the compressor. Place the mouthpiece in your mouth or put ...

  10. Substance use - inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... it has been sprayed or put into a paper or plastic bag Ballooning. Inhaling a gas from ... empty soda cans, empty perfume bottles, and toilet paper tubes stuffed with rags or toilet paper soaked ...

  11. Formoterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... shortness of breath, and breathing difficulties caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of lung diseases that includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema) in adults. Formoterol inhalation powder ...

  12. Olodaterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... of breath, coughing, and chest tightness caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of diseases that affect the lungs and airways, which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema). Olodaterol oral inhalation is in ...

  13. Umeclidinium Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... of breath, coughing, and chest tightness caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of diseases that affect the lungs and airways, that includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema). Umeclidinium inhalation is in a ...

  14. Cromolyn Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... difficulties (bronchospasm) caused by exercise, cold and dry air, or by inhaling substances such as pet dander, ... of substances that cause inflammation (swelling) in the air passages of the lungs.

  15. Fluticasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are near an open flame or a heat source. The inhaler may explode if it is ... Nizoral); clarithromycin (Biaxin); HIV protease inhibitors such as atazanavir (Reyataz, in Evotaz), indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir ( ...

  16. Pirbuterol Acetate Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pirbuterol is in a class of medications called beta-agonist bronchodilators. It works by relaxing and opening ... cleaning. Once a week, remove the mouthpiece cover, turn the inhaler upside down and wipe the mouthpiece ...

  17. Overview of inhalation toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Dorato, M A

    1990-01-01

    The development of inhalation toxicology as a distinct discipline can be traced back well over one hundred years. The technology has advanced in terms of materials and designs used to construct inhalation chambers and the equipment used to generate controlled test atmospheres of a wide variety of gases, vapors, dusts, and droplets. Consideration of metered dose inhalers, a relatively recent concern, has led to the design of new equipment for administering this unique dosage form. The parameters used to evaluate inhalation toxicity are similar to those used for any other route of administration. In addition, there are some unique procedures for early screening of pulmonary toxicity, especially within a series of related chemicals. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. PMID:2200660

  18. Thresholds of allergenic proteins in foods

    SciTech Connect

    Hourihane, Jonathan O'B. . E-mail: J.Hourihane@soton.ac.uk; Knulst, Andre C.

    2005-09-01

    Threshold doses or Estimated Eliciting Doses (EEDs) represent an important new field of research in food allergy. Clinicians and regulators have embraced some toxicological concepts such as LOAEL and NOAEL and applied them to an area of significant clinical uncertainty and interest. The impact of intrinsic human factors (e.g., asthma and exercise) and extrinsic event factors (e.g., season, location and especially dose of allergen) on a future allergic reaction in the community needs to be considered carefully when interpreting results of clinical and research low-dose food challenges. The ongoing cooperation of food allergy research groups in medicine, food science and government will surely deliver results of the highest importance to the wider communities of allergology, food science and technology and the increasing number of allergic consumers.

  19. Protocol for a human in vivo model of acute cigarette smoke inhalation challenge in smokers with COPD: monitoring the nasal and systemic immune response using a network biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Clare L; Galloway-Phillipps, Neil; Armstrong, Paul C; Mitchell, Jane A; Warner, Timothy D; Brearley, Christopher; Ito, Mari; Tunstall, Tanushree; Elkin, Sarah; Kon, Onn Min; Hansel, Trevor T; Paul-Clark, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cigarette smoke contributes to a diverse range of diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disorders and many cancers. There currently is a need for human challenge models, to assess the acute effects of a controlled cigarette smoke stimulus, followed by serial sampling of blood and respiratory tissue for advanced molecular profiling. We employ precision sampling of nasal mucosal lining fluid by absorption to permit soluble mediators measurement in eluates. Serial nasal curettage was used for transcriptomic analysis of mucosal tissue. Methods and analysis Three groups of strictly defined patients will be studied: 12 smokers with COPD (GOLD Stage 2) with emphysema, 12 matched smokers with normal lung function and no evidence of emphysema, and 12 matched never smokers with normal spirometry. Patients in the smoking groups are current smokers, and will be given full support to stop smoking immediately after this study. In giving a controlled cigarette smoke stimulus, all patients will have abstained from smoking for 12 h, and will smoke two cigarettes with expiration through the nose in a ventilated chamber. Before and after inhalation of cigarette smoke, a series of samples will be taken from the blood, nasal mucosal lining fluid and nasal tissue by curettage. Analysis of plasma nicotine and metabolites in relation to levels of soluble inflammatory mediators in nasal lining fluid and blood, as well as assessing nasal transcriptomics, ex vivo blood platelet aggregation and leucocyte responses to toll-like receptor agonists will be undertaken. Implications Development of acute cigarette smoke challenge models has promise for the study of molecular effects of smoking in a range of pathological processes. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the West London National Research Ethics Committee (12/LO/1101). The study findings will be presented at conferences and will be reported in peer-reviewed journals

  20. Approaches to assessment of the allergenic potential of novel proteins in food from genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2002-07-01

    The safety assessment of food derived from genetically modified plants continues to attract considerable attention. Among the important issues that need to be considered is whether the products of novel genes introduced into crop plants will have the potential to induce allergic sensitization or to elicit allergic disease. Hierarchical approaches to allergenicity testing have been proposed, and these incorporate evaluation of the structural and sequence homology and serological identity of novel proteins with known allergens, measurement of resistance to proteolytic digestion, and assessment of allergenic potential using animal models. Accounts of these approaches are available elsewhere, and it is not the purpose of this article to provide a detailed critique of specific methods. Our intention is rather to look more broadly at the strategy for assessment of allergenic potential, the challenges such assessments pose for the practicing toxicologist, and how some of these might best be addressed.

  1. Impact of thermal processing on legume allergens.

    PubMed

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2012-12-01

    Food induced allergic manifestations are reported from several parts of the world. Food proteins exert their allergenic potential by absorption through the gastrointestinal tract and can even induce life threatening anaphylaxis reactions. Among all food allergens, legume allergens play an important role in induction of allergy because legumes are a major source of protein for vegetarians. Most of the legumes are cooked either by boiling, roasting or frying before consumption, which can be considered a form of thermal treatment. Thermal processing may also include autoclaving, microwave heating, blanching, pasteurization, canning, or steaming. Thermal processing of legumes may reduce, eliminate or enhance the allergenic potential of a respective legume. In most of the cases, minimization of allergenic potential on thermal treatment has generally been reported. Thus, thermal processing can be considered an important tool by indirectly prevent allergenicity in susceptible individuals, thereby reducing treatment costs and reducing industry/office/school absence in case of working population/school going children. The present review attempts to explore various possibilities of reducing or eliminating allergenicity of leguminous food using different methods of thermal processing. Further, this review summarizes different methods of food processing, major legumes and their predominant allergenic proteins, thermal treatment and its relation with antigenicity, effect of thermal processing on legume allergens; also suggests a path that may be taken for future research to reduce the allergenicity using conventional/nonconventional methods.

  2. Orthologous Allergens and Diagnostic Utility of Major Allergen Alt a 1

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Antonio; Alcover, Javier; Rodríguez, David; Palacios, Ricardo; Martínez-Naves, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hypersensitivity to fungi is associated with rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma. For some fungi, such as Alternaria alternata (A. alternata), the symptoms of asthma are persistent, increasing disease severity and the risk of fatal outcomes. There are a large number of species of fungi but knowledge of them remains limited. This, together with the difficulties in obtaining adequate standardized extracts, means that there remain significant challenges in the diagnosis and immunotherapy of allergy associated with fungi. The type of indoor fungi related to asthma/allergy varies according to geographic, climatic, and seasonal factors, making their study difficult. The aim of this study was to determine hypersensitivity to indoor fungi in a population from Cuenca, Spain. Methods Thirty-five patients with symptoms compatible with rhinitis or asthma who showed clear worsening of their symptoms in their homes or workplace were included. In vivo and in vitro tests were made with a battery of fungal allergens, including the species isolated in the home or workplace. Results Ulocladium botrytis (U. botrytis) and A. alternata were the most representative species as a source of home sensitization. These species showed very high concordance in skin tests, specific IgE, and histamine release. The allergen Alt a 1, which was recognized in all patients, was detected in A. alternata, U. botrytis, and Stemphylium botryosum (S. botryosum). Conclusions U. botrytis and A. alternata were the most representative species as a source of home sensitization. Alt a 1 was recognized in all patients and may be considered a non-species-specific allergen that could be used as a diagnostic source of sensitization to some species of the Pleosporaceae family. PMID:27334781

  3. Seafood allergy and allergens: a review.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, S B; Ayuso, R; Reese, G

    2003-01-01

    Seafoods are composed of diverse sea organisms and humans are allergic to many of them. Tropomyosin is a major allergen in many shellfish, especially crustacea and mollusks. Interestingly, tropomyosin has also been identified as an important allergen in other invertebrates including dust mites and cockroaches, and it has been proposed by some to be an invertebrate pan allergen. Different regions of shrimp tropomyosin bind IgE; 5 major IgE-binding regions have been identified in shrimp tropomyosin containing 8 epitopes. Mutations of these shrimp allergenic epitopes can reduce seafood allergenicity; methods utilizing such mutations will provide safer vaccines for more effective treatment of seafood-allergic patients, and in the future less-allergenic seafood products for consumption.

  4. Respiratory allergenic potential of plant-derived proteins: Understanding the relationship between exposure and potency for risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Karen; N'jai, Alhaji U; Dearman, Rebecca J; Kimber, Ian; Gerberick, G Frank

    2015-01-01

    Botanical ingredients (ingredients derived from plants) are finding increasing application in personal care products and the public perceives these ingredients to be safe. However, some proteins in botanicals have the potential to cause immediate-type (IgE-mediated) respiratory allergic reactions. Although reports of such reactions are uncommon, when they do occur, they can be severe. Experience with soap containing wheat proteins illustrated that under certain specific conditions, consumers may be affected. Establishing safe exposure levels for botanical proteins has been challenging. Industrial enzymes provide a rich reference dataset based on their historical association with allergic reactions among workers, which includes robust dose-response information. In the absence of similar data on the potency of plant proteins, a conservative default approach has historically been applied based on information derived from allergenic enzymes. In this article we review the historical default approach and dataset for setting limits for plant proteins in botanical ingredients based on analogy to industrial enzymes followed by a synthesis of literature data on allergic reactions following inhalation exposure to plant-derived proteins. The aim is to share relevant background information and display the relationship between exposure and potency as a first step in the development of a strategy for the development of an improved approach to support the risk assessment of plant-derived proteins.

  5. Respiratory allergenic potential of plant-derived proteins: Understanding the relationship between exposure and potency for risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Karen; N'jai, Alhaji U; Dearman, Rebecca J; Kimber, Ian; Gerberick, G Frank

    2015-01-01

    Botanical ingredients (ingredients derived from plants) are finding increasing application in personal care products and the public perceives these ingredients to be safe. However, some proteins in botanicals have the potential to cause immediate-type (IgE-mediated) respiratory allergic reactions. Although reports of such reactions are uncommon, when they do occur, they can be severe. Experience with soap containing wheat proteins illustrated that under certain specific conditions, consumers may be affected. Establishing safe exposure levels for botanical proteins has been challenging. Industrial enzymes provide a rich reference dataset based on their historical association with allergic reactions among workers, which includes robust dose-response information. In the absence of similar data on the potency of plant proteins, a conservative default approach has historically been applied based on information derived from allergenic enzymes. In this article we review the historical default approach and dataset for setting limits for plant proteins in botanical ingredients based on analogy to industrial enzymes followed by a synthesis of literature data on allergic reactions following inhalation exposure to plant-derived proteins. The aim is to share relevant background information and display the relationship between exposure and potency as a first step in the development of a strategy for the development of an improved approach to support the risk assessment of plant-derived proteins. PMID:26565768

  6. Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Thomas R.

    1975-01-01

    Domestic and international challenges facing the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness are discussed; and U.S. and Russian programs in testing and correcting children's vision, developing eye safety programs in agriculture and industry, and disseminating information concerning the detection and treatment of cataracts are compared. (SB)

  7. Challenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allday, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The events that led to the spectacular destruction of the Space Shuttle "Challenger" in 1986 are detailed here. They show how NASA should have heeded engineers' worries over materials problems resulting from a launch in cold weather. Suggestions are made of how pupils could also learn from this tragedy. (Contains 4 figures and 2 footnotes.)

  8. Food proteins from different allergen families sensitize Balb/c mice to family-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Sun, Na; Zhou, Cui; Zhou, Xin; Lu, Jing; Wang, Cuiyan; Che, Huilian

    2014-01-01

    The classification of food allergens based on the structure and function of proteins contributes to the study of the relationship between bioinformatics and potential allergenicity of allergens. Food allergens always share sequence similarity with the allergens in the same allergen families. For that reason, food proteins from different allergen families may induce different patterns of immune responses in animal models. Female Balb/c mice (3-4-weeks-old) were sensitized with food proteins once per week for 4 weeks, and then challenged 2 weeks later (on Day 42 of study). Blood was collected (to obtain serum levels of histamine and protein-specific IgG1 and IgE antibodies) and measures of vascular permeability were performed 20 min after the challenge. Five food proteins (11S globulin, OVA [ovalbumin], HAS [human serum albumin] and LRP [lysine-responsive storage protein] of different allergen families, and Cry 1Ab/Ac [crystal protein]) were used to assess patterns of immune responses for each allergen family and then bioinformatics and digestive stability in simulated gastric fluid were employed to assess the overall utility of the Balb/c. The assay results indicated that, in this model, histamine and protein-specific IgE antibody levels and vascular permeability could be used to identify allergenicity of 11S globulin, OVA, and PAP (potato acid phosphatase) only. However, the results of the protein-specific IgG1 measures could only distinguish allergic food proteins with negative control. Based on bioinformatic analyses, the five different food proteins clearly induced distinct patterns of immune responses in the Balb/c model.

  9. Detection of castor allergens in castor wax.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, S B; Karr, R M; Müller, D J; Salvaggio, J E

    1980-01-01

    The presence of castor bean allergens in castor wax products was determined by in vivo and in vitro analysis of castor wax extracts. Allergens were detected in one extract of castor wax by the PCA reaction in mice, the RAST inhibition reaction, and skin prick test in castor bean sensitive individuals. However, these allergens in the wax were of much lower potency than those in the bean, and were not detectable in a deodorant product utilizing castor wax.

  10. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  11. Inhalation exposure methodology.

    PubMed Central

    Phalen, R F; Mannix, R C; Drew, R T

    1984-01-01

    Modern man is being confronted with an ever-increasing inventory of potentially toxic airborne substances. Exposures to these atmospheric contaminants occur in residential and commercial settings, as well as in the workplace. In order to study the toxicity of such materials, a special technology relating to inhalation exposure systems has evolved. The purpose of this paper is to provide a description of the techniques which are used in exposing laboratory subjects to airborne particles and gases. The various modes of inhalation exposure (whole body, head only, nose or mouth only, etc.) are described at length, including the advantages and disadvantages inherent to each mode. Numerous literature citations are included for further reading. Among the topics briefly discussed are the selection of appropriate animal species for toxicological testing, and the types of inhalation studies performed (acute, chronic, etc.). PMID:6383799

  12. Interleukin-2-Dependent Allergen-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory Cells Drive Asthma.

    PubMed

    Hondowicz, Brian D; An, Dowon; Schenkel, Jason M; Kim, Karen S; Steach, Holly R; Krishnamurty, Akshay T; Keitany, Gladys J; Garza, Esteban N; Fraser, Kathryn A; Moon, James J; Altemeier, William A; Masopust, David; Pepper, Marion

    2016-01-19

    Exposure to inhaled allergens generates T helper 2 (Th2) CD4(+) T cells that contribute to episodes of inflammation associated with asthma. Little is known about allergen-specific Th2 memory cells and their contribution to airway inflammation. We generated reagents to understand how endogenous CD4(+) T cells specific for a house dust mite (HDM) allergen form and function. After allergen exposure, HDM-specific memory cells persisted as central memory cells in the lymphoid organs and tissue-resident memory cells in the lung. Experimental blockade of lymphocyte migration demonstrated that lung-resident cells were sufficient to induce airway hyper-responsiveness, which depended upon CD4(+) T cells. Investigation into the differentiation of pathogenic Trm cells revealed that interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling was required for residency and directed a program of tissue homing migrational cues. These studies thus identify IL-2-dependent resident Th2 memory cells as drivers of lung allergic responses.

  13. Quantitative methods for food allergens: a review.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Stéphanie; Fourdrilis, Séverine; Dobson, Rowan; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Maghuin-Rogister, Guy; De Pauw, Edwin

    2009-09-01

    The quantitative detection of allergens in the food chain is a strategic health objective as the prevalence of allergy continues to rise. Food allergenicity is caused by proteins either in their native form or in forms resulting from food processing. Progress in mass spectrometry greatly opened up the field of proteomics. These advances are now available for the detection and the quantification of traces of allergenic proteins in complex mixtures, and complete the set of biological tests used until now, such as ELISA or PCR. We review methods classified according to their ability to simultaneously quantify and identify allergenic proteins and underline major advances in the mass-spectrometric methods.

  14. Recombinant expression systems for allergen vaccines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L

    2006-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy of future is likely to be based on allergy vaccines that contain engineered allergens modified to abolish or substantially reduce their IgE-binding activity in order to remove the risk of unwanted anaphylactic responses. The development of efficient systems for the production of recombinant allergens in sufficient quantities is requirement for establishing use of engineered allergens as components of allergy vaccines. This review outlines relative advantages and disadvantages of various heterologous systems for production of recombinant allergens. Microbial systems are most convenient and cost effective platforms for the production of recombinant allergens. However, lack of post-translational processing implies that some allergens have to be expressed in eukaryotic systems for proper folding and post-translational modifications such as glycosylation. Yeast systems can yield high levels of recombinant allergens but often are associated with hyper- glycosylation problems. Mammalian cell culture systems offer suitable post -translational modifications but are nearly hundred fold more expensive than microbial systems. The use of plants as bio-factories for production of recombinant allergens is emerging as a very attractive option as plants-based production system offer several advantages over other expression systems such as post translational processing of proteins, low production costs, scale up ability and enhanced safety due to absence of animal or human pathogens.

  15. Extraction and analysis of coffee bean allergens.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, S B; Karr, R M; Salvaggio, J E

    1978-05-01

    Workers in the coffee industry can develop occupational allergic disease upon exposure to dust associated with coffee manufacturing. Since controversy exists as to the source or chemical nature of these allergens, the mouse model of reaginic antibody production was used to assess the potential sources of allergens in samples obtained from a local coffee manufacturing plant. Mice were immunized with extracts of coffee dust and beans and the resulting reaginic antibody response determined by the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction. Cross-reacting allergens were detected in samples of coffee dust, cleaner can debris and green coffee beans, but not in chaff or roasted coffee beans. None of the allergens detected in coffee samples cross-reacted with extract of castor beans, although these extracts contained the potent castor bean allergen. Green coffee bean allergens partially purified by gel filtration were heterogeneous with respect to molecular size, although quite similar in their reactivity with reaginic antiserum. These results suggest that the green coffee bean is the major source of allergen in coffee manufacturing plants. This allergen is heterogeneous with respect to size and heat lability, and is immunochemically different from the castor bean allergen.

  16. Protein digestibility and relevance to allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Gary; Fu, Tong-Jen; Kimber, Ian; Hinton, Dennis M

    2003-06-01

    In January 2001 a Joint Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization Expert Consultation Committee on Allergenicity of Foods Derived from Biotechnology published a report outlining in detail an approach for assessing the allergenic potential of novel proteins. One component of this decision tree is a determination of whether the protein of interest is resistant to proteolytic digestion. Although these (Italic)in vitro(/Italic) methodologies have been useful, the correlation between resistance to proteolysis and allergenic activity is not absolute. Two views and highlights of supporting research regarding the relationship of resistance to digestion and allergenicity are presented in this article.

  17. [Inhalational or intravenous anesthesia?].

    PubMed

    Dahan, A; Aarts, L P H J

    2016-01-01

    The debate continues whether there is a difference in patient outcome following inhalational versus intravenous anesthesia. A recent meta-analysis showed improved outcome following inhalational anesthesia in patients undergoing cardiac surgery but not in patients undergoing non-cardiac procedures. In this article we discuss the meta-analysis and its caveats, taking into account additional comparative studies. Our overall conclusion is that it is too early to definitively claim that one anesthesia technique results in a better outcome than the other. PMID:27650024

  18. Pharmacometric Models for Characterizing the Pharmacokinetics of Orally Inhaled Drugs.

    PubMed

    Borghardt, Jens Markus; Weber, Benjamin; Staab, Alexander; Kloft, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    During the last decades, the importance of modeling and simulation in clinical drug development, with the goal to qualitatively and quantitatively assess and understand mechanisms of pharmacokinetic processes, has strongly increased. However, this increase could not equally be observed for orally inhaled drugs. The objectives of this review are to understand the reasons for this gap and to demonstrate the opportunities that mathematical modeling of pharmacokinetics of orally inhaled drugs offers. To achieve these objectives, this review (i) discusses pulmonary physiological processes and their impact on the pharmacokinetics after drug inhalation, (ii) provides a comprehensive overview of published pharmacokinetic models, (iii) categorizes these models into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and (clinical data-derived) empirical models, (iv) explores both their (mechanistic) plausibility, and (v) addresses critical aspects of different pharmacometric approaches pertinent for drug inhalation. In summary, pulmonary deposition, dissolution, and absorption are highly complex processes and may represent the major challenge for modeling and simulation of PK after oral drug inhalation. Challenges in relating systemic pharmacokinetics with pulmonary efficacy may be another factor contributing to the limited number of existing pharmacokinetic models for orally inhaled drugs. Investigations comprising in vitro experiments, clinical studies, and more sophisticated mathematical approaches are considered to be necessary for elucidating these highly complex pulmonary processes. With this additional knowledge, the PBPK approach might gain additional attractiveness. Currently, (semi-)mechanistic modeling offers an alternative to generate and investigate hypotheses and to more mechanistically understand the pulmonary and systemic pharmacokinetics after oral drug inhalation including the impact of pulmonary diseases.

  19. Search for Allergens from the Pollen Proteome of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.): A Major Sensitizer for Respiratory Allergy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Bodhisattwa; Pandey, Naren; Gupta Bhattacharya, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory allergy triggered by pollen allergens is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide. Sunflower pollen is thought to be an important source of inhalant allergens. Present study aims to identify the prevalence of sunflower pollinosis among the Indian allergic population and characterizes the pollen allergens using immuno-proteomic tools. Methodology Clinico-immunological tests were performed to understand the prevalence of sensitivity towards sunflower pollen among the atopic population. Sera from selected sunflower positive patients were used as probe to detect the IgE-reactive proteins from the one and two dimensional electrophoretic separated proteome of sunflower pollen. The antigenic nature of the sugar moiety of the glycoallergens was studied by meta-periodate modification of IgE-immunoblot. Finally, these allergens were identified by mass-spectrometry. Results Prevalence of sunflower pollen sensitization was observed among 21% of the pollen allergic population and associated with elevated level of specific IgE and histamine in the sera of these patients. Immunoscreening of sunflower pollen proteome with patient sera detected seven IgE-reactive proteins with varying molecular weight and pI. Hierarchical clustering of 2D-immunoblot data highlighted three allergens characterized by a more frequent immuno-reactivity and increased levels of IgE antibodies in the sera of susceptible patients. These allergens were considered as the major allergens of sunflower pollen and were found to have their glycan moiety critical for inducing IgE response. Homology driven search of MS/MS data of these IgE-reactive proteins identified seven previously unreported allergens from sunflower pollen. Three major allergenic proteins were identified as two pectate lyases and a cysteine protease. Conclusion Novelty of the present report is the identification of a panel of seven sunflower pollen allergens for the first time at immuno-biochemical and proteomic level

  20. Diagnostic Utility of Total IgE in Foods, Inhalant, and Multiple Allergies in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Mughales, Jamil A

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the diagnostic significance of total IgE in foods, inhalant, and multiple allergies. Methods. Retrospective review of the laboratory records of patients who presented with clinical suspicion of food or inhalant allergy between January 2013 and December 2014. Total IgE level was defined as positive for a value >195 kU/L; and diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of specific IgE (golden standard) for at least one food or inhalant allergen and at least two allergens in multiple allergies. Results. A total of 1893 (male ratio = 0.68, mean age = 39.0 ± 19.2 years) patients were included. Total IgE had comparable sensitivity (55.8% versus 59.6%) and specificity (83.9% versus 84.4%) in food versus inhalant allergy, respectively, but a superior PPV in inhalant allergy (79.1% versus 54.4%). ROC curve analysis showed a better diagnostic value in inhalant allergies (AUC = 0.817 (95% CI = 0.796-0.837) versus 0.770 (95% CI = 0.707-0.833)). In multiple allergies, total IgE had a relatively good sensitivity (78.6%), while negative IgE testing (<195 kU/L) predicted the absence of multiple allergies with 91.5% certitude. Conclusion. Total IgE assay is not efficient as a diagnostic test for foods, inhalant, or multiple allergies. The best strategy should refer to specific IgE testing guided by a comprehensive atopic history. PMID:27314052

  1. MODELING DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles: ABSTRACT

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeut...

  2. Establishment of Reference Doses for residues of allergenic foods: report of the VITAL Expert Panel.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steve L; Baumert, Joseph L; Kruizinga, Astrid G; Remington, Benjamin C; Crevel, Rene W R; Brooke-Taylor, Simon; Allen, Katrina J; Houben, Geert

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, an expert panel was assembled to establish appropriate Reference Doses for allergenic food residues as a part of the VITAL (Voluntary Incidental Trace Allergen Labeling) program of The Allergen Bureau of Australia & New Zealand (ABA). These Reference Doses would guide advisory labeling decisions for use on food labels. Individual NOAELs and LOAELs were obtained from clinical challenges of food-allergic subjects. Statistical dose-distribution models (log-normal, log-logistic, Weibull) were applied to the individual NOAELs and LOAELs for each allergenic food. The Reference Doses, in terms of mg of total protein from the allergenic food, were based upon either the ED01 (for peanut, cow's milk), the 95% lower confidence interval of the ED05 (for wheat, soybean, cashew, shrimp, sesame seed, mustard, and lupine), or both (egg, hazelnut) using all appropriate statistical dose-distribution models. Reference Doses were established for 11 allergenic foods ranging from 0.03 mg for egg protein to 10mg for shrimp protein. Reference Doses were not established for fish or celery due to poor model fits with existing data. Reference Doses were not established for other tree nuts beyond hazelnut and cashew because of the absence of data on NOAELs and LOAELs from individual subjects. PMID:24184597

  3. Summary of the ACS symposium on Advances in Food Allergen Detection.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mark M; Jackson, Lauren

    2013-06-19

    A symposium titled "Advances in Food Allergen Detection" was held at the 243rd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in March 2012 in San Diego, CA, and was sponsored by the ACS Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The purpose of the symposium was to convene the leaders in the food allergen analysis field for presentations on, and discussions of, the state of the art, new developments, and critical challenges in the detection and quantitation of allergenic proteins in foods. Twenty-five presentations were delivered by speakers representing academic, government, and industrial institutions in 10 countries. The presentations covered all aspects of food allergens, including a historical progress review, regulatory policies, clinical practices, food-processing effects, food production equipment cross-contamination and cleaning, and the performance of several food allergen analytical strategies and technologies. This paper is intended to provide a brief summary of the presentations as well as a record of the proceedings of the symposium, which was deemed a great success in advancing food allergen analysis.

  4. Challenger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Close-up view of the liftoff of the Shuttle Challenger on mission STS-51L taken from camera site 39B-2/T3. From this camera position, a cloud of grey-brown smoke can be seen on the right side of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) on a line directly across from the letter 'U' in United States. This was the first visible sign that an SRB joint breach may have occured. On January 28, 1986 frigid overnight temperatures caused normally pliable rubber O-ring seals and putty that are designed to seal and establish joint integrity between the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) joint segments, to become hard and non- flexible. At the instant of SRB ignition, tremendous stresses and pressures occur within the SRB casing and especially at the joint attachmentment points. The failure of the O-rings and putty to 'seat' properly at motor ignition, caused hot exhaust gases to blow by the seals and putty. During Challenger's ascent, this hot gas 'blow by' ultimately cut a swath completely through the steel booster casing; and like a welder's torch, began cutting into the External Tank (ET). It is believed that the ET was compromised in several locations starting in the aft at the initial point where SRB joint failure occured. The ET hydrogen tank is believed to have been breached first, with continuous rapid incremental failure of both the ET and SRB. A chain reaction of events occurring in milliseconds culminated in a massive explosion. The orbiter Challenger was instantly ejected by the blast and went askew into the supersonic air flow. These aerodynamic forces caused structural shattering and complete destruction of the orbiter. Though it was concluded that the G-forces experienced during orbiter ejection and break-up were survivable, impact with the ocean surface was not. Tragically, all seven crewmembers perished.

  5. Liposomal formulations for inhalation.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, David; Gonda, Igor; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2013-08-01

    No marketed inhaled products currently use sustained release formulations such as liposomes to enhance drug disposition in the lung, but that may soon change. This review focuses on the interaction between liposomal formulations and the inhalation technology used to deliver them as aerosols. There have been a number of dated reviews evaluating nebulization of liposomes. While the information they shared is still accurate, this paper incorporates data from more recent publications to review the factors that affect aerosol performance. Recent reviews have comprehensively covered the development of dry powder liposomes for aerosolization and only the key aspects of those technologies will be summarized. There are now at least two inhaled liposomal products in late-stage clinical development: ARIKACE(®) (Insmed, NJ, USA), a liposomal amikacin, and Pulmaquin™ (Aradigm Corp., CA, USA), a liposomal ciprofloxacin, both of which treat a variety of patient populations with lung infections. This review also highlights the safety of inhaled liposomes and summarizes the clinical experience with liposomal formulations for pulmonary application. PMID:23919478

  6. Inhalants. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    The document presents a collection of articles about inhalant abuse. Article 1 presents findings on the psychophysiological effects related to the use of amyl or butyl nitrate as a "recreational drug." Article 2 suggests a strong association between chronic sniffing of the solvent toulene and irreversible brain damage. Article 3 warns about the…

  7. Guilt by intimate association: what makes an allergen an allergen?

    PubMed

    Karp, Christopher L

    2010-05-01

    Why specific, ubiquitous, otherwise innocuous environmental proteins tend to provoke maladaptive, T(H)2-polarized immune responses in susceptible hosts is a fundamental mechanistic question for those interested in the pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention of allergic disease. The current renaissance in the study of innate immunity has provided important insights into this question. The theme emerging from recent studies is that direct (dys)functional interactions with pathways of innate immune activation that evolved to signal the presence of microbial infection are central to the molecular basis for allergenicity. This article reviews these data.

  8. Advances in allergen immunotherapy: aiming for complete tolerance to allergens.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2015-03-25

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been used for more than 100 years as a tolerance-inducing therapy for allergic diseases and represents a potentially curative method of treatment. AIT functions through multiple mechanisms, including regulating T and B cell responses, changing antibody isotypes, and decreasing mediator release and migration of eosinophils, basophils, and mast cells to affected tissues. Despite the relative success of AIT, attempts are being made to improve this therapy in order to overcome problems in standardization, efficacy, safety, long duration of treatment, and costs. These have led to the development of biotechnological products with successful clinical results.

  9. Influence of ultrasonic treatment on the allergenic properties of Shrimp ( Penaeus vannamei) Allergen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenxing, Li; Hong, Lin; Limin, Cao

    2006-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether high intensity ultrasound could reduce the allergic properties of shrimp allergens. Reducing the allergenic properties of these allergens will be beneficial to allergic individuals. Samples of shrimp protein extract and shrimp muscle were treated by high-intensity ultrasound with water bathing at 0°C or 50°C for different time periods. The treated and untreated samples were then analyzed by SDS-PAGE, Western blots and competitive inhibition ELISA (Ci-ELISA) to determine the shrimp allergenicity. The results show that high-intensity ultrasound has no effect on allergenicity when the extracts were treated at 0°C. However, a significant decrease was observed in the level of the major shrimp allergen, Pen a 1, when the samples were treated at 50°C. In the determination of allergenicity with Ci-ELISA, a reduction in IgE binding was also observed.

  10. Evaluating variability of allergens in commodity crops.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crops with significant food allergen issues, include legumes, peanut and soybean, cereal grains, such as wheat and maize, and tree nuts (walnut, Brazil nut, among other phylogenetically diverse species) (Teuber et al. 2006). Officially recognized allergenic proteins may include one or multiple prot...

  11. Recombinant allergen-based provocation testing☆

    PubMed Central

    Niederberger, Verena; Eckl-Dorna, Julia; Pauli, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, recombinant allergens from all important allergen sources have been cloned and are now available as recombinant proteins. These molecules can be produced in practically unlimited amounts without biological or batch-to-batch variability. It has been shown in provocation tests that recombinant allergens have similar clinical effects as their natural counterparts. With the help of these tools it is possible to reveal the precise reactivity profiles of patients and to uncover and differentiate cross-reactivity from genuine sensitization to an allergen source. Although it has been shown some time ago that it would be possible to replace crude allergen extracts with recombinant allergens for skin prick testing, and even though the use of allergen components can improve routine diagnosis, these tools are still not available for clinical routine applications. The use of provocation tests is a crucial step in the development of new, hypoallergenic vaccines for therapy of allergic disease. Here we describe important provocation methods (skin prick test, intradermal test, atopy patch test, nasal provocation, colonoscopic provocation test) and give an overview of the clinical provocation studies which have been performed with recombinant allergens so far. PMID:23920475

  12. Reducing food allergenicity at the molecular level.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food allergens are a significant worldwide public health issue. Estimates for the prevalence of food allergies are around 1-2 % of the total population and up to 8 % of children; although, the prevalence may vary between populations and age groups. Peanuts are one of the most allergenic foods. The...

