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Sample records for allergen-induced airway responses

  1. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  2. Protease inhibitor reduces airway response and underlying inflammation in cockroach allergen-induced murine model.

    PubMed

    Saw, Sanjay; Arora, Naveen

    2015-04-01

    Protease(s) enhances airway inflammation and allergic cascade. In the present study, effect of a serine protease inhibitor was evaluated in mouse model of airway disease. Mice were sensitized with cockroach extract (CE) or Per a 10 and treated with 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride (AEBSF) 1 h before or after challenge to measure airway response. Mice were euthanized to collect bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), blood, and lung to evaluate inflammation. AEBSF treatment significantly reduced the AHR in allergen-challenged mice in dose-dependent manner (p≤ 0.01). IgE (p≤0.05) and Th2 cytokines (p≤0.05) were significantly reduced in treated mice. AEBSF treatment lowered total cell (p≤0.05), eosinophil (p≤0.05), and neutrophil (p≤0.05) in BALF and lung tissue. Oxidative stress parameters were impaired on treatment in allergen-challenged mice (p≤0.05). AEBSF had therapeutic effect in allergen-induced airway resistance and underling inflammation and had potential for combination or as add-on therapy for respiratory diseases. PMID:25052477

  3. Protective Effects of the Polyphenol Sesamin on Allergen-Induced TH2 Responses and Airway Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Huei; Shen, Mei-Lin; Zhou, Ning; Lee, Chen-Chen; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a lifelong airway condition that affects people of all ages. In recent decades, asthma prevalence continues to increase globally, with an estimated number of 250,000 annual deaths attributed to the disease. Although inhaled corticosteroids and β-adrenergic receptor agonists are the primary therapeutic avenues that effectively reduce asthma symptoms, profound side effects may occur in patients with long-term treatments. Therefore, development of new therapeutic strategies is needed as alternative or supplement to current asthma treatments. Sesamin is a natural polyphenolic compound with strong anti-oxidative effects. Several studies have reported that sesamin is effective in preventing hypertension, thrombotic tendency, and neuroinflammation. However, it is still unknown whether sesamin can reduce asthma-induced allergic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Our study has revealed that sesamin exhibited significant anti-inflammatory effects in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma model. We found that treatments with sesamin after OVA sensitization and challenge significantly decreased expression levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-13, and serum IgE. The numbers of total inflammatory cells and eosinophils in BALF were also reduced in the sesamin-treated animals. Histological results demonstrated that sesamin attenuated OVA-induced eosinophil infiltration, airway goblet cell hyperplasia, mucus occlusion, and MUC5AC expression in the lung tissue. Mice administered with sesamin showed limited increases in AHR compared with mice receiving vehicle after OVA challenge. OVA increased phosphorylation levels of IκB-α and nuclear expression levels of NF-κB, both of which were reversed by sesamin treatments. These data indicate that sesamin is effective in treating allergic asthma responses induced by OVA in mice. PMID:24755955

  4. Resistin-Like Molecule–α Regulates IL-13–Induced Chemokine Production but Not Allergen-Induced Airway Responses

    PubMed Central

    Munitz, Ariel; Cole, Eric T.; Karo-Atar, Danielle; Finkelman, Fred D.

    2012-01-01

    Resistin-like molecule α (Relm-α) is one of the most up-regulated gene products in allergen- and parasite-associated Th2 responses. Localized to alternatively activated macrophages, Relm-α was shown to exert an anti-inflammatory effect in parasite-induced Th2 responses, but its role in experimental asthma remains unexplored. Here, we analyzed the cellular source, the IL-4 receptors required to stimulate Relm-α production, and the role of Relm-α after experimental asthma induction by IL-4, IL-13, or multiple experimental regimes, including ovalbumin and Aspergillus fumigatus immunization. We demonstrate that Relm-α was secreted into the airway lumen, dependent on both the IL-13 receptor–α1 chain and likely the Type I IL-4 receptor, and differentially localized to epithelial cells and myeloid cells, depending on the specific cytokine or aeroallergen trigger. Studies performed with Retnla gene–targeted mice demonstrate that Relm-α was largely redundant in terms of inducing the infiltration of Th2 cytokines, mucus, and inflammatory cells into the lung. These results mirror the dispensable role that other alternatively activated macrophage products (such as arginase 1) have in allergen-induced experimental asthma and contrast with their role in the setting of parasitic infections. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the distinct utilization of IL-4/IL-13 receptors for the induction of Relm-α in the lungs. The differential regulation of Relm-α expression is likely determined by the relative expression levels of IL-4, IL-13, and their corresponding receptors, which are differentially expressed by divergent cells (i.e., epithelial cells and macrophages.) Finally, we identify a largely redundant functional role for Relm-α in acute experimental models of allergen-associated Th2 immune responses. PMID:22246861

  5. Allergen-induced traffic of bone marrow eosinophils, neutrophils and lymphocytes to airways.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anna-Karin; Sergejeva, Svetlana; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Lee, James J; Lötvall, Jan

    2004-11-01

    We evaluated whether bone marrow (BM) inflammatory cells have capacity to traffic into the airways following allergen exposure in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway inflammation. We also evaluated the effect of IL-5 overexpression on (i) the production of eosinophils in BM, (ii) the accumulation of eosinophils, neutrophils and lymphocytes in blood and airways and (iii) the changes in CD34+ cell numbers in BM, blood and airways. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label cells produced during the exposure period. Furthermore, CD3 splenocytes were adoptively transferred to investigate the BM inflammatory response. Allergen exposure induced traffic of BM eosinophils, neutrophils and lymphocytes to the airways and increased the number of BrdU+ eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes and CD34+ cells in BALf. IL-5 overexpression enhanced the eosinophilopoiesis and increased the presence of BrdU+ eosinophils and CD34+ cells in airways and enhanced the number of CD34+ cells in BM and blood after allergen exposure. Adoptive transfer of CD3 lymphocytes overexpressing IL-5 caused increased BM eosinophilia. In conclusion, allergen exposure induces traffic of not only newly produced eosinophils but also newly produced neutrophils and lymphocytes into the airways. PMID:15384047

  6. [Allergens-induced sensitization alters airway epithelial adhesion molecules expression in mice].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dan; Tan, Mei-Ling; Xiang, Yang; Qin, Xiao-Qun; Zhu, Li-Ming; Dai, Ai-Guo

    2015-12-25

    To explore the relationship between the epithelial adhesion molecules and immune responses of airway epithelium, we observed the expression of integrin β4 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the mice airway epithelium after sensitization with allergens. BALB/c mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite (HDM) and then developed airway hyper-responsiveness as determined by barometric whole-body plethysmography. Both OVA and HDM sensitization led to increases of the number of peripheral leukocytes as well as inflammatory cells infiltration in lungs. OVA sensitized mice showed more severe inflammatory cells infiltration than HDM sensitized mice. Immunohistochemistry analysis of mice lung tissues revealed that sensitization with both allergens also led to a decrease of integrin β4 expression and an increase of ICAM-1 expression in airway epithelia. OVA sensitized mice showed a more significant increase of ICAM-1 expression compared with HDM sensitized mice. siRNA mediated silencing of integrin β4 gene in 16HBE cells resulted in an up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression. Our results indicate a possible role of airway epithelial adhesion molecules in allergen-induced airway immune responses. PMID:26701635

  7. Vagotomy Reverses Established Allergen-Induced Airway Hyperreactivity to Methacholine in the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the role of vagal reflexes in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Mice were actively sensitized to ovalbumin then exposed to the allergen via inhalation. Prior to ovalbumin inhalation, mice also received intratracheally-instilled particulate ma...

  8. Vagotomy reverses established allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity to methacholine in the mouse✩

    PubMed Central

    McAlexander, M. Allen; Gavett, Stephen H.; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the role of vagal reflexes in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Mice were actively sensitized to ovalbumin then exposed to the allergen via inhalation. Prior to ovalbumin inhalation, mice also received intratracheally-instilled particulate matter in order to boost the allergic response. In control mice, methacholine (i.v.) caused a dose-dependent increase in respiratory tract resistance (RT) that only modestly decreased if the vagi were severed bilaterally just prior to the methacholine challenge. Sensitized and challenged mice, however, manifested an airway reactivity increase that was abolished by severing the vagi prior to methacholine challenge. In an innervated ex vivo mouse lung model, methacholine selectively evoked action potential discharge in a subset of distension-sensitive A-fibers. These data support the hypothesis that the major component of the increased airway reactivity in inflamed mice is due to a vagal reflex initiated by activation of afferent fibers, even in response to a direct (i.e., smooth muscle)-acting muscarinic agonist. PMID:25842220

  9. Vagotomy reverses established allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity to methacholine in the mouse.

    PubMed

    McAlexander, M Allen; Gavett, Stephen H; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the role of vagal reflexes in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Mice were actively sensitized to ovalbumin then exposed to the allergen via inhalation. Prior to ovalbumin inhalation, mice also received intratracheally-instilled particulate matter in order to boost the allergic response. In control mice, methacholine (i.v.) caused a dose-dependent increase in respiratory tract resistance (RT) that only modestly decreased if the vagi were severed bilaterally just prior to the methacholine challenge. Sensitized and challenged mice, however, manifested an airway reactivity increase that was abolished by severing the vagi prior to methacholine challenge. In an innervated ex vivo mouse lung model, methacholine selectively evoked action potential discharge in a subset of distension-sensitive A-fibers. These data support the hypothesis that the major component of the increased airway reactivity in inflamed mice is due to a vagal reflex initiated by activation of afferent fibers, even in response to a direct (i.e., smooth muscle)-acting muscarinic agonist. PMID:25842220

  10. Effects of salbutamol and enantiomers on allergen-induced asthmatic reactions and airway hyperreactivity.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, F J; Zuidhof, A B; Kok, L; Meurs, H; Zaagsma, J

    2005-05-01

    Salbutamol consists of a racemic mixture of R- and S-salbutamol. R-salbutamol (levalbuterol) is the active bronchodilating enantiomer, whereas S-salbutamol is thought to be pharmacologically inactive or to exert adverse effects. This study evaluated the bronchoprotective effects of inhalation of therapeutically relevant doses of the racemate and individual enantiomers in guinea pigs. It was found that basal airway reactivity to histamine was similarly reduced 30 min after inhalation of equivalent doses of RS- and R-salbutamol; this protective effect disappeared within 3 h. Inhalation of RS- and R-salbutamol 30 min before and 5.5 h after allergen challenge suppressed allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity to histamine after the early and late asthmatic reaction, completely inhibiting the early asthmatic reaction and tending to reduce the development of the late asthmatic reaction. At 5 h after allergen challenge, the inhibition of airway hyperreactivity was more pronounced in animals treated with R-salbutamol compared to racemate-treated animals. Both basal airway reactivity and allergen-induced hyperreactivity were not affected by S-salbutamol. Inflammatory cell infiltration was not affected by the racemate or the individual enantiomers. In conclusion, inhalation of therapeutically relevant doses of R- and RS-salbutamol effectively suppress allergen-induced airway reactivity after the early and late asthmatic reactions, the R-enantiomer being slightly more potent with respect to early airway reactivity than the racemate. No adverse effects were observed for the S-enantiomer. PMID:15863644

  11. Effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on allergen-induced airway inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Broytman, Oleg; Braun, Rudolf K; Morgan, Barbara J; Pegelow, David F; Hsu, Pei-Ning; Mei, Linda S; Koya, Ajay K; Eldridge, Marlowe; Teodorescu, Mihaela

    2015-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea aggravates asthma, but its mechanisms are unknown. Chronic intermittent hypoxia is one hallmark feature of sleep apnea. In this study, we tested the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on allergen-induced inflammation in rats. Four groups (n = 9-11/group) of ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized Brown-Norway rats underwent intermittent hypoxia (10% oxygen, 30 cycles/h, 10 h/d) or normoxia for 30 days concurrent with weekly OVA or vehicle challenges. Lung physiology, differential leukocyte counts from bronchoalveolar lavage, and histology (Picro Sirius Red staining for collagen content) were compared between groups 2 days after the last challenge. Gene expression in bronchoalveolar lavage cells was quantified by quantitative PCR. Compared with normoxia, chronic intermittent hypoxia reduced the FEV0.1/FVC ratio (P = 0.005), peak expiratory flow (P = 0.002), and mean midexpiratory flow (P = 0.004), predominantly in medium and large airways; decreased the baseline eosinophil number (P = 0.01) and amplified the effect of OVA on monocyte number (P = 0.02 for the interaction); in proximal airways, increased (P = 0.008), whereas in distal airways it decreased (P = 0.004), collagen density; induced qualitative emphysematous changes in lung periphery; and increased expression of the M2 macrophage marker YM-1 and augmented OVA-induced expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Chronic intermittent hypoxia alters immune response to allergen toward a more TH-1-predominant cellular phenotype with collagen deposition and matrix degradation, leading to airflow limitation. These findings highlight the potential of sleep apnea to aggravate airway dysfunction in patients with preexistent asthma. PMID:25004109

  12. Natural killer T cells are dispensable in the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation and remodelling in a mouse model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Koh, Y-I; Shim, J-U; Lee, J-H; Chung, I-J; Min, J-J; Rhee, J H; Lee, H C; Chung, D H; Wi, J-O

    2010-07-01

    Natural killer T (NK T) cells have been shown to play an essential role in the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and/or airway inflammation in mouse models of acute asthma. Recently, NK T cells have been reported to be required for the development of AHR in a virus induced chronic asthma model. We investigated whether NK T cells were required for the development of allergen-induced AHR, airway inflammation and airway remodelling in a mouse model of chronic asthma. CD1d-/- mice that lack NK T cells were used for the experiments. In the chronic model, AHR, eosinophilic inflammation, remodelling characteristics including mucus metaplasia, subepithelial fibrosis and increased mass of the airway smooth muscle, T helper type 2 (Th2) immune response and immunoglobulin (Ig)E production were equally increased in both CD1d-/- mice and wild-type mice. However, in the acute model, AHR, eosinophilic inflammation, Th2 immune response and IgE production were significantly decreased in the CD1d-/- mice compared to wild-type. CD1d-dependent NK T cells may not be required for the development of allergen-induced AHR, eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway remodelling in chronic asthma model, although they play a role in the development of AHR and eosinophilic inflammation in acute asthma model. PMID:20456411

  13. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  14. Th2 cell-specific cytokine expression and allergen-induced airway inflammation depend on JunB

    PubMed Central

    Hartenstein, Bettina; Teurich, Sibylle; Hess, Jochen; Schenkel, Johannes; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina; Angel, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into effector T helper 1 (Th1) or Th2 cells, which are classified by their specific set of cytokines. Here we demonstrate that loss of JunB in in vitro polarized Th2 cells led to a dysregulated expression of the Th2-specific cytokines IL-4 and IL-5. These cells produce IFN-γ and express T-bet, the key regulator of Th1 cells. In line with the essential role of Th2 cells in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma, mice with JunB-deficient CD4+ T cells exhibited an impaired allergen-induced airway inflammation. This study demonstrates novel functions of JunB in the development of Th2 effector cells, for a normal Th2 cytokine expression pattern and for a complete Th2-dependent immune response in mice. PMID:12456639

  15. Anti-Siglec-F Antibody Reduces Allergen-Induced Eosinophilic Inflammation and Airway Remodeling1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dae Jin; Cho, Jae Youn; Lee, Sang Yeub; Miller, Marina; Rosenthal, Peter; Soroosh, Pejman; Croft, Michael; Zhang, Mai; Varki, Ajit; Broide, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Siglec-F is a sialic acid-binding Ig superfamily receptor that is highly expressed on eosinophils. We have investigated whether administration of an anti-Siglec-F Ab to OVA-challenged wild-type mice would reduce levels of eosinophilic inflammation and levels of airway remodeling. Mice sensitized to OVA and challenged repetitively with OVA for 1 mo who were administered an anti-Siglec-F Ab had significantly reduced levels of peribronchial eosinophilic inflammation and significantly reduced levels of subepithelial fibrosis as assessed by either trichrome staining or lung collagen levels. The anti-Siglec-F Ab reduced the number of bone marrow, blood, and tissue eosinophils, suggesting that the anti-Siglec-F Ab was reducing the production of eosinophils. Administration of a F(ab′)2 fragment of an anti-Siglec-F Ab also significantly reduced levels of eosinophilic inflammation in the lung and blood. FACS analysis demonstrated increased numbers of apoptotic cells (annexin V+/CCR3+ bronchoalveolar lavage and bone marrow cells) in anti-Siglec-F Ab-treated mice challenged with OVA. The anti-Siglec-F Ab significantly reduced the number of peribronchial major basic protein+/TGF-β+ cells, suggesting that reduced levels of eosinophil-derived TGF-β in anti-Siglec-F Ab-treated mice contributed to reduced levels of peribronchial fibrosis. Administration of the anti-Siglec-F Ab modestly reduced levels of periodic acid-Schiff-positive mucus cells and the thickness of the smooth muscle layer. Overall, these studies suggest that administration of an anti-Siglec-F Ab can significantly reduce levels of allergen-induced eosinophilic airway inflammation and features of airway remodeling, in particular subepithelial fibrosis, by reducing the production of eosinophils and increasing the number of apoptotic eosinophils in lung and bone marrow. PMID:19783675

  16. S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase Inhibition Regulates Allergen-Induced Lung Inflammation and Airway Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, David J. P.; Bradley, Matthews O.; Jaffar, Zeina

    2013-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by Th2 type inflammation, leading to airway hyperresponsivenes, mucus hypersecretion and tissue remodeling. S-Nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) is an alcohol dehydrogenase involved in the regulation of intracellular levels of S-nitrosothiols. GSNOR activity has been shown to be elevated in human asthmatic lungs, resulting in diminished S-nitrosothiols and thus contributing to increased airway hyperreactivity. Using a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we report that intranasal administration of a new selective inhibitor of GSNOR, SPL-334, caused a marked reduction in airway hyperreactivity, allergen-specific T cells and eosinophil accumulation, and mucus production in the lungs in response to allergen inhalation. Moreover, SPL-334 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the production of the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 and the level of the chemokine CCL11 (eotaxin-1) in the airways. Collectively, these observations reveal that GSNOR inhibitors are effective not only in reducing airway hyperresponsiveness but also in limiting lung inflammatory responses mediated by CD4+ Th2 cells. These findings suggest that the inhibition of GSNOR may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:23936192

  17. House dust mite allergen induces asthma via TLR4 triggering of airway structural cells

    PubMed Central

    HAMMAD, Hamida; CHIEPPA, Marcello; PERROS, Frederic; WILLART, Monique A.; GERMAIN, Ronald N.; LAMBRECHT, Bart N.

    2009-01-01

    Barrier epithelial cells and airway dendritic cells (DC) make up the first line of defence against inhaled substances like house dust mite (HDM) allergen and endotoxin. We hypothesized that these cells need to communicate to cause allergic disease. Using irradiated chimeric mice, we demonstrate that TLR4 expression on radioresistant lung structural cells is required and sufficient for DC activation in the lung and for priming of effector T helper responses to HDM. TLR4 triggering on structural cells caused production of the innate proallergic cytokines thymic stromal lymphopoietin, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, interleukin-25 and IL-33. The absence of TLR4 on structural cells, but not on hematopoietic cells, abolished HDM driven allergic airway inflammation. Finally, inhalation of a TLR4 antagonist to target exposed epithelial cells suppressed the salient features of asthma including bronchial hyperreactivity. Our data identify an innate immune function of airway epithelial cells that drives allergic inflammation via activation of mucosal DCs. PMID:19330007

  18. Inhalation of stable dust extract prevents allergen induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Peters, M; Kauth, M; Schwarze, J; Körner‐Rettberg, C; Riedler, J; Nowak, D; Braun‐Fahrländer, C; von Mutius, E; Bufe, A; Holst, O

    2006-01-01

    Background Recent epidemiological studies have shown that growing up on a traditional farm provides protection from the development of allergic disorders such as hay fever and allergic asthma. We present experimental evidence that substances providing protection from the development of allergic diseases can be extracted from dust collected in stables of animal farms. Methods Stable dust was collected from 30 randomly selected farms located in rural regions of the Alps (Austria, Germany and Switzerland). The dust was homogenised with glass beads and extracted with physiological sodium chloride solution. This extract was used to modulate immune response in a well established mouse model of allergic asthma. Results Treatment of mice by inhalation of stable dust extract during sensitisation to ovalbumin inhibited the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and airway eosinophilia upon challenge, as well as the production of interleukin 5 by splenocytes and of antigen specific IgG1 and IgE. Dust extract also suppressed the generation of human dendritic cells in vitro. The biological activity of the dust extract was not exclusively mediated by lipopolysaccharide. Conclusions Stable dust from animal farms contains strong immune modulating substances. These substances can interfere with the development of both cellular and humoral immunity against allergens, thus suppressing allergen sensitisation, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of allergic asthma. PMID:16244088

  19. TGF-β-mediated airway tolerance to allergens induced by peptide-based immunomodulatory mucosal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Michael, H; Li, Y; Wang, Y; Xue, D; Shan, J; Mazer, B D; McCusker, C T

    2015-11-01

    We sought to modulate mucosal immune responses using neonatal vaccination to avert the development of allergic airways disease (AAD). Pulmonary pathology in AAD is driven by T helper (TH)2 cytokines, in particular interleukin (IL)4 and IL13, the expression and actions of which are regulated by the transcription factor STAT6. We developed a peptide homolog of STAT6, STAT6-IP. Neonatal mice given, intranasally, STAT6-IP, in an effort to modulate de novo airways immune responses, developed tolerance following subsequent allergen sensitization, with either ovalbumin or ragweed allergens, as demonstrated by reduced TH2 cytokines and specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E and the significant increases in the latency-associated peptide (LAP)(+) T-regulatory (Treg) cell subset and expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. This regulatory phenotype was transferrable by CD4(+) T cells or CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs) derived from STAT6-IP-vaccinated mice. Anti-TGF-β treatment during allergen sensitization, however, re-established the pro-inflammatory TH2 response. Thus, neonatal STAT6-IP vaccination induces prospective TGF-β-dependent tolerance to allergen and constitutes a novel highly effective immunomodulatory allergy prevention strategy. PMID:25783968

  20. Allergen-induced airway remodeling is impaired in galectin-3 deficient mice1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiao Na; Bahaie, Nooshin S.; Kang, Bit Na; Hosseinkhani, Reza M.; Ha, Sung Gil; Frenzel, Elizabeth M.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rao, Savita P.; Sriramarao, P.

    2010-01-01

    The role played by the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-3 (Gal-3) in airway remodeling, a characteristic feature of asthma that leads to airway dysfunction and poor clinical outcome in humans, was investigated in a murine model of chronic allergic airway inflammation. Wild-type (WT) and Gal-3 knock-out (KO) mice were subjected to repetitive allergen challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) up to 12 weeks and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue collected after the last challenge were evaluated for cellular features associated with airway remodeling. Compared to WT mice, chronic OVA challenge in Gal-3 KO mice resulted in diminished remodeling of the airways with significantly reduced mucus secretion, sub-epithelial fibrosis, smooth muscle thickness, and peribronchial angiogenesis. The higher degree of airway remodeling in WT mice was associated with higher Gal-3 expression in the BALF as well as lung tissue. Cell counts in BALF and lung immunohistology demonstrated that eosinophil infiltration in OVA-challenged Gal-3 KO mice was significantly reduced compared to WT mice. Evaluation of cellular mediators associated with eosinophil recruitment and airway remodeling revealed that levels of eotaxin-1, IL-5, IL-13, FIZZ1 and TGF-β were substantially lower in Gal-3 KO mice. Finally, leukocytes from Gal-3 KO mice demonstrated decreased trafficking (rolling) on vascular endothelial adhesion molecules compared to WT cells. Overall, these studies demonstrate that Gal-3 is an important lectin that promotes airway remodeling via airway recruitment of inflammatory cells, specifically eosinophils, and the development of a Th2 phenotype as well as increased expression of eosinophil-specific chemokines, pro-fibrogenic and angiogenic mediators. PMID:20543100

  1. Mast cell-derived neurotrophin 4 mediates allergen-induced airway hyperinnervation in early life

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kruti R.; Aven, Linh; Shao, Fengzhi; Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Duvall, Melody G.; Levy, Bruce D.; Ai, Xingbin

    2016-01-01

    Asthma often progresses from early episodes of insults. How early life events connect to long-term airway dysfunction remains poorly understood. We demonstrated previously that increased neurotrophin 4 (NT4) levels following early life allergen exposure cause persistent changes in airway smooth muscle (ASM) innervation and airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in mice. Herein, we identify pulmonary mast cells as a key source of aberrant NT4 expression following early insults. NT4 is selectively expressed by ASM and mast cells in mice, nonhuman primates and humans. We show in mice that mast cell-derived NT4 is dispensable for ASM innervation during development. However, upon insults, mast cells expand in number and degranulate to release NT4 and thus become the major source of NT4 under pathological condition. Adoptive transfer of wild type mast cells, but not NT4−/− mast cells restores ASM hyperinnervation and AHR in KitW-sh/W-sh mice following early life insults. Notably, an infant nonhuman primate model of asthma also exhibits ASM hyperinnervation associated with the expansion and degranulation of mast cells. Together, these findings identify an essential role of mast cells in mediating ASM hyperinnervation following early life insults by producing NT4. This role may be evolutionarily conserved in linking early insults to long-term airway dysfunction. PMID:26860818

  2. Role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 in murine allergen-induced airway remodeling and exacerbation by carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Elizabeth A; Sayers, Brian C; Glista-Baker, Ellen E; Shipkowski, Kelly A; Ihrie, Mark D; Duke, Katherine S; Taylor, Alexia J; Bonner, James C

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is characterized by a T helper type 2 phenotype and by chronic allergen-induced airway inflammation (AAI). Environmental exposure to air pollution ultrafine particles (i.e., nanoparticles) exacerbates AAI, and a concern is possible exacerbation posed by engineered nanoparticles generated by emerging nanotechnologies. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 is a transcription factor that maintains T helper type 1 cell development. However, the role of STAT1 in regulating AAI or exacerbation by nanoparticles has not been explored. In this study, mice with whole-body knockout of the Stat1 gene (Stat1(-/-)) or wild-type (WT) mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) allergen and then exposed to multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by oropharygneal aspiration. In Stat1(-/-) and WT mice, OVA increased eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, whereas MWCNTs increased neutrophils. Interestingly, OVA sensitization prevented MWCNT-induced neutrophilia and caused only eosinophilic inflammation. Stat1(-/-) mice displayed increased IL-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at 1 day compared with WT mice after treatment with OVA or OVA and MWCNTs. At 21 days, the lungs of OVA-sensitized Stat1(-/-) mice displayed increased eosinophilia, goblet cell hyperplasia, airway fibrosis, and subepithelial apoptosis. MWCNTs further increased OVA-induced goblet cell hyperplasia, airway fibrosis, and apoptosis in Stat1(-/-) mice at 21 days. These changes corresponded to increased levels of profibrogenic mediators (transforming growth factor-β1, TNF-α, osteopontin) but decreased IL-10 in Stat1(-/-) mice. Finally, fibroblasts isolated from the lungs of Stat1(-/-) mice produced significantly more collagen mRNA and protein in response to transforming growth factor-β1 compared with WT lung fibroblasts. Our results support a protective role for STAT1 in chronic AAI and exacerbation of remodeling caused by MWCNTs. PMID:25807359

  3. PI3K and ERK1/2 kinase inhibition potentiate protease inhibitor to attenuate allergen induced Th2 immune response in mouse.

    PubMed

    Saw, Sanjay; Arora, Naveen

    2016-04-01

    Proteases affect immune response by activating PI3K, ERK1/2 and p38 kinase. In present study, therapeutic effect of PI3K, ERK1/2 and p38 kinase inhibitor in combination with serine protease inhibitor was evaluated in cockroach extract (CE) induced airway inflammatory disease. Mice were sensitized on day 0, 7 and 14 and challenged on day 27, 28 and 29 with CE. Mice were given PI3K, ERK1/2 and the p38 kinase inhibitor (iPI3K, iERK1/2 and the ip38) alone or with serine protease inhibitor 4-(2-Aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride (AEBSF), 1h before challenge. On day 30 airway resistance of mice were determined and euthanized to collect blood, BAL fluid and lung for analysis. CE immunized mice showed PI3K, ERK1/2 and p38 kinase activation, increased airway resistance, cellular infiltration, Th2 cytokines IgE and IgG1. AEBSF given to mice reduced the CE induced allergic response. AEBSF given in combination of iPI3K/iERK1/2 reduced cellular infiltration in lungs. Furthermore, iPI3K/iERK1/2 with AEBSF significantly reduced the CE induced Th2 cytokines in comparison to monotherapy of kinase inhibitor and AEBSF (P<0.05). The combination of iPI3K/iERK1/2 with AEBSF enhanced IL-12 level that could further provide a mean of Th2 reduction. Best effect in reduction of allergic response in mice was observed on administration of AEBSF with iPI3K. Conclusively, the combination of PI3K kinase inhibitor with AEBSF reduced allergen induced airway response and has therapeutic potential for add-on therapy in allergic airway disease. PMID:26905476

  4. Intranasal mite allergen induces allergic asthma-like responses in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Shibamori, Masafumi; Ogino, Keiki; Kambayashi, Yasuhiro; Ishiyama, Hironobu

    2006-01-25

    Airway responses induced by intranasal administration of mite allergen without adjuvant were studied in NC/Nga mice. A crude extract of Dermatophagoides farinae (Df) was administered for 5 consecutive days and a single intranasal challenge booster dose was given 1 week after the last sensitization. 24 h after the single challenge, the airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was measured and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed for numbers of eosinophils and neutrophils, and both cytokine and chemokine levels. There were marked increases in number of eosinophils in the BALF, AHR, Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13), and chemokine (eotaxin-1 and eotaxin-2) levels in the BALF following Df exposure. C57BL/6N, A/J, BALB/c, and CBA/JN mouse strains were also exposed to Df crude extract, but all of the measured responses were strongest in NC/Nga mice. Furthermore, Df-exposed NC/Nga mice showed the goblet cell hyperplasia, pulmonary eosinophilic inflammation, and increases in both total serum IgE and Df-specific IgG1. After intranasal exposure of NC/Nga mice to crude extract of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, the BALF eosinophilia and AHR were similar to responses induced by Df. None of the study parameters were increased in response to intranasal exposure to ovalbumin. These data demonstrated that NC/Nga mice developed allergic asthma-like responses after intranasal exposure to mite allergens. PMID:16229861

  5. [Comparison of respiratory control responses in bronchial and external airway stenosis].

    PubMed

    Marek, W; Rasche, K; Mailänder, A; Hoffarth, H P; Ulmer, W T

    1989-11-01

    Respiratory responses during allergen-induced airway obstruction and external airway stenosis were investigated in anaesthetised sheep. The results were compared to those obtained from healthy subjects during external airway stenosis. Allergen-induced increase in airway resistance results in an increased respiratory frequency, mainly due to a shortening of expiration (TE) and only partially due to a shortening of inspiration (TI). Tidal volume is diminished while respiratory changes in oesophageal pressure (delta Poes) are increased. Both results in an increase of dynamic elastance (Edyn) representing airway resistance. Based on the increase in the slope and amplitude of inspiratory pressure (delta Poes/TI), the mean inspiratory airflow (VT/TI) remains almost unchanged. In spite of an increased ventilation PaO2 decreases, whereas PaCO2 increases only slightly. External airway stenosis, however, results in a decrease of respiratory frequency, mainly depending on a prolongation of inspiration. Changes in Poes and VT are similar to those of allergen-induced airway obstruction. delta Poes/TI, however, increases less than during allergen application and results in a decrease of mean inspiratory airflow, tidal volume and ventilation. Respiratory responses of healthy subjects during external airway stenosis were similar to those described in experimental animals. The results of our investigation show a different pattern in the control of breathing during bronchial and external stenosis-induced airway obstruction and thus indicate different vagal reflex mechanisms. PMID:2608647

  6. Gene-metabolite expression in blood can discriminate allergen-induced isolated early from dual asthmatic responses.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrit; Yamamoto, Masatsugu; Kam, Sarah H Y; Ruan, Jian; Gauvreau, Gail M; O'Byrne, Paul M; FitzGerald, J Mark; Schellenberg, Robert; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Wojewodka, Gabriella; Kanagaratham, Cynthia; De Sanctis, Juan B; Radzioch, Danuta; Tebbutt, Scott J

    2013-01-01

    Some asthmatic individuals undergoing allergen inhalation challenge develop an isolated early response whereas others develop a dual response (early plus late response). In the present study we have used transcriptomics (microarrays) and metabolomics (mass spectrometry) of peripheral blood to identify molecular patterns that can discriminate allergen-induced isolated early from dual asthmatic responses. Peripheral blood was obtained prior to (pre-) and 2 hours post allergen inhalation challenge from 33 study participants. In an initial cohort of 14 participants, complete blood counts indicated significant differences in neutrophil and lymphocyte counts at pre-challenge between early and dual responders. At post-challenge, significant genes (ALOX15, FADS2 and LPCAT2) and metabolites (lysolipids) were enriched in lipid metabolism pathways. Enzymes encoding for these genes are involved in membrane biogenesis and metabolism of fatty acids into pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators. Correlation analysis indicated a strong negative correlation between ALOX15, FADS2, and IL5RA expression with 2-arachidonoylglycerophosphocholine levels in dual responders. However, measuring arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid levels in a validation cohort of 19 participants indicated that the free form of DHA (nmoles/µg of protein) was significantly (p = 0.03) different between early and dual responders after allergen challenge. Collectively these results may suggest an imbalance in lipid metabolism which dictates pro- (anti-) inflammatory and pro-resolving mechanisms. Future studies with larger sample sizes may reveal novel mechanisms and therapeutic targets of the late phase asthmatic response. PMID:23844124

  7. Endothelial gaps and adherent leukocytes in allergen-induced early- and late-phase plasma leakage in rat airways.

    PubMed

    Baluk, P; Bolton, P; Hirata, A; Thurston, G; McDonald, D M

    1998-06-01

    Exposure of sensitized individuals to antigen can induce allergic responses in the respiratory tract, manifested by early and late phases of vasodilatation, plasma leakage, leukocyte influx, and bronchoconstriction. Similar responses can occur in the skin, eye, and gastrointestinal tract. The early-phase response involves mast cell mediators and the late-phase response is leukocyte dependent, but the mechanism of leakage is not understood. We sought to identify the leaky blood vessels, to determine whether these vessels contained endothelial gaps, and to analyze the relationship of the gaps to adherent leukocytes, using biotinylated lectins or silver nitrate to stain the cells in situ and Monastral blue as a tracer to quantify plasma leakage. Most of the leakage occurred in postcapillary venules (< 40-microns diameter), whereas most of the leukocyte migration (predominantly neutrophils) occurred in collecting venules. Capillaries and arterioles did not leak. Endothelial gaps were found in the leaky venules, both by silver nitrate staining and by scanning electron microscopy, and 94% of the gaps were distinct from sites of leukocyte adhesion or migration. We conclude that endothelial gaps contribute to both early and late phases of plasma leakage induced by antigen, but most leakage occurs upstream to sites of leukocyte adhesion. PMID:9626051

  8. Endothelial gaps and adherent leukocytes in allergen-induced early- and late-phase plasma leakage in rat airways.

    PubMed Central

    Baluk, P.; Bolton, P.; Hirata, A.; Thurston, G.; McDonald, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of sensitized individuals to antigen can induce allergic responses in the respiratory tract, manifested by early and late phases of vasodilatation, plasma leakage, leukocyte influx, and bronchoconstriction. Similar responses can occur in the skin, eye, and gastrointestinal tract. The early-phase response involves mast cell mediators and the late-phase response is leukocyte dependent, but the mechanism of leakage is not understood. We sought to identify the leaky blood vessels, to determine whether these vessels contained endothelial gaps, and to analyze the relationship of the gaps to adherent leukocytes, using biotinylated lectins or silver nitrate to stain the cells in situ and Monastral blue as a tracer to quantify plasma leakage. Most of the leakage occurred in postcapillary venules (< 40-microns diameter), whereas most of the leukocyte migration (predominantly neutrophils) occurred in collecting venules. Capillaries and arterioles did not leak. Endothelial gaps were found in the leaky venules, both by silver nitrate staining and by scanning electron microscopy, and 94% of the gaps were distinct from sites of leukocyte adhesion or migration. We conclude that endothelial gaps contribute to both early and late phases of plasma leakage induced by antigen, but most leakage occurs upstream to sites of leukocyte adhesion. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9626051

  9. Beta 2-microglobulin-dependent T cells are dispensable for allergen-induced T helper 2 responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Rogers, K H; Lewis, D B

    1996-10-01

    CD4+ and CD8+ alpha/beta+ T cells of the T helper cell (Th)2 phenotype produce the cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 that promote IgE production and eosinophilic inflammation. IL-4 may play an important role in mediating the differentiation of antigenically naive alpha/beta+ T cells into Th2 cells. Murine NK1.1+ (CD4+ or CD4-CD8-) alpha/beta+ T cells comprise a beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m)-dependent cell population that rapidly produces IL-4 after cell activation in vitro and in vivo and has been proposed as a source of IL-4 for Th2 cell differentiation. alpha/beta+ CD8+ T cells, most of which require beta 2m for their development, have also been proposed as positive regulators of allergen-induced Th2 responses. We tested whether beta 2m-dependent T cells were essential for Th2 cell-mediated allergic reactions by treating wild-type, beta 2m-deficient (beta 2m -/-), and IL-4-deficient (IL-4 -/-) mice of the C57BL/6 genetic background with ovalbumin (OVA), using a protocol that induces robust allergic pulmonary disease in wild-type mice. OVA-treated beta 2m -/- mice had circulating levels of total and OVA-specific IgE, pulmonary eosinophilia, and expression of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 mRNA in bronchial lymph node tissue similar to that of OVA-treated wild-type mice. In contrast, these responses in OVA-treated IL-4 -/- mice were all either undetectable or markedly reduced compared with wild-type mice, confirming that IL-4 was required in this allergic model. These results indicate that the NK1.1+ alpha/beta+ T cell population, as well as other beta 2m-dependent populations, such as most peripheral alpha/beta+ CD8+ T cells, are dispensable for the Th2 pulmonary response to protein allergens. PMID:8879221

  10. Interaction between haemopoietic regulation and airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, P M; Gauvreau, G M; Wood, L J

    1999-06-01

    Asthma is characterized by reversible airway narrowing, by airway hyperresponsiveness, and by airway inflammation. Inhaled allergens are the most important of the stimuli known to cause asthma. Methods for studying inhaled allergen in the laboratory have been well standardized and extensively used for the investigation of the pathophysiology and the pharmacological modulation of allergen-induced airway responses. Allergen inhalation by a sensitized subject results in an early asthmatic response, and, in the majority of subjects, a late asthmatic response and airway hyperresponsiveness. The late response and airway hyperresponsiveness are associated with increases in airway eosinophils and metachromatic cells. Allergen-induced airway inflammation in dogs (predominantly neutrophilic) is associated with increased granulocyte-macrophage progenitors in bone marrow, which is dependent on the effects of a circulating serum factor stimulating the bone marrow. The newly formed cells traffic to the airways. These increases in granulocyte-macrophage progenitors are blocked by inhaled corticosteroids. In human subjects, allergen-induced eosinophilic inflammation is associated with increases in Eo/B progenitors, mediated through up-regulation if the IL-5 receptor on progenitors and increases responsiveness to IL-5. Inhaled corticosteroids also attenuate all allergen-induced physiological responses and airway inflammation, an effect possibly mediated, in part, through inhibition of eosinophil and basophil maturation or release from the bone marrow. PMID:10421819

  11. Comparison of allergen-induced changes in bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation between mildly allergic asthma patients and allergic rhinitis patients.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M J; Olaguibel, J M; Garcia, B E; Tabar, A I; Urbiola, E

    2000-06-01

    Bronchial eosinophilic inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) are the main features of allergic asthma (AA), but they have also been demonstrated in allergic rhinitis (AR), suggesting a continuity between both diseases. In spite of not fully reproducing natural allergenic exposure, the allergen bronchial provocation test (A-BPT) has provided important knowledge of the pathophysiology of AA. Our aim was to verify the existence of a behavior of AA and AR airways different from the allergen bronchial challenge-induced airway eosinophilic inflammation and BHR changes. We studied a group of 31 mild and short-evolution AA and 15 AR patients, sensitized to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. The A-BPT was performed with a partially biologically standardized D. pteronyssinus extract, and known quantities of Der p 1 were inhaled. Peripheral blood (eosinophils and ECP) and induced sputum (percentage cell counts, ECP, albumin, tryptase, and interleukin [IL]-5) were analyzed, before and 24 h after A-BPT. Methacholine BHR, assessed before and 32 h after the A-BPT, was defined by M-PD20 values and, when possible, by maximal response plateau (MRP). The A-BPT was well tolerated by all the patients. AA presented a lower Der p 1 PD20 and a higher occurrence of late-phase responses (LPR). M-PD20 values decreased in AA, but not in AR, patients. MRP values increased in both groups. Eosinophils numbers and ECP levels increased in blood and sputum from both AA and AR, but only the absolute increment of sputum ECP levels was higher in AA than AR patients (P = 0.025). The A-BPT induced no change in sputum albumin, tryptase, or IL-5 values. We conclude as follows: 1) In spite of presenting a lower degree of bronchial sensitivity to allergen, AR patients responded to allergen inhalation with an eosinophilic inflammation enhancement very similar to that observed among AA. 2) MRP levels increased in both AA and AR patients after allergen challenge; however, M-PD20 values

  12. Treatment with Pyranopyran-1, 8-Dione Attenuates Airway Responses in Cockroach Allergen Sensitized Asthma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Song, Joohyun; Kim, You Ah; Cho, Hi Jae; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-typed inflammation, and contributes to airway remodeling and the deterioration of lung function. Viticis Fructus (VF) has long been used in China and Korea as a traditional herbal remedy for treating various inflammatory diseases. Previously, we have isolated a novel phytochemical, pyranopyran-1, 8-dione (PPY), from VF. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of PPY to prevent airway inflammation and to attenuate airway responses in a cockroach allergen-induced asthma model in mice. The mice sensitized to and challenged with cockroach allergen were treated with oral administration of PPY. The infiltration of total cells, eosinophils and lymphocytes into the BAL fluid was significantly inhibited in cockroach allergen-induced asthma mice treated with PPY (1, 2, or 10 mg/kg). Th2 cytokines and chemokine, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and eotaxin in BAL fluid were also reduced to normal levels following treatment with PPY. In addition, the levels of IgE were also markedly suppressed after PPY treatment. Histopathological examination demonstrated that PPY substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airway, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPY possesses a potent efficacy on controlling allergic asthma response such as airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:24489937

  13. Treatment with pyranopyran-1, 8-dione attenuates airway responses in cockroach allergen sensitized asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Park, Min-Sun; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Song, Joohyun; Kim, You Ah; Cho, Hi Jae; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-typed inflammation, and contributes to airway remodeling and the deterioration of lung function. Viticis Fructus (VF) has long been used in China and Korea as a traditional herbal remedy for treating various inflammatory diseases. Previously, we have isolated a novel phytochemical, pyranopyran-1, 8-dione (PPY), from VF. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of PPY to prevent airway inflammation and to attenuate airway responses in a cockroach allergen-induced asthma model in mice. The mice sensitized to and challenged with cockroach allergen were treated with oral administration of PPY. The infiltration of total cells, eosinophils and lymphocytes into the BAL fluid was significantly inhibited in cockroach allergen-induced asthma mice treated with PPY (1, 2, or 10 mg/kg). Th2 cytokines and chemokine, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and eotaxin in BAL fluid were also reduced to normal levels following treatment with PPY. In addition, the levels of IgE were also markedly suppressed after PPY treatment. Histopathological examination demonstrated that PPY substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airway, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPY possesses a potent efficacy on controlling allergic asthma response such as airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:24489937

  14. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA) sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187) induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells. PMID:22439792

  15. Potential of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase as a Therapeutic Target for Allergen-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness: A Critical Connection to Nitric Oxide Levels and PARP Activity.

    PubMed

    Ibba, Salome' V; Ghonim, Mohamed A; Pyakurel, Kusma; Lammi, Matthew R; Mishra, Anil; Boulares, A Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Although expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the lungs of asthmatics and associated nitrosative damage are established, iNOS failed as a therapeutic target for blocking airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation in asthmatics. This dichotomy calls for better strategies with which the enzyme is adequately targeted. Here, we confirm iNOS expression in the asthmatic lung with concomitant protein nitration and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation. We show, for the first time, that iNOS is highly expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of asthmatics with uncontrolled disease, which did not correspond to protein nitration. Selective iNOS inhibition with L-NIL protected against AHR upon acute, but not chronic, exposure to ovalbumin or house dust mite (HDM) in mice. Supplementation of NO by nitrite administration significantly blocked AHR in chronically HDM-exposed mice that were treated with L-NIL. Protection against chronic HDM exposure-induced AHR by olaparib-mediated PARP inhibition may be associated with the partial but not the complete blockade of iNOS expression. Indeed, L-NIL administration prevented olaparib-mediated protection against AHR in chronically HDM-exposed mice. Our study suggests that the amount of iNOS and NO are critical determinants in the modulation of AHR by selective iNOS inhibitors and renews the potential of iNOS as a therapeutic target for asthma. PMID:27524861

  16. Potential of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase as a Therapeutic Target for Allergen-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness: A Critical Connection to Nitric Oxide Levels and PARP Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ghonim, Mohamed A.; Pyakurel, Kusma; Mishra, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Although expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the lungs of asthmatics and associated nitrosative damage are established, iNOS failed as a therapeutic target for blocking airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation in asthmatics. This dichotomy calls for better strategies with which the enzyme is adequately targeted. Here, we confirm iNOS expression in the asthmatic lung with concomitant protein nitration and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation. We show, for the first time, that iNOS is highly expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of asthmatics with uncontrolled disease, which did not correspond to protein nitration. Selective iNOS inhibition with L-NIL protected against AHR upon acute, but not chronic, exposure to ovalbumin or house dust mite (HDM) in mice. Supplementation of NO by nitrite administration significantly blocked AHR in chronically HDM-exposed mice that were treated with L-NIL. Protection against chronic HDM exposure-induced AHR by olaparib-mediated PARP inhibition may be associated with the partial but not the complete blockade of iNOS expression. Indeed, L-NIL administration prevented olaparib-mediated protection against AHR in chronically HDM-exposed mice. Our study suggests that the amount of iNOS and NO are critical determinants in the modulation of AHR by selective iNOS inhibitors and renews the potential of iNOS as a therapeutic target for asthma. PMID:27524861

  17. The immunomodulatory actions of prostaglandin E2 on allergic airway responses in the rat.

    PubMed

    Martin, James G; Suzuki, Masaru; Maghni, Karim; Pantano, Rosa; Ramos-Barbón, David; Ihaku, Daizo; Nantel, François; Denis, Danielle; Hamid, Qutayba; Powell, William S

    2002-10-01

    PGE(2) has been reported to inhibit allergen-induced airway responses in sensitized human subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of anti-inflammatory actions of PGE(2) in an animal model of allergic asthma. BN rats were sensitized to OVA using Bordetella pertussis as an adjuvant. One week later, an aerosol of OVA was administered. After a further week, animals were anesthetized with urethan, intubated, and subjected to measurements of pulmonary resistance (R(L)) for a period of 8 h after OVA challenge. PGE(2) (1 and 3 micro g in 100 micro l of saline) was administered by insufflation intratracheally 30 min before OVA challenge. The early response was inhibited by PGE(2) (3 micro g). The late response was inhibited by both PGE(2) (1 and 3 micro g). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from OVA-challenged rats showed eosinophilia and an increase in the number of cells expressing IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA. These responses were inhibited by PGE(2). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid levels of cysteinyl-leukotrienes were elevated after OVA challenge and were reduced after PGE(2) to levels comparable with those of sham challenged animals. We conclude that PGE(2) is a potent anti-inflammatory agent that may act by reducing allergen-induced Th2 cell activation and cysteinyl-leukotriene synthesis in the rat. PMID:12244197

  18. Ozone exposure increases eosinophilic airway response induced by previous allergen challenge.

    PubMed

    Vagaggini, Barbara; Taccola, Mauro; Cianchetti, Silvana; Carnevali, Stefano; Bartoli, Maria Laura; Bacci, Elena; Dente, Federico L; Di Franco, Antonella; Giannini, Daniele; Paggiaro, Pier Luigi

    2002-10-15

    We investigated whether exposure to ozone (O(3)) 24 hours after an allergen challenge test would increase airway eosinophilia induced by allergen in subjects with mild asthma with late airway response. Twelve subjects with mild atopic asthma participated in a randomized, single-blind study. Subjects underwent allergen challenge 24 hours before a 2 hour exposure to O(3) (0.27 ppm) or filtered air. Pulmonary function was monitored during the allergen challenge and after the exposure to O(3) or air. Six hours later, induced sputum was collected. After 4 weeks, the experiment was repeated with the same subjects. Allergen induced a comparable late airway response in both challenges. O(3) exposure induced a significant decrease in FVC, FEV(1), and vital capacity, and was associated with a significant increase in total symptom score compared with air exposure. The percentage of eosinophils, but not the percentage of neutrophils, in induced sputum was significantly higher after exposure to O(3) than after exposure to air (p = 0.04). These results indicate that O(3) exposure after a late airway response elicited by allergen challenge can potentiate the eosinophilic inflammatory response induced by the allergen challenge itself in subjects with mild atopic asthma. This observation may help explain the synergistic effect of air pollution and allergen exposure in the exacerbation of asthma. PMID:12379550

  19. Immune Modulatory Effects of IL-22 on Allergen-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ping; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Yuqi; Kolls, Jay K.; Zheng, Tao; Zhu, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    IL-22 is a Th17/Th22 cytokine that is increased in asthma. However, recent animal studies showed controversial findings in the effects of IL-22 in allergic asthma. To determine the role of IL-22 in ovalbumin-induced allergic inflammation we generated inducible lung-specific IL-22 transgenic mice. Transgenic IL-22 expression and signaling activity in the lung were determined. Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced pulmonary inflammation, immune responses, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) were examined and compared between IL-22 transgenic mice and wild type controls. Following doxycycline (Dox) induction, IL-22 protein was readily detected in the large (CC10 promoter) and small (SPC promoter) airway epithelial cells. IL-22 signaling was evidenced by phosphorylated STAT3. After OVA sensitization and challenge, compared to wild type littermates, IL-22 transgenic mice showed decreased eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and in lung tissue, decreased mucus metaplasia in the airways, and reduced AHR. Among the cytokines and chemokines examined, IL-13 levels were reduced in the BAL fluid as well as in lymphocytes from local draining lymph nodes of IL-22 transgenic mice. No effect was seen on the levels of serum total or OVA-specific IgE or IgG. These findings indicate that IL-22 has immune modulatory effects on pulmonary inflammatory responses in allergen-induced asthma. PMID:25254361

  20. Role of M2 Muscarinic Receptor in the Airway Response to Methacholine of Mice Selected for Minimal or Maximal Acute Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Juciane Maria de Andrade; Resende, Rodrigo R.; Florsheim, Esther; Albuquerque, Layra Lucy; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Gomes, Eliane; Tavares de Lima, Wothan; de Franco, Marcelo; Ribeiro, Orlando Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle constriction induced by cholinergic agonists such as methacholine (MCh), which is typically increased in asthmatic patients, is regulated mainly by muscle muscarinic M3 receptors and negatively by vagal muscarinic M2 receptors. Here we evaluated basal (intrinsic) and allergen-induced (extrinsic) airway responses to MCh. We used two mouse lines selected to respond maximally (AIRmax) or minimally (AIRmin) to innate inflammatory stimuli. We found that in basal condition AIRmin mice responded more vigorously to MCh than AIRmax. Treatment with a specific M2 antagonist increased airway response of AIRmax but not of AIRmin mice. The expression of M2 receptors in the lung was significantly lower in AIRmin compared to AIRmax animals. AIRmax mice developed a more intense allergic inflammation than AIRmin, and both allergic mouse lines increased airway responses to MCh. However, gallamine treatment of allergic groups did not affect the responses to MCh. Our results confirm that low or dysfunctional M2 receptor activity is associated with increased airway responsiveness to MCh and that this trait was inherited during the selective breeding of AIRmin mice and was acquired by AIRmax mice during allergic lung inflammation. PMID:23691511

  1. Nebulized anti-IL-13 monoclonal antibody Fab' fragment reduces allergen-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Hacha, Jonathan; Tomlinson, Kate; Maertens, Ludovic; Paulissen, Geneviève; Rocks, Natacha; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noel, Agnès; Palframan, Roger; Gueders, Maud; Cataldo, Didier D

    2012-11-01

    IL-13 is a prototypic T helper type 2 cytokine and a central mediator of the complex cascade of events leading to asthmatic phenotype. Indeed, IL-13 plays key roles in IgE synthesis, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, mucus hypersecretion, subepithelial fibrosis, and eosinophil infiltration. We assessed the potential efficacy of inhaled anti-IL-13 monoclonal antibody Fab' fragment on allergen-induced airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, and remodeling in an experimental model of allergic asthma. Anti-IL-13 Fab' was administered to mice as a liquid aerosol generated by inExpose inhalation system in a tower allowing a nose-only exposure. BALB/c mice were treated by PBS, anti-IL-13 Fab', or A33 Fab' fragment and subjected to ovalbumin exposure for 1 and 5 weeks (short-term and long-term protocols). Our data demonstrate a significant antiasthma effect after nebulization of anti-IL-13 Fab' in a model of asthma driven by allergen exposure as compared with saline and nonimmune Fab fragments. In short- and long-term protocols, administration of the anti-IL-13 Fab' by inhalation significantly decreased bronchial responsiveness to methacholine, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid eosinophilia, inflammatory cell infiltration in lung tissue, and many features of airway remodeling. Levels of proinflammatory mediators and matrix metalloprotease were significantly lower in lung parenchyma of mice treated with anti-IL-13 Fab'. These data demonstrate that an inhaled anti-IL-13 Fab' significantly reduces airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, and remodeling. Specific neutralization of IL-13 in the lungs using an inhaled anti-IL-13 Fab' could represent a novel and effective therapy for the treatment of asthma. PMID:22904197

  2. Alterations of the Lung Methylome in Allergic Airway Hyper-Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Robert YS; Shang, Yan; Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Dao, Tyna; Das, Sandhya; Rabold, Richard; Sham, James SK; Mitzner, Wayne; Tang, Wan-Yee

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of breathlessness and wheezing, affecting 300 million people around the world (available at: www.who.int). To date, genetic factors associated with asthma susceptibility have been unable to explain the full etiology of asthma. Recent studies have demonstrated that the epigenetic disruption of gene expression plays an equally important role in the development of asthma through interaction with our environment. We sensitized 6-week-old C57BL/6J mice with house-dust-mite (HDM) extracts intraperitoneally followed by 5 weeks of exposure to HDM challenges (three times a week) intratracheally. HDM-exposed mice showed an increase in airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and inflammation together with structural remodeling of the airways. We applied methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-next generation sequencing (MeDIP-seq) for profiling of DNA methylation changes in the lungs in response to HDM. We observed about 20 million reads by a single-run of massive parallel sequencing. We performed bioinformatics and pathway analysis on the raw sequencing data to identify differentially methylated candidate genes in HDM-exposed mice. Specifically, we have revealed that the transforming growth factor beta signaling pathway is epigenetically modulated by chronic exposure to HDM. Here, we demonstrated that a specific allergen may play a role in AHR through an epigenetic mechanism by disrupting the expression of genes in lungs that might be involved in airway inflammation and remodeling. Our findings provide new insights into the potential mechanisms by which environmental allergens induce allergic asthma and such insights may assist in the development of novel preventive and therapeutic options for this debilitative disease. PMID:24446183

  3. Persistence of serotonergic enhancement of airway response in a model of childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian D; Hyde, Dallas M; Miller, Lisa A; Wong, Emily M; Schelegle, Edward S

    2014-07-01

    The persistence of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and serotonergic enhancement of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction induced by ozone (O3) plus allergen has not been evaluated. If this mechanism persists after a prolonged recovery, it would indicate that early-life exposure to O3 plus allergen induces functional changes predisposing allergic individuals to asthma-related symptoms throughout life, even in the absence of environmental insult. A persistent serotonergic mechanism in asthma exacerbations may offer a novel therapeutic target, widening treatment options for patients with asthma. The objective of this study was to determine if previously documented AHR and serotonin-enhanced ASM contraction in allergic monkeys exposed to O3 plus house dust mite allergen (HDMA) persist after prolonged recovery. Infant rhesus monkeys sensitized to HDMA were exposed to filtered air (FA) (n = 6) or HDMA plus O3 (n = 6) for 5 months. Monkeys were then housed in a FA environment for 30 months. At 3 years, airway responsiveness was assessed. Airway rings were then harvested, and ASM contraction was evaluated using electrical field stimulation with and without exogenous serotonin and serotonin-subtype receptor antagonists. Animals exposed to O3 plus HDMA exhibited persistent AHR. Serotonin exacerbated the ASM contraction in the exposure group but not in the FA group. Serotonin subtype receptors 2, 3, and 4 appear to drive the response. Our study shows that AHR and serotonin-dependent exacerbation of cholinergic-mediated ASM contraction induced by early-life exposure to O3 plus allergen persist for at least 2.5 years and may contribute to a persistent asthma phenotype. PMID:24484440

  4. Alterations of the lung methylome in allergic airway hyper-responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Robert Ys; Shang, Yan; Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Dao, Tyna; Das, Sandhya; Rabold, Richard; Sham, James Sk; Mitzner, Wayne; Tang, Wan-Yee

    2014-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of breathlessness and wheezing, affecting 300 million people around the world (available at: www.who.int). To date, genetic factors associated with asthma susceptibility have been unable to explain the full etiology of asthma. Recent studies have demonstrated that the epigenetic disruption of gene expression plays an equally important role in the development of asthma through interaction with our environment. We sensitized 6-week-old C57BL/6J mice with house-dust-mite (HDM) extracts intraperitoneally followed by 5 weeks of exposure to HDM challenges (three times a week) intratracheally. HDM-exposed mice showed an increase in airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and inflammation together with structural remodeling of the airways. We applied methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-next generation sequencing (MeDIP-seq) for profiling of DNA methylation changes in the lungs in response to HDM. We observed about 20 million reads by a single-run of massive parallel sequencing. We performed bioinformatics and pathway analysis on the raw sequencing data to identify differentially methylated candidate genes in HDM-exposed mice. Specifically, we have revealed that the transforming growth factor beta signaling pathway is epigenetically modulated by chronic exposure to HDM. Here, we demonstrated that a specific allergen may play a role in AHR through an epigenetic mechanism by disrupting the expression of genes in lungs that might be involved in airway inflammation and remodeling. Our findings provide new insights into the potential mechanisms by which environmental allergens induce allergic asthma and such insights may assist in the development of novel preventive and therapeutic options for this debilitative disease. PMID:24446183

  5. A sensory neuronal ion channel essential for airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in asthma.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Ana I; Brackmann, Marian; Elia, Maxwell D; Bessac, Bret F; del Camino, Donato; D'Amours, Marc; Witek, JoAnn S; Fanger, Chistopher M; Chong, Jayhong A; Hayward, Neil J; Homer, Robert J; Cohn, Lauren; Huang, Xiaozhu; Moran, Magdalene M; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-06-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disorder caused by airway exposures to allergens and chemical irritants. Studies focusing on immune, smooth muscle, and airway epithelial function revealed many aspects of the disease mechanism of asthma. However, the limited efficacies of immune-directed therapies suggest the involvement of additional mechanisms in asthmatic airway inflammation. TRPA1 is an irritant-sensing ion channel expressed in airway chemosensory nerves. TRPA1-activating stimuli such as cigarette smoke, chlorine, aldehydes, and scents are among the most prevalent triggers of asthma. Endogenous TRPA1 agonists, including reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation products, are potent drivers of allergen-induced airway inflammation in asthma. Here, we examined the role of TRPA1 in allergic asthma in the murine ovalbumin model. Strikingly, genetic ablation of TRPA1 inhibited allergen-induced leukocyte infiltration in the airways, reduced cytokine and mucus production, and almost completely abolished airway hyperreactivity to contractile stimuli. This phenotype is recapitulated by treatment of wild-type mice with HC-030031, a TRPA1 antagonist. HC-030031, when administered during airway allergen challenge, inhibited eosinophil infiltration and prevented the development of airway hyperreactivity. Trpa1(-/-) mice displayed deficiencies in chemically and allergen-induced neuropeptide release in the airways, providing a potential explanation for the impaired inflammatory response. Our data suggest that TRPA1 is a key integrator of interactions between the immune and nervous systems in the airways, driving asthmatic airway inflammation following inhaled allergen challenge. TRPA1 may represent a promising pharmacological target for the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory conditions. PMID:19458046

  6. Recruited alveolar macrophages, in response to airway epithelial-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein 1/CCl2, regulate airway inflammation and remodeling in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Gyu; Jeong, Jong Jin; Nyenhuis, Sharmilee; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Chung, Sangwoon; Ranjan, Ravi; Karpurapu, Manjula; Deng, Jing; Qian, Feng; Kelly, Elizabeth A B; Jarjour, Nizar N; Ackerman, Steven J; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Christman, John W; Park, Gye Young

    2015-06-01

    Although alveolar macrophages (AMs) from patients with asthma are known to be functionally different from those of healthy individuals, the mechanism by which this transformation occurs has not been fully elucidated in asthma. The goal of this study was to define the mechanisms that control AM phenotypic and functional transformation in response to acute allergic airway inflammation. The phenotype and functional characteristics of AMs obtained from human subjects with asthma after subsegmental bronchoprovocation with allergen was studied. Using macrophage-depleted mice, the role and trafficking of AM populations was determined using an acute allergic lung inflammation model. We observed that depletion of AMs in a mouse allergic asthma model attenuates Th2-type allergic lung inflammation and its consequent airway remodeling. In both human and mouse, endobronchial challenge with allergen induced a marked increase in monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCPs) in bronchoalveolar fluid, concomitant with the rapid appearance of a monocyte-derived population of AMs. Furthermore, airway allergen challenge of allergic subjects with mild asthma skewed the pattern of AM gene expression toward high levels of the receptor for MCP1 (CCR2/MCP1R) and expression of M2 phenotypic proteins, whereas most proinflammatory genes were highly suppressed. CCL2/MCP-1 gene expression was prominent in bronchial epithelial cells in a mouse allergic asthma model, and in vitro studies indicate that bronchial epithelial cells produced abundant MCP-1 in response to house dust mite allergen. Thus, our study indicates that bronchial allergen challenge induces the recruitment of blood monocytes along a chemotactic gradient generated by allergen-exposed bronchial epithelial cells. PMID:25360868

  7. Increased Mast Cell Density and Airway Responses to Allergic and Non-Allergic Stimuli in a Sheep Model of Chronic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Van der Velden, Joanne; Barker, Donna; Barcham, Garry; Koumoundouros, Emmanuel; Snibson, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased mast cell (MC) density and changes in their distribution in airway tissues is thought to contribute significantly to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the time sequence for these changes and how they impact small airway function in asthma is not fully understood. The aim of the current study was to characterise temporal changes in airway MC density and correlate these changes with functional airway responses in sheep chronically challenged with house dust mite (HDM) allergen. Methodology/Principal Findings MC density was examined on lung tissue from four spatially separate lung segments of allergic sheep which received weekly challenges with HDM allergen for 0, 8, 16 or 24 weeks. Lung tissue was collected from each segment 7 days following the final challenge. The density of tryptase-positive and chymase-positive MCs (MCT and MCTC respectively) was assessed by morphometric analysis of airway sections immunohistochemically stained with antibodies against MC tryptase and chymase. MCT and MCTC density was increased in small bronchi following 24 weeks of HDM challenges compared with controls (P<0.05). The MCTC/MCT ratio was significantly increased in HDM challenged sheep compared to controls (P<0.05). MCT and MCTC density was inversely correlated with allergen-induced increases in peripheral airway resistance after 24 weeks of allergen exposure (P<0.05). MCT density was also negatively correlated with airway responsiveness after 24 challenges (P<0.01). Conclusions MCT and MCTC density in the small airways correlates with better lung function in this sheep model of chronic asthma. Whether this finding indicates that under some conditions mast cells have protective activities in asthma, or that other explanations are to be considered requires further investigation. PMID:22606346

  8. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. Methods We developed a quality improvement program—the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)—to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had three core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Results Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index > 40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous

  9. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Protects Lungs from Cockroach Allergen-Induced Inflammation by Modulating Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Zhou, Yufeng; Qiu, Lipeng; Do, Danh C; Zhao, Yilin; Cui, Zhuang; Wang, Heng; Liu, Xiaopeng; Saradna, Arjun; Cao, Xu; Wan, Mei; Gao, Peisong

    2015-12-15

    Exposure to cockroach allergen leads to allergic sensitization and increased risk of developing asthma. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a receptor for many common environmental contaminants, can sense not only environmental pollutants but also microbial insults. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells with the capacity to modulate immune responses. In this study, we investigated whether AhR can sense cockroach allergens and modulate allergen-induced lung inflammation through MSCs. We found that cockroach allergen-treated AhR-deficient (AhR(-/-)) mice showed exacerbation of lung inflammation when compared with wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an AhR agonist, significantly suppressed allergen-induced mouse lung inflammation. MSCs were significantly reduced in cockroach allergen-challenged AhR(-/-) mice as compared with WT mice, but increased in cockroach allergen-challenged WT mice when treated with TCDD. Moreover, MSCs express AhR, and AhR signaling can be activated by cockroach allergen with increased expression of its downstream genes cyp1a1 and cyp1b1. Furthermore, we tracked the migration of i.v.-injected GFP(+) MSCs and found that cockroach allergen-challenged AhR(-/-) mice displayed less migration of MSCs to the lungs compared with WT. The AhR-mediated MSC migration was further verified by an in vitro Transwell migration assay. Epithelial conditioned medium prepared from cockroach extract-challenged epithelial cells significantly induced MSC migration, which was further enhanced by TCDD. The administration of MSCs significantly attenuated cockroach allergen-induced inflammation, which was abolished by TGF-β1-neutralizing Ab. These results suggest that AhR plays an important role in protecting lungs from allergen-induced inflammation by modulating MSC recruitment and their immune-suppressive activity. PMID:26561548

  10. Cigarette smoke inhalation and the acute airway response.

    PubMed Central

    Higenbottam, T; Feyeraband, C; Clark, T J

    1980-01-01

    The acute airway response to smoking varying numbers (one to four) of identical cigarettes in rapid succession and smoking single cigarettes of differing tar/nicotine yields was assessed repeatedly in 13 healthy smokers. The airway response was variable, indicating airway narrowing consistently in only three subjects. There appeared no difference between forced spirometry and measurement of airway resistance in detecting the airway response. No relationship was observed between the airway response and amount of smoke inhaled into the lungs as measured either by changes in venous blood nicotine or percentage carboxyhaemoglobin. When five smokers inhaled smoke directly from a cigarette acute airway narrowing was consistently observed. A normal smoking pattern consisting of an initial drag of smoke into the mouth, followed after a pause by inhalation of smoke diluted with air, did not consistently cause airway narrowing although similar amounts of smoke as the direct drag were inhaled as assessed by changes in venous blood nicotine. The manner of smoke inhalation affects the relative concentrations of the different constituents of smoke reaching the lungs and also appears to be the main determinant of the acute airway response to smoking, which was unrelated to the number of cigarettes smoked or the tar content of the smoke. This suggests that patterns of smoke inhalation may influence the pathogenesis of bronchial disease associated with smoking. PMID:7434266

  11. Nitrogen Dioxide Exposure and Airway Responsiveness in Individuals with Asthma

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controlled human exposure studies evaluating the effect of inhaled NO2 on the inherent responsiveness of the airways to challenge by bronchoconstricting agents have had mixed results. In general, existing meta-analyses show statistically significant effects of NO2 on the airway r...

  12. Airway smooth muscle responsiveness from dogs with airway hyperresponsiveness after O/sub 3/ inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.L.; O'Byrne, P.M.; Pashley, M.; Serio, R.; Jury, J.; Lane, C.G.; Daniel, E.E.

    1988-07-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness occurs after inhalation of O3 in dogs. The purpose of this study was to examine the responsiveness of trachealis smooth muscle in vitro to electrical field stimulation, exogenous acetylcholine, and potassium chloride from dogs with airway hyperresponsiveness after inhaled O3 in vivo and to compare this with the responsiveness of trachealis muscle from control dogs. In addition, excitatory junction potentials were measured with the use of single and double sucrose gap techniques in both groups of dogs to determine whether inhaled O3 affects the release of acetylcholine from parasympathetic nerves in trachealis muscle. Airway hyperresponsiveness developed in all dogs after inhaled O3 (3 ppm for 30 min). The acetylcholine provocative concentration decreased from 4.11 mg/ml before O3 inhalation to 0.66 mg/ml after O3 (P less than 0.0001). The acetylcholine provocative concentration increased slightly after control inhalation of dry room air. Airway smooth muscle showed increased responses to both electrical field stimulation and exogenous acetylcholine but not to potassium chloride in preparations from dogs with airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo. The increased response to electrical field stimulation was not associated with a change in excitatory junctional potentials. These results suggest that a postjunctional alteration in trachealis muscle function occurs after inhaled O3 in dogs, which may account for airway hyperresponsiveness after O3 in vivo.

