Science.gov

Sample records for allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation

  1. Immune Modulatory Effects of IL-22 on Allergen-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ping; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Yuqi; Kolls, Jay K.; Zheng, Tao; Zhu, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    IL-22 is a Th17/Th22 cytokine that is increased in asthma. However, recent animal studies showed controversial findings in the effects of IL-22 in allergic asthma. To determine the role of IL-22 in ovalbumin-induced allergic inflammation we generated inducible lung-specific IL-22 transgenic mice. Transgenic IL-22 expression and signaling activity in the lung were determined. Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced pulmonary inflammation, immune responses, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) were examined and compared between IL-22 transgenic mice and wild type controls. Following doxycycline (Dox) induction, IL-22 protein was readily detected in the large (CC10 promoter) and small (SPC promoter) airway epithelial cells. IL-22 signaling was evidenced by phosphorylated STAT3. After OVA sensitization and challenge, compared to wild type littermates, IL-22 transgenic mice showed decreased eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and in lung tissue, decreased mucus metaplasia in the airways, and reduced AHR. Among the cytokines and chemokines examined, IL-13 levels were reduced in the BAL fluid as well as in lymphocytes from local draining lymph nodes of IL-22 transgenic mice. No effect was seen on the levels of serum total or OVA-specific IgE or IgG. These findings indicate that IL-22 has immune modulatory effects on pulmonary inflammatory responses in allergen-induced asthma. PMID:25254361

  2. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) reduces vascular endothelial growth factor expression in allergen-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Seoung Ju; Lee, Ho Kyung; Park, Hee Sun; Min, Kyung Hoon; Jin, Sun Mi; Lee, Yong Chul

    2006-06-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been implicated in regulating cell survival signaling through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. The key role of PI3K in VEGF-mediated signal transduction is established. However, the effects of PTEN on VEGF-mediated signaling in asthma are unknown. This study aimed to determine the effect of PI3K inhibitors and PTEN on VEGF expression in allergen-induced airway inflammation. We have used a female C57BL/6 mouse model for asthma to determine the role of PTEN in allergen-induced airway inflammation, specifically in the expression of VEGF. Allergen-induced airway inflammation leads to increased activity of PI3K in lung tissue. These mice develop the following typical pathophysiological features of asthma in the lungs: increased numbers of inflammatory cells of the airways; airway hyper-responsiveness; increased expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and eotaxin; increased vascular permeability; and increased levels of VEGF. Administration of PI3K inhibitors or adenoviruses carrying PTEN cDNA reduced the symptoms of asthma and decreased the increased levels of plasma extravasation and VEGF in allergen-induced asthmatic lungs. These results indicate that PTEN reduces VEGF expression in allergen-induced airway inflammation.

  3. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  4. S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase Inhibition Regulates Allergen-Induced Lung Inflammation and Airway Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, David J. P.; Bradley, Matthews O.; Jaffar, Zeina

    2013-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by Th2 type inflammation, leading to airway hyperresponsivenes, mucus hypersecretion and tissue remodeling. S-Nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) is an alcohol dehydrogenase involved in the regulation of intracellular levels of S-nitrosothiols. GSNOR activity has been shown to be elevated in human asthmatic lungs, resulting in diminished S-nitrosothiols and thus contributing to increased airway hyperreactivity. Using a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we report that intranasal administration of a new selective inhibitor of GSNOR, SPL-334, caused a marked reduction in airway hyperreactivity, allergen-specific T cells and eosinophil accumulation, and mucus production in the lungs in response to allergen inhalation. Moreover, SPL-334 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the production of the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 and the level of the chemokine CCL11 (eotaxin-1) in the airways. Collectively, these observations reveal that GSNOR inhibitors are effective not only in reducing airway hyperresponsiveness but also in limiting lung inflammatory responses mediated by CD4+ Th2 cells. These findings suggest that the inhibition of GSNOR may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:23936192

  5. The effects of an epithelial barrier protective cationic aerosol on allergen-induced airway inflammation in asthma: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Nair, P; Denis, S; Cancelliere, L; Radford, K; Efthimiadis, A; Rosano, M; Hanrahan, J

    2014-09-01

    Inhaled cationic airway lining modulator (iCALM) is a cationic aerosol therapy comprised of 1.29% calcium chloride dissolved in 0.9% isotonic saline that enhances the biophysical barrier function of the airway lining fluid and primes the host defense response. It's ability to attenuate bronchitis caused by inhaled particles was investigated using an allergen-inhalation model in a proof-of-concept study. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial of 6 mild atopic steroid-naïve asthmatic subjects, 3 doses of iCALM were well tolerated and they attenuated allergen-induced increase in sputum eosinophils, and levels of IL-5, MCP-1 and eotaxin. This study provides an opportunity to investigate the role of enhancing epithelial barrier to decrease airway inflammation provoked by inhaled particles in a variety of airway diseases.

  6. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  7. Inhallation of e-Cigarette Cartridge Solution Aggravates Allergen-induced Airway Inflammation and Hyper-responsiveness in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are becoming increasingly popular worldwide and their cellular effects warrant further evaluation. In this study, we investigated the effects of an e-cigarette cartridge solution on allergen related asthmatic airway inflammation (AI) and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), when it is delivered by intratracheal route in mice. Asthmatic AI and AHR were induced by systemic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) followed by intratracheal, intraperitoneal, and aerosol allergen challenges in BALB/c mice. The cartridge solution of e-cigarette (containing 16 mg/ml nicotine) was diluted 50 times and 100 μl of the diluted solution was intratracheally instilled to OVA-sensitized (OVA-S) mice two times a week for 10 weeks. Long-term e-cigarette inhalation elicited no remarkable changes in the activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase enzymes in serum, however, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells including eosinophils, into airways from blood, aggravated the asthmatic AI and AHR, and stimulated the production of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13, and OVA-specific IgE production. Our data suggest that the inhalation of e-cigarette solutions can function as an important factor to exacerbate the allergy-induced asthma symptoms. Further studies are needed to address the effects of e-cigarette solutions on human health. PMID:24795794

  8. Inflammation in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Price, Laura C; Wort, S John; Perros, Frédéric; Dorfmüller, Peter; Huertas, Alice; Montani, David; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling of the precapillary pulmonary arteries, with excessive proliferation of vascular cells. Although the exact pathophysiology remains unknown, there is increasing evidence to suggest an important role for inflammation. Firstly, pathologic specimens from patients with PAH reveal an accumulation of perivascular inflammatory cells, including macrophages, dendritic cells, T and B lymphocytes, and mast cells. Secondly, circulating levels of certain cytokines and chemokines are elevated, and these may correlate with a worse clinical outcome. Thirdly, certain inflammatory conditions such as connective tissue diseases are associated with an increased incidence of PAH. Finally, treatment of the underlying inflammatory condition may alleviate the associated PAH. Underlying pathologic mechanisms are likely to be "multihit" and complex. For instance, the inflammatory response may be regulated by bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR II) status, and, in turn, BMPR II expression can be altered by certain cytokines. Although antiinflammatory therapies have been effective in certain connective-tissue-disease-associated PAH, this approach is untested in idiopathic PAH (iPAH). The potential benefit of antiinflammatory therapies in iPAH is of importance and requires further study. PMID:22215829

  9. Effects of prior oral exposure to combinations of environmental immunosuppressive agents on ovalbumin allergen-induced allergic airway inflammation in Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Tomoki; Nishino, Risako; Kosaka, Tadashi; Watanabe, Yuko; Kurosawa, Yoshimi; Ueda, Hideo; Harada, Takanori

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Humans are exposed daily to multiple environmental chemicals in the atmosphere, in food, and in commercial products. Therefore, hazard identification and risk management must account for exposure to chemical mixtures. The objective of the study reported here was to investigate the effects of combinations of three well-known environmental immunotoxic chemicals - methoxychlor (MXC), an organochlorine compound; parathion (PARA), an organophosphate compound; and piperonyl butoxide (PBO), an agricultural insecticide synergist - by using a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airway inflammation. Four-week-old Balb/c mice were exposed orally to either one or two of the environmental immunotoxic chemicals for five consecutive days, prior to intraperitoneal sensitization with OVA and an inhalation challenge. We assessed IgE levels in serum, B-cell counts, and cytokine production in hilar lymph nodes, and differential cell counts and levels of related chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Mice treated with MXC + PARA or PBO + MXC showed marked increases in serum IgE, IgE-positive B-cells and cytokines in lymph nodes, and differential cell counts and related chemokines in BALF compared with mice that received the vehicle control or the corresponding individual test substances. These results suggest that simultaneous exposure to multiple environmental chemicals aggravates allergic airway inflammation more than exposure to individual chemicals. It is expected that the results of this study will help others in their evaluation of immunotoxic combinational effects when conducting assessments of the safety of environmental/occupational chemicals.

  10. Allergens induce enhanced bronchoconstriction and leukotriene production in C5 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    McKinley, Laura; Kim, Jiyoun; Bolgos, Gerald L; Siddiqui, Javed; Remick, Daniel G

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous genetic analysis has shown that a deletion in the complement component 5 gene-coding region renders mice more susceptible to allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) due to reduced IL-12 production. We investigated the role of complement in a murine model of asthma-like pulmonary inflammation. Methods In order to evaluate the role of complement B10 mice either sufficient or deficient in C5 were studied. Both groups of mice immunized and challenged with a house dust extract (HDE) containing high levels of cockroach allergens. Airways hyper-reactivity was determined with whole-body plesthysmography. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed to determine pulmonary cellular recruitment and measure inflammatory mediators. Lung homogenates were assayed for mediators and plasma levels of IgE determined. Pulmonary histology was also evaluated. Results C5-deficient mice showed enhanced AHR to methylcholine challenge, 474% and 91% increase above baseline Penh in C5-deficient and C5-sufficient mice respectively, p < 0.001. IL-12 levels in the lung homogenate (LH) were only slightly reduced and BAL IL-12 was comparable in C5-sufficient and C5-deficient mice. However, C5-deficient mice had significantly higher cysteinyl-leukotriene levels in the BAL fluid, 1913 +/- 246 pg/ml in C5d and 756 +/- 232 pg/ml in C5-sufficient, p = 0.003. Conclusion These data demonstrate that C5-deficient mice show enhanced AHR due to increased production of cysteinyl-leukotrienes. PMID:17044927

  11. Physicochemical characteristics of nanomaterials that affect pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The increasing manufacture and use of products based on nanotechnology raises concerns for both workers and consumers. Various studies report induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanoparticles, which can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Each of these aspects can affect their toxicity, although it is largely unknown to what extent. The aim of the current review is to analyse published data on inhalation of nanoparticles to identify and evaluate the contribution of their physicochemical characteristics to the onset and development of pulmonary inflammation. Many physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles affect their lung deposition, clearance, and pulmonary response that, in combination, ultimately determine whether pulmonary inflammation will occur and to what extent. Lung deposition is mainly determined by the physical properties of the aerosol (size, density, shape, hygroscopicity) in relation to airflow and the anatomy of the respiratory system, whereas clearance and translocation of nanoparticles are mainly determined by their geometry and surface characteristics. Besides size and chemical composition, other physicochemical characteristics influence the induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation. As some nanoparticles dissolve, they can release toxic ions that can damage the lung tissue, making dissolution rate an important characteristic that affects lung inflammation. Fibre-shaped materials are more toxic to the lungs compared to spherical shaped nanoparticles of the same chemical composition. In general, cationic nanoparticles are more cytotoxic than neutral or anionic nanoparticles. Finally, surface reactivity correlates well with observed pulmonary inflammation. With all these characteristics affecting different stages of the events leading to pulmonary inflammation, no unifying dose metric could be identified to describe pulmonary

  12. CCR4 in human allergen-induced late responses in the skin and lung.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Aria, Kayhan T; Wilson, Duncan; Francis, James N; Jopling, Louise A; Jacobson, Mikila R; Hodge, Martin R; Andrew, David P; Till, Stephen J; Varga, Eva-Maria; Williams, Timothy J; Pease, James E; Lloyd, Clare M; Sabroe, Ian; Durham, Stephen R

    2002-07-01

    We studied the regulation of CCR4 expression in peripheral blood and in human models of cutaneous and pulmonary allergen challenge. CCR4 expression was detectable on freshly isolated CD4+ lymphocytes and in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines derived from blood of atopic donors. Numbers of CCR4+ cells were up-regulated in T cell lines expanded in the presence of IL-4. CCR4 mRNA was absent at baseline in normal subjects in lung and skin, but present at baseline in the lung of some atopics. Baseline expression of CCR4 mRNA and protein was higher in lung vs. skin, but allergen-induced increases in CCR4 mRNA+ cells were observed in both organs. CCR4 protein+ cells were present at higher levels after allergen challenge in atopics compared to normal subjects. CCR4 may be important in the recruitment of T lymphocytes at sites of allergic inflammation, in a non-organ-specific manner.

  13. Inflammation and immunity in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rabinovitch, Marlene; Guignabert, Christophe; Humbert, Marc; Nicolls, Mark R

    2014-06-20

    This review summarizes an expanding body of knowledge indicating that failure to resolve inflammation and altered immune processes underlie the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. The chemokines and cytokines implicated in pulmonary arterial hypertension that could form a biomarker platform are discussed. Pre-clinical studies that provide the basis for dysregulated immunity in animal models of the disease are reviewed. In addition, we present therapies that target inflammatory/immune mechanisms that are currently enrolling patients, and discuss others in development. We show how genetic and metabolic abnormalities are inextricably linked to dysregulated immunity and adverse remodeling in the pulmonary arteries. PMID:24951765

  14. Semaphorin 7A Aggravates Pulmonary Inflammation during Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Mariella; Granja, Tiago Folgosa; Rosenberger, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The extent of pulmonary inflammation during lung injury ultimately determines patient outcome. Pulmonary inflammation is initiated by the migration of neutrophils into the alveolar space. Recent work has demonstrated that the guidance protein semaphorin 7A (SEMA7A) influences the migration of neutrophils into hypoxic tissue sites, yet, its role during lung injury is not well understood. Here, we report that the expression of SEMA7A is induced in vitro through pro-inflammatory cytokines. SEMA7A itself induces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in endothelial and epithelial cells, enhancing pulmonary inflammation. The induction of SEMA7A facilitates the transendothelial migration of neutrophils. In vivo, animals with deletion of SEMA7A expression showed reduced signs of pulmonary inflammatory changes following lipopolysaccharide challenge. We define here the role of SEMA7A in the development of lung injury and identify a potential pathway to interfere with these detrimental changes. Future anti-inflammatory strategies for the treatment of lung injury might be based on this finding. PMID:26752048

  15. Biology of diesel exhaust effects on allergic pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Takano, Hirohisa

    2011-03-01

    Although the adverse health effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) have been proposed and are being clarified, their facilitating effects on preexisting pathological conditions (pathological conditions) have not been fully identified. On the other hand, there exist hypersensitive subjects against particulate matters. In this review, we provide insights into the immunotoxicity of DEP as an aggravating factor in hypersusceptible subjects, especially those with allergic pulmonary diseases using our in vivo experimental model. In brief, we examined the effects of DEP on allergic asthma in vivo, and showed that repetitive pulmonary exposure to DEP has promoting effects on allergic airway inflammation, including adjuvanticity on Th2-milieu. Further, we propose a causal machinery regarding the adverse impacts, i.e., via inappropriate activation of antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells.

  16. Systemic inflammation after inspiratory loading in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, Antonia; Sauleda, Jaume; Sala, Ernest; Barceló, Bernardí; Pons, Jaume; Carrera, Miguel; Noguera, Aina; Togores, Bernat; Agustí, Alvar GN

    2008-01-01

    Objective Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present systemic inflammation. Strenuous resistive breathing induces systemic inflammation in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that the increased respiratory load that characterizes COPD can contribute to systemic inflammation in these patients. Patients and methods To test this hypothesis, we compared leukocyte numbers and levels of circulating cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFα], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10), before and 1 hour after maximal incremental inspiratory loading in 13 patients with stable COPD (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] 29 ± 2.5% ref) and in 8 healthy sedentary subjects (FEV1 98 ± 5% ref). Results We found that: (1) at baseline, patients with COPD showed higher leukocyte counts and IL-8 levels than controls (p < 0.01); and, (2) one hour after maximal inspiratory loading these values were unchanged, except for IL-10, which increased in controls (p < 0.05) but not in patients with COPD. Conclusions This study confirms the presence of systemic inflammation in COPD, shows that maximal inspiratory loading does not increase the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-8) in COPD patients or controls, but suggests that the former may be unable to mount an appropriate systemic anti-inflammatory response to exercise. PMID:18488438

  17. ICAM-1 Targeted Nanogels Loaded with Dexamethasone Alleviate Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Coll Ferrer, M. Carme; Shuvaev, Vladimir V.; Zern, Blaine J.; Composto, Russell J.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.; Eckmann, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysozyme dextran nanogels (NG) have great potential in vitro as a drug delivery platform, combining simple chemistry with rapid uptake and cargo release in target cells with “stealth” properties and low toxicity. In this work, we study for the first time the potential of targeted NG as a drug delivery platform in vivo to alleviate acute pulmonary inflammation in animal model of LPS-induced lung injury. NG are targeted to the endothelium via conjugation with an antibody (Ab) directed to Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1(ICAM-NG), whereas IgG conjugated NG (IgG-NG) are used for control formulations. The amount of Ab conjugated to the NG and distribution in the body after intravenous (IV) injection have been quantitatively analyzed using a tracer isotope-labeled [125I]IgG. As a proof of concept, Ab-NG are loaded with dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory therapeutic, and the drug uptake and release kinetics are measured by HPLC. In vivo studies in mice showed that: i) ICAM-NG accumulates in mouse lungs (∼120% ID/g vs ∼15% ID/g of IgG-NG); and, ii) DEX encapsulated in ICAM-NG, but not in IgG-NG practically blocks LPS-induced overexpression of pro-inflammatory cell adhesion molecules including ICAM-1 in the pulmonary inflammation. PMID:25019304

  18. Systemic Microvascular Dysfunction and Inflammation after Pulmonary Particulate Matter Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Porter, Dale W.; Barger, Mark; Millecchia, Lyndell; Rao, K. Murali K.; Marvar, Paul J.; Hubbs, Ann F.; Castranova, Vincent; Boegehold, Matthew A.

    2006-01-01

    The epidemiologic association between pulmonary exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) and cardiovascular dysfunction is well known, but the systemic mechanisms that drive this effect remain unclear. We have previously shown that acute pulmonary exposure to PM impairs or abolishes endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation in the rat spinotrapezius muscle. The purpose of this study was to further characterize the effect of pulmonary PM exposure on systemic microvascular function and to identify local inflammatory events that may contribute to these effects. Rats were intratracheally instilled with residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or titanium dioxide at 0.1 or 0.25 mg/rat 24 hr before measurement of pulmonary and systemic microvascular responses. In vivo microscopy of the spinotrapezius muscle was used to study systemic arteriolar responses to intraluminal infusion of the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 or iontophoretic abluminal application of the adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PHE). Leukocyte rolling and adhesion were quantified in venules paired with the studied arterioles. Histologic techniques were used to assess pulmonary inflammation, characterize the adherence of leukocytes to systemic venules, verify the presence of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the systemic microvascular wall, and quantify systemic microvascular oxidative stress. In the lungs of rats exposed to ROFA or TiO2, changes in some bronchoalveolar lavage markers of inflammation were noted, but an indication of cellular damage was not found. In rats exposed to 0.1 mg ROFA, focal alveolitis was evident, particularly at sites of particle deposition. Exposure to either ROFA or TiO2 caused a dose-dependent impairment of endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation. However, exposure to these particles did not affect microvascular constriction in response to PHE. ROFA and TiO2 exposure significantly increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion in paired venules, and these cells were positively identified as

  19. Systemic microvascular dysfunction and inflammation after pulmonary particulate matter exposure.

    PubMed

    Nurkiewicz, Timothy R; Porter, Dale W; Barger, Mark; Millecchia, Lyndell; Rao, K Murali K; Marvar, Paul J; Hubbs, Ann F; Castranova, Vincent; Boegehold, Matthew A

    2006-03-01

    The epidemiologic association between pulmonary exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) and cardiovascular dysfunction is well known, but the systemic mechanisms that drive this effect remain unclear. We have previously shown that acute pulmonary exposure to PM impairs or abolishes endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation in the rat spinotrapezius muscle. The purpose of this study was to further characterize the effect of pulmonary PM exposure on systemic microvascular function and to identify local inflammatory events that may contribute to these effects. Rats were intratracheally instilled with residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or titanium dioxide at 0.1 or 0.25 mg/rat 24 hr before measurement of pulmonary and systemic microvascular responses. In vivo microscopy of the spinotrapezius muscle was used to study systemic arteriolar responses to intraluminal infusion of the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 or iontophoretic abluminal application of the adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PHE). Leukocyte rolling and adhesion were quantified in venules paired with the studied arterioles. Histologic techniques were used to assess pulmonary inflammation, characterize the adherence of leukocytes to systemic venules, verify the presence of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the systemic microvascular wall, and quantify systemic microvascular oxidative stress. In the lungs of rats exposed to ROFA or TiO2, changes in some bronchoalveolar lavage markers of inflammation were noted, but an indication of cellular damage was not found. In rats exposed to 0.1 mg ROFA, focal alveolitis was evident, particularly at sites of particle deposition. Exposure to either ROFA or TiO2 caused a dose-dependent impairment of endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation. However, exposure to these particles did not affect microvascular constriction in response to PHE. ROFA and TiO2 exposure significantly increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion in paired venules, and these cells were positively identified as

  20. Asiatic acid inhibits pulmonary inflammation induced by cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Won; Park, Hyun Ah; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Jang, Yin-Gi; Kim, Ju Yeong; Choi, Bo Kyung; Lee, Hee Jae; Lee, Sangwoo; Paik, Jin-Hyub; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Ahn, Kyung-Seop; Lee, Hyun-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Asiatic acid (AA) is one of the major components of Titrated extract of Centella asiatica (TECA), which has been reported to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of AA on pulmonary inflammation induced by cigarette smoke (CS). AA significantly attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of CS exposure mice. AA also decreased ROS production and NE activity, and inhibited the release of proinflammatory cytokines in BALF. AA reduced the recruitment of inflammatory cells and MCP-1 expression in lung tissue of CS exposure mice. AA also attenuated mucus overproduction, and decreased the activation of MAPKs and NF-kB in lung tissue. Furthermore, AA increased HO-1 expression and inhibited the reduced expression of SOD3 in lung tissue. These findings indicate that AA effectively inhibits pulmonary inflammatory response, which is an important process in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) via suppression of inflammatory mediators and induction of HO-1. Therefore, we suggest that AA has the potential to treat inflammatory disease such as COPD.

  1. Inhalation of Carbon Black Nanoparticles Aggravates Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saputra, Devina; Yoon, Jin-ha; Park, Hyunju; Heo, Yongju; Yang, Hyoseon; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Sangjin; Song, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyuhong

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of recent studies have focused on the impact of particulate matter on human health. As a model for atmospheric particulate inhalation, we investigated the effects of inhaled carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP) on mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The CNBPs were generated by a novel aerosolization process, and the mice were exposed to the aerosol for 4 hours. We found that CBNP inhalation exacerbated lung inflammation, as evidenced by histopathology analysis and by the expression levels of interleukin-6 protein, fibronectin, and interferon-γ mRNAs in lung tissues. Notably, fibronectin mRNA expression showed a statistically significant increase in expression after CBNP exposure. These data suggest that the concentration of CBNPs delivered (calculated to be 12.5 μg/m3) can aggravate lung inflammation in mice. Our results also suggest that the inhalation of ultrafine particles like PM 2.5 is an impactful environmental risk factor for humans, particularly in susceptible populations with predisposing lung conditions. PMID:25071917

  2. Immune Inflammation and Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Balestro, Elisabetta; Calabrese, Fiorella; Turato, Graziella; Lunardi, Francesca; Bazzan, Erica; Marulli, Giuseppe; Biondini, Davide; Rossi, Emanuela; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Rea, Federico; Rigobello, Chiara; Gregori, Dario; Baraldo, Simonetta; Spagnolo, Paolo; Cosio, Manuel G; Saetta, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The clinical course in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is highly heterogeneous, with some patients having a slow progression and others an accelerated clinical and functional decline. This study aims to clinically characterize the type of progression in IPF and to investigate the pathological basis that might account for the observed differences in disease behavior. Clinical and functional data were analyzed in 73 IPF patients, followed long-time as candidates for lung transplantation. The forced vital capacity (FVC) change/year (< or ≥10% predicted) was used to define "slow" or "rapid" disease progression. Pathological abnormalities were quantified in the explanted lung of 41 out of 73 patients undergoing lung transplantation. At diagnosis, slow progressors (n = 48) showed longer duration of symptoms and lower FVC than rapid progressors (n = 25). Eleven slow and 3 rapid progressors developed an acute exacerbation (AE) during follow-up. Quantitative lung pathology showed a severe innate and adaptive inflammatory infiltrate in rapid progressors, markedly increased compared to slow progressors and similar to that observed in patients experiencing AE. The extent of inflammation was correlated with the yearly FVC decline (r = 0.52, p = 0.005). In conclusion an innate and adaptive inflammation appears to be a prominent feature in the lung of patients with IPF and could contribute to determining of the rate of disease progression. PMID:27159038

  3. Establishment of a mouse model for pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis by intratracheal instillation of polyhexamethyleneguanidine phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Jin; Park, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Jun-Young; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Song, Jeong Ah; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Dong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Although several animal models have been developed to study human pulmonary fibrosis, lack of a perfect model has raised the need for various animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we evaluated the pulmonary effect of polyhexamethyleneguanidine phosphate instillation into the lungs of mice to determine the potential of these mice as a murine model of pulmonary fibrosis. Intratracheal instillation of polyhexamethyleneguanidine phosphate induced severe lung inflammation manifested by the infiltration of mononuclear cells and neutrophils and increased production of IL-6, TNF-α, CCL2 and CXCL1. The lung inflammation gradually increased until 28 days after polyhexamethyleneguanidine phosphate exposure, and increases of collagen deposition and TGF-β production, which are indicators of pulmonary fibrosis, were seen. Our study showed that intratracheal instillation of polyhexamethyleneguanidine phosphate induces pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice. PMID:27182113

  4. Familial idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Evidence of lung inflammation in unaffected family members

    SciTech Connect

    Bitterman, P.B.; Rennard, S.I.; Keogh, B.A.; Wewers, M.D.; Adelberg, S.; Crystal, R.G.

    1986-05-22

    We evaluated 17 clinically unaffected members of three families with an autosomal dominant form of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis for evidence of alveolar inflammation. Each person in the study was examined by gallium-67 scanning for a general estimate of pulmonary inflammation, and by bronchoalveolar lavage for characterization of the types of recovered cells and their state of activation. Eight of the 17 subjects had evidence of alveolar inflammation on the lavage studies. Supporting data included increased numbers of neutrophils and activated macrophages that released one or more neutrophil chemoattractants, and growth factors for lung fibroblasts--findings similar to those observed in patients with overt idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Four of these eight also had a positive gallium scan; in all the other clinically unaffected subjects the scan was normal. During a follow-up of two to four years in seven of the eight subjects who had evidence of inflammation, no clinical evidence of pulmonary fibrosis has appeared. These results indicate that alveolar inflammation occurs in approximately half the clinically unaffected family members at risk of inheriting autosomal dominant idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Whether these persons with evidence of pulmonary inflammation but no fibrosis will proceed to have clinically evident pulmonary fibrosis is not yet known.

  5. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and dysregulated iron homeostatis in rat models of cardiovascular disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms ofvariation in susceptibility. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and altere...

  6. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  7. Protective role of interleukin-10 in Ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The mechanisms underlying ozone (03)-induced pulmonary inflammation remain unclear. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that is known to inhibit inflammatory mediators. Objectives: We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying interleuken-10...

  8. Balance impairment and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Tudorache, Emanuela; Oancea, Cristian; Avram, Claudiu; Fira-Mladinescu, Ovidiu; Petrescu, Lucian; Timar, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Background/purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in severe forms, is commonly associated with systemic inflammation and balance impairment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact on equilibrium of stable and exacerbation (acute exacerbation of COPD [AECOPD]) phases of COPD and to investigate if there is a connection between lower extremity muscle weakness and systemic inflammation. Methods We enrolled 41 patients with COPD (22 stable and 19 in AECOPD) and 20 healthy subjects (control group), having no significant differences regarding the anthropometric data. We analyzed the differences in balance tests scores: Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) questionnaire, Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, Single Leg Stance (SLS), 6-minute walking distance (6MWD), isometric knee extension (IKE) between these groups, and also the correlation between these scores and inflammatory biomarkers. Results The presence and severity of COPD was associated with significantly decreased score in IKE (P<0.001), 6MWD (P<0.001), SLS (P<0.001), and BBS (P<0.001), at the same time noting a significant increase in median TUG score across the studied groups (P<0.001). The AECOPD group vs stable group presented a significant increase in high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels (10.60 vs 4.01; P=0.003) and decrease in PaO2 (70.1 vs 59.1; P<0.001). We observed that both IKE scores were significantly and positive correlated with all the respiratory volumes. In both COPD groups, we observed that fibrinogen reversely and significantly correlated with the 6MWD, and FES-I questionnaire is correlated positively with TUG test. Hs-CRP correlated reversely with the walking test and SLS test, while correlating positively with TUG test and FES-I questionnaire. Conclusion According to this study, COPD in advanced and acute stages is associated with an increased history of falls, systemic inflammation, balance impairment, and lower extremity

  9. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  10. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  11. Skeletal muscle response to inflammation--lessons for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, W Darlene; Rurak, Jennifer; Harris, R Luke

    2009-10-01

    To describe how inflammation affects muscle adaptation and performance in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, an increasingly sedentary lifestyle is a primary contributor to muscle dysfunction that results in a loss of mobility and independence and, ultimately, mortality. Given the systemic chronic inflammation and profound limb muscle atrophy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, it is tempting to speculate that the inflammatory process is deleterious to skeletal muscle. In healthy people, however, the inflammatory process initially is dominated by a destructive phase that is tightly regulated and modulates a reparative, regenerative phase. Although the inflammatory process and associated oxidative stress is more closely connected to muscle wasting in animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the causative role of inflammation toward muscle atrophy and weakness in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has not been definitively shown. Anti-inflammatory interventions aimed toward tempering muscle wasting and weakness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may not prove to be beneficial because of longer-term disruption of the regeneration of muscle tissue. Temporally and spatially targeted interventions aimed toward ameliorating oxidative stress, such as antioxidants, nutritional supplements, and chronic exercise training, may optimize outcomes toward maintaining muscle mass and performance.

  12. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves clinical features and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Gomes, Evelim Leal Freitas Dantas; Greiffo, Flavia Regina; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Stirbulov, Roberto; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease characterized by chronic airflow limitation that leads beyond the pulmonary changes to important systemic effects. COPD is characterized by pulmonary and systemic inflammation. However, increases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma are found even when the disease is stable. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves physical exercise capacity and quality of life and decreases dyspnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR) program improves exercise tolerance in COPD patients, as well as health-related quality of life and systemic inflammation. This prospective study was conducted at the Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil. After anamnesis, patients were subjected to evaluations of health-related quality of life and dyspnea, spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, upper limbs incremental test, incremental shuttle walk test, and blood test for quantification of systemic inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6 and IL-8). At the end of the evaluations, patients received a booklet containing the physical exercises to be performed at home, three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Around 25 patients were enrolled, and 14 completed the pre- and post-HBPR ratings. There was a significant increase in the walked distance and the maximal inspiratory pressure, improvements on two components from the health-related quality-of-life questionnaire, and a decrease in plasma IL-8 levels after the intervention. The HBPR is an important and viable alternative to pulmonary rehabilitation for the treatment of patients with COPD; it improves exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle strength, quality of life, and systemic inflammation in COPD patients. PMID:25848241

  13. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves clinical features and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Gomes, Evelim Leal Freitas Dantas; Greiffo, Flavia Regina; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Stirbulov, Roberto; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease characterized by chronic airflow limitation that leads beyond the pulmonary changes to important systemic effects. COPD is characterized by pulmonary and systemic inflammation. However, increases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma are found even when the disease is stable. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves physical exercise capacity and quality of life and decreases dyspnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR) program improves exercise tolerance in COPD patients, as well as health-related quality of life and systemic inflammation. This prospective study was conducted at the Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil. After anamnesis, patients were subjected to evaluations of health-related quality of life and dyspnea, spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, upper limbs incremental test, incremental shuttle walk test, and blood test for quantification of systemic inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6 and IL-8). At the end of the evaluations, patients received a booklet containing the physical exercises to be performed at home, three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Around 25 patients were enrolled, and 14 completed the pre- and post-HBPR ratings. There was a significant increase in the walked distance and the maximal inspiratory pressure, improvements on two components from the health-related quality-of-life questionnaire, and a decrease in plasma IL-8 levels after the intervention. The HBPR is an important and viable alternative to pulmonary rehabilitation for the treatment of patients with COPD; it improves exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle strength, quality of life, and systemic inflammation in COPD patients.

  14. Blockade of CD49d (alpha4 integrin) on intrapulmonary but not circulating leukocytes inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, W R; Chi, E Y; Albert, R K; Chu, S J; Lamm, W J; Rochon, Y; Jonas, M; Christie, P E; Harlan, J M

    1997-01-01

    Immunized mice after inhalation of specific antigen have the following characteristic features of human asthma: airway eosinophilia, mucus and Th2 cytokine release, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. A model of late-phase allergic pulmonary inflammation in ovalbumin-sensitized mice was used to address the role of the alpha4 integrin (CD49d) in mediating the airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Local, intrapulmonary blockade of CD49d by intranasal administration of CD49d mAb inhibited all signs of lung inflammation, IL-4 and IL-5 release, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. In contrast, CD49d blockade on circulating leukocytes by intraperitoneal CD49d mAb treatment only prevented the airway eosinophilia. In this asthma model, a CD49d-positive intrapulmonary leukocyte distinct from the eosinophil is the key effector cell of allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. PMID:9399955

  15. Global analysis of gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis reveals distinct programs regulating lung inflammation and fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Naftali; Allard, John D.; Pittet, Jean F.; Zuo, Fengrong; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Morris, David; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Heller, Renu A.

    2000-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood. We have used oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the gene expression programs that underlie pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin, a drug that causes lung inflammation and fibrosis, in two strains of susceptible mice (129 and C57BL/6). We then compared the gene expression patterns in these mice with 129 mice carrying a null mutation in the epithelial-restricted integrin 6 subunit (6/-), which develop inflammation but are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of genes involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Analysis of gene expression at multiple time points after bleomycin administration revealed sequential induction of subsets of genes that characterize each response. The availability of this comprehensive data set should accelerate the development of more effective strategies for intervention at the various stages in the development of fibrotic diseases of the lungs and other organs.

  16. Multi-walled carbon nanotube physicochemical properties predict pulmonary inflammation and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Sarah S; Jackson, Petra; Kling, Kirsten; Knudsen, Kristina B; Skaug, Vidar; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Thomsen, Birthe L; Clausen, Per Axel; Atluri, Rambabu; Berthing, Trine; Bengtson, Stefan; Wolff, Henrik; Jensen, Keld A; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2016-11-01

    Lung deposition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) induces pulmonary toxicity. Commercial MWCNT vary greatly in physicochemical properties and consequently in biological effects. To identify determinants of MWCNT-induced toxicity, we analyzed the effects of pulmonary exposure to 10 commercial MWCNT (supplied in three groups of different dimensions, with one pristine and two/three surface modified in each group). We characterized morphology, chemical composition, surface area and functionalization levels. MWCNT were deposited in lungs of female C57BL/6J mice by intratracheal instillation of 0, 6, 18 or 54 μg/mouse. Pulmonary inflammation (neutrophil influx in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)) and genotoxicity were determined on day 1, 28 or 92. Histopathology of the lungs was performed on day 28 and 92. All MWCNT induced similar histological changes. Lymphocytic aggregates were detected for all MWCNT on day 28 and 92. Using adjusted, multiple regression analyses, inflammation and genotoxicity were related to dose, time and physicochemical properties. The specific surface area (BET) was identified as a positive predictor of pulmonary inflammation on all post-exposure days. In addition, length significantly predicted pulmonary inflammation, whereas surface oxidation (-OH and -COOH) was predictor of lowered inflammation on day 28. BET surface area, and therefore diameter, significantly predicted genotoxicity in BAL fluid cells and lung tissue such that lower BET surface area or correspondingly larger diameter was associated with increased genotoxicity. This study provides information on possible toxicity-driving physicochemical properties of MWCNT. The results may contribute to safe-by-design manufacturing of MWCNT, thereby minimizing adverse effects. PMID:27323647

  17. Multi-walled carbon nanotube physicochemical properties predict pulmonary inflammation and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Sarah S; Jackson, Petra; Kling, Kirsten; Knudsen, Kristina B; Skaug, Vidar; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Thomsen, Birthe L; Clausen, Per Axel; Atluri, Rambabu; Berthing, Trine; Bengtson, Stefan; Wolff, Henrik; Jensen, Keld A; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2016-11-01

    Lung deposition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) induces pulmonary toxicity. Commercial MWCNT vary greatly in physicochemical properties and consequently in biological effects. To identify determinants of MWCNT-induced toxicity, we analyzed the effects of pulmonary exposure to 10 commercial MWCNT (supplied in three groups of different dimensions, with one pristine and two/three surface modified in each group). We characterized morphology, chemical composition, surface area and functionalization levels. MWCNT were deposited in lungs of female C57BL/6J mice by intratracheal instillation of 0, 6, 18 or 54 μg/mouse. Pulmonary inflammation (neutrophil influx in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)) and genotoxicity were determined on day 1, 28 or 92. Histopathology of the lungs was performed on day 28 and 92. All MWCNT induced similar histological changes. Lymphocytic aggregates were detected for all MWCNT on day 28 and 92. Using adjusted, multiple regression analyses, inflammation and genotoxicity were related to dose, time and physicochemical properties. The specific surface area (BET) was identified as a positive predictor of pulmonary inflammation on all post-exposure days. In addition, length significantly predicted pulmonary inflammation, whereas surface oxidation (-OH and -COOH) was predictor of lowered inflammation on day 28. BET surface area, and therefore diameter, significantly predicted genotoxicity in BAL fluid cells and lung tissue such that lower BET surface area or correspondingly larger diameter was associated with increased genotoxicity. This study provides information on possible toxicity-driving physicochemical properties of MWCNT. The results may contribute to safe-by-design manufacturing of MWCNT, thereby minimizing adverse effects.

  18. Multi-walled carbon nanotube physicochemical properties predict pulmonary inflammation and genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Jackson, Petra; Kling, Kirsten; Knudsen, Kristina B.; Skaug, Vidar; Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Thomsen, Birthe L.; Clausen, Per Axel; Atluri, Rambabu; Berthing, Trine; Bengtson, Stefan; Wolff, Henrik; Jensen, Keld A.; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lung deposition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) induces pulmonary toxicity. Commercial MWCNT vary greatly in physicochemical properties and consequently in biological effects. To identify determinants of MWCNT-induced toxicity, we analyzed the effects of pulmonary exposure to 10 commercial MWCNT (supplied in three groups of different dimensions, with one pristine and two/three surface modified in each group). We characterized morphology, chemical composition, surface area and functionalization levels. MWCNT were deposited in lungs of female C57BL/6J mice by intratracheal instillation of 0, 6, 18 or 54 μg/mouse. Pulmonary inflammation (neutrophil influx in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)) and genotoxicity were determined on day 1, 28 or 92. Histopathology of the lungs was performed on day 28 and 92. All MWCNT induced similar histological changes. Lymphocytic aggregates were detected for all MWCNT on day 28 and 92. Using adjusted, multiple regression analyses, inflammation and genotoxicity were related to dose, time and physicochemical properties. The specific surface area (BET) was identified as a positive predictor of pulmonary inflammation on all post-exposure days. In addition, length significantly predicted pulmonary inflammation, whereas surface oxidation (–OH and –COOH) was predictor of lowered inflammation on day 28. BET surface area, and therefore diameter, significantly predicted genotoxicity in BAL fluid cells and lung tissue such that lower BET surface area or correspondingly larger diameter was associated with increased genotoxicity. This study provides information on possible toxicity-driving physicochemical properties of MWCNT. The results may contribute to safe-by-design manufacturing of MWCNT, thereby minimizing adverse effects. PMID:27323647

  19. The role of inflammation in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension: from cellular mechanisms to clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Poth, Jens M.; Fini, Mehdi A.; Olschewski, Andrea; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (PH) comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases sharing the common feature of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. The disease is usually characterized by mild to moderate pulmonary vascular remodeling that is largely thought to be reversible compared with the progressive irreversible disease seen in World Health Organization (WHO) group I disease. However, in these patients, the presence of PH significantly worsens morbidity and mortality. In addition, a small subset of patients with hypoxic PH develop “out-of-proportion” severe pulmonary hypertension characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling that is irreversible and similar to that in WHO group I disease. In all cases of hypoxia-related vascular remodeling and PH, inflammation, particularly persistent inflammation, is thought to play a role. This review focuses on the effects of hypoxia on pulmonary vascular cells and the signaling pathways involved in the initiation and perpetuation of vascular inflammation, especially as they relate to vascular remodeling and transition to chronic irreversible PH. We hypothesize that the combination of hypoxia and local tissue factors/cytokines (“second hit”) antagonizes tissue homeostatic cellular interactions between mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts and/or smooth muscle cells) and macrophages and arrests these cells in an epigenetically locked and permanently activated proremodeling and proinflammatory phenotype. This aberrant cellular cross-talk between mesenchymal cells and macrophages promotes transition to chronic nonresolving inflammation and vascular remodeling, perpetuating PH. A better understanding of these signaling pathways may lead to the development of specific therapeutic targets, as none are currently available for WHO group III disease. PMID:25416383

  20. Constitutive and allergen-induced expression of eotaxin mRNA in the guinea pig lung

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Eotaxin is a member of the C-C family of chemokines and is related during antigen challenge in a guinea pig model of allergic airway inflammation (asthma). Consistent with its putative role in eosinophilic inflammation, eotaxin induces the selective infiltration of eosinophils when injected into the lung and skin. Using a guinea pig lung cDNA library, we have cloned full-length eotaxin cDNA. The cDNA encodes a protein of 96 amino acids, including a putative 23-amino acid hydrophobic leader sequence, followed by 73 amino acids composing the mature active eotaxin protein. The protein-coding region of this cDNA is 73, 71, 50, and 48% identical in nucleic acid sequence to those of human macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP) 3, MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) 1 alpha, and RANTES, respectively. Analysis of genomic DNA suggested that there is a single eotaxin gene in guinea pig which is apparently conserved in mice. High constitutive levels of eotaxin mRNA expression were observed in the lung, while the intestines, stomach, spleen, liver, heart, thymus, testes, and kidney expressed lower levels. To determine if eotaxin mRNA levels are elevated during allergen-induced eosinophilic airway inflammation, ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized guinea pigs were challenged with aerosolized antigen. Compared with the lungs from saline-challenged animals, eotaxin mRNA levels increased sixfold within 3 h and returned to baseline by 6 h. Thus, eotaxin mRNA levels are increased in response to allergen challenge during the late phase response. The identification of constitutive eotaxin mRNA expression in multiple tissues suggests that in addition to regulating airway eosinophilia, eotaxin is likely to be involved in eosinophil recruitment into other tissues as well as in baseline tissue homing. PMID:7869037

  1. Effect of cyclosporin A on the allergen-induced late asthmatic reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sihra, B. S.; Kon, O. M.; Durham, S. R.; Walker, S.; Barnes, N. C.; Kay, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The allergen-induced late asthmatic reaction (LAR) is associated with mucosal inflammation involving several cell types including activated T lymphocytes and eosinophils. In contrast, the early asthmatic reaction (EAR) is considered to results from rapid allergen-induced release of bronchoconstrictor mediators from IgE sensitised mast cells. Cyclosporin A has efficacy in chronic severe corticosteroid-dependent asthma and is believed to act principally by inhibiting cytokine mRNA transcription in T lymphocytes. However, it has effects on other cell types in vitro, including the inhibition of exocytosis/degranulation events in mast cells. It was therefore hypothesised that cyclosporin A would attenuate both the EAR and LAR in subjects with mild asthma. METHODS: Twelve sensitised atopic asthmatic subjects with documented dual asthmatic responses were studied in a double blind, placebo controlled, crossover trial. On two separate study visits subjects received two oral doses of either cyclosporin A or matched placebo before inhaled allergen challenges. The forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was measured half hourly for eight hours and blood eosinophil counts were analysed three, six, and 24 hours after the challenge. Treatment effects on blood eosinophil counts as well as the EAR and LAR, respectively defined as the areas under the curve (AUC) of FEV1 changes from baseline between 0-1 and 4-8 hours after challenge, were compared by non-parametric crossover analysis. RESULTS: Cyclosporin A reduced both the LAR (median AUC -41.9 1.h (interquartile range -82.7 to -12.4) for cyclosporin A and -84.5 1.h (-248.9 to -39.1) for placebo; p = 0.007) and the late increase in blood eosinophils (median 0.2 x 10(9)/1 (0.15 to 0.4) for cyclosporin A and 0.4 x 10(9)/1 (0.25 to 0.55) for placebo; p = 0.024) but had no effect on the EAR. The reduction of the LAR by cyclosporin A correlated significantly with prechallenge blood concentrations of cyclosporin A (r

  2. Hyaluronan fragments as mediators of inflammation in allergic pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sumit; Hoselton, Scott A.; Dorsam, Glenn P.; Schuh, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is frequently caused and/or exacerbated by sensitization to allergens, which are ubiquitous in many indoor and outdoor environments. Severe asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and bronchial constriction in response to an inhaled allergen, leading to a disease course that is often very difficult to treat with standard asthma therapies. As a result of interactions among inflammatory cells, structural cells, and the intercellular matrix of the allergic lung, patients with sensitization to allergens may experience a greater degree of tissue injury followed by airway wall remodeling and progressive, accumulated pulmonary dysfunction as part of the disease sequela. In addition, turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a hallmark of tissue injury and repair. This review focuses on the role of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA), a component of the ECM, in pulmonary injury and repair with an emphasis on allergic asthma. Both the synthesis and degradation of the ECM are critical contributors to tissue repair and remodeling. Fragmented HA accumulates during tissue injury and functions in ways distinct from the larger native polymer. There is gathering evidence that HA degradation products are active participants in stimulating the expression of inflammatory genes in a variety of immune cells at the injury site. In this review, we will consider recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms that are associated with HA accumulation and inflammatory cell recruitment in the asthmatic lung. PMID:25582403

  3. CFTR-regulated MAPK/NF-κB signaling in pulmonary inflammation in thermal inhalation injury

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhi Wei; Chen, Jing; Ruan, Ye Chun; Zhou, Tao; Chen, Yu; Chen, YaJie; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Peng, Yi Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying pulmonary inflammation in thermal inhalation injury remains elusive. Cystic fibrosis, also hallmarked with pulmonary inflammation, is caused by mutations in CFTR, the expression of which is temperature-sensitive. We investigated whether CFTR is involved in heat-induced pulmonary inflammation. We applied heat-treatment in 16HBE14o- cells with CFTR knockdown or overexpression and heat-inhalation in rats in vivo. Heat-treatment caused significant reduction in CFTR and, reciprocally, increase in COX-2 at early stages both in vitro and in vivo. Activation of ERK/JNK, NF-κB and COX-2/PGE2 were detected in heat-treated cells, which were mimicked by knockdown, and reversed by overexpression of CFTR or VX-809, a reported CFTR mutation corrector. JNK/ERK inhibition reversed heat-/CFTR-knockdown-induced NF-κB activation, whereas NF-κB inhibitor showed no effect on JNK/ERK. IL-8 was augmented by heat-treatment or CFTR-knockdown, which was abolished by inhibition of NF-κB, JNK/ERK or COX-2. Moreover, in vitro or in vivo treatment with curcumin, a natural phenolic compound, significantly enhanced CFTR expression and reversed the heat-induced increases in COX-2/PGE2/IL-8, neutrophil infiltration and tissue damage in the airway. These results have revealed a CFTR-regulated MAPK/NF-κB pathway leading to COX-2/PGE2/IL-8 activation in thermal inhalation injury, and demonstrated therapeutic potential of curcumin for alleviating heat-induced pulmonary inflammation. PMID:26515683

  4. Inflammation in pulmonary hypertension: what we know and what we could logically and safely target first.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Hautefort, Aurélie; Price, Laura; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric

    2014-08-01

    Inflammation is important for the initiation and the maintenance of vascular remodeling in most of the animal models of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and therapeutic targeting of inflammation in these models blocks PAH development. In humans, pulmonary vascular lesions of PAH are the source of cytokine and chemokine production, related to inflammatory cell recruitment and lymphoid neogenesis. Circulating autoantibodies to endothelial cells and to fibroblasts have been reported in 10-40% of patients with idiopathic PAH, suggesting a possible role for autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular lesions. Current specific PAH treatments have immunomodulatory properties, and some studies have demonstrated a correlation between levels of circulating inflammatory mediators and patient survival. New immunopathological approaches to PAH should enable the development of innovative treatments for this severe condition. PMID:24747559

  5. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F; Hoyle, Gary W

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury.

  6. Aerobic exercise attenuates pulmonary inflammation induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Olivo, Clarice R; Miyaji, Eliane N; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Almeida, Francine M; Lourenço, Juliana D; Abreu, Rodrigo M; Arantes, Petra M M; Lopes, Fernanda Dtqs; Martins, Milton A

    2014-11-01

    Aerobic exercise has been recognized as a stimulator of the immune system, but its effect on bacterial infection has not been extensively evaluated. We studied whether moderate aerobic exercise training prior to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection influences pulmonary inflammatory responses. BALB/c mice were divided into four groups: Sedentary Untreated (sedentary without infection); Sedentary Infected (sedentary with infection); Trained Untreated (aerobic training without infection); and Trained Infected (aerobic training with infection). Animals underwent aerobic training for 4 wk, and 72 h after last exercise training, animals received a challenge with S. pneumoniae and were evaluated either 12 h or 10 days after instillation. In acute phase, Sedentary Infected group had an increase in respiratory system resistance and elastance; number of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL); polymorphonuclear cells in lung parenchyma; and levels of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin (IL)-1β (IL-1β) in lung homogenates. Exercise training significantly attenuated the increase in all of these parameters and induced an increase in expression of antioxidant enzymes (CuZnSOD and MnSOD) in lungs. Trained Infected mice had a significant decrease in the number of colony-forming units of pneumococci in the lungs compared with Sedentary Infected animals. Ten days after infection, Trained Infected group exhibited lower numbers of macrophages in BAL, polymorphonuclear cells in lung parenchyma and IL-6 in lung homogenates compared with Sedentary Infected group. Our results suggest a protective effect of moderate exercise training against respiratory infection with S. pneumoniae. This effect is most likely secondary to an effect of exercise on oxidant-antioxidant balance.

  7. The role of heparanase in pulmonary cell recruitment in response to an allergic but not non-allergic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Morris, Abigail; Wang, Bo; Waern, Ida; Venkatasamy, Radhakrishnan; Page, Clive; Schmidt, Eric P; Wernersson, Sara; Li, Jin-Ping; Spina, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that specifically cleaves heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix. Expression of this enzyme is increased in several pathological conditions including inflammation. We have investigated the role of heparanase in pulmonary inflammation in the context of allergic and non-allergic pulmonary cell recruitment using heparanase knockout (Hpa-/-) mice as a model. Following local delivery of LPS or zymosan, no significant difference was found in the recruitment of neutrophils to the lung between Hpa-/- and wild type (WT) control. Similarly neutrophil recruitment was not inhibited in WT mice treated with a heparanase inhibitor. However, in allergic inflammatory models, Hpa-/- mice displayed a significantly reduced eosinophil (but not neutrophil) recruitment to the airways and this was also associated with a reduction in allergen-induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness, indicating that heparanase expression is associated with allergic reactions. This was further demonstrated by pharmacological treatment with a heparanase inhibitor in the WT allergic mice. Examination of lung specimens from patients with different severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) found increased heparanase expression. Thus, it is established that heparanase contributes to allergen-induced eosinophil recruitment to the lung and could provide a novel therapeutic target for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of asthma and other allergic diseases.

  8. Combined radiation and burn injury results in exaggerated early pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Jessica L.; Deburghgraeve, Cory R.; Bird, Melanie D.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Chen, Michael M.; Yong, Sherri; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Events such as a nuclear meltdown accident or nuclear attack have potential for severe radiation injuries. Radiation injury frequently occurs in combination with other forms of trauma, most often burns. Thus far, combined injury studies have focused mainly on skin wound healing and damage to the gut. Since both radiation exposure and remote burn have pulmonary consequences, we examined the early effects of combined injury on the lung. C57BL/6 male mice were subjected to 5 Gy of total body irradiation followed by a 15% total body surface area scald burn. Lungs from surviving animals were examined for evidence of inflammation and pneumonitis. At 48 hours post-injury, pathology of the lungs from combined injury mice showed greater inflammation compared to all other treatment groups, with marked red blood cell and leukocyte congestion of the pulmonary vasculature. There was excessive leukocyte accumulation, primarily neutrophils, in the vasculature and interstitium, with occasional cells in the alveolar space. At 24 and 48 hours post-injury, myeloperoxidase levels in lungs of mice given combined injury were elevated compared to all other treatment groups (p<0.01), confirming histological evidence of neutrophil accumulation. Pulmonary levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant KC (CXCL1) were 3 times above that of either injury alone (p<0.05). Further, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, CCL2) was increased 2-fold and 3-fold compared to burn injury or radiation injury, respectively (p<0.05). Together, these data suggest that combined radiation and burn injury augments early pulmonary congestion and inflammation.. Currently, countermeasures for this unique type of injury are extremely limited. Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms behind the synergistic effects of combined injury in order to develop appropriate treatments. PMID:23899376

  9. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F.; Hoyle, Gary W.

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1 h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6 h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury. - Highlights: • Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. • Corticosteroids may inhibit lung injury through their anti-inflammatory actions. • Corticosteroids inhibited chlorine-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary edema. • Mometasone and budesonide are potential rescue treatments for chlorine lung injury.

  10. Matrikines are key regulators in modulating the amplitude of lung inflammation in acute pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    Akthar, Samia; Patel, Dhiren F.; Beale, Rebecca C.; Peiró, Teresa; Xu, Xin; Gaggar, Amit; Jackson, Patricia L.; Blalock, J. Edwin; Lloyd, Clare M.; Snelgrove, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive matrix fragments (matrikines) have been identified in a myriad of disorders, but their impact on the evolution of airway inflammation has not been demonstrated. We recently described a pathway where the matrikine and neutrophil chemoattractant proline–glycine–proline (PGP) could be degraded by the enzyme leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H). LTA4H classically functions in the generation of pro-inflammatory leukotriene B4, thus LTA4H exhibits opposing pro- and anti-inflammatory activities. The physiological significance of this secondary anti-inflammatory activity remains unknown. Here we show, using readily resolving pulmonary inflammation models, that loss of this secondary activity leads to more pronounced and sustained inflammation and illness owing to PGP accumulation. PGP elicits an exacerbated neutrophilic inflammation and protease imbalance that further degrades the extracellular matrix, generating fragments that perpetuate inflammation. This highlights a critical role for the secondary anti-inflammatory activity of LTA4H and thus has consequences for the generation of global LTA4H inhibitors currently being developed. PMID:26400771

  11. Effect of naturally occurring ozone air pollution episodes on pulmonary oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Cheryl; Sturrock, Anne; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Greene, Tom; Scholand, Mary Beth; Kanner, Richard; Paine, Robert

    2015-05-12

    This study aimed to determine if naturally occurring episodes of ozone air pollution in the Salt Lake Valley in Utah, USA, during the summer are associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, increased respiratory symptoms, and decreased lung function in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared to controls. We measured biomarkers (nitrite/nitrate (NOx), 8-isoprostane) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), spirometry, and respiratory symptoms in 11 former smokers with moderate-to-severe COPD and nine former smokers without airflow obstruction during periods of low and high ozone air pollution. High ozone levels were associated with increased NOx in EBC in both COPD (8.7 (±8.5) vs. 28.6 (±17.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p < 0.01) and control participants (7.6 (±16.5) vs. 28.5 (±15.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p = 0.02). There was no difference in pollution effect between COPD and control groups, and no difference in EBC 8-isoprostane, pulmonary function, or respiratory symptoms between clean air and pollution days in either group. Former smokers both with and without airflow obstruction developed airway oxidative stress and inflammation in association with ozone air pollution episodes.

  12. Fresh frozen plasma lessens pulmonary endothelial inflammation and hyperpermeability after hemorrhagic shock and is associated with loss of syndecan 1.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhanglong; Pati, Shibani; Potter, Daniel; Brown, Ryan; Holcomb, John B; Grill, Raymond; Wataha, Kathryn; Park, Pyong Woo; Xue, Hasen; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2013-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that injured patients in hemorrhagic shock shed syndecan 1 and that the early use of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in these patients is correlated with improved clinical outcomes. As the lungs are frequently injured after trauma, we hypothesized that hemorrhagic shock-induced shedding of syndecan 1 exposes the underlying pulmonary vascular endothelium to injury resulting in inflammation and hyperpermeability and that these effects would be mitigated by FFP. In vitro, pulmonary endothelial permeability, endothelial monolayer flux, transendothelial electrical resistance, and leukocyte-endothelial binding were measured in pulmonary endothelial cells after incubation with equal volumes of FFP or lactated Ringer's (LR). In vivo, using a coagulopathic mouse model of trauma and hemorrhagic shock, pulmonary hyperpermeability, neutrophil infiltration, and syndecan 1 expression and systemic shedding were assessed after 3 h of resuscitation with either 1× FFP or 3× LR and compared with shock alone and shams. In vitro, endothelial permeability and flux were decreased, transendothelial electrical resistance was increased, and leukocyte-endothelial binding was inhibited by FFP compared with LR-treated endothelial cells. In vivo, hemorrhagic shock was associated with systemic shedding of syndecan 1, which correlated with decreased pulmonary syndecan 1 and increased pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability and inflammation. Fresh frozen plasma resuscitation, compared with LR resuscitation, abrogated these injurious effects. After hemorrhagic shock, FFP resuscitation inhibits endothelial cell hyperpermeability and inflammation and restores pulmonary syndecan 1 expression. Modulation of pulmonary syndecan 1 expression may mechanistically contribute to the beneficial effects FFP.

  13. Acute secondhand smoke-induced pulmonary inflammation is diminished in RAGE knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wood, Tyler T; Winden, Duane R; Marlor, Derek R; Wright, Alex J; Jones, Cameron M; Chavarria, Michael; Rogers, Geraldine D; Reynolds, Paul R

    2014-11-15

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) has increasingly been demonstrated to be an important modulator of inflammation in cases of pulmonary disease. Published reports involving tobacco smoke exposure have demonstrated increased expression of RAGE, its participation in proinflammatory signaling, and its role in irreversible pulmonary remodeling. The current research evaluated the in vivo effects of short-term secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in RAGE knockout and control mice compared with identical animals exposed to room air only. Quantitative PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry revealed elevated RAGE expression in controls after 4 wk of SHS exposure and an anticipated absence of RAGE expression in RAGE knockout mice regardless of smoke exposure. Ras activation, NF-κB activity, and cytokine elaboration were assessed to characterize the molecular basis of SHS-induced inflammation in the mouse lung. Furthermore, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was procured from RAGE knockout and control animals for the assessment of inflammatory cells and molecules. As a general theme, inflammation coincident with leukocyte recruitment was induced by SHS exposure and significantly influenced by the availability of RAGE. These data reveal captivating information suggesting a role for RAGE signaling in lungs exposed to SHS. However, ongoing research is still warranted to fully explain roles for RAGE and other receptors in cells coping with involuntary smoke exposure for prolonged periods of time.

  14. Silver Nanoparticles: A study of dissolution, kinetics, and factors affecting pulmonary inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Eric L.

    The growing use of silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NP) in consumer and industrial goods has led to an increase in interest in the health effects associated with exposure, both occupationally and environmentally. The aim of this research is to examine the contribution of size, shape, and dissolution of AgNP, with its corresponding effect on pulmonary inflammation and clearance. In addition this study looks at metallothionein (MT) and the role it plays as an inflammatory modulator. A nose only exposure method was used to expose three strains of mouse (two inbred, one knockout) to two different sizes of AgNP (˜25 nm and ˜100 nm). This research demonstrates that size, chemistry, and dissolution play key roles in NP deposition and inflammatory response, while no conclusions could be drawn about shape. Additionally, this study found that the main factors affecting the deposition of NP in mice both acutely and sub-chronically are particle size and mouse strain. The results of this study also indicate a relationship between MT2 and inflammation. It was found that the mRNA levels of MT2 were greatly up-regulated in the livers and lungs of mice exposed to AgNP, while MT protein levels were not significantly altered to correlate with the altered regulation of mRNA. Finally, this study showed that, for AgNP, the mechanisms of pulmonary clearance and dissolution happened rapidly and that they, combined, likely represent a major pathway of AgNP transport out of the lung. Taken as a whole, the data in this study show that dissolution, coupled with protein interaction, is a significant mediator of pulmonary inflammation and translocation of AgNP.

  15. Dihydroartemisinin supresses inflammation and fibrosis in bleomycine-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongxia; Yuan, Wendan; Lv, Changjun; Li, Naie; Liu, Tongshen; Wang, Liang; Sun, Yufei; Qiu, Xueshan; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a respiratory disease with a high mortality rate and its pathogenesis involves multiple mechanisms including epithelial cell injury, fibroblast proliferation, inflammation, and collagen coagulation. The treatment regimens still fail to recover this disease. We have previously found that dihydroartemisinin inhibits the development of pulmonary fibrosis in rats. This study aimed to determine the mechanisms of dihydroartemisinin in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The experimental rats were divided into six groups as normal saline control group (NS group), bleomycin group (BLM group), dihydroartemisinin-1, -2, or -3 group (DHA-1, DHA-2 and DHA-3 group) and dexamethasone group (DXM group). In BLM group, rats were treated with intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. NS group received the same volume of saline instead of bleomycin. In DHA-1, DHA-2 and DHA-3 group, in addition to intratracheal instillation of bleomycin, respectively, dihydroartemisinin (25 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg daily) was administrated by intraperitoneal instillation. In DXM group, rats were treated with intraperitoneal instillation of dexamethasone as control. Immunocytochemical assay, reverse transcription PCR and western blot were used for detecting the expression of TGF-β1, TNF-α, α-SMA and NF-κB in lung tissues. What’s more, morphological change and collagen deposition were analyzed by hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson staining. Collagen synthesis was detected by hydroxyproline chromatometry. Results showed that dihydroartemisinin significantly decreased the amount of inflammatory cytokines and collagen synthesis, and inhibited fibroblast proliferation in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (P < 0.001). This study provides experimental evidence that dihydroartemisinin could decrease cytokines, alveolar inflammation and attenuates lung injury and fibrosis. PMID:25973011

  16. Acute effect of glucan-spiked office dust on nasal and pulmonary inflammation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Straszek, S P; Adamcakova-Dodd, A; Metwali, N; Pedersen, O F; Sigsgaard, T; Thorne, P S

    2007-11-01

    The acute effects of pure inhaled glucan on respiratory inflammation remain inconclusive and not sufficiently examined with regards to the simultaneous interaction of glucan, endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS), and house dust in airway inflammation. This study aims at determining effects of simultaneous exposure to office dust and glucan on nasal and pulmonary inflammation. This is relevant for humans with occupational exposure in waste handling and farming and buildings with mold problems. Office dust collected from Danish offices was spiked with 1% (1-3)-beta-glucan (curdlan). Guinea pig nasal cavity volume was measured by acoustic rhinometry (AR) and animals were exposed by inhalation for 4 h to curdlan-spiked dust, unspiked dust, purified air (negative controls), or LPS (positive controls). After exposure (+5 h) or the following day (+18 h), measurements were repeated by AR and followed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Total and differential cell counts, interleukin (IL)-8 in BAL fluid, and change in nasal volume were compared between groups. A 5-10% increase in nasal volume was seen for all groups including clean air except for a significant 5% decrease for spiked-dust inhalation (+18 h). No marked differences were observed in BAL cells or IL-8 except in LPS-exposed controls. The delayed decrease of nasal cavity volume after exposure to glucan spiked dust suggests a slow effect on the upper airways for curdlan and office dust together, though no pulmonary response or direct signs of inflammation were observed. Glucan-spiked office dust exposures produced a delayed nasal subacute congestion in guinea pigs compared to office dust alone, but extrapolated to nasal congestion in humans, paralleling the nasal congestion seen in human volunteers exposed to the same dust, this may not have clinical importance. PMID:17966063

  17. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10–40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a sputum eosinophilia is associated with a good response to corticosteroid therapy and tailored strategies aimed to normalize sputum eosinophils reduce exacerbation frequency and severity. Advances in our understanding of the multistep paradigm of eosinophil recruitment to the airway, and the consequence of eosinophilic inflammation, has led to the development of new therapies to target these molecular pathways. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of eosinophilic trafficking, the tools to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma and COPD during stable disease and exacerbations and review current and novel anti-eosinophilic treatments. PMID:26770668

  18. Decreased pulmonary inflammation after ethanol exposure and burn injury in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bird, Melanie D; Morgan, Michelle O; Ramirez, Luis; Yong, Sherri; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2010-01-01

    Clinical and laboratory evidence suggests that alcohol consumption dysregulates immune function. Burn patients who consume alcohol before their injuries demonstrate higher rates of morbidity and mortality, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, than patients without alcohol at the time of injury. Our laboratory observed higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and leukocyte infiltration in the lungs of mice after ethanol exposure and burn injury than with either insult alone. To understand the mechanism of the increased pulmonary inflammatory response in mice treated with ethanol and burn injury, we investigated the role of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. Wild-type and ICAM-1 knockout (KO) mice were treated with vehicle or ethanol and subsequently given a sham or burn injury. Twenty-four hours postinjury, lungs were harvested and analyzed for indices of inflammation. Higher numbers of neutrophils were observed in the lungs of wild-type mice after burn and burn with ethanol treatment. This increase in pulmonary inflammatory cell accumulation was significantly lower in the KO mice. In addition, levels of KC, interleukin-1beta, and interleukin-6 in the lung were decreased in the ICAM-1 KO mice after ethanol exposure and burn injury. Interestingly, no differences were observed in serum or lung tissue content of soluble ICAM-1 24 hours postinjury. These data suggest that upregulation of adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 on the vascular endothelium may play a critical role in the excessive inflammation seen after ethanol exposure and burn injury.