  13. Molecular and immunological approaches in quantifying the air-borne food allergen tropomyosin in crab processing facilities.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sandip D; Thomassen, Marte R; Saptarshi, Shruti R; Nguyen, Hong M X; Aasmoe, Lisbeth; Bang, Berit E; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-09-01

    Tropomyosin is a cross-reactive allergenic protein present in ingested shellfish species. Exposure and sensitization to this protein via inhalation is particularly important in the crustacean processing industry where workers are continuously exposed to the aerosolized form of this allergen. The aim of this study was to develop an antibody-based immunoassay to enable the specific and sensitive quantification of aerosolized tropomyosin present in the environment of two crab processing facilities. Anti-tropomyosin antibody was generated in rabbits against tropomyosins from four different crustacean species. These antibodies were purified using recombinant tropomyosin using an immuno-affinity column. The recombinant tropomyosin was also used as an allergen standard for the sandwich ELISA. In order to quantify aerosolized tropomyosin, air collection was performed in the personal breathing zone of 80 workers during two crab processing activities, edible crab (Cancer pagurus) and king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) using polytetrafluoroethylene filters. The purified antibody was able to detect tropomyosin selectively from different crustaceans but not from vertebrate sources. The limit of detection (LOD) for the developed sandwich ELISA was 60 picogram/m(3) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) 100 picogram/m(3). Immunoassay validation was based on linearity (R(2) 0.999), matrix interference test (78.8±6.5%), intra-assay CV (9.8%) and inter-assay CV (11%). The novel immunoassay was able to successfully identify working activities, which generated low, medium or high concentrations of the aerosolized food allergen. We describe an IgG antibody-based immunoassay for quantification of the major food allergen tropomyosin, with high sensitivity and specificity. This modified immunological approach can be adapted for the detection of other aerosolized food allergens, assisting in the identification of high-risk allergen exposure areas in the food industry. PMID:24755444

  14. Molecular and immunological approaches in quantifying the air-borne food allergen tropomyosin in crab processing facilities.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sandip D; Thomassen, Marte R; Saptarshi, Shruti R; Nguyen, Hong M X; Aasmoe, Lisbeth; Bang, Berit E; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-09-01

    Tropomyosin is a cross-reactive allergenic protein present in ingested shellfish species. Exposure and sensitization to this protein via inhalation is particularly important in the crustacean processing industry where workers are continuously exposed to the aerosolized form of this allergen. The aim of this study was to develop an antibody-based immunoassay to enable the specific and sensitive quantification of aerosolized tropomyosin present in the environment of two crab processing facilities. Anti-tropomyosin antibody was generated in rabbits against tropomyosins from four different crustacean species. These antibodies were purified using recombinant tropomyosin using an immuno-affinity column. The recombinant tropomyosin was also used as an allergen standard for the sandwich ELISA. In order to quantify aerosolized tropomyosin, air collection was performed in the personal breathing zone of 80 workers during two crab processing activities, edible crab (Cancer pagurus) and king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) using polytetrafluoroethylene filters. The purified antibody was able to detect tropomyosin selectively from different crustaceans but not from vertebrate sources. The limit of detection (LOD) for the developed sandwich ELISA was 60 picogram/m(3) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) 100 picogram/m(3). Immunoassay validation was based on linearity (R(2) 0.999), matrix interference test (78.8±6.5%), intra-assay CV (9.8%) and inter-assay CV (11%). The novel immunoassay was able to successfully identify working activities, which generated low, medium or high concentrations of the aerosolized food allergen. We describe an IgG antibody-based immunoassay for quantification of the major food allergen tropomyosin, with high sensitivity and specificity. This modified immunological approach can be adapted for the detection of other aerosolized food allergens, assisting in the identification of high-risk allergen exposure areas in the food industry.

  15. Comparison of international food allergen labeling regulations.

    PubMed

    Gendel, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Food allergy is a significant public health issue worldwide. Regulatory risk management strategies for allergic consumers have focused on providing information about the presence of food allergens through label declarations. A number of countries and regulatory bodies have recognized the importance of providing this information by enacting laws, regulations or standards for food allergen labeling of "priority allergens". However, different governments and organizations have taken different approaches to identifying these "priority allergens" and to designing labeling declaration regulatory frameworks. The increasing volume of the international food trade suggests that there would be value in supporting sensitive consumers by harmonizing (to the extent possible) these regulatory frameworks. As a first step toward this goal, an inventory of allergen labeling regulations was assembled and analyzed to identify commonalities, differences, and future needs.

  16. From allergen genes to allergy vaccines.

    PubMed

    Valenta, Rudolf; Ferreira, Fatima; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Linhart, Birgit; Niederberger, Verena; Swoboda, Ines; Vrtala, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    IgE-mediated allergy is a hypersensitivity disease affecting more than 25% of the population. The structures of the most common allergens have been revealed through molecular cloning technology in the past two decades. On the basis of this knowledge of the sequences and three-dimensional structures of culprit allergens, investigators can now analyze the immune recognition of allergens and the mechanisms of allergic inflammation in allergic patients. Allergy vaccines have been constructed that are able to selectively target the aberrant immune responses in allergic patients via different pathways of the immune system. Here we review various types of allergy vaccines that have been developed based on allergen structures, results from their clinical application in allergic patients, and future strategies for allergen-specific immunotherapy and allergy prophylaxis.

  17. Molecular and immunological characterization of shellfish allergens.

    PubMed

    Leung, P S; Chu, K H

    1998-03-15

    Shellfish (crustaceans and mollusks) have long been known as a common cause of allergic reactions to food. Like other food allergies, the allergic reactions to shellfish involve IgE-mediated Type I hypersensitivity. Biochemical and molecular studies have documented the major shrimp allergen is the muscle protein tropomyosin. Subsequent molecular cloning studies on lobsters and crabs have characterized this protein as the common allergen in crustaceans. There has also been strong immunological evidence that tropomyosin is a cross-reactive allergen among crustaceans and mollusks. This is further confirmed by recent studies on the identification of allergens in squid and abalone. The advances in the characterization of shellfish allergens will not only enhance our understanding on the physiological basis of shellfish allergy but also lay the groundwork for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic design in food allergies.

  18. Clinical implications of cross-reactive food allergens.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, S H

    2001-12-01

    As a consequence of the general increase in allergic sensitization, the prevalence of hypersensitivity reactions to multiple foods that share homologous proteins has become a significant clinical problem. A variety of these allergens conserved among plants (eg, profilin and lipid transfer proteins) and animals (eg, tropomyosin and caseins) have been characterized. Although studies with molecular biologic techniques have elucidated the nature of these ubiquitous allergens, clinical studies have lagged behind. The physician is called on to determine the risk of reaction to related foods among legumes, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, cereal grains, mammalian and avian food products, and a variety of other plant-derived foods that may share proteins with pollens, latex, and each other. Clinical evaluations require a careful history, laboratory evaluation, and in some cases oral food challenges. The pitfalls in the evaluation of food allergy-unreliable histories and limitations in laboratory assessment primarily caused by false-positive skin prick test responses/RAST results are magnified when dealing with cross-reactive proteins. This review focuses on the clinical data regarding cross-reacting food allergens with the goal of providing a background for improved risk assessment and a framework on which to approach these difficult clinical questions.

  19. ImmunoCAP® ISAC and Microtest for multiplex allergen testing in people with difficult to manage allergic disease: a systematic review and cost analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Marie; Ramaekers, Bram; Lang, Shona; Armstrong, Nigel; Noake, Caro; de Kock, Shelley; Joore, Manuela; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Allergy is a form of immune-mediated exaggerated sensitivity (hypersensitivity) to a substance that is either inhaled, swallowed, injected or comes into contact with the skin. Foreign substances that provoke allergies are called allergens. It has been claimed that multiplex allergen testing may help in diagnosing the cause of symptoms in patients with an unclear cause of allergy or who are allergic to more than one substance. OBJECTIVES To evaluate multiplex allergen testing [devices that can measure the presence of multiple immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies in a patient's blood at the same time], by assessing (1) clinical effectiveness (allergy symptoms, incidence of acute exacerbations, mortality, adverse events of testing and treatment, health-care presentations or admissions, health-related quality of life); (2) effects on treatment (diet, immunotherapy medications, other potential testing); (3) any additional diagnostic information provided by multiplex allergen testing; and (4) cost-effectiveness (cost of different assessment strategies). METHODS Fifteen databases were searched from 2005 to April 2015, including MEDLINE (via OvidSp), MEDLINE In-Process Citations, MEDLINE Daily Update, PubMed (National Library of Medicine), EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Health Technology Assessment (HTA) database, Science Citation Index (SCI), Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S), BIOSIS Previews, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) HTA programme, and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA); supplementary searches of conference proceedings and trials registries were performed. Review methods followed published guidance from the Cochrane Collaboration and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, UK. The methodological

  20. Carbohydrate modified ultrafine ceramic nanoparticles for allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravi Shankar; Sahu, Satish; Sudheesh, M S; Madan, Jitender; Kumar, Manoj; Dixit, Vinod Kumar

    2011-08-01

    The uses of drug-delivery systems in allergen specific immunotherapy appear to be a promising approach due to their ability to act as adjuvants, transport the allergens to immune-competent cells and tissues and reduce the number of administrations. The aim of this work was to evaluate the carbohydrate modified ultrafine ceramic core based nanoparticles (aquasomes) as adjuvant/delivery vehicle in specific immunotherapy using ovalbumin (OVA) as an allergen model. Prepared nanoparticles were characterized for size, shape, zeta potential, antigen integrity, surface adsorption efficiency and in vitro release. The humoral and cellular-induced immune responses generated by OVA adsorbed aquasomes were studied by two intradermal immunizations in BALB/c mice. OVA sensitized mice were treated with OVA adsorbed aquasomes and OVA adsorbed aluminum hydroxide following established protocol. Fifteen days after therapy, animals were challenged with OVA and different signs of anaphylactic shock were evaluated. Developed aquasomes possessed a negative zeta potential (-11.3 mV) and an average size of 47 nm with OVA adsorption efficiency of ~60.2 μg mg(-1) of hydroxyapatite core. In vivo immune response after two intradermal injections with OVA adsorbed aquasomes resulted in a mixed Th1/Th2-type immune response. OVA-sensitized mice model, treatment with OVA adsorbed aquasomes elicited lower levels of IgE (p<0.05), serum histamine and higher survival rate in comparison with alum adsorbed OVA. Symptoms of anaphylactic shock in OVA aquasome-treated mice were weaker than the one induced in the alum adsorbed OVA group. Results from this study demonstrate the valuable use of aquasomes in allergen immunotherapy. PMID:21333772

  1. Using magnetic beads to reduce reanut allergens from peanut extracts.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferric irons (Fe3+) and phenolic compounds have been shown to bind to peanut allergens. An easy way to isolate peanut allergens is by use of magnetic beads attached with or without phenolics to capture peanut allergens or allergen-Fe3+ complexes, thus, achieving the goal of producing peanut extracts...

  2. Effects of NO2 and Ozone on Pollen Allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Ulrike; Ernst, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes the available data of the air pollutants NO2 and ozone on allergenic pollen from different plant species, focusing on potentially allergenic components of the pollen, such as allergen content, protein release, IgE-binding, or protein modification. Various in vivo and in vitro studies on allergenic pollen are shown and discussed. PMID:26870080

  3. New routes for allergen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Pål; von Moos, Seraina; Mohanan, Deepa; Kündig, Thomas M.; Senti, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    IgE-mediated allergy is a highly prevalent disease in the industrialized world. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) should be the preferred treatment, as it has long lasting protective effects and can stop the progression of the disease. However, few allergic patients choose to undergo SIT, due to the long treatment time and potential allergic adverse events. Since the beneficial effects of SIT are mediated by antigen presenting cells inducing Th1, Treg and antibody responses, whereas the adverse events are caused by mast cells and basophils, the therapeutic window of SIT may be widened by targeting tissues rich in antigen presenting cells. Lymph nodes and the epidermis contain high density of dendritic cells and low numbers of mast cells and basophils. The epidermis has the added benefit of not being vascularised thereby reducing the chances of anaphylactic shock due to leakage of allergen. Hence, both these tissues represent highly promising routes for SIT and are the focus of discussion in this review. PMID:23095873

  4. Will genetically modified foods be allergenic?

    PubMed

    Taylor, S L; Hefle, S L

    2001-05-01

    Foods produced through agricultural biotechnology, including such staples as corn, soybeans, canola, and potatoes, are already reaching the consumer marketplace. Agricultural biotechnology offers the promise to produce crops with improved agronomic characteristics (eg, insect resistance, herbicide tolerance, disease resistance, and climatic tolerance) and enhanced consumer benefits (eg, better taste and texture, longer shelf life, and more nutritious). Certainly, the products of agricultural biotechnology should be subjected to a careful and complete safety assessment before commercialization. Because the genetic modification ultimately results in the introduction of new proteins into the food plant, the safety, including the potential allergenicity, of the newly introduced proteins must be assessed. Although most allergens are proteins, only a few of the many proteins found in foods are allergenic under the typical circumstances of exposure. The potential allergenicity of the introduced proteins can be evaluated by focusing on the source of the gene, the sequence homology of the newly introduced protein to known allergens, the expression level of the novel protein in the modified crop, the functional classification of the novel protein, the reactivity of the novel protein with IgE from the serum of individuals with known allergies to the source of the transferred genetic material, and various physicochemical properties of the newly introduced protein, such as heat stability and digestive stability. Few products of agricultural biotechnology (and none of the current products) will involve the transfer of genes from known allergenic sources. Applying such criteria provides reasonable assurance that the newly introduced protein has limited capability to become an allergen.

  5. Lupine inhalation induced asthma in a child.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ancillo, Alvaro; Gil-Adrados, Ana C; Domínguez-Noche, Carmen; Cosmes, Pedro M

    2005-09-01

    The ingestion of lupine seed flour has been reported as a cause of allergic reactions. There is some evidence of its allergenic potential after inhalation. An 8-year-old asthmatic child, who was allergic to peanut, was studied in our clinic with the suspicion of an adverse drug reaction due to salbutamol. He suffered an asthma attack while playing with his brother, who had been eating lupine seed as snack; surprisingly, the asthma attack worsened with salbutamol. The skin tests showed a positive result with Lupinus albus extract, peanut, garbanzo bean, navy bean, pea, green bean, lentil, soy, Olea europea pollen, grass pollen and Plantago lanceolata pollen. The prick-by-prick tests both from dried seeds and those preserved in salt and water were strongly positive. Serum specific IgE antibodies were positive to Lupine albus (1.43 kU/l), peanut (4.32 kU/l), soy (2.15 kU/l), lentil (3.12 kU/l) and garbanzo (0.7 kU/l). After informed consent salbutamol was well tolerated but the patient had asthma in 5 min of manipulation of the lupine seeds. In our case, reactivity with other legumes was also demonstrated, but only peanut allergy was relevant because boiled legumes were tolerated. It is also notorious that anamnesis is so important to assess the true etiological agents of asthma.

  6. How to Use Metered-Dose Inhalers

    MedlinePlus

    ... methods really work, and people who use these methods may continue to use their inhalers after the inhalers are empty.Some inhalers come with a counter that shows the number of sprays that remain in the inhaler. If your inhaler ...

  7. Enhanced approaches for identifying Amadori products:application to peanut allergens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dry roasting of peanuts is suggested to influence allergenic sensitization due to formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) on peanut proteins. Identifying AGEs is technically challenging. The AGE composition of peanut proteins was probed with nanoLC-ESI-MS and MS/MS analyses. Amadori ...

  8. Local reactions from subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coop, Christopher A

    2013-12-01

    Local reactions from subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy are very common during the course of immunotherapy. These local reactions are not bothersome to patients. Local reactions from immunotherapy also do not predict future local or systemic reactions. This review discusses the studies that show that local reactions are not predictive of future reactions and that dose adjustments for local reactions from allergen immunotherapy are unnecessary. The article also focuses on factors that lead to patient noncompliance with immunotherapy and evaluates methods to prevent local reactions from subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy. PMID:24283844

  9. Contact Dermatitis, Patch Testing, and Allergen Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Burkemper, Nicole M

    2015-01-01

    In patients presenting with a complaint of rash, contact dermatitis is often the underlying diagnosis making it an entity with which health care providers should be familiar. Contact dermatitis can be divided into irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. In a patient suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis, patch testing can be done to identify specific allergens. Education focused on allergen avoidance and safe products is an integral part of treatment for the contact dermatitis patient. Knowledge of the most common allergens is helpful for clinicians to be able to provide this education.

  10. Contact Dermatitis, Patch Testing, and Allergen Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Burkemper, Nicole M

    2015-01-01

    In patients presenting with a complaint of rash, contact dermatitis is often the underlying diagnosis making it an entity with which health care providers should be familiar. Contact dermatitis can be divided into irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. In a patient suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis, patch testing can be done to identify specific allergens. Education focused on allergen avoidance and safe products is an integral part of treatment for the contact dermatitis patient. Knowledge of the most common allergens is helpful for clinicians to be able to provide this education. PMID:26455061

  11. Local reactions from subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coop, Christopher A

    2013-12-01

    Local reactions from subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy are very common during the course of immunotherapy. These local reactions are not bothersome to patients. Local reactions from immunotherapy also do not predict future local or systemic reactions. This review discusses the studies that show that local reactions are not predictive of future reactions and that dose adjustments for local reactions from allergen immunotherapy are unnecessary. The article also focuses on factors that lead to patient noncompliance with immunotherapy and evaluates methods to prevent local reactions from subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy.

  12. Toxicity of inhaled methyl isocyanate vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The toxicity of inhaled isocyanate (MIC) vapor was evaluated using several bioassays designed to investigate the toxicity of airborne chemicals. Two methods which measure changes in respiratory rate and identify characteristic breathing patterns in mice were used to evaluate the potency of MIC as a sensory and pulmonary irritant. Using the CO{sub 2} challenge method in conjunction with the measurement of airflow (V) and tidal volume (VT), the pulmonary effects and subsequent recovery process following a single exposure to MIC were studied in guinea pigs for a period of one year. Flow-volume loops were also obtained by plotting V vs. VT. Measurement of O{sub 2} uptake and CO{sub 2} output were also performed to determine the acute and chronic effects of MIC exposure on gas exchange. Lastly, guinea pigs and mice were exposed to {sup 14}C-MIC in an effort to determine uptake and fate of inhaled MIC.

  13. Inhalation drug delivery devices: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mariam; Verma, Rahul; Garcia-Contreras, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    The pulmonary route of administration has proven to be effective in local and systemic delivery of miscellaneous drugs and biopharmaceuticals to treat pulmonary and non-pulmonary diseases. A successful pulmonary administration requires a harmonic interaction between the drug formulation, the inhaler device, and the patient. However, the biggest single problem that accounts for the lack of desired effect or adverse outcomes is the incorrect use of the device due to lack of training in how to use the device or how to coordinate actuation and aerosol inhalation. This review summarizes the structural and mechanical features of aerosol delivery devices with respect to mechanisms of aerosol generation, their use with different formulations, and their advantages and limitations. A technological update of the current state-of-the-art designs proposed to overcome current challenges of existing devices is also provided. PMID:25709510

  14. Variability of Offending Allergens of Allergic Rhinitis According to Age: Optimization of Skin Prick Test Allergens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Ahn, Jae-Chul; Han, Doo Hee; Kim, Dong-Young; Kim, Jung-Whun; Cho, Sang-Heon; Park, Heung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates offending allergens in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) according to age that establish a minimal panel for skin prick test (SPT) allergens required to identify if a patient is sensitized. Methods We retrospectively analyzed SPT results according to age to determine the minimum test battery panel necessary to screen at least 93%-95% of AR patients. Allergic skin tests (common airborne indoor and outdoor allergens) were performed on 7,182 patients from January 2007 to June 2011. All patients were classified into 9 groups according to age; subsequently, we investigated offending allergens by age group. Results A total of 5,032 (70.1%) patients were found sensitized to at least one of the 55 aeroallergen extracts tested. The annual ranking of offending allergens was not significantly different from each other over the past 5 years. House dust mites (HDM) were the most prevalent allergens ranked from first to third for all 5 years. The allergens in the minimum test panel differed slightly among all age groups; in addition, the types of sensitized allergen sources were more diverse in the older versus younger age group. HDM covered a larger proportion of the sensitized allergens in the younger age group versus the older age group. Testing with 5 allergens (Dermatophagoides farinae, Tetranychus urticae, oak, mugwort and cockroach) adequately identified over 90% of the sensitized patients. Conclusions A SPT with around 5-7 allergens adequately detected most of the sensitization in the majority of the age groups in Korea. However, this study suggests that physicians perform the SPT with appropriately selected allergens in each age category for the screening of AR. PMID:24404393

  15. Allergenic fragments of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) pollen allergen Lol p IV.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, K S; Ekramoddoullah, A K; Kisil, F T

    1989-01-01

    To facilitate studies on establishing the nature of structure/function relationships of allergens, ryegrass pollen allergen, Lol p IV, was cleaved into smaller fragments by cyanogen bromide (CNBr) and the resulting peptides were further digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were then fractionated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on a C-18 reverse phase column. The allergenic activity of the HPLC fractions was evaluated in terms of their ability to inhibit the binding of 125I-Lol p IV to serum IgE antibodies of a grass-allergic patient. Many of these fractions inhibited the binding between the native allergen and IgE antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitions were specific, i.e., the fractions did not inhibit the binding between 125I-Lol p I (a group-I ryegrass pollen allergen) and the IgE antibodies present in the allergic human serum. The possibility that the allergenic peptide fractions were contaminated by the native undegraded allergen, which might have accounted for the observed inhibition, was ruled out by the fact that the native allergen could not be detected by SDS-PAGE and the elution profiles of allergenically active peptides did not coincide with that of native allergen. One of the allergenic sites recognized by monoclonal antibody (Mab) 90, i.e., site A, was located in HPLC fractions 90-100 while another allergenic site B (recognized by Mab 12) appeared to be lost following the sequential digestion of Lol p IV with CNBr and trypsin.

  16. De-novo Onset of Eosinophilic Esophagitis After Large Volume Allergen Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, W. Asher; Jerath, Maya R.; Dellon, Evan S.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated condition believed to have an allergic component, but the timing of the initial allergen triggers that cause the disease is poorly understood. While the clinical presentation of EoE is often of longstanding symptoms, in animal models, acute exposure to an allergen challenge successfully produces EoE. In this report, we present three cases of individuals who developed esophageal eosinophilia and EoE shortly after a clearly identified exposure to aeroallergens. These cases highlight the allergic etiology of EoE, and provide a link from humans to the previously described experimental mechanisms. PMID:23799220

  17. Fuzzy logic for personalized healthcare and diagnostics: FuzzyApp--a fuzzy logic based allergen-protein predictor.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Vijayakumar; Lakshmi, P T V

    2014-09-01

    The path to personalized medicine demands the use of new and customized biopharmaceutical products containing modified proteins. Hence, assessment of these products for allergenicity becomes mandatory before they are introduced as therapeutics. Despite the availability of different tools to predict the allergenicity of proteins, it remains challenging to predict the allergens and nonallergens, when they share significant sequence similarity with known nonallergens and allergens, respectively. Hence, we propose "FuzzyApp," a novel fuzzy rule based system to evaluate the quality of the query protein to be an allergen. It measures the allergenicity of the protein based on the fuzzy IF-THEN rules derived from five different modules. On various datasets, FuzzyApp outperformed other existing methods and retained balance between sensitivity and specificity, with positive Mathew's correlation coefficient. The high specificity of allergen-like putative nonallergens (APN) revealed the FuzzyApp's capability in distinguishing the APN from allergens. In addition, the error analysis and whole proteome dataset analysis suggest the efficiency and consistency of the proposed method. Further, FuzzyApp predicted the Tropomyosin from various allergenic and nonallergenic sources accurately. The web service created allows batch sequence submission, and outputs the result as readable sentences rather than values alone, which assists the user in understanding why and what features are responsible for the prediction. FuzzyApp is implemented using PERL CGI and is freely accessible at http://fuzzyapp.bicpu.edu.in/predict.php . We suggest the use of Fuzzy logic has much potential in biomarker and personalized medicine research to enhance predictive capabilities of post-genomics diagnostics.

  18. Inactivation of allergens and toxins.

    PubMed

    Morandini, Piero

    2010-11-30

    Plants are replete with thousands of proteins and small molecules, many of which are species-specific, poisonous or dangerous. Over time humans have learned to avoid dangerous plants or inactivate many toxic components in food plants, but there is still room for ameliorating food crops (and plants in general) in terms of their allergens and toxins content, especially in their edible parts. Inactivation at the genetic rather than physical or chemical level has many advantages and classical genetic approaches have resulted in significant reduction of toxin content. The capacity, offered by genetic engineering, of turning off (inactivating) specific genes has opened up the possibility of altering the plant content in a far more precise manner than previously available. Different levels of intervention (genes coding for toxins/allergens or for enzymes, transporters or regulators involved in their metabolism) are possible and there are several tools for inactivating genes, both direct (using chemical and physical mutagens, insertion of transposons and other genetic elements) and indirect (antisense RNA, RNA interference, microRNA, eventually leading to gene silencing). Each level/strategy has specific advantages and disadvantages (speed, costs, selectivity, stability, reversibility, frequency of desired genotype and regulatory regime). Paradigmatic examples from classical and transgenic approaches are discussed to emphasize the need to revise the present regulatory process. Reducing the content of natural toxins is a trade-off process: the lesser the content of natural toxins, the higher the susceptibility of a plant to pests and therefore the stronger the need to protect plants. As a consequence, more specific pesticides like Bt are needed to substitute for general pesticides.

  19. [Animal models for assessment of GMO allergenicity: advantages and limitations].

    PubMed

    Adel-Patient, K; Wal, J M

    2004-03-01

    Incidence of IgE-mediated allergic reactions to foods is increasing as well as the severity of associated symptoms and numerous foods are now incriminated, probably in relation with modifications of dietary habits and increased exposure to new or modified food ingredients. Therefore, the introduction on the market of food composed of or derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) raised the question of their potential allergenicity. Particularly with regards to the allergenicity of a newly expressed protein, it is necessary to obtain, from several steps in the risk assessment process, a cumulative body of evidence which minimises any uncertainty. This may include the use of animal model despite no fully reliable validated model is available yet. Such animal models should allow to address 3 major issues: Is the novel protein a sensitizer, i.e. does it possess intrinsic properties that allow to sensitize a predisposed individual? Is the protein an elicitor i.e. is it able to elicit an allergic reaction in a sensitised individual? And is the protein an adjuvant, i.e. can it facilitate or enhance the sensitisation to an other protein? Animal models under investigation currently include mice, rats and guinea pigs but models such as dogs and swine also appeared a few years ago. The aim is to mimic the mechanism and characteristics of the sensitisation phase and/or the elicitation phase of the allergic reaction as it occurs in atopic humans. They are necessary because sensitisation studies can obviously not be done in human and because in vitro tests cannot reproduce the complexity of the immune system. We propose a mouse model which mimics both phases of the allergic reaction. It has permitted to evidence that biochemical and clinical manifestations occuring during the active phases of the allergic reaction differ according to the structure of the allergen used for the challenge. This may allow to compare the allergenic potential of a genetically modified protein

  20. [Governmental batch sample testing of allergen products].

    PubMed

    Bartel, D; Führer, F; Vieths, S

    2012-03-01

    Allergen products for specific immunotherapy of type I allergies were first authorized for the German market in the 1970s. In addition to finished products manufactured in advance and in batches, so-called named patient products have recently been defined as Medicinal Products by the German Medicinal Products Act ("Arzneimittelgesetz", AMG 14th Revision 2005). Some allergen products previously marketed as named patient products are now required to obtain marketing authorization according to the German ordinance for therapy allergens. Products have to be batch released by the competent German Federal Agency, the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI). Samples of product batches are delivered to the PEI in order to perform experimental quality controls. With regard to named patient products, PEI tests batch samples of the bulk extract preparations used for manufacturing of the respective, named patient products. The institute releases approximately 2,800 allergen product batches annually.

  1. 21 CFR 680.1 - Allergenic Products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... use of the mold as a source material for Allergenic Products, in accordance with 21 CFR 601.2, the... capable of determining the good health of the animals. (iii) Immunization against tetanus. Animals of...

  2. 21 CFR 680.1 - Allergenic Products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... use of the mold as a source material for Allergenic Products, in accordance with 21 CFR 601.2, the... capable of determining the good health of the animals. (iii) Immunization against tetanus. Animals of...

  3. 21 CFR 680.1 - Allergenic Products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... use of the mold as a source material for Allergenic Products, in accordance with 21 CFR 601.2, the... capable of determining the good health of the animals. (iii) Immunization against tetanus. Animals of...

  4. 21 CFR 680.1 - Allergenic Products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... use of the mold as a source material for Allergenic Products, in accordance with 21 CFR 601.2, the... capable of determining the good health of the animals. (iii) Immunization against tetanus. Animals of...

  5. 21 CFR 680.1 - Allergenic Products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... use of the mold as a source material for Allergenic Products, in accordance with 21 CFR 601.2, the... capable of determining the good health of the animals. (iii) Immunization against tetanus. Animals of...

  6. Identification of crustacea allergens by crossed radioimmunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, S B; McCants, M L; Salvaggio, J E

    1985-01-01

    Crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) detected 18 precipitating antigens in extracts of shrimp. Of these antigens, crossed-line immunoelectrophoresis (CLIE) of shrimp extract demonstrated that 5 cross-reacted with crayfish, 3 with lobster and 1 with crab extract. Allergens present in the shrimp CIE plates were identified by crossed radioimmunoelectrophoresis (CRIE) using sera from 6 study subjects who were skin-test and RAST positive to shrimp extract. Of the 7 allergens detected, 3 (precipitins 1, 3 and 6) reacted with most of the 6 sera tested from shrimp-sensitive subjects. Precipitins 1 and 6 appear to be common crustacea allergens (present in shrimp, crayfish, lobster and crab) whereas precipitin 3 may be a specific allergen since it is present only in shrimp.

  7. About Steroids (Inhaled and Oral Corticosteroids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... dose-inhalers ( inhaled steroids ), oral forms (pills or syrups) , injections (shots) and intravenous (IV) solutions. Healthcare providers ... slowly decreased. Inhaled steroids and steroid pills and syrups are often prescribed for people with a chronic ...

  8. Parent's Guide to Preventing Inhalant Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditioning coolants. How can you tell if a young person is an inhalant abuser? If someone is ... youths involved with inhalant abuse. How does a young person who abuses inhalants die? There are many ...

  9. Inhalation exposure of animals.

    PubMed Central

    Phalen, R F

    1976-01-01

    Relative advantages and disadvantages and important design criteria for various exposure methods are presented. Five types of exposures are discussed: whole-body chambers, head-only exposures, nose or mouth-only methods, lung-only exposures, and partial-lung exposures. Design considerations covered include: air cleaning and conditioning; construction materials; losses of exposure materials; evenness of exposure; sampling biases; animal observation and care; noise and vibration control, safe exhausts, chamber loading, reliability, pressure fluctuations; neck seals, masks, animal restraint methods; and animal comfort. Ethical considerations in use of animals in inhalation experiments are also discussed. PMID:1017420

  10. Asymptomatic inhaled foreign body

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Muhammad U.; Asghar, Asif; Tareen, Irum; Azhar, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    It is very rare to have a big foreign body in the lungs without any complications or symptoms for 2 years. A 14-year-old male with episodes of minor hemoptysis for 4 weeks had a history of inhalation of a bullet 2 years earlier. He had asymptomatic for lung complications for 2 years. The bullet was removed by right thoracotomy and non-anatomical wedge stapled resection, and he followed an uneventful recovery. An aspirated foreign body although big can remain asymptomatic for a long time, especially if it has migrated to the periphery. PMID:27652366

  11. Hydrolysed egg displays strong decrease in allergenicity and is well tolerated by egg-allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Ballmer-Weber, B K; Brockow, K; Fiocchi, A; Theler, B; Vogel, L; Ring, J; Szépfalusi, Z; Mazzina, O; Schaller, R; Fritsché, R; Vissers, Y M; Nutten, S

    2016-05-01

    Food allergies are believed to be on the rise, and currently, management relies on the avoidance of the food. Hen's egg allergy is after cow's milk allergy the most common food allergy; eggs are used in many food products and thus difficult to avoid. A technological process using a combination of enzymatic hydrolysis and heat treatment was designed to produce modified hen's egg with reduced allergenic potential. Biochemical (SDS-PAGE, Size exclusion chromatography and LC-MS/MS) and immunological (ELISA, immunoblot, RBL-assays, animal model) analysis showed a clear decrease in intact proteins as well as a strong decrease of allergenicity. In a clinical study, 22 of the 24 patients with a confirmed egg allergy who underwent a double-blind food challenge with the hydrolysed egg remained completely free of symptoms. Hydrolysed egg products may be beneficial as low-allergenic foods for egg-allergic patients to extent their diet.

  12. Topical skin treatment with Fab fragments of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody suppresses allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Sae-Wong, Chutha; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Kangsanant, Sureeporn; Yoshino, Shin

    2016-05-15

    Fab fragments (Fabs), which lack effector functions due to the absence of the Fc portion, maintain the ability to bind to specific allergens. In the present study, we examined whether Fabs of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) were able to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. BALB/c mice passively sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE mAb were repeatedly challenged with OVA applied to the skin after sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment. Fabs prepared by the digestion of anti-OVA IgG1 mAb (O1-10) with papain were applied to the skin 30min before the OVA challenges followed by measurement of clinical symptoms including erythema/hemorrhage, edema, scarring/dryness, and excoriation/erosion of the skin. Treatment with O1-10 Fabs, but not intact O1-10, showed inhibition of clinical symptoms (P<0.01) induced by the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice; O1-10 Fabs suppressed histological changes such as epidermal hyperplasia (P<0.01) and the accumulation of mast cells (P<0.01) and neutrophils (P<0.01). Furthermore, treatment with O1-10 Fabs inhibited the increase in levels of IL-13 (P<0.01) and IL-17A production (P<0.05) in the lymph nodes of the sensitized mice. Additionally, the increased level of OVA in serum following the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice was reduced by the treatment (P<0.05). These results suggest that topical application of pathogenic allergen-specific IgG1 mAb Fabs to the skin of mice is effective in suppressing allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions, suggesting that allergen-specific mAb Fabs could be used as a tool to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis. PMID:26970183

  13. Characterization of Der f 29, a new allergen from dermatophagoides farinae

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Congli; Fan, Xiaoqin; Li, Meng; Xing, Peng; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Yulan; Zhang, Min; Yang, Pingchang; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    More than 30 allergens have been identified from Dermatophagoides farina (D. farina), which is one of the main species of house dust mites. The mite allergens are an important factor contributing to allergic disease in the world. As the detection and identification of new allergens is critical for the diagnosis or treatment of allergic diseases, we sought to characterize the profilin of D. farina (Der f 29) in this study. The results showed that 21% of allergic patients displayed positive results in skin prick test with recombinant Der f 29 (rDer f 29) as the specific allergen; specific IgE reactivity to rDer f 29 was shown by Western Blot and ELISA. In addition, rDer f 29 induced bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) to produce T cells immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain protein 4 (TIM4). Moreover, an allergic asthma mouse model was established by challenging with rDer f 29. Airway hyperresponsiveness, serum specific IgE, IgG1, eosinophil infiltration in the allergic mice bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interferon-γ (INF-γ) from spleen cells were markedly increased; the histology showed severe inflammation in the lung. In conclusion, Der f 29 is identified as a new type of the house dust mite allergen. PMID:26328014

  14. Characterization of Der f 29, a new allergen from dermatophagoides farinae.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Congli; Fan, Xiaoqin; Li, Meng; Xing, Peng; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Yulan; Zhang, Min; Yang, Pingchang; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    More than 30 allergens have been identified from Dermatophagoides farina (D. farina), which is one of the main species of house dust mites. The mite allergens are an important factor contributing to allergic disease in the world. As the detection and identification of new allergens is critical for the diagnosis or treatment of allergic diseases, we sought to characterize the profilin of D. farina (Der f 29) in this study. The results showed that 21% of allergic patients displayed positive results in skin prick test with recombinant Der f 29 (rDer f 29) as the specific allergen; specific IgE reactivity to rDer f 29 was shown by Western Blot and ELISA. In addition, rDer f 29 induced bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) to produce T cells immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain protein 4 (TIM4). Moreover, an allergic asthma mouse model was established by challenging with rDer f 29. Airway hyperresponsiveness, serum specific IgE, IgG1, eosinophil infiltration in the allergic mice bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interferon-γ (INF-γ) from spleen cells were markedly increased; the histology showed severe inflammation in the lung. In conclusion, Der f 29 is identified as a new type of the house dust mite allergen.