  13. Airway responsiveness to psychological processes in asthma and health

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial factors have been found to impact airway pathophysiology in respiratory disease with considerable consistency. Influences on airway mechanics have been studied particularly well. The goal of this article is to review the literature on airway responses to psychological stimulation, discuss potential pathways of influence, and present a well-established emotion-induction paradigm to study airway obstruction elicited by unpleasant stimuli. Observational studies have found systematic associations between lung function and daily mood changes. The laboratory-based paradigm of bronchoconstrictive suggestion has been used successfully to elicit airway obstruction in a substantial proportion of asthmatic individuals. Other studies have demonstrated modulation of airway responses to standard airway challenges with exercise, allergens, or pharmacological agents by psychological factors. Standardized emotion-induction techniques have consistently shown airway constriction during unpleasant stimulation, with surgery, blood, and injury stimuli being particularly powerful. Findings with various forms of stress induction have been more mixed. A number of methodological factors may account for variability across studies, such as choice of measurement technique, temporal association between stimulation and measurement, and the specific quality and intensity of the stimulus material, in particular the extent of implied action-orientation. Research has also begun to elucidate physiological processes associated with psychologically induced airway responses, with vagal excitation and ventilatory influences being the most likely candidate pathways, whereas the role of specific central nervous system pathways and inflammatory processes has been less studied. The technique of emotion-induction using films has the potential to become a standardized challenge paradigm for the further exploration of airway hyperresponsiveness mediated by central nervous system processes. PMID

  14. Small Airway Dysfunction and Abnormal Exercise Responses

    PubMed Central

    Petsonk, Edward L.; Stansbury, Robert C.; Beeckman-Wagner, Lu-Ann; Long, Joshua L.; Wang, Mei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Coal mine dust exposure can cause symptoms and loss of lung function from multiple mechanisms, but the roles of each disease process are not fully understood. Objectives We investigated the implications of small airway dysfunction for exercise physiology among a group of workers exposed to coal mine dust. Methods Twenty coal miners performed spirometry, first breathing air and then helium-oxygen, single-breath diffusing capacity, and computerized chest tomography, and then completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Measurements and Main Results Six participants meeting criteria for small airway dysfunction were compared with 14 coal miners who did not. At submaximal workload, miners with small airway dysfunction used a higher proportion of their maximum voluntary ventilation and had higher ventilatory equivalents for both O2 and CO2. Regression modeling indicated that inefficient ventilation was significantly related to small airway dysfunction but not to FEV1 or diffusing capacity. At the end of exercise, miners with small airway dysfunction had 27% lower O2 consumption. Conclusions Small airway abnormalities may be associated with important inefficiency of exercise ventilation. In dust-exposed individuals with only mild abnormalities on resting lung function tests or chest radiographs, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be important in defining causes of exercise intolerance. PMID:27073987

  15. NEUROTROPHIN MEDIATION OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES TO INHALED DIESEL PARTICLES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airway hyper-responsiveness. Diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) associated with the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbate many of these allergic airways respons...

  16. The Role of the Extracellular Matrix Protein Mindin in Airway Response to Environmental Airways Injury

    PubMed Central

    Frush, Sarah; Li, Zhuowei; Potts, Erin N.; Du, Wanglei; Eu, Jerry P.; Garantziotis, Stavros; He, You-Wen; Foster, W. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background: Our previous work demonstrated that the extracellular matrix protein mindin contributes to allergic airways disease. However, the role of mindin in nonallergic airways disease has not previously been explored. Objectives: We hypothesized that mindin would contribute to airways disease after inhalation of either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or ozone. Methods: We exposed C57BL/6J and mindin-deficient (–/–) mice to aerosolized LPS (0.9 μg/m3 for 2.5 hr), saline, ozone (1 ppm for 3 hr), or filtered air (FA). All mice were evaluated 4 hr after LPS/saline 
exposure or 24 hr after ozone/FA exposure. We characterized the physiological and biological responses by analysis of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) with a computer-controlled small-animal ventilator (FlexiVent), inflammatory cellular recruitment, total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), proinflammatory cytokine profiling, and ex vivo bronchial ring studies. Results: After inhalation of LPS, mindin–/– mice demonstrated significantly reduced total cell and neutrophil recruitment into the airspace compared with their wild-type counterparts. Mindin–/– mice also exhibited reduced proinflammatory cytokine production and lower AHR to methacholine challenge by FlexiVent. After inhalation of ozone, mice had no detectible differences in cellular inflammation or total BALF protein dependent on mindin. However, mindin–/– mice were protected from increased proinflammatory cytokine production and AHR compared with their C57BL/6J counterparts. After ozone exposure, bronchial rings derived from mindin–/– mice demonstrated reduced constriction in response to carbachol. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the extracellular matrix protein mindin modifies the airway response to both LPS and ozone. Our data support a conserved role of mindin in production of proinflammatory cytokines and the development of AHR in two divergent models of reactive airways disease, as well as a role of

  17. Changes in airway permeability and responsiveness after exposure to ozone. [Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, W.M.; Delehunt, J.C.; Yerger, L.; Marchette, B.; Oliver, W. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    The relationship between airway responsiveness and the permeability of histamine through the airways in conscious sheep after exposure to ozone (O/sub 3/ was examined). Airway responsiveness was assessed by measuring the change from baseline in mean pulmonary flow resistance following a controlled 2-min inhalation challenge with 1% histamine, containing 200 ..mu..Ci/ml of (/sup 3/H)histamine. The rate of appearance of the (/sup 3/H)histamine in the plasma during inhalation challenge was used to estimate airway permeability. To perturb the airways, conscious sheep were exposed to either 0.5 or 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ for 2 hr via an endotracheal tube. Airway responsiveness and airway permeability were measured prior to and 1 day after exposure. In six sheep exposed to 0.5 ppm O/sub 3/, increased airway responsiveness and airway permeability were obseved 1 day after exposure. Four of seven sheep exposed to 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ had enhanced airway responsiveness and airway permeability, while the remaining three sheep showed corresponding decreases in airway responsiveness and airway permeability. Since the O/sub 3/-induced directional changes in airway responsiveness paralleled the directional changes in airway permeability in both the positive and negative directions, it was concluded that changes in airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine following exposure to O/sub 3/ may be related to concomitant changes in airway permeability to this agent.

  18. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Postnatal exposure history and airways: oxidant stress responses in airway explants.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Shannon R; Schelegle, Edward S; Edwards, Patricia C; Miller, Lisa A; Hyde, Dallas M; Van Winkle, Laura S

    2012-12-01

    Postnatally, the lung continues to grow and differentiate while interacting with the environment. Exposure to ozone (O(3)) and allergens during postnatal lung development alters structural elements of conducting airways, including innervation and neurokinin abundance. These changes have been linked with development of asthma in a rhesus monkey model. We hypothesized that O(3) exposure resets the ability of the airways to respond to oxidant stress and that this is mediated by changes in the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). Infant rhesus monkeys received episodic exposure to O(3) biweekly with or without house dust mite antigen (HDMA) from 6 to 12 months of age. Age-matched monkeys were exposed to filtered air (FA). Microdissected airway explants from midlevel airways (intrapulmonary generations 5-8) for four to six animals in each of four groups (FA, O(3), HDMA, and HDMA+O(3)) were tested for NK-1R gene responses to acute oxidant stress using exposure to hydrogen peroxide (1.2 mM), a lipid ozonide (10 μM), or sham treatment for 4 hours in vitro. Airway responses were measured using real-time quantitative RT-PCR of NK-1R and IL-8 gene expression. Basal NK-1R gene expression levels were not different between the exposure groups. Treatment with ozonide or hydrogen peroxide did not change NK-1R gene expression in animals exposed to FA, HDMA, or HDMA+O(3). However, treatment in vitro with lipid ozonide significantly increased NK-1R gene expression in explants from O(3)-exposed animals. We conclude that a history of prior O(3) exposure resets the steady state of the airways to increase the NK-1R response to subsequent acute oxidant stresses. PMID:22962062

  20. BLUNTING AIRWAYS EOSINOPHILIC INFLAMMATION RESULTS IN A DECREASED AIRWAY NEUTROPHIL RESPONSE TO INHALED LPS IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS A ROLE FOR CD-14

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent data demonstrate that atopic inflammation might enhance airway responses to inhaled LPS in individuals with atopic asthma by increasing CD14 expression on airway macrophages. We sought to determine whether blunting airway eosinophilic inflammation decreases CD14 expressio...

  1. Ambient particulate matter induces an exacerbation of airway inflammation in experimental asthma: role of interleukin-33

    PubMed Central

    Shadie, A M; Herbert, C; Kumar, R K

    2014-01-01

    High levels of ambient environmental particulate matter (PM10 i.e. < 10 μm median aerodynamic diameter) have been linked to acute exacerbations of asthma. We examined the effects of delivering a single dose of Sydney PM10 by intranasal instillation to BALB/c mice that had been sensitized to ovalbumin and challenged repeatedly with a low (≈3 mg/m3) mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks. Responses were compared to animals administered carbon black as a negative control, or a moderate (≈30 mg/m3) concentration of ovalbumin to simulate an allergen-induced acute exacerbation of airway inflammation. Delivery of PM10 to mice, in which experimental mild chronic asthma had previously been established, elicited characteristic features of enhanced allergic inflammation of the airways, including eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment, similar to that in the allergen-induced exacerbation. In parallel, there was increased expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-33 in airway tissues and an increased concentration of IL-33 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Administration of a monoclonal neutralizing anti-mouse IL-33 antibody prior to delivery of particulates significantly suppressed the inflammatory response induced by Sydney PM10, as well as the levels of associated proinflammatory cytokines in lavage fluid. We conclude that IL-33 plays a key role in driving airway inflammation in this novel experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic allergic asthma induced by exposure to PM10. PMID:24730559

  2. Role of Rho kinase isoforms in murine allergic airway responses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M; Liu, P-Y; Kasahara, D I; Williams, A S; Verbout, N G; Halayko, A J; Fedulov, A; Shoji, T; Williams, E S; Noma, K; Shore, S A; Liao, J K

    2011-10-01

    Inhibition of Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinases (ROCKs) reduces allergic airway responses in mice. The purpose of this study was to determine the roles of the two ROCK isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2, in these responses. Wildtype (WT) mice and heterozygous ROCK1 and ROCK2 knockout mice (ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-), respectively) were sensitised and challenged with ovalbumin. ROCK expression and activation were assessed by western blotting. Airway responsiveness was measured by forced oscillation. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and the lungs were fixed for histological assessment. Compared with WT mice, ROCK1 and ROCK2 expression were 50% lower in lungs of ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) mice, respectively, without changes in the other isoform. In WT lungs, ROCK activation increased after ovalbumin challenge and was sustained for several hours. This activation was reduced in ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) lungs. Airway responsiveness was comparable in WT, ROCK1(+/-), and ROCK2(+/-) mice challenged with PBS. Ovalbumin challenge caused airway hyperresponsiveness in WT, but not ROCK1(+/-) or ROCK2(+/-) mice. Lavage eosinophils and goblet cell hyperplasia were significantly reduced in ovalbumin-challenged ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) versus WT mice. Ovalbumin-induced changes in lavage interleukin-13, interleukin-5 and lymphocytes were also reduced in ROCK1(+/-) mice. In conclusion, both ROCK1 and ROCK2 are important in regulating allergic airway responses. PMID:21565918

  3. Dynamics of airway response in lung microsections: a tool for studying airway-extra cellular matrix interactions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Afzal

    2016-01-01

    The biological configuration of extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a key role in how mechanical interactions of the airway with its parenchymal attachments affect the dynamics of airway responses in different pulmonary disorders including asthma, emphysema and chronic bronchitis. It is now recognized that mechanical interactions between airway tissue and ECM play a key regulatory role on airway physiology and kinetics that can lead to the reorganization and remodeling of airway connective tissue. A connective tissue is composed of airway smooth muscle cells (ASM) and the ECM, which includes variety of glycoproteins and therefore the extent of interactions between ECM and ASM affects airway dynamics during exacerbations of major pulmonary disorders. Measurement of the velocity and magnitude of airway closure or opening provide important insights into the functions of the airway contractile apparatus and the interactions with its surrounding connective tissues. This review highlights suitability of lung microsection technique in studying measurements of airway dynamics (narrowing/opening) and associated structural distortions in airway compartments. PMID:27176036

  4. Mechanisms of airway responses to esophageal acidification in cats.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ivan M; Haworth, Steven T; Medda, Bidyut K; Forster, Hubert; Shaker, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Acid in the esophagus causes airway constriction, tracheobronchial mucous secretion, and a decrease in tracheal mucociliary transport rate. This study was designed to investigate the neuropharmacological mechanisms controlling these responses. In chloralose-anesthetized cats (n = 72), we investigated the effects of vagotomy or atropine (100 μg·kg(-1)·30 min(-1) iv) on airway responses to esophageal infusion of 0.1 M PBS or 0.1 N HCl at 1 ml/min. We quantified 1) diameter of the bronchi, 2) tracheobronchial mucociliary transport rate, 3) tracheobronchial mucous secretion, and 4) mucous content of the tracheal epithelium and submucosa. We found that vagotomy or atropine blocked the airway constriction response but only atropine blocked the increase in mucous output and decrease in mucociliary transport rate caused by esophageal acidification. The mucous cells of the mucosa produced more Alcian blue- than periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-stained mucosubstances, and the mucous cells of the submucosa produced more PAS- than Alcian blue-stained mucosubstances. Selective perfusion of the different segments of esophagus with HCl or PBS resulted in significantly greater production of PAS-stained mucus in the submucosa of the trachea adjacent to the HCl-perfused esophagus than in that adjacent to the PBS-perfused esophagus. In conclusion, airway constriction caused by esophageal acidification is mediated by a vagal cholinergic pathway, and the tracheobronchial transport response is mediated by cholinergic receptors. Acid perfusion of the esophagus selectively increases production of neutral mucosubstances of the apocrine glands by a local mechanism. We hypothesize that the airway responses to esophageal acid exposure are part of the innate, rather than acute emergency, airway defense system. PMID:26846551

  5. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca2+ elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca2+ elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca2+ entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  6. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H; Schleimer, Robert P; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca(2+) elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca(2+) elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca(2+) entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  7. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  8. Nitric Oxide Synthase Enzymes in the Airways of Mice Exposed to Ovalbumin: NOS2 Expression Is NOS3 Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Williams, Keisha; Rabowsky, Michelle F.; Last, Michael S.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Last, Jerold A.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives and Design. The function of the airway nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms and the lung cell types responsible for its production are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NO homeostasis in the airway is important to control inflammation, which requires upregulation, of NOS2 protein expression by an NOS3-dependent mechanism. Materials or Subjects. Mice from a C57BL/6 wild-type, NOS1−/−, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− genotypes were used. All mice strains were systemically sensitized and exposed to filtered air or ovalbumin (OVA) aerosol for two weeks to create a subchronic model of allergen-induced airway inflammation. Methods. We measured lung function, lung lavage inflammatory and airway epithelial goblet cell count, exhaled NO, nitrate and nitrite concentration, and airway NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3 protein content. Results. Deletion of NOS1 or NOS3 increases NOS2 protein present in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of air-exposed animals. Exposure to allergen significantly reduced the expression of NOS2 protein in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of the NOS3−/− strain only. This reduction in NOS2 expression was not due to the replacement of epithelial cells with goblet cells as remaining epithelial cells did not express NOS2. NOS1−/− animals had significantly reduced goblet cell metaplasia compared to C57Bl/6 wt, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− allergen-exposed mice. Conclusion. The airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells maintain a stable airway NO concentration under noninflammatory conditions. This “homeostatic” mechanism is unable to distinguish between NOS derived from the different constitutive NOS isoforms. NOS3 is essential for the expression of NOS2 under inflammatory conditions, while NOS1 expression contributes to allergen-induced goblet cell metaplasia. PMID:20953358

  9. The effect of phytocannabinoids on airway hyper-responsiveness, airway inflammation, and cough.

    PubMed

    Makwana, Raj; Venkatasamy, Radhakrishnan; Spina, Domenico; Page, Clive

    2015-04-01

    Cannabis has been demonstrated to have bronchodilator, anti-inflammatory, and antitussive activity in the airways, but information on the active cannabinoids, their receptors, and the mechanisms for these effects is limited. We compared the effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabigerol, cannabichromene, cannabidiolic acid, and tetrahydrocannabivarin on contractions of the guinea pig-isolated trachea and bronchoconstriction induced by nerve stimulation or methacholine in anesthetized guinea pigs following exposure to saline or the proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). CP55940 (2-[(1R,2R,5R)-5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl) cyclohexyl]-5-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenol), a synthetic cannabinoid agonist, was also investigated in vitro. The cannabinoids were also evaluated on TNF-α- and lipopolysaccharide-induced leukocyte infiltration into the lungs and citric acid-induced cough responses in guinea pigs. TNF-α, but not saline, augmented tracheal contractility and bronchoconstriction induced by nerve stimulation, but not methacholine. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol and CP55940 reduced TNF-α-enhanced nerve-evoked contractions in vitro to the magnitude of saline-incubated trachea. This effect was antagonized by the cannabinoid 1 (CB(1)) and CB(2) receptor antagonists AM251 [N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-caroxamide] and JTE907 [N-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-ylmethyl)-1,2-dihydro-7-methoxy-2-oxo-8-(pentyloxy)-3-quinolinecarboxamide], respectively. Tetrahydrocannabivarin partially inhibited the TNF-α-enhanced nerve-evoked contractions, whereas the other cannabinoids were without effect. The effect of cannabidiol and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol together did not differ from that of the latter alone. Only Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibited TNF-α-enhanced vagal-induced bronchoconstriction, neutrophil recruitment to the airways, and citric acid-induced cough responses. TNF-α potentiated contractions

  10. Airway inflammation, airway responsiveness and cough before and after inhaled budesonide in patients with eosinophilic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Brightling, C E; Ward, R; Wardlaw, A J; Pavord, I D

    2000-04-01

    Eosinophilic bronchitis is a common cause of chronic cough, characterized by sputum eosinophilia similar to that seen in asthma, but unlike asthma the patients have no objective evidence of variable airflow obstruction or airway hyperresponsiveness. The reason for the different functional associations is unclear. The authors have tested the hypothesis that in eosinophilic bronchitis the inflammation is mainly localized in the upper airway. In an open study the authors measured the lower (provocative concentration causing a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (PC20)) and upper (PC25 MIF50) airway responsiveness to histamine, lower and upper airway inflammation using induced sputum and nasal lavage, in II patients with eosinophilic bronchitis. The authors assessed changes in these measures and in cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin and cough severity after 400 microg of inhaled budesonide for 4 weeks. A nasal eosinophilia was present in only three patients with one having upper airway hyperresponsiveness. Following treatment with inhaled corticosteroids the geometric mean sputum eosinophil count decreased from 12.8% to 2.9% (mean difference 4.4-fold, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.14-10.02), the mean +/- sem cough visual analogue score on a 100 mm scale decreased from 27.2 +/- 6.6 mm to 12.6 +/- 5.7 mm (mean difference 14.6, 95% CI 9.1-20.1) and the cough sensitivity assessed as the capsaicin concentration required to cause two coughs (C2) and five coughs (C5) improved (C2 mean difference 0.75 doubling concentrations, 95% CI 0.36-1.1; C5 mean difference 1.3 doubling concentration, 95% CI 0.6-2.1). There was a significant positive correlation between the fold change in sputum eosinophil count and doubling dose change in C5 after inhaled budesonide (r=0.61). It is concluded that upper airway inflammation is not prominent in eosinophilic bronchitis and that inhaled budesonide improves the sputum eosinophilia, cough severity and sensitivity suggesting a

  11. Airway purinergic responses in healthy, atopic nonasthmatic, and atopic asthmatic subjects exposed to ozone**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Context: Ozone exposure triggers airway inflammatory responses that maybe influenced bybiologically active purine metabolites. Objective:To examinethe relationships between airway purine metabolites and established inflammatory markers of ozone exposure, and to determine if thes...

  12. The Epithelial Anion Transporter Pendrin Is Induced by Allergy and Rhinovirus Infection, Regulates Airway Surface Liquid, and Increases Airway Reactivity and Inflammation in an Asthma Model1

    PubMed Central

    Nakagami, Yasuhiro; Favoreto, Silvio; Zhen, Guohua; Park, Sung-Woo; Nguyenvu, Louis T.; Kuperman, Douglas A.; Dolganov, Gregory M.; Huang, Xiaozhu; Boushey, Homer A.; Avila, Pedro C.; Erle, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma exacerbations can be triggered by viral infections or allergens. The Th2 cytokines IL-13 and IL-4 are produced during allergic responses and cause increases in airway epithelial cell mucus, electrolyte and water secretion into the airway surface liquid (ASL). Since ASL dehydration can cause airway inflammation and obstruction, ion transporters could play a role in pathogenesis of asthma exacerbations. We previously reported that expression of the epithelial cell anion transporter pendrin is markedly increased in response to IL-13. Here we show that pendrin plays a role in allergic airway disease and in regulation of ASL thickness. Pendrin-deficient mice had less allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity and inflammation than control mice although other aspects of the Th2 response were preserved. In cultures of IL-13-stimulated mouse tracheal epithelial cells, pendrin deficiency caused an increase in ASL thickness, suggesting that reductions in allergen-induced hyperreactivity and inflammation in pendrin-deficient mice result from improved ASL hydration. To determine whether pendrin might also play a role in virus-induced exacerbations of asthma, we measured pendrin mRNA expression in human subjects with naturally occurring common colds caused by rhinovirus and found a 4.9-fold-increase in mean expression during colds. Studies of cultured human bronchial epithelial cells indicated that this increase could be explained by the combined effects of rhinovirus and IFN-γ, a Th1 cytokine induced during virus infection. We conclude that pendrin regulates ASL thickness and may be an important contributor to asthma exacerbations induced by viral infections or allergens. PMID:18641360

  13. Heightened airway responsiveness in normal female children compared with adults.

    PubMed

    Tepper, R S; Stevens, J; Eigen, H

    1994-03-01

    Studies have suggested that airway responsiveness declines with maturation; however, studies comparing infants, children, and adults are confounded by differences in size as well as maturation. Therefore, to determine whether maturation has a significant affect on airway responsiveness, we compared normal female children (n = 9; mean age = 13.6 yr) and adults (n = 7; mean age = 42.4 yr) who were matched for body size. Bronchial challenge tests were performed with increasing methacholine concentrations to a maximum of 30 mg/ml. At baseline, there were no significant differences between the two groups in lung volumes (TGV, RV, TLC) or flow-volume curves (FEV1, average forced expiratory flow rate between 25% and 75% of the vital capacity [FEF25-75], FVC). All subjects but one adolescent completed the challenge (30 mg/ml). The children had a greater percentage decline from baseline in FEV1 than the adults (17 versus 7%, p < 0.03). The percentage decline in FEF25-75 was greater for the children than for the adults, but the difference was not statistically significant (35 versus 20%, p < 0.10). Compared with the children, the adults more often demonstrated a plateau in their dose-response curves for FEV1 (22 versus 86%) and for FEF25-75 (33 versus 100%). We conclude that normal female children have a greater airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine than do adults, and that this difference is not related to baseline lung size, airway caliber, or delivered methacholine dose. PMID:8118636

  14. Airway reflexes, autonomic function, and cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed Central

    Widdicombe, J; Lee, L Y

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we review the cardiovascular responses to the inhalation of irritants and pollutants. Many sensory receptors in the respiratory system, from nose to alveoli, respond to these irritants and set up powerful reflex changes, including those in the cardiovascular system. Systemic hypotension or hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, bradycardia, tachycardia, and dysrhythmias have all been described previously. Most of the experiments have been acute and have been performed on anesthetized experimental animals. Experiments on humans suggest we have similar sensory systems and reflex responses. However, we must use caution when applying the animal results to humans. Most animal experiments, unlike those with humans, have been performed using general anesthesia, with irritants administered in high concentrations, and often to a restricted part of the respiratory tract. Species differences in the response to irritants are well established. We must be even more careful when applying the results of acute experiments in animals to the pathophysiologic changes observed in prolonged exposure to environmental pollution in humans. PMID:11544167

  15. Early interleukin 4-dependent response can induce airway hyperreactivity before development of airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    To, Y; Dohi, M; Tanaka, R; Sato, A; Nakagome, K; Yamamoto, K

    2001-10-01

    In experimental models of bronchial asthma with mice, airway inflammation and increase in airway hyperreactivity (AHR) are induced by a combination of systemic sensitization and airway challenge with allergens. In this report, we present another possibility: that systemic antigen-specific sensitization alone can induce AHR before the development of inflammation in the airway. Male BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) by a combination of intraperitoneal injection and aerosol inhalation, and various parameters for airway inflammation and hyperreactivity were sequentially analyzed. Bronchial response measured by a noninvasive method (enhanced pause) and the eosinophil count and interleukin (IL)-5 concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) gradually increased following the sensitization, and significant increase was achieved after repeated OVA aerosol inhalation along with development of histologic changes of the airway. In contrast, AHR was already significantly increased by systemic sensitization alone, although airway inflammation hardly developed at that time point. BALF IL-4 concentration and the expression of IL-4 mRNA in the lung reached maximal values after the systemic sensitization, then subsequently decreased. Treatment of mice with anti-IL-4 neutralizing antibody during systemic sensitization significantly suppressed this early increase in AHR. In addition, IL-4 gene-targeted mice did not reveal this early increase in AHR by systemic sensitization. These results suggest that an immune response in the lung in an early stage of sensitization can induce airway hyperreactivity before development of an eosinophilic airway inflammation in BALB/c mice and that IL-4 plays an essential role in this process. If this early increase in AHR does occur in sensitized human infants, it could be another therapeutic target for early prevention of the future onset of asthma. PMID:11598151

  16. Distinct Tlr4-expressing cell compartments control neutrophilic and eosinophilic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    McAlees, J W; Whitehead, G S; Harley, I T W; Cappelletti, M; Rewerts, C L; Holdcroft, A M; Divanovic, S; Wills-Karp, M; Finkelman, F D; Karp, C L; Cook, D N

    2015-07-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic, inflammatory lung disease. Some forms of allergic asthma are characterized by T helper type 2 (Th2)-driven eosinophilia, whereas others are distinguished by Th17-driven neutrophilia. Stimulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on hematopoietic and airway epithelial cells (AECs) contributes to the inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and allergens, but the specific contribution of TLR4 in these cell compartments to airway inflammatory responses remains poorly understood. We used novel, conditionally mutant Tlr4(fl/fl) mice to define the relative contributions of AEC and hematopoietic cell Tlr4 expression to LPS- and allergen-induced airway inflammation. We found that Tlr4 expression by hematopoietic cells is critical for neutrophilic airway inflammation following LPS exposure and for Th17-driven neutrophilic responses to the house dust mite (HDM) lysates and ovalbumin (OVA). Conversely, Tlr4 expression by AECs was found to be important for robust eosinophilic airway inflammation following sensitization and challenge with these same allergens. Thus, Tlr4 expression by hematopoietic and airway epithelial cells controls distinct arms of the immune response to inhaled allergens. PMID:25465099

  17. Cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin D2/CRTH2 pathway mediates double-stranded RNA-induced enhancement of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Yoshiki; Asano, Koichiro; Niimi, Kyoko; Fukunaga, Koichi; Wakaki, Misa; Kagyo, Junko; Takihara, Takahisa; Ueda, Soichiro; Nakajima, Takeshi; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Yusuke; Shiomi, Tetsuya; Sayama, Koichi; Kagawa, Shizuko; Ikeda, Eiji; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Kinya; Nakamura, Masataka; Miyasho, Taku; Ishizaka, Akitoshi

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory RNA viruses responsible for the common cold often worsen airway inflammation and bronchial responsiveness, two characteristic features of human asthma. We studied the effects of dsRNA, a nucleotide synthesized during viral replication, on airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in murine models of asthma. Intratracheal instillation of poly I:C, a synthetic dsRNA, increased the airway eosinophilia and enhanced bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine in OVA-sensitized, exposed rats. These changes were associated with induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and COX-2-dependent PGD2 synthesis in the lungs, particularly in alveolar macrophages. The direct intratracheal instillation of PGD2 enhanced the eosinophilic inflammation in OVA-exposed animals, whereas pretreatment with a dual antagonist against the PGD2 receptor-(CRTH2) and the thromboxane A2 receptor, but not with a thromboxane A2 receptor-specific antagonist, nearly completely eliminated the dsRNA-induced worsening of airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. CRTH2-deficient mice had the same degree of allergen-induced airway eosinophilia as wild-type mice, but they did not exhibit a dsRNA-induced increase in eosinophil accumulation. Our data demonstrate that COX-2-dependent production of PGD2 followed by eosinophil recruitment into the airways via a CRTH2 receptor are the major pathogenetic factors responsible for the dsRNA-induced enhancement of airway inflammation and responsiveness. PMID:18097056

  18. Nasal airway responses to nasal continuous positive airway pressure breathing: An in-vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    White, David E; Bartley, Jim; Shakeel, Muhammad; Nates, Roy J; Hankin, Robin K S

    2016-06-14

    The nasal cycle, through variation in nasal airflow partitioning, allows the upper airway to accommodate the contrasting demands of air conditioning and removal of entrapped air contaminants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) breathing has on both nasal airflow partitioning and nasal geometry. Using a custom-made nasal mask, twenty healthy participants had the airflow in each naris measured during normal nasal breathing followed by nCPAP breathing. Eight participants also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasal region during spontaneous nasal breathing, and then nCPAP breathing over a range of air pressures. During nCPAP breathing, a simultaneous reduction in airflow through the patent airway together with a corresponding increase in airway flow within the congested nasal airway were observed in sixteen of the twenty participants. Nasal airflow resistance is inversely proportional to airway cross-sectional area. MRI data analysis during nCPAP breathing confirmed airway cross-sectional area reduced along the patent airway while the congested airway experienced an increase in this parameter. During awake breathing, nCPAP disturbs the normal inter-nasal airflow partitioning. This could partially explain the adverse nasal drying symptoms frequently reported by many users of this therapy. PMID:27173595

  19. Airway responsiveness to hypertonic saline: dose-response slope or PD15?

    PubMed

    de Meer, G; Marks, G B; de Jongste, J C; Brunekreef, B

    2005-01-01

    The result of airway challenge test with hypertonic saline (HS) is expressed as the dose causing a 15% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1; PD15). A noncensored measure, such as the dose-response slope (DRS), allows the evaluation of the risk of asthma for subjects with a fall in FEV1 <15%. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between airway responsiveness to HS by PD15 or DRS, asthma symptoms and markers of eosinophilic inflammation. Data on current wheeze and airway responsiveness were obtained for 1,107 children (aged 8-13 yrs). Blood eosinophils and serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) were assessed in subsets (n = 683 and 485). PD15 was assessed if FEV1 fell > or =15%, and the DRS was calculated for all tests. Graphs were constructed to visualise relationships with current wheeze, blood eosinophils and serum ECP. Odds ratios and Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify these relationships. Children with features of asthma had lower PD15 and higher DRS, and separation was most pronounced for DRS. Prevalence of current wheeze increased continuously over the entire range of DRS values. Blood eosinophils were significantly higher only for the highest values of DRS. In conclusion, the continuous relationship between airway responsiveness and asthma symptoms is in favour of a noncensored measure of airway responsiveness, such as the dose-response slope. PMID:15640337

  20. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    The field of nanotechnology is continually advancing, and increasing amounts of consumer goods are being produced using engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). The health risks of occupational and/or consumer exposure to ENMs are not completely understood, although significant research indicates that pulmonary exposure to nanomaterials induces toxic effects in the lungs of exposed animals. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are a specific category of ENMs and consist of sheets of graphene rolled into cylinders that are multiple layers thick in order to strengthen their rigidity. MWCNTs have a fiber-like shape, similar to that of asbestos, which allows for a high aspect ratio and makes them difficult to clear from the lung. Studies with rodent models have demonstrated that pulmonary exposure to ENMs, in particular MWCNTs, results in acute lung inflammation and the subsequent development of chronic fibrosis, suggesting a potential human health risk to individuals involved in the manufacturing of products utilizing these nanomaterials. Induction of IL-1beta secretion via activation of the inflammasome is a prime mechanism of MWCNT-induced inflammation. The inflammasome is a multi-protein scaffold found in a variety of cell types that forms in response to a variety of immune signals, including particulates. Sensitization with allergens, such as house dust mite (HDM), increases levels of the T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 in mice and in humans, and there is particular cause for concern in cases of MWCNT exposure in individuals with pre-existing allergic airway disease, such as asthma. MWCNT exposure exacerbates airway inflammation and fibrosis in animal models of pre-existing allergic asthma, suggesting that individuals suffering from asthma are more susceptible to the toxic pulmonary effects of MWCNT exposure. Asthma is an exceptionally prominent human disease, and therefore the goal of this research was to better understand how pre-existing allergic airway

  1. Airway epithelial cell response to human metapneumovirus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, X.; Liu, T.; Spetch, L.; Kolli, D.; Garofalo, R.P.; Casola, A.

    2007-11-10

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. In this study, we show that hMPV can infect in a similar manner epithelial cells representative of different tracts of the airways. hMPV-induced expression of chemokines IL-8 and RANTES in primary small alveolar epithelial cells (SAE) and in a human alveolar type II-like epithelial cell line (A549) was similar, suggesting that A549 cells can be used as a model to study lower airway epithelial cell responses to hMPV infection. A549 secreted a variety of CXC and CC chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons, following hMPV infection. hMPV was also a strong inducer of transcription factors belonging to nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) families, which are known to orchestrate the expression of inflammatory and immunomodulatory mediators.

  2. AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONSE TO HUMAN METAPNEUMOVIRUS INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    X, Bao; T, Liu; L, Spetch; D, Kolli; R.P, Garofalo; A, Casola

    2007-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. In this study, we show that hMPV can infect in a similar manner epithelial cells representative of different tracts of the airways. hMPV-induced expression of chemokines IL-8 and RANTES in primary small alveolar epithelial cells (SAE) and in a human alveolar type II-like epithelial cell line (A549) was similar, suggesting that A549 cells can be used as a model to study lower airway epithelial cell responses to hMPV infection. A549 secreted a variety of CXC and CC chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons, following hMPV infection. hMPV was also a strong inducer of transcription factors belonging to nuclear factor (NF)-κB, interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) families, which are known to orchestrate the expression of inflammatory and immuno-modulatory mediators. PMID:17655903

  3. Purified Timothy grass pollen major allergen Phl p 1 may contribute to the modulation of allergic responses through a pleiotropic induction of cytokines and chemokines from airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Röschmann, K I L; van Kuijen, A-M; Luiten, S; Jonker, M J; Breit, T M; Fokkens, W J; Petersen, A; van Drunen, C M

    2012-01-01

    By definition, allergens are proteins with the ability to elicit powerful T helper lymphocyte type 2 (Th2) responses, culminating in immunoglobulin (Ig)E antibody production. Why specific proteins cause aberrant immune responses has remained largely unanswered. Recent data suggest that there may be several molecular paths that may affect allergenicity of proteins. The focus of this study is the response of airway epithelium to a major allergen from Phleum pratense Phl p 1. Instead of focusing on a few genes and proteins that might be affected by the major allergen, our aim was to obtain a broader view on the immune stimulatory capacity of Phl p 1. We therefore performed detailed analysis on mRNA and protein level by using a microarray approach to define Phl p 1-induced gene expression. We found that this allergen induces modulation and release of a broad range of mediators, indicating it to be a powerful trigger of the immune system. We were able to show that genes belonging to the GO cluster ‘cell communication’ were among the most prominent functional groups, which is also reflected in cytokines and chemokines building centres in a computational model of direct gene interaction. Further detailed comparison of grass pollen extract (GPE)- and Phl p 1-induced gene expression might be beneficial with regard to the application of single components within diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:22288584

  4. Plasticity of Airway Epithelial Cell Transcriptome in Response to Flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Joan G.; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Basom, Ryan S.; Gharib, Sina A.

    2015-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AEC) are critical components of the inflammatory and immune response during exposure to pathogens. AECs in monolayer culture and differentiated epithelial cells in air-liquid interface (ALI) represent two distinct and commonly used in vitro models, yet differences in their response to pathogens have not been investigated. In this study, we compared the transcriptional effects of flagellin on AECs in monolayer culture versus ALI culture using whole-genome microarrays and RNA sequencing. We exposed monolayer and ALI AEC cultures to flagellin in vitro and analyzed the transcriptional response by microarray and RNA-sequencing. ELISA and RT-PCR were used to validate changes in select candidates. We found that AECs cultured in monolayer and ALI have strikingly different transcriptional states at baseline. When challenged with flagellin, monolayer AEC cultures greatly increased transcription of numerous genes mapping to wounding response, immunity and inflammatory response. In contrast, AECs in ALI culture had an unexpectedly muted response to flagellin, both in number of genes expressed and relative enrichment of inflammatory and immune pathways. We conclude that in vitro culturing methods have a dramatic effect on the transcriptional profile of AECs at baseline and after stimulation with flagellin. These differences suggest that epithelial responses to pathogen challenges are distinctly different in culture models of intact and injured epithelium. PMID:25668187

  5. Plasticity of airway epithelial cell transcriptome in response to flagellin.

    PubMed

    Clark, Joan G; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Basom, Ryan S; Gharib, Sina A

    2015-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AEC) are critical components of the inflammatory and immune response during exposure to pathogens. AECs in monolayer culture and differentiated epithelial cells in air-liquid interface (ALI) represent two distinct and commonly used in vitro models, yet differences in their response to pathogens have not been investigated. In this study, we compared the transcriptional effects of flagellin on AECs in monolayer culture versus ALI culture using whole-genome microarrays and RNA sequencing. We exposed monolayer and ALI AEC cultures to flagellin in vitro and analyzed the transcriptional response by microarray and RNA-sequencing. ELISA and RT-PCR were used to validate changes in select candidates. We found that AECs cultured in monolayer and ALI have strikingly different transcriptional states at baseline. When challenged with flagellin, monolayer AEC cultures greatly increased transcription of numerous genes mapping to wounding response, immunity and inflammatory response. In contrast, AECs in ALI culture had an unexpectedly muted response to flagellin, both in number of genes expressed and relative enrichment of inflammatory and immune pathways. We conclude that in vitro culturing methods have a dramatic effect on the transcriptional profile of AECs at baseline and after stimulation with flagellin. These differences suggest that epithelial responses to pathogen challenges are distinctly different in culture models of intact and injured epithelium. PMID:25668187

  6. Different airway inflammatory responses in asthmatic and healthy humans exposed to diesel.

    PubMed

    Stenfors, N; Nordenhäll, C; Salvi, S S; Mudway, I; Söderberg, M; Blomberg, A; Helleday, R; Levin, J O; Holgate, S T; Kelly, F J; Frew, A J; Sandström, T

    2004-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution adversely affects the airways, with asthmatic subjects thought to be especially sensitive. The authors hypothesised that exposure to diesel exhaust (DE), a major source of PM, would induce airway neutrophilia in healthy subjects, and that either these responses would be exaggerated in subjects with mild allergic asthma, or DE would exacerbate pre-existent allergic airways. Healthy and mild asthmatic subjects were exposed for 2 h to ambient levels of DE (particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 microm (PM10) 108 microg x m(-3)) and lung function and airway inflammation were assessed. Both groups showed an increase in airway resistance of similar magnitude after DE exposure. Healthy subjects developed airway inflammation 6 h after DE exposure, with airways neutrophilia and lymphocytosis together with an increase in interleukin-8 (IL-8) protein in lavage fluid, increased IL-8 messenger ribonucleic acid expression in the bronchial mucosa and upregulation of the endothelial adhesion molecules. In asthmatic subjects, DE exposure did not induce a neutrophilic response or exacerbate their pre-existing eosinophilic airway inflammation. Epithelial staining for the cytokine IL-10 was increased after DE in the asthmatic group. Differential effects on the airways of healthy subjects and asthmatics of particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 microm at concentrations below current World Health Organisation air quality standards have been observed in this study. Further work is required to elucidate the significance of these differential responses. PMID:14738236

  7. Bystander suppression of allergic airway inflammation by lung resident memory CD8+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsland, Benjamin J.; Harris, Nicola L.; Camberis, Mali; Kopf, Manfred; Hook, Sarah M.; Le Gros, Graham

    2004-04-01

    CD8+ memory T cells have recently been recognized as playing a key role in natural immunity against unrelated viral infections, a phenomenon referred to as "heterologous antiviral immunity." We now provide data that the cellular immunological interactions that underlie such heterologous immunity can play an equally important role in regulating T helper 2 immune responses and protecting mucosal surfaces from allergen-induced inflammation. Our data show that CD8+ T cells, either retained in the lung after infection with influenza virus, or adoptively transferred via the intranasal route can suppress allergic airway inflammation. The suppression is mediated by IFN-, which acts to reduce the activation level, T helper 2 cytokine production, airways hyperresponsiveness, and migration of allergen-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung, whereas the systemic and draining lymph node responses remain unchanged. Of note, adoptive transfer of previously activated transgenic CD8+ T cells conferred protection against allergic airway inflammation, even in the absence of specific-antigen. Airway resident CD8+ T cells produced IFN- when directly exposed to conditioned media from activated dendritic cells or the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18. Taken together these data indicate that effector/memory CD8+ T cells present in the airways produce IFN- after inflammatory stimuli, independent of specific-antigen, and as a consequence play a key role in modifying the degree and frequency of allergic responses in the lung.

  8. Prevention of non-specific airway hyperreactivity after allergen challenge in guinea-pigs by the PAF receptor antagonist SDZ 64-412.

    PubMed Central

    Havill, A. M.; Van Valen, R. G.; Handley, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    1. Allergen challenge by aerosol in sensitized guinea-pigs elicited non-specific airway hyperreactivity assessed by reactivity to i.v. histamine or acetylcholine. Airway hyperreactivity to histamine persisted for at least 48 h and was accompanied by pulmonary eosinophilia as determined by bronchoalveolar lavage cell analysis. 2. Airway hyperreactivity was independent of vagal reflex mechanisms since it was not abrogated by bilateral vagotomy. 3. The novel platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist SDZ 64-412 inhibited the development of airway hyperreactivity, as measured 24 h after aerosol allergen challenge, when given as a single treatment orally 2 h before allergen challenge. The PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2086 as well as methylprednisolone and ketotifen also showed efficacy in preventing development of airway hyperreactivity. 4. Neither the two PAF antagonists nor ketotifen had any effect on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophil numbers. Methylprednisolone was the only substance which readily prevented eosinophil recruitment in addition to airway hyperreactivity. 5. We conclude that allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity in guinea-pigs is inhibited by prophylactic anti-asthma drugs and specific PAF receptor antagonists, thus demonstrating a pivotal role of PAF in this response. There was a lack of correlation between airway hyperreactivity and the presence of BAL eosinophils. PMID:2328403

  9. Differential Activation of Airway Eosinophils Induces IL-13 Mediated Allergic Th2 Pulmonary Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, EA; Doyle, AD; Colbert, DC; Zellner, KR; Protheroe, CA; LeSuer, WE; Lee, NA.; Lee, JJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophils are hallmark cells of allergic Th2 respiratory inflammation. However, the relative importance of eosinophil activation and the induction of effector functions such as the expression of IL-13 to allergic Th2 pulmonary disease remain to be defined. Methods Wild type or cytokine deficient (IL-13−/− or IL-4−/−) eosinophils treated with cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-4, IL-33) were adoptively transferred into eosinophil-deficient recipient mice subjected to allergen provocation using established models of respiratory inflammation. Allergen-induced pulmonary changes were assessed. Results In contrast to the transfer of untreated blood eosinophils to the lungs of recipient eosinophildeficient mice, which induced no immune/inflammatory changes either in the lung or lung draining lymph nodes (LDLNs), pretreatment of blood eosinophils with GM-CSF prior to transfer elicited trafficking of these eosinophils to LDLNs. In turn, these LDLN eosinophils elicited the accumulation of dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells to these same LDLNs without inducing pulmonary inflammation. However, exposure of eosinophils to GM-CSF, IL-4 and IL-33 prior to transfer induced not only immune events in the LDLN, but also allergen-mediated increases in airway Th2 cytokine/chemokine levels, the subsequent accumulation of CD4+ T cells as well as alternatively activated (M2) macrophages, and the induction of pulmonary histopathologies. Significantly, this allergic respiratory inflammation was dependent on eosinophil-derived IL-13 whereas IL-4 expression by eosinophils had no significant role. Conclusion The data demonstrate the differential activation of eosinophils as a function of cytokine exposure and suggest that eosinophil-specific IL-13 expression by activated cells is a necessary component of the subsequent allergic Th2 pulmonary pathologies. PMID:26009788

  10. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    The field of nanotechnology is continually advancing, and increasing amounts of consumer goods are being produced using engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). The health risks of occupational and/or consumer exposure to ENMs are not completely understood, although significant research indicates that pulmonary exposure to nanomaterials induces toxic effects in the lungs of exposed animals. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are a specific category of ENMs and consist of sheets of graphene rolled into cylinders that are multiple layers thick in order to strengthen their rigidity. MWCNTs have a fiber-like shape, similar to that of asbestos, which allows for a high aspect ratio and makes them difficult to clear from the lung. Studies with rodent models have demonstrated that pulmonary exposure to ENMs, in particular MWCNTs, results in acute lung inflammation and the subsequent development of chronic fibrosis, suggesting a potential human health risk to individuals involved in the manufacturing of products utilizing these nanomaterials. Induction of IL-1beta secretion via activation of the inflammasome is a prime mechanism of MWCNT-induced inflammation. The inflammasome is a multi-protein scaffold found in a variety of cell types that forms in response to a variety of immune signals, including particulates. Sensitization with allergens, such as house dust mite (HDM), increases levels of the T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 in mice and in humans, and there is particular cause for concern in cases of MWCNT exposure in individuals with pre-existing allergic airway disease, such as asthma. MWCNT exposure exacerbates airway inflammation and fibrosis in animal models of pre-existing allergic asthma, suggesting that individuals suffering from asthma are more susceptible to the toxic pulmonary effects of MWCNT exposure. Asthma is an exceptionally prominent human disease, and therefore the goal of this research was to better understand how pre-existing allergic airway

  11. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of dendritic cells induces interleukin-10 producing allergen-specific T cells in vitro but fails to prevent allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Birgit; Freund, Tobias; Rha, Ro-Dug; Dittrich, Anna-Maria; Quarcoo, David; Hutloff, Andreas; Hamelmann, Eckard

    2009-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in directing naive T cells towards a Th1/Th2 or regulatory T cells (Treg) cell phenotype. In this context, interleukin (IL)-10 has been shown to exhibit immune regulatory capacities. The aim of this study was to delineate the influence of high-IL-10-producing DCs on DC-T-cell interactions in inhibiting allergen-induced airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in a murine model of allergic airway disease. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) were generated from hemopoietic progenitors by culture with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and stimulated with ovalbumin (OVA) +/- lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The effects of ovalbumin-pulsed BMDCs on cytokine production by allergen-specific naive T cells were studied in vitro. The development of airway inflammation in Balb/c mice was determined after intranasal administration of BMDCs in vivo. LPS stimulation of BMDCs strongly enhanced IL-10 production. Coculture of LPS-modulated DCs exhibiting increased IL-10 production with allergen-specific naive T cells reduced the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-5, but enhanced the production of IL-10. After blockade with anti-IL-10 plus anti-IL-10-receptor antibodies, the level of IFN-gamma and IL-5 production by cocultured T cells was restored, underlining the regulatory function of IL-10. Intranasal administration of high-IL-10-producing LPS-stimulated, OVA-primed BMDCs prior to repetitive airway allergen challenges resulted in an even enhanced airway inflammation. These data demonstrate that increased IL-10 production by DCs may be a critical element for T-cell activation and differentiation in the context of allergen-induced immune responses in vitro. However, this DC modulation did not translate into suppression of allergic airway disease in vivo. PMID:19415548

  12. Airway response to ultra short-term exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Fouke, J.M.; Delemos, R.A.; McFadden, E.R. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    To determine whether acute short-term exposure to oxidant pollutants can cause changes in respiratory mechanics, we gave 0.5 ppm ozone for 5 min to 7 baboons. We measured pulmonary resistance (RL) and obtained dose response curves to methacholine before and after the exposures. This brief insult increased resistance (control RL = 1.53 +/- 0.21 cm H/sub 2/O.L-1 s; post-ozone RL = 3.53 +/- 0.54 cm H/sub 2/O.L-1 s). On a second occasion, 6 of these animals were restudied before and after the administration of cromolyn sodium. Although this drug had no effect on the measurements of mechanics made in the control period, it significantly reduced the ozone-induced changes in mechanics. The increase in RL was 52% of that produced in the first study. The results demonstrated that the ozone injury with its acute and subacute airway sequelae occurs quite rapidly and after very brief exposure. The time course of the change in mechanics and the effects of cromolyn suggest the hypothesis that surface epithelial cells are disrupted, causing subsequent release of bronchoconstricting agents.

  13. Activation of Nonclassical CD1d-Restricted NK T Cells Induces Airway Hyperreactivity in β2-Microglobulin-Deficient Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Everett H.; Pichavant, Muriel; Akbari, Omid; Yasumi, Takahiro; Savage, Paul B.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Umetsu, Dale T.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-driven eosinophilic airway inflammation and by a central feature called airway hyperreactivity (AHR), development of which requires the presence of classical type I invariant NK T (iNKT) cells. Allergen-induced AHR, however, develops in β2-microglobulin (β2m)−/− mice, which lack classical iNKT cells, suggesting that in some situations iNKT cells may be dispensable for the development of AHR. In contrast, our studies now suggest that a CD1d-restricted, NK1.1+ noninvariant TCR NKT cell population is present in β2m−/− mice and is responsible for the development of AHR but not for Th2 responses. Furthermore, treatment of β2m−/− mice with anti-CD1d mAb or anti-NK1.1 mAb unexpectedly abolished allergen-induced AHR. The CD1-restricted NKT cells in these mice, which failed to respond to α-galactosylceramide and which therefore were not classical type I iNKT cells, appear to represent an NKT cell subset restricted by a β2m-independent form of CD1d. These results indicate that, although classical type I iNKT cells are normally required for the development of AHR, under different circumstances other NKT cell subsets, including nonclassical NKT cells, may substitute for classical iNKT cells and induce AHR. PMID:18802058

  14. BLOCKADE OF TRKA OR P75 NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTORS ATTENUATES DIESEL PARTICULATE-INDUCED ENHANCEMENT OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airway resistance. Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) associated with the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbates allergic airways responses. We tested t...

  15. A fungal protease allergen provokes airway hyper-responsiveness in asthma.

    PubMed

    Balenga, Nariman A; Klichinsky, Michael; Xie, Zhihui; Chan, Eunice C; Zhao, Ming; Jude, Joseph; Laviolette, Michel; Panettieri, Reynold A; Druey, Kirk M

    2015-01-01

    Asthma, a common disorder that affects >250 million people worldwide, is defined by exaggerated bronchoconstriction to inflammatory mediators including acetylcholine (ACh), bradykinin and histamine-also termed airway hyper-responsiveness. Nearly 10% of people with asthma have severe, treatment-resistant disease, which is frequently associated with immunoglobulin-E sensitization to ubiquitous fungi, typically Aspergillus fumigatus (Af). Here we show that a major Af allergen, Asp f13, which is a serine protease, alkaline protease 1 (Alp 1), promotes airway hyper-responsiveness by infiltrating the bronchial submucosa and disrupting airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. Alp 1-mediated ECM degradation evokes pathophysiological RhoA-dependent Ca(2+) sensitivity and bronchoconstriction. These findings support a pathogenic mechanism in asthma and other lung diseases associated with epithelial barrier impairment, whereby ASM cells respond directly to inhaled environmental allergens to generate airway hyper-responsiveness. PMID:25865874

  16. Increase in passive stiffness at reduced airway smooth muscle length: potential impact on airway responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Ynuk; Solomon, Dennis; Chin, Leslie Y M; Lian, Kevin; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2010-03-01

    The amplitude of strain in airway smooth muscle (ASM) produced by oscillatory perturbations such as tidal breathing or deep inspiration (DI) influences the force loss in the muscle and is therefore a key determinant of the bronchoprotective and bronchodilatory effects of these breathing maneuvers. The stiffness of unstimulated ASM (passive stiffness) directly influences the amplitude of strain. The nature of the passive stiffness is, however, not clear. In this study, we measured the passive stiffness of ovine ASM at different muscle lengths (relative to in situ length, which was used as a reference length, L(ref)) and states of adaptation to gain insights into the origin of this muscle property. The results showed that the passive stiffness was relatively independent of muscle length, possessing a constant plateau value over a length range from 0.62 to 1.25 L(ref). Following a halving of ASM length, passive stiffness decreased substantially (by 71%) but redeveloped over time ( approximately 30 min) at the shorter length to reach 65% of the stiffness value at L(ref), provided that the muscle was stimulated to contract at least once over a approximately 30-min period. The redevelopment and maintenance of passive stiffness were dependent on the presence of Ca(2+) but unaffected by latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin filament polymerization. The maintenance of passive stiffness was also not affected by blocking myosin cross-bridge cycling using a myosin light chain kinase inhibitor or by blocking the Rho-Rho kinase (RhoK) pathway using a RhoK inhibitor. Our results suggest that the passive stiffness of ASM is labile and capable of redevelopment following length reduction. Redevelopment and maintenance of passive stiffness following muscle shortening could contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness by attenuating the airway wall strain induced by tidal breathing and DI. PMID:20008114

  17. [Influence of nanosize particles of cobalt ferrite on contractile responses of smooth muscle segment of airways].

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, L V; Zaĭtseva, T N; Nosarev, A V; D'iakova, E Iu; Petlina, Z R; Ogorodova, L M; Ageev, B G; Magaeva, A A; Itin, V I; Terekhova, O G; Medvedev, M A

    2012-02-01

    Contractile responses of airways segments of porpoises inhaling nanopowder CoFe2O4 were stidued by means of a mechanographic method. Inhalation of the nanosize particles of CoFe2O4 in vivo and in vitro testing the nanomaterial on isolated smooth muscles led to potentiation histaminergic, cholinergic contractile activity in airways of porpoises and to strengthening of adrenergic relaxing answers. Nanosize particles vary amplitude of hyperpotassium reductions in smooth muscle segments of airways similarly to the effect of depolymerizing drug colchicine. PMID:22650066

  18. Dose-response relationship of ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in unanesthetized guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, M.; Suzuki, S.; Ikeda, H.; Fukuda, T.; Suzuki, J.; Okubo, T. )

    1990-06-01

    The effect of ozone dose (the product of ozone concentration and exposure time) on airway responsiveness was examined in unanesthetized, spontaneously breathing guinea pigs. Airway responsiveness was assessed by measuring specific airway resistance (sRaw) as a function of increasing concentration of inhaled methacholine (Mch) aerosol (the concentration of Mch required in order to double the baseline sRaw: PC200Mch). The airway responsiveness was measured before and at 5 min, 5 h, and 24 h after exposure. A 30-min exposure to 1 ppm ozone (dose 30 ppm.min) did not change PC200Mch at any time after exposure. Both a 90-min exposure to 1 ppm ozone and a 30-min exposure to 3 ppm ozone, which are identical in terms of ozone dose (90 ppm.min), decreased PC200Mch to a similar degree. A 120-min exposure to 3 ppm ozone (360 ppm.min) produced a much greater decrease of PC200Mch at 5 min and 5 h after exposure, compared with low-dose exposure. There was a significant correlation between ozone dose and the change in airway responsiveness. In all groups, the baseline sRaw was increased by approximately 50% at 5 min after exposure, but there was no correlation between the changes in PC200Mch and the baseline sRaw. This study suggests that ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs is closely related to ozone dose.

  19. How the airway smooth muscle in cystic fibrosis reacts in proinflammatory conditions: implications for airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    McCuaig, Sarah; Martin, James G

    2013-04-01

    Among patients with cystic fibrosis there is a high prevalence (40-70%) of asthma signs and symptoms such as cough and wheezing and airway hyper-responsiveness to inhaled histamine or methacholine. Whether these abnormal airway responses are due to a primary deficiency in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) or are secondary to the inflammatory environment in the cystic fibrosis lungs is not clear. A role for the CFTR in smooth muscle function is emerging, and alterations in contractile signalling have been reported in CFTR-deficient airway smooth muscle. Persistent bacterial infection, especially with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, stimulates interleukin-8 release from the airway epithelium, resulting in neutrophilic inflammation. Increased neutrophilia and skewing of CFTR-deficient T-helper cells to type 2 helper T cells creates an inflammatory environment characterised by high concentrations of tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin-8, and interleukin-13, which might all contribute to increased contractility of airway smooth muscle in cystic fibrosis. An emerging role of interleukin-17, which is raised in patients with cystic fibrosis, in airway smooth muscle proliferation and hyper-responsiveness is apparent. Increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the altered smooth muscle physiology in patients with cystic fibrosis might provide insight into airway dysfunction in this disease. PMID:24429094

  20. Acute glutathione depletion leads to enhancement of airway reactivity and inflammation via p38MAPK-iNOS pathway in allergic mice.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, A; Siddiqui, N; Alharbi, Naif O; Alharbi, M M; Imam, F

    2014-09-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a major role in allergic airway responses through a variety of mechanism which include direct scavenging of oxidative species, being a reducing equivalent and regulation of cellular signaling through redox sensitive mechanisms. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of acute GSH depletion on airway reactivity, inflammation and NO signaling in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase was used for depletion of GSH levels. Acute depletion of GSH with BSO worsened allergen induced airway reactivity and inflammation through increase in nitrosative stress as reflected by increased inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression, total nitrates and nitrites (NOx), nitrotyrosine, protein carbonyls, and decreased total antioxidant capacity. Treatment with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and iNOS inhibitors attenuated the effects of GSH depletion on airway reactivity and inflammation through attenuation of nitrosative stress as evidenced by a decrease in NOx, nitrotyrosine, protein carbonyls and increase in total antioxidant capacity (TAC). In conclusion, these data suggest that acute depletion of glutathione is associated with alteration of airway responses through an increase in nitrosative stress in allergic airways of mice. PMID:24978607

  1. Adoptive transfer of allergic airway responses with sensitized lymphocytes in BN rats.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, A; Rossi, P; Renzi, P M; Xu, L J; Guttmann, R D; Martin, J G

    1995-07-01

    To evaluate the role of lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of allergic bronchoconstriction, we investigated whether allergic airway responses are adoptively transferred by antigen-primed lymphocytes in Brown Norway (BN) rats. Animals were actively sensitized to ovalbumin (OA) or sham sensitized, and 14 d later mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from intrathoracic lymph nodes, passed through a nylon wool column, and transferred to naive syngeneic rats. Recipients were challenged with aerosolized OA or bovine serum albumin (BSA) (5% wt/vol) and analyzed for changes in lung resistance (RL), airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine (MCh), and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells. Recipients of MNCs from sensitized rats responded to OA inhalation and exhibited sustained increases in RL throughout the 8-h observation period, but without usual early airway responses. Recipients of sham-sensitized MNCs or BSA-challenged recipients failed to respond to antigen challenge. At 32 h after OA exposure, airway responsiveness to MCh was increased in four of seven rats that had received sensitized MNCs (p = 0.035). BAL eosinophils increased at 32 h in the recipients of both sensitized and sham-sensitized MNCs. However, eosinophil numbers in BAL were inversely correlated with airway responsiveness in the recipients of sensitized MNCs (r = -0.788, p = 0.036). OA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) was undetectable by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in recipient rats following adoptive transfer. In conclusion, allergic late airway responses (LAR) and cholinergic airway hyperresponsiveness, but not antigen-specific IgE and early responses, were adoptively transferred by antigen-primed lymphocytes in BN rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7599864

  2. Gene Expression Changes Associated with the Airway Wall Response to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yahaya, Badrul; McLachlan, Gerry; McCorquodale, Caroline; Collie, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the way in which the airway heals in response to injury is fundamental to dissecting the mechanisms underlying airway disease pathology. As only limited data is available in relation to the in vivo characterisation of the molecular features of repair in the airway we sought to characterise the dynamic changes in gene expression that are associated with the early response to physical injury in the airway wall. Methodology/Principal Findings We profiled gene expression changes in the airway wall using a large animal model of physical injury comprising bronchial brush biopsy in anaesthetised sheep. The experimental design featured sequential studies in the same animals over the course of a week and yielded data relating to the response at 6 hours, and 1, 3 and 7 days after injury. Notable features of the transcriptional response included the early and sustained preponderance of down-regulated genes associated with angiogenesis and immune cell activation, selection and differentiation. Later features of the response included the up-regulation of cell cycle genes at d1 and d3, and the latter pronounced up-regulation of extracellular matrix-related genes at d3 and d7. Conclusions/Significance It is possible to follow the airway wall response to physical injury in the same animal over the course of time. Transcriptional changes featured coordinate expression of functionally related genes in a reproducible manner both within and between animals. This characterisation will provide a foundation against which to assess the perturbations that accompany airway disease pathologies of comparative relevance. PMID:23593124

  3. In vivo exposure to hyperoxia increases airway responsiveness in rats. Demonstration in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Szarek, J L

    1989-10-01

    Studies regarding O2-induced lung injury have concentrated on damage to alveolar structures and pulmonary vasculature without consideration of alterations that may be occurring in airways. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of in vivo hyperoxic exposure on airway responses to excitatory stimuli in intact, anesthetized rats and in intrapulmonary bronchi isolated from hyperoxia-exposed rats. Using lung conductance (G1) as an index of bronchoconstriction, intravenously administered 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) elicited greater bronchoconstrictor responses in anesthetized, mechanically ventilated rats that had been exposed to 85% O2 for 7 days rather than to air. Further, airways of hyperoxia-exposed rats were more sensitive to the effects of intravenously administered 5HT as evidenced by the lower log dose of 5HT required to decrease G1 30%. Cylindrical segments of intrapulmonary bronchi isolated from hyperoxia-exposed rats were more responsive to the contractile effects of 5HT and electrical field stimulation. However, no differences in responsiveness to bethanechol or KCl were observed between the two groups. The log concentration of 5HT and the log frequency of electrical field stimulation that elicited half-maximal responses were smaller in bronchi isolated from hyperoxia-exposed animals, indicating an increase in sensitivity of the airways to these stimuli. These results suggest that prolonged exposure to greater than ambient levels of O2 can alter airway function; however, the mechanism responsible for these changes remains to be determined. PMID:2802379

  4. Prolonged increased responsiveness of canine peripheral airways after exposure to O/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Beckett, W.S.; Freed, A.N.; Turner, C.; Menkes, H.A.

    1988-02-01

    Because it is relatively insoluble, the oxidant gas O3 may penetrate to small peripheral airways when it is inhaled. Increased responsiveness in large airways after O3 breathing has been associated with the presence of inflammatory cells. To determine whether O3 produces prolonged hyperresponsiveness of small airways associated with the presence of inflammatory cells, we exposed the peripheral lungs of anesthetized dogs to 1.0 ppm O3 for 2 h using a wedged bronchoscope technique. A contralateral sublobar segment was simultaneously exposed to air as a control. In the O3-exposed segments, collateral resistance (Rcs) was increased within 15 min and remained elevated approximately 150% throughout the 2-h exposure period. Fifteen hours later, the base-line Rcs of the O3-exposed sublobar segments was significantly elevated, and these segments demonstrated increased responsiveness to aerosolized acetylcholine (100 and 500 micrograms/ml). There were no differences in neutrophils, mononuclear cells, or mast cells (numbers or degree of mast cell degranulation) between O3 and air-exposed airways at 15 h. The small airways of the lung periphery thus are capable of remaining hyperresponsive hours after cessation of localized exposure to O3, but this does not appear to be dependent on the presence of inflammatory cells in the small airway wall.

  5. Airway blood flow response to dry air hyperventilation in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, G.H.; Baile, E.M.; Pare, P.D.

    1986-03-01

    Airway blood flow (Qaw) may be important in conditioning inspired air. To determine the effect of eucapneic dry air hyperventilation (hv) on Qaw in sheep the authors studied 7 anesthetized open-chest sheep after 25 min. of warm dry air hv. During each period of hv the authors have recorded vascular pressures, cardiac output (CO), and tracheal mucosal and inspired air temperature. Using a modification of the reference flow technique radiolabelled microspheres were injected into the left atrium to make separate measurements after humid air and dry air hv. In 4 animals a snare around the left main pulmonary artery was used following microsphere injection to prevent recirculation (entry into L lung of microspheres from the pulmonary artery). Qaw to the trachea and L lung as measured and Qaw for the R lung was estimated. After the final injection the sheep were killed and bronchi (Br) and lungs removed. Qaw (trachea plus L lung plus R lung) in 4 sheep increased from a mean of 30.8 to 67.0 ml/min. Airway mucosal temp. decreased from 39/sup 0/ to 33/sup 0/C. The authors conclude that dry air hv cools airway mucosa and increases Qaw in sheep.

  6. The effect of marimastat, a metalloprotease inhibitor, on allergen-induced asthmatic hyper-reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, Colleen; Thomas, Paul S. . E-mail: paul.thomas@unsw.edu.au

    2005-06-01

    This pilot study was designed to assess whether a synthetic matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor has anti-inflammatory properties in mild asthma. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha}) has been shown to be an important cytokine in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammatory responses, and its release can be inhibited by MMP inhibitors. Twelve atopic asthmatic subjects received the MMP inhibitor marimastat (5 mg) or placebo, twice daily for 3 weeks, separated by a 6-week washout period in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over manner. All subjects underwent an allergen inhalation provocation test to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus before and after each study phase. Spirometry, exhaled NO (eNO) levels, differential sputum cell counts, an asthma symptom questionnaire, peak flow, and {beta}{sub 2}-agonist usage were measured. Nine subjects completed the study, and, when compared with placebo, marimastat reduced bronchial hyper-responsiveness to inhaled allergen in these subjects from an allergen PC{sub 20} of 22.2 AU/ml (95%CI 11.7-32.6) to 17.0 AU/ml (95%CI 7.6-26.4, P = 0.02). The marimastat phase showed a nonsignificant fall in sputum inflammatory cells. Marimastat did not modify eNO, FEV{sub 1}, asthma symptoms, or albuterol usage. In conclusion, airway responsiveness to allergen may be modified by a MMP inhibitor, perhaps via TNF{alpha} playing a role in airway inflammation and remodeling.

  7. EFFECTS OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE NANOPARTICLE EXPOSURE ON NEUROIMMUNE RESPONSES IN RAT AIRWAYS

    PubMed Central

    Scuri, Mario; Chen, Bean T.; Castranova, Vincent; Reynolds, Jeffrey S.; Johnson, Victor J.; Samsell, Lennie; Walton, Cheryl; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to ambient nanoparticles (defined as particulate matter [PM] having one dimension < 100 nm) is associated with increased risk of childhood and adult asthma. Nanomaterials feature a smaller aerodynamic diameter and a higher surface area per unit mass ratio compared to fine or coarse-sized particles, resulting in greater lung deposition efficiency and an increased potential for biological interaction. The neurotrophins nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are key regulatory elements of neuronal development and responsiveness of airway sensory neurons. Changes in their expression are associated with bronchoconstriction, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation. The neurogenic-mediated control of airway responses is a key pathophysiological mechanism of childhood asthma. However, the effects of nanoparticle exposure on neurotrophin-driven airway responses and their potential role as a predisposing factor for developing asthma have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, in vivo inhalation exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (12 mg/m13; 5.6 h/d for 3 d) produced upregulation of lung neurotrophins in weanling (2-wk-old) and newborn (2-d-old) rats but not in adult (12-wk-old) animals compared to controls. This effect was associated with increased airway responsiveness and upregulation of growth-related oncogene/keratine-derived chemokine (GRO/KC; CXCL1, rat equivalent of human interleukin [IL]-8) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These data show for the first time that exposure to nanoparticulate upregulates the expression of lung neurotrophins in an age-dependent fashion and that this effect is associated with airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. These results suggest the presence of a critical window of vulnerability in earlier stages of lung development, which may lead to a higher risk of developing asthma. PMID:20818535

  8. IL-18 Does not Increase Allergic Airway Disease in Mice When Produced by BCG

    PubMed Central

    Amniai, L.; Biet, F.; Marquillies, P.; Locht, C.; Pestel, J.; Tonnel, A.-B.; Duez, C.

    2007-01-01

    Whilst BCG inhibits allergic airway responses in murine models, IL-18 has adversary effects depending on its environment. We therefore constructed a BCG strain producing murine IL-18 (BCG-IL-18) and evaluated its efficiency to prevent an asthma-like reaction in mice. BALB/cByJ mice were sensitized (day (D) 1 and D10) by intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA)-alum and primary (D20–22) and secondary (D62, 63) challenged with OVA aerosols. BCG or BCG-IL-18 were intraperitonealy administered 1 hour before each immunization (D1 and D10). BCG-IL-18 and BCG were shown to similarly inhibit the development of AHR, mucus production, eosinophil influx, and local Th2 cytokine production in BAL, both after the primary and secondary challenge. These data show that IL-18 did not increase allergic airway responses in the context of the mycobacterial infection, and suggest that BCG-IL-18 and BCG are able to prevent the development of local Th2 responses and therefore inhibit allergen-induced airway responses even after restimulation. PMID:18299704

  9. Assessing mucus and airway morphology in response to a segmental allergen challenge using OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Asthma affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, and the prevalence of the disease appears to be increasing. One of the most important aspects of asthma is the excessive bronchoconstriction that results in many of the symptoms experienced by asthma sufferers, but the relationship between bronchoconstriction and airway morphology is not clearly established. We present the imaging results of a study involving a segmental allergen challenge given to both allergic asthmatic (n = 12) and allergic non-asthmatic (n = 19) human volunteers. Using OCT, we have imaged and assessed baseline morphology in a right upper lobe (RUL) airway, serving as the control, and a right middle lobe (RML) airway, in which the allergen was to be administered. After a period of 24 hours had elapsed following the administration of the allergen, both airways were again imaged and the response morphology assessed. A number of airway parameters were measured and compared, including epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness and buckling, lumen area, and mucus content. We found that at baseline epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness, and mucosal buckling were greater in AAs than ANAs. We also observed statistically significant increases in these values 24 hours after the allergen had been administered for both the ANA and AA sets. In comparison, the control airway which received a diluent showed no statistically significant change.

  10. Novel small airway bronchodilator responses to rosiglitazone in mouse lung slices.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Jane E; Bai, Yan; Donovan, Chantal; Esposito, James G; Tan, Xiahui; Sanderson, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    There is a need to identify novel agents that elicit small airway relaxation when β2-adrenoceptor agonists become ineffective in difficult-to-treat asthma. Because chronic treatment with the synthetic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)γ agonist rosiglitazone (RGZ) inhibits airway hyperresponsiveness in mouse models of allergic airways disease, we tested the hypothesis that RGZ causes acute airway relaxation by measuring changes in small airway size in mouse lung slices. Whereas the β-adrenoceptor agonists albuterol (ALB) and isoproterenol induced partial airway relaxation, RGZ reversed submaximal and maximal contraction to methacholine (MCh) and was similarly effective after precontraction with serotonin or endothelin-1. Concentration-dependent relaxation to RGZ was not altered by the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol and was enhanced by ALB. RGZ-induced relaxation was mimicked by other synthetic PPARγ agonists but not by the putative endogenous agonist 15-deoxy-PGJ2 and was not prevented by the PPARγ antagonist GW9662. To induce airway relaxation, RGZ inhibited the amplitude and frequency of MCh-induced Ca(2+) oscillations of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). In addition, RGZ reduced MCh-induced Ca(2+) sensitivity of the ASMCs. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that acute bronchodilator responses induced by RGZ are PPARγ independent, additive with ALB, and occur by the inhibition of ASMC Ca(2+) signaling and Ca(2+) sensitivity. Because RGZ continues to elicit relaxation when β-adrenoceptor agonists have a limited effect, RGZ or related compounds may have potential as bronchodilators for the treatment of difficult asthma. PMID:24188042

  11. Effective treatment of allergic airway inflammation with Helicobacter pylori immunomodulators requires BATF3-dependent dendritic cells and IL-10.