  19. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways.

    PubMed

    Perros, Frederic; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs. PMID:21943186

  20. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs. PMID:21943186

  1. Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) induction of pulmonary inflammation: a role in tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Bauer, A K; Dwyer-Nield, L D; Keil, K; Koski, K; Malkinson, A M

    2001-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary inflammatory diseases predispose towards lung cancer by unknown mechanisms. Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) administration to mice causes lung injury and a subsequent inflammatory response, and when administered chronically to certain inbred strains following carcinogen treatment, increases lung tumor multiplicity. We hypothesize that inflammation promotes lung tumor growth in this model system and have begun to examine this hypothesis by assessing inflammatory parameters in inbred strains that vary in their susceptibility to promotion. Positive correlations were found between susceptibilities to tumor promotion and BHT induction of alveolar macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration into alveolar airspaces, and increased vascular permeability (P < .03, P < .04, and P < .005, respectively). The amounts of pulmonary cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 did not strongly correlate with promotion. Because persistent elevation of macrophage content is the hallmark of a chronic inflammatory response, the alveolar macrophage population was depleted by adding chlorine to the drinking water prior to carcinogenesis. This treatment reduced lung tumor multiplicity following 2-stage carcinogenesis (P < .05). These correlations between inflammatory and tumorigenic responses to BHT, along with decreased tumorigenesis after macrophage depletion, are consistent with a role of inflammation in promotion. Inflammatory mediators may provide targets for early diagnosis and chemoprevention.

  2. Vagotomy Reverses Established Allergen-Induced Airway Hyperreactivity to Methacholine in the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the role of vagal reflexes in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Mice were actively sensitized to ovalbumin then exposed to the allergen via inhalation. Prior to ovalbumin inhalation, mice also received intratracheally-instilled particulate ma...

  3. Pulmonary inflammation after ethanol exposure and burn injury is attenuated in the absence of IL-6.

    PubMed

    Chen, Michael M; Bird, Melanie D; Zahs, Anita; Deburghgraeve, Cory; Posnik, Bartlomiej; Davis, Christopher S; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2013-05-01

    Alcohol consumption leads to an exaggerated inflammatory response after burn injury. Elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in patients are associated with increased morbidity and mortality after injury, and high systemic and pulmonary levels of IL-6 have been observed after the combined insult of ethanol exposure and burn injury. To further investigate the role of IL-6 in the pulmonary inflammatory response, we examined leukocyte infiltration and cytokine and chemokine production in the lungs of wild-type and IL-6 knockout mice given vehicle or ethanol (1.11 g/kg) and subjected to a sham or 15% total body surface area burn injury. Levels of neutrophil infiltration and neutrophil chemoattractants were increased to a similar extent in wild-type and IL-6 knockout mice 24 h after burn injury. When ethanol exposure preceded the burn injury, however, a further increase of these inflammatory markers was seen only in the wild-type mice. Additionally, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) phosphorylation did not increase in response to ethanol exposure in the IL-6 knockout mice, in contrast to their wild-type counterparts. Visual and imaging analysis of alveolar wall thickness supported these findings and similar results were obtained by blocking IL-6 with antibody. Taken together, our data suggest a causal relationship between IL-6 and the excessive pulmonary inflammation observed after the combined insult of ethanol and burn injury.

  4. In vivo two-photon imaging reveals monocyte-dependent neutrophil extravasation during pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kreisel, Daniel; Nava, Ruben G.; Li, Wenjun; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.; Wang, Baomei; Lai, Jiaming; Pless, Robert; Gelman, Andrew E.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Miller, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Immune-mediated pulmonary diseases are a significant public health concern. Analysis of leukocyte behavior in the lung is essential for understanding cellular mechanisms that contribute to normal and diseased states. Here, we used two-photon imaging to study neutrophil extravasation from pulmonary vessels and subsequent interstitial migration. We found that the lungs contained a significant pool of tissue-resident neutrophils in the steady state. In response to inflammation produced by bacterial challenge or transplant-mediated, ischemia-reperfusion injury, neutrophils were rapidly recruited from the circulation and patrolled the interstitium and airspaces of the lung. Motile neutrophils often aggregated in dynamic clusters that formed and dispersed over tens of minutes. These clusters were associated with CD115+ F4/80+ Ly6C+ cells that had recently entered the lung. The depletion of blood monocytes with clodronate liposomes reduced neutrophil clustering in the lung, but acted by inhibiting neutrophil transendothelial migration upstream of interstitial migration. Our results suggest that a subset of monocytes serve as key regulators of neutrophil extravasation in the lung and may be an attractive target for the treatment of inflammatory pulmonary diseases. PMID:20923880

  5. Resolvin D1 Dampens Pulmonary Inflammation and Promotes Clearance of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Croasdell, Amanda; Lacy, Shannon H; Thatcher, Thomas H; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P

    2016-03-15

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that frequently causes ear infections, bronchitis, pneumonia, and exacerbations in patients with underlying inflammatory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In mice, NTHi is rapidly cleared, but a strong inflammatory response persists, underscoring the concept that NTHi induces dysregulation of normal inflammatory responses and causes a failure to resolve. Lipid-derived specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) play a critical role in the active resolution of inflammation by both suppressing proinflammatory actions and promoting resolution pathways. Importantly, SPMs lack the immunosuppressive properties of classical anti-inflammatory therapies. On the basis of these characteristics, we hypothesized that aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) would dampen NTHi-induced inflammation while still enhancing bacterial clearance. C57BL/6 mice were treated with AT-RvD1 and infected with live NTHi. AT-RvD1-treated mice had lower total cell counts and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and had earlier influx of macrophages. In addition, AT-RvD1-treated mice showed changes in temporal regulation of inflammatory cytokines and enzymes, with decreased KC at 6 h and decreased IL-6, TNF-α, and cyclooxygenase-2 expression at 24 h post infection. Despite reduced inflammation, AT-RvD1-treated mice had reduced NTHi bacterial load, mediated by enhanced clearance by macrophages and a skewing toward an M2 phenotype. Finally, AT-RvD1 protected NTHi-infected mice from weight loss, hypothermia, hypoxemia, and respiratory compromise. This research highlights the beneficial role of SPMs in pulmonary bacterial infections and provides the groundwork for further investigation into SPMs as alternatives to immunosuppressive therapies like steroids.

  6. Immunobiotic lactobacilli reduce viral-associated pulmonary damage through the modulation of inflammation-coagulation interactions.

    PubMed

    Zelaya, Hortensia; Tsukida, Kohichiro; Chiba, Eriko; Marranzino, Gabriela; Alvarez, Susana; Kitazawa, Haruki; Agüero, Graciela; Villena, Julio

    2014-03-01

    The exacerbated disease due to immune- and coagulative-mediated pulmonary injury during acute respiratory viruses infection results in severe morbidity and mortality. Identifying novel approaches to modulate virus-induced inflammation-coagulation interactions could be important alternatives for treating acute respiratory viruses infections. In this study we investigated the effect of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 on lung TLR3-mediated inflammation, and its ability to modulate inflammation-coagulation interaction during respiratory viral infection. Our findings reveal for the first time that a probiotic bacterium is able to influence lung immune-coagulative reaction triggered by TLR3 activation, by modulating the production of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as expression of tissue factor and thrombomodulin in the lung. We also demonstrated that the preventive treatment with the probiotic bacteria beneficially modulates the fine tune balance between clearing respiratory viruses (respiratory syncytial virus and influenza virus) and controlling immune-coagulative responses in the lung, allowing normal lung function to be maintained in the face of a viral attack. Our data also pinpoint a crucial role for IL-10 in the immune protection induced by L. rhamnosus CRL1505 during respiratory viral infections. These observations might be helpful to propose new preventive or therapeutic approaches to better control virus-inflammatory lung damage using probiotic functional foods.

  7. Lung inflammation and genotoxicity following pulmonary exposure to nanoparticles in ApoE-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter; Jensen, Keld Alstrup; Vogel, Ulla; Ladefoged, Ole; Loft, Steffen; Wallin, Håkan

    2009-01-01

    Background The toxic and inflammatory potential of 5 different types of nanoparticles were studied in a sensitive model for pulmonary effects in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (ApoE-/-). We studied the effects instillation or inhalation Printex 90 of carbon black (CB) and compared CB instillation in ApoE-/- and C57 mice. Three and 24 h after pulmonary exposure, inflammation was assessed by mRNA levels of cytokines in lung tissue, cell composition, genotoxicity, protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Results Firstly, we found that intratracheal instillation of CB caused far more pulmonary toxicity in ApoE-/- mice than in C57 mice. Secondly, we showed that instillation of CB was more toxic than inhalation of a presumed similar dose with respect to inflammation in the lungs of ApoE-/- mice. Thirdly, we compared effects of instillation in ApoE-/- mice of three carbonaceous particles; CB, fullerenes C60 (C60) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as gold particles and quantum dots (QDs). Characterization of the instillation media revealed that all particles were delivered as agglomerates and aggregates. Significant increases in Il-6, Mip-2 and Mcp-1 mRNA were detected in lung tissue, 3 h and 24 h following instillation of SWCNT, CB and QDs. DNA damage in BAL cells, the fraction of neutrophils in BAL cells and protein in BAL fluid increased statistically significantly. Gold and C60 particles caused much weaker inflammatory responses. Conclusion Our data suggest that ApoE-/- model is sensitive for evaluating particle induced inflammation. Overall QDs had greatest effects followed by CB and SWCNT with C60 and gold being least inflammatory and DNA-damaging. However the gold was used at a much lower mass dose than the other particles. The strong effects of QDs were likely due to Cd release. The surface area of the instilled dose correlated well the inflammatory response for low toxicity particles. PMID:19138394

  8. Mean platelet volume as an inflammation marker in active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The mean platelet volume (MPV) reflects the size of platelets. It has been shown to be inversely correlated with level of the inflammation in some chronic inflammatory diseases. This prospective study aims to show the usability of MPV as an inflammation marker in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) by comparison with healthy controls. In addition, its relationships with other inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) as well as with the radiological extent of disease were examined. Methods This study included 82 patients with active PTB and 95 healthy subjects (control group). Whole blood counts, CRP level, and ESR were compared between the two groups. In the PTB group, the relationships between the radiological extent of disease and the MPV and other inflammation markers were investigated. Results The MPV was 7.74 ± 1.33/μL in the PTB group and 8.20 ± 1.13/μL in the control group (p = 0.005). The blood platelet count, CRP level, and ESR were significantly higher in the active PTB group than in the control group (p < 0.0001). In the PTB group, CRP levels (r = 0.26, p = 0.003) and ESR (r = 0.39, p = 0.003), but not MPV (p = 0.80), were significantly correlated with the radiologic extent of the disease. Conclusions The MPV was lower in patients with PTB than in healthy controls, however, the difference was limited. The MPV does not reflect the severity of the disease. The use of MPV as an inflammation marker and a negative acute-phase reactant in PTB does not seem to be reliable. PMID:24581084

  9. CD14 contributes to pulmonary inflammation and mortality during murine tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Catharina W; van der Windt, Gerritje J W; Wiersinga, W Joost; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors play an essential role in the innate recognition of micro-organisms by the host. CD14 is one of the extracellular adaptor proteins required for recognition of Gram-negative bacteria and possibly also Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Therefore, we intranasally infected wild-type (WT) and CD14 knock-out (KO) mice with virulent M. tuberculosis H37Rv. We found no differences in bacterial load in the main target organ lung up to 32 weeks after infection. From 20 weeks onward 57% of WT mice succumbed, whereas all CD14 KO mice survived. The improved outcome of CD14 KO mice was accompanied by reduced pulmonary inflammation; lung cell counts and percentage of inflamed lung tissue were reduced in CD14 WT mice. These data suggest that during chronic infection CD14 KO mice are protected from lethality caused by lung tuberculosis because of a reduction of the inflammatory response. PMID:18393969

  10. Recent advances in understanding inflammation and remodeling in the airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Ward, Chris; Danial, Wan; Wood-Baker, Richard; Walters, Eugene Haydn

    2013-06-01

    The authors have reviewed the current literature on airway inflammation and remodeling in smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Detailed data on airway remodeling in COPD are especially sparse and how these changes lead to decline in lung function is not well understood. Small airway fibrosis and obliteration are likely to be the main contributors to physiological airway dysfunction and occur earlier than any subsequent development of emphysema. One potential mechanism contributing to small airway fibrosis/obliteration and change in extracellular matrix is epithelial-mesenchymal transition. When associated with angiogenesis (so-called epithelial-mesenchymal transition type 3) it may well also be the link with the development of cancer, which is closely associated with COPD, predominantly in large airways. The authors have focused on our recent publications in these areas. Further investigations teasing out these mechanisms will help improve our understanding of key airway disease processes in COPD, which may have major therapeutic implications.

  11. Prior exposure to acrolein accelerates pulmonary inflammation in influenza A-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Ong, Ferrer H C; Henry, Peter J; Burcham, Philip C

    2012-08-01

    The combustion product acrolein contributes to several smoke-related health disorders, but whether this immunomodulatory toxicant alters pulmonary susceptibility to viruses has received little attention. To study the effects of prior acrolein dosing on the severity of influenza A viral infection, male BALB/c mice received acrolein (1mg/kg) or saline (control) via oropharyngeal aspiration either 4- or 7-days prior to intranasal inoculation with either influenza A/PR/8/34 virus or vehicle. At 0, 2, 4 and 7 days post-inoculation, lung samples were assessed for histological changes while pulmonary inflammation was monitored by estimating immune cell numbers and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). After viral challenge, animals that were exposed to acrolein 4 days previously experienced greater weight loss and exhibited an accelerated inflammatory response at 2 days after viral inoculation. Thus compared to saline-pretreated, virus-challenged controls, BALF recovered from these mice contained higher numbers of macrophages and neutrophils in addition to increased levels of several inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF, IFN-γ, KC, and MCP-1. The acrolein-induced increase in viral susceptibility was suppressed by the carbonyl scavenger bisulphite. These findings suggest acute acrolein intoxication "primes" the lung to mount an accelerated immune response to inhaled viruses.

  12. The Prevalence of Oral Inflammation Among Denture Wearing Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Przybyłowska, D; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Swoboda-Kopeć, E; Kostrzewa-Janicka, J; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E

    2015-01-01

    Oral inflammation is an important contributor to the etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which can impact patient's health status. Previous studies indicate that people with poor oral health are at higher risk for nosocomial pneumonia. Denture wearing is one promoting factor in the development of mucosal infections. Colonization of the denture plaque by Gram-negative bacteria, Candida spp., or other respiratory pathogens, occurring locally, may be aspirated to the lungs. The studies showed that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients treated with combinations of medicines with corticosteroids more frequently suffer from Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Treatment of oral candidiasis in patients with COPD constitutes a therapeutic problem. Therefore, it is essential to pay attention to the condition of oral mucosal membrane and denture hygiene habits. The guidelines for care and maintenance of dentures for COPD patients are presented in this paper. The majority of patients required improvement of their prosthetic and oral hygiene. Standard oral hygiene procedures in relation to dentures, conducted for prophylaxis of stomatitis complicated by mucosal infection among immunocompromised patients, are essential to maintain healthy oral tissues. The elimination of traumatic denture action in dental office, compliance with oral and denture hygiene, proper use and storage of prosthetic appliances in a dry environment outside the oral cavity can reduce susceptibility to infection. Proper attention to hygiene, including brushing and rinsing the mouth, may also help prevent denture stomatitis in these patients.

  13. Overexpression of RORγt Enhances Pulmonary Inflammation after Infection with Mycobacterium Avium

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Masashi; Ishii, Yukio; Sakurai, Hirofumi; Ano, Satoshi; Morishima, Yuko; Yoh, Keigyou; Takahashi, Satoru; Ogawa, Kenji; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most common cause of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease in humans. The role of Th17 immunity in the pathogenesis of intracellular bacteria, such as MAC, is not currently understood. Transcription factor RAR-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) is known as the master regulator for Th17 cell development. Here, we investigated the role of RORγt in host responses against MAC infection. Wild-type (WT) mice and RORγt-overexpressing mice were infected with MAC via intratracheal inoculation. Systemic MAC growth was not different between WT mice and RORγt-overexpressing mice. However, neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation following MAC infection was enhanced in RORγt-overexpressing mice compared with that in WT mice. The cytokine expression shifted toward a Th17 phenotype in the lungs of RORγt-overexpressing mice following MAC infection; the levels of IL-6 and IL-17 were significantly higher in the lung of these mice than in WT mice. In addition to the increase in IL-17 single-positive T cells, T cells producing both IL-17 and interferon-γ were elevated in the lung of RORγt-overexpressing mice following MAC infection. These findings suggest that RORγt overexpression-mediated Th17 bias contributes to local inflammation rather than systemic responses, by regulating neutrophil recruitment into the sites of infection during MAC infection. PMID:26784959

  14. Restrictive pulmonary deficit is associated with inflammation in sub-optimally controlled obese diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Seemungal, Terence A. R.; Teelucksingh, Surujpal; Nayak, B. Shivananda

    2013-01-01

    Caribbean data linking inflammation, pulmonary dysfunction and diabetes is unavailable. Spirometry, acanthosis nigricans, hs-CRP were assessed in 109 type 2 diabetics (43% males) mean age=55.6 years, BMI=29.29 kg/m2, waist circumference=103.86 cm. Residual FEV1/FVC increased with age (P=0.005), BMI (P=0.011) and waist circumference (P=0.003). Residual FVC related inversely to hs-CRP (–0.178), P<0.06) systolic (–0.028, P<0.031), diastolic (–0.247, P<0.010) pressure and weight (–0.25, P<0.009). Residual FEV1 related inversely to diastolic pressure (–0.219, P<0.023), hs-CRP (–0.234, P<0.015), acanthosis nigricans (–0.029, P<0.029). HbA1C and residual FEV1 predict high hs-CRP (P=0.011, P=0.046). Low FVC with inflammation presents in poorly controlled obese diabetics. PMID:23825761

  15. Toll-like receptor 4 in butylated hydroxytoluene-induced mouse pulmonary inflammation and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Alison K; Dixon, Darlene; DeGraff, Laura M; Cho, Hye-Youn; Walker, Christopher R; Malkinson, Alvin M; Kleeberger, Steven R

    2005-12-01

    Because chronic pulmonary diseases predispose to lung neoplasia, the identification of the molecular mechanisms involved could provide novel preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic strategies. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) transduce exogenous and endogenous signals into the production of inflammatory cytokines to coordinate adaptive immune responses. To determine the role of Tlr4 in chronic lung inflammation, we compared lung permeability, leukocyte infiltration, and nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) DNA binding in butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-treated (four weekly injections of 125-200 mg/kg each) inbred mouse strains with functional Tlr4 (OuJ and BALB) and mutated Tlr4 (HeJ and BALB(Lps-d)). We also measured primary tumor formation in these mice after single-carcinogen injection (3-methylcholanthrene; 10 microg/kg), followed by BHT treatment (six weekly injections of 125-200 mg/kg each). Mice with functional Tlr4 had reduced lung permeability, leukocyte inflammation, and primary tumor formation (BALB(Lps-d), mean = 22.3 tumors/mouse, versus BALB, mean = 13.9 tumors/mouse, difference = 8.4 tumors/mouse, 95% confidence interval = 4.6 to 12.1 tumors/mouse; P = .025) compared with mice with mutated Tlr4. NFkappaB DNA binding activity was higher in OuJ than in HeJ mice; however, AP-1 activity was elevated in HeJ mice. To our knowledge, this is the first model to demonstrate a modulatory role for Tlr4 in chronic lung inflammation and tumorigenesis.

  16. Allergen-induced generation of mediators in the mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Mattoli, S

    2001-01-01

    The inhalation of antigens does not normally lead to allergic inflammation, but airway resident cells and their products may affect the outcome of antigen exposure. It is therefore important to elucidate how potential allergens interact with airway epithelial cells and other cells located within and below the epithelium. Some studies have indicated that certain antigens, particularly the major house dust mite antigen Der p1, penetrate the airway epithelium by intracellular transportation or paracellular passage, depending on their concentrations, time of exposure, and ability of the cells to inactivate them. If an antigen possesses proteolytic activity, such as Der p1, and it reaches high concentrations or the exposure is prolonged, the disruption of the tight junction can also favor the transepithelial passage of other antigens. In this way, the antigens can easily encounter the effector cells located between epithelial cells and below the basement membrane. The magnitude of this phenomenon may be more prominent in the airways of asthmatic patients, as their epithelium is more permeable to Der p1 than the epithelium of nonasthmatic patients and releases cytokines after exposure to very low concentrations of this antigen for brief periods. Epithelial cell activation may facilitate the development of allergic mucosal sensitization to Der p1 and contribute to the antigen-induced inflammatory response by affecting the migration and function of dendritic cells, mast cells, and eosinophils. Also, there might be a secondary release of interleukin-6 and endothelin-1, which can have a detrimental effect on the cardiovascular function. PMID:11544162

  17. Allergen-induced inflammation and the role of immunoglobulin E (IgE).

    PubMed

    Fendrick, A M; Baldwin, J L

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of common allergic disorders such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis has increased significantly in the past 30 years. The impact of these atopic diseases on the patient and the health care system is considerable: Allergic disorders are associated with a high degree of morbidity, which can profoundly impact patient quality of life and health care resource use. Existing strategies to treat allergic disorders beyond simple allergen avoidance focus on diminishing or eliminating the recurrent and/or persistent signs and symptoms that characterize the allergic response. A new strategy has been developed that uses antibodies directed against immunoglobulin E (IgE) to prevent it from binding to cells bearing its receptors and thus neutralizing the allergic response before it begins. These new agents reduce allergic responses in atopic individuals and improve their symptoms while reducing rescue medication and corticosteroid use in patients with allergic asthma or seasonal allergic rhinitis. Thus, anti-IgE antibodies represent proof that IgE plays a central role in allergic reactions and that anti-IgE therapy is a potentially effective treatment for allergic disease.

  18. 5-Aminosalicylic acid attenuates allergen-induced airway inflammation and oxidative stress in asthma.

    PubMed

    Raju, K Rama Satyanarayana; Kumar, M N Sathish; Gupta, Saurabh; Naga, Srinivas T; Shankar, Jaya K; Murthy, Vishakantha; Madhunapanthula, Subba Rao V; Mulukutla, Shashank; Ambhore, Nilesh S; Tummala, Shashank; Vishnuvarthan, V J; Azam, Afzal; Elango, Kannan

    2014-12-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines regulate the magnitude of allergic reactions during asthma. Tumor necrosis factor--alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) play a crucial role in aggravating the inflammatory conditions during allergic asthma. In addition, oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of asthma by altering the physiological condition resulting in the development of status asthmaticus. Anti-inflammatory corticosteroids are being widely used for treating allergic asthma. In the present study 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), a salicylic acid derivative, was evaluated, in vivo for its potential to suppress TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-13 using ovalbumin (OVA) induced allergic asthma in Balb/C mice. Oral administration of 65, 130 and 195 mg/kg 5-ASA significantly reduced the OVA induced total and differential leucocyte count, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-13, nitrite, nitrate, MDA, MPO and TPL levels in the lung lavage samples. Collectively, these findings suggest that 5-ASA is a potent immunomodulator and suppresses key Th2 cytokines production and oxidative stress in OVA-induced asthma.

  19. Montelukast versus Dexamethasone Treatment in a Guinea Pig Model of Chronic Pulmonary Neutrophilic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abdel Kawy, Hala S

    2016-08-01

    Airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is refractory to corticosteroids and hence COPD treatment is hindered and insufficient. This study assessed the effects of oral treatment with Montelukast (10 and 30 mg/kg) or dexamethasone (20 mg/kg) for 20 days on COPD model induced by chronic exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six groups of male guinea pigs were studied. Group 1: naïve group, group 2: exposed to saline nebulization. Groups 3, 4, 5, and 6: exposed to 9 nebulizations of LPS (30 μg/ml) for 1 hour, 48 hours apart with or without treatment with Montelukast or dexamethasone. Airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine (MCh), histopathological study and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as lung tissue analyses were performed 48 hours after the final exposure to LPS (day 20). LPS-induced pulmonary dysfunction was associated with increased neutrophil count, leukotriene (LT) B4, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in BALF. Moreover, there was an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) level and a decrease in histone deacetylases(HDAC) activity in the lung tissue. Both Montelukast (10 or 30 mg /kg) and dexamethasone significantly reduced neutrophil count in BALF and inflammatory cells in lung parenchyma as well as TNF-α, and MDA levels. However, dexamethasone was more effective (p < 0.05). Montelukast, at a dose of 30 mg /kg, significantly reduced specific airway resistance after the 9th LPS exposure, attenuated AHR to MCh, decreased LTB4 and increased HDAC activity in comparison to dexamethasone. These results suggest that treatment with Montelukast can be useful in chronic airway inflammatory diseases including COPD poorly responsive to glucocorticoids. PMID:26751767

  20. Time course of inflammation resolution in patients with frequent exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun; Yao, Wanzhen

    2014-01-01

    Background When exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) occurs frequently, patients have high levels of airway and systemic inflammation and a poor quality of life. This study compared the nature and course of systemic and airway inflammation during AECOPD between patients who experienced frequent exacerbations and those with non-frequent exacerbations. Material/Methods Consecutive hospitalized patients with AECOPD were recruited and divided into 2 groups according to the frequency of AECOPD they had experienced in the previous year. Frequent exacerbators (defined as 2 or more AECOPD in the previous year) and non-frequent exacerbators (defined as zero or 1 AECOPD in the previous year). Inflammatory (interleukin 6, interleukin 8, myeloperoxidase, and C-reactive protein) and clinical (dyspnea, COPD assessment test (CAT), and peak expiratory flow) indices were assessed on the day of admission before starting therapy, day 7 of treatment, the day of planned discharge (day 10–14), and 8 weeks after discharge. Results We analyzed data from 135 patients; 78 (57.8%) were non-frequent exacerbators and 57 (42.2%) were frequent exacerbators. In both groups, the inflammatory and clinical indices at day 7, the day of planned discharge (day 10–14), and 8 weeks were significantly improved compared to those at admission. Frequent exacerbators had a smaller reduction in their inflammatory indices and CAT scores between exacerbation onset and all the other time points compared with infrequent exacerbators. Conclusions Frequent exacerbators have a reduced response to treatment of AECOPD in terms of inflammatory indices and quality of life. PMID:24569299

  1. Hirsutella sinensis mycelium attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsung-Teng; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Ko, Yun-Fei; Ojcius, David M; Lan, Ying-Wei; Martel, Jan; Young, John D; Chong, Kowit-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hirsutella sinensis mycelium (HSM), the anamorph of Cordyceps sinensis, is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been shown to possess various pharmacological properties. We previously reported that this fungus suppresses interleukin-1β and IL-18 secretion by inhibiting both canonical and non-canonical inflammasomes in human macrophages. However, whether HSM may be used to prevent lung fibrosis and the mechanism underlying this activity remain unclear. Our results show that pretreatment with HSM inhibits TGF-β1-induced expression of fibronectin and α-SMA in lung fibroblasts. HSM also restores superoxide dismutase expression in TGF-β1-treated lung fibroblasts and inhibits reactive oxygen species production in lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, HSM pretreatment markedly reduces bleomycin-induced lung injury and fibrosis in mice. Accordingly, HSM reduces inflammatory cell accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and proinflammatory cytokines levels in lung tissues. The HSM extract also significantly reduces TGF-β1 in lung tissues, and this effect is accompanied by decreased collagen 3α1 and α-SMA levels. Moreover, HSM reduces expression of the NLRP3 inflammasome and P2X7R in lung tissues, whereas it enhances expression of superoxide dismutase. These findings suggest that HSM may be used for the treatment of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26497260

  2. Acrolein induced both pulmonary inflammation and the death of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Ito, Sachiko; Nishio, Naomi; Tanaka, Yuriko; Chen, Nana; Isobe, Ken-Ichi

    2014-09-01

    Acrolein, a compound found in cigarette smoke, is a major risk factor for respiratory diseases. Previous research determined that both acrolein and cigarette smoke produced reactive oxygen species (ROS). As many types of pulmonary injuries are associated with inflammation, this study sought to ascertain the extent to which exposure to acrolein advanced inflammatory state in the lungs. Our results showed that intranasal exposure of mice to acrolein increased CD11c(+)F4/80(high) macrophages in the lungs and increased ROS formation via induction of NF-κB signaling. Treatment with acrolein activated macrophages and led to their increased production of ROS and expression of several key pro-inflammatory cytokines. In in vitro studies, acrolein treatment of bone marrow-derived GM-CSF-dependent immature macrophages (GM-IMs), activated the cells and led to their increased production of ROS and expression of several key pro-inflammatory cytokines. Acrolein treatment of macrophages induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Inclusion of an inhibitor of ROS formation markedly decreased acrolein-mediated macrophage activation and reduced the extent of epithelial cell death. These results indicate that acrolein can cause lung damage, in great part by mediating the increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines/factors by macrophages.

  3. Hirsutella sinensis mycelium attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tsung-Teng; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Ko, Yun-Fei; Ojcius, David M.; Lan, Ying-Wei; Martel, Jan; Young, John D.; Chong, Kowit-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hirsutella sinensis mycelium (HSM), the anamorph of Cordyceps sinensis, is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been shown to possess various pharmacological properties. We previously reported that this fungus suppresses interleukin-1β and IL-18 secretion by inhibiting both canonical and non-canonical inflammasomes in human macrophages. However, whether HSM may be used to prevent lung fibrosis and the mechanism underlying this activity remain unclear. Our results show that pretreatment with HSM inhibits TGF-β1–induced expression of fibronectin and α-SMA in lung fibroblasts. HSM also restores superoxide dismutase expression in TGF-β1–treated lung fibroblasts and inhibits reactive oxygen species production in lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, HSM pretreatment markedly reduces bleomycin–induced lung injury and fibrosis in mice. Accordingly, HSM reduces inflammatory cell accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and proinflammatory cytokines levels in lung tissues. The HSM extract also significantly reduces TGF-β1 in lung tissues, and this effect is accompanied by decreased collagen 3α1 and α-SMA levels. Moreover, HSM reduces expression of the NLRP3 inflammasome and P2X7R in lung tissues, whereas it enhances expression of superoxide dismutase. These findings suggest that HSM may be used for the treatment of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26497260

  4. Chronic allergic inflammation causes vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension in BMPR2 hypomorph and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Hershey, Gurjit Khurana; Pauciulo, Michael W; Nichols, William C; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) gene have been identified in patients with heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); however, disease penetrance is low, suggesting additional factors play a role. Inflammation is associated with PAH and vascular remodeling, but whether allergic inflammation triggers vascular remodeling in individuals with BMPR2 mutations is unknown. Our goal was to determine if chronic allergic inflammation would induce more severe vascular remodeling and PAH in mice with reduced BMPR-II signaling. Groups of Bmpr2 hypomorph and wild-type (WT) Balb/c/Byj mice were exposed to house dust mite (HDM) allergen, intranasally for 7 or 20 weeks to generate a model of chronic inflammation. HDM exposure induced similar inflammatory cell counts in all groups compared to controls. Muscularization of pulmonary arterioles and arterial wall thickness were increased after 7 weeks HDM, more severe at 20 weeks, but similar in both groups. Right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) was measured by direct cardiac catheterization to assess PAH. RVSP was similarly increased in both HDM exposed groups after 20 weeks compared to controls, but not after 7 weeks. Airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine was also assessed and interestingly, at 20 weeks, was more severe in HDM exposed Bmpr2 hypomorph mice versus WT. We conclude that chronic allergic inflammation caused PAH and while the severity was mild and similar between WT and Bmpr2 hypomorph mice, AHR was enhanced with reduced BMPR-II signaling. These data suggest that vascular remodeling and PAH resulting from chronic allergic inflammation occurs independently of BMPR-II pathway alterations.

  5. Inhibitory effects of hydrogen sulphide on pulmonary fibrosis in smoking rats via attenuation of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; An, Guoyin; Chen, Jianchang

    2014-06-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that hydrogen sulphide (H2 S) is involved in the pathogenesis of various respiratory diseases. In the present study, we established a rat model of passive smoking and investigated whether or not H2 S has protective effects against pulmonary fibrosis induced by chronic cigarette smoke exposure. Rat lung tissues were stained with haematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome. The expression of type I collagen was detected by immunohistochemistry. Oxidative stress was evaluated by detecting serum levels of malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and measuring reactive oxygen species generation in lung tissue. Inflammation was assessed by measuring serum levels of inflammatory cytokines, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. The protein expression of Nrf2, NF-κB and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the pulmonary tissue was determined by Western blotting. Our findings indicated that administration of NaHS (a donor of H2 S) could protect against pulmonary fibrosis in the smoking rats. H2 S was found to induce the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 in lung tissue and consequently up-regulate the expression of antioxidant genes HO-1 and Trx-1 in the smoking rats. Moreover, H2 S could also reduce cigarette smoking-induced inflammation by inhibiting the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2, JNK and p38 MAPKs and negatively regulating NF-κB activation. In conclusion, our study suggests that H2 S has protective effects against pulmonary fibrosis in the smoking rats by attenuating oxidative stress and inflammation.

  6. Nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 mediate survival of pulmonary plasma cells during the allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abram, Melanie; Wegmann, Michael; Fokuhl, Verena; Sonar, Sanchaita; Luger, Elke Olga; Kerzel, Sebastian; Radbruch, Andreas; Renz, Harald; Zemlin, Michael

    2009-04-15

    Allergen-specific Abs play a pivotal role in the induction and maintenance of allergic airway inflammation. During secondary immune responses, plasma cell survival and Ab production is mediated by extrinsic factors provided by the local environment (survival niches). It is unknown whether neurotrophins, a characteristic marker of allergic airway inflammation, influence plasma cell survival in the lung. Using a mouse model of allergic asthma, we found that plasma cells from the lung and spleen are distinct subpopulations exhibiting differential expression patterns of neurotrophins and their receptors (Trks). In vitro, the nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT3) led to a dose-dependent increase in viability of isolated pulmonary plasma cells due to up-regulation of the antiapoptotic Bcl2 pathway. In parallel, the expression of transcription factors that stimulate the production of immunoglobulins (X-box binding protein 1 and NF-kappaB subunit RelA) was enhanced in plasma cells treated with NGF and NT3. These findings were supported in vivo. When the NGF pathway was blocked by intranasal application of a selective TrkA inhibitor, sensitized mice showed reduced numbers of pulmonary plasma cells and developed lower levels of allergen-specific and total serum IgE in response to OVA inhalation. This suggests that in the allergic airway inflammation, NGF/TrkA-mediated pulmonary IgE production contributes significantly to serum-IgE levels. We conclude that the neurotrophins NGF and NT3 act as survival factors for pulmonary plasma cells and thus are important regulators of the local Ab production in the allergic airway disease.

  7. Interleukin-8 in airway inflammation in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Nocker, R E; Schoonbrood, D F; van de Graaf, E A; Hack, C E; Lutter, R; Jansen, H M; Out, T A

    1996-02-01

    We have investigated whether IL-8 is present in airway secretions from patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to obtain information on its possible role in airway inflammation in obstructive airways disease. In the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from 11 clinically stable patients with asthma the levels of IL-8 were increased compared to 10 healthy subjects (median: controls 21.5 pg/ml, asthma 244 pg/ml: p < 0.005). In the patients with asthma the levels of IL-8 correlated with the percentage neutrophils in the BALF (r = 0.81; p < 0.001) and with a parameter of the permeability of the respiratory membrane, the quotient (alpha 2-macroglobulin in BALF)/(alpha 2-macroglobulin in serum) (r = 0.66; p < 0.025). In the sputum sol phase of 9 patients with symptomatic asthma the levels of IL-8 were lower than in 9 patients with COPD (asthma: 6.4 ng/ml; COPD: 16.3 ng/ml; p < 0.02) and significantly correlated with those of neutrophilic myeloperoxidase (MPO; r = 0.85; p < 0.005). The increased levels of IL-8 in the airway secretions from both patients with asthma and COPD may be markers of an ongoing inflammatory process, which is more pronounced in patients with COPD. In patients with asthma the strong correlation between the levels of IL-8 and the percentage neutrophils and/or the levels of MPO points to a role of IL-8 in the recruitment and activation of neutrophils in the airway lumen.

  8. Functional characterisation of human pulmonary monocyte-like cells in lipopolysaccharide-mediated acute lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously reported the presence of novel subpopulations of pulmonary monocyte-like cells (PMLC) in the human lung; resident PMLC (rPMLC, HLA-DR+CD14++CD16+cells) and inducible PMLC (iPMLC, HLA-DR+CD14++CD16- cells). iPMLC are significantly increased in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid following inhalation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We have carried out the first functional evaluation of PMLC subpopulations in the inflamed lung, following the isolation of these cells, and other lineages, from BAL fluid using novel and complex protocols. Methods iPMLC, rPMLC, alveolar macrophages (AM), neutrophils, and regulatory T cells were quantified in BAL fluid of healthy subjects at 9 hours post-LPS inhalation (n = 15). Cell surface antigen expression by iPMLC, rPMLC and AM and the ability of each lineage to proliferate and to undergo phagocytosis were investigated using flow cytometry. Basal cytokine production by iPMLC compared to AM following their isolation from BAL fluid and the responsiveness of both cell types following in vitro treatment with the synthetic corticosteroid dexamethasone were assessed. Results rPMLC have a significantly increased expression of mature macrophage markers and of the proliferation antigen Ki67, compared to iPMLC. Our cytokine data revealed a pro-inflammatory, corticosteroid-resistant phenotype of iPMLC in this model. Conclusions These data emphasise the presence of functionally distinct subpopulations of the monocyte/macrophage lineage in the human lung in experimental acute lung inflammation. PMID:24684897

  9. Cell- and isoform-specific increases in arginase expression in acute silica-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Poljakovic, Mirjana; Porter, Dale W; Millecchia, Lyndell; Kepka-Lenhart, Diane; Beighley, Christopher; Wolfarth, Michael G; Castranova, Vincent; Morris, Sidney M

    2007-01-15

    Arginase induction was reported in several inflammatory lung diseases, suggesting that this may be a common feature underlying the pathophysiology of such diseases. As little is known regarding arginase expression in silicosis, the induction and cellular localization of arginase were elucidated in lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats 24 h following exposure to varying doses of silica by intratracheal instillation. Arginase expression was evaluated by activity assay, quantification of arginase I and arginase II mRNA levels using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and immunohistochemistry. Analyses of cells and fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) showed that markers of pulmonary inflammation, tissue damage, activation of alveolar macrophages (AM) and NO production were significantly increased by all silica doses. Arginase activity was increased also in AMs isolated from BAL fluid of silica-treated rats. Silica produced two- and three-fold increases in arginase activity of whole lung at doses of 1 and 5 mg/100 g body weight, respectively. Levels of arginase I mRNA, but not of arginase II mRNA, were similarly elevated. In control lungs, arginase I immunoreactivity was observed only in AMs sparsely dispersed throughout the lung; no inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) immunoreactivity was detected. In silica-treated lungs, arginase I and iNOS were co-expressed in most AMs that were abundantly clustered at inflammatory foci. The rapid induction of arginase I expression in inflammatory lung cells, similar to induction of arginase in other inflammatory lung diseases, implicates elevated arginase activity as a factor in the development of lung damage following exposure to silica. PMID:17365572

  10. Cell- and Isoform-specific Increases in Arginase Expression in Acute Silica-induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Poljakovic, Mirjana; Porter, Dale W.; Millecchia, Lyndell; Kepka-Lenhart, Diane; Beighley, Christopher; Wolfarth, Michael G.; Castranova, Vincent; Morris, Sidney M.

    2009-01-01

    Arginase induction was reported in several inflammatory lung diseases, suggesting that this may be a common feature underlying the pathophysiology of such diseases. As little is known regarding arginase expression in silicosis, the induction and cellular localization of arginase was elucidated in lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats 24 hr following exposure to varying doses of silica by intratracheal instillation. Arginase expression was evaluated by activity assay, quantification of arginase I and arginase II mRNA levels using real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Analyses of cells and fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) showed that markers of pulmonary inflammation, tissue damage, activation of alveolar macrophages (AM) and NO production were significantly increased by all silica doses. Arginase activity was increased also in AMs isolated from BAL fluid of silica-treated rats. Silica produced 2- and 3-fold increases in arginase activity of whole lung at doses of 1 and 5 mg/100g body weight, respectively. Levels of arginase I mRNA, but not of arginase II mRNA, were similarly elevated. In control lungs, arginase I immunoreactivity was observed only in AMs sparsely dispersed throughout the lung; no iNOS immunoreactivity was detected. In silica-treated lungs, arginase I and iNOS were co-expressed in most AMs that were abundantly clustered at inflammatory foci. The rapid induction of arginase I expression in inflammatory lung cells, similar to induction of arginase in other inflammatory lung diseases, implicates elevated arginase activity as a factor in the development of lung damage following exposure to silica. PMID:17365572

  11. Tiotropium Attenuates Virus-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in Cigarette Smoke–Exposed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Hannes; Duechs, Matthias J.; Tilp, Cornelia; Jung, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections trigger exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and tiotropium, a M3 receptor antagonist, reduces exacerbations in patients by unknown mechanisms. In this report, we investigated whether tiotropium has anti-inflammatory effects in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) and infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and compared these effects with those of steroid fluticasone and PDE4-inhibitor roflumilast. Mice were exposed to CS; infected with H1N1 or RSV; and treated with tiotropium, fluticasone, or roflumilast. The amount of cells and cytokine levels in the airways, lung function, and viral load was determined. NCI-H292 cells were infected with H1N1 or RSV and treated with the drugs. In CS/H1N1-exposed mice, tiotropium reduced neutrophil and macrophage numbers and levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in the airways and improved lung function. In contrast, fluticasone increased the loss of body weight; failed to reduce neutrophil or macrophage numbers; increased IL-6, KC, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the lungs; and worsened lung function. Treatment with roflumilast reduced macrophage numbers, IL-6, and KC in the lungs but had no effect on neutrophil numbers or lung function. In CS/RSV-exposed mice, treatment with tiotropium, but not fluticasone or roflumilast, reduced neutrophil numbers and IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the lungs. Viral load of H1N1 and RSV was significantly elevated in CS/virus-exposed mice and NCI-H292 cells after fluticasone treatment, whereas tiotropium and roflumilast had no effect. In conclusion, tiotropium has anti-inflammatory effects on CS/virus-induced inflammation in mice that are superior to the effects of roflumilast and fluticasone. This finding might help to explain the observed reduction of exacerbation rates in COPD patients. PMID:27016458

  12. Variability in ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation in healthy and cardiovascular-compromised rat models.

    PubMed

    Kodavanti, Urmila P; Ledbetter, Allen D; Thomas, Ronald F; Richards, Judy E; Ward, William O; Schladweiler, Mette C; Costa, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure dependent on the type and severity of disease. Healthy male 12-14-week-old Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Wistar (WS) and Sprague Dawley (SD); and CVD-compromised spontaneously hypertensive (SH), Fawn-Hooded hypertensive (FHH), stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHSP), obese spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) and obese JCR (JCR) rats were exposed to 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 ppm ozone for 4 h; pulmonary injury and inflammation were analyzed immediately following (0-h) or 20-h later. Baseline bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein was higher in CVD strains except for FHH when compared to healthy. Ozone-induced increases in protein and inflammation were concentration-dependent within each strain but the degree of response varied from strain to strain and with time. Among healthy rats, SD were least affected. Among CVD strains, lean rats were more susceptible to protein leakage from ozone than obese rats. Ozone caused least neutrophilic inflammation in SH and SHHF while SHSP and FHH were most affected. BALF neutrophils and protein were poorly correlated when considering the entire dataset (r = 0.55). The baseline and ozone-induced increases in cytokine mRNA varied markedly between strains and did not correlate with inflammation. These data illustrate that the degree of ozone-induced lung injury/inflammation response is likely influenced by both genetic and physiological factors that govern the nature of cardiovascular compromise in CVD models.

  13. Exposure to Deepwater Horizon Crude Oil Burnoff Particulate Matter Induces Pulmonary Inflammation and Alters Adaptive Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Jaligama, Sridhar; Chen, Zaili; Saravia, Jordy; Yadav, Nikki; Lomnicki, Slawomir M; Dugas, Tammy R; Cormier, Stephania A

    2015-07-21

    The ″in situ burning" of trapped crude oil on the surface of Gulf waters during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill released numerous pollutants, including combustion-generated particulate matter (PM). Limited information is available on the respiratory impact of inhaled in situ burned oil sail particulate matter (OSPM). Here we utilized PM collected from in situ burn plumes of the DWH oil spill to study the acute effects of exposure to OSPM on pulmonary health. OSPM caused dose-and time-dependent cytotoxicity and generated reactive oxygen species and superoxide radicals in vitro. Additionally, mice exposed to OSPM exhibited significant decreases in body weight gain, systemic oxidative stress in the form of increased serum 8-isoprostane (8-IP) levels, and airway inflammation in the form of increased macrophages and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Further, in a mouse model of allergic asthma, OSPM caused increased T helper 2 cells (Th2), peribronchiolar inflammation, and increased airway mucus production. These findings demonstrate that acute exposure to OSPM results in pulmonary inflammation and alteration of innate/adaptive immune responses in mice and highlight potential respiratory effects associated with cleaning up an oil spill. PMID:26115348

  14. Exposure to Deepwater Horizon Crude Oil Burnoff Particulate Matter Induces Pulmonary Inflammation and Alters Adaptive Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Jaligama, Sridhar; Chen, Zaili; Saravia, Jordy; Yadav, Nikki; Lomnicki, Slawomir M; Dugas, Tammy R; Cormier, Stephania A

    2015-07-21

    The ″in situ burning" of trapped crude oil on the surface of Gulf waters during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill released numerous pollutants, including combustion-generated particulate matter (PM). Limited information is available on the respiratory impact of inhaled in situ burned oil sail particulate matter (OSPM). Here we utilized PM collected from in situ burn plumes of the DWH oil spill to study the acute effects of exposure to OSPM on pulmonary health. OSPM caused dose-and time-dependent cytotoxicity and generated reactive oxygen species and superoxide radicals in vitro. Additionally, mice exposed to OSPM exhibited significant decreases in body weight gain, systemic oxidative stress in the form of increased serum 8-isoprostane (8-IP) levels, and airway inflammation in the form of increased macrophages and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Further, in a mouse model of allergic asthma, OSPM caused increased T helper 2 cells (Th2), peribronchiolar inflammation, and increased airway mucus production. These findings demonstrate that acute exposure to OSPM results in pulmonary inflammation and alteration of innate/adaptive immune responses in mice and highlight potential respiratory effects associated with cleaning up an oil spill.

  15. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  16. Klotho Reduction in Alveolar Macrophages Contributes to Cigarette Smoke Extract-induced Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingling; Wang, Yujie; Gao, Wei; Yuan, Cheng; Zhang, Sini; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Mao; Yao, Xin

    2015-11-13

    Abnormal inflammation and accelerated decline in lung function occur in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Klotho, an anti-aging protein, has an anti-inflammatory function. However, the role of Klotho has never been investigated in COPD. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible role of Klotho by alveolar macrophages in airway inflammation in COPD. Klotho levels were assessed in the lung samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of non-smokers, smokers, and patients with COPD. The regulation of Klotho expression by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) was studied in vitro, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) and recombinant Klotho were employed to investigate the role of Klotho on CSE-induced inflammation. Klotho expression was reduced in alveolar macrophages in the lungs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of COPD patients. CSE decreased Klotho expression and release from MH-S cells. Knockdown of endogenous Klotho augmented the expression of the inflammatory mediators, such as MMP-9, IL-6, and TNF-α, by MH-S cells. Exogenous Klotho inhibited the expression of CSE-induced inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, we showed that Klotho interacts with IκBα of the NF-κB pathway. Dexamethasone treatment increased the expression and release level of Klotho in MH-S cells. Our findings suggest that Klotho plays a role in sustained inflammation of the lungs, which in turn may have therapeutic implications in COPD.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide and Interleukin 1 Augment the Effects of Hypoxia and Inflammation in Human Pulmonary Arterial Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziesche, Rolf; Petkov, Venzeslav; Williams, John; Zakeri, Schaker M.; Mosgoller, Wilhelm; Knofler, Martin; Block, Lutz H.

    1996-10-01

    The combined effects of hypoxia and interleukin 1, lipopolysaccharide, or tumor necrosis factor α on the expression of genes encoding endothelial constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthases, endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were investigated in human primary pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures. Hypoxia decreased the expression of constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS-3) mRNA and NOS-3 protein as compared with normoxic conditions. The inhibition of expression of NOS-3 corresponded with a reduced production of NO. A combination of hypoxia with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, interleukin 1β , or tumor necrosis factor α augmented both effects. In contrast, the combination of hypoxia and the inflammatory mediators superinduced the expression of endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8. Here, we have shown that inflammatory mediators aggravate the effect of hypoxia on the down-regulation of NOS-3 and increase the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in human pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures.

  18. Pentoxifylline inhibits pulmonary inflammation induced by infrarenal aorticcross-clamping dependent of adenosine receptor A2A

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hali; Tan, Gang; Tong, Liquan; Han, Peng; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Bing; Sun, Xueying

    2016-01-01

    Infrarenal aortic cross-clamping (IAC) is commonly used during infrarenal vascular operations. Prolonged IAC causes ischemia-reperfusion injury to local tissues, resulting in the release of inflammatory cytokines and acute lung injury (ALI). Pentoxifylline (PTX) is a clinically used drug for chronic occlusive arterial diseases and exerts protective effects against ALI induced by various factors in experimental models. In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of PTX in a rat model of IAC. Wistar rats underwent IAC for 2 h, followed by 4 h reperfusion. PTX alone, or in combination with ZM-241385 (an adenosine receptor A2A antagonist) or CGS-21680 (an A2A agonist), was pre-administered to rats 1 h prior to IAC, and the severity of lung injury and inflammation were examined. Administration of PTX significantly attenuated ALI induced by IAC, evidenced by reduced histological scores and wet lung contents, improved blood gas parameters, decreased cell counts and protein amounts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and inhibition of MPO activity and ICAM-1 expression in lung tissues, and lower plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and soluble ICAM-1. ZM-241385 significantly abrogated, while CGS-21680 slightly enhanced, the effects of PTX in ameliorating ALI and inhibiting pulmonary inflammation. In exploration of the mechanisms, we found that PTX stimulated IL-10 production through the phosphorylation of STAT3, and A2A receptor participated in this regulation. The study indicates PTX plays a protective role in IAC-induced ALI in rats by inhibiting pulmonary inflammation through A2A signaling pathways. PMID:27347328

  19. Early pulmonary inflammation and lung damage in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, André; Stick, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer progressive airway inflammation, infection and lung damage. Airway inflammation and infection are present from early in life, often before children are symptomatic. CF gene mutations cause changes in the CF transmembrane regulator protein that result in an aberrant airway microenvironment including airway surface liquid (ASL) dehydration, reduced ASL acidity, altered airway mucin and a dysregulated inflammatory response. This review discusses how an altered microenvironment drives CF lung disease before overt airway infection, the response of the CF airway to early infection, and methods to prevent inflammation and early lung disease.

  20. The novel compound Sul-121 inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in experimental models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bing; Poppinga, Wilfred J.; Zuo, Haoxiao; Zuidhof, Annet B.; Bos, I. Sophie T.; Smit, Marieke; Vogelaar, Pieter; Krenning, Guido; Henning, Robert H.; Maarsingh, Harm; Halayko, Andrew J.; van Vliet, Bernard; Stienstra, Stef; Graaf, Adrianus Cornelis van der; Meurs, Herman; Schmidt, Martina

    2016-01-01

    COPD is characterized by persistent airflow limitation, neutrophilia and oxidative stress from endogenous and exogenous insults. Current COPD therapy involving anticholinergics, β2-adrenoceptor agonists and/or corticosteroids, do not specifically target oxidative stress, nor do they reduce chronic pulmonary inflammation and disease progression in all patients. Here, we explore the effects of Sul-121, a novel compound with anti-oxidative capacity, on hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation in experimental models of COPD. Using a guinea pig model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neutrophilia, we demonstrated that Sul-121 inhalation dose-dependently prevented LPS-induced airway neutrophilia (up to ~60%) and AHR (up to ~90%). Non-cartilaginous airways neutrophilia was inversely correlated with blood H2S, and LPS-induced attenuation of blood H2S (~60%) was prevented by Sul-121. Concomitantly, Sul-121 prevented LPS-induced production of the oxidative stress marker, malondialdehyde by ~80%. In immortalized human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, Sul-121 dose-dependently prevented cigarette smoke extract-induced IL-8 release parallel with inhibition of nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit, p65 (each ~90%). Sul-121 also diminished cellular reactive oxygen species production in ASM cells, and inhibited nuclear translocation of the anti-oxidative response regulator, Nrf2. Our data show that Sul-121 effectively inhibits airway inflammation and AHR in experimental COPD models, prospectively through inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:27229886

  1. Mechanisms of carbon nanotube-induced toxicity: focus on pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kunal; Andón, Fernando Torres; El-Sayed, Ramy; Fadeel, Bengt

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have gained tremendous interest in a wide range of applications due to their unique physical, chemical, and electronic properties. Needless to say, close attention to the potential toxicity of carbon nanotubes is of paramount importance. Numerous studies have linked exposure of carbon nanotubes to the induction of inflammation, a complex protective response to harmful stimuli including pathogens, damaged or dying cells, and other irritants. However, inflammation is a double-edged sword as chronic inflammation can lead to destruction of tissues thus compromising the homeostasis of the organism. Here, we provide an overview of the process of inflammation, the key cells and the soluble mediators involved, and discuss research on carbon nanotubes and inflammation, including recent studies on the activation of the so-called inflammasome complex in macrophages resulting in secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, recent work has shown that inflammatory cells i.e. neutrophils and eosinophils are capable of enzymatic degradation of carbon nanotubes, with mitigation of the pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic effects of nanotubes thus underscoring that inflammation is both good and bad.

  2. Non-invasive biomarkers of pulmonary damage and inflammation: Application to children exposed to ozone and trichloramine

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Alfred . E-mail: bernard@toxi.ucl.ac.be; Carbonnelle, Sylviane; Nickmilder, Marc; Burbure, Claire de

    2005-08-07

    To date, airways injury or inflammation caused by air pollutants has been evaluated mainly by analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage, an invasive technique totally unsuitable to children. The assessment of respiratory risks in this particularly vulnerable population has thus for a long time relied on spirometric tests and self-reported symptoms which are relatively late and inaccurate indicators of lung damage. Research in the field of biomarkers is now opening new perspectives with the development of non-invasive tests allowing to monitor inflammation and damage in the deep lung. Blood tests measuring lung-specific proteins (pneumoproteins) such as Clara cell protein (CC16) and surfactant-associated proteins (A, B or D) are now available to evaluate the permeability and/or the cellular integrity of the pulmonary epithelium. The application of these tests to children has recently led to the discovery of a lung epithelium hyperpermeability caused by trichloramine (nitrogen trichloride), an irritant gas contaminating the air of indoor-chlorinated pools. Serum CC16 can also serve to detect increases of airway permeability during short-term exposures to ambient ozone. Indicators measurable in exhaled air such as nitric oxide (NO) appear more useful to detect airway inflammation. By applying the exhaled NO test to children attending summer camps, we recently found that ambient ozone produces an acute inflammatory response in children from levels slightly lower than current air quality guidelines. In a study exploring the links between atopy, asthma, and exposure to chlorination products in indoor pools, we also found that the exhaled NO test can serve to detect the chronic airway inflammation associated with excessive exposure to trichloramine. Lung-specific proteins measurable in serum and markers in exhaled air represent sensitive tools that can be used to assess non-invasively the effects of air pollutants on the respiratory tract of children.

  3. Serum amyloid A opposes lipoxin A₄ to mediate glucocorticoid refractory lung inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bozinovski, Steven; Uddin, Mohib; Vlahos, Ross; Thompson, Michelle; McQualter, Jonathan L; Merritt, Anne-Sophie; Wark, Peter A B; Hutchinson, Anastasia; Irving, Louis B; Levy, Bruce D; Anderson, Gary P

    2012-01-17

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) will soon be the third most common cause of death globally. Despite smoking cessation, neutrophilic mucosal inflammation persistently damages the airways and fails to protect from recurrent infections. This maladaptive and excess inflammation is also refractory to glucocorticosteroids (GC). Here, we identify serum amyloid A (SAA) as a candidate mediator of GC refractory inflammation in COPD. Extrahepatic SAA was detected locally in COPD bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which correlated with IL-8 and neutrophil elastase, consistent with neutrophil recruitment and activation. Immunohistochemistry detected SAA was in close proximity to airway epithelium, and in vitro SAA triggered release of IL-8 and other proinflammatory mediators by airway epithelial cells in an ALX/FPR2 (formyl peptide receptor 2) receptor-dependent manner. Lipoxin A(4) (LXA(4)) can also interact with ALX/FPR2 receptors and lead to allosteric inhibition of SAA-initiated epithelial responses (pA(2) 13 nM). During acute exacerbation, peripheral blood SAA levels increased dramatically and were disproportionately increased relative to LXA(4). Human lung macrophages (CD68(+)) colocalized with SAA and GCs markedly increased SAA in vitro (THP-1, pEC(50) 43 nM). To determine its direct actions, SAA was administered into murine lung, leading to induction of CXC chemokine ligand 1/2 and a neutrophilic response that was inhibited by 15-epi-LXA(4) but not dexamethasone. Taken together, these findings identify SAA as a therapeutic target for inhibition and implicate SAA as a mediator of GC-resistant lung inflammation that can overwhelm organ protective signaling by lipoxins at ALX/FPR2 receptors.

  4. Variability in Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation in Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure depe...

  5. Reduction in pulmonary function after CABG surgery is related to postoperative inflammation and hypercortisolemia

    PubMed Central

    Roncada, Gert; Dendale, Paul; Linsen, Loes; Hendrikx, Marc; Hansen, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary function is significantly reduced in the acute phase after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Because pulmonary function partly depends on respiratory muscle strength, we studied whether reductions in pulmonary function are related to postoperative alterations in circulatory factors that affect muscle protein synthesis. Methods: Slow vital capacity (SVC) was assessed in 22 subjects before and 9 ± 3 days after CABG surgery. Blood testosterone, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), growth hormone, sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), glucose, insulin, c-peptide, c-reactive protein (CRP) content, and free androgen index, cortisol/testosterone ratio, HOMA-IR index were assessed before surgery and during the first three days after surgery. Intubation, surgery time and cumulative chest tube drainage were measured. Correlations between changes in SVC and blood parameters after surgery or subject characteristics were studied. This was a prospective observational study. Results: After CABG surgery SVC decreased by 37 ± 18% (P < 0.01). Free androgen index, blood SHBG, testosterone and IGF-1 content decreased, while HOMA-IR index, cortisol/testosterone ratio, blood growth hormone, insulin and CRP content increased (P < 0.0025) in the first three days after surgery. Decrease in SVC was independently (P < 0.05) related to higher preoperative SVC (SC β = 0.66), and greater increase in blood cortisol (SC β = 0.54) and CRP (SC β = 0.37) content after surgery. Conclusions: Larger reductions in pulmonary function after CABG surgery are present in patients experiencing greater postoperative increases in blood CRP and cortisol levels. Decrements in pulmonary function after CABG surgery are, at least in part, thus related to alterations in circulatory factors that affect muscle protein synthesis. PMID:26379888

  6. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F.; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M.; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S.; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N.; Thorneloe, Kevin S.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  7. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N; Thorneloe, Kevin S; Bradshaw, Heather B; Matalon, Sadis; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2014-07-15

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  8. Dietary long-chain omega-3 fatty acids do not diminish eosinophilic pulmonary inflammation in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of fish oil supplements on diminishing airway inflammation in asthma have been studied in mouse models and human intervention trials with varying results. However, the independent effects of the main omega-3 PUFAs found in fish oil, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (D...