  15. Allergens in the pathogenesis of asthma: potential role of anti-immunoglobulin E therapy.

    PubMed

    Storms, William

    2002-01-01

    Evidence suggests that allergy is a significant triggering factor in asthma in children and adults alike. In immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated allergic reactions, sensitization occurs when allergen-specific B cells are stimulated and switched to IgE antibody production by interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 provided by helper T cells type 2 (Th2). The IgE antibodies act by arming cells bearing either the high-affinity (FcepsilonRI) or low-affinity (FcepsilonRII or CD23) receptor. The subsequent interaction of allergen with IgE-FcepsilonRI complexes on mast cells and basophils causes cross-linking of receptors that triggers the release of a variety of inflammatory mediators, cytokines and chemokines. Therefore, the ability to lower circulating free IgE levels is desirable because most individuals are exposed to multiple allergens to which they are sensitive at any given time. Omalizumab (formerly known as rhuMAb-E25) is a recently developed humanized monoclonal anti-IgE antibody directed at the FcepsilonRI binding domain of human IgE. It inhibits binding of IgE to mast cells without provoking mast cell activation. Preliminary clinical data from randomized controlled trials have shown that the addition of omalizumab to standard asthma therapy reduces asthma exacerbations and decreases inhaled corticosteroid and rescue medication use. The compound is also well tolerated. Omalizumab represents a novel therapeutic approach in the management of asthma.

  16. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Darsow, Ulf; Forer, Ingeborg; Ring, Johannes

    2011-08-01

    Aeroallergens are relevant eliciting factors of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma but also of atopic eczema. The use of allergen-specific immunotherapy as in respiratory atopic diseases is controversial in patients with atopic eczema, but refined diagnostic methods to characterize subgroups of patients with relevant allergies and the results of smaller controlled studies give rise to new approaches in this field. This article reviews the theoretical problems and practical results associated with allergen-specific immunotherapy in atopic eczema. PMID:21461718

  17. Allergenicity attributes of different peanut market types.

    PubMed

    Koppelman, Stef J; Jayasena, Shyamali; Luykx, Dion; Schepens, Erik; Apostolovic, Danijela; de Jong, Govardus A H; Isleib, Thomas G; Nordlee, Julie; Baumert, Joe; Taylor, Steve L; Cheng, Hsiaopo; Maleki, Soheila

    2016-05-01

    Four different market classes of peanut (Runner, Virginia Spanish, and Valencia) are commonly consumed in Western countries, but for some consumers peanuts are a main cause of food-induced anaphylaxis. Limited information is available on the comparative allergenicity of these distinct market classes. The aim of this study was to compare allergenicity attributes of different peanut cultivars. The protein content and protein profiles were highly comparable for all tested cultivars. All cultivar samples contained the major allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3 and Ara h 6, as assessed by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC, although some minor differences in major allergen content were found between samples. All samples were reactive in commercial ELISAs for detection and quantification of peanut protein. IgE-binding potency differed between samples with a maximum factor of 2, indicating a highly comparable allergenicity. Based on our observations, we conclude that peanuts from the main market types consumed in Western countries are highly comparable in their allergenicity attributes, indicating that safety considerations with regard to peanut allergy are not dependent on the peanut cultivar in question.

  18. Removing peanut allergens by tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Chung, Si-Yin; Reed, Shawndrika

    2012-10-01

    Tannic acid (TA) forms insoluble complexes with proteins. The aims here were to remove major peanut allergens as insoluble TA complexes and determine if they would dissociate and release the allergens at pH 2 and 8 (gut pH). Release of the allergens in the gut could lead to absorption and consequently an allergic reaction. TA (0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/ml) was added to a peanut butter extract (5 mg/ml; pH 7.2), stirred, and centrifuged. The precipitates were then suspended in buffer at pH 2, centrifuged, re-suspended at pH 8, and centrifuged. Supernatants from each step were analysed by SDS-PAGE, ELISA, and Western blots. The effect of NaCl (1M) on complexes was also determined. Results showed that complexes formed at a TA concentration >0.5 mg/ml did not release major peanut allergens at pH 2 and 8, regardless of 1M NaCl being present or not. IgE binding of the extracts was reduced substantially, especially at a TA concentration of 1-2 mg/ml. Animal or clinical studies are still needed before TA can find an application in the development of low-allergen peanut products/beverages or the removal of peanut allergens due to accidental ingestion. PMID:25005968

  19. [Occurrence of allergens on hospital premises].

    PubMed

    Andersen, U M; Osterballe, O

    2000-01-24

    The occurrence of allergens from the house-dust mites Der p 1, Der f 1 and Der m, and from dogs (Can f 1) and cats (Fel d 1) was assessed in Viborg Hospital. Three hundred samples collected in a standardized manner were analysed for allergens by ELISA technique. In only one dust sample was the total occurrence of mite allergens marginally above the sensitization threshold level of 2,000 ng mite allergens/g dust. For Fel d 1 a threshold level for sensitization or symptoms of 8,000 ng Fel d 1/g dust has been proposed; none of the dust samples contained this concentration. A low occurrence of Can f 1 was found. One dust sample contained 8,902 ng Can f 1, while the remainder exhibited lower concentrations. Efficient cleaning and adequate ventilation can reduce allergens in public buildings, but it is impossible to remove all allergens from upholstered furniture. Avoidance of such furniture in wards and outpatient departments which receive allergic patients might be considered.

  20. Allergenicity attributes of different peanut market types.

    PubMed

    Koppelman, Stef J; Jayasena, Shyamali; Luykx, Dion; Schepens, Erik; Apostolovic, Danijela; de Jong, Govardus A H; Isleib, Thomas G; Nordlee, Julie; Baumert, Joe; Taylor, Steve L; Cheng, Hsiaopo; Maleki, Soheila

    2016-05-01

    Four different market classes of peanut (Runner, Virginia Spanish, and Valencia) are commonly consumed in Western countries, but for some consumers peanuts are a main cause of food-induced anaphylaxis. Limited information is available on the comparative allergenicity of these distinct market classes. The aim of this study was to compare allergenicity attributes of different peanut cultivars. The protein content and protein profiles were highly comparable for all tested cultivars. All cultivar samples contained the major allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3 and Ara h 6, as assessed by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC, although some minor differences in major allergen content were found between samples. All samples were reactive in commercial ELISAs for detection and quantification of peanut protein. IgE-binding potency differed between samples with a maximum factor of 2, indicating a highly comparable allergenicity. Based on our observations, we conclude that peanuts from the main market types consumed in Western countries are highly comparable in their allergenicity attributes, indicating that safety considerations with regard to peanut allergy are not dependent on the peanut cultivar in question. PMID:26921497

  1. Cross-reactivity of peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Bublin, Merima; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2014-04-01

    Peanut seeds are currently widely used as source of human food ingredients in the United States of America and in European countries due to their high quality protein and oil content. This article describes the classification and molecular biology of peanut seed allergens with particular reference to their cross-reactivities. Currently, the IUIS allergen nomenclature subcommittee accepts 12 peanut allergens. Two allergens belong to the cupin and four to the prolamin superfamily, and six are distributed among profilins, Bet v 1-like proteins, oleosins, and defensins. Clinical observations frequently report an association of peanut allergy with allergies to legumes, tree nuts, seeds, fruits and pollen. Molecular cross-reactivity has been described between members of the Bet v 1-like proteins, the non-specific lipid transfer proteins, and the profilins. This review also addresses the less well-studied cross-reactivity between cupin and prolamin allergens of peanuts and of other plant food sources and the recently discovered cross-reactivity between peanut allergens of unrelated protein families. PMID:24554241

  2. Molecular characterization of Api g 1, the major allergen of celery (Apium graveolens), and its immunological and structural relationships to a group of 17-kDa tree pollen allergens.

    PubMed

    Breiteneder, H; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K; O'Riordain, G; Susani, M; Ahorn, H; Ebner, C; Kraft, D; Scheiner, O

    1995-10-15

    Individuals suffering from immediate hypersensitivity (type-I allergy) to a particular pollen frequently display intolerance to several foods of plant origin. In this respect, individuals sensitized to birch pollen and/or mugwort pollen frequently display type-I allergic symptoms after ingestion of celery. In this study, we expressed the major allergenic protein of celery, Api g 1, which is responsible for the birch-celery syndrome, in the form of a non-fusion protein. The open reading frame of the cDNA of Api g 1 codes for a protein of 153 amino acids with a molecular mass of 16.2 kDa and 40% identity (60% similarity) to the major allergen of birch pollen, Bet v 1. Furthermore, Api g 1 exhibited similar characteristics to (a) two proteins in parsley induced by fungal infection, (b) the major tree pollen allergens and (c) pathogenesis-related and stress-induced proteins in other plant species. The reactivity of recombinant Api g 1 with IgE antibodies present in sera from celery intolerant patients was comparable to that of the natural celery allergen. Cross-reactivity with Bet v 1 was proven by cross-inhibition experiments, which provides further support for the existence of the birch-celery syndrome and for the suggestion that allergies to some vegetable foods are epiphenomena to allergies caused by inhalation of tree pollen.

  3. Insulin inhalation: NN 1998.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Aradigm Corporation has developed an inhaled form of insulin using its proprietary AERx drug delivery system. The system uses liquid insulin that is converted into an aerosol containing very small particles (1-3 micro in diameter), and an electronic device suitable for either the rapid transfer of molecules of insulin into the bloodstream or localised delivery within the lung. The AERx insulin Diabetes Management System (iDMS), AERx iDMS, instructs the user on breathing technique to achieve the best results. Aradigm Corporation and Novo Nordisk have signed an agreement to jointly develop a pulmonary delivery system for insulin [AERx iDMS, NN 1998]. Under the terms of the agreement, Novo Nordisk has exclusive rights for worldwide marketing of any products resulting from the development programme. Aradigm Corporation will initially manufacture the product covered by the agreement, and in return will receive a share of the overall gross profits from Novo Nordisk's sales. Novo Nordisk will cover all development costs incurred by Aradigm Corporation while both parties will co-fund final development of the AERx device. Both companies will explore the possibilities of the AERx platform to deliver other compounds for the regulation of blood glucose levels. Additionally, the agreement gives Novo Nordisk an option to develop the technology for delivery of agents outside the diabetes area. In April 2001, Aradigm Corporation received a milestone payment from Novo Nordisk related to the completion of certain clinical and product development stages of the AERx drug delivery system. Profil, a CRO in Germany, is cooperating with Aradigm and Novo Nordisk in the development of inhaled insulin. Aradigm and Novo Nordisk initiated a pivotal phase III study with inhaled insulin formulation in September 2002. This 24-month, 300-patient trial is evaluating inhaled insulin in comparison with insulin aspart. Both medications will be given three times daily before meals in addition to basal

  4. Conventional and monocyte-derived CD11b(+) dendritic cells initiate and maintain T helper 2 cell-mediated immunity to house dust mite allergen.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Maud; Guilliams, Martin; Vanheerswynghels, Manon; Deswarte, Kim; Branco-Madeira, Filipe; Toussaint, Wendy; Vanhoutte, Leen; Neyt, Katrijn; Killeen, Nigel; Malissen, Bernard; Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2013-02-21

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial for mounting allergic airway inflammation, but it is unclear which subset of DCs performs this task. By using CD64 and MAR-1 staining, we reliably separated CD11b(+) monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) from conventional DCs (cDCs) and studied antigen uptake, migration, and presentation assays of lung and lymph node (LN) DCs in response to inhaled house dust mite (HDM). Mainly CD11b(+) cDCs but not CD103(+) cDCs induced T helper 2 (Th2) cell immunity in HDM-specific T cells in vitro and asthma in vivo. Studies in Flt3l(-/-) mice, lacking all cDCs, revealed that moDCs were also sufficient to induce Th2 cell-mediated immunity but only when high-dose HDM was given. The main function of moDCs was the production of proinflammatory chemokines and allergen presentation in the lung during challenge. Thus, we have identified migratory CD11b(+) cDCs as the principal subset inducing Th2 cell-mediated immunity in the LN, whereas moDCs orchestrate allergic inflammation in the lung.

  5. Effects of phytic acid on peanut allergens and allergenic properties of extracts.

    PubMed

    Chung, Si-Yin; Champagne, Elaine T

    2007-10-31

    Phytic acid would form soluble and insoluble complexes with proteins. Our objective was to determine if phytic acid forms insoluble complexes with major peanut allergens, and if such reaction results in a peanut extract with a lower level of soluble allergens and allergenic property. Extracts from raw and roasted peanuts were treated with and without phytic acid at various pH values and then analyzed by SDS-PAGE and a competitive inhibition ELISA (ciELISA). The ciELISA measured IgE binding using a pooled serum from peanut-allergic individuals. Results showed that phytic acid formed complexes with the major peanut allergens (Ara h 1 and Ara h 2), which were insoluble in acidic and neutral conditions. Succinylation of the allergens inhibited complex formation, indicating that lysine residues were involved. A 6-fold reduction in IgE binding or allergenic potency of the extract was observed after treatment with phytic acid. It was concluded that phytic acid formed insoluble complexes with the major peanut allergens, and resulted in a peanut extract with reduced allergenic potency. Application of phytic acid to a peanut butter slurry presented a similar result, indicating that phytic acid may find use in the development of hypoallergenic peanut-based products.

  6. Effect of oleic acid on the allergenic properties of peanut and cashew allergens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleic acid is the major fatty acid in peanuts and cashews. There is limited information about its effect on peanut and cashew allergens during heating. The objective was to determine if heat treatment with oleic acid changes the allergenic properties of these nut proteins. Peanut and cashew protein...

  7. Is high pressure treatment able to modify the allergenicity of the largemouth bass allergens?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chu-Yi; Tao, Sha; Liu, Rong; Chen, Fu-Sheng; Xue, Wen-Tong

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the influence of high pressure treatment on the structural changes and allergenicity of largemouth bass. We treated the allergens at 100, 200, 300 and 400 MPa for 15 min and at 300 MPa for 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min at 20 °C. The treated samples from largemouth bass were tested for their IgE-binding properties by combining Sodium dodecyl sulfate-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with western blotting (WB) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Circular dichroism analysis was performed to characterize the structural change. In summary, we can determine that the greatest structure changes were found for samples treated by 400 MPa for 15 min. High pressure treatment did change the structure, subunit composition and molecular weight of largemouth bass allergens, but it did not change the allergenicity of the allergens.

  8. Endogenous allergens and compositional analysis in the allergenicity assessment of genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, A; Mills, E N C; Lovik, M; Spoek, A; Germini, A; Mikalsen, A; Wal, J M

    2013-12-01

    Allergenicity assessment of genetically modified (GM) plants is one of the key pillars in the safety assessment process of these products. As part of this evaluation, one of the concerns is to assess that unintended effects (e.g. over-expression of endogenous allergens) relevant for the food safety have not occurred due to the genetic modification. Novel technologies are now available and could be used as complementary and/or alternative methods to those based on human sera for the assessment of endogenous allergenicity. In view of these developments and as a step forward in the allergenicity assessment of GM plants, it is recommended that known endogenous allergens are included in the compositional analysis as additional parameters to be measured.

  9. Bioanalytical methods for food allergy diagnosis, allergen detection and new allergen discovery.

    PubMed

    Gasilova, Natalia; Girault, Hubert H

    2015-01-01

    For effective monitoring and prevention of the food allergy, one of the emerging health problems nowadays, existing diagnostic procedures and allergen detection techniques are constantly improved. Meanwhile, new methods are also developed, and more and more putative allergens are discovered. This review describes traditional methods and summarizes recent advances in the fast evolving field of the in vitro food allergy diagnosis, allergen detection in food products and discovery of the new allergenic molecules. A special attention is paid to the new diagnostic methods under laboratory development like various immuno- and aptamer-based assays, including immunoaffinity capillary electrophoresis. The latter technique shows the importance of MS application not only for the allergen detection but also for the allergy diagnosis.

  10. Expression, purification, and characterization of almond (Prunus dulcis) allergen Pru du 4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochemical characterizations of food allergens are required for understanding the allergenicity of food allergens. Such studies require a relatively large amount of highly purified allergens. Profilins from numerous species are known to be allergens, including food allergens, such as almond (Prunus...

  11. Early life exposure to allergen and ozone results in altered development in adolescent rhesus macaque lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, M.J.; Putney, L.F.; St George, J.A.; Avdalovic, M.V.; Schelegle, E.S.; Miller, L.A.; Hyde, D.M.

    2015-02-15

    In rhesus macaques, previous studies have shown that episodic exposure to allergen alone or combined with ozone inhalation during the first 6 months of life results in a condition with many of the hallmarks of asthma. This exposure regimen results in altered development of the distal airways and parenchyma (Avdalovic et al., 2012). We hypothesized that the observed alterations in the lung parenchyma would be permanent following a long-term recovery in filtered air (FA) housing. Forty-eight infant rhesus macaques (30 days old) sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were treated with two week cycles of FA, house dust mite allergen (HDMA), ozone (O{sub 3}) or HDMA/ozone (HDMA + O{sub 3}) for five months. At the end of the five months, six animals from each group were necropsied. The other six animals in each group were allowed to recover in FA for 30 more months at which time they were necropsied. Design-based stereology was used to estimate volumes of lung components, number of alveoli, size of alveoli, distribution of alveolar volumes, interalveolar capillary density. After 30 months of recovery, monkeys exposed to HDMA, in either group, had significantly more alveoli than filtered air. These alveoli also had higher capillary densities as compared with FA controls. These results indicate that early life exposure to HDMA alone or HDMA + O{sub 3} alters the development process in the lung alveoli. - Highlights: • Abnormal lung development after postnatal exposure to ozone and allergen • This remodeling is shown as smaller, more numerous alveoli and narrower airways. • Allergen appears to have more of an effect than ozone during recovery. • These animals also have continued airway hyperresponsiveness (Moore et al. 2014)

  12. Molecular Cloning and Expression of a New Allergen of Acacia farnesiana (Aca f 2).

    PubMed

    Sepahi, Najmeh; Khodadadi, Ali; Assarehzadegan, Mohammad-Ali; Amini, Akram; Zarinhadideh, Farnoosh; Ali-Sadeghi, Hosein

    2015-08-01

    Inhalation of pollens from different species of Acacia is a common cause of respiratory allergy in tropical areas of the world. Acacia farnesiana is commonly used as street trees in towns and ornamental shade trees in parks and gardens throughout arid and semi-arid regions of Asia. This study aimed to produce and purify the A. farnesiana pollen profilin (Aca f 2) and evaluate its nucleotide sequence homology with profilins of common allergenic plants to predict allergenic cross-reactivity. Thirty-nine patients who were allergic to Acacia pollens were included in the study. Cloning of Acacia profilin-coding sequence was performed by polymerase chain reaction using primers from Acacia pollen RNA. The cDNA of Acacia pollen profilin was then expressed in Escherichia coli using pET-21b(+) vector and purified by metal affinity chromatography. Immunoreactivity of the recombinant Acacia profilin (rAca f 2) was evaluated by specific ELISA, immunoblotting, and inhibition assays. The coding sequence of the Acacia profilin cDNA was recognized as a 399-bp open reading frame encoding 133 amino acid residues. Eighteen patients (18/39, 46.15%) had significant specific IgE levels against Aca f 2. Immunodetection and inhibition assays indicated that purified Aca f 2 might be the same as that in the crude extract. Aca f2, the first allergen from A. farnesiana pollen, was identified as belonging to the family of profilins. The amino acid sequence homology analysis showed high cross-reactivity between Aca f 2 and other profilins from botanically unrelated common allergenic plants.

  13. Molecular Cloning and Expression of a New Allergen of Acacia farnesiana (Aca f 2).

    PubMed

    Sepahi, Najmeh; Khodadadi, Ali; Assarehzadegan, Mohammad-Ali; Amini, Akram; Zarinhadideh, Farnoosh; Ali-Sadeghi, Hosein

    2015-08-01

    Inhalation of pollens from different species of Acacia is a common cause of respiratory allergy in tropical areas of the world. Acacia farnesiana is commonly used as street trees in towns and ornamental shade trees in parks and gardens throughout arid and semi-arid regions of Asia. This study aimed to produce and purify the A. farnesiana pollen profilin (Aca f 2) and evaluate its nucleotide sequence homology with profilins of common allergenic plants to predict allergenic cross-reactivity. Thirty-nine patients who were allergic to Acacia pollens were included in the study. Cloning of Acacia profilin-coding sequence was performed by polymerase chain reaction using primers from Acacia pollen RNA. The cDNA of Acacia pollen profilin was then expressed in Escherichia coli using pET-21b(+) vector and purified by metal affinity chromatography. Immunoreactivity of the recombinant Acacia profilin (rAca f 2) was evaluated by specific ELISA, immunoblotting, and inhibition assays. The coding sequence of the Acacia profilin cDNA was recognized as a 399-bp open reading frame encoding 133 amino acid residues. Eighteen patients (18/39, 46.15%) had significant specific IgE levels against Aca f 2. Immunodetection and inhibition assays indicated that purified Aca f 2 might be the same as that in the crude extract. Aca f2, the first allergen from A. farnesiana pollen, was identified as belonging to the family of profilins. The amino acid sequence homology analysis showed high cross-reactivity between Aca f 2 and other profilins from botanically unrelated common allergenic plants. PMID:26547704

  14. Effect of high intensity ultrasound on the allergenicity of shrimp*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Lin, Hong; Cao, Li-Min; Jameel, Khalid

    2006-01-01

    The tropomyosin fraction of shrimp proteins is potentially responsible for allergic reaction in individuals with genetic predisposition to allergy. However, there are no efficient and safe methods to reduce its allergenicity. High intensity ultrasound is known to change the structure of proteins. This study is aimed at assessing high intensity ultrasound’s effect on the allergenicity of shrimp allergen. Shrimp and purified shrimp allergen were treated with high intensity ultrasound for 30~180 min. Extracts of treated samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with pool serum of shrimp allergy patients and polyclonal anti-allergen antibodies and by immunoblotting after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Shrimp treated with high intensity ultrasound showed a decrease in allergenicity measured with ELISA. A linear relationship between the immune response induced by treated shrimp allergen and the applied treatment time was observed. The decrease in allergenicity was confirmed by immunoblot assays with shrimp allergic patients serum. Allergenicity of shrimp allergen extracted from treated shrimp was higher than that of purified shrimp allergen with the same treatment time. Gel-filtration HPLC was applied for analysis of shrimp allergen after treatment with high intensity ultrasound. Some fractions were appeared with increasing treatment time. The results suggested that high intensity ultrasound could be used to reduce the allergenicity of shrimp. PMID:16532525

  15. Allergens of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Greg S; Huang, Shih-Wen; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2005-01-01

    Background Beauveria bassiana is an important entomopathogenic fungus currently under development as a bio-control agent for a variety of insect pests. Although reported to be non-toxic to vertebrates, the potential allergenicity of Beauveria species has not been widely studied. Methods IgE-reactivity studies were performed using sera from patients displaying mould hypersensitivity by immunoblot and immunoblot inhibition. Skin reactivity to B. bassiana extracts was measured using intradermal skin testing. Results Immunoblots of fungal extracts with pooled as well as individual sera showed a distribution of IgE reactive proteins present in B. bassiana crude extracts. Proteinase K digestion of extracts resulted in loss of IgE reactive epitopes, whereas EndoH and PNGaseF (glycosidase) treatments resulted in minor changes in IgE reactive banding patterns as determined by Western blots. Immunoblot inhibitions experiments showed complete loss of IgE-binding using self protein, and partial inhibition using extracts from common allergenic fungi including; Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium herbarum, Candida albicans, Epicoccum purpurascens, and Penicillium notatum. Several proteins including a strongly reactive band with an approximate molecular mass of 35 kDa was uninhibited by any of the tested extracts, and may represent B. bassiana specific allergens. Intradermal skin testing confirmed the in vitro results, demonstrating allergenic reactions in a number of individuals, including those who have had occupational exposure to B. bassiana. Conclusions Beauveria bassiana possesses numerous IgE reactive proteins, some of which are cross-reactive among allergens from other fungi. A strongly reactive potential B. bassiana specific allergen (35 kDa) was identified. Intradermal skin testing confirmed the allergenic potential of B. bassiana. PMID:15644142

  16. [Allergen management in the food industry].

    PubMed

    Röder, Martin; Weber, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Due to the lack of causative immunotherapies, individuals with food allergies have to rely on correct labelling for even minute amounts of allergenic constituents. It is not relevant to the allergic whether the source of the culprit food is an ingredient or an allergen that entered the food unintentionally, as is the case with so-called cross-contacts or hidden allergens.Efficient allergen management is the manufacturer's prerequisite for coping with allergenic foods in the food production environment and handling them in a way that avoids cross-contact. If it is technically not feasible to eliminate cross-contacts entirely, it must be ensured that these cross-contacts do not enter the final product without being detected.This article discusses measures that should be considered in allergen management. Examples include recording all relevant allergens in the production facility, staff sensitization and training, and taking into account all areas of production from incoming raw materials to outgoing goods.For the evaluation of unavoidable cross-contacts, it is possible today to draw on data from clinical trials for many of the substances that are subject to labelling. This data can be used to assess the risk of the final product.However, the data from threshold studies is not legally binding, so it is left to the manufacturer to assess the level up to which the food is safe for the allergic. In particular the non-harmonized approach of the EU member countries' food safety authorities currently represents a major obstacle, as this can lead to food recalls even though existing levels were evaluated as being safe according to the risk assessments performed. PMID:27299344

  17. Allergen-induced generation of mediators in the mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Mattoli, S

    2001-01-01

    The inhalation of antigens does not normally lead to allergic inflammation, but airway resident cells and their products may affect the outcome of antigen exposure. It is therefore important to elucidate how potential allergens interact with airway epithelial cells and other cells located within and below the epithelium. Some studies have indicated that certain antigens, particularly the major house dust mite antigen Der p1, penetrate the airway epithelium by intracellular transportation or paracellular passage, depending on their concentrations, time of exposure, and ability of the cells to inactivate them. If an antigen possesses proteolytic activity, such as Der p1, and it reaches high concentrations or the exposure is prolonged, the disruption of the tight junction can also favor the transepithelial passage of other antigens. In this way, the antigens can easily encounter the effector cells located between epithelial cells and below the basement membrane. The magnitude of this phenomenon may be more prominent in the airways of asthmatic patients, as their epithelium is more permeable to Der p1 than the epithelium of nonasthmatic patients and releases cytokines after exposure to very low concentrations of this antigen for brief periods. Epithelial cell activation may facilitate the development of allergic mucosal sensitization to Der p1 and contribute to the antigen-induced inflammatory response by affecting the migration and function of dendritic cells, mast cells, and eosinophils. Also, there might be a secondary release of interleukin-6 and endothelin-1, which can have a detrimental effect on the cardiovascular function. PMID:11544162

  18. Inhaled matters of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Zaky, Ahmed; Ahmad, Aftab; Dell’Italia, Louis J; Jahromi, Leila; Reisenberg, Lee Ann; Matalon, Sadis; Ahmad, Shama

    2015-01-01

    Inhalations of atmospheric pollutants, especially particulate matters, are known to cause severe cardiac effects and to exacerbate preexisting heart disease. Heart failure is an important sequellae of gaseous inhalation such as that of carbon monoxide. Similarly, other gases such as sulphur dioxide are known to cause detrimental cardiovascular events. However, mechanisms of these cardiac toxicities are so far unknown. Increased susceptibility of the heart to oxidative stress may play a role. Low levels of antioxidants in the heart as compared to other organs and high levels of reactive oxygen species produced due to the high energetic demand and metabolic rate in cardiac muscle are important in rendering this susceptibility. Acute inhalation of high concentrations of halogen gases is often fatal. Severe respiratory injury and distress occurs upon inhalation of halogens gases, such as chlorine and bromine; however, studies on their cardiac effects are scant. We have demonstrated that inhalation of high concentrations of halogen gases cause significant cardiac injury, dysfunction, and failure that can be critical in causing mortalities following exposures. Our studies also demonstrated that cardiac dysfunction occurs as a result of a direct insult independent of coexisting hypoxia, since it is not fully reversed by oxygen supplementation. Therefore, studies on offsite organ effects of inhaled toxic gases can impact development of treatment strategies upon accidental or deliberate exposures to these agents. Here we summarize the knowledge of cardiovascular effects of common inhaled toxic gases with the intent to highlight the importance of consideration of cardiac symptoms while treating the victims. PMID:26665179

  19. Epicutaneous Allergic Sensitization by Cooperation between Allergen Protease Activity and Mechanical Skin Barrier Damage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Sakiko; Takai, Toshiro; Iida, Hideo; Maruyama, Natsuko; Ochi, Hirono; Kamijo, Seiji; Nishioka, Izumi; Hara, Mutsuko; Matsuda, Akira; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Ikeda, Shigaku

    2016-07-01

    Allergen sources such as mites, insects, fungi, and pollen contain proteases. Airway exposure to proteases induces allergic airway inflammation and IgE/IgG1 responses via IL-33-dependent mechanisms in mice. We examined the epicutaneous sensitization of mice to a model protease allergen, papain; the effects of tape stripping, which induces epidermal barrier dysfunction; and the atopic march upon a subsequent airway challenge. Papain painting on ear skin and tape stripping cooperatively promoted dermatitis, the skin gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors, up-regulation of serum total IgE, and papain-specific IgE/IgG1 induction. Epicutaneous sensitization induced T helper (Th) 2 cells and Th17 differentiation in draining lymph nodes. Ovalbumin and protease inhibitor-treated papain induced no or weak responses, whereas the co-administration of ovalbumin and papain promoted ovalbumin-specific IgE/IgG1 induction. Wild-type and IL-33-deficient mice showed similar responses in the epicutaneous sensitization phase. The subsequent airway papain challenge induced airway eosinophilia and maintained high papain-specific IgE levels in an IL-33-dependent manner. These results suggest that allergen source-derived protease activity and mechanical barrier damage such as that caused by scratching cooperatively promote epicutaneous sensitization and skin inflammation and that IL-33 is dispensable for epicutaneous sensitization but is crucial in the atopic march upon a subsequent airway low-dose encounter with protease allergens. PMID:26987428

  20. Combined action of vasoactive amines and bradykinin mediates allergen-evoked thermal hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lavich, Tatiana R; Cordeiro, Renato S B; Calixto, João B; e Silva, Patrícia M R; Martins, Marco A

    2003-02-21

    The ability of allergens to induce hyperalgesia in immunoglobulin E (IgE)-sensitized rats was investigated. The left hind paws of Wistar rats were sensitized with intraplantar injections of IgE anti-dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin monoclonal antibody, and challenged with dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin 24 h later. Allergen challenge yielded rapid thermal hyperalgesia and oedema formation in the ipsilateral paws, both reaching a plateau from 15 min to 3 h, and both diminishing thereafter. Allergen-evoked hyperalgesia was inhibited by intraperitoneal treatment with meclizine or methysergide, histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonists. There was also sensitivity to local treatment with either bradykinin B(1) or B(2) receptor antagonists, des-Arg(9)-[Leu(8)]-bradykinin or D-arginyl-[Hyp3, Thi5, D-Tic7, Oic8]-bradykinin (Hoe 140). Anaphylactic hyperalgesia was mimicked by the combined administration of histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and bradykinin at doses which were ineffective when injected alone. This synergistic effect was abolished by treatment with either meclizine, methysergide, Hoe 140 or des-Arg(9)-[Leu(8)]-bradykinin. Our findings show that local thermal hyperalgesia is a feature of allergen-evoked inflammation, and that a synergistic interaction among bradykinin, 5-hydroxytryptamine and histamine plays a critical role in this phenomenon. PMID:12591112

  1. [Antigenicity and allergenicity of hypoallergenic hydrolysate for infant nutrition].

    PubMed

    Görtler, I; Urbanek, R

    1990-09-01

    The antigenicity/allergenicity of protein components in hypoallergenic formulae is altered by hydrolysis. Two different hydrolysate formulae, hydrolysate 1 = cow milk based; hydrolysate 2 = soya/beef collagen based, were investigated with respect to their specific IgG/IgE binding capacities using the sera of 41 healthy controls, 40 atopic and 12 cow milk allergic subjects. Furthermore, histamine liberation from basophils on incubation with milk proteins and the hydrolysates was measured in 5 healthy and 3 cow milk allergic individuals. Nearly all probands demonstrated specific IgG binding with hypoallergenic formulae. Anti-hydrolysate 1 IgG titres were higher than titres against hydrolysate 2 in the cow milk allergic and healthy populations. Nonhydrolyzed cow milk elicited IgE binding in all cow milk allergic sera. IgE-antibody for hydrolysate 2 could only be demonstrated in one atopic subject. Hydrolysate 1 showed binding capacity for the IgE-antibody of one atopic and 3/12 cow milk allergic patients. Histamine liberation followed in-vitro incubation with both hydrolysates in one out of 3 cow milk allergic subjects and two out of these cases following incubation to unprocessed cow milk protein. A decreased antigenicity/allergenicity can be demonstrated for the two hydrolysates investigated, however antigenic/allergenic reactivity is still present to some degree. Therefore, the therapeutic application of hypoallergenic formulae in patients with specific sensitization to cow milk should be based on the results of the above-mentioned in-vitro parameters and if necessary skin tests and oral challenges.

  2. 78 FR 66011 - Allergenic Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ..., perennial rye, Timothy, and Kentucky bluegrass mixed pollens allergen extract tablet for sublingual use... recommendations on the safety and efficacy of Grastek, a Timothy grass pollen allergen extract tablet...

  3. Update in the Mechanisms of Allergen-Specific Immunotheraphy

    PubMed Central

    Akkoc, Tunc; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2011-01-01

    Allergic diseases represent a complex innate and adoptive immune response to natural environmental allergens with Th2-type T cells and allergen-specific IgE predominance. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the most effective therapeutic approach for disregulated immune response towards allergens by enhancing immune tolerance mechanisms. The main aim of immunotherapy is the generation of allergen nonresponsive or tolerant T cells in sensitized patients and downregulation of predominant T cell- and IgE-mediated immune responses. During allergen-specific immunotherapy, T regulatory cells are generated, which secrete IL-10 and induce allergen-specific B cells for the production of IgG4 antibodies. These mechanisms induce tolerance to antigens that reduces allergic symptoms. Although current knowledge highlights the role of T regulatory cell-mediated immunetolerance, definite mechanisms that lead to a successful clinical outcomes of allergen-specific immunotherapy still remains an open area of research. PMID:21217920

  4. Inhalation delivery of asthma drugs.

    PubMed

    Matthys, H

    1990-01-01

    In the immediate future, metered-dose inhalers (MDIs) with spacers remain the aerosol application of choice for topical steroids, mainly to reduce side effects. For beta 2-agonist, anticholinergics and prophylactic drugs, MDI (with or without demand valve), dry powder inhalers (multidose inhalers), ultrasonic or jet aerosol generators (with or without mechanical breathing assistance [IPPB]) are chosen according to the preference or the ability of the patients to perform the necessary breathing maneuvers as well as the availability of different products in different countries.