    PubMed

    Engler, Daniela B; Reuter, Sebastian; van Wijck, Yolanda; Urban, Sabine; Kyburz, Andreas; Maxeiner, Joachim; Martin, Helen; Yogev, Nir; Waisman, Ari; Gerhard, Markus; Cover, Timothy L; Taube, Christian; Müller, Anne

    2014-08-12

    The prevalence of allergic asthma and other atopic diseases has reached epidemic proportions in large parts of the developed world. The gradual loss of the human indigenous microbiota has been held responsible for this trend. The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is a constituent of the normal gastric microbiota whose presence has been inversely linked to allergy and asthma in humans and experimental models. Here we show that oral or i.p. tolerization with H. pylori extract prevents the airway hyperresponsiveness, bronchoalveolar eosinophilia, pulmonary inflammation, and Th2 cytokine production that are hallmarks of allergen-induced asthma in mice. Asthma protection is not conferred by extracts from other enteropathogens and requires a heat-sensitive H. pylori component and the DC-intrinsic production of IL-10. The basic leucine zipper ATF-like 3 (BATF3)-dependent CD103(+)CD11b(-) dendritic cell lineage is enriched in the lungs of protected mice and strictly required for protection. Two H. pylori persistence determinants, the γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase GGT and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, are required and sufficient for asthma protection and can be administered in purified form to prevent asthma. In conclusion, we provide preclinical evidence for the concept that the immunomodulatory properties of H. pylori can be exploited for tolerization strategies aiming to prevent allergen-induced asthma. PMID:25074917

  12. Effective treatment of allergic airway inflammation with Helicobacter pylori immunomodulators requires BATF3-dependent dendritic cells and IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Engler, Daniela B.; Reuter, Sebastian; van Wijck, Yolanda; Urban, Sabine; Kyburz, Andreas; Maxeiner, Joachim; Martin, Helen; Yogev, Nir; Waisman, Ari; Gerhard, Markus; Cover, Timothy L.; Taube, Christian; Müller, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic asthma and other atopic diseases has reached epidemic proportions in large parts of the developed world. The gradual loss of the human indigenous microbiota has been held responsible for this trend. The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is a constituent of the normal gastric microbiota whose presence has been inversely linked to allergy and asthma in humans and experimental models. Here we show that oral or i.p. tolerization with H. pylori extract prevents the airway hyperresponsiveness, bronchoalveolar eosinophilia, pulmonary inflammation, and Th2 cytokine production that are hallmarks of allergen-induced asthma in mice. Asthma protection is not conferred by extracts from other enteropathogens and requires a heat-sensitive H. pylori component and the DC-intrinsic production of IL-10. The basic leucine zipper ATF-like 3 (BATF3)-dependent CD103+CD11b− dendritic cell lineage is enriched in the lungs of protected mice and strictly required for protection. Two H. pylori persistence determinants, the γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase GGT and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, are required and sufficient for asthma protection and can be administered in purified form to prevent asthma. In conclusion, we provide preclinical evidence for the concept that the immunomodulatory properties of H. pylori can be exploited for tolerization strategies aiming to prevent allergen-induced asthma. PMID:25074917

  13. Airway responses to methacholine and exercise at high altitude in healthy lowlanders.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Riccardo; Pompilio, Pasquale; Quaranta, Marco; Aliverti, Andrea; Kayser, Bengt; Miserocchi, Giuseppe; Fasano, Valter; Cogo, Annalisa; Milanese, Manlio; Cornara, Giuseppe; Brusasco, Vito; Dellacà, Raffaele

    2010-02-01

    Peribronchial edema has been proposed as a mechanism enhancing airway responses to constrictor stimuli. Acute exposure to altitude in nonacclimatized lowlanders leads to subclinical interstitial pulmonary edema that lasts for several days after ascent, as suggested by changes in lung mechanics. We, therefore, investigated whether changes in lung mechanics consistent with fluid accumulation at high altitude within the lungs are associated with changes in airway responses to methacholine or exercise. Fourteen healthy subjects were studied at 4,559 and at 120 m above sea level. At high altitude, both static and dynamic lung compliances and respiratory reactance at 5 Hz significantly decreased, suggestive of interstitial pulmonary edema. Resting minute ventilation significantly increased by approximately 30%. Compared with sea level, inhalation of methacholine at high altitude caused a similar reduction of partial forced expiratory flow but less reduction of maximal forced expiratory flow, less increments of pulmonary resistance and respiratory resistance at 5 Hz, and similar effects of deep breath on pulmonary and respiratory resistance. During maximal incremental exercise at high altitude, partial forced expiratory flow gradually increased with the increase in minute ventilation similarly to sea level but both achieved higher values at peak exercise. In conclusion, airway responsiveness to methacholine at high altitude is well preserved despite the occurrence of interstitial pulmonary edema. We suggest that this may be the result of the increase in resting minute ventilation opposing the effects and/or the development of airway smooth muscle force, reduced gas density, and well preserved airway-to-parenchyma interdependence. PMID:19940099

  14. Piperazine-induced airway symptoms: exposure-response relationships and selection in an occupational setting

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmar, L.; Bellander, T.; Ranstam, J.; Skerfving, S.

    1984-01-01

    The heterocyclic secondary amine piperazine is known to cause asthma. In a cohort of 602 workers, employed during the period 1942-1979, at a chemical industry where piperazine is handled, a study conducted by means of a mailed questionnaire showed a strong exposure-response relationship as to frequency of work-related airway symptoms indicating asthma. In the most exposed group about a third of the workers had experienced such symptoms. Age, length of employment, smoking habits, and previous work-related asthmatic symptoms, but not atopy, modified the response. Further, there was an association between piperazine exposure and chronic bronchitis. In the most exposed group every fourth subject had chronic bronchitis. The frequency was modified by smoking habits; atopy was a confounder. Although many subjects, especially high-exposed ones, left work because of airway symptoms, there was no difference in occurrence of airway symptoms between former and present employees.

  15. The effect of smoke inhalation on lung function and airway responsiveness in wildland fire fighters

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.; Tager, I.B.; Balmes, J.R.; Harrison, R.J. )

    1992-12-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of smoke on forced expiratory volumes and airway responsiveness in wildland fire fighters during a season of active fire fighting. Sixty-three seasonal and full-time wildland fire fighters from five U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USDAFS) Hotshot crews in Northern California and Montana completed questionnaires, spirometry, and methacholine challenge testing before and after an active season of fire fighting in 1989. There were significant mean individual declines of 0.09, 0.15, and 0.44 L/s in postseason values of FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75, respectively, compared with preseason values. There were no consistent significant relationships between mean individual declines of the spirometric parameters and the covariates: sex, smoking history, history of asthma or allergies, years as a fire fighter, upper/lower respiratory symptoms, or membership in a particular Hotshot crew. There was a statistically significant increase in airway responsiveness when comparing preseason methacholine dose-response slopes (DRS) with postseason dose-response slopes (p = 0.02). The increase in airway responsiveness appeared to be greatest in fire fighters with a history of lower respiratory symptoms or asthma, but it was not related to smoking history. These data suggest that wildland fire fighting is associated with decreases in lung function and increases in airway responsiveness independent of a history of cigarette smoking. Our findings are consistent with the results of previous studies of municipal fire fighters.

  16. The effect of smoke inhalation on lung function and airway responsiveness in wildland fire fighters.

    PubMed

    Liu, D; Tager, I B; Balmes, J R; Harrison, R J

    1992-12-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of smoke on forced expiratory volumes and airway responsiveness in wildland fire fighters during a season of active fire fighting. Sixty-three seasonal and full-time wildland fire fighters from five U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USDAFS) Hotshot crews in Northern California and Montana completed questionnaires, spirometry, and methacholine challenge testing before and after an active season of fire fighting in 1989. There were significant mean individual declines of 0.09, 0.15, and 0.44 L/s in postseason values of FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75, respectively, compared with preseason values. There were no consistent significant relationships between mean individual declines of the spirometric parameters and the covariates: sex, smoking history, history of asthma or allergies, years as a fire fighter, upper/lower respiratory symptoms, or membership in a particular Hotshot crew. There was a statistically significant increase in airway responsiveness when comparing preseason methacholine dose-response slopes (DRS) with postseason dose-response slopes (p = 0.02). The increase in airway responsiveness appeared to be greatest in fire fighters with a history of lower respiratory symptoms or asthma, but it was not related to smoking history. These data suggest that wildland fire fighting is associated with decreases in lung function and increases in airway responsiveness independent of a history of cigarette smoking. Our findings are consistent with the results of previous studies of municipal fire fighters. PMID:1456562

  17. Bronchial Epithelial Cells Produce IL-5: Implications for Local Immune Responses in the Airways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Carol A.; Peluso, John J.; Zhu, Li; Lingenheld, Elizabeth G.; Walker, Sharale T.; Puddington, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    IL-5 is a pleiotropic cytokine that promotes eosinophil differentiation and survival. While naïve bronchial epithelial cells (BEC) produce low levels of IL-5, the role of BEC-derived IL-5 in allergic airway inflammation is unknown. We now show that BEC, isolated from mice with OVA-induced allergic airway disease (AAD), produced elevated levels of IL-5 mRNA and protein as compared to BEC from naïve mice. To determine the contribution of BEC-derived IL-5 to effector responses in the airways, IL-5 deficient bone marrow chimeric mice were generated in which IL-5 expression was restricted to stromal (e.g. BEC) or hematopoietic cells. When subjected to AAD, IL-5 produced by BECs contributed to mucous metaplasia, airway eosinophilia, and OVA-specific IgA levels. Thus, IL-5 production by BEC can impact the microenvironment of the lung, modifying pathologic and protective immune responses in the airways. PMID:20494340

  18. Antioxidant airway responses following experimental exposure to wood smoke in man

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Biomass combustion contributes to the production of ambient particulate matter (PM) in rural environments as well as urban settings, but relatively little is known about the health effects of these emissions. The aim of this study was therefore to characterize airway responses in humans exposed to wood smoke PM under controlled conditions. Nineteen healthy volunteers were exposed to both wood smoke, at a particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration of 224 ± 22 μg/m3, and filtered air for three hours with intermittent exercise. The wood smoke was generated employing an experimental set-up with an adjustable wood pellet boiler system under incomplete combustion. Symptoms, lung function, and exhaled NO were measured over exposures, with bronchoscopy performed 24 h post-exposure for characterisation of airway inflammatory and antioxidant responses in airway lavages. Results Glutathione (GSH) concentrations were enhanced in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after wood smoke exposure vs. air (p = 0.025), together with an increase in upper airway symptoms. Neither lung function, exhaled NO nor systemic nor airway inflammatory parameters in BAL and bronchial mucosal biopsies were significantly affected. Conclusions Exposure of healthy subjects to wood smoke, derived from an experimental wood pellet boiler operating under incomplete combustion conditions with PM emissions dominated by organic matter, caused an increase in mucosal symptoms and GSH in the alveolar respiratory tract lining fluids but no acute airway inflammatory responses. We contend that this response reflects a mobilisation of GSH to the air-lung interface, consistent with a protective adaptation to the investigated wood smoke exposure. PMID:20727160

  19. Airway wall thickness is increased in COPD patients with bronchodilator responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Bronchodilator responsiveness (BDR) is a common but variable phenomenon in COPD. The CT characteristics of airway dimensions that differentiate COPD subjects with BDR from those without BDR have not been well described. We aimed to assess airway dimensions in COPD subjects with and without BDR. Methods We analyzed subjects with GOLD 1–4 disease in the COPDGene® study who had CT airway analysis. We divided patients into two groups: BDR + (post bronchodilator ΔFEV1 ≥ 10%) and BDR-(post bronchodilator ΔFEV1 < 10%). The mean wall area percent (WA%) of six segmental bronchi in each subject was quantified using VIDA. Using 3D SLICER, airway wall thickness was also expressed as the square root wall area of an airway of 10 mm (Pi10) and 15 mm (Pi15) diameter. %Emphysema and %gas trapping were also calculated. Results 2355 subjects in the BDR-group and 1306 in the BDR + group formed our analysis. The BDR + group had a greater Pi10, Pi15, and mean segmental WA% compared to the BDR-group. In multivariate logistic regression using gender, race, current smoking, history of asthma, %emphysema, %gas trapping, %predicted FEV1, and %predicted FVC, airway wall measures remained independent predictors of BDR. Using a threshold change in FEV1 ≥ 15% and FEV1 ≥ 12% and 200 mL to divide patients into groups, the results were similar. Conclusion BDR in COPD is independently associated with CT evidence of airway pathology. This study provides us with greater evidence of changes in lung structure that correlate with physiologic manifestations of airflow obstruction in COPD. PMID:25248436

  20. SYNTHETIC PARTICLES ENHANCE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO OVALBUMIN ANTIGEN IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    SYNTHETIC PARTICLES ENHANCE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO OVALBUMIN ANTIGEN IN BALB/CJ MICE. S H Gavett, N Haykal-Coates, and M I Gilmour. Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Levels of airborne particulate matter (PM) are positively c...

  1. Secretory response induced by essential oils on airway surface fluid: a pharmacological MRI study.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Elena; Boschi, Federico; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2009-07-30

    Using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging, we have performed an in vivo evaluation of the secretory response induced by essential oils in the rat airway. Aim of the work was to establish a computerized method to assess the efficacy of volatile compounds in spatially localized areas without the bias derived by subjective evaluation. Magnetic resonance experiments were carried out using a 4.7 T horizontal magnet. In the trachea, airway surface fluid was easily identified for its high intensity signal. The tracheal glands were also easily visible. The oesophageal lumen was usually collapsed and was identifiable only in the presence of intraluminal liquid. Scotch pine essential oil inhalation significantly increased the surface fluid in the middle portion of the trachea and the increase was visible at both 5 and 10 min. A lesser secretory response was detected after rosemary essential oil inhalation even though the response was significant with respect to the control in particular at 10 min. No secretory response was detected after peppermint essential oil inhalation both at 5 and 10 min. The data obtained in the present work demonstrate a chemically induced airway secretion. The availability of a pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging approach opens new perspectives to test the action of volatile compounds on the airway. PMID:19422906

  2. SYNTHETIC COPPER-CONTAINING PARTICLES ENHANCE ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    SYNTHETIC COPPER-CONTAINING PARTICLES ENHANCE ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES IN MICE. SH Gavett, MI Gilmour, and N Haykal-Coates. National Health and Environ Effects Research Lab, USEPA, Res Triangle Park, NC USA
    Respiratory morbidity and mortality associated with increases in ...

  3. Preexposure to ozone blocks the antigen-induced late asthmatic response of the canine peripheral airways

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C.R.; Kleeberger, S.R.; Spannhake, E.W. )

    1989-01-01

    The influence of exposure of the airways to ozone on acute allergic responsiveness has been investigated in several species. Little is known, however, about the effect of this environmental pollutant on the late asthmatic response (LAR) in animals in which it is exhibited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect in the canine peripheral airways and to assess the potential role of mast cells in modulating the effect. A series of experiments on seven mongrel dogs demonstrated that the numbers of mast cells at the base of the epithelial region of small subsegmental airways exposed to 1 ppm ozone for 5 min were significantly (p less than .01) increased 3 h following exposure compared to air exposed or nonexposed control airways. In a second series of experiments performed on eight additional mongrel dogs with inherent sensitivity to Ascaris suum antigen, antigen aerosol was administered to the sublobar segment 3 h following ozone preexposure when mast cell numbers were presumed to be increased. These experiments were performed to determine whether ozone preexposure could enhance the late-phase response to antigen by virtue of acutely increasing the number of mast cells available to bind the antigen. Four of the eight dogs tested displayed a late-phase response to antigen following air-sham preexposure. In these four dogs, simultaneous ozone preexposure of a contralateral lobe completely blocked the late-phase response to antigen. These results indicate that the consequences of a single exposure to ozone persist beyond its effects on acute antigen-induced bronchoconstriction and extend to the complex processes involved with the late response. This attenuating effect of ozone is seen under conditions where mast-cell numbers in the airways are increased above baseline levels.

  4. Effect of thromboxane antagonists on ozone-induced airway responses in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.L.; Lane, C.G.; O'Byrne, P.M. )

    1990-09-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness after inhaled ozone in dogs may occur as a result of thromboxane release in the airway. In this study, two thromboxane receptor antagonists, L-655,240 and L-670,596, were used in doses that inhibit the response to an inhaled thromboxane mimetic, U-46619, to determine further the role of thromboxane in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. Dogs were studied on 2 days separated by 1 wk. On each day, the dogs inhaled ozone (3 ppm) for 30 min. On one randomly assigned day, 10 dogs received an infusion of L-655,240 (5 mg.kg-1.h-1) and 5 dogs received an infusion of L-670,596 (1 mg.kg-1.h-1); on the other day dogs received a control infusion. Airway responses to doubling doses of acetylcholine were measured before and after inhalation of ozone and were expressed as the concentration of acetylcholine giving a rise in resistance of 5 cmH2O.l-1.s from baseline (acetylcholine provocation concentration). The development of airway hyperresponsiveness after ozone was not inhibited by the thromboxane antagonists. The mean log difference in the acetylcholine provocative concentration before and after ozone on the L-655,240 treatment day was 0.62 +/- 0.12 (SE) and on the control day was 0.71 +/- 0.12 (P = 0.48); on the L-670,596 treatment day the mean log difference was 0.68 +/- 0.15 (SE) and on the control day it was 0.75 +/- 0.19 (P = 0.45). These results do not support an important role for thromboxane in causing ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

  5. Pertussis Toxin Exacerbates and Prolongs Airway Inflammatory Responses during Bordetella pertussis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Carey E.; Sun, Yezhou

    2012-01-01

    Throughout infection, pathogenic bacteria induce dramatic changes in host transcriptional repertoires. An understanding of how bacterial factors influence host reprogramming will provide insight into disease pathogenesis. In the human respiratory pathogen Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, pertussis toxin (PT) is a key virulence factor that promotes colonization, suppresses innate immune responses during early infection, and causes systemic disease symptoms. To determine the full extent of PT-associated gene regulation in the airways through the peak of infection, we measured global transcriptional profiles in the lungs of BALB/c mice infected with wild-type (WT) or PT-deficient (ΔPT) B. pertussis. ΔPT bacteria were inoculated at a dose equivalent to the WT dose and at a high dose (ΔPThigh) to distinguish effects caused by higher bacterial loads achieved in WT infection from effects associated with PT. The results demonstrated that PT was associated with a significant upregulation of immune and inflammatory response genes as well as several other genes implicated in airway pathology. In contrast to the early, transient responses observed for ΔPThigh infection, WT infection induced a prolonged expression of inflammatory genes and increased the extent and duration of lung histopathology. In addition, the administration of purified PT to ΔPThigh-infected mice 1 day after bacterial inoculation exacerbated and prolonged inflammatory responses and airway pathology. These data indicate that PT not only is associated with exacerbated host airway responses during peak B. pertussis infection but also may inhibit host mechanisms of attenuating and resolving inflammation in the airways, suggesting possible links between PT and pertussis disease symptoms. PMID:23027529

  6. Ventilatory response to helium-oxygen breathing during exercise: effect of airway anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, B S; Clemens, R E; Zintel, T A; Stockwell, M J; Gallagher, C G

    1997-07-01

    The substitution of a normoxic helium mixture (HeO2) for room air (Air) during exercise results in a sustained hyperventilation, which is present even in the first breath. We hypothesized that this response is dependent on intact airway afferents; if so, airway anesthesia (Anesthesia) should affect this response. Anesthesia was administered to the upper airways by topical application and to lower central airways by aerosol inhalation and was confirmed to be effective for over 15 min. Subjects performed constant work-rate exercise (CWE) at 69 +/- 2 (SE) % maximal work rate on a cycle ergometer on three separate days: twice after saline inhalation (days 1 and 3) and once after Anesthesia (day 2). CWE commenced after a brief warm-up, with subjects breathing Air for the first 5 min (Air-1), HeO2 for the next 3 min, and Air again until the end of CWE (Air-2). The resistance of the breathing circuit was matched for Air and HeO2. Breathing HeO2 resulted in a small but significant increase in minute ventilation (VI) and decrease in alveolar PCO2 in both the Saline (average of 2 saline tests; not significant) and Anesthesia tests. Although Anesthesia had no effect on the sustained hyperventilatory response to HeO2 breathing, the VI transients within the first six breaths of HeO2 were significantly attenuated with Anesthesia. We conclude that the VI response to HeO2 is not simply due to a reduction in external tubing resistance and that, in humans, airway afferents mediate the transient but not the sustained hyperventilatory response to HeO2 breathing during exercise. PMID:9216948

  7. Dendritic cell-derived tumor necrosis factor α modifies airway epithelial cell responses.

    PubMed

    Lutfi, R; Ledford, J R; Zhou, P; Lewkowich, I P; Page, K

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal dendritic cells (DC) are intimately associated with the airway epithelium and thus are ideally situated to be first responders to pathogens. We hypothesize that DC drive innate immune responses through early release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, which drives airway epithelial cell responses. In a mouse model, TNFα release was significantly increased following a single exposure to German cockroach (GC) frass, an event independent of neutrophil recruitment into the airways. While lung epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages failed to release TNFα following GC frass exposure, bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) produced substantial amounts of TNFα suggesting their importance as early responding cells. This was confirmed by flow cytometry of pulmonary myeloid DC. Addition of GC frass-pulsed BMDC or conditioned media from GC frass-pulsed BMDC to primary mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTEC) or MLE-15 cells induced chemokine (C-C) motif ligand (CCL) 20 and granulocyte macrophage (GM) colony-stimulating factor (CSF), both of which are important for DC recruitment, survival and differentiation. Importantly, DC do not produce CCL20 or GM-CSF following allergen exposure. Blocking TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1) completely abolished chemokine production, suggesting that BMDC-derived TNFα induced airway epithelial cell activation and enhancement of the innate immune response. Lastly, blocking TNFR1 in vivo resulted in significantly decreased CCL20 and GM-CSF production in the lungs of mice. Together, our data strongly suggest that DC-derived TNFα plays a crucial role in the initiation of innate immune responses through the modification of airway epithelial cell responses. PMID:22517116

  8. The Endogenous Th17 Response in NO2-Promoted Allergic Airway Disease Is Dispensable for Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Distinct from Th17 Adoptive Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebecca A.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Daggett, Rebecca; Hoyt, Laura; Alcorn, John F.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Lundblad, Lennart K. A.; Poynter, Matthew E.

    2013-01-01

    Severe, glucocorticoid-resistant asthma comprises 5-7% of patients with asthma. IL-17 is a biomarker of severe asthma, and the adoptive transfer of Th17 cells in mice is sufficient to induce glucocorticoid-resistant allergic airway disease. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an environmental toxin that correlates with asthma severity, exacerbation, and risk of adverse outcomes. Mice that are allergically sensitized to the antigen ovalbumin by exposure to NO2 exhibit a mixed Th2/Th17 adaptive immune response and eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment to the airway following antigen challenge, a phenotype reminiscent of severe clinical asthma. Because IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling is critical in the generation of the Th17 response in vivo, we hypothesized that the IL-1R/Th17 axis contributes to pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease and manifests in glucocorticoid-resistant cytokine production. IL-17A neutralization at the time of antigen challenge or genetic deficiency in IL-1R resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment to the airway following antigen challenge but did not protect against the development of AHR. Instead, IL-1R-/- mice developed exacerbated AHR compared to WT mice. Lung cells from NO2-allergically inflamed mice that were treated in vitro with dexamethasone (Dex) during antigen restimulation exhibited reduced Th17 cytokine production, whereas Th17 cytokine production by lung cells from recipient mice of in vitro Th17-polarized OTII T-cells was resistant to Dex. These results demonstrate that the IL-1R/Th17 axis does not contribute to AHR development in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease, that Th17 adoptive transfer does not necessarily reflect an endogenously-generated Th17 response, and that functions of Th17 responses are contingent on the experimental conditions in which they are generated. PMID:24069338

  9. Innate Immune Response to LPS in Airway Epithelium Is Dependent on Chronological Age and Antecedent Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Maniar-Hew, Kinjal; Clay, Candice C.; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Evans, Michael J.; Fontaine, Justin H.

    2013-01-01

    The immune mechanisms for neonatal susceptibility to respiratory pathogens are poorly understood. Given that mucosal surfaces serve as a first line of host defense, we hypothesized that the innate immune response to infectious agents may be developmentally regulated in airway epithelium. To test this hypothesis, we determined whether the expression of IL-8 and IL-6 in airway epithelium after LPS exposure is dependent on chronological age. Tracheas from infant, juvenile, and adult rhesus monkeys were first exposed to LPS ex vivo, and then processed for air–liquid interface primary airway epithelial cell cultures and secondary LPS treatment in vitro. Compared with adult cultures, infant and juvenile cultures expressed significantly reduced concentrations of IL-8 after LPS treatment. IL-8 protein in cultures increased with animal age, whereas LPS-induced IL-6 protein was predominantly associated with juvenile cultures. Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway RT-PCR arrays showed differential expressions of multiple mRNAs in infant cultures relative to adult cultures, including IL-1α, TLR10, and the peptidoglycan recognition protein PGLYRP2. To determine whether the age-dependent cytokine response to LPS is reflective of antecedent exposures, we assessed primary airway epithelial cell cultures established from juvenile monkeys housed in filtered air since birth. Filtered air–housed animal cultures exhibited LPS-induced IL-8 and IL-6 expression that was discordant with age-matched ambient air–housed animals. A single LPS aerosol in vivo also affected this cytokine profile. Cumulatively, our findings demonstrate that the innate immune response to LPS in airway epithelium is variable with age, and may be modulated by previous environmental exposures. PMID:23600597

  10. Lipopolysaccharide exposure makes allergic airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness less responsive to dexamethasone and inhibition of iNOS.

    PubMed

    Komlósi, Z I; Pozsonyi, E; Tábi, T; Szöko, E; Nagy, A; Bartos, B; Kozma, G T; Tamási, L; Orosz, M; Magyar, P; Losonczy, G

    2006-07-01

    Allergic airway disease can be refractory to anti-inflammatory treatment, whose cause is unclarified. Therefore, in the present experiment, we have tested the hypothesis that co-exposure to lipopolysacharide (Lps) and allergen results in glucocorticoid-resistant eosinophil airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness (AHR). Ovalbumin (Ova)-sensitized BALB/c mice were primed with 10 microg intranasal Lps 24 h before the start of Ova challenges (20 min on 3 consecutive days). Dexamethasone (5 mg/kg/day) was given on the last 2 days of Ova challenges. AHR, cellular build-up, cytokine and nitrite concentrations of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung histology were examined. To assess the role of iNOS-derived NO in airway responsiveness, mice were treated with a selective inhibitor of this enzyme (1400W) 2 h before AHR measurements. More severe eosinophil inflammation and higher nitrite formation were found in Lps-primed than in non-primed allergized mice. After Lps priming, AHR and concentrations of T-helper type 2 cytokines in BALF were decreased, but still remained significantly higher than in controls. Eosinophil inflammation was partially, while nitrite production and AHR were observed to be largely dexamethasone resistant in Lps-primed allergized animals. 1400W effectively and rapidly diminished the AHR in Ova-sensitized and challenged mice, but failed to affect it after Lps priming plus allergization. In conclusion, Lps inhalation may exaggerate eosinophil inflammation and reduce responsiveness to anti-inflammatory treatment in allergic airway disease. PMID:16839411

  11. Phosphodiesterase 4B is essential for TH2-cell function and development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Catherine Jin, S.-L.; Goya, Sho; Nakae, Susumu; Wang, Dan; Bruss, Matthew; Hou, Chiaoyin; Umetsu, Dale; Conti, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Background Cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling modulates functions of inflammatory cells involved in the pathogenesis of asthma, and type 4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDE4s) are essential components of this pathway. Induction of the PDE4 isoform PDE4B is necessary for Toll-like receptor signaling in monocytes and macrophages and is associated with T cell receptor/CD3 in T cells; however, its exact physiological function in the development of allergic asthma remains undefined. Objectives We investigated the role of PDE4B in the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and TH2-driven inflammatory responses. Methods Wild-type and PDE4B−/− mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin and AHR measured in response to inhaled methacholine. Airway inflammation was characterized by analyzing leukocyte infiltration and cytokine accumulation in the airways. Ovalbumin-stimulated cell proliferation and TH2 cytokine production were determined in cultured bronchial lymph node cells. Results Mice deficient in PDE4B do not develop AHR. This protective effect was associated with a significant decrease in eosinophils recruitment to the lungs and decreased TH2 cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Defects in T-cell replication, TH2 cytokine production, and dendritic cell migration were evident in cells from the airway-draining lymph nodes. Conversely, accumulation of the TH1 cytokine IFN-γ was not affected in PDE4B−/− mice. Ablation of the orthologous PDE4 gene PDE4A has no impact on airway inflammation. Conclusion By relieving a cAMP-negative constraint, PDE4B plays an essential role in TH2-cell activation and dendritic cell recruitment during airway inflammation. These findings provide proof of concept that PDE4 inhibitors with PDE4B selectivity may have efficacy in asthma treatment. PMID:21047676

  12. Airway uric acid is a sensor of inhaled protease allergens and initiates type 2 immune responses in respiratory mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kenichiro; Iijima, Koji; Elias, Martha K; Seno, Satoshi; Tojima, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Kephart, Gail M; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-05-01

    Although type 2 immune responses to environmental Ags are thought to play pivotal roles in asthma and allergic airway diseases, the immunological mechanisms that initiate the responses are largely unknown. Many allergens have biologic activities, including enzymatic activities and abilities to engage innate pattern-recognition receptors such as TLR4. In this article, we report that IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin were produced quickly in the lungs of naive mice exposed to cysteine proteases, such as bromelain and papain, as a model for allergens. IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin sensitized naive animals to an innocuous airway Ag OVA, which resulted in production of type 2 cytokines and IgE Ab, and eosinophilic airway inflammation when mice were challenged with the same Ag. Importantly, upon exposure to proteases, uric acid (UA) was rapidly released into the airway lumen, and removal of this endogenous UA by uricase prevented type 2 immune responses. UA promoted secretion of IL-33 by airway epithelial cells in vitro, and administration of UA into the airways of naive animals induced extracellular release of IL-33, followed by both innate and adaptive type 2 immune responses in vivo. Finally, a potent UA synthesis inhibitor, febuxostat, mitigated asthma phenotypes that were caused by repeated exposure to natural airborne allergens. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the development of type 2 immunity to airborne allergens and recognize airway UA as a key player that regulates the process in respiratory mucosa. PMID:24663677

  13. Intratracheal myriocin enhances allergen‐induced Th2 inflammation and airway hyper‐responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Edukulla, Ramakrishna; Rehn, Kira Lee; Liu, Bo; McAlees, Jaclyn W.; Hershey, Gurjit K.; Wang, Yui Hsi; Lewkowich, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ceramide is the central substrate of sphingolipid metabolism and plays a key role in cellular signal transduction pathways, regulating apoptosis, differentiation, and chemotaxis. Alterations in airway ceramide levels are observed in multiple pulmonary diseases and recent human genetic association studies have linked dysregulation of sphingolipid regulatory genes with asthma pathogenesis. Methods Utilizing myriocin, a potent inhibitor of sphingolipid synthesis, we evaluated the immune regulatory role of de novo ceramide generation in vitro and in vivo. Intratracheal myriocin was administered alone or during house dust mite sensitization (HDM) of BALB/C mice and airway hyper‐responsiveness (AHR) was evaluated by invasive plethysmography followed by bronchial lavage (BAL) cytology and cytokine quantification. Results Myriocin inhibits and HDM exposure activates de novo ceramide synthesis in bone marrow‐derived dendritic cells. Mice receiving intratracheal myriocin developed a mild airway neutrophilic infiltrate without inducing a significant increase in AHR. CXCL1 was elevated in the BAL fluid of myriocin‐treated mice while the neutrophilic chemotactic factors anaphylatoxin C5a, leukotriene B4, and IL‐17 were unaffected. HDM treatment combined with myriocin led to a dramatic enhancement of AHR (63% increase over HDM alone, p < 0.001) and increased granulocyte pulmonary infiltrates versus HDM or myriocin alone. Elevated Th2 T cell counts and Th2 cytokines/chemokines (IL5, IL13, CCL17) were observed in mice treated with combined HDM/myriocin compared to HDM alone. Myriocin‐treated pulmonary CD11c+ cells stimulated with HDM secreted significantly more CXCL1 than cells stimulated with HDM alone while HDM stimulated airway epithelial cells showed no change in CXCL1 secretion following myriocin treatment. Conclusions Intratracheal myriocin, likely acting via ceramide synthesis inhibition, enhances allergen‐induced airway inflammation

  14. Inflammatory responses of airway smooth muscle cells and effects of endothelin receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Lin, Yingfeng; Konradi, Jürgen; Jungck, David; Behr, Juergen; Strauch, Justus; Stoelben, Erich; Koch, Andrea

    2013-07-01

    Endothelin receptor antagonists (ETRAs), authorized for pulmonary hypertension, have failed to prove their utility in chronic lung diseases with corticosteroid-resistant airway inflammation when applied at late disease stages with emphysema/fibrosis. Earlier administration might prove effective by targeting the interaction between airway inflammation and tissue remodeling. We hypothesized that human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) participate in linking inflammation with remodeling and that associated genes become differentially suppressed by ambrisentan (A-receptor selective ETRA) and bosentan (nonselective/dual ETRA). Inflammatory responses of ex vivo-cultivated HASMCs to TNF-α were investigated by whole-genome microarray analyses. qRT-PCR and ELISA were used to test inflammatory and remodeling genes for sensitivity to bosentan and ambrisentan and to investigate differential sensitivities mechanistically. ETRA and corticosteroid effects were compared in HASMCs from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. TNF-α induced the expression of 18 cytokines/chemokines and five tissue remodeling genes involved in severe, corticosteroid-insensitive asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and/or pulmonary hypertension. Thirteen cytokines/chemokines, MMP13, and WISP1 were suppressed by ETRAs. Eight genes had differential sensitivity to bosentan and ambrisentan depending on the endothelin-B receptor impact on transcriptional regulation and mRNA stabilization. Chemokine (C-C motif) ligands 2 and 5, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and MMP13 had increased sensitivity to bosentan or bosentan/dexamethasone combination versus dexamethasone alone. Suppression of cytokine and remodeling gene expression by ETRAs was confirmed in TNF-α-activated human bronchial epithelial cells. HASMCs and human bronchial epithelial cells participate in the interaction of inflammation and tissue remodeling. This interaction is

  15. USE OF WHOLE BODY PLETHSYMOGRAPHY TO ASSESS INFLUENCES OF RAT STRAIN AND AGE ON NONSPECIFIC AIRWAY RESPONSIVENESS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Increased airway responsiveness (AR) is a well-established characteristic of asthma that epidemiological evidence suggests may be linked to air pollutant exposure. Establishing the biologic basis between pollutant exposure and subsequent adverse public health outcome require...

  16. Lymphocyte Gene Expression Characteristic of Immediate Airway Responses (IAR) and Methacholine (MCH) Hyperresponsiveness in Mice Sensitized and Challenged with Isocyanates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to isocyanates has been associated with occupational airway diseases, including asthma. Previously we reported on respiratory and immune responses following dermal sensitization and intranasal challenge of BALB/c mice with 6 different isocyanates. The purpose of this st...

  17. Ovalbumin sensitization of guinea pig at birth prevents the ontogenetic decrease in airway smooth muscle responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chitano, Pasquale; Wang, Lu; Degan, Simone; Worthington, Charles L.; Pozzato, Valeria; Hussaini, Syed H.; Turner, Wesley C.; Dorscheid, Delbert R.; Murphy, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Airway smooth muscle (ASM) displays a hyperresponsive phenotype at young age and becomes less responsive in adulthood. We hypothesized that allergic sensitization, which causes ASM hyperresponsiveness and typically occurs early in life, prevents the ontogenetic loss of the ASM hyperresponsive phenotype. We therefore studied whether neonatal allergic sensitization, not followed by later allergen challenges, alters the ontogenesis of ASM properties. We neonatally sensitized guinea pigs to ovalbumin and studied them at 1 week, 3 weeks, and 3 months (adult). A Schultz‐Dale response in isolated tracheal rings confirmed sensitization. The occurrence of inflammation was evaluated in the blood and in the submucosa of large airways. We assessed ASM function in tracheal strips as ability to produce force and shortening. ASM content of vimentin was also studied. A Schultz‐Dale response was observed in all 3‐week or older sensitized animals. A mild inflammatory process was characterized by eosinophilia in the blood and in the airway submucosa. Early life sensitization had no effect on ASM force generation, but prevented the ontogenetic decline of shortening velocity and the increase in resistance to shortening. Vimentin increased with age in control but not in sensitized animals. Allergic sensitization at birth without subsequent allergen exposures is sufficient to prevent normal ASM ontogenesis, inducing persistence to adulthood of an ASM hyperresponsive phenotype. PMID:25501429

  18. Arsenic alters ATP-dependent Ca²+ signaling in human airway epithelial cell wound response.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Cara L; Lantz, R Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L; Boitano, Scott

    2011-05-01

    Arsenic is a natural metalloid toxicant that is associated with occupational inhalation injury and contaminates drinking water worldwide. Both inhalation of arsenic and consumption of arsenic-tainted water are correlated with malignant and nonmalignant lung diseases. Despite strong links between arsenic and respiratory illness, underlying cell responses to arsenic remain unclear. We hypothesized that arsenic may elicit some of its detrimental effects on the airway through limitation of innate immune function and, specifically, through alteration of paracrine ATP (purinergic) Ca²+ signaling in the airway epithelium. We examined the effects of acute (24 h) exposure with environmentally relevant levels of arsenic (i.e., < 4 μM as Na-arsenite) on wound-induced Ca²+ signaling pathways in human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-). We found that arsenic reduces purinergic Ca²+ signaling in a dose-dependent manner and results in a reshaping of the Ca²+ signaling response to localized wounds. We next examined arsenic effects on two purinergic receptor types: the metabotropic P2Y and ionotropic P2X receptors. Arsenic inhibited both P2Y- and P2X-mediated Ca²+ signaling responses to ATP. Both inhaled and ingested arsenic can rapidly reach the airway epithelium where purinergic signaling is essential in innate immune functions (e.g., ciliary beat, salt and water transport, bactericide production, and wound repair). Arsenic-induced compromise of such airway defense mechanisms may be an underlying contributor to chronic lung disease. PMID:21357385

  19. Mechanisms of Heightened Airway Sensitivity and Responses to Inhaled SO2 in Asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Reno, Anita L; Brooks, Edward G; Ameredes, Bill T

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a problematic inhalable air pollutant in areas of widespread industrialization, not only in the United States but also in countries undergoing rapid industrialization, such as China, and it can be a potential trigger factor for asthma exacerbations. It is known that asthmatics are sensitive to the effects of SO2; however, the basis of this enhanced sensitivity remains incompletely understood. A PubMed search was performed over the course of 2014, encompassing the following terms: asthma, airway inflammation, sulfur dioxide, IL-10, mouse studies, and human studies. This search indicated that biomarkers of SO2 exposure, SO2 effects on airway epithelial cell function, and animal model data are useful in our understanding of the body’s response to SO2, as are SO2-associated amplification of allergic inflammation, and potential promotion of neurogenic inflammation due to chemical irritant properties. While definitive answers are still being sought, these areas comprise important foci of consideration regarding asthmatic responses to inhaled SO2. Furthermore, IL-10 deficiency associated with asthma may be another important factor associated with an inability to resolve inflammation and mitigate oxidative stress resulting from SO2 inhalation, supporting the idea that asthmatics are predisposed to SO2 sensitivity, leading to asthma exacerbations and airway dysfunction. PMID:25922579

  20. Cessation of dexamethasone exacerbates airway responses to methacholine in asthmatic mice.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Peter W; Nickell, Laura E; Wolos, Jeffrey A; Snyder, David W

    2007-06-01

    In asthmatic mice, dexamethasone (30.0 mg/kg) was administered orally once daily on Days 24-27. One hour after dexamethasone on Day 25-27, the mice were exposed to ovalbumin aerosols. Twenty-eight days after the initial ovalbumin immunization, we found that dexamethasone reduced methacholine-induced pulmonary gas trapping and inhibited bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophils and neutrophils. However, five days after the last dose of dexamethasone and last ovalbumin aerosol exposure in other asthmatic mice, the airway obstructive response to methacholine was exacerbated in dexamethasone-treated mice compared to vehicle-treated mice on Day 32. Further, eosinophils, but not neutrophils, were still inhibited after cessation of dexamethasone. Thus, discontinuing dexamethasone worsened methacholine-induced pulmonary gas trapping of asthmatic mice in the absence of eosinophilic airway inflammation. PMID:17374534

  1. SERCA2 Regulates Non-CF and CF Airway Epithelial Cell Response to Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shama; Nichols, David P.; Strand, Matthew; Rancourt, Raymond C.; Randell, Scott H.; White, Carl W.; Ahmad, Aftab

    2011-01-01

    Calcium mobilization can regulate a wide range of essential functions of respiratory epithelium, including ion transport, ciliary beat frequency, and secretion of mucus, all of which are modified in cystic fibrosis (CF). SERCA2, an important controller of calcium signaling, is deficient in CF epithelium. We conducted this study to determine whether SERCA2 deficiency can modulate airway epithelial responses to environmental oxidants such as ozone. This could contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary exacerbations, which are important and frequent clinical events in CF. To address this, we used air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures of non-CF and CF cell lines, as well as differentiated cultures of cells derived from non-CF and CF patients. We found that ozone exposure caused enhanced membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic cell death in CF airway epithelial cell lines relative to non-CF. Ozone exposure caused increased proinflammatory cytokine production in CF airway epithelial cell lines. Elevated proinflammatory cytokine production also was observed in shRNA-mediated SERCA2 knockdown cells. Overexpression of SERCA2 reversed ozone-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Ozone-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was NF-κB- dependent. In a stable NF-κB reporter cell line, SERCA2 inhibition and knockdown both upregulated cytomix-induced NF-κB activity, indicating importance of SERCA2 in modulating NF-κB activity. In this system, increased NF-κB activity was also accompanied by increased IL-8 production. Ozone also induced NF-κB activity and IL-8 release, an effect that was greater in SERCA2-silenced NF-κB-reporter cells. SERCA2 overexpression reversed cytomix-induced increased IL-8 release and total nuclear p65 in CFTR-deficient (16HBE-AS) cells. These studies suggest that SERCA2 is an important regulator of the proinflammatory response of airway epithelial cells and could be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22096575

  2. Chitin-Induced Airway Epithelial Cell Innate Immune Responses Are Inhibited by Carvacrol/Thymol.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Ali Reza; Erle, David J

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is produced in large amounts by fungi, insects, and other organisms and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. Airway epithelial cells are in direct contact with environmental particles and serve as the first line of defense against inhaled allergens and pathogens. The potential contributions of airway epithelial cells to chitin-induced asthma remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that chitin directly stimulates airway epithelial cells to release cytokines that promote type 2 immune responses and to induce expression of molecules which are important in innate immune responses. We found that chitin exposure rapidly induced the expression of three key type 2-promoting cytokines, IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP, in BEAS-2B transformed human bronchial epithelial cells and in A549 and H292 lung carcinoma cells. Chitin also induced the expression of the key pattern recognition receptors TLR2 and TLR4. Chitin induced the expression of miR-155, miR-146a and miR-21, each of which is known to up-regulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Also the expression of SOCS1 and SHIP1 which are known targets of miR-155 was repressed by chitin treatment. The monoterpene phenol carvacrol (Car) and its isomer thymol (Thy) are found in herbal essential oils and have been shown to inhibit allergic inflammation in asthma models. We found that Car/Thy inhibited the effects of chitin on type 2-promoting cytokine release and on the expression of TLRs, SOCS1, SHIP1, and miRNAs. Car/Thy could also efficiently reduce the protein levels of TLR4, inhibit the increase in TLR2 protein levels in chitin plus Car/Thy-treated cells and increase the protein levels of SHIP1 and SOCS1, which are negative regulators of TLR-mediated inflammatory responses. We conclude that direct effects of chitin on airway epithelial cells are likely to contribute to allergic airway diseases like asthma, and that Car/Thy directly inhibits epithelial cell pro-inflammatory responses to chitin. PMID

  3. Chitin-Induced Airway Epithelial Cell Innate Immune Responses Are Inhibited by Carvacrol/Thymol

    PubMed Central

    Erle, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is produced in large amounts by fungi, insects, and other organisms and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. Airway epithelial cells are in direct contact with environmental particles and serve as the first line of defense against inhaled allergens and pathogens. The potential contributions of airway epithelial cells to chitin-induced asthma remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that chitin directly stimulates airway epithelial cells to release cytokines that promote type 2 immune responses and to induce expression of molecules which are important in innate immune responses. We found that chitin exposure rapidly induced the expression of three key type 2-promoting cytokines, IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP, in BEAS-2B transformed human bronchial epithelial cells and in A549 and H292 lung carcinoma cells. Chitin also induced the expression of the key pattern recognition receptors TLR2 and TLR4. Chitin induced the expression of miR-155, miR-146a and miR-21, each of which is known to up-regulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Also the expression of SOCS1 and SHIP1 which are known targets of miR-155 was repressed by chitin treatment. The monoterpene phenol carvacrol (Car) and its isomer thymol (Thy) are found in herbal essential oils and have been shown to inhibit allergic inflammation in asthma models. We found that Car/Thy inhibited the effects of chitin on type 2-promoting cytokine release and on the expression of TLRs, SOCS1, SHIP1, and miRNAs. Car/Thy could also efficiently reduce the protein levels of TLR4, inhibit the increase in TLR2 protein levels in chitin plus Car/Thy-treated cells and increase the protein levels of SHIP1 and SOCS1, which are negative regulators of TLR-mediated inflammatory responses. We conclude that direct effects of chitin on airway epithelial cells are likely to contribute to allergic airway diseases like asthma, and that Car/Thy directly inhibits epithelial cell pro-inflammatory responses to chitin. PMID

  4. Direct effects of interleukin-13 on epithelial cells cause airway hyperreactivity and mucus overproduction in asthma.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Douglas A; Huang, Xiaozhu; Koth, Laura L; Chang, Grace H; Dolganov, Gregory M; Zhu, Zhou; Elias, Jack A; Sheppard, Dean; Erle, David J

    2002-08-01

    Asthma is an increasingly common disease that remains poorly understood and difficult to manage. This disease is characterized by airway hyperreactivity (AHR, defined by exaggerated airflow obstruction in response to bronchoconstrictors), mucus overproduction and chronic eosinophilic inflammation. AHR and mucus overproduction are consistently linked to asthma symptoms and morbidity. Asthma is mediated by Th2 lymphocytes, which produce a limited repertoire of cytokines, including interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13. Although each of these cytokines has been implicated in asthma, IL-13 is now thought to be especially critical. In animal models of allergic asthma, blockade of IL-13 markedly inhibits allergen-induced AHR, mucus production and eosinophilia. Furthermore, IL-13 delivery to the airway causes all of these effects. IL-13 is thus both necessary and sufficient for experimental models of asthma. However, the IL-13-responsive cells causing these effects have not been identified. Here we show that mice lacking signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) were protected from all pulmonary effects of IL-13. Reconstitution of STAT6 only in epithelial cells was sufficient for IL-13-induced AHR and mucus production in the absence of inflammation, fibrosis or other lung pathology. These results demonstrate the importance of direct effects of IL-13 on epithelial cells in causing two central features of asthma. PMID:12091879

  5. Chrysin attenuates allergic airway inflammation by modulating the transcription factors T-bet and GATA-3 in mice.

    PubMed

    Du, Qiang; Gu, Xiaoyan; Cai, Jiankang; Huang, Mao; Su, Mei

    2012-07-01

    Chrysin, a flavonoid obtained from various natural sources, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antioxidant and anti-allergic activities. However, its anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory activities in asthma animal models are poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the effects of chrysin on airway inflammation and the possible mechanisms through which it acts in a murine model of allergic asthma. BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged to ovalbumin (OVA) were administered intragastrically with chrysin at a dose of 50 mg/kg daily. Chrysin significantly suppressed OVA-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to acetylcholine chloride (Ach). Chrysin administration significantly inhibited the total inflammatory cell and eosinophil counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and total immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in serum. Histological examination of lung tissue demonstrated that chrysin significantly attenuated allergen-induced lung eosinophilic inflammation and mucus-producing goblet cells in the airway. In addition, chrysin triggered a switch of the immune response to allergens towards a T-helper type 1 (Th1) profile by modulating the transcription factors T-bet and GATA-3 in allergic mice. These data suggest that chrysin exhibits anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory properties and provides new insights into the immunopharmacological role of chrysin in terms of its effects in a murine model of asthma. PMID:22552848

  6. Differential cellular responses in healthy mice and in mice with established airway inflammation when exposed to hematite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Åsa; Bergström, Ulrika; Ågren, Lina; Österlund, Lars; Sandström, Thomas; Bucht, Anders

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory and immunological responses in airways and lung-draining lymph nodes (LDLNs), following lung exposure to iron oxide (hematite) nanoparticles (NPs). The responses to the hematite NPs were evaluated in both healthy non-sensitized mice, and in sensitized mice with an established allergic airway disease. The mice were exposed intratracheally to either hematite NPs or to vehicle (PBS) and the cellular responses were evaluated on days 1, 2, and 7, post-exposure. Exposure to hematite NPs increased the numbers of neutrophils, eosinophils, and lymphocytes in the airways of non-sensitized mice on days 1 and 2 post-exposure; at these time points the number of lymphocytes was also elevated in the LDLNs. In contrast, exposing sensitized mice to hematite NPs induced a rapid and unspecific cellular reduction in the alveolar space on day 1 post-exposure; a similar decrease of lymphocytes was also observed in the LDLN. The results indicate that cells in the airways and in the LDLN of individuals with established airway inflammation undergo cell death when exposed to hematite NPs. A possible explanation for this toxic response is the extensive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pro-oxidative environment of inflamed airways. This study demonstrates how sensitized and non-sensitized mice respond differently to hematite NP exposure, and it highlights the importance of including individuals with respiratory disorders when evaluating health effects of inhaled nanomaterials. PMID:26163175

  7. Neurturin influences inflammatory responses and airway remodeling in different mouse asthma models.

    PubMed

    Mauffray, Marion; Domingues, Olivia; Hentges, François; Zimmer, Jacques; Hanau, Daniel; Michel, Tatiana

    2015-02-15

    Neurturin (NTN) was previously described for its neuronal activities, but recently, we have shown that this factor is also involved in asthma physiopathology. However, the underlying mechanisms of NTN are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate NTN involvement in acute bronchial Th2 responses, to analyze its interaction with airway structural cells, and to study its implication in remodeling during acute and chronic bronchial inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. We analyzed the features of allergic airway inflammation in wild-type and NTN(-/-) mice after sensitization with two different allergens, OVA and house dust mite. We showed that NTN(-/-) dendritic cells and T cells had a stronger tendency to activate the Th2 pathway in vitro than similar wild-type cells. Furthermore, NTN(-/-) mice had significantly increased markers of airway remodeling like collagen deposition. NTN(-/-) lung tissues showed higher levels of neutrophils, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, matrix metalloproteinase 9, TNF-α, and IL-6. Finally, NTN had the capacity to decrease IL-6 and TNF-α production by immune and epithelial cells, showing a direct anti-inflammatory activity on these cells. Our findings support the hypothesis that NTN could modulate the allergic inflammation in different mouse asthma models. PMID:25595789

  8. KGF alters gene expression in human airway epithelia: potential regulation of the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Prince, L S; Karp, P H; Moninger, T O; Welsh, M J

    2001-07-17

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) regulates several functions in adult and developing lung epithelia; it causes proliferation, stimulates secretion of fluid and electrolytes, enhances repair, and may minimize injury. To gain insight into the molecular processes influenced by KGF, we applied KGF to primary cultures of well-differentiated human airway epithelia and used microarray hybridization to assess the abundance of gene transcripts. Of 7,069 genes tested, KGF changed expression levels of 910. Earlier studies showed that KGF causes epithelial proliferation, and as expected, treatment altered expression of numerous genes involved in cell proliferation. We found that KGF stimulated transepithelial Cl(-) transport, but the number of cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) transcripts fell. Although transcripts for ClC-1 and ClC-7 Cl(-) channels increased, KGF failed to augment transepithelial Cl(-) transport in CF epithelia, suggesting that KGF-stimulated Cl(-) transport in differentiated airway epithelia depends on the CFTR Cl(-) channel. Interestingly, KGF decreased transcripts for many interferon (IFN)-induced genes. IFN causes trafficking of Stat dimers to the nucleus, where they activate transcription of IFN-induced genes. We found that KGF prevented the IFN-stimulated trafficking of Stat1 from the cytosol to the nucleus, suggesting a molecular mechanism for KGF-mediated suppression of the IFN-signaling pathway. These results suggest that in addition to stimulating proliferation and repair of damaged airway epithelia, KGF stimulates Cl(-) transport and may dampen the response of epithelial cells to inflammatory mediators. PMID:11459923

  9. Age specific responses to acute inhalation of diffusion flame soot particles: Cellular injury and the airway antioxidant response

    PubMed Central

    Van Winkle, Laura S.; Chan, Jackie K.W.; Anderson, Donald S.; Kumfer, Benjamin M.; Kennedy, Ian M.; Wexler, Anthony S; Wallis, Christopher; Abid, Aamir D.; Sutherland, Katherine M.; Fanucchi, Michelle V.

    2011-01-01

    Current studies of particulate matter (PM) are confounded by the fact that PM is a complex mixture of primary (crustal material, soot, metals) and secondary (nitrates, sulfates and organics formed in the atmosphere) compounds with considerable variance in composition by sources and location. We have developed a laboratory-based PM that is replicable, does not contain dust or metals and that can be used to study specific health effects of PM composition in animal models. We exposed both neonatal (7 days of age) and adult rats to a single 6-hr exposure of laboratory generated fine diffusion flame soot (DFP; 170 ug/m3), or filtered air. Pulmonary gene and protein expression as well as indicators of cytotoxicity were evaluated 24 hours after exposure. Although DFP exposure did not alter airway epithelial cell composition in either neonates or adults, increased LDH activity was found in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of neonates indicating an age-specific increase in susceptibility. In adults, 16 genes were differentially expressed as a result of DFP exposure while only 6 genes were altered in the airways of neonates. Glutamate cytsteine ligase protein was increased in abundance in both DFP exposed neonates and adults indicating an initiation of antioxidant responses involving the synthesis of glutathione. DFP significantly decreased catalase gene expression in adult airways, although catalase protein expression was increased by DFP in both neonates and adults. We conclude that key airway antioxidant enzymes undergo changes in expression in response to a moderate PM exposure that does not cause frank epithelial injury and that neonates have a different response pattern than adults. PMID:20961279

  10. Functional effects of TGF-β1 on mesenchymal stem cell mobilization in cockroach allergen-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peisong; Zhou, Yufeng; Xian, Lingling; Li, Changjun; Xu, Ting; Plunkett, Beverly; Huang, Shau-Ku; Wan, Mei; Cao, Xu

    2014-05-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been suggested to participate in immune regulation and airway repair/remodeling. TGF-β1 is critical in the recruitment of stem/progenitor cells for tissue repair, remodeling, and cell differentiation. In this study, we sought to investigate the role of TGF-β1 in MSC migration in allergic asthma. We examined nestin expression (a marker for MSCs) and TGF-β1 signaling activation in airways in cockroach allergen extract (CRE)-induced mouse models. Compared with control mice, there were increased nestin(+) cells in airways and higher levels of active TGF-β1 in serum and p-Smad2/3 expression in lungs of CRE-treated mice. Increased activation of TGF-β1 signaling was also found in CRE-treated MSCs. We then assessed MSC migration induced by conditioned medium from CRE-challenged human epithelium in air/liquid interface culture in Transwell assays. MSC migration was stimulated by epithelial-conditioned medium, but was significantly inhibited by either TGF-β1-neutralizing Ab or TβR1 inhibitor. Intriguingly, increased migration of MSCs from blood and bone marrow to the airway was also observed after systemic injection of GFP(+) MSCs and from bone marrow of Nes-GFP mice following CRE challenge. Furthermore, TGF-β1-neutralizing Ab inhibited the CRE-induced MSC recruitment, but promoted airway inflammation. Finally, we investigated the role of MSCs in modulating CRE-induced T cell response and found that MSCs significantly inhibited CRE-induced inflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-4, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-γ) by CD4(+) T cells. These results suggest that TGF-β1 may be a key promigratory factor in recruiting MSCs to the airways in mouse models of asthma. PMID:24711618

  11. Morin Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation by Modulating Oxidative Stress-Responsive MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuan; Ge, Ai; Zhu, Wen; Liu, Ya-Nan; Ji, Ning-Fei; Zha, Wang-Jian; Zhang, Jia-Xiang; Zeng, Xiao-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common inflammatory diseases characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Morin, an active ingredient obtained from Moraceae plants, has been demonstrated to have promising anti-inflammatory activities in a range of disorders. However, its impacts on pulmonary diseases, particularly on asthma, have not been clarified. This study was designed to investigate whether morin alleviates airway inflammation in chronic asthma with an emphasis on oxidative stress modulation. In vivo, ovalbumin- (OVA-) sensitized mice were administered with morin or dexamethasone before challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were obtained to perform cell counts, histological analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro, human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) were challenged by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The supernatant was collected for the detection of the proinflammatory proteins, and the cells were collected for reactive oxygen species (ROS)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) evaluations. Severe inflammatory responses and remodeling were observed in the airways of the OVA-sensitized mice. Treatment with morin dramatically attenuated the extensive trafficking of inflammatory cells into the BALF and inhibited their infiltration around the respiratory tracts and vessels. Morin administration also significantly suppressed goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition/fibrosis and dose-dependently inhibited the OVA-induced increases in IgE, TNF-α, interleukin- (IL-) 4, IL-13, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and malondialdehyde. In human BECs challenged by TNF-α, the levels of proteins such as eotaxin-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-8 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, were consistently significantly decreased by morin. Western blotting and the 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein assay revealed that the increases in intracellular ROS and MAPK phosphorylation were abolished by

  12. Morin Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation by Modulating Oxidative Stress-Responsive MAPK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuan; Ge, Ai; Zhu, Wen; Liu, Ya-Nan; Ji, Ning-Fei; Zha, Wang-Jian; Zhang, Jia-Xiang; Zeng, Xiao-Ning; Huang, Mao

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common inflammatory diseases characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Morin, an active ingredient obtained from Moraceae plants, has been demonstrated to have promising anti-inflammatory activities in a range of disorders. However, its impacts on pulmonary diseases, particularly on asthma, have not been clarified. This study was designed to investigate whether morin alleviates airway inflammation in chronic asthma with an emphasis on oxidative stress modulation. In vivo, ovalbumin- (OVA-) sensitized mice were administered with morin or dexamethasone before challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were obtained to perform cell counts, histological analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro, human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) were challenged by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The supernatant was collected for the detection of the proinflammatory proteins, and the cells were collected for reactive oxygen species (ROS)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) evaluations. Severe inflammatory responses and remodeling were observed in the airways of the OVA-sensitized mice. Treatment with morin dramatically attenuated the extensive trafficking of inflammatory cells into the BALF and inhibited their infiltration around the respiratory tracts and vessels. Morin administration also significantly suppressed goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition/fibrosis and dose-dependently inhibited the OVA-induced increases in IgE, TNF-α, interleukin- (IL-) 4, IL-13, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and malondialdehyde. In human BECs challenged by TNF-α, the levels of proteins such as eotaxin-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-8 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, were consistently significantly decreased by morin. Western blotting and the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein assay revealed that the increases in intracellular ROS and MAPK phosphorylation were abolished by morin

  13. ISO-1, a macrophage migration inhibitory factor antagonist, inhibits airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Fen; Luo, Ya-ling; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jiang-xin; Lai, Wen-yan; Hu, Si-ming; Cheng, Kai Fan; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2010-01-01

    Airway remodeling is the process of airway structural change that occurs in patients with asthma in response to persistent inflammation and leads to increasing disease severity. Drugs that decrease this persistent inflammation play a crucial role in managing asthma episodes. Mice sensitized (by intraperitoneal administration) and then challenged (by inhalation) with ovalbumin (OVA) develop an extensive eosinophilic inflammatory response, goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition, airway smooth muscle thickening, and airway wall area increase, similar to pathologies observed in human asthma. We used OVA-sensitized/challenged mice as a murine model of chronic allergic airway inflammation with subepithelial fibrosis (i.e., asthma). In this OVA mouse model, mRNA and protein of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) are upregulated, a response similar to what has been observed in the pathogenesis of acute inflammation in human asthma. We hypothesized that MIF induces transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) synthesis, which has been shown to play an important role in asthma and airway remodeling. To explore the role of MIF in the development of airway remodeling, we evaluated the effects of an MIF small-molecule antagonist, (S,R)3-(4-hy-droxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazole acetic acid methyl ester (ISO-1), on pathologies associated with the airway-remodeling process in the OVA mouse model. We found that administration of ISO-1 significantly mitigated all symptoms caused by OVA treatment. In addition, the treatment of OVA-sensitized mice with the MIF antagonist ISO-1 significantly reduced TGF-β1 mRNA levels in pulmonary tissue and its protein level in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid supernatants. We believe the repression of MIF in the ISO-1 treatment group led to the significant suppression observed in the inflammatory responses associated with the allergen-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis in our murine asthma (OVA) model. Our results implicate a

  14. Effect of Formaldehyde on Asthmatic Response to Inhaled Allergen Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ezratty, Véronique; Bonay, Marcel; Neukirch, Catherine; Orset-Guillossou, Gaëlle; Dehoux, Monique; Koscielny, Serge; Cabanes, Pierre-André; Lambrozo, Jacques; Aubier, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Background Exposure to formaldehyde may lead to exacerbation of asthma. Objectives Our aim in this study was to investigate whether exposure to a low level (500 μg/m3) of formaldehyde enhances inhaled allergen responses. Methods Twelve subjects with intermittent asthma and allergy to pollen were exposed, at rest, in a double-blind crossover study to either formaldehyde or purified air for 60 min. The order of exposure to formaldehyde and air-only was randomized, and exposures were separated by 2 weeks. We also performed an allergen inhalation challenge after each exposure. Airway responsiveness to methacholine and lower airway inflammation (induced sputum) were assessed 8 hr after allergen challenge. Results The median dose of allergen producing a 15% decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (PD15FEV1) was 0.80 IR (index of reactivity) after formaldehyde exposure compared with 0.25 IR after air-only exposure (p = 0.06). Formaldehyde exposure did not affect allergen-induced increase in responsiveness to methacholine (p = 0.42). We found no formaldehyde-associated effect on the airway inflammatory response, in particular the eosinophilic inflammatory response, induced by the allergen challenge 8 hr before. Conclusion In this study, exposure to 500 μg/m3 formaldehyde had no significant deleterious effect on airway allergen responsiveness of patients with intermittent asthma; we found a trend toward a protective effect. PMID:17384766

  15. Residual oil fly ash amplifies allergic cytokines, airway responsiveness, and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gavett, S H; Madison, S L; Stevens, M A; Costa, D L

    1999-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution may increase symptom severity in allergic asthmatics. To examine possible interaction, or greater than additive responses, between PM effects and allergic responses, an ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged (OVA) mouse model of allergic airways disease was utilized. After challenge, mice were intratracheally instilled with saline vehicle or 3 mg/kg (approximately 60 microg) residual oil fly ash (ROFA), a transition metal-rich emission source PM sample. Physiological and inflammatory responses were examined 1, 3, 8, and 15 d later. In response to intravenously administered methacholine, ROFA increased total respiratory system resistance and decreased compliance 1 d after exposure, whereas effects of OVA lasted at least 15 d after exposure. Significant interactions between OVA and ROFA were mainly observed 8 d after challenge and exposure, especially with respect to compliance. A strong interaction (p < 0.01) between OVA and ROFA exposure resulted in 8-fold (1 d) and 3-fold (3 d) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid eosinophil numbers. A similarly strong interaction (8-fold) was observed in BAL fluid interleukin-4 (IL-4) 1 d after challenge and exposure. Significant though less strong interactions were also found with respect to IL-4 and IL-5 by 3 d postchallenge/exposure. This study shows that allergen challenge and exposure to emission source particulate matter containing relatively high levels of transitions metals can interact to increase Th2 cytokine production, eosinophil recruitment, and airway hyperresponsiveness in previously sensitized mice. PMID:10588603

  16. Absence of inflammatory response from upper airway epithelial cells after X irradiation.

    PubMed

    Reiter, R; Deutschle, T; Wiegel, T; Riechelmann, H; Bartkowiak, D

    2009-03-01

    Radiotherapy of head and neck tumors causes adverse reactions in normal tissue, especially mucositis. The dose- and time-dependent response of upper airway cells to X radiation should be analyzed in terms of the pro-inflammatory potential. Immortalized BEAS-2B lung epithelial cells were treated with 2, 5 and 8 Gy. Out of 1232 genes, those that were transcribed differentially after 2, 6 and 24 h were assigned to biological themes according to the Gene Ontology Consortium. Enrichment of differentially regulated gene clusters was determined with GOTree ( http://bioinfo.vanderbilt.edu/gotm ). Eleven cytokines were measured in culture supernatants. The cell cycle response up to 24 h and induction of apoptosis up to 4 days after exposure were determined by flow cytometry. A significant dose- and time-dependent gene activation was observed for the categories response to DNA damage, oxidative stress, cell cycle arrest and cell death/apoptosis but not for immune/inflammatory response. This correlated with functional G(2) arrest and apoptosis. Pro-inflammatory cytokines accumulated in supernatants of control cells but not of X-irradiated cells. The complex gene expression pattern of X-irradiated airway epithelial cells is accompanied by cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. In vivo, this may impair the epithelial barrier. mRNA and protein expression suggest at most an indirect contribution of epithelial cells to early radiogenic mucositis. PMID:19267554

  17. Arousal and breathing responses to airway occlusion in healthy sleeping adults.

    PubMed

    Issa, F G; Sullivan, C E

    1983-10-01

    The arousal and breathing responses to total airway occlusion during sleep were measured in 12 normal subjects (7 males and 5 females) aged 25-36 yr. Subjects slept while breathing through a specially designed nosemask, which was glued to the nose with medical-grade silicon rubber. The lips were sealed together with a thin layer of Silastic. The nosemask was attached to a wide-bore (20 mm ID) rigid tube to allow a constant-bias flow of room air from a blower. Total airway occlusion was achieved by simultaneously inflating two rubber balloons fixed in the inspiratory and expiratory pipes. A total of 39 tests were done in stage III/IV nonrapid-eye movement (NREM) sleep in 11 subjects and 10 tests in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep in 5 subjects. The duration of total occlusion tolerated before arousal from NREM sleep varied widely (range 0.9-67.0 s) with a mean duration of 20.4 +/- 2.3 (SE) s. The breathing response to occlusion in NREM sleep was characterised by a breath-by-breath progressive increase in suction pressure achieved by an increase in the rate of inspiratory pressure generation during inspiration. In contrast, during REM sleep, arousal invariably occurred after a short duration of airway occlusion (mean duration 6.2 +/- 1.2 s, maximum duration 11.8 s), and the occlusion induced a rapid shallow breathing pattern. Our results indicate that total nasal occlusion during sleep causes arousal with the response during REM sleep being more predictable and with a generally shorter latency than that in NREM sleep. PMID:6629941

  18. Acute and chronic responses of the upper airway to inspiratory loading in healthy awake humans: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    How, Stephen C; McConnell, Alison K; Taylor, Bryan J; Romer, Lee M

    2007-08-01

    We assessed upper airway responses to acute and chronic inspiratory loading. In Experiment I, 11 healthy subjects underwent T(2)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of upper airway dilator muscles (genioglossus and geniohyoid) before and up to 10 min after a single bout of pressure threshold inspiratory muscle training (IMT) at 60% maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP). T(2) values for genioglossus and geniohyoid were increased versus control (p<0.001), suggesting that these airway dilator muscles are activated in response to acute IMT. In Experiment II, nine subjects underwent 2D-Flash sequence MRI of the upper airway during quiet breathing and while performing single inspirations against resistive loads (10%, 30% and 50% MIP); this procedure was repeated after 6 weeks of IMT. Lateral narrowing of the upper airway occurred at all loads, whilst anteroposterior narrowing occurred at the level of the laryngopharynx at loads > or =30% MIP. Changes in upper airway morphology and narrowing after IMT were undetectable using MRI. PMID:17341450

  19. Influenza A infection enhances antigen-induced airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness in young but not aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Birmingham, Janette M.; Gillespie, Virginia L.; Srivastava, Kamal; Li, Xiu-Min; Busse, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although morbidity and mortality rates from asthma are highest in patients > 65 years of age, the effect of older age on airway inflammation in asthma is not well established. Objective To investigate age-related differences in the promotion of allergic inflammation after influenza A viral respiratory infection on antigen specific IgE production, antigen-induced airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness in mice. Methods To accomplish this objective, the following model system was used. Young (six-week) and aged (18-month) BALB/c mice were first infected with a non-lethal dose of influenza virus A (H/HK×31). Mice were then ovalbumin (OVA) sensitized during the acute-infection (3-days post inoculation) and then chronically underwent challenge to the airways with OVA. Forty-eight hours after the final OVA-challenge, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) cellular and cytokine profile, antigen-specific IgE and IgG1, and lung tissue inflammation were measured. Results Age-specific differences were noted on the effect of a viral infection, allergic sensitization, airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Serum OVA-specific IgE was significantly increased in only the aged mice infected with influenza virus. Despite greater morbidity (e.g. weight loss and sickness scores) during the acute infection in the 18-month old mice that were OVA-sensitized there was little effect on the AHR and BALF cellular differential. In contrast, BALF neutrophils and AHR increased, but eosinophils decreased in 6-week mice that were OVA-sensitized during an acute influenza infection. Conclusion With increased age in a mouse model, viral infection prior to antigen sensitization affects the airway and systemic allergic response differently. These differences may reflect distinct phenotypic features of allergic inflammation in older patients with asthma PMID:25039815

  20. Hyperoxia promotes polarization of the immune response in ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, leading to a TH17 cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Nagato, Akinori C; Bezerra, Frank S; Talvani, André; Aarestrup, Beatriz J; Aarestrup, Fernando M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that hyperoxia-induced stress and oxidative damage to the lungs of mice lead to an increase in IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β expression. Together, IL-6 and TGF-β have been known to direct T cell differentiation toward the TH17 phenotype. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that hyperoxia promotes the polarization of T cells to the TH17 cell phenotype in response to ovalbumin-induced acute airway inflammation. Airway inflammation was induced in female BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal sensitization and intranasal introduction of ovalbumin, followed by challenge methacholine. After the methacholine challenge, animals were exposed to hyperoxic conditions in an inhalation chamber for 24 h. The controls were subjected to normoxia or aluminum hydroxide dissolved in phosphate buffered saline. After 24 h of hyperoxia, the number of macrophages and lymphocytes decreased in animals with ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, whereas the number of neutrophils increased after ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation. The results showed that expression of Nrf2, iNOS, T-bet and IL-17 increased after 24 of hyperoxia in both alveolar macrophages and in lung epithelial cells, compared with both animals that remained in room air, and animals with ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation. Hyperoxia alone without the induction of airway inflammation lead to increased levels of TNF-α and CCL5, whereas hyperoxia after inflammation lead to decreased CCL2 levels. Histological evidence of extravasation of inflammatory cells into the perivascular and peribronchial regions of the lungs was observed after pulmonary inflammation and hyperoxia. Hyperoxia promotes polarization of the immune response toward the TH17 phenotype, resulting in tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and the migration of neutrophils to the lung and airways. Elucidating the effect of hyperoxia on ovalbumin-induced acute airway inflammation is relevant to preventing or

  1. Invasive versus noninvasive measurement of allergic and cholinergic airway responsiveness in mice

    PubMed Central

    Glaab, Thomas; Ziegert, Michaela; Baelder, Ralf; Korolewitz, Regina; Braun, Armin; Hohlfeld, Jens M; Mitzner, Wayne; Krug, Norbert; Hoymann, Heinz G

    2005-01-01

    Background This study seeks to compare the ability of repeatable invasive and noninvasive lung function methods to assess allergen-specific and cholinergic airway responsiveness (AR) in intact, spontaneously breathing BALB/c mice. Methods Using noninvasive head-out body plethysmography and the decrease in tidal midexpiratory flow (EF50), we determined early AR (EAR) to inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus antigens in conscious mice. These measurements were paralleled by invasive determination of pulmonary conductance (GL), dynamic compliance (Cdyn) and EF50 in another group of anesthetized, orotracheally intubated mice. Results With both methods, allergic mice, sensitized and boosted with A. fumigatus, elicited allergen-specific EAR to A. fumigatus (p < 0.05 versus controls). Dose-response studies to aerosolized methacholine (MCh) were performed in the same animals 48 h later, showing that allergic mice relative to controls were distinctly more responsive (p < 0.05) and revealed acute airway inflammation as evidenced from increased eosinophils and lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage. Conclusion We conclude that invasive and noninvasive pulmonary function tests are capable of detecting both allergen-specific and cholinergic AR in intact, allergic mice. The invasive determination of GL and Cdyn is superior in sensitivity, whereas the noninvasive EF50 method is particularly appropriate for quick and repeatable screening of respiratory function in large numbers of conscious mice. PMID:16309547

  2. The effects of inhaled corticosteroids on intrinsic responsiveness and histology of airways from infant monkeys exposed to house dust mite allergen and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Plopper, Charles G.; Peake, Janice L.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2008-01-15

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are recommended to treat infants with asthma, some with intermittent asthma. We previously showed that exposing infant monkeys to allergen/ozone resulted in asthma-like characteristics of their airways. We evaluated the effects of ICS on histology and intrinsic responsiveness of allergen/ozone-exposed and normal infant primate airways. Infant monkeys were exposed by inhalation to (1) filtered air and saline, (2) house dust mite allergen (HDMA) + ozone and saline, (3) filtered air and ICS (budesonide) or (4) HDMA + ozone and ICS. Allergen/ozone exposures started at 1 month and ICS at 3 months of age. At 6 months of age, methacholine-induced changes in luminal area of airways in proximal and distal lung slices were determined using videomicrometry, followed by histology of the same slices. Proximal airway responsiveness was increased by allergen/ozone and by ICS. Eosinophil profiles were increased by allergen/ozone in both proximal and distal airways, an effect that was decreased by ICS in distal airways. In both allergen/ozone- and air-exposed monkeys, ICS increased the number of alveolar attachments in distal airways, decreased mucin in proximal airways and decreased epithelial volume in both airways. ICS increased smooth muscle in air-exposed animals while decreasing it in allergen/ozone-exposed animals in both airways. In proximal airways, there was a small but significant positive correlation between smooth muscle and airway responsiveness, as well as between alveolar attachments and responsiveness. ICS change morphology and function in normal airways as well as allergen/ozone-exposed airways, suggesting that they should be reserved for infants with active symptoms.