  9. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Patti C; Millecchia, Lyndell M; Castranova, Vincent

    2004-02-15

    Exposure of mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increases nitric oxide (NO) production, which is proposed to play a role in the resulting pulmonary damage and inflammation. To determine the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-induced NO in this lung reaction, the responses of inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout (iNOS KO) versus C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice to aspirated LPS + IFN-gamma were compared. Male mice (8-10 weeks) were exposed to LPS (1.2 mg/kg) + IFN-gamma (5000 U/mouse) or saline. At 24 or 72 h postexposure, lungs were lavaged with saline and the acellular fluid from the first bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, albumin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). The cellular fraction of the total BAL was used to determine alveolar macrophage (AM) and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) counts, and AM zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence (AM-CL). Pulmonary responses 24 h postexposure to LPS + IFN-gamma were characterized by significantly decreased TAC, increased BAL AMs and PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and enhanced AM-CL to the same extent in both WT and iNOS KO mice. Responses 72 h postexposure were similar; however, significant differences were found between WT and iNOS KO mice. iNOS KO mice demonstrated a greater decline in total antioxidant capacity, greater BAL PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and an enhanced AM-CL compared to the WT. These data suggest that the role of iNOS-derived NO in the pulmonary response to LPS + IFN-gamma is anti-inflammatory, and this becomes evident over time. PMID:14962504

  10. Depletion of Neutrophils Promotes the Resolution of Pulmonary Inflammation and Fibrosis in Mice Infected with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Arango, Julián Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stages of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) are characterized by granulomatous lesions which promote the development of pulmonary fibrosis leading to the loss of respiratory function in 50% of patients; in addition, it has been observed that neutrophils predominate during these chronic stages of P. brasiliensis infection. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of the neutrophil during the chronic stages of experimental pulmonary PCM and during the fibrosis development and tissue repair using a monoclonal specific to this phagocytic cell. Male BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with 1.5x106 P. brasiliensis yeast cells. A monoclonal antibody specific to neutrophils was administered at 4 weeks post-inoculation followed by doses every 48h during two weeks. Mice were sacrificed at 8 and 12 weeks post-inoculation to assess cellularity, fungal load, cytokine/chemokine levels, histopathological analysis, collagen and expression of genes related to fibrosis development. Depletion of neutrophils was associated with a significant decrease in the number of eosinophils, dendritic cells, B cells, CD4-T cells, MDSCs and Treg cells, fungal load and levels of most of the pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines evaluated, including IL-17, TNF-α and TGF-β1. Recovery of lung architecture was also associated with reduced levels of collagen, high expression of TGF-β3, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12 and -14, and decreased expression of tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2, and MMP-8. Depletion of neutrophils might attenuate lung fibrosis and inflammation through down-regulating TGF-β1, TNF-α, IL-17, MMP-8 and TIMP-2. These results suggest that neutrophil could be considered as a therapeutic target in pulmonary fibrosis induced by P. brasiliensis. PMID:27690127

  11. Acute pulmonary toxicity and inflammation induced by combined exposure to didecyldimethylammonium chloride and ethylene glycol in rats.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Do Young; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Eunji; Lim, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee; Kwon, Jung-Taek

    2016-02-01

    Didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), an antimicrobial agent, has been reported to induce pulmonary toxicity in animal studies. DDAC is frequently used in spray-form household products in combination with ethylene glycol (EG). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxic interaction between DDAC and EG in the lung. DDAC at a sub-toxic dose (100 μg/kg body weight) was mixed with a non-toxic dose of EG (100 or 200 μg/kg body weight), and was administrated to rats via intratracheal instillation. Lactate dehydrogenase activity and total protein content in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were not changed by singly treated DDAC or EG, but significantly enhanced at 1 d after treatment with the mixture, with the effect dependent on the dose of EG. Total cell count in BALF was largely increased and polymorphonuclear leukocytes were predominantly recruited to the lung in rats administrated with the mixture. Inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 also appeared to be increased by the mixture of DDAC and EG (200 μg/kg body weight) at 1 d post-exposure, which might be associated with the increase in inflammatory cells in lung. BALF protein content and inflammatory cell recruitment in the lung still remained elevated at 7 d after the administration of DDAC with the higher dose of EG. These results suggest that the combination of DDAC and EG can synergistically induce pulmonary cytotoxicity and inflammation, and EG appears to amplify the harmful effects of DDAC on the lung. Therefore pulmonary exposure to these two chemicals commonly found in commercial products can be a potential hazard to human health. PMID:26763389

  12. Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung

    SciTech Connect

    Yanamala, Naveena; Birch, M. Eileen; Kisin, Elena; Bugarski, Aleksandar D.

    2013-10-15

    The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-based D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. - Highlights: • Exposure of mice to BDPM caused higher pulmonary toxicity compared to DPM. • Oxidative stress and inflammation were higher in BD vs to D exposed mice. • Inflammatory lymphocyte infiltrates were seen only in lungs of mice exposed to BD. • Ineffective clearance, prolonged PM retention was present only after BD exposure.

  13. Epithelial expression of profibrotic mediators in a model of allergen-induced airway remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Margaret M; Leigh, Richard; Bonniaud, Philippe; Ellis, Russ; Wattie, Jennifer; Smith, Mary Jo; Martin, Gail; Panju, Mohammed; Inman, Mark D; Gauldie, Jack

    2005-02-01

    Airway remodeling, including subepithelial fibrosis, is a characteristic feature of asthma and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. We examined expression of genes related to airway wall fibrosis in a model of chronic allergen-induced airway dysfunction using laser capture microdissection and quantitative real-time PCR. BALB/c mice were sensitized and subjected to chronic ovalbumin exposure over a 12-wk period, after which they were rested and then harvested 2 and 8 wk after the last exposure. Chronic allergen-exposed mice had significantly increased indices of airway remodeling and airway hyperreactivity at all time points, although no difference in expression of fibrosis-related genes was found when mRNA extracted from whole lung was examined. In contrast, fibrosis-related gene expression was significantly upregulated in mRNA obtained from microdissected bronchial wall at 2 wk after chronic allergen exposure. In addition, when bronchial wall epithelium and smooth muscle were separately microdissected, gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta1 and plasminogen activating inhibitor-1 were significantly upregulated only in the airway epithelium. These data suggest that transforming growth factor-beta1 and other profibrotic mediators produced by airway wall, and specifically, airway epithelium, play an important role in the pathophysiology of airway remodeling.

  14. [Allergens-induced sensitization alters airway epithelial adhesion molecules expression in mice].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dan; Tan, Mei-Ling; Xiang, Yang; Qin, Xiao-Qun; Zhu, Li-Ming; Dai, Ai-Guo

    2015-12-25

    To explore the relationship between the epithelial adhesion molecules and immune responses of airway epithelium, we observed the expression of integrin β4 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the mice airway epithelium after sensitization with allergens. BALB/c mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite (HDM) and then developed airway hyper-responsiveness as determined by barometric whole-body plethysmography. Both OVA and HDM sensitization led to increases of the number of peripheral leukocytes as well as inflammatory cells infiltration in lungs. OVA sensitized mice showed more severe inflammatory cells infiltration than HDM sensitized mice. Immunohistochemistry analysis of mice lung tissues revealed that sensitization with both allergens also led to a decrease of integrin β4 expression and an increase of ICAM-1 expression in airway epithelia. OVA sensitized mice showed a more significant increase of ICAM-1 expression compared with HDM sensitized mice. siRNA mediated silencing of integrin β4 gene in 16HBE cells resulted in an up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression. Our results indicate a possible role of airway epithelial adhesion molecules in allergen-induced airway immune responses. PMID:26701635

  15. Vagotomy reverses established allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity to methacholine in the mouse✩

    PubMed Central

    McAlexander, M. Allen; Gavett, Stephen H.; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the role of vagal reflexes in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Mice were actively sensitized to ovalbumin then exposed to the allergen via inhalation. Prior to ovalbumin inhalation, mice also received intratracheally-instilled particulate matter in order to boost the allergic response. In control mice, methacholine (i.v.) caused a dose-dependent increase in respiratory tract resistance (RT) that only modestly decreased if the vagi were severed bilaterally just prior to the methacholine challenge. Sensitized and challenged mice, however, manifested an airway reactivity increase that was abolished by severing the vagi prior to methacholine challenge. In an innervated ex vivo mouse lung model, methacholine selectively evoked action potential discharge in a subset of distension-sensitive A-fibers. These data support the hypothesis that the major component of the increased airway reactivity in inflamed mice is due to a vagal reflex initiated by activation of afferent fibers, even in response to a direct (i.e., smooth muscle)-acting muscarinic agonist. PMID:25842220

  16. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C; Sellati, Timothy J; Harton, Jonathan A

    2016-03-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection. PMID:27015566

  17. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C; Sellati, Timothy J; Harton, Jonathan A

    2016-03-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection.

  18. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C.; Sellati, Timothy J.; Harton, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection. PMID:27015566

  19. Use of Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Band Gap to Develop a Predictive Paradigm for Oxidative Stress and Acute Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Xia, Tian; Meng, Huan; Low-Kam, Cecile; Liu, Rong; Pokhrel, Suman; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Li, Linjiang; Rallo, Robert; Damoiseaux, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Mädler, Lutz; Cohen, Yoram; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Nel, Andre E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate for 24 metal oxide (MOx) nanoparticles that it is possible to use conduction band energy levels to delineate their toxicological potential at cellular and whole animal levels. Among the materials, the overlap of conduction band energy (Ec) levels with the cellular redox potential (−4.12 to −4.84 eV) was strongly correlated to the ability of Co3O4, Cr2O3, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles to induce oxygen radicals, oxidative stress and inflammation. This outcome is premised on permissible electron transfers from the biological redox couples that maintain the cellular redox equilibrium to the conduction band of the semiconductor particles. Both single parameter cytotoxic as well as multi-parameter oxidative stress assays in cells showed excellent correlation to the generation of acute neutrophilic inflammation and cytokine responses in the lungs of CB57 Bl/6 mice. Co3O4, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles could also oxidize cytochrome c as a representative redox couple involved in redox homeostasis. While CuO and ZnO generated oxidative stress and acute pulmonary inflammation that is not predicted by Ec levels, the adverse biological effects of these materials could be explained by their solubility, as demonstrated by ICP-MS analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to predict the toxicity of a large series of MOx nanoparticles in the lung premised on semiconductor properties and an integrated in vitro/in vivo hazard ranking model premised on oxidative stress. This establishes a robust platform for modeling of MOx structure-activity relationships based on band gap energy levels and particle dissolution. This predictive toxicological paradigm is also of considerable importance for regulatory decision-making about this important class of engineered nanomaterials. PMID:22502734

  20. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronically colonized with Haemophilus influenzae during stable disease phase have increased airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tufvesson, Ellen; Bjermer, Leif; Ekberg, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background Some patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) show increased airway inflammation and bacterial colonization during stable phase. The aim of this study was to follow COPD patients and investigate chronic colonization with pathogenic bacteria during stable disease phase, and relate these findings to clinical parameters, inflammatory pattern, lung function, and exacerbations. Methods Forty-three patients with COPD were included while in a stable state and followed up monthly until exacerbation or for a maximum of 6 months. The patients completed the Clinical COPD Questionnaire and Medical Research Council dyspnea scale questionnaires, and exhaled breath condensate was collected, followed by spirometry, impulse oscillometry, and sputum induction. Results Ten patients were chronically colonized (ie, colonized at all visits) with Haemophilus influenzae during stable phase. These patients had higher sputum levels of leukotriene B4 (P<0.001), 8-isoprostane (P=0.002), myeloperoxidase activity (P=0.028), and interleukin-8 (P=0.02) during stable phase when compared with other patients. In addition, they had lower forced vital capacity (P=0.035) and reactance at 5 Hz (P=0.034), but there was no difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1 % predicted, forced vital capacity % predicted, exhaled breath condensate biomarkers, C-reactive protein, or Clinical COPD Questionnaire and Medical Research Council dyspnea scale results. Three patients had intermittent colonization (colonized at only some visits) of H. influenzae during stable phase, and had lower levels of inflammatory biomarkers in sputum when compared with the chronically colonized patients. The difference in airway inflammation seen during stable phase in patients chronically colonized with H. influenzae was not observed during exacerbations. Conclusion Some COPD patients who were chronically colonized with H. influenzae during stable phase showed increased airway

  1. Quantitative trait locus mapping of susceptibilities to butylated hydroxytoluene-induced lung tumor promotion and pulmonary inflammation in CXB mice.

    PubMed

    Malkinson, Alvin M; Radcliffe, Richard A; Bauer, Alison K

    2002-03-01

    We have reported previously [Bauer,A.K. et al. (2001) Exp. Lung Res., 27, 197-216] that the 13 CXB recombinant inbred mouse strains derived from BALB/cByJ and C57BL/6J progenitors vary in their responsiveness to both lung tumor promotion and pulmonary inflammation induced by chronic administration of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Herein we have applied these data, along with markers known to be polymorphic among these strains, to conduct linkage analysis of these susceptibilities. This enabled us to assign provisional quantitative trait loci (QTL) that govern these strain variations in susceptibility as a genetic approach to assessing the influence of inflammation on tumorigenesis. A Chr 15 (39.1-55.6 cM) QTL regulated susceptibility to two-stage carcinogenesis, a protocol in which chronic BHT exposure followed a single urethane injection; a similar QTL on Chr 15 (46.7-61.7 cM) influenced BHT induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. A Chr 18 (37-41 cM) QTL modulated both the number of lung tumors induced by 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) injection with subsequent treatment with BHT as well as BHT-induced ingress of macrophages into airways. Other chromosomal sites that affected either the degree of BHT-elicited macrophage infiltration, Chr 9 (48-61 cM), or COX-2 induction, Chr 10 (59-65 cM), were reported to influence susceptibility to lung tumorigenesis in other strains. The fact that common chromosomal locations regulate both inflammation and carcinogenesis suggests a pathogenic role of inflammatory mediators in tumor development that may be exploited for chemoprevention of lung cancer.

  2. Particulate nature of inhaled zinc oxide nanoparticles determines systemic effects and mechanisms of pulmonary inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Kun; Ho, Chia-Chi; Chang, Han; Lin, Jing-Fang; Yang, Chung Shi; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Tsai, Hui-Ti; Lin, Pinpin

    2015-02-01

    Inhalation of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP) has potential health impact. Because zinc ion may involve in the toxicity of ZnONP, we compared adverse effects of inhaled aerosolized ZnONP and zinc nitrate in mice. Aerosolized ZnONP and zinc nitrate were well-dispersed in the inhalation chamber. Inhalation of 0.86 mg/m(3) ZnONP or 1.98 mg/m(3) zinc nitrate for 5 h caused acute inflammation mainly at bronchioloalveolar junctions of lungs at 24-h post-exposure. Inhalation of ZnONP or zinc nitrate increased metallothionein expression in the epithelial cells of brochioloalveolar junction. While the effects on cytokines secretion in bronchoalveolar lavage were similar between ZnONP and zinc nitrate, only ZnONP increased lactate dehydrogenase activity. However, repeated exposure to 0.86 mg/m(3) ZnONP 5 h/day for 5 days failed to cause a similar adverse effect. Either single or repeated exposure to 0.86 mg/m(3) ZnONP increased activities of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, glutamate pyruvate transaminase and creatine phosphokinase in blood. In contrast, exposure to zinc nitrate had no similar systemic effects. In human bronchial epithelial cells, ZnONP-induced interleukin-8 secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inhibitor. Furthermore, ZnONP-induced pulmonary inflammation was greater in wild-type mice than in TLR4-deficent mice. It appears that ZnONP-induced acute pulmonary inflammation partially depended on TLR4. In summary, we demonstrated the dose-responsive effects for inhalation of ZnONP and zinc nitrate in mice. The threshold of cytokines induction for inhalation of ZnONP for 5 h was 0.43 mg/m(3). The particulate characters of ZnONP might contribute to the systemic adverse effects and shall be evaluated for assessing its health impact in humans.

  3. Characteristics of Allergic Pulmonary Inflammation in CXCR3Knockout Mice Sensitized and Challenged with House Dust Mite Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaolan; Gao, Jinming; Guo, Zijian

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine C-X-C motif receptor 3 (CXCR3) is a chemokine receptor that is mainly expressed by activated T lymphocytes. T cells play important roles in allergic pulmonary inflammation, which is a hallmark of asthma and elicits the localized accumulation of activated T cells in the lung. In China, a marked increase in the incidence rate of chronic allergic pulmonary inflammation has made it a major public health threat. In the present study, we investigated the role of CXCR3 and its ligands in airway inflammation induced by house dust mite protein (HDMP) in a CXCR3 knockout (CXCR3KO) asthma mouse model. Pathological manifestations in the lung, cell counts and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) classifications were studied using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in the BALF and splenocyte supernatants were measured using ELISA. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the lung and spleen were analyzed by flow cytometry. RT-PCR was applied to measure the mRNA transcript levels of monokines induced by IFN-γ(CXCL9) and IFN-γ inducible protein 10(CXCL10). The total cell counts, eosinophil counts, and IL-4 levels in the BALF and cultured splenocyte supernatants were significantly increased, while the levels of IFN-γ were reduced in the HDMP groups(P<0.01). Changes in the total cell counts, eosinophil counts, and lymphocyte counts, as well as the total protein levels in the BALF, the levels of IL-4 in splenocyte supernatants, and the pathological manifestations in the lung, were all greater in CXCR3KO mice than in C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Furthermore, the expression levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10 mRNA transcripts in the lungs of CXCR3KO mice were lower than those in C57BL/6 wild-type mice (P<0.05). CXCR3 and its ligands (i.e., CXCL9 and CXCL10) may play anti-inflammatory roles in this animal model. Promoting the expression of CXCR3 and its ligands may represent a novel therapeutic approach for preventing and curing asthma. PMID:27727269

  4. Regional pulmonary inflammation in an endotoxemic ovine acute lung injury model.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Bustamante, A; Easley, R B; Fuld, M; Mulreany, D; Chon, D; Lewis, J F; Simon, B A

    2012-08-15

    The regional distribution of inflammation during acute lung injury (ALI) is not well known. In an ovine ALI model we studied regional alveolar inflammation, surfactant composition, and CT-derived regional specific volume change (sVol) and specific compliance (sC). 18 ventilated adult sheep received IV lipopolysaccharide (LPS) until severe ALI was achieved. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from apical and basal lung regions were obtained at baseline and injury time points, for analysis of cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β), BAL protein and surfactant composition. Whole lung CT images were obtained in 4 additional sheep. BAL protein and IL-1β were significantly higher in injured apical vs. basal regions. No significant regional surfactant composition changes were observed. Baseline sVol and sC were lower in apex vs. base; ALI enhanced this cranio-caudal difference, reaching statistical significance only for sC. This study suggests that apical lung regions show greater inflammation than basal ones during IV LPS-induced ALI which may relate to differences in regional mechanical events.

  5. Pulmonary surfactant phosphatidylglycerol inhibits respiratory syncytial virus–induced inflammation and infection

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Mari; Chu, Hong Wei; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of hospitalization for respiratory tract infection in young children. It is also a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly individuals and in persons with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Currently, no reliable vaccine or simple RSV antiviral therapy is available. Recently, we determined that the minor pulmonary surfactant phospholipid, palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), could markedly attenuate inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide through direct interactions with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) interacting proteins CD14 and MD-2. CD14 and TLR4 have been implicated in the host response to RSV. Treatment of bronchial epithelial cells with POPG significantly inhibited interleukin-6 and -8 production, as well as the cytopathic effects induced by RSV. The phospholipid bound RSV with high affinity and inhibited viral attachment to HEp2 cells. POPG blocked viral plaque formation in vitro by 4 log units, and markedly suppressed the expansion of plaques from cells preinfected with the virus. Administration of POPG to mice, concomitant with viral infection, almost completely eliminated the recovery of virus from the lungs at 3 and 5 days after infection, and abrogated IFN-γ (IFN-γ) production and the enhanced expression of surfactant protein D (SP-D). These findings demonstrate an important approach to prevention and treatment of RSV infections using exogenous administration of a specific surfactant phospholipid. PMID:20080799

  6. Pulmonary Inflammation Impacts on CYP1A1-Mediated Respiratory Tract DNA Damage Induced by the Carcinogenic Air Pollutant Benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Volker M.; Krais, Annette M.; Godschalk, Roger W.; Riffo-Vasquez, Yanira; Mrizova, Iveta; Roufosse, Candice A.; Corbin, Charmaine; Shi, Quan; Frei, Eva; Stiborova, Marie; van Schooten, Frederik-Jan; Phillips, David H.; Spina, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary inflammation can contribute to the development of lung cancer in humans. We investigated whether pulmonary inflammation alters the genotoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the lungs of mice and what mechanisms are involved. To model nonallergic acute inflammation, mice were exposed intranasally to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 20 µg/mouse) and then instilled intratracheally with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP; 0.5 mg/mouse). BaP-DNA adduct levels, measured by 32P-postlabeling analysis, were approximately 3-fold higher in the lungs of LPS/BaP-treated mice than in mice treated with BaP alone. Pulmonary Cyp1a1 enzyme activity was decreased in LPS/BaP-treated mice relative to BaP-treated mice suggesting that pulmonary inflammation impacted on BaP-induced Cyp1a1 activity in the lung. Our results showed that Cyp1a1 appears to be important for BaP detoxification in vivo and that the decrease of pulmonary Cyp1a1 activity in LPS/BaP-treated mice results in a decrease of pulmonary BaP detoxification, thereby enhancing BaP genotoxicity (ie, DNA adduct formation) in the lung. Because less BaP was detoxified by Cyp1a1 in the lungs of LPS/BaP-treated mice, more BaP circulated via the blood to extrapulmonary tissues relative to mice treated with BaP only. Indeed, we observed higher BaP-DNA adduct levels in livers of LPS/BaP-treated mice compared with BaP-treated mice. Our results indicate that pulmonary inflammation could be a critical determinant in the induction of genotoxicity in the lung by PAHs like BaP. Cyp1a1 appears to be involved in both BaP bioactivation and detoxification although the contribution of other enzymes to BaP-DNA adduct formation in lung and liver under inflammatory conditions remains to be explored. PMID:25911668

  7. Elevated expression of IL-23/IL-17 pathway-related mediators correlates with exacerbation of pulmonary inflammation during polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cauvi, David M; Williams, Michael R; Bermudez, Jose A; Armijo, Gabrielle; De Maio, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death in the United States, claiming more than 215,000 lives every year. A primary condition observed in septic patients is the incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome, which is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into the lung. Prior studies have shown differences in pulmonary neutrophil accumulation in C57BL/6J (B6) and A/J mice after endotoxic and septic shock. However, the mechanism by which neutrophils accumulate in the lung after polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture still remains to be fully elucidated. We show in this study that lung inflammation, characterized by neutrophil infiltration and expression of inflammatory cytokines, was aggravated in B6 as compared with A/J mice and correlated with a high expression of p19, the interleukin 23 (IL-23)-specific subunit. Furthermore, lipopolysaccharide stimulation of B6- and A/J-derived macrophages, one of the main producers of IL-23 and IL-12, revealed that B6 mice favored the production of IL-23, whereas A/J-derived macrophages expressed higher levels of IL-12. In addition, expression of IL-17, known to be upregulated by IL-23, was also more elevated in the lung of B6 mice when compared with that in the lung of A/J mice. In contrast, pulmonary expression of interferon-γ was much more pronounced in A/J than that in B6 mice, which was most likely a result of a higher production of IL-12. The expression of the IL-17-dependent neutrophil recruitment factors chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 2 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was also higher in B6 mice. Altogether, these results suggest that increased activation of the IL-23/IL-17 pathway has detrimental effects on sepsis-induced lung inflammation, whereas activation of the IL-12/interferon-γ pathway may lead, in contrast, to less pronounced inflammatory events. These two pathways may become possible therapeutic targets for the treatment of sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress

  8. Effect of early treatment with transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (TEDS) on pulmonary inflammation induced by bleomycin

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Laisa A.; Silva, Carlos A.; Polacow, Maria L. O.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bleomycin (B) is an antineoplastic drug that has pulmonary fibrosis as a side effect. There are few experimental studies about the effects of physical therapy treatment in this case. Objective The objective was to study rat lungs treated with B and precocious intervention by transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (TEDS). Method Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n=5): a control group (C); a stimulated group (TEDS); a group treated with a single dose of B (intratracheally, 2.5 mg/kg) (B); and a group treated with B and electric stimulation (B + TEDS). After the B instillation, the electrical stimulation was applied for 7 days, for a duration of 20 minutes. Lung fragments were histologically processed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and 8-isoprostane-PGF2α (8-iso-PGF2α). The density of the alveolar area was determined by planimetry, the inflammatory profile was defined by the number of cells, and the level of oxidative stress in the pulmonary tissue was evaluated by 8-iso-PGF2α. For statistical analysis of the data, the Shapiro-Wilk test was used, followed by a one-way ANOVA with the post-hoc Bonferroni test (p≤0.05). Results The B group exhibited a significant reduction in the area density, and the acute treatment with B + TEDS prevented this reduction. There were increased numbers of fibroblasts, leukocytes, and macrophages in the B group, as well as increased lipid peroxidation, which was observed only in this group. Conclusion B promoted a reduction in the alveolar density area, thereby inducing the inflammatory process and increasing the production of free radicals. These effects were minimized by the application of TEDS at the initial treatment stage. PMID:24346295

  9. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) begins with inflammation and changes in the ... different types of PH. Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may have no known cause, or the ...

  10. Pulmonary inflammation induced by repeated inhalations of beta(1,3)-D-glucan and endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Fogelmark, B.; Sjöstrand, M.; Rylander, R.

    1994-01-01

    In an animal model of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) guinea-pigs were exposed for 5 weeks to an aerosol of bacterial endotoxin, beta(1,3)-D-glucan (curdlan) or a combination. Exposure to endotoxin or curdlan showed only small changes in inflammatory cells in airways or the lung wall, histologically or in terms of enzyme secretion from alveolar macrophages. When the two agents were given together, a histology resembling HP was seen with alveolar infiltrates and early granulomas. Inflammatory cells in airways were increased and enzyme production of macrophages was changed, suggesting an effect of curdlan on the inflammatory regulating capacity of airway macrophages. The results suggest that interference with macrophage function and inflammation are important components in the development of HP. PMID:8199009

  11. Acute pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure of the airways to staphylococcal enterotoxin type B in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Desouza, Ivani A. . E-mail: ivanidesouza@fcm.unicamp.br; Franco-Penteado, Carla F.; Camargo, Enilton A.; Lima, Carmen S.P.; Teixeira, Simone A.; Muscara, Marcelo N.; De Nucci, Gilberto; Antunes, Edson

    2006-11-15

    Staphylocococcus aureus is a gram-positive bacterium that produces several enterotoxins, which are responsible for most part of pathological conditions associated to staphylococcal infections, including lung inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the underlying inflammatory mechanisms involved in leukocyte recruitment in rats exposed to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium and intratracheally injected with either SEB or sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, 0.4 ml). Airways exposition to SEB (7.5-250 ng/trachea) caused a dose- and time-dependent neutrophil accumulation in BAL fluid, the maximal effects of which were observed at 4 h post-SEB exposure (250 ng/trachea). Eosinophils were virtually absent in BAL fluid, whereas mononuclear cell counts increased only at 24 h post-SEB. Significant elevations of granulocytes in bone marrow (mature and immature forms) and peripheral blood have also been detected. In BAL fluid, marked elevations in the levels of lipid mediators (LTB{sub 4} and PGE{sub 2}) and cytokines (TNF-{alpha}, IL-6 and IL-10) were observed after SEB instillation. The SEB-induced neutrophil accumulation in BAL fluid was reduced by pretreatment with dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg), the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (3 mg/kg), the selective iNOS inhibitor compound 1400 W (5 mg/kg) and the lipoxygenase inhibitor AA-861 (200 {mu}g/kg). In separate experiments carried out with rat isolated peripheral neutrophils, SEB failed to induce neutrophil adhesion to serum-coated plates and chemotaxis. In conclusion, rat airways exposition to SEB causes a neutrophil-dependent lung inflammation at 4 h as result of the release of proinflammatory (NO, PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4}, TNF-{alpha}, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory mediators (IL-10)

  12. Dietary Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids Do Not Diminish Eosinophilic Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Jiang, Xiaowen; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Grapov, Dmitry; Adkins, Yuriko; Kelley, Darshan S.; Newman, John W.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Stephensen, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    Although the effects of fish oil supplements on airway inflammation in asthma have been studied with varying results, the independent effects of the fish oil components, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), administered separately, are untested. Here, we investigated airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness using a mouse ovalbumin exposure model of asthma assessing the effects of consuming EPA (1.5% wt/wt), DHA (1.5% wt/wt), EPA plus DHA (0.75% each), or a control diet with no added omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Consuming these diets for 6 weeks resulted in erythrocyte membrane EPA contents (molar %) of 9.0 (± 0.6), 3.2 (± 0.2), 6.8 (± 0.5), and 0.01 (± 0.0)%; DHA contents were 6.8 (± 0.1), 15.6 (± 0.5), 12.3 (± 0.3), and 3.8 (± 0.2)%, respectively. The DHA group had the highest bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid eosinophil and IL-6 levels (P < 0.05). Similar trends were seen for macrophages, IL-4, and IL-13, whereas TNF-α was lower in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid groups than the control (P < 0.05). The DHA group also had the highest airway resistance, which differed significantly from the EPA plus DHA group (P < 0.05), which had the lowest. Oxylipins were measured in plasma and BAL fluid, with DHA and EPA suppressing arachidonic acid–derived oxylipin production. DHA-derived oxylipins from the cytochrome P450 and 15-lipoxygenase pathways correlated significantly with BAL eosinophil levels. The proinflammatory effects of DHA suggest that the adverse effects of individual fatty acid formulations should be thoroughly considered before any use as therapeutic agents in asthma. PMID:24134486

  13. Electrophilic Fatty Acid Species Inhibit 5-Lipoxygenase and Attenuate Sepsis-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Khader; Steinbrink, Svenja D.; Frömel, Timo; Lill, Nicole; Isaak, Johann; Häfner, Ann-Kathrin; Roos, Jessica; Hofmann, Bettina; Heide, Heinrich; Geisslinger, Gerd; Steinhilber, Dieter; Freeman, Bruce A.; Maier, Thorsten J.; Fleming, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The reaction of nitric oxide and nitrite-derived species with polyunsaturated fatty acids yields electrophilic fatty acid nitroalkene derivatives (NO2-FA), which display anti-inflammatory properties. Given that the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO, ALOX5) possesses critical nucleophilic amino acids, which are potentially sensitive to electrophilic modifications, we determined the consequences of NO2-FA on 5-LO activity in vitro and on 5-LO-mediated inflammation in vivo. Results: Stimulation of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) with nitro-oleic (NO2-OA) or nitro-linoleic acid (NO2-LA) (but not the parent lipids) resulted in the concentration-dependent and irreversible inhibition of 5-LO activity. Similar effects were observed in cell lysates and using the recombinant human protein, indicating a direct reaction with 5-LO. NO2-FAs did not affect the activity of the platelet-type 12-LO (ALOX12) or 15-LO-1 (ALOX15) in intact cells or the recombinant protein. The NO2-FA-induced inhibition of 5-LO was attributed to the alkylation of Cys418, and the exchange of Cys418 to serine rendered 5-LO insensitive to NO2-FA. In vivo, the systemic administration of NO2-OA to mice decreased neutrophil and monocyte mobilization in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), attenuated the formation of the 5-LO product 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), and inhibited lung injury. The administration of NO2-OA to 5-LO knockout mice had no effect on LPS-induced neutrophil or monocyte mobilization as well as on lung injury. Innovation: Prophylactic administration of NO2-OA to septic mice inhibits inflammation and promotes its resolution by interfering in 5-LO-mediated inflammatory processes. Conclusion: NO2-FAs directly and irreversibly inhibit 5-LO and attenuate downstream acute inflammatory responses. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2667–2680. PMID:24206143

  14. Group V secretory phospholipase A2 reveals its role in house dust mite-induced allergic pulmonary inflammation by regulation of dendritic cell function

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Giorgio; Fujioka, Daisuke; Xing, Wei; Katz, Howard R.; Boyce, Joshua A.; Balestrieri, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that group V secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) regulates phagocytosis of zymosan and Candida albicans by a mechanism that depends on fusion of phagosomes with late endosomes in macrophages. Here we report that group V sPLA2 (Pla2g5)-null mice exposed to an extract of house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae (Df) had markedly reduced pulmonary inflammation and goblet cell metaplasia compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Pla2g5-null mice had also impaired Th2-type adaptive immune responses to Df compared to WT mice. Pla2g5-null bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) activated by Df had delayed intracellular processing of allergen and impaired allergen-dependent maturation, a pattern recapitulated by the native lung DCs of Df-challenged mice. Adoptively transferred Df-loaded Pla2g5-null BMDCs were less able than Df-loaded WT BMDCs to induce pulmonary inflammation and Th2 polarization in WT mice. However, Pla2g5-null recipients transferred with WT or Pla2g5-null Df-loaded BMDCs exhibited significantly reduced local inflammatory responses to Df, even though the transfer of WT BMDCs still induced an intact Th2 cytokine response in regional lymph nodes. Thus, the expression of group V sPLA2 in APC regulates Ag processing and maturation of dendritic cells, and contributes to pulmonary inflammation and immune response against Df. Furthermore, an additional yet to be identified resident cell type is essential for the development of pulmonary inflammation, likely a cell in which group V sPLA2 is upregulated by Df and whose function is also regulated by group V sPLA2. PMID:20817863

  15. Effect of antigen sensitization and challenge on oscillatory mechanics of the lung and pulmonary inflammation in obese carboxypeptidase E-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Dahm, Paul H.; Richards, Jeremy B.; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Cromar, Kevin R.; Sur, Sanjiv; Price, Roger E.; Malik, Farhan; Spencer, Chantal Y.; Barreno, Ramon X.; Hashmi, Syed S.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Haque, Ikram U.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic, obese asthmatics exhibit airway obstruction with variable degrees of eosinophilic airway inflammation. We previously reported that mice obese as a result of a genetic deficiency in either leptin (ob/ob mice) or the long isoform of the leptin receptor (db/db mice) exhibit enhanced airway obstruction in the presence of decreased numbers of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) eosinophils compared with lean, wild-type mice following antigen (ovalbumin; OVA) sensitization and challenge. To determine whether the genetic modality of obesity induction influences the development of OVA-induced airway obstruction and OVA-induced pulmonary inflammation, we examined indices of these sequelae in mice obese as a result of a genetic deficiency in carboxypeptidase E, an enzyme that processes prohormones and proneuropeptides involved in satiety and energy expenditure (Cpefat mice). Accordingly, Cpefat and lean, wild-type (C57BL/6) mice were sensitized to OVA and then challenged with either aerosolized PBS or OVA. Compared with genotype-matched, OVA-sensitized and PBS-challenged mice, OVA sensitization and challenge elicited airway obstruction and increased BALF eosinophils, macrophages, neutrophils, IL-4, IL-13, IL-18, and chemerin. However, OVA challenge enhanced airway obstruction and pulmonary inflammation in Cpefat compared with wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that OVA sensitization and challenge enhance airway obstruction in obese mice regardless of the genetic basis of obesity, whereas the degree of OVA-induced pulmonary inflammation is dependent on the genetic modality of obesity induction. These results have important implications for animal models of asthma, as modeling the pulmonary phenotypes for subpopulations of atopic, obese asthmatics critically depends on selecting the appropriate mouse model. PMID:25009214

  16. Effect of antigen sensitization and challenge on oscillatory mechanics of the lung and pulmonary inflammation in obese carboxypeptidase E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dahm, Paul H; Richards, Jeremy B; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Cromar, Kevin R; Sur, Sanjiv; Price, Roger E; Malik, Farhan; Spencer, Chantal Y; Barreno, Ramon X; Hashmi, Syed S; Blackburn, Michael R; Haque, Ikram U; Johnston, Richard A

    2014-09-15

    Atopic, obese asthmatics exhibit airway obstruction with variable degrees of eosinophilic airway inflammation. We previously reported that mice obese as a result of a genetic deficiency in either leptin (ob/ob mice) or the long isoform of the leptin receptor (db/db mice) exhibit enhanced airway obstruction in the presence of decreased numbers of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) eosinophils compared with lean, wild-type mice following antigen (ovalbumin; OVA) sensitization and challenge. To determine whether the genetic modality of obesity induction influences the development of OVA-induced airway obstruction and OVA-induced pulmonary inflammation, we examined indices of these sequelae in mice obese as a result of a genetic deficiency in carboxypeptidase E, an enzyme that processes prohormones and proneuropeptides involved in satiety and energy expenditure (Cpe(fat) mice). Accordingly, Cpe(fat) and lean, wild-type (C57BL/6) mice were sensitized to OVA and then challenged with either aerosolized PBS or OVA. Compared with genotype-matched, OVA-sensitized and PBS-challenged mice, OVA sensitization and challenge elicited airway obstruction and increased BALF eosinophils, macrophages, neutrophils, IL-4, IL-13, IL-18, and chemerin. However, OVA challenge enhanced airway obstruction and pulmonary inflammation in Cpe(fat) compared with wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that OVA sensitization and challenge enhance airway obstruction in obese mice regardless of the genetic basis of obesity, whereas the degree of OVA-induced pulmonary inflammation is dependent on the genetic modality of obesity induction. These results have important implications for animal models of asthma, as modeling the pulmonary phenotypes for subpopulations of atopic, obese asthmatics critically depends on selecting the appropriate mouse model.

  17. Current concepts on oxidative/carbonyl stress, inflammation and epigenetics in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Hongwei; Rahman, Irfan

    2011-07-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a global health problem. The current therapies for COPD are poorly effective and the mainstays of pharmacotherapy are bronchodilators. A better understanding of the pathobiology of COPD is critical for the development of novel therapies. In the present review, we have discussed the roles of oxidative/aldehyde stress, inflammation/immunity, and chromatin remodeling in the pathogenesis of COPD. An imbalance of oxidants/antioxidants caused by cigarette smoke and other pollutants/biomass fuels plays an important role in the pathogenesis of COPD by regulating redox-sensitive transcription factors (e.g., NF-{kappa}B), autophagy and unfolded protein response leading to chronic lung inflammatory response. Cigarette smoke also activates canonical/alternative NF-{kappa}B pathways and their upstream kinases leading to sustained inflammatory response in lungs. Recently, epigenetic regulation has been shown to be critical for the development of COPD because the expression/activity of enzymes that regulate these epigenetic modifications have been reported to be abnormal in airways of COPD patients. Hence, the significant advances made in understanding the pathophysiology of COPD as described herein will identify novel therapeutic targets for intervention in COPD.

  18. Anergy-like immunosuppression in mice bearing pulmonary foreign-body granulomatous inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Allred, D. C.; Kobayashi, K.; Yoshida, T.

    1985-01-01

    Pulmonary granulomas were induced in BALB/c mice by the intratracheal injection of insoluble polymerized dextran and latex microparticles. Very large granulomas developed around dextran beads, which reached peak intensity within 2-3 days and rapidly declined in size thereafter. Latex beads generated small stable lesions. The involvement of cell-mediated immunity could not be demonstrated in the inflammatory responses induced by either type of bead. Antigen-induced delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and mitogen-induced DTH-like footpad reactions were markedly suppressed in immunized mice bearing early dextran granulomas. Mitogen-induced DTH-like footpad reactions were suppressed in unimmunized animals bearing early dextran foreign-body granulomas. Antigen- and mitogen-induced footpad swelling recovered to normal levels as dextran granulomas diminished in size. No suppression of these footpad reactions was observed in mice bearing small latex foreign-body granulomas. The intraperitoneal injection of aqueous extracts prepared from the lungs of unimmunized donor animals bearing early dextran foreign-body granulomas could partially transfer suppression of mitogen DTH-like footpad responses to normal mice. These results suggest that cells within large, nonimmunologic lung granulomas produce a soluble factor which participates in the expression of anergy-like immunosuppression. Images Figure 2 PMID:3907366

  19. Update on the Mechanisms of Pulmonary Inflammation and Oxidative Imbalance Induced by Exercise.

    PubMed

    Araneda, O F; Carbonell, T; Tuesta, M

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the generation of oxidative damage and lung inflammation induced by physical exercise are described. Changes in lung function induced by exercise involve cooling of the airways, fluid evaporation of the epithelial surface, increased contact with polluting substances, and activation of the local and systemic inflammatory response. The present work includes evidence obtained from the different types of exercise in terms of duration and intensity, the effect of both acute performance and chronic performance, and the influence of special conditions such as cold weather, high altitude, and polluted environments. Levels of prooxidants, antioxidants, oxidative damage to biomolecules, and cellularity, as well as levels of soluble mediators of the inflammatory response and its effects on tissues, are described in samples of lung origin. These samples include tissue homogenates, induced sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, biopsies, and exhaled breath condensate obtained in experimental protocols conducted on animal and human models. Finally, the need to simultaneously explore the oxidative/inflammatory parameters to establish the interrelation between them is highlighted. PMID:26881028

  20. In Vivo Transcriptional Profiling of Yersinia pestis Reveals a Novel Bacterial Mediator of Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pechous, Roger D.; Broberg, Christopher A.; Stasulli, Nikolas M.; Miller, Virginia L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inhalation of Yersinia pestis results in primary pneumonic plague, a highly lethal and rapidly progressing necrotizing pneumonia. The disease begins with a period of extensive bacterial replication in the absence of disease symptoms, followed by the sudden onset of inflammatory responses that ultimately prove fatal. Very little is known about the bacterial and host factors that contribute to the rapid biphasic progression of pneumonic plague. In this work, we analyzed the in vivo transcription kinetics of 288 bacterial open reading frames previously shown by microarray analysis to be dynamically regulated in the lung. Using this approach combined with bacterial genetics, we were able to identify five Y. pestis genes that contribute to the development of pneumonic plague. Deletion of one of these genes, ybtX, did not alter bacterial survival but attenuated host inflammatory responses during late-stage disease. Deletion of ybtX in another lethal respiratory pathogen, Klebsiella pneumoniae, also resulted in diminished host inflammation during infection. Thus, our in vivo transcriptional screen has identified an important inflammatory mediator that is common to two Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that cause severe pneumonia. PMID:25691593

  1. β-Glucans Are Masked but Contribute to Pulmonary Inflammation During Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kutty, Geetha; Davis, A Sally; Ferreyra, Gabriela A; Qiu, Ju; Huang, Da Wei; Sassi, Monica; Bishop, Lisa; Handley, Grace; Sherman, Brad; Lempicki, Richard; Kovacs, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    β-glucans, which can activate innate immune responses, are a major component in the cell wall of the cyst form of Pneumocystis In the current study, we examined whether β-1,3-glucans are masked by surface proteins in Pneumocystis and what role β-glucans play in Pneumocystis-associated inflammation. For 3 species, including Pneumocystis jirovecii, which causes Pneumocystis pneumonia in humans, Pneumocystis carinii, and Pneumocystis murina, β-1,3-glucans were masked in most organisms, as demonstrated by increased exposure following trypsin treatment. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and microarray techniques, we demonstrated in a mouse model of Pneumocystis pneumonia that treatment with caspofungin, an inhibitor of β-1,3-glucan synthesis, for 21 days decreased expression of a broad panel of inflammatory markers, including interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, and multiple chemokines/chemokine ligands. Thus, β-glucans in Pneumocystis cysts are largely masked, which likely decreases innate immune activation; this mechanism presumably was developed for interactions with immunocompetent hosts, in whom organism loads are substantially lower. In immunosuppressed hosts with a high organism burden, organism death and release of glucans appears to be an important contributor to deleterious host inflammatory responses. PMID:27324243

  2. Hemorrhagic shock primes for lung vascular endothelial cell pyroptosis: role in pulmonary inflammation following LPS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yuehua; Yang, Yong; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Junjie; Song, Xiao; Jiang, Gening; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) often renders patients more susceptible to lung injury by priming for an exaggerated response to a second infectious stimulus. Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major component of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome following HS and regularly serves as a major cause of patient mortality. The lung vascular endothelium is an active organ that has a central role in the development of ALI through synthesizing and releasing of a number of inflammatory mediators. Cell pyroptosis is a caspase-1-dependent regulated cell death, which features rapid plasma membrane rupture and release of proinflammatory intracellular contents. In this study, we demonstrated an important role of HS in priming for LPS-induced lung endothelial cell (EC) pyroptosis. We showed that LPS through TLR4 activates Nlrp3 (NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains containing protein 3) inflammasome in mouse lung vascular EC, and subsequently induces caspase-1 activation. However, HS induced release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which acting through the receptor for advanced glycation end products initiates EC endocytosis of HMGB1, and subsequently triggers a cascade of molecular events, including cathepsin B release from ruptured lysosomes followed by pyroptosome formation and caspase-1 activation. These HS-induced events enhance LPS-induced EC pyroptosis. We further showed that lung vascular EC pyroptosis significantly exaggerates lung inflammation and injury. The present study explores a novel mechanism underlying HS-primed ALI and thus presents a potential therapeutic target for post-HS ALI. PMID:27607578

  3. Hemorrhagic shock primes for lung vascular endothelial cell pyroptosis: role in pulmonary inflammation following LPS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yuehua; Yang, Yong; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Junjie; Song, Xiao; Jiang, Gening; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) often renders patients more susceptible to lung injury by priming for an exaggerated response to a second infectious stimulus. Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major component of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome following HS and regularly serves as a major cause of patient mortality. The lung vascular endothelium is an active organ that has a central role in the development of ALI through synthesizing and releasing of a number of inflammatory mediators. Cell pyroptosis is a caspase-1-dependent regulated cell death, which features rapid plasma membrane rupture and release of proinflammatory intracellular contents. In this study, we demonstrated an important role of HS in priming for LPS-induced lung endothelial cell (EC) pyroptosis. We showed that LPS through TLR4 activates Nlrp3 (NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains containing protein 3) inflammasome in mouse lung vascular EC, and subsequently induces caspase-1 activation. However, HS induced release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which acting through the receptor for advanced glycation end products initiates EC endocytosis of HMGB1, and subsequently triggers a cascade of molecular events, including cathepsin B release from ruptured lysosomes followed by pyroptosome formation and caspase-1 activation. These HS-induced events enhance LPS-induced EC pyroptosis. We further showed that lung vascular EC pyroptosis significantly exaggerates lung inflammation and injury. The present study explores a novel mechanism underlying HS-primed ALI and thus presents a potential therapeutic target for post-HS ALI. PMID:27607578

  4. A Functional Variant of Elafin With Improved Anti-inflammatory Activity for Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Small, Donna M; Zani, Marie-Louise; Quinn, Derek J; Dallet-Choisy, Sandrine; Glasgow, Arlene MA; O'Kane, Cecilia; McAuley, Danny F; McNally, Paul; Weldon, Sinéad; Moreau, Thierry; Taggart, Clifford C

    2015-01-01

    Elafin is a serine protease inhibitor produced by epithelial and immune cells with anti-inflammatory properties. Research has shown that dysregulated protease activity may elicit proteolytic cleavage of elafin, thereby impairing the innate immune function of the protein. The aim of this study was to generate variants of elafin (GG- and QQ-elafin) that exhibit increased protease resistance while retaining the biological properties of wild-type (WT) elafin. Similar to WT-elafin, GG- and QQ-elafin variants retained antiprotease activity and susceptibility to transglutaminase-mediated fibronectin cross-linking. However, in contrast to WT-elafin, GG- and QQ-elafin displayed significantly enhanced resistance to degradation when incubated with bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with cystic fibrosis. Intriguingly, both variants, particularly GG-elafin, demonstrated improved lipopolysaccharide (LPS) neutralization properties in vitro. In addition, GG-elafin showed improved anti-inflammatory activity in a mouse model of LPS-induced acute lung inflammation. Inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung was reduced in lungs of mice treated with GG-elafin, predominantly neutrophilic infiltration. A reduction in MCP-1 levels in GG-elafin treated mice compared to the LPS alone treatment group was also demonstrated. GG-elafin showed increased functionality when compared to WT-elafin and may be of future therapeutic relevance in the treatment of lung diseases characterized by a protease burden. PMID:25189740

  5. Update on the Mechanisms of Pulmonary Inflammation and Oxidative Imbalance Induced by Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, O. F.; Carbonell, T.; Tuesta, M.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the generation of oxidative damage and lung inflammation induced by physical exercise are described. Changes in lung function induced by exercise involve cooling of the airways, fluid evaporation of the epithelial surface, increased contact with polluting substances, and activation of the local and systemic inflammatory response. The present work includes evidence obtained from the different types of exercise in terms of duration and intensity, the effect of both acute performance and chronic performance, and the influence of special conditions such as cold weather, high altitude, and polluted environments. Levels of prooxidants, antioxidants, oxidative damage to biomolecules, and cellularity, as well as levels of soluble mediators of the inflammatory response and its effects on tissues, are described in samples of lung origin. These samples include tissue homogenates, induced sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, biopsies, and exhaled breath condensate obtained in experimental protocols conducted on animal and human models. Finally, the need to simultaneously explore the oxidative/inflammatory parameters to establish the interrelation between them is highlighted. PMID:26881028

  6. Update on the Mechanisms of Pulmonary Inflammation and Oxidative Imbalance Induced by Exercise.

    PubMed

    Araneda, O F; Carbonell, T; Tuesta, M

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the generation of oxidative damage and lung inflammation induced by physical exercise are described. Changes in lung function induced by exercise involve cooling of the airways, fluid evaporation of the epithelial surface, increased contact with polluting substances, and activation of the local and systemic inflammatory response. The present work includes evidence obtained from the different types of exercise in terms of duration and intensity, the effect of both acute performance and chronic performance, and the influence of special conditions such as cold weather, high altitude, and polluted environments. Levels of prooxidants, antioxidants, oxidative damage to biomolecules, and cellularity, as well as levels of soluble mediators of the inflammatory response and its effects on tissues, are described in samples of lung origin. These samples include tissue homogenates, induced sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, biopsies, and exhaled breath condensate obtained in experimental protocols conducted on animal and human models. Finally, the need to simultaneously explore the oxidative/inflammatory parameters to establish the interrelation between them is highlighted.

  7. Cold ischemia with selective anterograde in situ pulmonary perfusion preserves gas exchange and mitochondrial homeostasis and curbs inflammation in an experimental model of donation after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Pottecher, Julien; Santelmo, Nicola; Noll, Eric; Charles, Anne-Laure; Benahmed, Malika; Canuet, Matthieu; Frossard, Nelly; Namer, Izzie J; Geny, Bernard; Massard, Gilbert; Diemunsch, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the functional preservation of the lung graft with anterograde lung perfusion in a model of donation after cardiac death. Thirty minutes after cardiac arrest, in situ anterograde selective pulmonary cold perfusion was started in six swine. The alveolo-capillary membrane was challenged at 3, 6, and 8 h with measurements of the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), the pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), the PaO2 /FiO2 ratio, the transpulmonary oxygen output (tpVO2 ), and the transpulmonary CO2 clearance (tpCO2 ). Mitochondrial homeostasis was investigated by measuring maximal oxidative capacity (Vmax ) and the coupling of phosphorylation to oxidation (ACR, acceptor control ratio) in lung biopsies. Inflammation and induction of primary immune response were assessed by measurement of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukine-6 (IL-6) and receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Data were compared using repeated measures Anova. Pulmonary hemodynamics (mPAP: P = 0.69; PVR: P = 0.46), oxygenation (PaO2 /FiO2 : P = 0.56; tpVO2 : P = 0.46), CO2 diffusion (tpCO2 : P = 0.24), mitochondrial homeostasis (Vmax : P = 0.42; ACR: P = 0.8), and RAGE concentrations (P = 0.24) did not significantly change up to 8 h after cardiac arrest. TNFα and IL-6 were undetectable. Unaffected pulmonary hemodynamics, sustained oxygen and carbon dioxide diffusion, preserved mitochondrial homeostasis, and lack of inflammation suggest a long-lasting functional preservation of the graft with selective anterograde in situ pulmonary perfusion.

  8. Maternal dietary docosahexaenoic acid supplementation attenuates fetal growth restriction and enhances pulmonary function in a newborn mouse model of perinatal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Velten, Markus; Britt, Rodney D; Heyob, Kathryn M; Tipple, Trent E; Rogers, Lynette K

    2014-03-01

    The preterm infant is often exposed to maternal and neonatal inflammatory stimuli and is born with immature lungs, resulting in a need for oxygen therapy. Nutritional intervention with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 6.3 g/kg of diet) has been shown to attenuate inflammation in various human diseases. Previous studies demonstrated that maternal DHA supplementation during late gestation and lactation attenuated hyperoxic lung injury in newborn mouse pups. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that DHA supplementation to the dam would reduce hyperoxic lung injury and growth deficits in a more severe model of systemic maternal inflammation, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and neonatal hyperoxia exposure. On embryonic day 16, dams were placed on DHA (6.3 g DHA/kg diet) or control diets and injected with saline or LPS. Diets were maintained through weaning. At birth, pups were placed in room air or hyperoxia for 14 d. Improvements in birth weight (P < 0.01), alveolarization (P ≤ 0.01), and pulmonary function (P ≤ 0.03) at 2 and 8 wk of age were observed in pups exposed to perinatal inflammation and born to DHA-supplemented dams compared with control diet-exposed pups. These improvements were associated with decreases in tissue macrophage numbers (P < 0.01), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression (P ≤ 0.05), and decreases in soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products concentrations (P < 0.01) at 2 and 8 wk. Furthermore, DHA supplementation attenuated pulmonary fibrosis, which was associated with the reduction of matrix metalloproteinases 2, 3, and 8 (P ≤ 0.03) and collagen mRNA (P ≤ 0.05), and decreased collagen (P < 0.01) and vimentin (P ≤ 0.03) protein concentrations. In a model of severe inflammation, maternal DHA supplementation lessened inflammation and improved lung growth in the offspring. Maternal supplementation with DHA may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce neonatal inflammation.

  9. Framework for 3D histologic reconstruction and fusion with in vivo MRI: Preliminary results of characterizing pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Rusu, Mirabela; Golden, Thea; Wang, Haibo; Gow, Andrew; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary inflammation is associated with a variety of diseases. Assessing pulmonary inflammation on in vivo imaging may facilitate the early detection and treatment of lung diseases. Although routinely used in thoracic imaging, computed tomography has thus far not been compellingly shown to characterize inflammation in vivo. Alternatively, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a nonionizing radiation technique to better visualize and characterize pulmonary tissue. Prior to routine adoption of MRI for early characterization of inflammation in humans, a rigorous and quantitative characterization of the utility of MRI to identify inflammation is required. Such characterization may be achieved by considering ex vivo histology as the ground truth, since it enables the definitive spatial assessment of inflammation. In this study, the authors introduce a novel framework to integrate 2D histology, ex vivo and in vivo imaging to enable the mapping of the extent of disease from ex vivo histology onto in vivo imaging, with the goal of facilitating computerized feature analysis and interrogation of disease appearance on in vivo imaging. The authors’ framework was evaluated in a preclinical preliminary study aimed to identify computer extracted features on in vivo MRI associated with chronic pulmonary inflammation. Methods: The authors’ image analytics framework first involves reconstructing the histologic volume in 3D from individual histology slices. Second, the authors map the disease ground truth onto in vivo MRI via coregistration with 3D histology using the ex vivo lung MRI as a conduit. Finally, computerized feature analysis of the disease extent is performed to identify candidate in vivo imaging signatures of disease presence and extent. Results: The authors evaluated the framework by assessing the quality of the 3D histology reconstruction and the histology—MRI fusion, in the context of an initial use case involving characterization of chronic

  10. Pneumocystis murina infection and cigarette smoke exposure interact to cause increased organism burden, development of airspace enlargement, and pulmonary inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Paul J; Preston, Angela M; Ling, Tony; Du, Ming; Fields, W Bradley; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Beck, James M

    2008-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by the presence of airflow obstruction and lung destruction with airspace enlargement. In addition to cigarette smoking, respiratory pathogens play a role in pathogenesis, but specific organisms are not always identified. Recent reports demonstrate associations between the detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA in lung specimens or respiratory secretions and the presence of emphysema in COPD patients. Additionally, human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals who smoke cigarettes develop early emphysema, but a role for P. jirovecii in pathogenesis remains speculative. We developed a new experimental model using immunocompetent mice to test the interaction of cigarette smoke exposure and environmentally acquired Pneumocystis murina infection in vivo. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke and P. murina would interact to cause increases in total lung capacity, airspace enlargement, and pulmonary inflammation. We found that exposure to cigarette smoke significantly increases the lung organism burden of P. murina. Pulmonary infection with P. murina, combined with cigarette smoke exposure, results in changes in pulmonary function and airspace enlargement characteristic of pulmonary emphysema. P. murina and cigarette smoke exposure interact to cause increased lung inflammatory cell accumulation. These findings establish a novel animal model system to explore the role of Pneumocystis species in the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:18490462

  11. Omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS through suppressing pulmonary inflammation and promoting endothelial barrier via an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Di; Tang, Xumao; He, Jing; Wang, Daoxin; Zhao, Yan; Deng, Wang; Deng, Xinyu; Zhou, Guoqi; Xia, Jing; Zhong, Xi; Pu, Shenglan

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by increased pulmonary inflammation and endothelial barrier permeability. Omentin has been shown to benefit obesity-related systemic vascular diseases; however, its effects on ARDS are unknown. In the present study, the level of circulating omentin in patients with ARDS was assessed to appraise its clinical significance in ARDS. Mice were subjected to systemic administration of adenoviral vector expressing omentin (Ad-omentin) and one-shot treatment of recombinant human omentin (rh-omentin) to examine omentin's effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS. Pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) were treated with rh-omentin to further investigate its underlying mechanism. We found that a decreased level of circulating omentin negatively correlated with white blood cells and procalcitonin in patients with ARDS. Ad-omentin protected against LPS-induced ARDS by alleviating the pulmonary inflammatory response and endothelial barrier injury in mice, accompanied by Akt/eNOS pathway activation. Treatment of pulmonary ECs with rh-omentin attenuated inflammatory response and restored adherens junctions (AJs), and cytoskeleton organization promoted endothelial barrier after LPS insult. Moreover, the omentin-mediated enhancement of EC survival and differentiation was blocked by the Akt/eNOS pathway inactivation. Therapeutic rh-omentin treatment also effectively protected against LPS-induced ARDS via the Akt/eNOS pathway. Collectively, these data indicated that omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS by suppressing inflammation and promoting the pulmonary endothelial barrier, at least partially, through an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism. Therapeutic strategies aiming to restore omentin levels may be valuable for the prevention or treatment of ARDS. PMID:27607575

  12. Omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS through suppressing pulmonary inflammation and promoting endothelial barrier via an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qi, Di; Tang, Xumao; He, Jing; Wang, Daoxin; Zhao, Yan; Deng, Wang; Deng, Xinyu; Zhou, Guoqi; Xia, Jing; Zhong, Xi; Pu, Shenglan

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by increased pulmonary inflammation and endothelial barrier permeability. Omentin has been shown to benefit obesity-related systemic vascular diseases; however, its effects on ARDS are unknown. In the present study, the level of circulating omentin in patients with ARDS was assessed to appraise its clinical significance in ARDS. Mice were subjected to systemic administration of adenoviral vector expressing omentin (Ad-omentin) and one-shot treatment of recombinant human omentin (rh-omentin) to examine omentin's effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS. Pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) were treated with rh-omentin to further investigate its underlying mechanism. We found that a decreased level of circulating omentin negatively correlated with white blood cells and procalcitonin in patients with ARDS. Ad-omentin protected against LPS-induced ARDS by alleviating the pulmonary inflammatory response and endothelial barrier injury in mice, accompanied by Akt/eNOS pathway activation. Treatment of pulmonary ECs with rh-omentin attenuated inflammatory response and restored adherens junctions (AJs), and cytoskeleton organization promoted endothelial barrier after LPS insult. Moreover, the omentin-mediated enhancement of EC survival and differentiation was blocked by the Akt/eNOS pathway inactivation. Therapeutic rh-omentin treatment also effectively protected against LPS-induced ARDS via the Akt/eNOS pathway. Collectively, these data indicated that omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS by suppressing inflammation and promoting the pulmonary endothelial barrier, at least partially, through an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism. Therapeutic strategies aiming to restore omentin levels may be valuable for the prevention or treatment of ARDS. PMID:27607575

  13. Disruption of Sirtuin 1-Mediated Control of Circadian Molecular Clock and Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongwei; Sundar, Isaac K; Huang, Yadi; Gerloff, Janice; Sellix, Michael T; Sime, Patricia J; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth most common cause of death, and it is characterized by abnormal inflammation and lung function decline. Although the circadian molecular clock regulates inflammatory responses, there is no information available regarding the impact of COPD on lung molecular clock function and its regulation by sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). We hypothesize that the molecular clock in the lungs is disrupted, leading to increased inflammatory responses in smokers and patients with COPD and its regulation by SIRT1. Lung tissues, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and sputum cells were obtained from nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD for measurement of core molecular clock proteins (BMAL1, CLOCK, PER1, PER2, and CRY1), clock-associated nuclear receptors (REV-ERBα, REV-ERBβ, and RORα), and SIRT1 by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot. PBMCs were treated with the SIRT1 activator SRT1720 followed by LPS treatment, and supernatant was collected at 6-hour intervals. Levels of IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α released from PBMCs were determined by ELISA. Expression of BMAL1, PER2, CRY1, and REV-ERBα was reduced in PBMCs, sputum cells, and lung tissues from smokers and patients with COPD when compared with nonsmokers. SRT1720 treatment attenuated LPS-mediated reduction of BMAL1 and REV-ERBα in PBMCs from nonsmokers. Additionally, LPS differentially affected the timing and amplitude of cytokine (IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α) release from PBMCs in nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD. Moreover, SRT1720 was able to inhibit LPS-induced cytokine release from cultured PBMCs. In conclusion, disruption of the molecular clock due to SIRT1 reduction contributes to abnormal inflammatory response in smokers and patients with COPD.

  14. Sequential Treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules Reduce Inflammation and Improve Pulmonary Function in Acute Exacerbation-Risk Window of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaofan; Li, Ya; Li, Jiansheng; Wang, Haifeng; Wu, Zhaohuan; Li, Hangjie; Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sequential treatments of Chinese medicines for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) risk window (RW) have benefits for preventing reoccurrences of AEs; however, the effects on pulmonary function, pulmonary, and systemic inflammatory biomarkers remain unclear. Methods. Cigarette-smoke/bacterial infections induced rats were randomized into Control, COPD, AECOPD, Tongsai Granule/normal saline (TSG/NS), moxifloxacin + salbutamol/NS (MXF+STL/NS), TSG/Bufei Yishen Granule (BYG), MXF+STL/STL, and TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL groups and given corresponding medicine(s) in AE- and/or RW phase. Body temperature, pulmonary function, blood cytology, serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP), pulmonary histomorphology and myeloperoxidase (MPO), polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase, interleukins IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α expressions were determined. Results. Body temperature, inflammatory cells and cytokines, SAA, CRP, and pulmonary impairment were higher in AECOPD rats than stable COPD, while pulmonary function declined and recovered to COPD level in 14-18 days. All biomarkers were improved in treated groups with shorter recovery times of 4-10 days, especially in TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL group. Conclusion. Sequential treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules, during AECOPD-RW periods, can reduce inflammatory response and improve pulmonary function and shorten the recovery courses of AEs, especially the integrated Chinese and Western medicines. PMID:27563333

  15. Sequential Treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules Reduce Inflammation and Improve Pulmonary Function in Acute Exacerbation-Risk Window of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaofan; Li, Ya; Wang, Haifeng; Wu, Zhaohuan; Li, Hangjie; Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sequential treatments of Chinese medicines for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) risk window (RW) have benefits for preventing reoccurrences of AEs; however, the effects on pulmonary function, pulmonary, and systemic inflammatory biomarkers remain unclear. Methods. Cigarette-smoke/bacterial infections induced rats were randomized into Control, COPD, AECOPD, Tongsai Granule/normal saline (TSG/NS), moxifloxacin + salbutamol/NS (MXF+STL/NS), TSG/Bufei Yishen Granule (BYG), MXF+STL/STL, and TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL groups and given corresponding medicine(s) in AE- and/or RW phase. Body temperature, pulmonary function, blood cytology, serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP), pulmonary histomorphology and myeloperoxidase (MPO), polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase, interleukins IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α expressions were determined. Results. Body temperature, inflammatory cells and cytokines, SAA, CRP, and pulmonary impairment were higher in AECOPD rats than stable COPD, while pulmonary function declined and recovered to COPD level in 14–18 days. All biomarkers were improved in treated groups with shorter recovery times of 4–10 days, especially in TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL group. Conclusion. Sequential treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules, during AECOPD-RW periods, can reduce inflammatory response and improve pulmonary function and shorten the recovery courses of AEs, especially the integrated Chinese and Western medicines. PMID:27563333

  16. Effects of local and systemic budesonide on allergen-induced airway reactions in the pig.

    PubMed Central

    Fornhem, C.; Dahlbäck, M.; Kumlin, M.; Lundberg, J. M.; Alving, K.