  5. Targeting dendritic cells in allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Novak, Natalija

    2006-05-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is a well-established strategy for treating allergic diseases with the goal of inducing allergen-specific tolerance. Identified mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic effect of immunotherapy include a shift of T helper 2 (Th2)-type immune responses to a modified Th2 immune response, a change of the balance of IgE-producing B cells to the production of IgG subtypes, in addition to increased IL-10 and TGF-beta secretion and activation of the suppressive functions of regulatory T-cells. Dendritic cells (DCs), which as outposts of the immune system are capable of T-cell priming through efficient allergen uptake by IgE receptors expressed on their cell surface. Most of the hypotheses concerning the function of DCs as facilitators of allergen-specific tolerance in allergen immunotherapy remain speculative. Therefore, studies must focus on the functional changes of DCs under immunotherapy to close the gap of knowledge about their exact role. These experimental data should help confirm the hypothesis of DCs as efficient silencers and potential target cells and take advantage of the bivalent character and tolerogenic properties of DCs. PMID:16701146

  6. Pollensomes as Natural Vehicles for Pollen Allergens.

    PubMed

    Prado, Noela; De Linares, Concepción; Sanz, María L; Gamboa, Pedro; Villalba, Mayte; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Batanero, Eva

    2015-07-15

    Olive (Olea europaea) pollen constitutes one of the most important allergen sources in the Mediterranean countries and some areas of the United States, South Africa, and Australia. Recently, we provided evidence that olive pollen releases nanovesicles of respirable size, named generically pollensomes, during in vitro germination. Olive pollensomes contain allergens, such as Ole e 1, Ole e 11, and Ole e 12, suggesting a possible role in allergy. The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of pollensomes to the allergic reaction. We show that pollensomes exhibit allergenic activity in terms of patients' IgE-binding capacity, human basophil activation, and positive skin reaction in sensitized patients. Furthermore, allergen-containing pollensomes have been isolated from three clinically relevant nonphylogenetically related species: birch (Betula verrucosa), pine (Pinus sylvestris), and ryegrass (Lolium perenne). Most interesting, pollensomes were isolated from aerobiological samples collected with an eight-stage cascade impactor collector, indicating that pollensomes secretion is a naturally occurring phenomenon. Our findings indicate that pollensomes may represent widespread vehicles for pollen allergens, with potential implications in the allergic reaction.

  7. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (allergen-SIT) is a potentially curative treatment approach in allergic diseases. It has been used for almost 100 years as a desensitizing therapy. The induction of peripheral T cell tolerance and promotion of the formation of regulatory T-cells are key mechanisms in allergen-SIT. Both FOXP3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and inducible IL-10- and TGF-β-producing type 1 Treg (Tr1) cells may prevent the development of allergic diseases and play a role in successful allergen-SIT and healthy immune response via several mechanisms. The mechanisms of suppression of different pro-inflammatory cells, such as eosinophils, mast cells and basophils and the development of allergen tolerance also directly or indirectly involves Treg cells. Furthermore, the formation of non-inflammatory antibodies particularly IgG4 is induced by IL-10. Knowledge of these molecular basis is crucial in the understanding the regulation of immune responses and their possible therapeutic targets in allergic diseases. PMID:22409879

  8. Long-term allergen exposure induces adipose tissue inflammation and circulatory system injury.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chien-Cheng; Su, Huey-Jen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to study whether allergen exposure can induce inflammation and lower the anti-inflammation levels in serum and in adipose tissues, and further develop cardiovascular injury. Our data showed that heart rate was significantly higher in the OVA-challenged mice compared to control mice. Moreover, there were higher expressions of pro-inflammation genes in the OVA-challenged mice in adipose tissues, and the expressions of anti-inflammation genes were lower. The levels of inflammation mediators were associated in serum and adipose tissues. The level of circulatory injury lactate dehydrogenase was significantly associated with the levels of E-selectin, resistin and adiponectin in the serum. The hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemistry stains indicated the OVA-challenged mice had higher levels of inflammation. In summary, the current study demonstrated allergen exposure can cause cardiovascular injury, and inflammatory mediators in adipose tissues play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular injury.

  9. Evaluation of the Allergenicity Potential of TcPR-10 Protein from Theobroma cacao

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Thyago Hermylly Santana; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho; Micheli, Fabienne; Noronha, Fátima Soares Motta; Alves, Andréa Catão; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; da Silva Gesteira, Abelmon

    2012-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis related protein PR10 (TcPR-10), obtained from the Theobroma cacao-Moniliophthora perniciosa interaction library, presents antifungal activity against M. perniciosa and acts in vitro as a ribonuclease. However, despite its biotechnological potential, the TcPR-10 has the P-loop motif similar to those of some allergenic proteins such as Bet v 1 (Betula verrucosa) and Pru av 1 (Prunus avium). The insertion of mutations in this motif can produce proteins with reduced allergenic power. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the allergenic potential of the wild type and mutant recombinant TcPR-10 using bioinformatics tools and immunological assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Mutant substitutions (T10P, I30V, H45S) were inserted in the TcPR-10 gene by site-directed mutagenesis, cloned into pET28a and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells. Changes in molecular surface caused by the mutant substitutions was evaluated by comparative protein modeling using the three-dimensional structure of the major cherry allergen, Pru av 1 as a template. The immunological assays were carried out in 8–12 week old female BALB/c mice. The mice were sensitized with the proteins (wild type and mutants) via subcutaneous and challenged intranasal for induction of allergic airway inflammation. Conclusions/Significance We showed that the wild TcPR-10 protein has allergenic potential, whereas the insertion of mutations produced proteins with reduced capacity of IgE production and cellular infiltration in the lungs. On the other hand, in vitro assays show that the TcPR-10 mutants still present antifungal and ribonuclease activity against M. perniciosa RNA. In conclusion, the mutant proteins present less allergenic potential than the wild TcPR-10, without the loss of interesting biotechnological properties. PMID:22768037

  10. Indoor determinants of dustborne allergens in Mexican homes.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Cadena, Leticia; Zeldin, Darryl C; Barraza-Villarreal, Albino; Sever, Michelle L; Sly, Peter D; London, Stephanie J; Escamilla-Nuñez, María Consuelo; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to indoor allergens represents a significant risk factor for allergies and asthma in several parts of the world. In Mexico, few studies have evaluated indoor allergens, including cat, dog, and mouse allergens and the factors that predict their presence. This study evaluates the main environmental and household predictors of high prenatal allergen levels and multiple allergen exposures in a birth cohort from Mexico City. A cross-sectional study was conducted as part of a birth cohort study of 1094 infants recruited during pregnancy and followed until delivery. We collected dust samples in a subset of 264 homes and assessed environmental factors. Der p 1, Der f 1, dust mite group 2, Fel d 1, Can f 1, Rat n 1, Mus m 1, and Bla g 2 concentrations in dust samples were measured using immunoassays. To define detectable allergen levels, the lowest limits of detection for each allergen were taken as cutoff points. Overall allergen exposure was considered high when four or more allergens exceeded detectable levels in the same household. Logistic regression was used for predictive models. Eighty-five percent of homes had at least one allergen in dust over the detection limit, 52.1% had high exposure (four or more allergens above detectable limits), and 11.7% of homes had detectable levels for more than eight allergens. Der p 1, Der p 2, Mus m 1, and Fel d 1 were the most frequent allergens detected. Each allergen had both common and distinct predictors. The main predictors of a high multiple allergen index were the size of the home, pesticide use, mother's age, mother as homemaker, and season. Increased indoor environmental allergen exposure is mainly related to sociodemographic factors and household cleaning. PMID:25715241

  11. Origin and Functional Prediction of Pollen Allergens in Plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Miaolin; Xu, Jie; Devis, Deborah; Shi, Jianxin; Ren, Kang; Searle, Iain; Zhang, Dabing

    2016-09-01

    Pollen allergies have long been a major pandemic health problem for human. However, the evolutionary events and biological function of pollen allergens in plants remain largely unknown. Here, we report the genome-wide prediction of pollen allergens and their biological function in the dicotyledonous model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and the monocotyledonous model plant rice (Oryza sativa). In total, 145 and 107 pollen allergens were predicted from rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. These pollen allergens are putatively involved in stress responses and metabolic processes such as cell wall metabolism during pollen development. Interestingly, these putative pollen allergen genes were derived from large gene families and became diversified during evolution. Sequence analysis across 25 plant species from green alga to angiosperms suggest that about 40% of putative pollen allergenic proteins existed in both lower and higher plants, while other allergens emerged during evolution. Although a high proportion of gene duplication has been observed among allergen-coding genes, our data show that these genes might have undergone purifying selection during evolution. We also observed that epitopes of an allergen might have a biological function, as revealed by comprehensive analysis of two known allergens, expansin and profilin. This implies a crucial role of conserved amino acid residues in both in planta biological function and allergenicity. Finally, a model explaining how pollen allergens were generated and maintained in plants is proposed. Prediction and systematic analysis of pollen allergens in model plants suggest that pollen allergens were evolved by gene duplication and then functional specification. This study provides insight into the phylogenetic and evolutionary scenario of pollen allergens that will be helpful to future characterization and epitope screening of pollen allergens. PMID:27436829

  12. Indoor allergens in Minnesota schools and child care centers.

    PubMed

    Tranter, Daniel C; Wobbema, Amanda Teresa; Norlien, Kathleen; Dorschner, Dale F

    2009-09-01

    Elevated concentrations of allergens in the indoor environment may cause allergic sensitization and symptoms. Occupant exposure to indoor allergens in educational facilities should and can be controlled. This study (1) assessed the presence of indoor allergens in Minnesota schools and child care centers, (2) characterized the distribution of allergens in different materials, and (3) evaluated the effect of building and maintenance interventions on allergen concentrations. Settled dust samples were collected from carpet, vinyl tile floors, and upholstered furniture in six schools and seven child care centers before and after interventions. Interventions included changes to cleaning, ventilation, entry mats, furnishings, flooring, and classroom items. The amount of total dust, culturable fungi, and indoor allergens--cockroach, dust mite, cat, and dog--were quantified in the dust samples. Cockroach and dust mite allergens were generally low and below the detection limit, but one dust mite allergen was detected in some areas. Cat and dog allergens were frequently detected at elevated levels, with half the samples above the provisional sensitization risk thresholds and a few samples above the symptom thresholds. Allergen concentrations were highest in upholstered furniture, followed by carpeting and then vinyl floor tile. Cat and dog allergens were lower after the interventions. Cat and dog allergens, but not dust mite and cockroach allergens, seem to be ubiquitous in child care and elementary schools of the U.S. Midwest. These allergens may contribute to sensitization in atopic individuals and occasionally cause symptoms in sensitized allergic individuals. Fleecy materials that are not adequately cleaned, such as upholstered furniture, appear to be the most significant allergen reservoirs. Modest environmental interventions can be implemented by building staff, which should result in lower allergen concentrations.

  13. Indoor allergens in Minnesota schools and child care centers.

    PubMed

    Tranter, Daniel C; Wobbema, Amanda Teresa; Norlien, Kathleen; Dorschner, Dale F

    2009-09-01

    Elevated concentrations of allergens in the indoor environment may cause allergic sensitization and symptoms. Occupant exposure to indoor allergens in educational facilities should and can be controlled. This study (1) assessed the presence of indoor allergens in Minnesota schools and child care centers, (2) characterized the distribution of allergens in different materials, and (3) evaluated the effect of building and maintenance interventions on allergen concentrations. Settled dust samples were collected from carpet, vinyl tile floors, and upholstered furniture in six schools and seven child care centers before and after interventions. Interventions included changes to cleaning, ventilation, entry mats, furnishings, flooring, and classroom items. The amount of total dust, culturable fungi, and indoor allergens--cockroach, dust mite, cat, and dog--were quantified in the dust samples. Cockroach and dust mite allergens were generally low and below the detection limit, but one dust mite allergen was detected in some areas. Cat and dog allergens were frequently detected at elevated levels, with half the samples above the provisional sensitization risk thresholds and a few samples above the symptom thresholds. Allergen concentrations were highest in upholstered furniture, followed by carpeting and then vinyl floor tile. Cat and dog allergens were lower after the interventions. Cat and dog allergens, but not dust mite and cockroach allergens, seem to be ubiquitous in child care and elementary schools of the U.S. Midwest. These allergens may contribute to sensitization in atopic individuals and occasionally cause symptoms in sensitized allergic individuals. Fleecy materials that are not adequately cleaned, such as upholstered furniture, appear to be the most significant allergen reservoirs. Modest environmental interventions can be implemented by building staff, which should result in lower allergen concentrations. PMID:19585331

  14. Indoor determinants of dustborne allergens in Mexican homes

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Cadena, Leticia; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Sever, Michelle L.; Sly, Peter D.; London, Stephanie J.; Escamilla-Nuñez, María Consuelo; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to indoor allergens represents a significant risk factor for allergies and asthma in several parts of the world. In Mexico, few studies have evaluated indoor allergens, including cat, dog, and mouse allergens and the factors that predict their presence. This study evaluates the main environmental and household predictors of high prenatal allergen levels and multiple allergen exposures in a birth cohort from Mexico City. A cross-sectional study was conducted as part of a birth cohort study of 1094 infants recruited during pregnancy and followed until delivery. We collected dust samples in a subset of 264 homes and assessed environmental factors. Der p 1, Der f 1, dust mite group 2, Fel d 1, Can f 1, Rat n 1, Mus m 1, and Bla g 2 concentrations in dust samples were measured using immunoassays. To define detectable allergen levels, the lowest limits of detection for each allergen were taken as cutoff points. Overall allergen exposure was considered high when four or more allergens exceeded detectable levels in the same household. Logistic regression was used for predictive models. Eighty-five percent of homes had at least one allergen in dust over the detection limit, 52.1% had high exposure (four or more allergens above detectable limits), and 11.7% of homes had detectable levels for more than eight allergens. Der p 1, Der p 2, Mus m 1, and Fel d 1 were the most frequent allergens detected. Each allergen had both common and distinct predictors. The main predictors of a high multiple allergen index were the size of the home, pesticide use, mother's age, mother as homemaker, and season. Increased indoor environmental allergen exposure is mainly related to sociodemographic factors and household cleaning. PMID:25715241

  15. Investigations on the emission of fragrance allergens from scented toys by means of headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masuck, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Luch, Andreas

    2010-04-30

    In the revised European toy safety directive 2009/48/EC the application of fragrance allergens in children's toys is restricted. The focus of the present work lies on the instrumental analytics of 13 banned fragrance allergens, as well as on 11 fragrance allergens that require declaration when concentrations surpass 100 microg per gram material. Applying a mixture of ethyl acetate and toluene solid/liquid extraction was performed prior to quantitative analysis of mass contents of fragrances in scented toys. In addition, an easy-to-perform method for the determination of emitted fragrances at 23 degrees C (handling conditions) or at 40 degrees C (worst case scenario) has been worked out to allow for the evaluation of potential risks originating from inhalation of these compounds during handling of or playing with toys. For this purpose a headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) technique was developed and coupled to subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Fragrance allergens were adsorbed (extracted) from the gas phase onto an 85 microm polyacrylate fiber while incubating pieces of the scented toys in sealed headspace vials at 23 degrees C and 40 degrees C. Quantification of compounds was performed via external calibration. The newly developed headspace method was subsequently applied to five perfumed toys. As expected, the emission of fragrance allergens from scented toys depends on the temperature and on the content of fragrance allergens present in those samples. In particular at conditions mimicking worst case (40 degrees C), fragrance allergens in toys may pose a risk to children since considerable amounts of compound might be absorbed by lung tissue via breathing of contaminated air.

  16. Immunochemical characterization of prosopis juliflora pollen allergens and evaluation of cross-reactivity pattern with the most allergenic pollens in tropical areas.

    PubMed

    Assarehzadegan, Mohammad-Ali; Khodadadi, Ali; Amini, Akram; Shakurnia, Abdol-Hosein; Marashi, Seyed Saeid; Ali-Sadeghi, Hosein; Zarinhadideh, Farnoosh; Sepahi, Najmeh

    2015-02-01

    Allergy to Prosopis juliflora (mesquite) pollen is one of the common causes of respiratory allergy in tropical countries. Mesquite is widely used as street trees in towns and ornamental shade trees in parks and gardens throughout arid and semiarid regions of Iran. The inhalation of mesquite pollen and several species of Amaranthus/Chenopodiaceae family is the most important cause of allergic respiratory symptoms in Khuzestan province. This study was designed to evaluate IgE banding proteins of mesquite pollen extract and its IgE cross-reactivity with other allergenic plants. Twenty patients with allergic symptoms and positive skin prick tests (SPT) for mesquite pollen extract participated in the study. Crude pollen extract was prepared from local mesquite trees and used for the evaluation of allergenic profiles of P. juliflora pollen extract by Sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and IgE-immunoblotting. There were several protein bands in mesquite pollen extract using SDS-PAGE with the approximate range of molecular weight of 10-85 kDa. The most frequent IgE reactive bands among the patients' sera were approximately 20 and 66 kDa. However, there were other IgE reactive protein bands among the patients' sera with molecular weights of 10, 15, 35, 45, 55 and 85 kDa. Inhibition experiments revealed high IgE cross-reactivity between mesquite and acacia. There are several IgE-binding proteins in P. juliflora pollen extract. Results of this study indicate that proteins with a molecular weight of 10 to 85 kDa are the major allergens in P. juliflora pollen extract.

  17. Cardiac urticaria caused by eucleid allergen

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xiaodong; Li, Chaopin; Wu, Qianwen

    2015-01-01

    Urticaria is a common allergic diseases, which involve respiratory and digestive system being suffered in some population. Yet, relatively little research has been done on the adverse effect on the heart. We did this research to examine the correlation between the abnormality of ECG in the patients with acute allergic urticaria and the antigen of eucleid. The antigen (allergen of eucleid and other allergens) was used to test the patients with acute allergic urticaria by skin prick test and electrocardiogram was employed to examine the patients with strong positive (moth & caterpillar) eucleid antigen. Strong positive eucleid antigen was identified in 84 cases with abnormal electrocardiographic pattern of diversity. So, the acute allergic skin urticaria caused by eucleid allergen may impose strong effect on the heart and thus lead to allergic cardiac urticaria. PMID:26885121

  18. Cardiac urticaria caused by eucleid allergen.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiaodong; Li, Chaopin; Wu, Qianwen

    2015-01-01

    Urticaria is a common allergic diseases, which involve respiratory and digestive system being suffered in some population. Yet, relatively little research has been done on the adverse effect on the heart. We did this research to examine the correlation between the abnormality of ECG in the patients with acute allergic urticaria and the antigen of eucleid. The antigen (allergen of eucleid and other allergens) was used to test the patients with acute allergic urticaria by skin prick test and electrocardiogram was employed to examine the patients with strong positive (moth & caterpillar) eucleid antigen. Strong positive eucleid antigen was identified in 84 cases with abnormal electrocardiographic pattern of diversity. So, the acute allergic skin urticaria caused by eucleid allergen may impose strong effect on the heart and thus lead to allergic cardiac urticaria. PMID:26885121

  19. Indoor Allergens in School and Daycare Environments

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Päivi M.; Sever, Michelle L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2009-01-01

    Most studies that have examined exposure to indoor allergens have focused on home environments. However, allergen exposures can be encountered in environments other than the home. For example, many children spend a large part of their time in schools and daycare facilities. Over the past two decades, a large number of studies have been conducted in school and daycare environments. However, the role of indoor exposures in allergy and asthma development or morbidity in these settings is not well characterized. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the importance of indoor allergen exposures in school and daycare settings. We summarize the key findings from recent scientific literature, describe exposure characteristics, discuss the role of these exposures in relation to asthma and allergy symptoms, and provide information on the effectiveness of published interventions. PMID:19577284

  20. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings. PMID:26866411

  1. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings.

  2. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings. PMID:26866411

  3. Multiplex detection of food allergens and gluten.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chung Y; Nowatzke, William; Oliver, Kerry; Garber, Eric A E

    2015-05-01

    To help safeguard the food supply and detect the presence of undeclared food allergens and gluten, most producers and regulatory agencies rely on commercial test kits. Most of these are ELISAs with a few being PCR-based. These methods are very sensitive and analyte specific, requiring different assays to detect each of the different food allergens. Mass spectrometry offers an alternative approach whereby multiple allergens may be detected simultaneously. However, mass spectrometry requires expensive equipment, highly trained analysts, and several years before a quantitative approach can be achieved. Using multianalyte profiling (xMAP®) technology, a commercial multiplex test kit based on the use of established antibodies was developed for the simultaneous detection of up to 14 different food allergens plus gluten. The assay simultaneously detects crustacean seafood, egg, gluten, milk, peanut, soy, and nine tree nuts (almond, Brazil nut, cashew, coconut, hazelnut, macadamia, pine nut, pistachio, and walnut). By simultaneously performing multiple tests (typically two) for each analyte, this magnetic bead-based assay offers built-in confirmatory analyses without the need for additional resources. Twenty-five of the assays were performed on buffer extracted samples, while five were conducted on samples extracted using reduced-denatured conditions. Thus, complete analysis for all 14 allergens and gluten requires only two wells of a 96-well microtiter plate. This makes it possible to include in a single analytical run up to 48 samples. All 30 bead sets in this multiplex assay detected 5 ng/mL of food allergen and gluten with responses greater than background. In addition, 26 of the bead sets displayed signal/noise ratios of five or greater. The bead-based design makes this 30-plex assay expandable to incorporate new antibodies and capture/detector methodologies by ascribing these new detectors to any of the unassigned bead sets that are commercially available.

  4. Parvalbumin--the major tropical fish allergen.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dawn Li-Chern; Neo, Keng Hwee; Yi, Fong Cheng; Chua, Kaw Yan; Goh, Denise Li-Meng; Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi; Giam, Yoke Chin; Van Bever, Hugo P S; Lee, Bee Wah

    2008-08-01

    Fish allergy is common in countries where consumption is high. Asian nations are amongst the world's largest consumers of fish but the allergen profiles of tropical fish are unknown. This study sought to evaluate the allergenicity of four commonly consumed tropical fish, the threadfin (Polynemus indicus), Indian anchovy (Stolephorus indicus), pomfret (Pampus chinensis) and tengirri (Scomberomorus guttatus). Immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-reactivity with parvalbumin of cod fish (Gad c 1), the major fish allergen, was also studied. Detection of tropical fish and cod specific-IgE was performed by UniCap assay, and skin prick tests were also carried out. The IgE-binding components of tropical fish were identified using IgE immunoblot techniques, and cross-reactivity with Gad c 1 was assessed by ELISA inhibition and IgE immunoblot inhibition. Clinically, nine of 10 patients studied were allergic to multiple fish. All patients exhibited detectable specific-IgE to cod fish (10 of 10 skin prick test positive, eight of 10 UniCap assay positive) despite lack of previous exposure. The major allergen of the four tropical fish was the 12-kDa parvalbumin. IgE cross-reactivity of these allergens to Gad c 1 was observed to be moderate to high in the tropical fish studied. Parvalbumins are the major allergens in commonly consumed tropical fish. They are cross-reactive with each other as well as with Gad c 1. Commercial tests for cod fish appear to be sufficient for the detection of tropical fish specific-IgE.

  5. Multiplex detection of food allergens and gluten.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chung Y; Nowatzke, William; Oliver, Kerry; Garber, Eric A E

    2015-05-01

    To help safeguard the food supply and detect the presence of undeclared food allergens and gluten, most producers and regulatory agencies rely on commercial test kits. Most of these are ELISAs with a few being PCR-based. These methods are very sensitive and analyte specific, requiring different assays to detect each of the different food allergens. Mass spectrometry offers an alternative approach whereby multiple allergens may be detected simultaneously. However, mass spectrometry requires expensive equipment, highly trained analysts, and several years before a quantitative approach can be achieved. Using multianalyte profiling (xMAP®) technology, a commercial multiplex test kit based on the use of established antibodies was developed for the simultaneous detection of up to 14 different food allergens plus gluten. The assay simultaneously detects crustacean seafood, egg, gluten, milk, peanut, soy, and nine tree nuts (almond, Brazil nut, cashew, coconut, hazelnut, macadamia, pine nut, pistachio, and walnut). By simultaneously performing multiple tests (typically two) for each analyte, this magnetic bead-based assay offers built-in confirmatory analyses without the need for additional resources. Twenty-five of the assays were performed on buffer extracted samples, while five were conducted on samples extracted using reduced-denatured conditions. Thus, complete analysis for all 14 allergens and gluten requires only two wells of a 96-well microtiter plate. This makes it possible to include in a single analytical run up to 48 samples. All 30 bead sets in this multiplex assay detected 5 ng/mL of food allergen and gluten with responses greater than background. In addition, 26 of the bead sets displayed signal/noise ratios of five or greater. The bead-based design makes this 30-plex assay expandable to incorporate new antibodies and capture/detector methodologies by ascribing these new detectors to any of the unassigned bead sets that are commercially available. PMID

  6. Ant allergens and hypersensitivity reactions in response to ant stings.

    PubMed

    Potiwat, Rutcharin; Sitcharungsi, Raweerat

    2015-12-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions caused by ant stings are increasingly recognized as an important cause of death by anaphylaxis. Only some species of ants ( e.g. Solenopsis spp., Myrmecia spp., and Pachycondyla spp.) cause allergic reactions. Ant species are identified by evaluating the morphologic structures of worker ants or by molecular techniques. Ant venom contains substances, including acids and alkaloids, that cause toxic reactions, and those from Solenopsis invicta or the imported fire ant have been widely studied. Piperidine alkaloids and low protein contents can cause local reactions (sterile pustules) and systemic reactions (anaphylaxis). Imported fire ant venoms are cross-reactive; for example, the Sol i 1 allergen from S. invicta has cross-reactivity with yellow jacket phospholipase. The Sol i 3 allergen is a member of the antigen 5 family that has amino acid sequence identity with vespid antigen 5. The clinical presentations of ant hypersensitivity are categorized into immediate and delayed reactions: immediate reactions, such as small local reactions, large local reactions, and systemic reactions, occur within 1-4 hours after the ant stings, whereas delayed reactions, such as serum sickness and vasculitis, usually occur more than 4 hours after the stings. Tools for the diagnosis of ant hypersensitivity are skin testing, serum specific IgE, and sting challenge tests. Management of ant hypersensitivity can be divided into immediate (epinephrine, corticosteroids), symptomatic (antihistamines, bronchodilators), supportive (fluid resuscitation, oxygen therapy), and preventive (re-sting avoidance and immunotherapy) treatments.

  7. Ant allergens and hypersensitivity reactions in response to ant stings.

    PubMed

    Potiwat, Rutcharin; Sitcharungsi, Raweerat

    2015-12-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions caused by ant stings are increasingly recognized as an important cause of death by anaphylaxis. Only some species of ants ( e.g. Solenopsis spp., Myrmecia spp., and Pachycondyla spp.) cause allergic reactions. Ant species are identified by evaluating the morphologic structures of worker ants or by molecular techniques. Ant venom contains substances, including acids and alkaloids, that cause toxic reactions, and those from Solenopsis invicta or the imported fire ant have been widely studied. Piperidine alkaloids and low protein contents can cause local reactions (sterile pustules) and systemic reactions (anaphylaxis). Imported fire ant venoms are cross-reactive; for example, the Sol i 1 allergen from S. invicta has cross-reactivity with yellow jacket phospholipase. The Sol i 3 allergen is a member of the antigen 5 family that has amino acid sequence identity with vespid antigen 5. The clinical presentations of ant hypersensitivity are categorized into immediate and delayed reactions: immediate reactions, such as small local reactions, large local reactions, and systemic reactions, occur within 1-4 hours after the ant stings, whereas delayed reactions, such as serum sickness and vasculitis, usually occur more than 4 hours after the stings. Tools for the diagnosis of ant hypersensitivity are skin testing, serum specific IgE, and sting challenge tests. Management of ant hypersensitivity can be divided into immediate (epinephrine, corticosteroids), symptomatic (antihistamines, bronchodilators), supportive (fluid resuscitation, oxygen therapy), and preventive (re-sting avoidance and immunotherapy) treatments. PMID:26708389

  8. Common environmental contact allergens in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ng, S K

    1990-12-01

    Contact allergens produce three types of reactions. The commonest reaction is allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). The commonest contactants in Singapore causing ACD are, in decreasing order of importance, nickel, fragrances, neomycin, lanolin, colophony, flavine, rubber chemicals, paraphenylenediamine, clioquinol and chromates. Another type of allergic contact reaction is immunologic contact urticaria (ICU). ICU is an IgE mediated mechanisms. Contact allergens causing ICU in Singapore are proteinaceous foodstuffs and rubber latex products. Photoallergic contact dermatitis is occasionally seen in Singapore. The commonest agent is Musk Ambrette, a perfume fixature found in male colognes.

  9. Advances in allergen-microarray technology for diagnosis and monitoring of allergy: the MeDALL allergen-chip.

    PubMed

    Lupinek, Christian; Wollmann, Eva; Baar, Alexandra; Banerjee, Srinita; Breiteneder, Heimo; Broecker, Barbara M; Bublin, Merima; Curin, Mirela; Flicker, Sabine; Garmatiuk, Tetiana; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Mittermann, Irene; Pahr, Sandra; Resch, Yvonne; Roux, Kenneth H; Srinivasan, Bharani; Stentzel, Sebastian; Vrtala, Susanne; Willison, Leanna N; Wickman, Magnus; Lødrup-Carlsen, Karin C; Antó, Josep Maria; Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Ebner, Daniel; Schlederer, Thomas; Harwanegg, Christian; Valenta, Rudolf

    2014-03-01

    Allergy diagnosis based on purified allergen molecules provides detailed information regarding the individual sensitization profile of allergic patients, allows monitoring of the development of allergic disease and of the effect of therapies on the immune response to individual allergen molecules. Allergen microarrays contain a large variety of allergen molecules and thus allow the simultaneous detection of allergic patients' antibody reactivity profiles towards each of the allergen molecules with only minute amounts of serum. In this article we summarize recent progress in the field of allergen microarray technology and introduce the MeDALL allergen-chip which has been developed for the specific and sensitive monitoring of IgE and IgG reactivity profiles towards more than 170 allergen molecules in sera collected in European birth cohorts. MeDALL is a European research program in which allergen microarray technology is used for the monitoring of the development of allergic disease in childhood, to draw a geographic map of the recognition of clinically relevant allergens in different populations and to establish reactivity profiles which are associated with and predict certain disease manifestations. We describe technical advances of the MeDALL allergen-chip regarding specificity, sensitivity and its ability to deliver test results which are close to in vivo reactivity. In addition, the usefulness and numerous advantages of allergen microarrays for allergy research, refined allergy diagnosis, monitoring of disease, of the effects of therapies, for improving the prescription of specific immunotherapy and for prevention are discussed.

  10. Soybean flour asthma: detection of allergens by immunoblotting

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, R.K.; Schroeckenstein, D.; Meier-Davis, S.; Balmes, J.; Rempel, D.

    1988-08-01

    A 43-year-old woman developed asthma 6 years after beginning work in a food-processing plant in which soybean flour was used as a protein extender. Symptoms of sneezing, coughing, and wheezing would begin within minutes of exposure to soybean flour and resolve 2 hours after exposure ceased. Skin tests were positive to a soy extract prepared from the flour. Airway hyperreactivity was confirmed by a positive bronchial challenge to methacholine. Bronchial challenge with soybean flour produced an immediate increase in specific airway resistance from 5.0 to 22.7 L. cm of H2O/L/sec. There was no response to challenge with lactose. The patient's allergic response to soy-flour extract was further characterized by several immunologic methods. IgE binding to soy-flour protein by direct RAST was 5.98 times that of a normal control serum. The soy-flour extract was separated by dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Twenty-four protein bands were detected in the crude soy-flour extract. After immunoblotting and subsequent autoradiography, nine proteins with molecular weights ranging from 54,500 to 14,875 were found. Cross-reactivity studies with other legumes demonstrated apparent immunologic identity between a component in green pea extract and a soybean protein with a molecular weight of 17,000. The clinical significance of this cross-reactivity is not known. We conclude that in this case of occupational asthma to soybean flour, multiple allergens were involved. Immunoblotting may be useful in identifying the allergens involved in occupational asthma.

  11. Dry powder inhalable formulations for anti-tubercular therapy.

    PubMed

    Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Chang, Rachel Yoon Kyung; Abdelghany, Sharif; Ye, Tian Tian; Britton, Warwick John; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an intracellular infectious disease caused by the airborne bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Despite considerable research efforts, the treatment of TB continues to be a great challenge in part due to the requirement of prolonged therapy with multiple high-dose drugs and associated side effects. The delivery of pharmacological agents directly to the respiratory system, following the natural route of infection, represents a logical therapeutic approach for treatment or vaccination against TB. Pulmonary delivery is non-invasive, avoids first-pass metabolism in the liver and enables targeting of therapeutic agents to the infection site. Inhaled delivery also potentially reduces the dose requirement and the accompanying side effects. Dry powder is a stable formulation of drug that can be stored without refrigeration compared to liquids and suspensions. The dry powder inhalers are easy to use and suitable for high-dose formulations. This review focuses on the current innovations of inhalable dry powder formulations of drug and vaccine delivery for TB, including the powder production method, preclinical and clinical evaluations of inhaled dry powder over the last decade. Finally, the risks associated with pulmonary therapy are addressed. A novel dry powder formulation with high percentages of respirable particles coupled with a cost effective inhaler device is an appealing platform for TB drug delivery. PMID:27212477

  12. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy and immune tolerance to allergens.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2015-01-01

    Substantial progress in understanding mechanisms of immune regulation in allergy, asthma, autoimmune diseases, tumors, organ transplantation and chronic infections has led to a variety of targeted therapeutic approaches. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been used for 100 years as a desensitizing therapy for allergic diseases and represents the potentially curative and specific way of treatment. The mechanisms by which allergen-AIT has its mechanisms of action include the very early desensitization effects, modulation of T- and B-cell responses and related antibody isotypes as well as inhibition of migration of eosinophils, basophils and mast cells to tissues and release of their mediators. Regulatory T cells (Treg) have been identified as key regulators of immunological processes in peripheral tolerance to allergens. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T cells to a regulatory phenotype appears as a key event in the development of healthy immune response to allergens and successful outcome in AIT. Naturally occurring FoxP3(+) CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and inducible type 1 Treg (Tr1) cells contribute to the control of allergen-specific immune responses in several major ways, which can be summarized as suppression of dendritic cells that support the generation of effector T cells; suppression of effector Th1, Th2 and Th17 cells; suppression of allergen-specific IgE, and induction of IgG4; suppression of mast cells, basophils and eosinophils and suppression of effector T cell migration to tissues. New strategies for immune intervention will likely include targeting of the molecular mechanisms of allergen tolerance and reciprocal regulation of effector and regulatory T cell subsets.