  3. Small airway dysfunction and flow and volume bronchodilator responsiveness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Pisi, Roberta; Aiello, Marina; Zanini, Andrea; Tzani, Panagiota; Paleari, Davide; Marangio, Emilio; Spanevello, Antonio; Nicolini, Gabriele; Chetta, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated whether a relationship between small airways dysfunction and bronchodilator responsiveness exists in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods We studied 100 (20 female; mean age: 68±10 years) patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]: 55% pred ±21%; FEV1/forced vital capacity [FVC]: 53%±10%) by impulse oscillometry system. Resistance at 5 Hz and 20 Hz (R5 and R20, in kPa·s·L−1) and the fall in resistance from 5 Hz to 20 Hz (R5 – R20) were used as indices of total, proximal, and peripheral airway resistance; reactance at 5 Hz (X5, in kPa·s·L−1) was also measured. Significant response to bronchodilator (salbutamol 400 μg) was expressed as absolute (≥0.2 L) and percentage (≥12%) change relative to the prebronchodilator value of FEV1 (flow responders, FRs) and FVC (volume responders, VRs). Results Eighty out of 100 participants had R5 – R20 >0.03 kPa·s·L−1 (> upper normal limit) and, compared to patients with R5 – R20 ≤0.030 kPa·s·L−1, showed a poorer health status, lower values of FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, and X5, along with higher values of residual volume/total lung capacity and R5 (P<0.05 for all comparisons). Compared to the 69 nonresponders and the 8 FRs, the 16 VRs had significantly higher R5 and R5 – R20 values (P<0.05), lower X5 values (P<0.05), and greater airflow obstruction and lung hyperinflation. Conclusion This study shows that peripheral airway resistance is increased in the vast majority of patients with COPD, who showed worse respiratory reactance, worse spirometry results, more severe lung hyperinflation, and poorer health status. Small airway dysfunction was also associated with the bronchodilator responsiveness in terms of FVC, but not in terms of FEV1. PMID:26150710

  4. Sensory Neural Responses to Ozone Exposure during Early Postnatal Development in Rat Airways

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Dawn D.; Wu, Zhongxin; Dey, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Airway infections or irritant exposures during early postnatal periods may contribute to the onset of childhood asthma. The purpose of this study was to examine critical periods of postnatal airway development during which ozone (O3) exposure leads to heightened neural responses. Rats were exposed to O3 (2 ppm) or filtered air for 1 hour on specific postnatal days (PDs) between PD1 and PD29, and killed 24 hours after exposure. In a second experiment, rats were exposed to O3 on PD2–PD6, inside a proposed critical period of development, or on PD19–PD23, outside the critical period. Both groups were re-exposed to O3 on PD28, and killed 24 hours later. Airways were removed, fixed, and prepared for substance P (SP) immunocytochemistry. SP nerve fiber density (NFD) in control extrapulmonary (EXP) epithelium/lamina propria (EPLP) increased threefold, from 1% to 3.3% from PD1–PD3 through PD13–PD15, and maintained through PD29. Upon O3 exposure, SP-NFD in EXP–smooth muscle (SM) and intrapulmonary (INT)-SM increased at least twofold at PD1–PD3 through PD13–PD15 in comparison to air exposure. No change was observed at PD21–PD22 or PD28–PD29. In critical period studies, SP-NFD in the INT-SM and EXP-SM of the PD2–PD6 O3 group re-exposed to O3 on PD28 was significantly higher than that of the group exposed at PD19–PD23 and re-exposed at PD28. These findings suggest that O3-mediated changes in sensory innervation of SM are more responsive during earlier postnatal development. Enhanced responsiveness of airway sensory nerves may be a contributing mechanism of increased susceptibility to environmental exposures observed in human infants and children. PMID:20118220

  5. Airway hyperreactivity elicited by toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-albumin conjugate is not accompanied by airway eosinophilic infiltration in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Millecchia, L L; Frazer, D G; Fedan, J S

    1998-02-01

    Nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness is present in many patients with toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-induced asthma; however, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of this hyperresponsiveness remain controversial. In the present study, we used a guinea pig model to investigate the association of TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness with eosinophilic airway infiltration, which is widely considered to play a key role in the development of allergen-induced hyperresponsiveness. Guinea pigs were sensitized by i.d. injections of 10 microl TDI on day 1 and day 6. Control animals received saline injections. Two weeks after the second injection, airway reactivity to inhaled methacholine and specific airway resistance (sRaw) was measured before and at several times after inhalation challenge with TDI-GSA (guinea pig serum albumin) conjugates. Eosinophils in the airways were detected using enzyme histochemistry and quantified using computer-assisted image analysis. TDI-specific IgG1 antibodies were found in the blood of TDI-sensitized animals. An immediate increase in sRaw was induced in these animals by TDI-GSA challenge; airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine was observed at 6 h and 18 h after TDI-GSA challenge. However, TDI-GSA challenge did not result in an elevation of eosinophils in the airways, compared with control animals. The results suggest that the development of TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness is not dependent upon eosinophil infiltration in airways. PMID:9520137

  6. Attenuation of human nasal airway responses to bradykinin and histamine by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Dear, J. W.; Ghali, S.; Foreman, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase and local anaesthetics were studied on changes in human nasal airway patency and albumin extravasation in response to bradykinin and histamine, in vivo. 2. Compared with the action of the vasoconstrictor, ephedrine, 2.5 mumol, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), 1 mumol alone, did not change the resting value of the minimal cross-sectional area (A min) of the human nasal airway. L-NAME, 0.1 to 10 mumol, produced a dose-related inhibition of the reduction in A min caused by bradykinin, 300 micrograms. NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), 1 mumol, similarly reduced the effect of bradykinin, 300 micrograms, on A min, but NG-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester (D-NAME), had no effect. L-NAME, 0.1 to 10 mumol, or L-NMMA, 10 mumol, failed to inhibit the effect of histamine, 300 micrograms on A min. 3. The inhibition by L-NAME, 1 mumol of the action of bradykinin, 300 micrograms on A min was maximal between 15 and 30 min after pretreatment with L-NAME. 4. L-NAME, 1 and 10 mumol, inhibited the extravasation of albumin into the nasal cavity induced by bradykinin, 300 micrograms, and also by histamine, 300 micrograms. D-NAME, 1 and 10 mumol had no effect on the extravasation of albumin in response to bradykinin or histamine. 5. L-Arginine, 30 mumol, reversed the effect of L-NAME, 1 mumol, on the bradykinin- and histamine-induced albumin extravasation into the nasal airway. 6. Local anaesthesia of the nasal airway with lignocaine, 10 mg, or benzocaine, 10 mg, failed to inhibit the reduction in A min or the albumin extravasation induced by either bradykinin, 300 micrograms, and histamine, 300 micrograms. 7. We conclude that the extravasation of plasma albumin caused by bradykinin and by histamine involves the generation of nitric oxide. The nasal blockage induced by bradykinin involves nitric oxide generation but the nasal blockage induced by histamine does not. PMID:8818341

  7. Pulmonary vascular and airway responses to systemic vasoconstrictors in anesthetized BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mofei; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Shinomiya, Shohei; Yamamoto, Yuki; Kurata, Yasutaka; Kuda, Yuhichi; Tanida, Mamoru; Toga, Hirohisa

    2015-04-01

    There is no systematic study in which the effects of vasoactive substances were investigated on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in in vivo mouse by directly measuring cardiac output and the inflow and outflow pressures in the pulmonary circulation. We determined the responses of PVR, total peripheral resistance (TPR), and airway pressure (AWP) to angiotensin II, endothelin-1, vasopressin, phenylephrine, and thromboxane A2 analog U46619 in anesthetized BALB/c mice. Pulmonary arterial pressure, left atrial pressure (LAP), and aortic blood flow were measured. TPR increased dose-dependently in response to consecutive administration of all vasoconstrictors except vasopressin which reduced TPR at the highest dose of 100 nmol/kg. At high doses of vasoconstrictors, pulmonary arterial pressure and AWP increased due to increased LAP, as demonstrated by the separate LAP elevation experiments. When LAP transiently increased at high doses, PVR did not increase but decreased. Nonetheless, enodothelin-1, angiotensin II, and U46619 increased PVR. Vasopressin at 100 nmol/kg increased AWP without LAP elevation. In conclusion, the high doses of the vasoconstrictors studied here exert indirectly a transient pulmonary vasodilatory and AWP increasing actions due to pulmonary congestion evoked by strong systemic vasoconstriction. Nevertheless, enodothelin-1, angiotensin II, and U46619 cause pulmonary vasoconstriction, and vasopressin constricts airway in anesthetized BALB/c mice. PMID:25853950

  8. Effect of reproterol either alone or combined with disodium cromoglycate on airway responsiveness to methacholine.

    PubMed

    Kanniess, Frank; Jörres, Rudolf A; Magnussen, Helgo

    2005-01-01

    Regular use of inhaled beta2-agonists might lead to tolerance as reflected in a loss of bronchoprotection. In vitro-data suggest that this might be prevented by disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). Therefore, we studied the effect of the beta2-agonist reproterol in combination with DSCG. In a cross-over design, 19 subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness inhaled either placebo, 1mg reproterol, 2 mg DSCG, or 1mg reproterol plus 2 mg DSCG 4x daily over 2 weeks. Treatment periods were separated by > or = 7 days. Before and at the end of periods, lung function and methacholine responsiveness were determined in the morning, and 6h later the bronchodilator effect and the protection against methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. Reproterol or DSCG or their combination did not exert detrimental effects on lung function, airway responsiveness, or bronchodilator capacity. However, bronchoprotection was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) after treatment with placebo, reproterol or reproterol plus DSCG, the respective changes being 0.59, 0.96 and 1.37 doubling concentrations. All changes were small as compared to intraindividual variability. In this model all treatments except with DSCG caused a significant but small loss of protection against methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. Thus, tolerance was not prevented by 2 weeks of additional treatment with DSCG, in contrast to in vitro findings. PMID:15939309

  9. Abr, a negative regulator of Rac, attenuates cockroach allergen-induced asthma in a mouse model1

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Dapeng; Fei, Fei; Lim, Min; Yu, Min; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2013-01-01

    Abr deactivates Rac, a master molecular switch that positively regulates many immune cell functions, by converting it to its GDP-bound conformation. Here we report that in the absence of Abr function, cockroach allergen (CRA)-immunized mice experienced a fatal asthma attack when challenged with CRA. The asthma in abr−/− mice was characterized by increased pulmonary mucus production, elevated serum IgE and leukocyte airway infiltration. Decreased pulmonary compliance was further documented by increased airway resistance upon methacholine challenge. Peribronchial and bronchio-alveolar lavage eosinophils, key cells associated with allergic asthma, were increased in abr−/− mice, but adoptive transfer of this cell type from immunized mice to naïve controls followed by CRA challenge showed that eosinophils are not primarily responsible for differences in airway resistance between controls and abr null mutants. CD4+ T cell numbers in the airways of CRA-challenged abr−/− mice were also significantly increased compared to controls, as were the Th2 T cell-secreted cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 in total lung. Interestingly, when control and abr−/− CD4+ T cells from CRA-immunized mice were transferred to wild type animals, airway resistance upon challenge with CRA was significantly higher in mice transplanted with T cells lacking Abr function. CD4+ T cells from CRA-immunized and challenged abr−/− mice contained elevated levels of activated Rac-GTP, compared to wild type controls. Functionally, abr−/− CD4+ T cells from CRA-exposed mice showed significantly enhanced chemotaxis towards CCL21. These results identify Abr-regulated CD4+ T cell migration as an important component of severe cockroach allergen evoked allergic asthma in mice. PMID:24058174

  10. Airway Dysfunction in Obesity: Response to Voluntary Restoration of End Expiratory Lung Volume

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Beno W.; Berger, Kenneth I.; Segal, Leopoldo N.; Stabile, Alexandra; Coles, Katherine D.; Parikh, Manish; Goldring, Roberta M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Abnormality in distal lung function may occur in obesity due to reduction in resting lung volume; however, airway inflammation, vascular congestion and/or concomitant intrinsic airway disease may also be present. The goal of this study is to 1) describe the phenotype of lung function in obese subjects utilizing spirometry, plethysmography and oscillometry; and 2) evaluate residual abnormality when the effect of mass loading is removed by voluntary elevation of end expiratory lung volume (EELV) to predicted FRC. Methods 100 non-smoking obese subjects without cardio-pulmonary disease and with normal airflow on spirometry underwent impulse oscillometry (IOS) at baseline and at the elevated EELV. Results FRC and ERV were reduced (44±22, 62±14% predicted) with normal RV/TLC (29±9%). IOS demonstrated elevated resistance at 20 Hz (R20, 4.65±1.07 cmH2O/L/s); however, specific conductance was normal (0.14±0.04). Resistance at 5–20 Hz (R5−20, 1.86±1.11 cmH2O/L/s) and reactance at 5 Hz (X5, −2.70±1.44 cmH2O/L/s) were abnormal. During elevation of EELV, IOS abnormalities reversed to or towards normal. Residual abnormality in R5−20 was observed in some subjects despite elevation of EELV (1.16±0.8 cmH2O/L/s). R5−20 responded to bronchodilator at baseline but not during elevation of EELV. Conclusions This study describes the phenotype of lung dysfunction in obesity as reduction in FRC with airway narrowing, distal respiratory dysfunction and bronchodilator responsiveness. When R5−20 normalized during voluntary inflation, mass loading was considered the predominant mechanism. In contrast, when residual abnormality in R5−20 was demonstrable despite return of EELV to predicted FRC, mechanisms for airway dysfunction in addition to mass loading could be invoked. PMID:24505355

  11. Nicotine enhances murine airway contractile responses to kinin receptor agonists via activation of JNK- and PDE4-related intracellular pathways

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nicotine plays an important role in cigarette-smoke-associated airway disease. The present study was designed to examine if nicotine could induce airway hyperresponsiveness through kinin receptors, and if so, explore the underlying mechanisms involved. Methods Murine tracheal segments were cultured for 1, 2 or 4 days in serum-free DMEM medium in presence of nicotine (1 and 10 μM) or vehicle (DMSO). Contractile responses induced by kinin B1 receptor agonist, des-Arg9-bradykinin, and B2 receptor agonist, bradykinin, were monitored with myographs. The B1 and B2 receptor mRNA expressions were semi-quantified using real-time PCR and their corresponding protein expressions assessed with confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Various pharmacological inhibitors were used for studying intracellular signaling pathways. Results Four days of organ culture with nicotine concentration-dependently increased kinin B1 and B2 receptor-mediated airway contractions, without altering the kinin receptor-mediated relaxations. No such increase was seen at day 1 or day 2. The airway contractile responses to 5-HT, acetylcholine and endothelin receptor agonists remained unaffected by nicotine. Two different neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonists MG624 and hexamethonium blocked the nicotine-induced effects. The enhanced contractile responses were accompanied by increased mRNA and protein expression for both kinin receptors, suggesting the involvement of transcriptional mechanisms. Confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry showed that 4 days of nicotine treatment induced activation (phosphorylation) of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and p38. Inhibition of JNK with its specific inhibitor SP600125 abolished the nicotine-induced effects on kinin receptor-mediated contractions and reverted the enhanced receptor mRNA expression. Administration of phosphodiesterase inhibitors (YM976 and theophylline

  12. A murine model of stress controllability attenuates Th2-dominant airway inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Aniket; Kim, Byung-Jin; Gonzales, Xavier; Caffrey, James; Vishwanatha, Jamboor; Jones, Harlan P.

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest a positive correlation between chronic respiratory inflammatory disease and the ability to cope with adverse stress. Interactions between neuroendocrine and immune systems are believed to provide insight toward the biological mechanisms of action. The utility of an experimental murine model was employed to investigate the immunological consequences of stress-controllability and ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation. Pre-conditioned uncontrollable stress exacerbated OVA-induced lung histopathological changes that were typical of Th2-predominant inflammatory response along respiratory tissues. Importantly, mice given the ability to exert control over aversive stress attenuated inflammatory responses and reduced lung pathology. This model represents a means of investigating the neuro-immune axis in defining mechanisms of stress and respiratory disease. PMID:20462642

  13. [Cardiovascular responses during laryngeal mask airway insertion in normotensive, hypertensive and chronic renal failure patients].

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, M; Igarashi, M; Tsunoda, K; Edanaga, M; Suzuki, H; Tohdoh, Y; Namiki, A

    1999-08-01

    The hemodynamic response to the insertion of the laryngeal mask airway (LM) following induction with propofol 2 mg.kg-1 was assessed and compared in normotensive (Normal), hypertensive (HT) and chronic renal failure (CRF) patients (n = 23 in each group). Before induction, in HT and CRF groups blood pressure and rate pressure products (RPP) were higher than in Normal group (P < 0.05). Although blood pressure and RPP were decreased in every patient by induction with propofol, no patients needed vasopressor drugs. The decreases of blood pressure and RPP were larger in HT and CRF groups than in Normal group (P < 0.05). There were no differences between groups in heart rate and rate of successful LM insertion. We concluded that LM insertion with propofol 2 mg.kg-1 was an effective induction method preventing the adverse circulatory responses in normotensive, hypertensive and chronic renal failure patients. PMID:10481421

  14. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid; Silva Mendes, Diego da; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Silva Dias, Celidarque da; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina; and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine

  15. Early onset airway obstruction in response to organic dust in the horse.

    PubMed

    Deaton, Christopher M; Deaton, Laura; Jose-Cunilleras, Eduard; Vincent, Thea L; Baird, Alan W; Dacre, K; Marlin, David J

    2007-03-01

    Equine recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) has been used as a naturally occurring model of human asthma. However, it is unknown whether there is an early-phase response in RAO. The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure to organic dust induces immediate changes in lung function in RAO-affected horses, which could be mediated by airway mast cells. Six RAO-affected horses in remission and six control horses were challenged with hay-straw dust suspension by nebulization. Total respiratory resistance at 1 Hz, measured by forced oscillation, was increased from 0.62 +/- 0.09 cmH(2)O.l(-1).s (mean +/- SE) to 1.23 +/- 0.20 cmH(2)O.l(-1).s 15 min after nebulization in control horses (P = 0.023) but did not change significantly in the RAO group. Total respiratory reactance at 1 Hz (P = 0.005) was significantly lower in the control horses (-0.77 +/- 0.07 cmH(2)O.l(-1).s) than in the RAO group (-0.49 +/- 0.04 cmH(2)O.l(-1).s) 15 min after nebulization. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) histamine concentration was significantly elevated 10 and 20 min postnebulization in control horses but not in RAO horses. Minimum reactance at 1 Hz in the early postnebulization period significantly correlated with both prechallenge BALF mast cell numbers (r = -0.65, P = 0.02) and peak BALF histamine concentration postnebulization (r = -0.61, P = 0.04). In conclusion, RAO horses, unlike human asthmatic patients, do not exhibit an early-phase response. However, healthy control horses do demonstrate a mild but significant early (<20 min) phase response to inhaled organic dust. This response may serve to decrease the subsequent dose of dust inhaled and as such provide a protective mechanism, which may be compromised in RAO horses. PMID:17158251

  16. Selective response of human airway epithelia to luminal but not serosal solution hypertonicity. Possible role for proximal airway epithelia as an osmolality transducer.

    PubMed Central

    Willumsen, N J; Davis, C W; Boucher, R C

    1994-01-01

    The response of cultured human nasal epithelia to hypertonic bathing solutions was tested using ion-selective microelectrode and quantitative microscopy. Raised luminal, but not serosal, osmolality (+/- 150 mM mannitol) decreased Na+ absorption but did not induce Cl- secretion. Raised luminal osmolality increased cell Cl- activity, Na+ activity, and transepithelial resistance and decreased both apical and basolateral membrane potentials and the fractional resistance of the apical membrane; equivalent circuit analysis revealed increases in apical, basolateral, and shunt resistances. Prolonged exposure (10 min) to 430 mosM luminal solution elicited no regulation of any parameter. Optical measurements revealed a reduction in the thickness of preparations only in response to luminal hypertonic solutions. We conclude that (a) airway epithelial cells exhibit asymmetric water transport properties, with the apical membrane water permeability exceeding that of the basolateral membrane; (b) the cellular response to volume loss is a deactivation of the basolateral membrane K+ conductance and the apical membrane Cl- conductance; (c) luminal hypertonicity slows the rate of Na+ absorption but does not induce Cl- secretion; and (d) cell volume loss increases the resistance of the paracellular path. We speculate that these properties configure human nasal epithelium to behave as an osmotic sensor, transducing information about luminal solutions to the airway wall. Images PMID:8040333

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study Identification of Novel Loci Associated with Airway Responsiveness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Nadia N; Paré, Peter D; Rafaels, Nicholas; Sin, Don D; Sandford, Andrew; Daley, Denise; Vergara, Candelaria; Huang, Lili; Elliott, W Mark; Pascoe, Chris D; Arsenault, Bryna A; Postma, Dirkje S; Boezen, H Marike; Bossé, Yohan; van den Berge, Maarten; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Cho, Michael H; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David; Ober, Carole; Wise, Robert A; Connett, John; Neptune, Enid R; Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo; Mathias, Rasika A; Barnes, Kathleen C

    2015-08-01

    Increased airway responsiveness is linked to lung function decline and mortality in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, the genetic contribution to airway responsiveness remains largely unknown. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using the Illumina (San Diego, CA) Human660W-Quad BeadChip on European Americans with COPD from the Lung Health Study. Linear regression models with correlated meta-analyses, including data from baseline (n = 2,814) and Year 5 (n = 2,657), were used to test for common genetic variants associated with airway responsiveness. Genotypic imputation was performed using reference 1000 Genomes Project data. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses in lung tissues were assessed for the top 10 markers identified, and immunohistochemistry assays assessed protein staining for SGCD and MYH15. Four genes were identified within the top 10 associations with airway responsiveness. Markers on chromosome 9p21.2 flanked by LINGO2 met a predetermined threshold of genome-wide significance (P < 9.57 × 10(-8)). Markers on chromosomes 3q13.1 (flanked by MYH15), 5q33 (SGCD), and 6q21 (PDSS2) yielded suggestive evidence of association (9.57 × 10(-8) < P ≤ 4.6 × 10(-6)). Gene expression studies in lung tissue showed single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosomes 5 and 3 to act as eQTL for SGCD (P = 2.57 × 10(-9)) and MYH15 (P = 1.62 × 10(-6)), respectively. Immunohistochemistry confirmed localization of SGCD protein to airway smooth muscle and vessels and MYH15 to airway epithelium, vascular endothelium, and inflammatory cells. We identified novel loci associated with airway responsiveness in a GWAS among smokers with COPD. Risk alleles on chromosomes 5 and 3 acted as eQTLs for SGCD and MYH15 messenger RNA, and these proteins were expressed in lung cells relevant to the development of airway responsiveness. PMID:25514360

  18. High-fat diet promotes lung fibrosis and attenuates airway eosinophilia after exposure to cockroach allergen in mice.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao Na; Greenberg, Yana; Hosseinkhani, M Reza; Long, Eric K; Bahaie, Nooshin S; Rao, Amrita; Ha, Sung Gil; Rao, Savita P; Bernlohr, David A; Sriramarao, P

    2013-11-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for asthma but the mechanistic basis for this association is not well understood. In the current study, the impact of obesity on lung inflammatory responses after allergen exposure was investigated. C57BL/6 mice maintained on a high-fat diet (HFD) or a normal diet (ND) after weaning were sensitized and challenged with cockroach allergen (CRA). Airway inflammation was assessed based on inflammatory cell recruitment, measurement of lung Th1-Th2 cytokines, chemokines, eicosanoids, and other proinflammatory mediators as well as airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). CRA-challenged mice fed a HFD exhibited significantly decreased allergen-induced airway eosinophilia along with reduced lung IL-5, IL-13, LTC4, CCL11, and CCL2 levels as well as reduced mucus secretion and smooth muscle mass compared to ND fed mice. However, allergen-challenged HFD fed mice demonstrated significantly increased PAI-1 and reduced PGE2 levels in the lung relative to corresponding ND fed mice. Interestingly, saline-exposed HFD fed mice demonstrated elevated baseline levels of TGF-β1, arginase-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and lung collagen expression associated with decreased lung function compared to corresponding ND fed mice. These studies indicate that a HFD inhibits airway eosinophilia while altering levels of PAI-1 and PGE2 in response to CRA in mice. Further, a HFD can lead to the development of lung fibrosis even in the absence of allergen exposure which could be due to innate elevated levels of specific profibrotic factors, potentially affecting lung function during asthma. PMID:24102347

  19. Chronic exposure to a beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist increases the airway response to methacholine.

    PubMed

    Witt-Enderby, P A; Yamamura, H I; Halonen, M; Palmer, J D; Bloom, J W

    1993-09-01

    Scheduled chronic administration of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist bronchodilators in patients with asthma recently has been reported to be associated with a worsening of symptoms and an increase in bronchial responsiveness. We wanted to determine whether a 28-day in vivo exposure to albuterol (beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist) altered the response of rabbit airways to the cholinergic agonist methacholine. We found, using in vitro tissue bath techniques, that in mainstem bronchi from rabbits given a 28-day exposure to albuterol, maximum contraction to methacholine was increased in the albuterol-treated group (control group = 1.10 +/- 0.11 g vs. treated group = 1.50 +/- 0.13 g, P < 0.05). The potency (EC75) was also increased in the albuterol-treated group. The potency for the control group was 5.6 microM (95% confidence limit: 2.3-13 microM) and was 1.7 microM (95% confidence limit: 1.1-2.8 microM, P < 0.05) for the albuterol-treated group. In a subgroup of animals, maximum contraction to KCl, a receptor-independent contractile stimulus, was not significantly different between the groups (control group = 0.79 +/- 0.23 g vs. treated group = 0.82 +/- 0.20 g). The potency (EC50) for KCl-induced contractions was also not significantly different between the groups: control = 12 mM (95% confidence limit: 3.3-44 mM) vs. treated 19 mM (95% confidence limit: 18-20 mM). These data demonstrate that chronic in vivo exposure to a beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist can alter the in vitro tissue bath response of airway smooth muscle to methacholine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7901034

  20. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid Moraes; da Silva Mendes, Diego; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurélio; da Silva Dias, Celidarque; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina; Bozza, Patrícia T

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca(++) influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. PMID:23994558

  1. Airway Epithelial Orchestration of Innate Immune Function in Response to Virus Infection. A Focus on Asthma.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Andrew I; Jackson, David J; Edwards, Michael R; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a very common respiratory condition with a worldwide prevalence predicted to increase. There are significant differences in airway epithelial responses in asthma that are of particular interest during exacerbations. Preventing exacerbations is a primary aim when treating asthma because they often necessitate unscheduled healthcare visits and hospitalizations and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of asthma exacerbations is a respiratory virus infection, of which the most likely type is rhinovirus infection. This article focuses on the role played by the epithelium in orchestrating the innate immune responses to respiratory virus infection. Recent studies show impaired bronchial epithelial cell innate antiviral immune responses, as well as augmentation of a pro-Th2 response characterized by the epithelial-derived cytokines IL-25 and IL-33, crucial in maintaining the Th2 cytokine response to virus infection in asthma. A better understanding of the mechanisms of these abnormal immune responses has the potential to lead to the development of novel therapeutic targets for virus-induced exacerbations. The aim of this article is to highlight current knowledge regarding the role of viruses and immune modulation in the asthmatic epithelium and to discuss exciting areas for future research and novel treatments. PMID:27027954

  2. Oxidative Stress Regulates CFTR Gene Expression in Human Airway Epithelial Cells through a Distal Antioxidant Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaolin; Leir, Shih-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) expression in human airway epithelial cells involves the recruitment of distal cis-regulatory elements, which are associated with airway-selective DNase hypersensitive sites at −44 kb and −35 kb from the gene. The −35-kb site encompasses an enhancer that is regulated by the immune mediators interferon regulatory factor 1 and 2 and by nuclear factor Y. Here we investigate the −44-kb element, which also has enhancer activity in vitro in airway epithelial cells but is inactive in intestinal epithelial cells. This site contains an antioxidant response element (ARE) that plays a critical role in its function in airway cell lines and primary human bronchial epithelial cells. The natural antioxidant sulforaphane (SFN) induces nuclear translocation of nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor that regulates genes with AREs in their promoters, many of which are involved in response to injury. Under normal conditions, the −44-kb ARE is occupied by the repressor BTB and CNC homology 1, basic leucine zipper transcription factor (Bach1), and v-Maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog K (MafK) heterodimers. After 2 hours of SFN treatment, Nrf2 displaces these repressive factors and activates CFTR expression. Site-directed mutagenesis shows that both the ARE and an adjacent NF-κB binding site are required for activation of the –44-kb element in airway epithelial cells. Moreover, this element is functionally linked to the −35-kb enhancer in modulating CFTR expression in response to environmental stresses in the airway. PMID:25259561

  3. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells function as airway sensors to control lung immune response.

    PubMed

    Branchfield, Kelsey; Nantie, Leah; Verheyden, Jamie M; Sui, Pengfei; Wienhold, Mark D; Sun, Xin

    2016-02-12

    The lung is constantly exposed to environmental atmospheric cues. How it senses and responds to these cues is poorly defined. Here, we show that Roundabout receptor (Robo) genes are expressed in pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), a rare, innervated epithelial population. Robo inactivation in mouse lung results in an inability of PNECs to cluster into sensory organoids and triggers increased neuropeptide production upon exposure to air. Excess neuropeptides lead to an increase in immune infiltrates, which in turn remodel the matrix and irreversibly simplify the alveoli. We demonstrate in vivo that PNECs act as precise airway sensors that elicit immune responses via neuropeptides. These findings suggest that the PNEC and neuropeptide abnormalities documented in a wide array of pulmonary diseases may profoundly affect symptoms and progression. PMID:26743624

  4. Hyperosmolar solution effects in guinea pig airways. IV. Lipopolysaccharide-induced alterations in airway reactivity and epithelial bioelectric responses to methacholine and hyperosmolarity.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Richard A; Van Scott, Michael R; Kommineni, Choudari; Millecchia, Lyndell L; Dortch-Carnes, Juanita; Fedan, Jeffrey S

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the in vivo and in vitro effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment (4 mg/kg i.p.) on guinea pig airway smooth muscle reactivity and epithelial bioelectric responses to methacholine (MCh) and hyperosmolarity. Hyperosmolar challenge of the epithelium releases epithelium-derived relaxing factor (EpDRF). Using a two-chamber, whole body plethysmograph 18 h post-treatment, animals treated with LPS were hyporeactive to inhaled MCh aerosol. This could involve an increase in the release and/or actions of EpDRF, because LPS treatment enhanced EpDRF-induced smooth muscle relaxation in vitro in the isolated perfused trachea apparatus. In isolated perfused tracheas the basal transepithelial potential difference (Vt) was increased after LPS treatment. The increase in Vt was inhibited by amiloride and indomethacin. Concentration-response curves for changes in Vt in response to serosally and mucosally applied MCh were biphasic (hyperpolarization, <3 x 10(-7)M; depolarization, >3 x 10(-7)M); MCh was more potent when applied serosally. The hyperpolarization response to MCh, but not the depolarization response, was potentiated after LPS treatment. In both treatment groups, mucosally applied hyperosmolar solution (using added NaCl) depolarized the epithelium; this response was greater in tracheas from LPS-treated animals. The results of this study indicate that airway hyporeactivity in vivo after LPS treatment is accompanied by an increase in the release and/or actions of EpDRF in vitro. These changes may involve LPS-induced bioelectric alterations in the epithelium. PMID:14566002

  5. REAL-TIME MEASUREMENT OF AIRWAY RESPONSES TO SULOFUR DIOXIDE (SO2) IN AN INTACT, AWAKE GUINEA PIG MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time measurment of airway responses to Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) in an intact, awake guinea pig model. J Stanek1,2, Q Krantz2, J Nolan2, D Winsett2, W Watkinson2, and D Costa2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NCSU, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, ETD, NHEERL, US...

  6. The Compatible Solute Ectoine Reduces the Exacerbating Effect of Environmental Model Particles on the Immune Response of the Airways

    PubMed Central

    Gotić, Marijan

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of humans to particulate air pollution has been correlated with the incidence and aggravation of allergic airway diseases. In predisposed individuals, inhalation of environmental particles can lead to an exacerbation of immune responses. Previous studies demonstrated a beneficial effect of the compatible solute ectoine on lung inflammation in rats exposed to carbon nanoparticles (CNP) as a model of environmental particle exposure. In the current study we investigated the effect of such a treatment on airway inflammation in a mouse allergy model. Ectoine in nonsensitized animals significantly reduced the neutrophilic lung inflammation after CNP exposure. This effect was accompanied by a reduction of inflammatory factors in the bronchoalveolar lavage. Reduced IL-6 levels in the serum also indicate the effects of ectoine on systemic inflammation. In sensitized animals, an aggravation of the immune response was observed when animals were exposed to CNP prior to antigen provocation. The coadministration of ectoine together with the particles significantly reduced this exacerbation. The data indicate the role of neutrophilic lung inflammation in the exacerbation of allergic airway responses. Moreover, the data suggest to use ectoine as a preventive treatment to avoid the exacerbation of allergic airway responses induced by environmental air pollution. PMID:24822073

  7. Reduction of eotaxin production and eosinophil recruitment by pulmonary autologous macrophage transfer in a cockroach allergen-induced asthma model.

    PubMed

    Beal, Dominic R; Stepien, David M; Natarajan, Sudha; Kim, Jiyoun; Remick, Daniel G

    2013-12-01

    We sought to investigate the effects of cockroach allergen (CRA) exposure on the lung macrophage population to determine how different macrophage phenotypes influence exacerbation of disease. CRA exposure caused significantly reduced expression of CD86 on lung macrophages. These effects were not systemic, as peritoneal macrophage CD86 expression was not altered. To investigate whether naïve macrophages could reduce asthma-like pulmonary inflammation, autologous peritoneal macrophages were instilled into the airways 24 h before the final CRA challenge. Pulmonary inflammation was assessed by measurement of airway hyperresponsiveness, mucin production, inflammatory cell recruitment, and cytokine production. Cell transfer did not have significant effects in control mice, nor did it affect pulmonary mucin production or airway hyperresponsiveness in control or CRA-exposed mice. However, there was significant reduction in the number of eosinophils recovered in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) (5.8 × 10⁵ vs. 0.88 × 10⁵), and total cell recruitment to the airways of CRA-exposed mice was markedly reduced (1.1 × 10⁶ vs. 0.57 × 10⁶). The reduced eosinophil recruitment was reflected by substantially lower levels of eosinophil peroxidase in the lung and significantly lower concentrations of eotaxins in BAL (eotaxin 1: 3 pg/ml vs. undetectable; eotaxin 2: 2,383 vs. 131 pg/ml) and lung homogenate (eotaxin 1: 1,043 vs. 218 pg/ml; eotaxin 2: 10 vs. 1.5 ng/ml). We conclude that CRA decreases lung macrophage CD86 expression. Furthermore, supplementation of the lung cell population with peritoneal macrophages inhibits eosinophil recruitment, achieved through reduction of eotaxin production. These data demonstrate that transfer of naïve macrophages will reduce some aspects of asthma-like pulmonary inflammation in response to CRA. PMID:24077949

  8. Pneumocystis Elicits a STAT6-Dependent, Strain-Specific Innate Immune Response and Airway Hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Nicole N.; Siemsen, Dan W.; McInnerney, Kate; Harmsen, Allen G.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely held that exposure to pathogens such as fungi can be an agent of comorbidity, such as exacerbation of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although many studies have examined allergic responses to fungi and their effects on pulmonary function, the possible pathologic implications of the early innate responses to fungal pathogens have not been explored. We examined early responses to the atypical fungus Pneumocystis in two common strains of mice in terms of overall immunological response and related pathology, such as cell damage and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). We found a strong strain-specific response in BALB/c mice that included recruitment of neutrophils, NK, NKT, and CD4 T cells. This response was accompanied by elevated indicators of lung damage (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid albumin and LDH) and profound AHR. This early response was absent in C57BL/6 mice, although both strains exhibited a later response associated with the clearance of Pneumocystis. We found that this AHR could not be attributed exclusively to the presence of recruited neutrophils, NKT, NK, or CD4 cells or to the actions of IFN-γ or IL-4. However, in the absence of STAT6 signaling, AHR and inflammatory cell recruitment were virtually absent. Gene expression analysis indicated that this early response included activation of several transcription factors that could be involved in pulmonary remodeling. These results show that exposure to a fungus such as Pneumocystis can elicit pulmonary responses that may contribute to morbidity, even without prior sensitization, in the context of certain genetic backgrounds. PMID:21960549

  9. Paradoxical responses to positive end-expiratory pressure in patients with airway obstruction during controlled ventilation*

    PubMed Central

    Caramez, Maria Paula; Borges, Joao B.; Tucci, Mauro R.; Okamoto, Valdelis N.; Carvalho, Carlos R. R.; Kacmarek, Robert M.; Malhotra, Atul; Velasco, Irineu Tadeu; Amato, Marcelo B. P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To reevaluate the clinical impact of external positive end-expiratory pressure (external-PEEP) application in patients with severe airway obstruction during controlled mechanical ventilation. The controversial occurrence of a paradoxic lung deflation promoted by PEEP was scrutinized. Design External-PEEP was applied stepwise (2 cm H2O, 5-min steps) from zero-PEEP to 150% of intrinsic-PEEP in patients already submitted to ventilatory settings minimizing overinflation. Two commonly used frequencies during permissive hypercapnia (6 and 9/min), combined with two different tidal volumes (VT: 6 and 9 mL/kg), were tested. Setting A hospital intensive care unit. Patients Eight patients were enrolled after confirmation of an obstructive lung disease (inspiratory resistance, >20 cm H2O/L per sec) and the presence of intrinsic-PEEP (≥5 cm H2O) despite the use of very low minute ventilation. Interventions All patients were continuously monitored for intra-arterial blood gas values, cardiac output, lung mechanics, and lung volume with plethysmography. Measurements and Main Results Three different responses to external-PEEP were observed, which were independent of ventilatory settings. In the biphasic response, isovolume-expiratory flows and lung volumes remained constant during progressive PEEP steps until a threshold, beyond which overinflation ensued. In the classic overinflation response, any increment of external-PEEP caused a decrease in isovolume-expiratory flows, with evident overinflation. In the paradoxic response, a drop in functional residual capacity during external-PEEP application (when compared to zero-external-PEEP) was commonly accompanied by decreased plateau pressures and total-PEEP, with increased isovolume-expiratory flows. The paradoxic response was observed in five of the eight patients (three with asthma and two with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) during at least one ventilator pattern. Conclusions External-PEEP application may

  10. Inhalation of concentrated ambient particulate matter near a heavily trafficked road stimulates antigen-induced airway responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Michael T; Hamade, Ali; Meacher, Dianne; Oldham, Michael; Sioutas, Constantinos; Chakrabarti, Bhabesh; Stram, Dan; Froines, John R; Cho, Arthur K

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this study was to test the following hypotheses: (1) exposure to mobile emissions from mobile sources close to a heavily trafficked roadway will exacerbate airway inflammation and allergic airway responses in a sensitized mouse model, and (2) the magnitude of allergic airway disease responses will decrease with increasing distance from the roadway. A particle concentrator and a mobile exposure facility were used to expose ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized BALB/c mice to purified air and concentrated fine and concentrated ultrafine ambient particles at 50 m and 150 m downwind from a roadway that was heavily impacted by emissions from heavy duty diesel-powered vehicles. After exposure, we assessed interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, OVA-specific immunoglobulin E, OVA-specific immunoglobulin G1, and eosinophil influx as biomarkers of allergic responses and numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes as a marker of inflammation. The study was performed over a two-year period, and there were differences in the concentrations and compositions of ambient particulate matter across those years that could have influenced our results. However, averaged over the two-year period, exposure to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) increased the biomarkers associated with airway allergies (IL-5, immunoglobulin E, immunoglobulin G1 and eosinophils). In addition, mice exposed to CAPs 50 m downwind of the roadway had, on the average, greater allergic responses and showed greater indications of inflammation than did mice exposed to CAPs 150 m downwind. This study is consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to CAPs close to a heavily trafficked roadway influenced allergic airway responses. PMID:16259423

  11. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-04-22

    Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naïve T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical relationship between the allergic immune response and helminth infection. PMID:21440530

  12. Effect of different bronchodilators on airway smooth muscle responsiveness to contractile agents.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, B; Persson, C G

    1991-05-01

    "Functional antagonism" is often used to describe the general relaxant effect of beta 2 agonists and xanthines and their ability to protect the airways against bronchoconstrictor stimuli. This study in guinea pig isolated trachea addresses the question of whether the capacity of these drugs to protect against constrictor stimuli is related to smooth muscle relaxation. Three antimuscarinic drugs were also examined to determine whether antagonism of mediators other than muscarinic agonists might contribute to bronchodilatation by these antimuscarinic drugs. Terbutaline (1.1 x 10(-7), 2.2 x 10(-7) M), theophylline (2.2 x 10(-4), 4.4 x 10(-4) M), and enprofylline (5.2 x 10(-5), 1.0 x 10(-4) M) relaxed the tracheal tension that remained after indomethacin treatment. They did not, however, alter the carbachol concentration-response curve significantly. In addition, neither theophylline (2.2 x 10(-4) M) nor terbutaline (1.1 x 10(-7) M) altered histamine induced contraction. Atropine sulphate, glycopyrrolate, and ipratropium bromide had EC50 values of 10(-9) - 10(-8) M for relaxation of carbachol induced contractions, whereas concentrations of 10(-6) - 10(-3) M or greater were required to relax contractions induced by allergen and nine other non-muscarinic mediators. It is suggested that bronchodilatation by antimuscarinic drugs in vivo is due to inhibition of acetylcholine induced bronchoconstriction alone and that beta 2 agonists and xanthines have poor ability to protect airway smooth muscle against constrictor stimuli. Hence mechanisms other than bronchodilatation and "functional antagonism" should be considered to explain the protection against constrictor stimuli in asthma seen with beta 2 agonists and xanthines. PMID:2068693

  13. Associations of airway inflammation and responsiveness markers in non asthmatic subjects at start of apprenticeship

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness (BHR) is considered a hallmark of asthma. Other methods are helpful in epidemiological respiratory health studies including Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide (FENO) and Eosinophils Percentage (EP) in nasal lavage fluid measuring markers for airway inflammation along with the Forced Oscillatory Technique measuring Airway resistance (AR). Can their outcomes discriminate profiles of respiratory health in healthy subjects starting apprenticeship in occupations with a risk of asthma? Methods Rhinoconjunctivitis, asthma-like symptoms, FEV1 and AR post-Methacholine Bronchial Challenge (MBC) test results, FENO measurements and EP were all investigated in apprentice bakers, pastry-makers and hairdressers not suffering from asthma. Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA) was simultaneously conducted in relation to these groups and this generated a synthetic partition (EI). Associations between groups of subjects based on BHR and EI respectively, as well as risk factors, symptoms and investigations were also assessed. Results Among the 441 apprentice subjects, 45 (10%) declared rhinoconjunctivitis-like symptoms, 18 (4%) declared asthma-like symptoms and 26 (6%) suffered from BHR. The mean increase in AR post-MBC test was 21% (sd = 20.8%). The median of FENO values was 12.6 ppb (2.6-132 range). Twenty-six subjects (6.7%) had EP exceeding 14%. BHR was associated with atopy (p < 0.01) and highest FENO values (p = 0.09). EI identified 39 subjects with eosinophilic inflammation (highest values of FENO and eosinophils), which was associated with BHR and atopy. Conclusions Are any of the identified markers predictive of increased inflammatory responsiveness or of development of symptoms caused by occupational exposures? Analysis of population follow-up will attempt to answer this question. PMID:20604945

  14. MicroRNA Mediated Chemokine Responses in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dileepan, Mythili; Sarver, Anne E.; Rao, Savita P.; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S.

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells play a critical role in the pathophysiology of asthma due to their hypercontractility and their ability to proliferate and secrete inflammatory mediators. microRNAs (miRNAs) are gene regulators that control many signaling pathways and thus serve as potential therapeutic alternatives for many diseases. We have previously shown that miR-708 and miR-140-3p regulate the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in human ASM (HASM) cells following TNF-α exposure. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effect of these miRNAs on other asthma-related genes. Microarray analysis using the Illumina platform was performed with total RNA extracted from miR-708 (or control miR)-transfected HASM cells. Inhibition of candidate inflammation-associated gene expression was further validated by qPCR and ELISA. The most significant biologic functions for the differentially expressed gene set included decreased inflammatory response, cytokine expression and signaling. qPCR revealed inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL10, CCL2 and CXCL8, while the release of CCL11 was inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. Transfection of cells with miR-140-3p resulted in inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL12, CXCL10, CCL5 and CXCL8 and of TNF-α-induced CXCL12 release. In addition, expression of RARRES2, CD44 and ADAM33, genes known to contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma, were found to be inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. These results demonstrate that miR-708 and miR-140-3p exert distinct effects on inflammation-associated gene expression and biological function of ASM cells. Targeting these miRNA networks may provide a novel therapeutic mechanism to down-regulate airway inflammation and ASM proliferation in asthma. PMID:26998837

  15. MicroRNA Mediated Chemokine Responses in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Dileepan, Mythili; Sarver, Anne E; Rao, Savita P; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells play a critical role in the pathophysiology of asthma due to their hypercontractility and their ability to proliferate and secrete inflammatory mediators. microRNAs (miRNAs) are gene regulators that control many signaling pathways and thus serve as potential therapeutic alternatives for many diseases. We have previously shown that miR-708 and miR-140-3p regulate the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in human ASM (HASM) cells following TNF-α exposure. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effect of these miRNAs on other asthma-related genes. Microarray analysis using the Illumina platform was performed with total RNA extracted from miR-708 (or control miR)-transfected HASM cells. Inhibition of candidate inflammation-associated gene expression was further validated by qPCR and ELISA. The most significant biologic functions for the differentially expressed gene set included decreased inflammatory response, cytokine expression and signaling. qPCR revealed inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL10, CCL2 and CXCL8, while the release of CCL11 was inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. Transfection of cells with miR-140-3p resulted in inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL12, CXCL10, CCL5 and CXCL8 and of TNF-α-induced CXCL12 release. In addition, expression of RARRES2, CD44 and ADAM33, genes known to contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma, were found to be inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. These results demonstrate that miR-708 and miR-140-3p exert distinct effects on inflammation-associated gene expression and biological function of ASM cells. Targeting these miRNA networks may provide a novel therapeutic mechanism to down-regulate airway inflammation and ASM proliferation in asthma. PMID:26998837

  16. Respiratory responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and their relationship to nonspecific airway reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; Raggio, L.J.; Green, J.A.

    1987-12-01

    Ozone exposure in man produces changes in respiratory function and symptoms. There is a large degree of unexplained intersubject variability in the magnitude of these responses. There is concern that individuals with chronic respiratory diseases may also be more responsive to ozone than normal individuals. The purpose of this study was to describe the responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and to compare these responses to those previously observed in normal individuals. A further purpose was to measure the association of baseline nonspecific airway reactivity with changes in lung function and respiratory symptoms following ozone exposure. A group of 26 nonasthmatic subjects with allergic rhinitis performed a bronchial inhalation challenge with histamine and subsequently underwent two hour exposures to both clean air and to 0.18 part per million ozone with alternating periods of rest and heavy exercise. The airway reactivity of this group of subjects was no greater than that of a comparable group of subjects without allergic rhinitis. The respiratory responses of these subjects to ozone exposure were similar to those previously reported for subjects without allergic rhinitis with the exception that the allergic rhinitis subjects appeared to have a modestly increased bronchoconstrictor response compared to normals. Furthermore, we observed no significant relationships between nonspecific airway reactivity and response to ozone as measured by changes in lung function or the induction of symptoms.

  17. Effect of heparin and a low-molecular weight heparinoid on PAF-induced airway responses in neonatally immunized rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, M.; Herd, C. M.; Page, C. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. We have investigated the effect of an unfractionated heparin preparation, a low-molecular weight heparinoid (Org 10172) and the polyanionic molecule polyglutamic acid against PAF-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary cell infiltration in neonatally immunized rabbits in vivo. 2. Exposure of neonatally immunized rabbits to aerosolized platelet activating factor (PAF) (80 micrograms ml-1 for 60 min) elicited an increase in airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine 24 h and 72 h following challenge which was associated with an infiltration of inflammatory cells into the airways, as assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). 3. A significant increase in the total numbers of cells recovered from BAL fluid was associated with significantly increased cell numbers of neutrophils, eosinophils and mononuclear cells 24 h following PAF exposure. The numbers of eosinophils and neutrophils in the airways remained elevated 72 h after challenge. 4. The intravenous administration of an unfractionated preparation of heparin (100 units kg-1) or Org 10172 (100 micrograms kg-1) 30 min prior to PAF exposure significantly inhibited the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by PAF, 24 h and 72 h following challenge. PAF-induced hyperresponsiveness was not significantly affected by prior intravenous administration of polyglutamic acid (100 micrograms kg-1). 5. The intravenous administration of unfractionated heparin (100 units kg-1), Org 10172 (100 micrograms kg-1) or polyglutamic acid (100 micrograms kg-1) 30 min prior to PAF exposure significantly inhibited the expected increase in total cell infiltration. 6. This study shows that unfractionated heparin and a low-molecular weight heparinoid, Org 10172, are capable of inhibiting both the airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary cell infiltration induced by PAF in the rabbit. PMID:7693273

  18. Cultured human airway epithelial cells (calu-3): a model of human respiratory function, structure, and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Chidekel, Aaron; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the application of the human airway Calu-3 cell line as a respiratory model for studying the effects of gas concentrations, exposure time, biophysical stress, and biological agents on human airway epithelial cells. Calu-3 cells are grown to confluence at an air-liquid interface on permeable supports. To model human respiratory conditions and treatment modalities, monolayers are placed in an environmental chamber, and exposed to specific levels of oxygen or other therapeutic modalities such as positive pressure and medications to assess the effect of interventions on inflammatory mediators, immunologic proteins, and antibacterial outcomes. Monolayer integrity and permeability and cell histology and viability also measure cellular response to therapeutic interventions. Calu-3 cells exposed to graded oxygen concentrations demonstrate cell dysfunction and inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Modeling positive airway pressure reveals that pressure may exert a greater injurious effect and cytokine response than oxygen. In experiments with pharmacological agents, Lucinactant is protective of Calu-3 cells compared with Beractant and control, and perfluorocarbons also protect against hyperoxia-induced airway epithelial cell injury. The Calu-3 cell preparation is a sensitive and efficient preclinical model to study human respiratory processes and diseases related to oxygen- and ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:20948883

  19. Does Moderate Intensity Exercise Attenuate the Postprandial Lipemic and Airway Inflammatory Response to a High-Fat Meal?

    PubMed Central

    Kurti, Stephanie P.; Rosenkranz, Sara K.; Levitt, Morton; Cull, Brooke J.; Teeman, Colby S.; Emerson, Sam R.; Harms, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether an acute bout of moderate intensity exercise in the postprandial period attenuates the triglyceride and airway inflammatory response to a high-fat meal (HFM) compared to remaining inactive in the postprandial period. Seventeen (11 M/6 F) physically active (≥150 min/week of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA)) subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise (EX; 60% VO2peak) or sedentary (CON) condition after a HFM (10 kcal/kg, 63% fat). Blood analytes and airway inflammation via exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) were measured at baseline, and 2 and 4 hours after HFM. Airway inflammation was assessed with induced sputum and cell differentials at baseline and 4 hours after HFM. Triglycerides doubled in the postprandial period (~113 ± 18%, P < 0.05), but the increase did not differ between EX and CON. Percentage of neutrophils was increased 4 hours after HFM (~17%), but the increase did not differ between EX and CON. Exhaled nitric oxide changed nonlinearly from baseline to 2 and 4 hours after HFM (P < 0.05,  η2 = 0.36). Our findings suggest that, in active individuals, an acute bout of moderate intensity exercise does not attenuate the triglyceride or airway inflammatory response to a high-fat meal. PMID:26000301

  20. Does moderate intensity exercise attenuate the postprandial lipemic and airway inflammatory response to a high-fat meal?

    PubMed

    Kurti, Stephanie P; Rosenkranz, Sara K; Levitt, Morton; Cull, Brooke J; Teeman, Colby S; Emerson, Sam R; Harms, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether an acute bout of moderate intensity exercise in the postprandial period attenuates the triglyceride and airway inflammatory response to a high-fat meal (HFM) compared to remaining inactive in the postprandial period. Seventeen (11 M/6 F) physically active (≥ 150 min/week of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA)) subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise (EX; 60% VO 2peak) or sedentary (CON) condition after a HFM (10 kcal/kg, 63% fat). Blood analytes and airway inflammation via exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) were measured at baseline, and 2 and 4 hours after HFM. Airway inflammation was assessed with induced sputum and cell differentials at baseline and 4 hours after HFM. Triglycerides doubled in the postprandial period (~113 ± 18%, P < 0.05), but the increase did not differ between EX and CON. Percentage of neutrophils was increased 4 hours after HFM (~17%), but the increase did not differ between EX and CON. Exhaled nitric oxide changed nonlinearly from baseline to 2 and 4 hours after HFM (P < 0.05, η (2) = 0.36). Our findings suggest that, in active individuals, an acute bout of moderate intensity exercise does not attenuate the triglyceride or airway inflammatory response to a high-fat meal. PMID:26000301

  1. Carbon Nanofibers Have IgE Adjuvant Capacity but Are Less Potent Than Nanotubes in Promoting Allergic Airway Responses

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Mari; Marioara, Calin Daniel; Løvik, Martinus

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing concern for the possible health impact of nanoparticles. The main objective of this study was to investigate the allergy-promoting capacity of four different carbon nanofiber (CNF) samples in an injection and an airway mouse model of allergy. Secondly, the potency of the CNF was compared to the previously reported allergy-promoting capacity of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in the airway model. Ultrafine carbon black particles (ufCBP) were used as a positive control. Particles were given together with the allergen ovalbumin (OVA) either by subcutaneous injection into the footpad or intranasally to BALB/cA mice. After allergen booster, OVA-specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a in serum were measured. In the airway model, inflammation was determined as influx of inflammatory cells (eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages) and by mediators (MCP-1 and TNF-α present in bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF)). CNF and CNT both increased OVA-specific IgE levels in the two models, but in the airway model, the CNT gave a significantly stronger IgE response than the CNF. Furthermore, the CNT and not the CNF promoted eosinophil lung inflammation. Our data therefore suggest that nanotube-associated properties are particularly potent in promoting allergic responses. PMID:24024193

  2. Comprehensive evaluation of poly(I:C) induced inflammatory response in an airway epithelial model

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Amanda R; Park, Hyoungshin; Mulhern, Thomas J; Jackson, George R; Comolli, James C; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Hayden, Patrick J; Prantil-Baun, Rachelle

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory viruses invade the upper airway of the lung, triggering a potent immune response that often exacerbates preexisting conditions such as asthma and COPD. Poly(I:C) is a synthetic analog of viral dsRNA that induces the characteristic inflammatory response associated with viral infection, such as loss of epithelial integrity, and increased production of mucus and inflammatory cytokines. Here, we explore the mechanistic responses to poly(I:C) in a well-defined primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) model that recapitulates in vivo functions and responses. We developed functional and quantifiable methods to evaluate the physiology of our model in both healthy and inflamed states. Through gene and protein expression, we validated the differentiation state and population of essential cell subtypes (i.e., ciliated, goblet, club, and basal cells) as compared to the human lung. Assays for total mucus production, cytokine secretion, and barrier function were used to evaluate in vitro physiology and response to viral insult. Cells were treated apically with poly(I:C) and evaluated 48 h after induction. Results revealed a dose-dependent increase in goblet cell differentiation, as well as, an increase in mucus production relative to controls. There was also a dose-dependent increase in secretion of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and RANTES. Epithelial barrier function, as measured by TEER, was maintained at 1501 ± 355 Ω*cm² postdifferentiation, but dropped significantly when challenged with poly(I:C). This study provides first steps toward a well-characterized model with defined functional methods for understanding dsRNA stimulated inflammatory responses in a physiologically relevant manner. PMID:25847914

  3. Bile Acids Repress Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Signaling and Modulate the Airway Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, Claire; Reen, F. Jerry; Woods, David F.; Mooij, Marlies J.; Adams, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) frequently occurs in patients with respiratory disease and is particularly prevalent in patients with cystic fibrosis. GER is a condition in which the duodenogastric contents of the stomach leak into the esophagus, in many cases resulting in aspiration into the respiratory tract. As such, the presence of GER-derived bile acids (BAs) has been confirmed in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and sputum of affected patients. We have recently shown that bile causes cystic fibrosis-associated bacterial pathogens to adopt a chronic lifestyle and may constitute a major host trigger underlying respiratory infection. The current study shows that BAs elicit a specific response in humans in which they repress hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) protein, an emerging master regulator in response to infection and inflammation. HIF-1α repression was shown to occur through the 26S proteasome machinery via the prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) pathway. Further analysis of the downstream inflammatory response showed that HIF-1α repression by BAs can significantly modulate the immune response of airway epithelial cells, correlating with a decrease in interleukin-8 (IL-8) production, while IL-6 production was strongly increased. Importantly, the effects of BAs on cytokine production can also be more dominant than the bacterium-mediated effects. However, the effect of BAs on cytokine levels cannot be fully explained by their ability to repress HIF-1α, which is not surprising, given the complexity of the immune regulatory network. The suppression of HIF-1 signaling by bile acids may have a significant influence on the progression and outcome of respiratory disease, and the molecular mechanism underpinning this response warrants further investigation. PMID:24914220

  4. Ozone-induced oxygen radical release from bronchoalveolar lavage cells and airway hyper-responsiveness in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, W H; Conlon, P D; O'Byrne, P M

    1995-01-01

    1. Ozone inhalation causes airway hyper-responsiveness and airway inflammation in dogs. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these effects are associated with increases in oxygen radical production from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells. 2. Twelve randomly selected dogs were studied twice, 4 weeks apart. On each study day, acetylcholine (ACh) airway responsiveness was measured before and 1 h after ozone (3 p.p.m., 30 min) or dry air inhalation, followed by BAL. The response to ACh was expressed as the concentration causing an increase in lung resistance of 5 cmH2O l-1 s-1 above baseline. Spontaneous and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (2.4 mumol l-1)-stimulated oxygen radical release from washed BAL cells (4 x 10(6) cells ml-1) was measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence in a luminometer at 37 degrees C. 3. Ozone inhalation caused airway hyper-responsiveness. The concentration of ACh causing an increase in lung resistance of 5 cmH2O l-1 s-1 (the 'provocative' concentration) fell from 4.68 mg ml-1 (% S.E.M., 1.43) before, to 0.48 mg ml-1 (% S.E.M., 1.60) after ozone (P < 0.0001). Spontaneous chemiluminescence area under the curve (AUC) significantly increased after ozone from 4.08 mV (10 min) (% S.E.M., 1.28) after dry air to 8.25 mV (10 min; % S.E.M., 1.29) after ozone (P = 0.007). Ozone inhalation also increased PMA-stimulated chemiluminescence AUC from 18.97 mV (10 min; % S.E.M., 1.18) after dry air to 144.03 mV (10 min; % S.E.M., 1.45) after ozone (P = 0.0001). The increase in PMA-stimulated chemiluminescence was significantly correlated with ozone-induced ACh airway hyper-responsiveness (r = 0.83, P < 0.001). 4. These results indicate that inhaled ozone increases oxygen radical release from BAL cells and suggest that oxygen radicals are important in causing ozone-induced airway hyper-responsiveness. PMID:7562641

  5. The relationship between nasal index and nasal airway resistance, and response to a topical decongestant.

    PubMed

    Doddi, N M; Eccles, R

    2011-12-01

    The differences in the shape and size of the nose have been proposed to be an adaptation to climate with broad noses (platyrrhine) evolving in a warm humid environment where there was little need for air conditioning and narrow noses (leptorrhine) evolving in colder climates where the air needed more warming. The main aim of this research was to determine if there was any relationship between the shape of the nose as expressed in terms of nasal height and width (nasal index) and total nasal airway resistance (NAR), as one would predict that the narrower leptorrhine noses would have a greater resistance to air flow than the broader platyrrhine noses. It was also proposed that the narrow leptorrhine nose would have better developed vascular tissue than the broad platyrrhine nose in order to condition cold air, and would exhibit a greater response to nasal decongestion. No correlation was found between nasal index and NAR (r = -0.09) and similarly no correlation was found between nasal index and response to a topical nasal decongestant (r = 0.02). The absence of any physiological differences between the different nose types may be due to acclimatisation of participants to the area of recruitment. PMID:22125790

  6. Ets homologous factor regulates pathways controlling response to injury in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fossum, Sara L; Mutolo, Michael J; Yang, Rui; Dang, Hong; O'Neal, Wanda K; Knowles, Michael R; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2014-12-16

    Ets homologous factor (EHF) is an Ets family transcription factor expressed in many epithelial cell types including those lining the respiratory system. Disruption of the airway epithelium is central to many lung diseases, and a network of transcription factors coordinates its normal function. EHF can act as a transcriptional activator or a repressor, though its targets in lung epithelial cells are largely uncharacterized. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq), showed that the majority of EHF binding sites in lung epithelial cells are intergenic or intronic and coincide with putative enhancers, marked by specific histone modifications. EHF occupies many genomic sites that are close to genes involved in intercellular and cell-matrix adhesion. RNA-seq after EHF depletion or overexpression showed significant alterations in the expression of genes involved in response to wounding. EHF knockdown also targeted genes in pathways of epithelial development and differentiation and locomotory behavior. These changes in gene expression coincided with alterations in cellular phenotype including slowed wound closure and increased transepithelial resistance. Our data suggest that EHF regulates gene pathways critical for epithelial response to injury, including those involved in maintenance of barrier function, inflammation and efficient wound repair. PMID:25414352

  7. A GM-CSF/IL-33 pathway facilitates allergic airway responses to sub-threshold house dust mite exposure.

    PubMed

    Llop-Guevara, Alba; Chu, Derek K; Walker, Tina D; Goncharova, Susanna; Fattouh, Ramzi; Silver, Jonathan S; Moore, Cheryl Lynn; Xie, Juliana L; O'Byrne, Paul M; Coyle, Anthony J; Kolbeck, Roland; Humbles, Alison A; Stämpfli, Martin R; Jordana, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic immune-inflammatory disease of the airways. Despite aeroallergen exposure being universal, allergic asthma affects only a fraction of individuals. This is likely related, at least in part, to the extent of allergen exposure. Regarding house dust mite (HDM), we previously identified the threshold required to elicit allergic responses in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the impact of an initial immune perturbation on the response to sub-threshold HDM exposure. We show that transient GM-CSF expression in the lung facilitated robust eosinophilic inflammation, long-lasting antigen-specific Th2 responses, mucus production and airway hyperresponsiveness. This was associated with increased IL-33 levels and activated CD11b(+) DCs expressing OX40L. GM-CSF-driven allergic responses were significantly blunted in IL-33-deficient mice. IL-33 was localized on alveolar type II cells and in vitro stimulation of human epithelial cells with GM-CSF enhanced intracellular IL-33 independently of IL-1α. Likewise, GM-CSF administration in vivo resulted in increased levels of IL-33 but not IL-1α. These findings suggest that exposures to environmental agents associated with GM-CSF production, including airway infections and pollutants, may decrease the threshold of allergen responsiveness and, hence, increase the susceptibility to develop allergic asthma through a GM-CSF/IL-33/OX40L pathway. PMID:24551140

  8. A GM-CSF/IL-33 Pathway Facilitates Allergic Airway Responses to Sub-Threshold House Dust Mite Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Llop-Guevara, Alba; Chu, Derek K.; Walker, Tina D.; Goncharova, Susanna; Fattouh, Ramzi; Silver, Jonathan S.; Moore, Cheryl Lynn; Xie, Juliana L.; O’Byrne, Paul M.; Coyle, Anthony J.; Kolbeck, Roland; Humbles, Alison A.; Stämpfli, Martin R.; Jordana, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic immune-inflammatory disease of the airways. Despite aeroallergen exposure being universal, allergic asthma affects only a fraction of individuals. This is likely related, at least in part, to the extent of allergen exposure. Regarding house dust mite (HDM), we previously identified the threshold required to elicit allergic responses in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the impact of an initial immune perturbation on the response to sub-threshold HDM exposure. We show that transient GM-CSF expression in the lung facilitated robust eosinophilic inflammation, long-lasting antigen-specific Th2 responses, mucus production and airway hyperresponsiveness. This was associated with increased IL-33 levels and activated CD11b+ DCs expressing OX40L. GM-CSF-driven allergic responses were significantly blunted in IL-33-deficient mice. IL-33 was localized on alveolar type II cells and in vitro stimulation of human epithelial cells with GM-CSF enhanced intracellular IL-33 independently of IL-1α. Likewise, GM-CSF administration in vivo resulted in increased levels of IL-33 but not IL-1α. These findings suggest that exposures to environmental agents associated with GM-CSF production, including airway infections and pollutants, may decrease the threshold of allergen responsiveness and, hence, increase the susceptibility to develop allergic asthma through a GM-CSF/IL-33/OX40L pathway. PMID:24551140