    1996-01-01

    changes in these parameters. However, budesonide aerosol or infusion did not inhibit the late vasodilation in the bronchial circulation. 5. Histamine and cysteinyl-leukotrienes were released during the acute reaction as measured by urinary concentration of methylhistamine and leukotriene E4 respectively. There was no release of histamine during the late reaction. A late increase in leukotriene E4 was observed in 2 of the budesonide infusion and 3 of the budesonide vehicle pigs, whereas no such increase was seen in any of the budesonide aerosol pigs. 6. Budesonide concentration in lung tissue, but not in plasma at 8 h correlated negatively with the late increase in RL (P < 0.05, r = -0.53, n = 10), whereas budesonide concentration in plasma but not in lung tissue correlated negatively with the late decrease in dynamic compliance (P < 0.05, r = -0.67, n = 12). 7. This study has shown that a single low dose of locally administered budesonide can inhibit the late allergic reaction in the pig lower airways. If budesonide was given as an intravenous infusion in a dose yielding a plasma concentration similar to that seen after the aerosol treatment, the protective effect of budesonide was poor. It may be suggested that the tissue-bound portion of budesonide affects local mechanisms involved in the development of late changes in the airways (RL), although it does not affect the late increase in bronchial blood flow. We conclude that the inhibitory effect of budesonide on the allergen-induced late reaction in the pig airways relates to tissue-bound steroid, and that the systemic component is of less importance. PMID:8799573

  17. A Single 9-Colour Flow Cytometric Method to Characterise Major Leukocyte Populations in the Rat: Validation in a Model of LPS-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barnett-Vanes, Ashton; Sharrock, Anna; Birrell, Mark A; Rankin, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The rat is a commonly used model for immunological investigation. Yet basic research and characterisation of leukocyte populations and sub-sets lags far behind murine research, with inconsistency on reported leukocyte markers and their overlap. These shortcomings limit the opportunity for more complex and advanced rat immunology research. In this study, we developed a robust 9-colour flow-cytometric protocol to elucidate the major blood and tissue rat leukocyte populations, and validated it in a model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation. Blood and tissues (lung, BALF, spleen, liver, bone marrow) from naïve Sprague-Dawley rats were collected and analysed by flow cytometry (FCM). Rats were exposed to aerosolised saline or LPS (1 mg/mL), at 3 and 24 hrs thereafter blood, lung and BALF were collected and analysed using FCM and ELISA. Neutrophils, two monocyte subsets, NK Cells, B Cells, CD4+, CD8+ T Cells and alveolar macrophages can be identified simultaneously across different tissues using a 9-colour panel. Neutrophils and monocytes can be distinguished based upon differential expression of CD43 and His48. Neutrophils and CD43Lo/His48Hi monocyte-macrophages are elevated in the lung at 3 and 24 hrs during LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation. This validated method for leukocyte enumeration will offer a platform for greater consistency in future rat immunology and inflammation research.

  18. Effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a murine allergic airway inflammation model

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro Koike, Eiko; Yanagisawa, Rie; Hirano, Seishiro; Nishikawa, Masataka; Takano, Hirohisa

    2009-06-15

    The development of nanotechnology has increased the risk of exposure to types of particles other than combustion-derived particles in the environment, namely, industrial nanomaterials. On the other hand, patients with bronchial asthma are sensitive to inhaled substances including particulate matters. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to a type of nano-sized carbon nanotube (multi-walled nanotubes: MWCNT) on allergic airway inflammation in vivo and their cellular mechanisms in vitro. In vivo, ICR mice were divided into 4 experimental groups. Vehicle, MWCNT (50 {mu}g/animal), ovalbumin (OVA), and OVA + MWCNT were repeatedly administered intratracheally. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cellularity, lung histology, levels of cytokines related to allergic inflammation in lung homogenates/BAL fluids (BALFs), and serum immunoglobulin levels were studied. Also, we evaluated the impact of MWCNT (0.1-1 {mu}g/ml) on the phenotype and function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. MWCNT aggravated allergen-induced airway inflammation characterized by the infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, and mononuclear cells in the lung, and an increase in the number of goblet cells in the bronchial epithelium. MWCNT with allergen amplified lung protein levels of Th cytokines and chemokines compared with allergen alone. MWCNT exhibited adjuvant activity for allergen-specific IgG{sub 1} and IgE. MWCNT significantly increased allergen (OVA)-specific syngeneic T-cell proliferation, particularly at a lower concentration in vitro. Taken together, MWCNT can exacerbate murine allergic airway inflammation, at least partly, via the promotion of a Th-dominant milieu. In addition, the exacerbation may be partly through the inappropriate activation of antigen-presenting cells including DC.

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 and inflammation in experimental right ventricular failure on prolonged overcirculation-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Belhaj, Asmae; Dewachter, Laurence; Kerbaul, François; Brimioulle, Serge; Dewachter, Céline; Naeije, Robert; Rondelet, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is a stress response enzyme which presents with cardiovascular protective and anti-inflammatory properties. Six-month chronic overcirculation-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in piglets has been previously reported as a model of right ventricular (RV) failure related to the RV activation of apoptotic and inflammatory processes. We hypothesized that altered HO-1 signalling could be involved in both pulmonary vascular and RV changes. Fifteen growing piglets were assigned to a sham operation (n = 8) or to an anastomosis of the left innominate artery to the pulmonary arterial trunk (n = 7). Six months later, hemodynamics was evaluated after closure of the shunt. After euthanasia of the animals, pulmonary and myocardial tissue was sampled for pathobiological evaluation. Prolonged shunting was associated with a tendency to decreased pulmonary gene and protein expressions of HO-1, while pulmonary gene expressions of interleukin (IL)-33, IL-19, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and -2 were increased. Pulmonary expressions of constitutive HO-2 and pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α remained unchanged. Pulmonary vascular resistance (evaluated by pressure/flow plots) was inversely correlated to pulmonary HO-1 protein and IL-19 gene expressions, and correlated to pulmonary ICAM-1 gene expression. Pulmonary arteriolar medial thickness and PVR were inversely correlated to pulmonary IL-19 expression. RV expression of HO-1 was decreased, while RV gene expressions TNF-α and ICAM-2 were increased. There was a correlation between RV ratio of end-systolic to pulmonary arterial elastances and RV HO-1 expression. These results suggest that downregulation of HO-1 is associated to PAH and RV failure.

  20. Role of Chitinase 3-Like-1 in Interleukin-18-Induced Pulmonary Type 1, Type 2, and Type 17 Inflammation; Alveolar Destruction; and Airway Fibrosis in the Murine Lung.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Jong; Yoon, Chang Min; Nam, Milang; Kim, Do-Hyun; Choi, Je-Min; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (Chi3l1), which is also called YKL-40 in humans and BRP-39 in mice, is the prototypic chitinase-like protein. Recent studies have highlighted its impressive ability to regulate the nature of tissue inflammation and the magnitude of tissue injury and fibroproliferative repair. This can be appreciated in studies that highlight its induction after cigarette smoke exposure, during which it inhibits alveolar destruction and the genesis of pulmonary emphysema. IL-18 is also known to be induced and activated by cigarette smoke, and, in murine models, the IL-18 pathway has been shown to be necessary and sufficient to generate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-like inflammation, fibrosis, and tissue destruction. However, the relationship between Chi3l1 and IL-18 has not been defined. To address this issue we characterized the expression of Chi3l1/BRP-39 in control and lung-targeted IL-18 transgenic mice. We also characterized the effects of transgenic IL-18 in mice with wild-type and null Chi3l1 loci. The former studies demonstrated that IL-18 is a potent stimulator of Chi3l1/BRP-39 and that this stimulation is mediated via IFN-γ-, IL-13-, and IL-17A-dependent mechanisms. The latter studies demonstrated that, in the absence of Chi3l1/BRP-39, IL-18 induced type 2 and type 17 inflammation and fibrotic airway remodeling were significantly ameliorated, whereas type 1 inflammation, emphysematous alveolar destruction, and the expression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte perforin, granzyme, and retinoic acid early transcript 1 expression were enhanced. These studies demonstrate that IL-18 is a potent stimulator of Chi3l1 and that Chi3l1 is an important mediator of IL-18-induced inflammatory, fibrotic, alveolar remodeling, and cytotoxic responses.

  1. Hemoglobin-induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contribute to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeated-dose haptoglobin administration.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David C; Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Buehler, Paul W

    2015-05-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan for trauma, burns, and massive transfusion-related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia-mediated PH. Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for 5 weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated nonheme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right-ventricular hypertrophy, which suggests a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis-associated PH. PMID:25656991

  2. Hemoglobin induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contributes to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeat dose haptoglobin administration

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan with indications for trauma, burns and massive transfusion related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia mediated PH. Approach and results Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb-infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for five weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated non-heme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right ventricular hypertrophy, which suggest a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. Conclusions By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia; and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis associated PH. PMID:25656991

  3. CD28/B7 Deficiency Attenuates Systolic Overload-Induced Congestive Heart Failure, Myocardial and Pulmonary Inflammation, and Activated T Cell Accumulation in the Heart and Lungs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Kwak, Dongmin; Fassett, John; Hou, Lei; Xu, Xin; Burbach, Brandon J; Thenappan, Thenappan; Xu, Yawei; Ge, Jun-Bo; Shimizu, Yoji; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2016-09-01

    The inflammatory response regulates congestive heart failure (CHF) development. T cell activation plays an important role in tissue inflammation. We postulate that CD28 or B7 deficiency inhibits T cell activation and attenuates CHF development by reducing systemic, cardiac, and pulmonary inflammation. We demonstrated that chronic pressure overload-induced end-stage CHF in mice is characterized by profound accumulation of activated effector T cells (CD3(+)CD44(high) cells) in the lungs and a mild but significant increase of these cells in the heart. In knockout mice lacking either CD28 or B7, there was a dramatic reduction in the accumulation of activated effector T cells in both hearts and lungs of mice under control conditions and after transverse aortic constriction. CD28 or B7 knockout significantly attenuated transverse aortic constriction-induced CHF development, as indicated by less increase of heart and lung weight and less reduction of left ventricle contractility. CD28 or B7 knockout also significantly reduced transverse aortic constriction-induced CD45(+) leukocyte, T cell, and macrophage infiltration in hearts and lungs, lowered proinflammatory cytokine expression (such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) in lungs. Furthermore, CD28/B7 blockade by CTLA4-Ig treatment (250 μg/mouse every 3 days) attenuated transverse aortic constriction-induced T cell activation, left ventricle hypertrophy, and left ventricle dysfunction. Our data indicate that CD28/B7 deficiency inhibits activated effector T cell accumulation, reduces myocardial and pulmonary inflammation, and attenuates the development of CHF. Our findings suggest that strategies targeting T cell activation may be useful in treating CHF. PMID:27432861

  4. CD28/B7 Deficiency Attenuates Systolic Overload-Induced Congestive Heart Failure, Myocardial and Pulmonary Inflammation, and Activated T Cell Accumulation in the Heart and Lungs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Kwak, Dongmin; Fassett, John; Hou, Lei; Xu, Xin; Burbach, Brandon J; Thenappan, Thenappan; Xu, Yawei; Ge, Jun-Bo; Shimizu, Yoji; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2016-09-01

    The inflammatory response regulates congestive heart failure (CHF) development. T cell activation plays an important role in tissue inflammation. We postulate that CD28 or B7 deficiency inhibits T cell activation and attenuates CHF development by reducing systemic, cardiac, and pulmonary inflammation. We demonstrated that chronic pressure overload-induced end-stage CHF in mice is characterized by profound accumulation of activated effector T cells (CD3(+)CD44(high) cells) in the lungs and a mild but significant increase of these cells in the heart. In knockout mice lacking either CD28 or B7, there was a dramatic reduction in the accumulation of activated effector T cells in both hearts and lungs of mice under control conditions and after transverse aortic constriction. CD28 or B7 knockout significantly attenuated transverse aortic constriction-induced CHF development, as indicated by less increase of heart and lung weight and less reduction of left ventricle contractility. CD28 or B7 knockout also significantly reduced transverse aortic constriction-induced CD45(+) leukocyte, T cell, and macrophage infiltration in hearts and lungs, lowered proinflammatory cytokine expression (such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) in lungs. Furthermore, CD28/B7 blockade by CTLA4-Ig treatment (250 μg/mouse every 3 days) attenuated transverse aortic constriction-induced T cell activation, left ventricle hypertrophy, and left ventricle dysfunction. Our data indicate that CD28/B7 deficiency inhibits activated effector T cell accumulation, reduces myocardial and pulmonary inflammation, and attenuates the development of CHF. Our findings suggest that strategies targeting T cell activation may be useful in treating CHF.

  5. The standardized herbal formula, PM014, ameliorated cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation in a murine model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of PM014 on cigarette smoke induced lung disease in the murine animal model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 2 weeks to induce COPD-like lung inflammation. Two hours prior to cigarette smoke exposure, the treatment group was administered PM014 via an oral injection. To investigate the effects of PM014, we assessed PM014 functions in vivo, including immune cell infiltration, cytokine profiles in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and histopathological changes in the lung. The efficacy of PM014 was compared with that of the recently developed anti-COPD drug, roflumilast. Results PM014 substantially inhibited immune cell infiltration (neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes) into the airway. In addition, IL-6, TNF-α and MCP-1 were decreased in the BAL fluid of PM014-treated mice compared to cigarette smoke stimulated mice. These changes were more prominent than roflumilast treated mice. The expression of PAS-positive cells in the bronchial layer was also significantly reduced in both PM014 and roflumilast treated mice. Conclusions These data suggest that PM014 exerts strong therapeutic effects against CS induced, COPD-like lung inflammation. Therefore, this herbal medicine may represent a novel therapeutic agent for lung inflammation in general, as well as a specific agent for COPD treatment. PMID:24010767

  6. Effects of Schisandra chinensis extracts on cough and pulmonary inflammation in a cough hypersensitivity guinea pig model induced by cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shan; Nie, Yi-chu; Gan, Zhen-yong; Liu, Xiao-dong; Fang, Zhang-fu; Zhong, Bo-nian; Tian, Jin; Huang, Chu-qin; Lai, Ke-fang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2015-05-13

    Schisandra chinensis (S. chinensis) is a traditional Chinese medicine commonly used in prescription medications for the treatment of chronic cough. However, the material basis of S. chinensis in relieving cough has not been completely elucidated yet. This study established a guinea pig model of cough hypersensitivity induced by 14 days of cigarette smoke (CS) exposure, to evaluate the antitussive, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory effects of three S. chinensis extracts. And then the function of four lignans in reducing expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 was examined using A549 cells induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE). The results demonstrated that both ethanol extract (EE) and ethanol-water extract (EWE) of S. chinensis, but not water extract (WE), significantly reduced the cough frequency enhanced by 0.4M citric acid solution in these cough hypersensitivity guinea pigs. Meanwhile, pretreatment with EE and EWE both significantly attenuated the CS-induced increase in infiltration of pulmonary neutrophils and total inflammatory cells, as well as pulmonary MDA, TNF-α, and IL-8, while remarkably increased activities of pulmonary SOD and GSH. According to H&E and immunofluorescence staining assays, airway epithelium hyperplasia, smooth muscle thickening, inflammatory cells infiltration, as well as expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1, were significantly attenuated in animals pretreatment with 1g/kg EE. Moreover, four lignans of EE, including schizandrin, schisantherin A, deoxyschizandrin and γ-schisandrin, significantly inhibited CSE-induced expression of TRPV1, TRPA1 and NOS3, as well as NO release in A549 cells. In conclusion, S. chinensis reduces cough frequency and pulmonary inflammation in the CS-induced cough hypersensitivity guinea pigs. Lignans may be the active components.

  7. Protective effects of surfactant protein D treatment in 1,3-β-glucan-modulated allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fakih, Dalia; Pilecki, Bartosz; Schlosser, Anders; Jepsen, Christine S; Thomsen, Laura K; Ormhøj, Maria; Watson, Alastair; Madsen, Jens; Clark, Howard W; Barfod, Kenneth K; Hansen, Soren; Marcussen, Niels; Jounblat, Rania; Chamat, Soulaima; Holmskov, Uffe; Sorensen, Grith L

    2015-12-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a pulmonary collectin important in lung immunity. SP-D-deficient mice (Sftpd(-/-)) are reported to be susceptible to ovalbumin (OVA)- and fungal allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation, while treatment with exogenous SP-D has therapeutic effects in such disease models. β-Glucans are a diverse group of polysaccharides previously suggested to serve as fungal ligands for SP-D. We set out to investigate if SP-D could interact with 1,3-β-glucan and attenuate allergic pulmonary inflammation in the presence of 1,3-β-glucan. Allergic airway disease was induced in Sftpd(-/-) and Sftpd(+/+) mice by OVA sensitization and subsequent challenge with OVA, 1,3-β-glucan, or OVA/1,3-β-glucan together. Mice in the combined treatment group were further treated with a high dose of recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rfhSP-D). We demonstrated direct interaction between SP-D and 1,3-β-glucan. OVA-induced mucous cell metaplasia was increased in Sftpd(-/-) mice, supporting previously reported protective effects of endogenous SP-D in allergy. OVA-induced parenchymal CCL11 levels and eosinophilic infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage were unaffected by 1,3-β-glucan, but were reversed with rfhSP-D treatment. 1,3-β-Glucan treatment did, however, induce pulmonary neutrophilic infiltration and increased TNF-α levels in bronchoalveolar lavage, independently of OVA-induced allergy. This infiltration was also reversed by treatment with rfhSP-D. 1,3-β-Glucan reduced OVA-induced mucous cell metaplasia, T helper 2 cytokines, and IFN-γ production. rfhSP-D treatment further reduced mucous metaplasia and T helper 2 cytokine secretion to background levels. In summary, rfhSP-D treatment resulted in attenuation of both allergic inflammation and 1,3-β-glucan-mediated neutrophilic inflammation. Our data suggest that treatment with high-dose SP-D protects from mold-induced exacerbations of allergic asthma. PMID:26432866

  8. Protective effects of surfactant protein D treatment in 1,3-β-glucan-modulated allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fakih, Dalia; Pilecki, Bartosz; Schlosser, Anders; Jepsen, Christine S; Thomsen, Laura K; Ormhøj, Maria; Watson, Alastair; Madsen, Jens; Clark, Howard W; Barfod, Kenneth K; Hansen, Soren; Marcussen, Niels; Jounblat, Rania; Chamat, Soulaima; Holmskov, Uffe; Sorensen, Grith L

    2015-12-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a pulmonary collectin important in lung immunity. SP-D-deficient mice (Sftpd(-/-)) are reported to be susceptible to ovalbumin (OVA)- and fungal allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation, while treatment with exogenous SP-D has therapeutic effects in such disease models. β-Glucans are a diverse group of polysaccharides previously suggested to serve as fungal ligands for SP-D. We set out to investigate if SP-D could interact with 1,3-β-glucan and attenuate allergic pulmonary inflammation in the presence of 1,3-β-glucan. Allergic airway disease was induced in Sftpd(-/-) and Sftpd(+/+) mice by OVA sensitization and subsequent challenge with OVA, 1,3-β-glucan, or OVA/1,3-β-glucan together. Mice in the combined treatment group were further treated with a high dose of recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rfhSP-D). We demonstrated direct interaction between SP-D and 1,3-β-glucan. OVA-induced mucous cell metaplasia was increased in Sftpd(-/-) mice, supporting previously reported protective effects of endogenous SP-D in allergy. OVA-induced parenchymal CCL11 levels and eosinophilic infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage were unaffected by 1,3-β-glucan, but were reversed with rfhSP-D treatment. 1,3-β-Glucan treatment did, however, induce pulmonary neutrophilic infiltration and increased TNF-α levels in bronchoalveolar lavage, independently of OVA-induced allergy. This infiltration was also reversed by treatment with rfhSP-D. 1,3-β-Glucan reduced OVA-induced mucous cell metaplasia, T helper 2 cytokines, and IFN-γ production. rfhSP-D treatment further reduced mucous metaplasia and T helper 2 cytokine secretion to background levels. In summary, rfhSP-D treatment resulted in attenuation of both allergic inflammation and 1,3-β-glucan-mediated neutrophilic inflammation. Our data suggest that treatment with high-dose SP-D protects from mold-induced exacerbations of allergic asthma.

  9. Pulmonary instillation of low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice leads to particle retention and gene expression changes in the absence of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Mainul; Saber, Anne T.; Guo, Charles; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Jensen, Keld A.; Yauk, Carole L.; Williams, Andrew; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Hakan; Halappanavar, Sabina

    2013-06-15

    We investigated gene expression, protein synthesis, and particle retention in mouse lungs following intratracheal instillation of varying doses of nano-sized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO{sub 2}). Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to rutile nano-TiO{sub 2} via single intratracheal instillations of 18, 54, and 162 μg/mouse. Mice were sampled 1, 3, and 28 days post-exposure. The deposition of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. Biological responses in the pulmonary system were analyzed using DNA microarrays, pathway-specific real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), gene-specific qPCR arrays, and tissue protein ELISA. Hyperspectral mapping showed dose-dependent retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs up to 28 days post-instillation. DNA microarray analysis revealed approximately 3000 genes that were altered across all treatment groups (± 1.3 fold; p < 0.1). Several inflammatory mediators changed in a dose- and time-dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein level. Although no influx of neutrophils was detected at the low dose, changes in the expression of several genes and proteins associated with inflammation were observed. Resolving inflammation at the medium dose, and lack of neutrophil influx in the lung fluid at the low dose, were associated with down-regulation of genes involved in ion homeostasis and muscle regulation. Our gene expression results imply that retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the absence of inflammation over time may potentially perturb calcium and ion homeostasis, and affect smooth muscle activities. - Highlights: • Pulmonary effects following exposure to low doses of nano-TiO{sub 2} were examined. • Particle retention in lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. • Particles persisted up to 28 days in lungs in all dose groups. • Inflammation was the pathway affected in the high dose group at all time points. • Ion homeostasis and muscle activity pathways were affected in the low dose

  10. Role of Cardiovascular Disease-associated iron overload in Libby amphibole-induced acute pulmonary injury and inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by asbestos is thought to be mediated through redox-cycling of fiber-bound and bioavailable iron (Fe). We hypothesized that Libby amphibole (LA)-induced cute lung injury will be exacerbated in rat models of cardiovascular disease (CVD)-associated Fe-ove...

  11. DIFFERENTIAL PULMONARY INFLAMMATION AND IN VITRO CYTOTOXICITY BY SIZE-FRACTIONATED FLY ASH PARTICLES FROM PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results of research on the adverse health effects associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter. Pulmonary inflammatory responses were examined in CDI mice after intratracheal instillation of 25 or 100 micrograms of ultrafine (<0.2 micrometers), fine ...

  12. Mast cell-derived neurotrophin 4 mediates allergen-induced airway hyperinnervation in early life

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kruti R.; Aven, Linh; Shao, Fengzhi; Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Duvall, Melody G.; Levy, Bruce D.; Ai, Xingbin

    2016-01-01

    Asthma often progresses from early episodes of insults. How early life events connect to long-term airway dysfunction remains poorly understood. We demonstrated previously that increased neurotrophin 4 (NT4) levels following early life allergen exposure cause persistent changes in airway smooth muscle (ASM) innervation and airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in mice. Herein, we identify pulmonary mast cells as a key source of aberrant NT4 expression following early insults. NT4 is selectively expressed by ASM and mast cells in mice, nonhuman primates and humans. We show in mice that mast cell-derived NT4 is dispensable for ASM innervation during development. However, upon insults, mast cells expand in number and degranulate to release NT4 and thus become the major source of NT4 under pathological condition. Adoptive transfer of wild type mast cells, but not NT4−/− mast cells restores ASM hyperinnervation and AHR in KitW-sh/W-sh mice following early life insults. Notably, an infant nonhuman primate model of asthma also exhibits ASM hyperinnervation associated with the expansion and degranulation of mast cells. Together, these findings identify an essential role of mast cells in mediating ASM hyperinnervation following early life insults by producing NT4. This role may be evolutionarily conserved in linking early insults to long-term airway dysfunction. PMID:26860818

  13. Acute respiratory changes and pulmonary inflammation involving a pathway of TGF-β1 induction in a rat model of chlorine-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wigenstam, Elisabeth; Elfsmark, Linda; Koch, Bo; Bucht, Anders; Jonasson, Sofia

    2016-10-15

    We investigated acute and delayed respiratory changes after inhalation exposure to chlorine (Cl2) with the aim to understand the pathogenesis of the long-term sequelae of Cl2-induced lung-injury. In a rat model of nose-only exposure we analyzed changes in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammatory responses in airways, expression of pro-inflammatory markers and development of lung fibrosis during a time-course from 5h up to 90days after a single inhalation of Cl2. A single dose of dexamethasone (10mg/kg) was administered 1h following Cl2-exposure. A 15-min inhalation of 200ppm Cl2 was non-lethal in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 24h post exposure, Cl2-exposed rats displayed elevated numbers of leukocytes with an increase of neutrophils and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and edema was shown both in lung tissue and the heart. At 24h, the inflammasome-associated cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were detected in BAL. Concomitant with the acute inflammation a significant AHR was detected. At the later time-points, a delayed inflammatory response was observed together with signs of lung fibrosis as indicated by increased pulmonary macrophages, elevated TGF-β expression in BAL and collagen deposition around airways. Dexamethasone reduced the numbers of neutrophils in BAL at 24h but did not influence the AHR. Inhalation of Cl2 in rats leads to acute respiratory and cardiac changes as well as pulmonary inflammation involving induction of TGF-β1. The acute inflammatory response was followed by sustained macrophage response and lack of tissue repair. It was also found that pathways apart from the acute inflammatory response contribute to the Cl2-induced respiratory dysfunction. PMID:27586366

  14. The effect of marimastat, a metalloprotease inhibitor, on allergen-induced asthmatic hyper-reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, Colleen; Thomas, Paul S. . E-mail: paul.thomas@unsw.edu.au

    2005-06-01

    This pilot study was designed to assess whether a synthetic matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor has anti-inflammatory properties in mild asthma. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha}) has been shown to be an important cytokine in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammatory responses, and its release can be inhibited by MMP inhibitors. Twelve atopic asthmatic subjects received the MMP inhibitor marimastat (5 mg) or placebo, twice daily for 3 weeks, separated by a 6-week washout period in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over manner. All subjects underwent an allergen inhalation provocation test to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus before and after each study phase. Spirometry, exhaled NO (eNO) levels, differential sputum cell counts, an asthma symptom questionnaire, peak flow, and {beta}{sub 2}-agonist usage were measured. Nine subjects completed the study, and, when compared with placebo, marimastat reduced bronchial hyper-responsiveness to inhaled allergen in these subjects from an allergen PC{sub 20} of 22.2 AU/ml (95%CI 11.7-32.6) to 17.0 AU/ml (95%CI 7.6-26.4, P = 0.02). The marimastat phase showed a nonsignificant fall in sputum inflammatory cells. Marimastat did not modify eNO, FEV{sub 1}, asthma symptoms, or albuterol usage. In conclusion, airway responsiveness to allergen may be modified by a MMP inhibitor, perhaps via TNF{alpha} playing a role in airway inflammation and remodeling.

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jeppe M; Musavian, Hanieh S; Butt, Tariq M; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Thysen, Anna H; Brix, Susanne

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies of healthy human airways have revealed colonization by a distinct commensal bacterial microbiota containing Gram-negative Prevotella spp. However, the immunological properties of these bacteria in the respiratory system remain unknown. Here we compare the innate respiratory immune response to three Gram-negative commensal Prevotella strains (Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella nanceiensis and Prevotella salivae) and three Gram-negative pathogenic Proteobacteria known to colonize lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma (Haemophilus influenzae B, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis). The commensal Prevotella spp. and pathogenic Proteobacteria were found to exhibit intrinsic differences in innate inflammatory capacities on murine lung cells in vitro. In vivo in mice, non-typeable H. influenzae induced severe Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-independent COPD-like inflammation characterized by predominant airway neutrophilia, expression of a neutrophilic cytokine/chemokine profile in lung tissue, and lung immunopathology. In comparison, P. nanceiensis induced a diminished neutrophilic airway inflammation and no detectable lung pathology. Interestingly, the inflammatory airway response to the Gram-negative bacteria P. nanceiensis was completely TLR2-dependent. These findings demonstrate weak inflammatory properties of Gram-negative airway commensal Prevotella spp. that may make colonization by these bacteria tolerable by the respiratory immune system.

  16. Inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition attenuates lung tissue responsiveness and remodeling in a model of chronic pulmonary inflammation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Starling, Claudia M; Prado, Carla M; Leick-Maldonado, Edna A; Lanças, Tatiana; Reis, Fabiana G; Aristóteles, Luciana R C B R; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Mílton A; Tibério, Iolanda F L C

    2009-02-28

    We evaluated the influence of iNOS-derived NO on the mechanics, inflammatory, and remodeling process in peripheral lung parenchyma of guinea pigs with chronic pulmonary allergic inflammation. Animals treated or not with 1400 W were submitted to seven exposures of ovalbumin in increasing doses. Seventy-two hours after the 7th inhalation, lung strips were suspended in a Krebs organ bath, and tissue resistance and elastance measured at baseline and after ovalbumin challenge. The strips were submitted to histopathological measurements. The ovalbumin-exposed animals showed increased maximal responses of resistance and elastance (p<0.05), eosinophils counting (p<0.001), iNOS-positive cells (p<0.001), collagen and elastic fiber deposition (p<0.05), actin density (p<0.05) and 8-iso-PGF2alpha expression (p<0.001) in alveolar septa compared to saline-exposed ones. Ovalbumin-exposed animals treated with 1400 W had a significant reduction in lung functional and histopathological findings (p<0.05). We showed that iNOS-specific inhibition attenuates lung parenchyma constriction, inflammation, and remodeling, suggesting NO-participation in the modulation of the oxidative stress pathway.

  17. p53- and PAI-1-mediated induction of C-X-C chemokines and CXCR2: importance in pulmonary inflammation due to cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Nivedita; Marudamuthu, Amarnath S; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Fu, Jian; Shetty, Sreerama

    2016-03-15

    We previously demonstrated that tumor suppressor protein p53 augments plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) during chronic cigarette smoke (CS) exposure-induced lung injury. Chronic lung inflammation with elevated p53 and PAI-1 expression in AECs and increased susceptibility to and exacerbation of respiratory infections are all associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We recently demonstrated that preventing p53 from binding to the endogenous PAI-1 mRNA in AECs by either suppressing p53 expression or blockading p53 interactions with the PAI-1 mRNA mitigates apoptosis and lung injury. Within this context, we now show increased expression of the C-X-C chemokines (CXCL1 and CXCL2) and their receptor CXCR2, and the intercellular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), in the lung tissues of patients with COPD. We also found a similar increase in lung tissues and AECs from wild-type (WT) mice exposed to passive CS for 20 wk and in primary AECs treated with CS extract in vitro. Interestingly, passive CS exposure of mice lacking either p53 or PAI-1 expression resisted an increase in CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCR2, and ICAM-1. Furthermore, inhibition of p53-mediated induction of PAI-1 expression by treatment of WT mice exposed to passive CS with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide reduced CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCR2 levels and lung inflammation. Our study reveals that p53-mediated induction of PAI-1 expression due to chronic CS exposure exacerbates lung inflammation through elaboration of CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCR2. We further provide evidence that targeting this pathway mitigates lung injury associated with chronic CS exposure.

  18. Elevated circulating PAI-1 levels are related to lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and small airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Ting; Li, Diandian; Wu, Yanqiu; Zhang, Xue; Pang, Caishuang; Zhang, Junlong; Ying, Binwu; Wang, Tao; Wen, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) participate in inflammation and tissue remolding in various diseases, but their roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are not yet clear. This study aimed to investigate if PAI-1 and suPAR were involved in systemic inflammation and small airway obstruction (SAO) in COPD. Methods Demographic and clinical characteristics, spirometry examination, and blood samples were obtained from 84 COPD patients and 51 healthy volunteers. Serum concentrations of PAI-1, suPAR, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were detected with Magnetic Luminex Screening Assay. Differences between groups were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance or chi-square test. Pearson’s partial correlation test (adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, cigarette status, and passive smoke exposure) and multivariable linear analysis were used to explore the relationships between circulating PAI-1 and indicators of COPD. Results First, we found that serum PAI-1 levels but not suPAR levels were significantly increased in COPD patients compared with healthy volunteers (125.56±51.74 ng/mL versus 102.98±36.62 ng/mL, P=0.007). Then, the correlation analysis showed that circulating PAI-1 was inversely correlated with pulmonary function parameters including the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), FEV1/Pre (justified r=−0.308, P<0.001; justified r=−0.295, P=0.001, respectively) and SAO indicators such as FEV3/FVC, MMEF25–75/Pre (justified r=−0.289, P=0.001; justified r=−0.273, P=0.002, respectively), but positively related to the inflammatory marker CRP (justified r=0.351, P<0.001), the small airway remolding biomarker TIMP-1, and MMP-9 (justified r=0.498, P<0.001; justified r=0.267, P=0.002, respectively). Besides, multivariable

  19. Hepatic and Pulmonary Toxicogenomic Profiles in Mice Intratracheally Instilled With Carbon Black Nanoparticles Reveal Pulmonary Inflammation, Acute Phase Response, and Alterations in Lipid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bourdon, Julie A.; Halappanavar, Sabina; Saber, Anne T.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Williams, Andrew; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Yauk, Carole L.

    2012-01-01

    Global pulmonary and hepatic messenger RNA profiles in adult female C57BL/6 mice intratracheally instilled with carbon black nanoparticles (NPs) (Printex 90) were analyzed to identify biological perturbations underlying systemic responses to NP exposure. Tissue gene expression changes were profiled 1, 3, and 28 days following exposure to 0.018, 0.054, and 0.162 mg Printex 90 alongside controls. Pulmonary response was marked by increased expression of inflammatory markers and acute phase response (APR) genes that persisted to day 28 at the highest exposure dose. Genes in the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase pathway were increased, and those involved in cholesterol efflux were decreased at least at the highest dose on days 1 and 3. Hepatic responses mainly consisted of the HMG-CoA reductase pathway on days 1 (high dose) and 28 (all doses). Protein analysis in tissues and plasma of 0.162 mg Printex 90–exposed mice relative to control revealed an increase in plasma serum amyloid A on days 1 and 28 (p < 0.05), decreases in plasma high-density lipoprotein on days 3 and 28, an increase in plasma low-density lipoprotein on day 28 (p < 0.05), and marginal increases in total hepatic cholesterol on day 28 (p = 0.06). The observed changes are linked to APR. Although further research is needed to establish links between observations and the onset and progression of systemic disorders, the present study demonstrates the ability of NPs to induce systemic effects. PMID:22461453

  20. Identification of the appropriate dose metric for pulmonary inflammation of silver nanoparticles in an inhalation toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Cassee, Flemming R; Fokkens, Paul H B; de la Fonteyne, Liset J J; Oomen, Agnes G; Krystek, Petra; de Jong, Wim H; van Loveren, Henk; Park, Margriet V D Z

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that induction of pulmonary toxicity by nanoparticles of the same chemical composition depends on particle size, which is likely in part due to differences in lung deposition. Particle size mostly determines whether nanoparticles reach the alveoli, and where they might induce toxicity. For the risk assessment of nanomaterials, there is need for a suitable dose metric that accounts for differences in effects between different sized nanoparticles of the same chemical composition. The aim of the present study is to determine the most suitable dose metric to describe the effects of silver nanoparticles after short-term inhalation. Rats were exposed to different concentrations (ranging from 41 to 1105 µg silver/m(3) air) of 18, 34, 60 and 160 nm silver particles for four consecutive days and sacrificed at 24 h and 7 days after exposure. We observed a concentration-dependent increase in pulmonary toxicity parameters like cell counts and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. All results were analysed using the measured exposure concentrations in air, the measured internal dose in the lung and the estimated alveolar dose. In addition, we analysed the results based on mass, particle number and particle surface area. Our study indicates that using the particle surface area as a dose metric in the alveoli, the dose-response effects of the different silver particle sizes overlap for most pulmonary toxicity parameters. We conclude that the alveolar dose expressed as particle surface area is the most suitable dose metric to describe the toxicity of silver nanoparticles after inhalation.

  1. C1q Deficiency Promotes Pulmonary Vascular Inflammation and Enhances the Susceptibility of the Lung Endothelium to Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Zhu, Ying; Duong, Michelle; Sun, Jianxin; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-12-01

    The collectin proteins are innate immune molecules found in high concentrations on the epithelial and endothelial surfaces of the lung. While these proteins are known to have important anti-inflammatory actions in the airways of the lung little is known of their functional importance in the pulmonary circulation. We recently demonstrated that the circulating collectin protein adiponectin has potent anti-inflammatory effects on the lung endothelium, leading us to reason that other structurally related proteins might have similar effects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the anti-inflammatory actions of C1q in lung endothelial homeostasis and the pulmonary vascular response to LPS or HCl injury. We show that lung endothelium from C1q-deficient (C1q(-/-)) mice expresses higher baseline levels of the vascular adhesion markers ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin when compared with wild-type mice. Further, we demonstrate that these changes are associated with enhanced susceptibility of the lung to injury as evident by increased expression of adhesion markers, enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented neutrophil recruitment. Additionally, we found that C1q(-/-) mice also exhibited enhanced endothelial barrier dysfunction after injury as manifested by decreased expression of junctional adherens proteins and enhanced vascular leakage. Mechanistically, C1q appears to mediate its effects by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and blocking nuclear translocation of the P65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In summary, our findings indicate a previously unrecognized role for C1q in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and provide added support for the hypothesis that circulating collectin proteins have protective effects on the lung endothelium.

  2. Cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to particulate matter-induced oxidative stress, vagal dominance, arrhythmia, and pulmonary inflammation in heart failure-prone rats

    PubMed Central

    Carll, Alex P.; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Winsett, Darrell W.; Hazari, Mehdi S.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Richards, Judy H.; Cascio, Wayne E.; Costa, Daniel L.; Farraj, Aimen K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is tied to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially among those with prior cardiac injury. The mechanisms and pathophysiologic events precipitating these outcomes remain poorly understood but may involve inflammation, oxidative stress, arrhythmia, and autonomic nervous system imbalance. Cardiomyopathy results from cardiac injury, is the leading cause of heart failure, and can be induced in heart failure-prone rats through sub-chronic infusion of isoproterenol (ISO). To test whether cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to inhaled PM2.5 and can elucidate potential mechanisms, we investigated the cardiophysiologic, ventilatory, inflammatory, and oxidative effects of a single nose-only inhalation of a metal-rich PM2.5 (580 μg/m3, 4h) in ISO-pretreated (35 days * 1.0 mg/kg/day sc) rats. During the 5 days post-treatment, ISO-treated rats had decreased HR and BP and increased pre-ejection period (PEP, an inverse correlate of contractility) relative to saline-treated rats. Before inhalation exposure, ISO-pretreated rats had increased PR and ventricular repolarization time (QT) and heterogeneity (Tp-Te). Relative to clean air, PM2.5 further prolonged PR-interval and decreased systolic BP during inhalation exposure; increased tidal volume, expiratory time, heart rate variability (HRV) parameters of parasympathetic tone, and atrioventricular block arrhythmias over the hours post-exposure; increased pulmonary neutrophils, macrophages, and total antioxidant status one day post-exposure; and decreased pulmonary glutathione peroxidase 8 weeks after exposure, with all effects occurring exclusively in ISO-pretreated rats but not saline-pretreated rats. Ultimately, our findings indicate that cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to the oxidative, inflammatory, ventilatory, autonomic, and arrhythmogenic effects of acute PM2.5 inhalation. PMID:25600220

  3. Differences in allergen-induced T cell activation between allergic asthma and rhinitis: Role of CD28, ICOS and CTLA-4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Th2 cell activation and T regulatory cell (Treg) deficiency are key features of allergy. This applies for asthma and rhinitis. However with a same atopic background, some patients will develop rhinitis and asthma, whereas others will display rhinitis only. Co-receptors are pivotal in determining the type of T cell activation, but their role in allergic asthma and rhinitis has not been explored. Our objective was to assess whether allergen-induced T cell activation differs from allergic rhinitis to allergic rhinitis with asthma, and explore the role of ICOS, CD28 and CTLA-4. Methods T cell co-receptor and cytokine expressions were assessed by flow cytometry in PBMC from 18 house dust mite (HDM) allergic rhinitics (R), 18 HDM allergic rhinitics and asthmatics (AR), 13 non allergic asthmatics (A) and 20 controls, with or without anti-co-receptors antibodies. Results In asthmatics (A+AR), a constitutive decrease of CTLA-4+ and of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells was found, with an increase of IFN-γ+ cells. In allergic subjects (R + AR), allergen stimulation induced CD28 together with IL-4 and IL-13, and decreased the proportion of CTLA-4+, IL-10+ and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells. Anti-ICOS and anti-CD28 antibodies blocked allergen-induced IL-4 and IL-13. IL-13 production also involved CTLA-4. Conclusions T cell activation differs between allergic rhinitis and asthma. In asthma, a constitutive, co-receptor independent, Th1 activation and Treg deficiency is found. In allergic rhinitis, an allergen-induced Treg cell deficiency is seen, as well as an ICOS-, CD28- and CTLA-4-dependent Th2 activation. Allergic asthmatics display both characteristics. PMID:21356099

  4. IL-10 is necessary for the expression of airway hyperresponsiveness but not pulmonary inflammation after allergic sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, M. J.; Kanehiro, A.; Borish, L.; Dakhama, A.; Loader, J.; Joetham, A.; Xing, Z.; Jordana, M.; Larsen, G. L.; Gelfand, E. W.

    2000-05-01

    Cytokines play an important role in modulating inflammatory responses and, as a result, airway tone. IL-10 is a regulatory cytokine that has been suggested for treatment of asthma because of its immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. In contrast to these suggestions, we demonstrate in a model of allergic sensitization that mice deficient in IL-10 (IL-10/) develop a pulmonary inflammatory response but fail to exhibit airway hyperresponsiveness in both in vitro and in vivo assessments of lung function. Reconstitution of these deficient mice with the IL-10 gene fully restores development of airway hyperresponsiveness comparable to control mice. These results identify an important role of IL-10, downstream of the inflammatory cascade, in regulating the tone of the airways after allergic sensitization and challenge.

  5. γδ T Cells Are Required for M2 Macrophage Polarization and Resolution of Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Joel A; Kasahara, David I; Ribeiro, Luiza; Wurmbrand, Allison P; Ninin, Fernanda M C; Shore, Stephanie A

    2015-01-01

    We examined the role of γδ T cells in the induction of alternatively activated M2 macrophages and the resolution of inflammation after ozone exposure. Wildtype (WT) mice and mice deficient in γδ T cells (TCRδ-/- mice) were exposed to air or to ozone (0.3 ppm for up to 72h) and euthanized immediately or 1, 3, or 5 days after cessation of exposure. In WT mice, M2 macrophages accumulated in the lungs over the course of ozone exposure. Pulmonary mRNA abundance of the M2 genes, Arg1, Retnla, and Clec10a, also increased after ozone. In contrast, no evidence of M2 polarization was observed in TCRδ-/- mice. WT but not TCRδ-/- mice expressed the M2c polarizing cytokine, IL-17A, after ozone exposure and WT mice treated with an IL-17A neutralizing antibody exhibited attenuated ozone-induced M2 gene expression. In WT mice, ozone-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils and macrophages resolved quickly after cessation of ozone exposure returning to air exposed levels within 3 days. However, lack of M2 macrophages in TCRδ-/- mice was associated with delayed clearance of inflammatory cells after cessation of ozone and increased accumulation of apoptotic macrophages in the lungs. Delayed restoration of normal lung architecture was also observed in TCRδ-/- mice. In summary, our data indicate that γδ T cells are required for the resolution of ozone-induced inflammation, likely because γδ T cells, through their secretion of IL-17A, contribute to changes in macrophage polarization that promote clearance of apoptotic cells.

  6. PRMT1 Upregulated by Epithelial Proinflammatory Cytokines Participates in COX2 Expression in Fibroblasts and Chronic Antigen-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingzhu; Liu, Li; Roth, Michael; Tian, Jia; He, Qirui; Zhong, Bo; Bao, Ruanjuan; Lan, Xi; Jiang, Congshan; Sun, Jian; Yang, Xudong; Lu, Shemin

    2015-07-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT)1, methylating both histones and key cellular proteins, has emerged as a key regulator of various cellular processes. This study aimed to identify the mechanism that regulates PRMT1 in chronic Ag-induced pulmonary inflammation (AIPI) in the E3 rat asthma model. E3 rats were challenged with OVA for 1 or 8 wk to induce acute or chronic AIPI. Expression of mRNAs was detected by real-time quantitative PCR. PRMT1, TGF-β, COX2, and vascular endothelial growth factor protein expression in lung tissues was determined by immunohistochemistry staining and Western blotting. In the in vitro study, IL-4-stimulated lung epithelial cell (A549) medium (ISEM) with or without anti-TGF-β Ab was applied to human fibroblasts from lung (HFL1). The proliferation of HFL1 was determined by MTT. AMI-1 (pan-PRMT inhibitor) was administered intranasally to chronic AIPI rats to determine PRMT effects on asthmatic parameters. In lung tissue sections, PRMT1 expression was significantly upregulated, mainly in epithelial cells, in acute AIPI lungs, whereas it was significantly upregulated mainly in fibroblasts in chronic AIPI lungs. The in vitro study revealed that ISEM elevates PRMT1, COX2, and vascular endothelial growth factor expressions, and it promoted fibroblast proliferation. The application of anti-TGF-β Ab suppressed COX2 upregulation by ISEM. AMI-1 inhibited the expression of COX2 in TGF-β-stimulated cells. In the in vivo experiment, AMI-1 administered to AIPI rats reduced COX2 production and humoral immune response, and it abrogated mucus secretion and collagen generation. These findings suggested that TGF-β-induced PRMT1 expression participates in fibroblast proliferation and chronic airway inflammation in AIPI. PMID:26026059

  7. Effects of Mikania glomerata Spreng. and Mikania laevigata Schultz Bip. ex Baker (Asteraceae) extracts on pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress caused by acute coal dust exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T.P.; Silveira, P.C.; Rocha, L.G.; Rezin, G.T.; Rocha, J.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.T.; Dal-Pizzol, F.; Pinho, R.A.; Andrade, V.M.; Streck, E.L.

    2008-12-15

    Several studies have reported biological effects of Mikania glomerata and Mikania laevigata, used in Brazilian folk medicine for respiratory diseases. Pneumoconiosis is characterized by pulmonary inflammation caused by coal dust exposure. In this work, we evaluated the effect of pretreatment with M. glomerata and M. laevigata extracts (MGE and MLE, respectively) (100 mg/kg, s.c.) on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in lung of rats subjected to a single coal dust intratracheal instillation. Rats were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution, MGE, or MLE. On day 15, the animals were anesthetized, and gross mineral coal dust or saline solutions were administered directly in the lung by intratracheal instillation. Fifteen days after coal dust instillation, the animals were killed. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained; total cell count and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined. In the lung, myeloperoxidase activity, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level, and protein carbonyl and sulfhydryl contents were evaluated. In BAL of treated animals, we verified an increased total cell count and LDH activity. MGE and MLE prevented the increase in cell count, but only MLE prevented the increase in LDH. Myeloperoxidase and TBARS levels were not affected, protein carbonylation was increased, and the protein thiol levels were decreased by acute coal dust intratracheal administration. The findings also suggest that both extracts present an important protective effect on the oxidation of thiol groups. Moreover, pretreatment with MGE and MLE also diminished lung inflammatory infiltration induced by coal dust, as assessed by histopathologic analyses.

  8. Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Hatfield, Meghan K.; Farcas, Mariana T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Hummer, Jon A.; Shurin, Michael R.; Birch, M. Eileen; Gutkin, Dmitriy W.; Kisin, Elena; Kagan, Valerian E.; Bugarski, Aleksandar D.; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-based D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. PMID:23886933

  9. sTREM-1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis, effect of smoking and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Suchankova, M; Bucova, M; E, Tibenska; Demian, J; Majer, I; Novosadova, H; Tedlova, E; Durmanova, V; Paulovicova, E

    2013-01-01

    Soluble TREM-1 (sTREM-1; Triggering receptor expressed on myelocytes) is a new inflammatory marker indicating the intensity of myeloid cells activation and the presence of infection caused by extracellular bacteria and mould.The aim of our work was to detect and compare the levels of sTREM-1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis (PS) and other ILD of non-infectious origin. The sTREM-1 levels were assessed by ELISA in 46 patients suffering from ILD, out of them 22 with PS. The levels of BALF sTREM-1 in PS patients were higher than in control group of ILD patients of non-infectious origin, however, the difference was not statistically significant. Since all PS patients except one were non-smokers we compared non-smokers PS with non-smokers ILD patients and found four times higher levels of BALF sTREM-1 in PS patients (P = 0.001). We also recorded the effect of smoking, ILD smokers had higher sTREM-1 levels than non-smokers (P = 0.0019). Higher concentrations of sTREM-1 were detected in BALF of patients with lymphadenopathy and with elevated inflammatory markers in BALF. Our results show that BALF sTREM-1 could be a good inflammatory marker and could help in diagnosis and PS monitoring. Detection of sTREM-1 in BALF indirectly points to myeloid cells activation in the lungs and helps to complete the information about the number of myeloid cells commonly determined in BALF with additional information concerning the intensity of their activation. This is the first study that analyses BALF sTREM-1 levels in patients with PS (Tab. 8, Ref. 28). Text in PDF www.elis.sk.

  10. sTREM-1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis, effect of smoking and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Suchankova, M; Bucova, M; E, Tibenska; Demian, J; Majer, I; Novosadova, H; Tedlova, E; Durmanova, V; Paulovicova, E

    2013-01-01

    Soluble TREM-1 (sTREM-1; Triggering receptor expressed on myelocytes) is a new inflammatory marker indicating the intensity of myeloid cells activation and the presence of infection caused by extracellular bacteria and mould.The aim of our work was to detect and compare the levels of sTREM-1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis (PS) and other ILD of non-infectious origin. The sTREM-1 levels were assessed by ELISA in 46 patients suffering from ILD, out of them 22 with PS. The levels of BALF sTREM-1 in PS patients were higher than in control group of ILD patients of non-infectious origin, however, the difference was not statistically significant. Since all PS patients except one were non-smokers we compared non-smokers PS with non-smokers ILD patients and found four times higher levels of BALF sTREM-1 in PS patients (P = 0.001). We also recorded the effect of smoking, ILD smokers had higher sTREM-1 levels than non-smokers (P = 0.0019). Higher concentrations of sTREM-1 were detected in BALF of patients with lymphadenopathy and with elevated inflammatory markers in BALF. Our results show that BALF sTREM-1 could be a good inflammatory marker and could help in diagnosis and PS monitoring. Detection of sTREM-1 in BALF indirectly points to myeloid cells activation in the lungs and helps to complete the information about the number of myeloid cells commonly determined in BALF with additional information concerning the intensity of their activation. This is the first study that analyses BALF sTREM-1 levels in patients with PS (Tab. 8, Ref. 28). Text in PDF www.elis.sk. PMID:24329508

  11. Effects of a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, flurbiprofen, and an H1 histamine receptor antagonist, terfenadine, alone and in combination on allergen induced immediate bronchoconstriction in man.

    PubMed Central

    Curzen, N; Rafferty, P; Holgate, S T

    1987-01-01

    The effect of flurbiprofen, a potent cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, on histamine and methacholine reactivity was assessed in seven atopic subjects with asthma. Flurbiprofen 150 mg daily for three days displaced the histamine-FEV1 concentration-response curve to the right by 1.5 doubling doses, whereas no effect was observed on the response to methacholine. Subsequently the effects of flurbiprofen and terfenadine, a specific H1 histamine receptor antagonist, on allergen induced bronchoconstriction were studied in seven atopic but non-asthmatic subjects. The subjects inhaled the concentration of grass pollen allergen that had previously been shown to produce a 20% fall in FEV1 on separate occasions after prior treatment with placebo, flurbiprofen 150 mg daily for three days, terfenadine 180 mg three hours before challenge, and the combination of flurbiprofen and terfenadine. After placebo, allergen challenge caused a mean (SEM) maximum fall in FEV1 of 37.6% (2.6%) after 20 (3.7) minutes, followed by a gradual recovery to within 15% of baseline at 60 minutes. Terfenadine reduced the maximum allergen provoked fall in FEV1 to 21.5% (2.2%) and reduced the area under the time-response curve (AUC) by 50% (6%). Flurbiprofen alone reduced the mean maximum fall in FEV1 to 29.6% (3.2%) and reduced the AUC by 26%. The effect of the combination of flurbiprofen and terfenadine did not differ significantly from that of terfenadine alone. We conclude that histamine and prostaglandins contribute to immediate allergen induced bronchoconstriction and that a complex interaction occurs between the two classes of mediators. PMID:2894081

  12. Blood flow in histamine- and allergen-induced weal and flare responses, effects of an H1 antagonist, alpha-adrenoceptor agonist and a topical glucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Hammarlund, A; Olsson, P; Pipkorn, U

    1990-01-01

    Allergen has previously been shown to induce a continuous increase in local dermal blood flow after a prick test in allergic subjects, whereas histamine induced, initially, similar peak increases in blood flow of much shorter duration. Blood flow changes induced by histamine and allergen have now been evaluated (i) after pretreatment with a local corticosteroid cream, clobetasole-17-propionate; (ii) after oral administration of the H1-antihistamine loratadine; and (iii) after oral pretreatment with the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist pseudoephedrine. Blinded placebo-controlled designs were used in the substudies. Laser doppler flowmetry was used for non-invasive recording of changes in local blood flow intermittently for 24 h after the topical corticosteroid, 6 h for the substudies on loratadine and pseudoephedrine. The size of the immediate weal and flare reactions, as well as late phase reactions, were also determined. Pretreatment with clobetasole-17-propionate cream on the skin for 1 week prior to prick tests did not affect the blood flow response elicited by histamine or allergen, in either the initial part (up to 1 h) or the protracted 24 h determinations. The size of the weal and flare reactions decreased. Loratadine and pseudoephedrine did not reduce the initial allergen-induced increase in blood flow, while lower blood flow compared with placebo pretreatment was noted for the protracted (1-6 h) determinations. Blood flow changes after histamine were unaffected. The histamine-induced weal and flare was inhibited by loratadine more effectively than the corresponding allergen-induced reaction. The weal and flare reactions after histamine and allergen were not changed after pseudoephedrine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The Effects of Antigen-Specific IgG1 Antibody for the Pulmonary-Hypertension-Phenotype and B Cells for Inflammation in Mice Exposed to Antigen and Fine Particles from Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Chen, Wen-Chi; Durmus, Nedim; Bleck, Bertram; Reibman, Joan; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Grunig, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is known to exacerbate chronic inflammatory conditions of the lungs including pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and autoimmune diseases. Directly pathogenic antibodies bind pro-inflammatory cell receptors and cause or exacerbate inflammation. In contrast, anti-inflammatory antibody isotypes (e.g. mouse immunoglobulin G1, IgG1) bind inhibitory cell receptors and can inhibit inflammation. Our previous studies showed that co-exposure to antigen and urban ambient particulate matter (PM2.5) induced severe pulmonary arterial thickening and increased right ventricular systolic pressures in mice via T-cell produced cytokines, Interleukin (IL)-13 and IL-17A. The aim of the current study was to understand how B cell and antibody responses integrate into this T cell cytokine network for the pulmonary hypertension phenotype. Special focus was on antigen-specific IgG1 that is the predominant antibody in the experimental response to antigen and urban ambient PM2.5. Wild type and B cell-deficient mice were primed with antigen and then challenged with antigen and urban particulate matter and injected with antibodies as appropriate. Our data surprisingly showed that B cells were necessary for the development of increased right ventricular pressures and molecular changes in the right heart in response to sensitization and intranasal challenge with antigen and PM2.5. Further, our studies showed that both, the increase in right ventricular systolic pressure and right ventricular molecular changes were restored by reconstituting the B cell KO mice with antigen specific IgG1. In addition, our studies identified a critical, non-redundant role of B cells for the IL-17A-directed inflammation in response to exposure with antigen and PM2.5, which was not corrected with antigen-specific IgG1. In contrast, IL-13-directed inflammatory markers, as well as severe pulmonary arterial remodeling induced by challenge with antigen and PM2.5 were similar in B cell

  14. The Effects of Antigen-Specific IgG1 Antibody for the Pulmonary-Hypertension-Phenotype and B Cells for Inflammation in Mice Exposed to Antigen and Fine Particles from Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Chen, Wen-Chi; Durmus, Nedim; Bleck, Bertram; Reibman, Joan; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Grunig, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is known to exacerbate chronic inflammatory conditions of the lungs including pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and autoimmune diseases. Directly pathogenic antibodies bind pro-inflammatory cell receptors and cause or exacerbate inflammation. In contrast, anti-inflammatory antibody isotypes (e.g. mouse immunoglobulin G1, IgG1) bind inhibitory cell receptors and can inhibit inflammation. Our previous studies showed that co-exposure to antigen and urban ambient particulate matter (PM2.5) induced severe pulmonary arterial thickening and increased right ventricular systolic pressures in mice via T-cell produced cytokines, Interleukin (IL)-13 and IL-17A. The aim of the current study was to understand how B cell and antibody responses integrate into this T cell cytokine network for the pulmonary hypertension phenotype. Special focus was on antigen-specific IgG1 that is the predominant antibody in the experimental response to antigen and urban ambient PM2.5. Wild type and B cell-deficient mice were primed with antigen and then challenged with antigen and urban particulate matter and injected with antibodies as appropriate. Our data surprisingly showed that B cells were necessary for the development of increased right ventricular pressures and molecular changes in the right heart in response to sensitization and intranasal challenge with antigen and PM2.5. Further, our studies showed that both, the increase in right ventricular systolic pressure and right ventricular molecular changes were restored by reconstituting the B cell KO mice with antigen specific IgG1. In addition, our studies identified a critical, non-redundant role of B cells for the IL-17A-directed inflammation in response to exposure with antigen and PM2.5, which was not corrected with antigen-specific IgG1. In contrast, IL-13-directed inflammatory markers, as well as severe pulmonary arterial remodeling induced by challenge with antigen and PM2.5 were similar in B cell

  15. The Effects of Antigen-Specific IgG1 Antibody for the Pulmonary-Hypertension-Phenotype and B Cells for Inflammation in Mice Exposed to Antigen and Fine Particles from Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Chen, Wen-Chi; Durmus, Nedim; Bleck, Bertram; Reibman, Joan; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Grunig, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is known to exacerbate chronic inflammatory conditions of the lungs including pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and autoimmune diseases. Directly pathogenic antibodies bind pro-inflammatory cell receptors and cause or exacerbate inflammation. In contrast, anti-inflammatory antibody isotypes (e.g. mouse immunoglobulin G1, IgG1) bind inhibitory cell receptors and can inhibit inflammation. Our previous studies showed that co-exposure to antigen and urban ambient particulate matter (PM2.5) induced severe pulmonary arterial thickening and increased right ventricular systolic pressures in mice via T-cell produced cytokines, Interleukin (IL)-13 and IL-17A. The aim of the current study was to understand how B cell and antibody responses integrate into this T cell cytokine network for the pulmonary hypertension phenotype. Special focus was on antigen-specific IgG1 that is the predominant antibody in the experimental response to antigen and urban ambient PM2.5. Wild type and B cell-deficient mice were primed with antigen and then challenged with antigen and urban particulate matter and injected with antibodies as appropriate. Our data surprisingly showed that B cells were necessary for the development of increased right ventricular pressures and molecular changes in the right heart in response to sensitization and intranasal challenge with antigen and PM2.5. Further, our studies showed that both, the increase in right ventricular systolic pressure and right ventricular molecular changes were restored by reconstituting the B cell KO mice with antigen specific IgG1. In addition, our studies identified a critical, non-redundant role of B cells for the IL-17A-directed inflammation in response to exposure with antigen and PM2.5, which was not corrected with antigen-specific IgG1. In contrast, IL-13-directed inflammatory markers, as well as severe pulmonary arterial remodeling induced by challenge with antigen and PM2.5 were similar in B cell

  16. Impact of Dietary Tomato Juice on Changes in Pulmonary Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Structure Induced by Neonatal Hyperoxia in Mice (Mus musculus)

    PubMed Central

    Bouch, Sheena; Harding, Richard; O’Reilly, Megan; Wood, Lisa G.; Sozo, Foula

    2016-01-01

    Many preterm infants require hyperoxic gas for survival, although it can contribute to lung injury. Experimentally, neonatal hyperoxia leads to persistent alterations in lung structure and increases leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). These effects of hyperoxia on the lungs are considered to be caused, at least in part, by increased oxidative stress. Our objective was to determine if dietary supplementation with a known source of antioxidants (tomato juice, TJ) could protect the developing lung from injury caused by breathing hyperoxic gas. Neonatal mice (C57BL6/J) breathed either 65% O2 (hyperoxia) or room air from birth until postnatal day 7 (P7d); some underwent necropsy at P7d and others were raised in room air until adulthood (P56d). In subsets of both groups, drinking water was replaced with TJ (diluted 50:50 in water) from late gestation to necropsy. At P7d and P56d, we analyzed total antioxidant capacity (TAC), markers of oxidative stress (nitrotyrosine and heme oxygenase-1 expression), inflammation (interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression), collagen (COL) and smooth muscle in the lungs; we also assessed lung structure. We quantified macrophages in lung tissue (at P7d) and leukocytes in BALF (at P56d). At P7d, TJ increased pulmonary TAC and COL1α1 expression and attenuated the hyperoxia-induced increase in nitrotyrosine and macrophage influx; however, changes in lung structure were not affected. At P56d, TJ increased TAC, decreased oxidative stress and reversed the hyperoxia-induced increase in bronchiolar smooth muscle. Additionally, TJ alone decreased IL-1β expression, but following hyperoxia TJ increased TNF-α expression and did not alter the hyperoxia-induced increase in leukocyte number. We conclude that TJ supplementation during and after neonatal exposure to hyperoxia protects the lung from some but not all aspects of hyperoxia-induced injury, but may also have adverse side-effects. The effects of

  17. Relationship between Household Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke Exposure, and Pulmonary Dysfunction, Oxidant-Antioxidant Imbalance and Systemic Inflammation in Rural Women and Children in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oluwole, Oluwafemi; Arinola, Ganiyu O.; Ana, Godson R.; Wiskel, Tess; Huo, Dezheng; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olopade, Christopher O.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Exposure to particulate matter from burning biomass fuels is believed to affect oxidant-antioxidant balance and to induce oxidative stress. Methods: Fifty-nine mother-child pairs from 59 households that used firewood exclusively for cooking in three rural communities in southwest Nigeria underwent blood test for albumin, pre-albumin, retinol-binding protein (RBP), superoxide dismutase (SOD), vitamins C, vitamin E, malondialdehyde (MDA) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Spirometry was performed and indoor levels of PM2.5 were determined. Results: Mean age (± SD; years) of mothers and children was 43.0±11.7 and 13.6±3.2, respectively. The median indoor PM2.5 level was 1575.1 µg/m3 (IQR 943.6–2847.0, p<0.001), which is substantially higher than the World Health Organization (WHO) standard of 25 µg/m3. The mean levels of pre-albumin (0.21±0.14 g/dL) and RBP (0.03±0.03 g/dL) in women were significantly lower than their respective normal ranges (1-3 g/dL and 0.2-0.6 g/dL, respectively, p<0.05). Similarly, the mean levels of pre-albumin (0.19±0.13 g/dL) and RBP (0.01±0.01 g/dL) in children were significantly lower than the respective normal ranges (1-3 g/dL and 0.2-0.6 g/dL, respectively, p<0.05). Mean serum concentrations of MDA in children (5.44±1.88 µmol/L) was positively correlated to serum concentrations of CRP (r=0.3, p=0.04) and negatively correlated to lung function (FEV1/FVC) in both mothers and children (both r=-0.3, p<0.05). Also, regression analysis indicates that CRP and SOD are associated with lung function impairment in mothers (-2.55±1.08, p<0.05) and children (-5.96±3.05, p=0.05) respectively. Conclusion: Exposure to HAP from biomass fuel is associated with pulmonary dysfunction, reduced antioxidant defense and inflammation of the airways. Further studies are needed to better define causal relationships and the mechanisms involved. PMID:23777718

  18. Anti-inflammatory actions of Chemoattractant Receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 by the antagonist MK-7246 in a novel rat model of Alternaria alternata elicited pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gil, Malgorzata A; Caniga, Michael; Woodhouse, Janice D; Eckman, Joseph; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Salmon, Michael; Naber, John; Hamilton, Valerie T; Sevilla, Raquel S; Bettano, Kimberly; Klappenbach, Joel; Moy, Lily; Correll, Craig C; Gervais, Francois G; Siliphaivanh, Phieng; Zhang, Weisheng; Zhang-Hoover, Jie; McLeod, Robbie L; Cicmil, Milenko

    2014-11-15

    Alternaria alternata is a fungal allergen linked to the development of severe asthma in humans. In view of the clinical relationship between A. alternata and asthma, we sought to investigate the allergic activity of this antigen after direct application to the lungs of Brown Norway rats. Here we demonstrate that a single intratracheal instillation of A. alternata induces dose and time dependent eosinophil influx, edema and Type 2 helper cell cytokine production in the lungs of BN rats. We established the temporal profile of eosinophilic infiltration and cytokine production, such as Interleukin-5 and Interleukin-13, following A. alternata challenge. These responses were comparable to Ovalbumin induced models of asthma and resulted in peak inflammatory responses 48h following a single challenge, eliminating the need for multiple sensitizations and challenges. The initial perivascular and peribronchiolar inflammation preceded alveolar inflammation, progressing to a more sub-acute inflammatory response with notable epithelial cell hypertrophy. To limit the effects of an A. alternata inflammatory response, MK-7246 was utilized as it is an antagonist for Chemoattractant Receptor-homologous molecule expressed in Th2 cells. In a dose-dependent manner, MK-7246 decreased eosinophil influx and Th2 cytokine production following the A. alternata challenge. Furthermore, therapeutic administration of corticosteroids resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in eosinophil influx and Th2 cytokine production. Reproducible asthma-related outcomes and amenability to pharmacological intervention by mechanisms relevant to asthma demonstrate that an A. alternata induced pulmonary inflammation in BN rats is a valuable preclinical pharmacodynamic in vivo model for evaluating the pharmacological inhibitors of allergic pulmonary inflammation.