  13. Multiple independent IgE epitopes on the highly allergenic grass pollen allergen Phl p 5

    PubMed Central

    Levin, M; Rotthus, S; Wendel, S; Najafi, N; Källström, E; Focke-Tejkl, M; Valenta, R; Flicker, S; Ohlin, M

    2014-01-01

    Background Group 5 allergens are small proteins that consist of two domains. They belong to the most potent respiratory allergens. Objective To determine the binding sites and to study allergic patients' IgE recognition of the group 5 allergen (Phl p 5) from timothy grass pollen using human monoclonal IgE antibodies that have been isolated from grass pollen allergic patients. Methods Using recombinant isoallergens, fragments, mutants and synthetic peptides of Phl p 5, as well as peptide-specific antibodies, the interaction of recombinant human monoclonal IgE and Phl p 5 was studied using direct binding and blocking assays. Cross-reactivity of monoclonal IgE with group 5 allergens in several grasses was studied and inhibition experiments with patients' polyclonal IgE were performed. Results Monoclonal human IgE showed extensive cross-reactivity with group 5 allergens in several grasses. Despite its small size of 29 kDa, four independent epitope clusters on isoallergen Phl p 5.0101, two in each domain, were recognized by human IgE. Isoallergen Phl p 5.0201 carried two of these epitopes. Inhibition studies with allergic patients' polyclonal IgE suggest the presence of additional IgE epitopes on Phl p 5. Conclusions & Clinical Relevance Our results reveal the presence of a large number of independent IgE epitopes on the Phl p 5 allergen explaining the high allergenic activity of this protein and its ability to induce severe allergic symptoms. High-density IgE recognition may be a general feature of many potent allergens and form a basis for the development of improved diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in allergic disease. PMID:25262820

  14. Animal Allergens and Their Presence in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Zahradnik, Eva; Raulf, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to animal allergens is a major risk factor for sensitization and allergic diseases. Besides mites and cockroaches, the most important animal allergens are derived from mammals. Cat and dog allergies affect the general population; whereas, allergies to rodents or cattle is an occupational problem. Exposure to animal allergens is not limited to direct contact to animals. Based on their aerodynamic properties, mammalian allergens easily become airborne, attach to clothing and hair, and can be spread from one environment to another. For example, the major cat allergen Fel d 1 was frequently found in homes without pets and in public buildings, including schools, day-care centers, and hospitals. Allergen concentrations in a particular environment showed high variability depending on numerous factors. Assessment of allergen exposure levels is a stepwise process that involves dust collection, allergen quantification, and data analysis. Whereas a number of different dust sampling strategies are used, ELISA assays have prevailed in the last years as the standard technique for quantification of allergen concentrations. This review focuses on allergens arising from domestic, farm, and laboratory animals and describes the ubiquity of mammalian allergens in the human environment. It includes an overview of exposure assessment studies carried out in different indoor settings (homes, schools, workplaces) using numerous sampling and analytical methods and summarizes significant factors influencing exposure levels. However, methodological differences among studies have contributed to the variability of the findings and make comparisons between studies difficult. Therefore, a general standardization of methods is needed and recommended. PMID:24624129

  15. Prioritisation of allergenic foods with respect to public health relevance: Report from an ILSI Europe Food Allergy Task Force Expert Group.

    PubMed

    Houben, Geert; Burney, Peter; Chan, Chun-Han; Crevel, René; Dubois, Anthony; Faludi, Roland; Klein Entink, Rinke; Knulst, André; Taylor, Steve; Ronsmans, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Regulators and risk managers in general need to decide whether an allergenic food or ingredient is of such public health importance that it needs to be actively managed. There is therefore a need to scale the relative allergenicity of foods and ingredients according to the hazards they pose. Objective criteria increase transparency and trust in this decision-making process and its conclusions. This paper proposes a framework that allows categorisation and prioritisation of allergenic foods according to their public health importance. The challenge is to find a basis on which the allergenicity of foods can best be described and a method to combine the relevant measures of allergenicity into a scoring system that prioritises allergenic foods on the basis of their public health relevance. The framework is designed in accordance with the generic risk analysis principles used in food safety and can be used by regulators to decide whether or not a specific allergenic food or ingredient is of sufficient public health importance that it warrants regulation (i.e. mandatory labelling) when used in the production of food products. PMID:26763611

  16. Prioritisation of allergenic foods with respect to public health relevance: Report from an ILSI Europe Food Allergy Task Force Expert Group.

    PubMed

    Houben, Geert; Burney, Peter; Chan, Chun-Han; Crevel, René; Dubois, Anthony; Faludi, Roland; Klein Entink, Rinke; Knulst, André; Taylor, Steve; Ronsmans, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Regulators and risk managers in general need to decide whether an allergenic food or ingredient is of such public health importance that it needs to be actively managed. There is therefore a need to scale the relative allergenicity of foods and ingredients according to the hazards they pose. Objective criteria increase transparency and trust in this decision-making process and its conclusions. This paper proposes a framework that allows categorisation and prioritisation of allergenic foods according to their public health importance. The challenge is to find a basis on which the allergenicity of foods can best be described and a method to combine the relevant measures of allergenicity into a scoring system that prioritises allergenic foods on the basis of their public health relevance. The framework is designed in accordance with the generic risk analysis principles used in food safety and can be used by regulators to decide whether or not a specific allergenic food or ingredient is of sufficient public health importance that it warrants regulation (i.e. mandatory labelling) when used in the production of food products.

  17. Computational detection of allergenic proteins attains a new level of accuracy with in silico variable-length peptide extraction and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Soeria-Atmadja, D; Lundell, T; Gustafsson, M G; Hammerling, U

    2006-01-01

    The placing of novel or new-in-the-context proteins on the market, appearing in genetically modified foods, certain bio-pharmaceuticals and some household products leads to human exposure to proteins that may elicit allergic responses. Accurate methods to detect allergens are therefore necessary to ensure consumer/patient safety. We demonstrate that it is possible to reach a new level of accuracy in computational detection of allergenic proteins by presenting a novel detector, Detection based on Filtered Length-adjusted Allergen Peptides (DFLAP). The DFLAP algorithm extracts variable length allergen sequence fragments and employs modern machine learning techniques in the form of a support vector machine. In particular, this new detector shows hitherto unmatched specificity when challenged to the Swiss-Prot repository without appreciable loss of sensitivity. DFLAP is also the first reported detector that successfully discriminates between allergens and non-allergens occurring in protein families known to hold both categories. Allergenicity assessment for specific protein sequences of interest using DFLAP is possible via ulfh@slv.se.

  18. Proteomic identification of allergenic seed proteins, napin and cruciferin, from cold-pressed rapeseed oils.

    PubMed

    Puumalainen, T J; Puustinen, A; Poikonen, S; Turjanmaa, K; Palosuo, T; Vaali, K

    2015-05-15

    In Finland and France atopic children commonly react to seeds of oilseed rape and turnip rape in skin prick tests (SPT) and open food challenges. These seeds are not as such in dietary use and therefore the routes of sensitization are unknown. Possible allergens were extracted from commercial cold-pressed and refined rapeseed oils and identified by gel-based tandem nanoflow liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Napin (a 2S albumin), earlier identified as a major allergen in the seeds of oilseed rape and turnip rape, and cruciferin (an 11S globulin), a new potential seed allergen, were detected in cold-pressed oils, but not in refined oils. Pooled sera from five children sensitized or allergic to oilseed rape and turnip rape seeds reacted to these proteins from cold-pressed oil preparations and individual sera from five children reacted to these proteins extracted from the seeds when examined with IgE immunoblotting. Hence cold-pressed rapeseed oil might be one possible route of sensitization for these allergens.

  19. Allergens Induce the Release of Lactoferrin by Neutrophils from Asthmatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Inmaculada; Chamorro, Cristina; Aroca, Rocío; Prados, Manuel; Bobadilla, Pedro; Rodríguez, David; Palacios, Ricardo; Monteseirín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the evidence that Lactoferrin (Lf) is involved in allergic asthma processes, it is unknown whether neutrophils can be one of the main cellular sources of this key inflammatory mediator directly in response of an IgE mediated stimulus. The present study was undertaken to analyze this question. Methods Neutrophils from healthy subjects (n = 34) and neutrophils from allergic asthmatic patients (n = 102) were challenged in vitro with specific allergens to which the patients were sensitized, PAF, or agonist mAbs against IgE-receptors, and the levels of Lf were measured in the culture supernatant. The levels of serum IgE together with the severity of symptoms were also analyzed. Results Lf was released into the culture supernatant of neutrophils from allergic asthmatic patients in response to allergens and PAF. This response was highly allergen-specific, and did not happen in neutrophils from healthy donors. Allergen effect was mimicked by Abs against FcεRI and galectin-3 but not by FcεRII. The levels of released Lf correlated well with the levels of serum specific IgE and severity of asthma symptoms. These observations represent a novel view of neutrophils as an important source of Lf in allergic asthma. Importantly, the levels of released Lf by neutrophils could therefore be used to evaluate disease severity in allergic asthmatic patients. PMID:26488881

  20. Potential allergenicity research of Cry1C protein from genetically modified rice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Sishuo; He, Xiaoyun; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Ran, Wenjun; Liang, Lixing; Dai, Yunqing; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-07-01

    With the development of genetically modified crops, there has been a growing interest in available approaches to assess the potential allergenicity of novel gene products. We were not sure whether Cry1C could induce allergy. We examined the protein with three other proteins to determine the potential allergenicity of Cry1C protein from genetically modified rice. Female Brown Norway (BN) rats received 0.1 mg peanut agglutinin (PNA), 1mg potato acid phosphatase (PAP), 1mg ovalbumin (OVA) or 5 mg purified Cry1C protein dissolved in 1 mL water by daily gavage for 42 days to test potential allergenicity. Ten days after the last gavage, rats were orally challenged with antigens, and physiologic and immunologic responses were studied. In contrast to sensitization with PNA, PAP and OVA Cry1C protein did not induce antigen-specific IgG2a in BN rats. Cytokine expression, serum IgE and histamine levels and the number of eosinophils and mast cells in the blood of Cry1C group rats were comparable to the control group rats, which were treated with water alone. As Cry1C did not show any allergenicity, we make the following conclusion that the protein could be safety used in rice or other plants.

  1. PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF ALLERGENS FROM METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIEA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project is the identification and characterization of allergens from the fungus M. Anisopliae, using mass spectrometry (MS). The US EPA, under the "Children at Risk" program, is currently addressing the problem of indoor fungal bioaerosol contamination. One of ...

  2. ASSESSING ALLERGENICITY OF INDOOR AIR FUNGAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing Allergenicity of Indoor Air Fungal Contaminants
    M D W Ward1, M E Viana2, N Haykal-Coates1, L B Copeland1, S H Gavett1, and MJ K Selgrade1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC, USA. 2NCSU, CVM, Raleigh, NC, USA.
    Rationale: The indoor environment has increased in impor...

  3. PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF ALLERGENS FROM METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction

    The goal of this project is the identification and characterization of allergens from the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae, using mass spectrometry (MS). The US EPA, under the "Children at Risk" program, is currently addressing the problem of indoor fungal bioaer...

  4. Developments in allergen-specific immunotherapy: from allergen extracts to allergy vaccines bypassing allergen-specific immunoglobulin E and T cell reactivity.

    PubMed

    Focke, M; Swoboda, I; Marth, K; Valenta, R

    2010-03-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only specific and disease-modifying approach for the treatment of allergy but several disadvantages have limited its broad applicability. We argue that the majority of the possible disadvantages of SIT such as unwanted effects, poor efficacy and specificity as well as inconvenient application are related to the poor quality of natural allergen extracts, which are the active ingredients of all currently available allergy vaccines. Because of the progress made in the field of molecular allergen characterization, new allergy vaccines based on recombinant allergens, recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives and allergen-derived T cell peptides have entered clinical testing and hold promise to reduce the side-effects and to increase the specificity as well as the efficacy of SIT. Here, we present a refined immunotherapy concept, which is based on the use of peptides derived from allergen surfaces that exhibit reduced, allergen-specific IgE as well as T cell reactivity. These peptides when fused to non-allergenic carriers give rise to allergen-specific protective IgG responses with T cell help from a non-allergenic carrier molecule. We summarize the experimental data demonstrating that such peptide vaccines can bypass allergen-specific IgE as well as T cell activation and may be administered at high doses without IgE- and T cell-mediated side-effects. Should these peptide vaccines prove efficacious and safe in clinical trials, it may become possible to develop convenient, safe and broadly applicable forms of SIT as true alternatives to symptomatic, drug-based allergy treatment.

  5. Pneumoconiosis after sericite inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Algranti, E; Handar, A; Dumortier, P; Mendonca, E; Rodrigues, G; Santos, A; Mauad, T; Dolhnikoff, M; De Vuyst, P; Saldiva, P; Bussacos, M

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To investigate and describe the radiological, clinical, and pathological changes in miners and millers exposed to sericite dust with mineralogical characteristics of inhaled dust. Methods: The working premises were visited to examine the sericite processing and to classify the jobs according to make qualitative evaluation. Respirable dust was collected and the amount of crystalline silica and particle size distribution were measured. Forty four workers were examined by a standard questionnaire for respiratory symptoms, spirometry, and chest x ray. Material from an open lung biopsy was reviewed for histopathological and mineralogical analysis, together with sericite samples from the work site to compare the mineral characteristics in lung lesions and work area. Results: Respirable dust contained 4.5–10.0% crystalline silica. Particle size distribution showed a heavy burden of very fine particles (23–55%) with a mean diameter of <0.5 µm. Mean age of sericite miners was 41.0 (11.9) and mean number of years of exposure was 13.5 (10.1). In 52.3% of workers (23/44), chest radiographs presented a median category of 1/0 or above, and 18.2% (8/44) had a reduced FEV1. There was a significant association between exposure indices and x ray category. Histological studies of the lung biopsy showed lesions compatible with mixed dust fibrosis with no silicotic nodules. x Ray diffraction analysis of the lung dust residue and the bulk samples collected from work area showed similar mineralogical characteristics. Muscovite and kaolinite were the major mineral particle inclusions in the lung. Conclusion: Exposure to fine sericite particles is associated with the development of functional and radiological changes in workers inducing mixed dust lesions, which are distinct histologically from silicosis. PMID:15723874

  6. Is food allergen analysis flawed? Health and supply chain risks and a proposed framework to address urgent analytical needs.

    PubMed

    Walker, M J; Burns, D T; Elliott, C T; Gowland, M H; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is an increasing problem for those affected, their families or carers, the food industry and for regulators. The food supply chain is highly vulnerable to fraud involving food allergens, risking fatalities and severe reputational damage to the food industry. Many facets are being pursued to ameliorate the difficulties including better food labelling and the concept of thresholds of elicitation of allergy symptoms as risk management tools. These efforts depend to a high degree on the ability reliably to detect and quantify food allergens; yet all current analytical approaches exhibit severe deficiencies that jeopardise accurate results being produced particularly in terms of the risks of false positive and false negative reporting. If we fail to realise the promise of current risk assessment and risk management of food allergens through lack of the ability to measure food allergens reproducibly and with traceability to an international unit of measurement, the analytical community will have failed a significant societal challenge. Three distinct but interrelated areas of analytical work are urgently needed to address the substantial gaps identified: (a) a coordinated international programme for the production of properly characterised clinically relevant reference materials and calibrants for food allergen analysis; (b) an international programme to widen the scope of proteomics and genomics bioinformatics for the genera containing the major allergens to address problems in ELISA, MS and DNA methods; (c) the initiation of a coordinated international programme leading to reference methods for allergen proteins that provide results traceable to the SI. This article describes in more detail food allergy, the risks of inapplicable or flawed allergen analyses with examples and a proposed framework, including clinically relevant incurred allergen concentrations, to address the currently unmet and urgently required analytical requirements. Support for the

  7. Is food allergen analysis flawed? Health and supply chain risks and a proposed framework to address urgent analytical needs.

    PubMed

    Walker, M J; Burns, D T; Elliott, C T; Gowland, M H; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is an increasing problem for those affected, their families or carers, the food industry and for regulators. The food supply chain is highly vulnerable to fraud involving food allergens, risking fatalities and severe reputational damage to the food industry. Many facets are being pursued to ameliorate the difficulties including better food labelling and the concept of thresholds of elicitation of allergy symptoms as risk management tools. These efforts depend to a high degree on the ability reliably to detect and quantify food allergens; yet all current analytical approaches exhibit severe deficiencies that jeopardise accurate results being produced particularly in terms of the risks of false positive and false negative reporting. If we fail to realise the promise of current risk assessment and risk management of food allergens through lack of the ability to measure food allergens reproducibly and with traceability to an international unit of measurement, the analytical community will have failed a significant societal challenge. Three distinct but interrelated areas of analytical work are urgently needed to address the substantial gaps identified: (a) a coordinated international programme for the production of properly characterised clinically relevant reference materials and calibrants for food allergen analysis; (b) an international programme to widen the scope of proteomics and genomics bioinformatics for the genera containing the major allergens to address problems in ELISA, MS and DNA methods; (c) the initiation of a coordinated international programme leading to reference methods for allergen proteins that provide results traceable to the SI. This article describes in more detail food allergy, the risks of inapplicable or flawed allergen analyses with examples and a proposed framework, including clinically relevant incurred allergen concentrations, to address the currently unmet and urgently required analytical requirements. Support for the

  8. Prevention of Birch Pollen-Related Food Allergy by Mucosal Treatment with Multi-Allergen-Chimers in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hoflehner, Elisabeth; Hufnagl, Karin; Schabussova, Irma; Jasinska, Joanna; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Bohle, Barbara; Maizels, Rick M.; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Background Among birch pollen allergic patients up to 70% develop allergic reactions to Bet v 1-homologue food allergens such as Api g 1 (celery) or Dau c 1 (carrot), termed as birch pollen-related food allergy. In most cases, specific immunotherapy with birch pollen extracts does not reduce allergic symptoms to the homologue food allergens. We therefore genetically engineered a multi-allergen chimer and tested if mucosal treatment with this construct could represent a novel approach for prevention of birch pollen-related food allergy. Methodology BALB/c mice were poly-sensitized with a mixture of Bet v 1, Api g 1 and Dau c 1 followed by a sublingual challenge with carrot, celery and birch pollen extracts. For prevention of allergy sensitization an allergen chimer composed of immunodominant T cell epitopes of Api g 1 and Dau c 1 linked to the whole Bet v 1 allergen, was intranasally applied prior to sensitization. Results Intranasal pretreatment with the allergen chimer led to significantly decreased antigen-specific IgE-dependent β-hexosaminidase release, but enhanced allergen-specific IgG2a and IgA antibodies. Accordingly, IL-4 levels in spleen cell cultures and IL-5 levels in restimulated spleen and cervical lymph node cell cultures were markedly reduced, while IFN-γ levels were increased. Immunomodulation was associated with increased IL-10, TGF-β and Foxp3 mRNA levels in NALT and Foxp3 in oral mucosal tissues. Treatment with anti-TGF-β, anti-IL10R or anti-CD25 antibodies abrogated the suppression of allergic responses induced by the chimer. Conclusion Our results indicate that mucosal application of the allergen chimer led to decreased Th2 immune responses against Bet v 1 and its homologue food allergens Api g 1 and Dau c 1 by regulatory and Th1-biased immune responses. These data suggest that mucosal treatment with a multi-allergen vaccine could be a promising treatment strategy to prevent birch pollen-related food allergy. PMID:22768077

  9. Enhancement of systemic and sputum granulocyte response to inhaled endotoxin in people with the GSTM1 null genotype

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine if the GSTM1 null genotype is a risk factor for increased inflammatory response to inhaled endotoxin. Methods 35 volunteers who had undergone inhalation challenge with a 20 000 endotoxin unit dose of Clinical Center Reference Endotoxin (CCRE) were genotyped for the G...

  10. Zinc toxicology following particulate inhalation.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ross G

    2008-04-01

    The current mini-review describes the toxic effects of zinc inhalation principally in the workplace and associated complications with breathing and respiration. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Criteria were used to specifically select articles. Most of the commercial production of zinc involves the galvanizing of iron and the manufacture of brass. The recommended daily allowance for adults is 15 mg zinc/day. Metal fume fever associated with inhalation of fumes of ZnO is characterized by fatigue, chills, fever, myalgias, cough, dyspnea, leukocytosis, thirst, metallic taste and salivation. ZnCl(2) inhalation results in edema in the alveolar surface and the protein therein the lavage fluid is elevated. Particular pathological changes associated with zinc intoxication include: pale mucous membranes; jaundice; numerous Heinz bodies; and marked anemia. Adequate ambient air monitors for permissible exposure limits, excellent ventilation and extraction systems, and approved respirators are all important in providing adequate protection.

  11. Zinc toxicology following particulate inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ross G.

    2008-01-01

    The current mini-review describes the toxic effects of zinc inhalation principally in the workplace and associated complications with breathing and respiration. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Criteria were used to specifically select articles. Most of the commercial production of zinc involves the galvanizing of iron and the manufacture of brass. The recommended daily allowance for adults is 15 mg zinc/day. Metal fume fever associated with inhalation of fumes of ZnO is characterized by fatigue, chills, fever, myalgias, cough, dyspnea, leukocytosis, thirst, metallic taste and salivation. ZnCl2 inhalation results in edema in the alveolar surface and the protein therein the lavage fluid is elevated. Particular pathological changes associated with zinc intoxication include: pale mucous membranes; jaundice; numerous Heinz bodies; and marked anemia. Adequate ambient air monitors for permissible exposure limits, excellent ventilation and extraction systems, and approved respirators are all important in providing adequate protection. PMID:20040991

  12. Tree pollen allergens-an update from a molecular perspective.

    PubMed

    Asam, C; Hofer, H; Wolf, M; Aglas, L; Wallner, M

    2015-10-01

    It is estimated that pollen allergies affect approximately 40% of allergic individuals. In general, tree pollen allergies are mainly elicited by allergenic trees belonging to the orders Fagales, Lamiales, Proteales, and Pinales. Over 25 years ago, the gene encoding the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 was the first such gene to be cloned and its product characterized. Since that time, 53 tree pollen allergens have been identified and acknowledged by the WHO/IUIS allergen nomenclature subcommittee. Molecule-based profiling of allergic sensitization has helped to elucidate the immunological connections of allergen cross-reactivity, whereas advances in biochemistry have revealed structural and functional aspects of allergenic proteins. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge of the molecular aspects of tree pollen allergens. We analyze the geographic distribution of allergenic trees, discuss factors pivotal for allergic sensitization, and describe the role of tree pollen panallergens. Novel allergenic tree species as well as tree pollen allergens are continually being identified, making research in this field highly competitive and instrumental for clinical applications.

  13. Protocol for simultaneous isolation of three important banana allergens.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Jasna; Mrkic, Ivan; Grozdanovic, Milica; Popovic, Milica; Petersen, Arnd; Jappe, Uta; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija

    2014-07-01

    Banana fruit (Musa acuminata) has become an important food allergen source in recent years. So far, 5 IgE reactive banana proteins have been identified, and the major allergens are: Mus a 2 (a class I chitinase, 31kDa), Mus a 4 (thaumatin-like protein, 21kDa), and Mus a 5 (β-1,3-glucanase, 33kDa). Due to variations in allergen expression levels, diagnostic reagents for food allergy can be improved by using individual allergen components instead of banana allergen extracts. The purpose of this study was to optimize the purification protocol of the three major allergens present in banana fruit: Mus a 2, Mus a 4 and Mus a 5. By employing a three-step purification protocol (a combination of anion-exchange, cation-exchange and reversed-phase chromatography) three important banana allergens were obtained in sufficient yield and high purity. Characterization of the purified proteins was performed by both biochemical (2-D PAGE, mass fingerprint and N-terminal sequencing) and immunochemical (immunoblot) methods. IgE reactivity to the purified allergens was tested by employing sera of five allergic patients. The purified allergens displayed higher sensitivity in IgE detection than the routinely used extracts. The three purified allergens are good candidates for reagents in component-based diagnosis of banana allergy.

  14. Sorbent trapping solid-phase microextraction of fragrance allergens in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Lamas, J Pablo; Sanchez-Prado, Lucia; Lores, Marta; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Llompart, Maria

    2010-08-13

    Exposure to fragrance substances is exponentially increasing in our daily life due to the enhanced use of scented products. Some fragrances are known to be important sensitizers, inhalation being an important exposure pathway in indoor environments. A simple and sensitive method based on solid-phase enrichment and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been developed for the analysis of 24 volatile fragrance allergens in indoor air. Suspected allergens present in the air (0.2 m(3)) were adsorbed onto a very small quantity of florisil (25 mg) and then transferred to a SPME fiber in the headspace mode (HS). To the best of our knowledge, this paper describes the first application of SPME for the determination of these compounds in air samples. The experimental parameters affecting the microextraction process have been optimized using a multifactor experimental design strategy. Accuracy, linearity, precision and detection limits (LODs) were evaluated to assess the performance of the proposed method. External calibration, using spiked sorbent standards, and not requiring the complete sampling process (only the SPME step), demonstrated to be suitable for the quantification of all suspected allergens. Recovery studies were performed at three concentration levels (0.04, 1.00 and 50 microg m(-3)), obtaining quantitative recoveries (> or = 85%) in most cases. LOD values at the low ng m(-3) level were achieved for all the target compounds. The application of the method to daily home air samples demonstrated the ubiquity of this kind of fragrance ingredients in quotidian indoor environments, finding 18 of the 24 considered compounds in concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 56 microg m(-3). Benzyl alcohol, linalool, citronellol, ionone and lilial were found in most analyzed samples.

  15. Allergenius, an expert system for the interpretation of allergen microarray results

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An in vitro procedure based on a microarray containing many different allergen components has recently been introduced for use in allergy diagnosis. Recombinant and highly purified allergens belonging to different allergenic sources (inhalants, food, latex and hymenoptera) are present in the array. These components can either be genuine or cross-reactive, resistant or susceptible to heat and low pH, and innocuous or potentially dangerous. A large number of complex and heterogeneous relationships among these components has emerged, such that sometimes these interactions cannot be effectively managed by the allergist. In the 1960s, specialized languages and environments were developed to support the replacement of human experts with dedicated decision-making information systems. Currently, expert systems (ES) are advanced informatics tools that are widely used in medicine, engineering, finance and trading. Methods We developed an ES, named Allergenius ®, to support the interpretation of allergy tests based on microarray technology (ImmunoCAP ISAC ®). The ES was implemented using Flex, a LPA Win-Prolog shell. Rules representing the knowledge base (KB) were derived from the literature and specialized databases. The input data included the patient’s ID and disease(s), the results of either a skin prick test or specific IgE assays and ISAC results. The output was a medical report. Results The ES was first validated using artificial and real life cases and passed all in silico validations. Then, the opinions of allergists with experience in molecular diagnostics were compared with the ES reports. The Allergenius reports included all of the allergists’ opinions and considerations, as well as any additional information. Conclusions Allergenius is a trustable ES dedicated to molecular tests for allergy. In the present version, it provides a powerful method to understand ISAC results and to obtain a comprehensive interpretation of the patient’s Ig

  16. Assessment of the risk of respiratory sensitization from fragrance allergens released by air fresheners.

    PubMed

    ter Burg, Wouter; Bouma, Krista; Schakel, Durk J; Wijnhoven, Susan W P; van Engelen, Jacqueline; van Loveren, Henk; Ezendam, Janine

    2014-04-01

    Consumers using air fresheners are exposed to the emitted ingredients, including fragrances, via the respiratory tract. Several fragrances are known skin sensitizers, but it is unknown whether inhalation exposure to these chemicals can induce respiratory sensitization. Effects on the immune system were assessed by testing a selection of five fragrance allergens in the respiratory local lymph node assay (LLNA). The probability and extent of exposure were assessed by measuring concentrations of the 24 known fragrance allergens in 109 air fresheners. It was shown that the most frequently used fragrances in air fresheners were D-limonene and linalool. In the respiratory LLNA, these fragrances were negative. Of the other tested chemicals, only isoeugenol induced a statistically significant increase in cell proliferation. Consumer exposure was assessed in more detail for D-limonene, linalool, and isoeugenol by using exposure modeling tools. It was shown that the most frequently used fragrances in air fresheners, D-limonene, and linalool gave rise to a higher consumer exposure compared with isoeugenol. To evaluate whether the consumer exposure to these fragrances is low or high, these levels were compared with measured air concentrations of diisocyanates, known human respiratory sensitizers. This comparison showed that consumer exposure from air fresheners to D-limonene, linalool, and isoeugenol is considerably lower than occupational exposure to diisocyanates. By combing this knowledge on sensitizing potency with the much lower exposure compared to diisocyanates it seems highly unlikely that isoeugenol can induce respiratory sensitization in consumers using air fresheners.

  17. S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase Inhibition Regulates Allergen-Induced Lung Inflammation and Airway Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, David J. P.; Bradley, Matthews O.; Jaffar, Zeina

    2013-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by Th2 type inflammation, leading to airway hyperresponsivenes, mucus hypersecretion and tissue remodeling. S-Nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) is an alcohol dehydrogenase involved in the regulation of intracellular levels of S-nitrosothiols. GSNOR activity has been shown to be elevated in human asthmatic lungs, resulting in diminished S-nitrosothiols and thus contributing to increased airway hyperreactivity. Using a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we report that intranasal administration of a new selective inhibitor of GSNOR, SPL-334, caused a marked reduction in airway hyperreactivity, allergen-specific T cells and eosinophil accumulation, and mucus production in the lungs in response to allergen inhalation. Moreover, SPL-334 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the production of the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 and the level of the chemokine CCL11 (eotaxin-1) in the airways. Collectively, these observations reveal that GSNOR inhibitors are effective not only in reducing airway hyperresponsiveness but also in limiting lung inflammatory responses mediated by CD4+ Th2 cells. These findings suggest that the inhibition of GSNOR may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:23936192

  18. Current perspectives and recommendations for the development of mass spectrometry methods for the determination of allergens in foods.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Phil E; Baumgartner, Sabine; Aldick, Thomas; Bessant, Conrad; Giosafatto, Valeria; Heick, Julia; Mamone, Gianfranco; O'Connor, Gavin; Poms, Roland; Popping, Bert; Reuter, Andreas; Ulberth, Franz; Watson, Andrew; Monaci, Linda; Mills, E N Clare

    2011-01-01

    Allergen detection and quantification is an essential part of allergen management as practiced by food manufacturers. Recently, protein MS methods (in particular, multiple reaction monitoring experiments) have begun to be adopted by the allergen detection community to provide an alternative technique to ELISA and PCR methods. MS analysis of proteins in foods provides additional challenges to the analyst, both in terms of experimental design and methodology: (1) choice of analyte, including multiplexing to simultaneously detect several biologically relevant molecules able to trigger allergic reactions; (2) choice of processing stable peptide markers for different target analytes that should be placed in publicly available databases; (3) markers allowing quantification (e.g., through standard addition or isotopically labeled peptide standards); (4) optimization of protease digestion protocols to ensure reproducible and robust method development; and (5) effective validation of methods and harmonization of results through the use of naturally incurred reference materials spanning several types of food matrix.

  19. Specific allergen immunotherapy attenuates allergic airway inflammation in a rat model of Alstonia scholaris pollen induced airway allergy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ankur; Moitra, Saibal; Hazra, Iman; Mondal, Somnath; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Bhattacharya, Debanjan; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2016-01-01

    Pollen grains are well established to be an important cause of respiratory allergy. Current pharmacologic therapies for allergic asthma do not cure the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only treatment method which re-directs the immune system away from allergic response leading to a long lasting effect. The mechanism by which immunotherapy achieves this goal is an area of active research world-wide. The present experimental study was designed to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation based on a relevant human allergen, Alstonia scholaris pollen, and to establish the immunological and cellular features of specific allergen immunotherapy using this same pollen extract. Our results revealed that Alstonia scholaris pollen sensitization and challenge causes eosinophilic airway inflammation with mucin hypersecretion. This is associated with increased total IgE, increased expression of FcɛRI on lung mast cells and increased levels of IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 as confirmed by ELISA, in-situ immunofluorescence and FACS assay. Allergen specific immunotherapy reduced airway inflammation and also decreased total IgE level, FcɛRI expression, IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 levels. It was further noted that the reduction of these levels was more by intra-nasal route than by intra-peritoneal route. Thus we present a novel animal model of Alstonia scholaris pollen allergic disease and specific allergen immunotherapy which will pave the way towards the development of better treatment modalities.

  20. Specific allergen immunotherapy attenuates allergic airway inflammation in a rat model of Alstonia scholaris pollen induced airway allergy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ankur; Moitra, Saibal; Hazra, Iman; Mondal, Somnath; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Bhattacharya, Debanjan; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2016-01-01

    Pollen grains are well established to be an important cause of respiratory allergy. Current pharmacologic therapies for allergic asthma do not cure the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only treatment method which re-directs the immune system away from allergic response leading to a long lasting effect. The mechanism by which immunotherapy achieves this goal is an area of active research world-wide. The present experimental study was designed to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation based on a relevant human allergen, Alstonia scholaris pollen, and to establish the immunological and cellular features of specific allergen immunotherapy using this same pollen extract. Our results revealed that Alstonia scholaris pollen sensitization and challenge causes eosinophilic airway inflammation with mucin hypersecretion. This is associated with increased total IgE, increased expression of FcɛRI on lung mast cells and increased levels of IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 as confirmed by ELISA, in-situ immunofluorescence and FACS assay. Allergen specific immunotherapy reduced airway inflammation and also decreased total IgE level, FcɛRI expression, IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 levels. It was further noted that the reduction of these levels was more by intra-nasal route than by intra-peritoneal route. Thus we present a novel animal model of Alstonia scholaris pollen allergic disease and specific allergen immunotherapy which will pave the way towards the development of better treatment modalities. PMID:26667977

  1. Symposium Summary: "Breathe In, Breathe Out, Its Easy: What You Need to Know About Developing Inhaled Drugs".

    PubMed

    Tepper, Jeffrey S; Kuehl, Philip J; Cracknell, Stuart; Nikula, Kristen J; Pei, Luqi; Blanchard, James D

    2016-07-01

    Developing inhaled drugs requires knowledge of lung anatomy, cell biology, respiratory physiology, particle physics, and some plumbing. Although dose makes the poison, in the context of an inhaled drug, the "dose" is not easily defined. This lack of clarity around dose poses issues and challenges in the design of inhalation toxicology programs. To better understand dose, the influence of ventilation is discussed as are the perturbations in pulmonary function observed with inhalation exposure that can affect dose. Methods for determining inhaled drug deposition to arrive at an estimate of lung dose are examined. Equally important to understanding dose are the techniques used to deliver aerosols to animals. With a better understanding of dose and inhalation exposure, species-specific histopathologic lesions, both common background and toxicologically significant lesions, are reviewed. Finally, insight into how regulators synthesize and evaluate these complex findings to assess clinical safety risks is presented.