  9. MyD88 in lung resident cells governs airway inflammatory and pulmonary function responses to organic dust treatment.

    PubMed

    Poole, Jill A; Wyatt, Todd A; Romberger, Debra J; Staab, Elizabeth; Simet, Samantha; Reynolds, Stephen J; Sisson, Joseph H; Kielian, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation of organic dusts within agriculture environments contributes to the development and/or severity of airway diseases, including asthma and chronic bronchitis. MyD88 KO (knockout) mice are nearly completely protected against the inflammatory and bronchoconstriction effects induced by acute organic dust extract (ODE) treatments. However, the contribution of MyD88 in lung epithelial cell responses remains unclear. In the present study, we first addressed whether ODE-induced changes in epithelial cell responses were MyD88-dependent by quantitating ciliary beat frequency and cell migration following wounding by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. We demonstrate that the normative ciliary beat slowing response to ODE is delayed in MyD88 KO tracheal epithelial cells as compared to wild type (WT) control. Similarly, the normative ODE-induced slowing of cell migration in response to wound repair was aberrant in MyD88 KO cells. Next, we created MyD88 bone marrow chimera mice to investigate the relative contribution of MyD88-dependent signaling in lung resident (predominately epithelial cells) versus hematopoietic cells. Importantly, we demonstrate that ODE-induced airway hyperresponsiveness is MyD88-dependent in lung resident cells, whereas MyD88 action in hematopoietic cells is mainly responsible for ODE-induced TNF-α release. MyD88 signaling in lung resident and hematopoietic cells are necessary for ODE-induced IL-6 and neutrophil chemoattractant (CXCL1 and CXCL2) release and neutrophil influx. Collectively, these findings underscore an important role for MyD88 in lung resident cells for regulating ciliary motility, wound repair and inflammatory responses to ODE, and moreover, show that airway hyperresponsiveness appears uncoupled from airway inflammatory consequences to organic dust challenge in terms of MyD88 involvement. PMID:26376975

  10. Circulating progenitor epithelial cells traffic via CXCR4/CXCL12 in response to airway injury.

    PubMed

    Gomperts, Brigitte N; Belperio, John A; Rao, P Nagesh; Randell, Scott H; Fishbein, Michael C; Burdick, Marie D; Strieter, Robert M

    2006-02-01

    Recipient airway epithelial cells are found in human sex-mismatched lung transplants, implying that circulating progenitor epithelial cells contribute to the repair of the airway epithelium. Markers of circulating progenitor epithelial cells and mechanisms for their trafficking remain to be elucidated. We demonstrate that a population of progenitor epithelial cells exists in the bone marrow and the circulation of mice that is positive for the early epithelial marker cytokeratin 5 (CK5) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. We used a mouse model of sex-mismatched tracheal transplantation and found that CK5+ circulating progenitor epithelial cells contribute to re-epithelialization of the airway and re-establishment of the pseudostratified epithelium. The presence of CXCL12 in tracheal transplants provided a mechanism for CXCR4+ circulating progenitor epithelial cell recruitment to the airway. Depletion of CXCL12 resulted in the epithelium defaulting to squamous metaplasia, which was derived solely from the resident tissue progenitor epithelial cells. Our findings demonstrate that CK5+CXCR4+ cells are markers of circulating progenitor epithelial cells in the bone marrow and circulation and that CXCR4/CXCL12-mediated recruitment of circulating progenitor epithelial cells is necessary for the re-establishment of a normal pseudostratified epithelium after airway injury. These findings support a novel paradigm for the development of squamous metaplasia of the airway epithelium and for developing therapeutic strategies for circulating progenitor epithelial cells in airway diseases. PMID:16424223

  11. Distending Pressure Did Not Activate Acute Phase or Inflammatory Responses in the Airways and Lungs of Fetal, Preterm Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Rebecca Y.; Royse, Emily; Kemp, Matthew W.; Miura, Yuichiro; Noe, Andres; Jobe, Alan H.; Hillman, Noah H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation at birth causes airway injury and lung inflammation in preterm sheep. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is being increasingly used clinically to transition preterm infants at birth. Objective To test if distending pressures will activate acute phase reactants and inflammatory changes in the airways of fetal, preterm lambs. Methods The head and chest of fetal lambs at 128±1 day GA were surgically exteriorized. With placental circulation intact, fetal lambs were then randomized to one of five 15 minute interventions: PEEP of 0, 4, 8, 12, or 16 cmH2O. Recruitment volumes were recorded. Fetal lambs remained on placental support for 30 min after the intervention. The twins of each 0 cmH2O animal served as controls. Fetal lung fluid (FLF), bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), right mainstem bronchi and peripheral lung tissue were evaluated for inflammation. Results Recruitment volume increased from 0.4±0.04 mL/kg at 4 cmH2O to 2.4±0.3 mL/kg at 16 cmH2O. The lambs were surfactant deficient, and all pressures were below the opening inflection pressure on pressure-volume curve. mRNA expression of early response genes and pro-inflammatory cytokines did not increase in airway tissue or lung tissue at any pressure compared to controls. FLF and BAL also did not have increases in early response proteins. No histologic changes or Egr-1 activation was present at the pressures used. Conclusion Distending pressures as high as 16 cmH2O did not recruit lung volume at birth and did not increase markers of injury in the lung or airways in non-breathing preterm fetal sheep. PMID:27463520

  12. Effect of heparin on antigen-induced airway responses and pulmonary leukocyte accumulation in neonatally immunized rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Janet M H; Page, Clive P

    2000-01-01

    The effect of single administrations of aerosolized heparin, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and the linear polyanionic molecule, polyglutamic acid (PGA) were examined on antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and leukocyte accumulation in neonatally immunized rabbits.Adult litter-matched NZW rabbits immunized within 24 h of birth with Alternaria tenuis antigen were treated with heparin, LMWH or PGA prior to or following antigen challenge (Alternaria tenuis). For each drug-treated group, a parallel group of rabbits were treated with the appropriate vehicle. In all groups, airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 24 h prior to and following antigen challenge.Basal lung function in terms of resistance (RL) and dynamic compliance (Cdyn) and acute bronchoconstriction was unaltered by pre-treatment with heparin, LMWH or PGA compared to their respective vehicles 24 h prior to or following antigen challenge.In vehicle-treated animals, airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled histamine was indicated by an increase in the maximal responses of the cumulative concentration-effect curves to histamine and reductions in RLPC50 and CdynPC35 values 24 h following antigen challenge.Heparin and LMWH given prior to antigen challenge significantly inhibited the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, whereas PGA did not. When given following antigen challenge, all three drugs failed to inhibit the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.Eosinophil and neutrophil cell numbers in BAL fluid increased significantly 24 h following antigen challenge. Heparin, LMWH and PGA failed to inhibit the increase in cell numbers following antigen challenge whether given prior to or following antigen challenge. PMID:10780962

  13. Effects of breast milk from allergic and non-allergic mothers on mitogen- and allergen-induced cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Malin F; Fredriksson, Jenny; Hellquist, Anna; Jenmalm, Maria C

    2003-02-01

    Breast milk contains several components that provide specific immunity and affect the maturation of the infant's immune system. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of breast milk, on mitogen- and allergen-induced cytokine production from cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC), and if those effects differ between allergic and non-allergic mothers. The cells were incubated for 96 h with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), ovalbumin or cat dander in the presence of various dilutions of colostrum. Colostrum inhibited both mitogen- and cat-induced IFN-gamma and mitogen-induced interleukin-4 (IL-4) production. The inhibition on IFN-gamma production was to some extent caused by TGF-beta, as the effect was modified when an anti-TGF-beta antibody was added to the cultures. In contrast, colostrum enhanced allergen-induced production of the Th2-like cytokines IL-5 and IL-13, and this was accompanied with increased production of IL-10. No differences were found between allergic and non-allergic mothers. The inhibitory effect of breast milk on IFN-gamma production, which was partly due to the high levels of TGF-beta, together with the enhancing effect on IL-10 secretion, confirm that breast milk is anti-inflammatory. Although the production of IL-5 and IL-13 was enhanced by colostrum, this was accompanied with an increased production of IL-10. Together with the high levels of TGF-beta in breast milk and inhibitory effect of colostrum on IL-4 production, this suggests a possible mechanism whereby breast-feeding may protect against the development of allergy. Despite differences in the composition of breast milk between allergic and non-allergic mothers, the effects of breast milk on cytokine production from CBMC were independent of the atopic status of the mothers. PMID:12603708

  14. Effect of an inhaled neutral endopeptidase inhibitor, phosphoramidon, on baseline airway calibre and bronchial responsiveness to bradykinin in asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Crimi, N.; Polosa, R.; Pulvirenti, G.; Magrì, S.; Santonocito, G.; Prosperini, G.; Mastruzzo, C.; Mistretta, A.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Bradykinin is a potent vasoactive peptide which has been proposed as an important inflammatory mediator in asthma since it provokes potent bronchoconstriction in asthmatic subjects. Little is known at present about the potential role of lung peptidases in modulating bradykinin-induced airway dysfunction in vivo in man. The change in bronchial reactivity to bradykinin was therefore investigated after treatment with inhaled phosphoramidon, a potent neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor, in a double blind, placebo controlled, randomised study of 10 asthmatic subjects. METHODS--Subjects attended on six separate occasions at the same time of day during which concentration-response studies with inhaled bradykinin and histamine were carried out, without treatment and after each test drug. Subjects received nebulised phosphoramidon sodium salt (10(-5) M, 3 ml) or matched placebo for 5-7 minutes using an Inspiron Mini-neb nebuliser 5 minutes before the bronchoprovocation test with bradykinin or histamine. Agonists were administered in increasing concentrations as an aerosol generated from a starting volume of 3 ml in a nebuliser driven by compressed air at 8 1/min. Changes in airway calibre were measured as forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and responsiveness as the provocative concentration causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20). RESULTS--Phosphoramidon administration caused a transient fall in FEV1 from baseline, FEV1 values decreasing 6.3% and 5.3% on the bradykinin and histamine study days, respectively. When compared with placebo, phosphoramidon elicited a small enhancement of the airways response to bradykinin, the geometric mean PC20 value (range) decreasing from 0.281 (0.015-5.575) to 0.136 (0.006-2.061) mg/ml. In contrast, NEP blockade failed to alter the airways response to a subsequent inhalation with histamine, the geometric mean (range) PC20 histamine value of 1.65 (0.17-10.52) mg/ml after placebo being no different from that of 1.58 (0

  15. Respiratory responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and their relationship to nonspecific airway reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, W.F.; Horstman, D.H.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; Raggio, L.J.; Green, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ozone exposure in man produces changes in respiratory function and symptoms. There is a large degree of unexplained intersubject variability in the magnitude of these responses. There is concern that individuals with chronic respiratory diseases may also be more responsive to ozone than normal individuals. The purpose of this study was to describe the responses of subjects with allergic rhinitis to ozone exposure and to compare these responses to those previously observed in normal individuals. A further purpose was to measure the association between baseline nonspecific airway reactivity and changes in lung function and respiratory symptoms following ozone exposure.

  16. Divergent effects of urban particulate air pollution on allergic airway responses in experimental asthma: a comparison of field exposure studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increases in ambient particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm (PM2.5) are associated with asthma morbidity and mortality. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that PM2.5 derived from two distinct urban U.S. communities would induce variable responses to aggravate airway symptoms during experimental asthma. Methods We used a mobile laboratory to conduct community-based inhalation exposures to laboratory rats with ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease. In Grand Rapids exposures were conducted within 60 m of a major roadway, whereas the Detroit was located in an industrial area more than 400 m from roadways. Immediately after nasal allergen challenge, Brown Norway rats were exposed by whole body inhalation to either concentrated air particles (CAPs) or filtered air for 8 h (7:00 AM - 3:00 PM). Both ambient and concentrated PM2.5 was assessed for mass, size fractionation, and major component analyses, and trace element content. Sixteen hours after exposures, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung lobes were collected and evaluated for airway inflammatory and mucus responses. Results Similar CAPs mass concentrations were generated in Detroit (542 μg/m3) and Grand Rapids (519 μg/m3). Exposure to CAPs at either site had no effects in lungs of non-allergic rats. In contrast, asthmatic rats had 200% increases in airway mucus and had more BALF neutrophils (250% increase), eosinophils (90%), and total protein (300%) compared to controls. Exposure to Detroit CAPs enhanced all allergic inflammatory endpoints by 30-100%, whereas inhalation of Grand Rapids CAPs suppressed all allergic responses by 50%. Detroit CAPs were characterized by high sulfate, smaller sized particles and were derived from local combustion sources. Conversely Grand Rapids CAPs were derived primarily from motor vehicle sources. Conclusions Despite inhalation exposure to the same mass concentration of urban PM2.5, disparate health

  17. Prenatal secondhand cigarette smoke promotes Th2 polarization and impairs goblet cell differentiation and airway mucus formation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shashi P; Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Peña-Philippides, Juan C; Rir-Sima-ah, Jules; Mishra, Neerad C; Wilder, Julie A; Langley, Raymond J; Smith, Kevin R; Sopori, Mohan L

    2011-11-01

    Parental, particularly maternal, smoking increases the risk for childhood allergic asthma and infection. Similarly, in a murine allergic asthma model, prenatal plus early postnatal exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke (SS) exacerbates airways hyperreactivity and Th2 responses in the lung. However, the mechanism and contribution of prenatal versus early postnatal SS exposure on allergic asthma remain unresolved. To identify the effects of prenatal and/or early postnatal SS on allergic asthma, BALB/c dams and their offspring were exposed gestationally and/or 8-10 wk postbirth to filtered air or SS. Prenatal, but not postnatal, SS strongly increased methacholine and allergen (Aspergillus)-induced airway resistance, Th2 cytokine levels, and atopy and activated the Th2-polarizing pathway GATA3/Lck/ERK1/2/STAT6. Either prenatal and/or early postnatal SS downregulated the Th1-specific transcription factor T-bet and, surprisingly, despite high levels of IL-4/IL-13, dramatically blocked the allergen-induced mucous cell metaplasia, airway mucus formation, and the expression of mucus-related genes/proteins: Muc5ac, γ-aminobutyric acid A receptors, and SAM pointed domain-containing Ets-like factor. Given that SS/nicotine exposure of normal adult mice promotes mucus formation, the results suggested that fetal and neonatal lung are highly sensitive to cigarette smoke. Thus, although the gestational SS promotes Th2 polarization/allergic asthma, it may also impair and/or delay the development of fetal and neonatal lung, affecting mucociliary clearance and Th1 responses. Together, this may explain the increased susceptibility of children from smoking parents to allergic asthma and childhood respiratory infections. PMID:21930963

  18. Conquering the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Gandy, William E

    2008-01-01

    Every medic should practice regularly for the inevitable difficult airway case. Practice should include review of the causes of difficult airways, as well as skill practice. Having a preassembled airway kit can make your response to an unexpected difficult situation easier. Of all the devices mentioned, the bougie is the airway practitioner's best friend. Using the BURP technique, if not contraindicated, together with the bougie will enable you to intubate many difficult patients with confidence. Remember, "If your patient cannot breathe, nothing else matters. PMID:18251307

  19. Dose response relation to oral theophylline in severe chronic obstructive airways disease.

    PubMed Central

    Chrystyn, H.; Mulley, B. A.; Peake, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate measurement of the trapped gas volume as a measure of respiratory function in patients with chronic obstructive airways disease and their response to treatment with theophylline. DESIGN--Patients able to produce consistent results on testing of respiratory function spent two weeks having dosage of theophylline adjusted to give individual pharmacokinetic data. This was followed by random assignment to four consecutive two month treatment periods--placebo and low, medium, and high dose, as assessed by serum concentrations of theophylline. Respiratory function and exercise performance was assessed at the end of each two month period. SETTING--Chest unit in district hospital. PATIENTS--Thirty eight patients with chronic bronchitis and moderate to severe chronic obstruction to airflow were recruited; 33 aged 53-73 years completed the study. INTERVENTIONS--Dosage of oral theophylline increased during two week optimisation period to 800 mg daily unless toxicity was predicted, when 400 mg was given. Targets for the steady state serum theophylline concentrations were 5-10 mg/l in the low dose period, 10-15 mg/l in the medium dose, and 15-20 mg/l in the high dose period. ENDPOINTS--Respiratory function as measured by forced expiratory volume in one second, forced vital capacity, peak expiratory flow rate, slow vital capacity, and static lung volumes using helium dilution and body plethysmography from which trapped gas volume was derived. Exercise performance assessed by six minute walking test and diary cards using visual analogue scale. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--The forced expiratory volume in one second, forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow rate changed only slightly (about 13%) over the range of doses. There was a linear dose dependent fall of trapped gas volume from 1.84 l (SE 0.157) to 1.42 l (0.152), 1.05 l (0.128), and 0.67 l (0.102) during the placebo and low, medium, and high dose treatment periods. Mean walking distance

  20. Human Airway Epithelial Cell Responses to Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Exposure: Nanorope-Residual Body Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, Barbara J.; Warren, John B.; Kisslinger, Kim; Crosson, Kenya; Maye, Mathew M.

    2012-11-01

    This investigation examines the 'first contact responses' of in vitro human epithelial airway cells exposed to unrefined single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) [containing metal catalyst, carbon black, amorphous carbon, graphitic shells, and SWCNTs], and refined acid/peroxide cleaned and cut SWCNTs at low and high dose exposures (0.16 ug/L and 1.60 ug/L) for 2, 3 and 3.5 hours. FTIR, X-ray compositional analysis, morphological TEM analysis and UV-Vis were used to physicochemically characterize the SWCNTs in this study. Following SWCNT exposure to human lung NCI-H292 epithelial monolayers, the airway cells were prepared for light microscopy vital staining, or fixed in glutaraldehyde for SEM/TEM imaging to determine SWCNT binding, uptake, intracellular processing and organellar/SWCNT fate within the exposure period. At 2 hr exposures to both unrefined Carbolex, and refined SWCNTs (at both high and low doses), there were no increases in lung cell necrosis compared to controls. However high dose, 3 hr exposures to unrefined Carbolex material produced severe cell damage (apical and basal plasma membrane holes, decreased mitochondria, numerous intracellular vesicles containing nanomaterial and membrane fragments) and increased cell necrosis. The refined SWCNTs exposed for 3 hr at low dose produced no increase in cell death, although high dose exposure produced significant cell death. By TEM, Acid/peroxide cleaned SWCNT 3 hr exposures at high and low doses, revealed SWCNTs attachment to cell surface mucin, and SWCNT uptake into the cells during membrane recycling. Membranes and SWCNTs were seen within cytoplasmic lamellar body-type vesicles, where vesicular contents were bio-degraded, eventually forming long SWCNT-nanoropes, which were subsequently released into the cytoplasm as clusters of attached nanoropes, as the vesicle membranes fragmented. These Nanorope-Residual Bodies did not cause damage to the surrounding organelles or cytoplasm, and seemed very stabile in the

  1. Airway hyper-responsiveness in lipopolysaccharide-challenged common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Curths, Christoph; Wichmann, Judy; Dunker, Sarah; Windt, Horst; Hoymann, Heinz-Gerd; Lauenstein, Hans D.; Hohlfeld, Jens; Becker, Tamara; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Braun, Armin; Knauf, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Animal models with a high predictive value for human trials are needed to develop novel human-specific therapeutics for respiratory diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine lung-function parameters in marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus) that can be used to detect pharmacologically or provocation-induced AHR (airway hyper-responsiveness). Therefore a custom-made lung-function device that allows application of defined aerosol doses during measurement was developed. It was hypothesized that LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-challenged marmosets show AHR compared with non-challenged healthy subjects. Invasive plethysmography was performed in 12 anaesthetized orotracheally intubated and spontaneously breathing marmosets. Pulmonary data of RL (lung resistance), Cdyn (dynamic compliance), EF50 (mid-expiratory flow), Poes (oesophageal pressure), MV (minute volume), respiratory frequency (f) and VT (tidal volume) were collected. Measurements were conducted under baseline conditions and under MCh (methacholine)-induced bronchoconstriction. The measurement was repeated with the same group of animals after induction of an acute lung inflammation by intratracheal application of LPS. PDs (provocative doses) of MCh to achieve a certain increase in RL were significantly lower after LPS administration. AHR was demonstrated in the LPS treated compared with the naïve animals. The recorded lung-function data provide ground for pre-clinical efficacy and safety testing of anti-inflammatory substances in the common marmoset, a new translational NHP (non-human primate) model for LPS-induced lung inflammation. PMID:23879175

  2. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  3. An overview of asthma and airway hyper-responsiveness in Olympic athletes.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Kenneth D

    2012-05-01

    Data from the past five Olympic Games obtained from athletes seeking to inhale β2 adrenoceptor agonists (IBA) have identified those athletes with documented asthma and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR). With a prevalence of about 8%, asthma/AHR is the commonest chronic medical condition experienced by Olympic athletes. In Summer and Winter athletes, there is a marked preponderance of asthma/AHR in endurance-trained athletes. The relatively late onset of asthma/AHR in many older athletes is suggestive that years of endurance training may be a contributory cause. Inspiring polluted or cold air is considered a significant aetiological factor in some but not all sports. During the last five Olympic Games, there has been improved management of athletes with asthma/AHR with a much higher proportion of athletes combining inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) with IBA and few using long-acting IBA as monotherapy. Athletes with asthma/AHR have consistently outperformed their peers, which research suggests is not due to their treatment enhancing sports performance. Research is necessary to determine how many athletes will continue to experience asthma/AHR in the years after they cease intensive endurance training. PMID:22228581

  4. Levodropropizine (LD) activity in allergic asthmatic patients, challenged with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water, metacholine and allergen-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Bossi, R; Banfi, P; Filipazzi, V; Castelli, C; Braga, P C

    1994-04-01

    The antitussive compound Levodropropizine (LD) is active in animal bronchoconstriction induced by histamine and capsaicin and in man protects from bronchoconstriction induced by capsaicin. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanism of action of LD given at 60 mg t.i.d. as oral drops, for 8 days by means of specific bronchial challenges (allergens) and of aspecific challenges acting via different receptors and fibers (i.e. metacholine via cholinergic receptors and ultrasonically nebulized distilled water (UNDW) via histamine and neuropeptide release). The study design is randomized, double-blind, cross-over versus placebo in 30 allergic asthmatic patients. Baseline bronchial tone and bronchoconstrictor response to metacholine (MCh) were not modified by active treatment nor by placebo. On the contrary, in airway responsiveness to UNDW, the active treatment showed an antagonist effect against induced bronchoconstriction of 59% [activity ratio (AR) as antilog = 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.35-0.54; p < or = 0.05] in comparison to no effect for placebo. Similarly, in airway responsiveness to specific allergen, active treatment antagonized the bronchoconstrictor effect of grass pollen by 83% and of various allergens (dermatophagoides and grass pollen) by 72%, i.e. AR of 0.17 (95% confidence interval 0.045-0.65; p < 0.01) and of 0.28 (95% confidence interval 0.07-1.04; p < 0.05), respectively. No antagonist effect was evident with placebo at all times. Besides inhibiting cough, LD is also partially effective in inhibiting bronchial hyperreactive response against specific allergen and UNDW bronchoconstriction. Hence, LD might act by partly inhibiting histamine and neuropeptide release. PMID:10184318

  5. Effects of cessation of terbutaline treatment on airway obstruction and responsiveness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, J. W.; Koëter, G. H.; van der Mark, T. W.; Postma, D. S.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cessation of regular therapy with inhaled beta 2 agonists in patients with asthma may lead to a temporary deterioration of lung function and airway responsiveness. Few such studies have been reported in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), so an investigation was carried out to determine whether rebound airway responsiveness and rebound bronchoconstriction also occurs in COPD and if there is any relationship with the dose of beta 2 agonist being used. METHODS: Lung function (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and peak expiratory flow (PEF)), airway responsiveness (PC20 methacholine (PC20)) and symptoms were assessed in a double blind, placebo controlled crossover study during and after cessation of two weeks regular treatment with placebo, and low dose (250 micrograms) and high dose (1000 micrograms) inhaled terbutaline via a dry powder inhaler (Turbohaler) all given three times a day. Sixteen non-allergic patients with COPD of mean (SD) age 58.7 (6.5) years, FEV1 57.1 (12.8)% of predicted, and reversibility on 1000 micrograms terbutaline of 4.5 (3.5)% predicted were studied. PC20 and FEV1 were measured 10, 14, 34 and 82 hours after the last inhalation of terbutaline or placebo. Measurements performed at 10, 14, and 34 hours were expressed relative to 82 hour values in each period, transformed into an area under the curve (AUC) value and analysed by ANOVA. RESULTS: Mean morning and evening PEF increased during terbutaline treatment. PC20 and FEV1 did not change after cessation of terbutaline treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Cessation of regular treatment with both low and high dose inhaled terbutaline does not result in a rebound bronchoconstriction and rebound airway responsiveness in patients with COPD. PMID:8882073

  6. Nonadrenergic, noncholinergic responses stabilize smooth muscle tone, with and without parasympathetic activation, in guinea-pig isolated airways.

    PubMed

    Lindén, A; Löfdahl, C G; Ullman, A; Skoogh, B E

    1993-03-01

    In guinea-pig isolated airways, nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) neural responses converge towards a similar level of smooth muscle tone, via a contraction when the tone is low prior to stimulation, and via a relaxation when the tone is high prior to stimulation. We wanted to assess the effect of simultaneous parasympathetic activation on these converging NANC responses, with and without the addition of sympathetic activation. In guinea-pig isolated airways, the spontaneous airway tone was initially abolished by indomethacin (10 microM). In one series, adrenergic depletion by guanethidine (10 microM) was then established, with and without cholinergic blockade by atropine (1 microM). In another series, either cholinergic blockade by atropine (1 microM) or no blockade was utilized. Responses to electrical field stimulation (1,200 mA, 0.5 ms, 3 Hz for 240 s) were studied with no induced tone, at a moderate (0.3 microM) and at a near-maximum (6 microM), histamine-induced tone. The mean level of the tonus equilibrium (% of maximum tone) was higher with the simultaneous NANC and parasympathetic activation than with NANC activation alone (75% compared with 44%, in the main bronchus, n = 8). The level of the tonus equilibrium was also higher with the simultaneous NANC, sympathetic and parasympathetic activation than with NANC and sympathetic activation only (49% compared with 21%, in the main bronchus, n = 8). The pattern was similar in the distal trachea. In conclusion, NANC neural responses can stabilize smooth muscle tone, and this stabilizing effect can be modulated by both parasympathetic and sympathetic activation, in guinea-pig isolated airways. PMID:8472834

  7. Astragalin inhibits airway eotaxin-1 induction and epithelial apoptosis through modulating oxidative stress-responsive MAPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Eotaxin proteins are a potential therapeutic target in treating the peribronchial eosinophilia associated with allergic airway diseases. Since inflammation is often associated with an increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative stress is a mechanistically imperative factor in asthma. Astragalin (kaempferol-3-O-glucoside) is a flavonoid with anti-inflammatory activity and newly found in persimmon leaves and green tea seeds. This study elucidated that astragalin inhibited endotoxin-induced oxidative stress leading to eosinophilia and epithelial apoptosis in airways. Methods Airway epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the absence and presence of 1–20 μM astragalin. Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses were conducted to determine induction of target proteins. Cell and nuclear staining was also performed for ROS production and epithelial apoptosis. Results When airway epithelial cells were exposed to 2 μg/ml LPS, astragalin nontoxic at ≤20 μM suppressed cellular induction of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and ROS production enhanced by LPS. Both LPS and H2O2 induced epithelial eotaxin-1 expression, which was blocked by astragalin. LPS activated and induced PLCγ1, PKCβ2, and NADPH oxidase subunits of p22phox and p47phox in epithelial cells and such activation and induction were demoted by astragalin or TLR4 inhibition antagonizing eotaxin-1 induction. H2O2-upregulated phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK was dampened by adding astragalin to epithelial cells, while this compound enhanced epithelial activation of Akt and ERK. H2O2 and LPS promoted epithelial apoptosis concomitant with nuclear condensation or caspase-3 activation, which was blunted by astragalin. Conclusions Astragalin ameliorated oxidative stress-associated epithelial eosinophilia and apoptosis through disturbing TLR4-PKCβ2-NADPH oxidase-responsive signaling. Therefore, astragalin may be a potent agent antagonizing endotoxin

  8. Regulator of G-protein signaling 2 repression exacerbates airway hyper-responsiveness and remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haihong; Xie, Yan; Abel, Peter W; Wolff, Dennis W; Toews, Myron L; Panettieri, Reynold A; Casale, Thomas B; Tu, Yaping

    2015-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important regulators of cell functions in asthma. We recently reported that regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) 2, a selective modulator of Gq-coupled GPCRs, is a key regulator of airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR), the pathophysiologic hallmark of asthma. Because RGS2 protein levels in airway cells were significantly lower in patients with asthma compared with patients without asthma, we further investigated the potential pathological importance of RGS2 repression in asthma. The human RGS2 gene maps to chromosome 1q31. We first screened patients with asthma for RGS2 gene promoter single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and found significant differences in the distribution of two RGS2 SNPs (A638G, rs2746071 and C395G, rs2746072) between patients with asthma and nonasthmatic subjects. These two SNPs are always associated with each other and have the same higher prevalence in patients with asthma (65%) as compared with nonasthmatic subjects (35%). Point mutations corresponding to these SNPs decrease RGS2 promoter activity by 44%. The importance of RGS2 down-regulation was then determined in an acute IL-13 mouse model of asthma. Intranasal administration of IL-13 in mice also decreased RGS2 expression in lungs by ∼50% and caused AHR. Although naive RGS2 knockout (KO) mice exhibit spontaneous AHR, acute IL-13 exposure further increased AHR in RGS2 KO mice. Loss of RGS2 also significantly enhanced IL-13-induced mouse airway remodeling, including peribronchial smooth muscle thickening and fibrosis, without effects on goblet cell hyperplasia or airway inflammation in mice. Thus, genetic variations and increased inflammatory cytokines can lead to RGS2 repression, which exacerbates AHR and airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:25368964

  9. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional...

  10. Wogonin, a plant flavone from Scutellariae radix, attenuated ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in mouse model of asthma via the suppression of IL-4/STAT6 signaling.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Eun Kyung; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Jang, Eun Jeong; Choi, Yoon Suk; Kim, Seon Tae; Hahm, Ki Baik; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2015-09-01

    Bronchial asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by a marked infiltration of eosinophils at the site of inflammation. Eotaxins are potent chemoattractants for eosinophils and play important roles in pathogenesis of asthma. In the course of screening for eotaxin-3 inhibitors, we found that wogonin showed potent inhibitory activity of interleukin-4 (IL-4)-induced eotaxin-3 expression in BEAS-2B cells. In this study, we examined the effects of wogonin on IL-4/STAT6 signaling pathway and biological implication in a mouse model of asthma. Wogonin inhibited IL-4-induced activation and nuclear translocation of STAT6 which plays a key role in either the transcription of STAT6-response genes or Th2 cytokine-mediated inflammation. Oral administration of wogonin significantly reduced activation of STAT6 in the lung and the expression of eotaxin and RANTES in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Histological examination of lung tissue demonstrated that wogonin significantly inhibited allergen-induced eosinophilic inflammation. Administration of wogonin reduced the total IgE and ovalbumin-specific IgE levels compared with the ovalbumin-challenged group. All of these data demonstrated that wogonin could alleviate airway inflammation through inhibition of STAT6 activation induced by Th2 cytokines. Our finding implicates a potential therapeutic value of wogonin in the treatment of asthma through regulation of IL-4/STAT6 signaling pathway. PMID:26388667

  11. Acute response of airway muscle to extreme temperature includes disruption of actin-myosin interaction.

    PubMed

    Dyrda, Peter; Tazzeo, Tracy; DoHarris, Lindsay; Nilius, Berndt; Roman, Horia Nicolae; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Aziz, Tariq; Lukic, Dusan; Janssen, Luke J

    2011-02-01

    Despite the emerging use of bronchial thermoplasty in asthma therapy, the response of airway smooth muscle (ASM) to extreme temperatures is unknown. We investigated the immediate effects of exposing ASM to supraphysiologic temperatures. Isometric contractions were studied in bovine ASM before and after exposure to various thermal loads and/or pharmacologic interventions. Actin-myosin interactions were investigated using a standard in vitro motility assay. We found steep thermal sensitivity for isometric contractions evoked by acetylcholine, with threshold and complete inhibition at less than 50°C and greater than 55°C, respectively. Contractile responses to serotonin or KCl were similarly affected, whereas isometric relaxations evoked by the nitric oxide donor S-nitrosyl-N-acetylpenicillamine or the β-agonist isoproterenol were unaffected. This thermal sensitivity developed within 15 minutes, but did not evolve further over the course of several days (such a rapid time-course rules out heat shock proteins, apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis). Although heat-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRPV2) channels and the calmodulin-dependent (Cam) kinase-II-induced inactivation of myosin light chain kinase are both acutely thermally sensitive, with a temperature producing half-maximal effect (T(1/2)) of 52.5°C, the phenomenon we describe was not prevented by blockers of TRPV2 channels (e.g., ruthenium red, gadolinium, zero-Ca(2+) or zero-Na(+)/zero-Ca(2+) media, and cromakalim) or of Cam kinase-II (e.g., W7, trifluoperazine, and KN-93). However, direct measurements of actin-myosin interactions showed the same steep thermal profile. The functional changes preceded any histologic evidence of necrosis or apoptosis. We conclude that extreme temperatures (such as those used in bronchial thermoplasty) directly disrupt actin-myosin interactions, likely through a denaturation of the motor protein, leading to an immediate loss of ASM cell function. PMID:20395634

  12. Expression and function of a novel variant of estrogen receptor-α36 in murine airways.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuping; Zhang, Xintian; He, David Z Z; Segal, Manav; Berro, Abdo; Gerson, Trevor; Wang, Zhaoyi; Casale, Thomas B

    2011-11-01

    Evidence suggests that estrogen signaling is involved in sex differences in the prevalence rates and control of asthma, but the expression patterns of estrogen receptor variants and estrogen function in the lung are not well established. We investigated the expression of major estrogen receptor variants occurring naturally and after the development of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity in a murine model of allergic asthma, along with the role of estrogen signaling in small-airway ciliary motion and smooth muscle contraction. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin, and estrogen receptor expression patterns were examined by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Time-lapse video and photodiode-based displacement measurement systems were used to assess the effects of estrogen signaling on airway ciliary beat frequency and smooth muscle contraction. We found that a novel variant of estrogen receptor (ER)-α, ER-α36, is expressed in airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. ER-α36 was predominately localized on the plasma membranes of airway cells. After sensitization to allergen, the expression levels of ER-α36 increased significantly (P < 0.01), whereas the expression of ER-β and ER-α66 did not significantly change. Estrogen treatment in vitro resulted in a rapid increase in airway cilia motion in a dose-dependent fashion, but did not exert any effect on airway smooth muscle contraction. We speculate that the up-regulation of estrogen receptor expression associated with allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness may constitute a protective mechanism to facilitate the clearance of mucus. The identification and localization of specific estrogen receptor subtypes in the lung could lead to newer therapeutic avenues aimed at addressing sex differences of asthma susceptibility. PMID:21642591

  13. Curcumin regulates airway epithelial cell cytokine responses to the pollutant cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Rennolds, Jessica; Malireddy, Smitha; Hassan, Fatemat; Tridandapani, Susheela; Parinandi, Narasimham; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium induces secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 by two distinct pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium increases NAPDH oxidase activity leading to Erk activation and IL-8 secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin prevents cadmium-induced secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8 by airway cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin could be use to suppress lung inflammation due to cadmium inhalation. -- Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic metal present in the environment and its inhalation can lead to pulmonary disease such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These lung diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation. Here we show that exposure of human airway epithelial cells to cadmium promotes a polarized apical secretion of IL-6 and IL-8, two pivotal pro-inflammatory cytokines known to play an important role in pulmonary inflammation. We also determined that two distinct pathways controlled secretion of these proinflammatory cytokines by human airway epithelial cells as cadmium-induced IL-6 secretion occurs via an NF-{kappa}B dependent pathway, whereas IL-8 secretion involves the Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Interestingly, the natural antioxidant curcumin could prevent both cadmium-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, curcumin could be used to prevent airway inflammation due to cadmium inhalation.

  14. A-kinase-anchoring proteins coordinate inflammatory responses to cigarette smoke in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Heijink, Irene H.; Holtzer, Laura J.; Skroblin, Philipp; Klussmann, Enno; Halayko, Andrew J.; Timens, Wim; Maarsingh, Harm; Schmidt, Martina

    2015-01-01

    β2-Agonist inhibitors can relieve chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms by stimulating cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling. A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) compartmentalize cAMP signaling by establishing protein complexes. We previously reported that the β2-agonist fenoterol, direct activation of protein kinase A (PKA), and exchange factor directly activated by cAMP decrease cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced release of neutrophil attractant interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. In the present study, we tested the role of AKAPs in CSE-induced IL-8 release from ASM cells and assessed the effect of CSE on the expression levels of different AKAPs. We also studied mRNA and protein expression of AKAPs in lung tissue from patients with COPD. Our data show that CSE exposure of ASM cells decreases AKAP5 and AKAP12, both capable of interacting with β2-adrenoceptors. In lung tissue of patients with COPD, mRNA levels of AKAP5 and AKAP12 were decreased compared with lung tissue from controls. Using immunohistochemistry, we detected less AKAP5 protein in ASM of patients with COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage II compared with control subjects. St-Ht31, which disrupts AKAP-PKA interactions, augmented CSE-induced IL-8 release from ASM cells and diminished its suppression by fenoterol, an effect mediated by disturbed ERK signaling. The modulatory role of AKAP-PKA interactions in the anti-inflammatory effects of fenoterol in ASM cells and the decrease in expression of AKAP5 and AKAP12 in response to cigarette smoke and in lungs of patients with COPD suggest that cigarette smoke-induced changes in AKAP5 and AKAP12 in patients with COPD may affect efficacy of pharmacotherapy. PMID:25637608

  15. A-kinase-anchoring proteins coordinate inflammatory responses to cigarette smoke in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, Wilfred J; Heijink, Irene H; Holtzer, Laura J; Skroblin, Philipp; Klussmann, Enno; Halayko, Andrew J; Timens, Wim; Maarsingh, Harm; Schmidt, Martina

    2015-04-15

    β2-Agonist inhibitors can relieve chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms by stimulating cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling. A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) compartmentalize cAMP signaling by establishing protein complexes. We previously reported that the β2-agonist fenoterol, direct activation of protein kinase A (PKA), and exchange factor directly activated by cAMP decrease cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced release of neutrophil attractant interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. In the present study, we tested the role of AKAPs in CSE-induced IL-8 release from ASM cells and assessed the effect of CSE on the expression levels of different AKAPs. We also studied mRNA and protein expression of AKAPs in lung tissue from patients with COPD. Our data show that CSE exposure of ASM cells decreases AKAP5 and AKAP12, both capable of interacting with β2-adrenoceptors. In lung tissue of patients with COPD, mRNA levels of AKAP5 and AKAP12 were decreased compared with lung tissue from controls. Using immunohistochemistry, we detected less AKAP5 protein in ASM of patients with COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage II compared with control subjects. St-Ht31, which disrupts AKAP-PKA interactions, augmented CSE-induced IL-8 release from ASM cells and diminished its suppression by fenoterol, an effect mediated by disturbed ERK signaling. The modulatory role of AKAP-PKA interactions in the anti-inflammatory effects of fenoterol in ASM cells and the decrease in expression of AKAP5 and AKAP12 in response to cigarette smoke and in lungs of patients with COPD suggest that cigarette smoke-induced changes in AKAP5 and AKAP12 in patients with COPD may affect efficacy of pharmacotherapy. PMID:25637608

  16. MUC4 involvement in ErbB2/ErbB3 phosphorylation and signaling in response to airway cell mechanical injury.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, George; Carraway, Coralie A Carothers; Carraway, Kermit L

    2009-05-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinases ErbB2 and ErbB3 are phosphorylated in response to injury of the airway epithelium. Since we have shown that the membrane mucin MUC4 can act as a ligand/modulator for ErbB2, affecting its localization in polarized epithelial cells and its phosphorylation, we questioned whether Muc4 was involved, along with ErbB2 and ErbB3, in the damage response of airway epithelia. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the localization of MUC4 in human airway samples. Both immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence showed a co-localization of MUC4 and ErbB2 at the airway luminal surface. Sequential immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting from airway cells demonstrated that the MUC4 and ErbB2 are present as a complex in airway epithelial cells. To assess the participation of MUC4 in the damage response, cultures of NCI-H292 or airway cells were scratch-wounded, then analyzed for association of phospho-ErbB2 and -ErbB3 with MUC4 by sequential immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. Wounded cultures exhibited increased phosphorylation of both receptors in complex with MUC4. Scratch wounding also increased activation of the downstream pathway through Akt, as predicted from our previous studies on Muc4 effects on ErbB2 and ErbB3. The participation of MUC4 in the phosphorylation response was also indicated by siRNA repression of MUC4 expression, which resulted in diminution of the phosphorylation of ErbB2 and ErbB3. These studies provide a new model for the airway epithelial damage response, in which the MUC4-ErbB2 complex is a key element in the sensor mechanism and phosphorylation of the receptors. PMID:19288496

  17. Upper airway response in workers exposed to fuel oil ash: nasal lavage analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, R; Elreedy, S; Hoppin, J A; Christiani, D C

    1995-01-01

    non-smokers but not smokers was found. This suggests that in non-smokers, exposure to fuel oil ash is associated with upper airway inflammation manifested as increased polymorphonuclear cell counts. The lack of an increase in polymorphonuclear cells in smokers may reflect either a diminished inflammatory response or may indicate that smoking masks the effect of exposure to fuel oil ash. PMID:7795759

  18. Overexpression of Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase 1 Attenuates Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kinker, Kayla G.; Gibson, Aaron M.; Bass, Stacey A.; Day, Brandy P.; Deng, Jingyuan; Medvedovic, Mario; Figueroa, Julio A. Landero; Hershey, Gurjit K. Khurana; Chen, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, are increased in lung, sputum, exhaled breath condensate and plasma samples from asthma patients. ADMA is metabolized primarily by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1 (DDAH1) and DDAH2. We determined the effect of DDAH1 overexpression on development of allergic inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. The expression of DDAH1 and DDAH2 in mouse lungs was determined by RT-quantitative PCR (qPCR). ADMA levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum samples were determined by mass spectrometry. Wild type and DDAH1-transgenic mice were intratracheally challenged with PBS or house dust mite (HDM). Airway inflammation was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) total and differential cell counts. The levels of IgE and IgG1 in BALF and serum samples were determined by ELISA. Gene expression in lungs was determined by RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR. Our data showed that the expression of DDAH1 and DDAH2 was decreased in the lungs of mice following HDM exposure, which correlated with increased ADMA levels in BALF and serum. Transgenic overexpression of DDAH1 resulted in decreased BAL total cell and eosinophil numbers following HDM exposure. Total IgE levels in BALF and serum were decreased in HDM-exposed DDAH1-transgenic mice compared to HDM-exposed wild type mice. RNA-Seq results showed downregulation of genes in the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling pathway in PBS-treated DDAH1-transgenic mice versus PBS-treated wild type mice and downregulation of genes in IL-13/FOXA2 signaling pathway in HDM-treated DDAH1-transgenic mice versus HDM-treated wild type mice. Our findings suggest that decreased expression of DDAH1 and DDAH2 in the lungs may contribute to allergic asthma and overexpression of DDAH1 attenuates allergen-induced airway inflammation through modulation of Th2 responses. PMID:24465497

  19. Exposure to cigarette smoke impacts myeloid-derived regulatory cell function and exacerbates airway hyper-responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Jin, Tong Huan; Farhana, Aisha; Freeman, Jason; Estell, Kim; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw; Gaggar, Amit; Thannickal, Victor J; Schwiebert, Lisa M; Steyn, Adrie JC; Deshane, Jessy S

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking enhances oxidative stress and airway inflammation in asthma, the mechanisms of which are largely unknown. Myeloid-derived regulatory cells (MDRC) are free radical producing immature myeloid cells with immunoregulatory properties which have recently been demonstrated as critical regulators of allergic airway inflammation. NO (nitric oxide)-producing immunosuppressive MDRC suppress T cell proliferation and airway-hyper responsiveness (AHR), while the O2•− (superoxide)-producing MDRC are proinflammatory. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) exposure may impact MDRC function and contribute to exacerbations in asthma. Exposure of bone marrow (BM) derived NO-producing MDRC to CS reduced the production of NO and its metabolites and inhibited their potential to suppress T cell proliferation. Production of immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10 was significantly inhibited, while proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-33 were enhanced in CS exposed BMMDRC. Additionally, CS exposure increased NF-κB activation and induced BM-MDRC-mediated production of O2•−, via NF-κB dependent pathway. Intratracheal transfer of smoke exposed MDRC producing proinflammatory cytokines increased NF-κB activation, reactive oxygen species and mucin production in vivo and exacerbated AHR in C57BL/6 mice, mice deficient in Type I IFNR and MyD88, both with reduced numbers of endogenous MDRC. Thus, CS exposure modulates MDRC function and contributes to asthma exacerbation and identifies MDRC as potential targets for asthma therapy. PMID:25365203

  20. Exposure to cigarette smoke impacts myeloid-derived regulatory cell function and exacerbates airway hyper-responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Jin, Tong Huan; Farhana, Aisha; Freeman, Jason; Estell, Kim; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W; Gaggar, Amit; Thannickal, Victor J; Schwiebert, Lisa M; Steyn, Adrie J C; Deshane, Jessy S

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette smoking enhances oxidative stress and airway inflammation in asthma, the mechanisms of which are largely unknown. Myeloid-derived regulatory cells (MDRC) are free radical producing immature myeloid cells with immunoregulatory properties that have recently been demonstrated as critical regulators of allergic airway inflammation. NO (nitric oxide)-producing immunosuppressive MDRC suppress T-cell proliferation and airway-hyper responsiveness (AHR), while the O2(•-) (superoxide)-producing MDRC are proinflammatory. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) exposure may impact MDRC function and contribute to exacerbations in asthma. Exposure of bone marrow (BM)-derived NO-producing MDRC to CS reduced the production of NO and its metabolites and inhibited their potential to suppress T-cell proliferation. Production of immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10 was significantly inhibited, while proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-33 were enhanced in CS-exposed BM-MDRC. Additionally, CS exposure increased NF-κB activation and induced BM-MDRC-mediated production of O2(•-), via NF-κB-dependent pathway. Intratracheal transfer of smoke-exposed MDRC-producing proinflammatory cytokines increased NF-κB activation, reactive oxygen species and mucin production in vivo and exacerbated AHR in C57BL/6 mice, mice deficient in Type I IFNR and MyD88, both with reduced numbers of endogenous MDRC. Thus CS exposure modulates MDRC function and contributes to asthma exacerbation and identifies MDRC as potential targets for asthma therapy. PMID:25365203

  1. Effects of air pollution-related heavy metals on the viability and inflammatory responses of human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Honda, Akiko; Tsuji, Kenshi; Matsuda, Yugo; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Fukushima, Wataru; Sawahara, Takahiro; Kudo, Hitomi; Murayama, Rumiko; Takano, Hirohisa

    2015-01-01

    Various metals produced from human activity are ubiquitously detected in ambient air. The metals may lead to induction and/or exacerbation of respiratory diseases, but the significant metals and factors contributing to such diseases have not been identified. To compare the effects of each metal and different oxidation states of metals on human airway, we examined the viability and production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 using BEAS-2B cell line, derived from human airway epithelial cells. Airway epithelial cells were exposed to Mn(2+), V(4+), V(5+), Cr(3+), Cr(6+), Zn(2+), Ni(2+), and Pb(2+) at a concentration of 0.5, 5, 50, or 500 μmol/L for 24 hours. Mn and V decreased the cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner, and V(5+) tended to have a greater effect than V(4+). The Cr decreased the cell viability, and (Cr(+6)) at concentrations of 50 and 500 μmol/L was more toxic than (Cr(+3)). Zn at a concentration of 500 μmol/L greatly decreased the cell viability, whereas Ni at the same concentration increased it. Pb produced fewer changes. Mn and Ni at a concentration of 500 μmol/L induced the significant production of IL-6 and IL-8. However, most of the metals including (V(+4), V(+5)), (Cr(+3), Cr(+6)), Zn, and Pb inhibited the production of both IL-6 and IL-8. The present results indicate that various heavy metals have different effects on toxicity and the proinflammatory responses of airway epithelial cells, and those influences also depend on the oxidation states of the metals. PMID:25808165

  2. T cell-derived Act1 is necessary for IL-25-mediated Th2 responses and allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Swaidani, Shadi; Bulek, Katarzyna; Kang, Zizhen; Gulen, Muhammet Fatih; Liu, Caini; Yin, Weiguo; Abbadi, Amina; Aronica, Mark; Li, Xiaoxia

    2011-09-15

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms driven by IL-25 and its cognate receptor IL-17RB necessary for the promotion of Th2-mediating pathogenic pulmonary inflammation remains to be defined. We have previously reported the critical role of the U-box-type E3 ubiquitin ligase Act1 (1) for the downstream signaling of the IL-17 cytokine family including the Th2-promoting cytokine IL-25 (IL-17E) (2). In this study, we report that IL-25-driven but not conventional IL-4-driven Th2 polarization and cytokine production is impaired in Act1-deficient T cells. Also, Act1 deficiency in the T cell compartment results in the abrogation of eosinophilic airway infiltration as well as airway hyperresponsiveness in mouse models of Ag-induced airway inflammation. The in vivo generation of Ag-specific Th2 cytokine-producing cells is defective in the absence of Act1 expression in T cells after OVA/aluminum hydroxide immunization. Notably, the production of OVA-specific IgG(1) but not IgG(2a) or IgE is also impaired. At the molecular level, we report that IL-25-mediated induction of Th2 master regulator GATA-3 and the transcription factor GFI-1 is attenuated in Act1-deficient T cells. Taken together, our findings indicate that Act1 expression in T cells is required for cellular and humoral Th2-mediated allergic responses and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, in part, through Act1's function in IL-25-induced development of Th2 T cells. PMID:21856933

  3. Evaluating bronchodilator response in pediatric patients with post-infectious bronchiolitis obliterans: use of different criteria for identifying airway reversibility

    PubMed Central

    Mattiello, Rita; Vidal, Paula Cristina; Sarria, Edgar Enrique; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio; Stein, Renato Tetelbom; Mocelin, Helena Teresinha; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Pinto, Leonardo Araújo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Post-infectious bronchiolitis obliterans (PIBO) is a clinical entity that has been classified as constrictive, fixed obstruction of the lumen by fibrotic tissue. However, recent studies using impulse oscillometry have reported bronchodilator responses in PIBO patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate bronchodilator responses in pediatric PIBO patients, comparing different criteria to define the response. Methods: We evaluated pediatric patients diagnosed with PIBO and treated at one of two pediatric pulmonology outpatient clinics in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Spirometric parameters were measured in accordance with international recommendations. Results: We included a total of 72 pediatric PIBO patients. The mean pre- and post-bronchodilator values were clearly lower than the reference values for all parameters, especially FEF25-75%. There were post-bronchodilator improvements. When measured as mean percent increases, FEV1 and FEF25-75%, improved by 11% and 20%, respectively. However, when the absolute values were calculated, the mean FEV1 and FEF25-75% both increased by only 0.1 L. We found that age at viral aggression, a family history of asthma, and allergy had no significant effects on bronchodilator responses. Conclusions: Pediatric patients with PIBO have peripheral airway obstruction that is responsive to treatment but is not completely reversible with a bronchodilator. The concept of PIBO as fixed, irreversible obstruction does not seem to apply to this population. Our data suggest that airway obstruction is variable in PIBO patients, a finding that could have major clinical implications. PMID:27383929

  4. CULTURE CONDITIONS AFFECT HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONSE TO DIESEL PARTICLE EXPOSURE IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a ubiquitous ambient air contaminant that may contribute to the health effects of particulate matter inhalation. In vitro studies have shown that DEP exposure induces pro-inflammatory proteins in human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) with varying...

  5. Effect of subchronic in vivo exposure to nitrogen dioxide on lung tissue inflammation, airway microvascular leakage, and in vitro bronchial muscle responsiveness in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Chitano, P; Rado, V; Di Stefano, A; Papi, A; Boniotti, A; Zancuoghi, G; Boschetto, P; Romano, M; Salmona, M; Ciaccia, A; Fabbri, L M; Mapp, C E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In a previous study on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from rats exposed in vivo for seven days to 10 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO2), it has been shown that there is an influx of macrophages into the airways. The present study investigated the effect of seven day exposure to 10 ppm NO2, on: (a) lung tissue inflammation and morphology; (b) airway microvascular leakage; (c) in vitro contractile response of main bronchi. METHODS: Lung tissue was studied by light microscopy, after fixing the lungs by inflation with 4% formalin at a pressure of 20 cm H2O. Microvascular leakage was measured by extravasation of Evans blue dye in the larynx, trachea, main bronchi, and intrapulmonary airways. Smooth muscle responsiveness was evaluated by concentration-responses curves to acetylcholine (10(-9)-10(-3) M), serotonin (10(-9)-10(-4) M), and voltage-response curves (12-28 V) to electrical field stimulation. RESULTS: Histology showed an increased total inflammation at the level of respiratory bronchioles and alveoli. No influx of inflammatory cells was found in the main bronchi. A loss of cilia in the epithelium of small airways and ectasia of alveolar capillaries was also found. By contrast, no alterations to microvascular permeability or modification of bronchial smooth muscle responsiveness was found. CONCLUSIONS: Subchronic exposure to 10 ppm NO2 causes airway inflammation and structural damage, but does not cause any persistent alteration to microvascular permeability or bronchial smooth muscle responsiveness in rats. Images Figure 1 PMID:8758032

  6. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  7. Basophil-associated OX40 ligand participates in the initiation of Th2 responses during airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Di, Caixia; Lin, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Yanjie; Zhong, Wenwei; Yuan, Yufan; Zhou, Tong; Liu, Junling; Xia, Zhenwei

    2015-05-15

    Asthma is characterized by increased airway submucosal infiltration of T helper (Th) cells and myeloid cells that co-conspire to sustain a chronic inflammation. While recent studies have demonstrated that the myeloid basophils promote Th2 cells in response to various types of allergens, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we found for the first time that in a mouse model of allergic asthma basophils highly expressed OX40 ligand (OX40L) after activation. Interestingly, blockade of OX40-OX40L interaction suppressed basophils-primed Th2 cell differentiation in vitro and ameliorated ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic eosinophilic inflammation mediated by Th2 activation. In accordance, the adoptive transfer of basophils derived from mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) of OVA-immunized mice triggered a robust Th2 response and eosinophilic inflammation in wild-type mice but largely muted in OX40(-/-) mice and mice receiving OX40L-blocked basophils. Taken together, our results reveal a critical role of OX40L presented by the activated basophils to initiate Th2 responses in an allergic asthma model, implicating OX40-OX40L signaling as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:25839234

  8. Basophil-associated OX40 Ligand Participates in the Initiation of Th2 Responses during Airway Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Di, Caixia; Lin, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Yanjie; Zhong, Wenwei; Yuan, Yufan; Zhou, Tong; Liu, Junling; Xia, Zhenwei

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by increased airway submucosal infiltration of T helper (Th) cells and myeloid cells that co-conspire to sustain a chronic inflammation. While recent studies have demonstrated that the myeloid basophils promote Th2 cells in response to various types of allergens, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we found for the first time that in a mouse model of allergic asthma basophils highly expressed OX40 ligand (OX40L) after activation. Interestingly, blockade of OX40-OX40L interaction suppressed basophils-primed Th2 cell differentiation in vitro and ameliorated ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic eosinophilic inflammation mediated by Th2 activation. In accordance, the adoptive transfer of basophils derived from mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) of OVA-immunized mice triggered a robust Th2 response and eosinophilic inflammation in wild-type mice but largely muted in OX40−/− mice and mice receiving OX40L-blocked basophils. Taken together, our results reveal a critical role of OX40L presented by the activated basophils to initiate Th2 responses in an allergic asthma model, implicating OX40-OX40L signaling as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:25839234

  9. Elastic properties of the bronchial mucosa: epithelial unfolding and stretch in response to airway inflation.

    PubMed

    Noble, P B; Sharma, A; McFawn, P K; Mitchell, H W

    2005-12-01

    The bronchial mucosa contributes to elastic properties of the airway wall and may influence the degree of airway expansion during lung inflation. In the deflated lung, folds in the epithelium and associated basement membrane progressively unfold on inflation. Whether the epithelium and basement membrane also distend on lung inflation at physiological pressures is uncertain. We assessed mucosal distensibility from strain-stress curves in mucosal strips and related this to epithelial length and folding. Mucosal strips were prepared from pig bronchi and cycled stepwise from a strain of 0 (their in situ length at 0 transmural pressure) to a strain of 0.5 (50% increase in length). Mucosal stress and epithelial length in situ were calculated from morphometric data in bronchial segments fixed at 5 and 25 cmH(2)O luminal pressure. Mucosal strips showed nonlinear strain-stress properties, but regions at high and low stress were close to linear. Stresses calculated in bronchial segments at 5 and 25 cmH(2)O fell in the low-stress region of the strain-stress curve. The epithelium of mucosal strips was deeply folded at low strains (0-0.15), which in bronchial segments equated to < or =10 cmH(2)O transmural pressure. Morphometric measurements in mucosal strips at greater strains (0.3-0.4) indicated that epithelial length increased by approximately 10%. Measurements in bronchial segments indicated that epithelial length increased approximately 25% between 5 and 25 cmH(2)O. Our findings suggest that, at airway pressures <10 cmH(2)O, airway expansion is due primarily to epithelial unfolding but at higher pressures the epithelium also distends. PMID:16024520

  10. Responses of well-differentiated nasal epithelial cells exposed to particles: Role of the epithelium in airway inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, Floriane; Gendron, Marie-Claude; Chamot, Christophe; Marano, Francelyne; Dazy, Anne-Catherine . E-mail: dazy@paris7.jussieu.fr

    2006-09-15

    Numerous epidemiological studies support the contention that ambient air pollution particles can adversely affect human health. To explain the acute inflammatory process in airways exposed to particles, a number of in vitro studies have been performed on cells grown submerged on plastic and poorly differentiated, and on cell lines, the physiology of which is somewhat different from that of well-differentiated cells. In order to obtain results using a model system in which epithelial cells are similar to those of the human airway in vivo, apical membranes of well-differentiated human nasal epithelial (HNE) cells cultured in an air-liquid interface (ALI) were exposed for 24 h to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and Paris urban air particles (PM{sub 2.5}). DEP and PM{sub 2.5} (10-80 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}) stimulated both IL-8 and amphiregulin (ligand of EGFR) secretion exclusively towards the basal compartment. In contrast, there was no IL-1{beta} secretion and only weak non-reproducible secretion of TNF-{alpha}. IL-6 and GM-CSF were consistently stimulated towards the apical compartment and only when cells were exposed to PM{sub 2.5}. ICAM-1 protein expression on cell surfaces remained low after particle exposure, although it increased after TNF-{alpha} treatment. Internalization of particles, which is believed to initiate oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine expression, was restricted to small nanoparticles ({<=} 40 nm). Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected, and DEP were more efficient than PM{sub 2.5}. Collectively, our results suggest that airway epithelial cells exposed to particles augment the local inflammatory response in the lung but cannot alone initiate a systemic inflammatory response.

  11. IL-23 signaling enhances Th2 polarization and regulates allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Juan; Yang, Xuexian O.; Chang, Seon Hee; Yang, Jiong; Dong, Chen

    2009-01-01

    IL-23/IL-17 axis is an important regulator in various inflammatory diseases. However, the role of IL-23 in allergic airway inflammation is not well understood. In this study, we show that in an allergen-induced asthma model, mice with transgenic overexpression of IL-23R exhibited increased airway infiltration of eosinophils and Th2 cytokine production, whereas those deficient in IL-23 displayed reduced airway inflammation. In vitro, IL-23-IL-23R signaling promoted GATA-3 expression and enhanced Th2 cytokine expression. Conversely, in the absence of this signal, Th2 cell differentiation was partially inhibited. Therefore, IL-23 signaling may regulate allergic asthma through modulation of Th2 cell differentiation. PMID:19935773

  12. Evaluation of Furfuryl Alcohol Sensitization Potential Following Dermal and Pulmonary Exposure: Enhancement of Airway Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Franko, Jennifer; Jackson, Laurel G.; Hubbs, Ann; Kashon, Michael; Meade, B. J.; Anderson, Stacey E.