  19. A sensory neuronal ion channel essential for airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in asthma.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Ana I; Brackmann, Marian; Elia, Maxwell D; Bessac, Bret F; del Camino, Donato; D'Amours, Marc; Witek, JoAnn S; Fanger, Chistopher M; Chong, Jayhong A; Hayward, Neil J; Homer, Robert J; Cohn, Lauren; Huang, Xiaozhu; Moran, Magdalene M; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-06-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disorder caused by airway exposures to allergens and chemical irritants. Studies focusing on immune, smooth muscle, and airway epithelial function revealed many aspects of the disease mechanism of asthma. However, the limited efficacies of immune-directed therapies suggest the involvement of additional mechanisms in asthmatic airway inflammation. TRPA1 is an irritant-sensing ion channel expressed in airway chemosensory nerves. TRPA1-activating stimuli such as cigarette smoke, chlorine, aldehydes, and scents are among the most prevalent triggers of asthma. Endogenous TRPA1 agonists, including reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation products, are potent drivers of allergen-induced airway inflammation in asthma. Here, we examined the role of TRPA1 in allergic asthma in the murine ovalbumin model. Strikingly, genetic ablation of TRPA1 inhibited allergen-induced leukocyte infiltration in the airways, reduced cytokine and mucus production, and almost completely abolished airway hyperreactivity to contractile stimuli. This phenotype is recapitulated by treatment of wild-type mice with HC-030031, a TRPA1 antagonist. HC-030031, when administered during airway allergen challenge, inhibited eosinophil infiltration and prevented the development of airway hyperreactivity. Trpa1(-/-) mice displayed deficiencies in chemically and allergen-induced neuropeptide release in the airways, providing a potential explanation for the impaired inflammatory response. Our data suggest that TRPA1 is a key integrator of interactions between the immune and nervous systems in the airways, driving asthmatic airway inflammation following inhaled allergen challenge. TRPA1 may represent a promising pharmacological target for the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory conditions. PMID:19458046

  20. Topical Application of Fingolimod Perturbs Cutaneous Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wai Y; Dimasi, David P; Pitman, Melissa R; Zhuang, YiZhong; Heddle, Robert; Pitson, Stuart M; Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Bonder, Claudine S

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of allergies, including rhinitis, eczema, and anaphylaxis, is rising dramatically worldwide. This increase is especially problematic in children who bear the greatest burden of this rising trend. Increasing evidence identifies neutrophils as primary perpetrators of the more severe and difficult to manage forms of inflammation. A newly recognized mechanism by which neutrophils are recruited during the early phase of histamine-induced inflammation involves the sphingosine kinase (SK)/sphingosine-1-phosphate axis. This study examines whether topical application of fingolimod, an established SK/sphingosine-1-phosphate antagonist already in clinical use to treat multiple sclerosis, may be repurposed to treat cutaneous inflammation. Using two mouse models of ear skin inflammation (histamine- and IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis) we topically applied fingolimod prophylactically, as well as after establishment of the inflammatory response, and examined ear swelling, SK activity, vascular permeability, leukocyte recruitment, and production of proinflammatory mediators. The present study reveals that when applied topically, fingolimod attenuates both immediate and late-phase responses to histamine with reduced extravasation of fluid, SK-1 activity, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and neutrophil influx and prevents ear swelling. Intravital microscopy demonstrates that histamine-induced neutrophil rolling and adhesion to the postcapillary venules in the mouse ears is significantly attenuated even after 24 h. More importantly, these effects are achievable even once inflammation is established. Translation into humans was also accomplished with epicutaneous application of fingolimod resolving histamine-induced and allergen-induced inflammatory reactions in forearm skin. Overall, this study demonstrates, to our knowledge for the first time, that fingolimod may be repurposed to treat cutaneous inflammation. PMID:27001955

  1. Cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to particulate matter-induced oxidative stress, vagal dominance, arrhythmia, pulmonary inflammation in heart failure-prone rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is tied to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially among those with prior cardiac injury. The mechanisms and pathophysiologic events precipitating these outcomes remain poorly understood but may involve inflamm...

  2. Pulmonary C Fibers Modulate MMP-12 Production via PAR2 and Are Involved in the Long-Term Airway Inflammation and Airway Hyperresponsiveness Induced by Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Na; Zhuang, Jianguo; Deng, Yu; Yang, Zhimei; Ye, Zhixu; Xie, Xiaohong; Ren, Luo; Fu, Zhou; Luo, Zhengxiu; Xu, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Children with acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection often develop sequelae of persistent airway inflammation and wheezing. Pulmonary C fibers (PCFs) are involved in the generation of airway inflammation and resistance; however, their role in persistent airway diseases after RSV is unexplored. Here, we elucidated the pathogenesis of PCF activation in RSV-induced persistent airway disorders. PCF-degenerated and intact mice were used in the current study. Airway inflammation and airway resistance were evaluated. MMP408 and FSLLRY-NH2 were the selective antagonists for MMP-12 and PAR2, respectively, to investigate the roles of MMP-12 and PAR2 in PCFs mediating airway diseases. As a result, PCF degeneration significantly reduced the following responses to RSV infection: augmenting of inflammatory cells, especially macrophages, and infiltrating of inflammatory cells in lung tissues; specific airway resistance (sRaw) response to methacholine; and upregulation of MMP-12 and PAR2 expression. Moreover, the inhibition of MMP-12 reduced the total number of cells and macrophages in bronchiolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well infiltrating inflammatory cells, and decreased the sRaw response to methacholine. In addition, PAR2 was upregulated especially at the later stage of RSV infection. Downregulation of PAR2 ameliorated airway inflammation and resistance following RSV infection and suppressed the level of MMP-12. In all, the results suggest that PCF involvement in long-term airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness occurred at least partially via modulating MMP-12, and the activation of PAR2 might be related to PCF-modulated MMP-12 production. Our initial findings indicated that the inhibition of PCF activity would be targeted therapeutically for virus infection-induced long-term airway disorders. IMPORTANCE The current study is critical to understanding that PCFs are involved in long-term airway inflammation and airway resistance after RSV infection

  3. Inhaled extended-release microparticles of heparin elicit improved pulmonary pharmacodynamics against antigen-mediated airway hyper-reactivity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ayca; John, Elinor; Özsoy, Yildiz; Araman, Ahmet; Birchall, James C; Broadley, Kenneth J; Gumbleton, Mark

    2012-09-10

    Inhaled heparin appears to provide benefit in the management of airway hyper-reactivity and inflammation. The pharmacodynamics of inhaled heparin are however transient. Providing sustained heparin concentrations in the respiratory tract should provide for an extended duration of action. We examined the in-vivo efficacy of a nebulised controlled-release microparticle formulation of heparin in modifying antigen-induced airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) and lung inflammation. Heparin-loaded biodegradable poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles were prepared by spray-drying. Aerosol properties for both nebulised heparin solution and heparin microparticles displayed characteristics consistent with heparin delivery to the respiratory tract. In vitro release assays showed heparin to be released from the microparticles over 8-12 h and for the heparin to remain functional. Temporal pharmacodynamic responses were studied in an ovalbumin-sensitised in vivo model exhibiting AHR and airway inflammation. Despite a reduced total dose of heparin deposited in the airways following nebulisation with heparin microparticles, this treatment led to a more sustained inhibitory effect upon AHR and airway inflammation than equivalent doses of nebulised heparin solution. The work supports extended-release heparin as an inhalation dosing strategy in experimental therapeutic applications aimed at improving the pharmacodynamics of heparin in the treatment of AHR and lung inflammation.

  4. Efficacy and Pharmacology of the NLRP3 Inflammasome Inhibitor CP-456,773 (CRID3) in Murine Models of Dermal and Pulmonary Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Primiano, Michael J; Lefker, Bruce A; Bowman, Michael R; Bree, Andrea G; Hubeau, Cedric; Bonin, Paul D; Mangan, Matthew; Dower, Ken; Monks, Brian G; Cushing, Leah; Wang, Stephen; Guzova, Julia; Jiao, Aiping; Lin, Lih-Ling; Latz, Eicke; Hepworth, David; Hall, J Perry

    2016-09-15

    A critical component of innate immune response to infection and tissue damage is the NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, and this pathway and its activation products have been implicated in the pathophysiology of a variety of diseases. NLRP3 inflammasome activation leads to the cleavage of pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18, as well as the subsequent release of biologically active IL-1β, IL-18, and other soluble mediators of inflammation. In this study, we further define the pharmacology of the previously reported NLRP3 inflammasome-selective, IL-1β processing inhibitor CP-456,773 (also known as MCC950), and we demonstrate its efficacy in two in vivo models of inflammation. Specifically, we show that in human and mouse innate immune cells CP-456,773 is an inhibitor of the cellular release of IL-1β, IL-1α, and IL-18, that CP-456,773 prevents inflammasome activation induced by disease-relevant soluble and crystalline NLRP3 stimuli, and that CP-456,773 inhibits R848- and imiquimod-induced IL-1β release. In mice, CP-456,773 demonstrates potent inhibition of the release of proinflammatory cytokines following acute i.p. challenge with LPS plus ATP in a manner that is proportional to the free/unbound concentrations of the drug, thereby establishing an in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for CP-456,773. Furthermore, CP-456,773 reduces ear swelling in an imiquimod cream-induced mouse model of skin inflammation, and it reduces airway inflammation in mice following acute challenge with house dust mite extract. These data implicate the NLRP3 inflammasome in the pathogenesis of dermal and airway inflammation, and they highlight the utility of CP-456,773 for interrogating the contribution of the NLRP3 inflammasome and its outputs in preclinical models of inflammation and disease. PMID:27521339

  5. Efficacy and Pharmacology of the NLRP3 Inflammasome Inhibitor CP-456,773 (CRID3) in Murine Models of Dermal and Pulmonary Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Primiano, Michael J; Lefker, Bruce A; Bowman, Michael R; Bree, Andrea G; Hubeau, Cedric; Bonin, Paul D; Mangan, Matthew; Dower, Ken; Monks, Brian G; Cushing, Leah; Wang, Stephen; Guzova, Julia; Jiao, Aiping; Lin, Lih-Ling; Latz, Eicke; Hepworth, David; Hall, J Perry

    2016-09-15

    A critical component of innate immune response to infection and tissue damage is the NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, and this pathway and its activation products have been implicated in the pathophysiology of a variety of diseases. NLRP3 inflammasome activation leads to the cleavage of pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18, as well as the subsequent release of biologically active IL-1β, IL-18, and other soluble mediators of inflammation. In this study, we further define the pharmacology of the previously reported NLRP3 inflammasome-selective, IL-1β processing inhibitor CP-456,773 (also known as MCC950), and we demonstrate its efficacy in two in vivo models of inflammation. Specifically, we show that in human and mouse innate immune cells CP-456,773 is an inhibitor of the cellular release of IL-1β, IL-1α, and IL-18, that CP-456,773 prevents inflammasome activation induced by disease-relevant soluble and crystalline NLRP3 stimuli, and that CP-456,773 inhibits R848- and imiquimod-induced IL-1β release. In mice, CP-456,773 demonstrates potent inhibition of the release of proinflammatory cytokines following acute i.p. challenge with LPS plus ATP in a manner that is proportional to the free/unbound concentrations of the drug, thereby establishing an in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for CP-456,773. Furthermore, CP-456,773 reduces ear swelling in an imiquimod cream-induced mouse model of skin inflammation, and it reduces airway inflammation in mice following acute challenge with house dust mite extract. These data implicate the NLRP3 inflammasome in the pathogenesis of dermal and airway inflammation, and they highlight the utility of CP-456,773 for interrogating the contribution of the NLRP3 inflammasome and its outputs in preclinical models of inflammation and disease.

  6. Regulation of allergic lung inflammation by endothelial cell transglutaminase 2.

    PubMed

    Soveg, Frank; Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Campbell, Jackson; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Mutlu, Gökhan M; Cook-Mills, Joan M

    2015-09-15

    Tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is an enzyme with multiple functions, including catalysis of serotonin conjugation to proteins (serotonylation). Previous research indicates that TG2 expression is upregulated in human asthma and in the lung endothelium of ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice. It is not known whether endothelial cell TG2 is required for allergic inflammation. Therefore, to determine whether endothelial cell TG2 regulates allergic inflammation, mice with an endothelial cell-specific deletion of TG2 were generated, and these mice were sensitized and challenged in the airways with OVA. Deletion of TG2 in endothelial cells blocked OVA-induced serotonylation in lung endothelial cells, but not lung epithelial cells. Interestingly, deletion of endothelial TG2 reduced allergen-induced increases in respiratory system resistance, number of eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage, and number of eosinophils in the lung tissue. Endothelial cell deletion of TG2 did not alter expression of adhesion molecules, cytokines, or chemokines that regulate leukocyte recruitment, consistent with other studies, demonstrating that deletion of endothelial cell signals does not alter lung cytokines and chemokines during allergic inflammation. Taken together, the data indicate that endothelial cell TG2 is required for allergic inflammation by regulating the recruitment of eosinophils into OVA-challenged lungs. In summary, TG2 functions as a critical signal for allergic lung responses. These data identify potential novel targets for intervention in allergy/asthma.

  7. Topical skin treatment with Fab fragments of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody suppresses allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Sae-Wong, Chutha; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Kangsanant, Sureeporn; Yoshino, Shin

    2016-05-15

    Fab fragments (Fabs), which lack effector functions due to the absence of the Fc portion, maintain the ability to bind to specific allergens. In the present study, we examined whether Fabs of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) were able to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. BALB/c mice passively sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE mAb were repeatedly challenged with OVA applied to the skin after sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment. Fabs prepared by the digestion of anti-OVA IgG1 mAb (O1-10) with papain were applied to the skin 30min before the OVA challenges followed by measurement of clinical symptoms including erythema/hemorrhage, edema, scarring/dryness, and excoriation/erosion of the skin. Treatment with O1-10 Fabs, but not intact O1-10, showed inhibition of clinical symptoms (P<0.01) induced by the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice; O1-10 Fabs suppressed histological changes such as epidermal hyperplasia (P<0.01) and the accumulation of mast cells (P<0.01) and neutrophils (P<0.01). Furthermore, treatment with O1-10 Fabs inhibited the increase in levels of IL-13 (P<0.01) and IL-17A production (P<0.05) in the lymph nodes of the sensitized mice. Additionally, the increased level of OVA in serum following the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice was reduced by the treatment (P<0.05). These results suggest that topical application of pathogenic allergen-specific IgG1 mAb Fabs to the skin of mice is effective in suppressing allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions, suggesting that allergen-specific mAb Fabs could be used as a tool to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis. PMID:26970183

  8. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  9. Efficacy of Simple Short-Term in Vitro Assays for Predicting the Potential of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles to Cause Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Senlin; Duffin, Rodger; Poland, Craig; Daly, Paul; Murphy, Fiona; Drost, Ellen; MacNee, William; Stone, Vicki; Donaldson, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Background There has been concern regarding risks from inhalation exposure to nanoparticles (NPs). The large number of particles requiring testing means that alternative approaches to animal testing are needed. Objectives We set out to determine whether short-term in vitro assays that assess intrinsic oxidative stress potential and membrane-damaging potency of a panel of metal oxide NPs can be used to predict their inflammogenic potency. Methods For a panel of metal oxide NPs, we investigated intrinsic free radical generation, oxidative activity in an extracellular environment, cytotoxicity to lung epithelial cells, hemolysis, and inflammation potency in rat lungs. All exposures were carried out at equal surface area doses. Results Only nickel oxide (NiO) and alumina 2 caused significant lung inflammation when instilled into rat lungs at equal surface area, suggesting that these two had extra surface reactivity. We observed significant free radical generation with 4 of 13 metal oxides, only one of which was inflammogenic. Only 3 of 13 were significantly hemolytic, two of which were inflammogenic. Conclusions Potency in generating free radicals in vitro did not predict inflammation, whereas alumina 2 had no free radical activity but was inflammogenic. The hemolysis assay was correct in predicting the proinflammatory potential of 12 of 13 of the particles examined. Using a battery of simple in vitro tests, it is possible to predict the inflammogenicity of metal oxide NPs, although some false-positive results are likely. More research using a larger panel is needed to confirm the efficacy and generality of this approach for metal oxide NPs. PMID:19270794

  10. Cannabinoids for the treatment of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John C

    2007-05-01

    Cannabinoids are effective at suppressing immune and inflammation functions in leukocytes in vitro, and in animal models of acute inflammation, such as the mouse hind paw, ear and air pouch models, as well as gastrointestinal, pulmonary, myocardial, vascular, periodontal, neural, hepatic, pancreatic and arthritic inflammation models. The non-psychoactive cannabinoid receptor CB2 is emerging as a critical target for cannabinoid regulation of inflammation, and thus CB2-selective agonists are undergoing intense investigation and research. This review discusses the evidence for cannabinoid regulation of inflammation across a range of models and highlights the most promising drug candidates.

  11. Baicalein inhibits pulmonary carcinogenesis-associated inflammation and interferes with COX-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions in-vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrashekar, Naveenkumar; Selvamani, Asokkumar; Subramanian, Raghunandhakumar; Pandi, Anandakumar; Thiruvengadam, Devaki

    2012-05-15

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of baicalein (BE) on inflammatory cytokines, which is in line with tumor invasion factors and antioxidant defensive system during benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] (50 mg/kg body weight) induced pulmonary carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. After experimental period, increased levels of total and differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were observed. Accompanied by marked increase in immature mast cell by toluidine blue staining and mature mast cell by safranin–alcian blue staining in B(a)P-induced lung cancer bearing animals. Protein expression levels studied by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analysis of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and inducible nitric oxide synthase were also found to be significantly increased in lung cancer bearing animals. B(a)P-exposed mice lung exhibits activated expression of nuclear transcription factor kappa-B as confirmed by immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis. Administration of BE (12 mg/kg body weight) significantly counteracted all the above deleterious changes. Moreover, assessment of tumor invasion factors on protein levels by immunoblot and mRNA expression levels by RT-PCR revealed that BE treatment effectively negates B(a)P-induced upregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cyclo-oxygenase-2. Further analysis of lipid peroxidation markers such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hydro-peroxides and antioxidants such as glutathione-S-transferase and reduced glutathione in lung tissue was carried out to substantiate the antioxidant effect of BE. The chemotherapeutic effect observed in the present study is attributed to the potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential by BE against pulmonary carcinogenesis. -- Highlights: ► BE treatment protects from inflammatory cells and mast-cells accumulation in lungs. ► BE altered the expressions of TNF

  12. Arctigenin Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Pulmonary Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in a Mouse Model via Suppression of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-zhou; Jiang, Zheng-kui; He, Bao-xia; Liu, Xian-ben

    2015-08-01

    Arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa (Nubang), has anti-inflammatory activity. Here, we investigated the effects of arctigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. Mice were divided into four groups: control, LPS, LPS + DMSO, and LPS + Arctigenin. Mice in the LPS + Arctigenin group were injected intraperitoneally with 50 mg/kg of arctigenin 1 h before an intratracheal administration of LPS (5 mg/kg). Lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected. Histological changes of the lung were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Arctigenin decreased LPS-induced acute lung inflammation, infiltration of inflammatory cells into BALF, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, arctigenin pretreatment reduced the malondialdehyde level and increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and glutathione peroxidase/glutathione disulfide ratio in the lung. Mechanically, arctigenin significantly reduced the production of nitric oxygen and inducible nitric oxygen synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, and decreased the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Arctigenin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects on LPS-induced acute lung injury, which are associated with modulation of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS signaling.

  13. Lipids Derived from Virulent Francisella tularensis Broadly Inhibit Pulmonary Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Deborah D.; Ireland, Robin; Alinger, Joshua B.; Small, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that causes an acute lethal respiratory disease in humans. The heightened virulence of the pathogen is linked to its unique ability to inhibit Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses. The bacterial component and mechanism of this inhibition are unknown. Here we show that lipids isolated from virulent but not attenuated strains of F. tularensis are not detected by host cells, inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines by primary macrophages in response to known TLR ligands, and suppress neutrophil recruitment in vivo. We further show that lipid-mediated inhibition of inflammation is dependent on TLR2, MyD88, and the nuclear hormone and fatty acid receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Pathogen lipid-mediated interference with inflammatory responses through the engagement of TLR2 and PPARα represents a novel manipulation of host signaling pathways consistent with the ability of highly virulent F. tularensis to efficiently evade host immune responses. PMID:23925884

  14. Arctigenin Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Pulmonary Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in a Mouse Model via Suppression of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-zhou; Jiang, Zheng-kui; He, Bao-xia; Liu, Xian-ben

    2015-08-01

    Arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa (Nubang), has anti-inflammatory activity. Here, we investigated the effects of arctigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. Mice were divided into four groups: control, LPS, LPS + DMSO, and LPS + Arctigenin. Mice in the LPS + Arctigenin group were injected intraperitoneally with 50 mg/kg of arctigenin 1 h before an intratracheal administration of LPS (5 mg/kg). Lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected. Histological changes of the lung were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Arctigenin decreased LPS-induced acute lung inflammation, infiltration of inflammatory cells into BALF, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, arctigenin pretreatment reduced the malondialdehyde level and increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and glutathione peroxidase/glutathione disulfide ratio in the lung. Mechanically, arctigenin significantly reduced the production of nitric oxygen and inducible nitric oxygen synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, and decreased the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Arctigenin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects on LPS-induced acute lung injury, which are associated with modulation of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS signaling. PMID:25616905

  15. The Src family tyrosine kinases src and yes have differential effects on inflammation-induced apoptosis in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nelin, Leif D; White, Hilary A; Jin, Yi; Trittmann, Jennifer K; Chen, Bernadette; Liu, Yusen

    2016-05-01

    Endothelial cells are essential for normal lung function: they sense and respond to circulating factors and hemodynamic alterations. In inflammatory lung diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, endothelial cell apoptosis is an inciting event in pathogenesis and a prominent pathological feature. Endothelial cell apoptosis is mediated by circulating inflammatory factors, which bind to receptors on the cell surface, activating signal transduction pathways, leading to caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. We hypothesized that yes and src have differential effects on caspase-3 activation in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (hPMVEC) due to differential downstream signaling effects. To test this hypothesis, hPMVEC were treated with siRNA against src (siRNAsrc), siRNA against yes (siRNAyes), or their respective scramble controls. After recovery, the hPMVEC were treated with cytomix (LPS, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ). Treatment with cytomix induced activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. Treatment with siRNAsrc blunted cytomix-induced ERK activation and enhanced cleaved caspase-3 levels, while treatment with siRNAyes enhanced cytomix-induced ERK activation and attenuated levels of cleaved caspase-3. Inhibition of the ERK pathway using U0126 enhanced cytomix-induced caspase-3 activity. Treatment of hPMVEC with cytomix induced Akt activation, which was inhibited by siRNAsrc. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway using LY294002 prevented cytomix-induced ERK activation and augmented cytomix-induced caspase-3 cleavage. Together, our data demonstrate that, in hPMVEC, yes activation blunts the ERK cascade in response to cytomix, resulting in greater apoptosis, while cytomix-induced src activation induces the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, which leads to activation of Akt and ERK and attenuation of apoptosis.

  16. Air pollution source apportionment before, during, and after the 2008 Beijing Olympics and association of sources to aldehydes and biomarkers of blood coagulation, pulmonary and systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress in healthy young adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemose, Brent A.

    Based on principal component analysis (PCA) of air pollution data collected during the Summer Olympic Games held in Beijing, China during 2008, the five source types of air pollution identified -- natural soil/road dust, vehicle and industrial combustion, vegetative burning, oil combustion, and secondary formation, were all distinctly lower during the Olympics. This was particularly true for vehicle and industrial combustion and oil combustion, and during the main games period between the opening and closing ceremonies. The reduction in secondary formation was reflective of a reduction in nitrogen oxides, but this also contributed to increased ozone concentrations during the Olympic period. Among three toxic aldehydes measured in Beijing during the same time period, only acetaldehyde had a reduction in mean concentration during the Olympic air pollution control period compared to the pre-Olympic period. Accordingly, acetaldehyde was significantly correlated with primary emission sources including vegetative burning and oil combustion, and with several pollutants emitted mainly from primary sources. In contrast, formaldehyde and acrolein increased during the Olympic air pollution control period; accordingly both were significantly correlated with ozone and with the secondary formation source type. These findings indicate primary sources may dominate for acetaldehyde while secondary sources may dominate for formaldehyde and acrolein. Biomarkers for pulmonary inflammation (exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH, exhaled nitric oxide, and EBC nitrite) and hemostasis and blood coagulation (vWF and sCD62p) were most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion, oil combustion, and vegetative burning. The systemic inflammation biomarker 8-OHdG was most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion. In contrast, the associations between the biomarkers and the aldehydes were generally not significant or in the hypothesized direction, although

  17. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease - pulmonary atresia; Cyanotic heart disease - pulmonary atresia; Valve - disorder pulmonary atresia ... septum may also have a poorly developed tricuspid valve. They may also have an underdeveloped right ventricle ...

  18. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... people who have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , or ...

  19. The kinetics of allergen-induced transcription of messenger RNA for monocyte chemotactic protein-3 and RANTES in the skin of human atopic subjects: relationship to eosinophil, T cell, and macrophage recruitment

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The C-C chemokines RANTES and monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3) are potent chemoattractants in vitro for eosinophils and other cell types associated with allergic reactions. We tested the hypothesis that the allergen-induced infiltration of eosinophils, T cells, and macrophages in the skin of atopic subjects is accompanied by the appearance of mRNA+ cells for RANTES and MCP-3. Cryostat sections were obtained from skin biopsies from six subjects 6, 24, and 48 h after allergen challenge. Tissue was processed for immunocytochemistry (ICC) and for in situ hybridization using 35S-labeled riboprobes for RANTES and MCP-3. In contrast to diluent controls, allergen provoked a significant increase in mRNA+ cells for MCP-3, which peaked at 6 h and progressively declined at 24 and 48 h. This paralleled the kinetics of total (major basic protein positive [MBP]+) and activated (cleaved form of eosinophil cationic protein [EG2]+) eosinophil infiltration. The allergen-induced expression of cells mRNA+ for RANTES was also clearly demonstrable at 6 h. However, the numbers were maximal at 24 h and declined slightly at the 48-h time point. The number of mRNA+ cells for RANTES paralleled the kinetics of infiltration of CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells whereas the number of CD68+ macrophages was still increasing at 48 h. These data support the view that MCP-3 is involved in the regulation of the early eosinophil response to specific allergen, whereas RANTES may have more relevance to the later accumulation of T cells and macrophages. PMID:7539041

  20. [COPD: bronchial and systemic inflammation].

    PubMed

    Macario, Ciro Casanova; de Torres Tajes, Juan Pablo; Córdoba Lanus, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is considered to be an inflammatory disease of the airways, in which there can be low-grade systemic inflammation. The etiology of this disease is multifactorial but is mainly due to an anomalous and amplified inflammatory response to tobacco smoke. This inflammatory response involves innate and acquired immunity. The latter is characterized by a Th1-type (CD8) response and its presence seems to be associated with progression to advanced stages of the disease. Currently, it is unknown whether bronchial and systemic inflammation are related or whether they act as independent compartments. Most of the available data on COPD are drawn from cross-sectional studies and consequently a causal relation between the possible inflammatory mediators and the genetic factors involved in pulmonary and extrapulmonary involvement in this disease cannot be established. Further studies are required that would allow the inflammatory response to be correlated with the distinct COPD phenotypes.

  1. Potential of PEGylated Toll-Like Receptor 7 Ligands for Controlling Inflammation and Functional Changes in Mouse Models of Asthma and Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Tatiana Paula Teixeira; Mariano, Lívia Lacerda; Ghilosso-Bortolini, Roberta; de Arantes, Ana Carolina Santos; Fernandes, Andrey Junior; Berni, Michelle; Cecchinato, Valentina; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia; Maj, Roberto; Barberis, Alcide; Silva, Patricia Machado Rodrigues e; Martins, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    Prior investigations show that signaling activation through pattern recognition receptors can directly impact a number of inflammatory lung diseases. While toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonists have raised interest for their ability to inhibit allergen-induced pathological changes in experimental asthma conditions, the putative benefit of this treatment is limited by adverse effects. Our aim was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of two PEGylated purine-like compounds, TMX-302 and TMX-306, characterized by TLR7 partial agonistic activity; therefore, the compounds are expected to induce lower local and systemic adverse reactions. In vitro approaches and translation to murine models of obstructive and restrictive lung diseases were explored. In vitro studies with human PBMCs showed that both TMX-302 and TMX-306 marginally affects cytokine production as compared with equivalent concentrations of the TLR7 full agonist, TMX-202. The PEGylated compounds did not induce monocyte-derived DC maturation or B cell proliferation, differently from what observed after stimulation with TMX-202. Impact of PEGylated ligands on lung function and inflammatory changes was studied in animal models of acute lung injury, asthma, and silicosis following Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), allergen (ovalbumin), and silica inhalation, respectively. Subcutaneous injection of TMX-302 prevented LPS- and allergen-induced airway hyper-reactivity (AHR), leukocyte infiltration, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung. However, intranasal instillation of TMX-302 led to neutrophil infiltration and failed to prevent allergen-induced AHR, despite inhibiting leukocyte counts in the BAL. Aerosolized TMX-306 given prophylactically, but not therapeutically, inhibited pivotal asthma features. Interventional treatment with intranasal instillation of TMX-306 significantly reduced the pulmonary fibrogranulomatous response and the number of silica particles in lung interstitial space in silicotic mice

  2. Potential of PEGylated Toll-Like Receptor 7 Ligands for Controlling Inflammation and Functional Changes in Mouse Models of Asthma and Silicosis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tatiana Paula Teixeira; Mariano, Lívia Lacerda; Ghilosso-Bortolini, Roberta; de Arantes, Ana Carolina Santos; Fernandes, Andrey Junior; Berni, Michelle; Cecchinato, Valentina; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia; Maj, Roberto; Barberis, Alcide; Silva, Patricia Machado Rodrigues E; Martins, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    Prior investigations show that signaling activation through pattern recognition receptors can directly impact a number of inflammatory lung diseases. While toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonists have raised interest for their ability to inhibit allergen-induced pathological changes in experimental asthma conditions, the putative benefit of this treatment is limited by adverse effects. Our aim was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of two PEGylated purine-like compounds, TMX-302 and TMX-306, characterized by TLR7 partial agonistic activity; therefore, the compounds are expected to induce lower local and systemic adverse reactions. In vitro approaches and translation to murine models of obstructive and restrictive lung diseases were explored. In vitro studies with human PBMCs showed that both TMX-302 and TMX-306 marginally affects cytokine production as compared with equivalent concentrations of the TLR7 full agonist, TMX-202. The PEGylated compounds did not induce monocyte-derived DC maturation or B cell proliferation, differently from what observed after stimulation with TMX-202. Impact of PEGylated ligands on lung function and inflammatory changes was studied in animal models of acute lung injury, asthma, and silicosis following Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), allergen (ovalbumin), and silica inhalation, respectively. Subcutaneous injection of TMX-302 prevented LPS- and allergen-induced airway hyper-reactivity (AHR), leukocyte infiltration, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung. However, intranasal instillation of TMX-302 led to neutrophil infiltration and failed to prevent allergen-induced AHR, despite inhibiting leukocyte counts in the BAL. Aerosolized TMX-306 given prophylactically, but not therapeutically, inhibited pivotal asthma features. Interventional treatment with intranasal instillation of TMX-306 significantly reduced the pulmonary fibrogranulomatous response and the number of silica particles in lung interstitial space in silicotic mice

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to COPD.

    PubMed

    Shujaat, Adil; Bajwa, Abubakr A; Cury, James D

    2012-01-01

    The development of pulmonary hypertension in COPD adversely affects survival and exercise capacity and is associated with an increased risk of severe acute exacerbations. Unfortunately not all patients with COPD who meet criteria for long term oxygen therapy benefit from it. Even in those who benefit from long term oxygen therapy, such therapy may reverse the elevated pulmonary artery pressure but cannot normalize it. Moreover, the recent discovery of the key roles of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation in the pathogenesis of PH provides the rationale for considering specific pulmonary vasodilators that also possess antiproliferative properties and statins.

  4. Platelet function: aggregation by PAF or sequestration in lung is not modified during immediate or late allergen-induced bronchospasm in man.

    PubMed

    Hemmendinger, S; Pauli, G; Tenabene, A; Pujol, J L; Bessot, J C; Eber, M; Cazenave, J P

    1989-05-01

    Among the mediators involved in the pathophysiologic mechanisms that underly the reactions of the acute and delayed phases of bronchospasm induced by allergens in man, platelet-activating factor (PAF) could play an important role, in particular by its effects on platelets. In animals, inhalation or injection of PAF causes a platelet-dependent bronchoconstriction that is blocked by prior administration of an antiplatelet antiserum and accompanied by platelet accumulation in the pulmonary vessels. In man, inhalation of PAF causes a bronchospasm and induces a bronchial hyperreactivity. Abnormalities of platelet aggregation and the secretion into plasma of platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin have been described in patients with asthma during induced bronchospasm. Platelet functions have been studied in 15 patients with asthma before and after allergen bronchial provocation tests. There was no difference between platelet counts, plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin, and platelet aggregation induced by several agonists (adrenaline, arachidonic acid, or PAF) before and immediately after the allergen bronchial provocation test. There was no platelet pulmonary sequestration as studied with 111Indium-labeled platelets during 24 hours after the antigen challenge, and the life span of circulating platelets was normal. Our results do not support an important direct role for PAF in the pathophysiology of asthma. It is still possible that the current methodology is too insensitive to detect amounts of PAF in the circulation or that PAF is acting locally. PMID:2523922

  5. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot ... loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can ...

  6. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This tissue ... may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  7. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary Rehabilitation If you have shortness of breath because of lung problems, you may have asked yourself: • Can I ... medications do I really need to take? Pulmonary rehabilitation can help answer these and other questions. Enrolling ...

  8. Evaluation of the role of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the pulmonary and the hepatic toxicity induced by cerium oxide nanoparticles following intratracheal instillation in male Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalabotu, Siva Krishna

    The field of nanotechnology is rapidly progressing with potential applications in the automobile, healthcare, electronics, cosmetics, textiles, information technology, and environmental sectors. Nanomaterials are engineered structures with at least one dimension of 100 nanometers or less. With increased applications of nanotechnology, there are increased chances of exposure to manufactured nanomaterials. Recent reports on the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials have given scientific and regulatory agencies concerns over the safety of nanomaterials. Specifically, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has identified fourteen high priority nanomaterials for study. Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles are one among the high priority group. Recent data suggest that CeO2 nanoparticles may be toxic to lung cell lines in vitro and lung tissues in vivo. Other work has proposed that oxidative stress may play an important role in the toxicity; however, the exact mechanism of the toxicity, has to our knowledge, not been investigated. Similarly, it is not clear whether CeO2 nanoparticles exhibit systemic toxicity. Here, we investigate whether pulmonary exposure to CeO2 nanoparticles is associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the lungs and liver of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our data suggest that the intratracheal instillation of CeO2 nanoparticles can cause an increased lung weight to body weight ratio. Changes in lung weights were associated with the accumulation of cerium in the lungs, elevations in serum inflammatory markers, an increased Bax to Bcl-2 ratio, elevated caspase-3 protein levels, increased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and diminished phosphorylation of ERK1/2-MAPK. Our findings from the study evaluating the possible translocation of CeO2 nanoparticles from the lungs to the liver suggest that CeO 2 nanoparticle exposure was associated with increased liver ceria levels, elevations in serum alanine transaminase

  9. Cardiovascular function in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Visca, Dina; Aiello, Marina; Chetta, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic cardiovascular disease, such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias, have a strong influence on each other, and systemic inflammation has been considered as the main linkage between them. On the other hand, airflow limitation may markedly affect lung mechanics in terms of static and dynamic hyperinflation, especially in pulmonary emphysema, and they can in turn influence cardiac performance as well. Skeletal mass depletion, which is a common feature in COPD especially in pulmonary emphysema patients, may have also a role in cardiovascular function of these patients, irrespective of lung damage. We reviewed the emerging evidence that highlights the role of lung mechanics and muscle mass impairment on ventricular volumes, stroke volume, and stroke work at rest and on exercise in the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Patients with emphysema may differ among COPD population even in terms of cardiovascular function.

  10. Potential of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase as a Therapeutic Target for Allergen-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness: A Critical Connection to Nitric Oxide Levels and PARP Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ghonim, Mohamed A.; Pyakurel, Kusma; Mishra, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Although expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the lungs of asthmatics and associated nitrosative damage are established, iNOS failed as a therapeutic target for blocking airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation in asthmatics. This dichotomy calls for better strategies with which the enzyme is adequately targeted. Here, we confirm iNOS expression in the asthmatic lung with concomitant protein nitration and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation. We show, for the first time, that iNOS is highly expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of asthmatics with uncontrolled disease, which did not correspond to protein nitration. Selective iNOS inhibition with L-NIL protected against AHR upon acute, but not chronic, exposure to ovalbumin or house dust mite (HDM) in mice. Supplementation of NO by nitrite administration significantly blocked AHR in chronically HDM-exposed mice that were treated with L-NIL. Protection against chronic HDM exposure-induced AHR by olaparib-mediated PARP inhibition may be associated with the partial but not the complete blockade of iNOS expression. Indeed, L-NIL administration prevented olaparib-mediated protection against AHR in chronically HDM-exposed mice. Our study suggests that the amount of iNOS and NO are critical determinants in the modulation of AHR by selective iNOS inhibitors and renews the potential of iNOS as a therapeutic target for asthma. PMID:27524861

  11. Potential of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase as a Therapeutic Target for Allergen-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness: A Critical Connection to Nitric Oxide Levels and PARP Activity.

    PubMed

    Ibba, Salome' V; Ghonim, Mohamed A; Pyakurel, Kusma; Lammi, Matthew R; Mishra, Anil; Boulares, A Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Although expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the lungs of asthmatics and associated nitrosative damage are established, iNOS failed as a therapeutic target for blocking airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation in asthmatics. This dichotomy calls for better strategies with which the enzyme is adequately targeted. Here, we confirm iNOS expression in the asthmatic lung with concomitant protein nitration and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation. We show, for the first time, that iNOS is highly expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of asthmatics with uncontrolled disease, which did not correspond to protein nitration. Selective iNOS inhibition with L-NIL protected against AHR upon acute, but not chronic, exposure to ovalbumin or house dust mite (HDM) in mice. Supplementation of NO by nitrite administration significantly blocked AHR in chronically HDM-exposed mice that were treated with L-NIL. Protection against chronic HDM exposure-induced AHR by olaparib-mediated PARP inhibition may be associated with the partial but not the complete blockade of iNOS expression. Indeed, L-NIL administration prevented olaparib-mediated protection against AHR in chronically HDM-exposed mice. Our study suggests that the amount of iNOS and NO are critical determinants in the modulation of AHR by selective iNOS inhibitors and renews the potential of iNOS as a therapeutic target for asthma. PMID:27524861

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  13. Pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Troosters, Thierry; Demeyer, Heleen; Hornikx, Miek; Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Janssens, Wim

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is a therapy that offers benefits to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease that are complementary to those obtained by pharmacotherapy. The main objective of pulmonary rehabilitation is to restore muscle function and exercise tolerance, reverse other nonrespiratory consequences of the disease, and help patients to self-manage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its exacerbations and symptoms. To do so, a multidisciplinary program tailored to the patient in terms of program content, exercise prescription, and setting must be offered. Several settings and programs have shown to spin off in significant immediate results. The challenge lies in maintaining the benefits outside the program. PMID:24507849

  14. Pulmonary fibrosis: pathogenesis, etiology and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, MS; Wynn, TA

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis and architectural remodeling of tissues can severely disrupt lung function, often with fatal consequences. The etiology of pulmonary fibrotic diseases is varied, with an array of triggers including allergens, chemicals, radiation and environmental particles. However, the cause of one of the most common pulmonary fibrotic conditions, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), is still unclear. This review examines common mechanisms of pulmonary wound-healing responses following lung injury, and highlights the pathogenesis of some of the most widespread pulmonary fibrotic diseases. A three phase model of wound repair is reviewed that includes; (1) injury; (2) inflammation; and (3) repair. In most pulmonary fibrotic conditions dysregulation at one or more of these phases has been reported. Chronic inflammation can lead to an imbalance in the production of chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, and disrupt cellular recruitment. These changes coupled with excessive pro-fibrotic IL-13 and/or TGFβ1 production can turn a well-controlled healing response into a pathogenic fibrotic response. Endogenous regulatory mechanisms are discussed including novel areas of therapeutic intervention. Restoring homeostasis to these dysregulated healing responses, or simply neutralizing the key pro-fibrotic mediators may prevent or slow the progression of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:19129758

  15. Inflammation induced loss of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Londhe, Priya; Guttridge, Denis C

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an important contributor to the pathology of diseases implicated in skeletal muscle dysfunction. A number of diseases and disorders including inflammatory myopathies and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder (COPD) are characterized by chronic inflammation or elevation of the inflammatory mediators. While these disease states exhibit different pathologies, all have in common the loss of skeletal muscle mass and a deregulated skeletal muscle physiology. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are key contributors to chronic inflammation found in many of these diseases. This section of the review focuses on some of the known inflammatory disorders like COPD, Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and inflammatory myopathies that display skeletal muscle atrophy and also provides the reader an overview of the mediators of inflammation, their signaling pathways, and mechanisms of action. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Muscle Bone Interactions".

  16. Role of inflammation in cardiopulmonary health effects of PM

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, Ken . E-mail: ken.donaldson@ed.ac.uk; Mills, Nicholas; MacNee, William; Robinson, Simon; Newby, David

    2005-09-01

    The relationship between increased exposure to PM and adverse cardiovascular effects is well documented in epidemiological studies. Inflammation in the lungs, caused by deposited particles, can be seen as a key process that could mediate adverse effects on the cardiovascular system. There are at least three potential pathways that could lead from pulmonary inflammation to adverse cardiovascular effects. Firstly, inflammation in the lung could lead to systemic inflammation, which is well known to be linked to sudden death from cardiovascular causes. Systemic inflammation can lead to destabilization by activation of inflammatory processes in atheromatous plaques. Secondly, inflammation can cause an imbalance in coagulation factors that favor propagation of thrombi if thrombosis is initiated. Thirdly, inflammation could affect the autonomic nervous system activity in ways that could lead to alterations in the control of heart rhythm which could culminate in fatal dysrhythmia.

  17. High-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (Fc epsilon RI)-bearing eosinophils, mast cells, macrophages and Langerhans' cells in allergen-induced late-phase cutaneous reactions in atopic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ying, S; Barata, L T; Meng, Q; Grant, J A; Barkans, J; Durham, S R; Kay, A B

    1998-01-01

    We have used in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to investigate the kinetics of the expression for Fc epsilon RI mRNA (alpha-, beta- and gamma-chains), the alpha-chain protein product, as well as the phenotype of the mRNA- or protein-positive cells in allergen-induced late-phase skin reactions in atopic subjects. Compared with diluent controls, there were significant increases in the total number of mRNA+ cells for the alpha-, beta- and gamma-chains for Fc epsilon RI at all time-points (6, 24 and 48 hr) after allergen challenge (P < 0.01). By double IHC/ISH significant increases in alpha-, beta- and gamma-chain mRNA+ macrophages, eosinophils, mast cells and CD1a+ cells were also observed after allergen challenge (P < 0.05). The distribution of Fc epsilon RI subunit (alpha-, beta-, or gamma-chain) mRNA+ co-localization was CD68+ macrophages (42-47%), EG2+ eosinophils (33-39%), tryptase+ mast cells (5-11%) and CD1a+ Langerhans' cells (2-4%). Using single IHC, significant increases in the total number of Fc epsilon RI protein+ cells (P < 0.01) were observed 24 and 48 hr after allergen challenge. Double IHC showed that the distribution of Fc epsilon RI+ cells was tryptase+ mast cells (33%), CD68+ macrophages (36%), EG2+ eosinophils (20%), CD1a+ Langerhans' cells (4%) and unidentified cells (7%), at the 24-hr allergen-challenged sites. These observations suggest that the cutaneous late-phase reaction in man is associated with up-regulation of Fc epsilon RI on eosinophils, macrophages, mast cells and Langerhans' cells. Images Figure 6 PMID:9616380

  18. Unilateral Pulmonary Agenesis and Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Skokic, Fahrija; Hotic, Nesad; Husaric, Edin; Radoja, Gordana; Muratovic, Selma; Dedic, Nermina

    2013-01-01

    Lung agenesis and gastric duplication cysts are both rare congenital anomalies. Gastric duplication cysts can present with nausea, vomiting, hematemesis, or vague abdominal pain. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis can present with respiratory distress which usually occurs due to retention of bronchial secretions and inflammations. We report the unique case of right pulmonary agenesis associated with gastric duplication cyst. PMID:23844300

  19. The Pathobiology of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lang, Irene M; Dorfmüller, Peter; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a late sequel of venous thromboembolism that cannot be completely reproduced in animal models. The prevalence of CTEPH in humans is estimated at roughly 17-20 per million; however, partly because up to 50% of patients with CTEPH never experience symptomatic pulmonary embolism, precise numbers on the incidence and prevalence are not known. Because CTEPH is diagnosed at a median age of 63 years in patients who often have other concomitant cardiovascular disease or lung disease, assessment of pathophysiology in patients can be challenging, We do know that CTEPH is a dual vascular disorder. Stenoses, webs, and occlusions predominate in large and medium-sized pulmonary arteries at the sites of previous pulmonary emboli. A "secondary vasculopathy" resembling the pulmonary arteriopathy encountered in other forms of pulmonary hypertension predominates in low-resistance vessels. Anastomoses between bronchial artery branches and precapillary pulmonary arterioles appear during evolution of the disease. Other acquired vascular connections between bronchial arteries and pulmonary veins may trigger venous remodeling. Current concepts regarding the pathophysiology of CTEPH include contributions of hyperactive coagulation (e.g., high coagulation factor VIII, combined coagulation defects, dysfibrinogenemias), insufficient anticoagulation, non-O blood groups, and misguided thrombus resolution (e.g., infection, inflammation, dysfunctional innate immunity, abnormal circulating phospholipids). Current research focuses on the question as to whether a genetic predisposition leads to misguided vascular healing after pulmonary thromboembolism in susceptible individuals. PMID:27571003

  20. [Pulmonary rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Senjyu, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation commenced in Japan in 1957. However, the development of pulmonary rehabilitation took a long time due to the lack of the necessary health and medical services. Pulmonary rehabilitation is a comprehensive intervention based on a thorough patient assessment followed by patient-tailored therapies that include, but are not limited to, exercise training, education, and behavior change, designed to improve the physical and psychological condition of people with chronic respiratory disease and to promote the long-term adherence to health-enhancing behaviors. The benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation include a decrease in breathlessness and an improvement in exercise tolerance. It is important that the gains in exercise tolerance lead to an increase in daily physical activity. PMID:27254948

  1. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... that damage the lungs, such as scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis Birth defects of the heart Blood clots in the lung ( pulmonary embolism ) Heart failure Heart valve disease HIV infection Low oxygen levels in the blood ...

  2. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coccidioidomycosis Cystic fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung abscess Lung cancer Sarcoidosis See also: Aspergillosis Symptoms You may not have ... fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Update Date 8/31/2014 Updated by: Jatin ...

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  4. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  5. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  6. Pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, N.R.; Newman, G.E.; Perlmutt, L.M.; Braun, S.D.

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common medical problem whose incidence is likely to increase in our aging population. Although it is life-threatening, effective therapy exists. The treatment is not, however, without significant complications. Thus, accurate diagnosis is important. Unfortunately, the clinical manifestations of pulmonary embolism are nonspecific. Furthermore, in many patients the symptoms of an acute embolism are superimposed on underlying chronic heart or lung disease. Thus, a high index of suspicion is needed to identify pulmonary emboli. Laboratory parameters, including arterial oxygen tensions and electrocardiography, are as nonspecific as the clinical signs. They may be more useful in excluding another process than in diagnosing pulmonary embolism. The first radiologic examination is the chest radiograph, but the clinical symptoms are frequently out of proportion to the findings on the chest films. Classic manifestations of pulmonary embolism on the chest radiograph include a wedge-shaped peripheral opacity and a segmental or lobar diminution in vascularity with prominent central arteries. However, these findings are not commonly seen and, even when present, are not specific. Even less specific findings include cardiomegaly, pulmonary infiltrate, elevation of a hemidiaphragm, and pleural effusion. Many patients with pulmonary embolism may have a normal chest radiograph. The chest radiograph is essential, however, for two purposes. First, it may identify another cause of the patient's symptoms, such as a rib fracture, dissecting aortic aneurysm, or pneumothorax. Second, a chest radiograph is essential to interpretation of the radionuclide V/Q scan. The perfusion scan accurately reflects the perfusion of the lung. However, a perfusion defect may result from a variety of etiologies. Any process such as vascular stenosis or compression by tumor may restrict blood flow. 84 references.

  7. Protective Effects of Diallyl Sulfide on Ovalbumin-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation of Allergic Asthma Mice by MicroRNA-144, -34a, and -34b/c-Modulated Nrf2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Ying; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Weng, Chia-Jui; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2016-01-13

    Allergic airway disorder is characterized by an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The induction of inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by an allergen was ameliorated by antioxidants in vivo. This study investigated the protective effects and underlying mechanism of diallyl sulfide (DAS) on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma of BALB/c mice. The animals were intraperitoneally sensitized by inhaling OVA to induce chronic airway inflammation. By administering DAS, a decrease of the infiltrated inflammatory cell counts and the levels of IL-4 and IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as well as the OVA-specific immunoglobulin E levels in sera were observed. DAS also effectively inhibited OVA-induced inflammatory cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion in lung tissue. Several OVA-induced inflammatory factors (ROS, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, and NF-κB) were inhibited by DAS. In addition, DAS increased OVA inhalation-reduced levels of Nrf2 activation by regulating microRNA-144, -34a and -34b/c. Together, the pathogenesis of OVA-induced asthma is highly associated with oxidative stress, and DAS may be an effective supplement to alleviate this disease.

  8. Pulmonary Manifestations among Patients with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Koksal, Deniz; Koksal, Aydin Seref; Gurakar, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic progressive cholestatic liver disease caused by diffuse inflammation, destruction and fibrosis of the intrahepatic bile ducts, ultimately leading to cirrhosis, portal hypertension and liver failure. The pathogenesis of PBC is incompletely understood, but current data suggest roles for genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. PBC is often thought of as an organ-specific autoimmune disease, which mainly targets the liver; however, lung tissue is also a site for autoimmune involvement of PBC. The pulmonary manifestations of PBC include abnormalities in gas transfer and pulmonary function, subclinical alveolitis, interstitial lung disease, granulomatous lung disease, airway disease, pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary hemorrhage and pleural effusion. PMID:27777894

  9. Pulmonary Function Reduction in Diabetes With and Without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Gregory L.; Black-Shinn, Jennifer L.; Wan, Emily S.; Make, Barry; Regan, Elizabeth; Lutz, Sharon; Soler, Xavier; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James; Hokanson, John E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes damages major organ systems through disrupted glycemic control and increased inflammation. The effects of diabetes on the lung have been of interest for decades, but the modest reduction in pulmonary function and its nonprogressive nature have limited its investigation. A recent systematic review found that diabetes was associated with reductions in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide of the lung and increased FEV1/FVC. They reported pooled results including few smokers. This study will examine measures of pulmonary function in participants with extensive smoking exposure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We examined pulmonary function in participants with a >10–pack-year history of smoking with and without diabetes with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We measured pulmonary function, exercise capacity, and pulmonary-related quality of life in 10,129 participants in the Genetic Epidemiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPDGene) Study. RESULTS Participants with diabetes were observed to have reduced pulmonary function after controlling for known risk factors and also significant reductions in exercise capacity and quality of life across functional stages of COPD. CONCLUSIONS Pulmonary function in patients with ≥10 pack-years of smoking and diabetes is reduced, and this decrease is associated with significant reductions in activity-related quality of life and exercise capacity. PMID:24026562

  10. [Pulmonary toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo

    2012-05-01

    We introduced the report on the pulmonary toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials as a national project in Japan conducted by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO project). Well-characterized and well-dispersed industrial nanomaterials were used in this project. Using multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), we conducted intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies. At a low dose (0.2 mg/rat) and a high dose (1 mg/rat) of almost individual MWCNTs, transient and persistent inflammatory responses were induced in the lungs following intratracheal instillation. Well-dispersed MWCNTs at a low concentration (0.37 mg/m3) did not induce pulmonary inflammation. Using single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we also conducted both studies. At low (0.2 mg/rat) and high doses (0.4 mg/rat) of well-dispersed SWCNTs, persistent inflammatory responses were induced in the lungs following intratracheal instillation. Well-dispersed MWCNTs at low and high concentrations (0.03 mg/m3 and 0.13 mg/m3, respectively) did not induce pulmonary inflammation. On the basis of these data from mainly inhalation studies, the acceptable exposure concentration of carbon nanotubes is proposed to be 0.03 mg/m3 in Japan.

  11. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary disease and dysfunction exact a tremendous health burden on society. In a recent survey of lung disease published by the American Lung Association in 2012, upwards of 10 million Americans were diagnosed with chronic bronchitis while over 4 million Americans had emphysem...

  12. Pulmonary ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, C M; Thompson, J E

    1979-07-28

    A case of pulmonary ascariasis is reported for the first time in Australia. Because of increasing immigration from countries which have a high incidence of ascariasis (especially those of South-East Asia), and increasing travel to Asian countries, the awareness of this infestation as a cause of respiratory disease may be of great importance. PMID:40103

  13. Pulmonary schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Hill, I R; Turk, E P

    1980-09-01

    Two cases are reported of the incidental finding of pulmonary schistosomiasis in the victims of a fatal aircraft accident. The presence of this disease had no bearing on the causation of the accident, but it gives insight into the potential hazards of dissemination of diseases by travellers. The finding also emphasises the value of routine postmortems and histology in all aircraft accident victims.

  14. Sex differences in the pulmonary circulation: implications for pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Yvette N.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a form of pulmonary hypertension, is a complex disease of multifactorial origin. While new developments regarding pathophysiological features and therapeutic options in PAH are being reported, one important fact has emerged over the years: there is a sex difference in the incidence of this disease such that while there is a higher incidence in females, disease outcomes are much worse in males. Accordingly, recent attention has been focused on understanding the features of sex differences in the pulmonary circulation and the contributory mechanisms, particularly sex hormones and their role in the pathological and pathophysiological features of PAH. However, to date, there is no clear consensus whether sex hormones (particularly female sex steroids) are beneficial or detrimental in PAH. In this review, we highlight some of the most recent evidence regarding the influence of sex hormones (estrogen, testosterone, progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone) and estrogen metabolites on key pathophysiological features of PAH such as proliferation, vascular remodeling, vasodilation/constriction, and inflammation, thus setting the stage for research avenues to identify novel therapeutic target for PAH as well as potentially other forms of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24610923

  15. Pulmonary blue bodies.

    PubMed

    Koss, M N; Johnson, F B; Hochholzer, L

    1981-03-01

    Pulmonary blue bodies are intra-alveolar laminated basophilic concretions of uncertain etiology. Blue bodies were studied in lung biopsy specimens from 10 patients. The patients ranged in age from 47 to 69 years and were predominantly men. Three had a history of overt exposure to environmental dusts such as sawdust and asbestos, and two showed occasional ferruginous bodies in the lung, raising the possibility of pneumoconiosis. In eight cases there was interstitial pneumonitis, which resembled desquamative interstitial pneumonia by light microscopy but which was often seen to be patchy and asymmetrically distributed in the lung by chest x-ray examination. Of two other patients, one had xanthogranulomatous inflammation and the other, necrotizing granulomatous inflammation. Light and electron microscopic, histochemical, microchemical, and x-ray diffraction studies of blue bodies were also performed. Calcium carbonate is a major component of blue bodies and is responsible for their birefringence in unstained sections and ready solubility in acid solutions. Blue bodies also contain a mucopolysaccharide matrix and iron. We offer the hypothesis that blue bodies (calcium carbonate) are a product of histiocytic catabolism.

  16. Overexpression of Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase 1 Attenuates Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kinker, Kayla G.; Gibson, Aaron M.; Bass, Stacey A.; Day, Brandy P.; Deng, Jingyuan; Medvedovic, Mario; Figueroa, Julio A. Landero; Hershey, Gurjit K. Khurana; Chen, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, are increased in lung, sputum, exhaled breath condensate and plasma samples from asthma patients. ADMA is metabolized primarily by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1 (DDAH1) and DDAH2. We determined the effect of DDAH1 overexpression on development of allergic inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. The expression of DDAH1 and DDAH2 in mouse lungs was determined by RT-quantitative PCR (qPCR). ADMA levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum samples were determined by mass spectrometry. Wild type and DDAH1-transgenic mice were intratracheally challenged with PBS or house dust mite (HDM). Airway inflammation was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) total and differential cell counts. The levels of IgE and IgG1 in BALF and serum samples were determined by ELISA. Gene expression in lungs was determined by RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR. Our data showed that the expression of DDAH1 and DDAH2 was decreased in the lungs of mice following HDM exposure, which correlated with increased ADMA levels in BALF and serum. Transgenic overexpression of DDAH1 resulted in decreased BAL total cell and eosinophil numbers following HDM exposure. Total IgE levels in BALF and serum were decreased in HDM-exposed DDAH1-transgenic mice compared to HDM-exposed wild type mice. RNA-Seq results showed downregulation of genes in the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling pathway in PBS-treated DDAH1-transgenic mice versus PBS-treated wild type mice and downregulation of genes in IL-13/FOXA2 signaling pathway in HDM-treated DDAH1-transgenic mice versus HDM-treated wild type mice. Our findings suggest that decreased expression of DDAH1 and DDAH2 in the lungs may contribute to allergic asthma and overexpression of DDAH1 attenuates allergen-induced airway inflammation through modulation of Th2 responses. PMID:24465497

  17. Usefulness of Intratracheal Instillation Studies for Estimating Nanoparticle-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Fujishima, Kei; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation studies are the gold standard for the estimation of the harmful effects of respirable chemical substances, while there is limited evidence of the harmful effects of chemical substances by intratracheal instillation. We reviewed the effectiveness of intratracheal instillation studies for estimating the hazards of nanoparticles, mainly using papers in which both inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies were performed using the same nanoparticles. Compared to inhalation studies, there is a tendency in intratracheal instillation studies that pulmonary inflammation lasted longer in the lungs. A difference in pulmonary inflammation between high and low toxicity nanoparticles was observed in the intratracheal instillation studies, as in the inhalation studies. Among the endpoints of pulmonary toxicity, the kinetics of neutrophil counts, percentage of neutrophils, and chemokines for neutrophils and macrophages, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), reflected pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that these markers may be considered the predictive markers of pulmonary toxicity in both types of study. When comparing pulmonary inflammation between intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies under the same initial lung burden, there is a tendency that the inflammatory response following the intratracheal instillation of nanoparticles is greater than or equal to that following the inhalation of nanoparticles. If the difference in clearance in both studies is not large, the estimations of pulmonary toxicity are close. We suggest that intratracheal instillation studies can be useful for ranking the hazard of nanoparticles through pulmonary inflammation. PMID:26828483

  18. Usefulness of Intratracheal Instillation Studies for Estimating Nanoparticle-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Fujishima, Kei; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-27

    Inhalation studies are the gold standard for the estimation of the harmful effects of respirable chemical substances, while there is limited evidence of the harmful effects of chemical substances by intratracheal instillation. We reviewed the effectiveness of intratracheal instillation studies for estimating the hazards of nanoparticles, mainly using papers in which both inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies were performed using the same nanoparticles. Compared to inhalation studies, there is a tendency in intratracheal instillation studies that pulmonary inflammation lasted longer in the lungs. A difference in pulmonary inflammation between high and low toxicity nanoparticles was observed in the intratracheal instillation studies, as in the inhalation studies. Among the endpoints of pulmonary toxicity, the kinetics of neutrophil counts, percentage of neutrophils, and chemokines for neutrophils and macrophages, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), reflected pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that these markers may be considered the predictive markers of pulmonary toxicity in both types of study. When comparing pulmonary inflammation between intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies under the same initial lung burden, there is a tendency that the inflammatory response following the intratracheal instillation of nanoparticles is greater than or equal to that following the inhalation of nanoparticles. If the difference in clearance in both studies is not large, the estimations of pulmonary toxicity are close. We suggest that intratracheal instillation studies can be useful for ranking the hazard of nanoparticles through pulmonary inflammation.

  19. [Pulmonary melioidosis].

    PubMed

    Perret, J L; Vidal, D; Thibault, F

    1998-12-01

    Melioidosis is most frequently encountered in pulmonary localization. Melioidosis is an infectious disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei first described by Whitmore in 1912 in Burma. B. pseudomallei is a Gram negative rod belonging to the Pseudomonadaceae family. Soil and water are the natural reservoirs for the germ which is a specific pathogen for several mammal species. Long endemic in Southeast Asia and several tropical zones, B. pseudomallei has recently been found in temperate zones, including France. Human contamination occurs via the transcutaneous route and often leads to dormant inapparent infection. Many conditions, such as diabetes, renal lithiasis, various circumstances of immunodepression or stress, facilitate clinical manifestations which vary greatly. Pulmonary manifestations may be acute and extensive, producing a torpid pseudo-tuberculous condition or a variety of clinical and radiological features mimicking other diseases. Bacteriological and serological tests may be negative. Exposure in an endemic zone, the notion of a favorable context, weight loss, cavitary images on successive chest x-rays and the presence of extra-pulmonary localizations may be suggestive. Ceftazidime or the amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combination are indicated, but mortality in acute forms still reaches 40%. Relapse can be expected if the treatment duration is too short. PMID:10100350

  20. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  1. Inflammation in Tendon Disorders.

    PubMed

    Speed, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    The role of inflammation in tendon disorders has long been a subject of considerable debate. Developments in our understanding of the basic science of inflammation have provided further insight into its potential role in specific forms of tendon disease, and the circumstances that may potentiate this. Such circumstances include excessive mechanical stresses on tendon and the presence of systemic inflammation associated with chronic diseases. In this chapter a brief review of the basic science of inflammation is provided and the influence that it may play on tendons is discussed. PMID:27535263

  2. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophilia; Loffler syndrome; Eosinophilic pneumonia; Pneumonia - eosinophilic ... simple pulmonary eosinophilia is a severe type of pneumonia called acute idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia.