  2. Nanotechnology-based inhalation treatments for lung cancer: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Javed; Akhter, Sohail; Rizwanullah, Md; Amin, Saima; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Ahmad, Mohammad Zaki; Rizvi, Moshahid Alam; Kamal, Mohammad A; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2015-01-01

    Considering the challenges associated with conventional chemotherapy, targeted and local delivery of chemotherapeutics via nanoparticle (NP) carriers to the lungs is an emerging area of interest. Recent studies and growing clinical application in cancer nanotechnology showed the huge potential of NPs as drug carriers in cancer therapy, including in lung carcinoma for diagnosis, imaging, and theranostics. Researchers have confirmed that nanotechnology-based inhalation chemotherapy is viable and more effective than conventional chemotherapy, with lesser side effects. Recently, many nanocarriers have been investigated, including liposomes, polymeric micelles, polymeric NPs, solid lipid NPs, and inorganic NPs for inhalation treatments of lung cancer. Yet, the toxicity of such nanomaterials to the lungs tissues and further distribution to other organs due to systemic absorption on inhalation delivery is a debatable concern. Here, prospect of NPs-based local lung cancer targeting through inhalation route as well as its associated challenges are discussed. PMID:26640374

  3. [Evaluation of the total biological activity and allergenic composition of allergenic extracts].

    PubMed

    Lombardero, M; González, R; Duffort, O; Juan, F; Ayuso, R; Ventas, P; Cortés, C; Carreira, J

    1986-01-01

    In the present study, a complete procedure is presented in order to standardize allergenic extracts, the meaning of which is the measurement of the total allergenic activity and the determination of the allergenic composition. The measurement of the biological activity comprises 2 steps: Preparation of Reference Extracts and determination of their "in vivo" activity. Evaluation of the total allergenic activity of extracts for clinical use. Reference extracts were prepared from the main allergens and their "in vivo" biological activity was determined by a quantitative skin prick test in a sample of at least 30 allergic patients. By definition, the protein concentration of Reference Extract that produces, in the allergic population, a geometric mean wheal of 75 mm.2 has an activity of 100 biological units (BUs). The determination of the biological activity of a problem extract is made by RAST inhibition. The sample is compared with the corresponding Reference Extract by this technique and, from this comparison, it is possible to quantify the activity of the problem extract in biologic units (BUs) with clinical significance. Likewise, different techniques have been used to determine the allergenic composition of extracts. These techniques comprise 2 steps: Separation of the components of the extract. Identification of the components that bind specific human IgE. The separation of the components of the extract has been carried out by isoelectric focusing (IEF) and electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS-PAGE). In order to identify the allergenic components, an immunoblotting technique has been employed. The separated components in the IEF gel or SDS-PAGE gel are transferred to a nitrocellulose sheet and later on, this membrane is overlaid with a serum pool from allergic patients and a mouse monoclonal anti-human IgE, labelled with 125I. Finally, the autoradiography of the nitrocellulose membrane is obtained. In this way it is possible to compare

  4. T lymphocytes and mast cells express messenger RNA for interleukin-4 in the nasal mucosa in allergen-induced rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Ying, S; Durham, S R; Jacobson, M R; Rak, S; Masuyama, K; Lowhagen, O; Kay, A B; Hamid, Q A

    1994-06-01

    We have investigated the phenotype of interleukin-4 (IL-4) mRNA+ cells in the nasal mucosa of six subjects with allergic rhinitis before and 24 hr after local allergen provocation with grass pollen extract. Serial cryostat sections were cut from paraformaldehyde-fixed snap-frozen nasal biopsies, and immunocytochemistry (APAAP) followed by in situ hybridization performed on the same sections. For immunocytochemistry, antibodies against CD3, tryptase, major basic protein (MBP) and CD68 were used to identify T cells, mast cells, eosinophils and macrophages, respectively. Hybridization studies were performed using a digoxigenin-labelled IL-4 riboprobe. Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) and X-phosphate-5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indoly phosphate (BCIP) served as chromogens to detect hybridization IL-4 mRNA signals. Significant increases in T lymphocytes and eosinophils and in the number of IL-4 mRNA+ cells were observed after allergen challenge. Double immunocytochemistry/in situ hybridization demonstrated that the majority of IL-4 mRNA+ cells after allergen challenge were CD3+ (73.7% +/- 1.6). Lower numbers of IL-4 mRNA hybridization signals were co-localized to tryptase+ cells (26.0% +/- 1.6). In contrast, no IL-4 mRNA hybridization signals were co-localized to either eosinophils or macrophages. These results indicate that after allergen challenge T cells are the principal cellular source of IL-4 mRNA transcripts during human late nasal responses, with a lesser contribution from mast cells.

  5. Allergen-specific regulation of allergic rhinitis in mice by intranasal exposure to IgG1 monoclonal antibody Fab fragments against pathogenic allergen.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Daiko; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Sae-Wong, Chutha; Yoshino, Shin

    2014-09-01

    Fab fragments (Fabs) have the ability to bind to specific antigens but lack the Fc portion for binding to receptors on immune and inflammatory cells that play a critical role in allergic diseases. In the present study, we investigated whether Fabs of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) inhibited allergic rhinitis in mice. BALB/c mice sensitized by intraperitoneal injections of ovalbumin (OVA) plus alum on days 0 and 14 were intranasally challenged with OVA on days 28-30, and 35. Fabs prepared by the digestion of an anti-OVA IgG1 mAb (O1-10) with papain were also intranasally administered 15min before each OVA challenge. The results showed that treatment with O1-10 Fabs significantly suppressed the sneezing frequency, associated with decrease of OVA-specific IgE in the serum and infiltration by mast cells in the nasal mucosa seen following the fourth antigenic challenge; additionally, the level of mouse mast cell protease-1, a marker of mast cell activation, in serum was decreased. Furthermore, infiltration of eosinophils and goblet cell hyperplasia in the nasal mucosa at the fourth challenge were inhibited by treatment with O1-10 Fabs. In conclusion, these results suggest that intranasal exposure to Fabs of a pathogenic antigen-specific IgG1 mAb may be effective in regulating allergic rhinitis through allergen capture by Fabs in the nasal mucosa before the interaction of the intact antibody and allergen.

  6. Allergenicity of Maillard reaction products from peanut proteins.

    PubMed

    Chung, S Y; Champagne, E T

    1999-12-01

    It is known that peanut allergy is caused by peanut proteins. However, little is known about the impact of roasting on the allergenicity of peanuts. During roasting, proteins react with sugars to form Maillard reaction products, which could affect allergenicity. To determine if the Maillard reaction could convert a nonallergenic peanut protein into a potentially allergenic product, nonallergenic lectin was reacted with glucose or fructose at 50 degrees C for 28 days. Browning products from heat-treated peanuts were also examined. The products were analyzed in immunoblot and competitive assays, using a pooled serum (i.e., IgE antibodies) from patients with peanut anaphylaxis. Results showed that the products were recognized by IgE and had an inhibitory effect on IgE binding to a peanut allergen. Thus, the findings suggest that these Maillard reaction products are potentially allergenic and indicate the need to verify whether the Maillard reaction products formed in peanuts during roasting increase their allergenicity.

  7. Mechanisms underlying allergy vaccination with recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives.

    PubMed

    Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2012-06-19

    Hundred years ago therapeutic vaccination with allergen-containing extracts has been introduced as a clinically effective, disease-modifying, allergen-specific and long-lasting form of therapy for allergy, a hypersensitivity disease affecting more than 25% of the population. Today, the structures of most of the disease-causing allergens have been elucidated and recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives with reduced allergenic activity have been engineered to reduce side effects during allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT). These recombinant hypoallergens have been characterized in vitro, in experimental animal models and in clinical trials in allergic patients. This review provides a summary of the molecular, immunological and preclinical evaluation criteria applied for this new generation of allergy vaccines. Furthermore, we summarize the mechanisms underlying SIT with recombinant hypoallergens which are thought to be responsible for their therapeutic effect.

  8. Interfaces Between Allergen Structure and Diagnosis: Know Your Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Pomés, Anna; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Allergy diagnosis is based on the patient’s clinical history and can be strengthened by tests that confirm the origin of sensitization. In the past 25 years, these tests have evolved from the exclusive in vivo or in vitro use of allergen extracts, to complementary molecular-based diagnostics that rely on in vitro measurements of IgE reactivity to individual allergens. For this to occur, an increase in our understanding of the molecular structure of allergens, largely due to the development of technologies such as molecular cloning and expression of recombinant allergens, X-ray crystallography, or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), has been essential. New in vitro microarray or multiplex systems are now available to measure IgE against a selected panel of purified natural or recombinant allergens. The determination of the three-dimensional structure of allergens has facilitated detailed molecular studies, including the analysis of antigenic determinants for diagnostic purposes. PMID:25750181

  9. Allergen-specific immunotherapy: from therapeutic vaccines to prophylactic approaches.

    PubMed

    Valenta, R; Campana, R; Marth, K; van Hage, M

    2012-08-01

    Immunoglobulin E-mediated allergies affect more than 25% of the population. Allergen exposure induces a variety of symptoms in allergic patients, which include rhinitis, conjunctivitis, asthma, dermatitis, food allergy and life-threatening systemic anaphylaxis. At present, allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), which is based on the administration of the disease-causing allergens, is the only disease-modifying treatment for allergy. Current therapeutic allergy vaccines are still prepared from relatively poorly defined allergen extracts. However, with the availability of the structures of the most common allergen molecules, it has become possible to produce well-defined recombinant and synthetic allergy vaccines that allow specific targeting of the mechanisms of allergic disease. Here we provide a summary of the development and mechanisms of SIT, and then review new forms of therapeutic vaccines that are based on recombinant and synthetic molecules. Finally, we discuss possible allergen-specific strategies for prevention of allergic disease.

  10. Common food allergens and their IgE-binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hiroaki; Yokooji, Tomoharu; Taogoshi, Takanori

    2015-10-01

    Food allergy is an adverse immune response to certain kinds of food. Although any food can cause allergic reactions, chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shellfish, fruit, and buckwheat account for 75% of food allergies in Japan. Allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies play a pivotal role in the development of food allergy. Recent advances in molecular biological techniques have enabled the efficient analysis of food allergens. As a result, many food allergens have been identified, and their molecular structure and IgE-binding epitopes have also been identified. Studies of allergens have demonstrated that IgE antibodies specific to allergen components and/or the peptide epitopes are good indicators for the identification of patients with food allergy, prediction of clinical severity and development of tolerance. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the allergens and IgE epitopes in the well-researched allergies to chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shrimp, and peanut.

  11. IL-12p40 gene-deficient BALB/c mice exhibit lower weight loss, reduced lung pathology and decreased sensitization to allergen in response to infection with pneumonia virus of mice.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Pratima; Sarkar, Indranil; Atanley, Ethel; Gomis, Susantha; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) causes similar disease. BALB/c mice are highly susceptible, while C57BL/6 mice are more resistant to PVM. IL-12 was significantly more up-regulated in response to PVM infection in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 mice. IL-12p40-deficient neonatal and adult BALB/c mice showed significantly less weight loss than wild-type mice after PVM challenge. The percentage of regulatory T cells, as well as IFN-β and IL-18 expression, was higher in the lungs of both neonatal and adult IL-12p40-/- mice. Adult IL-12p40-/- mice also showed enhanced TGF-β and IL-10 expression and reduced inflammatory responses. Furthermore, IL-12p40-/- mice showed decreased sensitization to inhaled cockroach antigen after PVM infection when compared to wild-type mice. In conclusion, these data suggest that a depressed regulatory capacity in BALB/c mice to PVM infection results in enhanced immunopathology and sensitization to allergen. PMID:27400340

  12. Citral a fragrance allergen and irritant.

    PubMed

    Heydorn, S; Menné, T; Andersen, K E; Bruze, M; Svedman, C; White, I R; Basketter, D A

    2003-07-01

    Citral is a well known contact allergen and a contact irritant. Routine patch testing in the past may have been restricted because of possible irritant (IR) patch test responses. 586 consecutive patients, with hand eczema, were patch tested with a selection of fragrances including citral 2% petrolatum and the European standard series. 28 of the patients showed a positive patch test reaction (+ to +++) to citral and 82 at least 1 IR patch test reaction and no positive patch test reaction to citral. A statistically significant association between a positive patch test reaction to citral and positive patch test reactions to other fragrances compared with IR reactions (n = 82) was established. The difference regarding fragrance history found between those with IR and positive reactions to citral was not significant. Citral could be an allergen and/or irritant, worthy of further more extensive studies.

  13. Industrial Fungal Enzymes: An Occupational Allergen Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2011-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high-molecular-weight allergens is a risk factor for the development and pathogenesis of IgE-mediated respiratory disease. In some occupational environments, workers are at an increased risk of exposure to fungal enzymes used in industrial production. Fungal enzymes have been associated with adverse health effects in the work place, in particular in baking occupations. Exposure-response relationships have been demonstrated, and atopic workers directly handling fungal enzymes are at an increased risk for IgE-mediated disease and occupational asthma. The utilization of new and emerging fungal enzymes in industrial production will present new occupational exposures. The production of antibody-based immunoassays is necessary for the assessment of occupational exposure and the development of threshold limit values. Allergen avoidance strategies including personal protective equipment, engineering controls, protein encapsulation, and reduction of airborne enzyme concentrations are required to mitigate occupational exposure to fungal enzymes. PMID:21747869

  14. Tyrophagus putrescentiae: an allergenically important mite.

    PubMed

    Green, W F; Woolcock, A J

    1978-03-01

    The incidence of positive skin tests to the mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae was measured and compared with skin reactions to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and other allergens in Australian and New Guinean populations, and mite counts were determined in Sydney and New Guinea houses. Positive reactions to T. putrescentiae were as frequent as those for D. pteronyssinus in asthmatics in Sydney and were the commonest positive reactions in the normal New Guinea population. T. putrescentiae-specific serum IgE levels were determined and some IgG cross-reactions of D. pteronyssinus and T. putrescentiae antigens were demonstrated. It is suggested that T. putrescentiae is an important source of allergen and should be considered whenever D. pteronyssinus is thought to be a problem. A convenient method for culturing and isolating T. putrescentiae is described. PMID:647897

  15. Aluminium in Allergies and Allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is a hot topic in the current debate. Exposure occurs due to environmental, dietary and intentional exposure to aluminium, such as in vaccines where it was introduced in 1926. In spite of the fact that it is a typical Th2 adjuvant, aluminium redirects the immune response in systemic allergen immunotherapy (SIT) upon prolonged immunization. SIT in the US, and SLIT in general, are at present non-adjuvanted therapies, but in Europe aluminium is used as adjuvant in most SIT preparations. It enhances the safety of SIT by local deposition of the allergen. Undesired properties of aluminium adjuvants comprise acute and chronic inflammation at the injection site, its Th2 immune stimulatory capacity, its accumulation besides biodistribution in the body. The adjuvant and safety profile of aluminium adjuvants in allergy vaccines are discussed, as well as the need for putting modern delivery systems and adjuvants on the fast track.

  16. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  17. Inhalant Use in Florida Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siqueira, Lorena; Crandall, Lee A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine (1) the prevalence of use, (2) risk and protective factors for use of inhalants in Florida youth. Methods: The Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey 2004 is a comprehensive assessment of youth substance abuse attitudes and practices obtained by sampling youth from sixty-five counties. Results: The sample consisted of 60,345…

  18. Parental Influence on Inhalant Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltazar, Alina; Hopkins, Gary; McBride, Duane; Vanderwaal, Curt; Pepper, Sara; Mackey, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the dynamics of the relationship between parents and their adolescent children and their association with lifetime and past-month inhalant usage. The population studied was seventh- through ninth-grade students in rural Idaho (N = 570). The authors found a small, but consistent, significant inverse…

  19. INHALATION EXPOSURE-RESPONSE METHODOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Inhalation Exposure-Response Analysis Methodology Document is expected to provide guidance on the development of the basic toxicological foundations for deriving reference values for human health effects, focusing on the hazard identification and dose-response aspects of the ...

  20. Brain β2*-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor occupancy after use of a nicotine inhaler

    PubMed Central

    Esterlis, Irina; Mitsis, Effie M.; Batis, Jeffery C.; Bois, Frederic; Picciotto, Marina R.; Stiklus, Stephanie M.; Kloczynski, Tracy; Perry, Edward; Seibyl, John P.; McKee, Sherry; Staley, Julie K.; Cosgrove, Kelly P.

    2012-01-01

    The Nicotrol® (Pfizer, USA) nicotine inhaler reduces craving by mimicking the behavioural component of cigarettes and delivering controlled doses of nicotine, which binds to the beta-2 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (β2*-nAChRs). Previous studies examined β2*-nAChR occupancy after administration of regular and low-nicotine cigarettes. Here, we measured occupancy of β2*-nAChRs after administration of nicotine via inhaler, and the relationship between occupancy and changes in craving for tobacco smoking and withdrawal symptoms. Tobacco smokers participated in [123I]5-IA-85380 SPECT studies with either a nicotine inhaler (n=9) or tobacco cigarette (n=4) challenge. [123I]5-IA was administered as a bolus plus constant infusion. After equilibrium was achieved, three 30-min baseline scans were collected, and subjects either used the nicotine inhaler or a regular cigarette, and up to six additional scans were obtained. Receptor occupancy was determined based on the Lassen plot method. Craving for tobacco smoking and withdrawal symptoms were evaluated pre- and post-challenge. Use of the nicotine inhaler produced an average 55.9±6.4% occupancy of β2*-nAChRs 2–5 h post-challenge, whereas use of a cigarette produced significantly higher receptor occupancy (F=10.6, p=0.009) with an average 67.6±14.1% occupancy 1.5–5 h post-challenge. There was a significant decrease in withdrawal symptoms post-nicotine inhaler use (F=6.13, p=0.04). These results demonstrate significant differences in occupancy of β2*-nAChRs by nicotine after use of the inhaler vs. a cigarette and confirm the ability of the nicotine inhaler to relieve withdrawal symptoms. PMID:21029513

  1. Randomised trial of an inhaled β2 agonist, inhaled corticosteroid and their combination in the treatment of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hancox, R; Cowan, J; Flannery, E; Herbison, G; McLachlan, C; Wong, C; Taylor, D

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Although many asthmatic patients are treated with a combination of β2 agonist and corticosteroid inhalers, the clinical effects of combining the drugs are unknown. Studies on the early asthmatic response to allergen suggest that β2 agonists may reduce the benefit of inhaled corticosteroids. A study of the effects of combining the drugs on asthma control was undertaken.
METHODS—Sixty one subjects with mild to moderate asthma were randomised to a double blind crossover comparison of inhaled budesonide (200-400 µg twice daily), terbutaline (500-1000 µg four times daily), combined treatment, and placebo. Each treatment was given for six weeks following a four week washout period. Ipratropium was used for symptom relief. Treatments were ranked from worst (1) to best (4) based on need for oral steroid, mean morning peak flow, nocturnal awakening, ipratropium use, and asthma symptoms. Lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness were measured before and after each treatment.
RESULTS—Evaluable data for all four treatments were obtained from 47 subjects. The mean rank of each treatment was: placebo = 2.05; terbutaline = 2.13; budesonide = 2.48; combined treatment = 3.34.Combined treatment was ranked significantly better than any other treatment (p<0.01). Mean (95% CI) morning and evening peak flows were 14 (5 to 23) and 24 (15 to 34) l/min higher, respectively, during combined treatment than during budesonide, and 27 (17 to 37) and 15 (7 to 23) l/min higher than during terbutaline. Asthma symptoms tended to be least frequent during combined treatment but were not significantly different from budesonide alone. There was no significant difference between combined treatment and budesonide alone for lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.
CONCLUSIONS—In this group of mild to moderate asthmatic subjects the combination of β2 agonist and corticosteroid gave better asthma control than either treatment alone. There was no evidence that

  2. [Allergens responsible for occupational eczemas in hairdressers].

    PubMed

    Ludwig, E

    1982-01-01

    Allergens responsible for occupational contact dermatitis occurring in hairdressers are reviewed. The subject is of topical interest as far as the number of reports on occupational skin diseases shows a considerable increase in the last years. Only a--not yet available--careful analysis of the expertises in the possession of the competent Employers Liability Insurance Association can disclose the relevance of individual sensitizers contained in hair care products to occupational contact eczemas of hairdressers. PMID:6217966

  3. Allerdictor: fast allergen prediction using text classification techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Ha X.; Lawrence, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Accurately identifying and eliminating allergens from biotechnology-derived products are important for human health. From a biomedical research perspective, it is also important to identify allergens in sequenced genomes. Many allergen prediction tools have been developed during the past years. Although these tools have achieved certain levels of specificity, when applied to large-scale allergen discovery (e.g. at a whole-genome scale), they still yield many false positives and thus low precision (even at low recall) due to the extreme skewness of the data (allergens are rare). Moreover, the most accurate tools are relatively slow because they use protein sequence alignment to build feature vectors for allergen classifiers. Additionally, only web server implementations of the current allergen prediction tools are publicly available and are without the capability of large batch submission. These weaknesses make large-scale allergen discovery ineffective and inefficient in the public domain. Results: We developed Allerdictor, a fast and accurate sequence-based allergen prediction tool that models protein sequences as text documents and uses support vector machine in text classification for allergen prediction. Test results on multiple highly skewed datasets demonstrated that Allerdictor predicted allergens with high precision over high recall at fast speed. For example, Allerdictor only took ∼6 min on a single core PC to scan a whole Swiss-Prot database of ∼540 000 sequences and identified <1% of them as allergens. Availability and implementation: Allerdictor is implemented in Python and available as standalone and web server versions at http://allerdictor.vbi.vt.edu. Contact: lawrence@vbi.vt.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24403538

  4. Structures of Two Major Allergens, Bla g 4 and Per a 4, From Cockroaches and Their IgE Binding Epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Y.; Chan, S; Ong, T; Yit, L; Tiong, Y; Chew, F; Sivaraman, J; Mok, Y

    2009-01-01

    Inhalant allergens from cockroaches are an important cause of asthma to millions of individuals worldwide. Here we report for the first time the structures of two major cockroach allergens, Bla g 4 and Per a 4, that adopt a typical lipocalin fold but with distinct structural features as compared with other known lipocalin allergens. Both Bla g 4 and Per a 4 contain two long-range disulfide bonds linking the N and C termini to a beta-barrel. The C-terminal helix of Bla g 4 is bent and greatly extended toward the N terminus. Bla g 4 is found to be a monomer, whereas Per a 4 exists as a dimer in solution with a novel dimeric interface involving residues from loops at the top and bottom of the beta-barrel. Putative ligand binding sites of both allergens are determined by docking of the juvenile hormone III inside the beta-barrel and found to interact with the ligand using non-conserved residues. Bla g 4 and Per a 4 are found to be cross-reactive in sera IgE binding, at least in the Singaporean Chinese population tested. A major IgE binding epitope unique to Per a 4 is found on the loops at the bottom of the beta-barrel that may aid the development of hypoallergens for immunotherapy.

  5. Allergy to guinea pigs: II Identification of specific allergens in guinea pig dust by crossed radio-immunoelectrophoresis and investigation of the possible origin.

    PubMed

    Walls, A F; Newman Taylor, A J; Longbottom, J L

    1985-11-01

    An extract of dust from the air-vent filters of a room housing guinea pigs was analysed by quantitative immunoelectrophoretic procedures and compared with extracts of various materials derived from guinea pigs. Crossed radio-immunoelectrophoresis (CRIE) of the dust, performed with sera from twenty asthmatic patients who were positive by skin testing and RAST to guinea pig extracts, identified fourteen IgE-binding constituents. Although responses varied, most sera reacted with four particular allergens, antigens 2, 3, 10 and Sl. The numbers of allergens recognized by individual patients correlated with the RAST score, but not with total serum IgE. All seventeen dust constituents detected by crossed immunoelectrophoresis (and all four major allergens), were also present in extracts of guinea pig dander, fur, saliva and urine; several of these components were absent in an epithelial extract, and there were even less in preparations of shaved pelt, serum or faeces. None of the dust extract antigens were detected in materials used in animal husbandry, dust samples from rooms without guinea pigs, or a D. pteronyssinus extract. These findings suggest that inhalant allergens may be derived predominantly from material shed from the guinea pig coat after contamination with saliva, and possibly to a lesser extent, urine. PMID:2416489

  6. Markers of tolerance development to food allergens.

    PubMed

    Ponce, M; Diesner, S C; Szépfalusi, Z; Eiwegger, T

    2016-10-01

    IgE-mediated reactions to food allergens are the most common cause of anaphylaxis in childhood. Although allergies to cow's milk, egg, or soy proteins, in contrast to peanut and tree nut allergens, resolve within the first 6 years of life in up to 60% due to natural tolerance development, this process is not well understood. At present, there is no cure or treatment for food allergy that would result in an induction of tolerance to the symptom-eliciting food. Avoidance, providing an emergency plan and education, is the standard of treatment. Oral immunotherapeutic approaches have been proven reasonable efficacy; however, they are associated with high rates of side-effects and low numbers of patients achieving tolerance. Nevertheless, mechanisms that take place during oral immunotherapy may help to understand tolerance development. On the basis of these therapeutic interventions, events like loss of basophil activation and induction of regulatory lymphocyte subsets and of blocking antibodies have been described. Their functional importance at a clinical level, however, remains to be investigated in detail. Consequently, there is eminent need to understand the process of tolerance development to food allergens and define biomarkers to develop and monitor new treatment strategies for food allergy. PMID:27286276

  7. Biotransformation Strategy To Reduce Allergens in Propolis

    PubMed Central

    Gardana, Claudio; Barbieri, Andrea; Simonetti, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Propolis (bee glue) is a resinous, sticky, dark-colored material produced by honeybees. Propolis today, due to its medicinal properties, is increasingly popular and is extensively used in food, beverages, and cosmetic products. Besides its numerous positive properties, propolis may also have adverse effects, such as, principally, allergic eczematous contact dermatitis in apiarists and in consumers with an allergic predisposition. In this study, we found appropriate conditions for removing caffeate esters, which are the main allergenic components, from raw propolis. The proposed method consists of the resuspension of propolis in a food grade solvent, followed by a biotransformation based on the cinnamoyl esterase activity of Lactobacillus helveticus. We showed that the reduction of caffeate esters by L. helveticus did not affect the content of flavonoids, which are the main bioactive molecules of propolis. Furthermore, we verified that the biotransformation of propolis did not cause a loss of antimicrobial activity. Finally, we demonstrated that the ability of L. helveticus to hydrolyze caffeate esters in propolis is strain specific. In conclusion, the proposed strategy is simple, employs food grade materials, and is effective in selectively removing allergenic molecules without affecting the bioactive fraction of propolis. This is the first study demonstrating that the allergenic caffeate esters of propolis can be eliminated by means of a bacterial biotransformation procedure. PMID:22522681

  8. Assessment of the allergenic potential of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Betts, Catherine J; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2003-04-11

    The development of novel foods, including foods derived from genetically modified plants, has generated considerable interest in the design and application of appropriate safety assurance measures. A specific focus of attention has been on allergenicity, and in particular the need to determine whether the products of novel genes introduced into food plants have the potential to cause allergic sensitisation. Among the approaches applied currently are considerations of whether a new protein has structural, sequence and/or antigenic similarities with known food allergens, and whether or not it displays resistance to digestion within a simulated gastric fluid, or by pepsin. Although such data are useful in an overall hazard assessment, they are neither individually, nor collectively, able to provide a direct evaluation of inherent sensitising potential. For this reason there is a need to develop and apply appropriate animal models that will offer a more holistic view of sensitising activity. Several methods have been suggested, but as yet none has been evaluated fully or validated. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and in this article an experimental approach using BALB/c strain mice in which animals are exposed to the test protein via systemic (intraperitoneal, or in certain circumstances, intradermal) administration is described. Inherent sensitising potential is measured as a function of induced IgE antibody responses. Experience to date is encouraging and the data available reveal that this method is able to distinguish between proteins of different allergenic potential.

  9. CCR4 in human allergen-induced late responses in the skin and lung.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Aria, Kayhan T; Wilson, Duncan; Francis, James N; Jopling, Louise A; Jacobson, Mikila R; Hodge, Martin R; Andrew, David P; Till, Stephen J; Varga, Eva-Maria; Williams, Timothy J; Pease, James E; Lloyd, Clare M; Sabroe, Ian; Durham, Stephen R

    2002-07-01

    We studied the regulation of CCR4 expression in peripheral blood and in human models of cutaneous and pulmonary allergen challenge. CCR4 expression was detectable on freshly isolated CD4+ lymphocytes and in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines derived from blood of atopic donors. Numbers of CCR4+ cells were up-regulated in T cell lines expanded in the presence of IL-4. CCR4 mRNA was absent at baseline in normal subjects in lung and skin, but present at baseline in the lung of some atopics. Baseline expression of CCR4 mRNA and protein was higher in lung vs. skin, but allergen-induced increases in CCR4 mRNA+ cells were observed in both organs. CCR4 protein+ cells were present at higher levels after allergen challenge in atopics compared to normal subjects. CCR4 may be important in the recruitment of T lymphocytes at sites of allergic inflammation, in a non-organ-specific manner.

  10. Mold Allergens in Respiratory Allergy: From Structure to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Twaroch, Teresa E; Curin, Mirela; Swoboda, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Allergic reactions to fungi were described 300 years ago, but the importance of allergy to fungi has been underestimated for a long time. Allergens from fungi mainly cause respiratory and skin symptoms in sensitized patients. In this review, we will focus on fungi and fungal allergens involved in respiratory forms of allergy, such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Fungi can act as indoor and outdoor respiratory allergen sources, and depending on climate conditions, the rates of sensitization in individuals attending allergy clinics range from 5% to 20%. Due to the poor quality of natural fungal allergen extracts, diagnosis of fungal allergy is hampered, and allergen-specific immunotherapy is rarely given. Several factors are responsible for the poor quality of natural fungal extracts, among which the influence of culture conditions on allergen contents. However, molecular cloning techniques have allowed us to isolate DNAs coding for fungal allergens and to produce a continuously growing panel of recombinant allergens for the diagnosis of fungal allergy. Moreover, technologies are now available for the preparation of recombinant and synthetic fungal allergen derivatives which can be used to develop safe vaccines for the treatment of fungal allergy. PMID:25840710

  11. Wind-pollination and the roles of pollen allergenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Songnuan, Wisuwat

    2013-12-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been an explosion of understanding of the molecular nature of major allergens contained within pollens from the most important allergenic plant species. Most major allergens belong to only a few protein families. Protein characteristics, cross-reactivity, structures, and IgE binding epitopes have been determined for several allergens. These efforts have led to significant improvements in specific immunotherapy, yet there has been little discussion about the physiological functions of these proteins. Even with large amounts of available information about allergenic proteins from pollens, the incidence of pollen allergy continuously increases worldwide. The reason for this increase is unclear and is most likely due to a combination of factors. One important culprit might be a change in the pollen itself. Knowledge about pollen biology and how pollen is changing as a result of more extreme environmental conditions might improve our understanding of the disease. This review focuses on the characteristics of plants producing allergenic pollens that are relevant to pollen allergy, including the phylogenetic relationships, pollen dispersal distances, amounts of pollen produced, amounts of protein in each type of pollen, and how allergenic proteins are released from pollens. In addition, the physiological roles of major allergenic protein families will be discussed to help us understand why some of these proteins become allergens and why GMO plants with hypoallergenic pollens may not be successful.

  12. 76 FR 14414 - Allergenic Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations to the Agency on FDA's regulatory issues..., Parasitic, and Allergenic Products, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA; (2)...

  13. Endogenous allergen upregulation: transgenic vs. traditionally bred crops.

    PubMed

    Herman, Rod A; Ladics, Gregory S

    2011-10-01

    The safety assessment for transgenic food crops currently includes an evaluation of the endogenous allergy potential (via serum IgE screening) when the non-transgenic counterpart is a commonly allergenic food. The value of this analysis in the safety assessment of transgenic crops, especially with reference to recent requests to quantify individual allergen concentrations in raw commodities, is examined. We conclude that the likelihood of upregulating an endogenous allergen due to transgenesis is no greater than from traditional breeding which has a history of safety and is largely unregulated. The potential consequences of upregulating an endogenous allergen are also unclear.

  14. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy: multiple suppressor factors at work in immune tolerance to allergens.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2014-03-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been used for more than 100 years as a desensitizing therapy for IgE-mediated allergic diseases and represents a potentially curative way of treatment. The mechanisms of action of AIT include the induction of very early desensitization of mast cells and basophils; generation of regulatory T and regulatory B (Breg) cell responses; regulation of IgE and IgG4; decreases in numbers and activity of eosinophils and mast cells in mucosal allergic tissues; and decreases in the activity of basophils in circulation. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T and effector B cells to a regulatory phenotype appears as a key event in the course of AIT and normal immune response to allergens. Recently, inducible IL-10-secreting Breg cells were also demonstrated to contribute to allergen tolerance through suppression of effector T cells and selective induction of IgG4 isotype antibodies. Allergen-specific regulatory T and Breg cells orchestrate a general immunoregulatory activity, which can be summarized as suppression of cytokines from inflammatory dendritic cells; suppression of effector TH1, TH2, and TH17 cells; suppression of allergen-specific IgE and induction of IgG4; and suppression of migration of mast cells, basophils, eosinophils, and effector T cells to tissues. A detailed knowledge of the mechanisms of AIT is not only important in designing the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases but might also find applications in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, organ transplantation, chronic infection, and cancer.

  15. Relative immunogenicity of commonly allergenic foods versus rarely allergenic and nonallergenic foods in mice.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, Neil; Thanesvorakul, Sirinart; Gangur, Venu

    2002-12-01

    Food allergies affect 6 to 8% of children and 2% of adults in the United States. For reasons that are not clear, eight types of food account for a vast majority (approximately 90%) of food-induced hypersensitivity reactions. In this study, C57Bl/6 mice were used to test the hypothesis that commonly allergenic foods are intrinsically more immunogenic than rarely allergenic or nonallergenic foods in allergy-susceptible hosts. Groups of mice (n = 4 to 5) were injected intraperitoneally with the protein extracts (plus alum as an adjuvant) from chicken eggs, peanuts, almonds, filberts-hazelnuts, walnuts, soybeans, and wheat (commonly allergenic foods) and coffee, sweet potatoes, carrots, white potatoes, cherries, lettuce, and spinach (rarely allergenic and nonallergenic foods). Primary and secondary immune responses (as measured by specific IgG1 antibody serum levels) were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Proteins from peanuts, almonds, filberts, sweet potatoes, cherries, and spinach elicited robust primary and/or secondary immune responses. Proteins from eggs, walnuts, and lettuce elicited poor primary responses but significant secondary responses. In contrast, wheat, soybeans, coffee, carrots, and white potatoes elicited barely detectable to poor primary and secondary immune responses. The order of the immunogenicity levels of these foods in mice is as follows: almonds = filberts > spinach (Rubisco) > peanuts > or = sweet potatoes > cherries > lettuce > walnuts > chicken eggs > carrots > or = white potatoes > wheat = coffee = soybeans. In summary, these data demonstrate for the first time that: (i) foods vary widely with regard to their relative immunogenicity in allergy-susceptible hosts and (ii) intrinsic immunogenicity in mice does not distinguish commonly allergenic foods from rarely allergenic or nonallergenic foods.