    2015-01-01

    Furfuryl alcohol is considered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to be a high volume production chemical, with over 1 million pounds produced annually. Due to its high production volume and its numerous industrial and consumer uses, there is considerable potential for work-related exposure, as well as exposure to the general population, through pulmonary, oral, and dermal routes of exposure. Human exposure data report a high incidence of asthma in foundry mold workers exposed to furan resins, suggesting potential immunologic effects. Although furfuryl alcohol was nominated and evaluated for its carcinogenic potential by the National Toxicology Program, studies evaluating its immunotoxicity are lacking. The studies presented here evaluated the immunotoxic potential of furfuryl alcohol following exposure by the dermal and pulmonary routes using a murine model. When tested in a combined irritancy local lymph node assay, furfuryl alcohol was identified to be an irritant and mild sensitizer (EC3 = 25.6%). Pulmonary exposure to 2% furfuryl alcohol resulted in enhanced airway hyperreactivity, eosinophilic infiltration into the lungs, and enhanced cytokine production (IL-4, IL-5, and interferon-γ) by ex vivo stimulated lung-associated draining lymphoid cells. Airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic lung infiltration were augmented by prior dermal exposure to furfuryl alcohol. These results suggest that furfuryl alcohol may play a role in the development of allergic airway disease and encourage the need for additional investigation. PMID:22003193

  13. Airway dysfunction in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Elite competitive swimmers are particularly affected by airway disorders that are probably related to regular and intense training sessions in a chlorinated environment. Upper and lower airway respiratory symptoms, rhinitis, airway hyper-responsiveness, and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction are highly prevalent in these athletes, but their influence on athletic performance is still unclear. The authors reviewed the main upper and lower respiratory ailments observed in competitive swimmers who train in indoor swimming pools, their pathophysiology, clinical significance and possible effects on performance. Issues regarding the screening of these disorders, their management and preventive measures are addressed. PMID:22247299

  14. Airway responsiveness to leukotriene C4 (LTC4), leukotriene E4 (LTE4) and histamine in aspirin-sensitive asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Christie, P E; Schmitz-Schumann, M; Spur, B W; Lee, T H

    1993-11-01

    We wanted to determine whether the airway response to inhaled leukotriene C4 (LTC4) is similar to inhaled leukotriene E4 (LTE4) in aspirin-sensitive asthma and, therefore, determined airway responsiveness to histamine, LTC4 and LTE4 in seven aspirin-sensitive subjects and 13 control asthmatic subjects, who were tolerant of aspirin. The concentration of inhaled lysine-aspirin which produced a 15% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (PC15) was determined in aspirin-sensitive asthmatic subjects. The dose of histamine, LTC4 and LTE4 which produced a 35% fall in specific airways conductance (PD35sGaw) was determined by linear interpolation from the log dose response curve. There was no correlation between the PC15 for lysine-aspirin and the airway reactivity to inhaled LTC4 or LTE4. There was no difference in airway response to histamine and LTC4 between any of the groups of asthmatic subjects. There was a rank order of potency LTC4 > LTE4 > histamine in both groups, with LTC4 approximately 1,000 fold more potent than histamine in both groups. Aspirin-sensitive asthmatic subjects were significantly more responsive to LTE4 (p = 0.02) than aspirin-tolerant asthmatic subjects. The relative responsiveness of LTE4 to histamine (PD35 histamine/PD35 LTE4) was significantly greater in aspirin-sensitive asthmatic subjects compared to aspirin-tolerant asthmatic subjects (p = 0.05). There was no difference in relative responsiveness of LTC4 to histamine between aspirin-sensitive or aspirin-tolerant asthmatic subjects. We conclude that the airways of aspirin-sensitive asthmatic subjects demonstrate a selective hyperresponsiveness to LTE4, which is not observed for LTC4. PMID:8112440

  15. Diosgenin attenuates allergen-induced intestinal inflammation and IgE production in a murine model of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Hsiung; Ku, Chun-Yao; Jan, Tong-Rong

    2009-10-01

    Diosgenin, the major sapogenin contained in the Chinese yam, has recently been shown to promote systemic T helper 1-type immunity in a murine model of airway hypersensitivity. In this study, we hypothesized that diosgenin might be effective in modulating food allergy. BALB/c mice were either left untreated (naïve; NA) or administered daily with vehicle (VH; olive oil) and/or diosgenin (100 or 200 mg/kg) by gavage throughout the experiment. Except for the NA group, the mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and repeatedly challenged with intragastric OVA to induce intestinal allergic responses. Diosgenin demonstrated a suppressive effect on the intestinal inflammation, including the occurrence of diarrhea, the infiltration and degranulation of mast cells, and the presence of mucin-containing goblet cells in the duodenum. A protective effect by diosgenin on reducing the crypt depth of the intestine was also observed in OVA-sensitized and challenged mice. Furthermore, the serum production of OVA-specific IgE, and the total IgE was suppressed. In contrast, OVA-specific IgG (2a) was enhanced by diosgenin treatment in OVA-sensitized mice. These results demonstrated the IN VIVO anti-allergic activity of diosgenin, which is associated with the suppression of IgE production and mast cell infiltration and degranulation. PMID:19343624

  16. Allergens Induce the Release of Lactoferrin by Neutrophils from Asthmatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Inmaculada; Chamorro, Cristina; Aroca, Rocío; Prados, Manuel; Bobadilla, Pedro; Rodríguez, David; Palacios, Ricardo; Monteseirín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the evidence that Lactoferrin (Lf) is involved in allergic asthma processes, it is unknown whether neutrophils can be one of the main cellular sources of this key inflammatory mediator directly in response of an IgE mediated stimulus. The present study was undertaken to analyze this question. Methods Neutrophils from healthy subjects (n = 34) and neutrophils from allergic asthmatic patients (n = 102) were challenged in vitro with specific allergens to which the patients were sensitized, PAF, or agonist mAbs against IgE-receptors, and the levels of Lf were measured in the culture supernatant. The levels of serum IgE together with the severity of symptoms were also analyzed. Results Lf was released into the culture supernatant of neutrophils from allergic asthmatic patients in response to allergens and PAF. This response was highly allergen-specific, and did not happen in neutrophils from healthy donors. Allergen effect was mimicked by Abs against FcεRI and galectin-3 but not by FcεRII. The levels of released Lf correlated well with the levels of serum specific IgE and severity of asthma symptoms. These observations represent a novel view of neutrophils as an important source of Lf in allergic asthma. Importantly, the levels of released Lf by neutrophils could therefore be used to evaluate disease severity in allergic asthmatic patients. PMID:26488881

  17. Airway tissue factor-dependent coagulation activity in response to sulfur mustard analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Rancourt, Raymond C.; Veress, Livia A.; Guo, XiaoLing; Jones, Tara N.; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a principal cause of morbidity and mortality in response to mustard gas (SM) inhalation. Obstructive, fibrin-containing airway casts have recently been reported in a rat inhalation model employing the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). The present study was designed to identify the mechanism(s) causing activation of the coagulation cascade after CEES-induced airway injury. Here we report that CEES inhalation elevates tissue factor (TF) activity and numbers of detached epithelial cells present in lavage fluid (BALF) from rats after exposure (18 h). In vitro studies using 16HBE cells, or with rat BALF, indicated that detached epithelial cells could convert factor X (FX) to the active form FXa when incubated with factor VII and could elicit rapid clotting of plasma. In addition, immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated elevated cell surface (TF) expression on CEES-exposed 16HBE cells as a function of time. However, total cell TF expression did not increase. Since membrane surfaces bearing TF are important determinants of clot initiation, anticoagulants directed against these entities were tested for ability to limit plasma clotting or FX activation capacity of BALF or culture media. Addition of tifacogin, a TF pathway inhibitor, effectively blocked either activity, demonstrating that the procoagulant actions of CEES were TF pathway dependent. Lactadherin, a protein capable of competing with clotting factors for phospholipid-binding sites, was partially effective in limiting these procoagulant actions. These findings indicate that TF pathway inhibition could be an effective strategy to prevent airway obstruction after SM or CEES inhalation. PMID:21964405

  18. Comparison of hemodynamic and metabolic stress responses caused by endotracheal tube and Proseal laryngeal mask airway in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Güleç, Handan; Çakan, Türkay; Yaman, Halil; Kilinç, Aytül Şadan; Başar, Hülya

    2012-01-01

    Background: We aimed to compare hemodynamic and endocrine alterations caused by stress response due to Proseal laryngeal mask airway and endotracheal tube usage in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty-three ASA I-II patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in the study. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups of endotracheal tube and Proseal laryngeal mask airway. Standard general anaesthesia was performed in both groups with the same drugs in induction and maintenance of anaesthesia. After anaesthesia induction and 20 minutes after CO2 insufflations, venous blood samples were obtained for measuring adrenalin, noradrenalin, dopamine and cortisol levels. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were recorded at the 1st, 5th, 15th, 30th and 45th minutes after the insertion of airway devices. Results: No statistically significant differences in age, body mass index, gender, ASA physical status, and operation time were found between the groups (p > 0.05). Changes in hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were not statistically significant when compared between and within groups (p > 0.05). Although no statistically significant differences were observed between and within groups when adrenalin, noradrenalin and dopamine values were compared, serum cortisol levels after CO2 insufflation in PLMA group were significantly lower than the ETT group (p = 0.024). When serum cortisol levels were compared within groups, cortisol levels 20 minutes after CO2 insufflation were significantly higher (46.1 (9.5-175.7) and 27.0 (8.3-119.4) in the ETT and PLMA groups, respectively) than cortisol levels after anaesthesia induction (11.3 (2.8-92.5) and 16.6 (4.4-45.4) in the ETT and PLMA groups, respectively) in both groups (p = 0.001). Conclusion: PLMA usage is a suitable, effective and safe alternative to ETT in laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients with lower metabolic stress. PMID:23264788

  19. Mechanical effects of obesity on airway responsiveness in otherwise healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Torchio, Roberto; Gobbi, Alessandro; Gulotta, Carlo; Dellacà, Raffaele; Tinivella, Marco; Hyatt, Robert E; Brusasco, Vito; Pellegrino, Riccardo

    2009-08-01

    We investigated whether obesity is associated with airway hyperresponsiveness in otherwise healthy humans and, if so, whether this correlates with a restrictive lung function pattern or a decreased number of sighs at rest and/or during walking. Lung function was studied before and after inhaling methacholine (MCh) in 41 healthy subjects with body mass index ranging from 20 to 56. Breathing pattern was assessed during a 60-min rest period and a 30-min walk. The dose of MCh that produced a 50% decrease in the maximum expiratory flow measured in a body plethysmograph (PD50MCh) was inversely correlated with body mass index (r2=0.32, P<0.001) and waist circumference (r2=0.25, P<0.001). Significant correlations with body mass index were also found with the maximum changes in respiratory resistance (r2=0.19, P<0.001) and reactance (r2=0.40, P<0.001) measured at 5 Hz. PD50MCh was also positively correlated with functional residual capacity (r2=0.56, P<0.001) and total lung capacity (r2=0.59, P<0.001) in men, but not in women. Neither PD50MCh nor body mass index correlated with number of sighs, average tidal volume, ventilation, or breathing frequency. In this study, airway hyperresponsiveness was significantly associated with obesity in otherwise healthy subjects. In obese men, but not in women, airway hyperresponsiveness was associated with the decreases in lung volumes. PMID:19541741

  20. Coordinate Control of Expression of Nrf2-Modulated Genes in the Human Small Airway Epithelium Is Highly Responsive to Cigarette Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Ralf-Harto; Schwartz, Jamie D; De Bishnu, P; Ferris, Barbara; Omberg, Larsson; Mezey, Jason G; Hackett, Neil R; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) is an oxidant-responsive transcription factor known to induce detoxifying and antioxidant genes. Cigarette smoke, with its large oxidant content, is a major stress on the cells of small airway epithelium, which are vulnerable to oxidant damage. We assessed the role of cigarette smoke in activation of Nrf2 in the human small airway epithelium in vivo. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was used to sample the small airway epithelium in healthy-nonsmoker and healthy-smoker, and gene expression was assessed using microarrays. Relative to nonsmokers, Nrf2 protein in the small airway epithelium of smokers was activated and localized in the nucleus. The human homologs of 201 known murine Nrf2-modulated genes were identified, and 13 highly smoking-responsive Nrf2-modulated genes were identified. Construction of an Nrf2 index to assess the expression levels of these 13 genes in the airway epithelium of smokers showed coordinate control, an observation confirmed by quantitative PCR. This coordinate level of expression of the 13 Nrf2-modulated genes was independent of smoking history or demographic parameters. The Nrf2 index was used to identify two novel Nrf2-modulated, smoking-responsive genes, pirin (PIR) and UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1-family polypeptide A4 (UGT1A4). Both genes were demonstrated to contain functional antioxidant response elements in the promoter region. These observations suggest that Nrf2 plays an important role in regulating cellular defenses against smoking in the highly vulnerable small airway epithelium cells, and that there is variability within the human population in the Nrf2 responsiveness to oxidant burden. PMID:19593404

  1. Effect of diesel exhaust particles on allergic reactions and airway responsiveness in ovalbumin-sensitized brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, Caroline C; Yin, Xuejun J; Ma, Jane Y C; Millecchia, Lyndell; Wu, Zhong-Xin; Barger, Mark W; Roberts, Jenny R; Antonini, James M; Dey, Richard D; Ma, Joseph K H

    2005-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) prior to ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization in rats reduced OVA-induced airway inflammation. In the present study, Brown Norway rats were first sensitized to OVA (42.3 +/- 5.7 mg/m3) for 30 min on days 1, 8, and 15, then exposed to filtered air or DEP (22.7 +/- 2.5 mg/m3) for 4 h/day on days 24-28, and challenged with OVA on day 29. Airway responsiveness was examined on day 30, and animals were sacrificed on day 31. Ovalbumin sensitization and challenge resulted in a significant infiltration of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils into the lung, elevated presence of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in lung draining lymph nodes, and increased production of serum OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG. Diesel exhaust particles pre-exposure augmented OVA-induced production of allergen-specific IgE and IgG and pulmonary inflammation characterized by marked increases in T lymphocytes and infiltration of eosinophils after OVA challenge, whereas DEP alone did not have these effects. Although OVA-sensitized rats showed modest response to methacholine challenge, it was the combined DEP and OVA exposure that produced significant airway hyperresponsiveness in this animal model. The effect of DEP pre-exposure on OVA-induced immune responses correlated with an interactive effect of DEP with OVA on increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) by alveolar macrophages (AM) and alveolar type II (ATII) cells, NO levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the induction of inducible NO synthase expression in AM and ATII cells, and a depletion of total intracellular glutathione (GSH) in AM and lymphocytes. These results show that DEP pre-exposure exacerbates the allergic responses to the subsequent challenge with OVA in OVA-sensitized rats. This DEP effect may be, at least partially, attributed to the elevated generation of ROS in AM and ATII cells, a depletion of GSH in AM and

  2. A survey of airway responsiveness in 36 inbred mouse strains facilitates gene mapping studies and identification of quantitative trait loci

    PubMed Central

    Leme, Adriana S.; Williams, Laura K.; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Verdugo, Ricardo; Paigen, Beverly; Shapiro, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) is a critical phenotype of human asthma and animal models of asthma. Other studies have measured AHR in nine mouse strains, but only six strains have been used to identify genetic loci underlying AHR. Our goals were to increase the genetic diversity of available strains by surveying 27 additional strains, to apply haplotype association mapping to the 36-strain survey, and to identify new genetic determinants for AHR. We derived AHR from the increase in airway resistance in females subjected to increasing levels of methacholine concentrations. We used haplotype association mapping to identify associations between AHR and haplotypes on chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 12, 13, and 14. And we used bioinformatics techniques to narrow the identified region on chromosome 13, reducing the region to 29 candidate genes, with 11 of considerable interest. Our combined use of haplotype association mapping with bioinformatics tools is the first study of its kind for AHR on these 36 strains of mice. Our analyses have narrowed the possible QTL genes and will facilitate the discovery of novel genes that regulate AHR in mice. PMID:20143096

  3. Lower airway colonization and inflammatory response in COPD: a focus on Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Finney, Lydia J; Ritchie, Andrew; Pollard, Elizabeth; Johnston, Sebastian L; Mallia, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is common both in stable patients and during acute exacerbations. The most frequent bacteria detected in COPD patients is Haemophilus influenzae, and it appears this organism is uniquely adapted to exploit immune deficiencies associated with COPD and to establish persistent infection in the lower respiratory tract. The presence of bacteria in the lower respiratory tract in stable COPD is termed colonization; however, there is increasing evidence that this is not an innocuous phenomenon but is associated with airway inflammation, increased symptoms, and increased risk for exacerbations. In this review, we discuss host immunity that offers protection against H. influenzae and how disturbance of these mechanisms, combined with pathogen mechanisms of immune evasion, promote persistence of H. influenzae in the lower airways in COPD. In addition, we examine the role of H. influenzae in COPD exacerbations, as well as interactions between H. influenzae and respiratory virus infections, and review the role of treatments and their effect on COPD outcomes. This review focuses predominantly on data derived from human studies but will refer to animal studies where they contribute to understanding the disease in humans. PMID:25342897

  4. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. {yields} Induction of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. {yields} C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical

  5. Differences in allergen-induced T cell activation between allergic asthma and rhinitis: Role of CD28, ICOS and CTLA-4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Th2 cell activation and T regulatory cell (Treg) deficiency are key features of allergy. This applies for asthma and rhinitis. However with a same atopic background, some patients will develop rhinitis and asthma, whereas others will display rhinitis only. Co-receptors are pivotal in determining the type of T cell activation, but their role in allergic asthma and rhinitis has not been explored. Our objective was to assess whether allergen-induced T cell activation differs from allergic rhinitis to allergic rhinitis with asthma, and explore the role of ICOS, CD28 and CTLA-4. Methods T cell co-receptor and cytokine expressions were assessed by flow cytometry in PBMC from 18 house dust mite (HDM) allergic rhinitics (R), 18 HDM allergic rhinitics and asthmatics (AR), 13 non allergic asthmatics (A) and 20 controls, with or without anti-co-receptors antibodies. Results In asthmatics (A+AR), a constitutive decrease of CTLA-4+ and of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells was found, with an increase of IFN-γ+ cells. In allergic subjects (R + AR), allergen stimulation induced CD28 together with IL-4 and IL-13, and decreased the proportion of CTLA-4+, IL-10+ and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells. Anti-ICOS and anti-CD28 antibodies blocked allergen-induced IL-4 and IL-13. IL-13 production also involved CTLA-4. Conclusions T cell activation differs between allergic rhinitis and asthma. In asthma, a constitutive, co-receptor independent, Th1 activation and Treg deficiency is found. In allergic rhinitis, an allergen-induced Treg cell deficiency is seen, as well as an ICOS-, CD28- and CTLA-4-dependent Th2 activation. Allergic asthmatics display both characteristics. PMID:21356099

  6. Attenuation of circulatory and airway responses to endotracheal extubation in craniotomies for intracerebral space occupying lesions: Dexmedetomidine versus lignocaine

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Dilip; Tandon, Neelima; Singh, Meena; Kumar, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of the study is to compare the effect of dexmedetomidine versus lignocaine in attenuation of circulatory and airway responses during endotracheal extubation in craniotomies for intracerebral space occupying lesions (ICSOL). Materials and Methods: A total of 50 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade I and II of either sex, aged 18-50 years undergoing craniotomies for non-vascular ICSOL under general anesthesia were divided into two groups according to drug received. Group D (n = 25) received dexmedetomidine (0.5 mcg/kg) whereas group L (n = 25) received lignocaine (1.5 mg/kg). Both the drugs were given 5 min before the extubation over a period of 60 s. Values for heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), were recorded just before (A0) and 1, 3, 5 (A1, A3, A5) min after the study drug administration, at extubation (E) and 1, 3, 5, 10, 15 min after extubation (E1, E3, E5, E10 and E15). Respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and airway responses like coughing, breath-holding, laryngospasm/bronchospasm were recorded only at extubation (E) and 1, 3, 5, 10, 15 min after extubation (E1, E3, E5, E10, E15). Quality of extubation was recorded with four point scale. After extubation all these patients were also observed for sedation by Ramsey sedation score. Results: Both groups showed a statistically significant increase (D < L) in HR, SBP and DBP during (E) and immediately after extubation (E1) (P < 0.05). Dexmedetomidine (72%) produced a higher degree of sedation (Grade 3) as compare with lignocaine (0%) and with no incidence of coughing or breath holding (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Single dose of dexmedetomidine (0.5 mcg/kg) given 5 min before extubation produced significant attenuation of circulatory and airway responses produced during extubation as compared to Lignocaine (1.5 mg/kg) in ICSOL. PMID:25886109

  7. S-nitrosothiols regulate cell-surface pH buffering by airway epithelial cells during the human immune response to rhinovirus.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Silvia; Doherty, Joseph; Zaman, Khalequz; Gainov, Iain; Turner, Ronald; Vaughan, John; Hunt, John F; Márquez, Javier; Gaston, Benjamin

    2006-05-01

    Human rhinovirus infection is a common trigger for asthma exacerbations. Asthma exacerbations and rhinovirus infections are both associated with markedly decreased pH and ammonium levels in exhaled breath condensates. This observation is thought to be related, in part, to decreased activity of airway epithelial glutaminase. We studied whether direct rhinovirus infection and/or the host immune response to the infection decreased airway epithelial cell surface pH in vitro. Interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, but not direct rhinovirus infection, decreased pH, an effect partly associated with decreased ammonium concentrations. This effect was 1) prevented by nitric oxide synthase inhibition; 2) independent of cyclic GMP; 3) associated with an increase in endogenous airway epithelial cell S-nitrosothiol concentration; 4) mimicked by the exogenous S-nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-N-acetyl cysteine; and 5) independent of glutaminase expression and activity. We then confirmed that decreased epithelial pH inhibits human rhinovirus replication in airway epithelial cells. These data suggest that a nitric oxide synthase-dependent host response to viral infection mediated by S-nitrosothiols, rather than direct infection itself, plays a role in decreased airway surface pH during human rhinovirus infection. This host immune response may serve to protect the lower airways from direct infection in the normal host. In patients with asthma, however, this fall in pH could be associated with the increased mucus production, augmented inflammatory cell degranulation, bronchoconstriction, and cough characteristic of an asthma exacerbation. PMID:16603595

  8. Effects of environmental pollutants on airways, allergic inflammation, and the immune response.

    PubMed

    Handzel, Z T

    2000-01-01

    Particulate and gaseous air pollutants are capable of damaging the airway epithelial lining and of shifting the local immune balance, thereby facilitating the induction of persistent inflammation. Epidemiological studies are inconclusive regarding whether air pollution increases the incidence of asthma and chronic bronchitis in the population. Clearly, environmental pollution can, however, precipitate attacks and emergency-room admissions in those already suffering from such conditions. The catastrophic potential of airborne pollution was demonstrated in the 1960s and 1970s, when inverted atmospheric pressure conditions trapped smog over cities on the Eastern coast of the United States and over Europe. This smog resulted in thousands of hospital admissions and dozens of deaths. With the general rise in the incidence of atopy and asthma in the Western population, it is of major public health interest to reduce, as much as possible, the exposure of such populations to anthropogenic and natural sources of pollution. PMID:11048334

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS (P.
    SinghI, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, D.L. Doerfler2 and M.I. Gilmour2, 1NCSU, Ra...

  10. Growth of airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface changes both the response to particle exposure and iron homeostasis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE: We tested the hypothesis that 1) relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface and allowed to differentiate would have an altered response to particle exposure and 2) that these differences would be associated with indices of iro...

  11. Saponins, especially platyconic acid A, from Platycodon grandiflorum reduce airway inflammation in ovalbumin-induced mice and PMA-exposed A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Ho; Jin, Sun Woo; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Choi, Chul Yung; Lee, Hyun Sun; Ryu, Shi Yong; Chung, Young Chul; Hwang, Young Jung; Um, Yeon Ji; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2015-02-11

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of Platycodon grandiflorum root-derived saponins (Changkil saponins: CKS) on ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in mice. CKS suppressed leukocytes number, IgE, Th1/Th2 cytokines, and MCP-1 chemokine secretion in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Also, ovalbumin-increased MUC5AC, MMP-2/9, and TIMP-1/-2 mRNA expression, NF-κB activation, leukocytes recruitment, and mucus secretion were inhibited by CKS treatment. Moreover, the active component of CKS, platyconic acid A (PA), suppressed PMA-induced MUC5AC mRNA expression (from 2.1 ± 0.2 to 1.1 ± 0.1) by inhibiting NF-κB activation (from 2.3 ± 0.2 to 1.2 ± 0.1) via Akt (from 3.7 ± 0.3 to 2.1 ± 0.2) (p < 0.01) in A549 cells. Therefore, we demonstrate that CKS or PA suppressed the development of respiratory inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, and remodeling by reducing allergic responses, and they may be potential herbal drugs for allergen-induced respiratory disease prevention. PMID:25590691

  12. Accumulation of peribronchial mast cells in a mouse model of ovalbumin allergen induced chronic airway inflammation: modulation by immunostimulatory DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Reid K; Miller, Marina; Nayar, Jyothi; Walker, Linda; Cho, Jae Youn; McElwain, Kirsti; McElwain, Shauna; Raz, Eyal; Broide, David H

    2003-11-01

    Few peribronchial mast cells are noted either in the lungs of naive mice or in the lungs of OVA-sensitized mice challenged acutely with OVA by inhalation. In this study, we demonstrate that OVA-sensitized mice exposed to repetitive OVA inhalation for 1-6 mo have a significant accumulation of peribronchial mast cells. This accumulation of peribronchial mast cells is associated with increased expression of the Th2 cell-derived mast cell growth factors, including IL-4 and IL-9, but not with the non-Th2 cell-derived mast cell growth factor, stem cell factor. Pretreating mice with immunostimulatory sequences (ISS) of DNA containing a CpG motif significantly inhibited the accumulation of peribronchial mast cells and the expression of IL-4 and IL-9. To determine whether mast cells express Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR-9; the receptor for ISS), TLR-9 expression by mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (MBMMCs) was assessed by RT-PCR. MBMMCs strongly expressed TLR-9 and bound rhodamine-labeled ISS. However, incubation of MBMMCs with ISS in vitro neither inhibited MBMMC proliferation nor inhibited Ag/IgE-mediated MBMMC degranulation, but they did induce IL-6. Overall these studies demonstrate that mice exposed to repetitive OVA challenge, but not acute OVA challenge, have an accumulation of peribronchial mast cells and express increased levels of mast cell growth factors in the lung. Although mast cells express TLR-9, ISS does not directly inhibit mast cell proliferation in vitro, suggesting that ISS inhibits accumulation of peribronchial mast cells in vivo by indirect mechanism(s), which include inhibiting the lung expression of Th2 cell-derived mast cell growth factors. PMID:14568966

  13. The Role of COX-2 in the Inflammatory and Fibrotic Response in the Lung Following Exposure to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayers, Brian C.

    Exposure to multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) has been demonstrated to exacerbate airway inflammation and fibrosis in allergen-challenged mouse model. These data have led to concern that individuals with asthma could represent a susceptible population to adverse health effects following exposure to MWCNT, and possibly other engineered nanoparticles. Asthma pathogenesis is caused by the interaction of a complex genetic predisposition and environmental exposures. Because chronic airway inflammation is common to all asthma phenotypes, it is logical to investigate genes that are involved in inflammatory pathways in order to understand the genetic basis of asthma. The metabolism of arachidonic acid by cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes is the rate-determining step in the synthesis of prostanoids, which are biologically active lipids that are important modulators of inflammation. Based on the role of COX enzymes in inflammatory pathways, we sought to investigate how COX enzymes are involved in the inflammatory response following MWCNT exposure in asthmatic airways. We report that MWCNT significantly exacerbated allergen-induced airway inflammation and mucus cell metaplasia in COX-2 deficient mice compared to wild type mice. In addition, MWCNTs significantly enhanced allergen-induced cytokines involved in Th2 (IL-13, IL-5), Th1 (CXCL10), and Th17 (IL-17A) inflammatory responses in COX-2 deficient mice but not in WT mice. We conclude that exacerbation of allergen-induced airway inflammation and mucus cell metaplasia by MWCNTs is enhanced by deficiency in COX-2 and associated with activation of a mixed Th1/Th2/Th17 immune response. Based on our observation that COX-2 deficient mice developed a mixed Th immune response following MWCNT exposure, we sought to evaluate how cytokines associated with different Th immune responses alter COX expression following MWCNT exposure. For this study, a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) was used because MWCNT were largely sequestered

  14. Proton-Sensing Ovarian Cancer G Protein-Coupled Receptor 1 on Dendritic Cells Is Required for Airway Responses in a Murine Asthma Model

    PubMed Central

    Hisada, Takeshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Kamide, Yosuke; Ichimonji, Isao; Tomura, Hideaki; Tobo, Masayuki; Sato, Koichi; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Dobashi, Kunio; Mori, Tetsuya; Harada, Akihiro; Yamada, Masanobu; Mori, Masatomo; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) stimulation by extracellular protons causes the activation of G proteins and subsequent cellular functions. However, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of OGR1 in airway responses remain largely unknown. In the present study, we show that OGR1-deficient mice are resistant to the cardinal features of asthma, including airway eosinophilia, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and goblet cell metaplasia, in association with a remarkable inhibition of Th2 cytokine and IgE production, in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Intratracheal transfer to wild-type mice of OVA-primed bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) from OGR1-deficient mice developed lower AHR and eosinophilia after OVA inhalation compared with the transfer of those from wild-type mice. Migration of OVA-pulsed DCs to peribronchial lymph nodes was also inhibited by OGR1 deficiency in the adoption experiments. The presence of functional OGR1 in DCs was confirmed by the expression of OGR1 mRNA and the OGR1-sensitive Ca2+ response. OVA-induced expression of CCR7, a mature DC chemokine receptor, and migration response to CCR7 ligands in an in vitro Transwell assay were attenuated by OGR1 deficiency. We conclude that OGR1 on DCs is critical for migration to draining lymph nodes, which, in turn, stimulates Th2 phenotype change and subsequent induction of airway inflammation and AHR. PMID:24244587

  15. Ozone-induced lung function decrements do not correlate with early airway inflammatory or antioxidant responses.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, A; Mudway, I S; Nordenhäll, C; Hedenström, H; Kelly, F J; Frew, A J; Holgate, S T; Sandström, T

    1999-06-01

    This study sought to clarify the early events occurring within the airways of healthy human subjects performing moderate intermittent exercise following ozone challenge. Thirteen healthy nonsmoking subjects were exposed in a single blinded, crossover control fashion to 0.2 parts per million (ppm) O3 and filtered air for 2 h, using a standard intermittent exercise and rest protocol. Lung function was assessed pre- and immediately post-exposure. Bronchoscopy was performed with endobronchial mucosal biopsies, bronchial wash (BW) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 1.5 h after the end of the exposure period. Respiratory tract lining fluid (RTLF) redox status was assessed by measuring a range of antioxidants and oxidative damage markers in BW and BAL fluid samples. There was a significant upregulation after O3 exposure in the expression of vascular endothelial P-selectin (p<0.005) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (p<0.005). This was associated with a 2-fold increase in submucosal mast cells (p<0.005) in biopsy samples, without evidence of neutrophilic inflammation, and a decrease in BAL fluid macrophage numbers (1.6-fold, p<0.005), with an activation of the remaining macrophage subset (2.5-fold increase in % human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR+ cells, p<0.005). In addition, exposure led to a 4.5-fold and 3.1-fold increase of reduced glutathione (GSH) concentrations, in BW and BAL fluid respectively (p<0.05), with alterations in urate and alpha-tocopherol plasma/RTLF partitioning ratios (p<0.05). Spirometry showed reductions in forced vital capacity (p<0.05) and forced expiratory volume in one second (p<0.01), with evidence of small airway narrowing using forced expiratory flow values (p<0.005). Evidence was found of O3-induced early adhesion molecule upregulation, increased submucosal mast cell numbers and alterations to the respiratory tract lining fluid redox status. No clear relationship was demonstrable between changes in these early markers and the lung function

  16. Schistosoma mansoni antigens modulate the allergic response in a murine model of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, L S; Oliveira, S C; Góes, A M; Oliveira, R R; Pacífico, L G; Marinho, F V; Fonseca, C T; Cardoso, F C; Carvalho, E M; Araujo, M I

    2010-05-01

    Schistosoma mansoni infection has been associated with protection against allergies. The mechanisms underlying this association may involve regulatory cells and cytokines. We evaluated the immune response induced by the S. mansoni antigens Sm22.6, PIII and Sm29 in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway inflammation. BALB/c mice were sensitized with subcutaneously injected OVA-alum and challenged with aerolized OVA. Mice were given three doses of the different S. mansoni antigens. Lung histopathology, cellularity of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and eosinophil peroxidase activity in lung were evaluated. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E levels in serum and cytokines in BAL were also measured. Additionally, we evaluated the frequency of CD4+forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells in cultures stimulated with OVA and the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 by these cells. The number of total cells and eosinophils in BAL and the levels of OVA-specific IgE were reduced in the immunized mice. Also, the levels of IL-4 and IL-5 in the BAL of mice immunized with PIII and Sm22.6 were decreased, while the levels of IL-10 were higher in mice immunized with Sm22.6 compared to the non-immunized mice. The frequency of CD4+FoxP3+ T cells was higher in the groups of mice who received Sm22.6, Sm29 and PIII, being the expression of IL-10 by these cells only higher in mice immunized with Sm22.6. We concluded that the S. mansoni antigens used in this study are able to down-modulate allergic inflammatory mediators in a murine model of airway inflammation and that the CD4+FoxP3+ T cells, even in the absence of IL-10 expression, might play an important role in this process. PMID:20132231

  17. Schistosoma mansoni antigens modulate the allergic response in a murine model of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, L S; Oliveira, S C; Góes, A M; Oliveira, R R; Pacífico, L G; Marinho, F V; Fonseca, C T; Cardoso, F C; Carvalho, E M; Araujo, M I

    2010-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni infection has been associated with protection against allergies. The mechanisms underlying this association may involve regulatory cells and cytokines. We evaluated the immune response induced by the S. mansoni antigens Sm22·6, PIII and Sm29 in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway inflammation. BALB/c mice were sensitized with subcutaneously injected OVA-alum and challenged with aerolized OVA. Mice were given three doses of the different S. mansoni antigens. Lung histopathology, cellularity of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and eosinophil peroxidase activity in lung were evaluated. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E levels in serum and cytokines in BAL were also measured. Additionally, we evaluated the frequency of CD4+forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells in cultures stimulated with OVA and the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 by these cells. The number of total cells and eosinophils in BAL and the levels of OVA-specific IgE were reduced in the immunized mice. Also, the levels of IL-4 and IL-5 in the BAL of mice immunized with PIII and Sm22·6 were decreased, while the levels of IL-10 were higher in mice immunized with Sm22·6 compared to the non-immunized mice. The frequency of CD4+FoxP3+ T cells was higher in the groups of mice who received Sm22·6, Sm29 and PIII, being the expression of IL-10 by these cells only higher in mice immunized with Sm22·6. We concluded that the S. mansoni antigens used in this study are able to down-modulate allergic inflammatory mediators in a murine model of airway inflammation and that the CD4+FoxP3+ T cells, even in the absence of IL-10 expression, might play an important role in this process. PMID:20132231

  18. In vivo pharmacological evaluation of compound 48/80-induced airways oedema by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, H; Blé, F-X; Cannet, C; Zurbruegg, S; Fozard, J R; Page, C P; Beckmann, N

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Allergen-induced airways oedema in actively sensitized rats has been studied earlier by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We used MRI to follow the consequences of non-immunological mast cell activation induced by compound 48/80 in the rat lungs in vivo. Experimental approach: Male naïve rats were scanned by MRI prior to and at several time points following intratracheal administration of the mast cell secretagogue, compound 48/80. The effects of a range of drugs on the response induced by compound 48/80 were studied. Key results: Strong fluid signals were detected by MRI in the lungs at 24 h after compound 48/80, correlating with increased protein concentration and inflammatory cell infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage, and with perivascular oedema observed histologically. Pharmacological intervention demonstrated that the increase in MRI signal volume induced by compound 48/80 24 h after challenge was blocked by disodium cromoglycate and the glucocorticoid, budesonide. Pretreatment with wortmannin, capsazepine, DNK333 (a dual neurokinin (NK) 1 and NK2 antagonist) or the anti-allergy drug CGS8515, but not indomethacin, resulted in partial inhibition. Conclusions and implications: Compound 48/80 induced a complex inflammatory reaction which did not solely involve mast cell degranulation but also activation of sensory nerves and was qualitatively similar to allergen challenge. Changes observed by MRI correlated with decreases in protein concentration in BAL fluid. However, the magnitude of the changes detected was greater using MRI. Our results demonstrate that MRI is a sensitive and efficient tool to assess the effects of drugs on lung inflammation. PMID:18469845

  19. Citric acid cough threshold and airway responsiveness in asthmatic patients and smokers with chronic airflow obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Auffarth, B; de Monchy, J G; van der Mark, T W; Postma, D S; Koëter, G H

    1991-01-01

    The relation between citric acid cough threshold and airway hyperresponsiveness was investigated in 11 non-smoking patients with allergic asthma (mean FEV1 94% predicted) and 25 non-atopic smokers with chronic airflow obstruction (mean FEV1 65% predicted). Cough threshold was determined on two occasions by administering doubling concentrations of citric acid. Seven of the 11 asthmatic subjects and 14 of 25 smokers with chronic airflow obstruction had a positive cough threshold on both test days. Cough threshold measurements were reproducible in both groups (standard deviation of duplicate measurements 1.2 doubling concentrations in asthma, 1.1 doubling concentrations in chronic airflow obstruction). Citric acid provocation did not cause bronchial obstruction in most patients, though four patients had a fall in FEV1 of more than 20% for a short time on one occasion only. No significant difference in cough threshold was found between the two patient groups despite differences in baseline FEV1 values. There was no significant correlation between cough threshold and the provocative concentration of histamine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) histamine in either group. Thus sensory nerves can be activated with a tussive agent in patients with asthma and chronic airflow obstruction without causing bronchial smooth muscle contraction. PMID:1948792

  20. Primary Paediatric Bronchial Airway Epithelial Cell in Vitro Responses to Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, Neil; Davidson, Matthew; Scaife, Alison; Miller, David; Spiteri, Daniella; Engelhardt, Tom; Semple, Sean; Devereux, Graham; Walsh, Garry; Turner, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The bronchial airway epithelial cell (BAEC) is the site for initial encounters between inhaled environmental factors and the lower respiratory system. Our hypothesis was that release of pro inflammatory interleukins (IL)-6 and IL-8 from primary BAEC cultured from children will be increased after in vitro exposure to common environmental factors. Primary BAEC were obtained from children undergoing clinically indicated routine general anaesthetic procedures. Cells were exposed to three different concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or house dust mite allergen (HDM) or particulates extracted from side stream cigarette smoke (SSCS). BAEC were obtained from 24 children (mean age 7.0 years) and exposed to stimuli. Compared with the negative control, there was an increase in IL-6 and IL-8 release after exposure to HDM (p ≤ 0.001 for both comparisons). There was reduced IL-6 after higher compared to lower SSCS exposure (p = 0.023). There was no change in BAEC release of IL-6 or IL-8 after LPS exposure. BAEC from children are able to recognise and respond in vitro with enhanced pro inflammatory mediator secretion to some inhaled exposures. PMID:27023576

  1. Primary Paediatric Bronchial Airway Epithelial Cell in Vitro Responses to Environmental Exposures.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Neil; Davidson, Matthew; Scaife, Alison; Miller, David; Spiteri, Daniella; Engelhardt, Tom; Semple, Sean; Devereux, Graham; Walsh, Garry; Turner, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The bronchial airway epithelial cell (BAEC) is the site for initial encounters between inhaled environmental factors and the lower respiratory system. Our hypothesis was that release of pro inflammatory interleukins (IL)-6 and IL-8 from primary BAEC cultured from children will be increased after in vitro exposure to common environmental factors. Primary BAEC were obtained from children undergoing clinically indicated routine general anaesthetic procedures. Cells were exposed to three different concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or house dust mite allergen (HDM) or particulates extracted from side stream cigarette smoke (SSCS). BAEC were obtained from 24 children (mean age 7.0 years) and exposed to stimuli. Compared with the negative control, there was an increase in IL-6 and IL-8 release after exposure to HDM (p ≤ 0.001 for both comparisons). There was reduced IL-6 after higher compared to lower SSCS exposure (p = 0.023). There was no change in BAEC release of IL-6 or IL-8 after LPS exposure. BAEC from children are able to recognise and respond in vitro with enhanced pro inflammatory mediator secretion to some inhaled exposures. PMID:27023576

  2. I-gel Laryngeal Mask Airway Combined with Tracheal Intubation Attenuate Systemic Stress Response in Patients Undergoing Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chaoliang; Chai, Xiaoqing; Kang, Fang; Huang, Xiang; Hou, Tao; Tang, Fei; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The adverse events induced by intubation and extubation may cause intracranial hemorrhage and increase of intracranial pressure, especially in posterior fossa surgery patients. In this study, we proposed that I-gel combined with tracheal intubation could reduce the stress response of posterior fossa surgery patients. Methods. Sixty-six posterior fossa surgery patients were randomly allocated to receive either tracheal tube intubation (Group TT) or I-gel facilitated endotracheal tube intubation (Group TI). Hemodynamic and respiratory variables, stress and inflammatory response, oxidative stress, anesthesia recovery parameters, and adverse events during emergence were compared. Results. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were lower in Group TI during intubation and extubation (P < 0.05 versus Group TT). Respiratory variables including peak airway pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension were similar intraoperative, while plasma β-endorphin, cortisol, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, malondialdehyde concentrations, and blood glucose were significantly lower in Group TI during emergence relative to Group TT. Postoperative bucking and serious hypertensions were seen in Group TT but not in Group TI. Conclusion. Utilization of I-gel combined with endotracheal tube in posterior fossa surgery patients is safe which can yield more stable hemodynamic profile during intubation and emergence and lower inflammatory and oxidative response, leading to uneventful recovery. PMID:26273146

  3. Zerumbone enhances the Th1 response and ameliorates ovalbumin-induced Th2 responses and airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Ying-Hua; Huang, Huei-Mei; Wang, Ching-Chiung; Lee, Chen-Chen; Fan, Chia-Kwung; Lee, Yueh-Lun

    2015-02-01

    Zerumbone is a sesquiterpene compound isolated from the rhizome of wild ginger, Zingiber zerumbet Smith. The rhizomes of the plant are used as a spice and traditional medicine. Zerumbone was shown to possess anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. However, the antiallergic activity and the underlying mechanism of zerumbone have not been reported. Herein, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of zerumbone on antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and its potential therapeutic effects against ovalbumin (OVA)-induced T helper 2 (Th2)-mediated asthma in mice. In the presence of zerumbone, lipopolysaccharide-activated bone marrow-derived DCs enhanced T cell proliferation and Th1 cell polarization in an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. In animal experiments, mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA, and were orally treated with different doses of zerumbone after sensitization. Circulating titers of OVA-specific antibodies, airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, histological changes in lung tissues, the cell composition and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and cytokine profiles of spleen cells were assessed. Compared to OVA-induced hallmarks of asthma, oral administration of zerumbone induced lower OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) and higher IgG2a antibody production, attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness, prevented eosinophilic pulmonary infiltration, and ameliorated mucus hypersecretion. Zerumbone treatment also reduced the production of eotaxin, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13, and promoted Th1 cytokine interferon (IFN)-γ production in asthmatic mice. Taken together, these results suggest that zerumbone exhibits an antiallergic effect via modulation of Th1/Th2 cytokines in an asthmatic mouse model. PMID:25573403

  4. Differential effects of endogenous and exogenous interferon-gamma on immunoglobulin E, cellular infiltration, and airway responsiveness in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Hofstra, C L; Van Ark, I; Hofman, G; Nijkamp, F P; Jardieu, P M; Van Oosterhout, A J

    1998-11-01

    The inflammatory response as seen in human allergic asthma is thought to be regulated by Th2 cells. It has been shown that interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) can downregulate the proliferation of Th2 cells and therefore might be of therapeutic use. In the present study we have investigated the in vivo role of endogenous and exogenous IFN-gamma in a murine model with features reminiscent of human allergic asthma. IFN-gamma gene knockout (GKO) and wild-type mice were sensitized with ovalbumin and exposed to repeated ovalbumin aerosol challenges. In addition, wild-type mice were treated with intraperitoneal or nebulized recombinant murine IFN-gamma during the challenge period. Sensitized wild-type mice exhibited upregulated ovalbumin-specific IgE in serum, and airway hyperresponsiveness and infiltration of eosinophils and mononuclear cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) after ovalbumin challenge. In contrast, in GKO mice only reduced eosinophilic infiltration in the BALF was observed after ovalbumin challenge. In wild-type mice, parenteral IFN-gamma treatment downregulated ovalbumin-specific IgE levels in serum, and airway hyperresponsiveness and cellular infiltration in the BALF, whereas aerosolized IFN-gamma treatment only suppressed airway hyperresponsiveness. In vitro experiments showed that these effects of IFN-gamma appear not to be mediated via a direct effect on the cytokine production of antigen-specific Th2 cells. These data indicate that airway hyperresponsiveness can be downregulated by IFN-gamma locally in the airways, whereas for downregulation of IgE and cellular infiltration systemic IFN-gamma is needed. The present study shows that exogenous IFN-gamma can downregulate the allergic response via an antigen-specific T-cell independent mechanism, but at the same time endogenous IFN-gamma plays a role in an optimal response. PMID:9806748

  5. The influence of gender and upper airway resistance on the ventilatory response to arousal in obstructive sleep apnoea in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Amy S; McEvoy, R Doug; Edwards, Jill K; Schory, Karen; Yang, Chang-Kook; Catcheside, Peter G; Fogel, Robert B; Malhotra, Atul; White, David P

    2004-01-01

    The termination of obstructive respiratory events is typically associated with arousal from sleep. The ventilatory response to arousal may be an important determinant of subsequent respiratory stability/instability and therefore may be involved in perpetuating obstructive respiratory events. In healthy subjects arousal is associated with brief hyperventilation followed by more prolonged hypoventilation on return to sleep. This study was designed to assess whether elevated sleeping upper airway resistance (RUA) alters the ventilatory response to arousal and subsequent breathing on return to sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Inspired minute ventilation (VI), RUA and end-tidal CO2 pressure (PET,CO2) were measured in 22 patients (11 men, 11 women) with OSA (mean ±s.e.m., apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI) 48.9 ± 5.9 events h−1) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep with low RUA (2.8 ± 0.3 cmH2O l−1 s; optimal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) = 11.3 ± 0.7 cmH2O) and with elevated RUA (17.6 ± 2.8 cmH2O l−1 s; sub-optimal CPAP = 8.4 ± 0.8 cmH2O). A single observer, unaware of respiratory data, identified spontaneous and tone-induced arousals of 3–15 s duration preceded and followed by stable NREM sleep. VI was compared between CPAP levels before and after spontaneous arousal in 16 subjects with tone-induced arousals in both conditions. During stable NREM sleep at sub-optimal CPAP, PET,CO2 was mildly elevated (43.5 ± 0.8 versus 42.5 ± 0.8 Torr). However, baseline VI (7.8 ± 0.3 versus 8.0 ± 0.3 l min−1) was unchanged between CPAP conditions. For the first three breaths following arousal, VI was higher for sub-optimal than optimal CPAP (first breath: 11.2 ± 0.9 versus 9.3 ± 0.6 l min−1). The magnitude of hypoventilation on return to sleep was not affected by the level of CPAP and both obstructive and central respiratory events were rare following arousal. Similar results occurred after tone-induced arousals which led to

  6. Mean airway pressure and response to inhaled nitric oxide in neonatal and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, George M; Nelin, Leif D

    2005-01-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) can improve oxygenation and ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) matching by reduction of shunt (Qs/Qt) in patients with hypoxemic lung disease. Because the improvement in V/Q matching must occur by redistribution of pulmonary blood flow, and because high airway pressure (Paw) increases physiologic dead space (Vd/Vt), we hypothesized that high Paw may limit the improvement in V/Q matching during iNO treatment. iNO 0-50 ppm was administered during mechanical ventilation. Mechanical ventilator settings were at the discretion of the attending physician. Qs/Qt and Vd/Vt were derived from a tripartite lung model with correction for shunt-induced dead space. Data from 62 patients during 153 trials were analyzed for effects of Paw and iNO on Qs/Qt and Vd/Vt. Baseline Qs/Qt was slightly increased at Paw 16-23 cmH2O (p < 0.05), while Vd/Vt increased progressively with higher Paw (p < 0.002). Therapy with iNO significantly reduced Qs/Qt (p < 0.001) at all levels of mean Paw, reaching a maximum reduction at 16-23 cmH2O (p < 0.05), such that Qs/Qt during iNO treatment was similar at all levels of Paw. During iNO treatment, a reduction in Vd/Vt occurred only at Paw of 8-15 cmH2O (p < 0.05), and the positive relationship between Vd/Vt and Paw was maintained. These differential effects on Qs/Qt and Vd/Vt suggest that both high and low Paw may limit improvement in gas exchange with iNO. Analysis of gas exchange using this corrected tripartite lung model may help optimize ventilatory strategies during iNO therapy. PMID:16465603

  7. Effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure and oxygen supplementation on norepinephrine kinetics and cardiovascular responses in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Mills, Paul J; Kennedy, Brian P; Loredo, Jose S; Dimsdale, Joel E; Ziegler, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by noradrenergic activation. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice and has been shown to effectively reduce elevated norepinephrine (NE) levels. This study examined whether the reduction in NE after CPAP is due to an increase in NE clearance and/or a decrease of NE release rate. Fifty CPAP-naive OSA patients with an apnea-hypopnea index >15 were studied. NE clearance and release rates, circulating NE levels, urinary NE excretion, and blood pressure and heart rate were determined before and after 14 days of CPAP, placebo CPAP (CPAP administered at ineffective pressure), or oxygen supplementation. CPAP led to a significant increase in NE clearance (P < or = 0.01), as well as decreases in plasma NE levels (P < or = 0.018) and daytime (P < 0.001) and nighttime (P < 0.05) NE excretion. NE release rate was unchanged with treatment. Systolic (P < or = 0.013) and diastolic (P < or = 0.026) blood pressure and heart rate (P < or = 0.014) were decreased in response to CPAP but not in response to oxygen or placebo CPAP treatment. Posttreatment systolic blood pressure was best predicted by pretreatment systolic blood pressure and posttreatment NE clearance and release rate (P < 0.01). The findings indicate that one of the mechanisms through which CPAP reduces NE levels is through an increase in the clearance of NE from the circulation. PMID:16357087

  8. Airway epithelial cells initiate the allergen response through transglutaminase 2 by inducing IL-33 expression and a subsequent Th2 response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a post-translational protein-modifying enzyme that catalyzes the transamidation reaction, producing crosslinked or polyaminated proteins. Increased TG2 expression and activity have been reported in various inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammation-associated pulmonary fibrosis, and autoimmune encephalitis. In particular, TG2 from epithelial cells is important during the initial inflammatory response in the lung. In this study, we evaluated the role of TG2 in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma, particularly whether TG2 affects initial activation signaling leading to Th2 differentiation against antigens. Methods We induced allergic asthma by ovalbumin sensitization and intranasal challenge in wild-type (WT) BALB/c and TG2-deficient mice. Broncheoalveolar lavage fluid cells and intracellular cytokine production were analyzed by flow cytometry. Interleukin (IL)-33 and TG2 expression in lung epithelial cells was detected by confocal microscopy. Results Airway responsiveness was attenuated in TG2-deficient mice compared to that in the WT control. In addition, recruitment of eosinophils and Th2 and Th17 differentiation decreased in TG2-deficient mice. Treatment with cysteamine, a transglutaminase inhibitor, also reduced airway hypersensitivity, inflammatory cell recruitment, and T helper cell differentiation. TG2-deficient mice showed reduced IL-33 expression following induction of allergic asthma compared to those in the WT control. Conclusions We found that pulmonary epithelial cells damaged by allergens triggered TG2-mediated IL-33 expression leading to type 2 responses by recruiting both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. PMID:23496815

  9. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    van 't Wout, Emily F A; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; van Boxtel, Ria; Dalton, Lucy E; Clarke, Hanna J; Tommassen, Jan; Marciniak, Stefan J; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2015-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA). Efficient functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for cell survival and appropriate immune responses, while an excess of unfolded proteins within the ER leads to "ER stress" and activation of the "unfolded protein response" (UPR). Bacterial infection and Toll-like receptor activation trigger the UPR most likely due to the increased demand for protein folding of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we show that cell-free conditioned medium of the PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, containing secreted virulence factors, induces ER stress in primary bronchial epithelial cells as evidenced by splicing of XBP1 mRNA and induction of CHOP, GRP78 and GADD34 expression. Most aspects of the ER stress response were dependent on TAK1 and p38 MAPK, except for the induction of GADD34 mRNA. Using various mutant strains and purified virulence factors, we identified pyocyanin and AprA as inducers of ER stress. However, the induction of GADD34 was mediated by an ER stress-independent integrated stress response (ISR) which was at least partly dependent on the iron-sensing eIF2α kinase HRI. Our data strongly suggest that this increased GADD34 expression served to protect against Pseudomonas-induced, iron-sensitive cell cytotoxicity. In summary, virulence factors from P. aeruginosa induce ER stress in airway epithelial cells and also trigger the ISR to improve cell survival of the host. PMID:26083346

  10. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL PROTEINS PHOSPHORYLATED IN RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) EXPOSURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple studies conducted by NHEERL scientists in recent years have shown that acute exposure to metals found associated with combustion-derived particulate matter (PM) alters phosphoprotein metabolism in human airway epithelial cells causing intracellular signaling. This disreg...

  11. Dendritic cells induce Th2-mediated airway inflammatory responses to house dust mite via DNA-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amarjit; Brown, Alexandra L.; Yao, Xianglan; Yang, Shutong; Park, Sung-Jun; Liu, Chengyu; Dagur, Pradeep K.; McCoy, J. Philip; Keeran, Karen J.; Nugent, Gayle Z.; Jeffries, Kenneth R.; Qu, Xuan; Yu, Zu-Xi; Levine, Stewart J.; Chung, Jay H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) mediates double stranded DNA break repair, V(D)J recombination, and immunoglobulin class switch recombination, as well as innate immune and pro-inflammatory responses. However, there is limited information regarding the role of DNA-PK in adaptive immunity mediated by dendritic cells (DCs), which are the primary antigen-presenting cells in allergic asthma. Here we show that house dust mite induces DNA-PK phosphorylation, which is a marker of DNA-PK activation, in DCs via the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. We also demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK, as well as the specific deletion of DNA-PK in DCs, attenuates the induction of allergic sensitization and Th2 immunity via a mechanism that involves the impaired presentation of mite antigens. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK following antigen priming similarly reduces the manifestations of mite-induced airway disease. Collectively, these findings suggest that DNA-PK may be a potential target for treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:25692509

  12. Suppression of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammatory responses in a mouse model of asthma by Mimosa pudica extract.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ji-Sook; Yun, Chi-Young; Ryang, Yong Suk; Kim, Jong-Bae; Kim, In Sik

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory airway disease. The pathogenic mechanisms of asthma include the infiltration of leukocytes and release of cytokines. Mimosa pudica (Mp) has been used traditionally for the treatment of insomnia, diarrhea and inflammatory diseases. Although Mp extract has various therapeutic properties, the effect of this extract on asthma has not yet been reported. This study investigated the suppressive effects of Mp extract on asthmatic responses both in vitro and in vivo. Mp extract was acquired from dried and powdered whole plants of M. pudica using 80% ethanol. BALB/c mice were used for the mouse model of asthma induced by ovalbumin. Mp extract significantly inhibited the HMC-1 cell migration induced by stem cell factor and blocked the release of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in EoL-1 cells. Leukocytosis, eosinophilia and mucus hypersecretion in asthmatic lung were significantly suppressed by Mp extract. The release of ovalbumin-specific IgE in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum was also decreased. Mp extract treatment resulted in no liver cytotoxicity. The Mp extract has inhibitory properties on asthma and may be used as a potent therapeutic agent for allergic lung inflammation. PMID:20623591

  13. CXCR4 inhibitor attenuates ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by inhibiting Th17 and Tc17 cell immune response

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HUILONG; XU, XIANGQIN; TENG, JIEMING; CHENG, SHENG; BUNJHOO, HANSVIN; CAO, YONG; LIU, JIN; XIE, JUNGANG; WANG, CONGYI; XU, YONGJIAN; XIONG, WEINING

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12) and its receptor chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) may contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully understood. T-helper 17 cells (Th17) and T-cytotoxic 17 cells (Tc17) have been implicated in the development of several allergic disorders, including asthma. The present study aimed to explore the association between CXCL12 signaling and Th17/Tc17 cells in the development of asthma. Ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized BALB/c mice were treated with AMD3100, a specific CXCR4 antagonist, prior to OVA challenge. Following the final allergen (OVA) challenge, airway responsiveness to methacholine, influx of inflammatory cells to the airway, and cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) and lung homogenate were assessed. Interleukin (IL)-17-expressing CD3+CD8− lymphocytes (Th17 cells) and IL-17+CD3+CD8+ lymphocytes (Tc17 cells) isolated from lung tissue samples were detected by flow cytometry. The results of the present study demonstrated that administration of AMD3100 significantly decreased airway responsiveness to methacholine, attenuated the influx of inflammatory cells to the airway and reduced the levels of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 in the BALF. Furthermore, AMD3100 significantly reduced the increased number of lung Th17 and Tc17 cells as well as the levels of IL-17 in the lung homogenate induced by OVA challenge. In conclusion, the CXCR4 inhibitor suppresses the asthmatic response, which is associated with attenuation of the Th17 and Tc17 cell immune response. PMID:27168818

  14. Glutathione modulation during sensitization as well as challenge phase regulates airway reactivity and inflammation in mouse model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Ahmed; Siddiqui, Nahid; Alharbi, Naif O; Alharbi, Mohammad M; Imam, Faisal; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M

    2014-08-01

    Glutathione, being a major intracellular redox regulator has been shown to be implicated in regulation of airway reactivity and inflammation. However, no study so far has investigated the effect of glutathione depletion/repletion during sensitization and challenge phases separately, which could provide an important insight into the pathophysiology of allergic asthma. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of glutathione depletion/repletion during sensitization and challenge phases separately in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Buthionine sulphoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase or N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a thiol donor were used for depletion or repletion of glutathione levels respectively during both sensitization and challenge phases separately followed by assessment of airway reactivity, inflammation and oxidant-antioxidant balance in allergic mice. Depletion of glutathione with BSO during sensitization as well as challenge phase worsened allergen induced airway reactivity/inflammation and caused greater oxidant-antioxidant imbalance as reflected by increased NADPH oxidase expression/reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation/lipid peroxides formation and decreased total antioxidant capacity. On the other hand, repletion of glutathione pool by NAC during sensitization and challenge phases counteracted allergen induced airway reactivity/inflammation and restored oxidant-antioxidant balance through a decrease in NADPH oxidase expression/ROS generation/lipid peroxides formation and increase in total antioxidant capacity. Taken together, these findings suggest that depletion or repletion of glutathione exacerbates or ameliorates allergic asthma respectively by regulation of airway oxidant-antioxidant balance. This might have implications towards increased predisposition to allergy by glutathione depleting environmental pollutants. PMID:24742380

  15. Allergen-Induced Eotaxin-rich Pro-angiogenic Bone Marrow Progenitors: A Blood Borne Cellular Envoy for Lung Eosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    Asosingh, Kewal; Hanson, Jodi D.; Cheng, Georgiana; Aronica, Mark A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic inflammation is closely related to angiogenesis in asthmatic airway remodeling. In ovalbumin-sensitized mice, bone marrow-derived pro-angiogenic endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are rapidly recruited into the lungs after ovalbumin aerosol challenge, and promptly followed by mobilization and recruitment of eosinophils. Objective We hypothesized that bone marrow-derived EPCs initiate the recruitment of eosinophils through expression of eosinophil chemoattractant eotaxin-1. Methods EPCs were isolated from ovalbumin murine model of allergic airway inflammation and from asthma patients. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells were isolated from mice. Eotaxin-1 expression was analyzed by immunofluorescence, real-time PCR or by ELISA. In vivo recruitment of eosinophils by EPCs was analyzed in mice. Results Circulating EPCs of asthmatic individuals had higher levels of eotaxin-1 as compared to controls. In the murine model, ovalbumin allergen exposure augmented eotaxin-1 mRNA and protein levels in EPCs. The EPCs from ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged mice released high levels of eotaxin-1 upon contact with lung endothelial cells from sensitized and challenged mice, but not from control animals, and not upon contact with cardiac or hepatic endothelial cells from sensitized and challenged mice. Intranasal administration of the eotaxin-rich media overlying cultures of EPCs caused recruitment into lungs, confirming functional chemoattractant activity. Conclusions Bone marrow-derived EPCs are early responders to environmental allergen exposures, and initiate a parallel switch to a pro-angiogenic and pro-eosinophilic environment in the asthmatic lungs. PMID:20227754

  16. Chronic effects of mechanical force on airways.

    PubMed

    Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-01

    Airways are embedded in the mechanically dynamic environment of the lung. In utero, this mechanical environment is defined largely by fluid secretion into the developing airway lumen. Clinical, whole lung, and cellular studies demonstrate pivotal roles for mechanical distention in airway morphogenesis and cellular behavior during lung development. In the adult lung, the mechanical environment is defined by a dynamic balance of surface, tissue, and muscle forces. Diseases of the airways modulate both the mechanical stresses to which the airways are exposed as well as the structure and mechanical behavior of the airways. For instance, in asthma, activation of airway smooth muscle abruptly changes the airway size and stress state within the airway wall; asthma also results in profound remodeling of the airway wall. Data now demonstrate that airway epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts respond to their mechanical environment. A prominent role has been identified for the epithelium in transducing mechanical stresses, and in both the fetal and mature airways, epithelial cells interact with mesenchymal cells to coordinate remodeling of tissue architecture in response to the mechanical environment. PMID:16460284

  17. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 2 allergen bound to 8-OH modified adenine reduces the Th2-mediated airway inflammation without inducing a Th17 response and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pratesi, Sara; Nencini, Francesca; Filì, Lucia; Occhiato, Ernesto G; Romagnani, Sergio; Parronchi, Paola; Maggi, Enrico; Vultaggio, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    8-OH modified adenine bound to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 2 (nDer p2-Conj), a novel allergen-TLR7 agonist conjugate, improves murine airway inflammation in priming and therapeutic settings, however no data are known on the activity of this construct on Th17 cells. The aim of the study was to evaluate if nDer p2-Conj elicited in vivo Th17 cells and Th17-driven autoimmune responses, by using both short- and long-term priming and therapeutic protocols in a nDer p2-driven model of murine airway inflammation. The conjugate induced the in vitro production of cytokines favouring the Th17 polarization by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. In short-term protocols, the priming or treatment with the conjugate ameliorated the airway inflammation by shifting Th2 allergen-specific cells into T cells producing IFN-γ, IL-10, but not IL-17A. Similar results were found in long-term protocol where the conjugate down-regulated airway inflammation without any evidence of autoimmune response and B cell compartment expansion. nDer p2-Conj also failed to shorten the spontaneous onset of diabetes on conjugates-primed NOD/LtJ mice. We found that neutrophils in BALF, ROR-γt and IL-17A expression in lungs were increased in conjugate-treated IL-10KO mice. These data emphasize the role of conjugate-driven IL-10 production, which can regulate the activity of memory Th17 cells and prevent the onset of autoimmune response. PMID:27475304

  18. IL-10 reduces Th2 cytokine production and eosinophilia but augments airway reactivity in allergic mice.

    PubMed

    van Scott, M R; Justice, J P; Bradfield, J F; Enright, E; Sigounas, A; Sur, S

    2000-04-01

    We investigated the effects of interleukin (IL)-10 administration on allergen-induced Th2 cytokine production, eosinophilic inflammation, and airway reactivity. Mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injection of ragweed (RW) adsorbed to Alum and challenged by intratracheal instillation of the allergen. Sensitization and challenge with RW increased concentrations of IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from undetectable levels to 60 pg/ml over 72 h. Intratracheal instillation of 25 ng of recombinant murine IL-10 at the time of RW challenge further elevated BAL fluid IL-10 concentration to 440 pg/ml but decreased BAL fluid IL-4, IL-5, and interferon-gamma levels by 40-85% and eosinophil numbers by 70% (P < 0.0001). Unexpectedly, the same IL-10 treatment increased airway reactivity to methacholine in spontaneously breathing mice that had been sensitized and challenged with RW (P < 0.001). IL-10 treatment in naive animals or RW-sensitized mice challenged with PBS failed to increase airway reactivity, demonstrating that IL-10 induces an increase in airway reactivity only when it is administered in conjunction with allergic sensitization and challenge. The results demonstrate that IL-10 reduces Th2 cytokine levels and eosinophilic inflammation but augments airway hyperreactivity. Thus, despite its potent anti-inflammatory activity, IL-10 could contribute to the decline in pulmonary function observed in asthma. PMID:10749743

  19. PHENOTYPIC COMPARISON OF ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE IN THREE RAT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Brown Norway (BN) rats develop a robust response to antigens in the lung characterized by a large increase in allergen-specific immune function and pulmonary eosinophilia. The objective of this study was to investigate alternative models by determining if other rat s...

  20. Restoring the salivary cortisol awakening response through nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Ghiciuc, Cristina Mihaela; Dima Cozma, Lucia Corina; Bercea, Raluca Mihaela; Lupusoru, Catalina Elena; Mihaescu, Traian; Szalontay, Andreea; Gianfreda, Angela; Patacchioli, Francesca Romana

    2013-10-01

    Partial and largely conflicting data are currently available on the interplay between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity in adult obese men. This study was performed to evaluate the daily trajectories of salivary cortisol, specifically with respect to the salivary cortisol awakening response (CAR), a common method used to assess HPA axis activity. The main findings of this study were that adult male obese subjects who were newly diagnosed with severe OSA showed the following: (1) a flattening of the CAR; (2) levels of cortisol at awakening that were lower than those of the controls; and (3) maintenance of the physiological circadian activity of the HPA axis, with the highest hormone concentrations produced in the morning and the lowest in the evening. This study was also designed to investigate the effects of 3 and 6 mos of treatment with continuous airways positive pressure (CPAP). CPAP use resulted in a significant recovery of the sleep patterns disrupted by OSA; moreover, mild neuropsychological signs of depression and anxiety in severe OSA patients were concomitantly progressively improved by CPAP treatment. Furthermore, this study reports that 3 and 6 mos of CPAP therapy restored the presence of CAR and was able to significantly reduce the difference in the morning cortisol levels between the OSA and control groups. In conclusion, we report here that compared with obese nonapneic matched controls, OSA patients present a dysregulation of HPA axis activity, as shown by the flattening of the diurnal pattern of cortisol production in response to repeated challenge due to hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. This dysregulation was especially detectable in the first hour after awakening and restored after 3 and 6 mos of treatment with CPAP. PMID:23859257

  1. Influence of influenza A infection on capsaicin-induced responses in murine airways.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Samuel J; Mann, Tracy S; Henry, Peter J

    2012-02-01

    The principal aim of the study was to determine the influence of influenza A virus infection on capsaicin-induced relaxation responses in mouse isolated tracheal segments and clarify the underlying mechanisms. Anesthetized mice were intranasally inoculated with influenza A/PR-8/34 virus (VIRUS) or vehicle (SHAM), and 4 days later tracheal segments were harvested for isometric tension recording and biochemical and histologic analyses. Capsaicin induced dose-dependent relaxation responses in carbachol-contracted SHAM trachea (e.g., 10 μM capsaicin produced 66 ± 4% relaxation; n = 11), which were significantly inhibited by capsazepine [transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist], (2S,3S)-3-{[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methoxy}-2-phenylpiperidine hydrochloride (L-733,060) [neurokinin 1 (NK₁) receptor antagonist], indomethacin [cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor], and the combination of 6-isopropoxy-9-oxoxanthene-2-carboxylic acid (AH6809) and 7-[5α-([1S,1α(Z)-biphenyl]-4-ylmethoxy)-2β-(4-morpholinyl)-3-oxocyclopentyl]-4-heptenoic acid, calcium salt, hydrate (AH23848) [E-prostanoid (EP)₂ and EP₄ receptor antagonists, respectively], indicating that capsaicin-induced relaxation involved the TRPV1-mediated release of substance P (SP), activation of epithelial NK₁ receptors, and production of COX products capable of activating relaxant EP₂/EP₄ receptors. Consistent with this postulate, capsaicin-induced relaxation was associated with the significant release of SP and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) from mouse tracheal segments. As expected, influenza A virus infection was associated with widespread disruption of the tracheal epithelium. Tracheal segments from VIRUS mice responded weakly to capsaicin (7 ± 3% relaxation) and were 25-fold less responsive to SP than tracheas from SHAM mice. In contrast, relaxation responses to exogenous PGE₂ and the β-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline were not inhibited in VIRUS trachea. Virus infection

  2. Limited entry of adenovirus vectors into well-differentiated airway epithelium is responsible for inefficient gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Pickles, R J; McCarty, D; Matsui, H; Hart, P J; Randell, S H; Boucher, R C

    1998-07-01

    Investigations of the efficiency and safety of human adenovirus vector (AdV)-mediated gene transfer in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in vivo have demonstrated little success in correcting the CF bioelectrical functional defect, reflecting the inefficiency of AdV-mediated gene transfer to the epithelial cells that line the airway luminal surface. In this study, we demonstrate that low AdV-mediated gene transfer efficiency to well-differentiated (WD) cultured airway epithelial cells is due to three distinct steps in the apical membrane of the airway epithelial cells: (i) the absence of specific adenovirus fiber-knob protein attachment receptors; (ii) the absence of alphavbeta3/5 integrins, reported to partially mediate the internalization of AdV into the cell cytoplasm; and (iii) the low rate of apical plasma membrane uptake pathways of WD airway epithelial cells. Attempts to increase gene transfer efficiency by increasing nonspecific attachment of AdV were unsuccessful, reflecting the inability of the attached vector to enter (penetrate) WD cells via nonspecific entry paths. Strategies to improve the efficiency of AdV for the treatment of CF lung disease will require methods to increase the attachment of AdV to and promote its internalization into the WD respiratory epithelium. PMID:9621064

  3. Limited Entry of Adenovirus Vectors into Well-Differentiated Airway Epithelium Is Responsible for Inefficient Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Pickles, Raymond J.; McCarty, Douglas; Matsui, Hirotoshi; Hart, Pádraig J.; Randell, Scott H.; Boucher, Richard C.

    1998-01-01

    Investigations of the efficiency and safety of human adenovirus vector (AdV)-mediated gene transfer in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in vivo have demonstrated little success in correcting the CF bioelectrical functional defect, reflecting the inefficiency of AdV-mediated gene transfer to the epithelial cells that line the airway luminal surface. In this study, we demonstrate that low AdV-mediated gene transfer efficiency to well-differentiated (WD) cultured airway epithelial cells is due to three distinct steps in the apical membrane of the airway epithelial cells: (i) the absence of specific adenovirus fiber-knob protein attachment receptors; (ii) the absence of αvβ3/5 integrins, reported to partially mediate the internalization of AdV into the cell cytoplasm; and (iii) the low rate of apical plasma membrane uptake pathways of WD airway epithelial cells. Attempts to increase gene transfer efficiency by increasing nonspecific attachment of AdV were unsuccessful, reflecting the inability of the attached vector to enter (penetrate) WD cells via nonspecific entry paths. Strategies to improve the efficiency of AdV for the treatment of CF lung disease will require methods to increase the attachment of AdV to and promote its internalization into the WD respiratory epithelium. PMID:9621064

  4. Induction of Tachykinin Production in Airway Epithelia in Response to Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James P.; Kipar, Anja; Cox, Helen; Payne, Catherine; Vasiliou, Sylvia; Quinn, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Background The tachykinins are implicated in neurogenic inflammation and the neuropeptide substance P in particular has been shown to be a proinflammatory mediator. A role for the tachykinins in host response to lung challenge has been previously demonstrated but has been focused predominantly on the release of the tachykinins from nerves innervating the lung. We have previously demonstrated the most dramatic phenotype described for the substance P encoding gene preprotachykinin-A (PPT-A) to date in controlling the host immune response to the murine gammaherpesvirus 68, in the lung. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we have utilised transgenic mice engineered to co-ordinately express the beta-galactosidase marker gene along with PPT-A to facilitate the tracking of PPT-A expression. Using a combination of these mice and conventional immunohistology we now demonstrate that PPT-A gene expression and substance P peptide are induced in cells of the respiratory tract including tracheal, bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages after viral infection. This induction was observed 24h post infection, prior to observable inflammation and the expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines in this model. Induced expression of the PPT-A gene and peptide persisted in the lower respiratory tract through day 7 post infection. Conclusions/Significance Non-neuronal PPT-A expression early after infection may have important clinical implications for the progression or management of lung disease or infection aside from the well characterised later involvement of the tachykinins during the inflammatory response. PMID:18320026

  5. Interleukin-1 Receptor and Caspase-1 Are Required for the Th17 Response in Nitrogen Dioxide–Promoted Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebecca A.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Lundblad, Lennart K. A.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Budd, Ralph C.; Alcorn, John F.; Flavell, Richard A.; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an environmental pollutant and endogenously generated oxidant associated with the development, severity, and exacerbation of asthma. NO2 exposure is capable of allergically sensitizing mice to the innocuous inhaled antigen ovalbumin (OVA), promoting neutrophil and eosinophil recruitment, and a mixed Th2/Th17 response upon antigen challenge that is reminiscent of severe asthma. However, the identity of IL-17A–producing cells and the mechanisms governing their ontogeny in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease remain unstudied. We measured the kinetics of lung inflammation after antigen challenge in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease, including inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage and antigen-specific IL-17A production from the lung. We determined that IL-17A+ cells were predominately CD4+T cell receptor (TCR)β+ Th17 cells, and that a functional IL-1 receptor was required for Th17, but not Th2, cytokine production after in vitro antigen restimulation of lung cells. The absence of natural killer T cells, γδ T cells, or the inflammasome scaffold nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain, leucine rich repeat and pyrin domain (Nlrp)3 did not affect the development of NO2-promoted allergic inflammation or IL-17A production. Similarly, neutrophil depletion or the neutralization of IL-1α during sensitization exerted no effect on these parameters. However, the absence of caspase-1 significantly reduced IL-17A production from lung cells without affecting Th2 cytokines or lung inflammation. Finally, the intranasal administration of IL-1β and the inhalation of antigen promoted allergic sensitization that was reflected by neutrophilic airway inflammation and IL-17A production from CD4+TCRβ+ Th17 cells subsequent to antigen challenge. These data implicate a role for caspase-1 and IL-1β in the IL-1 receptor–dependent Th17 response manifest in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease. PMID:23371061

  6. Haemophilus influenzae increases the susceptibility and inflammatory response of airway epithelial cells to viral infections.