  3. Pulmonary chondroid hamartoma with nontuberculous mycobacterial infection: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Chul; Moon, Jin Chang; Gang, Su Jin; Park, Seung Yong; Kim, So Ri

    2015-04-01

    Solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) can be manifested in a variety of disorders including neoplasms, infection, inflammation, and vascular or congenital abnormalities. In addition, they are often accompanied with other pulmonary pathologic lesions such as consolidations and several pulmonary disorders present as similar pulmonary nodular lesions simultaneously. Diagnostic workup is important for these SPNs; however, many physicians often miss the second diagnosis for multiple pulmonary lesions with SPNs due to lack of clinical suspicion that each pulmonary nodule or pathologic lesion can have each other's diagnosis. Herein, we report 2 cases of coexistence of pulmonary chondroid hamartoma with nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection presenting as pulmonary nodules and multiple consolidative lesions. A 60-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of multifocal pulmonary lesions including SPN with chronic exertional dyspnea. Multiple lung tissues were obtained from each lesion through percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB). At the same time, bacteriologic examination was performed using respiratory samples obtained by bronchoscopy. Based on pathologic and microbiologic results, the patient diagnosed as pulmonary chondroid hamartoma with pulmonary NTM infectious disease. In addition, a 56-year-old woman visited for the evaluation of a small SPN. The SPN was resected surgically for the pathologic examination and turned out to be pulmonary chondroid hamartoma. Interestingly, the diagnostic workup revealed that the patient had Lady Windermere syndrome which is one of features for Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) pulmonary disease. Both patients were treated with the standard antibiotics against MAC as recommended by the ATS/IDSA guideline. This is the first report of 2 patients, as far as we know, that chondroid hamartoma and NTM disease develop simultaneously in the lung. This report emphasizes that physicians should endeavor to confirm the individual

  4. Pulmonary toxicity in mice following exposure to cerium chloride.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jie; Yu, Xiaohong; Pan, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Sheng, Lei; Sang, Xuezi; Lin, Anan; Zhang, Chi; Zhao, Yue; Gui, Suxin; Sun, Qingqing; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2014-06-01

    The widespread application of lanthanoids (Lns) in manufacturing industries has raised occupational and environmental health concerns about the possible increased health risks to humans exposed to Lns in their working and living environments. Numerous studies have shown that exposures to Ln cause pulmonary injury in animals, but very little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the pulmonary inflammation caused by cerium chloride (CeCl3) exposure. In this study, we evaluated the oxidative stress and molecular mechanism underlying with the pulmonary inflammation associated with chronic lung toxicity in mice treated with nasally instilled CeCl3 for 90 consecutive days. Our findings suggest that significant cerium accumulated in the lung, leading the obvious increase of the lung indices, significant increases in inflammatory cells and levels of lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphate, and total protein, overproduction of reactive oxygen species and peroxidation of lipids, reduced antioxidant capacity, and pulmonary inflammation. CeCl3 exposure also activated nuclear factor κB, increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor α, cyclooxygenase-2, heme oxygenase 1, interleukin 2, interleukin 4, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, interleukin 10, interleukin 18, interleukin 1β, and CYP1A1. However, CeCl3 reduced the expression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-inhibiting factor and heat shock protein 70. These findings suggest that the pulmonary inflammation caused by CeCl3 in mice is closely associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine expression. PMID:24736977

  5. Pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Ricardo de Amorim; Silva, Luciana Cristina dos Santos; Rezende, Cláudia Juliana; Bernardes, Rodrigo Castro; Prata, Tarciane Aline; Silva, Henrique Lima

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary artery dissection is a fatal complication of long-standing pulmonary hypertension, manifesting as acute, stabbing chest pain, progressive dyspnea, cardiogenic shock, or sudden death. Its incidence has been underestimated, and therapeutic options are still scarce. In patients with pulmonary hypertension, new chest pain, acute chest pain, or cardiogenic shock should raise the suspicion of pulmonary artery dissection, which can result in sudden death. PMID:23670510

  6. [Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma mimicking pulmonary carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Uçvet, Ahmet; Tözüm, Halil; Gürsoy, Soner; Gülle, Ali Alper; Yaldiz, Sadik; Aydoğdu Dinç, Zekiye

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma is a rare fibrosing nodular disease of the lung characterized by solitary or multiple pulmonary nodules. They can occur after inflammatory or post-inflammatory changes. A 60 years old asymptomatic patient admitted to our clinic because of a solid mass of 6 cm in his routine chest radiography. A lobectomy was performed and the histological diagnosis was reported as pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. This case, mimicking pulmonary carcinoma, is rarely found in the literature. PMID:16615022

  7. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms. PMID:3533597

  8. Therapeutic effect of lecithinized superoxide dismutase on pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Tanaka, Yuta; Miyazaki, Yuri; Namba, Takushi; Sato, Keizo; Aoshiba, Kazutetsu; Azuma, Arata; Mizushima, Tohru

    2011-09-01

    No medication exists that clearly improves the mortality of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Oxidative molecules, in particular superoxide anions, play important roles in the COPD-associated abnormal inflammatory response and pulmonary emphysema, which arises because of an imbalance in proteases and antiproteases and increased apoptosis. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide anions. Lecithinized human Cu/Zn- SOD (PC-SOD) has overcome a number of the clinical limitations of SOD, including low tissue affinity and low stability in plasma. In this study, we examine the effect of PC-SOD on elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema, an animal model of COPD. The severity of the pulmonary inflammatory response and emphysema in mice was assessed by various criteria, such as the number of leukocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and the enlargement of airspace. Not only intravenous administration but also inhalation of PC-SOD suppressed elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation, emphysema, and dysfunction. Inhalation of PC-SOD suppressed the elastase-induced increase in the pulmonary level of superoxide anions and apoptosis. Inhalation of PC-SOD also suppressed elastase-induced activation of proteases and decreased in the level of antiproteases and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We also found that inhalation of PC-SOD suppressed cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary inflammation. The results suggest that PC-SOD protects against pulmonary emphysema by decreasing the pulmonary level of superoxide anions, resulting in the inhibition of inflammation and apoptosis and amelioration of the protease/antiprotease imbalance. We propose that inhalation of PC-SOD would be therapeutically beneficial for COPD.

  9. Histamine H4 receptor antagonism reduces hapten-induced scratching behaviour but not inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rossbach, Kristine; Wendorff, Stephanie; Sander, Kerstin; Stark, Holger; Gutzmer, Ralf; Werfel, Thomas; Kietzmann, Manfred; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the histamine H(4) receptor antagonist JNJ 7777120 (1-[(5-chloro-1H-indol-2-yl)carbonyl]-4-methylpiperazine) were tested in two models of allergic contact dermatitis. Dermatitis was induced by 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene and toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, which differ in their Th1-Th2 profile in that way that 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene is a classical contact allergen with a pronounced Th1-mediated inflammation, while the respiratory chemical allergen toluene-2,4-diisocyanate induces a Th2-dominated inflammation. JNJ 7777120 (15 mg/kg) administered 2 h and 30 min before and 1 h after challenge did not reduce the hapten-induced ear swelling determined 24 h after challenge. This was confirmed by histological evaluation of the ear skin. A repeated administration of the haptens to the rostral part of the back of sensitized animals resulted in a frequent scratching behaviour. An administration of JNJ 7777120 (15 mg/kg) 30 min before challenge reduced this hapten-induced scratching significantly. The H(1) receptor antagonist cetirizine also reduced the scratching bouts in sensitized mice. A combination of H(1) and H(4) receptor antagonists resulted in the strongest inhibition of scratching behaviour associated with allergic dermatitis. These results indicate that H(4) receptor antagonism fails to reduce the allergic inflammatory response but strongly inhibits allergen-induced itch. Thus, a combination of H(4) and H(1) receptor antagonism might be a new strategy to treat pruritus related to allergic diseases like atopic dermatitis.

  10. [Novel immunopathological approaches to pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Perros, Frédéric; Montani, David; Dorfmüller, Peter; Huertas, Alice; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc

    2011-04-01

    Inflammation is important for the initiation and the maintenance of vascular remodeling in the most commun animal models of pulmonary hypertension (PH), and its therapeutical targeting blocks PH development in these models. In human, pulmonary vascular lesions of PH are also the source of an intense chemokine production, linked to inflammatory cell recruitment. However, arteritis is uncommon in PH patients. Of note, current PH treatments have immunomodulatory properties. In addition, some studies have shown a correlation between levels of circulating inflammatory mediators and patients' survival. The study of autoimmunity in the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension is becoming an area of intense investigation. New immunopathological approaches to PH should allow the development of innovative treatments for this very severe condition. PMID:21536178

  11. Inflammation and haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Margetic, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and haemostasis are interrelated pathophysiologic processes that considerably affect each other. In this bidirectional relationship, inflammation leads to activation of the haemostatic system that in turn also considerably influences inflammatory activity. Such, the haemostatic system acts in concert with the inflammatory cascade creating an inflammation-haemostasis cycle in which each activated process promotes the other and the two systems function in a positive feedback loop. The extensive crosstalk between immune and haemostatic systems occurs at level of all components of the haemostatic system including vascular endothelial cells, platelets, plasma coagulation cascade, physiologic anticoagulants and fibrinolytic activity. During inflammatory response, inflammatory mediators, in particular proinflammatory cytokines, play a central role in the effects on haemostatic system by triggering its disturbance in a number of mechanisms including endothelial cell dysfunction, increased platelet reactivity, activation of the plasma coagulation cascade, impaired function of physiologic anticoagulants and suppressed fibrinolytic activity. The two examples of pathophysiologic processes in which the tight interdependent relationship between inflammation and haemostasis considerably contribute to the pathogenesis and/or progression of disease are systemic inflammatory response to infection or sepsis and acute arterial thrombosis as a consequence of ruptured atherosclerotic plaque. Close links between inflammation and haemostasis help explain the prothrombotic tendency in these two clinical conditions in which inflammation shifts the haemostatic activity towards procoagulant state by the ability of proinflammatory mediators to activate coagulation system and to inhibit anticoagulant and fibrinolytic activities. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the complex interactions in the bidirectional relationship between inflammation and haemostasis.

  12. Postoperative Acute Pulmonary Embolism Following Pulmonary Resections

    PubMed Central

    Shonyela, Felix Samuel; Liu, Bo; Jiao, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections is highly fatal complication. Many literatures have documented cancer to be the highest risk factor for acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections. Early diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism is highly recommended and computed tomographic pulmonary angiography is the gold standard in diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic therapy have shown a great success in treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. Surgical therapies (embolectomy and inferior vena cava filter replacement) proved to be lifesaving but many literatures favored medical therapy as the first choice. Prophylaxis pre and post operation is highly recommended, because there were statistical significant results in different studies which supported the use of prophylaxis in prevention of acute pulmonary embolism. Having reviewed satisfactory number of literatures, it is suggested that thoroughly preoperative assessment of patient conditions, determining their risk factors complicating to pulmonary embolism and the use of appropriate prophylaxis measures are the key options to the successful minimization or eradication of acute pulmonary embolism after lung resections. PMID:26354232

  13. Responsiveness of basophil granulocytes of horses suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to various allergens.

    PubMed

    Dirscherl, P; Grabner, A; Buschmann, H

    1993-10-01

    As basophils are the major effector cells of allergic reactions, confirmation of the allergic etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was sought by the demonstration of a specific in vitro response of equine basophilic blood cells to some potential allergens (Aspergillus, Cladosporidium, Mucor, Penicillium, extracts of dust particles of hay and straw). The allergen induced degranulation of basophils and the histamine and protease release from basophils during incubation with the allergens were tested. By evaluating the results obtained from 14 COPD horses and eight controls it could be shown that the sensitivity of the basophils of affected horses was increased, particularly against the allergen extract of Mucor mucedo and Mucor spinosus. Further a greater percentage of COPD horses reacted positively with the Mucor allergen extract. The mitogenic stimulation of lymphocytes by PHA and by the allergen extracts used gave comparable results in affected and control horses. Thus the in vitro stimulation of basophils may be an easily to perform testing device for the identification of potential allergens involved in the pathogenesis of equine COPD.

  14. [Inflammation and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Löbner, K; Füchtenbusch, M

    2004-09-01

    The focus of current diabetes research is the clarification of the pathogenetic relationships between subclinical inflammation, diabetes and arteriosclerosis. Even minimal disturbances in glucose tolerance are associated with a chronic, generalized inflammatory reaction that links components of the metabolic syndrome and contributes to the development of diabetic complications as well as to the development and progression of arteriosclerosis. The most important mediators and markers of this inflammation cascade are NF-kappaB, TNF-alpha, IL-6, CRP and PAI-1. For the treatment of subclinical inflammation, substances with anti-inflammatory properties such as statins or ACE inhibitors are of increasing importance.

  15. Estrogens, inflammation and cognition.

    PubMed

    Au, April; Feher, Anita; McPhee, Lucy; Jessa, Ailya; Oh, Soojin; Einstein, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The effects of estrogens are pleiotropic, affecting multiple bodily systems. Changes from the body's natural fluctuating levels of estrogens, through surgical removal of the ovaries, natural menopause, or the administration of exogenous estrogens to menopausal women have been independently linked to an altered immune profile, and changes to cognitive processes. Here, we propose that inflammation may mediate the relationship between low levels of estrogens and cognitive decline. In order to determine what is known about this connection, we review the literature on the cognitive effects of decreased estrogens due to oophorectomy or natural menopause, decreased estrogens' role on inflammation--both peripherally and in the brain--and the relationship between inflammation and cognition. While this review demonstrates that much is unknown about the intersection between estrogens, cognition, inflammation, we propose that there is an important interaction between these literatures.

  16. Inducible Bronchus-Associated Lymphoid Tissue: Taming Inflammation in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji Young; Randall, Troy D.; Silva-Sanchez, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Following pulmonary inflammation, leukocytes that infiltrate the lung often assemble into structures known as inducible Bronchus-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (iBALT). Like conventional lymphoid organs, areas of iBALT have segregated B and T cell areas, specialized stromal cells, high endothelial venules, and lymphatic vessels. After inflammation is resolved, iBALT is maintained for months, independently of inflammation. Once iBALT is formed, it participates in immune responses to pulmonary antigens, including those that are unrelated to the iBALT-initiating antigen, and often alters the clinical course of disease. However, the mechanisms that govern immune responses in iBALT and determine how iBALT impacts local and systemic immunity are poorly understood. Here, we review our current understanding of iBALT formation and discuss how iBALT participates in pulmonary immunity. PMID:27446088

  17. Vitamin D and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cannell, John J; Grant, William B; Holick, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Several studies found an inverse relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and markers of inflammation. A controversy exists as to whether vitamin D lowers inflammation or whether inflammation lowers 25(OH)D concentrations. Certainly 25(OH)D concentrations fall after major surgery. However, is this due to inflammation lowering 25(OH)D or is 25(OH)D being metabolically cleared by the body to quell inflammation. We searched the literature and found 39 randomized controlled trials (RCT) of vitamin D and markers of inflammation. Seventeen found significantly reduced inflammatory markers, 19 did not, one was mixed and one showed adverse results. With few exceptions, studies in normal subjects, obesity, type 2 diabetics, and stable cardiovascular disease did not find significant beneficial effects. However, we found that 6 out of 7 RCTS of vitamin D3 in highly inflammatory conditions (acute infantile congestive heart failure, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, cystic fibrosis, SLE, active TB and evolving myocardial infarction) found significant reductions. We found baseline and final 25(OH)D predicted RCTs with significant reduction in inflammatory markers. Vitamin D tends to modestly lower markers of inflammation in highly inflammatory conditions, when baseline 25(OH)D levels were low and when achieved 25(OH)D levels were higher. Future inquiries should: recruit subjects with low baseline 25(OH)D levels, subjects with elevated markers of inflammation, subjects with inflammatory conditions, achieve adequate final 25(OH)D levels, and use physiological doses of vitamin D. We attempted to identify all extant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of vitamin D that used inflammatory markers as primary or secondary endpoints. PMID:26413186

  18. Orbital inflammation: Corticosteroids first.

    PubMed

    Dagi Glass, Lora R; Freitag, Suzanne K

    2016-01-01

    Orbital inflammation is common, and may affect all ages and both genders. By combining a thorough history and physical examination, targeted ancillary laboratory testing and imaging, a presumptive diagnosis can often be made. Nearly all orbital inflammatory pathology can be empirically treated with corticosteroids, thus obviating the need for histopathologic diagnosis prior to initiation of therapy. In addition, corticosteroids may be effective in treating concurrent systemic disease. Unless orbital inflammation responds atypically or incompletely, patients can be spared biopsy.

  19. Epidemic inflammation: pondering obesity.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Over the past two decades, inflammation has been recognized as a major driver in the pathogenesis of several common diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer, and asthma. Over the same period, there has been a steep rise in the incidence of obesity, a major risk factor for these disorders. Inflammation of adipose tissue is now recognized to accompany obesity and contribute to its sequelae. Thus, whereas obesity is primarily a disorder of energy balance, it may be helpful to consider it also as a form of epidemic inflammation that predisposes to other forms of epidemic inflammation. It is a fundamental biologic challenge to understand how a positive energy balance and inflammation are linked. This work reviews evidence that reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates (ROI and RNI) help drive chronic inflammation in the obese. This is proposed to be a maladaptive instance of our evolved dependence on ROI and RNI for both homeostatic signaling and host defense. ROI and RNI are well suited for these seemingly contradictory dual functions by their metabolic origin, high diffusibility in water and lipid, atomic specificity, and large number of molecular targets. When we eat so much and work so little that we repeatedly generate reactive compounds at levels normally reserved for emergencies, we treat our own cells like invading microbes.

  20. Nebulized anticoagulants limit coagulopathy but not inflammation in pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia in rats.

    PubMed

    Cornet, Alexander D; Hofstra, Jorrit J; Vlaar, Alexander P; van den Boogaard, Floor E; Roelofs, Joris J; van der Poll, Tom; Levi, Marcel; Groeneveld, A B Johan; Schultz, Marcus J

    2011-10-01

    Disturbed alveolar fibrin turnover is a characteristic feature of pneumonia. Inhibitors of coagulation could exert lung-protective effects via anticoagulant (inhibiting fibrin deposition) and possibly anti-inflammatory pathways, but could also affect host defense. In this randomized controlled in vivo laboratory study, rats were challenged intratracheally with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inducing pneumonia, and randomized to local treatment with normal saline (placebo), recombinant human activated protein C (rh-APC), plasma-derived antithrombin (AT), heparin, or danaparoid. Induction of P. aeruginosa pneumonia resulted in activation of pulmonary coagulation and inhibition of pulmonary fibrinolysis, as reflected by increased pulmonary levels of thrombin-AT complexes and fibrin degradation products and decreased pulmonary levels plasminogen activator activity. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia was accompanied by systemic coagulopathy, since systemic levels of thrombin-AT complexes increased, and systemic levels of plasminogen activator activity decreased. Although rh-APC and plasma-derived AT potently limited pulmonary coagulopathy, neither heparin nor danaparoid affected net pulmonary fibrin turnover. Recombinant human APC also displayed systemic anticoagulant effects. Neither bacterial clearance nor pulmonary inflammation was affected by anticoagulant therapy. Nebulization of rh-APC or plasma-derived AT attenuated pulmonary coagulopathy, but not bacterial clearance or inflammation, in a rat model of P. aeruginosa pneumonia. PMID:21897338

  1. Lung transcriptional profiling: insights into the mechanisms of ozone-induced pulmonary injury in Wistar Kyoto rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized in rats; however, mechanistic understanding of the pathways involved is limited. We hypothesized that acute exposure of healthy rats to ozone will cause transcriptional alterations, and comprehensive ana...

  2. Pathogenic mechanism of second hand smoke induced inflammation and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Birru, Rahel L.; Di, Y. Peter

    2012-01-01

    Second hand smoke (SHS) introduces thousands of toxic chemicals into the lung, including carcinogens and oxidants, which cause direct airway epithelium tissue destruction. It can also illicit indirect damage through its effect on signaling pathways related to tissue cell repair and by the abnormal induction of inflammation into the lung. After repeated exposure to SHS, these symptoms can lead to the development of pulmonary inflammatory disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a severe pulmonary disease characterized by chronic inflammation and irreversible tissue destruction. There is no causal cure, as the mechanism behind the development and progression of the disease is still unknown. Recent discoveries implicate genetic predisposition associated with inflammatory response contributed to the development of COPD, linked to irregular innate and adaptive immunity, as well as a risk factor for cancer. The use of animal models for both cigarette smoke (CS) and SHS associated in vivo experiments has been crucial in elucidating the pathogenic mechanisms and genetic components involved in inflammation-related development of COPD. PMID:22973236

  3. The Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in Pulmonary Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nisbet, Rachel E.; Sutliff, Roy L.; Hart, C. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that regulate diverse physiological processes ranging from lipogenesis to inflammation. Recent evidence has established potential roles of PPARs in both systemic and pulmonary vascular disease and function. Existing treatment strategies for pulmonary hypertension, the most common manifestation of pulmonary vascular disease, are limited by an incomplete understanding of the underlying disease pathogenesis and lack of efficacy indicating an urgent need for new approaches to treat this disorder. Derangements in pulmonary endothelial-derived mediators and endothelial dysfunction have been shown to play a pivotal role in pulmonary hypertension pathogenesis. Therefore, the following review will focus on selected mediators implicated in pulmonary vascular dysfunction and evidence that PPARs, in particular PPARγ, participate in their regulation and may provide a potential novel therapeutic target for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:17710111

  4. Pulmonary endarterectomy after pulmonary infectious embolisms

    PubMed Central

    Heiberg, Johan; Ilkjær, Lars B.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is a well-established procedure in the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTPH). The procedure is known to increase functional outcome and to raise the 5-year survival rate. We report 2 cases of pulmonary valve endocarditis and secondary embolisms causing sustained pulmonary hypertension. Both were treated with PEA. In none of the cases, a cleavage between the thrombotic masses and the vessel wall was obtainable, and both attempts were therefore inadequate. Based on our reports, we recommend not attempting PEA in cases of CTPH after infectious embolisms. PMID:23248168

  5. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  6. [Connective tissue and inflammation].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Lajos

    2014-03-23

    The author summarizes the structure of the connective tissues, the increasing motion of the constituents, which determine the role in establishing the structure and function of that. The structure and function of the connective tissue are related to each other in the resting as well as inflammatory states. It is emphasized that cellular events in the connective tissue are part of the defence of the organism, the localisation of the damage and, if possible, the maintenance of restitutio ad integrum. The organism responds to damage with inflammation, the non specific immune response, as well as specific, adaptive immunity. These processes are located in the connective tissue. Sterile and pathogenic inflammation are relatively similar processes, but inevitable differences are present, too. Sialic acids and glycoproteins containing sialic acids have important roles, and the role of Siglecs is also highlighted. Also, similarities and differences in damages caused by pathogens and sterile agents are briefly summarized. In addition, the roles of adhesion molecules linked to each other, and the whole event of inflammatory processes are presented. When considering practical consequences it is stressed that the structure (building up) of the organism and the defending function of inflammation both have fundamental importance. Inflammation has a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and the unimpaired somato-psychological state of the organism. Thus, inflammation serves as a tool of organism identical with the natural immune response, inseparably connected with the specific, adaptive immune response. The main events of the inflammatory processes take place in the connective tissue.

  7. A study of magnesium deficiency in human and experimental pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Lecerf, Florence; Fattal, Soly; Savale, Laurent; Günther, Sven; Huertas, Alice; Montani, David; Perros, Frederic; Humbert, Marc; German-Fattal, Michèle

    2012-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined as an increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure above 25 mmHg. Pulmonary vasoconstriction, cellular proliferation, inflammation, and oxidative stress are involved in the pathophysiology of PH. Since hypomagnesemia was reported to promote endothelial cell dysfunction leading to inflammation and oxidative stress, we investigated the potential involvement of magnesium (Mg) deficiency in experimental and human PH. Our results indicate that Mg deficiency has no impact on hypoxia-induced PH development or severity, and that no reduction in Mg plasma concentration was observed in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. Thus, hypomagnesemia does not appear to play a role in the pathophysiology of experimental and human pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22433438

  8. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here: Health Information > Condition Information Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis: Overview When two or more members within the ... Associate Professor View full profile More Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Information Forms Causes Genetic Counseling Print Page Email ...

  9. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis (PULL-mun-ary fi-BRO-sis) is a ... time. The formation of scar tissue is called fibrosis. As the lung tissue thickens, your lungs can' ...

  10. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Severe HPS. Image courtesy D. ... the workers showed evidence of infection or illness. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Topics Transmission Where HPS is ...

  11. Who Needs Pulmonary Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... other symptoms. Examples of interstitial lung diseases include sarcoidosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis . Cystic fibrosis (CF). CF ...

  12. Physiological mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    MacIver, David H; Adeniran, Ismail; MacIver, Iain R; Revell, Alistair; Zhang, Henggui

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is usually related to obstruction of pulmonary blood flow at the level of the pulmonary arteries (eg, pulmonary embolus), pulmonary arterioles (idiopathic pulmonary hypertension), pulmonary veins (pulmonary venoocclusive disease) or mitral valve (mitral stenosis and regurgitation). Pulmonary hypertension is also observed in heart failure due to left ventricle myocardial diseases regardless of the ejection fraction. Pulmonary hypertension is often regarded as a passive response to the obstruction to pulmonary flow. We review established fluid dynamics and physiology and discuss the mechanisms underlying pulmonary hypertension. The important role that the right ventricle plays in the development and maintenance of pulmonary hypertension is discussed. We use principles of thermodynamics and discuss a potential common mechanism for a number of disease states, including pulmonary edema, through adding pressure energy to the pulmonary circulation. PMID:27659877

  13. Febrile-range hyperthermia augments pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and amplifies pulmonary oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hasday, Jeffrey D; Garrison, Allen; Singh, Ishwar S; Standiford, Theodore; Ellis, Garrettson S; Rao, Srinivas; He, Ju-Ren; Rice, Penny; Frank, Mariah; Goldblum, Simeon E; Viscardi, Rose M

    2003-06-01

    Febrile-range hyperthermia (FRH) improves survival in experimental infections by accelerating pathogen clearance, but may also increase collateral tissue injury. We hypothesized that FRH would worsen the outcome of inflammation stimulated by a non-replicating agonist and tested this hypothesis in a murine model of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Using a conscious, temperature-controlled mouse model, we showed that maintaining a core temperature at FRH (39 degrees C to 40 degrees C) rather than at euthermic levels (36.5 degrees C to 37 degrees C) during hyperoxia exposure accelerated lethal pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, reduced the inspired oxygen threshold for lethality, induced expression of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and expanded the circulating neutrophil pool. In these same mice, FRH augmented pulmonary expression of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines, KC and LPS-induced CXC chemokine, enhanced recruitment of neutrophils, and changed the histological pattern of lung injury to a neutrophilic interstitial pneumonitis. Immunoblockade of CXC receptor-2 abrogated neutrophil recruitment, reduced pulmonary vascular injury, and delayed death. These combined data demonstrate that FRH may enlist distinct mediators and effector cells to profoundly shift the host response to a defined injurious stimulus, in part by augmenting delivery of neutrophils to sites of inflammation, such as may occur in infections. In certain conditions, such as in the hyperoxic lung, this process may be deleterious.

  14. Inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coussens, Lisa M.; Werb, Zena

    2009-01-01

    Recent data have expanded the concept that inflammation is a critical component of tumour progression. Many cancers arise from sites of infection, chronic irritation and inflammation. It is now becoming clear that the tumour microenvironment, which is largely orchestrated by inflammatory cells, is an indispensable participant in the neoplastic process, fostering proliferation, survival and migration. In addition, tumour cells have co-opted some of the signalling molecules of the innate immune system, such as selectins, chemokines and their receptors for invasion, migration and metastasis. These insights are fostering new anti-inflammatory therapeutic approaches to cancer development. PMID:12490959

  15. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity. PMID:26999194

  16. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-01

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity. PMID:26999194

  17. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Gans, S J; van der Elst, A M; Straks, W

    1988-04-01

    A patient with pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) is presented. PHG is a rare disease with very specific histological characteristics. Roentgenograms display multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules which may be cavitated. Evidence exists that the nodules are the result of an exaggerated chronic immune response. The course of the disease is generally favourable. PHG should be considered in patients showing multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules. PMID:2456228

  18. Dietary modulation of inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation is heightened innate immune response caused by infection or wound. It is a part of essential immune responses for host defense against invading pathogens and wound healing which are the key biological processes necessary for the survival of all multi-cellular organisms. In mammals, it i...

  19. Periostin in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Izuhara, Kenji; Arima, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Shoichi; Inamitsu, Masako; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi

    2014-06-01

    Periostin, an extracellular matrix protein belonging to the fasciclin family, has been shown to play a critical role in the process of remodeling during tissue/organ development or repair. Periostin functions as a matricellular protein in cell activation by binding to their receptors on cell surface, thereby exerting its biological activities. After we found that periostin is a downstream molecule of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, signature cytokines of type 2 immune responses, we showed that periostin is a component of subepithelial fibrosis in bronchial asthma, the first formal proof that periostin is involved in allergic inflammation. Subsequently, a great deal of evidence has accumulated demonstrating the significance of periostin in allergic inflammation. It is of note that in skin tissues, periostin is critical for amplification and persistence of allergic inflammation by communicating between fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Furthermore, periostin has been applied to development of novel diagnostics or therapeutic agents for allergic diseases. Serum periostin can reflect local production of periostin in inflamed lesions induced by Th2-type immune responses and also can predict the efficacy of Th2 antagonists against bronchial asthma. Blocking the interaction between periostin and its receptor, αv integrin, or down-regulating the periostin expression shows improvement of periostin-induced inflammation in mouse models or in in vitro systems. It is hoped that diagnostics or therapeutic agents targeting periostin will be of practical use in the near future.

  20. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Placement

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary valve disease need multiple procedures over their lifetimes to replace their pulmonary valves. Chronic pulmonary stenosis, regurgitation, or both have untoward effects on ventricular function and on the clinical status of these patients. To date, all right ventricle–pulmonary artery conduits have had relatively short lifespans. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, although relatively new, will probably reduce the number of operative procedures that these patients will have to undergo over a lifetime. Refinement and further development of this procedure holds promise for the extension of this technology to other patient populations. PMID:26175629

  1. The significance of nanoparticles in particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James D; Baugh, John A

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to airborne nanoparticles contributes to many chronic pulmonary diseases. Nanoparticles, classified as anthropogenic and natural particles, and fibers of diameters less than 100 nm, have unrestricted access to most areas of the lung due to their size. Size relates to the deposition efficiency of the particle, with particles in the nano-range having the highest efficiencies. The deposition of nanoparticles in the lung can lead to chronic inflammation, epithelial injury, and further to pulmonary fibrosis. Cases of particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis, namely pneumoconiosis, are mostly occupationally influenced, and continue to be documented around the world. The tremendous growth of nanotechnology, however, has spurred fears of increased rates of pulmonary diseases, especially fibrosis. The severity of toxicological consequences warrants further examination of the effects of nanoparticles in humans, possible treatments and increased regulatory measures. PMID:18523535

  2. Calcitriol inhibits bleomycin-induced early pulmonary inflammatory response and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhu-Xia; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xu, Shen; Qin, Hou-Ying; Zhang, Cheng; Zhao, Hui; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Early pulmonary inflammation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) play important roles during lung fibrosis. Increasing evidence demonstrates that calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D3, has anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of calcitriol on bleomycin (BLM)-induced early pulmonary inflammation and subsequent EMT. Mice were intratracheally injected with BLM (3.0mg/kg). In three calcitriol+BLM groups, mice were intraperitoneal (i.p.) injected with different doses of calcitriol (0.2, 1.0 or 5.0 μg/kg) daily, beginning at 48 h before BLM injection. Twenty-four hours, seven and fourteen days after BLM injection, pulmonary inflammation and EMT were evaluated. As expected, BLM-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lungs was attenuated by calcitriol. BLM-induced pulmonary inflammatory cytokines were repressed by calcitriol. Moreover, BLM-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was blocked by calcitriol. In addition, BLM-induced phosphorylation of pulmonary p38 MAPK and protein kinase B (Akt) was inhibited by calcitriol. Further analysis showed that BLM-induced α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker for EMT in the lungs, was significantly attenuated by calcitriol. BLM-induced transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) up-regulation and Smad phosphorylation were attenuated by calcitriol. In conclusion, calcitriol inhibits BLM-induced early pulmonary inflammation and subsequent EMT. PMID:26520185

  3. Fibrogenesis in granulomas and lung interstitium in tuberculous inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Shkurupiy, V A; Kim, L B; Potapova, O V; Cherdantseva, L A; Putyatina, A N; Nikonova, I K

    2014-04-01

    The study in mouse model of BCG-induced granulomatous inflammation showed that early pulmonary fibrosis (day 3-30 postinfection) in tuberculous inflammation was primarily determined by increased number of fibroblasts in the lung interstitium and granulomas and enhanced fibroplastic activity. Fibroplastic processes are initiated via an increase in secretory activity of activated granuloma macrophages caused by the persistence of the pathogen in the cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system. The dynamics of hydroxyproline concentration under these conditions is determined by changes in the number and differentiation degree of fibroblasts in granulomas and lung interstitium at various stages of tuberculous inflammation.

  4. A method for generating pulmonary neutrophilia using aerosolized lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Roos, Abraham B; Berg, Tove; Ahlgren, Kerstin M; Grunewald, Johan; Nord, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe disease characterized by alveolar neutrophilia, with limited treatment options and high mortality. Experimental models of ALI are key in enhancing our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from gram positive bacteria induces neutrophilic inflammation in the airways and lung parenchyma of mice. Efficient pulmonary delivery of compounds such as LPS is, however, difficult to achieve. In the approach described here, pulmonary delivery in mice is achieved by challenge to aerosolized Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS. Dissolved LPS was aerosolized by a nebulizer connected to compressed air. Mice were exposed to a continuous flow of LPS aerosol in a Plexiglas box for 10 min, followed by 2 min conditioning after the aerosol was discontinued. Tracheal intubation and subsequent bronchoalveolar lavage, followed by formalin perfusion was next performed, which allows for characterization of the sterile pulmonary inflammation. Aerosolized LPS generates a pulmonary inflammation characterized by alveolar neutrophilia, detected in bronchoalveolar lavage and by histological assessment. This technique can be set up at a small cost with few appliances, and requires minimal training and expertise. The exposure system can thus be routinely performed at any laboratory, with the potential to enhance our understanding of lung pathology. PMID:25548888

  5. Novel biomarkers for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Anjum; Ruffenach, Gregoire; Mahajan, Aman; Eghbali, Mansoureh; Umar, Soban

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a deadly disease characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressures leading to right ventricular hypertrophy and failure. The confirmatory gold standard test is the invasive right heart catheterization. The disease course is monitored by pulmonary artery systolic pressure measurement via transthoracic echocardiography. A simple non-invasive test to frequently monitor the patients is much needed. Search for a novel biomarker that can be detected by a simple test is ongoing and many different options are being studied. Here we review some of the new and unique pre-clinical options for potential pulmonary hypertension biomarkers. These biomarkers can be broadly categorized based on their association with endothelial cell dysfunction, inflammation, epigenetics, cardiac function, oxidative stress, metabolism,extracellular matrix, and volatile compounds in exhaled breath condensate. A biomarker that can be detected in blood, urine or breath condensate and correlates with disease severity, progression and response to therapy may result in significant cost reduction and improved patient outcomes. PMID:27439993

  6. Upregulation of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Channels Contributes to Endotoxin-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gui-Lan; Jiang, Hongni; Zou, Fangdong

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock is a pathologic condition caused by endotoxin-producing bacteria, and often associated with severe pulmonary hypertension. Inflammation is a major systemic response to endotoxin; however, it is unknown whether endotoxin has a direct impact on pulmonary arteries that contributes to pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Material/Methods Rat pulmonary arteries and primary pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were cultured in vitro and treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and blockers of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. Neointimal growth and arterial stenosis were observed on cryosections of cultured pulmonary arteries. Proliferation of PASMCs was examined by a WST-1 (water-soluble tetrazolium salt) assay. Expression of TRPC genes in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs were detected and quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Results LPS significantly induced neointimal growth and stenosis of pulmonary arteries and promoted proliferation of PASMCs. TRPC channel blockers 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and SKF-96365 inhibited LPS-induced remodeling of pulmonary arteries and PASMC proliferation. Expression of TRPC1/3/4/6 was detected in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs. LPS treatment dramatically increased the expression of TRPC3 and TRPC4 at both messenger RNA and protein levels. Conclusions LPS stimulates stenosis of pulmonary arteries through enhancement of TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry into PASMCs, which is caused by upregulation of TRPC3 and TRPC4 channels. PMID:27471122

  7. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy.

  8. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy. PMID:24054776

  9. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy.

  10. Glycyrrhizic acid alleviates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lili; Tang, Haiying; He, Huanyu; Liu, Jia; Mao, Jingwei; Ji, Hong; Lin, Hongli; Wu, Taihua

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and lethal form of interstitial lung disease that lacks effective therapies at present. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a natural compound extracted from a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Glycyrrhiza glabra, was recently reported to benefit lung injury and liver fibrosis in animal models, yet whether GA has a therapeutic effect on pulmonary fibrosis is unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential therapeutic effect of GA on pulmonary fibrosis in a rat model with bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The results indicated that GA treatment remarkably ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis and attenuated BLM-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and activation of transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway in the lungs. Further, we demonstrated that GA treatment inhibited proliferation of 3T6 fibroblast cells, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted apoptosis in vitro, implying that GA-mediated suppression of fibroproliferation may contribute to the anti-fibrotic effect against BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In summary, our study suggests a therapeutic potential of GA in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26483688

  11. The Role of Iron in Libby Amphibole-Induced Lung Injury and Inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Complexation of host iron (Fe) on the surface of inhaled asbestos fibers has been postulated to cause oxidative stress contributing to in vivo pulmonary injury and inflammation. We examined the role of Fe in Libby amphibole (LA; mean length 4.99um ± 4.53 and width 0.28um ± 0.19)...

  12. Gut Microbiota and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hakansson, Asa; Molin, Goran

    2011-01-01

    Systemic and local inflammation in relation to the resident microbiota of the human gastro-intestinal (GI) tract and administration of probiotics are the main themes of the present review. The dominating taxa of the human GI tract and their potential for aggravating or suppressing inflammation are described. The review focuses on human trials with probiotics and does not include in vitro studies and animal experimental models. The applications of probiotics considered are systemic immune-modulation, the metabolic syndrome, liver injury, inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and radiation-induced enteritis. When the major genomic differences between different types of probiotics are taken into account, it is to be expected that the human body can respond differently to the different species and strains of probiotics. This fact is often neglected in discussions of the outcome of clinical trials with probiotics. PMID:22254115

  13. Osteoprotegerin and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saidenberg Kermanac'h, N; Bessis, Natacha; Cohen-Solal, M; De Vernejoul, M C; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2002-01-01

    RANK, RANKL, and OPG have well established regulatory effects on bone metabolism. RANK is expressed at very high levels on osteoclastic precursors and on mature osteoclasts, and is required for differentiation and activation of the osteoclast. The ligand, RANKL binds to its receptor RANK to induce bone resorption. RANKL is a transmembrane protein expressed in various cells type and particularly on osteoblast and activated T cells. RANKL can be cleaved and the soluble form is active. Osteoprotegerin decoy receptor (OPG), a member of the TNF receptor family expressed by osteoblasts, strongly inhibits bone resorption by binding with high affinity to its ligand RANKL, thereby preventing RANKL from engaging its receptor RANK. This system is regulated by the calciotropic hormones. Conversely, the effects of RANKL, RANK, and OPG on inflammatory processes, most notably on the bone resorption associated with inflammation, remain to be defined. The RANK system seems to play a major role in modulating the immune system. Activated T cells express RANKL messenger RNA, and knock-out mice for RANKL acquire severe immunological abnormalities and osteopetrosis. RANKL secretion by activated T cells can induce osteoclastogenesis. These mechanisms are enhanced by cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-17, which promote both inflammation and bone resorption. Conversely, this system is blocked by OPG, IL-4, and IL-10, which inhibit both inflammation and osteoclastogenesis. These data may explain part of the abnormal phenomena in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis characterized by both inflammation and destruction. Activated T cells within the rheumatoid synovium express RANKL. Synovial cells are capable of differentiating to osteoclast-like cells under some conditions, including culturing with M-CSF and RANKL. This suggests that the bone erosion seen in rheumatoid arthritis may result from RANKL/RANK system activation by activated T cells. This opens up the possibility that OPG

  14. Coagulation inhibitors in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Esmon, C T

    2005-04-01

    Coagulation is triggered by inflammatory mediators in a number of ways. However, to prevent unwanted clot formation, several natural anticoagulant mechanisms exist, such as the antithrombin-heparin mechanism, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor mechanism and the protein C anticoagulant pathway. This review examines the ways in which these pathways are down-regulated by inflammation, thus limiting clot formation and decreasing the natural anti-inflammatory mechanisms that these pathways possess. PMID:15787615

  15. Pulmonary manifestations of the collagen vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, H P; Matthay, R A

    1989-12-01

    The collagen vascular diseases are a heterogeneous group of immunologically mediated inflammatory disorders. The organs and tissues that compose the respiratory system are frequently affected by these diseases. Potential targets of the inflammation and injury include the lung parenchyma, tracheobronchial tree, pulmonary vasculature, pleura, larynx, and respiratory muscles. In this article, the spectrum of respiratory disease caused by systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, ankylosing spondylitis, relapsing polychondritis, and Sjögren's syndrome is reviewed. Where appropriate, therapeutic options are discussed.

  16. Extracellular Matrix Powder Protects Against Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Manni, Michelle L.; Czajka, Caitlin A.; Oury, Tim D.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis refers to a group of lung diseases characterized by inflammation, fibroblast proliferation, and excessive collagen deposition. Although the mechanisms underlying pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood, current evidence suggests that epithelial injury contributes to the development of fibrosis. Regenerative medicine approaches using extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds have been shown to promote site-specific tissue remodeling. This led to the hypothesis that particulate ECM would promote normal tissue repair and attenuate bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. C57BL/6 mice were treated intratracheally with bleomycin or saline with or without a particulate form of ECM scaffold from porcine urinary bladder matrix (UBM-ECM) or enzymatically digested UBM-ECM. Mice were sacrificed 5 and 14 days after exposure. Compared to control mice, bleomycin-exposed mice had similar increases in inflammation in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid regardless of UBM-ECM treatment. However, 14 days after exposure, lung histology and collagen levels revealed that mice treated with bleomycin and the particulate or digested UBM-ECM had negligible fibrosis, whereas mice given only bleomycin had marked fibrosis. Administration of the particulate UBM-ECM 24 h after bleomycin exposure also significantly protected against pulmonary injury. In vitro epithelial cell migration and wound healing assays revealed that particulate UBM-ECM promoted epithelial cell chemotaxis and migration. This suggests that promotion of epithelial wound repair may be one mechanism in which UBM-ECM limits pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:21797754

  17. Mechanisms of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Wedzicha, Jadwiga A

    2015-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are important events that contribute to worsening health status, disease progression, and mortality. They are mainly triggered by respiratory viruses (especially rhinovirus, the cause of the common cold), but airway bacteria are also involved in their pathogenesis. Exacerbations are associated with both airway and systemic inflammation and, this is mainly neutrophilic in origin. Some patients are especially prone to develop exacerbations, and these have been identified as a high-risk group with increased airway inflammation and greater disease progression. Management of acute exacerbations involves therapy with oral corticosteroids and/or antibiotics, and new therapies are needed. A number of interventions may prevent exacerbations, including vaccination, long-acting bronchodilators, antiinflammatory agents, and long-term antibiotic therapy. Understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of COPD exacerbations is important to develop novel therapies.

  18. Stress increases periodontal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    RIVERA, CÉSAR; MONSALVE, FRANCISCO; SUAZO, IVÁN; BECERRA, JAVIERA

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of chronic restraint stress (RS) on the severity of experimental periodontal disease in rats. A total of 32 male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups: i) Rats receiving two treatment regimens, chronic stress induced by movement restriction in acrylic cylinders for 1–1.5 h daily and induction of experimental periodontal disease, using a nylon ligature which was placed around the first left mandibular molars (n=8); ii) induction of periodontal disease, without RS (n=8); iii) RS (n=8) and iv) control (n=8). After 15 days, blood samples were obtained, and blood glucose levels and the corticosterone concentration were measured as stress markers. The severity of periodontal disease was analyzed according to the level of gingival and bone inflammation, leading to compromise of the teeth involved. Chronic stress was induced with movement restriction (P≤0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test) and increased the severity (P≤0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test) of experimental perio dontal disease in rats, according to the level of gingival and bone inflammation around the first left mandibular molars. The results of the present study showed that RS modulates periodontal inflammation and that the rat model described herein is suitable for investigating the association between stress and periodontal disease. PMID:23226743

  19. [Free radicals and eye inflammations].

    PubMed

    Ianopol, N

    1998-01-01

    Free radicals (FR), mainly those oxygen derived (FRO) are considered to be inflammation's mediators. Produced either by photochemical reactions or by synthesis into active phagocytic cells (in the cellular time of inflammation), FRO can determine an inflammatory reaction or they can augment a pre-existed one. These phenomena are produced by synthesis of inflammation's mediators as: prostaglandines, prostaciclines, thromboxane and leucotrienes starting from arachidonic acid, by the generation of some compounds with chemotactic properties and by the activation of phagocytic cells, by the augmentation of the proteolytic activity due to natural protease inhibitors inactivation and, last but not least, by the directly destructive action against different tissue compounds. In the first part of this lecture I presented general data about FR, inflammation, photosensitive agents and radical reactions. In the second part, I presented the pathogenic relation between FR and ocular inflammations from two different point of view: that of inflammation generation by FR, and that of FR generation during a preexistent inflammation.

  20. [Pulmonary hypertension: current aspects].

    PubMed

    Tello de Meneses, R; Gómez Sánchez, M A; Delgado Jiménez, J; Gómez Pajuelo, C; Sáenz de la Calzada, C; Zarco Gutiérrez, P

    1996-08-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension, although less frequent than secondary forms, represents the true paradigm of this disease. The recent investigations on pulmonary vascular response mechanisms to different stimuli has increased our knowledge about the mechanism of high pulmonary pressure. Molecular biology of the endothelial cell has provided evidence that endothelial injury plus a genetic individual predisposition may be the pathogenic mainstream of this disease. The histologic findings of pulmonary hypertension are still a matter of controversy, although the clinical, epidemiological and prognostic features are better defined. Therapeutically, there has been important advances, specially with various vasodilators, like calciumantagonists, prostacyclin, adenosine and nitric oxide, as well as new routes of administration. In more advance stages of the disease, atrial septostomy (only paliative) and pulmonary or cardio-pulmonary transplantation, are other therapeutic options to consider, after an adequate selection of patients.

  1. Cystic pulmonary hydatidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Pathania, Rajnish; Jhobta, Anupam; Thakur, Babu Ram; Chopra, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by the larval stages of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. Worldwide, pulmonary hydatid cyst is a significant problem medically, socially, and economically. Surgery is the definitive therapy of pulmonary hydatidosis. Benzimidazoles may be considered in patients with a surgical contraindication. This review will focus on pathogenesis, lifecycle, clinical features, and management of pulmonary hydatid disease. PMID:27051107

  2. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma Masquerading as Chronic Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Ugur; Calpar, Ilknur; Yildizeli, Bedrettin; Yanartas, Mehmet; Filinte, Deniz; Kucukoglu, Mehmet Serdar

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with pulmonary artery sarcoma, a very rare tumor of the cardiovascular system. Her tumor was initially misdiagnosed as chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, and she underwent pulmonary endarterectomy. Early diagnosis of primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is crucial. That alternative should always be considered before settling on a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Suspicion should be aroused by the failure of anticoagulant treatment to alleviate pulmonary perfusion abnormalities and systemic symptoms. Surgical resection of the tumor—preferably by pulmonary endarterectomy, followed by reconstruction as needed—is currently the most promising treatment for pulmonary artery sarcoma. PMID:25425987

  3. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... To Look for the Underlying Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension PH has many causes, so many tests may ...

  4. Miliary pulmonary cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Shane; Marriott, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old HIV positive male presents with fevers and a non-productive cough. Initial X-ray and subsequent computerised tomography of the chest shows a bilateral miliary pattern of pulmonary infiltration highly suggestive of disseminated tuberculosis. However subsequent results were consistent with disseminated cryptococcosis, including pulmonary involvement, with cryptococcus identified on transbronchial tissue biopsy, and on blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures. Imaging features of pulmonary cryptococcosis are generally of well-defined pleural-based nodules and less commonly alveolar infiltrates, lymphadenopathy, pleural effusions or cavitating lesions. Miliary pulmonary infiltrates are an exceptionally rare presentation. PMID:25379393

  5. Improving pulmonary rehabilitation services.

    PubMed

    Beckford, Katy

    The Clinical Audit of Pulmonary Rehabilitation Services in England and Wales was the first national audit of pulmonary rehabilitation services in England and Wales. Forming part of the National Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Audit Programme, it was commissioned by Healthcare Quality Improvement Programme and conducted by the Royal College of Physicians and British Thoracic Society. The audit was undertaken to geographically map pulmonary rehabilitation services and identify how they can improve. This article summarises the key findings of the audit, and its recommendations. PMID:27400620

  6. Neostigmine and pulmonary oedema

    PubMed Central

    Nagella, Amrutha Bindu; Bijapur, Mubina Begum; Shreyavathi, Shreyavathi; R S, Raghavendra Rao

    2014-01-01

    A 1-year-old child with no pre-existing cardiac or respiratory disease developed frank pulmonary oedema after administration of a neostigmine–glycopyrrolate mixture to reverse neuromuscular blockade during general anaesthesia. Possible cardiac and extra-cardiac factors that could cause pulmonary oedema in this child were ruled out by appropriate investigations. As the pulmonary oedema manifested shortly after administration of the neostigmine–glycopyrrolate mixture, we concluded that neostigmine was the most probable cause. This article briefly reports the occurrence of events and successful management of perioperative pulmonary oedema. PMID:25199191

  7. PULMONARY CIRCULATION AT EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    NAEIJE, R; CHESLER, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high flow and low pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg.min.L−1 in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg.min.L−1 over 4–6 decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20–25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40–50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23105961

  8. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension and Assessment of Right Ventricular Function in the Piglet.

    PubMed

    Noly, Pierre-Emmanuel; Guihaire, Julien; Coblence, Matthieu; Dorfmüller, Peter; Fadel, Elie; Mercier, Olaf

    2015-11-04

    An original piglet model of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (CTEPH) associated with chronic Right Ventricular (RV) dysfunction is described. Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) was induced in 3-week-old piglets by a progressive obstruction of the pulmonary vascular bed. A ligation of the left Pulmonary Artery (PA) was performed first through a mini-thoracotomy. Second, weekly embolizations of the right lower pulmonary lobe were done under fluoroscopic guidance with n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate during 5 weeks. Mean Pulmonary Arterial Pressure (mPAP) measured by ritght heart catheterism, increased progressively, as well as Right Atrial pressure and Pulmonary Vascular Resistances (PVR) after 5 weeks compared to sham animals. Right Ventricular (RV) structural and functional remodeling were assessed by transthoracic echocardiography (RV diameters, RV wall thickness, RV systolic function). RV elastance and RV-pulmonary coupling were assessed by Pressure-Volume Loops (PVL) analysis with conductance method. Histologic study of the lung and the right ventricle were also performed. Molecular analyses on RV fresh tissues could be performed through repeated transcutaneous endomyocardial biopsies. Pulmonary microvascular disease in obstructed and unobstructed territories was studied from lung biopsies using molecular analyses and pathology. Furthermore, the reliability and the reproducibility was associated with a range of PH severity in animals. Most aspects of the human CTEPH disease were reproduced in this model, which allows new perspectives for the understanding of the underlying mechanisms (mitochondria, inflammation) and new therapeutic approaches (targeted, cellular or gene therapies) of the overloaded right ventricle but also pulmonary microvascular disease.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells suppress CaN/NFAT expression in the pulmonary arteries of rats with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    LIU, JUNFENG; HAN, ZHIBO; HAN, ZHONGCHAO; HE, ZHIXU

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and hyperproliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) is considered the primary pathological feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). The present study determined that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) suppress the expression of calcineurin (CaN) and nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) in the pulmonary arteries of rats, and this may exert a therapeutic effect on PH. The potential therapeutic effects of MSCs on PH were assessed via the transplantation of human umbilical cord-derived MSCs, which were cultured in serum-free medium, into a monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH rat model. Subsequently, the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lung tissue and plasma, and of CaN and NFATc2 in pulmonary arteries were assessed. In the rat model of MCT-induced PH, investigated in the present study, TNF-α expression levels were detected in the lung tissue, and the levels of TNF-α in the plasma were increased. Furthermore, in addition to hemodynamic changes and the evident medial hypertrophy of the pulmonary muscular arterioles, CaN and NFATc2 expression levels were significantly upregulated in the pulmonary arteries. In the present study, the transplantation of MSCs, cultured in serum-free medium, decreased the levels of TNF-α in the lung tissue and plasma of rats, and downregulated CaN and NFATc2 expression in the pulmonary arteries. Furthermore, hemodynamic abnormalities and medial hypertrophy of the pulmonary muscular arterioles were notably improved. Therefore, the results of the present study may suggest that the administration of MSCs in PH may suppress the production of TNF-α, and downregulate the expression of CaN and NFATc2 in pulmonary arteries, which may provide an effective treatment for PH by suppressing the pathological proliferation of PASMCs. PMID:26640533

  10. A Mitochondrial Perspective of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shadel, Gerald S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) encompasses several clinical syndromes, most notably emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Most of the current treatments fail to attenuate severity and progression of the disease, thereby requiring better mechanistic understandings of pathogenesis to develop disease-modifying therapeutics. A number of theories on COPD pathogenesis have been promulgated wherein an increase in protease burden from chronic inflammation, exaggerated production of reactive oxygen species and the resulting oxidant injury, or superfluous cell death responses caused by enhanced cellular injury/damage were proposed as the culprit. These hypotheses are not mutually exclusive and together likely represent the multifaceted biological processes involved in COPD pathogenesis. Recent studies demonstrate that mitochondria are involved in innate immune signaling that plays important roles in cigarette smoke-induced inflammasome activation, pulmonary inflammation and tissue remodeling responses. These responses are reviewed herein and synthesized into a view of COPD pathogenesis whereby mitochondria play a central role. PMID:27790272

  11. [Inflammation and obesity (lipoinflammation)].

    PubMed

    Izaola, Olatz; de Luis, Daniel; Sajoux, Ignacio; Domingo, Joan Carles; Vidal, Montse

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease with multiple origins. It is a widespread global phenomenon carrying potentially serious complications which requires a multidisciplinary approach due to the significant clinical repercussions and elevated health costs associated with the disease. The most recent evidence indicates that it shares a common characteristic with other prevalent, difficult-to-treat pathologies: chronic, low-grade inflammation which perpetuates the disease and is associated with multiple complications. The current interest in lipoinflammation or chronic inflammation associated with obesity derives from an understanding of the alterations and remodelling that occurs in the adipose tissue, with the participation of multiple factors and elements throughout the process. Recent research highlights the importance of some of these molecules, called pro-resolving mediators, as possible therapeutic targets in the treatment of obesity. This article reviews the evidence published on the mechanisms that regulate the adipose tissue remodelling process and lipoinflammation both in obesity and in the mediators that are directly involved in the appearance and resolution of the inflammatory process.

  12. Leptin and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Iikuni, Noriko; Lam, Queenie Lai Kwan; Lu, Liwei; Matarese, Giuseppe; La Cava, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The past few years of research on leptin have provided important information on the link between metabolism and immune homeostasis. Adipocytes influence not only the endocrine system but also the immune response through several cytokine-like mediators known as adipokines, which include leptin. It is widely accepted that leptin can directly link nutritional status and pro-inflammatory T helper 1 immune responses, and that a decrease of leptin plasma concentration during food deprivation can lead to an impaired immune function. Additionally, several studies have implicated leptin in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation, and the elevated circulating leptin levels in obesity appear to contribute to the low-grade inflammatory background which makes obese individuals more susceptible to increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, type II diabetes, or degenerative disease including autoimmunity and cancer. Conversely, reduced levels of leptin such as those found in malnourished individuals have been linked to increased risk of infection and reduced cell-mediated immune responses. We discuss here the functional influences of leptin in the physiopathology of inflammation, and the effects of leptin in the modulation of such responses. PMID:20198122

  13. [Inflammation and obesity (lipoinflammation)].

    PubMed

    Izaola, Olatz; de Luis, Daniel; Sajoux, Ignacio; Domingo, Joan Carles; Vidal, Montse

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease with multiple origins. It is a widespread global phenomenon carrying potentially serious complications which requires a multidisciplinary approach due to the significant clinical repercussions and elevated health costs associated with the disease. The most recent evidence indicates that it shares a common characteristic with other prevalent, difficult-to-treat pathologies: chronic, low-grade inflammation which perpetuates the disease and is associated with multiple complications. The current interest in lipoinflammation or chronic inflammation associated with obesity derives from an understanding of the alterations and remodelling that occurs in the adipose tissue, with the participation of multiple factors and elements throughout the process. Recent research highlights the importance of some of these molecules, called pro-resolving mediators, as possible therapeutic targets in the treatment of obesity. This article reviews the evidence published on the mechanisms that regulate the adipose tissue remodelling process and lipoinflammation both in obesity and in the mediators that are directly involved in the appearance and resolution of the inflammatory process. PMID:26040339

  14. Pulmonary Function Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ranu, Harpreet; Wilde, Michael; Madden, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications. PMID:22347750

  15. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Venkatachalam, Jonathen; Lee, Victor Kwan Min; Tan, Sze Khen

    2016-05-01

    Leiomyoma is a smooth muscle neoplasm that commonly occurs in the genitourinary system and the gastrointestinal tract of the body. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma is rarely reported in literature. We report a rare case of primary pulmonary leiomyoma of a 55-year-old male patient presenting with symptoms of cough for six months. PMID:27516882

  16. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation. PMID:14664293

  17. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What is Pulmonary Hypertension? Updated:Aug 12,2014 Is pulmonary hypertension different ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  18. Pulmonary Paragonimiasis Mimicking Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kj; Basu, Arup; Khana, Shilpi; Wattal, Chand

    2015-08-01

    Paragonimiasis is a disease which is frequently misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis. In the areas where people eat crab/crayfish this disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis to avoid antituberculosis treatment for a non-tubercular condition. We are reporting a case of pulmonary paragonimiasis who had been treated for tuberculosis. PMID:27604443

  19. Schistosomiasis and the pulmonary vasculature (2013 Grover Conference series)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Inflammation is associated with multiple forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), including autoimmune (scleroderma) and infectious (HIV, schistosomiasis) etiologies. More than 200 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma, predominantly in Brazil, Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia. Schistosomiasis causes PAH in about 6.1% of those chronically infected and is particularly associated with the species Schistosoma mansoni. Treatment for schistosomiasis-associated PAH includes antihelminthic treatment, if active infection is present (although associated with little immediate benefit to the pulmonary hypertension), and then pharmacologic treatment with targeted pulmonary vascular therapies, including phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and endothelin receptor antagonists. The pathophysiological mechanism by which this parasitic infection causes pulmonary hypertension is unknown but is unlikely to be simple mechanical obstruction of the pulmonary vasculature by parasite eggs. Preexisting hepatosplenic disease due to Schistosoma infection is likely important because of portopulmonary hypertension and/or because it allows egg embolization to the lung by portocaval shunts. Potential immune signaling originating in the periegg granulomas causing the pulmonary vascular disease includes the cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-13, and transforming growth factor β. Modulating these pathways may be possible targets for future therapy of schistosomiasis-associated PAH specifically, and study of this disease may provide novel insights into other inflammatory causes of PAH. PMID:25621148

  20. The cytokine network in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are very common inflammatory diseases of the airways. They both cause airway narrowing and are increasing in incidence throughout the world, imposing enormous burdens on health care. Cytokines play a key role in orchestrating the chronic inflammation and structural changes of the respiratory tract in both asthma and COPD and have become important targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies in these diseases. PMID:18982161

  1. Cigarette Smoke, Bacteria, Mold, Microbial Toxins, and Chronic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, John L.; Paszkiewicz, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation associated with cigarette smoke fosters malignant transformation and tumor cell proliferation and promotes certain nonneoplastic pulmonary diseases. The question arises as to whether chronic inflammation and/or colonization of the airway can be attributed, at least in part, to tobacco-associated microbes (bacteria, fungi, and spores) and/or microbial toxins (endotoxins and mycotoxins) in tobacco. To address this question, a literature search of documents in various databases was performed. The databases included PubMed, Legacy Tobacco Documents Library, and US Patents. This investigation documents that tobacco companies have identified and quantified bacteria, fungi, and microbial toxins at harvest, throughout fermentation, and during storage. Also characterized was the microbial flora of diverse smoking and smokeless tobacco articles. Evidence-based health concerns expressed in investigations of microbes and microbial toxins in cigarettes, cigarette smoke, and smokeless tobacco products are reasonable; they warrant review by regulatory authorities and, if necessary, additional investigation to address scientific gaps. PMID:21772847

  2. Pulmonary extramedullary hematopoiesis involving the pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Monga, Varun; Silverman, Margarida

    2015-02-24

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) occurs as a complication of hematologic disorders such as myelofibrosis, sickle cell anemia and thalassemia. The extramedullary tissue usually involves liver, spleen and lymph nodes, less frequently the chest. We present a recent case of a man with myeloproliferative neoplasm who developed pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to EMH in the lung and pulmonary artery. Radiation therapy was considered the best approach, but it didn't work and the patient died a week after radiation therapy was completed. We also review herein the present literature. PMID:25852851

  3. CD46 Protects against Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grumelli, Sandra; Lu, Bao; Peterson, Leif; Maeno, Toshitaka; Gerard, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema develops in 15% of ex-smokers despite sustained quitting, while 10% are free of emphysema or severe lung obstruction. The cause of the incapacity of the immune system to clear the inflammation in the first group remains unclear. Methods and Findings We searched genes that were protecting ex-smokers without emphysema, using microarrays on portions of human lungs surgically removed; we found that loss of lung function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema was associated with a lower expression of CD46 and verified this finding by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. Also, there was a significant association among decreased CD46+ cells with decreased CD4+T cells, apoptosis mediator CD95 and increased CD8+T cells that were protecting patients without emphysema or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. CD46 not only regulates the production of T regulatory cells, which suppresses CD8+T cell proliferation, but also the complement cascade by degradation of C3b. These results were replicated in the murine smoking model, which showed increased C5a (produced by C3b) that suppressed IL12 mediated bias to T helper 1 cells and elastin co-precipitation with C3b, suggesting that elastin could be presented as an antigen. Thus, using ELISA from elastin peptides, we verified that 43% of the patients with severe early onset of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease tested positive for IgG to elastin in their serum compared to healthy controls. Conclusions These data suggest that higher expression of CD46 in the lungs of ex-smoker protects them from emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by clearing the inflammation impeding the proliferation of CD8+ T cells and necrosis, achieved by production of T regulatory cells and degradation of C3b; restraining the complement cascade favors apoptosis over necrosis, protecting them from autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. PMID:21573156

  4. The Crossroads of Iron with Hypoxia and Cellular Metabolism. Implications in the Pathobiology of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Brian B.; Rouault, Tracey C.; Tuder, Rubin M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic hallmark of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is pulmonary vascular remodeling, characterized by endothelial cell proliferation, smooth muscle hypertrophy, and perivascular inflammation, ultimately contributing to increased pulmonary arterial pressures. Several recent studies have observed that iron deficiency in patients with various forms of PAH is associated with worsened clinical outcome. Iron plays a key role in many cellular processes regulating the response to hypoxia, oxidative stress, cellular proliferation, and cell metabolism. Given the potential importance of iron supplementation in patients with the disease and the broad cellular functions of iron, we review its role in processes that pertain to PAH. PMID:24988529

  5. Immune and Inflammatory Mechanisms in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    El Chami, Hala; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Altered immunity and inflammation are increasingly recognized features of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). This is suggested by infiltration of various inflammatory cells (e.g., macrophages, T and B lymphocytes), increased cytokine and growth factor (e.g., VEGF and PDGF) expression in remodeled pulmonary vessels, and the presence of circulating chemokines and cytokines. In certain diseases associated with PAH, increased expression of growth and transcriptional (e.g., Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells or NFAT) factors, and viral protein components (e.g., HIV-1 Nef), appear to contribute directly to recruitment of inflammatory cells in remodeled vessels, and may potentially serve as specific therapeutic targets. This section provides an overview of inflammatory pathways highlighting their potential role in pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH and the possibility of future targeted therapy. PMID:23009917

  6. Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium infection demonstrating unusual lobar caseous pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Okuzumi, Shinichi; Minematsu, Naoto; Sasaki, Mamoru; Ohsawa, Kazuma; Murakami, Marohito

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection is a major medical concern in Japan because of its increased prevalence and associated mortality. A common radiological feature in pulmonary MAC infection is a mixture of two basic patterns: fibrocavitary and nodular bronchiectatic; however, lobar consolidation is rare. We report an 83-year-old man with lobar caseous pneumonia caused by pulmonary MAC infection. Radiological findings were predominantly composed of dense lobar consolidation and ground-glass opacity. A diagnosis was made in accordance with the clinical and microbiological criteria set by the American Thoracic Society. A histological examination of lung specimens obtained by using a bronchoscope revealed a caseous granulomatous inflammation with an appearance of Langhans cells. The patient was treated using combined mycobacterium chemotherapy with an initial positive response for 6 months; however, the disease progressed later. We suggest that an awareness of lobar pneumonic consolidation as a rare radiological finding in pulmonary MAC infection is important. PMID:27516892

  7. [Evaluation of nasal inflammation].