  16. Exposure to Inhalable, Respirable, and Ultrafine Particles in Welding Fume

    PubMed Central

    Pesch, Beate

    2012-01-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m−3 for inhalable and 1.29 mg m−3 for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m−3). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging. PMID:22539559

  17. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging. PMID:22539559

  18. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging.

  19. Immunoproteomic tools are used to identify masked allergens: Ole e 12, an allergenic isoflavone reductase from olive (Olea europaea) pollen.

    PubMed

    Castro, Lourdes; Crespo, Jesús F; Rodríguez, Julia; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Villalba, Mayte

    2015-12-01

    Proteins performing important biochemical activities in the olive tree (Olea europaea) pollen have been identified as allergens. One novel 37-kDa protein seems to be associated to the IgE-binding profile of a group of patients suffering allergy to peach and olive pollen. Three previously described olive pollen allergens exhibit very similar molecular mass. Our objective was to identify this allergen by using immunoproteomic approaches. After 2D-electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, peptide sequences from several IgE-binding spots, allowed identifying this new allergen, as well as cloning and DNA sequencing of the corresponding gene. The allergen, named Ole e 12, is a polymorphic isoflavone reductase-like protein of 308 amino acids showing 80% and 74% identity with birch and pear allergens, Bet v 6 and Pyr c 5, respectively. A prevalence of 33% in the selected population is in contrast to 4%-10% in groups of subjects suffering from pollinosis. Recombinant allergen was produced in Escherichia coli, and deeply characterised. Immunoblotting and ELISA detection as well as inhibition experiments were performed with polyclonal antisera and allergic patients' sera. The recombinant allergen retains the IgE reactivity of its natural counterpart. Close structural and immunological relationships between members of this protein family were supported by their IgG recognition in vegetable species. In summary, Ole e 12 is a minor olive pollen allergen, which gains relevance in patients allergic to peach with olive pollinosis. Proteomic approaches used to analyse this allergen provide useful tools to identify hidden allergens, relevant for several allergic populations and thus complete allergenic panels.

  20. Pressurised aerosol inhalers: the cost of misuse.

    PubMed

    King, D; Earnshaw, S M; Delaney, J C

    1991-01-01

    Bronchodilator aerosols, if used correctly, have many advantages over other therapies in patients with chronic airflow limitation caused by asthma or chronic bronchitis. The use of pressurized aerosol inhalers was examined in a district general hospital: of 57 patients on these inhalers, 39 were unable to use the inhaler effectively, and 23 had never received any advice on inhaler technique. A single demonstration of correct technique decreased the failures to 21 patients and, after two demonstrations, to ten. The cost of the misused inhalers in this relatively small population was 450 pounds, and obviously this figure escalates when the prescription for these inhalers is repeated monthly. It is also increased when the total numbers of misused inhalers in the country are accounted for. The cost in terms of finance, in these days of medical audit and drug budgets, and, more importantly, in terms of patient health, is unacceptable and can be avoided by repeated tuition of technique.

  1. Peanut Allergy, Allergen Composition, and Methods of Reducing Allergenicity: A Review.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Wang, Jin-Shui; Yang, Xiao-Jia; Lin, Dan-Hua; Gao, Yun-Fang; Su, Yin-Jie; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Yan-Jie; Zheng, Jing-Jing

    2013-01-01

    Peanut allergy affects 1-2% of the world's population. It is dangerous, and usually lifelong, and it greatly decreases the life quality of peanut-allergic individuals and their families. In a word, peanut allergy has become a major health concern worldwide. Thirteen peanut allergens are identified, and they are briefly introduced in this paper. Although there is no feasible solution to peanut allergy at present, many methods have shown great promise. This paper reviews methods of reducing peanut allergenicity, including physical methods (heat and pressure, PUV), chemical methods (tannic acid and magnetic beads), and biological methods (conventional breeding, irradiation breeding, genetic engineering, enzymatic treatment, and fermentation). PMID:26904614

  2. Peanut Allergy, Allergen Composition, and Methods of Reducing Allergenicity: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin-shui; Yang, Xiao-jia; Lin, Dan-hua; Gao, Yun-fang; Su, Yin-jie; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Yan-jie; Zheng, Jing-jing

    2013-01-01

    Peanut allergy affects 1-2% of the world's population. It is dangerous, and usually lifelong, and it greatly decreases the life quality of peanut-allergic individuals and their families. In a word, peanut allergy has become a major health concern worldwide. Thirteen peanut allergens are identified, and they are briefly introduced in this paper. Although there is no feasible solution to peanut allergy at present, many methods have shown great promise. This paper reviews methods of reducing peanut allergenicity, including physical methods (heat and pressure, PUV), chemical methods (tannic acid and magnetic beads), and biological methods (conventional breeding, irradiation breeding, genetic engineering, enzymatic treatment, and fermentation). PMID:26904614

  3. Mammalian-derived respiratory allergens - implications for diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to furry animals.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Ola B; van Hage, Marianne; Grönlund, Hans

    2014-03-01

    Furry animals cause respiratory allergies in a significant proportion of the population. A majority of all mammalian allergens are spread as airborne particles, and several have been detected in environments where furry animals are not normally kept. The repertoire of allergens from each source belongs to a restricted number of allergen families. Classification of allergen families is particularly important for the characterization of allergenicity and cross-reactivity of allergens. In fact, major mammalian allergens are taken from only three protein families, i.e. the secretoglobin, lipocalin and kallikrein families. In particular, the lipocalin superfamily harbours major allergens in all important mammalian allergen sources, and cross-reactivity between lipocalin allergens may explain cross-species sensitization between mammals. The identification of single allergen components is of importance to improve diagnosis and therapy of allergic patients using component-resolved diagnostics and allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) respectively. Major disadvantages with crude allergen extracts for these applications emphasize the benefits of careful characterization of individual allergens. Furthermore, detailed knowledge of the characteristics of an allergen is crucial to formulate attenuated allergy vaccines, e.g. hypoallergens. The diverse repertoires of individual allergens from different mammalian species influence the diagnostic potential and clinical efficacy of ASIT to furry animals. As such, detailed knowledge of individual allergens is essential for adequate clinical evaluation. This review compiles current knowledge of the allergen families of mammalian species, and discusses how this information may be used for improved diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to mammals. PMID:24041755

  4. Mammalian-derived respiratory allergens - implications for diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to furry animals.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Ola B; van Hage, Marianne; Grönlund, Hans

    2014-03-01

    Furry animals cause respiratory allergies in a significant proportion of the population. A majority of all mammalian allergens are spread as airborne particles, and several have been detected in environments where furry animals are not normally kept. The repertoire of allergens from each source belongs to a restricted number of allergen families. Classification of allergen families is particularly important for the characterization of allergenicity and cross-reactivity of allergens. In fact, major mammalian allergens are taken from only three protein families, i.e. the secretoglobin, lipocalin and kallikrein families. In particular, the lipocalin superfamily harbours major allergens in all important mammalian allergen sources, and cross-reactivity between lipocalin allergens may explain cross-species sensitization between mammals. The identification of single allergen components is of importance to improve diagnosis and therapy of allergic patients using component-resolved diagnostics and allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) respectively. Major disadvantages with crude allergen extracts for these applications emphasize the benefits of careful characterization of individual allergens. Furthermore, detailed knowledge of the characteristics of an allergen is crucial to formulate attenuated allergy vaccines, e.g. hypoallergens. The diverse repertoires of individual allergens from different mammalian species influence the diagnostic potential and clinical efficacy of ASIT to furry animals. As such, detailed knowledge of individual allergens is essential for adequate clinical evaluation. This review compiles current knowledge of the allergen families of mammalian species, and discusses how this information may be used for improved diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to mammals.

  5. [Theoretical basis and clinical benefits of dry salt inhalation therapy].

    PubMed

    Endre, László

    2015-10-11

    Dry salt inhalation (halotherapy) reproduces the microclimate of salt caves, with beneficial effect on health. Sodium chloride crystals are disrupted into very small particles (with a diameter less than 3 µm), and this powder is artificially exhaled into the air of a comfortable room (its temperature is between 20-22 °C, and the relative humidity is low). The end-concentration of the salt in the air of the room will be between 10-30 mg/m(3). The sick (or healthy) persons spend 30-60 minutes in this room, usually 10-20 times. Due to the greater osmotic pressure the inhaled salt diminishes the oedema of the bronchial mucosa, decreases its inflammation, dissolves the mucus, and makes expectoration easier and faster (expectoration of air pollution and allergens will be faster, too). It inhibits the growth of bacteria and, in some case, kills them. Phagocyte activity is also increased. It has beneficial effect on the well being of the patients, and a relaxation effect on the central nervous system. It can prevent, or at least decrease the frequency of the respiratory tract inflammations. It produces better lung function parameters, diminishes bronchial hyperreactivity, which is the sign of decreasing inflammation. Its beneficial effect is true not only in inflammation of the lower respiratory tract, but also in acute or chronic upper airways inflammations. According to the international literature it has beneficial effect for some chronic dermatological disease, too, such as psoriasis, pyoderma and atopic dermatitis. This treatment (called as Indisó) is available under medical control in Hungary, too.

  6. [Theoretical basis and clinical benefits of dry salt inhalation therapy].

    PubMed

    Endre, László

    2015-10-11

    Dry salt inhalation (halotherapy) reproduces the microclimate of salt caves, with beneficial effect on health. Sodium chloride crystals are disrupted into very small particles (with a diameter less than 3 µm), and this powder is artificially exhaled into the air of a comfortable room (its temperature is between 20-22 °C, and the relative humidity is low). The end-concentration of the salt in the air of the room will be between 10-30 mg/m(3). The sick (or healthy) persons spend 30-60 minutes in this room, usually 10-20 times. Due to the greater osmotic pressure the inhaled salt diminishes the oedema of the bronchial mucosa, decreases its inflammation, dissolves the mucus, and makes expectoration easier and faster (expectoration of air pollution and allergens will be faster, too). It inhibits the growth of bacteria and, in some case, kills them. Phagocyte activity is also increased. It has beneficial effect on the well being of the patients, and a relaxation effect on the central nervous system. It can prevent, or at least decrease the frequency of the respiratory tract inflammations. It produces better lung function parameters, diminishes bronchial hyperreactivity, which is the sign of decreasing inflammation. Its beneficial effect is true not only in inflammation of the lower respiratory tract, but also in acute or chronic upper airways inflammations. According to the international literature it has beneficial effect for some chronic dermatological disease, too, such as psoriasis, pyoderma and atopic dermatitis. This treatment (called as Indisó) is available under medical control in Hungary, too. PMID:26551167

  7. Whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposures.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jinghai; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Frazer, Dave; Castranova, Vince; McBride, Carroll; Knuckles, Travis L; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Minarchick, Valerie C; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation is the most likely exposure route for individuals working with aerosolizable engineered nano-materials (ENM). To properly perform nanoparticle inhalation toxicology studies, the aerosols in a chamber housing the experimental animals must have: 1) a steady concentration maintained at a desired level for the entire exposure period; 2) a homogenous composition free of contaminants; and 3) a stable size distribution with a geometric mean diameter < 200 nm and a geometric standard deviation σg < 2.5 (5). The generation of aerosols containing nanoparticles is quite challenging because nanoparticles easily agglomerate. This is largely due to very strong inter-particle forces and the formation of large fractal structures in tens or hundreds of microns in size (6), which are difficult to be broken up. Several common aerosol generators, including nebulizers, fluidized beds, Venturi aspirators and the Wright dust feed, were tested; however, none were able to produce nanoparticle aerosols which satisfy all criteria (5). A whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposure system was fabricated, validated and utilized for nano-TiO2 inhalation toxicology studies. Critical components: 1) novel nano-TiO2 aerosol generator; 2) 0.5 m(3) whole-body inhalation exposure chamber; and 3) monitor and control system. Nano-TiO2 aerosols generated from bulk dry nano-TiO2 powders (primary diameter of 21 nm, bulk density of 3.8 g/cm(3)) were delivered into the exposure chamber at a flow rate of 90 LPM (10.8 air changes/hr). Particle size distribution and mass concentration profiles were measured continuously with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and an electric low pressure impactor (ELPI). The aerosol mass concentration (C) was verified gravimetrically (mg/m(3)). The mass (M) of the collected particles was determined as M = (Mpost-Mpre), where Mpre and Mpost are masses of the filter before and after sampling (mg). The mass concentration was calculated as C = M

  8. Early Exposure to Respiratory Allergens by Placental Transfer and Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Macchiaverni, Patricia; Ynoue, Leandro H.; Arslanian, Christina; Verhasselt, Valérie; Condino-Neto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between allergen exposure and the onset of or protection from allergic diseases remains unclear. Many factors could be related to immunological responses, such as the age when the exposure occurs, type of allergen, timing, dose, and allergen route. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to respiratory allergens could occur in pregnancy or early life. In particular, we assessed whether Der p 1 and Blo t 5, as well as specific antibodies against these allergens, could be detected in 90 paired cord blood and colostrum samples. Der p 1 was detected in 58.6% of colostrum and 29% of cord blood samples, whereas Blot 5 was positive in 41.3% and 9.6% of the samples, respectively. Similar to specific IgA, which could be detected in all samples for both mites, specific IgG was found in a high number of colostrum samples, 93.5% and 94.8% for Dp and Bt, respectively. Although allergens were not detected in all cord blood samples, a high percentage of them (≥95%) were positive for specific IgM to both mites in cord blood samples, suggesting that neonates can be exposed and sensitized to airborne allergens during pregnancy. Many studies have attempted to correlate allergen exposure or its prevention in early infancy with the onset of or protection from allergic diseases. However, conflicting and inconsistent data do not show a clear correlation with or suggest a way to prevent allergen sensitization. Nevertheless, these unconvincing results could be better understood if the relationship with many aspects of allergen exposure after pregnancy could be clarified. Thus, it is necessary to address basic issues related to allergen exposure, including the development of reproducible, standardized and reliable methods, and to determine how and where the exposure occurs. PMID:26398234

  9. Hierarchy and molecular properties of house dust mite allergens.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Wayne R

    2015-10-01

    The allergenic load of house dust mite allergy is largely constituted by a few proteins with a hierarchical pattern of allergenicity. The serodominant specificities are the group 1&2 and the group 23 faecal allergens. The collective IgE binding to the group 1&2 allergens can measure unequivocal HDM sensitisation better than HDM extracts although discrepancies have been found in regions with complex acarofauna suggesting a need to investigate the specificity with allergen components. The group 4, 5, 7&21 allergens that each induce responses in about 40% of subjects are mid-tier allergens accounting for most of the remaining IgE binding. Their titres are proportional to the concomitant responses to Der p1&2. Group 2 allergen variants have different antibody binding. Body proteins only occasionally induce sensitisation although a higher prevalence of binding by atopic dermatitis patients provides a new avenue of research. A broad spectrum of IgE binding has been associated with diverse symptoms but not with the severity of asthma which is associated with low IgG antibody. Some allergens such as the group 14 large lipid binding proteins and the recently described proteins Der f 24-33, need further investigation but with the cognoscence that other denominated allergens have been found to be minor sensitisers by comparative quantitative analyses. Scabies is a confounder for diagnosis with extracts, inducing cross-reactive antibodies with Der p 4&20 as is seafood allergy with cross reactivity to Der p 10 a minor HDM allergen. The HDM genome sequence can now be used to verify allelic and paralogous variations. PMID:26433526

  10. Modulation of an allergic immune response via the mucosal route in a murine model of inhalative type-I allergy.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, U; Jahn-Schmid, B; Repa, A; Kraft, D; Ebner, C

    1999-01-01

    A murine model of aerosol inhalation, leading to sensitization to birch pollen (BP) and its major allergen Bet v 1, was established in order to try to influence type-I allergic immune responses via the mucosal route. We previously demonstrated that simultaneous inhalation of BP and cholera toxin, a potent mucosal adjuvant, induced a Th1-like immune response to the allergen in naive mice and modulated allergic immune responses in sensitized mice. In contrast to cholera holotoxin, mucosal application of the cholera B subunit (CTB) conjugated to antigen has been shown to induce peripheral tolerance in certain models of Th1-based autoimmune diseases. In the present study we investigated the potential of such an antigen delivery system to suppress Th2-based, allergic immune responses. Mucosal administration of CTB/Bet v 1 conjugates prior to sensitization led to significantly increased allergen-specific IgE/IgG1 and IgG2a antibody levels and cytokine production (IL-5, IFN-gamma) in vitro. Thus, CTB coupled to Bet v 1 acted as an adjuvant rather than a tolerogen. On the other hand we noted that mucosal application of CTB coupled to ovalbumin led to marked suppression of antigen-specific IgE antibody levels and IL-5 production in vitro and thereby restricted allergic sensitization. These results indicated that the effects of CTB/antigen conjugates depended on the nature of the antigen. In contrast to Bet v 1 coupled to CTB, nasal as well as oral application of low doses of unconjugated, Bet v 1 prior to aerosol sensitization inhibited allergen-specific antibody responses of all isotypes, cutaneous type-I skin tests in vivo as well as allergen-specific lymphoproliferative responses and cytokine production (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IFN-gamma) in vitro, suggesting that both T- and B-cell tolerance to the allergen were induced. Taken together, mucosal tolerance induction as well as the use of certain transmucosal antigen delivery systems might be promising new strategies to

  11. "Trying, But Failing" - The Role of Inhaler Technique and Mode of Delivery in Respiratory Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Braido, Fulvio; Chrystyn, Henry; Baiardini, Ilaria; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; van der Molen, Thys; Dandurand, Ronald J; Chisholm, Alison; Carter, Victoria; Price, David

    2016-01-01

    Inhaled therapies are the backbone of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management, helping to target therapy at the airways. Adherence to prescribed treatment is necessary to ensure achievement of the clinician's desired therapeutic effect. In the case of inhaled therapies, this requires patients' acceptance of their need for inhaled therapy together with successful mastery of the inhaler technique specific to their device(s). This article reviews a number of challenges and barriers that inhaled mode of delivery can pose to optimum adherence-to therapy initiation and, thereafter, to successful implementation and persistence. The potential effects on adherence of different categories of devices, their use in multiplicity, and the mixing of device categories are discussed. Common inhaler errors identified by the international Implementing Helping Asthma in Real People (iHARP) study are summarized, and adherence intervention opportunities for health care professionals are offered. Better knowledge of common errors can help practicing clinicians identify their occurrence among patients and prompt remedial actions, such as tailored education, inhaler technique retraining, and/or shared decision making with patients regarding suitable alternatives. Optimizing existing therapy delivery, or switching to a suitable alternative, can help avoid unnecessary escalation of treatment and health care resources. PMID:27587316

  12. High-fat diet promotes lung fibrosis and attenuates airway eosinophilia after exposure to cockroach allergen in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiao Na; Greenberg, Yana; Hosseinkhani, M. Reza; Long, Eric K.; Bahaie, Nooshin S.; Rao, Amrita; Ha, Sung Gil; Rao, Savita P.; Bernlohr, David A.; Sriramarao, P.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for asthma but the mechanistic basis for this association is not well understood. In the current study, the impact of obesity on lung inflammatory responses after allergen exposure was investigated. C57BL/6 mice maintained on a high-fat diet (HFD) or a normal diet (ND) after weaning were sensitized and challenged with cockroach allergen (CRA). Airway inflammation was assessed based on inflammatory cell recruitment, measurement of lung Th1-Th2 cytokines, chemokines, eicosanoids, and other proinflammatory mediators as well as airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). CRA-challenged mice fed a HFD exhibited significantly decreased allergen-induced airway eosinophilia along with reduced lung IL-5, IL-13, LTC4, CCL11, and CCL2 levels as well as reduced mucus secretion and smooth muscle mass compared to ND fed mice. However, allergen-challenged HFD fed mice demonstrated significantly increased PAI-1 and reduced PGE2 levels in the lung relative to corresponding ND fed mice. Interestingly, saline-exposed HFD fed mice demonstrated elevated baseline levels of TGF-α1, arginase-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and lung collagen expression associated with decreased lung function compared to corresponding ND fed mice. These studies indicate that a HFD inhibits airway eosinophilia while altering levels of PAI-1 and PGE2 in response to CRA in mice. Further, a HFD can lead to the development of lung fibrosis even in the absence of allergen exposure which could be due to innate elevated levels of specific profibrotic factors, potentially affecting lung function during asthma. PMID:24102347

  13. Inhalation therapy in mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Maccari, Juçara Gasparetto; Teixeira, Cassiano; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Savi, Augusto; Dexheimer-Neto, Felippe Leopoldo; Knorst, Marli Maria

    2015-01-01

    Patients with obstructive lung disease often require ventilatory support via invasive or noninvasive mechanical ventilation, depending on the severity of the exacerbation. The use of inhaled bronchodilators can significantly reduce airway resistance, contributing to the improvement of respiratory mechanics and patient-ventilator synchrony. Although various studies have been published on this topic, little is known about the effectiveness of the bronchodilators routinely prescribed for patients on mechanical ventilation or about the deposition of those drugs throughout the lungs. The inhaled bronchodilators most commonly used in ICUs are beta adrenergic agonists and anticholinergics. Various factors might influence the effect of bronchodilators, including ventilation mode, position of the spacer in the circuit, tube size, formulation, drug dose, severity of the disease, and patient-ventilator synchrony. Knowledge of the pharmacological properties of bronchodilators and the appropriate techniques for their administration is fundamental to optimizing the treatment of these patients. PMID:26578139

  14. Two Allergen Model Reveals Complex Relationship Between IgE Cross-Linking and Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Handlogten, Michael W.; Deak, Peter E.; Bilgicer, Basar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Allergy is an immune response to complex mixtures of multiple allergens yet current models use a single synthetic allergen. Multiple allergens were modeled using two well-defined tetravalent allergens each specific for a distinct IgE thus enabling a systematic approach to evaluate the effect of each allergen and percent of allergen specific IgE on mast cell degranulation. We found the overall degranulation response caused by two allergens is additive for low allergen concentrations or low percent specific IgE, does not change for moderate allergen concentrations with moderate to high percent specific IgE, and is reduced for high allergen concentrations with moderate to high percent specific IgE. These results provide further evidence that supra-optimal IgE cross-linking decreases the degranulation response and establishes the two allergen model as a relevant experimental system to elucidate mast cell degranulation mechanisms. PMID:25308278

  15. Recognition and prevention of inhalant abuse.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Carrie E; Loomis, Glenn A

    2003-09-01

    Inhalant abuse is a prevalent and often overlooked form of substance abuse in adolescents. Survey results consistently show that nearly 20 percent of children in middle school and high school have experimented with inhaled substances. The method of delivery is inhalation of a solvent from its container, a soaked rag, or a bag. Solvents include almost any household cleaning agent or propellant, paint thinner, glue, and lighter fluid. Inhalant abuse typically can cause a euphoric feeling and can become addictive. Acute effects include sudden sniffing death syndrome, asphyxia, and serious injuries (e.g., falls, burns, frostbite). Chronic inhalant abuse can damage cardiac, renal, hepatic, and neurologic systems. Inhalant abuse during pregnancy can cause fetal abnormalities. Diagnosis of inhalant abuse is difficult and relies almost entirely on a thorough history and a high index of suspicion. No specific laboratory tests confirm solvent inhalation. Treatment is generally supportive, because there are no reversal agents for inhalant intoxication. Education of young persons and their parents is essential to decrease experimentation with inhalants. PMID:13678134

  16. A Protein Allergen Microarray Detects Specific IgE to Pollen Surface, Cytoplasmic, and Commercial Allergen Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Vigh-Conrad, Katinka A.; Conrad, Donald F.; Preuss, Daphne

    2010-01-01

    Background Current diagnostics for allergies, such as skin prick and radioallergosorbent tests, do not allow for inexpensive, high-throughput screening of patients. Additionally, extracts used in these methods are made from washed pollen that lacks pollen surface materials that may contain allergens. Methodology/Principal Findings We sought to develop a high-throughput assay to rapidly measure allergen-specific IgE in sera and to explore the relative allergenicity of different pollen fractions (i.e. surface, cytoplasmic, commercial extracts). To do this, we generated a protein microarray containing surface, cytoplasmic, and commercial extracts from 22 pollen species, commercial extracts from nine non-pollen allergens, and five recombinant allergenic proteins. Pollen surface and cytoplasmic fractions were prepared by extraction into organic solvents and aqueous buffers, respectively. Arrays were incubated with <25 uL of serum from 176 individuals and bound IgE was detected by indirect immunofluorescence, providing a high-throughput measurement of IgE. We demonstrated that the allergen microarray is a reproducible method to measure allergen-specific IgE in small amounts of sera. Using this tool, we demonstrated that specific IgE clusters according to the phylogeny of the allergen source. We also showed that the pollen surface, which has been largely overlooked in the past, contained potent allergens. Although, as a class, cytoplasmic fractions obtained by our pulverization/precipitation method were comparable to commercial extracts, many individual allergens showed significant differences. Conclusions/Significance These results support the hypothesis that protein microarray technology is a useful tool for both research and in the clinic. It could provide a more efficient and less painful alternative to traditionally used skin prick tests, making it economically feasible to compare allergen sensitivity of different populations, monitor individual responses over time

  17. *Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens fol...

  18. An overview of fruit allergy and the causative allergens.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A K G; Venkatesh, Y P

    2015-11-01

    Plant allergens, being one of the most widespread allergenic substances, are hard to avoid. Hence, their identification and characterization are of prime importance for the diagnosis and treatment of food allergy. The reported allergies to fruits mainly evoke oral allergy syndrome caused by the presence of cross-reactive IgE to certain pollens and thus, allergy to fruits has also been linked to particular pollens. Many fruit allergies are being studied for their causative allergens, and are being characterized. Some tropical or exotic fruits are responsible for region-specific allergies for which only limited information is available, and generally lack allergen characterization. From a survey of the literature on fruit allergy, it is clear that some common fruits (apple, peach, musk melon, kiwi fruit, cherry, grape, strawberry, banana, custard apple, mango and pomegranate) and their allergens appear to be at the center of current research on food allergy. The present review focuses on common fruits reported as allergenic and their identified allergens; a brief description of allergens from six rare/tropical fruits is also covered.

  19. Enzymatic treatment of peanut kernels to reduce allergen levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the use of enzymatic treatment to reduce peanut allergens in peanut kernel by processing conditions, such as, pretreatment with heat and proteolysis at different enzyme concentrations and treatment times. Two major peanut allergens, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, were used as indicator...

  20. An overview of fruit allergy and the causative allergens.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A K G; Venkatesh, Y P

    2015-11-01

    Plant allergens, being one of the most widespread allergenic substances, are hard to avoid. Hence, their identification and characterization are of prime importance for the diagnosis and treatment of food allergy. The reported allergies to fruits mainly evoke oral allergy syndrome caused by the presence of cross-reactive IgE to certain pollens and thus, allergy to fruits has also been linked to particular pollens. Many fruit allergies are being studied for their causative allergens, and are being characterized. Some tropical or exotic fruits are responsible for region-specific allergies for which only limited information is available, and generally lack allergen characterization. From a survey of the literature on fruit allergy, it is clear that some common fruits (apple, peach, musk melon, kiwi fruit, cherry, grape, strawberry, banana, custard apple, mango and pomegranate) and their allergens appear to be at the center of current research on food allergy. The present review focuses on common fruits reported as allergenic and their identified allergens; a brief description of allergens from six rare/tropical fruits is also covered. PMID:26549334

  1. [Recombinant allergens. For routine use or still only science?].

    PubMed

    Schmid-Grendelmeier, P

    2010-11-01

    Component-resolved diagnosis of allergies allows disease-specific patterns of sensitization in some conditions such as allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis ABPA). By determination of IgE against important pollen allergens such as Bet v 1, Ole e 1 or Phl p1/Phl p 5, more precise guidance for allergen-specific immunotherapy may be achieved, as pollen extracts contain mostly these major allergens. Sensitizations against minor allergens such as profilins or polcalcins influence the outcome of IgE measurements against full allergen sources, but are often of limited clinical relevance. In food allergy, frequent cross reactivity between pollens such as birch pollen via Bet v 1/PR10 proteins can be identified. Sensitization against some storage proteins such as peanut (Ara h 2) or lipid transfer proteins of peach (Pru p 3) or hazelnut (Cor a 8) may indicate an increased risk of severe anaphylactic reactions. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis, unclear sensitizations against latex or double-positivity in insect allergy are other useful indications for component-resolved diagnosis. Microarray-based allergen chip diagnosis makes possible today the detection of IgE against more than 100 allergens in tiny amounts of serum and is very promising, but still needs evaluation and optimization in regard to allergen selection and sensitivity.

  2. Mechanisms of immune tolerance to allergens in children.

    PubMed

    Kucuksezer, Umut C; Ozdemir, Cevdet; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2013-12-01

    Because the prevalence of allergic diseases has significantly increased in recent years, understanding the causes and mechanisms of these disorders is of high importance, and intense investigations are ongoing. Current knowledge pinpoints immune tolerance mechanisms as indispensable for healthy immune response to allergens in daily life. It is evident that development and maintenance of allergens-pecific T cell tolerance is of vital importance for a healthy immune response to allergens. Such tolerance can be gained spontaneously by dose-dependent exposures to allergens in nature or by allergen-specific immunotherapy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy induces regulatory T cells with the capacity to secrete interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β, limits activation of effector cells of allergic inflammation (such as mast cells and basophils), and switches antibody isotype from IgE to the noninflammatory type IgG4. Although allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only method of tolerance induction in allergic individuals, several factors, such as long duration of treatment, compliance problems, and life-threatening side effects, have limited widespread applicability of this immunomodulatory treatment. To overcome these limitations, current research focuses on the introduction of allergens in more efficient and safer ways. Defining the endotypes and phenotypes of allergic diseases might provide the ability to select ideal patients, and novel biomarkers might ensure new custom-tailored therapy modalities.

  3. Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Allergen Exposure: Screening For Sensitization Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: An in vitro assay to identify respiratory sensitizers will provide a rapid screen and reduce animal use. The study goal was to identify biomarkers that differentiate allergen versus non-allergen responses following an acute exposure. Methods: Female BALB/c mice rec...

  4. Nanoparticulate Adjuvants and Delivery Systems for Allergen Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    De Souza Rebouças, Juliana; Esparza, Irene; Ferrer, Marta; Sanz, María Luisa; Irache, Juan Manuel; Gamazo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades, significant progress in research and clinics has been made to offer possible innovative therapeutics for the management of allergic diseases. However, current allergen immunotherapy shows limitations concerning the long-term efficacy and safety due to local side effects and risk of anaphylaxis. Thus, effective and safe vaccines with reduced dose of allergen have been developed using adjuvants. Nevertheless, the use of adjuvants still has several disadvantages, which limits its use in human vaccines. In this context, several novel adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy are currently being investigated and developed. Currently, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems have received much interest as potential adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy. It has been demonstrated that the incorporation of allergens into a delivery system plays an important role in the efficacy of allergy vaccines. Several nanoparticles-based delivery systems have been described, including biodegradable and nondegradable polymeric carriers. Therefore, this paper provides an overview of the current adjuvants used for allergen immunotherapy. Furthermore, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems are focused as a novel and promising strategy for allergy vaccines. PMID:22496608

  5. Protein families: implications for allergen nomenclature, standardisation and specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Breiteneder, Heimo

    2009-01-01

    Allergens are embedded into the protein universe as members of large families and superfamilies of related proteins which is a direct consequence of their shared evolution. The classification of allergens by protein families offers a valuable frame of reference that allows the design of experiments to study cross-reactivity and allergenic potency of proteins. Information on protein family membership also complements the current official IUIS allergen nomenclature. All presently known allergens belong to one of 140 (1.4%) of the 10,340 protein families currently described by version 23.0 of the Pfam database. This is indicative of a strong bias among allergens towards certain protein architectures that are able to induce an IgE response in an atopic immune system. However, even small variations in the structure of a protein alter its immunological characteristics. Various isoforms of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 were shown to possess highly variant immunogenic and allergenic properties. Ber e 1 and SFA8, two 2S albumins, were revealed to display differential capacities to polarise an immune response. Such data will be exploited in the future for the design of allergy vaccines.

  6. Mechanisms of immune tolerance to allergens in children

    PubMed Central

    Kucuksezer, Umut C.; Ozdemir, Cevdet; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2013-01-01

    Because the prevalence of allergic diseases has significantly increased in recent years, understanding the causes and mechanisms of these disorders is of high importance, and intense investigations are ongoing. Current knowledge pinpoints immune tolerance mechanisms as indispensable for healthy immune response to allergens in daily life. It is evident that development and maintenance of allergens-pecific T cell tolerance is of vital importance for a healthy immune response to allergens. Such tolerance can be gained spontaneously by dose-dependent exposures to allergens in nature or by allergen-specific immunotherapy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy induces regulatory T cells with the capacity to secrete interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β, limits activation of effector cells of allergic inflammation (such as mast cells and basophils), and switches antibody isotype from IgE to the noninflammatory type IgG4. Although allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only method of tolerance induction in allergic individuals, several factors, such as long duration of treatment, compliance problems, and life-threatening side effects, have limited widespread applicability of this immunomodulatory treatment. To overcome these limitations, current research focuses on the introduction of allergens in more efficient and safer ways. Defining the endotypes and phenotypes of allergic diseases might provide the ability to select ideal patients, and novel biomarkers might ensure new custom-tailored therapy modalities. PMID:24416044

  7. Nanoparticulate adjuvants and delivery systems for allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    De Souza Rebouças, Juliana; Esparza, Irene; Ferrer, Marta; Sanz, María Luisa; Irache, Juan Manuel; Gamazo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades, significant progress in research and clinics has been made to offer possible innovative therapeutics for the management of allergic diseases. However, current allergen immunotherapy shows limitations concerning the long-term efficacy and safety due to local side effects and risk of anaphylaxis. Thus, effective and safe vaccines with reduced dose of allergen have been developed using adjuvants. Nevertheless, the use of adjuvants still has several disadvantages, which limits its use in human vaccines. In this context, several novel adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy are currently being investigated and developed. Currently, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems have received much interest as potential adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy. It has been demonstrated that the incorporation of allergens into a delivery system plays an important role in the efficacy of allergy vaccines. Several nanoparticles-based delivery systems have been described, including biodegradable and nondegradable polymeric carriers. Therefore, this paper provides an overview of the current adjuvants used for allergen immunotherapy. Furthermore, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems are focused as a novel and promising strategy for allergy vaccines.

  8. Tannic acid as a means to remove peanut allergens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tannic acid (TA) is a polyphenol (commonly found in tea and coffee) that has been used as a treatment for toxic substances and carpet allergens. The objectives were to determine the efficacy of TA’s binding and removal of peanut allergens from peanut butter extracts as insoluble precipitates, and to...

  9. Current Overview of Allergens of Plant Pathogenesis Related Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mau; Singh, Rashmi Prabha; Kushwaha, Gajraj Singh; Iqbal, Naseer; Singh, Avinash; Kaushik, Sanket; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis related (PR) proteins are one of the major sources of plant derived allergens. These proteins are induced by the plants as a defense response system in stress conditions like microbial and insect infections, wounding, exposure to harsh chemicals, and atmospheric conditions. However, some plant tissues that are more exposed to environmental conditions like UV irradiation and insect or fungal attacks express these proteins constitutively. These proteins are mostly resistant to proteases and most of them show considerable stability at low pH. Many of these plant pathogenesis related proteins are found to act as food allergens, latex allergens, and pollen allergens. Proteins having similar amino acid sequences among the members of PR proteins may be responsible for cross-reactivity among allergens from diverse plants. This review analyzes the different pathogenesis related protein families that have been reported as allergens. Proteins of these families have been characterized in regard to their biological functions, amino acid sequence, and cross-reactivity. The three-dimensional structures of some of these allergens have also been evaluated to elucidate the antigenic determinants of these molecules and to explain the cross-reactivity among the various allergens. PMID:24696647

  10. Reducing peanut allergens by high pressure combined with polyphenol oxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been shown to reduce major peanut allergens (Ara h 1 and Ara h 2). Because high pressure (HP) can increase enzyme activity, we postulated that further reduction of peanut allergens can be achieved through HP combined with PPO. Peanut extracts were treated with each of th...

  11. Recombinant proteins in newly developed foods: identification of allergenic activity.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, S B; Reese, G

    1997-01-01

    A number of agricultural crops are being modified for various purposes using recombinant DNA technology. Since transferred genes may code for proteins that are ordinarily not present, there is concern about the potential allergenicity of these new varieties. The safety evaluation of transgenic foods is relatively easy when the allergenicity of the gene source is known. Recombinant allergens in genetically engineered or altered foods can be identified using traditional immunological assays such as RAST or ELISA inhibition or immunoblotting procedures. Our recent studies of two corn proteins (10 kD and HSZ) used to alter grain amino acid composition and of transgenic soybeans with an altered fatty acid profile are examples of this approach. Both 10 kD and HSZ did not bind IgE antibodies from sera of corn-reactive subjects by immunoblotting. Studies of wild-type and transgenic soybeans with high oleic acidic content by RAST inhibition and immunoblotting with pooled sera of soy-allergic individuals demonstrated no difference in the allergen content of both extracts. In contrast to these studies, a recent investigation by Nordlee et al. (1996) of transgenic soybeans which expressed a methionine/cysteine-rich protein from Brazil nuts identified this protein as a major Brazil nut allergen. These studies indicate that, when the gene source is from a known allergen or if the recipient contains allergens, it is possible to determine whether the allergen content of the transgenic line is altered relative to the nontransgenic varieties.

  12. Stability of food allergens to digestion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Astwood, J D; Leach, J N; Fuchs, R L

    1996-10-01

    An integral part of the safety assessment of genetically modified plants is consideration of possible human health effects, especially food allergy. Prospective testing for allergenicity of proteins obtained from sources with no prior history of causing allergy has been difficult because of the absence of valid methods and models. Food allergens may share physicochemical properties that distinguish them from nonallergens, properties that may be used as a tool to predict the inherent allergenicity of proteins newly introduced into the food supply by genetic engineering. One candidate property is stability to digestion. We have systematically evaluated the stability of food allergens that are active via the gastrointestinal tract in a simple model of gastric digestion, emphasizing the major allergens of plant-derived foods such as legumes (peanuts and soybean). Important food allergens were stable to digestion in the gastric model (simulated gastric fluid). For example, soybean beta-conglycinin was stable for 60 min. In contrast, nonallergenic food proteins, such as spinach ribulose bis-phosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, were digested in simulated gastric fluid within 15 sec. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that food allergens must exhibit sufficient gastric stability to reach the intestinal mucosa where absorption and sensitization (development of atopy) can occur. Thus, the stability to digestion is a significant and valid parameter that distinguishes food allergens from nonallergens.

  13. Allergic contact dermatitis in dermatologic surgery: review of common allergens.

    PubMed

    Butler, Lara; Mowad, Christen

    2013-01-01

    With the growing number of dermatologic surgeries performed each year comes an increased potential for patient exposure and sensitization to allergens. Patients are exposed to many well-documented allergens in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative settings during surgery. Postoperative skin complications of allergic contact dermatitis increase health care costs and cause patient suffering. Early recognition, diagnosis, and treatment by dermatologic surgeons are essential to decrease morbidity related to medically necessary and elective cutaneous surgeries. While a specific standard screening panel for cutaneous surgery-related allergens is not well established, we propose several categories of allergens be strongly considered and tested if a patient is suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis in an attempt to reveal pertinent allergens and prevent future exposures.

  14. Aspects of food processing and its effect on allergen structure.

    PubMed

    Paschke, Angelika

    2009-08-01

    The article summarizes current physical and chemical methods in food processing as storage, preparation, separation, isolation or purification and thermal application on the one hand as well as enzymatic treatment on the other and their impact on the properties of food proteins. Novel methods of food processing like high pressure, electric field application or irradiation and their impact on food allergens are presented. The EU project REDALL (Reduced Allergenicity of Processed Foods, Containing Animal Allergens: QLK1-CT-2002-02687) showed that by a combination of enzyme and heat treatment the allergic potential of hen's egg decreased about 100 fold. Clinical reactions do not appear anymore. An AiF-FV 12024 N project worked with fruits like mango, lychee and apple. Processed mango and lychee had no change in allergenic potential during heating while e. g. canning. Apple almost lost its allergenic potential after pasteurization in juice production.

  15. Novel developments in the mechanisms of immune tolerance to allergens

    PubMed Central

    Eiwegger, Thomas; Gruber, Saskia; Szépfalusi, Zsolt; Akdis, Cezmi A.

    2012-01-01

    Allergy is the result of a disbalanced immune response to environmental innocuous antigens. Despite of accumulating data to define the pathomechanisms that take place in case of allergic diseases a detailed understanding of sequence of events that lead to the "normal" scenario of tolerance development are still under debate. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only causal treatment of allergic diseases. It modifies the immune response to a particular antigen to achieve tolerance against the symptom-causing allergen. This process is considered to mirror physiological peripheral tolerance induction. A number of immunological changes have been described to occur under allergen immunotherapy, including the generation of allergen-specific regulatory T cells, the induction of allergen-specific IgG4, an increase in the Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio and decreased activation and function of effector cells such as mast cells, basophils and eosinophils. PMID:23095863

  16. Paprika rhinoconjunctivitis case reveals new occupational Capsicum allergens.

    PubMed

    Airaksinen, Liisa; Riekki, Riitta; Vuokko, Aki; Puustinen, Anne

    2015-07-01

    No allergens related to paprika or cayenne respiratory allergy have been identified thus far. We describe a previously healthy 28-year woman who developed work-related rhinoconjunctivitis after four years of kebab-restaurant work. The allergy was studied using skin prick tests, serum specific IgE and nasal provocation tests. Specific IgE protein reactions were studied by Western blot analysis. Paprika, cayenne and curry allergens were identified from the strongest immunoblot bands using tandem mass spectrometry. A positive skin prick test, high specific IgE and positive nasal provocation test confirmed occupational rhinoconjunctivitis from Capsicum spices. Defensin J1 and Vicilin were identified as major paprika and cayenne allergens in this case. Vicilin was detected also from the curry ingredients. Two new occupational respiratory allergens from the Capsicum species were identified. These differ from previously reported bell pepper allergens. We emphasize that substantial spice handling at work poses an allergy risk.

  17. [Current aspects in risk assessment of allergen traces in foodstuffs].

    PubMed

    Richter, K; Rubin, D; Lampen, A

    2012-03-01

    In contrast to usual ingredients in processed packaged foodstuffs, there are no suitable and binding regulations for the labeling of unintentional allergen traces in these foods as yet. This situation is unsatisfactory in regard to the fact that even traces of undeclared "hidden" allergens can constitute a considerable health risk for food allergic consumers. Furthermore, the unintentional cross-contact (cross-contamination) of allergens is also an issue in regard to food manufacturer product liability and due diligence. Therefore, stakeholders consider imperative need for the scientific determination of maximum tolerable levels of allergen traces in order to establish thresholds for legally binding food labeling. In addition to conventional toxicological risk assessments, the risk assessment of allergen traces that would be necessary in this context nowadays also incorporates modern approaches such as benchmark procedures and probabilistic modeling and methods. The scientific debate concerning the establishment of safe threshold levels continues, and a consensus must still be reached.

  18. Paprika rhinoconjunctivitis case reveals new occupational Capsicum allergens.

    PubMed

    Airaksinen, Liisa; Riekki, Riitta; Vuokko, Aki; Puustinen, Anne

    2015-07-01

    No allergens related to paprika or cayenne respiratory allergy have been identified thus far. We describe a previously healthy 28-year woman who developed work-related rhinoconjunctivitis after four years of kebab-restaurant work. The allergy was studied using skin prick tests, serum specific IgE and nasal provocation tests. Specific IgE protein reactions were studied by Western blot analysis. Paprika, cayenne and curry allergens were identified from the strongest immunoblot bands using tandem mass spectrometry. A positive skin prick test, high specific IgE and positive nasal provocation test confirmed occupational rhinoconjunctivitis from Capsicum spices. Defensin J1 and Vicilin were identified as major paprika and cayenne allergens in this case. Vicilin was detected also from the curry ingredients. Two new occupational respiratory allergens from the Capsicum species were identified. These differ from previously reported bell pepper allergens. We emphasize that substantial spice handling at work poses an allergy risk. PMID:25944018

  19. Occurrence of indoor allergens in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, H.; Gravesen, S.; Lind, P.; Schwartz, B.; Ashoor, A.A.; Maglad, S.

    1985-06-01

    Investigations on indoor airborne allergens in Saudi Arabia were performed by mold cultures and dust analyses by counter-current immunoelectrophoresis. Twenty fungal genera were isolated, with Aspergillus as the most often encountered. Most of the dust-bound fungi found are ubiquitous and common. Antibodies against Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, cat- cow- and rat dander, and Cynodon dactylon pollen were used in the dust analyses. Animal antigens were found in five of the ten dust samples. House dust mites were extraordinarily rare. Pollen of Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda grass) was present in nearly all the samples, and in a concurrent clinical study this antigen was found to be the most common cause of perennial rhinitis.

  20. How allergenic are hypoallergenic infant formulae?

    PubMed

    Rugo, E; Wahl, R; Wahn, U

    1992-06-01

    In a comparative study six different protein hydrolysates, marketed as 'hypoallergenic' infant formulae were investigated by skin prick tests, RAST, RAST inhibition and titrated provocation tests. When hydrolysates containing a high percentage of larger peptides were found to have the highest capacity to induce positive skin tests, provocation tests and to bind to human serum IgE antibodies of cow's milk allergic children. Casein hydrolysates appeared to have the least residual allergenic activity. We recommend that 'hypoallergenic' formulae should be tested in each case, before being prescribed to cow's milk sensitive children.

  1. [New pets, allergens and allergic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Brajon, D; Waton, J; Schmutz, J-L; Barbaud, A

    2014-10-01

    The number of household pets increased greatly during the twentieth century, with the numbers of new pets (NP, i.e. any pet other than cats and dogs) rising especially sharply over the last decade. Contact with such animals, whose owners do not always know how to look after them properly, expose the population to new risks such as trauma, infection and allergy. While the most common allergies are respiratory, allergic skin reactions, both immediate and delayed, may also result from contact with these new allergens. The animal itself or its environment may be the cause. Herein, we review NPs and reports of allergic dermatitis associated with them.

  2. Comparison of combination inhalers vs inhaled corticosteroids alone in moderate persistent asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel K C; Jackson, Catherine M; Currie, Graeme P; Cockburn, Wendy J; Lipworth, Brian J

    2003-01-01

    Aims Inhalers combining long acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (LABA) and corticosteroids (ICS) are indicated at Step 3 of current asthma guidelines. We evaluated the relative effects of LABA + ICS combination vs ICS alone on pulmonary function, bronchoprotection, acute salbutamol recovery following methacholine bronchial challenge, and surrogate inflammatory markers in patients with moderate persistent asthma. Methods Twenty-nine patients with mean FEV1 (± SEM) of 78 ± 3% predicted completed a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, cross-over study. Patients received either 4 weeks of budesonide 400 µg + formoterol 12 µg (BUD + FM) combination twice daily followed by 1 week of BUD 400 µg alone twice daily, or 4 weeks of fluticasone propionate 250 µg + salmeterol 50 µg (FP + SM) combination twice daily followed by 1 week of FP 250 µg alone twice daily. Measurements were made at baseline and following each randomized treatment. Results FEV1 increase from pretreatment baseline as mean (± SEM) % predicted was significantly higher (P < 0.05) for BUD + FM (8 ± 1%) vs BUD (2 ± 1%), and for FP + SM (8 ± 1%) vs FP (2 ± 1%). The fall in FEV1 following methacholine challenge as percentage change from prechallenge baseline FEV1 was not significantly different in all four groups; BUD + FM (22 ± 1%), BUD (24 ± 1%), FP + SM (23 ± 1%) and FP (23 ± 1%). Salbutamol recovery over 30 min following methacholine challenge as area under curve (AUC %.min) was significantly blunted (P < 0.05) with BUD + FM (486.7 ± 35.5) vs BUD (281.1 ± 52.8), and with FP + SM (553.1 ± 34.1) vs FP (368.3 ± 46.7). There were no significant differences between respective combination inhalers or between respective ICS alone. Decreases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) and serum eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) from baseline were not significantly different between treatments. Conclusions Combination inhalers improve pulmonary function without potentiating anti-inflammatory effects on

  3. Inhalation therapy: technological milestones in asthma treatment.

    PubMed

    Dalby, Richard; Suman, Julie

    2003-07-18

    The humble origins of the propellant driven metered dose inhaler, as a response to a child's enquiry, initiated an industry which supplies approximately a half billion inhalers globally for the treatment of asthma. These inhalers fall into three major groups: nebulizers; propellant driven metered dose inhalers and dry powder inhalers. Each requires drug formulation, metering and device technology to be successful. In recent years there have been several new developments in the field including auxiliary systems to improve drug delivery from the device to the patient and new categories of device, notably single breath aqueous systems. As device technology improves and our understanding of the disease leads to new drugs the only barrier to therapy is the patient. Patient training and compliance will continue to be important factors in the success, or failure, of inhaled therapy and the role of health care professionals will depend on who sponsors their intervention.

  4. Reduction of allergenicity of irradiated ovalbumin in ovalbumin-allergic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Lee, Soo-Young; Kang, Il-Jun; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2007-11-01

    Egg allergy is one of the most serious of the immediate hypersensitivity reactions to foods. Such an allergic disorder is mediated by IgE antibodies stimulated by T-helper type 2 (Th2) lymphocytes. This study was undertaken to evaluate changes of allergenicity and cytokine profiles by exposure of irradiated ovalbumin (OVA), a major allergen of egg white, in the OVA-allergic mice model. OVA solutions (2 mg/ml in 0.01 M phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were gamma-irradiated to 50 and 100 kGy. The allergenicity in the OVA-allergy-induced mice model was remarkably reduced when challenged with irradiated OVA. Cultures of spleen cells harvested from OVA-sensitized mice showed a significant decrease in Th2 cytokine levels of ILs-4 and -5 with a concomitant increase in Th1 cytokine levels of IL-12 when co-cultured with irradiated OVA. However, IFN- γ level decreased dependant on the radiation dose of co-cultured OVA. The levels of IgEs and Th2-cytokine were reduced dependant on the radiation dose. These data show that the irradiated OVA could downregulate the activity of Th2 lymphocytes in OVA-sensitized mice.

  5. Enzymatic treatment of soy protein isolates: effects on the potential allergenicity, technofunctionality, and sensory properties.

    PubMed

    Meinlschmidt, Pia; Sussmann, Daniela; Schweiggert-Weisz, Ute; Eisner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Soybean allergy is of great concern and continues to challenge both consumer and food industry. The present study investigates the enzyme-assisted reduction in major soybean allergens in soy protein isolate using different food-grade proteases, while maintaining or improving the sensory attributes and technofunctional properties. SDS-PAGE analyses showed that hydrolysis with Alcalase, Pepsin, and Papain was most effective in the degradation of the major soybean allergens with proteolytic activities of 100%, 100%, and 95.9%, respectively. In the course of hydrolysis, the degree of hydrolysis increased, and Alcalase showed the highest degree of hydrolysis (13%) among the proteases tested. DSC analysis confirmed the degradation of major soybean allergens. The sensory experiments conducted by a panel of 10 panelists considered the overall improved sensory properties as well as the bitterness of the individual hydrolysates. In particular, Flavourzyme and Papain were attractive due to a less pronounced bitter taste and improved sensory profile (smell, taste, mouthfeeling). Technofunctional properties showed a good solubility at pH 7.0 and 4.0, emulsifying capacity up to 760 mL g(-1) (Flavourzyme) as well as improved oil-binding capacities, while the water-binding properties were generally decreased. Increased foaming activity for all proteases up to 3582% (Pepsin) was observed, whereas lower foaming stability and density were found. The hydrolysates could potentially be used as hypoallergenic ingredients in a variety of food products due to their improved technofunctional properties and a pleasant taste.

  6. Prenatal allergen and diesel exhaust exposure and their effects on allergy in adult offspring mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple studies have suggested that prenatal exposure to either allergens or air pollution may increase the risk for the development of allergic immune responses in young offspring. However, the effects of prenatal environmental exposures on adult offspring have not been well-studied. We hypothesized that combined prenatal exposure to Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) allergen and diesel exhaust particles will be associated with altered IgE production, airway inflammation, airway hyperreactivity (AHR), and airway remodeling of adult offspring. Methods Following sensitization via the airway route to A. fumigatus and mating, pregnant BALB/c mice were exposed to additional A. fumigatus and/or diesel exhaust particles. At age 9-10 weeks, their offspring were sensitized and challenged with A. fumigatus. Results We found that adult offspring from mice that were exposed to A. fumigatus or diesel exhaust particles during pregnancy experienced decreases in IgE production. Adult offspring of mice that were exposed to both A. fumigatus and diesel exhaust particles during pregnancy experienced decreases in airway eosinophilia. Conclusion These results suggest that, in this model, allergen and/or diesel administration during pregnancy may be associated with protection from developing systemic and airway allergic immune responses in the adult offspring. PMID:20459836

  7. Enzymatic treatment of soy protein isolates: effects on the potential allergenicity, technofunctionality, and sensory properties.

    PubMed

    Meinlschmidt, Pia; Sussmann, Daniela; Schweiggert-Weisz, Ute; Eisner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Soybean allergy is of great concern and continues to challenge both consumer and food industry. The present study investigates the enzyme-assisted reduction in major soybean allergens in soy protein isolate using different food-grade proteases, while maintaining or improving the sensory attributes and technofunctional properties. SDS-PAGE analyses showed that hydrolysis with Alcalase, Pepsin, and Papain was most effective in the degradation of the major soybean allergens with proteolytic activities of 100%, 100%, and 95.9%, respectively. In the course of hydrolysis, the degree of hydrolysis increased, and Alcalase showed the highest degree of hydrolysis (13%) among the proteases tested. DSC analysis confirmed the degradation of major soybean allergens. The sensory experiments conducted by a panel of 10 panelists considered the overall improved sensory properties as well as the bitterness of the individual hydrolysates. In particular, Flavourzyme and Papain were attractive due to a less pronounced bitter taste and improved sensory profile (smell, taste, mouthfeeling). Technofunctional properties showed a good solubility at pH 7.0 and 4.0, emulsifying capacity up to 760 mL g(-1) (Flavourzyme) as well as improved oil-binding capacities, while the water-binding properties were generally decreased. Increased foaming activity for all proteases up to 3582% (Pepsin) was observed, whereas lower foaming stability and density were found. The hydrolysates could potentially be used as hypoallergenic ingredients in a variety of food products due to their improved technofunctional properties and a pleasant taste. PMID:26788306

  8. Sensitization rates of causative allergens for dogs with atopic dermatitis: detection of canine allergen-specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Hee; Kim, Ha-Jung; Jang, Hye-Jin; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-12-01

    Allergen-specific IgE serology tests became commercially available in the 1980s. Since then these tests have been widely used to diagnose and treat allergic skin diseases. However, the relationship between a positive reaction and disease occurrence has been controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate allergens using a serologic allergy test in dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD). Dogs clinically diagnosed with AD (n = 101) were tested using an allergen-specific IgE immunoassay. Among the total 92 environmental and food allergens, house dust and house dust mites were the most common. Several allergens including airborne pollens and molds produced positive reactions, and which was considered increasing allergens relating to the climate changes. The presence of antibodies against staphylococci and Malassezia in cases of canine AD was warranted in this study. Additionally, strong (chicken, turkey, brown rice, brewer's yeast, and soybean) and weakly (rabbit, vension, duck, and tuna) positive reactions to food allergens could be used for avoidance and limited-allergen trials. PMID:24962408

  9. Overview of inhalation exposure techniques: strengths and weaknesses.

    PubMed

    Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2005-07-01

    The vast majority of toxicity studies and risk evaluations deal with single chemicals. Due to the growing interest in potential human health risks originating from exposure to environmental pollutants or lifestyle-related complex chemical mixtures, well thought-out tailor-made mechanistic inhalation toxicity studies have been performed. In contrast to the complex mixtures potentially encountered from hazardous waste sites, drinking water disinfection by-products, natural flavoring complexes or the cumulative intake of food additives and pesticide residues, the scientific evaluation of complex airborne mixtures, such as acid aerosols, atmospheres produced by combustion or thermolysis, e.g. residual oil fly ash (ROFA), diesel and gasoline exhaust, and tobacco smoke, or volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in residential areas, to mention but a few, is a daunting challenge for experimental toxicologists. These challenges include the controlled in situ generation of exposure atmospheres, the compositions of which are often process-determined and metastable. This means that volatile agents may partition with liquid aerosols or be adsorbed onto surfaces of solid aerosols. Similarly, the nature and composition of test atmospheres might change continuously through oxidation and aging of constituents or coagulation of particles. This, in turn, poses additional challenges to the analytical characterization of such complex test atmospheres, including the identification of potential experimental artifacts. Accordingly, highly standardized and controlled inhalation studies are required for hazard identification of complex mixtures and the results of inhalation studies have to be analyzed judiciously due to the great number of experimental variables. These variables may be related to technical issues or to the specific features of the animal model. Although inhalation exposure of animals mimics human exposure best, not all results obtained under such rigorous test conditions might

  10. House-dust Mite Asthma. Results of Challenge Tests on Five Criteria with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus

    PubMed Central

    McAllen, Monica K.; Assem, E. S. K.; Maunsell, K.

    1970-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with asthma and house-dust allergy were investigated by five different challenge tests with mite extract (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus). These tests were performed on the skin, bronchi, nasal mucosa, and leucocytes, and on normal human lung tissue passively sensitized by the patients' serum. The results were compared with each other and with the clinical state of the patients. Of 21 patients on whom all five tests were carried out, positive reactions to every test were found in 14 (67%). Asthmatic attacks were readily induced by inhalation of the mite extract and occurred in 18 (86%). Nasal reactions were provoked in 18 (86%) and were not followed by asthmatic symptoms. A leucocyte test was positive in 19 (90%) and the serum test was positive in all (100%). Delayed asthmatic responses to bronchial challenge were seen in six patients, but there was no evidence that these were mediated by precipitins. Quantitatively there was no fixed pattern between the degrees of sensitivity of the different tissues in the same patient. The amount of mite antigen capable of causing an asthmatic reaction was extremely small—less than 1 μg. of mite material in several patients. In view of the prevalence of D. pteronyssinus in this country and its high allergenic potency, it is considered that this mite is an important factor in allergic asthma. PMID:4987898

  11. Misuse of xylometazoline nasal drops by inhalation.

    PubMed

    Anand, Jacek Sein; Salamon, Marek; Habrat, Boguslaw; Scinska, Anna; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw

    2008-12-01

    Six male prisoners who misused xylometazoline nasal drops by inhalation were interviewed by a prison physician in 2006. The prisoners received xylometazoline drops during regular visits in the prison ambulatory service. In order to get the medication, the subjects reported false symptoms of rhinosinusitis and allergic reactions. Psychoactive effects of inhaled xylometazoline were described as "stimulation," "excitation," and "feeling of strength." Although preliminary, our findings suggest that topical adrenergic decongestants can produce rewarding effects when administered by inhalation. PMID:19085441

  12. Evaluation on the immunotherapy efficacies of synthetic peptide vaccines in asthmatic mice with group I and II allergens from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaopin; Xu, Pengfei; Xu, Haifeng; Zhu, Haibin

    2015-01-01

    To assess the immunotherapy efficacies of recombinant vaccines containing T-cell epitopes derived from group I and allergens from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p1, Der p2). Forty female BALB/c mice were randomized into groups of negative control (PBS group), positive controls (Asthma group), immunotherapy with rDer p1 and rDer p2 protein suspension (rDer p1/rDer p2 group) and specific immunotherapy with fusion peptide T1-8 (T1-8 group). Asthmatic mouse models were initially established with the crude extract from house dust mites (HDM), and PBS models were solely treated with PBS buffer. The two treatment groups were managed with corresponding protein via subcutaneous injection at the back 30 minutes before inhalation sensitization from day 25 to 27. Twenty-four hour following the final inhalation challenge, sera, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the supernatant of splenocyte cultures (SSCC) were collected in each group of mice. ELISA was used to assay the levels of IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17 in the BALF and SSCC, as well as serum levels of specific IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a. The lung tissue sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) for pathological examination. ELISA detection revealed reduced levels of IL-4 and IL-17 in the BALF and SSCC, yet increased levels of IFN-γ and IL-10, and decreased specific serum IgE and IgG1, yet increased serum IgG2a in T1-8 group and rDer p1/rDer p2 group than asthma group (P<0.05). T1-8 group had lower IL-4 and IL-17 level and higher IFN-γ and IL-10 level in the BALF and SSCC as well as reduced specific serum IgE and IgG1, yet elevated IgG2a level compared to rDer p1/rDer p2 group (P<0.05). Examination on the lung sections indicated significantly abated pulmonary inflammation, less inflammatory cell infiltration and better remodeled airway epithelia in T1-8 group and rDer p1/rDer p2 group than asthma group. However, the airway epithelium structure T1-8 group and rDer p1/rDer p2 group remained similar to

  13. COMPARISON OF SUBCUTANEOUS AND ORAL ROUTES OF EXPOSURE FOR EVALUATING ALLERGENICITY OF FOOD EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the potential for food allergenicity of any given protein is limited by the lack of an appropriate animal model. In this study we examined the intrinsic allergenicity of foods known to be allergenic (peanut, egg) or non-allergenic (spinach) by exposing mice either s...

  14. Making peanut allergens indigestible: a model system for reducing or preventing an allergic reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut allergens are not totally resistant to digestion as previously known. Creating peanut allergen conjugates that are more resistant to digestion may prevent absorption of the allergens into the bloodstream, and thereby, an allergic reaction. Peanut allergen conjugates were prepared by covalen...

  15. Reduction of the Number of Major Representative Allergens: From Clinical Testing to 3-Dimensional Structures

    PubMed Central

    He, Ying; Liu, Xueting; Huang, Yuyi; Zou, Zehong; Chen, Huifang; Lai, He; Wu, Qiurong; Zhang, Junyan; Wang, Shan; Zhang, Jianguo; Tao, Ailin; Sun, Baoqing

    2014-01-01

    Vast amounts of allergen sequence data have been accumulated, thus complicating the identification of specific allergenic proteins when performing diagnostic allergy tests and immunotherapy. This study aims to rank the importance/potency of the allergens so as to logically reduce the number of allergens and/or allergenic sources. Meta-analysis of 62 allergenic sources used for intradermal testing on 3,335 allergic patients demonstrated that in southern China, mite, sesame, spiny amaranth, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and house dust account for 88.0% to 100% of the observed positive reactions to the 62 types of allergenic sources tested. The Kolmogorov-Smironov Test results of the website-obtained allergen data and allergen family featured peptides suggested that allergen research in laboratories worldwide has been conducted in parallel on many of the same species. The major allergens were reduced to 21 representative allergens, which were further divided into seven structural classes, each of which contains similar structural components. This study therefore has condensed numerous allergenic sources and major allergens into fewer major representative ones, thus allowing for the use of a smaller number of allergens when conducting comprehensive allergen testing and immunotherapy treatments. PMID:24778467

  16. Inhaled magnesium fluoride reverse bronchospasma.

    PubMed

    Gandia, Fedoua; Rouatbi, Sonia; Latiri, Imed; Guénard, Hervé; Tabka, Zouhair

    2010-01-01

    Asthma is a global health problem. Asthma attacks are becoming more severe and more resistant to usual treatment by beta(2) agonists nebulisation. The search for a new product that could reduce the morbidity of asthmatic disease seems necessary. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of inhaled magnesium fluoride (MgF(2)) with that of magnesium sulphate (MgSO(4)) 15% alone and sodium fluoride (NaF) 0.5 M alone in rats pre-contracted by methacholine (MeCh). Fifty six adult male Wistar rats of medium weight 259 +/- 15 g were divided randomly into five groups. They inhaled respectively: MeCh, MgF(2) + NaCl 0.9%, MgF(2) + acetic acid, MgSO(4) 15% single and NaF (0.5 M) single. Airway resistances were measured after each dose of MeCh by pneumomultitest equipment. Results indicated that (1) MgF(2) + NaCl 0.9%, MgF(2) + acetic acid and MgSO(4) reversed significantly the methacholine-induced bronchial constriction in rats and had a bronchodilating effect at the moment of its administration (2) MgF(2) + acetic acid led to a greater decrease (P<0.05) of bronchial resistances when compared to that obtained from MgF(2) + NaCl 0.9%, NaF exclusively and MgSO(4) alone (3) inhaled NaF alone led to a significant bronchorelaxing effect (P<0.05) that starts at the sixth dose of MeCh (17 mg/L). As a matter of fact, MgF(2) dissolved in acetic acid and delivered in aerosol form reduces significantly bronchial spasm. In conclusion, MgF(2) can be used as a bronchodilator for diseases with bronchospasma such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  17. Effect of natural allergen exposure during the grass pollen season on airways inflammatory cells and asthma symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Djukanović, R; Feather, I; Gratziou, C; Walls, A; Peroni, D; Bradding, P; Judd, M; Howarth, P H; Holgate, S T

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bronchial challenge with allergen causes a specific form of airways inflammation consisting of an influx of neutrophils, eosinophils, and T cells. Because the relevance of the challenge model to clinical asthma is uncertain, the cellular changes that occur in the lungs of asthmatic subjects during natural seasonal allergen exposure were investigated. METHODS: Seventeen grass pollen sensitive asthmatic subjects with previously reported seasonal exacerbations of asthma kept records of symptoms and underwent fibreoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and endobronchial biopsy before and during the peak of the grass pollen season. The BAL cells were analysed for differential cell counts and by flow cytometry for T cell subsets and surface activation markers. The biopsy samples were processed into glycol methacrylate resin and immunohistochemical analysis was performed for mast cells, activated eosinophils, T cells and interleukin 4 (IL-4), a cytokine with a pivotal role in allergen-induced inflammation. RESULTS: In the pollen season there was an increase in T lymphocyte activation in the BAL fluid as identified by increased expression of interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R). In the submucosa these changes were paralleled by an increase in CD4+ T cells. By contrast, the numbers of metachromatic cells in BAL fluid staining with toluidine blue were reduced, possibly because of degranulation following allergen stimulation. In keeping with mast cell activation, the number of mucosal mast cells staining for secreted IL-4 increased during the season. In comparison with the period shortly before the onset of the season, all but two subjects experienced an asthma exacerbation which followed the rise in pollen counts but, compared with the period preceding the first bronchoscopic examination, asthma symptoms were not increased during the pollen season. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that natural allergen exposure, leading to a clinical exacerbation of asthma

  18. Emerging technologies for electronic monitoring of adherence, inhaler competence, and true adherence.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, John N; Nicholls, Clare

    2015-04-01

    Despite the availability of effective treatments for respiratory disorders, disease control is often suboptimal, due in part to the failure of patients to adhere to prescribed regimens, or to demonstrate competence with the often complex steps in the administration of inhaled medications. The cost of poor true adherence, a combined measure of adherence and inhaler competence, is considerable, both economically and in terms of health-related impact. While patient education is recognized as essential, there exist many barriers to healthcare professional-led monitoring and promotion of true adherence. Successful intervention remains a challenging task, dependent upon understanding and addressing the distinct issues associated with poor adherence and inhaler competence, and lessening the perceived burden on healthcare professionals. Electronic monitors provide an accurate and objective indication of adherence and may also be of value in assessing inhaler competence. The information provided by such devices is a helpful aid to understanding the challenging nature of true adherence, and may be crucial to the development and assessment of true adherence promoting interventions. This article provides a background to the impact of suboptimal adherence and inhaler competence, and the challenges associated with the promotion of true adherence, with an emphasis on respiratory therapies. Contemporary electronic monitors of adherence and inhaler competence are critically reviewed, and case studies of emerging technologies are provided to illustrate the use of innovative monitoring devices in the promotion of true adherence in practice. Potential future directions, including increased targeting and individualization, enhanced coordination of care, and a greater focus on inhaler competence are considered to be important additions to currently available technologies in this rapidly evolving field.

  19. Walnut allergens: molecular characterization, detection and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Costa, J; Carrapatoso, I; Oliveira, M B P P; Mafra, I

    2014-03-01

    Food-induced allergies have been regarded as an emergent problem of public health. Classified as important allergenic ingredients, the presence of walnut and other nuts as hidden allergens in processed foods constitutes a risk for sensitized individuals, being a real problem of allergen management. Attending to the increasing importance dedicated to walnut allergy, this review intends to provide the relevant and up-to-date information on main issues such as the prevalence of walnut allergy, the clinical threshold levels, the molecular characterization of walnut allergens and their clinical relevance, as well as the methodologies for walnut allergen detection in foods. As the walnut used in human diet comes from Juglans regia and Juglans nigra, the molecular characterization of the allergens from both species included in the prolamins (Jug r 1, Jug n 1 and Jug r 3), cupins (Jug r 2, Jug n 2 and Jug r 4) and profilins (Jug r 5), together with respective clinical relevance, were compiled in this review. The most recent progresses on walnut allergen detection techniques (protein- and DNA-based) are described and critically compared, including the emergent multitarget approaches.

  20. Seed-based oral vaccines as allergen-specific immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Takaiwa, Fumio

    2011-03-01

    Plant-based vaccines have advantages over conventional vaccines in terms of scalability, lack of requirement for cold chain logistics, stability, safety, cost-effectiveness and needle-free administration. In particular, when antigen is expressed in seeds, high production is possible and immunogenicity is not lost even if stocked at ambient temperature for several years. Induction of immune tolerance (desensitization) to allergen is a principle strategy for controlling allergic diseases, and is generally carried out by subcutaneous injection. Seed-based oral administration offers a straightforward and inexpensive alternative approach to deliver vaccines effectively to the GALT without loss of activity. Consumption of transgenic seeds containing modified hypo-allergenic tolerogen or T-cell epitope peptides derived from allergens has no or very few severe side effects and can induce immune tolerance leading to reduction of allergen-specific IgE production, T-cell proliferation and release of histamine. Suppression of allergen-specific clinical symptoms results. Thus, seed-based allergy vaccines offer an innovative and convenient allergen-specific immunotherapeutic approach as an alternative to conventional allergen-specific immunotherapy.