    PubMed

    Gulraiz, Fahad; Bellinghausen, Carla; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Stassen, Frank R

    2015-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), a common colonizer of lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), can enhance expression of the cellular receptor intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), which in turn can be used by major group human rhinoviruses (HRVs) for attachment. Here, we evaluated the effect of NTHI-induced up-regulation of ICAM-1 on viral replication and inflammatory responses toward different respiratory viruses. Therefore, human bronchial epithelial cells were pretreated with heat-inactivated NTHI (hi-NTHI) and subsequently infected with either HRV16 (major group), HRV1B (minor group), or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Pretreatment with hi-NTHI significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 in BEAS-2B cells and primary bronchial epithelial cells. Concomitantly, release of infectious HRV16 particles was increased in cells pretreated with hi-NTHI. Pretreatment with hi-NTHI also caused a significant increase in HRV16 RNA, whereas replication of HRV1B and RSV were increased to a far lesser extent and only at later time points. Interestingly, release of IL-6 and IL-8 after RSV, but not HRV, infection was synergistically increased in hi-NTHI-pretreated BEAS-2B cells. In summary, exposure to hi-NTHI significantly enhanced sensitivity toward HRV16 but not HRV1B or RSV, probably through ICAM-1 up-regulation. Furthermore, hi-NTHI pretreatment may enhance the inflammatory response to RSV infection, suggesting that preexisting bacterial infections might exaggerate inflammation during secondary viral infection. PMID:25411435

  7. Role of size and composition of traffic and agricultural aerosols in the molecular responses triggered in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Val, Stéphanie; Stéphanie, Val; Martinon, Laurent; Laurent, Martinon; Cachier, Hélène; Hélène, Cachier; Yahyaoui, Abderrazak; Abderrazak, Yahyaoui; Marfaing, Hélène; Hélène, Marfaing; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Armelle, Baeza-Squiban

    2011-09-01

    The increased levels of fine particles in the atmosphere are suspected of aggravating cardiopulmonary diseases, but the determinants of particle toxicity are poorly understood. This work aims at studying the role of composition and size in the toxicity of size-segregated particulate matter (PM) collected at different sites on human bronchial epithelial cells. PM were sampled at a traffic urban site (Urb S) and a rural site (Rur S) during the pesticide-spreading period. Ultrafine (UF), fine (F), and coarse (C) PM were characterized by their shape and chemical composition. Whatever the site, the finest PM (UF and F) induced the mRNA expression of CYP1A1, a biomarker of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) exposure, NQO-1 and heme HO-1, two antioxidant responsive element-driven genes; and two effect biomarkers, GM-CSF, a proinflammatory cytokine and amphiregulin (AR), a growth factor. C PM have a low or no effect. Interestingly, AR is more strongly induced by rural PM at the same mass exposure. These discrepancies suggest involvement of PM chemical composition: rural PM bearing the characteristics of aged aerosols with a high content of water-soluble components, and PM at urban kerbside sites containing mainly water-insoluble components. To conclude, we provide evidence that the finest PM fractions, whatever their origin, are more prone to induce exposure and effect biomarkers. The AR differential expression suggests a source-dependent effect requiring further investigation because of the role of this growth factor in airway remodeling, a characteristic feature of chronic lung respiratory diseases exacerbated by particulate pollution. PMID:21879948

  8. The Pentax airway scope versus the Macintosh laryngoscope: Comparison of hemodynamic responses and concentrations of plasma norepinephrine to tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Pentax Airway Scope (AWS) is a video laryngoscope designed to facilitate tracheal intubation with a high-resolution image. The Pentax AWS has been reported to cause less hemodynamic stress than the Macintosh laryngoscope. The aims of this study are to investigate the differences in hemodynamic responses and norepinephrine concentrations to tracheal intubation between procedures using he Pentax AWS and the Macintosh laryngoscope. Methods Forty patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists class I-II, age range: 18-60 years) were randomly assigned to be intubated with either the Pentax AWS or the Macintosh laryngoscope while under general anesthesia. Routine monitoring, including invasive arterial blood pressure and bispectral index, were applied. Thiopental (4 mg/kg), fentanyl (1 µg/kg), midazolam (0.05 mg/kg), and rocuronium (0.6 mg/kg) were administered for anesthetic induction. Systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressures and heart rates were recorded pre-intubation, immediately post-intubation (T0), and over the following 10 minutes at one minute intervals (T1, T2, T3, T4, T5…T10). Patient blood was sampled for norepinephrine concentrations pre-intubation (baseline) and post-intubation (T1). Evidence of sore throat was evaluated 30 min and 24 hr after extubation. Data were transformed to % basal and expressed as mean ± SD. Results The systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure, and heart rate at T0 and T4 were significantly different between the two groups. There was no significant difference in plasma norepinephrine between the two groups. The difference in incidence of sore throat was not significant between the two groups. Conclusions Pentax-AWS for tracheal intubation has greater hemodynamic stability than the Macintosh blade laryngoscope. PMID:23646240

  9. Effects of inhaled budesonide on spirometric values, reversibility, airway responsiveness, and cough threshold in smokers with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Auffarth, B; Postma, D S; de Monchy, J G; van der Mark, T W; Boorsma, M; Koëter, G H

    1991-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids are known to reduce respiratory symptoms and airway responsiveness in allergic patients with asthma. The aim of the present randomised, double blind study was to assess the effect of eight weeks' treatment with inhaled budesonide in non-allergic smokers with chronic obstructive lung disease. Twenty four subjects (23 male) entered the study. Their ages ranged from 40 to 70 (mean 57) years, with a mean of 35 (range 9-80) pack years of smoking; the mean FEV1 was 53% (range 32-74%) predicted and geometric mean PC20 (histamine concentration causing a 20% fall in FEV1) 0.96 (range 0.07-7.82) mg/ml. After a two week washout, single blind, placebo period, 12 patients were allocated to treatment with budesonide 1600 microgram/day and 12 to placebo for eight weeks. The only additional drug to be taken was ipratropium bromide "if needed." Twenty one patients completed the study, 10 in the budesonide group and 11 in the placebo group. The standard deviation of the difference between duplicate measurements of PC20 histamine and citric acid cough threshold made two weeks apart was below one doubling dose step. There was a significant reduction in dyspnoea in the budesonide group, but otherwise no change in symptom scores or use of ipratropium bromide over the eight weeks of treatment within or between the two groups. No significant differences in spirometric values, peak expiratory flow, PC20 histamine, or citric acid cough threshold were found between the groups. Although differences were not significant, some of the changes showed a trend in favour of budesonide. Whether a longer observation period would show a significant influence of inhaled corticosteroids in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease remains to be determined. Images PMID:2068695

  10. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  11. Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) airway effects and dose-responses in different animal models

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Thomas; Collins, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Many inhalation exposure studies have been performed with toluene diisocyanate (TDI) in different animal species. Many were targeted at respiratory irritation and/or sensitisation. As there is still no broadly accepted guideline for the performance of respiratory sensitisation tests, protocols used and endpoints investigated are numerous. In this review we collected data from those respiratory sensitisation and/or irritation studies that provided threshold or dose-response information. Against this aim, and as TDI is a model substance for a respiratory sensitiser, a great number of mechanistic studies are not cited in this paper, although they were checked for relevant information. The literature data available allow the conclusion that both respiratory irritation and sensitisation may be interdependent, and both irritation and sensitisation by TDI is a threshold phenomenon. Across species, the majority of NOAECs for respiratory sensitisation are in the range of 0.005 to 0.03 ppm, whereas the LOAEC is about 0.02 to 0.4 ppm. PMID:27298608

  12. Exposure of brown Norway rats to diesel exhaust particles prior to ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization elicits IgE adjuvant activity but attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Caroline C; Yin, Xuejun J; Ma, Jane Y C; Millecchia, Lyndell; Barger, Mark W; Roberts, Jenny R; Zhang, Xing-Dong; Antonini, James M; Ma, Joseph K H

    2005-11-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) during the sensitization process has been shown to increase antigen-specific IgE production and aggravate allergic airway inflammation in human and animal models. In this study, we evaluated the effect of short-term DEP exposure on ovalbumin (OVA)-mediated responses using a post-sensitization model. Brown Norway rats were first exposed to filtered air or DEP (20.6 +/- 2.7 mg/m3) for 4 h/day for five consecutive days. One day after the final air or DEP exposure (day 1), rats were sensitized with aerosolized OVA (40.5 +/- 6.3 mg/m3), and then again on days 8 and 15, challenged with OVA on day 29, and sacrificed on days 9 or 30, 24 h after the second OVA exposure or the final OVA challenge, respectively. Control animals received aerosolized saline instead of OVA. DEP were shown to elicit an adjuvant effect on the production of antigen-specific IgE and IgG on day 30. At both time points, no significant airway inflammatory responses and lung injury were found for DEP exposure alone. However, the OVA-induced inflammatory cell infiltration, acellular lactate dehydrogenase activity and albumin content in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and numbers of T cells and their CD4+ and CD8+ subsets in lung-draining lymph nodes were markedly reduced by DEP on day 30 compared with the air-plus-OVA exposure group. The OVA-induced nitric oxide (NO) in the BAL fluid and production of NO, interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-12 by alveolar macrophages (AM) were also significantly lowered by DEP on day 30 as well as day 9. DEP or OVA alone decreased intracellular glutathione (GSH) in AM and lymphocytes on days 9 and 30. The combined DEP and OVA exposure resulted in further depletion of GSH in both cell types. These results show that short-term DEP exposure prior to sensitization had a delayed effect on enhancement of the sensitization in terms of allergen-specific IgE and IgG production, but caused an attenuation of the allergen-induced airway

  13. Ambient air pollution, lung function and airway responsiveness in children with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ierodiakonou, Despo; Zanobetti, Antonella; Coull, Brent A.; Melly, Steve; Postma, Dirkje S.; Boezen, H. Marike; Vonk, Judith M.; Williams, Paul V.; Shapiro, Gail G.; McKone, Edward F.; Hallstrand, Teal S.; Koenig, Jane Q.; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Lumley, Thomas; Fuhlbrigge, Anne N.; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel; Weiss, Scott T.; Gold, Diane R

    2016-01-01

    Background Although ambient air pollution has been linked to reduced lung function in healthy children, longitudinal analyses of pollution effects in asthma are lacking. Objective To investigate pollution effects in a longitudinal asthma study and effect modification by controller medications. Methods We examined associations of lung function and methacholine responsiveness (PC20) with ozone, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) levels in 1,003 asthmatic children participating in a 4-year clinical trial. We further investigated whether budesonide and nedocromil modified pollution effects. Daily pollutant concentrations were linked to zip/postal code of residence. Linear mixed models tested associations of within-subject pollutant concentrations with FEV1 and FVC %predicted, FEV1/FVC and PC20, adjusting for seasonality and confounders. Results Same-day and 1-week average CO levels were negatively associated with post-bronchodilator %predicted FEV1 (change(95%CI) per IQR: −0.33(−0.49, −0.16), −0.41(−0.62, −0.21), respectively) and FVC (−0.19(−0.25, −0.07), −0.25(−0.43, −0.07)). Longer-term four-month averages of CO were negatively associated with prebronchodilator %predicted FEV1 and FVC (−0.36(−0.62, −0.10), −0.21(−0.42, −0.01)). Four-month averaged CO and ozone levels were negatively associated with FEV1/FVC (p<0.05). Increased four-month average NO2 levels were associated with reduced post-bronchodilator FEV1 and FVC %predicted. Long-term exposures to SO2 were associated with reduced PC20 (%change(95%CI) per IQR:-6(-11,-1.5)). Treatment augmented the negative short-term CO effect on PC20. Conclusions Air pollution adversely influences lung function and PC20 in asthmatic children. Treatment with controller medications may not protect but worsens the CO effects on PC20. This clinical trial design evaluates modification of pollution effects by treatment without confounding by indication. PMID

  14. Time- and concentration-dependent genomic responses of the rat airway to inhaled nickel subsulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Efremenko, A.Y.; Campbell, J.L.; Dodd, D.E.; Oller, A.R.; Clewell, H.J.

    2014-09-15

    Objective: To provide insights into the mode of action for Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} lung carcinogenicity by examining gene expression changes in target cells after inhalation exposure. Methods: Gene expression changes were determined in micro-dissected lung broncho-alveolar cells from Fischer 344 rats following inhalation of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} at 0.0, 0.04, 0.08, 0.15, and 0.60 mg/m{sup 3} (0.03, 0.06, 0.11, and 0.44 mg Ni/m{sup 3}) for one and four weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). Results: Broncho-alveolar lavage fluid evaluation and lung histopathology provided evidence of inflammation only at the two highest concentrations, which were similar to those tested in the 2-year bioassay. The number of statistically significant up- and down-regulated genes decreased markedly from one to four weeks of exposure, suggesting adaptation. Cell signal pathway enrichment at both time-points primarily reflected responses to toxicity, including inflammatory and proliferative signaling. While proliferative signaling was up-regulated at both time points, some inflammatory signaling reversed from down-regulation at 1 week to up-regulation at 4 weeks. Conclusions: These results support a mode of action for Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} carcinogenicity driven by chronic toxicity, inflammation and proliferation, leading to mis-replication, rather than by direct genotoxicity. Benchmark dose (BMD) analysis identified the lowest pathway transcriptional BMD exposure concentration as 0.026 mg Ni/m{sup 3}, for apoptosis/survival signaling. When conducted on the basis of lung Ni concentration the lowest pathway BMD was 0.64 μg Ni/g lung, for immune/inflammatory signaling. Implications: These highly conservative BMDs could be used to derive a point of departure in a nonlinear risk assessment for Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} toxicity and carcinogenicity. - Highlights: • The mode of action for lung carcinogenicity of inhaled Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} was investigated in rats. • Gene expression changes were determined in micro

  15. TIMING OF DIESEL PARTICLE INSTILLATION AND MAGNITUDE OF DOSE INFLUENCE THE SEVERITY OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) arising from the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbates asthma. Several studies have shown that particulate and allergen co-exposure leads to an exacerbation of the hallmark features of allergic airways disease relative to allergen exp...

  16. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... Emergency airway puncture is done in an emergency situation, when someone is choking and all other efforts ...

  17. Innate Immune Responses in House Dust Mite Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Sensitizations to house dust mites (HDM) trigger strong exacerbated allergen-induced inflammation of the skin and airways mucosa from atopic subjects resulting in atopic dermatitis as well as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Initially, the Th2-biased HDM allergic response was considered to be mediated only by allergen B- and T-cell epitopes to promote allergen-specific IgE production as well as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 to recruit inflammatory cells. But this general molecular model of HDM allergenicity must be revisited as a growing literature suggests that stimulations of innate immune activation pathways by HDM allergens offer new answers to the following question: what makes an HDM allergen an allergen? Indeed, HDM is a carrier not only for allergenic proteins but also microbial adjuvant compounds, both of which are able to stimulate innate signaling pathways leading to allergy. This paper will describe the multiple ways used by HDM allergens together with microbial compounds to control the initiation of the allergic response through engagement of innate immunity. PMID:23724247

  18. Airway injury during high-level exercise.

    PubMed

    Kippelen, Pascale; Anderson, Sandra D

    2012-05-01

    Airway epithelial cells act as a physical barrier against environmental toxins and injury, and modulate inflammation and the immune response. As such, maintenance of their integrity is critical. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that exercise can cause injury to the airway epithelium. This seems the case particularly for competitive athletes performing high-level exercise, or when exercise takes place in extreme environmental conditions such as in cold dry air or in polluted air. Dehydration of the small airways and increased forces exerted on to the airway surface during severe hyperpnoea are thought to be key factors in determining the occurrence of injury of the airway epithelium. The injury-repair process of the airway epithelium may contribute to the development of the bronchial hyper-responsiveness that is documented in many elite athletes. PMID:22247295

  19. Tachykinin receptors and airway pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A

    1993-05-01

    The mammalian tachykinins (TKs), substance P and neurokinin A, are present in sensory nerve fibres in the upper and lower airways of various mammalian species, including humans. TKs are released from these afferent nerves in an "efferent" mode at peripheral level, especially in response to irritant stimuli. TKs exert a variety of biological effects (bronchoconstriction, plasma protein extravasation, stimulation of mucus secretion), collectively known as "neurogenic inflammation", and this process is thought to be of potential pathogenic relevance for various airway diseases. The recent development of potent and selective TK receptor antagonists on the one hand provides important new tools for the understanding of basic airway physiology and pathophysiology and, on the other, opens new possibilities for therapy of airway diseases. PMID:8390944

  20. Eosinophilic phenotypes of airway disease.

    PubMed

    Pavord, Ian D

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the clinical implications of eosinophilic airway inflammation has increased significantly over the last 20 years, aided by the development of noninvasive means to assess it. This pattern of airway inflammation can occur in a diverse range of airway diseases. It is associated with a positive response to corticosteroids and a high risk of preventable exacerbations. Our new understanding of the role of eosinophilic airway inflammation has paved the way for the clinical development of a number of more specific inhibitors that may become new treatment options. Different definitions, ideas of disease, and adoption of biomarkers that are not well known are necessary to fully realize the potential of these treatments. PMID:24313765

  1. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  2. Transfer of allergic airway responses with antigen-primed CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells in brown Norway rats.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, A; Mishima, H; Renzi, P M; Xu, L J; Hamid, Q; Martin, J G

    1995-01-01

    Activated CD4+ helper T cells have been demonstrated in asthmatic airways and postulated to play a central role in eliciting allergic inflammation; direct evidence of their involvement seems to be lacking. We hypothesized that CD4+ T cells have the potential to induce allergic responses to antigen challenge, and tested this hypothesis in a model of allergic bronchoconstriction, the Brown Norway rat, using the approach of adoptive transfer. Animals were actively sensitized to either ovalbumin (OVA) or BSA and were used as donors of T cells. W3/25(CD4)+ or OX8(CD8)+ T cells were isolated from the cervical lymph nodes of sensitized donors and transferred to naive BN rats. 2 d after adoptive transfer recipient rats were challenged by OVA inhalation, and changes in lung resistance (RL), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells, and serum levels of antigen-specific IgE were studied. After OVA challenge recipients of OVA-primed W3/25+ T cells exhibited sustained increases in RL throughout the entire 8-h observation period and had significant bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophilia, which was detected by immunocytochemistry using an antimajor basic protein mAb. Recipients of BSA-primed W3/25+ T cells or OVA-primed OX8+ T cells failed to respond to inhaled OVA. OVA-specific immunoglobulin E was undetectable by ELISA or skin testing in any of the recipient rats after adoptive transfer. In conclusion, antigen-induced airway bronchoconstriction and eosinophilia were successfully transferred by antigen-specific W3/25+ T cells in Brown Norway rats. These responses were dependent on antigen-primed W3/25+ T cells and appeared to be independent of IgE-mediated mast cell activation. This study provides clear evidence for T cell mediated immune mechanisms in allergic airway responses in this experimental model. Images PMID:7657805

  3. Mainstream cigarette smoke exposure attenuates airway immune inflammatory responses to surrogate and common environmental allergens in mice, despite evidence of increased systemic sensitization.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Clinton S; Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Fattouh, Ramzi; Dawe, David E; Vujicic, Neda; Richards, Carl D; Jordana, Manel; Inman, Mark D; Stampfli, Martin R

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of mainstream cigarette smoke exposure (MTS) on allergic sensitization and the development of allergic inflammatory processes. Using two different experimental murine models of allergic airways inflammation, we present evidence that MTS increased cytokine production by splenocytes in response to OVA and ragweed challenge. Paradoxically, MTS exposure resulted in an overall attenuation of the immune inflammatory response, including a dramatic reduction in the number of eosinophils and activated (CD69+) and Th2-associated (T1ST2+) CD4 T lymphocytes in the lung. Although MTS did not impact circulating levels of OVA-specific IgE and IgG1, we observed a striking reduction in OVA-specific IgG2a production and significantly diminished airway hyperresponsiveness. MTS, therefore, plays a disparate role in the development of allergic responses, inducing a heightened state of allergen-specific sensitization, but dampening local immune inflammatory processes in the lung. PMID:16116169

  4. Tachykinin antagonists and the airways.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; Kips, J C; Peleman, R A; Pauwels, R A

    1995-01-01

    There is now convincing evidence for the presence of substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) in human airway nerves. Studies on autopsy tissue, on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and on sputum suggest that SP may be present in increased amounts in the asthmatic airway. Substance P and NKA are potent bronchoconstrictors of human airways, asthmatics being more sensitive than normal persons. The major enzyme responsible for the degradation of the tachykinins, the neutral endopeptidase, is present in the airways and is involved in the breakdown of exogenously administered SP and NKA, both in normal and asthmatic persons. Other, less well documented airway effects of SP and NKA include mucus secretion, vasodilation and plasma extravasation, as well as the chemoattraction and stimulation of various cells presumed to be involved in asthmatic airway inflammation. NK2 receptors and, to a lesser extent, NK1 receptors have been shown to be involved in bronchoconstriction, whereas NK1 receptors were found to be involved in mucus secretion, microvascular leakage and vasodilatation, and in most of the effects on inflammatory cells. The first clinical trial with FK224, a peptide NK1 and NK2 receptor antagonist, and CP99994, a nonpeptide NK1 receptor antagonist, are negative. However, FK224 failed to block the bronchoconstrictor effect of NKA in asthmatics and the dose of CP99994, needed to antagonize tachykinin effects in man, remains to be determined. PMID:7543746

  5. Surfactant and allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Carla; Hohlfeld, Jens M

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of unique proteins and lipids that covers the airway lumen. Surfactant prevents alveolar collapse and maintains airway patency by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Furthermore, it provides a defence against antigen uptake by binding foreign particles and enhancing cellular immune responses. Allergic asthma is associated with chronic airway inflammation and presents with episodes of airway narrowing. The pulmonary inflammation and bronchoconstriction can be triggered by exposure to allergens or pathogens present in the inhaled air. Pulmonary surfactant has the potential to interact with various immune cells which orchestrate allergen- or pathogen-driven episodes of airway inflammation. The complex nature of surfactant allows multiple sites of interaction, but also makes it susceptible to external alterations, which potentially impair its function. This duality of modulating airway physiology and immunology during inflammatory conditions, while at the same time being prone to alterations accompanied by restricted function, has stimulated numerous studies in recent decades, which are reviewed in this article. PMID:23896983

  6. INHIBITION OF PAN NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTOR P75 ATTENUATES DIESEL PARTICULATE-INDUCED ENHANCEMENT OF ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES IN C57/BL6J MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent investigations have linked neurotrophins including nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to allergic airways diseases. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airway resistance in allergic mice. Diesel exhaust particle...

  7. Differential Gene Expression Profiles and Selected Cytokine Protein Analysis of Mediastinal Lymph Nodes of Horses with Chronic Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO) Support an Interleukin-17 Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) is a pulmonary inflammatory condition that afflicts certain mature horses exposed to organic dust particulates in hay. Its clinical and pathological features, manifested by reversible bronchoconstriction, excessive mucus production and airway neutrophilia, resemble the pulmonary alterations that occur in agricultural workers with occupational asthma. The immunological basis of RAO remains uncertain although its chronicity, its localization to a mucosal surface and its domination by a neutrophilic, non-septic inflammatory response, suggest involvement of Interleukin-17 (IL-17). We examined global gene expression profiles in mediastinal (pulmonary-draining) lymph nodes isolated from RAO-affected and control horses. Differential expression of > 200 genes, coupled with network analysis, supports an IL-17 response centered about NF-κB. Immunohistochemical analysis of mediastinal lymph node sections demonstrated increased IL-17 staining intensity in diseased horses. This result, along with the finding of increased IL-17 concentrations in lymph node homogenates from RAO-affected horses (P = 0.1) and a down-regulation of IL-4 gene and protein expression, provides additional evidence of the involvement of IL-17 in the chronic stages of RAO. Additional investigations are needed to ascertain the cellular source of IL-17 in this equine model of occupational asthma. Understanding the immunopathogenesis of this disorder likely will enhance the development of therapeutic interventions beneficial to human and animal pulmonary health. PMID:26561853

  8. Effects of tracheal airway occlusion on hyoid muscle length and upper airway volume.

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, E; Haxhiu, M A; Cherniack, N S

    1989-12-01

    Complex relationships exist among electromyograms (EMGs) of the upper airway muscles, respective changes in muscle length, and upper airway volume. To test the effects of preventing lung inflation on these relationships, recordings were made of EMGs and length changes of the geniohyoid (GH) and sternohyoid (SH) muscles as well as of tidal changes in upper airway volume in eight anesthetized cats. During resting breathing, tracheal airway occlusion tended to increase the inspiratory lengthening of GH and SH. In response to progressive hypercapnia, the GH eventually shortened during inspiration in all animals; the extent of muscle shortening was minimally augmented by airway occlusion despite substantial increases in EMGs. SH lengthened during inspiration in six of eight animals under hypercapnic conditions, and in these cats lengthening was greater during airway occlusion even though EMGs increased. Despite the above effects on SH and GH length, upper airway tidal volume was increased significantly by tracheal occlusion under hypercapnic conditions. These data suggest that the thoracic and upper airway muscle reflex effects of preventing lung inflation during inspiration act antagonistically on hyoid muscle length, but, because of the mechanical arrangement of the hyoid muscles relative to the airway and thorax, they act agonistically to augment tidal changes in upper airway volume. The augmentation of upper airway tidal volume may occur in part as a result of the effects of thoracic movements being passively transmitted through the hyoid muscles. PMID:2606835

  9. Non-Invasive Optical Imaging of Eosinophilia during the Course of an Experimental Allergic Airways Disease Model and in Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Markus, M. Andrea; Dullin, Christian; Mitkovski, Miso; Prieschl-Grassauer, Eva; Epstein, Michelle M.; Alves, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular imaging of lung diseases, including asthma, is limited and either invasive or non-specific. Central to the inflammatory process in asthma is the recruitment of eosinophils to the airways, which release proteases and proinflammatory factors and contribute to airway remodeling. The aim of this study was to establish a new approach to non-invasively assess lung eosinophilia during the course of experimental asthma by combining non-invasive near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging with the specific detection of Siglec-F, a lectin found predominantly on eosinophils. Methodology/Principal Findings An ovalbumin (OVA)-based model was used to induce asthma-like experimental allergic airway disease (EAAD) in BALB/c mice. By means of a NIRF imager, we demonstrate that 48 h–72 h after intravenous (i.v.) application of a NIRF-labeled anti-Siglec-F antibody, mice with EAAD exhibited up to 2 times higher fluorescence intensities compared to lungs of control mice. Furthermore, average lung intensities of dexamethasone-treated as well as beta-escin-treated mice were 1.8 and 2 times lower than those of untreated, EAAD mice, respectively and correlated with the reduction of cell infiltration in the lung. Average fluorescence intensities measured in explanted lungs confirmed the in vivo findings of significantly higher values in inflamed lungs as compared to controls. Fluorescence microscopy of lung cryosections localized the i.v. applied NIRF-labeled anti-Siglec-F antibody predominantly to eosinophils in the peribronchial areas of EAAD lungs as opposed to control lungs. Conclusion/Significance We show that monitoring the occurrence of eosinophils, a prominent feature of allergic asthma, by means of a NIRF-labeled antibody directed against Siglec-F is a novel and powerful non-invasive optical imaging approach to assess EAAD and therapeutic response in mice over time. PMID:24587190

  10. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES PERSISTENT AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The endotoxin component of organic dusts causes acute reversible airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. To test the hypothesis that endotoxin alone causes airway remodeling, we have compared the response of two inbred mouse strains to subchronic endotoxin ...

  11. Allergic airways disease develops after an increase in allergen capture and processing in the airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    von Garnier, Christophe; Wikstrom, Matthew E; Zosky, Graeme; Turner, Debra J; Sly, Peter D; Smith, Miranda; Thomas, Jennifer A; Judd, Samantha R; Strickland, Deborah H; Holt, Patrick G; Stumbles, Philip A

    2007-11-01

    Airway mucosal dendritic cells (AMDC) and other airway APCs continuously sample inhaled Ags and regulate the nature of any resulting T cell-mediated immune response. Although immunity develops to harmful pathogens, tolerance arises to nonpathogenic Ags in healthy individuals. This homeostasis is thought to be disrupted in allergic respiratory disorders such as allergic asthma, such that a potentially damaging Th2-biased, CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response develops against intrinsically nonpathogenic allergens. Using a mouse model of experimental allergic airways disease (EAAD), we have investigated the functional changes occurring in AMDC and other airway APC populations during disease onset. Onset of EAAD was characterized by early and transient activation of airway CD4(+) T cells coinciding with up-regulation of CD40 expression exclusively on CD11b(-) AMDC. Concurrent enhanced allergen uptake and processing occurred within all airway APC populations, including B cells, macrophages, and both CD11b(+) and CD11b(-) AMDC subsets. Immune serum transfer into naive animals recapitulated the enhanced allergen uptake observed in airway APC populations and mediated activation of naive allergen-specific, airway CD4(+) T cells following inhaled allergen challenge. These data suggest that the onset of EAAD is initiated by enhanced allergen capture and processing by a number of airway APC populations and that allergen-specific Igs play a role in the conversion of normally quiescent AMDC subsets into those capable of inducing airway CD4(+) T cell activation. PMID:17947647

  12. Trefoil factor-2 reverses airway remodeling changes in allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Royce, Simon G; Lim, Clarice; Muljadi, Ruth C; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C; Giraud, Andrew S; Tang, Mimi L K

    2013-01-01

    Trefoil factor 2 (TFF2) is a small peptide with an important role in mucosal repair. TFF2 is up-regulated in asthma, suggesting a role in asthma pathogenesis. Given its known biological role in promoting epithelial repair, TFF2 might be expected to exert a protective function in limiting the progression of airway remodeling in asthma. The contribution of TFF2 to airway remodeling in asthma was investigated by examining the expression of TFF2 in the airway and lung, and evaluating the effects of recombinant TFF2 treatment on established airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic allergic airways disease (AAD). BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) or saline for 9 weeks, whereas mice with established OVA-induced AAD were treated with TFF2 or vehicle control (intranasally for 14 d). Effects on airway remodeling, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness were then assessed, whereas TFF2 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. TFF2 expression was significantly increased in the airways of mice with AAD, compared with expression levels in control mice. TFF2 treatment resulted in reduced epithelial thickening, subepithelial collagen deposition, goblet-cell metaplasia, bronchial epithelium apoptosis, and airway hyperresponsiveness (all P < 0.05, versus vehicle control), but TFF2 treatment did not influence airway inflammation. The increased expression of endogenous TFF2 in response to chronic allergic inflammation is insufficient to prevent the progression of airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic AAD. However, exogenous TFF2 treatment is effective in reversing aspects of established airway remodeling. TFF2 has potential as a novel treatment for airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22652198

  13. Airway vascular damage in elite swimmers.

    PubMed

    Moreira, André; Palmares, Carmo; Lopes, Cristina; Delgado, Luís

    2011-11-01

    We postulated that high level swimming can promote airway inflammation and thus asthma by enhancing local vascular permeability. We aimed to test this hypothesis by a cross-sectional study comparing swimmers (n = 13, 17 ± 3 years, competing 7 ± 4 years, training 18 ± 3 h per week), asthmatic-swimmers (n = 6, 17 ± 2 years, competing 8 ± 3 years, training 16 ± 4 h per week), and asthmatics (n = 19, 14 ± 3 years). Subjects performed induced sputum and had exhaled nitric oxide, lung volumes, and airway responsiveness determined. Airway vascular permeability index was defined as the ratio of albumin in sputum and serum. Results from the multiple linear regression showed each unit change in airway vascular permeability index was associated with an increase of 0.97% (95%CI: 0.02 to 1.92; p = 0.047) in sputum eosinophilis, and of 2.64% (95%CI:0.96 to 4.31; p = 0.006) in sputum neutrophils after adjustment for confounders. In a general linear model no significant differences between airway vascular permeability between index study groups existed, after controlling for sputum eosinophilis and neutrophils. In conclusion, competitive swimmers training in chlorine-rich pools have similar levels of airway vascular permeability than asthmatics. Although competitive swimming has been associated with asthma, airway inflammation and airway hyperesponsiveness do not seem to be dependent on increased airway vascular permeability. PMID:21669516

  14. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  15. Abnormal Histone Methylation is Responsible for Increased VEGF165a Secretion from Airway Smooth Muscle Cells in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Rachel L.; John, Alison E.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Knox, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), a key angiogenic molecule, is aberrantly expressed in several diseases including asthma where it contributes to bronchial vascular remodelling and chronic inflammation. Asthmatic human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells hypersecrete VEGF but the mechanism is unclear. Here we defined the mechanism in HASM cells from non-asthmatic (NA) and asthmatic (A) patients. We found that asthmatic cells lacked a repression complex at the VEGF promoter which was present in non-asthmatic cells. Recruitment of G9A, trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me3) and a resultant decrease in RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) at the VEGF promoter was critical to repression of VEGF secretion in non-asthmatic cells. At the asthmatic promoter H3K9me3 was absent due to failed recruitment of G9a; RNA pol II binding, in association with TAF1, was increased, H3K4me3 was present and Sp1 binding was exaggerated and sustained. In contrast DNA methylation and histone acetylation were similar in A and NA cells. This is the first study to show that airway cells in asthma have altered epigenetic regulation of remodelling gene(s). Histone methylation at genes such as VEGF may be an important new therapeutic target. PMID:22689881

  16. Chronic exposure to perfluorinated compounds: Impact on airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Min H.; Jha, Aruni; Ojo, Oluwaseun O.; Mahood, Thomas H.; Basu, Sujata; Detillieux, Karen A.; Nikoobakht, Neda; Wong, Charles S.; Loewen, Mark; Becker, Allan B.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging epidemiological evidence reveals a link between lung disease and exposure to indoor pollutants such as perfluorinated compounds (PFCs). PFC exposure during critical developmental stages may increase asthma susceptibility. Thus, in a murine model, we tested the hypothesis that early life and continued exposure to two ubiquitous household PFCs, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perflurooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), can induce lung dysfunction that exacerbates allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation. Balb/c mice were exposed to PFOA or PFOS (4 mg/kg chow) from gestation day 2 to 12 wk of age by feeding pregnant and nursing dams, and weaned pups. Some pups were also sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). We assessed lung function and inflammatory cell and cytokine expression in the lung and examined bronchial goblet cell number. PFOA, but not PFOS, without the OVA sensitization/challenge induced AHR concomitant with a 25-fold increase of lung macrophages. PFOA exposure did not affect OVA-induced lung inflammatory cell number. In contrast, PFOS exposure inhibited OVA-induced lung inflammation, decreasing total cell number in lung lavage by 68.7%. Interferon-γ mRNA in the lung was elevated in all PFC-exposed groups. Despite these effects, neither PFOA nor PFOS affected OVA-induced AHR. Our data do not reveal PFOA or PFOS exposure as a risk factor for more severe allergic asthma-like symptoms, but PFOA alone can induce airway inflammation and alter airway function. PMID:25217661

  17. Effect of CD8+ T-cell depletion on bronchial hyper-responsiveness and inflammation in sensitized and allergen-exposed Brown-Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, T J; MacAry, P A; Kemeny, D M; Chung, K F

    1999-03-01

    We examined the role of CD8+ T cells in a Brown-Norway rat model of asthma, using a monoclonal antibody to deplete CD8+ T cells. Ovalbumin (OA)-sensitized animals were given anti-CD8 antibody (0.5 mg/rat) intravenously 1 week prior to exposure to 1% OA aerosol and were studied 18-24 hr after aerosol exposure. Following administration of anti-CD8 antibody, CD8+ cells were reduced to <1% of total lymphocytes in whole blood and in spleen. In sensitized animals, OA exposure induced bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR), accumulation of eosinophils, lymphocytes and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and also an increase in tissue eosinophils and CD2+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in airways. Anti-CD8 antibody caused a further increase in allergen-induced BHR (P<0.03, compared with sham-treated animals), together with a significant increase in eosinophil number in BAL fluid (P<0.05). While CD2+ and CD4+ T cells in airways were not affected by anti-CD8 treatment, the level of CD8+ T cells was significantly reduced in sensitized, saline-exposed animals (P<0.04, compared with sham-treated rats), and sensitized and OA-challenged rats (P<0.002, compared with sham-treated rats). Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, an increase of T helper (Th)2 cytokine [interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5], and also of Th1 cytokine [interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-2], mRNA in the lung of sensitized and OA-exposed animals was found; after CD8+ T-cell depletion, Th1 cytokine expression was significantly reduced (P<0.02), while Th2 cytokine expression was unchanged. CD8+ T cells have a protective role in allergen-induced BHR and eosinophilic inflammation, probably through activation of the Th1 cytokine response. PMID:10233723

  18. Fungal glycan interactions with epithelial cells in allergic airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Roy, René M.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to fungi results in a wide range of health outcomes, from invasive disease or allergy to immune tolerance. Inhaled fungi contact airway epithelial cells as an early event, and this host:fungal interaction can shape the eventual immunological outcome. Emerging evidence points to exposure to fungal cell wall carbohydrates in the development of allergic airway disease. Herein, we describe determinants of fungal allergenicity, and review the responses of airway epithelial cells to fungal carbohydrates. A greater understanding of the recognition of and response to fungal carbohydrates by airway epithelial cells may lead to the development of targeted therapies that ameliorate allergic airway disease. PMID:23602359

  19. Efficacy of Bilevel-auto Treatment in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Not Responsive to or Intolerant of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Carlucci, Annalisa; Ceriana, Piero; Mancini, Marco; Cirio, Serena; Pierucci, Paola; D'Artavilla Lupo, Nadia; Gadaleta, Felice; Morrone, Elisa; Fanfulla, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventilation with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard therapy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, it was recently suggested that a novel mode of ventilation, Bilevel-auto, could be equally effective in treating patients unable to tolerate CPAP. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of Bilevel-auto to treat OSA patients whose nocturnal ventilatory disturbances are not completely corrected by CPAP. Methods: We enrolled 66 consecutive OSA patients, not responsive to (group A) or intolerant of (group B) CPAP treatment, after a full night of manual CPAP titration in a laboratory. Full polysomnography data and daytime sleepiness score were compared for each group in the three different conditions: basal, during CPAP, and during Bilevel-auto. Results: The apnea-hypopnea index decreased significantly during CPAP in both groups; however, in the group A, there was a further significant improvement during Bilevel-auto. The same trend was observed for oxygenation indices, while the distribution and the efficiency of sleep did not differ following the switch from CPAP to Bilevel-auto. Conclusions: This study confirmed the role of Bilevel-auto as an effective therapeutic alternative to CPAP in patients intolerant of this latter mode of ventilation. Moreover, extending the use of Bilevel-auto to those OSA patients not responsive to CPAP, we showed a significantly better correction of nocturnal respiratory disturbances. Citation: Carlucci A, Ceriana P, Mancini M, Cirio S, Pierucci P, D'Artavilla Lupo N, Gadaleta F, Morrone E, Fanfulla F. Efficacy of Bilevel-auto treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea not responsive to or intolerant of continuous positive airway pressure ventilation. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(9):981–985. PMID:25902825

  20. Importance of airway inflammation for hyperresponsiveness induced by ozone. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, M.J.; Fabbri, L.M.; O'Byrne, P.M.; Gold, B.D.; Aizawa, H.; Walters, E.H.; Alpert, S.E.; Nadel, J.A.

    1983-06-01

    We studied whether ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness correlates with the development of airway inflammation in dogs. To assess airway responsiveness, we determined increases in pulmonary resistance produced by delivering acetylcholine aerosol to the airways. To assess airway inflammation, we biopsied the airway mucosa and counted the number of neutrophils present in the epithelium. Airway responsiveness and inflammation were assessed in anesthetized dogs before ozone exposure and then 1 h and 1 wk after ozone (2.1 ppm, 2 h). Airway responsiveness increased markedly at 1 h after ozone and returned to control levels 1 wk later in each of 6 dogs, but it did not change after ozone in another 4 dogs. Furthermore, dogs that became hyperresponsive also developed a marked and reversible increase in the number of neutrophils in the epithelium, whereas dogs that did not become hyperresponsive had no change in the number of neutrophils. For the group of dogs, the level of airway responsiveness before and after ozone exposure correlated closely with the number of epithelial neutrophils. The results suggest that ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness may depend on the development of an acute inflammatory response in the airways.

  1. Understanding allergic asthma from allergen inhalation tests.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, Donald W; Hargreave, Fredrick E; O'Byrne, Paul M; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2007-10-01

    The allergen challenge has evolved, in less than 150 years, from a crude tool used to document the etiology of allergen-induced disease to a well-controlled tool used today to investigate the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of asthma. Highlights of the authors' involvement with the allergen challenge include confirmation of the immunoglobulin E-dependence of the late asthmatic response, importance of (nonallergic) airway hyper-responsiveness as a determinant of the airway response to allergen, identification of allergen-induced increase in airway hyper-responsiveness, documentation of beta(2)-agonist-induced increase in airway response to allergen (including eosinophilic inflammation), advances in understanding the pathophysiology and kinetics of allergen-induced airway responses, and development of a multicentre clinical trial group devoted to using the allergen challenge for investigating promising new therapeutic strategies for asthma. PMID:17948142

  2. Airway Gland Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Submucosal glands contribute to airway surface liquid (ASL), a film that protects all airway surfaces. Glandular mucus comprises electrolytes, water, the gel-forming mucin MUC5B, and hundreds of different proteins with diverse protective functions. Gland volume per unit area of mucosal surface correlates positively with impaction rate of inhaled particles. In human main bronchi, the volume of the glands is ∼ 50 times that of surface goblet cells, but the glands diminish in size and frequency distally. ASL and its trapped particles are removed from the airways by mucociliary transport. Airway glands have a tubuloacinar structure, with a single terminal duct, a nonciliated collecting duct, then branching secretory tubules lined with mucous cells and ending in serous acini. They allow for a massive increase in numbers of mucus-producing cells without replacing surface ciliated cells. Active secretion of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) by serous cells produces most of the fluid of gland secretions. Glands are densely innervated by tonically active, mutually excitatory airway intrinsic neurons. Most gland mucus is secreted constitutively in vivo, with large, transient increases produced by emergency reflex drive from the vagus. Elevations of [cAMP]i and [Ca(2+)]i coordinate electrolyte and macromolecular secretion and probably occur together for baseline activity in vivo, with cholinergic elevation of [Ca(2+)]i being mainly responsive for transient increases in secretion. Altered submucosal gland function contributes to the pathology of all obstructive diseases, but is an early stage of pathogenesis only in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26336032

  3. Topical skin treatment with Fab fragments of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody suppresses allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Sae-Wong, Chutha; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Kangsanant, Sureeporn; Yoshino, Shin

    2016-05-15

    Fab fragments (Fabs), which lack effector functions due to the absence of the Fc portion, maintain the ability to bind to specific allergens. In the present study, we examined whether Fabs of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) were able to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. BALB/c mice passively sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE mAb were repeatedly challenged with OVA applied to the skin after sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment. Fabs prepared by the digestion of anti-OVA IgG1 mAb (O1-10) with papain were applied to the skin 30min before the OVA challenges followed by measurement of clinical symptoms including erythema/hemorrhage, edema, scarring/dryness, and excoriation/erosion of the skin. Treatment with O1-10 Fabs, but not intact O1-10, showed inhibition of clinical symptoms (P<0.01) induced by the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice; O1-10 Fabs suppressed histological changes such as epidermal hyperplasia (P<0.01) and the accumulation of mast cells (P<0.01) and neutrophils (P<0.01). Furthermore, treatment with O1-10 Fabs inhibited the increase in levels of IL-13 (P<0.01) and IL-17A production (P<0.05) in the lymph nodes of the sensitized mice. Additionally, the increased level of OVA in serum following the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice was reduced by the treatment (P<0.05). These results suggest that topical application of pathogenic allergen-specific IgG1 mAb Fabs to the skin of mice is effective in suppressing allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions, suggesting that allergen-specific mAb Fabs could be used as a tool to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis. PMID:26970183

  4. Airway compliance and dynamics explain the apparent discrepancy in length adaptation between intact airways and smooth muscle strips.

    PubMed

    Dowie, Jackson; Ansell, Thomas K; Noble, Peter B; Donovan, Graham M

    2016-01-01

    Length adaptation is a phenomenon observed in airway smooth muscle (ASM) wherein over time there is a shift in the length-tension curve. There is potential for length adaptation to play an important role in airway constriction and airway hyper-responsiveness in asthma. Recent results by Ansell et al., 2015 (JAP 2014 10.1152/japplphysiol.00724.2014) have cast doubt on this role by testing for length adaptation using an intact airway preparation, rather than strips of ASM. Using this technique they found no evidence for length adaptation in intact airways. Here we attempt to resolve this apparent discrepancy by constructing a minimal mathematical model of the intact airway, including ASM which follows the classic length-tension curve and undergoes length adaptation. This allows us to show that (1) no evidence of length adaptation should be expected in large, cartilaginous, intact airways; (2) even in highly compliant peripheral airways, or at more compliant regions of the pressure-volume curve of large airways, the effect of length adaptation would be modest and at best marginally detectable in intact airways; (3) the key parameters which control the appearance of length adaptation in intact airways are airway compliance and the relaxation timescale. The results of this mathematical simulation suggest that length adaptation observed at the level of the isolated ASM may not clearly manifest in the normal intact airway. PMID:26376002

  5. Recent insights into the relationship between airway inflammation and asthma.

    PubMed

    Siva, R; Berry, M; Pavord, I D

    2003-01-01

    There have been important recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway dysfunction. Observational studies have shown that eosinophilic airway inflammation is not always present in asthma nor is it an exclusive feature of asthma. Its presence seems to be more closely linked to the presence of corticosteroid responsive airways disease and the occurrence of severe exacerbations than the presence of symptoms or the extent of airway dysfunction--indeed recent evidence suggests that in asthma these features may be more closely linked to the site of localisation of mast cells in the airway wall. One implication of this new understanding of the significance of eosinophilic airway inflammation is that it predicts that measuring airway inflammation might provide information that it is not readily available from a more traditional clinical assessment, and that patients might do better if this information is available. Recent studies support this view, showing a marked reduction in asthma exacerbation in patients with moderate to severe disease who are managed with reference to markers of airway inflammation as well as symptoms and simple tests of airway function. The development of new agents that have the potential to modulate specific aspects of airway inflammation, together with refinements in non-invasive techniques to assess the efficacy of these agents offers the prospect of further refining our understanding of the role of this aspect of the inflammatory response in asthma and other airway diseases. PMID:15148839

  6. Puberty and Upper Airway Dynamics During Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Bandla, Preetam; Huang, Jingtao; Karamessinis, Laurie; Kelly, Andrea; Pepe, Michelle; Samuel, John; Brooks, Lee; Mason, Thornton. A.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Marcus, Carole L.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: The upper airway compensatory response to subatmospheric pressure loading declines with age. The epidemiology of obstructive sleep apnea suggests that sex hormones play a role in modulating upper airway function. Sex hormones increase gradually during puberty, from minimally detectable to adult levels. We hypothesized that the upper airway response to subatmospheric pressure loading decreased with increasing pubertal Tanner stage in males but remained stable during puberty in females. Design: Upper airway dynamic function during sleep was measured over the course of puberty. Participants: Normal subjects of Tanner stages 1 to 5. Measurements: During sleep, maximal inspiratory airflow was measured while varying the level of nasal pressure. The slope of the upstream pressure-flow relationship (SPF) was measured. Results: The SPF correlated with age and Tanner stage. However, the relationship with Tanner stage became nonsignificant when the correlation due to the mutual association with age was removed. Females had a lower SPF than males. Conclusions: In both sexes, the upper airway compensatory response to subatmospheric pressure loading decreased with age rather than degree of pubertal development. Thus, changes in sex hormones are unlikely to be a primary modulator of upper airway function during the transition from childhood to adulthood. Although further studies of upper airway structural changes during puberty are needed, we speculate that the changes in upper airway function with age are due to the depressant effect of age on ventilatory drive, leading to a decrease in upper airway neuromotor tone. Citation: Bandla P; Huang J; Karamessinis L; Kelly A; Pepe M; Samuel J; Brooks L; Mason TA; Gallagher PR; Marcus CL. Puberty and Upper Airway Dynamics During Sleep. SLEEP 2008;31(4):534-541. PMID:18457241

  7. Upper airway test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An upper airway biopsy is obtained by using a flexible scope called a bronchoscope. The scope is passed down through ... may be performed when an abnormality of the upper airway is suspected. It may also be performed as ...

  8. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 exerts a protective role in ovalbumin-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation by inhibiting Th17 cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjie; Zhang, Liya; Wu, Jinhong; Di, Caixia; Xia, Zhenwei

    2013-11-29

    Allergic asthma is conventionally considered as a Th2 immune response characterized by eosinophilic inflammation. Recent investigations revealed that Th17 cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of non-eosinophilic asthma (NEA), resulting in steroid-resistant neutrophilic airway inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, and anti-apoptosis functions. However, its role in NEA is still unclear. Here, we explore the role of HO-1 in a mouse model of NEA. HO-1 inducer hemin or HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin IX was injected intraperitoneally into ovalbumin-challenged DO11.10 mice. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was delivered into mice to knock down HO-1 expression. The results show that induction of HO-1 by hemin attenuated airway inflammation and decreased neutrophil infiltration in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid and was accompanied by a lower proportion of Th17 cells in mediastinal lymph nodes and spleen. More importantly, induction of HO-1 down-regulated Th17-related transcription factor retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) expression and decreased IL-17A levels, all of which correlated with a decrease in phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) level and inhibition of Th17 cell differentiation. Consistently, the above events could be reversed by tin protoporphyrin IX. Also, HO-1 siRNA transfection abolished the effect of hemin induced HO-1 in vivo. Meanwhile, the hemin treatment promoted the level of Foxp3 expression and enhanced the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Collectively, our findings indicate that HO-1 exhibits anti-inflammatory activity in the mouse model of NEA via inhibition of the p-STAT3-RORγt pathway, regulating kinetics of RORγt and Foxp3 expression, thus providing a possible novel therapeutic target in asthmatic patients. PMID:24097973

  10. Allergen challenge induces Ifng dependent GTPases in the lungs as part of a Th1 transcriptome response in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Dharajiya, Nilesh; Vaidya, Swapnil; Sinha, Mala; Luxon, Bruce; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2009-01-01

    According to the current paradigm, allergic airway inflammation is mediated by Th2 cytokines and pro-inflammatory chemokines. Since allergic inflammation is self-limited, we hypothesized that allergen challenge simultaneously induces anti-inflammatory genes to counter-balance the effects of Th2 cytokines and chemokines. To identify these putative anti-inflammatory genes, we compared the gene expression profile in the lungs of ragweed-sensitized mice four hours after challenge with either PBS or ragweed extract (RWE) using a micro-array platform. Consistent with our hypothesis, RWE challenge concurrently upregulated Th1-associated early target genes of the Il12/Stat4 pathway, such as p47 and p65 GTPases (Iigp, Tgtp and Gbp1), Socs1, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Gadd45g with the Th2 genes Il4, Il5, Ccl2 and Ccl7. These Th1-associated genes remain upregulated longer than the Th2 genes. Augmentation of the local Th1 milieu by administration of Il12 or CpG prior to RWE challenge further upregulated these Th1 genes. Abolition of the Th1 response by disrupting the Ifng gene increased allergic airway inflammation and abrogated RWE challenge-induced upregulation of GTPases, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Socs1, but not Gadd45g. Our data demonstrate that allergen challenge induces two sets of Th1-associated genes in the lungs: 1) Ifng-dependent genes such as p47 and p65 GTPases, Socs1, Cxcl9 and Cxcl10 and 2) Ifng-independent Th1-inducing genes like Gadd45g. We propose that allergen-induced airway inflammation is regulated by simultaneous upregulation of Th1 and Th2 genes, and that persistent unopposed upregulation of Th1 genes resolves allergic inflammation. PMID:20027288

  11. REGULATION OF CYTOKINE PRODUCTION IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGES AND AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS IN RESPONSE TO AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES: FURTHER MECHANISTIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to better understand how ambient air particulate matter (PM) affect lung health, the two main airway cell types likely to interact with inhaled particles, alveolar macrophages (AM) and airway epithelial cells have been exposed to particles in vitro and followed for endp...

  12. The Physiologically Difficult Airway.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Jarrod M; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C

    2015-12-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  13. The Physiologically Difficult Airway

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Jarrod M.; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  14. Intrathoracic airway measurement: ex-vivo validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Raab, Stephen A.; D'Souza, Neil D.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1997-05-01

    High-resolution x-ray CT (HRCT) provides detailed images of the lungs and bronchial tree. HRCT-based imaging and quantitation of peripheral bronchial airway geometry provides a valuable tool for assessing regional airway physiology. Such measurements have been sued to address physiological questions related to the mechanics of airway collapse in sleep apnea, the measurement of airway response to broncho-constriction agents, and to evaluate and track the progression of disease affecting the airways, such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. Significant attention has been paid to the measurements of extra- and intra-thoracic airways in 2D sections from volumetric x-ray CT. A variety of manual and semi-automatic techniques have been proposed for airway geometry measurement, including the use of standardized display window and level settings for caliper measurements, methods based on manual or semi-automatic border tracing, and more objective, quantitative approaches such as the use of the 'half-max' criteria. A recently proposed measurements technique uses a model-based deconvolution to estimate the location of the inner and outer airway walls. Validation using a plexiglass phantom indicates that the model-based method is more accurate than the half-max approach for thin-walled structures. In vivo validation of these airway measurement techniques is difficult because of the problems in identifying a reliable measurement 'gold standard.' In this paper we report on ex vivo validation of the half-max and model-based methods using an excised pig lung. The lung is sliced into thin sections of tissue and scanned using an electron beam CT scanner. Airways of interest are measured from the CT images, and also measured with using a microscope and micrometer to obtain a measurement gold standard. The result show no significant difference between the model-based measurements and the gold standard; while the half-max estimates exhibited a measurement bias and were significantly

  15. Reproducibility of the airway response to an exercise protocol standardized for intensity, duration, and inspired air conditions, in subjects with symptoms suggestive of asthma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Exercise testing to aid diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is commonly performed. Reproducibility of the airway response to a standardized exercise protocol has not been reported in subjects being evaluated with mild symptoms suggestive of asthma but without a definite diagnosis. This study examined reproducibility of % fall in FEV1 and area under the FEV1 time curve for 30 minutes in response to two exercise tests performed with the same intensity and duration of exercise, and inspired air conditions. Methods Subjects with mild symptoms of asthma exercised twice within approximately 4 days by running for 8 minutes on a motorized treadmill breathing dry air at an intensity to induce a heart rate between 80-90% predicted maximum; reproducibility of the airway response was expressed as the 95% probability interval. Results Of 373 subjects challenged twice 161 were positive (≥10% fall FEV1 on at least one challenge). The EIB was mild and 77% of subjects had <15% fall on both challenges. Agreement between results was 76.1% with 56.8% (212) negative (< 10% fall FEV1) and 19.3% (72) positive on both challenges. The remaining 23.9% of subjects had only one positive test. The 95% probability interval for reproducibility of the % fall in FEV1 and AUC0-30 min was ± 9.7% and ± 251% for all 278 adults and ± 13.4% and ± 279% for all 95 children. The 95% probability interval for reproducibility of % fall in FEV1 and AUC0-30 min for the 72 subjects with two tests ≥10% fall FEV1 was ± 14.6% and ± 373% and for the 34 subjects with two tests ≥15% fall FEV1 it was ± 12.2% and ± 411%. Heart rate and estimated ventilation achieved were not significantly different either on the two test days or when one test result was positive and one was negative. Conclusions Under standardized, well controlled conditions for exercise challenge, the majority of subjects with mild symptoms of asthma demonstrated agreement in test results. Performing two

  16. Candida albicans Airway Exposure Primes the Lung Innate Immune Response against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection through Innate Lymphoid Cell Recruitment and Interleukin-22-Associated Mucosal Response

    PubMed Central

    Mear, Jean Baptiste; Gosset, Philippe; Kipnis, Eric; Faure, Emmanuel; Dessein, Rodrigue; Jawhara, Samir; Fradin, Chantal; Faure, Karine; Poulain, Daniel; Sendid, Boualem

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans are two pathogens frequently encountered in the intensive care unit microbial community. We have demonstrated that C. albicans airway exposure protected against P. aeruginosa-induced lung injury. The goal of the present study was to characterize the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with C. albicans-induced protection. Airway exposure by C. albicans led to the recruitment and activation of natural killer cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), macrophages, and dendritic cells. This recruitment was associated with the secretion of interleukin-22 (IL-22), whose neutralization abolished C. albicans-induced protection. We identified, by flow cytometry, ILCs as the only cellular source of IL-22. Depletion of ILCs by anti-CD90.2 antibodies was associated with a decreased IL-22 secretion and impaired survival after P. aeruginosa challenge. Our results demonstrate that the production of IL-22, mainly by ILCs, is a major and inducible step in protection against P. aeruginosa-induced lung injury. This cytokine may represent a clinical target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung injury. PMID:24166952

  17. Bronchoconstriction and airway biology: potential impact and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gosens, Reinoud; Grainge, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that mechanical forces occurring in the airway as a consequence of bronchoconstriction are sufficient to not only induce symptoms but also influence airway biology. Animal and human in vitro and in vivo work demonstrates that the airways are structurally and functionally altered by mechanical stress induced by bronchoconstriction. Compression of the airway epithelium and mechanosensing by the airway smooth muscle trigger the activation and release of growth factors, causing cell proliferation, extracellular matrix protein accumulation, and goblet cell differentiation. These effects of bronchoconstriction are of major importance to asthma pathophysiology and appear sufficient to induce remodeling independent of the inflammatory response. We review these findings in detail and discuss previous studies in light of this new evidence regarding the influence of mechanical forces in the airways. Furthermore, we highlight potential impacts of therapies influencing mechanical forces on airway structure and function in asthma. PMID:25732446

  18. Sensory neuropeptides and airway function.

    PubMed

    Solway, J; Leff, A R

    1991-12-01

    Sensory nerves synthesize tachykinins and calcitonin-gene related peptide and package these neuropeptides together in synaptic vesicles. Stimulation of these C-fibers by a range of chemical and physical factors results in afferent neuronal conduction that elicits central parasympathetic reflexes and in antidromic conduction that results in local release of neuropeptides through the axon reflex. In the airways, sensory neuropeptides act on bronchial smooth muscle, the mucosal vasculature, and submucosal glands to promote airflow obstruction, hyperemia, microvascular hyperpermeability, and mucus hypersecretion. In addition, tachykinins potentiate cholinergic neurotransmission. Proinflammatory effects of these peptides also promote the recruitment, adherence, and activation of granulocytes that may further exacerbate neurogenic inflammation (i.e., neuropeptide-induced plasma extravasation and vasodilation). Enzymatic degradation limits the physiological effects of tachykinins but may be impaired by respiratory infection or other factors. Given their sensitivity to noxious compounds and physical stimuli and their potent effects on airway function, it is possible that neuropeptide-containing sensory nerves play an important role in mediating airway responses in human disease. Supporting this view are the striking phenomenological similarities between hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB) in guinea pigs and HIB in patients with exercise-induced asthma. Endogenous tachykinins released from airway sensory nerves mediate HIB in guinea pigs and also cause hyperpnea-induced bronchovascular hyperpermeability in these animals. On the basis of these observations, it is reasonable to speculate that sensory neuropeptides participate in the pathogenesis of hyperpnea-induced airflow obstruction in human asthmatic subjects as well. PMID:1663932

  19. The S1P/S1PR2 axis regulates early airway T cell infiltration in murine mast cell-dependent acute allergic responses

    PubMed Central

    Oskeritzian, Carole A.; Hait, Nitai C.; Wedman, Piper; Chumanevich, Alena; Kolawole, Elizabeth M.; Price, Megan M.; Falanga, Yves T.; Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.; Ryan, John J.; Milstien, Sheldon; Sabbadini, Roger; Spiegel, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Background Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid produced by mast cells (MC) upon cross-linking of their high affinity receptors for IgE by antigen (Ag) that can amplify MC responses by binding to its S1P receptors. Acute MC-dependent allergic reaction can lead to systemic shock but the early events of its development in lung tissues have not been investigated, and S1P functions in the onset of allergic processes remain to be examined. Objective We used a highly specific neutralizing anti-S1P antibody (mAb) and an S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2) antagonist, JTE-013, to study S1P and S1PR2 signaling contributions to MC- and IgE-dependent airway allergic responses in mice within minutes after Ag challenge. Methods Allergic reaction was triggered by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of Ag in sensitized mice pre-treated i.p. with anti-S1P or isotype control mAb, or JTE-013 or vehicle prior to Ag challenge. Results Kinetics experiments revealed early pulmonary infiltration of mostly T cells around blood vessels of sensitized mice 20 minutes post-Ag exposure. Pre-treatment with anti-S1P mAb inhibited in vitro MC activation, as well as in vivo development of airway infiltration and MC activation, reducing serum levels of histamine, cytokines and the chemokines MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and RANTES/CCL5. S1PR2 antagonism or deficiency, or MC deficiency recapitulated these results. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated MC S1PR2 dependency for chemokine release and the necessity for signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) activation. Conclusion Activation of S1PR2 by S1P and downstream Stat3 signaling in MC regulate early T cell recruitment to antigen-challenged lungs by chemokine production. PMID:25512083

  20. Prevention of Th2-like cell responses by coadministration of IL-12 and IL-18 is associated with inhibition of antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilia, and serum IgE levels.

    PubMed

    Hofstra, C L; Van Ark, I; Hofman, G; Kool, M; Nijkamp, F P; Van Oosterhout, A J

    1998-11-01

    Allergic asthma is thought to be regulated by Th2 cells, and inhibiting this response is a promising mode of intervention. Many studies have focused on differentiation of Th cells to the Th1 or Th2 subset in vitro. IL-4 is essential for Th2 development, while IL-12 induces Th1 development, which can be enhanced by IL-18. In the present study, we investigated whether IL-12 and IL-18 were able to interfere in Th2 development and the associated airway symptoms in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Mice were sensitized with OVA using a protocol that induces IgE production. Repeated challenges by OVA inhalation induced elevated serum levels of IgE, airway hyperresponsiveness, and a predominantly eosinophilic infiltrate in the bronchoalveolar lavage concomitant with the appearance of Ag-specific Th2-like cells in lung tissue and lung-draining lymph nodes. Whereas treatments with neither IL-12 nor IL-18 during the challenge period were effective, combined treatment of IL-12 and IL-18 inhibited Ag-specific Th2-like cell development. This inhibition was associated with an absence of IgE up-regulation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and cellular infiltration in the lavage. These data show that, in vivo, the synergistic action of IL-12 and IL-18 is necessary to prevent Th2-like cell differentiation, and consequently inhibits the development of airway symptoms in a mouse model of allergic asthma. PMID:9794443

  1. Response to Commentary on "The influence of lung airways branching structure and diffusion time on measurements and models of short-range 3He gas MR diffusion".

    PubMed

    Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M

    2014-02-01

    Our extensive investigation of the cylinder model theory through numerical modelling and purpose-designed experiments has demonstrated that it does produce inaccurate estimates of airway dimensions at all diffusion times currently used. This is due to a variety of effects: incomplete treatment of non-Gaussian effects, finite airway size, branching geometry, background susceptibility gradients and diffusion time dependence of the (3)He MR diffusion behaviour in acinar airways. The cylinder model is a good starting point for the development of a lung morphometry technique from (3)He diffusion MR but its limitations need to be understood and documented in the interest of reliable clinical interpretation. PMID:24342570

  2. Pneumococcal components induce regulatory T cells that attenuate the development of allergic airways disease by deviating and suppressing the immune response to allergen.

    PubMed

    Thorburn, Alison N; Brown, Alexandra C; Nair, Prema M; Chevalier, Nina; Foster, Paul S; Gibson, Peter G; Hansbro, Philip M

    2013-10-15

    The induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) to suppress aberrant inflammation and immunity has potential as a therapeutic strategy for asthma. Recently, we identified key immunoregulatory components of Streptococcus pneumoniae, type 3 polysaccharide and pneumolysoid (T+P), which suppress allergic airways disease (AAD) in mouse models of asthma. To elucidate the mechanisms of suppression, we have now performed a thorough examination of the role of Tregs. BALB/c mice were sensitized to OVA (day 0) i.p. and challenged intranasal (12-15 d later) to induce AAD. T+P was administered intratracheally at the time of sensitization in three doses (0, 12, and 24 h). T+P treatment induced an early (36 h-4 d) expansion of Tregs in the mediastinal lymph nodes, and later (12-16 d) increases in these cells in the lungs, compared with untreated allergic controls. Anti-CD25 treatment showed that Treg-priming events involving CD25, CCR7, IL-2, and TGF-β were required for the suppression of AAD. During AAD, T+P-induced Tregs in the lungs displayed a highly suppressive phenotype and had an increased functional capacity. T+P also blocked the induction of IL-6 to prevent the Th17 response, attenuated the expression of the costimulatory molecule CD86 on myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), and reduced the number of DCs carrying OVA in the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes. Therefore, bacterial components (T+P) drive the differentiation of highly suppressive Tregs, which suppress the Th2 response, prevent the Th17 response and disable the DC response resulting in the effective suppression of AAD. PMID:24048894

  3. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  4. RESPIRATORY RESPONSES OF SUBJECTS WITH ALLERGIC RHINITIS TO OZONE EXPOSURE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO NONSPECIFIC AIRWAY REACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone exposure in man produces changes in respiratory function and symptoms. There is a large degree of unexplained intersubject variability in the magnitude of these responses. There is concern that individuals with chronic respiratory diseases may also be more responsive to ozo...

  5. Airway smooth muscle in airway reactivity and remodeling: what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is now established that airway smooth muscle (ASM) has roles in determining airway structure and function, well beyond that as the major contractile element. Indeed, changes in ASM function are central to the manifestation of allergic, inflammatory, and fibrotic airway diseases in both children and adults, as well as to airway responses to local and environmental exposures. Emerging evidence points to novel signaling mechanisms within ASM cells of different species that serve to control diverse features, including 1) [Ca2+]i contractility and relaxation, 2) cell proliferation and apoptosis, 3) production and modulation of extracellular components, and 4) release of pro- vs. anti-inflammatory mediators and factors that regulate immunity as well as the function of other airway cell types, such as epithelium, fibroblasts, and nerves. These diverse effects of ASM “activity” result in modulation of bronchoconstriction vs. bronchodilation relevant to airway hyperresponsiveness, airway thickening, and fibrosis that influence compliance. This perspective highlights recent discoveries that reveal the central role of ASM in this regard and helps set the stage for future research toward understanding the pathways regulating ASM and, in turn, the influence of ASM on airway structure and function. Such exploration is key to development of novel therapeutic strategies that influence the pathophysiology of diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24142517

  6. Epithelium damage and protection during reopening of occluded airways in a physiologic microfluidic pulmonary airway model.

    PubMed

    Tavana, Hossein; Zamankhan, Parsa; Christensen, Paul J; Grotberg, James B; Takayama, Shuichi

    2011-08-01

    Airways of the peripheral lung are prone to closure at low lung volumes. Deficiency or dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant during various lung diseases compounds this event by destabilizing the liquid lining of small airways and giving rise to occluding liquid plugs in airways. Propagation of liquid plugs in airways during inflation of the lung exerts large mechanical forces on airway cells. We describe a microfluidic model of small airways of the lung that mimics airway architecture, recreates physiologic levels of pulmonary pressures, and allows studying cellular response to repeated liquid plug propagation events. Substantial cellular injury happens due to the propagation of liquid plugs devoid of surfactant. We show that addition of a physiologic concentration of a clinical surfactant, Survanta, to propagating liquid plugs protects the epithelium and significantly reduces cell death. Although the protective role of surfactants has been demonstrated in models of a propagating air finger in liquid-filled airways, this is the first time to study the protective role of surfactants in liquid plugs where fluid mechanical stresses are expected to be higher than in air fingers. Our parallel computational simulations revealed a significant decrease in mechanical forces in the presence of surfactant, confirming the experimental observations. The results support the practice of providing exogenous surfactant to patients in certain clinical settings as a protective mechanism against pathologic flows. More importantly, this platform provides a useful model to investigate various surface tension-mediated lung diseases at the cellular level. PMID:21487664

  7. Human airway measurement from CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaesung; Reeves, Anthony P.; Fotin, Sergei; Apanasovich, Tatiyana; Yankelevitz, David

    2008-03-01

    A wide range of pulmonary diseases, including common ones such as COPD, affect the airways. If the dimensions of airway can be measured with high confidence, the clinicians will be able to better diagnose diseases as well as monitor progression and response to treatment. In this paper, we introduce a method to assess the airway dimensions from CT scans, including the airway segments that are not oriented axially. First, the airway lumen is segmented and skeletonized, and subsequently each airway segment is identified. We then represent each airway segment using a segment-centric generalized cylinder model and assess airway lumen diameter (LD) and wall thickness (WT) for each segment by determining inner and outer wall boundaries. The method was evaluated on 14 healthy patients from a Weill Cornell database who had two scans within a 2 month interval. The corresponding airway segments were located in two scans and measured using the automated method. The total number of segments identified in both scans was 131. When 131 segments were considered altogether, the average absolute change over two scans was 0.31 mm for LD and 0.12 mm for WT, with 95% limits of agreement of [-0.85, 0.83] for LD and [-0.32, 0.26] for WT. The results were also analyzed on per-patient basis, and the average absolute change was 0.19 mm for LD and 0.05 mm for WT. 95% limits of agreement for per-patient changes were [-0.57, 0.47] for LD and [-0.16, 0.10] for WT.

  8. Markers of airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in patients with well-controlled asthma.

    PubMed

    Leuppi, J D; Salome, C M; Jenkins, C R; Koskela, H; Brannan, J D; Anderson, S D; Andersson, M; Chan, H K; Woolcock, A J

    2001-09-01

    In steroid-naive asthmatics, airway hyperresponsiveness correlates with noninvasive markers of airway inflammation. Whether this is also true in steroid-treated asthmatics, is unknown. In 31 stable asthmatics (mean age 45.4 yrs, range 22-69; 17 females) taking a median dose of 1,000 microg inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) per day (range 100-3,600 microg x day(-1)), airway responsiveness to the "direct" agent histamine and to the "indirect" agent mannitol, lung function (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow (PEF)), exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), and number of inflammatory cells in induced sputum as a percentage of total cell count were measured. Of the 31 subjects, 16 were hyperresponsive to mannitol and 11 to histamine. The dose-response ratio (DRR: % fall in FEV1/cumulative dose) to both challenge tests was correlated (r=0.59, p=0.0004). However, DRR for histamine and DRR for mannitol were not related to basic lung function, eNO, per cent sputum eosinophils and ICS dose. In addition, NO was not related to basic lung function and per cent sputum eosinophils. In clinically well-controlled asthmatics taking inhaled corticosteroids, there is no relationship between markers of airway inflammation (such as exhaled nitric oxide and sputum eosinophils) and airway responsiveness to either direct (histamine) or indirect (mannitol) challenge. Airway hyperresponsiveness in clinically well-controlled asthmatics appears to be independent of eosinophilic airway inflammation. PMID:11589340

  9. CD38 and Airway hyperresponsiveness: Studies on human airway smooth muscle cells and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Alonso GP; Deshpande, Deepak A; Dileepan, Mythili; Walseth, Timothy F; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease in which altered calcium regulation, contractility and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and airway wall remodeling. The enzymatic activity of CD38, a cell-surface protein expressed in human ASM cells, generates calcium mobilizing second messenger molecules such as cyclic ADP-ribose. CD38 expression in human ASM cells is augmented by cytokines (e.g. TNF-α) that requires activation of MAP kinases and the transcription factors, NF-ƙB and AP-1 and post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-140-3p and miR-708 by binding to 3’ Untranslated Region of CD38 as well as by modulating the activation of signaling mechanisms involved in its regulation. Mice deficient in CD38 exhibit reduced airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine relative to response in wild-type mice. Intranasal challenge of CD38 deficient mice with TNF-α or IL-13, or the environmental fungus Alternaria alternata, causes significantly attenuated methacholine responsiveness compared to wild-type mice, with comparable airway inflammation. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer studies revealed partial restoration of airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine in the Cd38 deficient mice. These studies provide evidence for CD38 involvement in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, a hallmark feature of asthma. Future studies aimed at drug discovery and delivery targeting CD38 expression and/or activity are warranted. PMID:25594684

  10. Comparative assessment of ProSeal™ laryngeal mask airway intervention versus standard technique of endotracheal extubation for attenuation of pressor response in controlled hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raj Pal; Gulabani, Michell; Kaur, Mohandeep; Sood, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Swapping of the endotracheal tube with laryngeal mask airway (LMA) before emergence from anaesthesia is one of the methods employed for attenuation of pressor response at extubation. We decided to compare the placement of ProSeal™ LMA (PLMA) before endotracheal extubation versus conventional endotracheal extubation in controlled hypertensive patients scheduled for elective surgeries under general anaesthesia. Methods: Sixty consenting adult patients were randomly allocated to two groups of thirty each; Group E in whom extubation was performed using standard technique and Group P in whom PLMA was inserted before endotracheal extubation (Bailey manoeuvre). The primary outcome parameter was heart rate (HR). The secondary outcomes were systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure (MBP), electrocardiogram, oxygen saturation and end-tidal carbon dioxide. Two-tailed paired Student's t-test was used for comparison between the two study groups. The value of P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The patient characteristics, demographic data and surgical procedures were comparable in the two groups. A statistically significant decrease was observed in HR in Group P as compared to Group E. Secondary outcomes such as systolic, diastolic and MBP depicted a statistically insignificant difference. Conclusion: Bailey manoeuvre was not effective method to be completely relied upon during extubation when compared to standard extubation. PMID:27512160

  11. T-cell activation and HLA-regulated response to smoking in the deep airways of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Öckinger, Johan; Hagemann-Jensen, Michael; Kullberg, Susanna; Engvall, Benita; Eklund, Anders; Grunewald, Johan; Piehl, Fredrik; Olsson, Tomas; Wahlström, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), and the risk is further multiplied for HLA-DRB1*15(+) smokers. To define the smoke-induced immune responses in the lung we performed bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) on smokers and non-smokers, both MS-patients and healthy volunteers. In the BAL, non-smokers with MS showed an increased preformed CD40L expression in CD4(+) T-cells while smokers displayed an increase in proliferating (Ki-67(+)) T-cells. In addition, our results confirm that smoking induces an increase of alveolar macrophages in BAL, and further defined a significant attenuation of this response in carriers of the HLA-DRB1*15 allele, in both MS patients and healthy controls. This first systematic investigation of the immune response in the lungs of smokers and non-smokers diagnosed with MS, thus suggests an MS-associated lung T-cell phenotype, involvement of a specific T-cell response to smoke, and a genetic regulation of the macrophage response. PMID:27339331

  12. Cox4i2, Ifit2, and Prdm11 Mutant Mice: Effective Selection of Genes Predisposing to an Altered Airway Inflammatory Response from a Large Compendium of Mutant Mouse Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bönisch, Clemens; Côme, Christophe; Kolster-Fog, Cathrine; Jensen, Klaus T.; Lund, Anders H.; Lee, Icksoo; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Sinkler, Christopher; Hüttemann, Maik; Bohn, Erwin; Fuchs, Helmut; Ollert, Markus; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabĕ de Angelis, Martin; Beckers, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We established a selection strategy to identify new models for an altered airway inflammatory response from a large compendium of mutant mouse lines that were systemically phenotyped in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). As selection criteria we included published gene functional data, as well as immunological and transcriptome data from GMC phenotyping screens under standard conditions. Applying these criteria we identified a few from several hundred mutant mouse lines and further characterized the Cox4i2tm1Hutt, Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb, and Prdm11tm1.1ahl lines following ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and repeated OVA airway challenge. Challenged Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice exhibited changes in B cell counts, CD4+ T cell counts, and in the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavages, whereas challenged Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb mice displayed alterations in plasma IgE, IgG1, IgG3, and IgM levels compared to the challenged wild type littermates. In contrast, challenged Cox4i2tm1Hutt mutant mice did not show alterations in the humoral or cellular immune response compared to challenged wild type mice. Transcriptome analyses from lungs of the challenged mutant mouse lines showed extensive changes in gene expression in Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice. Functional annotations of regulated genes of all three mutant mouse lines were primarily related to inflammation and airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling. We were thus able to define an effective selection strategy to identify new candidate genes for the predisposition to an altered airway inflammatory response under OVA challenge conditions. Similar selection strategies may be used for the analysis of additional genotype – envirotype interactions for other diseases. PMID:26263558

  13. Brachycephalic airway syndrome: management.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Dena L; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2012-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) is a group of primary and secondary abnormalities that result in upper airway obstruction. Several of these abnormalities can be addressed medically and/or surgically to improve quality of life. This article reviews potential complications, anesthetic considerations, recovery strategies, and outcomes associated with medical and surgical management of BAS. PMID:22935992

  14. Simvastatin Inhibits Airway Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Amir A.; Franzi, Lisa; Last, Jerold; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Statin use has been linked to improved lung health in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We hypothesize that statins inhibit allergic airway inflammation and reduce airway hyperreactivity via a mevalonate-dependent mechanism. Objectives: To determine whether simvastatin attenuates airway inflammation and improves lung physiology by mevalonate pathway inhibition. Methods: BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin over 4 weeks and exposed to 1% ovalbumin aerosol over 2 weeks. Simvastatin (40 mg/kg) or simvastatin plus mevalonate (20 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally before each ovalbumin exposure. Measurements and Main Results: Simvastatin reduced total lung lavage leukocytes, eosinophils, and macrophages (P < 0.05) in the ovalbumin-exposed mice. Cotreatment with mevalonate, in addition to simvastatin, reversed the antiinflammatory effects seen with simvastatin alone (P < 0.05). Lung lavage IL-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were all reduced by treatment with simvastatin (P < 0.05). Simvastatin treatment before methacholine bronchial challenge increased lung compliance and reduced airway hyperreactivity (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Simvastatin attenuates allergic airway inflammation, inhibits key helper T cell type 1 and 2 chemokines, and improves lung physiology in a mouse model of asthma. The mevalonate pathway appears to modulate allergic airway inflammation, while the beneficial effects of simvastatin on lung compliance and airway hyperreactivity may be independent of the mevalonate pathway. Simvastatin and similar agents that modulate the mevalonate pathway may prove to be treatments for inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma. PMID:19608720

  15. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong Silbajoris, Robert A.; Cao Dongsun; Bromberg, Philip A.; Zhang Qiao; Peden, David B.; Samet, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional and posttranscriptional events that regulate COX-2 expression in a human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B exposed to Zn{sup 2+}. Zn{sup 2+} exposure resulted in pronounced increases in COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, which were prevented by pretreatment with the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, implying the involvement of transcriptional regulation. This was supported by the observation of increased COX-2 promoter activity in Zn{sup 2+}-treated BEAS-2B cells. Mutation of the cAMP response element (CRE), but not the {kappa}B-binding sites in the COX-2 promoter markedly reduced COX-2 promoter activity induced by Zn{sup 2+}. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B activation did not block Zn{sup 2+}-induced COX-2 expression. Measurement of mRNA stability demonstrated that Zn{sup 2+} exposure impaired the degradation of COX-2 mRNA in BEAS-2B cells. This message stabilization effect of Zn{sup 2+} exposure was shown to be dependent on the integrity of the 3'-untranslated region found in the COX-2 transcript. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the CRE and mRNA stability regulates COX-2 expression induced in BEAS-2B cells exposed to extracellular Zn{sup 2+}.