    PubMed

    De La Torre Morín, F; Sánchez Machín, I

    2006-01-01

    In the reaction of immediate hypersensibility to alergene is joined to its specific type IgE antibody, also united to the high affinity receptors for IgE (FccI) of the effecters cells fundamentally mastocites and basophiles. The interbreeding of these molecules Fcc to RI, after the union ofpolyvalent antigenes to IgE, active these cells, producing three biologic responses: excitosis of the preformed content of its granules, synthesization of lipidic mediators and citoquine secretion. The inflammation mediators are in last term, substances responsible of the clinic symptomatology. They can be divided generally in preformed mediators (biogene amines and macromolecules of the granules) and of new synthese mediators (lipidic and citoquine mediators). PMID:16749721

  8. SOCS, inflammation, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki-Ohara, Kyoko; Kondo, Taisuke; Ito, Minako; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways elicited by cytokines and hormones have been shown to regulate distinct stages of development. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are negative feedback regulators of cytokine signaling mediated by the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. In particular, SOCS1 and SOCS3 are potent inhibitors of JAKs and can play pivotal roles in inflammation, as well as in the development and progression of cancers. Abnormal expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 in cancer cells has been reported in human carcinoma associated with dysregulation of signals from cytokine receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), and hormone receptors, resulting in malignancies. In this review, we focus on the role of SOCS1 and SOCS3 in cancer development. In addition, the potential of SOCS as a therapeutic target and diagnostic aid will be discussed. PMID:24069550

  9. Frailty, Inflammation and Immunosenescence.

    PubMed

    Fulop, Tamas; McElhaney, Janet; Pawelec, Graham; Cohen, Alan A; Morais, José A; Dupuis, Gilles; Baehl, Sarra; Camous, Xavier; Witkowski, Jacek M; Larbi, Anis

    2015-01-01

    Frailty is a still-evolving concept of a complex phenomenon. There are several algorithms and strategies for assessing frailty syndrome, but currently, no universally accepted definition or measurement protocol has been determined. Consequently, the biological cause(s) of frailty are also poorly defined. Much circumstantial experimental data point to the dysregulation of several key physiological systems, including the neuroendocrine, musculoskeletal, metabolic and immune/inflammatory systems, resulting from alterations in functional reserves. Immune dysregulation and inflammation as causes of frailty have gained some support from the results of longitudinal studies, but a true causal relationship has not been established. This chapter will describe the immune/inflammatory alterations found in frailty and their putative causal relationships with this state. PMID:26301977

  10. Sleep Loss and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Norah S.; Meier-Ewert, Hans K.; Haack, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Controlled, experimental studies on the effects of acute sleep loss in humans have shown that mediators of inflammation are altered by sleep loss. Elevations in these mediators have been found to occur in healthy, rigorously screened individuals undergoing experimental vigils of more than 24 hours, and have also been seen in response to various durations of sleep restricted to between 25 and 50% of a normal 8 hour sleep amount. While these altered profiles represent small changes, such sub-clinical shifts in basal inflammatory cytokines are known to be associated with the future development of metabolic syndrome disease in healthy, asymptomatic individuals. Although the mechanism of this altered inflammatory status in humans undergoing experimental sleep loss is unknown, it is likely that autonomic activation and metabolic changes play key roles. PMID:21112025

  11. Agmatine attenuates silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    El-Agamy, D S; Sharawy, M H; Ammar, E M

    2014-06-01

    There is a large body of evidence that nitric oxide (NO) formation is implicated in mediating silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. As a reactive free radical, NO may not only contribute to lung parenchymal tissue injury but also has the ability to combine with superoxide and form a highly reactive toxic species peroxynitrite that can induce extensive cellular toxicity in the lung tissues. This study aimed to explore the effect of agmatine, a known NO synthase inhibitor, on silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated with agmatine for 60 days following a single intranasal instillation of silica suspension (50 mg in 0.1 ml saline/rat). The results revealed that agmatine attenuated silica-induced lung inflammation as it decreased the lung wet/dry weight ratio, protein concentration, and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Agmatine showed antifibrotic activity as it decreased total hydroxyproline content of the lung and reduced silica-mediated lung inflammation and fibrosis in lung histopathological specimen. In addition, agmatine significantly increased superoxide dismutase (p < 0.001) and reduced glutathione (p < 0.05) activities with significant decrease in the lung malondialdehyde (p < 0.001) content as compared to the silica group. Agmatine also reduced silica-induced overproduction of pulmonary nitrite/nitrate as well as tumor necrosis factor α. Collectively, these results demonstrate the protective effects of agmatine against the silica-induced lung fibrosis that may be attributed to its ability to counteract the NO production, lipid peroxidation, and regulate cytokine effects.

  12. Common lung conditions: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Delzell, John E

    2013-06-01

    The etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is chronic lung inflammation. In the United States, this inflammation most commonly is caused by smoking. COPD is diagnosed when an at-risk patient presents with respiratory symptoms and has irreversible airway obstruction indicated by a forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity ratio of less than 0.7. Management goals for COPD include smoking cessation, symptom reduction, exacerbation reduction, hospitalization avoidance, and improvement of quality of life. Stable patients with COPD who remain symptomatic despite using short-acting bronchodilators should start inhaled maintenance drugs to reduce symptoms and exacerbations, avoid hospitalizations, and improve quality of life. A long-acting anticholinergic or a long-acting beta2-agonist (LABA) can be used for initial therapy; these drugs have fewer adverse effects than inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). If patients remain symptomatic despite monotherapy, dual therapy with a long-acting anticholinergic and a LABA, or a LABA and an ICS, may be beneficial. Triple therapy (ie, a long-acting anticholinergic, a LABA, and an ICS) also is used, but it is unclear if triple therapy is superior to dual therapy. Roflumilast, an oral selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 4, is used to manage moderate to severe COPD. Continuous oxygen therapy is indicated for patients with COPD who have severe hypoxemia (ie, PaO2 less than 55 mm Hg or an oxygen saturation less than 88% on room air). Nonpharmacologic strategies also are useful to improve patient outcomes. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves dyspnea and quality of life. Pulmonary rehabilitation after an acute exacerbation reduces hospitalizations and mortality, and improves quality of life and exercise capacity. Smoking cessation is the most effective management strategy for reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with COPD. Lung volume reduction surgery, bullectomy, and lung transplantation are

  13. Infections, inflammation and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Fujinami, Robert S; White, H Steve; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Blümcke, Ingmar; Sander, Josemir W; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    Epilepsy is the tendency to have unprovoked epileptic seizures. Anything causing structural or functional derangement of brain physiology may lead to seizures, and different conditions may express themselves solely by recurrent seizures and thus be labelled "epilepsy." Worldwide, epilepsy is the most common serious neurological condition. The range of risk factors for the development of epilepsy varies with age and geographic location. Congenital, developmental and genetic conditions are mostly associated with the development of epilepsy in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. Head trauma, infections of the central nervous system (CNS) and tumours may occur at any age and may lead to the development of epilepsy. Infections of the CNS are a major risk factor for epilepsy. The reported risk of unprovoked seizures in population-based cohorts of survivors of CNS infections from developed countries is between 6.8 and 8.3 %, and is much higher in resource-poor countries. In this review, the various viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infectious diseases of the CNS which result in seizures and epilepsy are discussed. The pathogenesis of epilepsy due to brain infections, as well as the role of experimental models to study mechanisms of epileptogenesis induced by infectious agents, is reviewed. The sterile (non-infectious) inflammatory response that occurs following brain insults is also discussed, as well as its overlap with inflammation due to infections, and the potential role in epileptogenesis. Furthermore, autoimmune encephalitis as a cause of seizures is reviewed. Potential strategies to prevent epilepsy resulting from brain infections and non-infectious inflammation are also considered.

  14. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kim, Nick H; Delcroix, Marion; Jenkins, David P; Channick, Richard; Dartevelle, Philippe; Jansa, Pavel; Lang, Irene; Madani, Michael M; Ogino, Hitoshi; Pengo, Vittorio; Mayer, Eckhard

    2014-10-01

    Since the last World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in 2008, we have witnessed numerous and exciting developments in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Emerging clinical data and advances in technology have led to reinforcing and updated guidance on diagnostic approaches to pulmonary hypertension, guidelines that we hope will lead to better recognition and more timely diagnosis of CTEPH. We have new data on treatment practices across international boundaries as well as long-term outcomes for CTEPH patients treated with or without pulmonary endarterectomy. Furthermore, we have expanded data on alternative treatment options for select CTEPH patients, including data from multiple clinical trials of medical therapy, including 1 recent pivotal trial, and compelling case series of percutaneous pulmonary angioplasty. Lastly, we have garnered more experience, and on a larger international scale, with pulmonary endarterectomy, which is the treatment of choice for operable CTEPH. This report overviews and highlights these important interval developments as deliberated among our task force of CTEPH experts and presented at the 2013 World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in Nice, France. (J Am Coil Cardiol 2013;62:D92-9) ©2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  15. The Chinese Herbal Medicine Formula mKG Suppresses Pulmonary Fibrosis of Mice Induced by Bleomycin

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Yao, Li-Fu; Zhao, Yang; Wei, Li-Man; Guo, Peng; Yu, Meng; Cao, Bo; Li, Tan; Chen, Hong; Zou, Zhong-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is a serious progressive lung disease and it originates from inflammation-induced parenchymal injury with excessive extracellular matrix deposition to result in the destruction of the normal lung architecture. Modified Kushen Gancao Formula (mKG), derived from traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has a prominent anti-inflammatory effect. The present study is to explore the inhibitory effects of mKG on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. mKG significantly decreased pulmonary alveolitis, fibrosis scores, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-17 (IL-17), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and hydroxyproline (HYP) levels in lung tissue of mice compared with BLM treatment. It markedly alleviated the increase of HYP content in the lung tissues and pathologic changes of pulmonary fibrosis caused by BLM instillation. In conclusion, mKG has an anti-fibrotic effect and might be employed as a therapeutic candidate agent for attenuating pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26891294

  16. 17(R)-resolvin D1 ameliorates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yatomi, Masakiyo; Hisada, Takeshi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Koga, Yasuhiko; Ono, Akihiro; Kamide, Yosuke; Seki, Kaori; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Sunaga, Noriaki; Kaira, Kyoichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a destructive inflammatory disease with limited therapeutic options. Inflammation plays an integral role in the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Unresolved inflammatory responses can lead to substantial tissue injury, chronic inflammation, and fibrosis. The resolvins are a family of endogenous ω-3 fatty acid derived-lipid mediators of inflammation resolution. Resolvin D1 (RvD1) displays potent anti-inflammatory, pro-resolving activity, without causing immunosuppression. Its epimer, 17(R)-resolvin D1 (17(R)-RvD1), exhibits equivalent functionality to RvD1. In addition, 17(R)-RvD1 is resistant to rapid inactivation by eicosanoid oxidoreductases. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that 17(R)-RvD1 can provide a therapeutic benefit in IPF by reducing inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis, while leaving the normal immune response intact. Mice were exposed to bleomycin (BLM) via micro-osmotic pump to induce pulmonary fibrosis, and were then treated with 17(R)-RvD1 or vehicle by intraperitoneal injection. Administration of 17(R)-RvD1 from the start of BLM treatment attenuated neutrophil alveolar infiltration, lung collagen content, and Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and type I collagen mRNA expression, along with subsequent reduction in histologically detectable fibrosis. The 17(R)-RvD1-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells was inhibited by an antagonist of lipoxin A4 receptor/formyl peptide receptor 2 (ALX/FPR2). The administration of 17(R)-RvD1 at the later fibrotic stage also improved the lung failure. These results suggest that 17(R)-RvD1 attenuates pulmonary fibrosis by promoting the resolution of neutrophilic inflammation and also provides pulmonary restoration. These data highlight the therapeutic potential of 17(R)-RvD1 in the management of this intractable disease. PMID:26660549

  17. [Relevant issues in the pathology and pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Tuder, Rubin M; Archer, Stephen L; Dorfmüller, Peter; Erzurum, Serpil C; Guignabert, Christophe; Michelakis, Evangelos; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Schermuly, Ralph; Stenmark, Kurt R; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge of the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH) continues to accelerate. However, fundamental gaps remain in our understanding of the underlying pathological changes in pulmonary arteries and veins in the different forms of this syndrome. Although PH primarily affects the arteries, venous disease is increasingly recognized as an important entity. Moreover, prognosis in PH is determined largely by the status of the right ventricle, rather than the levels of pulmonary artery pressures. It is increasingly clear that although vasospasm plays a role, PH is an obstructive lung panvasculopathy. Disordered metabolism and mitochondrial structure, inflammation, and dysregulation of growth factors lead to a proliferative, apoptosis-resistant state. These abnormalities may be acquired, genetically mediated as a result of mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor-2 or activin-like kinase-1, or epigenetically inherited (as a result of epigenetic silencing of genes such as superoxide dismutase-2). There is a pressing need to better understand how the pathobiology leads to severe disease in some patients versus mild PH in others. Recent recognition of a potential role of acquired abnormalities of mitochondrial metabolism in the right ventricular myocytes and pulmonary vascular cells suggests new therapeutic approaches, diagnostic modalities, and biomarkers. Finally, dissection of the role of pulmonary inflammation in the initiation and promotion of PH has revealed a complex yet fascinating interplay with pulmonary vascular remodeling, promising to lead to novel therapeutics and diagnostics. Emerging concepts are also relevant to the pathobiology of PH, including a role for bone marrow and circulating progenitor cells and microribonucleic acids. Continued interest in the interface of the genetic basis of PH and cellular and molecular pathogenetic links should further expand our understanding of the disease. (J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;62:D4-12) a 2013 by the

  18. Inflammation and Vascular Effects after Repeated Intratracheal Instillations of Carbon Black and Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Sheykhzade, Majid; Loft, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are considered the main drivers of vasomotor dysfunction and progression of atherosclerosis after inhalation of particulate matter. In addition, new studies have shown that particle exposure can induce the level of bioactive mediators in serum, driving vascular- and systemic toxicity. We aimed to investigate if pulmonary inflammation would accelerate nanoparticle-induced atherosclerotic plaque progression in Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. ApoE -/- mice were exposed to vehicle, 8.53 or 25.6 μg nanosized carbon black (CB) alone or spiked with LPS (0.2 μg/mouse/exposure; once a week for 10 weeks). Inflammation was determined by counting cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Serum Amyloid A3 (Saa3) expression and glutathione status were determined in lung tissue. Plaque progression was assessed in the aorta and the brachiocephalic artery. The effect of vasoactive mediators in plasma of exposed ApoE-/- mice was assessed in aorta rings isolated from naïve C57BL/6 mice. Pulmonary exposure to CB and/or LPS resulted in pulmonary inflammation with a robust influx of neutrophils. The CB exposure did not promote plaque progression in aorta or BCA. Incubation with 0.5% plasma extracted from CB-exposed ApoE-/- mice caused vasoconstriction in aorta rings isolated from naïve mice; this effect was abolished by the treatment with the serotonin receptor antagonist Ketanserin. In conclusion, repeated pulmonary exposure to nanosized CB and LPS caused lung inflammation without progression of atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice. Nevertheless, plasma extracted from mice exposed to nanosized CB induced vasoconstriction in aortas of naïve wild-type mice, an effect possibly related to increased plasma serotonin. PMID:27571356

  19. Inflammation and Vascular Effects after Repeated Intratracheal Instillations of Carbon Black and Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Sheykhzade, Majid; Loft, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan; Møller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are considered the main drivers of vasomotor dysfunction and progression of atherosclerosis after inhalation of particulate matter. In addition, new studies have shown that particle exposure can induce the level of bioactive mediators in serum, driving vascular- and systemic toxicity. We aimed to investigate if pulmonary inflammation would accelerate nanoparticle-induced atherosclerotic plaque progression in Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. ApoE -/- mice were exposed to vehicle, 8.53 or 25.6 μg nanosized carbon black (CB) alone or spiked with LPS (0.2 μg/mouse/exposure; once a week for 10 weeks). Inflammation was determined by counting cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Serum Amyloid A3 (Saa3) expression and glutathione status were determined in lung tissue. Plaque progression was assessed in the aorta and the brachiocephalic artery. The effect of vasoactive mediators in plasma of exposed ApoE-/- mice was assessed in aorta rings isolated from naïve C57BL/6 mice. Pulmonary exposure to CB and/or LPS resulted in pulmonary inflammation with a robust influx of neutrophils. The CB exposure did not promote plaque progression in aorta or BCA. Incubation with 0.5% plasma extracted from CB-exposed ApoE-/- mice caused vasoconstriction in aorta rings isolated from naïve mice; this effect was abolished by the treatment with the serotonin receptor antagonist Ketanserin. In conclusion, repeated pulmonary exposure to nanosized CB and LPS caused lung inflammation without progression of atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice. Nevertheless, plasma extracted from mice exposed to nanosized CB induced vasoconstriction in aortas of naïve wild-type mice, an effect possibly related to increased plasma serotonin. PMID:27571356

  20. Obesity and inflammation in children.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Sinaiko, Alan R

    2006-12-01

    Systemic inflammation is present in children and adults with obesity. Inflammation associated with obesity appears to be central to the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis and may be important in the pathogenesis of other comorbid conditions. Although generally considered an inert energy storage tissue, white adipose tissue is a metabolically active organ. It produces a number of inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase reactants. Inflammation associated with obesity declines after weight loss and with exercise. It may also be possible to modify obesity-associated inflammation with medications, reducing comorbidities without weight loss. The study of inflammation in the context of excessive adipose tissue is central to understanding obesity and modifying its impact on patients.

  1. Phenotypic assessment of pulmonary hypertension using high-resolution echocardiography is feasible in neonatal mice with experimental bronchopulmonary dysplasia and pulmonary hypertension: a step toward preventing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Corey L; Zhang, Shaojie; Shrestha, Amrit Kumar; Barrios, Roberto; Shivanna, Binoy

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic lung diseases of human infants and adults, respectively, that are characterized by alveolar simplification. One-third of the infants with severe BPD develop pulmonary hypertension (PH). More importantly, PH increases morbidity and mortality in BPD patients. Additionally, COPD is a common respiratory morbidity in former BPD patients. The lack of an appropriate small animal model wherein echocardiography (Echo) can demonstrate PH is one of the major barriers to understand the molecular mechanisms of the disease and, thereby, develop rational therapies to prevent and/or treat PH in BPD patients. Thus, the goal of this study was to establish a model of experimental BPD and PH and investigate the feasibility of Echo to diagnose PH in neonatal mice. Since hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress and inflammation contributes to the development of BPD with PH, we tested the hypothesis that exposure of newborn C57BL/6J mice to 70% O2 (hyperoxia) for 14 days leads to lung oxidative stress, inflammation, alveolar and pulmonary vascular simplification, pulmonary vascular remodeling, and Echo evidence of PH. Hyperoxia exposure caused lung oxidative stress and inflammation as evident by increased malondialdehyde adducts and inducible nitric oxide synthase, respectively. Additionally, hyperoxia exposure caused growth restriction, alveolar and pulmonary vascular simplification, and pulmonary vascular remodeling. At 14 days of age, Echo of these mice demonstrated that hyperoxia exposure decreased pulmonary acceleration time (PAT) and PAT/ejection time ratio and increased right ventricular free wall thickness, which are indicators of significant PH. Thus, we have demonstrated the feasibility of Echo to phenotype PH in neonatal mice with experimental BPD with PH, which can aid in discovery of therapies to prevent and/or treat BPD with PH and its sequelae such as COPD in humans. PMID:27478373

  2. Phenotypic assessment of pulmonary hypertension using high-resolution echocardiography is feasible in neonatal mice with experimental bronchopulmonary dysplasia and pulmonary hypertension: a step toward preventing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Corey L; Zhang, Shaojie; Shrestha, Amrit Kumar; Barrios, Roberto; Shivanna, Binoy

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic lung diseases of human infants and adults, respectively, that are characterized by alveolar simplification. One-third of the infants with severe BPD develop pulmonary hypertension (PH). More importantly, PH increases morbidity and mortality in BPD patients. Additionally, COPD is a common respiratory morbidity in former BPD patients. The lack of an appropriate small animal model wherein echocardiography (Echo) can demonstrate PH is one of the major barriers to understand the molecular mechanisms of the disease and, thereby, develop rational therapies to prevent and/or treat PH in BPD patients. Thus, the goal of this study was to establish a model of experimental BPD and PH and investigate the feasibility of Echo to diagnose PH in neonatal mice. Since hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress and inflammation contributes to the development of BPD with PH, we tested the hypothesis that exposure of newborn C57BL/6J mice to 70% O2 (hyperoxia) for 14 days leads to lung oxidative stress, inflammation, alveolar and pulmonary vascular simplification, pulmonary vascular remodeling, and Echo evidence of PH. Hyperoxia exposure caused lung oxidative stress and inflammation as evident by increased malondialdehyde adducts and inducible nitric oxide synthase, respectively. Additionally, hyperoxia exposure caused growth restriction, alveolar and pulmonary vascular simplification, and pulmonary vascular remodeling. At 14 days of age, Echo of these mice demonstrated that hyperoxia exposure decreased pulmonary acceleration time (PAT) and PAT/ejection time ratio and increased right ventricular free wall thickness, which are indicators of significant PH. Thus, we have demonstrated the feasibility of Echo to phenotype PH in neonatal mice with experimental BPD with PH, which can aid in discovery of therapies to prevent and/or treat BPD with PH and its sequelae such as COPD in humans. PMID:27478373

  3. Possible role of anti-SSA/Ro antibodies in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Guerreso, Kelsey; Conner, Edward Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are many different causes of pulmonary hypertension and the pathogenesis of the disease is still being elucidated. Although they are not the most common, autoimmunity and inflammation have been identified as possible causes. No one autoantibody has been identified as the definite cause of pulmonary hypertension. We present a rare association of anti-SSA/Ro antibodies and isolated pulmonary hypertension. Case presentation A 53 year old African American female presented with abdominal pain, nausea, weight loss, dyspnea and fatigue. Upon further exam she was found to have high titers of antinuclear antibodies and anti-SSA/Ro antibodies. This antibody profile would typically be suggestive of Sjögren's Syndrome, which is characterized by dry eyes and poor salivary gland function. However, since this patient did not have any symptoms consistent with the disease a diagnosis of Sjögren's Syndrome could not be made. A combination of laboratory, imaging and diagnostic studies were done that revealed a final diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion It is known that pulmonary hypertension has association with autoimmune diseases, however no clear markers yet exist. Anti-SSA/Ro antibodies have been rarely described in cases of pulmonary disease, and less so in pulmonary hypertension. This case describes a unique association between isolated pulmonary hypertension and anti-SSA/Ro antibody, thereby illustrating the need to investigate this autoantibody and others in the pathogenesis of autoimmune pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27222785

  4. Serum Cytokines in Young Pediatric Patients with Congenital Cardiac Shunts and Altered Pulmonary Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zorzanelli, Leína; Maeda, Nair Yukie; Clavé, Mariana Meira; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Rabinovitch, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. Inflammation is central in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. We investigated how serum cytokines correlate with clinical features, hemodynamics, and lung histology in young patients with pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital cardiac shunts. Design. Prospective, observational study. Methods and Results. Patients (n = 44) were aged 2.6 to 37.6 months. Group I patients (n = 31) were characterized by pulmonary congestion and higher pulmonary blood flow compared to group II (p = 0.022), with no need for preoperative cardiac catheterization. Group II patients (n = 13) had no congestive features. At catheterization, they had elevated pulmonary vascular resistance (5.7 [4.4–7.4] Wood units·m2, geometric mean with 95% CI). Cytokines were measured by chemiluminescence. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was found to be inversely related to pulmonary blood flow (r = −0.33, p = 0.026) and was higher in group II (high pulmonary vascular resistance) compared to group I (high pulmonary blood flow) (p = 0.017). In contrast, RANTES chemokine (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) was characteristically elevated in Group I (p = 0.022). Interleukin 16 was also negatively related to pulmonary blood flow (rS = −0.33, p = 0.029) and was higher in patients with obstructive vasculopathy at intraoperative lung biopsy (p = 0.021). Conclusion. Cytokines seem to be important and differentially regulated in subpopulations of young patients with cardiac shunts.

  5. Serum Cytokines in Young Pediatric Patients with Congenital Cardiac Shunts and Altered Pulmonary Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zorzanelli, Leína; Maeda, Nair Yukie; Clavé, Mariana Meira; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Rabinovitch, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. Inflammation is central in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. We investigated how serum cytokines correlate with clinical features, hemodynamics, and lung histology in young patients with pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital cardiac shunts. Design. Prospective, observational study. Methods and Results. Patients (n = 44) were aged 2.6 to 37.6 months. Group I patients (n = 31) were characterized by pulmonary congestion and higher pulmonary blood flow compared to group II (p = 0.022), with no need for preoperative cardiac catheterization. Group II patients (n = 13) had no congestive features. At catheterization, they had elevated pulmonary vascular resistance (5.7 [4.4–7.4] Wood units·m2, geometric mean with 95% CI). Cytokines were measured by chemiluminescence. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was found to be inversely related to pulmonary blood flow (r = −0.33, p = 0.026) and was higher in group II (high pulmonary vascular resistance) compared to group I (high pulmonary blood flow) (p = 0.017). In contrast, RANTES chemokine (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) was characteristically elevated in Group I (p = 0.022). Interleukin 16 was also negatively related to pulmonary blood flow (rS = −0.33, p = 0.029) and was higher in patients with obstructive vasculopathy at intraoperative lung biopsy (p = 0.021). Conclusion. Cytokines seem to be important and differentially regulated in subpopulations of young patients with cardiac shunts. PMID:27656048

  6. The role of granulocytes in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Palmblad, J

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils secrete of variety of biologically active compounds, especially when they accumulate at sites of inflammation. Secretory products are delivered to the tissues both by exocytosis of cytoplasmic granules and by metabolic events taking place at the plasma membrane. The release of lysosomal constituents, such as lactoferrin, elastase and collagenases, is associated with the regulation of the turnover of neutrophils, their participation and activity in the inflammatory reaction, and breakdown of cartilage and connective tissues, for example. Generation of cytotoxic oxygen radicals and compounds, e.g. the superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and the hydroxyl radical, is initiated by many inflammatory mediators. These two systems, either individually or in collaboration, can cause damage to many types of structures. For instance, when endothelial cells are injured, increased vascular permeability may occur. If such injury involves the pulmonary capillary system a respiratory distress syndrome may supervene. Leukotrienes are potent mediators of inflammation, formed in neutrophils after exposure to various other chemotactic or perturbating compounds. Leukotriene B4 is the most potent of the hitherto described compounds, being a promotor of neutrophil adherence, aggregation and chemotaxis in vitro of similar potency as the formylated synthetic chemotactic peptides, e.g. fMLP, and as the C5a fragment. However, the ability of LTB4 to induce a release of lysosomal enzymes is only half of that of fMLP, and, finally, the capacity to initiate a chemiluminescence response, being a measure of the oxidative metabolism, is only one-tenth of that of fMLP. Thus, leukotrienes of the B series seem to be a signal system whereby activated neutrophils can recruit cellular reinforcements, and, possibly, to act as an intracellular, second messenger system.

  7. Psoriasis and intraocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Knox, D L

    1979-01-01

    Presented in this series were seven men and three women. Ages when seen, ranged from 32 to 68 years (average 54). Psoriasis had begun in childhood in the women and in the late 20's and 30's in the men. Arthritis (ankylosing spondylitis) was present in only one. Their ocular inflammations began from ages 26 to 62 (average 41). The onset of the inflammation was acute iritis in four and in indolent iridocylcitis in six. All but one were bilateral and chronic. The vitreous had heavy debris in nine of the ten patients. The retina was normal in only three. Boggy congestion was present in two with cystoid edema. Patches of edema. fluorescein leaking, depigmentation of both maculae, pars plana exudate, and retinal vessel obliteration to grey-white, shaggy cords was present in at least one of the remaining five patients. Systemic corticosteroid therapy has been used in eight of the ten patients described in this report. Doses no higher than 30 mg of prednisone per day were used to initiate reversal of the inflammatory response. In case 10, knowledge of the sensitivity of the process to steroids led to the successful rapid reversal of a recalcitrant iritis with only 20 mg of prednisone as a first dose and 20 mg per day for less than three weeks. Maintenance corticosteroid therapy ranged from 40 mg of prednisone every other day in case 9, prednisone 12.5 mg one day and 5 mg the next in case 8, to 8 mg of Aristocort or methylprednisolone acetate (M-edrol) daily in cases 1 and 2. In summary, these patients are older, have an indolent onset bilateral uveitis with dense vitreous debris, retinal abnormalites, and are extremely sensitive to systemic corticosteroids. Many of these patients had undergone the series of clinical evaluations known as a "uveitis survey." Many different systemic abnormalities were found and merited treatment which rarely made a difference in their ocular disease, though two improved after infected teeth were treated. Assuming that these ocular diseases

  8. Inflammation, Sanitation, and Consternation

    PubMed Central

    Raison, Charles L.; Lowry, Christopher A.; Rook, Graham A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Context Inflammation is increasingly recognized as contributing to the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD), even in individuals who are otherwise medically healthy. Most studies in search of sources for this increased inflammation have focused on factors such as psychosocial stress and obesity that are known to activate inflammatory processes and increase the risk for depression. However, MDD may be so prevalent in the modern world not just because proinflammatory factors are widespread, but also because we have lost contact with previously available sources of anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory signaling. Objective To examine evidence that disruptions in co-evolved relationships with a variety of tolerogenic microorganisms that were previously ubiquitous in soil, food, and the gut, but that are largely missing from industrialized societies, may contribute to increasing rates of MDD in the modern world. Data Sources Relevant studies were identified using PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE. Study Selection Included were laboratory animal and human studies relevant to immune functioning, the hygiene hypothesis, and major depressive disorder identified via PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE searches. Data Extraction Studies were reviewed by all authors, and data considered to be potentially relevant to the contribution of hygiene-related immune variables to major depressive disorder were extracted. Data Synthesis Significant data suggest that a variety of microorganisms (frequently referred to as the “old friends”) were tasked by coevolutionary processes with training the human immune system to tolerate a wide array of nonthreatening but potentially proinflammatory stimuli. Lacking such immune training, vulnerable individuals in the modern world are at significantly increased risk of mounting inappropriate inflammatory attacks on harmless environmental antigens (leading to asthma), benign food contents and commensals in the gut (leading to inflammatory bowel disease), or

  9. Pulmonary function tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... measured to estimate the lung volume. To measure diffusion capacity , you breathe a harmless gas, called a ... on your report after pulmonary function tests include: Diffusion capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO) Expiratory reserve volume ( ...

  10. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  11. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cough, shortness of breath, fatigue and low blood oxygen levels. Pulmonary fibrosis can be caused by an ... breath. Your health care provider may notice the oxygen levels in your blood drop when you walk. ...

  12. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Measurements of blood oxygen level (arterial blood gases) Pulmonary function tests 6-minute walk test Tests for connective tissue diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis , lupus, or scleroderma Open lung (surgical) lung biopsy

  13. Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Belts! For PFF Spend an evening with the stars on Monday, February 27, 2017. MORE PFF Moved ... Patients The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation has a four-star rating from Charity Navigator and is a Better ...

  14. Pulmonary hyalinizing granulomas.

    PubMed

    Macedo, E V; Adolph, J

    1985-03-01

    Little has been written about pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma as a cause of nodules in the lungs. In a patient with a past history of carcinoma of the breast, the diagnosis made a significant difference in the prognosis. PMID:2984210

  15. Pulmonary rehabilitation in adults.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation can help people with long-term lung conditions whose symptoms, such as breathlessness and being easily tired out by daily activities, seriously impact their lives. PMID:27408642

  16. Cannabidiol improves lung function and inflammation in mice submitted to LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A; Almeida, V I; Costola-de-Souza, C; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Vitoretti, L B; Gimenes-Junior, J A; Akamine, A T; Crippa, J A; Tavares-de-Lima, W; Palermo-Neto, J

    2015-02-01

    We have previously shown that the prophylactic treatment with cannabidiol (CBD) reduces inflammation in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). In this work we analyzed the effects of the therapeutic treatment with CBD in mice subjected to the model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI on pulmonary mechanics and inflammation. CBD (20 and 80 mg/kg) was administered (i.p.) to mice 6 h after LPS-induced lung inflammation. One day (24 h) after the induction of inflammation the assessment of pulmonary mechanics and inflammation were analyzed. The results show that CBD decreased total lung resistance and elastance, leukocyte migration into the lungs, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, protein concentration and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage supernatant. Thus, we conclude that CBD administered therapeutically, i.e. during an ongoing inflammatory process, has a potent anti-inflammatory effect and also improves the lung function in mice submitted to LPS-induced ALI. Therefore the present and previous data suggest that in the future cannabidiol might become a useful therapeutic tool for the attenuation and treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.

  17. Lung inflammation caused by inhaled toxicants: a review

    PubMed Central

    Wong, John; Magun, Bruce E; Wood, Lisa J

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of the lungs to airborne toxicants from different sources in the environment may lead to acute and chronic pulmonary or even systemic inflammation. Cigarette smoke is the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, although wood smoke in urban areas of underdeveloped countries is now recognized as a leading cause of respiratory disease. Mycotoxins from fungal spores pose an occupational risk for respiratory illness and also present a health hazard to those living in damp buildings. Microscopic airborne particulates of asbestos and silica (from building materials) and those of heavy metals (from paint) are additional sources of indoor air pollution that contributes to respiratory illness and is known to cause respiratory illness in experimental animals. Ricin in aerosolized form is a potential bioweapon that is extremely toxic yet relatively easy to produce. Although the aforementioned agents belong to different classes of toxic chemicals, their pathogenicity is similar. They induce the recruitment and activation of macrophages, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, inhibition of protein synthesis, and production of interleukin-1 beta. Targeting either macrophages (using nanoparticles) or the production of interleukin-1 beta (using inhibitors against protein kinases, NOD-like receptor protein-3, or P2X7) may potentially be employed to treat these types of lung inflammation without affecting the natural immune response to bacterial infections. PMID:27382275

  18. Lung inflammation caused by inhaled toxicants: a review.

    PubMed

    Wong, John; Magun, Bruce E; Wood, Lisa J

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of the lungs to airborne toxicants from different sources in the environment may lead to acute and chronic pulmonary or even systemic inflammation. Cigarette smoke is the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, although wood smoke in urban areas of underdeveloped countries is now recognized as a leading cause of respiratory disease. Mycotoxins from fungal spores pose an occupational risk for respiratory illness and also present a health hazard to those living in damp buildings. Microscopic airborne particulates of asbestos and silica (from building materials) and those of heavy metals (from paint) are additional sources of indoor air pollution that contributes to respiratory illness and is known to cause respiratory illness in experimental animals. Ricin in aerosolized form is a potential bioweapon that is extremely toxic yet relatively easy to produce. Although the aforementioned agents belong to different classes of toxic chemicals, their pathogenicity is similar. They induce the recruitment and activation of macrophages, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, inhibition of protein synthesis, and production of interleukin-1 beta. Targeting either macrophages (using nanoparticles) or the production of interleukin-1 beta (using inhibitors against protein kinases, NOD-like receptor protein-3, or P2X7) may potentially be employed to treat these types of lung inflammation without affecting the natural immune response to bacterial infections. PMID:27382275

  19. Eosinophils generate brominating oxidants in allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weijia; Samoszuk, Michael K.; Comhair, Suzy A.A.; Thomassen, Mary Jane; Farver, Carol F.; Dweik, Raed A.; Kavuru, Mani S.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2000-01-01

    Eosinophils promote tissue injury and contribute to the pathogenesis of allergen-triggered diseases like asthma, but the chemical basis of damage to eosinophil targets is unknown. We now demonstrate that eosinophil activation in vivo results in oxidative damage of proteins through bromination of tyrosine residues, a heretofore unrecognized pathway for covalent modification of biologic targets in human tissues. Mass spectrometric studies demonstrated that 3-bromotyrosine serves as a specific “molecular fingerprint” for proteins modified through the eosinophil peroxidase-H2O2 system in the presence of plasma levels of halides. We applied a localized allergen challenge to model the effects of eosinophils and brominating oxidants in human lung injury. Endobronchial biopsy specimens from allergen-challenged lung segments of asthmatic, but not healthy control, subjects demonstrated significant enrichments in eosinophils and eosinophil peroxidase. Baseline levels of 3-bromotyrosine in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) proteins from mildly allergic asthmatic individuals were modestly but not statistically significantly elevated over those in control subjects. After exposure to segmental allergen challenge, lung segments of asthmatics, but not healthy control subjects, exhibited a >10-fold increase in BAL 3-bromotyrosine content, but only two- to threefold increases in 3-chlorotyrosine, a specific oxidation product formed by neutrophil- and monocyte-derived myeloperoxidase. These results identify reactive brominating species produced by eosinophils as a distinct class of oxidants formed in vivo. They also reveal eosinophil peroxidase as a potential therapeutic target for allergen-triggered inflammatory tissue injury in humans. PMID:10811853

  20. Modulation of pulmonary inflammatory responses and anti-microbial defenses in mice exposed to diesel exhaust

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major component of urban air pollution and has been shown to increase the severity of infectious and allergic lung disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of DE exposure on pulmonary inflammation, mediator production and ...

  1. PULMONARY AND CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION FOLLOWING ACUTE ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLE INHALATION IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhalation of ultrafine carbon particles (ufCP) causes cardiac physiological changes without marked pulmonary injury or inflammation. We hypothesized that acute ufCP exposure of 13 months old Spontaneously Hypertensive (SH) rats will cause differential effects on the lung and hea...

  2. Mechanisms Underlying Inflammation in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Christopher K.; Saijo, Kaoru; Winner, Beate; Marchetto, Maria Carolina; Gage, Fred H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis. In this Review, we discuss inducers, sensors, transducers, and effectors of neuroinflammation that contribute to neuronal dysfunction and death. Although inducers of inflammation may be generated in a disease-specific manner, there is evidence for a remarkable convergence in the mechanisms responsible for the sensing, transduction, and amplification of inflammatory processes that result in the production of neurotoxic mediators. A major unanswered question is whether pharmacological inhibition of inflammation pathways will be able to safely reverse or slow the course of disease. PMID:20303880

  3. Definition and classification of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Evgenov, Oleg V; Simonneau, Gérald

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is defined as an increase of mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mmHg at rest as assessed by right heart catheterization. According to different combinations of values of pulmonary wedge pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac output, a hemodynamic classification of pulmonary hypertension has been proposed. Of major importance is the pulmonary wedge pressure which allows to distinguish pre-capillary (pulmonary wedge pressure ≤15 mmHg) and post-capillary (pulmonary wedge pressure >15 mmHg) pulmonary hypertension. Pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension includes the clinical groups 1 (pulmonary arterial hypertension), 3 (pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia), 4 (chronic thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension) and 5 (pulmonary hypertension with unclear and/or multifactorial mechanisms). Post-capillary pulmonary hypertension corresponds to the clinical group 2 (pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases).

  4. Role of oxidized lipids in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Salil; Ruffenach, Grégoire; Umar, Soban; Motayagheni, Negar; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a multifactorial disease characterized by interplay of many cellular, molecular, and genetic events that lead to excessive proliferation of pulmonary cells, including smooth muscle and endothelial cells; inflammation; and extracellular matrix remodeling. Abnormal vascular changes and structural remodeling associated with PAH culminate in vasoconstriction and obstruction of pulmonary arteries, contributing to increased pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular failure. The complex molecular mechanisms involved in the pathobiology of PAH are the limiting factors in the development of potential therapeutic interventions for PAH. Over the years, our group and others have demonstrated the critical implication of lipids in the pathogenesis of PAH. This review specifically focuses on the current understanding of the role of oxidized lipids, lipid metabolism, peroxidation, and oxidative stress in the progression of PAH. This review also discusses the relevance of apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides and microRNA-193, which are known to regulate the levels of oxidized lipids, as potential therapeutics in PAH. PMID:27683603

  5. Role of oxidized lipids in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Salil; Ruffenach, Grégoire; Umar, Soban; Motayagheni, Negar; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a multifactorial disease characterized by interplay of many cellular, molecular, and genetic events that lead to excessive proliferation of pulmonary cells, including smooth muscle and endothelial cells; inflammation; and extracellular matrix remodeling. Abnormal vascular changes and structural remodeling associated with PAH culminate in vasoconstriction and obstruction of pulmonary arteries, contributing to increased pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular failure. The complex molecular mechanisms involved in the pathobiology of PAH are the limiting factors in the development of potential therapeutic interventions for PAH. Over the years, our group and others have demonstrated the critical implication of lipids in the pathogenesis of PAH. This review specifically focuses on the current understanding of the role of oxidized lipids, lipid metabolism, peroxidation, and oxidative stress in the progression of PAH. This review also discusses the relevance of apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides and microRNA-193, which are known to regulate the levels of oxidized lipids, as potential therapeutics in PAH.

  6. Role of oxidized lipids in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ruffenach, Grégoire; Umar, Soban; Motayagheni, Negar; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a multifactorial disease characterized by interplay of many cellular, molecular, and genetic events that lead to excessive proliferation of pulmonary cells, including smooth muscle and endothelial cells; inflammation; and extracellular matrix remodeling. Abnormal vascular changes and structural remodeling associated with PAH culminate in vasoconstriction and obstruction of pulmonary arteries, contributing to increased pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular failure. The complex molecular mechanisms involved in the pathobiology of PAH are the limiting factors in the development of potential therapeutic interventions for PAH. Over the years, our group and others have demonstrated the critical implication of lipids in the pathogenesis of PAH. This review specifically focuses on the current understanding of the role of oxidized lipids, lipid metabolism, peroxidation, and oxidative stress in the progression of PAH. This review also discusses the relevance of apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides and microRNA-193, which are known to regulate the levels of oxidized lipids, as potential therapeutics in PAH. PMID:27683603

  7. Role of oxidized lipids in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ruffenach, Grégoire; Umar, Soban; Motayagheni, Negar; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a multifactorial disease characterized by interplay of many cellular, molecular, and genetic events that lead to excessive proliferation of pulmonary cells, including smooth muscle and endothelial cells; inflammation; and extracellular matrix remodeling. Abnormal vascular changes and structural remodeling associated with PAH culminate in vasoconstriction and obstruction of pulmonary arteries, contributing to increased pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular failure. The complex molecular mechanisms involved in the pathobiology of PAH are the limiting factors in the development of potential therapeutic interventions for PAH. Over the years, our group and others have demonstrated the critical implication of lipids in the pathogenesis of PAH. This review specifically focuses on the current understanding of the role of oxidized lipids, lipid metabolism, peroxidation, and oxidative stress in the progression of PAH. This review also discusses the relevance of apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides and microRNA-193, which are known to regulate the levels of oxidized lipids, as potential therapeutics in PAH.

  8. Does airway colonization cause systemic inflammation in bronchiectasis?

    PubMed

    Ergan Arsava, Begüm; Cöplü, Lütfi

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests the presence of accompanying systemic inflammation in chronic inflammatory airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma; however little is known regarding the presence of systemic inflammation in bronchiectasis. Although bronchiectasis was initially considered a stationary process, chronic bacterial colonization causes airway inflammation and progressive airway damage. The aim of this study was to determine the level of systemic inflammation in bronchiectasis patients and identify its relationship with colonization. White blood cell (WBC) count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), plasma fibrinogen, interleukin-8, tumor necrosis factor-α and leptin levels were determined in clinically stable bronchiectasis patients (n= 50), and age- and sex-matched controls. Bronchiectasis patients were also analyzed according to colonization in sputum samples. There was no significant difference between bronchiectasis and control groups with respect to inflammatory markers but median (interquartile range-IQR) WBC count, CRP and fibrinogen levels were significantly higher in colonized patients (n= 14) when compared to non-colonized patients [8.2 (6.4-9.5) vs. 6.4 (5.8-7.7) x 103/mm3, 0.91 (0.45-1.29) vs. 0.42 (0.30-0.77) mg/dL, 433.5 (390.3-490.3) vs. 392.0 (327.0-416.0) mg/dL, respectively; p< 0.05]. There was no evidence supporting the presence of systemic inflammation in the overall bronchiectasis group when compared to controls. However, elevated WBC count, CRP and fibrinogen levels in patients with colonization suggest the presence of a systemic inflammatory response in clinically stable bronchiectasis patients with colonization. PMID:22233303

  9. Size effects of latex nanomaterials on lung inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko; Shimada, Akinori

    2009-01-01

    Effects of nano-sized materials (nanomaterials) on sensitive population have not been well elucidated. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to (latex) nanomaterials on lung inflammation related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or allergen in mice, especially in terms of their size-dependency. In protocol 1, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received a single exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (250 {mu}g/animal) with three sizes (25, 50, and 100 nm), LPS (75 {mu}g/animal), or LPS plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 2, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received repeated exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (100 {mu}g/animal), allergen (ovalbumin: OVA; 1 {mu}g/animal), or allergen plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 1, latex nanomaterials with all sizes exacerbated lung inflammation elicited by LPS, showing an overall trend of amplified lung expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, LPS plus nanomaterials, especially with size less than 50 nm, significantly elevated circulatory levels of fibrinogen, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant, and von Willebrand factor as compared with LPS alone. The enhancement tended overall to be greater with the smaller nanomaterials than with the larger ones. In protocol 2, latex nanomaterials with all sizes did not significantly enhance the pathophysiology of allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation and Igs production, although latex nanomaterials with less than 50 nm significantly induced/enhanced neutrophilic lung inflammation. These results suggest that latex nanomaterials differentially affect two types of (innate and adaptive immunity-dominant) lung inflammation.

  10. Patients with chronic pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Caron M; Galvagno, Samuel M

    2013-11-01

    Chronic pulmonary disease is common among the surgical population and the importance of a thorough and detailed preoperative assessment is monumental for minimizing morbidity and mortality and reducing the risk of perioperative pulmonary complications. These comorbidities contribute to pulmonary postoperative complications, including atelectasis, pneumonia, and respiratory failure, and can predict long-term mortality. The important aspects of the preoperative assessment for patients with chronic pulmonary disease, and the value of preoperative testing and smoking cessation, are discussed. Specifically discussed are preoperative pulmonary assessment and management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, restrictive lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and obesity. PMID:24182721

  11. Pulmonary hypertension imitating HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease presenting with microangiopathic haemolysis, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes imitating severe preeclampsia (HELLP syndrome) is described. Connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Maternal mortality rates with pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy are extremely high. All women with connective tissue disorders should have pulmonary hypertension excluded by echocardiography before attempting conception. End-stage pulmonary hypertension may be associated with haemolysis and thrombocytopenia and thus may imitate severe preeclampsia in pregnant women. There may be a role for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the peripartum management of women with severe pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27656251

  12. Pulmonary hypertension imitating HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease presenting with microangiopathic haemolysis, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes imitating severe preeclampsia (HELLP syndrome) is described. Connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Maternal mortality rates with pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy are extremely high. All women with connective tissue disorders should have pulmonary hypertension excluded by echocardiography before attempting conception. End-stage pulmonary hypertension may be associated with haemolysis and thrombocytopenia and thus may imitate severe preeclampsia in pregnant women. There may be a role for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the peripartum management of women with severe pulmonary hypertension.

  13. Pulmonary toxicity of printer toner following inhalation and intratracheal instillation.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Oyabu, Takako; Horie, Masanori; Kambara, Tatsunori; Izumi, Hiroto; Kuroda, Etsushi; Creutzenberg, Otto; Bellmann, Bernd; Pohlmann, Gerhard; Schuchardt, Sven; Hansen, Tanja; Ernst, Heinrich

    2013-10-01

    The pulmonary effects of a finished toner were evaluated in intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies, using toners with external additives (titanium dioxide nanoparticles and amorphous silica nanoparticles). Rats received an intratracheal dose of 1 mg or 2 mg of toner and were sacrificed at 3 days, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months. The toner induced pulmonary inflammation, as evidenced by a transient neutrophil response in the low-dose groups and persistent neutrophil infiltration in the high-dose groups. There were increased concentrations of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) as a marker of oxidative stress in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the lung. In a 90-day inhalation study, rats were exposed to well-dispersed toner (mean of MMAD: 3.76 µm). The three mass concentrations of toner were 1, 4 and 16 mg/m(3) for 13 weeks, and the rats were sacrificed at 6 days and 91 days after the end of the exposure period. The low and medium concentrations did not induce neutrophil infiltration in the lung of statistical significance, but the high concentration did, and, in addition, upon histopathological examination not only showed findings of inflammation but also of fibrosis in the lung. Taken together, the results of our studies suggest that toners with external additives lead to pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis at lung burdens suggest beyond the overload. The changes observed in the pulmonary responses in this inhalation study indicate that the high concentration (16 mg/m(3)) is an LOAEL and that the medium concentration (4 mg/m(3)) is an NOAEL.

  14. Biofilms and chronic wound inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, R D; Rhoads, D D; Dowd, S E

    2008-08-01

    In contrast to the commonly accepted hypothesis of host-centred pathology, it is possible that surface bacteria, not host dysfunction, cause the chronicity and perpetual inflammation associated with chronic non-healing wounds.

  15. Predictors of Pulmonary Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Miniati, Massimo; Bottai, Matteo; Ciccotosto, Cesario; Roberto, Luca; Monti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the setting of acute pulmonary embolism (PE), pulmonary infarction is deemed to occur primarily in individuals with compromised cardiac function. The current study was undertaken to establish the prevalence of pulmonary infarction in patients with acute PE, and the relationship between infarction and: age, body height, body mass index (BMI), smoking habits, clot burden, and comorbidities. The authors studied prospectively 335 patients with acute PE diagnosed by computed tomographic angiography (CT) in 18 hospitals throughout central Italy. The diagnosis of pulmonary infarction on CT was based on Hampton and Castleman's criteria (cushion-like or hemispherical consolidation lying along the visceral pleura). Multivariable logistic regression was used to model the relationship between covariates and the probability of pulmonary infarction. The prevalence of pulmonary infarction was 31%. Patients with infarction were significantly younger and with significantly lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease than those without (P < 0.001). The frequency of infarction increased linearly with increasing height, and decreased with increasing BMI. In logistic regression, the covariates significantly associated with the probability of infarction were age, body height, BMI, and current smoking. The risk of infarction grew with age, peaked at approximately age 40, and decreased afterwards. Increasing body height and current smoking were significant amplifiers of the risk of infarction, whereas increasing BMI appeared to confer some protection. Our data indicate that pulmonary infarction occurs in nearly one-third of the patients with acute PE. Those with infarction are often young and otherwise healthy. Increasing body height and active smoking are predisposing risk factors. PMID:26469892

  16. IL-1R signalling is critical for regulation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes-induced acute lung inflammation in C57Bl/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Girtsman, Teri Alyn; Beamer, Celine A; Wu, Nianqiang; Buford, Mary; Holian, Andrij

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to certain engineered nanomaterials has been associated with pathological changes in animal models raising concerns about potential human health effects. MWCNT have been reported to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in vitro, correlating with lung inflammation and pathology, in vivo. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-1 signalling in pulmonary inflammatory responses in WT and IL-1R−/− mice after exposure to MWCNT. The results suggest that MWCNT were effective in inducing acute pulmonary inflammation. Additionally, WT mice demonstrated significant increased airway resistance 24 h post exposure to MWCNT, which was also blocked in the IL-1R−/− mice. In contrast, by 28 days post exposure to MWCNT, the inflammatory response that was initially absent in IL-1R−/− mice was elevated in comparison to the WT mice. These data suggest that IL-1R signalling plays a crucial role in the regulation of MWCNT-induced pulmonary inflammation. PMID:23094697

  17. Inflammation in diabetic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Patricia M; Getino-Melián, María A; Domínguez-Pimentel, Virginia; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus entails significant health problems worldwide. The pathogenesis of diabetes is multifactorial, resulting from interactions of both genetic and environmental factors that trigger a complex network of pathophysiological events, with metabolic and hemodynamic alterations. In this context, inflammation has emerged as a key pathophysiology mechanism. New pathogenic pathways will provide targets for prevention or future treatments. This review will focus on the implications of inflammation in diabetes mellitus, with special attention to inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25126391

  18. Inflammation in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    García-García, Patricia M; Getino-Melián, María A; Domínguez-Pimentel, Virginia; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2014-08-15

    Diabetes mellitus entails significant health problems worldwide. The pathogenesis of diabetes is multifactorial, resulting from interactions of both genetic and environmental factors that trigger a complex network of pathophysiological events, with metabolic and hemodynamic alterations. In this context, inflammation has emerged as a key pathophysiology mechanism. New pathogenic pathways will provide targets for prevention or future treatments. This review will focus on the implications of inflammation in diabetes mellitus, with special attention to inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25126391

  19. Differential effects of pirfenidone on acute pulmonary injury and ensuing fibrosis in the hamster model of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Card, Jeffrey W; Racz, William J; Brien, James F; Margolin, Solomon B; Massey, Thomas E

    2003-09-01

    Pulmonary toxicity, including fibrosis, is a serious adverse effect associated with the antidysrhythmic drug amiodarone (AM). We tested the potential usefulness of pirfenidone against AM-induced pulmonary toxicity in the hamster model. Intratracheal AM administration resulted in pulmonary fibrosis 21 days posttreatment, as evidenced by an increased hydroxyproline content and histological damage. Dietary pirfenidone administration (0.5% w/w in chow), for 3 days prior to and continuously after AM, prevented fibrosis and suppressed elevation of pulmonary transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 mRNA content at 7 and 21 days post-AM. Protection against AM-induced lung damage was not observed when supplementation with pirfenidone was delayed until 7 days following AM administration, suggesting that alteration of early events in AM lung toxicity is necessary for the protective effect of pirfenidone. Both AM and bleomycin, another pulmonary fibrogen, caused inflammation 24 h after intratracheal dosing, measured as increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, protein content, and cellular alterations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, with the response to AM markedly greater than that to bleomycin. Administration of AM, but not bleomycin, also caused whole lung mitochondrial dysfunction, alveolar macrophage death, and an influx of eosinophils into the lung, of which pirfenidone was able to decrease only the latter. We conclude that: (1) AM induces alveolar macrophage death and severe, acute pulmonary inflammation with associated eosinophilia following intratracheal administration; (2) mitochondrial dysfunction may play an early role in AM pulmonary injury; and (3) pirfenidone decreases AM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in the hamster, probably through suppression of TGF-beta1 gene expression.

  20. Pulmonary oedema of immersion.

    PubMed

    Koehle, Michael S; Lepawsky, Michael; McKenzie, Donald C

    2005-01-01

    Acute pulmonary oedema has been described in individuals participating in three aquatic activities: (i) scuba diving; (ii) breath-hold diving; and (iii) endurance swimming. In this review, 60 published cases have been compiled for comparison. Variables considered included: age; past medical history; activity; water depth, type (salt or fresh) and temperature; clinical presentation; investigations; management; and outcome. From these data, we conclude that a similar phenomenon is occurring among scuba, breath-hold divers and swimmers. The pathophysiology is likely a pulmonary overperfusion mechanism. High pulmonary capillary pressures lead to extravasation of fluid into the interstitium. This overperfusion is caused by the increase in ambient pressure, peripheral vasoconstriction from ambient cold, and increased pulmonary blood flow resulting from exercise. Affected individuals are typically healthy males and females. Older individuals may be at higher risk. The most common symptoms are cough and dyspnoea, with haemoptysis also a frequent occurrence. Chest pain has never been reported. Radiography is the investigation of choice, demonstrating typical findings for pulmonary oedema. Management is supportive, with oxygen the mainstay of treatment. Cases usually resolve within 24 hours. In some cases, diuretics have been used, but there are no data as to their efficacy. Nifedipine has been used to prevent recurrence, but there is only anecdotal evidence to support its use.

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and glucose metabolism: a bitter sweet symphony.

    PubMed

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are common and underdiagnosed medical conditions. It was predicted that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease will be the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020. The healthcare burden of this disease is even greater if we consider the significant impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be considered as a novel risk factor for new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus via multiple pathophysiological alterations such as: inflammation and oxidative stress, insulin resistance, weight gain and alterations in metabolism of adipokines. On the other hand, diabetes may act as an independent factor, negatively affecting pulmonary structure and function. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary infections, disease exacerbations and worsened COPD outcomes. On the top of that, coexistent OSA may increase the risk for type 2 DM in some individuals. The current scientific data necessitate a greater outlook on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be viewed as a risk factor for the new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. Conversely, both types of diabetes mellitus should be viewed as strong contributing factors for the development of obstructive lung disease. Such approach can potentially improve the outcomes and medical control for both conditions, and, thus, decrease the healthcare burden of these major medical problems.

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and glucose metabolism: a bitter sweet symphony

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are common and underdiagnosed medical conditions. It was predicted that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease will be the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020. The healthcare burden of this disease is even greater if we consider the significant impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be considered as a novel risk factor for new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus via multiple pathophysiological alterations such as: inflammation and oxidative stress, insulin resistance, weight gain and alterations in metabolism of adipokines. On the other hand, diabetes may act as an independent factor, negatively affecting pulmonary structure and function. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary infections, disease exacerbations and worsened COPD outcomes. On the top of that, coexistent OSA may increase the risk for type 2 DM in some individuals. The current scientific data necessitate a greater outlook on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be viewed as a risk factor for the new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. Conversely, both types of diabetes mellitus should be viewed as strong contributing factors for the development of obstructive lung disease. Such approach can potentially improve the outcomes and medical control for both conditions, and, thus, decrease the healthcare burden of these major medical problems. PMID:23101436

  3. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase: A new therapeutic target for pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Das Gupta, Asish; Bowman, Lindsay; D’Arsigny, Christine L.; Archer, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) activates soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by binding its prosthetic heme group, thereby catalyzing cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) synthesis. cGMP causes vasodilation and may inhibit smooth muscle cell proliferation and platelet aggregation. The NO-sGC-cGMP pathway is disordered in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a syndrome in which pulmonary vascular obstruction, inflammation, thrombosis, and constriction ultimately lead to death from right heart failure. Expression of sGC is increased in PAH but its function is reduced by decreased NO bioavailability, sGC oxidation and the related loss of sGC’s heme group. Two classes of sGC modulators offer promise in PAH. sGC stimulators (e.g. riociguat) require heme-containing sGC to catalyze cGMP production, whereas sGC activators (e.g. cinaciguat) activate heme-free sGC. Riociguat is approved for PAH and yields functional and hemodynamic benefits similar to other therapies. Its main serious adverse effect is dose-dependent hypotension Riociguat is also approved for inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25670386

  4. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. ... Complications that may develop include: Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) Respiratory failure

  5. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease that makes it difficult to empty air out of the lungs. This difficulty in ...

  6. Marine Natural Product Inhibitors of Neutrophil-Associated Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chang, Wen-Yi; Yang, Shun-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are widely recognized to play an important role in acute inflammatory responses, and recent evidence has expanded their role to modulating chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and microbicidal compounds released from neutrophils that are recruited to the site of inflammation contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple inflammation-associated diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, atherosclerosis, and hepatitis. Marine organisms are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with potential for industrial and pharmaceutical application. Marine natural products that inhibit neutrophil activation could be used as drugs for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Numerous studies investigating marine natural products have reported novel anti-inflammatory agents. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanisms underlying their actions, which could facilitate our understanding of the molecular events occurring in neutrophils, have not been reported in most of the associated research studies. Therefore, in this review, we will present marine products that inhibit neutrophil-associated inflammation. Furthermore, we will be limiting the detailed discussion to agents with well-investigated molecular targets. PMID:27472345

  7. Marine Natural Product Inhibitors of Neutrophil-Associated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chang, Wen-Yi; Yang, Shun-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are widely recognized to play an important role in acute inflammatory responses, and recent evidence has expanded their role to modulating chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and microbicidal compounds released from neutrophils that are recruited to the site of inflammation contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple inflammation-associated diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, atherosclerosis, and hepatitis. Marine organisms are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with potential for industrial and pharmaceutical application. Marine natural products that inhibit neutrophil activation could be used as drugs for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Numerous studies investigating marine natural products have reported novel anti-inflammatory agents. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanisms underlying their actions, which could facilitate our understanding of the molecular events occurring in neutrophils, have not been reported in most of the associated research studies. Therefore, in this review, we will present marine products that inhibit neutrophil-associated inflammation. Furthermore, we will be limiting the detailed discussion to agents with well-investigated molecular targets. PMID:27472345

  8. Differential pulmonary and cardiac effects of pulmonary exposure to a panel of particulate matter-associated metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wallenborn, J. Grace; Schladweiler, Mette J.; Richards, Judy H.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2009-11-15

    Biological mechanisms underlying the association between particulate matter (PM) exposure and increased cardiovascular health effects are under investigation. Water-soluble metals reaching systemic circulation following pulmonary exposure are likely exerting a direct effect. However, it is unclear whether specific PM-associated metals may be driving this. We hypothesized that exposure to equimolar amounts of five individual PM-associated metals would cause differential pulmonary and cardiac effects. We exposed male WKY rats (14 weeks old) via a single intratracheal instillation (IT) to saline or 1 mumol/kg body weight of zinc, nickel, vanadium, copper, or iron in sulfate form. Responses were analyzed 4, 24, 48, or 96 h after exposure. Pulmonary effects were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid levels of total cells, macrophages, neutrophils, protein, albumin, and activities of lactate dehydrogenase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and n-acetyl glucosaminidase. Copper induced earlier pulmonary injury/inflammation, while zinc and nickel produced later effects. Vanadium or iron exposure induced minimal pulmonary injury/inflammation. Zinc, nickel, or copper increased serum cholesterol, red blood cells, and white blood cells at different time points. IT of nickel and copper increased expression of metallothionein-1 (MT-1) in the lung. Zinc, nickel, vanadium, and iron increased hepatic MT-1 expression. No significant changes in zinc transporter-1 (ZnT-1) expression were noted in the lung or liver; however, zinc increased cardiac ZnT-1 at 24 h, indicating a possible zinc-specific cardiac effect. Nickel exposure induced an increase in cardiac ferritin 96 h after IT. This data set demonstrating metal-specific cardiotoxicity is important in linking metal-enriched anthropogenic PM sources with adverse health effects.

  9. A Mathematical Model of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wenrui; Marsh, Clay; Friedman, Avner

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a disease of unknown etiology, and life expectancy of 3-5 years after diagnosis. The incidence rate in the United States is estimated as high as 15 per 100,000 persons per year. The disease is characterized by repeated injury to the alveolar epithelium, resulting in inflammation and deregulated repair, leading to scarring of the lung tissue, resulting in progressive dyspnea and hypoxemia. The disease has no cure, although new drugs are in clinical trials and two agents have been approved for use by the FDA. In the present paper we develop a mathematical model based on the interactions among cells and proteins that are involved in the progression of the disease. The model simulations are shown to be in agreement with available lung tissue data of human patients. The model can be used to explore the efficacy of potential drugs. PMID:26348490

  10. Skeletal Implications of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Misof, Barbara M; Moreira, Carolina A; Klaushofer, Klaus; Roschger, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with numerous comorbidities, among which osteoporosis is of high significance. Low bone mass and the occurrence of fragility fractures is a common finding in patients with COPD. Typical risk factors related directly or indirectly to these skeletal complications include systemic inflammation, tobacco smoking, vitamin D deficiency, and treatment with oral or inhaled corticosteroids. In particular, treatment with glucocorticoids appears to be a strong contributor to bone changes in COPD, but does not fully account for all skeletal complications. Additional to the effects of COPD on bone mass, there is evidence for COPD-related changes in bone microstructure and material properties. This review summarizes the clinical outcomes of low bone mass and increased fracture risk, and reports on recent observations in bone tissue and material in COPD patients. PMID:26861899

  11. Musculoskeletal Disorders in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cielen, Nele; Maes, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lung disease characterized by airway obstruction and inflammation but also accompanied by several extrapulmonary consequences, such as skeletal muscle weakness and osteoporosis. Skeletal muscle weakness is of major concern, since it leads to poor functional capacity, impaired health status, increased healthcare utilization, and even mortality, independently of lung function. Osteoporosis leads to fractures and is associated with increased mortality, functional decline, loss of quality of life, and need for institutionalization. Therefore, the presence of the combination of these comorbidities will have a negative impact on daily life in patients with COPD. In this review, we will focus on these two comorbidities, their prevalence in COPD, combined risk factors, and pathogenesis. We will try to prove the clustering of these comorbidities and discuss possible preventive or therapeutic strategies. PMID:24783225

  12. Modelling pulmonary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Tawhai, Merryn H.; Burrowes, Kelly S.

    2008-01-01

    Computational model analysis is a method that has been used widely to understand and interpret complexity of interactions in the pulmonary system. Pulmonary blood transport is a multi-scale phenomenon that involves scale-dependent structure and function, therefore requiring different model assumptions for the microcirculation and the arterial or venous flows. The blood transport systems interact with the surrounding lung tissue, and are dependent on hydrostatic pressure gradients, control of vasoconstriction, and the topology and material composition of the vascular trees. This review focuses on computational models that have been developed to study the different mechanisms contributing to regional perfusion of the lung. Different models for the microcirculation and the pulmonary arteries are considered, including fractal approaches and anatomically-based methods. The studies that are reviewed illustrate the different complementary approaches that can be used to address the same physiological question of flow heterogeneity. PMID:18434260

  13. Aging and Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Selman, Moisés; Buendía-Roldán, Ivette; Pardo, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic, progressive, and usually fatal lung disorder of unknown etiology. The disease likely results from the interaction of genetic susceptibility architecture, environmental factors such as smoking, and an abnormal epigenetic reprogramming that leads to a complex pathogenesis. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis occurs in middle-aged and mainly elderly adults, and in this context age has emerged as its strongest risk factor. However, the mechanisms linking it to aging are uncertain. Recently, nine molecular and cellular hallmarks of aging have been proposed: genomic instability, telomere attrition, epigenetic alterations, loss of proteostasis, deregulated nutrient sensing, mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular senescence, stem cell exhaustion, and altered intercellular communication. In this review, we provide an overview of these molecular mechanisms and their involvement in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, while emphasizing that the studies on this disease are few and the findings are not definitive. PMID:27103043

  14. Treatment of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajendrakumar; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Patel, Laxeshkumar; Gandhi, Kaushang; Desai, Harit; Kaul, Dhiraj; Sahgal, Sumir P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and secondary right ventricular failure. PAH is considered a life-threatening condition unless treated. This article provides a comprehensive review of controlled and uncontrolled trials to define the risk-benefit for different therapeutic options of this clinical disorder. Relevant published articles were identified through searches of the National Center for Biotechnology PubMed database. All therapeutic measures for PAH were discussed. Six drugs have been approved in the United States for the treatment of PAH. Extensive medical advancement has been achieved in treatment of PAH. However, none of the approved therapies have shown ability to cure the disease. New research should be performed to develop promising new therapies. PMID:22460104

  15. Symptomatic pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, J; Mehta, J B; Taylor, R A; Byrd, R P; Roy, T M

    1998-09-01

    An otherwise healthy 37-year-old man came to the emergency room with left-sided dull chest pain of 4 weeks' duration. Physical examination, laboratory studies, and electrocardiogram were all unremarkable. A chest x-ray film revealed calcified pulmonary nodules. Computed tomography of the chest confirmed bilateral parenchymal cavitary lesions. Via limited thoracotomy, a tan nodule measuring 2.5 to 3.0 cm in diameter was excised from the left upper lobe. Histopathologic examination revealed a well circumscribed lesion and extensive lamellar hyalinization. A few foci of finely granular calcification were present within the hyalinizing areas. After surgery and short-term use of nonnarcotic analgesics, the chest pain resolved. Although pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) is known to produce cavitating lesions, calcification at multiple sites is also consistent with this diagnosis. Clinicians should remember to include PHG in the differential diagnosis of multiple pulmonary nodules. PMID:9743062

  16. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. {yields} Induction of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. {yields} C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical

  17. Transcriptome Analysis and Gene Identification in the Pulmonary Artery of Broilers with Ascites Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingyang; Guo, Xiaoquan; Zhuang, Yu; Zhang, Caiying; Wang, Tiancheng; Lin, Huayuan; Song, Yalu; Hu, Guoliang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension, also known as Ascites syndrome (AS), remains a clinically challenging disease with a large impact on both humans and broiler chickens. Pulmonary arterial remodeling presents a key step in the development of AS. The precise molecular mechanism of pulmonary artery remodeling regulating AS progression remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings We obtained pulmonary arteries from two positive AS and two normal broilers for RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis and pathological observation. RNA-seq analysis revealed a total of 895 significantly differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with 437 up-regulated and 458 down-regulated genes, which were significantly enriched to 12 GO (Gene Ontology) terms and 4 KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways (Padj<0.05) regulating pulmonary artery remodeling and consequently occurrence of AS. These GO terms and pathways include ribosome, Jak-STAT and NOD-like receptor signaling pathways which regulate pulmonary artery remodeling through vascular smooth cell proliferation, inflammation and vascular smooth cell proliferation together. Some notable DEGs within these pathways included downregulation of genes like RPL 5, 7, 8, 9, 14; upregulation of genes such as IL-6, K60, STAT3, STAT5 Pim1 and SOCS3; IKKα, IkB, P38, five cytokines IL-6, IL8, IL-1β, IL-18, and MIP-1β. Six important regulators of pulmonary artery vascular remodeling and construction like CYP1B1, ALDH7A1, MYLK, CAMK4, BMP7 and INOS were upregulated in the pulmonary artery of AS broilers. The pathology results showed that the pulmonary artery had remodeled and become thicker in the disease group. Conclusions/Significance Our present data suggested some specific components of the complex molecular circuitry regulating pulmonary arterial remodeling underlying AS progression in broilers. We revealed some valuable candidate genes and pathways that involved in pulmonary artery remodeling further contributing to the AS

  18. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Yousem, S A; Hochholzer, L

    1987-01-01

    Pulmonary hyalinizing granulomas are distinct fibrosing lesions of lung, having central whorled deposits of lamellar collagen. Twenty-four cases of this unusual pulmonary lesion are reported herein. Hyalinizing granulomas occur in middle-aged persons and are frequently mistaken for metastatic carcinoma radiographically. More than half of the patients had autoimmune phenomena or previous exposures to mycobacterial or fungal antigens. Four patients had sclerosing mediastinitis develop. A progressive debilitating clinical course was related to increasing dyspnea and bilateral disease on chest radiographs. A discussion of the histogenesis and histologic differential diagnosis is presented. PMID:3799538

  19. [Pulmonary Echinococcosis: Surgical Aspects].

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, M E; Hoffmann, H; Dienemann, H

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary cystic echinococcosis is a very rare disease in Germany. It is caused by the larvae of the dog tapeworm (echinococcus granulosus). The liver is the most affected organ, followed by the lungs. Surgery remains the main therapeutic approach for pulmonary CE. Whenever possible, parenchyma-preserving lung surgery should be preferred over anatomic lung resections. To ensure best therapeutic results, surgery needs to be performed under precise consideration of important infectiological aspects and patients should be treated in specialised centres based on interdisciplinary consensus. In addition to surgical aspects, this review summarises special infectiological features of this disease, which are crucial to the surgical approach. PMID:26351761

  20. Pulmonary vascular resistance and compliance relationship in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chemla, Denis; Lau, Edmund M T; Papelier, Yves; Attal, Pierre; Hervé, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Right ventricular adaptation to the increased pulmonary arterial load is a key determinant of outcomes in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and total arterial compliance (C) quantify resistive and elastic properties of pulmonary arteries that modulate the steady and pulsatile components of pulmonary arterial load, respectively. PVR is commonly calculated as transpulmonary pressure gradient over pulmonary flow and total arterial compliance as stroke volume over pulmonary arterial pulse pressure (SV/PApp). Assuming that there is an inverse, hyperbolic relationship between PVR and C, recent studies have popularised the concept that their product (RC-time of the pulmonary circulation, in seconds) is "constant" in health and diseases. However, emerging evidence suggests that this concept should be challenged, with shortened RC-times documented in post-capillary PH and normotensive subjects. Furthermore, reported RC-times in the literature have consistently demonstrated significant scatter around the mean. In precapillary PH, the true PVR can be overestimated if one uses the standard PVR equation because the zero-flow pressure may be significantly higher than pulmonary arterial wedge pressure. Furthermore, SV/PApp may also overestimate true C. Further studies are needed to clarify some of the inconsistencies of pulmonary RC-time, as this has major implications for our understanding of the arterial load in diseases of the pulmonary circulation.

  1. Sirtuins Link Inflammation and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vachharajani, Vidula T; Liu, Tiefu; Wang, Xianfeng; Hoth, Jason J; Yoza, Barbara K; McCall, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins (SIRT), first discovered in yeast as NAD+ dependent epigenetic and metabolic regulators, have comparable activities in human physiology and disease. Mounting evidence supports that the seven-member mammalian sirtuin family (SIRT1-7) guard homeostasis by sensing bioenergy needs and responding by making alterations in the cell nutrients. Sirtuins play a critical role in restoring homeostasis during stress responses. Inflammation is designed to "defend and mend" against the invading organisms. Emerging evidence supports that metabolism and bioenergy reprogramming direct the sequential course of inflammation; failure of homeostasis retrieval results in many chronic and acute inflammatory diseases. Anabolic glycolysis quickly induced (compared to oxidative phosphorylation) for ROS and ATP generation is needed for immune activation to "defend" against invading microorganisms. Lipolysis/fatty acid oxidation, essential for cellular protection/hibernation and cell survival in order to "mend," leads to immune repression. Acute/chronic inflammations are linked to altered glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, at least in part, by NAD+ dependent function of sirtuins. Therapeutically targeting sirtuins may provide a new class of inflammation and immune regulators. This review discusses how sirtuins integrate metabolism, bioenergetics, and immunity during inflammation and how sirtuin-directed treatment improves outcome in chronic inflammatory diseases and in the extreme stress response of sepsis. PMID:26904696

  2. Sirtuins Link Inflammation and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vachharajani, Vidula T.; Liu, Tiefu; Wang, Xianfeng; Hoth, Jason J.; Yoza, Barbara K.; McCall, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins (SIRT), first discovered in yeast as NAD+ dependent epigenetic and metabolic regulators, have comparable activities in human physiology and disease. Mounting evidence supports that the seven-member mammalian sirtuin family (SIRT1–7) guard homeostasis by sensing bioenergy needs and responding by making alterations in the cell nutrients. Sirtuins play a critical role in restoring homeostasis during stress responses. Inflammation is designed to “defend and mend” against the invading organisms. Emerging evidence supports that metabolism and bioenergy reprogramming direct the sequential course of inflammation; failure of homeostasis retrieval results in many chronic and acute inflammatory diseases. Anabolic glycolysis quickly induced (compared to oxidative phosphorylation) for ROS and ATP generation is needed for immune activation to “defend” against invading microorganisms. Lipolysis/fatty acid oxidation, essential for cellular protection/hibernation and cell survival in order to “mend,” leads to immune repression. Acute/chronic inflammations are linked to altered glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, at least in part, by NAD+ dependent function of sirtuins. Therapeutically targeting sirtuins may provide a new class of inflammation and immune regulators. This review discusses how sirtuins integrate metabolism, bioenergetics, and immunity during inflammation and how sirtuin-directed treatment improves outcome in chronic inflammatory diseases and in the extreme stress response of sepsis. PMID:26904696

  3. Bioactive Egg Components and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a normal acute response of the immune system to pathogens and tissue injury. However, chronic inflammation is known to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Thus, the impact of dietary factors on inflammation may provide key insight into mitigating chronic disease risk. Eggs are recognized as a functional food that contain a variety of bioactive compounds that can influence pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Interestingly, the effects of egg consumption on inflammation varies across different populations, including those that are classified as healthy, overweight, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetic. The following review will discuss the pro- and anti-inflammatory properties of egg components, with a focus on egg phospholipids, cholesterol, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, and bioactive proteins. The effects of egg consumption of inflammation across human populations will additionally be presented. Together, these findings have implications for population-specific dietary recommendations and chronic disease risk. PMID:26389951

  4. Chronic Inflammation in Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Molls, Michael; Radons, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory mediators exert pleiotropic effects in the development of cancer. On the one hand, inflammation favors carcinogenesis, malignant transformation, tumor growth, invasion, and metastatic spread; on the other hand inflammation can stimulate immune effector mechanisms that might limit tumor growth. The link between cancer and inflammation depends on intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Both pathways result in the activation of transcription factors such as NF-κB, STAT-3, and HIF-1 and in accumulation of tumorigenic factors in tumor and microenvironment. STAT-3 and NF-κB interact at multiple levels and thereby boost tumor-associated inflammation which can suppress anti-tumor immune responses. These factors also promote tumor growth, progression, and metastatic spread. IL-1, IL-6, TNF, and PGHS-2 are key mediators of an inflammatory milieu by modulating the expression of tumor-promoting factors. In this review we concentrate on the crucial role of pro-inflammatory mediators in inflammation-driven carcinogenesis and outline molecular mechanisms of IL-1 signaling in tumors. In addition, we elucidate the dual roles of stress proteins as danger signals in the development of anti-cancer immunity and anti-apoptotic functions. PMID:22566887

  5. Experimental extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary angiitis induced by intratracheal or intravenous challenge with Corynebacterium parvum in sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Yi, E S; Lee, H; Suh, Y K; Tang, W; Qi, M; Yin, S; Remick, D G; Ulich, T R

    1996-10-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary sarcoidosis are granulomatous diseases of the lung for which clinical presentation and anatomic site of granuloma formation differ. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis is caused by inhaled antigens, whereas the nature and source of the inciting antigen in sarcoidosis is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the route via which antigen is introduced to the lung contributes to the clinicopathological presentation of pulmonary granulomatous disease, rats immunized with intravenous (i.v.) Corynebacterium parvum were challenged after 2 weeks with either intratracheal (i.t.) or i.v. C. parvum. The granulomatous inflammation elicited by i.t. challenge predominantly involved alveolar spaces and histologically simulated extrinsic allergic alveolitis. In contrast, the inflammation induced by i.v. challenge was characterized by granulomatous angiitis and interstitial inflammation simulating sarcoidosis. Elevations of leukocyte counts and TNF levels in bronchoalveolar fluid, which reflect inflammation in the intra-alveolar compartment, were much more pronounced after i.t. than after i.v. challenge. Tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, CC chemokine, CXC chemokine, and adhesion molecule mRNA and protein expression occurred in each model. In conclusion, i.t. or i.v. challenge with C. parvum in sensitized rats caused pulmonary granulomatous inflammation that was histologically similar to human extrinsic allergic alveolitis and sarcoidosis, respectively. Although the soluble and cellular mediators of granulomatous inflammation were qualitatively similar in both disease models, the differing anatomic source of the same antigenic challenge was responsible for differing clinicopathological presentations. PMID:8863677

  6. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-08-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  7. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients.

  8. [Management of patients with pulmonary fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Bestaev, D V; Karateev, D E; Nasonov, E L

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune systemic disease. Its systemic manifestations include interstitial lung lesions (ILL). According to morphological studies and X-ray computed tomography, the incidence of RA-associated ILL is 60-70% which gives reason to consider pulmonary fibrosis (PF) to be the main form of lung pathology in this disease. PF is a pathological process in the lungs characterized by high mortality rate and refractoriness to therapy. It is a heterogeneous group of disorders with progressive and irreversible destruction of lung architectonics due to scarification that in the end results in organ dysfunction, disturbed gaseous exchange and respiratory distress. Changes in the interstitial lung tissue resulting from local autoimmune rheumatoid inflammation develop by the same mechanisms that underlie idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis used as a model for classification, pathogenesis and treatment of RA-associated ILL. This review is focused on the therapeutic strategy for the management of PF in the context of consensus of the American Thoracic Society (ATS), European Respiratory Society (ERS), Japanese Respiratory Society (JRS) and Latin American Thoracic Association (ALAT, 2010/2011).

  9. Respiratory Conditions Update: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Karel, Daphne J

    2016-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined as persistent airflow limitation due to irritant-induced chronic inflammation. A postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio of 0.7 or less is diagnostic in a patient with dyspnea, chronic cough or sputum production, and a history of irritant exposure. Tobacco smoking is the most significant etiology, and smoking cessation is the only intervention shown to slow disease progression. Long-acting beta2-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists are first-line treatments for patients with persistently symptomatic COPD with an FEV1 of 80% or less of predicted. When COPD is uncontrolled with a long-acting bronchodilator, combination therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist-long-acting beta2-agonist or long-acting beta2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid should be prescribed. Patients with COPD and reduced exercise tolerance should undergo pulmonary rehabilitation and be evaluated for supplemental oxygen therapy. Other treatment options for persistently symptomatic COPD include inhaler triple therapy (ie, long-acting muscarinic antagonist, long-acting beta2-agonist, inhaled corticosteroid), phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors, oxygen, and surgical interventions. PMID:27576232

  10. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  11. Pulmonary hypertension and hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Téllez Villajos, L; Martínez González, J; Moreira Vicente, V; Albillos Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a relatively common phenomenon in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and can appear through various mechanisms. The most characteristic scenario that binds portal and pulmonary hypertension is portopulmonary syndrome. However, hyperdynamic circulation, TIPS placement and heart failure can raise the mean pulmonary artery pressure without increasing the resistances. These conditions are not candidates for treatment with pulmonary vasodilators and require a specific therapy. A correct assessment of hemodynamic, ultrasound and clinical variables enables the differential diagnosis of each situation that produces pulmonary hypertension in patients with cirrhosis.

  12. [Use of essential oil of peppermint (Mentha piperita) in the complex treatment of patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Shkurupiĭ, V A; Odintsova, O A; Kazarinova, N V; Tkrachenko, K G

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the effects of peppermint (Mentha piperita) essential oil inhaled by patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis in the penitentiary system. This procedure is shown to be most effective in infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis in the phase of resorption of infiltrates and/or closure of decay cavities. The efficiency is determined by the rapid positive changes in a tuberculous process, which appear as a rapider regression of tuberculous inflammation, causing small residual changes. This procedure may be used to prevent recurrences and exacerbations of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  13. Parkinson's Disease and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Carina C.; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the “primed” microglia into an “active” state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease. PMID:21403862

  14. Points of control in inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Carl

    2002-12-01

    Inflammation is a complex set of interactions among soluble factors and cells that can arise in any tissue in response to traumatic, infectious, post-ischaemic, toxic or autoimmune injury. The process normally leads to recovery from infection and to healing, However, if targeted destruction and assisted repair are not properly phased, inflammation can lead to persistent tissue damage by leukocytes, lymphocytes or collagen. Inflammation may be considered in terms of its checkpoints, where binary or higher-order signals drive each commitment to escalate, go signals trigger stop signals, and molecules responsible for mediating the inflammatory response also suppress it, depending on timing and context. The non-inflammatory state does not arise passively from an absence of inflammatory stimuli; rather, maintenance of health requires the positive actions of specific gene products to suppress reactions to potentially inflammatory stimuli that do not warrant a full response.

  15. Parkinson's disease and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Carina C; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-02-22

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the "primed" microglia into an "active" state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease.

  16. Glufosinate aerogenic exposure induces glutamate and IL-1 receptor dependent lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Isabelle; Perche, Olivier; Pâris, Arnaud; Richard, Olivier; Gombault, Aurélie; Herzine, Ameziane; Pichon, Jacques; Huaux, Francois; Mortaud, Stéphane; Ryffel, Bernhard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline

    2016-11-01

    Glufosinate-ammonium (GLA), the active component of an herbicide, is known to cause neurotoxicity. GLA shares structural analogy with glutamate. It is a powerful inhibitor of glutamine synthetase (GS) and may bind to glutamate receptors. Since these potentials targets of GLA are present in lung and immune cells, we asked whether airway exposure to GLA may cause lung inflammation in mice. A single GLA exposure (1 mg/kg) induced seizures and inflammatory cell recruitment in the broncho-alveolar space, and increased myeloperoxidase (MPO), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), interstitial inflammation and disruption of alveolar septae within 6-24 h. Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) was increased and lung inflammation depended on IL-1 receptor 1 (IL-1R1). We demonstrate that glutamate receptor pathway is central, since the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor inhibitor MK-801 prevented GLA-induced lung inflammation. Chronic exposure (0.2 mg/kg 3× per week for 4 weeks) caused moderate lung inflammation and enhanced airway hyperreactivity with significant increased airway resistance. In conclusion, GLA aerosol exposure causes glutamate signalling and IL-1R-dependent pulmonary inflammation with airway hyperreactivity in mice.

  17. Nodular pulmonary amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, A; Rasmussen, S L; Campbell, T M; Lester, W M

    1984-01-01

    An elderly man had a 10-year history of multiple pulmonary nodules that he had refused to have investigated. He died of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. At autopsy the nodules were shown to consist of amyloid. There was no evidence of systemic amyloidosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6744167

  18. [Pulmonary involvements of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Ohmichi, M; Hiraga, Y; Hirasawa, M

    1990-01-01

    We reported about intrathoracic changes and prognosis of 686 patients with sarcoidosis diagnosed in our hospital between 1963 and 1988. We evaluated CT findings in 135 patients with sarcoidosis and found pulmonary involvements in 81. We analyzed CT findings according to the classification by Tuengerthal which classified radiographic findings combining ILO classification of pneumoconiosis and characteristic findings of bronchovascular sheath with sarcoidosis. The CT findings were as follows: small opacities (44 out of 81 cases, 54.3%), large opacities (37 cases, 46.7%). Additional findings were as follows: peribronchial marking (42 cases, 51.9%), contraction (17 cases, 21.0%), pleural involvement (9 cases, 11.1%), bulla (5 cases, 6.2%). The characteristic CT findings of serious sarcoidosis were extasis of bronchus, thickening of the bronchial wall, unclearness of vascular shadow, atelectasis and thickening of pleura. Concerning the prognosis of pulmonary involvement, according to age, patients younger than 30 years old at initial diagnosis were better than those of 30 years and over in terms of disappearance of pulmonary involvements. According to stage, patients of stage I and stage II were better than those of stage III. Among the patients we were able to observe chest X-ray findings during five years according to the character of shadow, ill-defined shadow of small opacities and rounded shadows of large opacities had a higher disappearance rate of pulmonary involvements than irregular shadows of large opacities, atelectasis and contraction.

  19. [Multiple pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma].

    PubMed

    Haro, M; Ruiz, J; Vila, X; Avellanet, M; Izquierdo, J

    1994-01-01

    The causes of multiple pulmonary nodules are many, with metastasis being the most feared. A rare but possible etiology, however, is hyalinizing multiple granuloma. We present a case that allows us to review this condition and its course, as well as a variety of associated immunological changes and possible complications. PMID:8087395

  20. [Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma].

    PubMed

    Westhoff, M; Litterst, P; Albert, M; Welim, B

    2015-01-01

    Benign lesions as pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma may mimic a malign disease. A 63-year old patient complained dyspnea and a weight loss of 30 kg. CT-thorax scans showed a destructive and infiltrative pulmonary process with pleural thickening. Histologic examination of transbronchial and transthoracic biopsies as well as of biopsies taken by minithoracotomy was not conclusive. Due to further progression the patient underwent a left-sided pleuropneumonectomy despite a VO2 peak of 9 ml/kg/min. Histology revealed DIP-like infiltrations, a histiocytic reaction and hyaline granulomas. Among less than 100 published cases of pulmonary hyaline granuloma a comparable rapid progression with a total functional loss of the affected lung is not reported. Mostly hyalinizing granuloma presents with infiltrations, which may mimic lung cancer, or nodular lesions, partly with cavitations or calcifications. The etiology is unknown, a persistent immunologic response to an antigenic stimulus is discussed. Associations with infections, lymphomas, amyloidosis or IgG4-related disease are reported. Some cases have features of multifocal fibrosis. In the case reported none of these associations could be found. The prognosis of pulmonary hyaline granuloma is regarded as benign. There is no effective treatment yet. Once the diagnosis has been established a conservative approach as well as a resection of nodules and a therapeutic attempt with steroids are an option. Extensive resections as pleuropneumonectomy are an exception. PMID:25599140

  1. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Maijub, A G; Giltman, L I; Verner, J L; Peace, R J

    1985-03-01

    We describe a recent case of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presenting classically in a young black American female. The diagnosis was made by histopathologic examination. The etiology of this entity remains elusive, however, an abnormal response involving the immune system to an undefined agent (or agents) is the most likely explanation. PMID:3977139

  2. Solitary pulmonary nodule

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest x-ray Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan Respiratory system References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  3. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  4. Surgical inflammation: a pathophysiological rainbow

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Jose-Ignacio; Aller, María-Angeles; Arias, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Tetrapyrrole molecules are distributed in virtually all living organisms on Earth. In mammals, tetrapyrrole end products are closely linked to oxygen metabolism. Since increasingly complex trophic functional systems for using oxygen are considered in the post-traumatic inflammatory response, it can be suggested that tetrapyrrole molecules and, particularly their derived pigments, play a key role in modulating inflammation. In this way, the diverse colorfulness that the inflammatory response triggers during its evolution would reflect the major pathophysiological importance of these pigments in each one of its phases. Therefore, the need of exploiting this color resource could be considered for both the diagnosis and treatment of the inflammation. PMID:19309494

  5. [Two cases of lung injury due to inhalation of waterproofing spray--with special reference to pulmonary function disorder].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kazunori; Arita, Kenichi; Kajihara, Toshiki; Nitta, Tomoko; Mito, Akiko; Awaya, Hirokazu; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Ohashi, Nobuyuki

    2009-05-01

    CASE 1: A 57-year-old man experienced severe dyspnea 24 hours after inhalation of waterproofing spray. Computed tomography (CT) revealed diffuse ground glass opacities in bilateral lungs. Pulmonary function tests showed mixed ventilatory disturbance with a low expiratory flow rate near the end of forced expiration and a normal diffusing capacity with normal functional residual capasity. The pulmonary function disorder was quickly improved by steroid therapy. CASE 2: A 59-year-old man smoked after inhaling waterproofing spray and soon developed dyspnea. The findings of CT were similar to those of case 1. His pulmonary function test revealed restrictive ventilatory disturbance and normal pulmonary diffusing capacity with low functional residual capacity. These findings improved without steroid treatment. However, it took more time for the pulmonary function to recover. There was probably specific inflammation around bronchioles, and the inflammation might have spread to the alveolar region in such cases with severe pulmonary function disorder. Steroid treatment seems to be useful to improve both the pulmonary function disorder and the clinical feature due to inhalation of waterproofing spray.

  6. Pulmonary function in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Elliott, A. R.; Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth.

  7. Acute pulmonary dose–responses to inhaled multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Dale W.; Hubbs, Ann F.; Chen, Bean T.; McKinney, Walter; Mercer, Robert R.; Wolfarth, Michael G.; Battelli, Lori; Wu, Nianqiang; Sriram, Krishnan; Leonard, Stephen; Andrew, Michael; Willard, Patsy; Tsuruoka, Shuji; Endo, Morinobu; Tsukada, Takayuki; Munekane, Fuminori; Frazer, David G.; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the in vivo pulmonary toxicity of inhaled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Mice-inhaled aerosolized MWCNT (10 mg/m3, 5 h/day) for 2, 4, 8 or 12 days. MWCNT lung burden was linearly related to exposure duration. MWCNT-induced pulmonary inflammation was assessed by determining whole lung lavage (WLL) polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). Lung cytotoxicity was assessed by WLL fluid LDH activities. WLL fluid albumin concentrations were determined as a marker of alveolar air–blood barrier integrity. These parameters significantly increased in MWCNT-exposed mice versus controls and were dose-dependent. Histopathologic alterations identified in the lung included (1) bronciolocentric inflammation, (2) bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia and hypertrophy, (3) fibrosis, (4) vascular changes and (5) rare pleural penetration. MWCNT translocated to the lymph node where the deep paracortex was expanded after 8 or 12 days. Acute inhalation of MWCNT induced dose-dependent pulmonary inflammation and damage with rapid development of pulmonary fibrosis, and also demonstrated that MWCNT can reach the pleura after inhalation exposure. PMID:22881873

  8. Regulation of IL-4 Receptor Signaling by STUB1 in Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qin; Sha, Youbao; Bhattacharya, Abhisek; Fattah, Elmoataz Abdel; Bonilla, Diana; Jyothula, Soma S. S. K.; Pandit, Lavannya; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: IL-4Rα, the common receptor component for IL-4 and IL-13, plays a critical role in IL-4– and IL-13–mediated signaling pathways that regulate airway inflammation and remodeling. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying IL-4Rα turnover and its signal termination remain elusive. Objectives: To evaluate the role of STUB1 (STIP1 homology and U-Box containing protein 1) in regulating IL-4R signaling in airway inflammation. Methods: The roles of STUB1 in IL-4Rα degradation and its signaling were investigated by immunoblot, immunoprecipitation, and flow cytometry. The involvement of STUB1 in airway inflammation was determined in vivo by measuring lung inflammatory cells infiltration, mucus production, serum lgE levels, and alveolar macrophage M2 activation in STUB1−/− mice. STUB1 expression was evaluated in airway epithelium of patients with asthma and lung tissues of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Measurements and Main Results: STUB1 interacted with IL-4Rα and targeted it for ubiquitination-mediated proteasomal degradation, terminating IL-4 or IL-13 signaling. STUB1 knockout cells showed increased levels of IL-4Rα and sustained STAT6 activation, whereas STUB1 overexpression reduced IL-4Rα levels. Mice deficient in STUB1 had spontaneous airway inflammation, alternative M2 activation of alveolar macrophage, and increased serum IgE. STUB1 levels were increased in airways of subjects with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, suggesting that up-regulation of STUB1 might be an important feedback mechanism to dampen IL-4R signaling in airway inflammation. Conclusions: Our study identified a previously uncharacterized role for STUB1 in regulating IL-4R signaling, which might provide a new strategy for attenuating airway inflammation. PMID:24251647

  9. The histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A suppresses murine innate allergic inflammation by blocking group 2 innate lymphoid cell (ILC2) activation

    PubMed Central

    Toki, Shinji; Goleniewska, Kasia; Reiss, Sara; Zhou, Weisong; Newcomb, Dawn C; Bloodworth, Melissa H; Stier, Matthew T; Boyd, Kelli L; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Subramaniam, Sriram; Peebles, R Stokes

    2016-01-01

    Background Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) are an important source of the type 2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 that are critical to the allergic airway phenotype. Previous studies reported that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition by trichostatin A (TSA) downregulated adaptive allergic immune responses; however, the effect of HDAC inhibition on the early innate allergic immune response is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effect of TSA on innate airway inflammation mediated by ILC2 activation. Methods BALB/c mice were challenged intranasally with Alternaria extract, exogenous recombinant mouse IL-33 (rmIL-33) or the respective vehicles for four consecutive days following TSA or vehicle treatment. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids and lungs were harvested 24 h after the last challenge. Results We found that TSA treatment significantly decreased the number of ILC2 expressing IL-5 and IL-13 in the lungs challenged with Alternaria extract or rmIL-33 compared with vehicle treatment (p<0.05). TSA treatment significantly decreased protein expression of IL-5, IL-13, CCL11 and CCL24 in the lung homogenates from Alternaria extract-challenged mice or rmIL-33-challenged mice compared with vehicle treatment (p<0.05). Further, TSA treatment significantly decreased the number of perivascular eosinophils and mucus production in the large airways that are critical components of the asthma phenotype (p<0.05). TSA did not change early IL-33 release in the BAL fluids; however, TSA decreased lung IL-33 expression from epithelial cells 24 h after last Alternaria extract challenge compared with vehicle treatment (p<0.05). Conclusions These results reveal that TSA reduces allergen-induced ILC2 activation and the early innate immune responses to an inhaled protease-containing aeroallergen. PMID:27071418

  10. Pulmonary hemosiderosis with normocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis in a child.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, H; Yilmaz, O; Savas, R; Kirmaz, C; Sogut, A; Ozalp, S

    2007-03-01

    Pulmonary hemosiderosis is rarely associated with urticarial vaculitis especially if normocomplementemic. An eigth year old girl presented with relapsing and remitting chronic and persistent urticarial lesions, conjunctival injection, recurrent cough and hemoptysis. Respiratory findings started at seven years of age. Physical examination revealed diffuse skin lesions mainly settled on the extremities, non-purulent conjunctival injection, rare ronchi and fine crackles in bilateral lower zones of the lungs. Biopsy of the urticaria like skin lesions demonstrated leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Rheumatological markers were negative. Levels of complement fractions 3 and 4 were normal. Chest x-ray demonstrated diffuse alveolar infiltrative images. High Resolution Computed Tomography of the chest revealed diffuse ground-glass appearance, increased interstitial density. Diagnostic flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed hemosiderin laden alveolar macrophages. She was started on systemic corticosteroid treatment. During follow up, pulmonary symptoms disappeared, however skin lesions and conjunctival symptoms persisted and exacerbated four times in two years. CT of lungs after two years of treatment revealed rare patchy areas of ground glass appearance in bilateral lower lobes and right upper lobe as well as a few of millimetric pleural nodules. This patient is still followed up under low dose steroids and pulmonary findings regressed but low grade inflammation due to vasculitis is thought to continue as supported by the persistence of tomographic findings in the lungs despite the absence of any symptoms. This case demonstrates association of urticarial vasculitis and pulmonary hemosiderosis in the setting of normocomplementemia.

  11. Hepatic Cryoablation, But Not Radiofrequency Ablation, Results in Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, William C.; Debelak, Jacob P.; Wright Pinson, C.; Washington, M. Kay; Atkinson, James B.; Venkatakrishnan, Annapurna; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Christman, John W.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of 35% hepatic cryoablation with a similar degree of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on lung inflammation, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation, and production of NF-κB dependent cytokines. Summary Background Data Multisystem injury, including acute lung injury, is a severe complication associated with hepatic cryoablation of 30% to 35% or more of liver parenchyma, but this complication has not been reported with RFA. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 35% hepatic cryoablation or RFA and were killed at 1, 2, and 6 hours. Liver and lung tissue were freeze-clamped for measurement of NF-κB activation, which was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor α and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Histologic studies of pulmonary tissue and electron microscopy of ablated liver tissue were compared among treatment groups. Results Histologic lung sections after cryoablation showed multiple foci of perivenular inflammation, with activated lymphocytes, foamy macrophages, and neutrophils. In animals undergoing RFA, inflammatory foci were not present. NF-κB activation was detected at 1 hour in both liver and lung tissue samples of animals undergoing cryoablation but not after RFA, and serum cytokine levels were significantly elevated in cryoablation versus RFA animals. Electron microscopy of cryoablation-treated liver tissue demonstrated disruption of the hepatocyte plasma membrane with extension of intact hepatocyte organelles into the space of Disse; RFA-treated liver tissue demonstrated coagulative destruction of hepatocyte organelles within an intact plasma membrane. To determine the stimulus for systemic inflammation, rats treated with cryoablation had either immediate resection of the ablated segment or delayed resection after a 15-minute thawing interval. Immediate resection of the cryoablated liver tissue prevented NF

  12. Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: an increasingly recognized condition* **

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Olívia Meira; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Costa, André Nathan; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) has been increasingly recognized in the literature. Patients with CPFE are usually heavy smokers or former smokers with concomitant lower lobe fibrosis and upper lobe emphysema on chest HRCT scans. They commonly present with severe breathlessness and low DLCO, despite spirometry showing relatively preserved lung volumes. Moderate to severe pulmonary arterial hypertension is common in such patients, who are also at an increased risk of developing lung cancer. Unfortunately, there is currently no effective treatment for CPFE. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of the pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, and prognostic factors of CPFE. Given that most of the published data on CPFE are based on retrospective analysis, more studies are needed in order to address the role of emphysema and its subtypes; the progression of fibrosis/emphysema and its correlation with inflammation; treatment options; and prognosis. PMID:25029654

  13. Differential regulation of autophagy and mitophagy in pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Mannam, Praveen; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomal-mediated degradation of intracellular lipids, proteins and organelles, known as autophagy, represents a inducible adaptive response to lung injury resulting from exposure to insults, such as hypoxia, microbes, inflammation, ischemia-reperfusion, pharmaceuticals (e.g., bleomycin), or inhaled xenobiotics (i.e., air pollution, cigarette smoke). This process clears damaged or toxic cellular constituents and facilitates cell survival in stressful environments. Autophagic degradation of dysfunctional or damaged mitochondria is termed mitophagy. Enhanced mitophagy is usually an early response to promote survival. However, overwhelming or prolonged mitochondrial damage can induce excessive/pathological levels of mitophagy, thereby promoting cell death and tissue injury. Autophagy/mitophagy is therefore an important modulator in human pulmonary diseases and a potential therapeutic target. This review article will summarize the most recent studies highlighting the role of autophagy/mitophagy and its molecular pathways involved in stress response in pulmonary pathologies. PMID:27402690

  14. Differential polarization of alveolar macrophages and bone marrow-derived monocytes following chemically and pathogen-induced chronic lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Redente, Elizabeth F.; Higgins, David M.; Dwyer-Nield, Lori D.; Orme, Ian M.; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Malkinson, Alvin M.

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages and BDMCs undergo sequential biochemical changes during the chronic inflammatory response to chemically induced lung carcinogenesis in mice. Herein, we examine two chronic lung inflammation models—repeated exposure to BHT and infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis—to establish whether similar macrophage phenotype changes occur in non-neoplastic pulmonary disease. Exposure to BHT or M. tuberculosis results in pulmonary inflammation characterized by an influx of macrophages, followed by systemic effects on the BM and other organs. In both models, pulmonary IFN-γ and IL-4 production coincided with altered polarization of alveolar macrophages. Soon after BHT administration or M. tuberculosis infection, IFN-γ content in BALF increased, and BAL macrophages became classically (M1) polarized, as characterized by increased expression of iNOS. As inflammation progressed in both models, the amount of BALF IFN-γ content and BAL macrophage iNOS expression decreased, and BALF IL-4 content and macrophage arginase I expression rose, indicating alternative/M2 polarization. Macrophages present in M. tuberculosis-induced granulomas remained M1-polarized, implying that these two pulmonary macrophage populations, alveolar and granuloma-associated, are exposed to different activating cytokines. BDMCs from BHT-treated mice displayed polarization profiles similar to alveolar macrophages, but BDMCs in M. tuberculosis-infected mice did not become polarized. Thus, only alveolar macrophages in these two models of chronic lung disease exhibit a similar progression of polarization changes; polarization of BDMCs was specific to BHT-induced pulmonary inflammation, and polarization of granuloma macrophages was specific to the M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:20360403

  15. Host lung immunity is severely compromised during tropical pulmonary eosinophilia: role of lung eosinophils and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Sharma, Aditi; Vishwakarma, Achchhe Lal; Agnihotri, Promod Kumar; Sharma, Sharad; Srivastava, Mrigank

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophils play a central role in the pathogenesis of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, a rare, but fatal, manifestation of filariasis. However, no exhaustive study has been done to identify the genes and proteins of eosinophils involved in the pathogenesis of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia. In the present study, we established a mouse model of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia that mimicked filarial manifestations of human tropical pulmonary eosinophilia pathogenesis and used flow cytometry-assisted cell sorting and real-time RT-PCR to study the gene expression profile of flow-sorted, lung eosinophils and lung macrophages during tropical pulmonary eosinophilia pathogenesis. Our results show that tropical pulmonary eosinophilia mice exhibited increased levels of IL-4, IL-5, CCL5, and CCL11 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung parenchyma along with elevated titers of IgE and IgG subtypes in the serum. Alveolar macrophages from tropical pulmonary eosinophilia mice displayed decreased phagocytosis, attenuated nitric oxide production, and reduced T-cell proliferation capacity, and FACS-sorted lung eosinophils from tropical pulmonary eosinophilia mice upregulated transcript levels of ficolin A and anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2,but proapoptotic genes Bim and Bax were downregulated. Similarly, flow-sorted lung macrophages upregulated transcript levels of TLR-2, TLR-6, arginase-1, Ym-1, and FIZZ-1 but downregulated nitric oxide synthase-2 levels, signifying their alternative activation. Taken together, we show that the pathogenesis of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia is marked by functional impairment of alveolar macrophages, alternative activation of lung macrophages, and upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes by eosinophils. These events combine together to cause severe lung inflammation and compromised lung immunity. Therapeutic interventions that can boost host immune response in the lungs might thus provide relief to patients with tropical pulmonary eosinophilia. PMID

  16. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  17. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  18. [Adipose tissue inflammation and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Shwarts, V

    2009-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ secreting more than 30 various adipokines which regulate wide spectrum of metabolic and immune processes. Obesity is associated with development of adipose tissue inflammation. This inflammation is characterized by infiltration with macrophages, alterations of adipokine secretion, development of insulin resistance. All these factors promote atherosclerosis. Inflammation of perivascular adipose tissue is especially important. Adipokines damage vascular endothelium via paracrine pathway. Cytokines released by macrophages as well as changes of adipokine secretion lead to endothelial dysfunction - the first stage of atherogenesis. Besides specific action curative factors used in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes mellitus also produce anti-inflammatory effect and thus diminish risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, rate of their development, and alleviate manifestations of atherosclerosis. Inflammation of adipose tissue is a connecting link between obesity and atherosclerosis. This review contains an outline of roles of various major adipokines in development of atherosclerosis as well as synopsis of anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects of glytazones , metformin, rimonabant, statins, and of lowering of body weight.

  19. Endogenous Inhibitors of Kidney Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Trostel, Jessica; Garcia, Gabriela E.

    2015-01-01

    Although inflammation is the physiological response to pathogen invasion and tissue damage, it can also be responsible for significant tissue damage. Therefore, the inflammatory response must be carefully regulated to prevent critical inflammatory damage to vital organs. Typically, local endogenous regulatory mechanisms adjust the magnitude of the response such that the injurious condition is resolved and homeostasis is mantained. Humoral mechanisms that restrain or inhibit inflammation include glucocorticoid hormones, anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and soluble cytokine receptors; other mediators facilitate tissue healing, like lipoxins and resolvins. There is growing evidence that inflammation plays a critical role in the development and progression of heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, kidney diseases, sepsis, and several fibroproliferative disorders. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms that regulate inflammation may offer therapeutic targets for inhibiting the progression of several diseases. In this article, we review the significance of several novel endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators in the protection from kidney injury and the potential of these regulatory molecules as therapeutic targets for treatment of kidney inflammatory diseases. PMID:26779569

  20. Platelets in inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Jenne, Craig N; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Although platelets are traditionally recognized for their central role in hemostasis, many lines of research clearly demonstrate these rather ubiquitous blood components are potent immune modulators and effectors. Platelets have been shown to directly recognize, sequester and kill pathogens, to activated and recruit leukocytes to sites of infection and inflammation, and to modulate leukocyte behavior, enhancing their ability to phagocytose and kill pathogens and inducing unique effector functions, such as the production of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). This multifaceted response to infection and inflammation is due, in part, to the huge array of soluble mediators and cell surface molecules expressed by platelets. From their earliest origins as primordial hemocytes in invertebrates to their current form as megakaryocyte-derived cytoplasts, platelets have evolved to be one of the key regulators of host intravascular immunity and inflammation. In this review, we present the diverse roles platelets play in immunity and inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases and infection. Additionally, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of platelet behavior made possible through the use of advanced imaging techniques that allow us to visualize platelets and their interactions, in real-time, within the intact blood vessels of a living host.

  1. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Gasull, Xavier; Diebold, Yolanda; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101) have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases) can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation. PMID:25132732

  2. Clinical application of autologous technetium-99m-labelled eosinophils to detect focal eosinophilic inflammation in the lung.

    PubMed

    Loutsios, Chrystalla; Farahi, Neda; Simmonds, Rosalind; Cullum, Ian; Gillett, Daniel; Solanki, Chandra; Solanki, Kishor; Buscombe, John; Condliffe, Alison M; Peters, A Mike; Chilvers, Edwin R

    2015-11-01

    The detection of focal eosinophilic inflammation by non-invasive means may aid the diagnosis and follow-up of a variety of pulmonary pathologies. All current methods of detection involve invasive sampling, which may be contraindicated or too high-risk to be performed safely. The use of injected autologous technetium-99m (Tc-99m)-labelled eosinophils coupled to single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been demonstrated to localise eosinophilic inflammation in the lungs of a patient with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitis. Here, we report on the utility of this technique to detect active eosinophilic inflammation in a patient with focal lung inflammation where a biopsy was contraindicated.

  3. Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Larissa A; Laurie, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complex, progressive condition arising from a variety of genetic and pathogenic causes. Patients present with a spectrum of histologic and pathophysiological features, likely reflecting the diversity in underlying pathogenesis. It is widely recognized that structural alterations in the vascular wall contribute to all forms of pulmonary hypertension. Features characteristic of the remodeled vasculature in patients with pulmonary hypertension include increased stiffening of the elastic proximal pulmonary arteries, thickening of the intimal and/or medial layer of muscular arteries, development of vaso-occlusive lesions and the appearance of cells expressing smooth muscle specific markers in normally non-muscular small diameter vessels, resulting from proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and cellular trans-differentiation. The development of several animal models of pulmonary hypertension has provided the means to explore the mechanistic underpinnings of pulmonary vascular remodeling, although none of the experimental models currently used entirely replicates the pulmonary arterial hypertension observed in patients. Herein, we provide an overview of the histological abnormalities observed in humans with pulmonary hypertension and in preclinical models and discuss insights gained regarding several key signaling pathways contributing to the remodeling process. In particular, we will focus on the roles of ion homeostasis, endothelin-1, serotonin, bone morphogenetic proteins, Rho kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, highlighting areas of cross-talk between these pathways and potentials for therapeutic targeting. PMID:23334338

  4. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Sherif R.; Greer, Patricia w.; Coffield, Lisa M.; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Nolte, Kurt B.; Foucar, Kathy; Feddersen, Richard M.; Zumwalt, Ross E.; Miller, Gayle L.; Khan, Ali S.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Mahy, Brian W.J.; Peters, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    A recent outbreak of a severe pulmonary disease in the southwestern United States was etiologically linked to a previously unrecognized bantavirus. The virus has been isolated from its majorreservoir, the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus,and recently named Sin Nombre virus. Clinically, the disease has become known as the bantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Since May 1993, 44 fatal cases of HPS have been identified through clinicopathological review and immunobistochemical(IHC) testing of tissues from 273 patients who died of an unexplained noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. In 158 cases for which suitable specimens were available, serologicaltesting and/or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of extracted RNA was also performed. IHC, serological, and PCR results were concordant for virtually all HPS and non-HPS patients when more than one assay was performed. The prodromal ilness of HPS is similar to that of many other viral diseases. Consistent bematological features include thrombocytopenia, bemoconcentration, neutropbilic leukocytosis with a left shift, and reactivel lymphocytes. Pulmonary bistopatbological features were similar in most of the fatal HPS cases (40/44) and consisted of an interstitial pneumonitis with a variable mononuclear cell infiltrate, edema, and focal byaline membranes. In four cases, bowever, pulmonary features were significantly different and included diffuse alveolar damage and variable degrees of severe air space disorganization. IHC analysis showed widespread presence of bantaviral antigens in endothelial cells of the microvasculature, particularly in the lung. Hantaviral antigens were also observed within follicular dendritic cells, macrophages, and lymphocytes. Hantaviral inclusions were observed in endothelial cells of lungs by thinsection electron microscopy, and their identity was verified by immunogold labeling. Virus-like particles were seen in pulmonary endothelial cells and macropbages. HPS is

  5. Interdisciplinary networks for the treatment of childhood pulmonary vascular disease: what pulmonary hypertension doctors can learn from pediatric oncologists.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, Georg

    2013-12-01

    The pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is complex and multifactorial. None of the current therapies has been shown to be universally effective or able to reverse advanced pulmonary vascular disease, characterized by plexiform vascular lesions, or to prevent right ventricular failure in advanced PAH. It is thus unlikely that only one factor, pathway, or gene mutation will explain all forms and cases. Pediatric oncologists recognized a need for intensified, collaborative research within their field more than 40 years ago and implemented major clinical and translational networks worldwide to achieve evidence-based "tailored therapies." The similarities in the pathobiology (e.g., increased proliferation and resistance to apoptosis in vascular cells and perivascular inflammation) and the uncertainties in the proper treatment of both cancer and pulmonary hypertension (PH) have led to the idea of building interdisciplinary networks among PH centers to achieve rapid translation of basic research findings, optimal diagnostic algorithms, and significant, sustained treatment results. Such networks leading to patient registries, clinical trials, drug development, and innovative, effective therapies are urgently needed for the care of children with PH. This article reviews the current status, limitations, and recent developments in the field of pediatric PH. It is suggested that the oncologists' exemplary networks, concepts, and results in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are applicable to future networks and innovative therapies for pediatric pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease and right ventricular dysfunction.

  6. Targeting inflammation in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Welty, Francine K; Alfaddagh, Abdulhamied; Elajami, Tarec K

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is comprised of a cluster of closely related risk factors, including visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, hypertension, high triglyceride, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; all of which increase the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A chronic state of inflammation appears to be a central mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and MetS. In this review, we summarize recent research which has provided insight into the mechanisms by which inflammation underlies the pathophysiology of the individual components of MetS including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. On the basis of these mechanisms, we summarize therapeutic modalities to target inflammation in the MetS and its individual components. Current therapeutic modalities can modulate the individual components of MetS and have a direct anti-inflammatory effect. Lifestyle modifications including exercise, weight loss, and diets high in fruits, vegetables, fiber, whole grains, and low-fat dairy and low in saturated fat and glucose are recommended as a first line therapy. The Mediterranean and dietary approaches to stop hypertension diets are especially beneficial and have been shown to prevent development of MetS. Moreover, the Mediterranean diet has been associated with reductions in total and cardiovascular mortality. Omega-3 fatty acids and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonists lower high levels of triglyceride; their role in targeting inflammation is reviewed. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and aldosterone blockers comprise pharmacologic therapies for hypertension but also target other aspects of MetS including inflammation. Statin drugs target many of the underlying inflammatory pathways involved in MetS.

  7. Dual Proinflammatory and Antiviral Properties of Pulmonary Eosinophils in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine-Enhanced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yung-Chang; Townsend, Dijana; Herrero, Lara J.; Zaid, Ali; Rolph, Michael S.; Gahan, Michelle E.; Nelson, Michelle A.; Rudd, Penny A.; Matthaei, Klaus I.; Foster, Paul S.; Dent, Lindsay; Tripp, Ralph A.; Lee, James; Simson, Ljubov

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of morbidity and severe lower respiratory tract disease in the elderly and very young, with some infants developing bronchiolitis, recurrent wheezing, and asthma following infection. Previous studies in humans and animal models have shown that vaccination with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) leads to prominent airway eosinophilic inflammation following RSV challenge; however, the roles of pulmonary eosinophilia in the antiviral response and in disease pathogenesis are inadequately understood. In vivo studies in mice with eotaxin and/or interleukin 5 (IL-5) deficiency showed that FI-RSV vaccination did not lead to enhanced pulmonary disease, where following challenge there were reduced pulmonary eosinophilia, inflammation, Th2-type cytokine responses, and altered chemokine (TARC and CCL17) responses. In contrast to wild-type mice, RSV was recovered at high titers from the lungs of eotaxin- and/or IL-5-deficient mice. Adoptive transfer of eosinophils to FI-RSV-immunized eotaxin- and IL-5-deficient (double-deficient) mice challenged with RSV was associated with potent viral clearance that was mediated at least partly through nitric oxide. These studies show that pulmonary eosinophilia has dual outcomes: one linked to RSV-induced airway inflammation and pulmonary pathology and one with innate features that contribute to a reduction in the viral load. IMPORTANCE This study is critical to understanding the mechanisms attributable to RSV vaccine-enhanced disease. This study addresses the hypothesis that IL-5 and eotaxin are critical in pulmonary eosinophil response related to FI-RSV vaccine-enhanced disease. The findings suggest that in addition to mediating tissue pathology, eosinophils within a Th2 environment also have antiviral activity. PMID:25410867

  8. Pulmonary Strongyloidiasis Masquerading as Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Gourahari; Behera, Priyadarshini; Bhuniya, Sourin; Mohapatra, Prasanta Raghab; Turuk, Jyotirmayee; Mohanty, Srujana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary strongyloidiasis is an uncommon presentation of Strongyloides infection, usually seen in immunocompromised hosts. The manifestations are similar to that of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Therefore, the diagnosis of pulmonary strongyloidiasis could be challenging in a COPD patient, unless a high index of suspicion is maintained. Here, we present a case of Strongyloides hyperinfection in a COPD patient mimicking acute exacerbation, who was on chronic steroid therapy. PMID:27790284

  9. Pulmonary Artery Denervation Reduces Pulmonary Artery Pressure and Induces Histological Changes in an Acute Porcine Model of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nadine D.; Chang, William; Watson, Oliver; Swift, Andrew J.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A.; Kiely, David G.; Suvarna, S. Kim; Gunn, Julian; Lawrie, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background— Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality and limited treatment options. Recent studies have shown that pulmonary artery denervation improves pulmonary hemodynamics in an experimental model and in an early clinical trial. We aimed to evaluate the nerve distribution around the pulmonary artery, to determine the effect of radiofrequency pulmonary artery denervation on acute pulmonary hypertension induced by vasoconstriction, and to demonstrate denervation of the pulmonary artery at a histological level. Methods and Results— Histological evaluation identified a circumferential distribution of nerves around the proximal pulmonary arteries. Nerves were smaller in diameter, greater in number, and located in closer proximity to the luminal aspect of the pulmonary arterial wall beyond the pulmonary artery bifurcation. To determine the effect of pulmonary arterial denervation acute pulmonary hypertension was induced in 8 pigs by intravenous infusion of thromboxane A2 analogue. Animals were assigned to either pulmonary artery denervation, using a prototype radiofrequency catheter and generator, or a sham procedure. Pulmonary artery denervation resulted in reduced mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output. Ablation lesions on the luminal surface of the pulmonary artery were accompanied by histological and biochemical alteration in adventitial nerves and correlated with improved hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions— Pulmonary artery denervation offers the possibility of a new treatment option for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Further work is required to determine the long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26553697

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype. PMID:27213345

  11. Subpleural pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presenting as a solitary pulmonary nodule.

    PubMed

    Na, Kook Joo; Song, Sang Yun; Kim, Jo Heon; Kim, Young Chul

    2007-08-01

    We introduce a case of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presented as a solitary pulmonary nodule located subpleurally. The patient was a 57-year-old man who had abnormal chest roentgenograms showing a solitary pulmonary nodule in the right lower lung field. The nodule was resected for definitive diagnosis and histopathologically proved to be pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. In previously reported cases, most patients had ill-defined margins and usually bilateral, multiple lesions radiographically. In our case, the subpleural location is an uncommon location of this rare entity. PMID:17762348

  12. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macneil, Adam; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2011-12-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a severe disease characterized by a rapid onset of pulmonary edema followed by respiratory failure and cardiogenic shock. The HPS associated viruses are members of the genus Hantavirus, family Bunyaviridae. Hantaviruses have a worldwide distribution and are broadly split into the New World hantaviruses, which includes those causing HPS, and the Old World hantaviruses [including the prototype Hantaan virus (HTNV)], which are associated with a different disease, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV) are the most common causes of HPS in North and South America, respectively. Case fatality of HPS is approximately 40%. Pathogenic New World hantaviruses infect the lung microvascular endothelium without causing any virus induced cytopathic effect. However, virus infection results in microvascular leakage, which is the hallmark of HPS. This article briefly reviews the knowledge on HPS-associated hantaviruses accumulated since their discovery, less than 20 years ago.

  13. [Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis].

    PubMed

    Popper, H H

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is regarded as a reactive proliferation of the dendritic Langerhans cell population stimulated by chronic tobacco-derived plant proteins due to incomplete combustion but can also occur in childhood as a tumor-like systemic disease. Currently, both these forms cannot be morphologically distinguished. In the lungs a nodular proliferation of Langerhans cells occurs in the bronchial mucosa and also peripherally in the alveolar septa with an accompanying infiltration by eosinophilic granulocytes and destruction of the bronchial wall. Langerhans cells can be selectively detected with antibodies against CD1a and langerin. In the reactive isolated pulmonary form, abstinence from tobacco smoking in most patients leads to regression of infiltration and improvement of symptoms. In high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) the small star-like scars can still be detected even after complete cessation of tobacco smoking.

  14. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) overexpression attenuates agricultural organic dust extract-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kl; Wyatt, Ta; Wells, Sm; Klein, Eb; Robinson, Je; Romberger, Dj; Poole, Ja

    2014-03-01

    Modern, industrialized farming practices have lead to working conditions that include high levels of airborne dust. Agricultural workers inhale these complex organic dusts on a daily basis, leading to airway inflammation and higher risk for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The mechanisms regulating the organic dust-induced airway inflammatory response are not well-defined. We investigated whether overexpression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) would lead to diminished pulmonary inflammation in an animal model of organic dust extract exposure. We instilled wild-type (WT) and DDAH overexpressing mice with an aqueous organic dust extract (ODE) collected from a swine confinement building. We found that inflammatory indices such as neutrophil influx and inflammatory cytokine production was lower in the DDAH overexpressing mice compared to WT after organic dust extract (ODE) instillation. We went on to determine how DDAH was mediating the decrease in inflammation induced by ODE. PKCα and PKCε play an essential role in the ODE inflammatory response. In a model of lung slices from WT and DDAH overexpressing mice, we demonstrated an increase in PKCα and PKCε in the WT mice exposed to ODE. This increase was diminished in the DDAH overexpressing mice exposed to ODE. We also tested an important component of the ODE, peptidoglycan (PGN). We noted a similar decrease in neutrophils and inflammatory cytokines in the DDAH overexpressing animals instilled with PGN compared to WT. In conclusion, our studies found a role for DDAH in regulating the ODE-triggered activation of epithelial PKCα and PKCε, a previously unrecognized mechanism of action. This ultimately results in diminished pulmonary inflammation.

  15. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) overexpression attenuates agricultural organic dust extract-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, KL; Wyatt, TA; Wells, SM; Klein, EB; Robinson, JE; Romberger, DJ; Poole, JA

    2013-01-01

    Modern, industrialized farming practices have lead to working conditions that include high levels of airborne dust. Agricultural workers inhale these complex organic dusts on a daily basis, leading to airway inflammation and higher risk for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The mechanisms regulating the organic dust-induced airway inflammatory response are not well-defined. We investigated whether overexpression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) would lead to diminished pulmonary inflammation in an animal model of organic dust extract exposure. We instilled wild-type (WT) and DDAH overexpressing mice with an aqueous organic dust extract (ODE) collected from a swine confinement building. We found that inflammatory indices such as neutrophil influx and inflammatory cytokine production was lower in the DDAH overexpressing mice compared to WT after organic dust extract (ODE) instillation. We went on to determine how DDAH was mediating the decrease in inflammation induced by ODE. PKCα and PKCε play an essential role in the ODE inflammatory response. In a model of lung slices from WT and DDAH overexpressing mice, we demonstrated an increase in PKCα and PKCε in the WT mice exposed to ODE. This increase was diminished in the DDAH overexpressing mice exposed to ODE. We also tested an important component of the ODE, peptidoglycan (PGN). We noted a similar decrease in neutrophils and inflammatory cytokines in the DDAH overexpressing animals instilled with PGN compared to WT. In conclusion, our studies found a role for DDAH in regulating the ODE-triggered activation of epithelial PKCα and PKCε, a previously unrecognized mechanism of action. This ultimately results in diminished pulmonary inflammation. PMID:25221746

  16. Synthetic Amphipathic Helical Peptides Targeting CD36 Attenuate Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Alexander V; Wu, Tinghuai; Baranova, Irina N; Birukova, Anna A; Sviridov, Denis; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G; Remaley, Alan T; Eggerman, Thomas L; Patterson, Amy P; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2016-07-15

    Synthetic amphipathic helical peptides (SAHPs) designed as apolipoprotein A-I mimetics are known to bind to class B scavenger receptors (SR-Bs), SR-BI, SR-BII, and CD36, receptors that mediate lipid transport and facilitate pathogen recognition. In this study, we evaluated SAHPs, selected for targeting human CD36, by their ability to attenuate LPS-induced inflammation, endothelial barrier dysfunction, and acute lung injury (ALI). L37pA, which targets CD36 and SR-BI equally, inhibited LPS-induced IL-8 secretion and barrier dysfunction in cultured endothelial cells while reducing lung neutrophil infiltration by 40% in a mouse model of LPS-induced ALI. A panel of 20 SAHPs was tested in HEK293 cell lines stably transfected with various SR-Bs to identify SAHPs with preferential selectivity toward CD36. Among several SAHPs targeting both SR-BI/BII and CD36 receptors, ELK-B acted predominantly through CD36. Compared with L37pA, 5A, and ELK SAHPs, ELK-B was most effective in reducing the pulmonary barrier dysfunction, neutrophil migration into the lung, and lung inflammation induced by LPS. We conclude that SAHPs with relative selectivity toward CD36 are more potent at inhibiting acute pulmonary inflammation and dysfunction. These data indicate that therapeutic strategies using SAHPs targeting CD36, but not necessarily mimicking all apolipoprotein A-I functions, may be considered a possible new treatment approach for inflammation-induced ALI and pulmonary edema. PMID:27316682

  17. [Neonatal pulmonary fibrosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Desrousseaux, B; Gourdin, C; Atat, I; Podvin, A; Vix, M; Dusol, F; Bayart, M

    1989-01-01

    The authors report a case of pulmonary fibrosarcoma in a newborn. The respiratory distress imposed an urgent thoracotomy at the fifth hour of live. A lobectomy was performed. Three months later a relapse occurred. A second thoracotomy permitted an incomplete resection. The total involution was achieved after 6 months of chemotherapy. Actually no recidive is shown after 20 months of follow up. Its an exceptional case. A unique one was published in 1977. PMID:2698289

  18. Asthma Outcomes: Pulmonary Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Robert S.; Wise, Robert S.; Covar, Ronina; Irvin, Charles G.; Kercsmar, Carolyn M.; Kraft, Monica; Liu, Mark C.; O’Connor, George T.; Peters, Stephen P.; Sorkness, Ronald; Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    Background Outcomes of pulmonary physiology have a central place in asthma clinical research. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to provide recommendations on the use of pulmonary function measures as asthma outcomes that should be assessed in a standardized fashion in future asthma clinical trials and studies to allow for cross-study comparisons. Methods Our subcommittee conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed to identify studies that focused on the validation of various airway response tests used in asthma clinical research. The subcommittee classified the instruments as core (to be required in future studies), supplemental (to be used according to study aims and in a standardized fashion), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results A list of pulmonary physiology outcomes that applies to both adults and children older than 6 years was created. These outcomes were then categorized into core, supplemental, and emerging. Spirometric outcomes (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and FEV1/FVC) are proposed as core outcomes for study population characterization, for observational studies, and for prospective clinical trials. Bronchodilator reversibility and pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV1 also are core outcomes for study population characterization and observational studies. Conclusions The subcommittee considers pulmonary physiology outcomes of central importance in asthma and proposes spirometric outcomes as core outcomes for all future NIH-initiated asthma clinical research. PMID:22386510

  19. Diagnostics for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cudahy, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of human suffering and mortality despite decades of effective treatment being available. Accurate and timely diagnosis remains an unmet goal. The HIV epidemic has also led to new challenges in the diagnosis of TB. Several new developments in TB diagnostics have the potential to positively influence the global campaign against TB. We aim to review the performance of both established as well as new diagnostics for pulmonary TB in adults, and discuss the ongoing challenges. PMID:27005271

  20. Role of Biomarkers in the Diagnosis, Risk Assessment, and Management of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rameh, Vanessa; Kossaify, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a severe and debilitating disease with no definite cure, and the domain of targeted therapies is a promising field for better management of this severe condition. The disease comprises pulmonary arterial remodeling, hypoxia, endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation, with subsequent organ damage including right heart and liver dysfunction. Biomarkers have a valuable role at different levels of the disease, from diagnosis to risk assessment an