  16. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  17. Fluticasone propionate and pentamidine isethionate reduce airway hyperreactivity, pulmonary eosinophilia and pulmonary dendritic cell response in a guinea pig model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, T E; Millecchia, L L; Fedan, J S

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of fluticasone propionate (FP) and pentamidine isethionate (PI) on antigen-induced lung inflammation and airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs. Male guinea pigs were sensitized on days 0 and 14 with 10 micrograms of ovalbumin (OVA) plus 1 mg of Al(OH)3. On day 21, animals were challenged with a 2% OVA aerosol inhalation until they developed pulmonary obstruction. Animals were treated with aerosol inhalation of FP (2 ml of 0.5 mg/ml, five consecutive doses at 12-hr intervals with the last dose given 6 hr before OVA challenge) or PI (30 mg/ml for 30 min 1 hr before OVA challenge), and control animals received no drug before OVA challenge. Airway reactivity to methacholine (MCh) was assessed before sensitization and 18 hr after OVA challenge. At 18 hr after challenge, histological sections of trachea and lung were examined for eosinophil, dendritic cell (DC) and macrophage cell densities in the airways. In control animals, OVA evoked airway hyperreactivity to MCh in conjunction with pulmonary eosinophilia and increases in DC prevalence in the trachea and bronchi. Treatment with FP or PI abolished the OVA-induced hyperresponsiveness and significantly reduced the OVA-induced increases in eosinophils and DCs in the airways. FP and PI had no effect on saline-treated animals. Our study indicates that both inhaled FP and inhaled PI reduce antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity and pulmonary inflammation in guinea pigs. The results also suggest that the DC is a target of the anti-inflammatory effects of these drugs in the airways. PMID:9435182

  18. Regulation of airway neurogenic inflammation by neutral endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, G U; Bellofiore, S; Geppetti, P

    1998-12-01

    Airway neurogenic inflammation is caused by tachykinins released from peripheral nerve endings of sensory neurons within the airways, and is characterized by plasma protein extravasation, airway smooth muscle contraction and increased secretion of mucus. Tachykinins are degraded and inactivated by neutral endopeptidase (NEP), a membrane-bound metallopeptidase, which is located mainly at the surface of airway epithelial cells, but is also present in airway smooth muscle cells, submucosal gland cells and fibroblasts. The key role of NEP in limiting and regulating the neurogenic inflammation provoked by different stimuli has been demonstrated in a large series of studies published in recent years. It has also been shown that a variety of factors, which are relevant for airway diseases, including viral infections, allergen exposure, inhalation of cigarette smoke and other respiratory irritants, is able to reduce NEP activity, thus enhancing the effects of tachykinins within the airways. On the basis of these observations, the reduction of neutral endopeptidase activity may be regarded as a factor that switches neurogenic airway responses from their physiological and protective functions to a detrimental role that increases and perpetuates airway inflammation. However, further studies are needed to assess the role of neutral endopeptidase down regulation in the pathogenesis of asthma and other inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:9877509

  19. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  20. Acid-sensing by airway afferent nerves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Gu, Qihai; Xu, Fadi; Hong, Ju-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation of acid aerosol or aspiration of acid solution evokes a stimulatory effect on airway C-fiber and Aδ afferents, which in turn causes airway irritation and triggers an array of defense reflex responses (e.g., cough, reflex bronchoconstriction, etc.). Tissue acidosis can also occur locally in the respiratory tract as a result of ischemia or inflammation, such as in the airways of asthmatic patients during exacerbation. The action of proton on the airway sensory neurons is generated by activation of two different current species: a transient (rapidly activating and inactivating) current mediated through the acid-sensing ion channels, and a slowly activating and sustained current mediated through the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. In view of the recent findings that the expression and/or sensitivity of TRPV1 are up-regulated in the airway sensory nerves during chronic inflammatory reaction, the proton-evoked irritant effects on these nerves may play an important part in the manifestation of various symptoms associated with airway inflammatory diseases. PMID:23524016

  1. Home dampness, childhood asthma, hay fever, and airway symptoms in Shanghai, China: associations, dose-response relationships, and lifestyle's influences.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Liu, W; Huang, C; Zou, Z J; Zhao, Z H; Shen, L; Sundell, J

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies of associations between dampness and respiratory diseases have been conducted, but their implications remain inconclusive. In this study of 13,335 parent-reported questionnaires (response rate: 85.3%), we analyzed associations between home dampness and asthma and related symptoms in 4- to 6-year-old children in a cross-sectional study of Shanghai. Indicators of home dampness were strongly and significantly associated with dry cough, wheeze, and rhinitis symptoms. In the current residence, children with visible mold spots (VMS) exposure had 32% higher risk of asthma (adjusted OR, 95% CI: 1.32, 1.07-1.64); damp clothing and/or bedding (frequently) was strongly associated with dry cough (1.78, 1.37-2.30); condensation on windows was strongly associated with hay fever (1.60, 1.27-2.01). In the early-life residence, VMS or damp stains (frequently) were strongly associated with dry cough (2.20, 1.55-3.11) and rhinitis ever (1.57, 1.11-2.21). Associations between dampness and diseases among children with or without family history of atopy were similar. The total number of dampness indicators had strong dose-response relationships with investigated health outcomes. Actions, including opening windows of the child's room at night and cleaning the child's room frequently, could potentially mitigate 25% of home VMS, thereby preventing more than 1.5% of attributable risk of the studied symptoms. PMID:24571077

  2. Innate lymphoid cells in the airways.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennifer A; McKenzie, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    The airways, similar to other mucosal surfaces, are continuously exposed to the outside environment and a barrage of antigens, allergens, and microorganisms. Of critical importance therefore is the ability to mount rapid and effective immune responses to control commensal and pathogenic microbes, while simultaneously limiting the extent of these responses to prevent immune pathology and chronic inflammation. The function of the adaptive immune response in controlling these processes at mucosal surfaces has been well documented but the important role of the innate immune system, particularly the recently identified family of innate lymphoid cells, has only lately become apparent. In this review, we give an overview of the innate lymphoid cells that exist in the airways and examine the evidence pertaining to their emerging roles in airways immunity, inflammation, and homeostasis. PMID:22678892

  3. Enhancement of Airway Gene Transfer by DNA Nanoparticles Using a pH-Responsive Block Copolymer of Polyethylene Glycol and Poly-L-lysine

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Nicholas J.; Kim, Anthony J.; Suk, Jung Soo; Adstamongkonkul, Pichet; Simons, Brian W.; Lai, Samuel K.; Cooper, Mark J.; Hanes, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Highly compacted DNA nanoparticles, composed of single molecules of plasmid DNA compacted with block copolymers of polyethylene glycol and poly-L-lysine (PEG-CK30), have shown considerable promise in human gene therapy clinical trials in the nares, but may be less capable of transfecting cells that lack surface nucleolin. To address this potential shortcoming, we formulated pH-responsive DNA nanoparticles that mediate gene transfer via a nucleolin-independent pathway. Poly-L-histidine was inserted between PEG and poly-L-lysine to form a triblock copolymer system, PEG-CH12K18. Inclusion of poly-L-histidine increased the buffering capacity of PEG-CH12K18 to levels comparable with branched polyethyleneimine. PEG-CH12K18 compacted DNA into rod-shaped DNA nanoparticles with similar morphology and colloidal stability as PEG-CK30 DNA nanoparticles. PEG-CH12K18 DNA nanoparticles entered human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) that lack surface nucleolin by a clathrin-dependent endocytic mechanism followed by endo-lysosomal processing. Despite trafficking through the degradative endo-lysosomal pathway, PEG-CH12K18 DNA nanoparticles improved the in vitro gene transfer by ~ 20-fold over PEG-CK30 DNA nanoparticles, and in vivo gene transfer to lung airways in BALB/c mice by ~ 3-fold, while maintaining a favorable toxicity profile. These results represent an important step toward the rational development of an efficient gene delivery platform for the lungs based on highly compacted DNA nanoparticles. PMID:22182747

  4. Immediate inhibitory effect of methylprednisolone suleptanate (U-67590A) on antigen-induced cutaneous and airway anaphylactic responses in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, M.; Shinozaki, Y.; Katori, M.

    1993-01-01

    1. Inhibitory effects of water-soluble glucocorticoids administered intravenously were examined on skin and airway reactions caused by antigen challenge or chemical mediators in guinea-pigs. 2. Methylprednisolone suleptanate (U-67590A) which is an analogue of methylprednisolone, produced immediate inhibition of 3-h and 7-day homologous passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reactions, but not of histamine- or bradykinin-induced cutaneous vascular permeability, when administered 10 min before antigen challenge. In contrast, methylprednisolone succinate (MP) or dexamethasone (DXM) administered 10 min before antigen challenge failed to show an immediate inhibitory effect on the PCA or mediator-induced reactions. When administered 1 to 5 h before antigen challenge, all the steroids used in this study reduced both PCA and mediator-induced reactions. 3. Pretreatment with cycloheximide almost completely abolished the late inhibition of 3-h PCA and histamine reactions produced by U-67590A or MP, but it did not affect the immediate inhibition of 3-h PCA produced by U-67590A. 4. U-67590A also demonstrated immediate inhibitory effects on antigen-induced bronchoconstriction in guinea-pigs actively sensitized with ovalbumin even when administered 10 min before antigen challenge, whereas MP and DXM failed to show the immediate inhibitory effect. When administered 3 h before antigen challenge, all the steroids used in this study reduced the response to antigen. 5. The late inhibitory effect of U-67590A administered 3 h before antigen challenge was almost completely abolished by treatment with cycloheximide or 17 alpha-methyltestosterone, whereas the immediate inhibition produced by U-67590A administered 10 min before challenge was not affected by this treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7682130

  5. Enhancement of airway gene transfer by DNA nanoparticles using a pH-responsive block copolymer of polyethylene glycol and poly-L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Nicholas J; Kim, Anthony J; Suk, Jung Soo; Adstamongkonkul, Pichet; Simons, Brian W; Lai, Samuel K; Cooper, Mark J; Hanes, Justin

    2012-03-01

    Highly compacted DNA nanoparticles, composed of single molecules of plasmid DNA compacted with block copolymers of polyethylene glycol and poly-L-lysine (PEG-CK(30)), have shown considerable promise in human gene therapy clinical trials in the nares, but may be less capable of transfecting cells that lack surface nucleolin. To address this potential shortcoming, we formulated pH-responsive DNA nanoparticles that mediate gene transfer via a nucleolin-independent pathway. Poly-L-histidine was inserted between PEG and poly-L-lysine to form a triblock copolymer system, PEG-CH(12)K(18). Inclusion of poly-L-histidine increased the buffering capacity of PEG-CH(12)K(18) to levels comparable with branched polyethyleneimine. PEG-CH(12)K(18) compacted DNA into rod-shaped DNA nanoparticles with similar morphology and colloidal stability as PEG-CK(30) DNA nanoparticles. PEG-CH(12)K(18) DNA nanoparticles entered human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) that lack surface nucleolin by a clathrin-dependent endocytic mechanism followed by endo-lysosomal processing. Despite trafficking through the degradative endo-lysosomal pathway, PEG-CH(12)K(18) DNA nanoparticles improved the in vitro gene transfer by ~20-fold over PEG-CK(30) DNA nanoparticles, and in vivo gene transfer to lung airways in BALB/c mice by ~3-fold, while maintaining a favorable toxicity profile. These results represent an important step toward the rational development of an efficient gene delivery platform for the lungs based on highly compacted DNA nanoparticles. PMID:22182747

  6. Overexpression of Smad2 Drives House Dust Mite–mediated Airway Remodeling and Airway Hyperresponsiveness via Activin and IL-25

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Lisa G.; Mathie, Sara A.; Walker, Simone A.; Pegorier, Sophie; Jones, Carla P.; Lloyd, Clare M.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Airway hyperreactivity and remodeling are characteristic features of asthma. Interactions between the airway epithelium and environmental allergens are believed to be important in driving development of pathology, particularly because altered epithelial gene expression is common in individuals with asthma. Objectives: To investigate the interactions between a modified airway epithelium and a common aeroallergen in vivo. Methods: We used an adenoviral vector to generate mice overexpressing the transforming growth factor-β signaling molecule, Smad2, in the airway epithelium and exposed them to house dust mite (HDM) extract intranasally. Measurements and Main Results: Smad2 overexpression resulted in enhanced airway hyperreactivity after allergen challenge concomitant with changes in airway remodeling. Subepithelial collagen deposition was increased and smooth muscle hyperplasia was evident resulting in thickening of the airway smooth muscle layer. However, there was no increase in airway inflammation in mice given the Smad2 vector compared with the control vector. Enhanced airway hyperreactivity and remodeling did not correlate with elevated levels of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-13 or IL-4. However, mice overexpressing Smad2 in the airway epithelium showed significantly enhanced levels of IL-25 and activin A after HDM exposure. Blocking activin A with a neutralizing antibody prevented the increase in lung IL-25 and inhibited subsequent collagen deposition and also the enhanced airway hyperreactivity observed in the Smad2 overexpressing HDM-exposed mice. Conclusions: Epithelial overexpression of Smad2 can specifically alter airway hyperreactivity and remodeling in response to an aeroallergen. Moreover, we have identified novel roles for IL-25 and activin A in driving airway hyperreactivity and remodeling. PMID:20339149

  7. Meteorological conditions along airways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, W R

    1927-01-01

    This report is an attempt to show the kind of meteorological information that is needed, and is in part available, for the purpose of determining operating conditions along airways. In general, the same factors affect these operating conditions along all airways though in varying degree, depending upon their topographic, geographic, and other characteristics; but in order to bring out as clearly as possible the nature of the data available, a specific example is taken, that of the Chicago-Dallas airway on which regular flying begins this year (1926).

  8. Airway smooth muscle in the pathophysiology and treatment of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Solway, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays an integral part in the pathophysiology of asthma. It is responsible for acute bronchoconstriction, which is potentiated by constrictor hyperresponsiveness, impaired relaxation and length adaptation. ASM also contributes to airway remodeling and inflammation in asthma. In light of this, ASM is an important target in the treatment of asthma. PMID:23305987

  9. Endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 mediates antigen-induced acute airway inflammation and late-phase airway obstruction in monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Gundel, R H; Wegner, C D; Torcellini, C A; Clarke, C C; Haynes, N; Rothlein, R; Smith, C W; Letts, L G

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the role of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1) in the development of the acute airway inflammation (cell influx) and late-phase airway obstruction in a primate model of extrinsic asthma. In animals sensitive to antigen, a single inhalation exposure induced the rapid expression of ELAM-1 (6 h) exclusively on vascular endothelium that correlated with the influx of neutrophils into the lungs and the onset of late-phase airway obstruction. In contrast, basal levels of ICAM-1 was constitutively expressed on vascular endothelium and airway epithelium before antigen challenge. After the single antigen exposure, changes in ICAM-1 expression did not correlate with neutrophil influx or the change in airway caliber. This was confirmed by showing that pretreatment with a monoclonal antibody to ICAM-1 did not inhibit the acute influx of neutrophils associated with late-phase airway obstruction, whereas a monoclonal antibody to ELAM-1 blocked both the influx of neutrophils and the late-phase airway obstruction. This study demonstrates a functional role for ELAM-1 in the development of acute airway inflammation in vivo. We conclude that, in primates, the late-phase response is the result of an ELAM-1 dependent influx of neutrophils. Therefore, the regulation of ELAM-1 expression may provide a novel approach to controlling the acute inflammatory response, and thereby, affecting airway function associated with inflammatory disorders, including asthma. Images PMID:1717514

  10. Effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a murine allergic airway inflammation model

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro Koike, Eiko; Yanagisawa, Rie; Hirano, Seishiro; Nishikawa, Masataka; Takano, Hirohisa

    2009-06-15

    The development of nanotechnology has increased the risk of exposure to types of particles other than combustion-derived particles in the environment, namely, industrial nanomaterials. On the other hand, patients with bronchial asthma are sensitive to inhaled substances including particulate matters. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to a type of nano-sized carbon nanotube (multi-walled nanotubes: MWCNT) on allergic airway inflammation in vivo and their cellular mechanisms in vitro. In vivo, ICR mice were divided into 4 experimental groups. Vehicle, MWCNT (50 {mu}g/animal), ovalbumin (OVA), and OVA + MWCNT were repeatedly administered intratracheally. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cellularity, lung histology, levels of cytokines related to allergic inflammation in lung homogenates/BAL fluids (BALFs), and serum immunoglobulin levels were studied. Also, we evaluated the impact of MWCNT (0.1-1 {mu}g/ml) on the phenotype and function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. MWCNT aggravated allergen-induced airway inflammation characterized by the infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, and mononuclear cells in the lung, and an increase in the number of goblet cells in the bronchial epithelium. MWCNT with allergen amplified lung protein levels of Th cytokines and chemokines compared with allergen alone. MWCNT exhibited adjuvant activity for allergen-specific IgG{sub 1} and IgE. MWCNT significantly increased allergen (OVA)-specific syngeneic T-cell proliferation, particularly at a lower concentration in vitro. Taken together, MWCNT can exacerbate murine allergic airway inflammation, at least partly, via the promotion of a Th-dominant milieu. In addition, the exacerbation may be partly through the inappropriate activation of antigen-presenting cells including DC.

  11. Use of continuous positive airway pressure reduces airway reactivity in adults with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Busk, Michael; Busk, Nancy; Puntenney, Paula; Hutchins, Janet; Yu, Zhangsheng; Gunst, Susan J.; Tepper, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterised by airway hyperreactivity, which is primarily treated with β-adrenergic bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory agents. However, mechanical strain during breathing is an important modulator of airway responsiveness and we have previously demonstrated in animal models that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) resulted in lower in vivo airway reactivity. We now evaluated whether using nocturnal CPAP decreased airway reactivity in clinically-stable adults with asthma. Adults with stable asthma and normal spirometry used nocturnal CPAP (8–10 cmH2O) or sham treatment (0–2 cmH2O) for 7 days. Spirometry and bronchial challenges were obtained before and after treatment. The primary outcome was the provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (PC20). The CPAP group (n=16) had a significant decrease in airway reactivity (change in (Δ)logPC20 0.406, p<0.0017) while the sham group (n=9) had no significant change in airway reactivity (ΔlogPC20 0.003, p=0.9850). There was a significant difference in the change in airway reactivity for the CPAP versus the sham group (ΔlogPC20 0.41, p<0.043). Our findings indicate that chronic mechanical strain of the lungs produced using nocturnal CPAP for 7 days reduced airway reactivity in clinically stable asthmatics. Future studies of longer duration are required to determine whether CPAP can also decrease asthma symptoms and/or medication usage. PMID:22835615

  12. Bronchial hyperreactivity is correlated with increased baseline airway tone.

    PubMed

    Bergner, A; Kellner, J; Kemp da Silva, A; Fischer, R; Gamarra, F; Huber, R M

    2006-02-21

    Physiologically, airways are not completely relaxed but maintain a baseline airway tone (BAT). Although not fulfilling the criteria for obstructive airway disease, increased BAT may nevertheless be important because the same amount of airway narrowing can be well tolerated or can cause severe airway obstruction depending on the starting point of the narrowing. In this study, we aimed at studying if BAT is correlated with bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). For in vitro studies, airways in murine lung slices were digitally recorded and the change in cross-sectional area with time was quantified. BAT was measured by the amount of relaxation induced by permeabilization of the cell membrane with beta-escin in zero external calcium. BHR was induced by incubation of lung slices with interleukin-13 (IL-13). T-bet knock-out mice served as an additional model for BHR. T-bet knock-out mice show a shift towards TH2-lymphocytes and display histological as well as functional characteristics of asthma. In vivo, the specific airway resistance of healthy non-smoking volunteers was assessed before and after inhalation of formoterol and bronchial challenge was performed using methacholin. In murine lung slices that had been cultivated without serum, only a minimal BAT could be observed. But, after cultivation with 10 % new born calve serum, airways showed a BAT of approximately 13 % that could be reduced by incubation with an IL-13 receptor antagonist. Atropine, isoproterenol and indomethacin failed to relax airways regardless of cultivation with serum. Incubation of lung slices without serum but with IL-13 increased BAT as well as airway responsiveness to acetylcholine and both effects were more pronounced in small compared to large airways. In lung slices from T-bet knock-out mice, airways were hyperreactive compared to airways in slices from wild type mice and BAT was found to be increased. Again, both effects were more pronounced in small compared to large airways. In human non

  13. STUDIES TO ADDRESS THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) EXPOSURE AND DEVELOPMENT/EXACERBATION OF LUNG INJURY, INFLAMMATION, AND INCREASED AIRWAY RESPONSIVENESS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma, an inflammatory airways disease, has become an urgent health problem affecting an estimated 17 million persons in the United States alone (CDC 1998 MMWR 47). Since 1979, the death rate from asthma has increased by almost 56%. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated posit...

  14. Breathtaking TRP channels: TRPA1 and TRPV1 in airway chemosensation and reflex control.

    PubMed

    Bessac, Bret F; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2008-12-01

    New studies have revealed an essential role for TRPA1, a sensory neuronal TRP ion channel, in airway chemosensation and inflammation. TRPA1 is activated by chlorine, reactive oxygen species, and noxious constituents of smoke and smog, initiating irritation and airway reflex responses. Together with TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, TRPA1 may contribute to chemical hypersensitivity, chronic cough, and airway inflammation in asthma, COPD, and reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. PMID:19074743

  15. Macrophage adaptation in airway inflammatory resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manminder; Bell, Thomas; Salek-Ardakani, Samira; Hussell, Tracy

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial and viral infections (exacerbations) are particularly problematic in those with underlying respiratory disease, including post-viral infection, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis. Patients experiencing exacerbations tend to be at the more severe end of the disease spectrum and are often difficult to treat. Most of the unmet medical need remains in this patient group. Airway macrophages are one of the first cell populations to encounter airborne pathogens and, in health, exist in a state of reduced responsiveness due to interactions with the respiratory epithelium and specific factors found in the airway lumen. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-10, transforming growth factor-β, surfactant proteins and signalling via the CD200 receptor, for example, all raise the threshold above which airway macrophages can be activated. We highlight that following severe respiratory inflammation, the airspace microenvironment does not automatically re-set to baseline and may leave airway macrophages more restrained than they were at the outset. This excessive restraint is mediated in part by the clearance of apoptotic cells and components of extracellular matrix. This implies that one strategy to combat respiratory exacerbations would be to retune airway macrophage responsiveness to allow earlier bacterial recognition. PMID:26324813

  16. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  17. Does the length dependency of airway smooth muscle force contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness?

    PubMed

    Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Pascoe, Chris D; Couture, Christian; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2013-11-01

    Airway wall remodeling and lung hyperinflation are two typical features of asthma that may alter the contractility of airway smooth muscle (ASM) by affecting its operating length. The aims of this study were as follows: 1) to describe in detail the "length dependency of ASM force" in response to different spasmogens; and 2) to predict, based on morphological data and a computational model, the consequence of this length dependency of ASM force on airway responsiveness in asthmatic subjects who have both remodeled airway walls and hyperinflated lungs. Ovine tracheal ASM strips and human bronchial rings were isolated and stimulated to contract in response to increasing concentrations of spasmogens at three different lengths. Ovine tracheal strips were more sensitive and generated greater force at longer lengths in response to acetylcholine (ACh) and K(+). Equipotent concentrations of ACh were approximately a log less for ASM stretched by 30% and approximately a log more for ASM shortened by 30%. Similar results were observed in human bronchi in response to methacholine. Morphometric and computational analyses predicted that the ASM of asthmatic subjects may be elongated by 6.6-10.4% (depending on airway generation) due to remodeling and/or hyperinflation, which could increase ACh-induced force by 1.8-117.8% (depending on ASM length and ACh concentration) and enhance the increased resistance to airflow by 0.4-4,432.8%. In conclusion, elongation of ASM imposed by airway wall remodeling and/or hyperinflation may allow ASM to operate at a longer length and to consequently generate more force and respond to lower concentration of spasmogens. This phenomenon could contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:23970527

  18. DIESEL PARTICLE INSTILLATION ENHANCES INFLAMMATORY AND NEUROTROPHIN RESPONSES IN THE LUNGS OF ALLERGIC BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airways resistance and inflammation. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airways resistance associated with the allergen-specific airways responses in mice. ...

  19. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future. PMID:27529028

  20. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  1. A systematic study on the influence of the main ingredients of an ivy leaves dry extract on the β2-adrenergic responsiveness of human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Greunke, Christian; Hage-Hülsmann, Anne; Sorkalla, Thomas; Keksel, Nelli; Häberlein, Felix; Häberlein, Hanns

    2015-04-01

    The bronchospasmolytic and secretolytic effects of ivy leaves dry extracts can be explained by an increased β2-adrenergic responsiveness of the bronchi. Recently, it was shown that α-hederin inhibits the internalization of β2-adrenergic receptors (ß2AR) under stimulating conditions. α-Hederin pretreated alveolar type II cells and human airway smooth muscle cells revealed an increased ß2AR binding and an elevated intracellular cAMP level, respectively. In order to identify whether additional compounds also mediate an increased β2-adrenergic responsiveness, we examined the ingredients of an ivy leaves dry extract (EA 575) protocatechuic acid, neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid, cryptochlorogenic acid, rutin, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, 3,4-, 3,5- and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, hederacoside B, and β-hederin. Within all the tested substances, only β-hederin inhibited the internalization of GFP-tagged ß2AR in stably transfected HEK293 cells. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy β-hederin (1 μM, 24 h) pretreated HASM cells showed a statistically significant increase in the ß2AR binding from 33.0 ± 8.9% to 44.1 ± 11.5% which was distributed with 36.0 ± 9.5% for τbound1 and 8.1 ± 2.6% for τbound2, respectively (n = 8, p < 0.05). The increased binding was selectively found for the receptor-ligand complex with unrestricted lateral mobility (τbound1 of 0.9 ± 0.1 ms, D1 = 9.1 ± 0.2 μm(2)/s, n = 8), whereas the binding of ß2AR with hindered lateral mobility (τbound2 of 64.2 ± 47.6 ms, D2 = 0.15 ± 0.02 μm(2)/s, n = 8) was not affected. Compared to control cells, a statistically significant increase of 17.5 ± 6.4% (n = 4, p < 0.05) and 24.2 ± 5.8% (n = 4, p < 0.001) in the cAMP formation was found for β-hederin pretreated HASM cells after stimulation with 10 μM of terbutaline and simultaneous stimulation with 10 μM terbutaline and 10 μM forskolin, respectively. Within this systematic study

  2. Deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in human upper airways.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei-Chung; Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene nanomaterials have attracted wide attention in recent years on their application to state-of-the-art technology due to their outstanding physical properties. On the other hand, the nanotoxicity of graphene materials also has rapidly become a serious concern especially in occupational health. Graphene naomaterials inevitably could become airborne in the workplace during manufacturing processes. The inhalation and subsequent deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human respiratory tract could potentially result in adverse health effects to exposed workers. Therefore, investigating the deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human airways is an indispensable component of an integral approach to graphene occupational health. For this reason, this study carried out a series of airway replica deposition experiments to obtain original experimental data for graphene aerosol airway deposition. In this study, graphene aerosols were generated, size classified, and delivered into human airway replicas (nasal and oral-to-lung airways). The deposition fraction and deposition efficiency of graphene aerosol in the airway replicas were obtained by a novel experimental approach. The experimental results acquired showed that the fractional deposition of graphene aerosols in airway sections studied were all less than 4%, and the deposition efficiency in each airway section was generally lower than 0.03. These results indicate that the majority of the graphene nanomaterial aerosols inhaled into the human respiratory tract could easily penetrate through the head airways as well as the upper part of the tracheobronchial airways and then transit down to the lower lung airways, where undesired biological responses might be induced. PMID:26317666

  3. Supraglottic airway devices.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Kumar, Anjana M

    2014-06-01

    Supraglottic airway devices (SADs) are used to keep the upper airway open to provide unobstructed ventilation. Early (first-generation) SADs rapidly replaced endotracheal intubation and face masks in > 40% of general anesthesia cases due to their versatility and ease of use. Second-generation devices have further improved efficacy and utility by incorporating design changes. Individual second-generation SADs have allowed more dependable positive-pressure ventilation, are made of disposable materials, have integrated bite blocks, are better able to act as conduits for tracheal tube placement, and have reduced risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. SADs now provide successful rescue ventilation in > 90% of patients in whom mask ventilation or tracheal intubation is found to be impossible. However, some concerns with these devices remain, including failing to adequately ventilate, causing airway damage, and increasing the likelihood of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. Careful patient selection and excellent technical skills are necessary for successful use of these devices. PMID:24891199

  4. Applications of mouse airway epithelial cell culture for asthma research.

    PubMed

    Horani, Amjad; Dickinson, John D; Brody, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Primary airway epithelial cell culture provides a valuable tool for studying cell differentiation, cell-cell interactions, and the role of immune system factors in asthma pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss the application of mouse tracheal epithelial cell cultures for the study of asthma biology. A major advantage of this system is the ability to use airway epithelial cells from mice with defined genetic backgrounds. The in vitro proliferation and differentiation of mouse airway epithelial cells uses the air-liquid interface condition to generate well-differentiated epithelia with characteristics of native airways. Protocols are provided for manipulation of differentiation, induction of mucous cell metaplasia, genetic modification, and cell and pathogen coculture. Assays for the assessment of gene expression, responses of cells, and analysis of specific cell subpopulations within the airway epithelium are included. PMID:23943446

  5. Comparison of three inhaled non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the airway response to sodium metabisulphite and adenosine 5'-monophosphate challenge in asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M.; Wisniewski, A.; Pavord, I.; Knox, A.; Tattersfield, A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to assess the role of prostaglandins in asthma but their effects on bronchoconstrictor challenges have been inconsistent. The effects of three nebulised nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the airway response to inhaled sodium metabisulphite (MBS) and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) were compared in the same asthmatic subjects to see whether contractile prostaglandins were involved in MBS or AMP induced bronchoconstriction. A possible protective effect of the osmolarity or pH of the inhaled solutions was also assessed. METHODS: Two double blind placebo controlled studies were carried out. In study 1, 15 non-aspirin sensitive patients with mild asthma attended on four occasions and inhaled 5 ml of lysine aspirin (L-aspirin) 900 mg, indomethacin 50 mg, sodium salicylate 800 mg, or saline 20 minutes before an inhaled MBS challenge. On four further occasions 14 of the patients inhaled the same solutions followed by an inhaled AMP challenge. In study 2, 10 of the patients attended on four additional occasions and inhaled 5 ml of 0.9%, 3%, 10%, or 9.5% saline with indomethacin 50 mg 20 minutes before an inhaled MBS challenge. RESULTS: In study 1 inhaled lysine aspirin had a similar effect on MBS and AMP induced bronchoconstriction, increasing the provocative dose causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PD20) by 1.29 (95% CI 0.54 to 2.03) and 1.23 (95% CI 0.53 to 1.93) doubling doses, respectively. Indomethacin increased the MBS PD20 and AMP PD20 by 0.64 (95% CI -0.1 to 1.38) and 0.99 (95% CI 0.29 to 1.69) doubling doses, respectively. Sodium salicylate had no significant effect on either challenge. The two solutions causing most inhibition were the most acidic and the most alkaline. In study 2 inhaled 9.5% saline with indomethacin (osmolarity 3005 mOsm/kg) increased the MBS PD20 by 1.1 doubling doses (95% CI 0.2 to 2.0) compared with only 0.09 (95% CI -0.83 to 1.0) and 0.04 (95% CI -0.88 to 0.95) doubling doses

  6. Lung surfactant proteins A and D can inhibit specific IgE binding to the allergens of Aspergillus fumigatus and block allergen-induced histamine release from human basophils

    PubMed Central

    MADAN, T; KISHORE, U; SHAH, A; EGGLETON, P; STRONG, P; WANG, J Y; AGGRAWAL, S S; SARMA, P U; REID, K B M

    1997-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen which, in the immunocompetent host, causes allergic disorders such as allergic rhinitis, allergic sinusitis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and allergic bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA). In the present study, the interaction of 3-week culture filtrate (3wcf) allergens and various purified glycosylated and non-glycosylated allergens of A. fumigatus with lung surfactant proteins, SP-A and SP-D, was investigated. Purified SP-A and SP-D, isolated from human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, bound to the 3wcf allergens and purified allergens, gp55 and gp45, in a carbohydrate-specific and calcium-dependent manner. Both SP-A and SP-D did not bind to deglycosylated allergens, suggesting that the ability of SP-A and SP-D to bind certain allergens is mediated through their carbohydrate recognition domains, interacting with the carbohydrate residues on the allergen. Both SP-A and SP-D could inhibit the ability of allergen-specific IgE from Aspergillosis patients to bind these allergens, suggesting that SP-A and SP-D may be involved in the modulation of allergic sensitization and/or development of allergic reactions. The view that SP-A and SP-D play a protective role against airborne allergens is further supported by the demonstration of their ability to inhibit A. fumigatus allergen-induced histamine release from allergic patients' basophils. PMID:9367408

  7. Lung surfactant proteins A and D can inhibit specific IgE binding to the allergens of Aspergillus fumigatus and block allergen-induced histamine release from human basophils.

    PubMed

    Madan, T; Kishore, U; Shah, A; Eggleton, P; Strong, P; Wang, J Y; Aggrawal, S S; Sarma, P U; Reid, K B

    1997-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen which, in the immunocompetent host, causes allergic disorders such as allergic rhinitis, allergic sinusitis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and allergic bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA). In the present study, the interaction of 3-week culture filtrate (3wcf) allergens and various purified glycosylated and non-glycosylated allergens of A. fumigatus with lung surfactant proteins, SP-A and SP-D, was investigated. Purified SP-A and SP-D, isolated from human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, bound to the 3wcf allergens and purified allergens, gp55 and gp45, in a carbohydrate-specific and calcium-dependent manner. Both SP-A and SP-D did not bind to deglycosylated allergens, suggesting that the ability of SP-A and SP-D to bind certain allergens is mediated through their carbohydrate recognition domains, interacting with the carbohydrate residues on the allergen. Both SP-A and SP-D could inhibit the ability of allergen-specific IgE from Aspergillosis patients to bind these allergens, suggesting that SP-A and SP-D may be involved in the modulation of allergic sensitization and/or development of allergic reactions. The view that SP-A and SP-D play a protective role against airborne allergens is further supported by the demonstration of their ability to inhibit A. fumigatus allergen-induced histamine release from allergic patients' basophils. PMID:9367408

  8. Mechanical ventilation causes airway distension with proinflammatory sequelae in mice.

    PubMed

    Nickles, Hannah T; Sumkauskaite, Migle; Wang, Xin; Wegner, Ingmar; Puderbach, Michael; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury has predominantly been attributed to overdistension or mechanical opening and collapse of alveoli, whereas mechanical strain on the airways is rarely taken into consideration. Here, we hypothesized that mechanical ventilation may cause significant airway distension, which may contribute to the pathological features of ventilator-induced lung injury. C57BL/6J mice were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated at tidal volumes of 6, 10, or 15 ml/kg body wt. Mice were imaged by flat-panel volume computer tomography, and central airways were segmented and rendered in 3D for quantitative assessment of airway distension. Alveolar distension was imaged by intravital microscopy. Functional dead space was analyzed in vivo, and proinflammatory cytokine release was analyzed in isolated, ventilated tracheae. CT scans revealed a reversible, up to 2.5-fold increase in upper airway volume during mechanical ventilation compared with spontaneous breathing. Airway distension was most pronounced in main bronchi, which showed the largest volumes at tidal volumes of 10 ml/kg body wt. Conversely, airway distension in segmental bronchi and functional dead space increased almost linearly, and alveolar distension increased even disproportionately with higher tidal volumes. In isolated tracheae, mechanical ventilation stimulated the release of the early-response cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. Mechanical ventilation causes a rapid, pronounced, and reversible distension of upper airways in mice that is associated with an increase in functional dead space. Upper airway distension is most pronounced at moderate tidal volumes, whereas higher tidal volumes redistribute preferentially to the alveolar compartment. Airway distension triggers proinflammatory responses and may thus contribute relevantly to ventilator-induced pathologies. PMID:24816486

  9. Issues of critical airway management (Which anesthesia; which surgical airway?).

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2012-10-01

    Which anesthesia for patients with critical airway? Safe and effective analgesia and anesthesia in critical airway is a skilled task especially after severe maxillofacial injury combined with head injury and hemorrhagic shock. If on one side sedation is wanted, on the other hand it may worsen the airway and hemodynamic situation to a point where hypoventilation and decrease of blood pressure, common side-effect of many opioids, may prejudice the patient's level of consciousness and hemodynamic compensation, compounding an already critical situation. What to do when endotracheal intubation fails and blood is trickling down the airways in an unconscious patient or when a conscious patient has to sit up to breathe? Which surgical airway in critical airway? Comparative studies among the various methods of emergency surgical airway would be unethical; furthermore, operator's training and experience is relevant for indications and performance. PMID:23248494

  10. Intrathoracic airway wall detection using graph search and scanner PSF information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Park, Wonkyu; Hoffman, Eric A.; Sonka, Milan

    1997-05-01

    Measurements of the in vivo bronchial tree can be used to assess regional airway physiology. High-resolution CT (HRCT) provides detailed images of the lungs and has been used to evaluate bronchial airway geometry. Such measurements have been sued to assess diseases affecting the airways, such as asthma and cystic fibrosis, to measure airway response to external stimuli, and to evaluate the mechanics of airway collapse in sleep apnea. To routinely use CT imaging in a clinical setting to evaluate the in vivo airway tree, there is a need for an objective, automatic technique for identifying the airway tree in the CT images and measuring airway geometry parameters. Manual or semi-automatic segmentation and measurement of the airway tree from a 3D data set may require several man-hours of work, and the manual approaches suffer from inter-observer and intra- observer variabilities. This paper describes a method for automatic airway tree analysis that combines accurate airway wall location estimation with a technique for optimal airway border smoothing. A fuzzy logic, rule-based system is used to identify the branches of the 3D airway tree in thin-slice HRCT images. Raycasting is combined with a model-based parameter estimation technique to identify the approximate inner and outer airway wall borders in 2D cross-sections through the image data set. Finally, a 2D graph search is used to optimize the estimated airway wall locations and obtain accurate airway borders. We demonstrate this technique using CT images of a plexiglass tube phantom.

  11. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285

  12. Epithelial hyperplasia, airways

    Cancer.gov

    Number of respiratory epithelial cells is increased diffusely or focally. Frequently luminal protrusions are observed, sometimes forming papillae. Mucous (goblet) cell metaplastic hyperplasia is a variant, in which the respiratory epithelium of conducting airways is replaced by mucous cells either as a single or a pseudostratified layer.

  13. Advances in prehospital airway management

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, PE; Grabinsky, A

    2014-01-01

    Prehospital airway management is a key component of emergency responders and remains an important task of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) systems worldwide. The most advanced airway management techniques involving placement of oropharyngeal airways such as the Laryngeal Mask Airway or endotracheal tube. Endotracheal tube placement success is a common measure of out-of-hospital airway management quality. Regional variation in regard to training, education, and procedural exposure may be the major contributor to the findings in success and patient outcome. In studies demonstrating poor outcomes related to prehospital-attempted endotracheal intubation (ETI), both training and skill level of the provider are usually often low. Research supports a relationship between the number of intubation experiences and ETI success. National standards for certification of emergency medicine provider are in general too low to guarantee good success rate in emergency airway management by paramedics and physicians. Some paramedic training programs require more intense airway training above the national standard and some EMS systems in Europe staff their system with anesthesia providers instead. ETI remains the cornerstone of definitive prehospital airway management, However, ETI is not without risk and outcomes data remains controversial. Many systems may benefit from more input and guidance by the anesthesia department, which have higher volumes of airway management procedures and extensive training and experience not just with training of airway management but also with different airway management techniques and adjuncts. PMID:24741499

  14. Methods of airway resistance assessment.

    PubMed

    Urbankowski, Tomasz; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Airway resistance is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of the airflow in the airways. The most frequent methods used to measure airway resistance are whole-body plethysmography, the interrupter technique and the forced oscillation technique. All these methods allow to measure resistance during respiration at the level close to tidal volume, they do not require forced breathing manoeuvres or deep breathing during measurement. The most popular method for measuring airway resistance is whole-body plethysmography. The results of plethysmography include among others the following parameters: airway resistance (Raw), airway conductance (Gaw), specific airway resistance (sRaw) and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The interrupter technique is based on the assumption that at the moment of airway occlusion, air pressure in the mouth is equal to the alveolar pressure . In the forced oscillation technique (FOT), airway resistance is calculated basing on the changes in pressure and flow caused by air vibration. The methods for measurement of airway resistance that are described in the present paper seem to be a useful alternative to the most common lung function test - spirometry. The target group in which these methods may be widely used are particularly the patients who are unable to perform spirometry. PMID:27238174

  15. Supraglottic airway devices in children

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R

    2011-01-01

    Modern anaesthesia practice in children was made possible by the invention of the endotracheal tube (ET), which made lengthy and complex surgical procedures feasible without the disastrous complications of airway obstruction, aspiration of gastric contents or asphyxia. For decades, endotracheal intubation or bag-and-mask ventilation were the mainstays of airway management. In 1983, this changed with the invention of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), the first supraglottic airway device that blended features of the facemask with those of the ET, providing ease of placement and hands-free maintenance along with a relatively secure airway. The invention and development of the LMA by Dr. Archie Brain has had a significant impact on the practice of anaesthesia, management of the difficult airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children and neonates. This review article will be a brief about the clinical applications of supraglottic airways in children. PMID:22174464

  16. Temporal Monitoring of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelial Cells Using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Cornelia; Reale, Riccardo; Held, Marie; Millar, Timothy M.; Collins, Jane E.; Davies, Donna E.; Morgan, Hywel; Swindle, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    The airway epithelium is exposed to a variety of harmful agents during breathing and appropriate cellular responses are essential to maintain tissue homeostasis. Recent evidence has highlighted the contribution of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the development of many chronic respiratory diseases. Despite intense research efforts, the responses of the airway barrier to environmental agents are not fully understood, mainly due to lack of suitable in vitro models that recapitulate the complex in vivo situation accurately. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we describe a novel dynamic 3D in vitro model of the airway epithelium, incorporating fully differentiated primary human airway epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface and a basolateral microfluidic supply of nutrients simulating the interstitial flow observed in vivo. Through combination of the microfluidic culture system with an automated fraction collector the kinetics of cellular responses by the airway epithelium to environmental agents can be analysed at the early phases for the first time and with much higher sensitivity compared to common static in vitro models. Following exposure of primary differentiated epithelial cells to pollen we show that CXCL8/IL–8 release is detectable within the first 2h and peaks at 4–6h under microfluidic conditions, a response which was not observed in conventional static culture conditions. Such a microfluidic culture model is likely to have utility for high resolution temporal profiling of toxicological and pharmacological responses of the airway epithelial barrier, as well as for studies of disease mechanisms. PMID:26436734

  17. Chlorine-induced injury to the airways in mice.

    PubMed

    Martin, James G; Campbell, Holly R; Iijima, Hiroaki; Gautrin, Denyse; Malo, Jean-Luc; Eidelman, David H; Hamid, Qutayba; Maghni, Karim

    2003-09-01

    Exposure to chlorine gas (Cl2) causes occupational asthma that we hypothesized occurs through the induction of airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness by oxidative damage. Respiratory mechanics and airway responsiveness to methacholine were assessed in A/J mice 24 hours after a 5-minute exposure to 100, 200, 400, or 800 ppm Cl2 and 2 and 7 days after inhalation of 400 ppm Cl2. Airway responsiveness was higher 24 hours after 400 and 800 ppm Cl2. Responsiveness after inhalation of 400 ppm Cl2 returned to normal by 2 days but was again elevated at 7 days. Airway epithelial loss, patchy alveolar damage, proteinaceous exudates, and inflammatory cells within alveolar walls were observed in animals exposed to 800 ppm Cl2. Macrophages, granulocytes, epithelial cells, and nitrate/nitrite levels increased in lung lavage fluid. Increased inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and oxidation of lung proteins were observed. Epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages from mice exposed to 800 ppm Cl2 stained for 3-nitrotyrosine residues. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase with 1400W (1 mg/kg) abrogated the Cl2-induced changes in responsiveness. We conclude that chlorine exposure causes functional and pathological changes in the airways associated with oxidative stress. Inducible nitric oxide synthase is involved in the induction of changes in responsiveness to methacholine. PMID:12724121

  18. Temporal Monitoring of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelial Cells Using Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Blume, Cornelia; Reale, Riccardo; Held, Marie; Millar, Timothy M; Collins, Jane E; Davies, Donna E; Morgan, Hywel; Swindle, Emily J

    2015-01-01

    The airway epithelium is exposed to a variety of harmful agents during breathing and appropriate cellular responses are essential to maintain tissue homeostasis. Recent evidence has highlighted the contribution of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the development of many chronic respiratory diseases. Despite intense research efforts, the responses of the airway barrier to environmental agents are not fully understood, mainly due to lack of suitable in vitro models that recapitulate the complex in vivo situation accurately. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we describe a novel dynamic 3D in vitro model of the airway epithelium, incorporating fully differentiated primary human airway epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface and a basolateral microfluidic supply of nutrients simulating the interstitial flow observed in vivo. Through combination of the microfluidic culture system with an automated fraction collector the kinetics of cellular responses by the airway epithelium to environmental agents can be analysed at the early phases for the first time and with much higher sensitivity compared to common static in vitro models. Following exposure of primary differentiated epithelial cells to pollen we show that CXCL8/IL-8 release is detectable within the first 2h and peaks at 4-6h under microfluidic conditions, a response which was not observed in conventional static culture conditions. Such a microfluidic culture model is likely to have utility for high resolution temporal profiling of toxicological and pharmacological responses of the airway epithelial barrier, as well as for studies of disease mechanisms. PMID:26436734

  19. Management of the Traumatized Airway.

    PubMed

    Jain, Uday; McCunn, Maureen; Smith, Charles E; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence-based approach regarding the best practice for airway management in patients with a traumatized airway. General recommendations for the management of the traumatized airway are summarized in table 5. Airway trauma may not be readily apparent, and its evaluation requires a high level of suspicion for airway disruption and compression. For patients with facial trauma, control of the airway may be significantly impacted by edema, bleeding, inability to clear secretions, loss of bony support, and difficulty with face mask ventilation. With the airway compression from neck swelling or hematoma, intubation attempts can further compromise the airway due to expanding hematoma. For patients with airway disruption, the goal is to pass the tube across the injured area without disrupting it or to insert the airway distal to the injury using a surgical approach. If airway injury is extensive, a surgical airway distal to the site of injury may be the best initial approach. Alternatively, if orotracheal intubation is chosen, spontaneous ventilation may be maintained or RSI may be performed. RSI is a common approach. Thus, some of the patients intubated may subsequently require tracheostomy. A stable patient with limited injuries may not require intubation but should be watched carefully for at least several hours. Because of a paucity of evidence-based data, the choice between these approaches and the techniques utilized is a clinical decision depending on the patient's condition, clinical setting, injuries to airway and other organs, and available personnel, expertise, and equipment. Inability to obtain a definitive airway is always an absolute indication for an emergency cricothyroidotomy or surgical tracheostomy. PMID:26517857

  20. A small molecule, orally active, α4β1/α4β7 dual antagonist reduces leukocyte infiltration and airway hyper-responsiveness in an experimental model of allergic asthma in Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Cortijo, Julio; Sanz, María-Jesús; Iranzo, Arantxa; Montesinos, José Luis; Nabah, Yafa Naim Abu; Alfón, José; Gómez, Luis A; Merlos, Manuel; Morcillo, Esteban J

    2006-01-01

    α4β1 and α4β7 integrins are preferentially expressed on eosinophils and mononuclear leukocytes and play critical roles in their recruitment to inflammatory sites. We investigated the effects of TR14035, a small molecule, α4β1/α4β7 dual antagonist, in a rat model of allergic asthma. Actively sensitized rats were challenged with aerosol antigen or saline on day 21, and the responses evaluated 24 and 48-h later. TR14035 (3 mg kg−1, p.o.) was given 1-h before and 4-h after antigen or saline challenge. Airway hyper-responsiveness to intravenous 5-hydroxytryptamine was suppressed in TR14035-treated rats. Eosinophil, mononuclear cell and neutrophil counts, and eosinophil peroxidase and protein content in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were decreased in TR14035-treated rats. Histological study showed a marked reduction of lung inflammatory lesions by TR14035. At 24-h postchallenge, antigen-induced lung interleukin (IL)-5 mRNA upregulation was suppressed in TR14035-treated rats. By contrast, IL-4 levels in BALF were not significantly affected by TR14035 treatment. IL-4 selectively upregulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), which is the main endothelial ligand of α4 integrins. Intravital microscopy within the rat mesenteric microcirculation showed that 24-h exposure to 1 μg per rat of IL-4 induced a significant increase in leukocyte rolling flux, adhesion and emigration. These responses were decreased by 48, 100 and 99%, respectively in animals treated with TR14035. In conclusion, TR14035, by acting on α4β1 and α4β7 integrins, is an orally active inhibitor of airway leukocyte recruitment and hyper-responsiveness in animal models with potential interest for the treatment of asthma. PMID:16432509

  1. CTLA-4 recombinant protein genetically fused to canine Fcepsilon receptor Ialpha enhances allergen specific lymphocyte responses in experimentally sensitized dogs.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Sho; Tsukui, Toshihiro; Masuda, Kenichi; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2004-06-01

    Vaccination with a recombinant antigen fused to a targeting molecule is a potential strategy for inducing efficient immune responses. For the therapeutic purpose of allergic diseases in dogs, a DNA construct which expresses recombinant fusion protein with two functional domains, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA-4) and Fcepsilon receptor Ialpha, was developed to bridge antigen-presenting cells and IgE-allergen complex. The recombinant fusion protein expressed by the DNA construct was demonstrated to retain the ability to bind monocytes in PBMC and dog IgE, respectively. Additionally, the recombinant protein induced enhancement of allergen-induced lymphoproliferation in experimentally sensitized dogs under conditions of suboptimal allergen stimulation. These results indicated that the DNA construct could enhance allergen-induced immune responses in vivo, implying its usefulness for perspective application in immunotherapy in dogs. PMID:15240934

  2. Control of local immunity by airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Weitnauer, M; Mijošek, V; Dalpke, A H

    2016-03-01

    The lung is ventilated by thousand liters of air per day. Inevitably, the respiratory system comes into contact with airborne microbial compounds, most of them harmless contaminants. Airway epithelial cells are known to have innate sensor functions, thus being able to detect microbial danger. To avoid chronic inflammation, the pulmonary system has developed specific means to control local immune responses. Even though airway epithelial cells can act as proinflammatory promoters, we propose that under homeostatic conditions airway epithelial cells are important modulators of immune responses in the lung. In this review, we discuss epithelial cell regulatory functions that control reactivity of professional immune cells within the microenvironment of the airways and how these mechanisms are altered in pulmonary diseases. Regulation by epithelial cells can be divided into two mechanisms: (1) mediators regulate epithelial cells' innate sensitivity in cis and (2) factors are produced that limit reactivity of immune cells in trans. PMID:26627458

  3. Classification of pulmonary airway disease based on mucosal color analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Melissa; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Riker, David; Ferguson, John Scott; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    Airway mucosal color changes occur in response to the development of bronchial diseases including lung cancer, cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma. These associated changes are often visualized using standard macro-optical bronchoscopy techniques. A limitation to this form of assessment is that the subtle changes that indicate early stages in disease development may often be missed as a result of this highly subjective assessment, especially in inexperienced bronchoscopists. Tri-chromatic CCD chip bronchoscopes allow for digital color analysis of the pulmonary airway mucosa. This form of analysis may facilitate a greater understanding of airway disease response. A 2-step image classification approach is employed: the first step is to distinguish between healthy and diseased bronchoscope images and the second is to classify the detected abnormal images into 1 of 4 possible disease categories. A database of airway mucosal color constructed from healthy human volunteers is used as a standard against which statistical comparisons are made from mucosa with known apparent airway abnormalities. This approach demonstrates great promise as an effective detection and diagnosis tool to highlight potentially abnormal airway mucosa identifying a region possibly suited to further analysis via airway forceps biopsy, or newly developed micro-optical biopsy strategies. Following the identification of abnormal airway images a neural network is used to distinguish between the different disease classes. We have shown that classification of potentially diseased airway mucosa is possible through comparative color analysis of digital bronchoscope images. The combination of the two strategies appears to increase the classification accuracy in addition to greatly decreasing the computational time.

  4. Upper Airway Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Verbraecken, Johan A.; De Backer, Wilfried A.

    2009-01-01

    This review discusses the pathophysiological aspects of sleep-disordered breathing, with focus on upper airway mechanics in obstructive and central sleep apnoea, Cheyne-Stokes respiration and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. These disorders constitute the end points of a spectrum with distinct yet interrelated mechanisms that lead to substantial pathology, i.e. increased upper airway collapsibility, control of breathing instability, increased work of breathing, disturbed ventilatory system mechanics and neurohormonal changes. Concepts are changing. Although sleep apnoea is considered more and more to be an increased loop gain disorder, the central type of apnoea is now considered as an obstructive event, because it causes pharyngeal narrowing, associated with prolonged expiration. Although a unifying concept for the pathogenesis is lacking, it seems that these patients are in a vicious circle. Knowledge of common patterns of sleep-disordered breathing may help to identify these patients and guide therapy. PMID:19478479

  5. Chemosensors in the Nose: Guardians of the Airways

    PubMed Central

    Tizzano, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor molecules and downstream effectors that are used by taste buds to detect sweet, bitter, and savory tastes are also utilized by chemoresponsive cells of the airways to detect irritants. Here, we describe the different cell types in the airways that utilize taste-receptor signaling to trigger protective epithelial and neural responses to potentially dangerous toxins and bacterial infection. PMID:23280357

  6. Brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meola, Stacy D

    2013-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome is a common finding in brachycephalic breeds. A combination of primary and secondary changes can progress to life-threatening laryngeal collapse. Early recognition of primary anatomic abnormalities that include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and hypoplastic trachea would allow the clinician to make early recommendations for medical and surgical management, which can improve the quality of life in affected animals. PMID:24182996

  7. LIGHT is a crucial mediator of airway remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jen-Yu; Chiang, Shyh-Ren; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Chong, Inn-Wen; Shieh, Jiunn-Min; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2015-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory airway diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are major health problems globally. Airway epithelial cells play important role in airway remodeling, which is a critical process in the pathogenesis of diseases. This study aimed to demonstrate that LIGHT, an inflammatory factor secreted by T cells after allergen exposure, is responsible for promoting airway remodeling. LIGHT increased primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and expressing MMP-9. The induction of EMT was associated with increased NF-κB activation and p300/NF-κB association. The interaction of NF-κB with p300 facilitated NF-κB acetylation, which in turn, was bound to the promoter of ZEB1, resulting in E-cadherin downregulation. LIGHT also stimulated HBECs to produce numerous cytokines/chemokines that could worsen airway inflammation. Furthermore, LIGHT enhanced HBECs to secrete activin A, which increased bronchial smooth muscle cell (BSMC) migration. In contrast, depletion of activin A decreased such migration. The findings suggest a new molecular determinant of LIGHT-mediated pathogenic changes in HBECs and that the LIGHT-related vicious cycle involving HBECs and BSMCs may be a potential target for the treatment of chronic inflammation airway diseases with airway remodeling. PMID:25251281

  8. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 Moderates Airway Re-Epithelialization by Regulating Matrilysin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peter; McGuire, John K.; Hackman, Robert C.; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Black, Roy A.; Poindexter, Kurt; Yan, Wei; Liu, Phillip; Chen, Ann J.; Parks, William C.; Madtes, David K.

    2008-01-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) is the histopathological finding in chronic lung allograft rejection. Mounting evidence suggests that epithelial damage drives the development of airway fibrosis in OB. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 expression increases in lung allografts and is associated with the onset of allograft rejection. Furthermore, in a mouse model of OB, airway obliteration is reduced in TIMP-1-deficient mice. Matrilysin (matrix metallproteinase-7) is essential for airway epithelial repair and is required for the re-epithelialization of airway wounds by facilitating cell migration; therefore, the goal of this study was to determine whether TIMP-1 inhibits re-epithelialization through matrilysin. We found that TIMP-1 and matrilysin co-localized in the epithelium of human lungs with OB and both co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated in wounded primary airway epithelial cultures. TIMP-1-deficient cultures migrated faster, and epithelial cells spread to a greater extent compared with wild-type cultures. TIMP-1 also inhibited matrilysin-mediated cell migration and spreading in vitro. In vivo, TIMP-1 deficiency enhanced airway re-epithelialization after naphthalene injury. Furthermore, TIMP-1 and matrilysin co-localized in airway epithelial cells adjacent to the wound edge. Our data demonstrate that TIMP-1 interacts with matrix metalloproteinases and regulates matrilysin activity during airway epithelial repair. Furthermore, we speculate that TIMP-1 overexpression restricts airway re-epithelialization by inhibiting matrilysin activity, contributing to a stereotypic injury response that promotes airway fibrosis via bronchiole airway epithelial damage and obliteration. PMID:18385523

  9. Patterns of recruitment and injury in a heterogeneous airway network model.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Peter S; Jensen, Oliver E

    2015-10-01

    In respiratory distress, lung airways become flooded with liquid and may collapse due to surface-tension forces acting on air-liquid interfaces, inhibiting gas exchange. This paper proposes a mathematical multiscale model for the mechanical ventilation of a network of occluded airways, where air is forced into the network at a fixed tidal volume, allowing investigation of optimal recruitment strategies. The temporal response is derived from mechanistic models of individual airway reopening, incorporating feedback on the airway pressure due to recruitment. The model accounts for stochastic variability in airway diameter and stiffness across and between generations. For weak heterogeneity, the network is completely ventilated via one or more avalanches of recruitment (with airways recruited in quick succession), each characterized by a transient decrease in the airway pressure; avalanches become more erratic for airways that are initially more flooded. However, the time taken for complete ventilation of the network increases significantly as the network becomes more heterogeneous, leading to increased stresses on airway walls. The model predicts that the most peripheral airways are most at risk of ventilation-induced damage. A positive-end-expiratory pressure reduces the total recruitment time but at the cost of larger stresses exerted on airway walls. PMID:26423440

  10. Upper airway resistance syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hasan, N; Fletcher, E C

    1998-07-01

    Many clinicians are familiar with the clinical symptoms and signs of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In its most blatant form, OSA is complete airway obstruction with repetitive, prolonged pauses in breathing, arterial oxyhemoglobin desaturation; followed by arousal with resumption of breathing. Daytime symptoms of this disorder include excessive daytime somnolence, intellectual dysfunction, and cardiovascular effects such as systemic hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction, and stroke. It has been recently recognized that increased pharyngeal resistance with incomplete obstruction can lead to a constellation of symptoms identical to OSA called "upper airway resistance syndrome" (UARS). The typical findings of UARS on sleep study are: (1) repetitive arousals from EEG sleep coinciding with a (2) waxing and waning of the respiratory airflow pattern and (3) increased respiratory effort as measured by esophageal pressure monitoring. There may be few, if any, obvious apneas or hypopneas with desaturation, but snoring may be a very prominent finding. Treatment with nasal positive airway pressure (NCPAP) eliminates the symptoms and confirms the diagnosis. Herein we describe two typical cases of UARS. PMID:9676067

  11. Airway closure in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Dutrieue, Brigitte; Verbanck, Sylvia; Darquenne, Chantal; Prisk, G Kim

    2005-08-25

    Recent single breath washout (SBW) studies in microgravity and on the ground have suggested an important effect of airway closure on gas mixing in the human lung, reflected particularly in the phase III slope of vital capacity SBW and bolus tests. In order to explore this effect, we designed a SBW in which subjects inspired 2-l from residual volume (RV) starting with a 150 ml bolus of He and SF6. In an attempt to vary the pattern of airways closure configuration before the test, the experiments were conducted in 1G and in microgravity during parabolic flight allowing the pre-test expiration to RV to be either in microgravity or at 1.8 G, with the actual test gas inhalation performed entirely in microgravity. Contrary to our expectations, the measured phase III slope and phase IV height and volume obtained from seven subjects in microgravity were essentially identical irrespective of the gravity level during the pre-test expiration to RV. The results suggest that airway closure configuration at RV before the test inspiration has no apparent impact on phases III and IV generation. PMID:15979418

  12. Research Upregulation of CD23 (FcεRII) Expression in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells (huASMC) in Response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Belleau, Joseph T; Gandhi, Radha K; McPherson, Holly M; Lew, D Betty

    2005-01-01

    Background Airway smooth muscle cells play a key role in remodeling that contributes to airway hyperreactivity. Airway smooth muscle remodeling includes hypertrophy and hyperplasia. It has been previously shown that the expression of CD23 on ASMC in rabbits can be induced by the IgE component of the atopic serum. We examined if other components of atopic serum are capable of inducing CD23 expression independent of IgE. Methods Serum starved huASMC were stimulated with either IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-13, IL-5, PGD2, LTD4, tryptase or a combination of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 each with GM-CSF for a period of 24 h. CD23 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, western blot, and indirect immunofluorescence. Results The CD23 protein expression was upregulated in huASMC in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The percentage of cells with increased fluorescence intensity above the control was 25.1 ± 4.2% (IL-4), 15.6 ± 2.7% (GM-CSF) and 32.9 ± 13.9% (IL-4/GMCSF combination)(n = 3). The protein content of IL-4/GMCSF stimulated cells was significantly elevated. Expression of CD23 in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-4/GM-CSF was accompanied by changes in cell morphology including depolymerization of isoactin fibers, cell spreading, and membrane ruffling. Western blot revealed abundant expression of the IL-4Rα and a low level expression of IL-2Rγc in huASMC. Stimulation with IL-4 resulted in the phosphorylation of STAT-6 and an increase in the expression of the IL-2Rγc. Conclusion CD23 on huASMC is upregulated by IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The expression of CD23 is accompanied by an increase in cell volume and an increase in protein content per cell, suggesting hypertrophy. Upregulation of CD23 by IL-4/GM-CSF results in phenotypic changes in huASMC that could play a role in cell migration or a change in the synthetic function of the cells. Upregulation of CD23 in huASMC by IL-4 and GM-CSF can contribute to changes in huASMC and may provide an avenue for new therapeutic options

  13. A new compound, 1H,8H-pyrano[3,4-c]pyran-1,8-dione, suppresses airway epithelial cell inflammatory responses in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Han, A R; Kim, Y; Choi, S H; Ko, E; Lee, N Y; Jeong, J H; Kim, S H; Bae, H

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have established eosinophilia as a sign of allergic disorders. Activation of eosinophils in the airways is believed to cause epithelial tissue injury, contraction of airway smooth muscle and increased bronchial responsiveness. As part of the search for new antiasthmatic agents produced by medicinal plants, the effects of 270 standardized medicinal plant extracts on cytokine-activated A549 human lung epithelial cells were evaluated. After several rounds of activity-guided screening, the new natural compound, 1H,8H-Pyrano[3,4-c]pyran-1,8-dione (PPY), was isolated from Vitex rotundifolia L. To elucidate the mechanism by which the anti-asthmatic responses of PPY occurred in vitro, lung epithelial cells (A549 cell) were stimulated with TNF-alpha, IL-4 and IL-1beta to induce the expression of chemokines and adhesion molecules involved in eosinophil chemotaxis. PPY treatments reduced the expression of eotaxin, IL-8, IL-16 and VCAM-1 mRNA significantly. Additionally, PPY reduced eotaxin secretion in a dose-dependent manner and significantly inhibited eosinophil migration toward A549 medium. In addition, PPY treatment suppressed the phosphorylation of p65 and ERK1/2, suggesting that it can inhibit the MAPK/NF-KB pathway. To clarify the anti-inflammatory and antiasthmatic effects of PPY in vivo, we examined the influence of PPY on the development of pulmonary eosinophilic inflammation in a murine model of asthma. To accomplish this, mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) and then examined for the following typical asthmatic reactions: an increase in the number of eosinophils in BALF; the presence of Th2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-5 in the BALF; the presence of allergen-specific IgE in the serum; and a marked influx of inflammatory cells into the lung. Taken together, our results revealed that PPY exerts profound inhibitory effects on the accumulation of eosinophils into the airways while reducing the levels of IL-4, IL-5

  14. The early asthmatic response is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondria activity as revealed by proteomic analysis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The inhalation of allergens by allergic asthmatics results in the early asthmatic response (EAR), which is characterized by acute airway obstruction beginning within a few minutes. The EAR is the earliest indicator of the pathological progression of allergic asthma. Because the molecular mechanism underlying the EAR is not fully defined, this study will contribute to a better understanding of asthma. Methods In order to gain insight into the molecular basis of the EAR, we examined changes in protein expression patterns in the lung tissue of asthmatic rats during the EAR using 2-DE/MS-based proteomic techniques. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic data was then performed using PPI Spider and KEGG Spider to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism. Results In total, 44 differentially expressed protein spots were detected in the 2-DE gels. Of these 44 protein spots, 42 corresponded to 36 unique proteins successfully identified using mass spectrometry. During subsequent bioinformatic analysis, the gene ontology classification, the protein-protein interaction networking and the biological pathway exploration demonstrated that the identified proteins were mainly involved in glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity. Using western blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed the changes in expression of five selected proteins, which further supports our proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Conclusions Our results reveal that the allergen-induced EAR in asthmatic rats is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity, which could establish a functional network in which calcium binding may play a central role in promoting the progression of asthma. PMID:20691077

  15. Use of a Canine Model of Atopic Dermatitis to Investigate the Efficacy of a CCR4 Antagonist in Allergen-Induced Skin Inflammation in a Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Murray, Clare; Ahrens, Kim; Devalaraja, Matt; Dymond, Mike; Fagura, Malbinder; Hargreaves, Adam; Holt, Alison; Peers, Ian; Price, Sally; Reens, Jaimini; Riley, Rob; Marsella, Rosanna

    2016-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammator